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1

Advanced Hot-Gas Desulfurization Sorbents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power systems are being advanced worldwide for generating electricity from coal due to their superior environmental performance, economics, and efficiency in comparison to conventional coal-based power plants. Hot gas cleanup offers the potential for higher plant thermal efficiencies and lower cost. A key subsystem of hot-gas cleanup is hot-gas desulfurization using regenerable sorbents. Sorbents based on zinc oxide are currently the leading candidates and are being developed for moving- and fluidized- bed reactor applications. Zinc oxide sorbents can effectively reduce the H{sub 2}S in coal gas to around 10 ppm levels and can be regenerated for multicycle operation. However, all current first-generation leading sorbents undergo significant loss of reactivity with cycling, as much as 50% or greater loss in only 25-50 cycles. Stability of the hot-gas desulfurization sorbent over 100`s of cycles is essential for improved IGCC economics over conventional power plants. This project aims to develop hot-gas cleanup sorbents for relatively lower temperature applications, 343 to 538{degrees}C with emphasis on the temperature range from 400 to 500{degrees}. Recent economic evaluations have indicated that the thermal efficiency of IGCC systems increases rapidly with the temperature of hot-gas cleanup up to 350{degrees}C and then very slowly as the temperature is increased further. This suggests that the temperature severity of the hot-gas cleanup devices can be reduced without significant loss of thermal efficiency. The objective of this study is to develop attrition-resistant advanced hot-gas desulfurization sorbents which show stable and high sulfidation reactivity at 343{degrees}C (650{degrees}F) to 538{degrees}C(1OOO{degrees}F) and regenerability at lower temperatures than leading first generation sorbents.

Jothimurugesan, K.; Gangwal, S.K.; Gupta, R.; Turk, B.S.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Development of advanced hot-gas desulfurization sorbents. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to develop hot-gas desulfurization sorbent formulations for relatively lower temperature application, with emphasis on the temperature range from 343--538 C. The candidate sorbents include highly dispersed mixed metal oxides of zinc, iron, copper, cobalt, nickel and molybdenum. The specific objective was to develop suitable sorbents, that would have high and stable surface area and are sufficiently reactive and regenerable at the relatively lower temperatures of interest in this work. Stability of surface area during regeneration was achieved by adding stabilizers. To prevent sulfation, catalyst additives that promote the light-off of the regeneration reaction at lower temperature was considered. Another objective of this study was to develop attrition-resistant advanced hot-gas desulfurization sorbents which show stable and high sulfidation reactivity at 343 to 538 C and regenerability at lower temperatures than leading first generation sorbents.

Jothimurugesan, K.; Adeyiga, A.A.; Gangwal, S.K.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Advanced Flue Gas Desulfurization (AFGD) Demonstration Project...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in the WES, which involves injection into the flue gas duct upstream of the existing electrostatic 11 precipitator (ESP). The hot flue gas evaporates the water and the...

4

Advanced Flue Gas Desulfurization (AFGD) Demonstration Project, A DOE Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 8 Advanced Flue Gas Desulfurization (AFGD) Demonstration Project A DOE Assessment August 2001 U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory P.O. Box 880, 3610 Collins Ferry Road Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 and P.O. Box 10940, 626 Cochrans Mill Road Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 website: www.netl.doe.gov 2 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference

5

SCALE-UP OF ADVANCED HOT-GAS DESULFURIZATION SORBENTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to develop advanced regenerable sorbents for hot gas desulfurization in IGCC systems. The specific objective was to develop durable advanced sorbents that demonstrate a strong resistance to attrition and chemical deactivation, and high sulfidation activity at temperatures as low as 343 C (650 F). Twenty sorbents were synthesized in this work. Details of the preparation technique and the formulations are proprietary, pending a patent application, thus no details regarding the technique are divulged in this report. Sulfidations were conducted with a simulated gas containing (vol %) 10 H{sub 2}, 15 CO, 5 CO{sub 2}, 0.4-1 H{sub 2}S, 15 H{sub 2}O, and balance N{sub 2} in the temperature range of 343-538 C. Regenerations were conducted at temperatures in the range of 400-600 C with air-N{sub 2} mixtures. To prevent sulfation, catalyst additives were investigated that promote regeneration at lower temperatures. Characterization were performed for fresh, sulfided and regenerated sorbents.

K. JOTHIMURUGESAN; S.K. GANGWAL

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

DEVELOPMENT OF ADVANCED HOT-GAS DESULFURIZATION PROCESSES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The techniques employed in this project have successfully demonstrated the feasibility of preparing sorbents that achieve greater than 99% H{sub 2}S removal at temperatures 480 C and that retain their activity over 50 cycles. Fundamental understanding of phenomena leading to chemical deactivation and high regeneration light-off temperature has enabled us to successfully prepare and scale up a FHR-32 sorbent that showed no loss in reactivity and capacity over 50 cycles. This sorbent removed H{sub 2}S below 80 ppmv and lighted-off nicely at 480 C during regeneration. Overall the test is a success with potential for an optimized FHR-32 to be a candidate for Sierra-Pacific. An advanced attrition resistant hot-gas desulfurization sorbent that can eliminate the problematic SO{sub 2} tail gas and yield elemental sulfur directly has been developed. Attrition resistant Zn-Fe sorbent (AHI-2) formulations have been prepared that can remove H{sub 2}S to below 20 ppmv from coal gas and can be regenerated using SO{sub 2} to produce elemental sulfur.

K. Jothimurugesan; Santosh K. Gangwal

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Scale-Up of Advanced Hot-Gas desulfurization Sorbents.  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this project is to develop regenerable sorbents for hot gas desulfurization in IGCC systems. The specific objective of the project is to develop durable advanced sorbents that demonstrate a strong resistance to attrition and chemical deactivation, and high activity at temperatures as low as 343 {degrees}C (650{degrees}F). A number of formulations will be prepared and screened in a one-half inch fixed bed reactor at high pressure (1 to 20 atm) and high temperatures using simulated coal-derived fuel- gases. Screening criteria will include chemical reactivity, stability, and regenerability over the temperature range of 343{degrees}C to 650{degrees}C. After initial screening, at least 3 promising formulations will be tested for 25-30 cycles of absorption and regeneration. One of the superior formulations with the best cyclic performance will be selected for investigating scale up parameters. The scaled-up formulation will be tested for long term durability and chemical reactivity.

Jothimurugesan, K.; Gangwal, S.K.

1997-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

8

Economic assessment of advanced flue gas desulfurization processes. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of a project sponsored by the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC). The purpose of the study was to perform an economic and market assessment of advanced flue gas desulfurization (FGD) processes for application to coal-fired electric utility plants. The time period considered in the study is 1981 through 1990, and costs are reported in 1980 dollars. The task was divided into the following four subtasks: (1) determine the factors affecting FGD cost evaluations; (2) select FGD processes to be cost-analyzed; (3) define the future electric utility FGD system market; and (4) perform cost analyses for the selected FGD processes. The study was initiated in September 1979, and separate reports were prepared for the first two subtasks. The results of the latter two subtasks appear only in this final reprot, since the end-date of those subtasks coincided with the end-date of the overall task. The Subtask 1 report, Criteria and Methods for Performing FGD Cost Evaluations, was completed in October 1980. A slightly modified and condensed version of that report appears as appendix B to this report. The Subtask 2 report, FGD Candidate Process Selection, was completed in January 1981, and the principal outputs of that subtask appear in Appendices C and D to this report.

Bierman, G. R.; May, E. H.; Mirabelli, R. E.; Pow, C. N.; Scardino, C.; Wan, E. I.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Scale-Up of Advanced Hot-Gas Desulfurization Sorbents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project is to develop regenerable sorbents for hot gas desulfurization in IGCC systems. The specific objective of the project is to develop durable advanced sorbents that demonstrate a strong resistance to attrition and chemical deactivation, and high activity at temperatures as low as 343{degrees}C (650{degrees}F). A number of formulations will be prepared and screened in a 1/2-inch fixed bed reactor at high pressure (1 to 20 atm) and high temperatures using simulated coal-derived fuel-gases. Screening criteria will include, chemical reactivity, stability, and regenerability over the temperature range of 343{degrees}C to 650{degrees}C. After initial screening, at least 3 promising formulations will be tested for 25-30 cycles of absorption and regeneration. One of the superior formulations with the best cyclic performance will be selected for investigating scale up parameters. The scaled-up formulation will be tested for long term durability and chemical reactivity.

Jothimurugesan, K.; Gangwal, S.K.

1997-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

10

Development of advanced hot-gas desulfurization processes  

SciTech Connect

Advanced integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants nearing completion, such as Sierra-Pacific, employ a circulating fluidized-bed (transport) reactor hot-gas desulfurization (HGD) process that uses 70-180 {micro}m average particle size (aps) zinc-based mixed-metal oxide sorbent for removing H{sub 2}S from coal gas down to less than 20 ppmv. The sorbent undergoes cycles of absorption (sulfidation) and air regeneration. The key barrier issues associated with a fluidized-bed HGD process are chemical degradation, physical attrition, high regeneration light-off (initiation) temperature, and high cost of the sorbent. Another inherent complication in all air-regeneration-based HGD processes is the disposal of the problematic dilute SO{sub 2} containing regeneration tail-gas. Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (DSRP), a leading first generation technology, efficiently reduces this SO{sub 2} to desirable elemental sulfur, but requires the use of 1-3 % of the coal gas, thus resulting in an energy penalty to the plant. Advanced second-generation processes are under development that can reduce this energy penalty by modifying the sorbent so that it could be directly regenerated to elemental sulfur. The objective of this research is to support the near and long term DOE efforts to commercialize the IGCC-HGD process technology. Specifically we aim to develop: optimized low-cost sorbent materials with 70-80 {micro}m average aps meeting all Sierra specs; attrition resistant sorbents with 170 {micro}m aps that allow greater flexibility in the choice of the type of fluidized-bed reactor e.g. they allow increased throughput in a bubbling-bed reactor; and modified fluidizable sorbent materials that can be regenerated to produce elemental sulfur directly with minimal or no use of coal gas. The effort during the reporting period has been devoted to testing the FHR-32 sorbent. FHR-32 sorbent was tested for 50 cycles of sulfidation in a laboratory scale reactor.

Jothimurugesan, K.

2000-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

11

Flue Gas Desulfurization Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In many of the operating flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems throughout the world, materials corrosion leads to considerable costs and downtime. Utilities are often required to maintain, repair, replace, and/or upgrade existing materials to combat corrosion issues. This document provides the results of a recent EPRI survey that examined the various types of corrosion and materials damage in FGD systems.

2005-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

12

Advanced Flue Gas Desulfurization (AFGD) demonstration project: Volume 2, Project performance and economics. Final technical report  

SciTech Connect

The project objective is to demonstrate removal of 90--95% or more of the SO{sub 2} at approximately one-half the cost of conventional scrubbing technology; and to demonstrate significant reduction of space requirements. In this project, Pure Air has built a single SO{sub 2} absorber for a 528-MWe power plant. The absorber performs three functions in a single vessel: prequencher, absorber, and oxidation of sludge to gypsum. Additionally, the absorber is of a co- current design, in which the flue gas and scrubbing slurry move in the same direction and at a relatively high velocity compared to conventional scrubbers. These features all combine to yield a state- of-the-art SO{sub 2} absorber that is more compact and less expensive than conventional scrubbers. The project incorporated a number of technical features including the injection of pulverized limestone directly into the absorber, a device called an air rotary sparger located within the base of the absorber, and a novel wastewater evaporation system. The air rotary sparger combines the functions of agitation and air distribution into one piece of equipment to facilitate the oxidation of calcium sulfite to gypsum. Additionally, wastewater treatment is being demonstrated to minimize water disposal problems inherent in many high-chloride coals. Bituminous coals primarily from the Indiana, Illinois coal basin containing 2--4.5% sulfur were tested during the demonstration. The Advanced Flue Gas Desulfurization (AFGD) process has demonstrated removal of 95% or more of the SO{sub 2} while providing a commercial gypsum by-product in lieu of solid waste. A portion of the commercial gypsum is being agglomerated into a product known as PowerChip{reg_sign} gypsum which exhibits improved physical properties, easier flowability and more user friendly handling characteristics to enhance its transportation and marketability to gypsum end-users.

NONE

1996-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

13

Flue gas desulfurization  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention involves a combustion process in which combustion gas containing sulfur oxide is directed past a series of heat exchangers to a stack and in which a sodium compound is added to the combustion gas in a temparature zone of above about 1400 K to form Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/. Preferably, the temperature is above about 1800 K and the sodium compound is present as a vapor to provide a gas-gas reaction to form Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ as a liquid. Since liquid Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ may cause fouling of heat exchanger surfaces downstream from the combustion zone, the process advantageously includes the step of injecting a cooling gas downstream of the injection of the sodium compound yet upstream of one or more heat exchangers to cool the combustion gas to below about 1150 K and form solid Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/. The cooling gas is preferably a portion of the combustion gas downstream which may be recycled for cooling. It is further advantageous to utilize an electrostatic precipitator downstream of the heat exchangers to recover the Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/. It is also advantageous in the process to remove a portion of the combustion gas cleaned in the electrostatic precipitator and recycle that portion upstream to use as the cooling gas. 3 figures.

Im, K.H.; Ahluwalia, R.K.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Economic assessment of advanced flue gas desulfurization processes. Final report. Volume 2. Appendices G, H, and I  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of a project sponsored by the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC). The purpose of the study was to perform an economic and market assessment of advanced flue gas desulfurization (FGD) processes for application to coal-fired electric utility plants. The time period considered in the study is 1981 through 1990, and costs are reported in 1980 dollars. The task was divided into the following four subtasks: (1) determine the factors affecting FGD cost evaluations; (2) select FGD processes to be cost-analyzed; (3) define the future electric utility FGD system market; and (4) perform cost analyses for the selected FGD processes. The study was initiated in September 1979, and separate reports were prepared for the first two subtasks. The results of the latter two subtasks appear only in this final report, since the end-date of those subtasks coincided with the end-date of the overall task. The Subtask 1 report, Criteria and Methods for Performing FGD Cost Evaluation, was completed in October 1980. A slightly modified and condensed version of that report appears as Appendix B to this report. The Subtask 2 report, FGD Candidate Process Selection, was completed in January 1981, and the principal outputs of that subtask appear in Appendices C and D to this report.

Bierman, G. R.; May, E. H.; Mirabelli, R. E.; Pow, C. N.; Scardino, C.; Wan, E. I.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Advanced gasifier-desulfurizer process development for SNG (substitute natural gas) application. Final report, August 1987-December 1988  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

KRW conducted investigations of calcium-promoted coal pyrolysis and gasification by means of bench-scale studies and an oxygen-blown PDU test. Results were used in a design study of a commercial KRW gasifier-desulfurizer, operating on Pittsburgh No. 8 coal and limestone for production of SNG. Bench-scale fluid-bed reactor studies were conducted with various fluidizing gases at temperatures and pressures of 1650 to 1950 F and 40 to 450 psig, with and without limestone, to give methane-yield and tar-yield data. The gasification kinetics studies of chars produced gave data which showed that limestone increases char reactivity and exerts a catalytic effect. Methane yields correlated exponentially to pressure. The bench-scale test results lead to an expectation that feeding some of the coal to the upper portion of the gasifier will increase methane yield and decrease oxygen consumption. In two PDU test-set points, expected operability and performance of the oxygen-blown gasifier-desulfurizer were confirmed. In Set Point 2, in-bed desulfurization efficiency was 88% and the product-gas higher heating value was 302 Btu/scf. The test results provided inputs to the design study of a KRW gasifier-desulfurizer island for production of 125 MM Btu/day of SNG. Results included a 4 to 6% improvement in feedstock inputs when compared to an earlier GRI-sponsored study. Methane yield decreased but the number of operating gasifier-desulfurizers remained at five. Equipment costs are expected to remain well within the previous + or - 25% cost estimate.

Blinn, M.B.; Cover, A.E.; Haldipur, G.B.; Datta, S.C.; Holmgren, J.D.

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Flue Gas Desulfurization Gypsum Agricultural Network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Research on flue gas desulfurization gypsum (FGDG) has been conducted under the auspices of the Flue Gas Desulfurization Gypsum Agricultural Network program sponsored by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) in collaboration with individual utilities, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, U.S. Department of Agriculture-Agricultural Research Service, and universities. This report describes work conducted in northwestern New Mexico in 2008–2012 as part of that effort. Two separate ...

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

17

Advanced Flue Gas Desulfurization (AFGD) Demonstration Project. Technical progress report No. 15, July 1, 1993--September 30, 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of this project is to demonstrate that, by combining state-of-the-art technology, highly efficient plant operation and maintenance capabilities and by-product gypsum sales, significant reductions of SO{sub 2} emissions can be achieved at approximately one-half the life cycle cost of a conventional Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) system. Further, this emission reduction is achieved without generating solid waste and while minimizing liquid wastewater effluent. Basically, this project entails the design, construction and operation of a nominal 600 MWe AFGD facility to remove SO{sub 2} from coal-fired power plant flue gas at the Northern Indiana Public Service Company`s Bailly Generating Station.

Not Available

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Flue Gas Desulfurization Gypsum Agricultural Network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Increasing volumes of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum will become available for agricultural use as more utilities install forced oxidation scrubbers and the wallboard market for the resulting gypsum becomes saturated. This interim report describes work performed in 2007 and 2008 to develop a national research network to gain data and experience to support the beneficial uses of FGD products, especially FGD gypsum, in agriculture and other land applications.

2008-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

19

Flue Gas Desulfurization Equipment Issues Guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As electric utilities enter a more competitive environment, every aspect of electric power generation is under scrutiny to determine where costs can be reduced. Because flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems represent significant capital, operating, and maintenance expenses for many coal-fired power plants, identification and implementation of cost reduction options are crucial. This report documents successful approaches for determining the cost-effectiveness of key FGD optimization strategies.

2001-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

20

Flue Gas Desulfurization Gypsum Agricultural Network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum is a solid produced by wet FGD systems with forced air oxidation and is chemically similar to mined gypsum. These gypsums, used as beneficial agricultural amendments, were evaluated for their effects on earthworm populations and trace element concentrations in soils and earthworms at four field sites (Ohio, Indiana, Alabama, and Wisconsin). These sites are part of a network study on agricultural uses of FGD gypsum conducted at sites across the United States. ...

2012-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas desulfurization advanced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

The Effect of Water on Natural Gas Desulfurization by Adsorption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 15, 2006 ... The Effect of Water on Natural Gas Desulfurization by Adsorption by Ambalavanan Jayaraman, Gokhan Alptekin, Margarita Dubovik, Robert ...

22

Flue gas desulfurization wastewater treatment primer  

SciTech Connect

Purge water from a typical wet flue gas desulfurization system contains myriad chemical constituents and heavy metals whose mixture is determined by the fuel source and combustion products as well as the stack gas treatment process. A well-designed water treatment system can tolerate upstream fuel and sorbent arranged in just the right order to produce wastewater acceptable for discharge. This article presents state-of-the-art technologies for treating the waste water that is generated by wet FGD systems. 11 figs., 3 tabs.

Higgins, T.E.; Sandy, A.T.; Givens, S.W.

2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

23

Enviropower hot gas desulfurization pilot  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of the project are to develop and demonstrate (1) hydrogen sulfide removal using regenerable zinc titanate sorbent in pressurized fluidized bed reactors, (2) recovery of the elemental sulfur from the tail-gas of the sorbent regenerator and (3) hot gas particulate removal system using ceramic candle filters. Results are presented on pilot plant design and testing and modeling efforts.

Ghazanfari, R.; Feher, G.; Konttinen, J.; Ghazanfari, R.; Lehtovaara, A.; Mojtahedi, W.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Sorbent for use in hot gas desulfurization  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A multiple metal oxide sorbent supported on a zeolite of substantially silicon oxide is used for the desulfurization of process gas streams, such as from a coal gasifier, at temperatures in the range of about 1200.degree. to about 1600.degree. F. The sorbent is provided by a mixture of copper oxide and manganese oxide and preferably such a mixture with molybdenum oxide. The manganese oxide and the molybdenum are believed to function as promoters for the reaction of hydrogen sulfide with copper oxide. Also, the manganese oxide inhibits the volatilization of the molybdenum oxide at the higher temperatures.

Gasper-Galvin, Lee D. (Washington, PA); Atimtay, Aysel T. (Cankaya, TR)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Hot gas desulfurization sorbent and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A multiple metal oxide sorbent supported on a zeolite of substantially silicon oxide is used for the desulfurization of process gas streams, such as from a coal gasifier, at temperatures in the range of about 1200{degrees} to about 1600{degrees}F. The sorbent is provided by a mixture of copper oxide and manganese oxide and preferably such a mixture with molybdenum oxide. The manganese oxide and the molybdenum are believed to function as promoters for the reaction of hydrogen sulfide with copper oxide. Also, the manganese oxide inhibits the volatilization of the molybdenum oxide at the higher temperatures.

Gasper-Galvin, L.D.; Atimtay, A.T.

1991-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

26

Hot gas desulfurization sorbent and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A multiple metal oxide sorbent supported on a zeolite of substantially silicon oxide is used for the desulfurization of process gas streams, such as from a coal gasifier, at temperatures in the range of about 1200[degrees] to about 1600[degrees]F. The sorbent is provided by a mixture of copper oxide and manganese oxide and preferably such a mixture with molybdenum oxide. The manganese oxide and the molybdenum are believed to function as promoters for the reaction of hydrogen sulfide with copper oxide. Also, the manganese oxide inhibits the volatilization of the molybdenum oxide at the higher temperatures.

Gasper-Galvin, L.D.; Atimtay, A.T.

1991-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

27

Dry Flue Gas Desulfurization State of the Art Survey  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The intent of this report is to provide a summary of state-of-the-art dry flue gas desulfurization (FGD) technologies, including circulating dry scrubbers (CDS), spray dryer absorbers (SDA), and the Alstom Novel Integrated Desulfurization (NID) technology. These can all be considered “semi-dry” technologies, as the flue gas is cooled and humidified as part of each of these processes. This report also discusses a completely dry FGD technology, dry sorbent injection (DSI), which is ...

2012-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

28

BENCH-SCALE DEMONSTRATION OF HOT-GAS DESULFURIZATION TECHNOLOGY  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC), is sponsoring research in advanced methods for controlling contaminants in hot coal gasifier gas (coal-derived fuel-gas) streams of integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) power systems. The hot gas cleanup work seeks to eliminate the need for expensive heat recovery equipment, reduce efficiency losses due to quenching, and minimize wastewater treatment costs. Hot-gas desulfurization research has focused on regenerable mixed-metal oxide sorbents that can reduce the sulfur in coal-derived fuel-gas to less than 20 ppmv and can be regenerated in a cyclic manner with air for multicycle operation. Zinc titanate (Zn{sub 2} TiO{sub 4} or ZnTiO{sub 3}), formed by a solid-state reaction of zinc oxide (ZnO) and titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}), is currently one of the leading sorbents. Overall chemical reactions with Zn{sub 2} TiO{sub 4} during the desulfurization (sulfidation)-regeneration cycle are shown below: Sulfidation: Zn{sub 2} TiO{sub 4} + 2H{sub 2}S {yields} 2ZnS + TiO{sub 2} + 2H{sub 2}O; Regeneration: 2ZnS + TiO{sub 2} + 3O{sub 2} {yields} Zn{sub 2} TiO{sub 4} + 2SO{sub 2} The sulfidation/regeneration cycle can be carried out in a fixed-bed, moving-bed, or fluidized-bed reactor configuration. The fluidized-bed reactor configuration is most attractive because of several potential advantages including faster kinetics and the ability to handle the highly exothermic regeneration to produce a regeneration offgas containing a constant concentration of SO{sub 2}.

Unknown

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Flue gas desulfurization: Physicochemical and biotechnological approaches  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Various flue gas desulfurization processes - physicochemical, biological, and chemobiological - for the reduction of emission of SO{sub 2} with recovery of an economic by-product have been reviewed. The physicochemical processes have been categorized as 'once-through' and 'regenerable.' The prominent once-through technologies include wet and dry scrubbing. The wet scrubbing technologies include wet limestone, lime-inhibited oxidation, limestone forced oxidation, and magnesium-enhanced lime and sodium scrubbing. The dry scrubbing constitutes lime spray drying, furnace sorbent injection, economizer sorbent injection, duct sorbent injection, HYPAS sorbent injection, and circulating fluidized bed treatment process. The regenerable wet and dry processes include the Wellman Lord's process, citrate process, sodium carbonate eutectic process, magnesium oxide process, amine process, aqueous ammonia process, Berglau Forchung's process, and Shell's process. Besides these, the recently developed technologies such as the COBRA process, the OSCAR process, and the emerging biotechnological and chemobiological processes are also discussed. A detailed outline of the chemistry, the advantages and disadvantages, and the future research and development needs for each of these commercially viable processes is also discussed.

Pandey, R.A.; Biswas, R.; Chakrabarti, T.; Devotta, S. [National Environmental Engineering Research Institute, Nagpur (India)

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Carbon Dioxide Sequestration with Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) Gypsum  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carbonation of industrial alkaline residues can be used as a CO2 sequestration technology to reduce carbon dioxide emissions. In this study, alkaline Ca-rich flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum samples were carbonated to a varying extent. These materials ... Keywords: FGD gypsum, carbonation, carbon dioxide

Hongqi Wang; Ningning Sun; Rona J. Donahoe

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Flue Gas Desulfurization Scrubber Maintenance Guide: Gypsum Dewatering Area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flue Gas Desulfurization Scrubber Maintenance Guide: Gypsum Dewatering Area provides fossil plant maintenance personnel with current maintenance information on this system. This report will assist the plant maintenance personnel in improving the reliability and reducing the maintenance costs for this area of their scrubber system.

2009-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

32

Flue Gas Desulfurization Scrubber Maintenance Guide: Absorber Area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Flue Gas Desulfurization Scrubber Maintenance Guide: Absorber Area provides fossil plant maintenance personnel with current maintenance information on this system and will help to improve the reliability of and reduce the maintenance costs for this area of their scrubber system.

2008-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

33

Investigation of Flue Gas Desulfurization Chemical Process Problems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An understanding of flue gas desulfurization process chemistry is crucial in troubleshooting problems in operating FGD systems. This report discusses a variety of problems and solutions associated with process chemistry for 25 different wet FGD systems, including lime/limestone and double alkali processes. Among the problems addressed are SO2 removal, mist eliminator scaling, poor solids dewatering, and water management.

1990-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

34

Flue Gas Desulfurization Scrubber Maintenance Guide: Reagent Preparation Area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Flue Gas Desulfurization Scrubber Maintenance Guide: Reagent Preparation Area provides the fossil plant maintenance personnel with current maintenance information on this system and will help improve the reliability and reduce the maintenance costs for this area of their scrubber system.

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

35

Trace Metals Determination in Flue Gas Desulfurization Water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flue gas desulfurization (FGD) scrubbers are used on coal-fired power plants to reduce sulfur dioxide emissions to air. While effective for this purpose, wet FGD scrubbers produce an aqueous blowdown stream that contains trace levels of metals adsorbed from flue gas. Power plant owners need to measure concentrations of these metals for purposes of process control, discharge monitoring, or design and operation of wastewater treatment systems. FGD water has proven to be a very difficult matrix to analyze a...

2009-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

36

Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) Wastewater Characterization and Management: 2007 Update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tightened air regulations on acid-gas-forming emissions are leading more electric utilities to install flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems, typically wet scrubbers. However, there are challenges associated with such decisions in terms of utility wastewater management. Volatile metals, such as selenium and mercury, are better captured in wet scrubber systems than in electrostatic precipitators and may be present at higher concentrations in utility wastewater systems. This report is designed to help pow...

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

37

Guidelines for Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) Water Sampling and Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flue gas desulfurization (FGD) scrubbers are being installed on coal-fired power plants in response to federal and state air pollution regulations limiting sulfur dioxide emissions. FGD scrubbers produce an aqueous waste stream that contains metals adsorbed from flue gas. At the same time, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is reviewing, and may tighten, water discharge limits on trace metals. Collection of accurate data on the trace metal composition of FGD water discharges is therefore esse...

2009-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

38

2009 Update on Mercury Capture by Wet Flue Gas Desulfurization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This technical update presents results of four research and development projects focused on understanding and enhancing mercury emissions control associated with wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) technology. The first project was directed at characterizing partitioning of elemental and oxidized mercury species in solid, liquid, and gas phases within process streams involved in an operating commercial system. The second project explored dewatering options with an objective of producing low-mercury-conten...

2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

39

Evaluation of Selenium Species in Flue Gas Desulfurization Waters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flue gas desulfurization (FGD) is a process used in the electrical power industry to remove sulfur dioxide from flue gas produced by coal-fired power plants. The trace element selenium is found in coal and can become concentrated in the wastewater from the FGD process. Some chemical forms, or species, of selenium are more resistant to removal by water treatment processes than others; thus, understanding the speciation of selenium is important to designing effective wastewater treatment systems. In additi...

2009-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

40

Air Toxics Control by Wet Flue Gas Desulfurization Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides an update on three tasks associated with the EPRI project, Air Toxics Control by Wet Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) Systems. The first task is an investigation of the factors that influence and control the oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) at which a limestone forced oxidation FGD system operates. Both a literature review and a numerical analysis of full-scale wet FGD data were conducted. Results from this task are presented and discussed in Section 2 of the ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas desulfurization advanced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

New process for coke-oven gas desulfurization  

SciTech Connect

With the EPA reclassifying spent iron oxide as a hazardous waste material in 1990, an alternative technology was sought for desulfurizing coke-oven gas. Vacasulf technology was adopted for reasons that included: producing of coke battery heating gas without further polishing and high-quality elemental sulfur; lowest operating cost in comparison with other methods; no waste products; and integrates with existing ammonia destruction facility. Vacasulf requires a single purchased material, potassium hydroxide, that reacts with carbon dioxide in coke-oven gas to form potassium carbonate which, in turn, absorbs hydrogen sulfide. Operation of the system has been successful following the resolution of relatively minor start-up problems.

Currey, J.H. [Citizens Gas and Coke Utility, Indianapolis, IN (United States)

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Identification of Unknown Selenium Species in Flue Gas Desulfurization Water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flue gas desulfurization (FGD) is a process used in the electrical power industry to remove sulfur dioxide (SO2) from flue gas produced by coal-fired power plants. In a wet FGD system, circulating water must be periodically blown down and treated to remove solids and dissolved chemicals. Along with SO2, other substances in flue gas may dissolve in water, including selenium (Se). In addition to the common selenium species selenite and selenate, past research has identified selenium-containing species that...

2008-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

43

Spray tower: the workhorse of flue-gas desulfurization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A recently developed spray tower system for use in a utility flue gas desulfurization system is simple, durable, and capable of achieving very high sulfur dioxide removal efficiencies, possibly approaching 100%. The principles behind the design and operation of the spray tower are discussed. The quality of water used for washing, tower size limitations, construction materials liquid distribution, gas-inlet design, gas distribution, mass transfer, and operating characteristics are examined. Procedures to maintain the reliability and high performance of the spray tower are described. (5 diagrams, 5 photos, 12 references, 1 table)

Saleem, A.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Desulfurized gas production from vertical kiln pyrolysis  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas, formed as a product of a pyrolysis of oil shale, is passed through hot, retorted shale (containing at least partially decomposed calcium or magnesium carbonate) to essentially eliminate sulfur contaminants in the gas. Specifically, a single chambered pyrolysis vessel, having a pyrolysis zone and a retorted shale gas into the bottom of the retorted shale zone and cleaned product gas is withdrawn as hot product gas near the top of such zone.

Harris, Harry A. (Rifle, CO); Jones, Jr., John B. (Grand Junction, CO)

1978-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

45

Process for the desulfurization of flue gas  

SciTech Connect

A process for the removal of sulfur oxides from gases is described that is comprised of the steps of contacting the gas with a cerium oxide sorbent at conditions whereby the sulfur oxides present in the gas are sorbed by the cerium oxide sorbent and regenerate the cerium oxide sorbent by contacting it with a reducing atmosphere at conditions whereby the sorbent is substantially converted to a sulfur-free state. The gas may be an exhaust gas, e.g., from an automobile or a flue gas. This invention is especially preferred for treating flue gas. In this preferred embodiment, the flue gas may be contacted with the cerium oxide sorbent at a temperature of from 300/sup 0/ to 800/sup 0/C, to form cerium sulfate and/or sulfite and the sorbent is regenerated by contacting with a reducing gas, for example, hydrogen in admixture with steam or other inert gases at a temperature of from 500/sup 0/ to 800/sup 0/C to convert the cerium sulfate or sulfite to cerium oxide. During the regeneration step, the desorbed species is initially sulfur dioxide. However, when about 50% of the sulfur is removed from the sorbent, the desorbed species becomes H/sub 2/S. Thus, the instant invention provides SO/sub 2/ and H/sub 2/S in admixture with the excess reducing gas, which can be fed conveniently to the Claus plant for conversion into elemental sulfur.

Longo, J.M.

1977-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

46

Integrated operation of a pressurized fixed bed gasifier and hot gas desulfurization system  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of this contract continues to be the demonstration of high fuel gas desulfurization of high temperature fuel gas desulfurization and particulate removal using a moving bed process with regenerable metal oxide sorbent. The fuel gas source for test operation is a fixed bed, air blown gasifier located at GE Corporate Research and Development in Schenectady, New York. The demonstration project also includes the design, construction, installation and test operation of a gas turbine simulator which includes a modified GE MS6000 type gas turbine combustor and a film cooled, first stage LM 6000 nozzle assembly. The hot gas cleanup (HGCU) system and the gas turbine simulator have been designed to operate with the full 8000 lb/hr fuel gas flow from the gasification of 1800 lb/hr of coal at 280 psig and 1000 to 1150 F. An advanced formulation of zinc ferrite as well as zinc titanate have been used as the regenerable metal oxide sorbents in testing to date. Demonstration of halogen removal as well as characterization of alkali and heavy metal concentrations in the fuel gas remain objectives, as well. Results are discussed.

Cook, C.S.; Gal, E.; Furman, A.H.; Ayala, R.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Integrated operation of a pressurized fixed bed gasifier and hot gas desulfurization system  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of this contract continues to be the demonstration of high fuel gas desulfurization of high temperature fuel gas desulfurization and particulate removal using a moving bed process with regenerable metal oxide sorbent. The fuel gas source for test operation is a fixed bed, air blown gasifier located at GE Corporate Research and Development in Schenectady, New York. The demonstration project also includes the design, construction, installation and test operation of a gas turbine simulator which includes a modified GE MS6000 type gas turbine combustor and a film cooled, first stage LM 6000 nozzle assembly. The hot gas cleanup (HGCU) system and the gas turbine simulator have been designed to operate with the full 8000 lb/hr fuel gas flow from the gasification of 1800 lb/hr of coal at 280 psig and 1000 to 1150 F. An advanced formulation of zinc ferrite as well as zinc titanate have been used as the regenerable metal oxide sorbents in testing to date. Demonstration of halogen removal as well as characterization of alkali and heavy metal concentrations in the fuel gas remain objectives, as well. Results are discussed.

Cook, C.S.; Gal, E.; Furman, A.H.; Ayala, R.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Process for production desulfurized of synthesis gas  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for the partial oxidation of a sulfur- and silicate-containing carbonaceous fuel to produce a synthesis gas with reduced sulfur content which comprises partially oxidizing said fuel at a temperature in the range of 1900.degree.-2600.degree. F. in the presence of a temperature moderator, an oxygen-containing gas and a sulfur capture additive which comprises a calcium-containing compound portion, a sodium-containing compound portion, and a fluoride-containing compound portion to produce a synthesis gas comprising H.sub.2 and CO with a reduced sulfur content and a molten slag which comprises (1) a sulfur-containing sodium-calcium-fluoride silicate phase; and (2) a sodium-calcium sulfide phase.

Wolfenbarger, James K. (Torrance, CA); Najjar, Mitri S. (Wappingers Falls, NY)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Takahax-Hirohax process for coke oven gas desulfurization  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the Takahax-Hirohax process to desulfurize coke oven gas and to produce an ammonium sulfate end product. A review is also made of current operating experience and recent technical developments. The Takahax-Hirohax process is extremely useful when the COG contains a suitable ammonia to sulfur ratio and when ammonium sulfate is a desirable end product. No contaminated effluent streams are emitted from the process. The process is simple, reliable, flexible, and responds easily to COG variations. 4 figures, 3 tables. (DP)

Gastwirth, H.; Miner, R.; Stengle, W.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Development of a hot-gas desulfurization system for IGCC applications  

SciTech Connect

Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants are being advanced worldwide to produce electricity from coal because of their superior environmental performance, economics, and efficiency in comparison to conventional coal-based power plants. One key component of an advanced IGCC power plant is a hot-gas desulfurization system employing regenerable sorbents. To carry out hot-gas desulfurization in a fluidized-bed reactor, it is necessary that the sorbents have high attrition resistance, while still maintaining high chemical reactivity and sulfur absorption capacity. Also, efficient processes are needed for the treatment of SO{sub 2}-containing regeneration off-gas to produce environmentally benign waste or useful byproducts. A series of durable zinc titanate sorbents were formulated and tested in a bench-scale fluidized-bed reactor system. Reactive sorbents were developed with addition resistance comparable to fluid-bed cracking (FCC) catalysts used in petroleum refineries. In addition, progress continues on the development of the Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (DSRP) for converting SO{sub 2} in the regeneration off-gas to elemental sulfur. Plans are under way to test these bench-scale systems at gasifier sites with coal gas. This paper describes the status and future plans for the demonstration of these technologies.

Gupta, R.; McMichael, W.J.; Gangwal, S.K. [Research Triangle Inst., Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Jain, S.C.; Dorchak, T.P. [USDOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center, WV (United States)

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

51

The durability of stabilized flue gas desulfurization sludge  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effects of freeze-thaw cycling on the strength and durability of samples of compacted, stabilized, wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by-products are reported. The results of laboratory tests show a clear relationship between higher water contents and increasing vulnerability to freeze-thaw effects. In the samples tested, water contents at or above 40% were characteristic of all the freeze-thaw specimens exhibiting low strengths. Lime content and curing time were also shown to have a marked influence on the durability of the FGD material. It was shown that samples can maintain good strength under freeze-thaw conditions provided 5% lime was added before compaction and the time from compaction to first freeze was at least 60 days.

Chen, X.; Wolfe, W.E.; Hargraves, M.D.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

52

Flue gas desulfurization : cost and functional analysis of large-scale and proven plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Flue Gas Desulfurization is a method of controlling the emission of sulfurs, which causes the acid rain. The following study is based on 26 utilities which burn coal, have a generating capacity of at least 50 Megawatts ...

Tilly, Jean

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

A Review of Manufacturing Uses for Gypsum Produced by Flue Gas Desulfurization Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gypsum is widely used as a source material to manufacture products for building construction applications8212primarily wallboard, cement, and concrete8212and has a number of other commercial applications. The mineral is mined throughout the world (natural gypsum) and also is produced as a result of various industrial processes (synthetic gypsum). The largest source of synthetic gypsum used for manufacturing applications is flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum, the product of wet flue gas desulfurization...

2006-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

54

Flue Gas Desulfurization Gypsum Agricultural Network: Indiana Kingman Research Station (Corn and Soybeans)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flue gas desulfurization gypsum (FGDG) is an excellent source of gypsum (CaSO4•2H2O) that is created when sulfur dioxide is removed from the exhaust gases during the combustion of coal for energy production. Research on FGDG has been conducted as part of the Flue Gas Desulfurization Gypsum Agricultural Network program sponsored by the Electric Power Research Institute in collaboration with individual utilities, the U.S. EPA, the United States Department of Agriculture’s Agricultural ...

2013-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

55

Liquefaction and desulfurization of coal using synthesis gas  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for desulfurizing and liquefying coal by heating said coal at a temperature of 375.degree.-475.degree. C in the presence of a slurry liquid, hydrogen, carbon monoxide, steam, and a catalyst comprising a desulfurization catalyst and an alkali metal salt.

Fu, Yuan C. (Bethel Park, PA)

1977-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

56

Kinetics of hot-gas desulfurization sorbents for transport reactors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hot-gas desulfurization for the integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) process has been investigated by many researchers to remove effectively hydrogen sulfide with various metal oxide sorbents at elevated temperatures. Various metal oxide sorbents are formulated with metal oxides such as Fe, Co, Zn, and Ti. Initial reaction kinetics of formulated sorbents with hydrogen sulfide is studied in the presence of various amounts of moisture and hydrogen at various reaction temperatures. The objectives of this research are to study initial reaction kinetics for a sorbent-hydrogen sulfide heterogeneous reaction system, to investigate effects of concentrations of hydrogen sulfide, hydrogen, and moisture on dynamic absorption of H{sub 2}S into sorbents, to understand effects of space time of reaction gas mixtures on initial reaction kinetics of the sorbent-hydrogen sulfide system, and to evaluate effects of temperature and sorbent amounts on dynamic absorption of H{sub 2}S into sorbents. Experimental data on initial reaction kinetics of hydrogen sulfide with metal oxide sorbents were obtained with a 0.83-cm{sup 3} differential reactor. The reactivity of MCRH-67 sorbent and AHI-1 was examined. These sorbents were obtained from the Research Triangle Institute (RTI). The sorbents in the form of 70 {micro}m particles are reacted with 1,000--4,000 ppm hydrogen sulfide at 450--600 C. The range of space time of reaction gas mixtures is 0.03--0.09 s. The range of reaction duration is 4--14,400 s.

K.C. Kwon

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Method for enhancing the desulfurization of hot coal gas in a fluid-bed coal gasifier  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process and apparatus for providing additional desulfurization of the hot gas produced in a fluid-bed coal gasifier, within the gasifier. A fluid-bed of iron oxide is located inside the gasifier above the gasification bed in a fluid-bed coal gasifier in which in-bed desulfurization by lime/limestone takes place. The product gases leave the gasification bed typically at 1600.degree. to 1800.degree. F. and are partially quenched with water to 1000.degree. to 1200.degree. F. before entering the iron oxide bed. The iron oxide bed provides additional desulfurization beyond that provided by the lime/limestone.

Grindley, Thomas (Morgantown, WV)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

KINETICS OF HOT-GAS DESULFURIZATION SORBENTS FOR TRANSPORT REACTORS  

SciTech Connect

Hot-gas desulfurization for the integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) process has been investigated by many researchers to remove effectively hydrogen sulfide with various metal oxide sorbents at elevated temperatures. Various metal oxide sorbents are formulated with metal oxides such as Fe, Co, Zn, and Ti. Initial reaction kinetics of formulated sorbents with hydrogen sulfide is studied in the presence of various amounts of moisture and hydrogen at various reaction temperatures. The objectives of this research are to study initial reaction kinetics for a sorbent-hydrogen sulfide heterogeneous reaction system, to investigate effects of concentrations of hydrogen sulfide, hydrogen, and moisture on dynamic absorption of H{sub 2}S into sorbents, and to evaluate effects of temperature and sorbent amounts on dynamic absorption of H{sub 2}S into sorbents. Experimental data on initial reaction kinetics of hydrogen sulfide with metal oxide sorbents were obtained with a 0.83-cm{sup 3} differential reactor. The reactivity of MCRH-67 was examined in this report. This sorbent was obtained from the Research Triangle Institute (RTI). The sorbent in the form of 130 mm particles are reacted with 18000-ppm hydrogen sulfide at 350-525 C. The range of space time of reaction gas mixtures is 0.069-0.088 s. The range of reaction duration is 4-180 s.

K.C. Kwon

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

KINETICS OF HOT-GAS DESULFURIZATION SORBENTS FOR TRANSPORT REACTORS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hot-gas desulfurization for the integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) process has been investigated by many researchers to remove effectively hydrogen sulfide with various metal oxide sorbents at elevated temperatures. Various metal oxide sorbents are formulated with metal oxides such as Fe, Co, Zn, and Ti. Initial reaction kinetics of formulated sorbents with hydrogen sulfide is studied in the presence of various amounts of moisture and hydrogen at various reaction temperatures. The objectives of this research are to study initial reaction kinetics for a sorbent-hydrogen sulfide heterogeneous reaction system, to investigate effects of concentrations of hydrogen sulfide, hydrogen, and moisture on dynamic absorption of H{sub 2}S into sorbents, and to evaluate effects of temperature and sorbent amounts on dynamic absorption of H{sub 2}S into sorbents. Experimental data on initial reaction kinetics of hydrogen sulfide with metal oxide sorbents were obtained with a 0.83-cm{sup 3} differential reactor. The reactivity of EX-SO3 was examined in this report. This sorbent was obtained from the Research Triangle Institute (RTI). The sorbent in the form of 110 {micro}m particles are reacted with 18000-ppm hydrogen sulfide at 350-550 C. The range of space time of reaction gas mixtures is 0.069-0.088 s. The range of reaction duration is 4-180 s.

K.C. Kwon

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

KINETICS OF HOT-GAS DESULFURIZATION SORBENTS FOR TRANSPORT REACTORS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hot-gas desulfurization for the integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) process has been investigated by many researchers to remove effectively hydrogen sulfide with various metal oxide sorbents at elevated temperatures. Various metal oxide sorbents are formulated with metal oxides such as Fe, Co, Zn, and Ti. Initial reaction kinetics of formulated sorbents with hydrogen sulfide is studied in the presence of various amounts of moisture and hydrogen at various reaction temperatures. The objectives of this research are to study initial reaction kinetics for a sorbent-hydrogen sulfide heterogeneous reaction system, to investigate effects of concentrations of hydrogen sulfide, hydrogen, and moisture on dynamic absorption of H{sub 2}S into sorbents, and to evaluate effects of temperature and sorbent amounts on dynamic absorption of H{sub 2}S into sorbents. Experimental data on initial reaction kinetics of hydrogen sulfide with metal oxide sorbents were obtained with a 0.83-cm{sup 3} differential reactor. In this report, the reactivity of AHI-5 was examined. This sorbent was obtained from the Research Triangle Institute (RTI). The sorbent in the form of 70 {micro}m particles are reacted with 9000-18000 ppm hydrogen sulfide at 350-500 C. The range of space time of reaction gas mixtures is 0.071-0.088 s. The range of reaction duration is 4-10800 s.

K.C. Kwon

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas desulfurization advanced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

METC fluid-bed hot-gas desulfurization PDU  

SciTech Connect

METC is constructing an on-site, hot-gas desulfurization (HGD) process development unit (PDU) to support the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power systems program. With industrial participation, this PDU will be used for the further development of fluid-bed and transport reactor HGD configurations. The fluid-bed absorber and regenerator in the PDU were designed to operate in a turbulent as well as a bubbling regime. In addition, when encouraging results from a small-scale transport reactor unit became known, the decision was made to incorporate transport reactor provisions on both the sulfidation and regeneration sides of the PDU. With completion of National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) documentation requirements, the preliminary process and equipment design, and the April groundbreaking to prepare the project site, the project is now proceeding at a faster, more visible pace. Equipment installation should be completed in about 2 years. This report describes the project.

Bissett, L.A.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Bench-Scale Demonstration of Hot-Gas Desulfurization Technology  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC), is sponsoring research in advanced methods for controlling contaminants in hot coal gasifier gas (coal-derived fuel-gas) streams of integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) power systems. The hot gas cleanup work seeks to eliminate the need for expensive heat recovery equipment, reduce efficiency losses due to quenching, and minimize wastewater treatment costs.

Jeffrey W. Portzer; Santosh K. Gangwal

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Coke oven gas desulfurization: at Republic Steel's New Coking Facility, Warren, OH  

SciTech Connect

Our performance test indicates that the Sulfiban process is an effective method for removing H/sub 2/S from coke-oven gas. The process is able to handle variations in coke-oven gas flow and composition. Continuing efforts are underway to maintain optimum desulfurization conditions while trying to reduce waste production and MEA consumption. The problems which have prevented us from operating continuously have given us a better understanding of the process. This has contributed to better plant operations and greater equipment reliability for us to obtain continuous coke-oven gas desulfurization. 2 figures, 1 table.

Boak, S.C.; Prucha, D.G.; Turic, H.L.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

PRODUCTION OF CONSTRUCTION AGGREGATES FROM FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION SLUDGE  

SciTech Connect

Through a cooperative agreement with DOE, the Research and Development Department of CONSOL Inc. (CONSOL R and D) is teaming with SynAggs, Inc. and Duquesne Light to design, construct, and operate a 500 lb/h continuous pilot plant to produce road construction aggregate from a mixture of wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) sludge, fly ash, and other components. The proposed project is divided into six tasks: (1) Project Management; (2) Mix Design Evaluation; (3) Process Design; (4) Construction; (5) Start-Up and Operation; and (6) Reporting. In this quarter, Tasks 1 and 2 were completed. A project management plan (Task 1) was issued to DOE on October 22, 1998 . The mix design evaluation (Task 2) with Duquesne Light Elrama Station FGD sludge and Allegheny Power Hatfields Ferry Station fly ash was completed. Eight semi-continuous bench-scale tests were conducted to examine the effects of mix formulation on aggregate properties. A suitable mix formulation was identified to produce aggregates that meet specifications of the American Association of State High Transport Officials (AASHTO) as Class A aggregate for use in highway construction. The mix formulation was used in designing the flow sheet of the pilot plant. The process design (Task 3) is approximately 80% completed. Equipment was evaluated to comply with design requirements. The design for the curing vessel was completed by an outside engineering firm. All major equipment items for the pilot plant, except the curing vessel, were ordered. Pilot plant construction (Task 4) was begun in October. The Hazardous Substance Plan was issued to DOE. The Allegheny County (PA) Heat Department determined that an air emission permit is not required for operation of the pilot plant.

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Land Application Uses for Dry Flue Gas Desulfurization By-Products: Phase 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The utility industry currently generates about 20 million tons of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by-products annually, and the quantity is expected to increase as utilities institute further controls to comply with Clean Air Act requirements. This report presents the results of the second phase of a large-scale study of beneficial land-use applications of these by-products.

1998-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

66

Flue Gas Desulfurization Scrubber Maintenance Guide: Wastewater Treatment and Gypsum Handling Area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Flue Gas Desulfurization Scrubber Maintenance Guide: Wastewater Treatment and Gypsum Handling Area provides fossil plant maintenance personnel with current maintenance information on these systems. This guide will assist plant maintenance personnel in improving the reliability and reducing the maintenance costs for these areas of their scrubber system.

2009-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

67

Stabilization of Flue Gas Desulfurization Sludge for Application in Marine Environments.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Flue Gas Desulfurization sludge (FGD, CaSO4·2H2O, CaSO3·1/2H2O) is a waste by-product produced when sorbent slurry is passed through wet scrubbers. FGD contains higher concentrations of… (more)

Kour, Tej

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Evaluation of the NeuStream-S™ Flue Gas Desulfurization Process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Harris Group Inc. (HGI) of Denver, Colorado, was contracted by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) to monitor, evaluate, and prepare this report on a dual-alkali flue gas desulfurization (FGD) process developed by Neumann Systems Group, Inc. (NSG). The process is being demonstrated in a nominal 20-MW demonstration plant, treating a slip stream of flue gas from the Colorado Springs Utilities 142-MW Drake Unit 7. HGI evaluated performance, operability, and readiness for scale-up of the process. Co...

2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

69

Enhanced Control of Mercury by Wet Flue Gas Desulfurization Systems - Site 3 Topical Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Researchers conducted field tests to evaluate the ability of a variety of materials to oxidize vapor-phase elemental mercury at a coal-fired power plant equipped with a wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system. Results, while confounded by measurement difficulties, showed that under bituminous coal flue gas conditions, two catalysts, Pd #1 and Carbon #6, continued to oxidize at least 85 percent of the inlet elemental mercury after three months.

2002-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

70

Characteristics and reactivity of rapidly hydrated sorbent for semidry flue gas desulfurization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The semidry flue gas desulfurization (FGD) process has many advantages over the wet FGD process for moving sulfur dioxide emissions from pulverized coal-fired power plants. Semidry FGD with a rapidly hydrated sorbent was studied in a pilot-scale circulating fluidized bed (CFB) experimental facility. The sorbent was made from lumps of lime and coal fly ash. The desulfurization efficiency was measured for various operating parameters, including the sorbent recirculation rate and the water spray method. The experimental results show that the desulfurization efficiencies of the rapidly hydrated sorbent were 1.5-3.0 times higher than a commonly used industrial sorbent for calcium to sulfur molar ratios from 1.2 to 3.0, mainly due to the higher specific surface area and pore volume. The Ca(OH){sub 2} content in the cyclone separator ash was about 2.9% for the rapidly hydrated sorbent and was about 0.1% for the commonly used industrial sorbent, due to the different adhesion between the fine Ca(OH){sub 2} particles and the fly ash particles, and the low cyclone separation efficiency for the fine Ca(OH){sub 2} particles that fell off the sorbent particles. Therefore the actual recirculation rates of the active sorbent with Ca(OH){sub 2} particles were higher for the rapidly hydrated sorbent, which also contributed to the higher desulfurization efficiency. The high fly ash content in the rapidly hydrated sorbent resulted in good operating stability. The desulfurization efficiency with upstream water spray was 10-15% higher than that with downstream water spray. 20 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

Jie Zhang; Changfu You; Suwei Zhao; Changhe Chen; Haiying Qi [Tsinghua University, Beijing (China). Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering of Ministry of Education, Department of Thermal Engineering

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Thermal Flue Gas Desulfurization Wastewater Treatment Processes for Zero Liquid Discharge Operations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents a worldwide inventory of power plant flue gas desulfurization (FGD) blowdown treatment systems using thermal technologies to achieve zero liquid discharge (ZLD) water management. The number of thermal treatment systems presently operating is very few, with the majority using chemical pretreatment followed by evaporation in a brine concentrator and crystallizer and finally dewatering of the residual salts. Of the operating thermal ZLD systems identified, six are located in Italy and o...

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

72

Flue Gas Desulfurization Gypsum Agricultural Network: North Dakota Sites 1 and 2 (Wheat)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes work performed in 2007 and 2008 to evaluate potential beneficial agricultural uses of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum at two sites in North Dakota. This work was part of a national research network evaluating beneficial uses of FGD gypsum in agriculture. The objectives of this research were to determine the influence of FGD gypsum applications on soil quality and on wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) yields and seed quality. Three application rates of FGD gypsum were compared with s...

2011-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

73

Pore structure and reactivity changes in hot coal gas desulfurization sorbents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary objective of the project was the investigation of the pore structure and reactivity changes occurring in metal/metal oxide sorbents used for desulfurization of hot coal gas during sulfidation and regeneration, with particular emphasis placed on the effects of these changes on the sorptive capacity and efficiency of the sorbents. Commercially available zinc oxide sorbents were used as model solids in our experimental investigation of the sulfidation and regeneration processes.

Sotirchos, S.V.

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Performance Evaluation of a Radial Deionization System for Flue Gas Desulfurization Wastewater Treatment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U. S. Environmental Protection Agency’s proposed effluent limitation guidelines for steam electric power generating units could affect not only how power plants use water but also how they discharge it. The revised guidelines propose discharge limits for selenium, mercury, arsenic, and nitrite/nitrate in flue gas desulfurization (FGD) wastewater. Final rule approval is expected by the middle of 2014. Additional regulation of these contaminants and other constituents may occur through ...

2013-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

75

Land Application Uses for Dry Flue Gas Desulfurization By-Products: Phase 3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The utility industry currently generates about 25 million tons of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by-products annually in the United States -- a quantity that is expected to increase as utilities apply new controls to comply with Clean Air Act Amendments. This report presents results of the third and final phase of a large-scale study of beneficial land-use applications for these by-products.

1999-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

76

A Review of Agricultural and Other Land Application Uses of Flue Gas Desulfurization Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The production of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) products, especially FGD gypsum, is expected to increase substantially over the next ten to twenty years in response to clean air initiatives. There are a large number of agricultural and other land application uses of FGD products that have received previous research and development attention, but only in specific locations of the United States and under limited conditions of crops, climate and soil types. This report discusses current and potential futur...

2006-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

77

Demonstration Test of Iron Addition to a Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) Absorber to Enhance Mercury Removal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the findings from a full-scale demonstration test of the effects on trace elements of adding iron to a forced oxidation flue gas desulfurization (FGD) scrubber. Three specific effects were evaluated: lowering mercury emissions to the atmosphere; lowering the concentration of soluble or sub-micron-sized mercury particles in FGD purge water, which could improve removal of mercury in FGD purge water treatment; and lowering the concentration of selenate in FGD purge water, which could i...

2009-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

78

Land Application Uses for Dry Flue Gas Desulfurization By-Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New sulfur dioxide removal technologies produce a dry, solid by-product material consisting of excess sorbent, reaction products that contain sulfates and sulfites, and coal fly ash. The scarcity of landfill disposal sites for such flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by-products has led to a long-term study on possible large-volume beneficial applications. To date, FGD by-products have been successfully used in agriculture, construction, and strip mine reclamation.

1995-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

79

Method and apparatus for enhancing the desulfurization of hot coal gas in a fluid-bed coal gasifier  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process and apparatus for providing additional desulfurization of the hot gas produced in a fluid-bed coal gasifier, within the gasifier is described. A fluid-bed of iron oxide is located inside the gasifier above the gasification bed in a fluid-bed coal gasifier in which in-bed desulfurization by lime/limestone takes place. The product gases leave the gasification bed typically at 1600 to 1800 F and are partially quenched with water to 1000 to 1200 F before entering the iron oxide bed. The iron oxide bed provides additional desulfurization beyond that provided by the lime /limestone. 1 fig.

Grindley, T.

1988-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

80

Reclamation of abandoned surface coal mined land using flue gas desulfurization products  

SciTech Connect

Details are given of a field-scale research project where the Fleming site, in Ohio, of highly degraded and acid-forming abandoned surface coal-mined land, was reclaimed using a dry flue gas desulfurization product from an atmospheric fluidized bed combustion burner at a General Motors plant Pontiac, MI, which burned eastern Ohio coal and used dolomitic limestone for desulfurization. Plots were seeded with a mixture of grasses, wheat and clover, in 1994 and soil and water samples were analysed in 1995 and in 2009. It was found that FGD-treated plots promoted good regenerative growth, similar to that in plots using more concentrated re-soil material. The FGD treatment also greatly improved overall water quality. 3 figs., 4 tabs.

Chen, L.; Kost, D.; Dick, W.A. [Ohio State University, OH (United States)

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas desulfurization advanced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Status of METC investigations of coal gas desulfurization at high temperature. [Zinc ferrite  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents the continuing effort at the US Department of Energy/Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) to develop a hot-gas desulfurization process for coal-derived gas, primarily for application to molten carbonate fuel cells. Metal oxide sorbents were tested on lab-scale test equipment, and it was determined that scale-up of the process was warranted. A larger, skid-mounted test unit was therefore designed, constructed, and installed on a sidestream of the DOE/METC fixed-bed gasifier. A first series of tests was conducted during Gasifier Run 101. These tests served to shake down the test unit, and provide data on the performance of the test unit operating on coal-derived gas. Overall, the process operated well on fixed-bed, air-blown gasifier gas. Sulfur levels in exit dry gas were reduced to less than 10 ppM. Regeneration appears to restore the sulfur-removing capacity of the sorbent. Sorbent integrity was maintained during the test period, which incorporated three sulfidations. It is recommended that treatment of the regeneration offgas be investigated, and that testing and development of a system to reduce the sulfur in this gas to elemental sulfur be initiated. In addition, it is suggested that a multiple reactor system be planned for continuous operation, to allow for long-term tests of downstream users of desulfurized gas. 7 references, 18 figures, 9 tables.

Steinfeld, G.

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Utilizing secondary heat to heat wash oil in the coke-oven gas desulfurization division  

SciTech Connect

Removal of hydrogen sulfide from the coke-oven gas by the vacuum-carbonate method involves significant energy costs, comprising about 47% of the total costs of the process. This is explained by the significant demand of steam for regeneration of the wash oil, the cost of which exceeds 30% of the total operating costs. The boiling point of the saturated wash oil under vacuum does not exceed 70/sup 0/C, thus the wash oil entering the regenerator can be heated either by the direct coke-oven gas or by the tar supernatant from the gas collection cycle. Utilizing the secondary heat of the direct coke-oven gas and the tar supernatant liquor (the thermal effect is approximately the same) to heat the wash oil from the gas desulfurization shops significantly improves the industrial economic indices. Heating the wash oil from gas desulfurization shops using the vacuum-carbonate method by the heat of the tar supernatant liquor may be adopted at a number of coking plants which have a scarcity of thermal resources and which have primary coolers with vertical tubes.

Volkov, E.L.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

BUILDING MATERIALS MADE FROM FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION BY-PRODUCTS  

SciTech Connect

Flue gas desulphurization (FGD) materials are produced in abundant quantities by coal burning utilities. Due to environmental restrains, flue gases must be ''cleaned'' prior to release to the atmosphere. They are two general methods to ''scrub'' flue gas: wet and dry. The choice of scrubbing material is often defined by the type of coal being burned, i.e. its composition. Scrubbing is traditionally carried out using a slurry of calcium containing material (slaked lime or calcium carbonate) that is made to contact exiting flue gas as either a spay injected into the gas or in a bubble tower. The calcium combined with the SO{sub 2} in the gas to form insoluble precipitates. Some plants have been using dry injection of these same materials or their own Class C fly ash to scrub. In either case the end product contains primarily hannebachite (CaSO{sub 3} {center_dot} 1/2H{sub 2}O) with smaller amounts of gypsum (CaSO{sub 4} {center_dot} 2H{sub 2}O). These materials have little commercial use. Experiments were carried out that were meant to explore the feasibility of using blends of hannebachite and fly ash mixed with concentrated sodium hydroxide to make masonry products. The results suggest that some of these mixtures could be used in place of conventional Portland cement based products such as retaining wall bricks and pavers.

Michael W. Grutzeck; Maria DiCola; Paul Brenner

2006-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

84

Durable zinc oxide-containing sorbents for coal gas desulfurization  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Durable zinc-oxide containing sorbent pellets for removing hydrogen sulfide from a gas stream at an elevated temperature are made up to contain titania as a diluent, high-surface-area silica gel as a matrix material, and a binder. These materials are mixed, moistened, and formed into pellets, which are then dried and calcined. The resulting pellets undergo repeated cycles of sulfidation and regeneration without loss of reactivity and without mechanical degradation. Regeneration of the pellets is carried out by contacting the bed with an oxidizing gas mixture.

Siriwardane, R.V.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

85

Leaching Assessment of Fly Ash, Flue Gas Desulfurization Filter Cake, and Fixated Scrubber Solids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The by-products of coal combustion (for example, fly ash and flue gas desulfurization filter cake) are an important environmental concern due to potential leaching of trace constituents and the large volume of residues produced. About 40% of these by-products may be utilized as raw materials outside of the energy sector; the remaining 60% of the coal combustion products (CCPs) are disposed of as waste. At Plant 14090, the subject of this report, fly ash and scrubber sludge are blended with quicklime ...

2012-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

86

Flue Gas Desulfurization Gypsum Agricultural Network: Wisconsin Arlington Research Station Fields 295 and 27 (Alfalfa)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes field research in Wisconsin as part of the Flue Gas Desulfurization Gypsum (FGDG) Agricultural Network. The objective of this study, conducted during 2009-2010, was to evaluate potential beneficial agricultural uses of FGDG as a soil amendment to improve alfalfa production. FGDG was compared to a commercially available gypsum product (C-GYP) widely sold in the U.S. Midwest and other areas. A study was established in two fields (Field 295 in 2009/2010 and Field 27 in 2010) at ...

2013-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

87

Flue Gas Desulfurization Gypsum Agricultural Network: North Dakota Sites 3, 4, and 5 (Canola)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flue gas desulfurization gypsum (FGDG) is a very pure form of gypsum that is a by-product from the combustion of coal for energy production. This report describes 2008-2009 work to evaluate potential beneficial agricultural uses of FGDG at three sites near Langdon, North Dakota. This work was part of a national research network evaluating beneficial uses of FGDG in agriculture, in this case, fertilization of dryland canola by FGDG. The objectives of this research were to 1) determine the influence of FGD...

2011-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

88

The Fate of Mercury Absorbed in Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems are known to remove a percentage of the mercury in coal flue gases. This raises several questions about the fate of mercury removed by wet FGD systems: Does the absorbed mercury stay in the FGD liquor or does it leave with the byproduct solids? What happens to mercury in the FGD liquor and solid byproducts when they leave the FGD system? To address such questions, this report describes results from an EPRI project that involves field sample collection and labora...

2005-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

89

Enhanced Control of Mercury by Wet Flue Gas Desulfurization Systems - Site 2 Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy and EPRI are co-funding this project to improve the control of mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants equipped with wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. The project is investigating catalytic oxidation of vapor-phase elemental mercury to a form that is more effectively captured in wet FGD systems. If successfully developed, the process could be applicable to over 90,000 MW of utility generating capacity with existing FGD systems, and to future FGD installation...

2000-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

90

Flue gas desulfurization/denitrification using metal-chelate additives  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of simultaneously removing SO/sub 2/ and NO from oxygen-containing flue gases resulting from the combustion of carbonaceous material by contacting the flue gas with an aqueous scrubber solution containing an aqueous sulfur dioxide sorbent and an active metal chelating agent which promotes a reaction between dissolved SO/sub 2/ and dissolved NO to form hydroxylamine N-sulfonates. The hydroxylamine sulfonates are then separated from the scrubber solution which is recycled. 3 figs.

Harkness, J.B.L.; Doctor, R.D.; Wingender, R.J.

1985-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

91

Pilot-plant technical assessment of wet flue gas desulfurization using limestone  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An experimental study was performed on a countercurrent pilot-scale packed scrubber for wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD). The flow rate of the treated flue gas was around 300 Nm{sup 3}/h, so the pilot-plant capacity is one of the largest with respect to other published studies on a pilot-plant wet FGD. The tests were carried out at an SO{sub 2} inlet concentration of 2000 ppm by changing the recycle slurry pH to around 4.8 and the L/G ratio to between 7.5 and 15. Three types of limestone were tested, obtaining desulfurization efficiencies from 59 to 99%. We show the importance of choosing an appropriate limestone in order to get a better performance from the FGD plant. Thus, it is important to know the reactivity (on a laboratory scale) and the sorbent utilization (on a pilot-plant scale) in order to identify if a limestone is reactive enough and to compare it with another type. In addition, by using the transfer-unit concept, a function has been obtained for the desulfurization efficiency, using the L/G ratio and the recycle slurry pH as independent variables. The Ca/S molar ratio is related to these and to the SO{sub 2} removal efficiency. This function, together with a simplified function of the operation variable cost, allows us to determine the pair (L/G ratio and pH) to achieve the desired SO{sub 2} removal with the minimum operation cost. Finally, the variable operation costs between packed towers and spray scrubbers have been compared, using as a basis the pilot packed tower and the industrial spray column at the Compostilla Power Station's FGD plant (in Leon, Spain).

Ortiz, F.J.G.; Vidal, F.; Ollero, P.; Salvador, L.; Cortes, V.; Gimenez, A. [University of Seville, Seville (Spain)

2006-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

92

Desulfurization mixture and process for desulfurizing pig iron  

SciTech Connect

Process and composition for desulfurizing pig iron in which the desulfurization agent consists essentially of calcium carbide, a gas-evolving component and fluorspar; the advantage of the process and composition is that it reduces dust pollution and danger of flaming in the handling of the slag after the desulfurization of pig iron.

Freissmuth, A.; Gmohling, W.; Rock, H.

1982-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

93

Potential Agricultural Uses of Flue Gas Desulfurization Gypsum in the Northern Great Plains  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flue gas desulfurization gypsum (FGDG) is a byproduct from the combustion of coal for electrical energy production. Currently, FGDG is being produced by 15 electrical generating stations in Alabama, Florida, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, Ohio, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, and Wisconsin. Much of this byproduct is used in the manufacturing of wallboard. The National Network for Use of FGDG in Agriculture was initiated to explore alternative uses of this byproduct. In the northern Great Plains (North Dakota, South Dakota, and Montana), FGDG has the potential to be used as a Ca or S fertilizer, as an acid soil ameliorant, and for reclaiming or mitigating sodium-affected soils. Greater than 1.4 million Mg of FGDG could initially be used in these states for these purposes. Flue gas desulfurization gypsum can be an agriculturally important resource for helping to increase the usefulness of problem soils and to increase crop and rangeland production. Conducting beneficial use audits would increase the public awareness of this product and help identify to coal combustion electrical generating stations the agriculturally beneficial outlets for this byproduct.

DeSutter, T.M.; Cihacek, L.J. [North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND (United States). Department of Soil Science

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

94

Catalytic seawater flue gas desulfurization process: an experimental pilot plant study  

SciTech Connect

In previous articles by the authors on seawater S(IV) oxidation kinetics, a significant catalytic effect was demonstrated by means of a commercially available activated carbon. The aims of this study carried out at pilot plant scale were to assess the use of high-efficiency structured packing and to validate the positive results obtained previously in laboratory studies. A comparison between a packed tower and a spray column was made by maintaining the same desulfurization efficiency. A 47% reduction in seawater flow can be obtained with a packed tower. This option seems to be more economical, with a reduction in operation costs of least of 33%. With the appropriate activated carbon, it is possible to reach a greater oxidation rate at a low pH level than by operating conventionally at a high pH level without a catalyst. A preliminary technical and financial comparison between the advanced seawater desulfurization process (equipped with a packed tower and a catalytic oxidation plant) and the conventional process (spray tower and noncatalytic oxidation) was carried out. 18 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

F. Vidal B.; P. Ollero; F.J. Gutierrez Ortiz; A. Villanueva [University of Seville, Seville (Spain). Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering

2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

95

Model predictive control of a wet limestone flue gas desulfurization pilot plant  

SciTech Connect

A model predictive control (MPC) strategy based on a dynamic matrix (DMC) is designed and applied to a wet limestone flue gas desulfurization (WLFGD) pilot plant to evaluate what enhancement in control performance can be achieved with respect to a conventional decentralized feedback control strategy. The results reveal that MPC can significantly improve both reference tracking and disturbance rejection. For disturbance rejection, the main control objective in WLFGD plants, selection of tuning parameters and sample time, is of paramount importance due to the fast effect of the main disturbance (inlet SO{sub 2} load to the absorber) on the most important controlled variable (outlet flue gas SO{sub 2} concentration). The proposed MPC strategy can be easily applied to full-scale WLFGD plants.

Perales, A.L.V.; Ollero, P.; Ortiz, F.J.G.; Gomez-Barea, A. [University of Seville, Seville (Spain). Dept. of Chemical & Environmental Engineering

2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

96

The utilization of flue gas desulfurization waste by-products in construction brick  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Millions of tons of waste by-products from Texas coal burning plants are produced each year. Two common byproducts are the fuel ashes and calcium sulfate (gypsum). Fuel ashes result from the burning of coal. Gypsum is a byproduct of the air purification system, called Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD). Abatement of these waste products is a growing concern, not only for the industry, but the environment as well. It is possible to produce a gypsum brick unit that can meet the engineering properties required by the Americans Society of Testing Materials (ASTM) standards by using these by-products. This can be accomplished at a cost less than the least expensive common fired clay brick that is used in construction operations. The gypsum brick can be manufactured using established methods that are currently in operation.

Berryman, Charles Wayne

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Controllability analysis and decentralized control of a wet limestone flue gas desulfurization plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presently, decentralized feedback control is the only control strategy used in wet limestone flue gas desulfurization (WLFGD) plants. Proper tuning of this control strategy is becoming an important issue in WLFGD plants because more stringent SO{sub 2} regulations have come into force recently. Controllability analysis is a highly valuable tool for proper design of control systems, but it has not been applied to WLFGD plants so far. In this paper a decentralized control strategy is designed and applied to a WLFGD pilot plant taking into account the conclusions of a controllability analysis. The results reveal that good SO{sub 2} control in WLFGD plants can be achieved mainly because the main disturbance of the process is well-aligned with the plant and interactions between control loops are beneficial to SO{sub 2} control.

Perales, A.L.V.; Ortiz, F.J.G.; Ollero, P.; Gil, F.M. [University of Seville, Seville (Spain)

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

98

Method for reducing sulfate formation during regeneration of hot-gas desulfurization sorbents  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The regeneration of sulfur sorbents having sulfate forming tendencies and used for desulfurizing hot product gas streams such as provided by coal gasification is provided by employing a two-stage regeneration method. Air containing a sub-stoichiometric quantity of oxygen is used in the first stage for substantially fully regenerating the sorbent without sulfate formation and then regeneration of the resulting partially regenerated sorbent is completed in the second stage with air containing a quantity of oxygen slightly greater than the stoichiometric amount adequate to essentially fully regenerate the sorbent. Sulfate formation occurs in only the second stage with the extent of sulfate formation being limited only to the portion of the sulfur species contained by the sorbent after substantially all of the sulfur species have been removed therefrom in the first stage.

Bissett, Larry A. (Morgantown, WV); Strickland, Larry D. (Morgantown, WV); Rockey, John M. (Westover, WV)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry with Collision/Reaction Cell Technology for Analysis of Flue Gas Desulfurization Wastew aters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flue gas desulfurization (FGD) wastewater is produced by pollution control equipment used on coal-fired power plants to reduce sulfur dioxide emissions to air. Wet FGD scrubbers produce an aqueous blowdown stream that contains trace levels of metals that have been adsorbed from flue gas. Power plant owners need to measure concentrations of these metals for purposes of process control, discharge monitoring, or design and operation of wastewater treatment systems. FGD water is a very difficult matrix ...

2012-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

100

Desulfurization of Fisher-Tropsch synthesis gas in coal-to-gasoline pilot plant  

SciTech Connect

In 1989, a coal-to-gasoline pilot plant was installed and operated successfully in China, and a dry desulfurization process was used in this plant. This paper presents an overview of the dry desulfurization process. It includes design and operation of the process, and a description of ST801, T305 adsorbents and TGH COS hydrolysis catalyst. In addition, the desulfurization process used in a planned demonstration plant scheduled for completion in 1991 is presented.

Shishao, T.; Ju, S.; Shenzhao, L.; Maoqian, M.; Hanxian, G. (Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Taiyuan Univ. of Technology, Taiyuan, Shanxi (CN))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas desulfurization advanced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

SOLOX coke-oven gas desulfurization ppm levels -- No toxic waste  

SciTech Connect

For sulfur removal from coke-oven gas, the reduction/oxidation processes such as Stretford are the most effective, capable of removing the H[sub 2]S down to ppm levels. However, these processes have, in the past, suffered from ecological problems with secondary pollutant formation resulting from side reactions with HCN and O[sub 2]. The SOLOX gas desulfurization system is a development of the Stretford process in which the toxic effluent problems are eliminated by installing a salt decomposition process operating according to the liquid-phase hydrolysis principle. In this process, the gaseous hydrolysis products H[sub 2]S, NH[sub 3] and CO[sub 2] are returned to the untreated gas, and the regenerated solution is recycled to the absorption process. The blowdown from the absorption circuit is fed into a tube reactor where the hydrolysis process takes place. The toxic salts react with water, producing as reaction products the gases H[sub 2]S, NH[sub 3] and CO[sub 2], and the nontoxic salt Na[sub 2]SO[sub 4]. From the hydrolysis reactor the liquid stream flows into a fractionating crystallization plant. This plant produces a recycle stream of regenerated absorption solution and a second stream containing most of the Na[sub 2]SO[sub 4]. This second stream comprises the net plant waste and can be disposed of with the excess ammonia liquor or sprayed onto the coal.

Platts, M. (Thyssen Still Otto Technical Services, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)); Tippmer, K. (Thyssen Still Otto Anlagentechnik GmbH, Bochum (Germany))

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

A pilot-scale Process Development Unit for transport and fluid-bed hot-gas desulfurization  

SciTech Connect

The Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) has designed and is currently constructing an on-site, hot gas desulfurization (HGD) Process Development Unit (PDU). The PDU is designed to use regenerable solid metal oxide sorbents that absorb hydrogen sulfide from high-temperature, high-pressure simulated coal-gasification fuel gas that is generated by a METC designed syngas generator. The simulated coal gas is a mixture of partially combusted natural gas, water, carbon dioxide, and hydrogen sulfide. PDU process conditions will be representative of anticipated commercial applications in terms of temperatures, pressures, compositions, velocities, and sorbent cycling. The PDU supports the Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) mission at METC by providing a test bed for development of IGCC cleanup systems that offer low capital cost, operating costs, and costs of electricity. METC intends to develop additional industrial involvement opportunities as the project progresses towards operations. The primary objectives of the PDU are to (1) fill the gap between small-scale testing and large-scale demonstration projects by providing a cost effective test site for transport and fluid-bed desulfurization reactor and sorbent development, (2) demonstrate sorbent suitability over a wide range of parameters, and (3) generate significant information on process control for transport and fluidized bed based desulfurization. PDU data is expected to be used to optimize process performance by expanding the experience for larger scale demonstration projects such as Sierra Pacific Power Company`s Clean Coal Technology project.

McMillian, M.H.; Bissett, L.A.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Pore structure and reactivity changes in hot coal gas desulfurization sorbents. Final report, September 1987--January 1991  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of the project was the investigation of the pore structure and reactivity changes occurring in metal/metal oxide sorbents used for desulfurization of hot coal gas during sulfidation and regeneration, with particular emphasis placed on the effects of these changes on the sorptive capacity and efficiency of the sorbents. Commercially available zinc oxide sorbents were used as model solids in our experimental investigation of the sulfidation and regeneration processes.

Sotirchos, S.V.

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Corrosion in Wet Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) Systems: Technical Root Cause Analysis of Internal Corrosion on Wet FGD Alloy Absorbers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

State-of-the-art flue gas desulfurization (FGD) technologies have been or are being installed on most large coal-fired electric generating units in response to new regulatory emission requirements. Aggressive corrosion has been noted in some of these systems, presumably from the low pH, high chloride environments created in the FGD process. There exists a plethora of material systems (metallic, organic, plastics, coating, and so forth) available to construct these systems, but, because of cost, fabricabi...

2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

105

Evaluation of the Origin of Dissolved Organic Carbon and the Treatability of Mercury in Flue Gas Desulfurization Wastewater  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Regulations for reducing the dissolved mercury (Hg) concentrations in wastewater discharged by electric generating power plants are becoming more stringent via federal regulatory limits proposed by the EPA and regulatory limits set by select states. Data obtained in a previous EPRI study conducted in 2009 suggested a potential negative impact of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and iodide concentrations present in flue gas desulfurization (FGD) wastewater on mercury treatability (EPRI report 1019867). ...

2013-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

106

Investigation of a mercury speciation technique for flue gas desulfurization materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most of the synthetic gypsum generated from wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) scrubbers is currently being used for wallboard production. Because oxidized mercury is readily captured by the wet FGD scrubber, and coal-fired power plants equipped with wet scrubbers desire to benefit from the partial mercury control that these systems provide, some mercury is likely to be bound in with the FGD gypsum and wallboard. In this study, the feasibility of identifying mercury species in the FGD gypsum and wallboard samples was investigated using a large sample size thermal desorption method and samples from power plants in Pennsylvania. Potential candidates of pure mercury standards including mercuric chloride, mercurous chloride, mercury oxide, mercury sulfide, and mercuric sulfate were analyzed to compare their results with those obtained from FGD gypsum and dry wallboard samples. Although any of the thermal evolutionary curves obtained from these pure mercury standards did not exactly match with those of the FGD gypsum and wallboard samples, it was identified that Hg{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} and HgCl{sub 2} could be candidates. An additional chlorine analysis from the gypsum and wallboard samples indicated that the chlorine concentrations were approximately 2 orders of magnitude higher than the mercury concentrations, suggesting possible chlorine association with mercury. 21 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

Lee, J.Y.; Cho K.; Cheng L.; Keener, T.C.; Jegadeesan G.; Al-Abed, S.R. [University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH (United States). Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering

2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

107

Recycle/reuse of boiler chemical cleaning wastes in wet limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Boiler chemical cleaning wastes (BCCW) are generated by the periodic waterside cleaning of utility boilers to remove metallic deposits from boiler tube surfaces. Depending on boiler metallurgy, BCCW generally contain high concentrations of iron and copper or both, as well as other heavy metals such as chromium, lead, nickel, and zinc. BCCW treatment and disposal methods include precipitation, coponding in an ash pond, evaporation in the fireside of an operating boiler (for organic solvents), and contracted off-site disposal. Depending on the type of BCCW chemical treatment methods achieve varying degrees of success. BCCW which contain organic chelating agents can be especially difficult to treat to national pollutant discharge elimination system (NPDES) limits (1 mg/L for both iron and copper) with conventional lime precipitation.Research is being done to evaluate different BCCW treatment and disposal methods. One waste management option under consideration is reuse of BCCW in utility wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. To investigate this option, a series of laboratory tests were performed in which five different types of BCCW were added to the reaction tank of EPRI's bench-scale wet limestone FGD system. This paper presents the results and conclusions from this study.

Stohs, M.; Owens, D.R. (Radian Corp. (US)); Micheletti, W. (Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (USA))

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Summary and assessment of METC zinc ferrite hot coal gas desulfurization test program, final report: Volume 2, Appendices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) has conducted a test program to develop a zinc ferrite-based high temperature desulfurization process which could be applied to fuel gas entering downstream components such as molten carbonate fuel cells or gas turbines. As a result of prior METC work with iron oxide and zinc oxide sorbents, zinc ferrite evolved as a candidate with the potential for high capacity, low equilibrium levels of H/sub 2/S, and structural stability after multiple regenerations. The program consisted of laboratory-scale testing with a two-inch diameter reactor and simulated fixed-bed gasifier gas; bench-scale testing with a six-inch diameter reactor and actual gas from the METC 42-inch fixed bed gasifier; as well as laboratory-scale testing of zinc ferrite with simulated fluidized bed gasifier gas. Data from sidestream testing are presented. 18 refs.

Underkoffler, V.S.

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Production of manufactured aggregates from flue gas desulfurization by-products  

SciTech Connect

CONSOL R and D has developed a disk pelletization process to produce manufactured aggregates from the by-products of various technologies designed to reduce sulfur emissions produced from coal utilization. Aggregates have been produced from the by-products of the Coolside and LIMB sorbent injection, the fluidized-bed combustion (FBC), spray dryer absorption (SDA), and lime and limestone wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) processes. The aggregates produced meet the general specifications for use as road aggregate in road construction and for use as lightweight aggregate in concrete masonry units. Small field demonstrations with 1200 lb to 5000 lb of manufactured aggregates were conducted using aggregates produced from FBC ash and lime wet FGD sludge in road construction and using aggregates made from SDA ash and lime wet FGD sludge to manufacture concrete blocks. The aggregates for this work were produced with a bench-scale (200--400 lb batch) unit. In 1999, CONSOL R and D constructed and operated a 500 lb/hr integrated, continuous pilot plant. A variety of aggregate products were produced from lime wet FGD sludge. The pilot plant test successfully demonstrated the continuous, integrated operation of the process. The pilot plant demonstration was a major step toward commercialization of manufactured aggregate production from FGD by-products. In this paper, progress made in the production of aggregates from dry FGD (Coolside, LIMB, SDA) and FBC by-products, and lime wet FGD sludge is discussed. The discussion covers bench-scale and pilot plant aggregate production and aggregate field demonstrations.

Wu, M.M.; McCoy, D.C.; Fenger, M.L.; Scandrol, R.O.; Winschel, R.A.; Withum, J.A.; Statnick, R.M.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Hot coal gas desulfurization with manganese-based sorbents. Quarterly report, October--December 1993  

SciTech Connect

The focus of work being performed on Hot Coal Gas Desulfurization at the Morgantown Energy Technology Center is primarily in the use of zinc ferrite and zinc titanate sorbents; however, prior studies indicated that an alternate sorbent, manganese dioxide-containing ore in mixture with alumina (75 wt% ore + 25 wt% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) may be a viable alternative to zinc-based sorbents. Manganese, for example, has a lower vapor pressure in the elemental state than zinc hence it is not as likely to undergo depletion from the sorbent surface upon loading and regeneration cycles. Also manganese oxide is less readily reduced to the elemental state than iron hence the range of reduction potentials for oxygen is somewhat greater than for zinc ferrite. In addition, thermodynamic analysis of the manganese-oxygen-sulfur system shows it to be less amenable to sulfation than zinc ferrite. Potential also exists for utilization of manganese at higher temperatures than zinc ferrite or zinc titanate. This Fifth Quarterly Report documents progress in pellet testing via thermogravimetric analysis of pellet formulation FORM4-A of a manganese ore/alumina combination. This formulation, described more fully in the Quarterly Technical Progress Report of October 15, 1993, consists of manganese carbonate combined with alundum. A 2-inch fixed-bed reactor has been fabricated and is now ready for subjecting pellets to cyclic loading and regeneration; however, a minor problem has arisen during the regeneration cycle in that sulfur tends to form and plug the exit tube during the early stage of regeneration. This problem is about to be overcome by increasing the flow rate of air during the regeneration cycle resulting in more oxidizing conditions and hence less tendency for sulfide sulfur (S{sup =}) to oxidize to the intermediate elemental form (S{sup o}) rather than to 4-valent (S{sup +4}).

Hepworth, M.T.; Slimane, R.B.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Optimization on Seawater Desulfurization Efficiency Based on LSSVM-GA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Seawater flue gas Desulfurization (SFGD) was adopted in many coal-fired power plants of littoral for its low cost and high desulfurization efficiency. Operating Parameters would seriously affect SFGD efficiency, the desulfurization efficiency can be ... Keywords: SFGD, desulfurization efficiency, LSSVM, GA, optimization

Liu Ding-ping; Li Xiao-wei

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Integrated operation of a pressurized gasifier, hot gas desulfurization system and turbine simulator  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of the General Electric Hot Gas Cleanup (HGCU) Program is to develop a commercially viable technology to remove sulfur, particulates, and halogens from a high-temperature fuel gas stream using a moving bed, regenerable mixed metal oxide sorbent based process. This technology will ultimately be incorporated into advanced Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power generation systems. The objectives of the turbine simulator testing are (1) to demonstrate the suitability of fuel gas processed by the HGCU system for use in state-of-the-art gas turbines firing at F conditions (2,350 F rotor inlet temperature) and (2) to quantify the combustion characteristics and emissions of such a combustor. Testing of the GE HGCU system has been underway since December 1990. The two most recent tests, Test 5 and Test 6, represent the latest advancements in regenerator configuration, type of sorbent, and chloride control systems. Test 5 was based on the use of zinc titanate sorbent and included a revised regenerator configuration and a sodium bicarbonate injection system for chloride control. Test 6 incorporated the use of Z-Sorb, a chloride guard in the regenerator recycle loop, and further modifications to the regenerator internal configuration. This report describes the test conditions in detail and discusses the test results.

Bevan, S.; Najewicz, D.; Gal, E.; Furman, A.H.; Ayala, R.; Feitelberg, A.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Management of dry flue gas desulfurization by-products in underground mines. Annual report, October 1994--September 1995  

SciTech Connect

On September 30, 1993, the U.S. Department of Energy-Morgantown Energy Technology Center (DOE-METC) and Southern Illinois University at Carbondale (SIUC) entered into a cooperative research agreement entitled {open_quotes}Management of Dry Flue Gas Desulfurization By-Products in Underground Mines{close_quotes} (DE-FC21-93MC30252). Under the agreement Southern Illinois University at Carbondale will develop and demonstrate several technologies for the placement of coal combustion residues (CCBs) in abandoned coal mines, and will assess the environmental impact of such underground CCB placement. This report describes progress in the following areas: environmental characterization, mix development and geotechnical characterization, material handling and system economics, underground placement, and field demonstration.

Chugh, Y.P.; Dutta, D.; Esling, S. [and others

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Effect of H{sub 2}O on the desulfurization of simulated flue gas by an ionic liquid  

SciTech Connect

Functionalized ionic liquids (ILs) have been demonstrated to absorb SO{sub 2} from mixed gases or simulated flue gases efficiently. However, after absorbing a large amount of SO{sub 2}, the viscosity of the ILs increases greatly, which might limit their eventual applications in large-scale desulfurization from mixed gases or flue gases. In this work, the effect of the presence of water in a simulated flue gas on the absorption of SO{sub 2} by a functionalized ionic liquid, 1,1,3,3-tetramethylguanidinium lactate, has been studied at different temperatures. It is found that the presence of water in the simulated flue gas can decrease the viscosity of the IL greatly, and it has no effect on the absorptivity of SO{sub 2} from the flue gas. The densities of the IL absorbing SO{sub 2} from the flue gas with or without water are also studied. They increase with the increase of the amount of SO{sub 2} absorbed from the flue gas in both cases.

Ren, S.H.; Hou, Y.C.; Wu, W.Z.; Chen, X.T.; Fan, J.L.; Zhang, J.W. [Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing (China)

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

115

Desulfurization of hot fuel gas produced from high-chlorine Illinois coals. Final technical report, September 1, 1991--August 31, 1992  

SciTech Connect

In this project, simulated gasifier-product streams were contacted with the zinc titanate desulfurization sorbent in a bench-scale atmospheric fluidized-bed reactor at temperatures ranging from 538 to 750 {degree}C (1000 to 1382 {degree}F). The first set of experiments involved treating a medium-Btu fuel gas (simulating that of a ``Texaco`` oxygen-blown, entrained-bed gasifier) containing 1.4 percent H{sub 2}S and HCl concentrations of 0, 200, and 1500 ppmv. The second experimental set evaluated hot-gas desulfurization of a low-Btu fuel gas (simulating the product of the ``U-Gas`` air-blown gasifier), with HCl concentrations of 0, 200, and 800 ppmv. These operating conditions were typical of the gas-treatment requirements of gasifiers fueled by Illinois basin coals containing up to 0.6 percent chlorine. The results of the experiments at 538 and 650 {degree}C at all the HCl concentrations revealed no deleterious effects on the capability of the sorbent to remove H{sub 2}S from the fuel gas mixtures. In most cases, the presence of the HCl significantly enhanced the desulfurization reaction rate. Some zinc loss, however, was encountered in certain situations at 750 {degree}C when low-steam operating conditions were present. Also of interest, a portion of the incoming HCl was removed from the gas stream and was retained permanently by the sorbent. This behavior was examined in more detail in a limited set of experiments aimed at identifying ways to modify the sorbents composition so that the sorbent could act as a simultaneous desulfurization and dechlorination agent in the hot-gas cleanup process.

O`Brien, W.S. [Southern Illinois Univ., Carbondale, IL (United States); Gupta, R.P. [Research Triangle Inst., Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

116

ADVANCED GAS TURBINE SYSTEMS RESEARCH  

SciTech Connect

The activities of the Advanced Gas Turbine Systems Research (AGTSR) program for this reporting period are described in this quarterly report. The report is divided into discussions of Membership, Administration, Technology Transfer (Workshop/Education), Research and Miscellaneous Related Activity. Items worthy of note are presented in extended bullet format following the appropriate heading.

Unknown

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

ADVANCED GAS TURBINE SYSTEMS RESEARCH  

SciTech Connect

The activities of the Advanced Gas Turbine Systems Research (AGRSR) program are described in the quarterly report. The report is divided into discussions of Membership, Administration, Technology Transfer (Workshop/Education) and Research. Items worthy of note are presented in extended bullet format following the appropriate heading.

Unknown

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

ADVANCED GAS TURBINE SYSTEMS RESEARCH  

SciTech Connect

The activities of the Advanced Gas Turbine Systems Research (AGTSR) program for this reporting period are described in this quarterly report. The report is divided into discussions of Membership, Administration, Technology Transfer (Workshop/Education), Research and Miscellaneous Related Activity. Items worthy of note are presented in extended bullet format following the appropriate heading.

Unknown

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Gas fired Advanced Turbine System  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of the first phase of the Advanced Gas Turbine System (ATS) program was the concept definition of an advanced engine system that meets efficiency and emission goals far exceeding those that can be provided with today`s equipment. The thermal efficiency goal for such an advanced industrial engine was set at 50% some 15 percentage points higher than current equipment levels. Exhaust emissions goals for oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}), carbon monoxide (CO), and unburned hydrocarbons (UH) were fixed at 8 parts per million by volume (ppmv), 20 ppmv, and 20 ppmv respectively, corrected to 15% oxygen (O{sub 2}) levels. Other goals had to be addressed; these involved reducing the cost of power produced by 10 percent and improving or maintaining the reliability, availability, and maintainability (RAM) at current levels. This advanced gas turbine was to be fueled with natural gas, and it had to embody features that would allow it bum coal or coal derived fuels.

LeCren, R.T.; White, D.J.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Selenium Removal by Iron Cementation from a Coal-Fired Power Plant Flue Gas Desulfurization Wastewater in a Continuous Flow System-- a Pilot Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This technical update describes work funded by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and performed by MSE Technology Applications, Inc. (MSE) at a coal-fired power plant burning Powder River Basin (PRB) coal (identified in this report as Plant E). This work was based on encouraging results obtained during previous EPRI-funded work on flue gas desulfurization (FGD) wastewater treatability testing by MSE, which focused on selenium removal from a variety of FGD wastewater sources. The results from th...

2009-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas desulfurization advanced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Pilot-Scale Demonstration of Hybrid Zero-Valent Iron Water Treatment Technology: Removing Trace Metals from Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) Wastewater  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In previous laboratory- and field bench-scale tests, the hybrid zero-valent iron (hZVI) process had been demonstrated capable of removing selenium, mercury, nitrates, and other pollutants from flue gas desulfurization (FGD) wastewater. By incorporating zero-valent iron (ZVI) with magnetite and certain Fe(II) species, the hZVI technology creates a highly reactive mixture that can transform and immobilize various trace metals, oxyanions, and other impurities from aqueous streams. To further evaluate ...

2013-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

122

Management of dry flue gas desulfurization by-products in underground mines. Topical report, April 1, 1996--April 30, 1997  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report represents the Final Technical Progress Report for Phase II of the overall program for a cooperative research agreement between the U.S. Department of Energy - MORGANTOWN Energy Technology Center (DOE-METC) and Southern Illinois University at Carbondale (SIUC). Under the agreement, SIUC will develop and demonstrate technologies for the handling, transport, and placement in abandoned underground coal mines of dry flue gas desulfurization by-products, such as fly ash, scrubber sludge, fluidized bed combustion by-products, and will assess the environmental impact of such underground placement. The overall program is divided into three (3) phases. Phase II of the program is primarily concerned with developing and testing the hardware for the actual underground placement demonstrations. Two technologies have been identified and hardware procured for full-scale demonstrations: (1) hydraulic placement, where coal combustion by-products (CCBs) will be placed underground as a past-like mixture containing about 70 to 75 percent solids; and (2) pneumatic placement, where CCBs will be placed underground as a relatively dry material using compressed air. 42 refs., 36 figs., 36 tabs.

Chugh, Y.P.; Brackebusch, F.; Carpenter, J. [and others

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

123

Management of dry flue gas desulfurization by-products in underground mines. Quarterly report, October--December 1994  

SciTech Connect

On September 30, 1993, the US Department of Energy, Morgantown Energy Technology Center and Southern Illinois University at Carbondale (SIUC) entered into a cooperative agreement entitled ``Management of Dry Flue Gas Desulfurization By-Products in Underground Mines`` (DE-FC21-93MC30252). Under the agreement, Southern Illinois University at Carbondale will develop and demonstrate several technologies for the placement of coal combustion residues in abandoned coal mines, and will assess the environmental impact of such underground residues placement. The major event during the quarter was the demonstration of the SEEC, Inc. technology for loading and transporting coal combustion residues in the SEEC developed Collapsible Intermodal Containers (CIC). The demonstration was held on November 17, 1994, at the Illinois Power Company Baldwin power plant, and was attended by about eighty (80) invited guest. Also during the quarter meetings were held with Peabody Coal Company officials to finalize the area in the Peabody No. 10 mine to be used for the placement of coal combustion residues. Work under the Materials Handling and Systems Economics area continued, particularly in refining the costs and systems configuration and in economic evaluation of various systems using equipment leasing rather than equipment purchases. Likewise, work progressed on residues characterization, with some preparations being made for long-term testing.

Chugh, Y.; Dutta, D.; Esling, S.; Ghafoori, N.; Paul, B.; Sevim, H.; Thomasson, E.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Hot-gas desulfurization. II. Use of gasifier ash in a fluidized-bed process. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Three gasifier coal ashes were used as reactant/sorbents in batch fluidized-beds to remove hydrogen sulfide from hot, made-up fuel gases. It is predominantly the iron oxide in the ash that reacts with and removes the hydrogen sulfide; the sulfur reappears in ferrous sulfide. Sulfided ashes were regenerated by hot, fluidizing streams of oxygen in air; the sulfur is recovered as sulfur dioxide, exclusively. Ash sorption efficiency and sulfur capacity increase and stabilize after several cycles of use. These two parameters vary directly with the iron oxide content of the ash and process temperature, but are independent of particle size in the range 0.01 - 0.02 cm. A western Kentucky No. 9 ash containing 22 weight percent iron as iron oxide sorbed 4.3 weight percent sulfur at 1200/sup 0/F with an ash sorption efficiency of 0.83 at ten percent breakthrough. A global, fluidized-bed, reaction rate model was fitted to the data and it was concluded that chemical kinetics is the controlling mechanism with a predicted activation energy of 19,600 Btu/lb mol. Iron oxide reduction and the water-gas-shift reaction were two side reactions that occurred during desulfurization. The regeneration reaction occurred very rapidly in the fluid-bed regime, and it is suspected that mass transfer is the controlling phenomenon.

Schrodt, J.T.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

The impact of wet flue gas desulfurization scrubbing on mercury emissions from coal-fired power stations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The article introduces a predictive capability for mercury (Hg) retention in any Ca-based wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) scrubber, given Hg speciation at the FGD inlet, the flue gas composition, and the sulphur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) capture efficiency. A preliminary statistical analysis of data from 17 full-scale wet FGDs connects flue gas compositions, the extents of Hg oxidation at FGD inlets, and Hg retention efficiencies. These connections show that solution chemistry within the FGD determines Hg retention. A more thorough analysis based on thermochemical equilibrium yields highly accurate predictions for total Hg retention with no parameter adjustments. For the most reliable data, the predictions were within measurement uncertainties for both limestone and Mg/lime systems operating in both forced and natural oxidation mode. With the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Information Collection Request (ICR) database, the quantitative performance was almost as good for the most modern FGDs, which probably conform to the very high SO{sub 2} absorption efficiencies assumed in the calculations. The large discrepancies for older FGDs are tentatively attributed to the unspecified SO{sub 2} capture efficiencies and operating temperatures and to the possible elimination of HCl in prescrubbers. The equilibrium calculations suggest that Hg retention is most sensitive to inlet HCl and O{sub 2} levels and the FGD temperature; weakly dependent on SO{sub 2} capture efficiency; and insensitive to HgCl{sub 2}, NO, CA:S ratio, slurry dilution level in limestone FGDs, and MgSO{sub 3} levels in Mg/lime systems. Consequently, systems with prescrubbers to eliminate HCl probably retain less Hg than fully integrated FGDs. The analysis also predicts re-emission of Hg{sub 0} but only for inlet O{sub 2} levels that are much lower than those in full-scale FGDs. 12 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

Stephen Niksa; Naoki Fujiwara [Niksa Energy Associates, Belmont, CA (US)

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Longer-term Characterization of Mercury Partitioning and Re-emissions in a Full-scale Wet Flue Gas Desulfurization System, Site 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document presents and discusses results from an EPRI project focused on understanding and enhancing how mercury is captured by a wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system and how it partitions among the FGD liquor, fine solids, and bulk FGD solid byproduct. A second objective was to close a mercury balance around the host unit by determining what portion of the coal mercury exits the stack with the scrubbed flue gas and how much ends up in the fly ash, byproduct gypsum, and FGD wastewater. During t...

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

127

Effects of Ammonia and Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) Wastewater on Power Plant Effluent Toxicity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Clean Air Act Amendments and subsequently the Clean Air Interstate Rule and other state-level actions have resulted in implementation of a variety of technologies to reduce emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx), and to further reduce emissions of sulfur oxides (SOx). Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) and SNCR (non-catalytic) are two of the primary NOx emission reduction technologies. Often, ammonia is injected into flue gas as the reductant for the chemical reaction that converts NOx to nitrogen gas. ...

2007-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

128

Pilot-Scale Demonstration of hZVI Process for Treating Flue Gas Desulfurization Wastewater at Plant Wansley, Carrollton, GA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The hybrid Zero Valent Iron (hZVI) process is a novel chemical treatment platform that has shown great potential in our previous bench-scale tests for removing selenium, mercury and other pollutants from Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) wastewater. This integrated treatment system employs new iron chemistry to create highly reactive mixture of Fe^0, iron oxides (FeOx) and various forms of Fe (II) for the chemical transformation and mineralization of various heavy metals in water. To further evaluate and develop the hZVI technology, a pilot-scale demonstration had been conducted to continuously treat 1-2 gpm of the FGD wastewater for five months at Plant Wansley, a coal-fired power plant of Georgia Power. This demonstrated that the scaled-up system was capable of reducing the total selenium (of which most was selenate) in the FGD wastewater from over 2500 ppb to below 10 ppb and total mercury from over 100 ppb to below 0.01 ppb. This hZVI system reduced other toxic metals like Arsenic (III and V), Chromium (VI), Cadmium (II), Lead (II) and Copper (II) from ppm level to ppb level in a very short reaction time. The chemical consumption was estimated to be approximately 0.2-0.4 kg of ZVI per 1 m^3 of FGD water treated, which suggested the process economics could be very competitive. The success of the pilot test shows that the system is scalable for commercial application. The operational experience and knowledge gained from this field test could provide guidance to further improvement of technology for full scale applications. The hZVI technology can be commercialized to provide a cost-effective and reliable solution to the FGD wastewater and other metal-contaminated waste streams in various industries. This technology has the potential to help industries meet the most stringent environmental regulations for heavy metals and nutrients in wastewater treatment.

Peddi, Phani 1987-

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Management of dry flue gas desulfurization by-products in underground mines. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1995--June 1995  

SciTech Connect

On September 30, 1993, the U.S. Department of Energy-Morgantown Energy Technology Center and Southern Illinois University at Carbondale (SIUC) entered into a cooperative research agreement entitled {open_quotes}Management of Dry Flue Gas Desulfurization By-Products in Underground Mines{close_quotes} (DE-FC21-93MC30252). Under the agreement Southern Illinois University at Carbondale will develop and demonstrate several technologies for the placement of coal combustion residues in abandoned coal mines, and will assess the environmental impact of such underground residues placement. Previous quarterly Technical Progress Reports have set forth the specific objectives of the program, and a discussion of these is not repeated here. Rather, this report discusses the technical progress made during the period April 1 - June 30, 1995. A final topical report on the SEEC, Inc. demonstration of its technology for the transporting of coal combustion residues was completed during the quarter, although final printing of the report was accomplished early in July, 1995. The SEEC technology involves the use of Collapsible Intermodal Containers (CIC`s) developed by SEEC, and the transportation of such containers - filled with fly ash or other coal combustion residues - on rail coal cars or other transportation means. Copies of the final topical report, entitled {open_quotes}The Development and Testing of Collapsible Intermodal Containers for the Handling and Transport of Coal Combustion Residues{close_quotes} were furnished to the Morgantown Energy Technology Center. The Rapid Aging Test colums were placed in operation during the quarter. This test is to determine the long-term reaction of both the pneumatic and hydraulic mixtures to brine as a leaching material, and simulates the conditions that will be encountered in the actual underground placement of the coal combustion residues mixtures. The tests will continue for about one year.

Chugh, Y.P.; Dutta, D.; Esling, S. [and others

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Integrated operation of a pressurized fixed-bed gasifier, hot gas desulfurization system, and turbine simulator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall objective of the General Electric Hot Gas Cleanup (HGCU) Program is to develop a commercially viable technology to remove sulfur, particulates, and halogens from a high-temperature fuel gas stream using a moving bed, regenerable mixed metal oxide sorbent based process. The HGCU Program is based on the design and demonstration of the HGCU system in a test facility made up of a pilot-scale fixed bed gasifier, a HGCU system, and a turbine simulator in Schenectady, NY, at the General Electric Research and Development Center. The objectives of the turbine simulator testing are (1) to demonstrate the suitability of fuel gas processed by the HGCU system for use in state-of-the-art gas turbines firing at 2,350 F rotor inlet temperature and (2) to quantify the combustion characteristics and emissions on low-Btu fuel gas. The turbine simulator program also includes the development and operation of experimental combustors based on the rich-quench-lean concept (RQL) to minimize the conversion of ammonia and other fuel-bound nitrogen species to NO{sub x} during combustion. The HGCU system and turbine simulator have been designed to process approximately 8,000 lb/hr of low heating value fuel gas produced by the GE fixed bed gasifier. The HGCU system has utilized several mixed metal oxide sorbents, including zinc ferrite, zinc titanate, and Z-Sorb, with the objective of demonstrating good sulfur removal and mechanical attrition resistance as well as economic cost characteristics. Demonstration of halogen removal and the characterization of alkali and trace metal concentrations in the fuel gas are subordinate objectives of the overall program. This report describes the results of several long-duration pilot tests.

Bevan, S.; Ayala, R.E.; Feitelberg, A.; Furman, A.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Advanced Materials and Processes for Gas Turbines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 1, 2003 ... Out of Print. Description These proceedings from the United Engineering Foundation's Advanced Materials and Processes for Gas Turbines ...

132

Method and apparatus for hot-gas desulfurization of fuel gases  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is directed to a method and apparatus for removing sulfur values from a hot fuel gas stream in a fluidized bed contactor containing particulate sorbent material by employing a riser tube regeneration arrangement. Sulfur-laden sorbent is continuously removed from the fluidized bed through a stand pipe to the riser tube and is rapidly regenerated in the riser tube during transport of the sorbent therethrough by employing an oxygen- containing sorbent regenerating gas stream. The riser tube extends from a location below the fluidized bed to an elevation above the fluidized bed where a gas-solid separating mechanism is utilized to separate the regenerated particulate sorbent from the regeneration gases and reaction gases so that the regenerated sorbent can be returned to the fluidized bed for reuse. 3 figs., 1 tab.

Bissett, L.A.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Method and apparatus for hot-gas desulfurization of fuel gases  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is directed to a method and apparatus for removing sulfur values from a hot fuel gas stream in a fluidized bed contactor containing particulate sorbent material by employing a riser tube regeneration arrangement. Sulfur-laden sorbent is continuously removed from the fluidized bed through a stand pipe to the riser tube and is rapidly regenerated in the riser tube during transport of the sorbent therethrough by employing an oxygen- containing sorbent regenerating gas stream. The riser tube extends from a location below the fluidized bed to an elevation above the fluidized bed where a gas-solid separating mechanism is utilized to separate the regenerated particulate sorbent from the regeneration gases and reaction gases so that the regenerated sorbent can be returned to the fluidized bed for reuse. 3 figs., 1 tab.

Bissett, L.A.

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

134

Case Studies to Evaluate Flue Gas Desulfurization Wastewater Physical/Chemical Treatment Performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study focuses on physical/chemical wastewater treatment technologies used to remove trace metals from flue gas desulphurization (FGD) wastewater. The scope of this study includes FGD wastewater treatment for trace metals.BackgroundThe United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is currently revising the Effluent Limitations Guidelines (ELGs) for the steam electric power generating industry. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) provided ...

2013-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

135

Numerical Modeling of Reactive Multiphase Flow for FCC and Hot Gas Desulfurization Circulating Fluidized Beds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work was carried out to understand the behavior of the solid and gas phases in a CFB riser. Only the riser is modeled as a straight pipe. A model with linear algebraic approximation to solids viscosity of the form, {musubs} = 5.34{epsisubs}, ({espisubs} is the solids volume fraction) with an appropriate boundary condition at the wall obtained by approximate momentum balance solution at the wall to acount for the solids recirculation is tested against experimental results. The work done was to predict the flow patterns in the CFB risers from available experimental data, including data from a 7.5-cm-ID CFB riser at the Illinois Institute of Technology and data from a 20.0-cm-ID CFB riser at the Particulate Solid Research, Inc., facility. This research aims at modeling the removal of hydrogen sulfide from hot coal gas using zinc oxide as the sorbent in a circulating fluidized bed and in the process indentifying the parameters that affect the performance of the sulfidation reactor. Two different gas-solid reaction models, the unreacted shrinking core (USC) and the grain model were applied to take into account chemical reaction resistances. Also two different approaches were used to affect the hydrodynamics of the process streams. The first model takes into account the effect of micro-scale particle clustering by adjusting the gas-particle drag law and the second one assumes a turbulent core with pseudo-steady state boundary condition at the wall. A comparison is made with experimental results.

None

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Choosing a coke-oven gas desulfurization system: a review of current technology  

SciTech Connect

Installation of coke-oven gas desulphurizing systems is primarily the result of air pollution control regulations. Although not currently profitable, operating costs can be minimized by choosing the technology most suited to the particular application. The Stretford Holmes, Takahax/Hirohax, Koppers Vacuum Carbonate, Sulfiban and Dravo/Still processes are discussed, together with criteria for economic analysis based on technical and by-product market evaluations.

Lynch, P.A.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Flue Gas Desulfurization Gypsum Agricultural Network: Ohio Sites 1 (Mixed Hay) and 2 (Corn)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objectives of this work conducted during 2008–2010 were to evaluate potential beneficial agricultural uses of flue gas desulphurization gypsum (FGDG) in eastern Ohio and to assess the potential for environmental effects of the use of FGDG. Two field experiments were conducted at the eastern Ohio research site, one involving a mixed-grass hay field and the other a corn (Zea mays L.) field. FGDG and mined gypsum product were applied one time at rates of 0.2, 2.0, and 20 megagrams ...

2012-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

138

Desulfurization of fuel gases in fluidized bed gasification and hot fuel gas cleanup systems  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A problem with the commercialization of fluidized bed gasification is that vast amounts of spent sorbent are generated if the sorbent is used on a once-through basis, especially if high sulfur coals are burned. The requirements of a sorbent for regenerative service in the FBG process are: (1) it must be capable of reducing the sulfur containing gas concentration of the FBG flue gas to within acceptable environmental standards; (2) it must not lose its reactivity on cyclic sulfidation and regeneration; (3) it must be capable of regeneration with elimination of substantially all of its sulfur content; (4) it must have good attrition resistance; and, (5) its cost must not be prohibitive. It has now been discovered that calcium silicate pellets, e.g., Portland cement type III pellets meet the criteria aforesaid. Calcium silicate removes COS and H/sub 2/S according to the reactions given to produce calcium sulfide silicate. The sulfur containing product can be regenerated using CO/sub 2/ as the regenerant. The sulfur dioxide can be conveniently reduced to sulfur with hydrogen or carbon for market or storage. The basic reactions in the process of this invention are the reactions with calcium silicate given in the patent. A convenient and inexpensive source of calcium silicate is Portland cement. Portland cement is a readily available, widely used construction meterial.

Steinberg, M.; Farber, G.; Pruzansky, J.; Yoo, H.J.; McGauley, P.

1983-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

139

Adsorption and desorption of sulfur dioxide on novel adsorbents for flue gas desulfurization. Final report, September 1, 1994--February 29, 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A sol-gel granulation method was developed to prepare spherical {gamma}-alumina granular supports and supported CuO granular sorbents for flue gas desulfurization. The prepared {gamma}-alumina supported CuO sorbents exhibit desirable pore structure and excellent mechanical properties. The sorbents contain higher loading (30-40 wt. %) of CuO dispersed in the monolayer or sub-monolayer form, giving rise to a larger SO{sub 2} sorption capacity ({gt}20 wt.%) and a faster sorption rate as compared to similar sorbents reported in the literature. With these excellent sulfation and mechanical properties, the sol-gel derived {gamma}-alumina supported CuO granular sorbents offer great potential for use in the dry, regenerative flue gas desulfurization process. Research efforts were also made to prepare DAY zeolite supported sorbents with various CuO contents by the microwave and conventional thermal dispersion methods at different conditions. Monolayer or sub-monolayer coating of Cu(NO{sub 3})sub 2 or CuO was achieved on several DAY supported sorbents by the microwave heating method but not by the conventional thermal dispersion method. The DAY zeolite supported CuO sorbents prepared by the microwave heating method can adsorb up to 15 wt.% of SO{sub 2}. The results obtained have demonstrated the feasibility of effective preparation of zeolite supported CuO sorbents by the microwave heating method.

Lin, Y.S.; Deng, S.G.

1996-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

140

Advance Materials & Innovative Solutions for Oil and Gas II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 7, 2013 ... Advanced Materials and Reservoir Engineering for Extreme Oil & Gas Environments: Advance Materials & Innovative Solutions for Oil and Gas ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas desulfurization advanced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Combustion modeling in advanced gas turbine systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Goal of DOE`s Advanced Turbine Systems program is to develop and commercialize ultra-high efficiency, environmentally superior, cost competitive gas turbine systems for base-load applications in utility, independent power producer, and industrial markets. Primary objective of the program here is to develop a comprehensive combustion model for advanced gas turbine combustion systems using natural gas (coal gasification or biomass fuels). The efforts included code evaluation (PCGC-3), coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy, laser Doppler anemometry, and laser-induced fluorescence.

Smoot, L.D.; Hedman, P.O.; Fletcher, T.H.; Brewster, B.S.; Kramer, S.K. [Brigham Young Univ., Provo, UT (United States). Advanced Combustion Engineering Research Center

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

142

Economical Desulfurization of Petroleum Coke  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Economical Desulfurization of Petroleum Coke ... " Desulfurization of Petroleum Coke Beyond 1600'C" by Christopher A. Paul of Great Lakes ...

143

ADVANCED HOT GAS FILTER DEVELOPMENT  

SciTech Connect

Iron aluminide hot gas filters have been developed using powder metallurgy techniques to form seamless cylinders. Three alloys were short-term corrosion tested in simulated IGCC atmospheres with temperatures between 925 F and 1200 F with hydrogen sulfide concentrations ranging from 783 ppm{sub v} to 78,300 ppm{sub v}. Long-term testing was conducted for 1500 hours at 925 F with 78,300 ppm{sub v}. The FAS and FAL alloys were found to be corrosion resistant in the simulated environments. The FAS alloy has been commercialized.

Matthew R. June; John L. Hurley; Mark W. Johnson

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Development of advanced gas turbine systems  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the Advanced Turbine Systems study is to investigate innovative natural gas fired cycle developments to determine the feasibility of achieving 60% efficiency within a 8-year time frame. The potential system was to be environmentally superior, cost competitive and adaptable to coal-derived fuels. Progress is described.

Bannister, R.L.; Little, D.A.; Wiant, B.C.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Center for Advanced Gas Turbine Systems Research  

SciTech Connect

An unregulated conventional power station based on the Rankine Cycle typically bums pulverized coal in a boiler that exports steam for expansion through a steam turbine which ultimately drives an electric generator. The flue gases are normally cleaned of particulates by an electrostatic precipitator or bag house. A basic cycle such as this will have an efficiency of approximately 35% with 10% of the energy released through the stack and 55% to cooling water. Advanced gas turbine based combustion systems have the potential to be environmentally and commercially superior to existing conventional technology. however, to date, industry, academic, and government groups have not coordinated their effort to commercialize these technologies. The Center for Advanced Gas Turbine Systems Research will provide the medium to support effective commercialization of this technology. Several cycles or concepts for advanced gas turbine systems that could be fired on natural gas or could be adapted into coal based systems have been proposed (for examples, see Figures 4, 5, 6, and 7) (2) all with vary degrees of complexity, research needs, and system potential. Natural gas fired power systems are now available with 52% efficiency ratings; however, with a focused base technology program, it is expected that the efficiency levels can be increased to the 60% level and beyond. This increase in efficiency will significantly reduce the environmental burden and reduce the cost of power generation.

Golan, L.P.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

146

Center for Advanced Gas Turbine Systems Research  

SciTech Connect

An unregulated conventional power station based on the Rankine Cycle typically bums pulverized coal in a boiler that exports steam for expansion through a steam turbine which ultimately drives an electric generator. The flue gases are normally cleaned of particulates by an electrostatic precipitator or bag house. A basic cycle such as this will have an efficiency of approximately 35% with 10% of the energy released through the stack and 55% to cooling water. Advanced gas turbine based combustion systems have the potential to be environmentally and commercially superior to existing conventional technology. however, to date, industry, academic, and government groups have not coordinated their effort to commercialize these technologies. The Center for Advanced Gas Turbine Systems Research will provide the medium to support effective commercialization of this technology. Several cycles or concepts for advanced gas turbine systems that could be fired on natural gas or could be adapted into coal based systems have been proposed (for examples, see Figures 4, 5, 6, and 7) (2) all with vary degrees of complexity, research needs, and system potential. Natural gas fired power systems are now available with 52% efficiency ratings; however, with a focused base technology program, it is expected that the efficiency levels can be increased to the 60% level and beyond. This increase in efficiency will significantly reduce the environmental burden and reduce the cost of power generation.

Golan, L.P.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

ADVANCED HOT GAS FILTER DEVELOPMENT  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the fabrication and testing of continuous fiber ceramic composite (CFCC) based hot gas filters. The fabrication approach utilized a modified filament winding method that combined both continuous and chopped fibers into a novel microstructure. The work was divided into five primary tasks. In the first task, a preliminary set of compositions was fabricated in the form of open end tubes and characterized. The results of this task were used to identify the most promising compositions for sub-scale filter element fabrication and testing. In addition to laboratory measurements of permeability and strength, exposure testing in a coal combustion environment was performed to asses the thermo-chemical stability of the CFCC materials. Four candidate compositions were fabricated into sub-scale filter elements with integral flange and a closed end. Following the 250 hour exposure test in a circulating fluid bed combustor, the retained strength ranged from 70 t 145 percent of the as-fabricated strength. The post-test samples exhibited non-catastrophic failure behavior in contrast to the brittle failure exhibited by monolithic materials. Filter fabrication development continued in a filter improvement and cost reduction task that resulted in an improved fiber architecture, the production of a net shape flange, and an improved low cost bond. These modifications were incorporated into the process and used to fabricate 50 full-sized filter elements for testing in demonstration facilities in Karhula, Finland and at the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) in Wilsonville, AL. After 581 hours of testing in the Karhula facility, the elements retained approximately 87 percent of their as-fabricated strength. In addition, mechanical response testing at Virginia Tech provided a further demonstration of the high level of strain tolerance of the vacuum wound filter elements. Additional testing in the M. W. Kellogg unit at the PSDF has accumulated over 1800 hours of coal firing at temperatures of 760 °C including a severe thermal upset that resulted in the failure of several monolithic oxide elements. No failures of any kind have been reported for the MTI CFCC elements in either of these test campaigns. Additional testing is planned at the M. W. Kellogg unit and Foster Wheeler unit at the PSDF over the next year in order to qualify for consideration for the Lakeland PCFB. Process scale-up issues have been identified and manufacturing plans are being evaluated to meet the needs of future demand.

RICHARD A. WAGNER

1998-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

148

Two-stage coal gasification and desulfurization  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is directed to a system which effectively integrates a two-stage, fixed-bed coal gasification arrangement with hot fuel gas desulfurization of a first stream of fuel gas from a lower stage of the two-stage gasifier and the removal of sulfur from the sulfur sorbent regeneration gas utilized in the fuel-gas desulfurization process by burning a second stream of fuel gas from the upper stage of the gasifier in a combustion device in the presence of calcium-containing material. The second stream of fuel gas is taken from above the fixed bed in the coal gasifier and is laden with ammonia, tar and sulfur values. This second stream of fuel gas is burned in the presence of excess air to provide heat energy sufficient to effect a calcium-sulfur compound forming reaction between the calcium-containing material and sulfur values carried by the regeneration gas and the second stream of fuel gas. Any ammonia values present in the fuel gas are decomposed during the combustion of the fuel gas in the combustion chamber. The substantially sulfur-free products of combustion may then be combined with the desulfurized fuel gas for providing a combustible fluid utilized for driving a prime mover. 1 fig.

Bissett, L.A.; Strickland, L.D.

1990-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

149

Partitioning of mercury, arsenic, selenium, boron, and chloride in a full-scale coal combustion process equipped with selective catalytic reduction, electrostatic precipitation, and flue gas desulfurization systems  

SciTech Connect

A full-scale field study was carried out at a 795 MWe coal-fired power plant equipped with selective catalytic reduction (SCR), an electrostatic precipitator (ESP), and wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems to investigate the distribution of selected trace elements (i.e., mercury, arsenic, selenium, boron, and chloride) from coal, FGD reagent slurry, makeup water to flue gas, solid byproduct, and wastewater streams. Flue gases were collected from the SCR outlet, ESP inlet, FGD inlet, and stack. Concurrent with flue gas sampling, coal, bottom ash, economizer ash, and samples from the FGD process were also collected for elemental analysis. By combining plant operation parameters, the overall material balances of selected elements were established. The removal efficiencies of As, Se, Hg, and B by the ESP unit were 88, 56, 17, and 8%, respectively. Only about 2.5% of Cl was condensed and removed from flue gas by fly ash. The FGD process removed over 90% of Cl, 77% of B, 76% of Hg, 30% of Se, and 5% of As. About 90% and 99% of the FGD-removed Hg and Se were associated with gypsum. For B and Cl, over 99% were discharged from the coal combustion process with the wastewater. Mineral trona (trisodium hydrogendicarbonate dehydrate, Na{sub 3}H(CO{sub 3}){sub 2}.2H{sub 2}O) was injected before the ESP unit to control the emission of sulfur trioxide (SO{sub 3}). By comparing the trace elements compositions in the fly ash samples collected from the locations before and after the trona injection, the injection of trona did not show an observable effect on the partitioning behaviors of selenium and arsenic, but it significantly increased the adsorption of mercury onto fly ash. The stack emissions of mercury, boron, selenium, and chloride were for the most part in the gas phase. 47 refs., 3 figs., 11 tabs.

Chin-Min Cheng; Pauline Hack; Paul Chu; Yung-Nan Chang; Ting-Yu Lin; Chih-Sheng Ko; Po-Han Chiang; Cheng-Chun He; Yuan-Min Lai; Wei-Ping Pan [Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, KY (United States). Institute for Combustion Science and Environmental Technology

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

150

Advanced Sensor Approaches for Monitoring and Control of Gas...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Contract Value (327,501 DOE) Advanced Sensor Approaches For Monitoring and Control Of Gas Turbine Combustors Georgia Institute of Technology JSTL 101905 Advanced Sensors 10...

151

ADVANCED GAS TURBINE SYSTEMS RESEARCH PROGRAM  

SciTech Connect

The quarterly activities of the Advanced Gas Turbine Systems Research (AGTSR) program are described in this quarterly report. As this program administers research, we have included all program activity herein within the past quarter as dated. More specific research progress reports are provided weekly at the request of the AGTSR COR and are being sent to NETL As for the administration of this program, items worthy of note are presented in extended bullet format following the appropriate heading.

Lawrence P. Golan

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

ADVANCED GAS TURBINE SYSTEMS RESEARCH PROGRAM  

SciTech Connect

The quarterly activities of the Advanced Gas Turbine Systems Research (AGTSR) program are described in this quarterly report. As this program administers research, we have included all program activity herein within the past quarter as dated. More specific research progress reports are provided weekly at the request of the AGTSR COR and are being sent to NETL As for the administration of this program, items worthy of note are presented in extended bullet format following the appropriate heading.

Lawrence P. Golan

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

ADVANCED GAS TURBINE SYSTEMS RESEARCH PROGRAM  

SciTech Connect

The quarterly activities of the Advanced Gas Turbine Systems Research (AGTSR) program are described in this quarterly report. As this program administers research, we have included all program activity herein within the past quarter as dated. More specific research progress reports are provided weekly at the request of the AGTSR COR and are being sent to NETL. As for the administration of this program, items worthy of note are presented in extended bullet format following the appropriate heading.

Lawrence P. Golan

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

ADVANCED GAS TURBINE SYSTEMS RESEARCH PROGRAM  

SciTech Connect

The quarterly activities of the Advanced Gas Turbine Systems Research (AGTSR) program are described in this quarterly report. As this program administers research, we have included all program activity herein within the past quarter as dated. More specific research progress reports are provided weekly at the request of the AGTSR COR and are being sent to NETL As for the administration of this program, items worthy of note are presented in extended bullet format following the appropriate heading.

Lawrence P. Golan

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

ADVANCED GAS TURBINE SYSTEMS RESEARCH PROGRAM  

SciTech Connect

The activities of the Advanced Gas Turbine Systems Research (AGTSR) program are described in the quarterly report. As this program administers research, we have included all program activity herein within the past quarter dated. More specific research progress reports are provided weekly at the request of the AGTSR COR and are being sent to NETL. As for the administration of this program, items worthy of note are presented in extended bullet format following the appropriate heading.

Lawrence P. Golan

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Advanced coal-fueled gas turbine systems  

SciTech Connect

Several technology advances since the early coal-fueled turbine programs that address technical issues of coal as a turbine fuel have been developed in the early 1980s: Coal-water suspensions as fuel form, improved methods for removing ash and contaminants from coal, staged combustion for reducing NO{sub x} emissions from fuel-bound nitrogen, and greater understanding of deposition/erosion/corrosion and their control. Several Advanced Coal-Fueled Gas Turbine Systems programs were awarded to gas turbine manufacturers for for components development and proof of concept tests; one of these was Allison. Tests were conducted in a subscale coal combustion facility and a full-scale facility operating a coal combustor sized to the Allison Model 501-K industrial turbine. A rich-quench-lean (RQL), low nitrogen oxide combustor design incorporating hot gas cleanup was developed for coal fuels; this should also be applicable to biomass, etc. The combustor tests showed NO{sub x} and CO emissions {le} levels for turbines operating with natural gas. Water washing of vanes from the turbine removed the deposits. Systems and economic evaluations identified two possible applications for RQL turbines: Cogeneration plants based on Allison 501-K turbine (output 3.7 MW(e), 23,000 lbs/hr steam) and combined cycle power plants based on 50 MW or larger gas turbines. Coal-fueled cogeneration plant configurations were defined and evaluated for site specific factors. A coal-fueled turbine combined cycle plant design was identified which is simple, compact, and results in lower capital cost, with comparable efficiency and low emissions relative to other coal technologies (gasification, advanced PFBC).

Wenglarz, R.A.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

High-volume, high-value usage of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by-products in underground mines - Phase I: Laboratory investigations. Quarterly report, October 1993--December 1993  

SciTech Connect

This project proposes to use pneumatically or hydraulically emplaced dry-flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by-products to backfill the adits left by highwall mining. Backfilling highwall mine adits with dry-FGD materials is technically attractive. The use of an active highwall mine would allow the dry-FGD material to be brought in using the same transportation network used to move the coal out, eliminating the need to recreated the transportation infrastructure, thereby saving costs. Activities during the period included the negotiations leading to the final cooperative agreement for the project and the implementation of the necessary instruments at the University of Kentucky to administer the project. Early in the negotiations, a final agreement on a task structure was reached and a milestone plan was filed. A review was initiated of the original laboratory plan as presented in the proposal, and tentative modifications were developed. Selection of a mine site was made early; the Pleasant Valley mine in Greenup County was chosen. Several visits were made to the mine site to begin work on the hydrologic monitoring plan. The investigation of the types of permits needed to conduct the project was initiated. Considerations concerning the acceptance and implementation of technologies led to the choice of circulating fluidized bed ash as the primary material for the study. Finally, the membership of a Technical Advisory Committee for the study was assembled.

Not Available

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Management of dry flue gas desulfurization by-products in underground mines. Quarterly technical progress report, [October 1, 1993--December 31, 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ``Management of Dry Flue Gas Desulfurization By-Products in Underground Mines`` program is one of the largest programs ever undertaken by the Mining Engineering Department of Southern Illinois university, both in terms of complexity and in terms of funding. Total funding over the expected four-year extent of the program, including both Department of Energy, matching Southern Illinois University funds, and contributed funds, this program exceeds three million dollars. The number of cooperating organizations adds to the management complexity of the program. It was believed, therefore, that sound management plan and management base is essential for the efficient and effective conduct of the program. This first quarter period (i.e., October 1--December 31, 1993) was developed to establishing the management base, developing a sound management plan, developing a test plan, and developing sound fiscal management and control. Actual technical operations, such as residue sample acquisition, residue analyses, groundwater sample acquisition and analyses, and material handling studies will get underway early in the next quarter (i.e., January 1--March 31, 1994). Some early results of residue analyses and groundwater analyses should be available by the end of the second quarter. These results will be reported in the next Technical Progress Report.

Thomasson, E.M.; Chugh, Y.P.; Esling, S.; Honaker, R.; Paul, B.; Sevin, H.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Program to develop advanced gas turbine systems  

SciTech Connect

The need for an advanced turbine program for land-based engines has been broadly recognized in light of reductions in military funding for turbines, rapid growth in the sale of gas turbines for utility and industrial usage, and the fierce competition with off-shore manufacturers. Only with Government support can US manufacturers meet rapidly changing market conditions such as increased emissions requirements and lower capital cost requirements. In light of this, ATS planning was requested by Congress in the fiscal year (FY) 92 appropriations and is included in thee Energy Policy Act of 1992. The program budget has increased rapidly, with the FY 94 budget including. over $28 million for ATS program activities. The Natural Gas Strategic Plan and Multi-Year Program Crosscut Plan, 1993--1998, includes the ATS program as part of the overall DOE plan for natural gas-related research and development (R&D) activities. Private sector support for the program is sufficient. Three open meetings have been held during the last 2 years to provide an opportunity for industry suggestions and comments. As the result of a public review of the program plan held June 4, 1993, in Pittsburgh, 46 letters of support were received from industry, academia, and others. Gas turbines represent the fastest growing market segment in electrical and cogeneration markets, with over 60 percent of recent installations based on gas turbines. Gas turbine systems offer low installation and operating costs, low emissions (currently with add-on equipment for non-attainment areas), and quick installation (1--2 years). According to the Annual Energy Outlook 1993, electricity and natural gas demand should both grow substantially through 2010. Natural gas-fired gas turbine systems continue to be the prime candidates for much of both new and retrofit capacity in this period. Emissions requirements continue to ratchet downward with single-digit NO{sub x} ppM required in several non-attainment areas in the US

Webb, H.A. [USDOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center, WV (United States); Parks, W.P. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Advanced Coal-Fueled Gas Turbine Program  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the original Request for Proposal was to establish the technological bases necessary for the subsequent commercial development and deployment of advanced coal-fueled gas turbine power systems by the private sector. The offeror was to identify the specific application or applications, toward which his development efforts would be directed; define and substantiate the technical, economic, and environmental criteria for the selected application; and conduct such component design, development, integration, and tests as deemed necessary to fulfill this objective. Specifically, the offeror was to choose a system through which ingenious methods of grouping subcomponents into integrated systems accomplishes the following: (1) Preserve the inherent power density and performance advantages of gas turbine systems. (2) System must be capable of meeting or exceeding existing and expected environmental regulations for the proposed application. (3) System must offer a considerable improvement over coal-fueled systems which are commercial, have been demonstrated, or are being demonstrated. (4) System proposed must be an integrated gas turbine concept, i.e., all fuel conditioning, all expansion gas conditioning, or post-expansion gas cleaning, must be integrated into the gas turbine system.

Horner, M.W.; Ekstedt, E.E.; Gal, E.; Jackson, M.R.; Kimura, S.G.; Lavigne, R.G.; Lucas, C.; Rairden, J.R.; Sabla, P.E.; Savelli, J.F.; Slaughter, D.M.; Spiro, C.L.; Staub, F.W.

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas desulfurization advanced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Process for the elimination of waste water produced upon the desulfurization of coking oven gas by means of wash solution containing organic oxygen-carrier, with simultaneous recovery of elemental sulfur  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A process is disclosed for the elimination of waste water falling out with the desulfurization of coking oven gas by means of an organic oxygen carrier-containing washing solution with simultaneous recovery of elemental sulfur. The waste water is decomposed in a combustion chamber in a reducing atmosphere at temperatures between about 1000/sup 0/ and 1100/sup 0/ C. under such conditions that the mole ratio of H/sub 2/S:SO/sub 2/ in the exhaust gas of the combustion chamber amounts to at least 2:1. Sulfur falling out is separated and the sensible heat of the exhaust gas is utilized for steam generation. The cooled and desulfurized exhaust gas is added to the coking oven gas before the pre-cooling. Sulfur falling out from the washing solution in the oxidizer is separated out and lead into the combustion chamber together with the part of the washing solution discharged as waste water from the washing solution circulation. Preferred embodiments include that the sulfur loading of the waste water can amount to up to about 370 kg sulfur per m/sup 3/ waste water; having the cooling of sulfur-containing exhaust gas leaving the combustion chamber follow in a waste heat boiler and a sulfur condenser heated by pre-heated boiler feed water, from which condenser sulfur is discharged in liquid state.

Diemer, P.; Brake, W.; Dittmer, R.

1985-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

162

COAL DESULFURIZATION PRIOR TO COMBUSTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Corporation, 5-25~79. on Coal Liquefaction at ChevronHamersma, et a L, "Meyers Process for Coal Desulfurization,"in Wheelock, Coal Desulfurization, ACS Symp. Ser 64 (1977(.

Wrathall, J.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Cooperative Research and Development for Advanced Materials in Advanced Industrial Gas Turbines Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect

Evaluation of the performance of innovative thermal barrier coating systems for applications at high temperatures in advanced industrical gas turbines.

Ramesh Subramanian

2006-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

164

Adsorption and desorption of sulfur dioxide on novel adsorbents for flue gas desulfurization. Final report, September 1, 1993--August 31, 1994  

SciTech Connect

Dry regenerative sorption processes have recently attracted increasing attention in flue gas desulfurization (FGD) because of their several advantages over the conventional wet-scrubbing processes. Dry sorbents are usually made by coating a transition or alkaline earth metal precursor on the surface of a porous support. Major disadvantages of these sorbents prepared by the conventional methods include relatively poor attrition resistance and low SO{sub 2} sorption capacity. The physical and especially chemical attrition (associated with the sulphation-oxidation-reduction cycles in the process) deteriorates the performance of the sorbents. The low SO{sub 2} sorption capacity is primarily due to the small surface area of the support. Materials with a high surface area are not used as the supports for FGD sorbents because these materials usually are not thermally stable at high temperatures. In the past year, the research supported by Ohio Coal Development Office was focused on synthesis and properties of sol-gel derived alumina and zeolite sorbents with improved properties for FGD. The sol-gel derived alumina has large surface area, mesopore size and excellent mechanical strength. Some alumina-free zeolites not only posses the basic properties required as a sorbent for FGD (hydrophobicity, thermal and chemical stability, mechanical strength) but also have extremely large surface area and selective surface chemistry. The major objectives of this research program were to synthesize the sol-gel derived sorbents and to explore the use of the zeolites either directly as adsorbents or as sorbent support for FGD. The research was aimed at developing novel FGD sorbents possessing better sorption equilibrium and kinetic properties and improved physical and chemical attrition resistance.

Lin, Y.S. [University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

High-volume, high-value usage of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by-products in underground mines: Phase 1 -- Laboratory investigations. Quarterly report, July--September 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Efforts primarily focused on Subtask 2.2, Chemical and Mineralogical Characterization and Subtask 4.3, Selection and Testing of Transport System. As part of Subtask 2.2, samples were collected from the Freeman United Crown Mine III FBC disposal facility representing a verity of ages and weathering. A laboratory scale transport system has been built at the CAER to evaluate the potential of pneumatic transport for flue gas desulfurization material (FGDM) emplacement and to provide essential data for the mine emplacement demonstration as part of the Subtask 4.3 effort. The system is modeled after shotcreting systems and has the advantage that the material can be remotely placed without the need for forms. The test program is focusing on determining the pneumatic conditions necessary to maximize the strength of the emplaced FGDM under anticipated mine curing conditions while minimizing dust formation. Work on Subtask 4.1, Mine Selection, also proceeded during the quarter. A new mine site, located in the south-central section of the Pikeville quadrangle, Pike County, Kentucky, was examined for the field study. The proposed fill site is in the Middle Pennsylvanian Breathitt Formation Middle Amburgy coal bed, a coal previously mined by Costain elsewhere on the property. Efforts on Subtask 4.2, Hydrologic Monitoring Plan, focused primarily on theoretical issues concerning the effects of the mining and backfill activity on the ground water and surface water due to uncertainties in the location of the final field site. There are three major concerns about the effects of the mining activity: changes in the ground water flow field, changes in ground water quality, and consequential induced changes on stream flow.

NONE

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Assessment of coal gasification/hot gas cleanup based advanced gas turbine systems  

SciTech Connect

The major objectives of the joint SCS/DOE study of air-blown gasification power plants with hot gas cleanup are to: (1) Evaluate various power plant configurations to determine if an air-blown gasification-based power plant with hot gas cleanup can compete against pulverized coal with flue gas desulfurization for baseload expansion at Georgia Power Company's Plant Wansley; (2) determine if air-blown gasification with hot gas cleanup is more cost effective than oxygen-blown IGCC with cold gas cleanup; (3) perform Second-Law/Thermoeconomic Analysis of air-blown IGCC with hot gas cleanup and oxygen-blown IGCC with cold gas cleanup; (4) compare cost, performance, and reliability of IGCC based on industrial gas turbines and ISTIG power island configurations based on aeroderivative gas turbines; (5) compare cost, performance, and reliability of large (400 MW) and small (100 to 200 MW) gasification power plants; and (6) compare cost, performance, and reliability of air-blown gasification power plants using fluidized-bed gasifiers to air-blown IGCC using transport gasification and pressurized combustion.

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Optical Gas Sensors for Advanced Coal-Fired Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Optical Gas Sensors for Advanced Coal-Fired Power Plants. Author(s), Paul Ohodnicki, Congjun Wang, Douglas Kauffman, Kristi Kauffman, ...

168

Full-Scale Testing of a Mercury Oxidation Catalyst Upstream of a Wet Flue Gas Desulfurization System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to demonstrate at full scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury (Hg0) in flue gas from coal combustion. The project was conducted from July 24, 2006 through June 30, 2010. It was conducted with cofunding from the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory as part of Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-06NT42778, "Full-Scale Testing of a Mercury Oxidation Catalyst Upstream of a Wet FGD System." Private secto...

2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

169

Coal desulfurization with sodium hypochlorite.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Wet desulfurization of Pittsburgh No. 8 coal and Illinois No. 6 coal were conducted with sodium hypochlorite in the laboratory. Pittsburgh No. 8 coal was… (more)

Li, Wei, M.S.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Coal Liquefaction desulfurization process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a solvent refined coal liquefaction process, more effective desulfurization of the high boiling point components is effected by first stripping the solvent-coal reacted slurry of lower boiling point components, particularly including hydrogen sulfide and low molecular weight sulfur compounds, and then reacting the slurry with a solid sulfur getter material, such as iron. The sulfur getter compound, with reacted sulfur included, is then removed with other solids in the slurry.

Givens, Edwin N. (Bethlehem, PA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Advanced coal-fueled gas turbine systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Activity towards completing Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) Phase I work was begun again in December. Effort to complete the Phase I work was temporarily suspended upon receipt of the ATS Phase II RFP the last week in August. The Westinghouse ATS team's efforts were directed at preparing the ATS Phase II proposal which was submitted November 18. It is planned to finish Phase I work and submit the topical report by the end of February 1993. The objective of the four slogging combustor tests conducted during this reporting period (i.e., tests SL3-1 through SL3-4) were to perform sulfur capture experiments using limestoneand iron oxide based sorbents and to collect exhaust vapor phase and solids bound alkali measurements using the Westinghouse and Ames Laboratory alkali probes/monitors. The most significant, if not outstanding result revealed by these tests is that the Ames alkali monitor indicates that the vapor phase sodium is approximately 23--30 ppbw and the vapor phase potassium is approximately 5--20 ppbw. For reference, alkalilevels of 20 ppbw are acceptable in Westinghouse gas turbines fueled with crude oil.

Not Available

1993-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

172

Advanced coal-fueled gas turbine systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Westinghouse's Advanced Coal-Fueled Gas Turbine System Program (DE-AC2l-86MC23167) was originally split into two major phases - a Basic Program and an Option. The Basic Program also contained two phases. The development of a 6 atm, 7 lb/s, 12 MMBtu/hr slagging combustor with an extended period of testing of the subscale combustor, was the first part of the Basic Program. In the second phase of the Basic Program, the combustor was to be operated over a 3-month period with a stationary cascade to study the effect of deposition, erosion and corrosion on combustion turbine components. The testing of the concept, in subscale, has demonstrated its ability to handle high- and low-sulfur bituminous coals, and low-sulfur subbituminous coal. Feeding the fuel in the form of PC has proven to be superior to CWM type feed. The program objectives relative to combustion efficiency, combustor exit temperature, NO[sub x] emissions, carbon burnout, and slag rejection have been met. Objectives for alkali, particulate, and SO[sub x] levels leaving the combustor were not met by the conclusion of testing at Textron. It is planned to continue this testing, to achieve all desired emission levels, as part of the W/NSP program to commercialize the slagging combustor technology.

Not Available

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Natural Gas-optimized Advanced Heavy-duty Engine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural Gas-optimized Advanced Heavy-duty Engine Transportation Research PIER Transportation of natural gas vehicles as a clean alternative is currently limited to smaller engine displacements and spark ignition, which results in lower performance. A large displacement natural gas engine has

174

Puerto Rico Refinery Desulfurization, Gasoline Downstream Charge ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Puerto Rico Refinery Desulfurization, Gasoline Downstream Charge Capacity as of January 1 (Barrels per Stream Day)

175

Mercury Oxidation Performance of Advanced SCR Catalyst  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ability of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalysts to oxidize mercury is an important aspect of many utilities’ mercury control strategies. Improved SCR mercury oxidation will facilitate its capture in downstream wet–flue gas desulfurization systems and will generally result in lower emission rates. Recently, catalyst manufacturers have attempted to maximize mercury oxidation through advanced catalyst formulations.This study documents the performance of an advanced ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

176

Advanced Liquid Natural Gas Onboard Storage System  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Cummins Westport Incorporated (CWI) has designed and developed a liquefied natural gas (LNG) vehicle fuel system that includes a reciprocating pump with the cold end submerged in LNG contained in a vacuum-jacketed tank. This system was tested and analyzed under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Advanced LNG Onboard Storage System (ALOSS) program. The pumped LNG fuel system developed by CWI and tested under the ALOSS program is a high-pressure system designed for application on Class 8 trucks powered by CWI's ISX G engine, which employs high-pressure direct injection (HPDI) technology. A general ALOSS program objective was to demonstrate the feasibility and advantages of a pumped LNG fuel system relative to on-vehicle fuel systems that require the LNG to be ''conditioned'' to saturation pressures that exceeds the engine fuel pressure requirements. These advantages include the capability to store more fuel mass in given-size vehicle and station tanks, and simpler lower-cost LNG refueling stations that do not require conditioning equipment. Pumped LNG vehicle fuel systems are an alternative to conditioned LNG systems for spark-ignition natural gas and port-injection dual-fuel engines (which typically require about 100 psi), and they are required for HPDI engines (which require over 3,000 psi). The ALOSS program demonstrated the feasibility of a pumped LNG vehicle fuel system and the advantages of this design relative to systems that require conditioning the LNG to a saturation pressure exceeding the engine fuel pressure requirement. LNG tanks mounted on test carts and the CWI engineering truck were repeatedly filled with LNG saturated at 20 to 30 psig. More fuel mass was stored in the vehicle tanks as well as the station tank, and no conditioning equipment was required at the fueling station. The ALOSS program also demonstrated the general viability and specific performance of the CWI pumped LNG fuel system design. The system tested as part of this program is designed to be used on Class 8 trucks with CWI ISX G HPDI engines. Extensive test cart and engineering truck tests of the pump demonstrated good durability and the high-pressure performance needed for HPDI application. The LNG tanks manufactured by Taylor-Wharton passed SAE J2343 Recommended Practice drop tests and accelerated road-load vibration tests. NER and hold-time tests produced highly consistent results. Additional tests confirmed the design adequacy of the liquid level sensor, vaporizer, ullage volume, and other fuel system components. While the testing work performed under this program focused on a high-pressure pumped LNG fuel system design, the results also validate the feasibility of a low-pressure pumped fuel system. A low-pressure pumped fuel system could incorporate various design refinements including a simpler and lighter-weight pump, which would decrease costs somewhat relative to a high-pressure system.

Greg Harper; Charles Powars

2003-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

177

Impact of supplemental firing of tire-derived fuel (TDF) on mercury species and mercury capture with the advanced hybrid filter in a western subbituminous coal flue gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pilot-scale experimental studies were carried out to evaluate the impacts of cofiring tire-derived fuel and a western subbituminous coal on mercury species in flue gas. Mercury samples were collected at the inlet and outlet of the Advanced Hybrid filter to determine mercury concentrations in the flue gas with and without TDF cofiring, respectively. Cofiring of TDF with a subbituminous coal had a significant effect on mercury speciation in the flue gas. With 100% coal firing, there was only 16.8% oxidized mercury in the flue gas compared to 47.7% when 5% TDF (mass basis) was fired and 84.8% when 10% TDF was cofired. The significantly enhanced mercury oxidation may be the result of additional homogeneous gas reactions between Hg{sup 0} and the reactive chlorine generated in the TDF-cofiring flue gas and the in situ improved reactivity of unburned carbon in ash by the reactive chlorine species. Although the cofiring of TDF demonstrated limited improvement on mercury-emission control with the Advanced Hybrid filter, it proved to be a very cost-effective mercury control approach for power plants equipped with wet or dry flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems because of the enhanced mercury oxidation. 15 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

Ye Zhuang; Stanley J. Miller [University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States). Energy & Environmental Research Center

2006-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

178

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects - Advanced Gas Hydrate...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Comparative Assessment of Advanced Gas Hydrate Production Methods Last Reviewed 09232009 DE-FC26-06NT42666 Goal The goal of this project is to compare and contrast, through...

179

Method for desulfurization of coal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process and apparatus are disclosed for desulfurizing coal which removes sulfur in the inorganic and organic form by preferentially heating the inorganic iron sulfides in coal in a flowing gas to convert some of the inorganic iron sulfides from a pyrite form FeS[sub 2] to a troilite FeS form or a pyrrhotite form Fe[sub 1[minus]x]S and release some of the sulfur as a gaseous compound. The troilite and pyrrhotite forms are convenient catalyst for removing the organic sulfur in the next step, which is to react the coal with chemical agents such as alcohol, thus removing the organic sulfur as a liquid or a gas such as H[sub 2]S. The remaining inorganic sulfur is left in the predominantly higher magnetic form of pyrrhotite and is then removed by magnetic separation techniques. Optionally, an organic flocculant may be added after the organic sulfur has been removed and before magnetic separation. The flocculant attaches non-pyrite minerals with the pyrrhotite for removal by magnetic separation to reduce the ash-forming contents. 2 figs.

Kelland, D.R.

1987-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

180

GE Upgrades Top Selling Advanced Gas Turbine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 30, 2009 ... According to GE, a typical power plant operating two new 7FA gas turbines with a single steam turbine in combined cycle configuration would ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas desulfurization advanced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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181

Two-stage coal gasification and desulfurization apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is directed to a system which effectively integrates a two-stage, fixed-bed coal gasification arrangement with hot fuel gas desulfurization of a first stream of fuel gas from a lower stage of the two-stage gasifier and the removal of sulfur from the sulfur sorbent regeneration gas utilized in the fuel-gas desulfurization process by burning a second stream of fuel gas from the upper stage of the gasifier in a combustion device in the presence of calcium-containing material. The second stream of fuel gas is taken from above the fixed bed in the coal gasifier and is laden with ammonia, tar and sulfur values. This second stream of fuel gas is burned in the presence of excess air to provide heat energy sufficient to effect a calcium-sulfur compound forming reaction between the calcium-containing material and sulfur values carried by the regeneration gas and the second stream of fuel gas. Any ammonia values present in the fuel gas are decomposed during the combustion of the fuel gas in the combustion chamber. The substantially sulfur-free products of combustion may then be combined with the desulfurized fuel gas for providing a combustible fluid utilized for driving a prime mover.

Bissett, Larry A. (Morgantown, WV); Strickland, Larry D. (Morgantown, WV)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Construction advances on gas pipeline in Germany  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports that construction is well under way on a pipeline to transport gas form the North Sea and Russia into the heart of Germany. Mitte Deutchland Anbindungs Leitung (Midal) gas pipeline, under construction for Winershall AG and partner Gazprom, the Russian state gas company, will extend more than 640 km from the North Sea coast to Ludwigshafen in Southwest Germany. en route, the line will make more than 100 river crossings. Midal will connect with the joint ventures' Sachesen-Thurigen-Erdgas Leitung (Stegal) pipeline, which moves Russian gas into eastern Germany and Wintershall's gas storage site at Rehden. Wintershall Erdgas Handelshaus GmbH, set up to manage the joint venture project, divided the pipeline route into six parts, hiring different contractors to lay each section.

Not Available

1992-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

183

Advances in gas-liquid flows 1990  

SciTech Connect

Gas-liquid two-phase flows commonly occur in nature and industrial applications. Rain, clouds, geysers, and waterfalls are examples of natural gas-liquid flow phenomena, whereas industrial applications can be found in nuclear reactors, steam generators, boilers, condensers, evaporators, fuel atomization, heat pipes, electronic equipment cooling, petroleum engineering, chemical process engineering, and many others. The household-variety phenomena such as garden sprinklers, shower, whirlpool bath, dripping faucet, boiling tea pot, and bubbling beer provide daily experience of gas-liquid flows. The papers presented in this volume reflect the variety and richness of gas-liquid two-phase flow and the increasing role it plays in modern technology. This volume contains papers dealing with some recent development in gas-liquid flow science and technology, covering basic gas-liquid flows, measurements and instrumentation, cavitation and flashing flows, countercurrent flow and flooding, flow in various components and geometries liquid metals and thermocapillary effects, heat transfer, nonlinear phenomena, instability, and other special and general topics related to gas-liquid flows.

Kim, J.M. (Texas Univ., Austin, TX (United States). Nuclear Reactor Lab.); Rohatgi, U.S. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)); Hashemi, A. (Lockheed Missiles and Space Company (US))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Development requirements for an advanced gas turbine system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In cooperation with US Department of Energy`s Morgantown Energy Technology Center, a Westinghouse-led team is working on the second part of an 8-year, Advanced Turbine Systems Program to develop the technology required to provide a significant increase in natural gas-fired combined cycle power generation plant efficiency. This paper reports on the Westinghouse program to develop an innovative natural gas-fired advanced turbine cycle, which, in combination with increased firing temperature, use of advanced materials, increased component efficiencies, and reduced cooling air usage, has the potential of achieving a lower heating value plant efficiency in excess of 60%.

Bannister, R.L.; Cheruvu, N.S.; Little, D.A.; McQuiggan, G. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Orlando, FL (United States)

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Advanced gas distribution research at IGT  

SciTech Connect

The Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) has made substantial progress on its multi-year program in demonstrating the technical feasibility of integrated, automated gas distribution systems. The objective of this program is to address automation of distribution as a total system, rather than automation of individual features. This work is geared towards developing a compatible, modular automation system to benefit gas utilities. The system must have an open architecture so that any manufacturer can produce equipment that will be compatible with all other system components. There are approximately 30 capabilities that the laboratory system will ultimately demonstrate, and 10 are now functional. These include: gas meter reading, bill calculation and printing, multiple rate billing, tamper detection, electronic reconfiguration, global commands, remote city gate station control, district meter reading, cathodic protection potential reading, and automatic differential pressure reading.

Rush, W.F. Jr.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Enhanced durability and reactivity for zinc ferrite desulfurization sorbent  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

AMAX Research Development Center (AMAX R D) has been investigating methods for enhancing the reactivity and durability of the zinc ferrite desulfurization sorbent. Zinc ferrite sorbents are intended for use in desulfurization of hot coal gas in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) or molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) applications. For the present program, the reactivity of the sorbent may be defined as its sulfur sorption capacity at the breakthrough point and at saturation in a bench-scale, fixed-bed reactor. Durability may be defined as the ability of the sorbent to maintain important physical characteristics such As size, strength, and specific surface area during 10 cycles of sulfidation and oxidation.

Jha, M.C.; Berggren, M.H.

1989-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

187

The Biocatalytic Desulfurization Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The material in this report summarizes the Diversa technical effort in development of a biocatalyst for the biodesulfurization of Petro Star diesel as well as an economic report of standalone and combined desulfurization options, prepared by Pelorus and Anvil, to support and inform the development of a commercially viable process. We will discuss goals of the projected as originally stated and their modification as guided by parallel efforts to evaluate commercialization economics and process parameters. We describe efforts to identify novel genes and hosts for the generation of an optimal biocatalyst, analysis of diesel fuels (untreated, chemically oxidized and hydrotreated) for organosulfur compound composition and directed evolution of enzymes central to the biodesulfurization pathway to optimize properties important for their use in a biocatalyst. Finally we will summarize the challenges and issues that are central to successful development of a viable biodesulfurization process.

David Nunn; James Boltz; Philip M. DiGrazia; Larry Nace

2006-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

188

DRY FLUE GAS CLEANING PROCESSES FOR ACHIEVING AIR POLLUTANT EMISSIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

was mercury adsorption onto calcium sulfate (CaSO4), a byproduct of the flue gas desulfurization (FGD) wet., Powers K.W., and Pitoniak E.R. (2004) Method for Purifying Flue Gases from Combustion Sources. PatentCoupling of Advanced Oxidation and Adsorption Processes onto Silica-Titania Composites for Low

Columbia University

189

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects - Advanced Gas Hydrate  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Comparative Assessment of Advanced Gas Hydrate Production Methods Last Reviewed 09/23/2009 Comparative Assessment of Advanced Gas Hydrate Production Methods Last Reviewed 09/23/2009 DE-FC26-06NT42666 Goal The goal of this project is to compare and contrast, through numerical simulation, conventional and innovative approaches for producing methane from gas hydrate-bearing geologic reservoirs. Numerical simulation is being used to assess the production of natural gas hydrates from geologic deposits using three production technologies: 1) depressurization, 2) direct CO2 exchange, and 3) dissociation-reformation CO2 exchange. Performers Battelle Pacific Northwest Division, Richland, Washington 99352 Background There are relatively few published studies of commercial production methods for gas hydrates, and all of these studies have examined essentially

190

Advanced Coating Development for Gas Turbine Components  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sacrificial, oxidation-resistant coatings on turbine blades in high-firing temperature gas turbines are wearing out at an unacceptably rapid rate, resulting in excessive downtime and repair costs for turbine operators. This report summarizes the results of an exploratory development project that assessed the feasibility of decelerating the degradation rate of an MCrAlY coating on several turbine blade alloys.

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

A NOVEL APPROACH TO CATALYTIC DESULFURIZATION OF COAL  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Column chromatographic separation of the S=PBu{sub 3}/PBu{sub 3} product mixture followed by weighing the S=PBu{sub 3}, and by vacuum distillation of S=PBu{sub 3}/PBu{sub 3}mixture followed by gas chromatographic analysis are described. Effects of coal mesh size, pre-treatment with methanol Coal (S) + excess PR{sub 3} {yields} Coal + S=PR{sub 3}/PBu{sub 3} and sonication on sulfur removal by PBu{sub 3} revealed that particle size was not observed to affect desulfurization efficiency in a consistent manner. Coal pretreatment with methanol to induce swelling or the addition of a filter aid such as Celite reduced desulfurization efficiency of the PBu{sub 3} and sonication was no more effective than heating. A rationale is put forth for the lack of efficacy of methanol pretreatment of the coal in desulfurization runs with PBu{sub 3}. Coal desulfurization with PBu{sub 3} was not improved in the presence of miniscule beads of molten lithium or sodium as a desulfurizing reagent for SPBu{sub 3} in a strategy aimed at regenerating PBu{sub 3} inside coal pores. Although desulfurization of coals did occur in sodium solutions in liquid ammonia, substantial loss of coal mass was also observed. Of particular concern is the mass balance in the above reaction, a problem which is described in some detail. In an effort to solve this difficulty, a specially designed apparatus is described which we believe can solve this problem reasonably effectively. Elemental sodium was found to remove sulfur quantitatively from a variety of polycyclic organosulfur compounds including dibenzothiophene and benzothiophene under relatively mild conditions (150 C) in a hydrocarbon solvent without requiring the addition of a hydrogen donor. Lithium facilitates the same reaction at a higher temperature (254 C). Mechanistic pathways are proposed for these transformations. Curiously, dibenzothiophene and its corresponding sulfone was virtually quantitatively desulfurized in sodium solutions in liquid ammonia at -33 C, although the yield of biphenyl was only about 20 to 30%. On the other hand, benzothiophene gave a high yield of 2-ethylthiophenol under these conditions. Although our superbase P(MeNCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}){sub 3}N, which is now commercially available, is a more effective desulfurizing agent for a variety of organophosphorus compounds than PPh{sub 3} or its acyclic analogue P(NMe){sub 3}, it does not desulfurize benzothiophene or dibenzothiophene.

John G. Verkade

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

GE power generation technology challenges for advanced gas turbines  

SciTech Connect

The GE Utility ATS is a large gas turbine, derived from proven GEPG designs and integrated GEAE technology, that utilizes a new turbine cooling system and incorporates advanced materials. This system has the potential to achieve ATS objectives for a utility sized machine. Combined with use of advanced Thermal Barrier Coatings (TBC`s), the new cooling system will allow higher firing temperatures and improved cycle efficiency that represents a significant improvement over currently available machines. Developing advances in gas turbine efficiency and emissions is an ongoing process at GEPG. The third generation, ``F`` class, of utility gas turbines offers net combined cycle efficiencies in the 55% range, with NO{sub x} programs in place to reduce emissions to less than 10 ppM. The gas turbines have firing temperatures of 2350{degree}F, and pressure ratios of 15 to 1. The turbine components are cooled by air extracted from the cycle at various stages of the compressor. The heat recovery cycle is a three pressure steam system, with reheat. Throttle conditions are nominally 1400 psi and 1000{degree}F reheat. As part of GEPG`s ongoing advanced power generation system development program, it is expected that a gas fired advanced turbine system providing 300 MW power output greater than 58% net efficiency and < 10 ppM NO{sub x} will be defined. The new turbine cooling system developed with technology support from the ATS program will achieve system net efficiency levels in excess of 60%.

Cook, C.S.; Nourse, J.G.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Advanced Gas Storage Concepts: Technologies for the Future  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This full text product includes: 1) A final technical report titled Advanced Underground Gas Storage Concepts, Refrigerated-Mined Cavern Storage and presentations from two technology transfer workshops held in 1998 in Houston, Texas, and Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (both on the topic of Chilled Gas Storage in Mined Caverns); 2) A final technical report titled Natural Gas Hydrates Storage Project, Final Report 1 October 1997 - 31 May 1999; 3) A final technical report titled Natural Gas Hydrates Storage Project Phase II: Conceptual Design and Economic Study, Final Report 9 June - 10 October 1999; 4) A final technical report titled Commerical Potential of Natural Gas Storage in Lined Rock Caverns (LRC) and presentations from a DOE-sponsored workshop on Alternative Gas Storage Technologies, held Feb 17, 2000 in Pittsburgh, PA; and 5) Phase I and Phase II topical reports titled Feasibility Study for Lowering the Minimum Gas Pressure in Solution-Mined Caverns Based on Geomechanical Analyses of Creep-Induced Damage and Healing.

Freeway, Katy (PB-KBB Inc.) [PB-KBB Inc.; Rogers, R.E. (Mississippi State University) [Mississippi State University; DeVries, Kerry L.; Nieland, Joel D.; Ratigan, Joe L.; Mellegard, Kirby D. (RESPEC) [RESPEC

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Advanced Technologies For Stripper Gas Well Enhancement  

SciTech Connect

Stripper gas and oil well operators frequently face a dilemma regarding maximizing production from low-productivity wells. With thousands of stripper wells in the United States covering extensive acreage, it is difficult to identify easily and efficiently marginal or underperforming wells. In addition, the magnitude of reviewing vast amounts of data places a strain on an operator's work force and financial resources. Schlumberger DCS, in cooperation with the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), has created software and developed in-house analysis methods to identify remediation potential in stripper wells relatively easily. This software is referred to as Stripper Well Analysis Remediation Methodology (SWARM). SWARM was beta-tested with data pertaining to two gas fields located in northwestern Pennsylvania and had notable results. Great Lakes Energy Partners, LLC (Great Lakes) and Belden & Blake Corporation (B&B) both operate wells in the first field studied. They provided data for 729 wells, and we estimated that 41 wells were candidates for remediation. However, for reasons unbeknownst to Schlumberger these wells were not budgeted for rework by the operators. The second field (Cooperstown) is located in Crawford, Venango, and Warren counties, Pa and has more than 2,200 wells operated by Great Lakes. This paper discusses in depth the successful results of a candidate recognition study of this area. We compared each well's historical production with that of its offsets and identified 339 underperformers before considering remediation costs, and 168 economically viable candidates based on restimulation costs of $50,000 per well. From this data, we prioritized a list based on the expected incremental recoverable gas and 10% discounted net present value (NPV). For this study, we calculated the incremental gas by subtracting the volumes forecasted after remediation from the production projected at its current configuration. Assuming that remediation efforts increased production from the 168 marginal wells to the average of their respective offsets, approximately 6.4 Bscf of gross incremental gas with a NPV approximating $4.9 million after investment, would be made available to the domestic market. Seventeen wells have successfully been restimulated to date and have already obtained significant production increases. At the time of this report, eight of these wells had enough post-rework production data available to forecast the incremental gas and verify the project's success. This incremental gas is estimated at 615 MMscf. The outcome of the other ten wells will be determined after more post-refrac production data becomes available. Plans are currently underway for future restimulations. The success of this project has shown the value of this methodology to recognize underperforming wells quickly and efficiently in fields containing hundreds or thousands of wells. This contributes considerably to corporate net income and domestic natural gas and/or oil reserves.

Ronald J. MacDonald; Charles M. Boyer; Joseph H. Frantz Jr; Paul A. Zyglowicz

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Coupling of Advanced Oxidation and Adsorption Processes onto Silica-Titania Composites for Low Level  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

was mercury adsorption onto calcium sulfate (CaSO4), a byproduct of the flue gas desulfurization (FGD) wet., Powers K.W., and Pitoniak E.R. (2004) Method for Purifying Flue Gases from Combustion Sources. PatentCoupling of Advanced Oxidation and Adsorption Processes onto Silica-Titania Composites for Low

Choate, Paul M.

196

Collaborative Advanced Gas Turbine Program: Phase 1. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Collaborative Advanced Gas Turbine (CAGT) Program is an advanced gas turbine research and development program whose goal is to accelerate the commercial availability, to within the turn of the century, of high efficiency aeroderivative gas turbines for electric power generating applications. In the first project phase, research was conducted to prove or disprove the research hypothesis that advanced aeroderivative gas turbine systems can provide a promising technology alternative, offering high efficiency and good environmental performance characteristics in modular sizes, for utility applications. This $5 million, Phase 1 research effort reflects the collaborative efforts of a broad and international coalition of industries and organizations, both public and private, that have pooled their resources to assist in this research. Included in this coalition are: electric and gas utilities, the Electric Power Research Institute, the Gas Research Institute and the principal aircraft engine manufacturers. Additionally, the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the California Energy Commission have interacted with the CAGT on both technical and executive levels as observers and sources of funding. The three aircraft engine manufacturer-led research teams participating in this research include: Rolls-Royce, Inc., and Bechtel; the Turbo Power and Marine Division of United Technologies and Fluor Daniel; and General Electric Power Generation, Stewart and Stevenson, and Bechtel. Each team has investigated advanced electric power generating systems based on their high-thrust (60,000 to 100,000 pounds) aircraft engines. The ultimate goal of the CAGT program is that the community of stakeholders in the growing market for natural-gas-fueled, electric power generation can collectively provide the right combination of market-pull and technology-push to substantially accelerate the commercialization of advanced, high efficiency aeroderivative technologies.

Hollenbacher, R.; Kesser, K.; Beishon, D.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Advanced Water-Gas Shift Membrane Reactor  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall objectives for this project were: (1) to identify a suitable PdCu tri-metallic alloy membrane with high stability and commercially relevant hydrogen permeation in the presence of trace amounts of carbon monoxide and sulfur; and (2) to identify and synthesize a water gas shift catalyst with a high operating life that is sulfur and chlorine tolerant at low concentrations of these impurities. This work successfully achieved the first project objective to identify a suitable PdCu tri-metallic alloy membrane composition, Pd{sub 0.47}Cu{sub 0.52}G5{sub 0.01}, that was selected based on atomistic and thermodynamic modeling alone. The second objective was partially successful in that catalysts were identified and evaluated that can withstand sulfur in high concentrations and at high pressures, but a long operating life was not achieved at the end of the project. From the limited durability testing it appears that the best catalyst, Pt-Re/Ce{sub 0.333}Zr{sub 0.333}E4{sub 0.333}O{sub 2}, is unable to maintain a long operating life at space velocities of 200,000 h{sup -1}. The reasons for the low durability do not appear to be related to the high concentrations of H{sub 2}S, but rather due to the high operating pressure and the influence the pressure has on the WGS reaction at this space velocity.

Sean Emerson; Thomas Vanderspurt; Susanne Opalka; Rakesh Radhakrishnan; Rhonda Willigan

2009-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

198

NETL: News Release - First Commercial Application of Advanced Natural Gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

February 19, 2004 February 19, 2004 First Commercial Application of Advanced Natural Gas Turbine Announced Turbine Developed Through Department of Energy's Advanced Turbine Systems Program GE Energy has announced that the world's first application of their next-generation 7H gas turbine technology will be an 800-megawatt class, combined-cycle project with Hydro-Quebec Production. The new natural-gas-fired power plant, to be built at Beauharnois, Quebec, southwest of Montreal, will be based on two GE 107H combined-cycle systems. The plant is expected to enter commercial service in mid 2007. The 7H gas turbine is one of two H System gas turbines developed by GE Energy as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's advanced turbine systems program. The Hydro-Quebec plant will be the first commercial application of the 60-hertz 7H, the H System turbine suitable for use in the United States and Canada. The 50-hertz 9H, suitable for the overseas market, got its commercial start in 2003 at the Baglan Bay Power Station in Wales, UK. The Baglan Bay plant has received a number of prestigious industry awards for its use of the innovative H System turbine.

199

THE BIOCATALYTIC DESULFURIZATION PROJECT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The analysis of Petro Star diesel sulfur species is complete and a report is attached. Further analytical efforts will concentrate on characterization of diesel fuel, hydrodesulfurized to varying degrees, in order to determine sulfur species that may be problematic to hydrogen treatment and represent potential target substrates for biodesulfurization in a combined HDS-BDS process. Quotes have been received and are being considered for the partial treatment of Petro Star Inc. marine diesel fuel. Direction of research is changing slightly; economic analysis of the hyphenated--BDSHDS, BDS-CED--has shown the highest probability of success to be with a BDS-HDS process where the biodesulfurization precedes hydrodesulfurization. Thus, the microorganisms will be tailored to focus on those compounds that tend to be recalcitrant to hydrodesulfurization and decrease the severity of the hydrodesulfurization step. A separate, detailed justification for this change is being prepared. Research activities have continued in the characterization of the desulfurization enzymes from multiple sources. Genes for all DszA, -B, -C and -D enzymes (and homologs) have been cloned and expressed. Activity determinations, on a variety of substituted benzothiophene and dibenzothiophene substrates, have been carried out and continue. In addition, chemical synthesis efforts have been carried out to generate additional substrates for analytical standards and activity determinations. The generation of a GSSM mutant library of the ''Rhodococcus IGTS8 dszA'' gene has been completed and development of protocols for a high throughput screen to expand substrate specificity are nearing completion. In an effort to obtain improved hosts as biocatalyst, one hundred-thirty ''Rhodococcus'' and related strains are being evaluated for growth characteristics and other criteria deemed important for an optimal biocatalyst strain. We have also begun an effort to generate derivatives of the entire IGTS8 BDS plasmid that will allow for its easy transfer and manipulation into a variety of hosts. To support this activity and to gain an understanding of additional genes that may potentially affect BDS activity, the nucleotide sequence of the entire complement of plasmids in IGTS8 is being determined. Lastly, we continue to develop genetic screens and selections for the discovery and improvement of the biodesulfurization genes and strains.

Scott Collins; David Nunn

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Western tight gas sands advanced logging workshop proceedings  

SciTech Connect

An advanced logging research program is one major aspect of the Western Tight Sands Program. Purpose of this workshop is to help BETC define critical logging needs for tight gas sands and to allow free interchange of ideas on all aspects of the current logging research program. Sixteen papers and abstracts are included together with discussions. Separate abstracts have been prepared for the 12 papers. (DLC)

Jennings, J B; Carroll, Jr, H B [eds.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas desulfurization advanced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

The DOE Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The high outlet temperatures and high thermal-energy conversion efficiency of modular High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactors (HTGRs) enable an efficient and cost effective integration of the reactor system with non-electricity generation applications, such as process heat and/or hydrogen production, for the many petrochemical and other industrial processes that require temperatures between 300°C and 900°C. The Department of Energy (DOE) has selected the HTGR concept for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project as a transformative application of nuclear energy that will demonstrate emissions-free nuclear-assisted electricity, process heat, and hydrogen production, thereby reducing greenhouse-gas emissions and enhancing energy security. The objective of the DOE Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification program is to qualify tristructural isotropic (TRISO)-coated particle fuel for use in HTGRs. The Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification Program consists of five elements: fuel manufacture, fuel and materials irradiations, post-irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing, fuel performance modeling, and fission-product transport and source term evaluation. An underlying theme for the fuel development work is the need to develop a more complete, fundamental understanding of the relationship between the fuel fabrication process and key fuel properties, the irradiation and accident safety performance of the fuel, and the release and transport of fission products in the NGNP primary coolant system. An overview of the program and recent progress is presented.

David Petti

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Advanced Coal-Fueled Gas Turbine Program. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the original Request for Proposal was to establish the technological bases necessary for the subsequent commercial development and deployment of advanced coal-fueled gas turbine power systems by the private sector. The offeror was to identify the specific application or applications, toward which his development efforts would be directed; define and substantiate the technical, economic, and environmental criteria for the selected application; and conduct such component design, development, integration, and tests as deemed necessary to fulfill this objective. Specifically, the offeror was to choose a system through which ingenious methods of grouping subcomponents into integrated systems accomplishes the following: (1) Preserve the inherent power density and performance advantages of gas turbine systems. (2) System must be capable of meeting or exceeding existing and expected environmental regulations for the proposed application. (3) System must offer a considerable improvement over coal-fueled systems which are commercial, have been demonstrated, or are being demonstrated. (4) System proposed must be an integrated gas turbine concept, i.e., all fuel conditioning, all expansion gas conditioning, or post-expansion gas cleaning, must be integrated into the gas turbine system.

Horner, M.W.; Ekstedt, E.E.; Gal, E.; Jackson, M.R.; Kimura, S.G.; Lavigne, R.G.; Lucas, C.; Rairden, J.R.; Sabla, P.E.; Savelli, J.F.; Slaughter, D.M.; Spiro, C.L.; Staub, F.W.

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Advanced coal-fueled industrial cogeneration gas turbine system  

SciTech Connect

Advances in coal-fueled gas turbine technology over the past few years, together with recent DOE-METC sponsored studies, have served to provide new optimism that the problems demonstrated in the past can be economically resolved and that the coal-fueled gas turbine can ultimately be the preferred system in appropriate market application sectors. The objective of the Solar/METC program is to prove the technical, economic, and environmental feasibility of a coal-fired gas turbine for cogeneration applications through tests of a Centaur Type H engine system operated on coal fuel throughout the engine design operating range. The five-year program consists of three phases, namely: (1) system description; (2) component development; (3) prototype system verification. A successful conclusion to the program will initiate a continuation of the commercialization plan through extended field demonstration runs.

LeCren, R.T.; Cowell, L.H.; Galica, M.A.; Stephenson, M.D.; Wen, C.S.

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

BIOMASS GASIFICATION AND POWER GENERATION USING ADVANCED GAS TURBINE SYSTEMS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A multidisciplined team led by the United Technologies Research Center (UTRC) and consisting of Pratt & Whitney Power Systems (PWPS), the University of North Dakota Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC), KraftWork Systems, Inc. (kWS), and the Connecticut Resource Recovery Authority (CRRA) has evaluated a variety of gasified biomass fuels, integrated into advanced gas turbine-based power systems. The team has concluded that a biomass integrated gasification combined-cycle (BIGCC) plant with an overall integrated system efficiency of 45% (HHV) at emission levels of less than half of New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) is technically and economically feasible. The higher process efficiency in itself reduces consumption of premium fuels currently used for power generation including those from foreign sources. In addition, the advanced gasification process can be used to generate fuels and chemicals, such as low-cost hydrogen and syngas for chemical synthesis, as well as baseload power. The conceptual design of the plant consists of an air-blown circulating fluidized-bed Advanced Transport Gasifier and a PWPS FT8 TwinPac{trademark} aeroderivative gas turbine operated in combined cycle to produce {approx}80 MWe. This system uses advanced technology commercial products in combination with components in advanced development or demonstration stages, thereby maximizing the opportunity for early implementation. The biofueled power system was found to have a levelized cost of electricity competitive with other new power system alternatives including larger scale natural gas combined cycles. The key elements are: (1) An Advanced Transport Gasifier (ATG) circulating fluid-bed gasifier having wide fuel flexibility and high gasification efficiency; (2) An FT8 TwinPac{trademark}-based combined cycle of approximately 80 MWe; (3) Sustainable biomass primary fuel source at low cost and potentially widespread availability-refuse-derived fuel (RDF); (4) An overall integrated system that exceeds the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) goal of 40% (HHV) efficiency at emission levels well below the DOE suggested limits; and (5) An advanced biofueled power system whose levelized cost of electricity can be competitive with other new power system alternatives.

David Liscinsky

2002-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

205

ADVANCED UNDERGROUND GAS STORAGE CONCEPTS REFRIGERATED-MINED CAVERN STORAGE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Limited demand and high cost has prevented the construction of hard rock caverns in this country for a number of years. The storage of natural gas in mined caverns may prove technically feasible if the geology of the targeted market area is suitable; and economically feasible if the cost and convenience of service is competitive with alternative available storage methods for peak supply requirements. It is believed that mined cavern storage can provide the advantages of high delivery rates and multiple fill-withdrawal cycles in areas where salt cavern storage is not possible. In this research project, PB-KBB merged advanced mining technologies and gas refrigeration techniques to develop conceptual designs and cost estimates to demonstrate the commercialization potential of the storage of refrigerated natural gas in hard rock caverns. Five regions of the U.S.A. were studied for underground storage development and PB-KBB reviewed the literature to determine if the geology of these regions was suitable for siting hard rock storage caverns. Area gas market conditions in these regions were also studied to determine the need for such storage. Based on an analysis of many factors, a possible site was determined to be in Howard and Montgomery Counties, Maryland. The area has compatible geology and a gas industry infrastructure for the nearby market populous of Baltimore and Washington D.C.. As Gas temperature is lowered, the compressibility of the gas reaches an optimum value. The compressibility of the gas, and the resultant gas density, is a function of temperature and pressure. This relationship can be used to commercial advantage by reducing the size of a storage cavern for a given working volume of natural gas. This study looks at this relationship and and the potential for commercialization of the process in a storage application. A conceptual process design, and cavern design were developed for various operating conditions. Potential site locations were considered and a typical plant layout was developed. In addition a geomechanical review of the proposed cavern design was performed, evaluating the stability of the mine rooms and shafts, and the effects of the refrigerated gas temperatures on the stability of the cavern. Capital and operating cost estimates were also developed for the various temperature cases considered. The cost estimates developed were used to perform a comparative market analysis of this type of gas storage system to other systems that are commercially used in the region of the study.

NONE

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Development of Advanced Environmental Control Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

mercury, on the other hand, is more readily captured because it is soluble in the liquids typically present in flue gas desulfurization scrubbers. Successful ionization of...

207

Desulfurization sorbent regeneration  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A spent solid sorbent resulting from the removal of hydrogen sulfide from a fuel gas flow is regenerated with a steam-air mixture. The mixture of steam and air may also include additional nitrogen or carbon dioxide. The gas mixture contacts the spent sorbent containing metal sulfide at a temperature above 500/sup 0/C to regenerate the sulfide to metal oxide or carbonate. Various metal species including the period four transition metals and the lanthanides are suitable sorbents that may be regenerated by this method. In addition, the introduction of carbon dioxide gas permits carbonates such as those of strontium, barium and calcium to be regenerated. The steam permits regeneration of spent sorbent without formation of metal sulfate. Moreover, the regeneration will proceed with low oxygen concentrations and will occur without the increase in temperature to minimize the risk of sintering and densification of the sorbent. This method may be used for high-temperature fuel cells.

Jalan, V.M.; Frost, D.G.

1982-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

208

Gas Technology Institute (Partnership for Advanced Residential Retrofit) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Technology Institute (Partnership for Advanced Residential Retrofit) Technology Institute (Partnership for Advanced Residential Retrofit) Jump to: navigation, search Name Gas Technology Institute Place Des Plaines, IL Website http://www.gastechnology.org/ Coordinates 42.0333623°, -87.8833991° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.0333623,"lon":-87.8833991,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

209

Advanced Materials for Mercury 50 Gas Turbine Combustion System  

SciTech Connect

Solar Turbines Incorporated (Solar), under cooperative agreement number DE-FC26-0CH11049, has conducted development activities to improve the durability of the Mercury 50 combustion system to 30,000 hours life and reduced life cycle costs. This project is part of Advanced Materials in the Advanced Industrial Gas Turbines program in DOE's Office of Distributed Energy. The targeted development engine was the Mercury{trademark} 50 gas turbine, which was developed by Solar under the DOE Advanced Turbine Systems program (DOE contract number DE-FC21-95MC31173). As a generator set, the Mercury 50 is used for distributed power and combined heat and power generation and is designed to achieve 38.5% electrical efficiency, reduced cost of electricity, and single digit emissions. The original program goal was 20,000 hours life, however, this goal was increased to be consistent with Solar's standard 30,000 hour time before overhaul for production engines. Through changes to the combustor design to incorporate effusion cooling in the Generation 3 Mercury 50 engine, which resulted in a drop in the combustor wall temperature, the current standard thermal barrier coated liner was predicted to have 18,000 hours life. With the addition of the advanced materials technology being evaluated under this program, the combustor life is predicted to be over 30,000 hours. The ultimate goal of the program was to demonstrate a fully integrated Mercury 50 combustion system, modified with advanced materials technologies, at a host site for a minimum of 4,000 hours. Solar was the Prime Contractor on the program team, which includes participation of other gas turbine manufacturers, various advanced material and coating suppliers, nationally recognized test laboratories, and multiple industrial end-user field demonstration sites. The program focused on a dual path development route to define an optimum mix of technologies for the Mercury 50 and future gas turbine products. For liner and injector development, multiple concepts including high thermal resistance thermal barrier coatings (TBC), oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloys, continuous fiber ceramic composites (CFCC), and monolithic ceramics were evaluated before down-selection to the most promising candidate materials for field evaluation. Preliminary, component and sub-scale testing was conducted to determine material properties and demonstrate proof-of-concept. Full-scale rig and engine testing was used to validated engine performance prior to field evaluation at a Qualcomm Inc. cogeneration site located in San Diego, California. To ensure that the CFCC liners with the EBC proposed under this program would meet the target life, field evaluations of ceramic matrix composite liners in Centaur{reg_sign} 50 gas turbine engines, which had previously been conducted under the DOE sponsored Ceramic Stationary Gas Turbine program (DE-AC02-92CE40960), was continued under this program at commercial end-user sites under Program Subtask 1A - Extended CFCC Materials Durability Testing. The goal of these field demonstrations was to demonstrate significant component life, with milestones of 20,000 and 30,000 hours. Solar personnel monitor the condition of the liners at the field demonstration sites through periodic borescope inspections and emissions measurements. This program was highly successful at evaluating advanced materials and down-selecting promising solutions for use in gas turbine combustions systems. The addition of the advanced materials technology has enabled the predicted life of the Mercury 50 combustion system to reach 30,000 hours, which is Solar's typical time before overhaul for production engines. In particular, a 40 mil thick advanced Thermal Barrier Coating (TBC) system was selected over various other TBC systems, ODS liners and CFCC liners for the 4,000-hour field evaluation under the program. This advanced TBC is now production bill-of-material at various thicknesses up to 40 mils for all of Solar's advanced backside-cooled combustor liners (Centaur 50, Taurus 60,

Price, Jeffrey

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

210

Advanced Materials for Mercury 50 Gas Turbine Combustion System  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Solar Turbines Incorporated (Solar), under cooperative agreement number DE-FC26-0CH11049, has conducted development activities to improve the durability of the Mercury 50 combustion system to 30,000 hours life and reduced life cycle costs. This project is part of Advanced Materials in the Advanced Industrial Gas Turbines program in DOE's Office of Distributed Energy. The targeted development engine was the Mercury{trademark} 50 gas turbine, which was developed by Solar under the DOE Advanced Turbine Systems program (DOE contract number DE-FC21-95MC31173). As a generator set, the Mercury 50 is used for distributed power and combined heat and power generation and is designed to achieve 38.5% electrical efficiency, reduced cost of electricity, and single digit emissions. The original program goal was 20,000 hours life, however, this goal was increased to be consistent with Solar's standard 30,000 hour time before overhaul for production engines. Through changes to the combustor design to incorporate effusion cooling in the Generation 3 Mercury 50 engine, which resulted in a drop in the combustor wall temperature, the current standard thermal barrier coated liner was predicted to have 18,000 hours life. With the addition of the advanced materials technology being evaluated under this program, the combustor life is predicted to be over 30,000 hours. The ultimate goal of the program was to demonstrate a fully integrated Mercury 50 combustion system, modified with advanced materials technologies, at a host site for a minimum of 4,000 hours. Solar was the Prime Contractor on the program team, which includes participation of other gas turbine manufacturers, various advanced material and coating suppliers, nationally recognized test laboratories, and multiple industrial end-user field demonstration sites. The program focused on a dual path development route to define an optimum mix of technologies for the Mercury 50 and future gas turbine products. For liner and injector development, multiple concepts including high thermal resistance thermal barrier coatings (TBC), oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloys, continuous fiber ceramic composites (CFCC), and monolithic ceramics were evaluated before down-selection to the most promising candidate materials for field evaluation. Preliminary, component and sub-scale testing was conducted to determine material properties and demonstrate proof-of-concept. Full-scale rig and engine testing was used to validated engine performance prior to field evaluation at a Qualcomm Inc. cogeneration site located in San Diego, California. To ensure that the CFCC liners with the EBC proposed under this program would meet the target life, field evaluations of ceramic matrix composite liners in Centaur{reg_sign} 50 gas turbine engines, which had previously been conducted under the DOE sponsored Ceramic Stationary Gas Turbine program (DE-AC02-92CE40960), was continued under this program at commercial end-user sites under Program Subtask 1A - Extended CFCC Materials Durability Testing. The goal of these field demonstrations was to demonstrate significant component life, with milestones of 20,000 and 30,000 hours. Solar personnel monitor the condition of the liners at the field demonstration sites through periodic borescope inspections and emissions measurements. This program was highly successful at evaluating advanced materials and down-selecting promising solutions for use in gas turbine combustions systems. The addition of the advanced materials technology has enabled the predicted life of the Mercury 50 combustion system to reach 30,000 hours, which is Solar's typical time before overhaul for production engines. In particular, a 40 mil thick advanced Thermal Barrier Coating (TBC) system was selected over various other TBC systems, ODS liners and CFCC liners for the 4,000-hour field evaluation under the program. This advanced TBC is now production bill-of-material at various thicknesses up to 40 mils for all of Solar's advanced backside-cooled combustor liners (Centaur 50, Taurus 60, Mars 100, Taurus 70,

Price, Jeffrey

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

211

Advanced Combustion Systems for Next Generation Gas Turbines  

SciTech Connect

Next generation turbine power plants will require high efficiency gas turbines with higher pressure ratios and turbine inlet temperatures than currently available. These increases in gas turbine cycle conditions will tend to increase NOx emissions. As the desire for higher efficiency drives pressure ratios and turbine inlet temperatures ever higher, gas turbines equipped with both lean premixed combustors and selective catalytic reduction after treatment eventually will be unable to meet the new emission goals of sub-3 ppm NOx. New gas turbine combustors are needed with lower emissions than the current state-of-the-art lean premixed combustors. In this program an advanced combustion system for the next generation of gas turbines is being developed with the goal of reducing combustor NOx emissions by 50% below the state-of-the-art. Dry Low NOx (DLN) technology is the current leader in NOx emission technology, guaranteeing 9 ppm NOx emissions for heavy duty F class gas turbines. This development program is directed at exploring advanced concepts which hold promise for meeting the low emissions targets. The trapped vortex combustor is an advanced concept in combustor design. It has been studied widely for aircraft engine applications because it has demonstrated the ability to maintain a stable flame over a wide range of fuel flow rates. Additionally, it has shown significantly lower NOx emission than a typical aircraft engine combustor and with low CO at the same time. The rapid CO burnout and low NOx production of this combustor made it a strong candidate for investigation. Incremental improvements to the DLN technology have not brought the dramatic improvements that are targeted in this program. A revolutionary combustor design is being explored because it captures many of the critical features needed to significantly reduce emissions. Experimental measurements of the combustor performance at atmospheric conditions were completed in the first phase of the program. Emissions measurements were obtained over a variety of operating conditions. A kinetics model is formulated to describe the emissions performance. The model is a tool for determining the conditions for low emission performance. The flow field was also modeled using CFD. A first prototype was developed for low emission performance on natural gas. The design utilized the tools anchored to the atmospheric prototype performance. The 1/6 scale combustor was designed for low emission performance in GE's FA+e gas turbine. A second prototype was developed to evaluate changes in the design approach. The prototype was developed at a 1/10 scale for low emission performance in GE's FA+e gas turbine. The performance of the first two prototypes gave a strong indication of the best design approach. Review of the emission results led to the development of a 3rd prototype to further reduce the combustor emissions. The original plan to produce a scaled-up prototype was pushed out beyond the scope of the current program. The 3rd prototype was designed at 1/10 scale and targeted further reductions in the full-speed full-load emissions.

Joel Haynes; Jonathan Janssen; Craig Russell; Marcus Huffman

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Low temperature aqueous desulfurization of coal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention describes a chemical process for desulfurizing coal, especially adaptable to the treatment of coal-water slurries, at temperatures as low as ambient, comprising treating the coal with aqueous titanous chloride whereby hydrogen sulfide is liberated and the desulfurized coal is separated with the conversion of titanous chloride to titanium oxides.

Slegeir, William A. (Hampton Bays, NY); Healy, Francis E. (Massapequa, NY); Sapienza, Richard S. (Shoreham, NY)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Low temperature aqueous desulfurization of coal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention describes a chemical process for desulfurizing coal, especially adaptable to the treatment of coal-water slurries, at temperatures as low as ambient, comprising treating the coal with aqueous titanous chloride whereby hydrogen sulfide is liberated and the desulfurized coal is separated with the conversion of titanous chloride to titanium oxides.

Slegeir, W.A.; Healy, F.E.; Sapienza, R.S.

1985-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

214

DEEP DESULFURIZATION OF DIESEL FUELS BY A NOVEL INTEGRATED APPROACH  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project is to explore a new desulfurization system concept, which consists of efficient separation of the refractory sulfur compounds from diesel fuel by selective adsorption, and effective hydrodesulfurization of the concentrated fraction of the refractory sulfur compounds in diesel fuels. Our approaches focused on (1) selecting and developing new adsorbents for selective adsorption of sulfur or sulfur compounds in commercial diesel fuel; (2) conducting the adsorption desulfurization of model fuels and real diesel fuels by the selective-adsorption-for-removing-sulfur (PSUSARS) process over various developed adsorbents, and examining the adsorptive desulfurization performance of various adsorbents; (3) developing and evaluating the regeneration methods for various spent adsorbent; (4) developing new catalysts for hydrodesulfurization of the refractory sulfur existing in the commercial diesel fuel; (5) on the basis of the fundamental understanding of the adsorptive performance and regeneration natures of the adsorbents, further confirming and improving the conceptual design of the novel PSU-SARS process for deep desulfurization of diesel fuel Three types of adsorbents, the metal-chloride-based adsorbents, the activated nickel-based adsorbents and the metal-sulfide-based adsorbents, have been developed for selective adsorption desulfurization of liquid hydrocarbons. All of three types of the adsorbents exhibit the significant selectivity for sulfur compounds, including alkyl dibenzothiophenes (DBTs), in diesel fuel. Adsorption desulfurization of real diesel fuels (regular diesel fuel (DF), S: 325 ppmw; low sulfur diesel fuel (LSD-I), S: 47 ppmw) over the nickel-based adsorbents (A-2 and A-5) has been conducted at different conditions by using a flowing system. The adsorption capacity of DF over A-2 corresponding to an outlet sulfur level of 30 ppmw is 2.8 mg-S/g-A. The adsorption capacity of LSD-I over A-5 corresponding to the break-through point at 5.0 ppmw sulfur level is 0.35 mg-S/g-A. The spent A-5 can be regenerated by using H2 gas at a flowing rate of 40-50 ml/min, 500 C, and ambient pressure. Adsorption desulfurization of model diesel fuels over metal-sulfide-based adsorbents (A-6-1 and A-6-2) has been conducted at different temperatures to examine the capacity and selectivity of the adsorbents. A regeneration method for the spent metal-sulfide-based adsorbents has been developed. The spent A-6-1 can be easily regenerated by washing the spent adsorbent with a polar solvent followed by heating the adsorbent bed to remove the remainder solvent. Almost all adsorption capacity of the fresh A-6-1 can be recovered after the regeneration. On the other hand, a MCM-41-supported HDS catalyst was developed for deep desulfurization of the refractory sulfur compounds. The results show that the developed MCM-41-supported catalyst demonstrates consistently higher activity for the HDS of the refractory dibenzothiophenic sulfur compounds than the commercial catalyst. On the basis of the fundamental understanding of the adsorptive performance and regeneration natures of the adsorbents, the conceptual design of the novel PSU-SARS process for deep desulfurization of diesel fuel is confirmed and improved further.

Xiaoliang Ma; Uday Turaga; Shingo Watanabe; Subramani Velu; Chunshan Song

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

REVISED NOTICE OF PROPOSED AWARDS Advanced Natural Gas Engine Research and Development for Class 3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

REVISED NOTICE OF PROPOSED AWARDS Advanced Natural Gas Engine Research and Development for Class 3 Notice (PON-12-504) entitled "Advanced Natural Gas Engine research and Development for Class 3 through of natural gas engine concepts for application in light heavy-duty vehicles (LHDV) and medium heavy duty

216

Environmental benefits of advanced oil and gas exploration and production technology  

SciTech Connect

THROUGHOUT THE OIL AND GAS LIFE CYCLE, THE INDUSTRY HAS APPLIED AN ARRAY OF ADVANCED TECHNOLOGIES TO IMPROVE EFFICIENCY, PRODUCTIVITY, AND ENVIRONMENTAL PERFORMANCE. THIS REPORT FOCUSES SPECIFICALLY ON ADVANCES IN EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION (E&P) OPERATIONS.

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

NETL: Gasification Systems - Advanced Acid Gas Separation Technology for  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Feed Systems Feed Systems Advanced Acid Gas Separation Technology for the Utilization of Low-Rank Coals Project Number: DE-FE0007759 Refinery offgas PSA at Air Products' facility in Baytown, TX Refinery offgas PSA at Air Products' facility in Baytown, TX. Air Products, in collaboration with the University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC), is testing its Sour Pressure Swing Adsorption (Sour PSA) process that separates syngas into an hydrogen-rich stream and second stream comprising of sulfur compounds(primarily hydrogen sulfide)carbon dioxide (CO2), and other impurities. The adsorbent technology testing that has been performed to date utilized syngas streams derived from higher rank coals and petcoke. Using data from experiments based on petcoke-derived syngas, replacing the

218

CONVERSION EXTRACTION DESULFURIZATION (CED) PHASE III  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project was undertaken to refine the Conversion Extraction Desulfurization (CED) technology to efficiently and economically remove sulfur from diesel fuel to levels below 15-ppm. CED is considered a generic term covering all desulfurization processes that involve oxidation and extraction. The CED process first extracts a fraction of the sulfur from the diesel, then selectively oxidizes the remaining sulfur compounds, and finally extracts these oxidized materials. The Department of Energy (DOE) awarded Petro Star Inc. a contract to fund Phase III of the CED process development. Phase III consisted of testing a continuous-flow process, optimization of the process steps, design of a pilot plant, and completion of a market study for licensing the process. Petro Star and the Degussa Corporation in coordination with Koch Modular Process Systems (KMPS) tested six key process steps in a 7.6-centimeter (cm) (3.0-inch) inside diameter (ID) column at gas oil feed rates of 7.8 to 93.3 liters per hour (l/h) (2.1 to 24.6 gallons per hour). The team verified the technical feasibility with respect to hydraulics for each unit operation tested and successfully demonstrated pre-extraction and solvent recovery distillation. Test operations conducted at KMPS demonstrated that the oxidation reaction converted a maximum of 97% of the thiophenes. The CED Process Development Team demonstrated that CED technology is capable of reducing the sulfur content of light atmospheric gas oil from 5,000-ppm to less than 15-ppm within the laboratory scale. In continuous flow trials, the CED process consistently produced fuel with approximately 20-ppm of sulfur. The process economics study calculated an estimated process cost of $5.70 per product barrel. The Kline Company performed a marketing study to evaluate the possibility of licensing the CED technology. Kline concluded that only 13 refineries harbored opportunity for the CED process. The Kline study and the research team's discussions with prospective refineries led to the conclusion that there were not likely prospects for the licensing of the CED process.

James Boltz

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

DOE-Funded Primer Underscores Technology Advances, Challenges of Shale Gas  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE-Funded Primer Underscores Technology Advances, Challenges of DOE-Funded Primer Underscores Technology Advances, Challenges of Shale Gas Development DOE-Funded Primer Underscores Technology Advances, Challenges of Shale Gas Development April 14, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, D.C. - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announces the release of "Modern Shale Gas Development in the United States: A Primer." The Primer provides regulators, policy makers, and the public with an objective source of information on the technology advances and challenges that accompany deep shale gas development. Natural gas production from hydrocarbon rich deep shale formations, known as "shale gas," is one of the most quickly expanding trends in onshore domestic oil and gas exploration. The lower 48 states have a wide

220

Methods, systems, and devices for deep desulfurization of fuel gases  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A highly effective and regenerable method, system and device that enables the desulfurization of warm fuel gases by passing these warm gasses over metal-based sorbents arranged in a mesoporous substrate. This technology will protect Fischer-Tropsch synthesis catalysts and other sulfur sensitive catalysts, without drastic cooling of the fuel gases. This invention can be utilized in a process either alone or alongside other separation processes, and allows the total sulfur in such a gas to be reduced to less than 500 ppb and in some instances as low as 50 ppb.

Li, Liyu (Richland, WA); King, David L. (Richland, WA); Liu, Jun (Richland, WA); Huo, Qisheng (Richland, WA)

2012-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas desulfurization advanced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Hot gas cleanup and gas turbine aspects of an advanced PFBC power plant  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of the second-generation PFBC development program is to advance this concept to a commercial status. Three major objectives of the current Phase 2 program activities are to: Separately test key components of the second-generation PFBC power plant at sub-scale to ascertain their performance characteristics, Revise the commercial plant performance and economic predictions where necessary, Prepare for a 1.6 MWe equivalent Phase 3 integrated subsystem test of the key components. The key components of the plant, with respect to development risk, are the carbonizer, the circulating PFBC unit, the ceramic barrier filter, and the topping combustor. This paper reports on the development and testing of one key component -- the ceramic barrier filter for the carbonizer fuel gas. The objective of the Phase 2 carbonizer ceramic barrier filter testing has been to confirm filter performance and operability in the carbonizer fuel gas environment.

Robertson, A. (Foster Wheeler Development Corp., Livingston, NJ (United States)); Newby, R.A.; Alvin, M.A.; Bachovchin, D.M.; Bruck, G.J.; Smeltzer, E.E. (Westinghouse Electric Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Science and Technology Center)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Desulfurization with transition metal catalysts. Quarterly summary  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this research is to develop desulfurizing transition metal catalysts, which are active in homogeneous media at moderate temperatures and pressures for the purification of coal-derived fuels and chemicals. To this end, the mechanism of action is being examined whereby newly identified nickel(0) complexes desulfurize organosulfur compounds in solution at 65 to 70/sup 0/C. The sulfur compounds under investigation are typical of those commonly encountered in coal-derived liquids and solids, such as thiophenes, sulfides and mercaptans. The following studies on the homogeneous, stoichiometric desulfurizing agent, bis(1,5-cyclooctadiene) nickel(0) ((COD)/sub 2/Ni), were continued: (a) activation of the agent by means of added mono-, bi-/sup 2/ and tri-dentate amines, either of the tertiary or primary amine type; (b) labeling studies designed to reveal the source of the hydrogen that replaces the sulfur in the desulfurization of dibenzothiophene; (c) comparison of the desulfurizing activity of (COD)/sub 2/Ni, both in the presence and in the absence of lithium aluminum hydride; and (d) testing for the role of any biphenylene intermediate in these desulfurizations. Results are reported.

Eisch, J J

1980-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

223

Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Program's TRISO Particle Fuel Sets A New World  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Program's TRISO Particle Fuel Sets A New Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Program's TRISO Particle Fuel Sets A New World Record For Irradiation Performance Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Program's TRISO Particle Fuel Sets A New World Record For Irradiation Performance November 16, 2009 - 1:12pm Addthis As part of the Office of Nuclear Energy's Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Program, the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development Program has achieved a new international record for irradiation testing of next-generation particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors (HTGRs). The AGR Fuel Development Program was initiated by the Department of Energy in 2002 to develop the advanced fabrication and characterization technologies, and provide irradiation and safety performance data required to license TRISO particle fuel for the NGNP and future HTGRs. The AGR

224

NETL: News Release - DOE-Fossil Energy: World's Most Advanced Gas Turbine  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

February 18, 2000 February 18, 2000 DOE-Fossil Energy: World's Most Advanced Gas Turbine Now Ready to Cross Commercial Threshold Secretary Richardson Cites Success of Government-Industry Partnership For natural gas turbines - the technology likely to dominate the growing market for new electric power generation - the future was unveiled today in Greenville, South Carolina. GE's MS7001H Advanced Gas Turbine The 4000-ton Model MS7001H advanced gas turbine is the size of a locomotive. Secretary of Energy Bill Richardson and U.S. Senator Ernest Hollings joined General Electric today in announcing that the company's newest H System™ gas turbine, the most advanced combustion turbine in the world, is ready to cross the commercial threshold. "Today, we are seeing the most advanced combustion turbine anywhere,

225

[Advanced Gas Turbine Systems Research]. Technical Quarterly Progress Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Major Accomplishments by Advanced Gas Turbine Systems Research (AGTSR) during this reporting period are highlighted below and amplified in later sections of this report: AGTSR distributed 50 proposals from the 98RFP to the IRB for review, evaluation and rank-ordering during the summer; AGTSR conducted a detailed program review at DOE-FETC on July 24; AGTSR organized the 1998 IRB proposal review meeting at SCIES on September 15-16; AGTSR consolidated all the IRB proposal scores and rank-orderings to facilitate the 98RFP proposal deliberations; AGTSR submitted meeting minutes and proposal short-list recommendation to the IRB and DOE for the 98RFP solicitation; AGTSR reviewed two gas turbine related proposals as part of the CU RFP State Project for renovating the central energy facility; AGTSR reviewed and cleared research papers with the IRB from the University of Pittsburgh, Wisconsin, and Minnesota; AGTSR assisted GTA in obtaining university stakeholder support of the ATS program from California, Pennsylvania, and Colorado; AGTSR assisted GTA in distributing alert notices on potential ATS budget cuts to over 150 AGTSR performing university members; AGTSR submitted proceedings booklet and organizational information pertaining to the OAI hybrid gas turbine workshop to DOE-FETC; For DOE-FETC, AGTSR updated the university consortium poster to include new members and research highlights; For DOE-FETC, the general AGTSR Fact Sheet was updated to include new awards, workshops, educational activity and select accomplishments from the research projects; For DOE-FETC, AGTSR prepared three fact sheets highlighting university research supported in combustion, aero-heat transfer, and materials; For DOE-FETC, AGTSR submitted pictures on materials research for inclusion in the ATS technology brochure; For DOE-FETC, AGTSR submitted a post-2000 roadmap showing potential technology paths AGTSR could pursue in the next decade; AGTSR distributed the ninth newsletter UPDATE to DOE, the IRB: and two interested partners involved in ATS; AGTSR submitted information on its RFP's, workshops, and educational activities for the 1999 ASMWIGTI technology report for worldwide distribution; AGTSR coordinated university poster session titles and format with Conference Management Associates (CMA) for the 98 ATS Annual; and AGTSR submitted 2-page abstract to CMA for the 98 ATS Review titled: ''AGTSR: A Virtual National Lab''.

NONE

1998-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

226

Advanced Materials and Processes for Gas Turbines TABLE OF ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Materials Issues for the Design of Industrial Gas Turbines [pp. 3-13] ... French Developments of Superalloys for Gas Turbine Disks and Blades [pp. 17-28

227

Advanced Acid Gas Separation Technology for Clean Power and Syngas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Syngas Processing Systems Syngas Processing Systems Advanced Acid Gas Separation Technology for Clean Power and Syngas Applications Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. Project Number: FE0013363 Project Description In this project, Air Products will operate a two-bed mobile system at the National Carbon Capture Center (NCCC) facility. A slipstream of authentic, high-hydrogen syngas based on low-rank coal will be evaluated as the feedstock. Testing will be conducted for approximately eight weeks, thereby providing far longer adsorbent exposure data than demonstrated to date. By utilizing real-world, high- hydrogen syngas, information necessary to understand the utility of the system for methanol production will be made available. In addition, Air Products will also operate a multi-bed PSA process development unit (PDU), located at its Trexlertown, PA headquarters, to evaluate the impact of incorporating pressure equalization steps in the process cycle. This testing will be conducted utilizing a sulfur-free, synthetic syngas, and will improve the reliability of the prediction of the system's operating performance at commercial scale.

228

Fracture behavior of advanced ceramic hot gas filters: Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of mechanical/microstructural evaluation, thermal shock/fatigue testing, and stress analyses of advanced hot-gas filters obtained from different manufacturers. These filters were fabricated from both monolithic ceramics and composites. The composite filters, made of both oxide and nonoxide materials, were in both as-fabricated and exposed conditions, whereas the monolithic filters were made only of nonoxide materials. Mechanical property measurement of composite filters included diametral compression testing with O-ring specimens and burst-testing of short filter segments with rubber plugs. In-situ strength of fibers in the composite filters was evaluated by microscopic technique. Thermal shock/fatigue resistance was estimated by measuring the strengths of filter specimens before and after thermal cycling from an air environment at elevated temperatures to a room temperature oil bath. Filter performance during mechanical and thermal shock/fatigue loadings was correlated with microstructural observations. Micromechanical models were developed to derive properties of composite filter constituents on the basis of measured mechanical properties of the filters. Subsequently, these properties were used to analytically predict the performance of composite filters during thermal shock loading.

Singh, J.P.; Majumdar, S.; Sutaria, M.; Bielke, W. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Energy Technology Div.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Pressurized fluidized-bed hydroretorting of Eastern oil shales -- Sulfur control. Topical report for Subtask 3.1, In-bed sulfur capture tests; Subtask 3.2, Electrostatic desulfurization; Subtask 3.3, Microbial desulfurization and denitrification  

SciTech Connect

This topical report on ``Sulfur Control`` presents the results of work conducted by the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT), the Illinois Institute of Technology (IIT), and the Ohio State University (OSU) to develop three novel approaches for desulfurization that have shown good potential with coal and could be cost-effective for oil shales. These are (1) In-Bed Sulfur Capture using different sorbents (IGT), (2) Electrostatic Desulfurization (IIT), and (3) Microbial Desulfurization and Denitrification (OSU and IGT). The objective of the task on In-Bed Sulfur Capture was to determine the effectiveness of different sorbents (that is, limestone, calcined limestone, dolomite, and siderite) for capturing sulfur (as H{sub 2}S) in the reactor during hydroretorting. The objective of the task on Electrostatic Desulfurization was to determine the operating conditions necessary to achieve a high degree of sulfur removal and kerogen recovery in IIT`s electrostatic separator. The objectives of the task on Microbial Desulfurization and Denitrification were to (1) isolate microbial cultures and evaluate their ability to desulfurize and denitrify shale, (2) conduct laboratory-scale batch and continuous tests to improve and enhance microbial removal of these components, and (3) determine the effects of processing parameters, such as shale slurry concentration, solids settling characteristics, agitation rate, and pH on the process.

Roberts, M.J.; Abbasian, J.; Akin, C.; Lau, F.S.; Maka, A.; Mensinger, M.C.; Punwani, D.V.; Rue, D.M. [Institute of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Gidaspow, D.; Gupta, R.; Wasan, D.T. [Illinois Inst. of Tech., Chicago, IL (United States); Pfister, R.M.: Krieger, E.J. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Comparison of intergrated coal gasification combined cycle power plants with current and advanced gas turbines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two recent conceptual design studies examined ''grass roots'' integrated gasification-combined cycle (IGCC) plants for the Albany Station site of Niagara Mohawk Power Corporation. One of these studies was based on the Texaco Gasifier and the other was developed around the British Gas Co.-Lurgi slagging gasifier. Both gasifiers were operated in the ''oxygen-blown'' mode, producing medium Btu fuel gas. The studies also evaluated plant performance with both current and advanced gas turbines. Coalto-busbar efficiencies of approximately 35 percent were calculated for Texaco IGCC plants using current technology gas turbines. Efficiencies of approximately 39 percent were obtained for the same plant when using advanced technology gas turbines.

Banda, B.M.; Evans, T.F.; McCone, A.I.; Westisik, J.H.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

CEC-500-2010-FS-XXX The Advanced Natural Gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as an alternative transportation fuel in California. In addition, natural gas storage options are expensive, flat panel natural gas storage tanks in vehicles and at fueling stations. PIER Program ObjectivesCEC-500-2010-FS-XXX The Advanced Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Tank Project TRANSPORTATION ENERGY

232

The DOE Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Materials for Nuclear Power Overview. The DOE Advanced ... electricity- generation applications, such as ... United States by reducing dependence on foreign ...

233

A BP neural network predictor model for desulfurizing molten iron  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Desulfurization of molten iron is one of the stages of steel production process. A back-propagation (BP) artificial neural network (ANN) model is developed to predict the operation parameters for desulfurization process in this paper. The primary objective ...

Zhijun Rong; Binbin Dan; Jiangang Yi

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Defining the needs for gas centrifuge enrichment plants advanced safeguards  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current safeguards approaches used by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) at gas centrifuge enrichment plants (GCEPs) need enhancement in order to verify declared low-enriched (LEU) production, detect undeclared LEU production and detect highly enriched uranium (HEU) production with adequate detection probability using nondestructive assay (NDA) techniques. At present inspectors use attended systems, systems needing the presence of an inspector for operation, during inspections to verify the mass and {sup 235}U enrichment of declared UF{sub 6} containers used in the process of enrichment at GCEPs. In verifying declared LEU production, the inspectors also take samples for off-site destructive assay (DA) which provide accurate data, with 0.1% to 0.5% measurement uncertainty, on the enrichment of the UF{sub 6} feed, tails, and product. However, taking samples of UF{sub 6} for off-site analysis is a much more labor and resource intensive exercise for the operator and inspector. Furthermore, the operator must ship the samples off-site to the IAEA laboratory which delays the timeliness of results and interruptions to the continuity of knowledge (CofK) of the samples during their storage and transit. This paper contains an analysis of possible improvements in unattended and attended NDA systems such as process monitoring and possible on-site analysis of DA samples that could reduce the uncertainty of the inspector's measurements and provide more effective and efficient IAEA GCEPs safeguards. We also introduce examples advanced safeguards systems that could be assembled for unattended operation.

Boyer, Brian David [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Erpenbeck, Heather H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Miller, Karen A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swinhoe, Martyn T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ianakiev, Kiril [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Marlowe, Johnna B [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

NETL: News Release - Advanced Natural Gas Turbine Hailed as Top Power  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

December 30, 2003 December 30, 2003 Advanced Natural Gas Turbine Hailed as Top Power Project of 2003 Power Engineering Cites Product of Energy Department's Advanced Turbine Systems Program WASHINGTON, DC - A power plant featuring a next-generation gas turbine developed as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's advanced turbine systems program has been selected by Power Engineering magazine as one of three "2003 Projects of the Year." Baglan Bay Power Station Baglan Bay Power Station, South Wales, U.K. Photo courtesy of GE Power Systems The Baglan Bay Power Station near Cardiff, Wales, UK reached a major milestone for the global power industry when GE Power System's H System gas turbine debuted there earlier this year. The most advanced combustion turbine in the world, the H System is the first gas turbine combined-cycle

236

Powder Metallurgy Products for Advanced Gas Turbine Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ties for gas turbine a.pplications. At Avco Lycoming, powder metallurgy activity has focused upon a series of high strength nickel base superalloys. These alloys  ...

237

Advanced Laser Machining Techniques for Cooling Holes in Gas...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

that will improve the predictability and repeatability of cooling hole performance in gas turbine blades while meeting manufacturing cost objectives. The water guided laser...

238

Gas Turbines for Advanced Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

APFBC uses a circulating pressurized fluidized bed combustor (PFBC) with a fluid bed heat exchanger to develop hot vitiated air for the gas turbine' s topping combustor and...

239

Advanced Acid Gas Separation Technology for the Utilization of...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

can be adapted to carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) capture while supplying synthesis gas (syngas) to produce power, hydrogen (H 2 ), chemical products or combinations thereof....

240

Evaluation of gasification and gas cleanup processes for use in molten carbonate fuel cell power plants. Final report. [Contains lists and evaluations of coal gasification and fuel gas desulfurization processes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report satisfies the requirements for DOE Contract AC21-81MC16220 to: List coal gasifiers and gas cleanup systems suitable for supplying fuel to molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFC) in industrial and utility power plants; extensively characterize those coal gas cleanup systems rejected by DOE's MCFC contractors for their power plant systems by virtue of the resources required for those systems to be commercially developed; develop an analytical model to predict MCFC tolerance for particulates on the anode (fuel gas) side of the MCFC; develop an analytical model to predict MCFC anode side tolerance for chemical species, including sulfides, halogens, and trace heavy metals; choose from the candidate gasifier/cleanup systems those most suitable for MCFC-based power plants; choose a reference wet cleanup system; provide parametric analyses of the coal gasifiers and gas cleanup systems when integrated into a power plant incorporating MCFC units with suitable gas expansion turbines, steam turbines, heat exchangers, and heat recovery steam generators, using the Westinghouse proprietary AHEAD computer model; provide efficiency, investment, cost of electricity, operability, and environmental effect rankings of the system; and provide a final report incorporating the results of all of the above tasks. Section 7 of this final report provides general conclusions.

Jablonski, G.; Hamm, J.R.; Alvin, M.A.; Wenglarz, R.A.; Patel, P.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas desulfurization advanced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Outline of plan for advanced reheat gas turbine  

SciTech Connect

A new reheat gas turbine system is being developed in Japan. The machine consists of two axial flow compressors, three turbines, intercooler, combustor and reheater. The pilot plant is expected to go into operation in 1982, and a prototype plant will be set up in 1984. The major objective of this reheat gas turbine is application to a combined cycle power plant, with LNG burning, and the final target of combined cycle thermal efficiency is to be 55 percent (LHV).

Hori, A.; Takeya, K.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Recombinant DNA encoding a desulfurization biocatalyst  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to a recombinant DNA molecule containing a gene or genes which encode a biocatalyst capable of desulfurizing a fossil fuel which contains organic sulfur molecules. For example, the present invention encompasses a recombinant DNA molecule containing a gene or genes of a strain of Rhodococcus rhodochrous.

Rambosek, John (Seattle, WA); Piddington, Chris S. (Seattle, WA); Kovacevich, Brian R. (Seattle, WA); Young, Kevin D. (Grand Forks, ND); Denome, Sylvia A. (Thompson, ND)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Recombinant DNA encoding a desulfurization biocatalyst  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to a recombinant DNA molecule containing a gene or genes which encode a biocatalyst capable of desulfurizing a fossil fuel which contains organic sulfur molecules. For example, the present invention encompasses a recombinant DNA molecule containing a gene or genes of a strain of Rhodococcus rhodochrous. 13 figs.

Rambosek, J.; Piddington, C.S.; Kovacevich, B.R.; Young, K.D.; Denome, S.A.

1994-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

244

Advanced gas turbines: The choice for low-cost, environmentally superior electric power generation  

SciTech Connect

In July 1993, the US Department of Energy (DOE) initiated an ambitious 8-year program to advance state-of-the-art gas turbine technology for land-based electric power generation. The program, known as the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Program, is a joint government/industry program with the objective to demonstrate advanced industrial and utility gas turbine systems by the year 2000. The goals of the ATS Program are to develop gas turbine systems capable of providing low-cost electric power, while maintaining environmental superiority over competing power generation options. A progress report on the ATS Program pertaining to program status at DOE will be presented and reviewed in this paper. The technical challenges, advanced critical technology requirements, and systems designs meeting the goals of the program will be described and discussed.

Zeh, C.M.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Hydrogen Sulfide, Oil and Gas, and People's Lana Skrtic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at sewage treatment plants, manure-handling plants, tanneries, and coke oven plants.5 2 EPA, "Report standard cubic feet)."9 Sour gas is routinely `sweetened' at processing facilities called desulfurization Process for Desulfurizing Ultra-deep Natural Gas Near the Wellhead," presented at Natural Gas Technologies

Kammen, Daniel M.

246

Advanced natural gas fuel technologies for military installations. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Energy conservation efforts reduced Department of Defense (DoD) fossil fuel consumption considerably between FYX5 and FY9 I, yet electricity consumption increased. Electricity consumption accounts for only one-third of DoD energy use, but over half of DoD energy costs. In addition, the production of electricity at coal or nuclear plants often creates environmental concerns, while the use of clean-burning natural gas does not; its use can help DoD bases comply with increasingly stringent environmental regulations. Recent developments in natural gas-fired technologies also demonstrate improved efficiency and productivity at lower costs. This report identifies state-of-the-art and emerging natural gas utilization technologies with potential application on DoD installations. This report describes various technologies that have potential residential, commercial, or industrial applications on DoD installations. Applications include heating, cooling, power generation, food preparation, and several industrial processes.

Savoie, M.J.; Freeman, P.M.; Blazek, C.F.; Potts, N.L.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Enhanced durability and reactivity for zinc ferrite desulfurization sorbent. Volume 1, Bench-scale testing and analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

AMAX Research & Development Center (AMAX R&D) has been investigating methods for enhancing the reactivity and durability of the zinc ferrite desulfurization sorbent. Zinc ferrite sorbents are intended for use in desulfurization of hot coal gas in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) or molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) applications. For the present program, the reactivity of the sorbent may be defined as its sulfur sorption capacity at the breakthrough point and at saturation in a bench-scale, fixed-bed reactor. Durability may be defined as the ability of the sorbent to maintain important physical characteristics such As size, strength, and specific surface area during 10 cycles of sulfidation and oxidation.

Jha, M.C.; Berggren, M.H.

1989-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

248

Advanced Gas Turbine (AGT) powertrain system development for automotive applications  

SciTech Connect

Topics covered include the AGT 101 engine test compressor design modification cold air turbine testing Mod 1 alloy turbine rotor fabrication combustion aspects regenerator development and thermal screening tests for ceramic materials. The foil gas bearings, rotor dynamics, and AGT controls and accessories are also considered.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Reactivity of target compounds for chemical coal desulfurization. Technical report, March 1, 1994--May 31, 1994  

SciTech Connect

This project seeks to identify representative organosulfur compounds which are removed by known coal desulfurization reactions. Demineralized coals are solvent extracted and the extracts fractionated to concentrate organosulfur compounds for analysis by Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectroscopy. After sulfur compounds are characterized, the parent extracts are subjected to reactions previously shown to reduce the organic sulfur content of Illinois coals, fractionated and again analyzed for organosulfur content to determine if the identified compounds reacted during the chemical treatment. The original coal also will be subjected to chemical desulfurization, extraction, fractionation and analysis in order to correlate changes in organic sulfur content of the coal with reactions of specific sulfur compounds. These compounds can thus be reliably considered as target molecules for the next generation of desulfurization processes. Work during this quarter has shown that fractionation and chromatography of pyridine extracts to isolate suitable samples for GC/MS analysis, although time-consuming, appears to be better than direct toluene extraction in terms of providing a representative set of compounds for analysis. The toluene soluble fractions prepared by this route contain aromatic sulfur compounds and O, N, S-containing hetrocycles. A set of these compounds has been identified and their fate following desulfurization of the parent coal extracts is under investigation. Previously studied desulfurization reactions using the single electron transfer reagent, K/THF/naphthalene, and the reactive nickel boride reagent have been repeated and analyzed by GC/MS. SET and nickel boride reactions of the THF soluble portions of pyridine coal are currently in progress.

Buchanan, D.H.; Amin, M.; Cunningham, R.; Galyen, J.; Ho, K.K.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Advanced Hydraulic Fracturing Technology for Unconventional Tight Gas Reservoirs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objectives of this project are to develop and test new techniques for creating extensive, conductive hydraulic fractures in unconventional tight gas reservoirs by statistically assessing the productivity achieved in hundreds of field treatments with a variety of current fracturing practices ranging from 'water fracs' to conventional gel fracture treatments; by laboratory measurements of the conductivity created with high rate proppant fracturing using an entirely new conductivity test - the 'dynamic fracture conductivity test'; and by developing design models to implement the optimal fracture treatments determined from the field assessment and the laboratory measurements. One of the tasks of this project is to create an 'advisor' or expert system for completion, production and stimulation of tight gas reservoirs. A central part of this study is an extensive survey of the productivity of hundreds of tight gas wells that have been hydraulically fractured. We have been doing an extensive literature search of the SPE eLibrary, DOE, Gas Technology Institute (GTI), Bureau of Economic Geology and IHS Energy, for publicly available technical reports about procedures of drilling, completion and production of the tight gas wells. We have downloaded numerous papers and read and summarized the information to build a database that will contain field treatment data, organized by geographic location, and hydraulic fracture treatment design data, organized by the treatment type. We have conducted experimental study on 'dynamic fracture conductivity' created when proppant slurries are pumped into hydraulic fractures in tight gas sands. Unlike conventional fracture conductivity tests in which proppant is loaded into the fracture artificially; we pump proppant/frac fluid slurries into a fracture cell, dynamically placing the proppant just as it occurs in the field. From such tests, we expect to gain new insights into some of the critical issues in tight gas fracturing, in particular the roles of gel damage, polymer loading (water-frac versus gel frac), and proppant concentration on the created fracture conductivity. To achieve this objective, we have designed the experimental apparatus to conduct the dynamic fracture conductivity tests. The experimental apparatus has been built and some preliminary tests have been conducted to test the apparatus.

Stephen Holditch; A. Daniel Hill; D. Zhu

2007-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

251

Effects of external boost compression on gas turbine performance in an advanced CPFBC application  

SciTech Connect

When a commercial gas turbine, designed and optimized for natural gas fuel, is used in an Advanced Circulating Pressurized Fluid Bed Combustor (CPFBC) application, changes occur that affect both the thermodynamic cycle and the performance of the individual components. These come principally from the increased pressure drop encountered between the compressor discharge and expander inlet, with changes in gas properties and flow rates for the hot combustion products having secondary effects. Net effect is that power output can be reduced and significant design and/or operational compromises may be required for the gas turbine. Application of an external boost compressor can mitigate these effects.

Freier, M.D. [USDOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center, WV (United States); Goldstein, H.N.; White, J.S. [Parsons Power Group, Inc., Reading, PA (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

252

Advanced Underground Gas Storage Concepts Refrigerated-Mined Cavern Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

UNDERGROUND GAS STORAGE CONCEPTS UNDERGROUND GAS STORAGE CONCEPTS REFRIGERATED-MINED CAVERN STORAGE FINAL REPORT DOE CONTRACT NUMBER DE-AC26-97FT34349 SUBMITTED BY: PB-KBB INC. 11757 KATY FREEWAY, SUITE 600 HOUSTON, TX 77079 SEPTEMBER 1998 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily

253

Advanced coal-fueled industrial cogeneration gas turbine system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of the Solar/METC program is to prove the technical, economic, and environmental feasibility of coal-fired gas turbine for cogeneration applications through tests of a Centaur Type H engine system operated on coal fuel throughout the engine design operating range. This quarter, work was centered on design, fabrication, and testing of the combustor, cleanup, fuel specifications, and hot end simulation rig. 2 refs., 59 figs., 29 tabs.

LeCren, R.T.; Cowell, L.H.; Galica, M.A.; Stephenson, M.D.; Wen, C.S.

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Final report for the Advanced Natural Gas Vehicle Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The project objective was to develop the technologies necessary to prototype a dedicated compressed natural gas (CNG) powered, mid-size automobile with operational capabilities comparable to gasoline automobiles. A system approach was used to design and develop the engine, gas storage system and vehicle packaging. The 2.4-liter DOHC engine was optimized for natural gas operation with high-compression pistons, hardened exhaust valves, a methane-specific catalytic converter and multi-point gaseous injection. The chassis was repackaging to increase space for fuel storage with a custom-designed, cast-aluminum, semi-trailing arm rear suspension system, a revised flat trunk sheet-metal floorpan and by equipping the car with run-flat tires. An Integrated Storage system (ISS) was developed using all-composite, small-diameter cylinders encapsulated within a high-strength fiberglass shell with impact-absorbing foam. The prototypes achieved the target goals of a city/highway driving range of 300 miles, ample trunk capacity, gasoline vehicle performance and ultra low exhaust emissions.

John Wozniak

1999-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

255

DESULFURIZATION OF COAL MODEL COMPOUNDS AND COAL LIQUIDS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pollutants Associated With Coal Combustion. • E.P.A.Control Guidelines for Coal-Derived Pollutants .Forms of Sulfur in Coal • . . . . Coal Desulfurization

Wrathall, James Anthony

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Advanced combustion technologies for gas turbine power plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Objectives are to develop actuators for enhancing the mixing between gas streams, increase combustion stability, and develop hgih-temperature materials for actuators and sensors in combustors. Turbulent kinetic energy maps of an excited jet with co-flow in a cavity with a partially closed exhaust end are given with and without a longitudinal or a transverse acoustic field. Dielectric constants and piezoelectric coefficients were determined for Sr{sub 2}(Nb{sub x}Ta{sub 1-x}){sub 2}O{sub 7} ceramics.

Vandsburger, U. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Roe, L.A. [Arkansas Univ., Fayetteville, AR (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Desu, S.B. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

257

Compatibility of alternative fuels with advanced automotive gas-turbine and Stirling engines. A literature survey  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The application of alternative fuels in advanced automotive gas turbine and Stirling engines is discussed on the basis of a literature survey. These alternative engines are briefly described, and the aspects that will influence fuel selection are identified. Fuel properties and combustion properties are discussed, with consideration given to advanced materials and components. Alternative fuels from petroleum, coal, oil shale, alcohol, and hydrogen are discussed, and some background is given about the origin and production of these fuels. Fuel requirements for automotive gas turbine and Stirling engines are developed, and the need for certain research efforts is discussed. Future research efforts planned at Lewis are described. 52 references.

Cairelli, J.; Horvath, D.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

ULTRACLEAN FUELS PRODUCTION AND UTILIZATION FOR THE TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY: ADVANCES TOWARDS SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORTATION FUELS  

SciTech Connect

Ultraclean fuels production has become increasingly important as a method to help decrease emissions and allow the introduction of alternative feed stocks for transportation fuels. Established methods, such as Fischer-Tropsch, have seen a resurgence of interest as natural gas prices drop and existing petroleum resources require more intensive clean-up and purification to meet stringent environmental standards. This review covers some of the advances in deep desulfurization, synthesis gas conversion into fuels and feed stocks that were presented at the 245th American Chemical Society Spring Annual Meeting in New Orleans, LA in the Division of Energy and Fuels symposium on "Ultraclean Fuels Production and Utilization".

Fox, E.

2013-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

259

Pilot-Scale and Full-Scale Evaluation of Treatment Technologies for the Removal of Mercury and Selenium in Flue Gas Desulphurization Water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents an overall evaluation of the various advanced treatment technologies that the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has tested for removal of mercury and selenium from flue gas desulfurization (FGD) water. EPRI conducted a literature survey followed by a preliminary laboratory-scale evaluation to screen promising technologies. For the technologies that were selected based on the success of laboratory-scale testing, EPRI worked with treatment vendors to further evaluate these techn...

2010-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

260

Advanced Gas Turbine Guidelines: Hot Gas Path Parts Condition and Remaining Life Assessment for GE 7FA in Baseload Operation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Based on two years experience operating four advanced gas turbines (AGT) General Electric MS 7221 FA at Martin CC of Florida Power & Light (FP&L), this guideline describes the operating and maintenance philosophy used for baseload AGT units and the integrity of the hot path components and their remaining life. The guideline will assist utilities operating the GE MS 7221FA class AGT plan inspections and comparisons with other units in this class.

1997-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas desulfurization advanced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Enhanced durability and reactivity for zinc ferrite desulfurization sorbent  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

AMAX Research Development Center (AMAX R D) investigated methods for enhancing the reactivity and durability of zinc ferrite desulfurization sorbents. Zinc ferrite sorbents are intended for use in desulfurization of hot coal gas in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) or molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) applications. For this program, the reactivity of the sorbent may be defined as its sulfur sorption capacity at the breakthrough point and at saturation in a bench-scale, fixed-bed reactor. Durability may be defined as the ability of the sorbent to maintain important physical characteristics such as size, strength, and specific surface area during 10 cycles of sulfidation and oxidation. Two base case sorbents, a spherical pellet and a cylindrical extrude used in related METC-sponsored projects, were used to provide a basis for the aimed enhancement in durability and reactivity. Sorbent performance was judged on the basis of physical properties, single particle kinetic studies based on thermogravimetric (TGA) techniques, and multicycle bench-scale testing of sorbents. A sorbent grading system was utilized to quantify the characteristics of the new sorbents prepared during the program. Significant enhancements in both reactivity and durability were achieved for the spherical pellet shape over the base case formulation. Overall improvements to reactivity and durability were also made to the cylindrical extrude shape. The primary variables which were investigated during the program included iron oxide type, zinc oxide:iron oxide ratio, inorganic binder concentration, organic binder concentration, and induration conditions. The effects of some variables were small or inconclusive. Based on TGA studies and bench-scale tests, induration conditions were found to be very significant.

Berggren, M.H.; Jha, M.C.

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Development of a Desulfurization Strategy for a NOx Adsorber Catalyst  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Improve NOx regeneration calibration developed in DECSE Phase I project to understand full potential of NOx adsorber catalyst over a range of operating temperatures. Develop and demonstrate a desulfurization process to restore NOx conversion efficiency lost to sulfur contamination. Investigate effect of desulfurization process on long-term performance of the NOx adsorber catalyst.

Tomazic, Dean

2000-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

263

Advanced Sensor Approaches for Monitoring and Control of Gas Turbine Combustors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Seitzman and T. Lieuwen Seitzman and T. Lieuwen SCIES Project 02- 01- SR102 DOE COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT DE-FC26-02NT41431 Tom J. George, Program Manager, DOE/NETL Richard Wenglarz, Manager of Research, SCIES Project Awarded (5/1/2002, 36 Month Duration) $337,501 Total Contract Value ($327,501 DOE) Advanced Sensor Approaches For Monitoring and Control Of Gas Turbine Combustors Georgia Institute of Technology JS/TL 10/19/05 Advanced Sensors 10/19/05 2 Gas Turbine Need * Gas turbines must operate with ultra-low levels of pollutant emissions - Problem: lean, premixed operation causes minimal pollutant generation but introduces combustion problems, such as instabilities and blowoff * Combustor health and performance information needed to optimize engine across competing demands of emissions levels, power output, and

264

SoCalGas - New Construction Advanced Homes Incentives | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

New Construction Advanced Homes Incentives New Construction Advanced Homes Incentives SoCalGas - New Construction Advanced Homes Incentives < Back Eligibility Construction Installer/Contractor Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Solar Buying & Making Electricity Maximum Rebate Base incentives increase until building is 45% above code. Program Info Expiration Date 12/15/2013 State California Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Baseline Advanced Home Incentives: $75-$225/kW, $0.43-$1.29/kWh, $1.72-$5.14/Therm (15%-45% above code) California ENERGY STAR Marketing Support: CAHP provides marketing material valued at up to 10% of baseline project incentive On-site Photovoltaics: Additional $1,000 per single-family unit and $200

265

Enhanced durability of high-temperature desulfurization sorbents for moving-bed applications  

SciTech Connect

Sulfur removal will be mandatory for all power generation coal gas applications in order to comply with future environmental standards. Two promising technologies that are currently being optimized for coal-based power generation are the integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) and the gasifier/molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) systems. Zinc ferrite is currently the leading candidate to serve as a sulfur removal agent in the IGCC systems. GE has developed a patented moving-bed coal gas desulfurization system that has been shown to achieve a reduction in complexity and cost in a simplified IGCC system relative to conventional IGCC configurations (Cook et al, 1988).

Ayala, R.E. (GE Corporate Research and Development, Schenectady, NY (USA)); Gal, E. (GE Environmental Systems, Lebanon, PA (USA)); Gangwal, S.K. (Research Triangle Institute, NC (USA)); Jain, S. (Dept. of Energy, Morgantown, WV (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Government/industry partnership: A revolutionary approach in global leadership of advanced gas turbines  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has established a government/industry partnership program to greatly improve the capabilities of U.S. gas turbine technology. A new and challenging program named the Advanced Turbine Systems Program (ATS) has been initiated by DOE. The technical and business objectives of this initiative are to challenge the bounds of high performance capabilities of gas turbines, meet stringent environmental requirements, and produce lower cost electric power and cogeneration steam. This program will also yield greater societal benefits through continued expansion of high skilled U.S. jobs and export of U.S. products world wide. A progress report on the ATS program pertaining to program status at DOE will be presented and reviewed in this paper. A preliminary design of an industrial advanced turbine system configuration will also be outlined in the paper. The technical challenges; advanced critical technologies incorporation, analytical and experimental solutions, and test results of an advanced gas turbine meeting the DOE goals will be described and discussed.

Ali, S.A. [Allison Engine Co., Indianapolis, IN (United States); Zeh, C.M. [Morgantown Energy Technology Center, WV (United States)

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Anion-exchange resin-based desulfurization process. Annual technical progress report, October 1, 1992--September 30, 1993  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Under the DOE Grant No. DE-FG22-90PC90309, the University of Tennessee Space Institute (UTSI) has been directed to further develop an anion-exchange, resin-based desulfurization concept that has been developed and tested on a limited scope for feasibility. From environmental as well as the economic viewpoints, it is necessary that the soluble sulfates of alkali metal sorbents be desulfurized (regenerated) and recycled to make regenerative flue gas desulfurization and MHD spent seed regeneration options more attractive. In order to achieve this, a low-temperature, low-cost desulfurization process to reactivate spent alkali metal sorbents is necessary. UTSI`s anion-exchange, resin-based concept uses the available technology and is believed to satisfy this requirement. In this DOE-sponsored project, UTSI, will perform the following investigations: Screening of commercially available resins; process variables study and improving resin performance; optimization of resin-regeneration step; evaluation of performance enhancers; development of Best-Process Schematic and related economics, and planning for proof-of-concept (POC) scale testing. The above activities have been grouped into five major tasks and the entire project is expected to take thirty-six months to complete.

Sheth, A.C.; Dharmapurikar, R.; Strevel, S.D.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Advanced gas turbine systems research. Quarterly report, January--March, 1994  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy is sponsoring a series of studies related to advanced gas turbine systems. Ten universities participated in the first round studies, and an additional 13 studies have been funded this year. The five areas being covered are heat transfer, aerodynamics, materials, combustion, and dynamics. Summaries are given for the 6-month progress on the 1993 subcontract studies and on the planned research for the new subcontract studies.

Not Available

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Method for the desulfurization of hot product gases from coal gasifier  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The gasification of sulfur-bearing coal produces a synthesis gas which contains a considerable concentration of sulfur compounds especially hydrogen sulfide that renders the synthesis gas environmentally unacceptable unless the concentration of the sulfur compounds is significantly reduced. To provide for such a reduction in the sulfur compounds a calcium compound is added to the gasifier with the coal to provide some sulfur absorption. The synthesis gas from the gasifier contains sulfur compounds and is passed through an external bed of a regenerable solid absorbent, preferably zinc ferrite, for essentially completed desulfurizing the hot synthesis gas. This absorbent is, in turn, periodically or continuously regenerated by passing a mixture of steam and air or oxygen through the bed for converting absorbed hydrogen sulfide to sulfur dioxide. The resulting tail gas containing sulfur dioxide and steam is injected into the gasifier where the sulfur dioxide is converted by the calcium compound into a stable form of sulfur such as calcium sulfate.

Grindley, Thomas (Morgantown, WV)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Method for the desulfurization of hot product gases from a coal gasifier  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The gasification of sulfur-bearing coal produces a synthesis gas which contains a considerable concentration of sulfur compounds, especially hydrogen sulfide that renders the synthesis gas environmentally unacceptable unless the concentration of the sulfur compounds is significantly reduced. To provide for such a reduction in the sulfur compounds a calcium compound is added to the gasifier with the coal to provide some sulfur absorption. The synthesis gas from the gasifier contains sulfur compounds and is passed through an external bed of a regenerable solid absorbent, preferably zinc ferrite, for essentially completed desulfurizing the hot synthesis gas. This absorbent is, in turn, periodically or continuously regenerated by passing a mixture of steam and air or oxygen through the bed for converting absorbed hydrogen sulfide to sulfur dioxide. The resulting tail gas containing sulfur dioxide and steam is injected into the gasifier where the sulfur dioxide is converted by the calcium compound into a stable form of sulfur such as calcium sulfate. 2 figs.

Grindley, T.

1986-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

271

The second and third NGNP advanced gas reactor fuel irradiation experiments  

SciTech Connect

The United States Dept. of Energy's Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program is currently scheduled to irradiate a total of five low enriched uranium (LEU) tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The irradiations are being accomplished to demonstrate and qualify new TRISO coated particle fuel for use in high temperature gas cooled reactors. The experiments will each consist of at least six separate capsules, and will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control of each capsule. The effluent sweep gas will also have on-line fission product monitoring to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation. The first experiment (designated AGR-1) started irradiation in December 2006 and completed a very successful irradiation in early November 2009. The second experiment (AGR-2) started irradiation in June 2010, and the third and fourth experiments have been combined into a single larger irradiation (AGR-3/4) that is currently being assembled. The design and status of the second through fourth experiments as well as the irradiation results of the second experiment to date are discussed. (authors)

Grover, S. B.; Petti, D. A. [Idaho National Laboratory, 2525 N. Fremont Ave., Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Advanced coal fueled industrial cogeneration gas turbine system. Final report, June 1986--April 1994  

SciTech Connect

Demonstration of a direct coal-fueled gas turbine system that is environmentally, technically, and economically viable depends on the satisfactory resolution of several key issues. Solar Turbines, Incorporates technical approach to these issues was to advance a complete direct coal-fueled gas turbine system that incorporated near-term technology solutions to both historically demonstrated problem areas such as deposition, erosion, and hot end corrosion, and to the emergent environmental constraints based on NO{sub x}, SO{sub x}, and particulates. Solar`s program approach was keyed to the full commercialization of the coal-fueled cogeneration gas turbine which would occur after extended field verification demonstrations conducted by the private sector. The program was structured in three phases plus an optional fourth phase: Phase 1 -- system description; Phase 2 -- component development; Phase 3 -- prototype system verification; and Phase 4 -- field evaluation.

LeCren, R.T.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Advanced coal-fueled industrial cogeneration gas turbine system. Annual report, June 1990--June 1991  

SciTech Connect

Advances in coal-fueled gas turbine technology over the past few years, together with recent DOE-METC sponsored studies, have served to provide new optimism that the problems demonstrated in the past can be economically resolved and that the coal-fueled gas turbine can ultimately be the preferred system in appropriate market application sectors. The objective of the Solar/METC program is to prove the technical, economic, and environmental feasibility of a coal-fired gas turbine for cogeneration applications through tests of a Centaur Type H engine system operated on coal fuel throughout the engine design operating range. The five-year program consists of three phases, namely: (1) system description; (2) component development; (3) prototype system verification. A successful conclusion to the program will initiate a continuation of the commercialization plan through extended field demonstration runs.

LeCren, R.T.; Cowell, L.H.; Galica, M.A.; Stephenson, M.D.; Wen, C.S.

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Communications to the Editor Room-Temperature Desulfurization of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

difficult to remove in the hydroprocessing of crude oil.3 In homogeneous models, orga- nometallic nickel of polynuclear complexes in the desulfurization of various thiophenes,6 led us to prepare a dinuclear nickel

Jones, William D.

275

Advances in Conjugated Linoleic Acid Research, Vol 2Chapter 2 Gas Chromatography - Mass Spectrometry of Conjugated Linoleic Acids and Metabolites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advances in Conjugated Linoleic Acid Research, Vol 2 Chapter 2 Gas Chromatography - Mass Spectrometry of Conjugated Linoleic Acids and Metabolites Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Dow

276

Melt Infiltrated Ceramic Matrix Composites for Shrouds and Combustor Liners of Advanced Industrial Gas Turbines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report covers work performed under the Advanced Materials for Advanced Industrial Gas Turbines (AMAIGT) program by GE Global Research and its collaborators from 2000 through 2010. A first stage shroud for a 7FA-class gas turbine engine utilizing HiPerComp{reg_sign}* ceramic matrix composite (CMC) material was developed. The design, fabrication, rig testing and engine testing of this shroud system are described. Through two field engine tests, the latter of which is still in progress at a Jacksonville Electric Authority generating station, the robustness of the CMC material and the shroud system in general were demonstrated, with shrouds having accumulated nearly 7,000 hours of field engine testing at the conclusion of the program. During the latter test the engine performance benefits from utilizing CMC shrouds were verified. Similar development of a CMC combustor liner design for a 7FA-class engine is also described. The feasibility of using the HiPerComp{reg_sign} CMC material for combustor liner applications was demonstrated in a Solar Turbines Ceramic Stationary Gas Turbine (CSGT) engine test where the liner performed without incident for 12,822 hours. The deposition processes for applying environmental barrier coatings to the CMC components were also developed, and the performance of the coatings in the rig and engine tests is described.

Gregory Corman; Krishan Luthra; Jill Jonkowski; Joseph Mavec; Paul Bakke; Debbie Haught; Merrill Smith

2011-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

277

The Next Generation Nuclear Plant/Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Irradiation Experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor  

SciTech Connect

The United States Department of Energy’s Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Program will be irradiating eight separate low enriched uranium (LEU) tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The ATR has a long history of irradiation testing in support of reactor development and the INL has been designated as the new United States Department of Energy’s lead laboratory for nuclear energy development. The ATR is one of the world’s premiere test reactors for performing long term, high flux, and/or large volume irradiation test programs. These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States, and will be irradiated over the next ten years to demonstrate and qualify new particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. The experiments, which will each consist of at least six separate capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control of each capsule. The sweep gas will also have on-line fission product monitoring on its effluent to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation. The first experiment (designated AGR-1) started irradiation in December 2006, and the second experiment (AGR-2) is currently in the design phase. The design of test trains, as well as the support systems and fission product monitoring system that will monitor and control the experiment during irradiation will be discussed. In addition, the purpose and differences between the two experiments will be compared and the irradiation results to date on the first experiment will be presented.

S. Blaine Grover

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Fuel-cycle greenhouse gas emissions impacts of alternative transportation fuels and advanced vehicle technologies.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

At an international conference on global warming, held in Kyoto, Japan, in December 1997, the United States committed to reduce its greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by 7% over its 1990 level by the year 2012. To help achieve that goal, transportation GHG emissions need to be reduced. Using Argonne's fuel-cycle model, I estimated GHG emissions reduction potentials of various near- and long-term transportation technologies. The estimated per-mile GHG emissions results show that alternative transportation fuels and advanced vehicle technologies can help significantly reduce transportation GHG emissions. Of the near-term technologies evaluated in this study, electric vehicles; hybrid electric vehicles; compression-ignition, direct-injection vehicles; and E85 flexible fuel vehicles can reduce fuel-cycle GHG emissions by more than 25%, on the fuel-cycle basis. Electric vehicles powered by electricity generated primarily from nuclear and renewable sources can reduce GHG emissions by 80%. Other alternative fuels, such as compressed natural gas and liquefied petroleum gas, offer limited, but positive, GHG emission reduction benefits. Among the long-term technologies evaluated in this study, conventional spark ignition and compression ignition engines powered by alternative fuels and gasoline- and diesel-powered advanced vehicles can reduce GHG emissions by 10% to 30%. Ethanol dedicated vehicles, electric vehicles, hybrid electric vehicles, and fuel-cell vehicles can reduce GHG emissions by over 40%. Spark ignition engines and fuel-cell vehicles powered by cellulosic ethanol and solar hydrogen (for fuel-cell vehicles only) can reduce GHG emissions by over 80%. In conclusion, both near- and long-term alternative fuels and advanced transportation technologies can play a role in reducing the United States GHG emissions.

Wang, M. Q.

1998-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

279

Fuel-cycle greenhouse gas emissions impacts of alternative transportation fuels and advanced vehicle technologies.  

SciTech Connect

At an international conference on global warming, held in Kyoto, Japan, in December 1997, the United States committed to reduce its greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by 7% over its 1990 level by the year 2012. To help achieve that goal, transportation GHG emissions need to be reduced. Using Argonne's fuel-cycle model, I estimated GHG emissions reduction potentials of various near- and long-term transportation technologies. The estimated per-mile GHG emissions results show that alternative transportation fuels and advanced vehicle technologies can help significantly reduce transportation GHG emissions. Of the near-term technologies evaluated in this study, electric vehicles; hybrid electric vehicles; compression-ignition, direct-injection vehicles; and E85 flexible fuel vehicles can reduce fuel-cycle GHG emissions by more than 25%, on the fuel-cycle basis. Electric vehicles powered by electricity generated primarily from nuclear and renewable sources can reduce GHG emissions by 80%. Other alternative fuels, such as compressed natural gas and liquefied petroleum gas, offer limited, but positive, GHG emission reduction benefits. Among the long-term technologies evaluated in this study, conventional spark ignition and compression ignition engines powered by alternative fuels and gasoline- and diesel-powered advanced vehicles can reduce GHG emissions by 10% to 30%. Ethanol dedicated vehicles, electric vehicles, hybrid electric vehicles, and fuel-cell vehicles can reduce GHG emissions by over 40%. Spark ignition engines and fuel-cell vehicles powered by cellulosic ethanol and solar hydrogen (for fuel-cell vehicles only) can reduce GHG emissions by over 80%. In conclusion, both near- and long-term alternative fuels and advanced transportation technologies can play a role in reducing the United States GHG emissions.

Wang, M. Q.

1998-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

280

Advanced Multi-Effect Distillation System for Desalination Using Waste Heat fromGas Brayton Cycles  

SciTech Connect

Generation IV high temperature reactor systems use closed gas Brayton Cycles to realize high thermal efficiency in the range of 40% to 60%. The waste heat is removed through coolers by water at substantially greater average temperature than in conventional Rankine steam cycles. This paper introduces an innovative Advanced Multi-Effect Distillation (AMED) design that can enable the production of substantial quantities of low-cost desalinated water using waste heat from closed gas Brayton cycles. A reference AMED design configuration, optimization models, and simplified economics analysis are presented. By using an AMED distillation system the waste heat from closed gas Brayton cycles can be fully utilized to desalinate brackish water and seawater without affecting the cycle thermal efficiency. Analysis shows that cogeneration of electricity and desalinated water can increase net revenues for several Brayton cycles while generating large quantities of potable water. The AMED combining with closed gas Brayton cycles could significantly improve the sustainability and economics of Generation IV high temperature reactors.

Haihua Zhao; Per F. Peterson

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas desulfurization advanced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Advanced Gas Turbine Guidelines Summary of Overall Operating History and Experience from GE 7F in Peaking Operation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This guideline report describes the operating history, performance, and maintenance protocol for advanced gas turbine units. It details the effects of peaking service on the integrity and life of hot-gas-path parts such as buckets and combustors and the frequency of hot gas path inspections. The results have serious implications for the reliability, availability, and maintainability of these units when subjected to peaking operation.

1997-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

282

Assessment of hot gas contaminant control  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this work is to gather data and information to assist DOE in responding to the NRC recommendation on hot gas cleanup by performing a comprehensive assessment of hot gas cleanup systems for advanced coal-based Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) and Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC) including the status of development of the components of the hot gas cleanup systems, and the probable cost and performance impacts. The scope and time frame of information gathering is generally responsive to the boundaries set by the National Research council (NRC), but includes a broad range of interests and programs which cover hot gas cleanup through the year 2010. As the status of hot gas cleanup is continually changing, additional current data and information are being obtained for this effort from this 1996 METC Contractors` Review Meeting as well as from the 1996 Pittsburgh Coal Conference, and the University of Karlsruhe Symposium. The technical approach to completing this work consists of: (1) Determination of the status of hot gas cleanup technologies-- particulate collection systems, hot gas desulfurization systems, and trace contaminant removal systems; (2) Determination of hot gas cleanup systems cost and performance sensitivities. Analysis of conceptual IGCC and PFBC plant designs with hot gas cleanup have been performed. The impact of variations in hot gas cleanup technologies on cost and performance was evaluated using parametric analysis of the baseline plant designs and performance sensitivity.

Rutkowski, M.D.; Klett, M.G.; Zaharchuk, R.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

283

Advanced onboard storage concepts for natural gas-fueled automotive vehicles  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this study was the evaluation, both through experimentation and a literature review, of several advanced concepts for storing natural gas at reduced pressure. The advanced concepts included adsorption on high surface area carbon, adsorption in high porosity zeolite, storage in clathration compounds, and storage by dissolution in liquid solvents. Results indicated that high surface area carbons with high packing density were the best low pressure storage mediums. A simple mathematical model was used to compare adsorption storage on a state-of-the-art carbon with compression storage. The model indicated that a vehicle using adsorption storage of natural gas at 3.6 MPa will have 36% of the range, on the EPA city cycle, of a vehicle operating on a compression storage system having the same physical size and a peak storage pressure of 21 MPa. However, preliminary experiments and current literature suggest that the storage capacity of state-of-the-art carbons could be improved by as much as 50%, and that adsorption systems having a capacity equal to compression storage at 14 MPa are possible without exceeding a maximum pressure of 3.6 MPa.

Remick, R.J.; Elkins, R.H.; Camara, E.H.; Bulicz, T.

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Microbial reduction of SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} as a means of by-product recovery/disposal from regenerable processes for the desulfurization of flue gas. Technical progress report, September 11, 1992--December 11, 1992  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

With the continual increase in the utilization of high sulfur and high nitrogen containing fossil fuels, the release of airborne pollutants into the environment has become a critical problem. The fuel sulfur is converted to SO{sub 2} during combustion. Fuel nitrogen and a fraction of the nitrogen from the combustion air are converted to nitric oxide and nitrogen dioxide, NO{sub x}. For the past five years Combustion Engineering (now Asea Brown Boveri or ABB) and, since 1986, the University of Tulsa (TU) have been investigating the oxidation of H{sub 2}S by the facultatively anaerobic and autotrophic bacterium Thiobacillus denitrificans and have developed a process, concept for the microbial removal of H{sub 2}S from a gas stream the simultaneous removal of SO{sub 2} and NO by D. desulfuricans and T. denitrificans co-cultures and cultures-in-series was demonstrated. These systems could not be sustained due to NO inhibition of D. desulfuricans. However, a preliminary economic analysis has shown that microbial reduction of SO{sub 2} to H{sub 2}S with subsequent conversion to elemental sulfur by the Claus process is both technically and economically feasible if a less expensive carbon and/or energy source can be found. It has also been demonstrated that T. denitrificans can be grown anaerobically on NO(g) as a terminal electron acceptor with reduction to elemental nitrogen. Microbial reduction of NO{sub x} is a viable process concept for the disposal of concentrated streams of NO{sub x} as may be produced by certain regenerable processes for the removal of SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} from flue gas.

Sublette, K.L.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

285

Advanced Underground Gas Storage Concepts: Refrigerated-Mined Cavern Storage, Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the past 40 years, cavern storage of LPG's, petrochemicals, such as ethylene and propylene, and other petroleum products has increased dramatically. In 1991, the Gas Processors Association (GPA) lists the total U.S. underground storage capacity for LPG's and related products of approximately 519 million barrels (82.5 million cubic meters) in 1,122 separate caverns. Of this total, 70 are hard rock caverns and the remaining 1,052 are caverns in salt deposits. However, along the eastern seaboard of the U.S. and the Pacific northwest, salt deposits are not available and therefore, storage in hard rocks is required. Limited demand and high cost has prevented the construction of hard rock caverns in this country for a number of years. The storage of natural gas in mined caverns may prove technically feasible if the geology of the targeted market area is suitable; and economically feasible if the cost and convenience of service is competitive with alternative available storage methods for peak supply requirements. Competing methods include LNG facilities and remote underground storage combined with pipeline transportation to the area. It is believed that mined cavern storage can provide the advantages of high delivery rates and multiple fill withdrawal cycles in areas where salt cavern storage is not possible. In this research project, PB-KBB merged advanced mining technologies and gas refrigeration techniques to develop conceptual designs and cost estimates to demonstrate the commercialization potential of the storage of refrigerated natural gas in hard rock caverns. DOE has identified five regions, that have not had favorable geological conditions for underground storage development: New England, Mid-Atlantic (NY/NJ), South Atlantic (DL/MD/VA), South Atlantic (NC/SC/GA), and the Pacific Northwest (WA/OR). PB-KBB reviewed published literature and in-house databases of the geology of these regions to determine suitability of hard rock formations for siting storage caverns, and gas market area storage needs of these regions.

none

1998-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

286

The DOE Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy has established the Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification Program to address the following overall goals: Provide a baseline fuel qualification data set in support of the licensing and operation of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). Gas-reactor fuel performance demonstration and qualification comprise the longest duration research and development (R&D) task for the NGNP feasibility. The baseline fuel form is to be demonstrated and qualified for a peak fuel centerline temperature of 1250°C. Support near-term deployment of an NGNP by reducing market entry risks posed by technical uncertainties associated with fuel production and qualification. Utilize international collaboration mechanisms to extend the value of DOE resources. The Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification Program consists of five elements: fuel manufacture, fuel and materials irradiations, postirradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing, fuel performance modeling, and fission product transport and source term evaluation. An underlying theme for the fuel development work is the need to develop a more complete fundamental understanding of the relationship between the fuel fabrication process, key fuel properties, the irradiation performance of the fuel, and the release and transport of fission products in the NGNP primary coolant system. Fuel performance modeling and analysis of the fission product behavior in the primary circuit are important aspects of this work. The performance models are considered essential for several reasons, including guidance for the plant designer in establishing the core design and operating limits, and demonstration to the licensing authority that the applicant has a thorough understanding of the in-service behavior of the fuel system. The fission product behavior task will also provide primary source term data needed for licensing. An overview of the program and recent progress will be presented.

David Petti; Hans Gougar; Gary Bell

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Gas fired advanced turbine system. Phase 1, System scoping and feasibility studies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The basic concept thus derived from the Ericsson cycle is an intercooled, recuperated, and reheated gas turbine. Theoretical performance analyses, however, showed that reheat at high turbine rotor inlet temperatures (TRIT) did not provide significant efficiency gains and that the 50 percent efficiency goal could be met without reheat. Based upon these findings, the engine concept adopted as a starting point for the gas-fired advanced turbine system is an intercooled, recuperated (ICR) gas turbine. It was found that, at inlet temperatures greater than 2450{degrees}F, the thermal efficiency could be maintained above 50%, provided that the turbine cooling flows could be reduced to 7% of the main air flow or lower. This dual and conflicting requirement of increased temperatures and reduced cooling will probably force the abandonment of traditional air cooled turbine parts. Thus, the use of either ceramic materials or non-air cooling fluids has to be considered for the turbine nozzle guide vanes and turbine blades. The use of ceramic components for the proposed engine system is generally preferred because of the potential growth to higher temperatures that is available with such materials.

LeCren, R.T.; White, D.J.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Functionally gradient materials for thermal barrier coatings in advanced gas turbine systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

New designs for advanced gas turbine engines for power production are required to have higher operating temperatures in order to increase efficiency. However, elevated temperatures will increase the magnitude and severity of environmental degradation of critical turbine components (e.g. combustor parts, turbine blades, etc.). To offset this problem, the usage of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) has become popular by allowing an increase in maximum inlet temperatures for an operating engine. Although thermal barrier technology is over thirty years old, the principle failure mechanism is the spallation of the ceramic coating at or near the ceramic/bond coat interface. Therefore, it is desirable to develop a coating that combines the thermal barrier qualities of the ceramic layer and the corrosion protection by the metallic bond coat without the detrimental effects associated with the localization of the ceramic/metal interface to a single plane.

Banovic, S.W.; Chan, H.M.; Marder, A.R. [Lehigh Univ., Bethlehem, PA (United States)] [and others

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

289

Advanced Gas Turbine Guidelines: Startup and Operations of the Siemens 84.3A in Peaking Service  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Worldwide pressures to reduce power generation costs have led domestic and foreign manufacturers to build high-efficiency gas turbines using leading-edge technology. To assure the staying power of these turbines, EPRI launched a multi-year Durability Surveillance Program in 1991 to monitor advanced industrial gas turbines currently produced by major turbine manufacturers. This report discusses the startup and initial site testing of a new Siemens Model V84.3A combustion turbine at the Hawthorn Station op...

1997-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

290

Advanced Gas Turbine Guidelines: Data Acquisition System and Baseline Data: Durability Surveillance at Potomac Electric Power Compan y's Station H  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Operational data provides the key resource in establishing baseline data for the new "F class" of advanced gas turbines. These guidelines describe the use of a data acquisition system (DAS) to collect operational data and the subsequent real-time and historical trend analyses of gas turbine performance. The guidelines specifically address the installation and operation of a DAS at a General Electric MS7001F turbine operating in simple-cycle peaking mode.

1999-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

291

Thermal barrier coatings issues in advanced land-based gas turbines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Energy`s Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) program is aimed at fostering the development of a new generation of land-based gas turbine systems with overall efficiencies significantly beyond those of current state-of-the-art machines, as well as greatly increased times between inspection and refurbishment, improved environmental impact, and decreased cost. The proposed duty cycle of ATS machines will emphasize different criteria in the selection of materials for the critical components. In particular, thermal barrier coatings (TBCS) will be an essential feature of the hot gas path components in these machines. In fact, the goals of the ATS will require significant improvements in TBC technology, since these turbines will be totally reliant on TBCs, which will be required to function on critical components such as the first stage vanes and blades for times considerably in excess of those experienced in current applications. Issues that assume increased importance are the mechanical and chemical stability of the ceramic layer and of the metallic bond coat; the thermal expansion characteristics and compliance of the ceramic layer; and the thermal conductivity across the thickness of the ceramic layer. Obviously, the ATS program provides a very challenging opportunity for TBCs, and involves some significant opportunities to extend this technology. A significant TBC development effort is planned in the ATS program which will address these key issues.

Parks, W.P. [USDOE Office of Industrial Technologies, Washington, DC (United States); Lee, W.Y.; Wright, I.G. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Advanced Turbine Systems Program conceptual design and product development. Task 3.0, Selection of natural gas-fired Advanced Turbine System  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents results of Task 3 of the Westinghouse ATS Phase II program. Objective of Task 3 was to analyze and evaluate different cycles for the natural gas-fired Advanced Turbine Systems in order to select one that would achieve all ATS program goals. About 50 cycles (5 main types) were evaluated on basis of plant efficiency, emissions, cost of electricity, reliability-availability-maintainability (RAM), and program schedule requirements. The advanced combined cycle was selected for the ATS plant; it will incorporate an advanced gas turbine engine as well as improvements in the bottoming cycle and generator. Cost and RAM analyses were carried out on 6 selected cycle configurations and compared to the baseline plant. Issues critical to the Advanced Combined Cycle are discussed; achievement of plant efficiency and cost of electricity goals will require higher firing temperatures and minimized cooling of hot end components, necessitating new aloys/materials/coatings. Studies will be required in combustion, aerodynamic design, cooling design, leakage control, etc.

NONE

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Advanced Gas Turbine Guidelines: Vibration Monitoring and Analysis: Durability Surveillance at Potomac Electric Power Company's Stat ion H  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The analyses performed by EPRI's Vibration Monitoring and Analysis System (VMAS) represent an important source of steady- state and transient operational data. These advanced gas turbine guidelines discuss state-of-the art vibration analysis methods, monitoring systems, and sensors as well as troubleshooting approaches for engine-related problems.

1999-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

294

Advanced Gas Turbine Guidelines: Rotating Blade Temperature Measurement System (BTMS): Durability Surveillance at Potomac Electric P ower Company's Station H  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The blade scans performed by EPRI's Blade Temperature Measurement System (BTMS) represent an important source of blade metal temperature data. These advanced gas turbine guidelines describe the design, installation, and operation of the BTMS in a utility power plant. The guidelines include an analysis of blade temperature scans as well as a summary of lessons learned.

1999-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

295

PRODUCTION OF CONSTRUCTION AGGREGATES FROM FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION SLUDGE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The three main conclusions of this report are: (1) The pilot plant successfully demonstrated the continuous, fully-integrated, long-term process operation, including the mixing, pelletizing, and curing steps for aggregate production. The curing vessel, which was designed for the pilot plant test, was operated in a mass flow mode and performed well during pilot plant operation. (2) The pilot plant test demonstrated process flexibility. The same equipment was used to produce lightweight, medium-weight, and road aggregates. The only change was the mix formulation. Aggregates were produced from a variety of mix designs and from FGD sludge with solids concentrations between 45.0% and 56.7% and moisture contents between 55.0% and 43.3%. (3) The pilot plant provided operating data and experience to design and cost a commercial plant, which was not part of the cooperative agreement.

M.M. Wu; D.C. McCoy; R.O. Scandrol; M.L. Fenger; J.A. Withum; R.M. Statnick

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

THERMODYNAMIC DATA FOR FLUE-GAS DESULFURIZATION PROCESSES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Energy, Div. of Fossil Energy, Report FE-2710-1, pg. 24 (by the Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy, Office of Coalby the Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy, Off1ce of Coal

Brewer, Leo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

THERMODYNAMIC DATA FOR FLUE-GAS DESULFURIZATION PROCESSES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

De Carvalho, J. Chern. Thermodynamics D. Detry, J. Drowart,Vanderzee, J. Chern. Thermodynamics ! Q,lll3-36 (1978). (43)L.G. Hepler, J. Chern. Thermodynamics~~ (45) J.E. Desnoyers,

Brewer, Leo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Flue Gas Desulfurization Bid Preparation and Proposal Review Guideline  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The prospect of more stringent limits for sulfur dioxide (SO2) has led power producers to begin planning for the future installation of FGD systems to meet new emission limits for their power plants. Major activity has already begun with the announcements of system-wide FGD system installations by many utilities in the southeastern United States. Contractor selection is a critical component to the successful compliance with regulatory requirements. This document provides utilities with the tools that the...

2003-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

299

Inspection Guideline for Wet Flue Gas Desulfurization Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Severe corrosion attack has occurred in several absorber vessels constructed of duplex 2205 and 255 stainless steels. There are also mounting concerns that earlier generation absorber vessels fabricated with austenitic stainless steels may also be subject to underdeposit and pitting corrosion attack. This corrosion attack has been found in several of the spray tower/ tray tower and jet bubble reactor designs constructed of stainless steels and are reported to be occurring with relatively little service l...

2011-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

300

THERMODYNAMIC DATA FOR FLUE-GAS DESULFURIZATION PROCESSES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

N.T. Ioffe, et. al. Thermodynamic Constants of Materials,Heats and Related Thermodynamic Quan- ti ties , John W i 1 eN.P.L. Computer Analysed Thermodynamic Data: Organic and

Brewer, Leo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas desulfurization advanced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Development and testing of low-Btu fuel gas turbine combustors  

SciTech Connect

The integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) concept represents a highly efficient and environmentally compatible advanced coal fueled power generation technology. When IGCC is coupled with high temperature desulfurization, or hot gas cleanup (HGCU), the efficiency and cost advantage of IGCC is further improved with respect to systems based on conventional low temperature gas cleanup. Commercialization of the IGCC/HGCU concept requires successful development of combustion systems for high temperature low Btu fuel in gas turbines. Toward this goal, a turbine combustion system simulator has been designed, constructed, and fired with high temperature low Btu fuel. Fuel is supplied by a pilot scale fixed bed gasifier and hot gas desulfurization system. The primary objectives of this project are: (1) demonstration of long term operability of the turbine simulator with high temperature low Btu fuel; (2) characterization of particulates and other contaminants in the fuel as well as deposits in the fuel nozzle, combustor, and first stage nozzle; and (3) measurement of NO{sub x}, CO, unburned hydrocarbons, trace element, and particulate emissions.

Bevan, S.; Abuaf, N.; Feitelberg, A.S.; Hung, S.L.; Samuels, M.S.; Tolpadi, A.K.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Advanced Gas Turbine Systems Research, Technical Quarterly Progress Report. October 1, 1998--December 31, 1998  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Major accomplishments during this reporting period by the Advanced Gas Turbine Systems Research (AGTSR) are: AGTSR submitted FY99 program continuation request to DOE-FETC for $4M; AGTSR submitted program and workshop Formation to the Collaborative Advanced Gas Turbine (CAGT) initiative; AGTSR distributed research accomplishment summaries to DOE-FETC in the areas of combustion, aero-heat transfer, and materials; AGTSR reviewed and cleared research papers with the IRB from Arizona State, Cornell, Wisconsin, Minnesota, Pittsburgh, Clemson, Texas and Georgia Tech; AGTSR prepared background material for DOE-FETC on three technology workshops for distribution at the DOE-ATS conference in Washington, DC; AGTSR coordinated two recommendations for reputable firms to conduct an economic impact analysis in support of new DOE gas turbine initiatives; AGTSR released letters announcing the short-list winners/non-winners from the 98RFP solicitation AGTSR updated fact sheet for 1999 and announced four upcoming workshops via the SCIES web page AGTSR distributed formation to EPRI on research successes, active university projects, and workshop offerings in 1999 AGTSR continued to conduct telephone debriefings to non-winning PI's born the 98RFP solicitation AGTSR distributed completed quarterly progress report assessments to the IRB experts in the various technology areas AGTSR provided Formation to GE-Evandale on the active combustion control research at Georgia Tech AGTSR provided information to AlliedSignal and Wright-Pat Air Force Base on Connecticut's latest short-listed proposal pertaining to NDE of thermal barrier coatings AGTSR submitted final technical reports from Georgia Tech - one on coatings and the other on active combustion control - to the HU3 for review and evaluation AGTSR coordinated the format, presentation and review of 28 university research posters for the ATS Annual Review Meeting in November, 1998 AGTSR published a research summary paper at the ATS Annual Review pertaining to the university consortium's activities AGTSR published and presented a paper on the status of ATS catalytic combustion R&D at the RTA/NATO Gas Turbine Combustion Symposium, October 12-16,1998 in Lisbon, Portugal IRE approved a 12-month add-on request from Penn State University to conduct an added research task in their multistage unsteady aerodynamics project AGTSR reviewed a research extension white paper from Clemson University with the IRB to conduct an added task pertaining to their mist/steam cooling research project AGTSR coordinated new research topics with the IR.Band select universities to facilitate R&D roadmapping needs at the Aero-Heat Transfer III workshop in Austin, TX AGTSR distributed FY97 research progress reports to DOE and the XRB; and AGTSR solicited new R&D topics from the IRB experts for the 1999 RFP.

NONE

1999-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

303

LOW-ENGINE-FRICTION TECHNOLOGY FOR ADVANCED NATURAL-GAS RECIPROCATING ENGINES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This program aims at improving the efficiency of advanced natural-gas reciprocating engines (ANGRE) by reducing piston/ring assembly friction without major adverse effects on engine performance, such as increased oil consumption and emissions. An iterative process of simulation, experimentation and analysis, are being followed towards achieving the goal of demonstrating a complete optimized low-friction engine system. To date, a detailed set of piston/ring dynamic and friction models have been developed and applied that illustrated the fundamental relationships between design parameters and friction losses. Various low-friction strategies and ring-design concepts have been explored, and engine experiments have been done on a full-scale Waukesha VGF F18 in-line 6 cylinder power generation engine rated at 370 kW at 1800 rpm. Current accomplishments include designing and testing ring-packs using a subtle top-compression-ring profile (skewed barrel design), lowering the tension of the oil-control ring, employing a negative twist to the scraper ring to control oil consumption. Initial test data indicate that piston ring-pack friction was reduced by 35% by lowering the oil-control ring tension alone, which corresponds to a 1.5% improvement in fuel efficiency. Although small in magnitude, this improvement represents a first step towards anticipated aggregate improvements from other strategies. Other ring-pack design strategies to lower friction have been identified, including reduced axial distance between the top two rings, tilted top-ring groove. Some of these configurations have been tested and some await further evaluation. Colorado State University performed the tests and Waukesha Engine Dresser, Inc. provided technical support. Key elements of the continuing work include optimizing the engine piston design, application of surface and material developments in conjunction with improved lubricant properties, system modeling and analysis, and continued technology demonstration in an actual full-sized reciprocating natural-gas engine.

Victor W. Wong; Tian Tian; Grant Smedley; Jeffrey Jocsak

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

304

Fission Product Monitoring and Release Data for the Advanced Gas Reactor -1 Experiment  

SciTech Connect

The AGR-1 experiment is a fueled multiple-capsule irradiation experiment that was irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) from December 26, 2006 until November 6, 2009 in support of the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Technology Development Office (TDO) Fuel Development and Qualification program. An important measure of the fuel performance is the quantification of the fission product releases over the duration of the experiment. To provide this data for the inert fission gasses(Kr and Xe), a fission product monitoring system (FPMS) was developed and implemented to monitor the individual capsule effluents for the radioactive species. The FPMS continuously measured the concentrations of various krypton and xenon isotopes in the sweep gas from each AGR-1 capsule to provide an indicator of fuel irradiation performance. Spectrometer systems quantified the concentrations of Kr-85m, Kr-87, Kr-88, Kr-89, Kr-90, Xe-131m, Xe-133, Xe 135, Xe 135m, Xe-137, Xe-138, and Xe-139 accumulated over repeated eight hour counting intervals.-. To determine initial fuel quality and fuel performance, release activity for each isotope of interest was derived from FPMS measurements and paired with a calculation of the corresponding isotopic production or birthrate. The release activities and birthrates were combined to determine Release-to-Birth ratios for the selected nuclides. R/B values provide indicators of initial fuel quality and fuel performance during irradiation. This paper presents a brief summary of the FPMS, the release to birth ratio data for the AGR-1 experiment and preliminary comparisons of AGR-1 experimental fuels data to fission gas release models.

Dawn M. Scates; John B. Walter; Jason M. Harp; Mark W. Drigert; Edward L. Reber

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

LIFAC Sorbent Injection Desulfurization Demonstration Project...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of the flue gas in a separate activation reactor, which increases SO 2 removal. An electrostatic precipitator downstream from the point of injection captures the reaction...

306

LOW-ENGINE-FRICTION TECHNOLOGY FOR ADVANCED NATURAL-GAS RECIPROCATING ENGINES  

SciTech Connect

This program aims at improving the efficiency of advanced natural-gas reciprocating engines (ANGRE) by reducing piston/ring assembly friction without major adverse effects on engine performance, such as increased oil consumption and emissions. A detailed set of piston/ring dynamic and friction models have been developed and applied that illustrated the fundamental relationships between design parameters and friction losses. Various low-friction strategies and concepts have been explored, and engine experiments will validate these concepts. An iterative process of experimentation, simulation and analysis, will be followed with the goal of demonstrating a complete optimized low-friction engine system. As planned, MIT has developed guidelines for an initial set of low-friction piston-ring-pack designs. Current recommendations focus on subtle top-piston-ring and oil-control-ring characteristics. A full-scale Waukesha F18 engine has been installed at Colorado State University and testing of the baseline configuration is in progress. Components for the first design iteration are being procured. Subsequent work includes examining the friction and engine performance data and extending the analyses to other areas to evaluate opportunities for further friction improvement and the impact on oil consumption/emission and wear, towards demonstrating an optimized reduced-friction engine system.

Victor W. Wong; Tian Tian; Grant Smedley

2003-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

307

Advanced coal-fueled gas turbine systems. Technical progress report, October--December 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Activity towards completing Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) Phase I work was begun again in December. Effort to complete the Phase I work was temporarily suspended upon receipt of the ATS Phase II RFP the last week in August. The Westinghouse ATS team`s efforts were directed at preparing the ATS Phase II proposal which was submitted November 18. It is planned to finish Phase I work and submit the topical report by the end of February 1993. The objective of the four slogging combustor tests conducted during this reporting period (i.e., tests SL3-1 through SL3-4) were to perform sulfur capture experiments using limestoneand iron oxide based sorbents and to collect exhaust vapor phase and solids bound alkali measurements using the Westinghouse and Ames Laboratory alkali probes/monitors. The most significant, if not outstanding result revealed by these tests is that the Ames alkali monitor indicates that the vapor phase sodium is approximately 23--30 ppbw and the vapor phase potassium is approximately 5--20 ppbw. For reference, alkalilevels of 20 ppbw are acceptable in Westinghouse gas turbines fueled with crude oil.

Not Available

1993-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

308

Analysis of the effectiveness of gas centrifuge enrichment plants advanced safeguards  

SciTech Connect

Current safeguards approaches used by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) at gas centrifuge enrichment plants (GCEPs) need enhancement in order to verify declared low-enriched uranium (LEU) production, detect undeclared LEU production and detect highly enriched uranium (HEU) production with adequate detection probability using non destructive assay (NDA) techniques. At present inspectors use attended systems, systems needing the presence of an inspector for operation, during inspections to verify the mass and 235U enrichment of declared UF6 containers used in the process of enrichment at GCEPs. This paper contains an analysis of possible improvements in unattended and attended NDA systems including process monitoring and possible on-site destructive assay (DA) of samples that could reduce the uncertainty of the inspector's measurements. These improvements could reduce the difference between the operator's and inspector's measurements providing more effective and efficient IAEA GCEPs safeguards. We also explore how a few advanced safeguards systems could be assembled for unattended operation. The analysis will focus on how unannounced inspections (UIs), and the concept of information-driven inspections (IDS) can affect probability of detection of the diversion of nuclear materials when coupled to new GCEPs safeguards regimes augmented with unattended systems.

Boyer, Brian David [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Erpenbeck, Heather H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Miller, Karen A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swinjoe, Martyn T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ianakiev, Kiril D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Marlow, Johnna B [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Advanced coal-fueled industrial cogeneration gas turbine system: Hot End Simulation Rig  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Hot End Simulation Rig (HESR) was an integral part of the overall Solar/METC program chartered to prove the technical, economic, an environmental feasibility of a coal-fueled gas turbine, for cogeneration applications. The program was to culminate in a test of a Solar Centaur Type H engine system operated on coal slurry fuel throughput the engine design operating range. This particular activity was designed to verify the performance of the Centaur Type H engine hot section materials in a coal-fired environment varying the amounts of alkali, ash, and sulfur in the coal to assess the material corrosion. Success in the program was dependent upon the satisfactory resolution of several key issues. Included was the control of hot end corrosion and erosion, necessary to ensure adequate operating life. The Hot End Simulation Rig addressed this important issue by exposing currently used hot section turbine alloys, alternate alloys, and commercially available advanced protective coating systems to a representative coal-fueled environment at turbine inlet temperatures typical of Solar`s Centaur Type H. Turbine hot end components which would experience material degradation include the transition duct from the combustor outlet to the turbine inlet, the shroud, nozzles, and blades. A ceramic candle filter vessel was included in the system as the particulate removal device for the HESR. In addition to turbine material testing, the candle material was exposed and evaluated. Long-term testing was intended to sufficiently characterize the performance of these materials for the turbine.

Galica, M.A.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Advanced coal-fueled gas turbine systems. Annual report, July 1991--June 1992  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Westinghouse`s Advanced Coal-Fueled Gas Turbine System Program (DE-AC2l-86MC23167) was originally split into two major phases - a Basic Program and an Option. The Basic Program also contained two phases. The development of a 6 atm, 7 lb/s, 12 MMBtu/hr slagging combustor with an extended period of testing of the subscale combustor, was the first part of the Basic Program. In the second phase of the Basic Program, the combustor was to be operated over a 3-month period with a stationary cascade to study the effect of deposition, erosion and corrosion on combustion turbine components. The testing of the concept, in subscale, has demonstrated its ability to handle high- and low-sulfur bituminous coals, and low-sulfur subbituminous coal. Feeding the fuel in the form of PC has proven to be superior to CWM type feed. The program objectives relative to combustion efficiency, combustor exit temperature, NO{sub x} emissions, carbon burnout, and slag rejection have been met. Objectives for alkali, particulate, and SO{sub x} levels leaving the combustor were not met by the conclusion of testing at Textron. It is planned to continue this testing, to achieve all desired emission levels, as part of the W/NSP program to commercialize the slagging combustor technology.

Not Available

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

First results on disruption mitigation by massive gas injection in Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Massive gas injection (MGI) system was developed on Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) in 2011 campaign for disruption studies. The MGI valve has a volume of 80 ml and maximum injection pressure of 50 bar, the diameter of valve orifice to vacuum vessel is 18.4 mm, the distance between MGI valve and plasma edge is {approx}3.4 m. The MGI power supply employs a large capacitor of 1 mF with the maximum voltage of 3 kV, the valve can be opened in less than 0.1 ms, and the amount of MGI can be controlled by the imposed voltage. During KSTAR 2011 campaign, MGI disruptions are carried out by triggering MGI during the flat top of circular and limiter discharges with plasma current 400 kA and magnetic field 2-3.5 T, deuterium injection pressure 39.7 bar, and imposed voltage 1.1-1.4 kV. The results show that MGI could mitigate the heat load and prevent runaway electrons with proper MGI amount, and MGI penetration is deeper under higher amount of MGI or lower magnetic field. However, plasma start-up is difficult after some of D{sub 2} MGI disruptions due to the high deuterium retention and consequently strong outgassing of deuterium in next shot, special effort should be made to get successful plasma start-up after deuterium MGI under the graphite first wall.

Yu Yaowei [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Kim, Young-Ok; Kim, Hak-Kun; Kim, Hong-Tack; Kim, Woong-Chae; Kim, Kwang-Pyo; Son, Soo-Hyun; Bang, Eun-Nam; Hong, Suk-Ho; Yoon, Si-Woo [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of); Zhuang Huidong [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Chen Zhongyong [Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

312

Gas centrifuge enrichment plants inspection frequency and remote monitoring issues for advanced safeguards implementation  

SciTech Connect

Current safeguards approaches used by the IAEA at gas centrifuge enrichment plants (GCEPs) need enhancement in order to verify declared low enriched uranium (LEU) production, detect undeclared LEU production and detect high enriched uranium (BEU) production with adequate probability using non destructive assay (NDA) techniques. At present inspectors use attended systems, systems needing the presence of an inspector for operation, during inspections to verify the mass and {sup 235}U enrichment of declared cylinders of uranium hexafluoride that are used in the process of enrichment at GCEPs. This paper contains an analysis of how possible improvements in unattended and attended NDA systems including process monitoring and possible on-site destructive analysis (DA) of samples could reduce the uncertainty of the inspector's measurements providing more effective and efficient IAEA GCEPs safeguards. We have also studied a few advanced safeguards systems that could be assembled for unattended operation and the level of performance needed from these systems to provide more effective safeguards. The analysis also considers how short notice random inspections, unannounced inspections (UIs), and the concept of information-driven inspections can affect probability of detection of the diversion of nuclear material when coupled to new GCEPs safeguards regimes augmented with unattended systems. We also explore the effects of system failures and operator tampering on meeting safeguards goals for quantity and timeliness and the measures needed to recover from such failures and anomalies.

Boyer, Brian David [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Erpenbeck, Heather H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Miller, Karen A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ianakiev, Kiril D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reimold, Benjamin A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ward, Steven L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Howell, John [GLASGOW UNIV.

2010-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

313

Reduction of spalling in mixed metal oxide desulfurization sorbents by addition of a large promoter metal oxide  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Mixed metal oxide pellets for removing hydrogen sulfide from fuel gas mixes derived from coal are stabilized for operation over repeated cycles of desulfurization and regeneration reactions by addition of a large promoter metal oxide such as lanthanum trioxide. The pellets, which may be principally made up of a mixed metal oxide such as zinc titanate, exhibit physical stability and lack of spalling or decrepitation over repeated cycles without loss of reactivity. The lanthanum oxide is mixed with pellet-forming components in an amount of 1 to 10 weight percent.

Poston, James A. (Star City, WV)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Reduction of spalling in mixed metal oxide desulfurization sorbents by addition of a large promoter metal oxide  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Mixed metal oxide pellets for removing hydrogen sulfide from fuel gas mixtures derived from coal are stabilized for operation over repeated cycles of desulfurization and regeneration reactions by addition of a large promoter metal oxide such as lanthanum trioxide. The pellets, which may be principally made up of a mixed metal oxide such as zinc titanate, exhibit physical stability and lack of spalling or decrepitation over repeated cycles without loss of reactivity. The lanthanum oxide is mixed with pellet-forming components in an amount of 1 to 10 weight percent.

Poston, J.A.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

315

NETL: News Release - DOE Announces Further Field Testing of Advanced  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE Announces Further Field Testing of Advanced Mercury Control Technologies DOE Announces Further Field Testing of Advanced Mercury Control Technologies Six Projects Selected in Round 2 to Address Future Power Plant Mercury Reduction Initiatives PITTSBURGH, PA - With an eye on future federal regulations aimed at reducing mercury emissions, the U.S. Department of Energy has selected six additional projects as part of a DOE research program to advance the technical readiness of mercury control options for the Nation's fleet of coal-fired power plants. The six projects in this second round of awards build on last year's selection of eight projects, and will verify technology performance, evaluate costs, and assess balance-of-plant impacts. The projects will field test advanced, post-combustion technologies involving all coal types at utilities using pulverized coal or cyclone-boiler configurations, and focus on technologies capable of removing mercury from flue gas containing higher concentrations of elemental mercury. The technologies include sorbent injection, wet flue gas desulfurization systems enhancement, and combustion optimization.

316

Desulfurization Effects on a Light-Duty Diesel Vehicle NOx Adsorber Exhaust Emission Control System  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Analyzes the effects on gaseous emissions, before and after desulfurization, on a light-duty diesel vehicle with a NOx adsorber catalyst.

Tatur, M.; Tomazic, D.; Tyrer, H.; Thornton, M.; Kubsh, J.

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

ADVANCED SORBENT DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT OF SORBENTS FOR MOVING-BED AND FLUIDIZED-BED APPLICATIONS  

SciTech Connect

The integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power system using high-temperature coal gas cleanup is one of the most promising advanced technologies for the production of electric power from coal in an environmentally acceptable manner. Unlike conventional low-temperature cleanup systems that require costly heat exchangers, high-temperature coal gas cleanup systems can be operated near 482-538 C (900-1000 F) or higher, conditions that are a closer match with the gasifier and turbine components in the IGCC system, thus resulting is a more efficient overall system. GE is developing a moving-bed, high-temperature desulfurization system for the IGCC power cycle in which zinc-based regenerable sorbents are currently being used as desulfurization sorbents. Zinc titanate and other proprietary zinc-based oxides are being considered as sorbents for use in the Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program at Tampa Electric Co.'s (TECo) Polk Power Station. Under cold startup conditions at TECo, desulfurization and regeneration may be carried out at temperatures as low as 343 C (650 F), hence a versatile sorbent is desirable to perform over this wide temperature range. A key to success in the development of high-temperature desulfurization systems is the matching of sorbent properties for the selected process operating conditions, namely, sustainable desulfurization kinetics, high sulfur capacity, and mechanical durability over multiple cycles. Additionally, the sulfur species produced during regeneration of the sorbent must be in a form compatible with sulfur recovery systems, such as sulfuric acid or elemental sulfur processes. The overall objective of this program is to develop regenerable sorbents for hydrogen sulfide removal from coal-derived fuel gases in the temperature range 343-538 C (650-1000 F). Two categories of reactor configurations are being considered: moving-bed reactors and fluidized-bed (bubbling and circulating) reactors. In addition, a cost assessment and a market plan for large-scale fabrication of sorbents were developed. As an optional task, long-term bench-scale tests of the best moving-bed sorbents were conducted. Starting from thermodynamic calculations, several metal oxides were identified for potential use as hot gas cleanup sorbents using constructed phase stability diagrams and laboratory screening of various mixed-metal oxide formulations. Modified zinc titanates and other proprietary metal oxide formulations were evaluated at the bench scale and many of them found to be acceptable for operation in the target desulfurization temperature range of 370 C (700 F) to 538 C (1000 F) and regeneration temperatures up to 760 C (1400 F). Further work is still needed to reduce the batch-to-batch repeatability in the fabrication of modified zinc titanates for larger scale applications. The information presented in this Volume 1 report contains the results of moving-bed sorbent development at General Electric's Corporate Research and Development (GE-CRD). A separate Volume 2 report contains the results of the subcontract on fluidized-bed sorbent development at the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT).

R.E Ayala; V.S. Venkataramani; Javad Abbasian; Rachid B. Slimane; Brett E. Williams; Minoo K. Zarnegar; James R. Wangerow; Andy H. Hill

2000-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

318

ADVANCED SORBENT DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM; DEVELOPMENT OF SORBENTS FOR MOVING-BED AND FLUIDIZED-BED APPLICATIONS  

SciTech Connect

The integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power system using high-temperature coal gas cleanup is one of the most promising advanced technologies for the production of electric power from coal in an environmentally acceptable manner. Unlike conventional low-temperature cleanup systems that require costly heat exchangers, high-temperature coal gas cleanup systems can be operated near 482-538 °C (900-1000 °F) or higher, conditions that are a closer match with the gasifier and turbine components in the IGCC system, thus resulting is a more efficient overall system. GE is developing a moving-bed, high-temperature desulfurization system for the IGCC power cycle in which zinc-based regenerable sorbents are currently being used as desulfurization sorbents. Zinc titanate and other proprietary zinc-based oxides are being considered as sorbents for use in the Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program at Tampa Electric Co.?s (TECo) Polk Power Station. Under cold startup conditions at TECo, desulfurization and regeneration may be carried out at temperatures as low as 343 °C (650 °F), hence a versatile sorbent is desirable to perform over this wide temperature range. A key to success in the development of high-temperature desulfurization systems is the matching of sorbent properties for the selected process operating conditions, namely, sustainable desulfurization kinetics, high sulfur capacity, and mechanical durability over multiple cycles. Additionally, the sulfur species produced during regeneration of the sorbent must be in a form compatible with sulfur recovery systems, such as sulfuric acid or elemental sulfur processes. The overall objective of this program is to develop regenerable sorbents for hydrogen sulfide removal from coal-derived fuel gases in the temperature range 343-538 °C (650-1000 °F). Two categories of reactor configurations are being considered: moving-bed reactors and fluidized-bed (bubbling and circulating) reactors. In addition, a cost assessment and a market plan for large-scale fabrication of sorbents were developed. As an optional task, long-term bench-scale tests of the best moving-bed sorbents were conducted. Starting from thermodynamic calculations, several metal oxides were identified for potential use as hot gas cleanup sorbents using constructed phase stability diagrams and laboratory screening of various mixed-metal oxide formulations. Modified zinc titanates and other proprietary metal oxide formulations were evaluated at the bench scale and many of them found to be acceptable for operation in the target desulfurization temperature range of 370 °C (700 °F) to 538 °C (1000 °F) and regeneration tempera-tures up to 760 °C (1400 °F). Further work is still needed to reduce the batch-to-batch repeatability in the fabrication of modified zinc titanates for larger scale applications. The information presented in this Volume 1 report contains the results of moving-bed sorbent develop-ment at General Electric?s Corporate Research and Development (GE-CRD). A separate Volume 2 report contains the results of the subcontract on fluidized-bed sorbent development at the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT).

R.E. AYALA; V.S. VENKATARAMANI

1998-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

319

Well-to-wheel energy use and greenhouse gas emissions of advanced fuel/vehicle systems North American analysis.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There are differing, yet strongly held views among the various ''stakeholders'' in the advanced fuel/propulsion system debate. In order for the introduction of advanced technology vehicles and their associated fuels to be successful, it seems clear that four important stakeholders must view their introduction as a ''win'': Society, Automobile manufacturers and their key suppliers, Fuel providers and their key suppliers, and Auto and energy company customers. If all four of these stakeholders, from their own perspectives, are not positive regarding the need for and value of these advanced fuels/vehicles, the vehicle introductions will fail. This study was conducted to help inform public and private decision makers regarding the impact of the introduction of such advanced fuel/propulsion system pathways from a societal point of view. The study estimates two key performance criteria of advanced fuel/propulsion systems on a total system basis, that is, ''well'' (production source of energy) to ''wheel'' (vehicle). These criteria are energy use and greenhouse gas emissions per unit of distance traveled. The study focuses on the U.S. light-duty vehicle market in 2005 and beyond, when it is expected that advanced fuels and propulsion systems could begin to be incorporated in a significant percentage of new vehicles. Given the current consumer demand for light trucks, the benchmark vehicle considered in this study is the Chevrolet Silverado full-size pickup.

Wang, M.

2001-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

320

LOW-ENGINE-FRICTION TECHNOLOGY FOR ADVANCED NATURAL-GAS RECIPROCATING ENGINES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This program aims at improving the efficiency of advanced natural-gas reciprocating engines (ANGRE) by reducing piston and piston ring assembly friction without major adverse effects on engine performance, such as increased oil consumption and wear. An iterative process of simulation, experimentation and analysis is being followed towards achieving the goal of demonstrating a complete optimized low-friction engine system. To date, a detailed set of piston and piston-ring dynamic and friction models have been developed and applied that illustrate the fundamental relationships between design parameters and friction losses. Low friction ring designs have already been recommended in a previous phase, with full-scale engine validation partially completed. Current accomplishments include the addition of several additional power cylinder design areas to the overall system analysis. These include analyses of lubricant and cylinder surface finish and a parametric study of piston design. The Waukesha engine was found to be already well optimized in the areas of lubricant, surface skewness and honing cross-hatch angle, where friction reductions of 12% for lubricant, and 5% for surface characteristics, are projected. For the piston, a friction reduction of up to 50% may be possible by controlling waviness alone, while additional friction reductions are expected when other parameters are optimized. A total power cylinder friction reduction of 30-50% is expected, translating to an engine efficiency increase of two percentage points from its current baseline towards the goal of 50% efficiency. Key elements of the continuing work include further analysis and optimization of the engine piston design, in-engine testing of recommended lubricant and surface designs, design iteration and optimization of previously recommended technologies, and full-engine testing of a complete, optimized, low-friction power cylinder system.

Victor Wong; Tian Tian; Luke Moughon; Rosalind Takata; Jeffrey Jocsak

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

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321

Advanced coal-fueled industrial cogeneration gas turbine system. Annual report, 2 June 1992--1 June 1993  

SciTech Connect

This program was initiated in June of 1986 because advances in coal-fueled gas turbine technology over the previous few years, together with DOE-METC sponsored studies, served to provide new optimism that the problems demonstrated in the past can be economically resolved and that the coal-fueled gas turbine could ultimately be the preferred system in appropriate market application sectors. In early 1991 it became evident that a combination of low natural gas prices, stringent emission limits of the Clean Air Act and concerns for CO{sub 2} emissions made the direct coal-fueled gas turbine less attractive. In late 1991 it was decided not to complete this program as planned. The objective of the Solar/METC program was to prove the technical, economic, and environmental feasibility of a coal-fired gas turbine for cogeneration applications through tests of a Centaur Type H engine system operated on coal fuel throughout the engine design operating range. Component development of the coal-fueled combustor island and cleanup system while not complete indicated that the planned engine test was feasible. Preliminary designs of the engine hardware and installation were partially completed. A successful conclusion to the program would have initiated a continuation of the commercialization plan through extended field demonstration runs. After notification of the intent not to complete the program a replan was carried out to finish the program in an orderly fashion within the framework of the contract. A contract modification added the first phase of the Advanced Turbine Study whose objective is to develop high efficiency, natural gas fueled gas turbine technology.

LeCren, L.T.; Cowell, L.H.; Galica, M.A.; Stephenson, M.D.; Wen, C.S.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Optical Thin Films for Gas Sensing in Advanced Coal Fired Power ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Approaching Multimaterial 3D Nanostructured Gas Phase Nanoxerographic Printers · Carbon Nanotube Coatings Laser Power and Energy Measurements.

323

LOW-ENGINE-FRICTION TECHNOLOGY FOR ADVANCED NATURAL-GAS RECIPROCATING ENGINES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This program aims at improving the efficiency of advanced natural-gas reciprocating engines (ANGRE) by reducing piston and piston ring assembly friction without major adverse effects on engine performance, such as increased oil consumption and wear. An iterative process of simulation, experimentation and analysis is being followed towards achieving the goal of demonstrating a complete optimized low-friction engine system. To date, a detailed set of piston and piston-ring dynamic and friction models have been developed and applied that illustrate the fundamental relationships among mechanical, surface/material and lubricant design parameters and friction losses. Demonstration of low-friction ring-pack designs in the Waukesha VGF 18GL engine confirmed total engine FEMP (friction mean effective pressure) reduction of 7-10% from the baseline configuration without significantly increasing oil consumption or blow-by flow. This represents a substantial (30-40%) reduction of the ringpack friction alone. The measured FMEP reductions were in good agreement with the model predictions. Further improvements via piston, lubricant, and surface designs offer additional opportunities. Tests of low-friction lubricants are in progress and preliminary results are very promising. The combined analysis of lubricant and surface design indicates that low-viscosity lubricants can be very effective in reducing friction, subject to component wear for extremely thin oils, which can be mitigated with further lubricant formulation and/or engineered surfaces. Hence a combined approach of lubricant design and appropriate wear reduction offers improved potential for minimum engine friction loss. Piston friction studies indicate that a flatter piston with a more flexible skirt, together with optimizing the waviness and film thickness on the piston skirt offer significant friction reduction. Combined with low-friction ring-pack, material and lubricant parameters, a total power cylinder friction reduction of 30-50% is expected, translating to an engine efficiency increase of two percentage points from its current baseline towards the goal of 50% ARES engine efficiency. The design strategies developed in this study have promising potential for application in all modern reciprocating engines as they represent simple, low-cost methods to extract significant fuel savings. The current program has possible spinoffs and applications in other industries as well, including transportation, CHP, and diesel power generation. The progress made in this program has wide engine efficiency implications, and potential deployment of low-friction engine components or lubricants in the near term is possible as current investigations continue.

Victor Wong; Tian Tian; Luke Moughon; Rosalind Takata; Jeffrey Jocsak

2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

324

DESIGN, FABRICATION, AND TESTING OF AN ADVANCED, NON-POLLUTING TURBINE DRIVE GAS GENERATOR  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this report period were to complete the development of the Gas Generator design, which was done; fabricate and test of the non-polluting unique power turbine drive gas Gas Generator, which has been postponed. Focus during this report period has been to complete the brazing and bonding necessary to fabricate the Gas Generator hardware, continue making preparations for fabricating and testing the Gas Generator, and continuing the fabrication of the Gas Generator hardware and ancillary hardware in preparation for the test program. Fabrication is more than 95% complete and is expected to conclude in early May 2002. the test schedule was affected by relocation of the testing to another test supplier. The target test date for hot fire testing is now not earlier than June 15, 2002.

Unknown

2002-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

325

Hindawi Publishing Corporation Advances in Materials Science and Engineering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the nature of the precious metal and the support for generating clean desulfurized H2-rich reformate.1 kWh/Kg resp.) are much higher compared to lower hydrocarbons (natural gas). Furthermore, Diesel high. The reformate gas contains mainly CO, CO2, H2, and trace amount of H2S. The sulfur products can

Azad, Abdul-Majeed

326

Advanced Gas Turbine Guidelines: Rotating Blade Temperature Measurement System (BTMS)--Supplement No. 1: Durability Surveillance at Florida Power & Light Company's Martin Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The blade scans performed by EPRI's Blade Temperature Measurement System (BTMS) represent an important source of blade metal temperature data. These advanced gas turbine guidelines describe the design, installation, and operation of the BTMS in a utility power plant operating General Electric MS7221FA advanced gas turbines. The guidelines include an analysis of blade temperature scans as well as a summary of lessons learned under baseload operating conditions.

1999-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

327

Advanced turbine systems program conceptual design and product development task 5 -- market study of the gas fired ATS. Topical report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Solar Turbines Incorporated (Solar), in partnership with the Department of Energy, will develop a family of advanced gas turbine-based power systems (ATS) for widespread commercialization within the domestic and international industrial marketplace, and to the rapidly changing electric power generation industry. The objective of the jointly-funded Program is to introduce an ATS with high efficiency, and markedly reduced emissions levels, in high numbers as rapidly as possible following introduction. This Topical Report is submitted in response to the requirements outlined in Task 5 of the Department of Energy METC Contract on Advanced Combustion Systems, Contract No, DE AC21-93MC30246 (Contract), for a Market Study of the Gas Fired Advanced Turbine System. It presents a market study for the ATS proposed by Solar, and will examine both the economic and siting constraints of the ATS compared with competing systems in the various candidate markets. Also contained within this report is an examination and analysis of Solar`s ATS and its ability to compete in future utility and industrial markets, as well as factors affecting the marketability of the ATS.

NONE

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

An Advanced Diagnostic and Prognostic System for Gas Turbine Generator Sets with Experimental Validation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Diagnostic and Prognostic System for Gas Diagnostic and Prognostic System for Gas Turbine Generator Sets with Experimental Validation Clemson University John R. Wagner, Ph.D., P.E. SCIES Project 03-01-SR108 DOE COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT DE-FC26-02NT41431 Tom J. George, Program Manager, DOE/NETL Richard Wenglarz, Manager of Research, SCIES Project Awarded (07/01/2003, 36 Month Duration) $319,479 Total Contract Value ($319,479 DOE) Clemson Presentation 10-19-2005 J.W. Gas Turbine Need * The Reliability, Availability, and Maintainability (RAM) technical area within High Efficiency Engines and Turbines (HEET) Program encompasses the design of gas turbine health management systems * The introduction of real-time diagnostic and prognostic capabilities on gas turbines can provide increased reliability, safety, and efficiency

329

Advancing New 3D Seismic Interpretation Methods for Exploration and Development of Fractured Tight Gas Reservoirs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a study funded by the U.S. Department of Energy and GeoSpectrum, Inc., new P-wave 3D seismic interpretation methods to characterize fractured gas reservoirs are developed. A data driven exploratory approach is used to determine empirical relationships for reservoir properties. Fractures are predicted using seismic lineament mapping through a series of horizon and time slices in the reservoir zone. A seismic lineament is a linear feature seen in a slice through the seismic volume that has negligible vertical offset. We interpret that in regions of high seismic lineament density there is a greater likelihood of fractured reservoir. Seismic AVO attributes are developed to map brittle reservoir rock (low clay) and gas content. Brittle rocks are interpreted to be more fractured when seismic lineaments are present. The most important attribute developed in this study is the gas sensitive phase gradient (a new AVO attribute), as reservoir fractures may provide a plumbing system for both water and gas. Success is obtained when economic gas and oil discoveries are found. In a gas field previously plagued with poor drilling results, four new wells were spotted using the new methodology and recently drilled. The wells have estimated best of 12-months production indicators of 2106, 1652, 941, and 227 MCFGPD. The latter well was drilled in a region of swarming seismic lineaments but has poor gas sensitive phase gradient (AVO) and clay volume attributes. GeoSpectrum advised the unit operators that this location did not appear to have significant Lower Dakota gas before the well was drilled. The other three wells are considered good wells in this part of the basin and among the best wells in the area. These new drilling results have nearly doubled the gas production and the value of the field. The interpretation method is ready for commercialization and gas exploration and development. The new technology is adaptable to conventional lower cost 3D seismic surveys.

James Reeves

2005-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

330

PINON PINE: An advanced IGCC demonstration  

SciTech Connect

The Pinon Pine Power Project is a second generation integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant, located at Sierra Pacific Power Company`s (SPPC) Tracy Station, 17 miles east of Reno, Nevada. The project is being partially funded under the Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Clean Coal Technology Program (CCT). SPPC intends to operate the plant in base-load mode to supply approximately 100 megawatts electric (MWe) to the transmission grid. This plant will be the first full-scale integration of several advanced technologies: an air-blown KRW gasifier; full-stream hot gas desulfurization using a transport reactor system with a zinc-based sorbent; full-stream, high-temperature ceramic filters for particulate removal; the General Electric Model MS6001FA (617A) Gas Turbine Engine/generator, and a 950 pound per square inch absolute (psia), 950{degrees}F steam turbine generator. This paper reviews the overall configuration and integration of the gasification and power islands components, which yield the plant`s high efficiency. Current status of the project is addressed.

Freier, M.D.; Jewell, D.M. [Morgantown Energy Technology Center, WV (United States); Motter, J.W. [Sierra Pacific Power Co., Reno, NV (United States)

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

DESIGN, FABRICATION, AND TESTING OF AN ADVANCED, NON-POLLUTING TURBINE DRIVE GAS GENERATOR  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this report period was to continue the development of the Gas Generator design, fabrication and test of the non-polluting unique power turbine drive Gas Generator. Focus during this past report period has been to continue completion the Gas Generator design, completing the brazing and bonding experiments to determine the best method and materials necessary to fabricate the Gas Generator hardware, continuing to making preparations for fabricating and testing this Gas Generator and commencing with the fabrication of the Gas Generator hardware and ancillary hardware. Designs have been completed sufficiently such that Long Lead Items [LLI] have been ordered and upon arrival will be readied for the fabrication process. The keys to this design are the platelet construction of the injectors that precisely measures/meters the flow of the propellants and water all throughout the steam generating process and the CES patented gas generating cycle. The Igniter Assembly injector platelets fabrication process has been completed and bonded to the Igniter Assembly and final machined. The Igniter Assembly is in final assembly and is being readied for testing in the October 2001 time frame. Test Plan dated August 2001, was revised and finalized, replacing Test Plan dated May 2001.

Unknown

2002-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

332

Low-Engine-Friction Technology for Advanced Natural-Gas Reciprocating Engines  

SciTech Connect

This program aims at improving the efficiency of advanced natural-gas reciprocating engines (ANGRE) by reducing piston and piston ring assembly friction without major adverse effects on engine performance, such as increased oil consumption and wear. An iterative process of simulation, experimentation and analysis has been followed towards achieving the goal of demonstrating a complete optimized low-friction engine system. In this program, a detailed set of piston and piston-ring dynamic and friction models have been adapted and applied that illustrate the fundamental relationships among mechanical, surface/material and lubricant design parameters and friction losses. Demonstration of low-friction ring-pack designs in the Waukesha VGF 18GL engine confirmed ring-pack friction reduction of 30-40%, which translates to total engine FEMP (friction mean effective pressure) reduction of 7-10% from the baseline configuration without significantly increasing oil consumption or blow-by flow. The study on surface textures, including roughness characteristics, cross hatch patterns, dimples and grooves have shown that even relatively small-scale changes can have a large effect on ring/liner friction, in some cases reducing FMEP by as much as 30% from a smooth surface case. The measured FMEP reductions were in good agreement with the model predictions. The combined analysis of lubricant and surface design indicates that low-viscosity lubricants can be very effective in reducing friction, subject to component wear for extremely thin oils, which can be mitigated with further lubricant formulation and/or engineered surfaces. Hence a combined approach of lubricant design and appropriate wear reduction offers improved potential for minimum engine friction loss. Testing of low-friction lubricants showed that total engine FMEP reduced by up to {approx}16.5% from the commercial reference oil without significantly increasing oil consumption or blow-by flow. Piston friction studies indicate that a flatter piston with a more flexible skirt, together with optimizing the waviness and film thickness on the piston skirt offer significant friction reduction. Combined with low-friction ring-pack, material and lubricant parameters, a total power cylinder friction reduction of 30-50% is expected, translating to an engine efficiency increase of two percentage points from its current baseline towards the goal of 50% ARES engine efficiency. The design strategies developed in this study have promising potential for application in all modern reciprocating engines as they represent simple, low-cost methods to extract significant fuel savings. The current program has possible spinoffs and applications in other industries as well, including transportation, CHP, and diesel power generation. The progress made in this program has wide engine efficiency implications, and potential deployment of low-friction engine components or lubricants in the near term is quite possible.

Victor Wong; Tian Tian; G. Smedley; L. Moughon; Rosalind Takata; J. Jocsak

2006-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

333

Advanced Gas Turbine Guidelines: Performance Retention for GE 7FA Unit in Baseload Operation: Durability Surveillance at Florida Pow er & Lights Company's Martin Station  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Worldwide pressures for reducing power generation costs have encouraged domestic and foreign manufacturers to build high-efficiency gas turbines implementing the latest technological advances. This report discusses performance monitoring and analysis in a multiyear project, launched in 1991, to assure the staying power of industrial gas turbines produced by major turbine manufacturers.

1999-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

334

Achievement of Low Emissions by Engine Modification to Utilize Gas-to-Liquid Fuel and Advanced Emission Controls on a Class 8 Truck  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A 2002 Cummins ISM engine was modified to be optimized for operation on gas-to-liquid (GTL) fuel and advanced emission control devices. The engine modifications included increased exhaust gas recirculation (EGR), decreased compression ratio, and reshaped piston and bowl configuration.

Alleman, T. L.; Tennant, C. J.; Hayes, R. R.; Miyasato, M.; Oshinuga, A.; Barton, G.; Rumminger, M.; Duggal, V.; Nelson, C.; Ray, M.; Cherrillo, R. A.

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Development of an advanced gas-fired mineral wool melter. Final report, October 1987-December 1990  

SciTech Connect

A gas-fired mineral wool melter was successfully designed and tested. The test results clearly show that the gas-fired melter offers significant advantages over the current state-of-the-art system, the coke-fired cupola. The primary benefits offered are: lower energy costs, fewer airborne pollutant emissions, virtual elimination of solid waste generation and superior control and quality of the resultant melt stream. Specifically, the unit eliminates the emission of carbon monoxide, hydrogen sulfide and hydrocarbons. Emissions of SOx and particulate are substantially reduced as well. The generation of solid wastes is eliminated through the gas-fired melters ability to utilize untreated process wastes as a feedstock.

Vereecke, F.J.; Gardner, K.M.; Thekdi, A.C.; Swift, M.D.

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Advanced Gas Cooled Nuclear Reactor Materials Evaluation and Development Program. Progress report, January 1, 1980-March 31, 1980  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results are presented of work performed on the Advanced Gas-Cooled Nuclear Reactor Materials Evaluation and Development Program. The objectives of this program are to evaluate candidate alloys for Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Nuclear Process Heat (NPH) and Direct Cycle Helium Turbine (DCHT) applications, in terms of the effect of simulated reactor primary coolant (helium containing small amounts of various other gases), high temperatures, and long time exposures, on the mechanical properties and structural and surface stability of selected candidate alloys. A second objective is to select and recommend materials for future test facilities and more extensive qualification programs. Included are the activities associated with the status of the simulated reactor helium supply system, testing equipment and gas chemistry analysis instrumentation and equipment. The progress in the screening test program is described, including screening creep results and metallographic analysis for materials thermally exposed or tested at 750, 850, and 950/sup 0/C.

Not Available

1980-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

337

FABRICATE AND TEST AN ADVANCED NON-POLLUTING TURBINE DRIVE GAS GENERATOR  

SciTech Connect

In September 2000 the Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) contracted with Clean Energy Systems, Inc. (CES) of Sacramento, California to design, fabricate, and test a 20 MW{sub t} (10 MW{sub e}) gas generator. Program goals were to demonstrate a non-polluting gas generator at temperatures up to 3000 F at 1500 psi, and to demonstrate resulting drive gas composition, comprising steam and carbon dioxide substantially free of pollutants. Following hardware design and fabrication, testing, originally planned to begin in the summer of 2001, was delayed by unavailability of the contracted test facility. CES designed, fabricated, and tested the proposed gas generator as originally agreed. The CES process for producing near-zero-emissions power from fossil fuels is based on the near-stoichiometric combustion of a clean gaseous fuel with oxygen in the presence of recycled water, to produce a high-temperature, high-pressure turbine drive fluid comprising steam and carbon dioxide. Tests demonstrated igniter operation over the prescribed ranges of pressure and mixture ratios. Ignition was repeatable and reliable through more than 100 ignitions. Injector design ''A'' was operated successfully at both low power ({approx}20% of rated power) and at rated power ({approx}20 MW{sub t}) in more than 95 tests. The uncooled gas generator configuration (no diluent injectors or cooldown chambers installed) produced drive gases at temperatures approaching 3000 F and at pressures greater than 1550 psia. The fully cooled gas generator configuration, with cooldown chambers and injector ''A'', operated consistently at pressures from 1100 to 1540 psia and produced high pressure, steam-rich turbine drive gases at temperatures ranging from {approx}3000 to as low as 600 F. This report includes description of the intended next steps in the gas generator technology demonstration and traces the anticipated pathway to commercialization for the gas generator technology developed in this program.

Eugene Baxter; Roger E. Anderson; Stephen E. Doyle

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

LIFAC Sorbent Injection Desulfurization Demonstration Project. Quarterly report No. 13, October 1993--December 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Dec 1989, the U.S. Department of Energy selected 13 projects for funding under the Federal Clean Coal Technology Program (Round III). One of the projects selected was the project sponsored by LIFAC North America, (LIFAC NA), titled {open_quotes}LIFAC Sorbent Injection Desulfurization Demonstration Project.{close_quotes} The host site for this $22 million, three-phase project is Richmond Power and Light`s Whitewater Valley Unit No. 2 in Richmond, Indiana. The LIFAC technology uses upper-furnace limestone injection with patented humidification of the flue gas to remove 75-85% of the sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) in the flue gas. In November 1990, after a ten month negotiation period, LIFAC NA and the U.S. DOE entered into a Cooperative Agreement for the design, construction, and demonstration of the LIFAC system. This report is the thirteenth Technical Progress Report covering the period October 1, 1993 through the end of December 1993. Due to the power plant`s planned outage in March 1991, and the time needed for engineering, design and procurement of critical equipment, DOE and LIFAC NA agreed to execute the Design Phase of the project in Aug 1990, with DOE funding contingent upon final signing of the Cooperative Agreement.

Not Available

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

NETL's Gas Process Development Unit for Hot/Warm Gas Cleanup  

SciTech Connect

The long-term objectives for the GPDU project are to: (1) assess transport and fluidized bed reactor control and performance to determine the most suitable mode for continuous gas desulfurization, and (2) evaluate candidate sorbents for bulk removal of sulfurous compounds from syngas to assess the readiness of sorbents for commercial scale. The DOE has funded desulfurization and sorbent research for over 20 years and extensive laboratory-scale and bench-scale work has been conducted by government, academia and industry on the development and testing of regenerable sorbents for bulk sulfur removal from syngas (Cicero, et.al, 2000; Mitchell, 1998; Lew, 1989). However, the technologies still need to be proven in controlled conditions at a larger scale. Several Clean Coal Technology projects (i.e, the Toms Creek IGCC Demonstration Project, the Pinon Pine IGCC Power Project and the Tampa Electric Integrated Gasification Combined-Cycle Project) had proposed demonstrations of hot-gas desulfurization technology, but were not seen to completion (Clean Coal Technology Compendium website, 2002). As a result, there is a lack of data on sorbent and reactor performance under longer-term continuous conditions at a large scale. For commercial acceptance of hot- or warm-gas desulfurization, technology reliability is a question yet to be answered. The GPDU will fill the gap and has the objective to provide the proof-of-concept that is needed to foster commercialization of hot (greater than 538 C (1,000 F)) and/or warm (260 to 427 C (500 to 800 F)) gas desulfurization for IGCC processes. The GPDU facility, which includes a separate Syngas Generator (SGG) that supplies a simulated coal gas to the GPDU, is in the shakedown phase of operations with an initial reactor configuration of transport absorber-transport regenerator. The status and preliminary results of shakedown activities are presented to provide insight into startup and operations of a continuous transport desulfurization process.

Everitt, E.; Bissett, L.A.

2002-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

340

Flight Testing of an Advanced Airborne Natural Gas Leak Detection System  

SciTech Connect

ITT Industries Space Systems Division (Space Systems) has developed an airborne natural gas leak detection system designed to detect, image, quantify, and precisely locate leaks from natural gas transmission pipelines. This system is called the Airborne Natural Gas Emission Lidar (ANGEL) system. The ANGEL system uses a highly sensitive differential absorption Lidar technology to remotely detect pipeline leaks. The ANGEL System is operated from a fixed wing aircraft and includes automatic scanning, pointing system, and pilot guidance systems. During a pipeline inspection, the ANGEL system aircraft flies at an elevation of 1000 feet above the ground at speeds of between 100 and 150 mph. Under this contract with DOE/NETL, Space Systems was funded to integrate the ANGEL sensor into a test aircraft and conduct a series of flight tests over a variety of test targets including simulated natural gas pipeline leaks. Following early tests in upstate New York in the summer of 2004, the ANGEL system was deployed to Casper, Wyoming to participate in a set of DOE-sponsored field tests at the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC). At RMOTC the Space Systems team completed integration of the system and flew an operational system for the first time. The ANGEL system flew 2 missions/day for the duration for the 5-day test. Over the course of the week the ANGEL System detected leaks ranging from 100 to 5,000 scfh.

Dawn Lenz; Raymond T. Lines; Darryl Murdock; Jeffrey Owen; Steven Stearns; Michael Stoogenke

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas desulfurization advanced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Advanced gas turbine systems research. Technical quarterly progress report, July 1--September 30, 1997  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Major accomplishments by AGTSR during this reporting period are highlighted and then amplified in later sections of this report. Main areas of research are combustion, heat transfer, and materials. Gas turbines are used for power generation by utilities and industry and for propulsion.

NONE

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

342

Advanced gas turbine systems research. Technical quarterly progress report, April 1--June 30, 1998  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Major accomplishments by AGTSR during this reporting period are highlighted and then amplified in later sections of this report. Main areas of research are combustion, heat transfer, and materials. Gas turbines are used for power generation by utilities and industry and for propulsion.

NONE

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Advanced gas turbine systems research. Technical quarterly progress report, January 1--March 31, 1998  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Major accomplishments by AGTSR during this reporting period are highlighted and then amplified in later sections of this report. Main areas of research are combustion, heat transfer, and materials. Gas turbines are used for power generation by utilities and industry and for propulsion.

NONE

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Advanced gas turbine systems research. Technical quarterly progress report, October 1--December 31, 1997  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Major accomplishments by AGTSR during this reporting period are highlighted and then amplified in later sections of this report. Main areas of research are combustion, heat transfer, and materials. Gas turbines are used for power generation by utilities and industry and for propulsion.

NONE

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

345

Advanced gas turbine systems research. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1, 1994--June 30, 1994  

SciTech Connect

A cooperative development of gas turbines for electric power generation in USA is underway. Since the first AGTSR program manager has retired, a search for a new manager has begun. Reports during this period include membership, combustion instability white paper, and a summary paper for the ASME IGTI conference.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Energy savings and economics of advanced control strategies for packaged air conditioners with gas heat  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents an evaluation of the potential energy savings from adding advanced control to existing packaged air conditioners. Advanced control options include air-side economizer, multi-speed fan control, demand control ventilation and staged cooling. The energy and cost savings from the different control strategies individually and in combination are estimated using the EnergyPlus detailed energy simulation program for four building types, namely, a small office building, a stand-alone retail building, a strip mall building and a supermarket building. For each of the four building types, the simulation was run for 16 locations covering all 15 climate zones in the U.S. The maximum installed cost of a replacement controller that provides acceptable payback periods to owners is estimated.

Wang, Weimin; Katipamula, Srinivas; Huang, Yunzhi; Brambley, Michael R.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Optical fiber evanescent wave adsorption sensors for high-temperature gas sensing in advanced coal-fired power plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Modern advanced energy systems such as coal-fired power plants, gasifiers, or similar infrastructure present some of the most challenging harsh environments for sensors. The power industry would benefit from new, ultra-high temperature devices capable of surviving in hot and corrosive environments for embedded sensing at the highest value locations. For these applications, we are currently exploring optical fiber evanescent wave absorption spectroscopy (EWAS) based sensors consisting of high temperature core materials integrated with novel high temperature gas sensitive cladding materials. Mathematical simulations can be used to assist in sensor development efforts, and we describe a simulation code that assumes a single thick cladding layer with gas sensitive optical constants. Recent work has demonstrated that Au nanoparticle-incorporated metal oxides show a potentially useful response for high temperature optical gas sensing applications through the sensitivity of the localized surface plasmon resonance absorption peak to ambient atmospheric conditions. Hence, the simulation code has been applied to understand how such a response can be exploited in an optical fiber based EWAS sensor configuration. We demonstrate that interrogation can be used to optimize the sensing response in such materials.

Buric, M.; Ohodnicky, P.; Duy, J.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

PWR Primary-Side Gas Management in Advanced Light Water Reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The designs for advanced light water reactors (ALWRs) have incorporated new water chemistry controls that have been developed over the past few decades to improve material and equipment reliability and fuel performance and to minimize radionuclide production and transport. It is important to ensure that the new designs operate within ranges that are considered safe based on current knowledge and that industry guidance for normal operation, startup, and shutdown are updated to account for expanding ...

2013-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

349

ADVANCED FRACTURING TECHNOLOGY FOR TIGHT GAS: AN EAST TEXAS FIELD DEMONSTRATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary objective of this research was to improve completion and fracturing practices in gas reservoirs in marginal plays in the continental United States. The Bossier Play in East Texas, a very active tight gas play, was chosen as the site to develop and test the new strategies for completion and fracturing. Figure 1 provides a general location map for the Dowdy Ranch Field, where the wells involved in this study are located. The Bossier and other tight gas formations in the continental Unites States are marginal plays in that they become uneconomical at gas prices below $2.00 MCF. It was, therefore, imperative that completion and fracturing practices be optimized so that these gas wells remain economically attractive. The economic viability of this play is strongly dependent on the cost and effectiveness of the hydraulic fracturing used in its well completions. Water-fracs consisting of proppant pumped with un-gelled fluid is the type of stimulation used in many low permeability reservoirs in East Texas and throughout the United States. The use of low viscosity Newtonian fluids allows the creation of long narrow fractures in the reservoir, without the excessive height growth that is often seen with cross-linked fluids. These low viscosity fluids have poor proppant transport properties. Pressure transient tests run on several wells that have been water-fractured indicate a long effective fracture length with very low fracture conductivity even when large amounts of proppant are placed in the formation. A modification to the water-frac stimulation design was needed to transport proppant farther out into the fracture. This requires suspending the proppant until the fracture closes without generating excessive fracture height. A review of fracture diagnostic data collected from various wells in different areas (for conventional gel and water-fracs) suggests that effective propped lengths for the fracture treatments are sometimes significantly shorter than those predicted by fracture models. There was no accepted optimal method for conducting hydraulic fracturing in the Bossier. Each operator used a different approach. Anadarko, the most active operator in the play, had tested at least four different kinds of fracture treatments. The ability to arrive at an optimal fracturing program was constrained by the lack of adequate fracture models to simulate the fracturing treatment, and an inability to completely understand the results obtained in previous fracturing programs. This research aimed at a combined theoretical, experimental and field-testing program to improve fracturing practices in the Bossier and other tight gas plays.

Mukul M. Sharma

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Advanced Oxidation Techniques for Soils Containing Manufactured Gas Plant (MGP) Hydrocarbons  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of a bench-scale experimental study using a combination of chemical oxidation and electrotreatment of PAH contaminated soils from former Manufactured Gas Plant (MGP) sites. Electroosmotic movement of water and movement of charged surfactant micelles due to the electro-gradient were used to introduce persulfate oxidant into the contaminated soil matrix. Results showed that greater than 80% removal of the PAHs were obtained in 20 days of treatment time. Experiments with aqu...

2006-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

351

Proceedings of the Department of Energy advanced gas turbine central power systems workshop  

SciTech Connect

The basic objective of the DOE Central Power Systems group is the development of technology for increasing the use of coal in central station electric power generation in an economical and environmentally acceptable manner. The two major research and development areas of this program are the Open Cycle Gas Turbine System and the Closed Cycle Gas Turbine System. Recognizing that the ultimate success of the DOE program is measured by end-user acceptance of the technology developed, the workshop was held to obtain utility industry comments and suggestions on the development of these systems and their potential use by electric power utilities. Representatives of equipment manufacturers, architect and engineering firms, and universities were also invited as participants to provide a comprehensive review of the technology development and implementation process. The 65 participants and observers examined the following topics: technical considerations of the Open Cycle and of the Closed Cycle Gas Turbine program; commercialization of both systems; and regulatory impacts on the development of both systems. Each group evaluated the existing program, indicating R and D objectives that they supported and cited recommendations for modifications and expansion of future R and D work.

D' Angelo, S. (ed.)

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Development of an advanced water-gas shift conversion system. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest Laboratory has completed initial exploratory research to investigate the chemistry and use of a pressurized aqueous catalyst system for conducting the water-gas shift reaction. The research was done under sponsorship of the USDOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center. A 1.0 liter continuous bench scale reactor system was built and operated to investigate water-gas shift chemistry at high pressure. Details regarding the chemistry of the aqueous, base-catalyzed system in both batch and continuous reactors are presented for a temperature range of 200 to 350/sup 0/C and pressures from 500 to 3000 psig. The catalyst choice is sodium carbonate at a concentration of 6% in water, but any material which can generate hydroxide ions at the process conditions will effectively catalyze the reaction. This report summarizes the results of the bench-scale research on the concept and presents a discussion of optimum operating conditions, pressure effects and limitations, kinetic data, effects of gas flow rates, catalyst type, and preliminary concept evaluation. 16 refs., 29 figs., 8 tabs.

Sealock, L.J. Jr.; Elliott, D.C.; Butner, R.S.

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Advanced Off-Gas Control System Design For Radioactive And Mixed Waste Treatment  

SciTech Connect

Treatment of radioactive and mixed wastes is often required to destroy or immobilize hazardous constituents, reduce waste volume, and convert the waste to a form suitable for final disposal. These kinds of treatments usually evolve off-gas. Air emission regulations have become increasingly stringent in recent years. Mixed waste thermal treatment in the United States is now generally regulated under the Hazardous Waste Combustor (HWC) Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) standards. These standards impose unprecedented requirements for operation, monitoring and control, and emissions control. Off-gas control technologies and system designs that were satisfactorily proven in mixed waste operation prior to the implementation of new regulatory standards are in some cases no longer suitable in new mixed waste treatment system designs. Some mixed waste treatment facilities have been shut down rather than have excessively restrictive feed rate limits or facility upgrades to comply with the new standards. New mixed waste treatment facilities in the U. S. are being designed to operate in compliance with the HWC MACT standards. Activities have been underway for the past 10 years at the INL and elsewhere to identify, develop, demonstrate, and design technologies for enabling HWC MACT compliance for mixed waste treatment facilities. Some specific off-gas control technologies and system designs have been identified and tested to show that even the stringent HWC MACT standards can be met, while minimizing treatment facility size and cost.

Nick Soelberg

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Solar turbines perspective on advanced fuel cell/gas turbine systems  

SciTech Connect

Solar Turbines Inc. has a vested interest in integrating gas turbines and high-temperature fuel cells(eg, solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs)). Approach is to develop more efficient recuperated engines, which would be followed by more efficient intercooled and recuperated engines and finally by a humid air turbine cycle system. This engine system would be capable of providing efficiencies on the order of 60% with potentially low exhaust emissions. Because of possible fossil fuel shortages and severe CO{sub 2} emissions regulations, Solar adopted an alternative approach in the development of high efficiency machines; it involves combining SOFCs with recuperated gas turbines. Preliminary results show that the performance of TCPS (Tandem Cycle Unified Power System) is much better than expected, especially the efficiency. Costs are acceptable for the introductory models, and with full production, cost reductions will make the system competitive with all future energy conversion systems of the same power output. Despite the problems that must be overcome in creating a viable control system, it is believed that they are solvable. The efficiency of TCPS would be synergetic, ie, higher than either fuel cell or gas turbine alone.

White, D.J.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

355

Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Implements a gas based on the ideal gas law. It should be noted that this model of gases is niave (from many perspectives). ...

356

Coke oven gas desulphurization by the Carl Still process  

SciTech Connect

The Steubenville East Coke Plant need a desulfurization process that would desulfurize an eventual 95 million standard cubic feet per day of coke oven gas from an inlet of 450 gr/DSCF to an outlet of 45 gr/DSCF of hydrogen sulfide. The Dravo/Still plant process was selected, due to the use of ammonia which was available in the gas, as the absorbing agent. It was also a proven process. Dravo/Still also was capable of building a sulfuric acid plant. The desulfurization efficiency of the plant has consistently provided an average final gas sulfur loading below the guaranteed 45 gr/DSCF. This removal efficiency has enabled production of an average of 4615 tons per day of 66/sup 0/Be acid. Also SO/sub 2/ to SO/sub 3/ conversion has averaged 98%. 3 figures. (DP)

Knight, R.E.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

LIFAC Sorbent Injection Desulfurization Demonstration Project: A DOE Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

41 41 LIFAC Sorbent Injection Desulfurization Demonstration Project: A DOE Assessment January 2001 U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory P.O. Box 880, 3610 Collins Ferry Road Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 and P.O. Box 10940, 626 Cochrans Mill Road Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 website: www.netl.doe.gov Disclaimer 2 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference

358

Neutron flux measurements in the side-core region of Hunterston B advanced gas-cooled reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The core restraints of advanced gas-cooled reactors are important structural components that are required to maintain the geometric integrity of the cores. A review of neutron dosimetry for the sister stations Hunterston B and Hinkley Point B identified that earlier conservative assessments predicted high thermal neutron dose rates to key components of the restraint structure (the restraint rod welds), with the implication that some of them may be predicted to fail during a seismic event. A revised assessment was therefore undertaken [Thornton, D. A., Allen, D. A., Tyrrell, R. J., Meese, T. C., Huggon, A.P., Whiley, G. S., and Mossop, J. R., 'A Dosimetry Assessment for the Core Restraint of an Advanced Gas Cooled Reactor,' Proceedings of the 13. International Symposium on Reactor Dosimetry (ISRD-13, May 2008), World Scientific, River Edge, NJ, 2009, W. Voorbraak, L. Debarberis, and P. D'hondt, Eds., pp. 679-687] using a detailed 3D model and a Monte Carlo radiation transport program, MCBEND. This reassessment resulted in more realistic fast and thermal neutron dose recommendations, the latter in particular being much lower than had been thought previously. It is now desirable to improve confidence in these predictions by providing direct validation of the MCBEND model through the use of neutron flux measurements. This paper describes the programme of work being undertaken to deploy two neutron flux measurement 'stringers' within the side-core region of one of the Hunterston B reactors for the purpose of validating the MCBEND model. The design of the stringers and the determination of the preferred deployment locations have been informed by the use of detailed MCBEND flux calculations. These computational studies represent a rare opportunity to design a flux measurement beforehand, with the clear intention of minimising the anticipated uncertainties and obtaining measurements that are known to be representative of the neutron fields to which the vulnerable steel restraint components are exposed. (authors)

Allen, D.A. [Serco, Rutherford House, Quedgeley, Gloucester, GL2 4NF (United Kingdom); Shaw, S.E. [British Energy, Barnett Way, Barnwood, Gloucester, GL4 3RS (United Kingdom); Huggon, A.P.; Steadman, R.J.; Thornton, D.A. [Serco, Rutherford House, Quedgeley, Gloucester, GL2 4NF (United Kingdom); Whiley, G.S. [British Energy, Barnett Way, Barnwood, Gloucester, GL4 3RS (United Kingdom)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Method for processing coke oven gas  

SciTech Connect

Coke oven gas is subjected, immediately after the discharge thereof from coke ovens, and without any preliminary cooling operation or any purification operation other than desulfurization, to a catalytic cracking operation to form a hot cracked gas which is rich in hydrogen and carbon monoxide. The catalytic cracking reaction is carried out in the presence of a hydrogen-containing and/or CO2-containing gas, with a steam reforming catalyst.

Flockenhaus, C.; Meckel, J.F.; Wagener, D.

1980-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

360

The use of gypsum and a coal desulfurization by-product to ameliorate subsoil acidity for alfalfa growth  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Acid soils limit the growth of aluminum-(Al) sensitive crops such as alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.). Management of acid subsoils can be difficult due to physical and economic constraints. Field experiments were conducted at two locations to evaluate the effectiveness of surface-applied gypsum and a flue gas desulfurization by-product for reducing the toxic effects of acid subsoils on alfalfa. The materials were applied at rates of 0, 5, 10, and 15 Mg ha-1. In addition, a glasshouse experiment was conducted that used 0, 5, and 10 Mg ha-1 of gypsum only. Field studies were concluded 41 and 45 months after treatment application at the two locations. No effect of material on alfalfa yield or tissue mineral concentration was observed. Also, rate did not affect yield. However, there were differences in plant tissue mineral concentration in several harvests that were related to rate. Soil was sampled periodically to 120 cm and indicated movement of Ca and S into the soil profile to depths of 60 and 120 cm, respectively. Subsoil pHH2O and pHCaCl2 were not affected by treatment. Extractable and exchangeable Al were not reduced by movement of Ca and S into the soil. In the glasshouse study, alfalfa yields and root growth were not affected by gypsum rate. As gypsum rate increased, plant tissue S increased, but K and Mg decreased. Alfalfa roots did not grow below 60 cm, even though there was indication of material movement to 90 cm in the soil. Although sulfur moved to 75 cm, no effect on soil Al was observed. Leachate collected from the bottoms of columns indicated that soil cations were leached as a result of gypsum application. Gypsum and the flue gas desulfurization by-product did not significantly affect the acid soils used in these studies or improve alfalfa growth.

Chessman, Dennis John

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas desulfurization advanced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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361

Advanced ceramics for land-based gas turbine applications. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In order to increase the efficiency of land-based gas turbines, inlet gas temperatures have to be increased, and the amount of air which cools the turbine vanes has to be reduced, to the maximum extent possible. Presently, thermal barrier coatings (TBC`s) are the state of the art in achieving these goals. However, since TBC`s are very thin (typically 100 {mu}m), they have clearly limitations. Since all-ceramic turbine vanes would be a very large and risky development step, Westinghouse is considering to protect the leading edges of turbine vanes with high-performance ceramics. This might be done by either replacing the leading edge with a suitably shaped ceramic part, or by modifying the vanes such that they can accommodate ceramic inserts. Among the most important criteria for the success of ceramics in such applications are (a) thermodynamic compatibility with the turbine vane alloy, (b) sufficient thermal shock resistance to survive the thermal cycling during operation and in particular during emergency shut-down, and a design considering the thermal expansion mismatch of the metallic and ceramic components. This paper presents results of work performed on SiC, SiN, and aluminas.

Schneibel, J.H.; Ludeman, E.; Sabol, S.M.

1997-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

362

INVESTIGATION OF FUNDAMENTAL THERMAL-HYDRAULIC PHENOMENA IN ADVANCED GAS-COOLED REACTORS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

INL LDRD funded research was conducted at MIT to experimentally characterize mixed convection heat transfer in gas-cooled fast reactor (GFR) core channels in collaboration with INL personnel. The GFR for Generation IV has generated considerable interest and is under development in the U.S., France, and Japan. One of the key candidates is a block-core configuration first proposed by MIT, has the potential to operate in Deteriorated Turbulent Heat Transfer (DTHT) regime or in the transition between the DTHT and normal forced or laminar convection regime during post-loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) conditions. This is contrary to most industrial applications where operation is in a well-defined and well-known turbulent forced convection regime. As a result, important new need emerged to develop heat transfer correlations that make possible rigorous and accurate predictions of Decay Heat Removal (DHR) during post LOCA in these regimes. Extensive literature review on these regimes was performed and a number of the available correlations was collected in: (1) forced laminar, (2) forced turbulent, (3) mixed convection laminar, (4) buoyancy driven DTHT and (5) acceleration driven DTHT regimes. Preliminary analysis on the GFR DHR system was performed and using the literature review results and GFR conditions. It confirmed that the GFR block type core has a potential to operate in the DTHT regime. Further, a newly proposed approach proved that gas, liquid and super critical fluids all behave differently in single channel under DTHT regime conditions, thus making it questionable to extrapolate liquid or supercritical fluid data to gas flow heat transfer. Experimental data were collected with three different gases (nitrogen, helium and carbon dioxide) in various heat transfer regimes. Each gas unveiled different physical phenomena. All data basically covered the forced turbulent heat transfer regime, nitrogen data covered the acceleration driven DTHT and buoyancy driven DTHT, helium data covered the mixed convection laminar, acceleration driven DTHT and the laminar to turbulent transition regimes and carbon dioxide data covered the returbulizing buoyancy driven DTHT and non-returbulizing buoyancy induced DTHT. The validity of the data was established using the heat balance and the uncertainty analysis. Based on experimental data, the traditional threshold for the DTHT regime was updated to account for phenomena observed in the facility and a new heat transfer regime map was proposed. Overall, it can be stated that substantial reduction of heat transfer coefficient was observed in DTHT regime, which will have significant impact on the core and DHR design of passive GFR. The data were compared to the large number of existing correlations. None of the mixed convection laminar correlation agreed with the data. The forced turbulent and the DTHT regime, Celeta et al. correlation showed the best fit with the data. However, due to larger ratio of the MIT facility compared to the Celeta et al. facility and the returbuliziation due to the gas characteristics, the correlation sometimes under-predicts the heat transfer coefficient. Also, since Celeta et al. correlation requires the information of the wall temperature to evaluate the heat transfer coefficient, it is difficult to apply this correlation directly for predicting the wall temperature. Three new sets of correlation that cover all heat transfer regimes were developed. The bas

INVESTIGATION OF FUNDAMENTAL THERMAL-HYDRAULIC PHE

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Advanced coal-fueled gas turbine systems reference system definition update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of the the Direct Coal-Fueled 80 MW Combustion Turbine Program is to establish the technology required for private sector use of an advanced coal-fueled combustion turbine power system. Under this program the technology for a direct coal-fueled 80 MW combustion turbine is to be developed. This unit would be an element in a 207 MW direct coal-fueled combustion turbine combined cycle which includes two combustion turbines, two heat recovery steam generators and a steam turbine. Key to meeting the program objectives is the development of a successful high pressure slagging combustor that burns coal, while removing sulfur, particulates, and corrosive alkali matter from the combustion products. Westinghouse and Textron (formerly AVCO Research Laboratory/Textron) have designed and fabricated a subscale slagging combustor. This slagging combustor, under test since September 1988, has been yielding important experimental data, while having undergone several design iterations.

Not Available

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Advanced Membrane Filtration Technology for Cost Effective Recovery of Fresh Water from Oil & Gas Produced Brine  

SciTech Connect

This study is developing a comprehensive study of what is involved in the desalination of oil field produced brine and the technical developments and regulatory changes needed to make the concept a commercial reality. It was originally based on ''conventional'' produced water treatment and reviewed (1) the basics of produced water management, (2) the potential for desalination of produced brine in order to make the resource more useful and available in areas of limited fresh water availability, and (3) the potential beneficial uses of produced water for other than oil production operations. Since we have begun however, a new area of interest has appeared that of brine water treatment at the well site. Details are discussed in this technical progress report. One way to reduce the impact of O&G operations is to treat produced brine by desalination. The main body of the report contains information showing where oil field brine is produced, its composition, and the volume available for treatment and desalination. This collection of information all relates to what the oil and gas industry refers to as ''produced water management''. It is a critical issue for the industry as produced water accounts for more than 80% of all the byproducts produced in oil and gas exploration and production. The expense of handling unwanted waste fluids draws scarce capital away for the development of new petroleum resources, decreases the economic lifetimes of existing oil and gas reservoirs, and makes environmental compliance more expensive to achieve. More than 200 million barrels of produced water are generated worldwide each day; this adds up to more than 75 billion barrels per year. For the United States, the American Petroleum Institute estimated about 18 billion barrels per year were generated from onshore wells in 1995, and similar volumes are generated today. Offshore wells in the United States generate several hundred million barrels of produced water per year. Internationally, three barrels of water are produced for each barrel of oil. Production in the United States is more mature; the US average is about 7 barrels of water per barrel of oil. Closer to home, in Texas the Permian Basin produces more than 9 barrels of water per barrel of oil and represents more than 400 million gallons of water per day processed and re-injected.

David B. Burnett

2005-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

365

Nondestructive characterization of ceramic composites used as combustor liners in advanced gas turbines  

SciTech Connect

Nondestructive characterization (NDC) methods, which can provide full-field information about components prior to and during use, are critical to the reliable application of continuous fiber ceramic matrix composites in high-firing-temperature (>1,350 C) gas turbines. [For combustor liners, although they are nonmechanical load-bearing components, both thermal characteristics and mechanical integrity are vitally important.] NDC methods being developed to provide necessary information include x-ray computed tomography (mainly for through-wall density and delamination detection), infrared-based thermal diffusivity imaging, and single-wall through-transmission x-ray imaging (mainly for fiber content and alignment detection). Correlation of the data obtained from NDC methods with subscale combustor liner tests have shown positive results at thermal cycling temperatures from 700 C to 1,177 C.

Ellingson, W.A.; Rothermel, S.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Energy Technology Div.; Simpson, J.F. [Solar Turbines, Inc., San Diego, CA (United States)

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Advanced coal-fueled industrial cogeneration gas turbine system particle removal system development  

SciTech Connect

Solar Turbines developed a direct coal-fueled turbine system (DCFT) and tested each component in subscale facilities and the combustion system was tested at full-scale. The combustion system was comprised of a two-stage slagging combustor with an impact separator between the two combustors. Greater than 90 percent of the native ash in the coal was removed as liquid slag with this system. In the first combustor, coal water slurry mixture (CWM) was injected into a combustion chamber which was operated loan to suppress NO{sub x} formation. The slurry was introduced through four fuel injectors that created a toroidal vortex because of the combustor geometry and angle of orientation of the injectors. The liquid slag that was formed was directed downward toward an impaction plate made of a refractory material. Sixty to seventy percent of the coal-borne ash was collected in this fashion. An impact separator was used to remove additional slag that had escaped the primary combustor. The combined particulate collection efficiency from both combustors was above 95 percent. Unfortunately, a great deal of the original sulfur from the coal still remained in the gas stream and needed to be separated. To accomplish this, dolomite or hydrated lime were injected in the secondary combustor to react with the sulfur dioxide and form calcium sulfite and sulfates. This solution for the sulfur problem increased the dust concentrations to as much as 6000 ppmw. A downstream particulate control system was required, and one that could operate at 150 psia, 1850-1900{degrees}F and with low pressure drop. Solar designed and tested a particulate rejection system to remove essentially all particulate from the high temperature, high pressure gas stream. A thorough research and development program was aimed at identifying candidate technologies and testing them with Solar`s coal-fired system. This topical report summarizes these activities over a period beginning in 1987 and ending in 1992.

Stephenson, M.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Advanced natural gas-fired turbine system utilizing thermochemical recuperation and/or partial oxidation for electricity generation, greenfield and repowering applications  

SciTech Connect

The performance, economics and technical feasibility of heavy duty combustion turbine power systems incorporating two advanced power generation schemes have been estimated to assess the potential merits of these advanced technologies. The advanced technologies considered were: Thermochemical Recuperation (TCR), and Partial Oxidation (PO). The performance and economics of these advanced cycles are compared to conventional combustion turbine Simple-Cycles and Combined-Cycles. The objectives of the Westinghouse evaluation were to: (1) simulate TCR and PO power plant cycles, (2) evaluate TCR and PO cycle options and assess their performance potential and cost potential compared to conventional technologies, (3) identify the required modifications to the combustion turbine and the conventional power cycle components to utilize the TCR and PO technologies, (4) assess the technical feasibility of the TCR and PO cycles, (5) identify what development activities are required to bring the TCR and PO technologies to commercial readiness. Both advanced technologies involve the preprocessing of the turbine fuel to generate a low-thermal-value fuel gas, and neither technology requires advances in basic turbine technologies (e.g., combustion, airfoil materials, airfoil cooling). In TCR, the turbine fuel is reformed to a hydrogen-rich fuel gas by catalytic contact with steam, or with flue gas (steam and carbon dioxide), and the turbine exhaust gas provides the indirect energy required to conduct the endothermic reforming reactions. This reforming process improves the recuperative energy recovery of the cycle, and the delivery of the low-thermal-value fuel gas to the combustors potentially reduces the NO{sub x} emission and increases the combustor stability.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Enhanced durability of high-temperature desulfurization sorbents for moving-bed applications. Option 2 Program: Development and testing of zinc titanate sorbents  

SciTech Connect

One of the most advantageous configurations of the integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power system is coupling it with a hot gas cleanup for the more efficient production of electric power in an environmentally acceptable manner. In conventional gasification cleanup systems, closely heat exchangers are necessary to cool down the fuel gases for cleaning, sometimes as low as 200--300{degree}F, and to reheat the gases prior to injection into the turbine. The result is significant losses in efficiency for the overall power cycle. High-temperature coal gas cleanup in the IGCC system can be operated near 1000{degree}F or higher, i.e., at conditions compatible with the gasifier and turbine components, resulting is a more efficient overall system. GE is developing a moving-bed, high-temperature desulfurization system for IGCC power systems in which mixed-metal oxides are currently being used as desulfurization sorbents. The objective of this contract is to identify and test fabrication methods and sorbent chemical compositions that enhance the long-term chemical reactivity and mechanical durability of zinc ferrite and other novel sorbents for moving-bed, high-temperature desulfurization of coal-derived gases. Zinc ferrite was studied under the base program of this contract. In the next phase of this program novel sorbents, particularly zinc titanate-based sorbents, are being studied under the remaining optional programs. This topical report summarizes only the work performed under the Option 2 program. In the course of carrying out the program, more than 25 zinc titanate formulations have been prepared and characterized to identify formulations exhibiting enhanced properties over the baseline zinc titanate formulation selected by the US Department of Energy.

Ayala, R.E.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Advanced coal-fueled gas turbine systems. Quarterly report, January--March 1993  

SciTech Connect

All scheduled tests for the slagging combustor program were completed prior to this reporting period. The draft topical report for the slagging combustor testing was begun in January and the draft submitted to DOE/METC for review in March. Work was completed on the (Advanced Turbine Systems) Phase 1 program and the draft topical begun in January. The ATS Phase 1 draft topical report was submitted to DOE/METC in March. Comments to the report were received back from METC prior to the end of March allowing for the preparation of the final version of the report to begin. Conceptual design of a combustion turbine system that can be integrated in a pressurized fluidized bed combustor (PFBC) application was completed at the end of March. An intermediate design review was held in February with METC and a draft of the topical report was begun during the reporting period. Details of the individual subtask work for the first generation PFBC combustion turbine system conceptual design are discussed in the ``Generic Turbine Design Study Final Report`` which was issued June 1993 to DOE/METC.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Computer Aided Design of Advanced Turbine Airfoil Alloys for Industrial Gas Turbines in Coal Fired Environments  

SciTech Connect

Recent initiatives for fuel flexibility, increased efficiency and decreased emissions in power generating industrial gas turbines (IGT's), have highlighted the need for the development of techniques to produce large single crystal or columnar grained, directionally solidified Ni-base superalloy turbine blades and vanes. In order to address the technical difficulties of producing large single crystal components, a program has been initiated to, using computational materials science, better understand how alloy composition in potential IGT alloys and solidification conditions during processing, effect castability, defect formation and environmental resistance. This program will help to identify potential routes for the development of high strength, corrosion resistant airfoil/vane alloys, which would be a benefit to all IGT's, including small IGT's and even aerospace gas turbines. During the first year, collaboration with Siemens Power Corporation (SPC), Rolls-Royce, Howmet and Solar Turbines has identified and evaluated about 50 alloy compositions that are of interest for this potential application. In addition, alloy modifications to an existing alloy (CMSX-4) were also evaluated. Collaborating with SPC and using computational software at SPC to evaluate about 50 alloy compositions identified 5 candidate alloys for experimental evaluation. The results obtained from the experimentally determined phase transformation temperatures did not compare well to the calculated values in many cases. The effects of small additions of boundary strengtheners (i.e., C, B and N) to CMSX-4 were also examined. The calculated phase transformation temperatures were somewhat closer to the experimentally determined values than for the 5 candidate alloys, discussed above. The calculated partitioning coefficients were similar for all of the CMSX-4 alloys, similar to the experimentally determined segregation behavior. In general, it appears that computational materials science has become a useful tool to help reduce the number of iterations necessary to perform laboratory experiments or alloy development. However, we clearly are not able to rely solely on computational techniques in the development of high temperature materials for IGT applications. A significant amount of experimentation will continue to be required.

G.E. Fuchs

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

371

Modeling prismatic HTGRs with U.S. N.R.C advanced gas reactor evaluator (AGREE)  

SciTech Connect

A core fluids and heat transfer model has been developed for the prismatic high temperature gas reactor in support of the US NRC Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) evaluation model. The core fluids modeling relies on a subchannel approach in which the primary coolant flow path through the core region and vertical in-core and ex-core gaps can be modeled as individual subchannels. These subchannels are connected together to represent a three dimensional reactor. An initial validation calculation for the core fluids model has been performed using data available in literature for bypass flow. The predicted bypass flow was within 2.6% of the value reported in the literature. The core level heat transfer model is based on a triangular finite volume method, where the base triangle is one sixth of the prismatic block. In order to improve the spatial accuracy at this level, a triangular refinement method was also implemented. The fuel compact temperature is calculated by a cylindrical conduction model which is implicitly coupled to the triangular core level model. The preliminary verification of the model was performed by comparing AGREE to a finite element code COMSOL by analyzing the MHTGR core heat transfer. Further verification and validation is currently an ongoing effort. (authors)

Seker, V.; Drzewiecki, T.; Downar, T. [Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, 2355 Bonisteel Blvd, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Kelly, J. M. [US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Advanced Acid Gas Separation Technology for the Utilization of Low Rank Coals  

SciTech Connect

Air Products has developed a potentially ground-breaking technology – Sour Pressure Swing Adsorption (PSA) – to replace the solvent-based acid gas removal (AGR) systems currently employed to separate sulfur containing species, along with CO{sub 2} and other impurities, from gasifier syngas streams. The Sour PSA technology is based on adsorption processes that utilize pressure swing or temperature swing regeneration methods. Sour PSA technology has already been shown with higher rank coals to provide a significant reduction in the cost of CO{sub 2} capture for power generation, which should translate to a reduction in cost of electricity (COE), compared to baseline CO{sub 2} capture plant design. The objective of this project is to test the performance and capability of the adsorbents in handling tar and other impurities using a gaseous mixture generated from the gasification of lower rank, lignite coal. The results of this testing are used to generate a high-level pilot process design, and to prepare a techno-economic assessment evaluating the applicability of the technology to plants utilizing these coals.

Kloosterman, Jeff

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

373

Advanced Gas Turbine Guidelines: Performance Retention for GE 7F Unit in Peaking Operation: Durability Surveillance at Potomac Elect ric Power Company's Station H  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Worldwide pressures to reduce power generation costs have encouraged domestic and foreign manufacturers to build high-efficiency gas turbines implementing the latest technological advances. To assure the staying power of these turbines, EPRI launched a multi-year durability surveillance program. This report discusses performance monitoring and analysis of a General Electric 7F unit in peaking operation.

1999-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

374

Durable Zinc Oxide-Based Regenerable Sorbents for Desulfurization of Syngas in a Fixed-Bed Reactor  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A fixed-bed regenerable desulfurization sorbent, identified as RVS-land developed by researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory, was awarded the R&D 100 award in 2000 and is currently offered as a commercial product by Sued-Chemie Inc. An extensive testing program for this sorbent was undertaken which included tests at a wide range of temperatures, pressures and gas compositions both simulated and generated in an actual gasifier for sulfidation and regeneration. This testing has demonstrated that during these desulfurization tests, the RVS-1 sorbent maintained an effluent H2S concentration of <5 ppmv at temperatures from 260 to 600 C (500-1100 F) and pressures of 203-2026 kPa(2 to 20 atm) with a feed containing 1.2 vol% H{sub 2}S. The types of syngas tested ranged from an oxygen-blown Texaco gasifier to biomass-generated syngas. The RVS-1 sorbent has high crush strength and attrition resistance, which, unlike past sorbent formulations, does not decrease with extended testing at actual at operating conditions. The sulfur capacity of the sorbent is roughly 17 to 20 wt.% and also remains constant during extended testing (>25 cycles). In addition to H{sub 2}S, the RVS-1 sorbent has also demonstrated the ability to remove dimethyl sulfide and carbonyl sulfide from syngas. During regeneration, the RVS-1 sorbent has been regenerated with dilute oxygen streams (1 to 7 vol% O{sub 2}) at temperatures as low as 370 C (700 F) and pressures of 304-709 kPa(3 to 7 atm). Although regeneration can be initiated at 370 C (700 F), regeneration temperatures in excess of 538 C (1000 F) were found to be optimal. The presence of steam, carbon dioxide or sulfur dioxide (up to 6 vol%) did not have any visible effect on regeneration or sorbent performance during either sulfidation or regeneration. A number of commercial tests involving RVS-1 have been either conducted or are planned in the near future. The RVS-1 sorbent has been tested by Epyx, Aspen Systems and McDermott Technology (MTI), Inc for desulfurization of syngas produced by reforming of hydrocarbon liquid feedstocks for fuel cell applications. The RVS-1 sorbent was selected by MTI over other candidate sorbents for demonstration testing in their 500-kW ship service fuel cell program. It was also possible to obtain sulfur levels in the ppbv range with the modified RVS-1 sorbent.

Siriwardane, Ranjani V.; Cicero, Daniel C. (U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory, Morgantown); Stiegel, Gary J.; Gupta, Raghubir P. (U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory, Pittsburgh); Turk, Brian S. (Research Triangle Institute)

2001-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

375

LIFAC Sorbent Injection Desulfurization Demonstration Project. Quarterly report No. 12, July--September 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In December 1989, the U.S. Department of Energy selected 13 projects for funding under the Federal Clean Coal Technology Program (Round III). One of the projects selected was the project sponsored by LIFAC North America, (LIFAC NA), titled {open_quotes}LIFAC Sorbent Injection Desulfurization Demonstration Project.{close_quotes} The LIFAC technology uses upper-furnace limestone injection with patented humidification of the flue gas to remove 75-85% of the sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) in the flue gas. The host site for this $22 million, three-phase project is Richmond Power and Light`s Whitewater Valley Unit No. 2 in Richmond, Indiana. The three project phases are: (1) Design; (2A) Long Lead Procurement; (2B) Construction; and (3) Operations. The design phase began on August 8, 1990 and was scheduled to last six months. Phase 2A, long lead procurement, overlaps the design phase and was expected to require about four months to complete. The construction phase was then to continue for another seven months, while the operations phase was scheduled to last about twenty-six months. In November 1990, after a ten (10) month negotiation period, LIFAC NA and the U.S. DOE entered into a Cooperative Agreement for the design, construction, and demonstration of the LIFAC system. This report is the twelfth Technical Progress Report covering the period July 1, 1993 through the end of September 1993. Due to the power plant`s planned outage in March 1991, and the time needed for engineering, design and procurement of critical equipment, DOE and LIFAC NA agreed to execute the Design Phase of the project in August 1990, with DOE funding contingent upon final signing of the Cooperative Agreement.

Not Available

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

376

Advanced techniques for safety analysis applied to the gas turbine control system of ICARO co-generative plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The paper describes two complementary and integrable approaches, a probabilistic one and a deterministic one, based on classic and advanced modelling techniques for safety analysis of complex computer based systems. The probabilistic approach is based on classical and innovative probabilistic analysis methods. The deterministic approach is based on formal verification methods. Such approaches are applied to the gas turbine control system of ICARO co generative plant, in operation at ENEA CR Casaccia. The main difference between the two approaches, behind the underlining different theories, is that the probabilistic one addresses the control system by itself, as the set of sensors, processing units and actuators, while the deterministic one also includes the behaviour of the equipment under control which interacts with the control system. The final aim of the research, documented in this paper, is to explore an innovative method which put the probabilistic and deterministic approaches in a strong relation to overcome the drawbacks of their isolated, selective and fragmented use which can lead to inconsistencies in the evaluation results. 1.

Ro Bologna; Ester Ciancamerla; Piero Incalcaterra; Michele Minichino; Andrea Bobbio; Università Del Piemonte Orientale; Enrico Tronci

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Advancing strategic environmental assessment in the offshore oil and gas sector: Lessons from Norway, Canada, and the United Kingdom  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract: Strategic environmental assessment (SEA) for offshore oil and gas planning and development is utilized in select international jurisdictions, but the sector has received limited attention in the SEA literature. While the potential benefits of and rationale for SEA are well argued, there have been few empirical studies of SEA processes for the offshore sector. Hence, little is known about the efficacy of SEA offshore, in particular its influence on planning and development decisions. This paper examines SEA practice and influence in three international offshore systems: Norway, Atlantic Canada and the United Kingdom, with the intent to identify the challenges, lessons and opportunities for advancing SEA in offshore planning and impact assessment. Results demonstrate that SEA can help inform and improve the efficacy and efficiency of project-based assessment in the offshore sector, however weak coordination between higher and lower tiers limit SEA's ability to influence planning and development decisions in a broad regional environmental and socioeconomic context. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SEA can inform and improve the efficacy and efficiency of project EA offshore Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Scope and deliverables of SEA offshore often differ from stakeholder expectations Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Considerable variability in influence of SEA output beyond licensing decisions Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sector-based SEA offshore is often too restrictive to generate expected benefits.

Fidler, Courtney, E-mail: crfidler@gmail.com [Department of Geography and Planning, University of Saskatchewan, 117 Science Place, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, S7N 5A5 (Canada); Noble, Bram, E-mail: b.noble@usask.ca [Department of Geography and Planning, School of Environment and Sustainability, University of Saskatchewan, 117 Science Place, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, S7N 5A5 (Canada)

2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

378

Apparatus and method for the desulfurization of petroleum by bacteria  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for treating petroleum with anaerobic microorganisms acting as biocatalysts that can remove sulfur atoms from hydrocarbon molecules, under anaerobic conditions, and then convert the sulfur atoms to hydrogen sulfide. The microorganisms utilized are from the family known as the ``Sulfate Reducing Bacteria``. These bacteria generate metabolic energy from the oxidation of organic compounds, but use oxidized forms of sulfur as an electron acceptor. Because the biocatalyst is present in the form of bacteria in an aqueous suspension, whereas the reacting substrate consists of hydrocarbon molecules in an organic phase, the actual desulfurization reaction takes place at the aqueous-organic interphase. To ensure adequate interfacial contacting and mass transfer, a biphasic electrostatic bioreactor system is utilized. The bioreactor is utilized to disperse and recoalesce a biocatalyst contained in the aqueous liquid phase into the organic liquid phase containing the sulfur. High-intensity electrical fields rupture the aqueous drops into a plurality of microdroplets and induce continuous coalescence and redispersion as the microdroplets travel through the organic phase, thus increasing surface area. As the aqueous microdroplets progress through the organic phase, the biocatalyst then reacts with the sulfur to produce hydrogen sulfide which is then removed from the bioreactor. The organic liquid, now free of the sulfur, is ready for immediate use or further processing. 5 figs.

Lizama, H.M.; Scott, T.C.; Scott, C.D.

1995-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

379

Apparatus and method for the desulfurization of petroleum by bacteria  

SciTech Connect

A method for treating petroleum with anaerobic microorganisms acting as biocatalysts that can remove sulfur atoms from hydrocarbon molecules, under anaerobic conditions, and then convert the sulfur atoms to hydrogen sulfide. The microorganisms utilized are from the family known as the "Sulfate Reducing Bacteria." These bacteria generate metabolic energy from the oxidation of organic compounds, but use oxidized forms of sulfur as an electron acceptor. Because the biocatalyst is present in the form of bacteria in an aqueous suspension, whereas the reacting substrate consists of hydrocarbon molecules in an organic phase, the actual desulfurization reaction takes place at the aqueous-organic interphase. To ensure adequate interfacial contacting and mass transfer, a biphasic electrostatic bioreactor system is utilized. The bioreactor is utilized to disperse and recoalesce a biocatalyst contained in the aqueous liquid phase into the organic liquid phase containing the sulfur. High-intensity electrical fields rupture the aqueous drops into a plurality of microdroplets and induce continuous coalescence and redispersion as the microdroplets travel through the organic phase, thus increasing surface area. As the aqueous microdroplets progress through the organic phase, the biocatalyst then reacts with the sulfur to produce hydrogen sulfide which is then removed from the bioreactor. The organic liquid, now free of the sulfur, is ready for immediate use or further processing.

Lizama, Hector M. (Knoxville, TN); Scott, Timothy C. (Knoxville, TN); Scott, Charles D. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Advanced Materials and Processes for Extreme Environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Advanced Materials and Reservoir Engineering for Extreme Oil & Gas Environments. Presentation Title, Advanced Materials and Processes for ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas desulfurization advanced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Recent Advances in Mapping Deep Permafrost and Gas Hydrate Occurrences Using Industry Seismic Data, Richards Island Area, Northwest Territories, Canada  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

). #12;Bellefleur et al. 103 (also referred to as washout zones) is important for any gas- hydrate in Arctic permafrost regions are seen as a potential source of natural gas. Most known gasNfereNCe oN Permafrost Potsdam, U.S. Geological Survey, India Ministry of Petroleum and Natural Gas, BP

Ramachandran, Kumar

382

Advanced design nuclear power plants: Competitive, economical electricity. An analysis of the cost of electricity from coal, gas and nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect

This report presents an updated analysis of the projected cost of electricity from new baseload power plants beginning operation around the year 2000. Included in the study are: (1) advanced-design, standardized nuclear power plants; (2) low emissions coal-fired power plants; (3) gasified coal-fired power plants; and (4) natural gas-fired power plants. This analysis shows that electricity from advanced-design, standardized nuclear power plants will be economically competitive with all other baseload electric generating system alternatives. This does not mean that any one source of electric power is always preferable to another. Rather, what this analysis indicates is that, as utilities and others begin planning for future baseload power plants, advanced-design nuclear plants should be considered an economically viable option to be included in their detailed studies of alternatives. Even with aggressive and successful conservation, efficiency and demand-side management programs, some new baseload electric supply will be needed during the 1990s and into the future. The baseload generating plants required in the 1990s are currently being designed and constructed. For those required shortly after 2000, the planning and alternatives assessment process must start now. It takes up to ten years to plan, design, license and construct a new coal-fired or nuclear fueled baseload electric generating plant and about six years for a natural gas-fired plant. This study indicates that for 600-megawatt blocks of capacity, advanced-design nuclear plants could supply electricity at an average of 4.5 cents per kilowatt-hour versus 4.8 cents per kilowatt-hour for an advanced pulverized-coal plant, 5.0 cents per kilowatt-hour for a gasified-coal combined cycle plant, and 4.3 cents per kilowatt-hour for a gas-fired combined cycle combustion turbine plant.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Advanced low-temperature sorbents  

SciTech Connect

A number of promising technologies are currently being optimized for coal-based power generation, including the Integrated-Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) system. If IGCC is to be used successfully for power generation, an economic and efficient way must be found to remove the contaminants, particularly sulfur species, found in coal gas. Except for the hot gas desulfurization system, all major components of IGCC are commercially available or have been shown to meet system requirements. Over the last two decades, the U.S. Department of Energy/Morgantown Energy Technology Center (DOE/METC) has sponsored development of various configurations of high-temperature desulfurization systems including fixed-bed, moving-bed, transport-bed, and fluidized-bed systems. Because of their mode of operation and requirements for sorbent manufacturing, the fixed-bed systems can generally use the same materials as moving-bed configurations, i.e., pelletized or extruded sorbents, while fluidized-bed (circulating or bubbling configurations) and transport reactor configurations use materials generally described as agglomerated or granulated.The objective of this program is to remove hydrogen sulfides from coal gas using sorbent materials.

Ayala, R.E.; Venkataramani, V.S.; Abbasian, J.; Hill, A.H.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Preliminary Economic and Engineering Evaluation of the Foster Wheeler Advanced Pressurized Fluidized-Bed Combustor (PFBC) Technology with Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Gas Turbines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For new coal-based power plants to be competitive, it is essential that their capital cost be reduced. Additionally, they must utilize coal in a highly efficient, cost-effective, environmentally superior manner. One of the most cost-competitive coal-based power plant technologies is believed to be an air-blown combined cycle that incorporates a partial gasifier and a pressurized char combustor. This report presents preliminary results from the evaluation of one such technology, the Advanced Pressurized F...

1998-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

385

Executive Summary of the Inventory of U.S. Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Sinks: 19902009 1 n emissions inventory that identifies and quantifies a country's primary anthropogenic1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

stone, flue gas desulfurization, and glass manufacturing), soda ash production and consumption, titaniumExecutive Summary of the Inventory of U.S. Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Sinks: 1990­2009 1 n, in accordance with the relevant provisions of the Convention, stabilization of greenhouse gas concentrations

Little, John B.

386

RESULTS OF TESTS TO DEMONSTRATE A SIX-INCH DIAMETER COATER FOR PRODUCTION OF TRISO-COATED PARTICLES FOR ADVANCED GAS REACTOR EXPERIMENTS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP)/Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program includes a series of irradiation experiments in Idaho National Laboratory's (INL's) Advanced Test Reactor. TRISOcoated particles for the first AGR experiment, AGR-1, were produced at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in a twoinch diameter coater. A requirement of the NGNP/AGR Program is to produce coated particles for later experiments in coaters more representative of industrial scale. Toward this end, tests have been performed by Babcock and Wilcox (B&W) in a six-inch diameter coater. These tests are expected to lead to successful fabrication of particles for the second AGR experiment, AGR-2. While a thorough study of how coating parameters affect particle properties was not the goal of these tests, the test data obtained provides insight into process parameter/coated particle property relationships. Most relationships for the six-inch diameter coater followed trends found with the ORNL two-inch coater, in spite of differences in coater design and bed hydrodynamics. For example the key coating parameters affecting pyrocarbon anisotropy were coater temperature, coating gas fraction, total gas flow rate and kernel charge size. Anisotropy of the outer pyrolytic carbon (OPyC) layer also strongly correlates with coater differential pressure. In an effort to reduce the total particle fabrication run time, silicon carbide (SiC) was deposited with methyltrichlorosilane (MTS) concentrations up to 3 mol %. Using only hydrogen as the fluidizing gas, the high concentration MTS tests resulted in particles with lower than desired SiC densities. However when hydrogen was partially replaced with argon, high SiC densities were achieved with the high MTS gas fraction.

Douglas W. Marshall

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

RESULTS OF TESTS TO DEMONSTRATE A SIX-INCH-DIAMETER COATER FOR PRODUCTION OF TRISO-COATED PARTICLES FOR ADVANCED GAS REACTOR EXPERIMENTS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP)/Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program includes a series of irradiation experiments in Idaho National Laboratory’s (INL’s) Advanced Test Reactor. TRISOcoated particles for the first AGR experiment, AGR-1, were produced at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in a two inch diameter coater. A requirement of the NGNP/AGR Program is to produce coated particles for later experiments in coaters more representative of industrial scale. Toward this end, tests have been performed by Babcock and Wilcox (B&W) in a six-inch diameter coater. These tests are expected to lead to successful fabrication of particles for the second AGR experiment, AGR-2. While a thorough study of how coating parameters affect particle properties was not the goal of these tests, the test data obtained provides insight into process parameter/coated particle property relationships. Most relationships for the six-inch diameter coater followed trends found with the ORNL two-inch coater, in spite of differences in coater design and bed hydrodynamics. For example the key coating parameters affecting pyrocarbon anisotropy were coater temperature, coating gas fraction, total gas flow rate and kernel charge size. Anisotropy of the outer pyrolytic carbon (OPyC) layer also strongly correlates with coater differential pressure. In an effort to reduce the total particle fabrication run time, silicon carbide (SiC) was deposited with methyltrichlorosilane (MTS) concentrations up to 3 mol %. Using only hydrogen as the fluidizing gas, the high concentration MTS tests resulted in particles with lower than desired SiC densities. However when hydrogen was partially replaced with argon, high SiC densities were achieved with the high MTS gas fraction.

Charles M Barnes

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Pyrite surface characterization and control for advanced fine coal desulfurization technologies  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the project is to conduct extensive fundamental studies on the surface reactivity and surface hydrophobicity of coal-pyrites using various surface characterization techniques and to understand how the alteration of the coal-pyrite surface affects the efficiency of pyrite rejection in coal flotation. During this reporting period, the influence of the impurity content, particularly coal/carbon content, on the electrochemical oxidation of pyrite surfaces was investigated. The studies demonstrate that the coal/carbon content in coal-pyrite has a determining effect on the surface reactivity of pyrite. The oxidation behavior of high carbon-content coal-pyrite is completely different from that of purer coal-pyrite and ore-pyrite. The effects of flotation gases on the flotation behavior of coal and the surface hydrophobicity of various coal-pyrite were investigated. It was found from the lab-scale column flotation studies that among the various gases studied (air, oxygen, argon, nitrogen and carbon dioxide), carbon dioxide produced the best results with a combustible recovery of 90% and ash-content of less than 9 percent. Finally, the surface energetic studies revealed that the surfaces of pyrites and coals produced by wet grinding is more heterogenous than that prepared by dry grinding.

Wang, X.H.; Leonard, J.W.; Parekh, B.K.; Raichur, A.M.; Jiang, C.L.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Pyrite surface characterization and control for advanced fine coal desulfurization technologies  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to conduct extensive studies on the surface reactivity and surface hydrophobicity of coal-pyrites using various surface characterization techniques and to correlate the alteration of the coal-pyrite surface with the efficiency of pyrite rejection in coal flotation. The flotation characteristics of coal-pyrites under various conditions was studied and compared with ore-pyrite and coal to determine the causes of pyrite rejection difficulties in coal flotation. Both the native and induced floatabilities of pyrites were investigated. It was found that both coal- and ore-pyrites, ff prepared by dry-grinding, show little or no floatability in the absence of any chemical reagents. After ultrasonic pretreatment, ore-pyrite floats effectively in the acidic to neutral pH range. Kentucky No. 9 coal-pyrite (KYPY) shows significant flotation in the pH range 7--10. With ethyl xanthate as collector, ore-pyrite floats well up to pH = 10; while coal-pyrite reveals no flotation above pH = 6. For the first time, the effect of coal collector on the floatability of coal-pyrite has been studied. It was shown that in the presence of fuel oil--a widely used collector for promoting coal flotation, coal-pyrite, particularly for the fine sizes, shows good flotation below pH = 11, whereas ore-pyrite has no or little floatability. These studies demonstrate that one of the main causes of the coal-pyrite flotation in coal separation is the oil-induced floatability due to adsorption/attachment of oil droplets on the coal-pyrite surfaces, the native'' or self-induced'' floatability of pyrite is no as profound as the oil-induced flotation.

Wang, Xiang-Huai; Leonard, J.W.; Parekh, B.K.; Jiang, Chengliang; Raichur, A.M.

1992-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

390

Mechanism-Based Testing Methodology for Improving the Oxidation, Hot Corrosion and Impact Resistance of High-Temperature Coatings for Advanced Gas Turbines  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pittsburgh Pittsburgh University of Pittsburgh PIs: F. S. Pettit, G. H. Meier Subcontractor: J. L. Beuth SCIES Project 02- 01- SR101 DOE COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT DE-FC26-02NT41431 Tom J. George, Program Manager, DOE/NETL Richard Wenglarz, Manager of Research, SCIES Project Awarded (05/01/02, 36 Month Duration + 6 mo No-Cost Extension) $ 458,420 Total Contract Value ($ 412,695 DOE) Mechanism-Based Testing Methodology For Improving the Oxidation, Hot Corrosion and Impact Resistance of High- Temperature Coatings for Advanced Gas Turbines University of Pittsburgh - Carnegie Mellon University University of Pittsburgh University of Pittsburgh In the next generation gas turbine, resistance to thermal cycling damage may be as important as resistance to long isothermal exposures. Moreover, metallic coatings and Thermal Barrier

391

Joule-Thomson inversion curves of mixtures by molecular simulation in comparison to advanced equations of state: natural gas as an example  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Molecular modelling and simulation as well as four equations of state (EOS) are applied to natural gas mixtures regarding Joule-Thomson (JT) inversion. JT inversion curves are determined by molecular simulation for six different natural gas mixtures consisting of methane, nitrogen, carbon dioxide and ethane. These components are also regarded as pure fluids, leading to a total of ten studied systems. The results are compared to four advanced mixture EOS: DDMIX, SUPERTRAPP, BACKONE and the recent GERG-2004 Wide-Range Reference EOS. It is found that molecular simulation is competitive with state-of-the-art EOS in predicting JT inversion curves. The molecular based approaches (simulation and BACKONE) are superior to DDMIX and SUERTRAPP.

Vrabec, J; Hasse, H

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Advanced gas atomization production of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) Ni-base superalloys through process and solidification control.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A novel gas atomization reaction synthesis (GARS) method was utilized to produce precursor Ni-Cr-Y-Ti powder with a surface oxide and an internal rare earth (RE)-containing… (more)

Meyer, John

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

GEOTECHNICAL/GEOCHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF ADVANCED COAL PROCESS WASTE STREAMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thirteen solid wastes, six coals and one unreacted sorbent produced from seven advanced coal utilization processes were characterized for task three of this project. The advanced processes from which samples were obtained included a gas-reburning sorbent injection process, a pressurized fluidized-bed coal combustion process, a coal-reburning process, a SO{sub x}, NO{sub x}, RO{sub x}, BOX process, an advanced flue desulfurization process, and an advanced coal cleaning process. The waste samples ranged from coarse materials, such as bottom ashes and spent bed materials, to fine materials such as fly ashes and cyclone ashes. Based on the results of the waste characterizations, an analysis of appropriate waste management practices for the advanced process wastes was done. The analysis indicated that using conventional waste management technology should be possible for disposal of all the advanced process wastes studied for task three. However, some wastes did possess properties that could present special problems for conventional waste management systems. Several task three wastes were self-hardening materials and one was self-heating. Self-hardening is caused by cementitious and pozzolanic reactions that occur when water is added to the waste. All of the self-hardening wastes setup slowly (in a matter of hours or days rather than minutes). Thus these wastes can still be handled with conventional management systems if care is taken not to allow them to setup in storage bins or transport vehicles. Waste self-heating is caused by the exothermic hydration of lime when the waste is mixed with conditioning water. If enough lime is present, the temperature of the waste will rise until steam is produced. It is recommended that self-heating wastes be conditioned in a controlled manner so that the heat will be safely dissipated before the material is transported to an ultimate disposal site. Waste utilization is important because an advanced process waste will not require ultimate disposal when it is put to use. Each task three waste was evaluated for utilization potential based on its physical properties, bulk chemical composition, and mineral composition. Only one of the thirteen materials studied might be suitable for use as a pozzolanic concrete additive. However, many wastes appeared to be suitable for other high-volume uses such as blasting grit, fine aggregate for asphalt concrete, road deicer, structural fill material, soil stabilization additives, waste stabilization additives, landfill cover material, and pavement base course construction.

Edwin S. Olson; Charles J. Moretti

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Advanced Combustion  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Systems Systems Advanced Combustion Background Conventional coal-fired power plants utilize steam turbines to generate electricity, which operate at efficiencies of 35-37 percent. Operation at higher temperatures and pressures can lead to higher efficiencies, resulting in reduced fuel consumption and lower greenhouse gas emissions. Higher efficiency also reduces CO2 production for the same amount of energy produced, thereby facilitating a reduction in greenhouse gas emissions. When combined, oxy-combustion comes with an efficiency hit, so it will actually increase the amount of CO2 to be captured. But without so much N2 in the flue gas, it will be easier and perhaps more efficient to capture, utilize and sequester. NETL's Advanced Combustion Project and members of the NETL-Regional University

395

EA-1752: Smart Grid, Pacific Gas & Electric, Advanced Compressed Air Energy Storage in Porous Rock Formation, San Francisco, California  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

DOE will prepare an EA to evaluate the potential environmental impacts of providing a financial assistance grant under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 for the construction of an advanced compressed air energy storage plant in San Francisco, California.

396

ADVANCED FLUE GAS CONDITIONING AS A RETROFIT UPGRADE TO ENHANCE PM COLLECTION FROM COAL-FIRED ELECTRIC UTILITY BOILERS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy and ADA Environmental Solutions have begun a project to develop commercial flue gas conditioning additives. The objective is to develop conditioning agents that can help improve particulate control performance of smaller or under-sized electrostatic precipitators on utility coal-fired boilers. The new chemicals will be used to control both the electrical resistivity and the adhesion or cohesivity of the flyash. There is a need to provide cost-effective and safer alternatives to traditional flue gas conditioning with SO{sub 3} and ammonia. During the second reporting quarter for this project, design and development is continuing on an electrostatic tensiometer to measure cohesion of flyash layers. A dedicated test fixture to automate flyash electrical resistivity testing is also underway. Ancillary instrumentation to control gas humidification within these test fixtures is also under construction.

Kenneth E. Baldrey

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Integrating desulfurization with CO{sub 2}-capture in chemical-looping combustion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chemical looping combustion (CLC) is an emerging technology for clean combustion. We have previously demonstrated that the embedding of metal nanoparticles into a nanostructured ceramic matrix can result in unusually active and sinter-resistant nanocomposite oxygen carrier materials for CLC which maintain high reactivity and high-temperature stability even when sulfur contaminated fuels are used in CLC. Here, we propose a novel process scheme for in situ desulfurization of syngas with simultaneous CO{sub 2}-capture in chemical looping combustion by using these robust nanocomposite oxygen carriers simultaneously as sulfur-capture materials. We found that a nanocomposite Cu-BHA carrier can indeed strongly reduce the H{sub 2}S concentration in the fuel reactor effluent. However, during the process the support matrix is also sulfidized and takes part in the redox process of CLC. This results in SO{sub 2} production during the reduction of the oxygen carrier and thus limits the degree of desulfurization attainable with this kind of carrier. Nevertheless, the results suggest that simultaneous desulfurization and CO{sub 2} capture in CLC is feasible with Cu as oxygen carrier as long as appropriate carrier support materials are chosen, and could result in a novel, strongly intensified process for low-emission, high efficiency combustion of sulfur contaminated fuel streams.

Solunke, Rahul; Veser, Goetz

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Development of an advanced gas-fired mineral-wool melter. Annual report, January-December 1988  

SciTech Connect

A gas-fired mineral-wool melter was designed to provide a melting technology option to the existing coke-fired cupola melters used by the mineral wool industry. Over the past few years, mineral-wool producers have been increasingly pressured to reduce their level of pollutant gaseous emissions. Including the fuel consumption for an afterburner required with a cupola melter, the direct production costs for fuel currently range from $32 to $44 per ton of melted product; dependent on the effectiveness of a heat-recovery system. The estimated direct fuel cost for a gas-fired mineral-wool melter could be as low as $16 per ton. The configuration of the prototype melter contributes to the energy savings because waste heat is reclaimed by preheating the feedstock in a counterflow shaft. Besides the beneficial decrease in energy costs, the proposed gas-fired melter will virtually eliminate carbon monoxide and unburned hydrocarbon emissions as well as substantially reduce emissions of hydrogen sulfide. Finally, with an improved capability to process the melted product at a controlled temperature and flow rate, the gas-fired melter should improve the overall quality of the mineral fiber product compared to the state-of-the-art coke-fired cupola melter.

Vereecke, F.J.; Thekdi, A.C.

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

ASSESSING AND FORECASTING, BY PLAY, NATURAL GAS ULTIMATE RECOVERY GROWTH AND QUANTIFYING THE ROLE OF TECHNOLOGY ADVANCEMENTS IN THE TEXAS GULF COAST BASIN AND EAST TEXAS  

SciTech Connect

A detailed natural gas ultimate recovery growth (URG) analysis of the Texas Gulf Coast Basin and East Texas has been undertaken. The key to such analysis was determined to be the disaggregation of the resource base to the play level. A play is defined as a conceptual geologic unit having one or more reservoirs that can be genetically related on the basis of depositional origin of the reservoir, structural or trap style, source rocks and hydrocarbon generation, migration mechanism, seals for entrapment, and type of hydrocarbon produced. Plays are the geologically homogeneous subdivision of the universe of petroleum pools within a basin. Therefore, individual plays have unique geological features that can be used as a conceptual model that incorporates geologic processes and depositional environments to explain the distribution of petroleum. Play disaggregation revealed important URG trends for the major natural gas fields in the Texas Gulf Coast Basin and East Texas. Although significant growth and future potential were observed for the major fields, important URG trends were masked by total, aggregated analysis based on a broad geological province. When disaggregated by plays, significant growth and future potential were displayed for plays that were associated with relatively recently discovered fields, deeper reservoir depths, high structural complexities due to fault compartmentalization, reservoirs designated as tight gas/low-permeability, and high initial reservoir pressures. Continued technology applications and advancements are crucial in achieving URG potential in these plays.

William L. Fisher; Eugene M. Kim

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

A High Performance Austenitic ODS Superalloy Sheet for Advanced ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Requirements for the next generation of advanced gas turbines dictate that ... cepts will carry advanced gas turbine engine designs into the next century.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas desulfurization advanced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Reduction of NO[sub x] emissions coke oven gas combustion process  

SciTech Connect

The paper describes by-product processing at Clairton Works which uses a unique cryogenic technology. Modifications to the desulfurization facility, nitrogen oxide formation in combustion processes (both thermal and fuel NO[sub x]), and the boilers plants are described. Boilers were used to study the contribution of fuel NO[sub x] formation during the combustion of coke oven gas. Results are summarized. The modifications made to the desulfurization facility resulted in the overall H[sub 2]S emission being reduced by 2-4 grains/100scf and the NO[sub x] emission being reduced by 21-42% in the boiler stacks.

Terza, R.R. (USS Clairton Works, PA (United States)); Sardesai, U.V. (Westfield Engineering and Services, Inc., Houston, TX (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

ADVANCED FLUE GAS CONDITIONING AS A RETROFIT UPGRADE TO ENHANCE PM COLLECTION FROM COAL-FIRED ELECTRIC UTILITY BOILERS  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy and ADA Environmental Solutions are engaged in a project to develop commercial flue gas conditioning additives. The objective is to develop conditioning agents that can help improve particulate control performance of smaller or under-sized electrostatic precipitators on utility coal-fired boilers. The new chemicals will be used to control both the electrical resistivity and the adhesion or cohesivity of the fly ash. There is a need to provide cost-effective and safer alternatives to traditional flue gas conditioning with SO{sub 3} and ammonia. During this reporting quarter, progress was made in obtaining an industry partner for a long-term demonstration and in technology transfer activities. Engineering and equipment procurement activities related to the long-term demonstration were also completed.

Kenneth E. Baldrey

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Engineering development of advanced coal-fired low-emission boiler systems: Technical progress report No. 16, July-September 1996  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of the Project is the expedited commercialization of advanced coal-fired low-emission boiler systems. The Project is under budget and generally on schedule. The current status is shown in the Milestone Schedule Status Report included as Appendix A. Under Task 7--Component development and optimization, the CeraMem filter testing was completed. Due to an unacceptably high flue gas draft loss, which will not be resolved in the POCTF timeframe, a decision was made to change the design of the flue gas cleaning system from Hot SNO{sub x}{sup {trademark}} to an advanced dry scrubber called New Integrated Desulfurization (NID). However, it is recognized that the CeraMem filter still has the potential to be viable in pulverized coal systems. In Task 8-- Preliminary POCTF design, integrating and optimizing the performance and design of the boiler, turbine/generator and heat exchangers of the Kalina cycle as well as the balance of plant design were completed. Licensing activities continued. A NID system was substituted for the SNO{sub x} Hot Process.

Barcikowski, G.F.; Borio, R.W.; Bozzuto, C.R.; Burr, D.H.; Cellilli, L.; Fox, J.D.; Gibbons, T.B.; Hargrove, M.J.; Jukkola, G.D.; King, A.M.

1996-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

404

Energy Savings and Economics of Advanced Control Strategies for Packaged Air-Conditioning Units with Gas Heat  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) with funding from the U.S. Department of Energy's Building Technologies Program (BTP) evaluated a number of control strategies that can be implemented in a controller, to improve the operational efficiency of the packaged air conditioning units. The two primary objectives of this research project are: (1) determine the magnitude of energy savings achievable by retrofitting existing packaged air conditioning units with advanced control strategies not ordinarily used for packaged units and (2) estimating what the installed cost of a replacement control with the desired features should be in various regions of the U.S. This document reports results of the study.

Wang, Weimin; Katipamula, Srinivas; Huang, Yunzhi; Brambley, Michael R.

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

405

A Study of Advanced Materials for Gas Turbine Coatings at Elevated Temperatures Using Selected Microstructures and Characteristic Environments for Syngas Combustion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) that can be suitable for use in industrial gas turbine engines have been processed and compared with electron beam physical vapor deposition (EBPVD) microstructures for applications in advanced gas turbines that use coal-derived synthesis gas. Thermo-physical properties have been evaluated of the processed air plasma sprayed TBCs with standard APS-STD and vertically cracked APS-VC coatings samples up to 1300 C. Porosity of these selected coatings with related microstructural effects have been analyzed in this study. Wet and dry thermal cycling studies at 1125 C and spalling resistance thermal cycling studies to 1200 C have also been carried out. Type I and Type II hot corrosion tests were carried out to investigate the effects of microstructure variations and additions of alumina in YSZ top coats in multi-layered TBC structures. The thermal modeling of turbine blade has also been carried out that gives the capability to predict in-service performance temperature gradients. In addition to isothermal high temperature oxidation kinetics analysis in YSZ thermal barrier coatings of NiCoCrAlY bond coats with 0.25% Hf. This can affect the failure behavior depending on the control of the thermally grown oxide (TGO) growth at the interface. The TGO growth kinetics is seen to be parabolic and the activation energies correspond to interfacial growth kinetics that is controlled by the diffusion of O{sub 2} in Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The difference between oxidation behavior of the VC and STD structures are attributed to the effects of microstructure morphology and porosity on oxygen ingression into the zirconia and TGO layers. The isothermal oxidation resistance of the STD and VC microstructures is similar at temperatures up to 1200 C. However, the generally thicker TGO layer thicknesses and the slightly faster oxidation rates in the VC microstructures are attributed to the increased ingression of oxygen through the grain boundaries of the vertically cracked microstructures. The plasma sprayed TBC microstructure (VC and STD) with NiCoCrAlY-Hf bond coat are stable up to 1100 C. However, as with other TBC structures, a considerable amount of interdiffusion was observed in the different layers, although the TBC growth was self-limiting and parabolic. The addition of Hf to the VC microstructure appears to have some potential for the future development of robust TBCs with improved isothermal and service temperatures in advanced gas turbines.

Ravinder Diwan; Patrick Mensah; Guoqiang Li; Nalini Uppu; Strphen Akwaboa; Monica Silva; Ebubekir Beyazoglu; Ogad Agu; Naresh Polasa; Lawrence Bazille; Douglas Wolfe; Purush Sahoo

2011-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

406

Air Toxics Control by Wet Flue Gas Desulfurization Systems: 2013 Update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With proposed changes in current emissions regulations and recent EPA initiatives, most power producers have concluded that tighter limits on mercury, NOx, SO2, and primary particulates are inevitable. Likewise, more stringent controls for power plant emissions emphasize the need for more cost-effective pollutant reduction approaches. This report provides an update on results from an ongoing EPRI project directed at enhancing “co-benefit” capture of mercury and ...

2013-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

407

Energy Basics: Alternative and Advanced Fuels  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

There are a variety of alternative and advanced fuels available, which are used to fuel alternative and advanced vehicles. Learn more about: Electricity Hydrogen Natural Gas...

408

Advanced turbine design for coal-fueled engines. Phase 1, Erosion of turbine hot gas path blading: Final report  

SciTech Connect

The investigators conclude that: (1) Turbine erosion resistance was shown to be improved by a factor of 5 by varying the turbine design. Increasing the number of stages and increasing the mean radius reduces the peak predicted erosion rates for 2-D flows on the blade airfoil from values which are 6 times those of the vane to values of erosion which are comparable to those of the vane airfoils. (2) Turbine erosion was a strong function of airfoil shape depending on particle diameter. Different airfoil shapes for the same turbine operating condition resulted in a factor of 7 change in airfoil erosion for the smallest particles studied (5 micron). (3) Predicted erosion for the various turbines analyzed was a strong function of particle diameter and weaker function of particle density. (4) Three dimensional secondary flows were shown to cause increases in peak and average erosion on the vane and blade airfoils. Additionally, the interblade secondary flows and stationary outer case caused unique erosion patterns which were not obtainable with 2-D analyses. (5) Analysis of the results indicate that hot gas cleanup systems are necessary to achieve acceptable turbine life in direct-fired, coal-fueled systems. In addition, serious consequences arise when hot gas filter systems fail for even short time periods. For a complete failure of the filter system, a 0.030 in. thick corrosion-resistant protective coating on a turbine blade would be eroded at some locations within eight minutes.

Wagner, J.H.; Johnson, B.V.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

ADVANCED FLUE GAS CONDITIONING AS A RETROFIT UPGRADE TO ENHANCE PM COLLECTION FROM COAL-FIRED ELECTRIC UTILITY BOILERS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ADA Environmental Solutions (ADA-ES) has successfully completed a research and development program granted by the Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to develop a family of non-toxic flue gas conditioning agents to provide utilities and industries with a cost-effective means of complying with environmental regulations on particulate emissions and opacity. An extensive laboratory screening of potential additives was completed followed by full-scale trials at four utility power plants. The developed cohesivity additives have been demonstrated on a 175 MW utility boiler that exhibited poor collection of unburned carbon in the electrostatic precipitator. With cohesivity conditioning, opacity spiking caused by rapping reentrainment was reduced and total particulate emissions were reduced by more than 30%. Ammonia conditioning was also successful in reducing reentrainment on the same unit. Conditioned fly ash from the process is expected to be suitable for dry or wet disposal and for concrete admixture.

C. Jean Bustard

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IGCC PC advanced coal-wind hybrid combined cycle power plantnatural gas combined cycle gas turbine power plant carboncrude gasification combined cycle power plant with carbon

Phadke, Amol

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Industrial Plant for Flue Gas Treatment with High Power Electron Accelerators  

SciTech Connect

Fossil fuel combustion leads to acidic pollutants, like SO2, NOx, HCl emission. Different control technologies are proposed however, the most popular method is combination of wet FGD (flue gas desulfurization) and SCR (selective catalytic reduction). First, using lime or limestone slurry leads to SO2 capture, and gypsum is a product. The second process where ammonia is used as reagent and nitrogen oxides are reduced over catalyst surface to gaseous nitrogen removes NOx. New advanced method using electron accelerators for simultaneous SO2 and NOx removal has been developed in Japan, the USA, Germany and Poland. Both pollutants are removed with high efficiency and byproduct can be applied as fertilizer. Two industrial plants have been already constructed. One in China and second in Poland, third one is under construction in Japan. Information on the Polish plant is presented in the paper. Plant has been constructed at Power Station Pomorzany, Szczecin (Dolna Odra Electropower Stations Group) and treats flue gases from two Benson boilers 60 MWe and 100 MWth each. Flow rate of the flue gas stream is equal to 270 000 Nm3/h. Four transformer accelerators, 700 keV electron energy and 260 kW beam power each were applied. With its 1.05 MW total beam power installed it is a biggest radiation facility over the world, nowadays. Description of the plant and results obtained has been presented in the paper.

Chmielewski, Andrzej G. [Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, Warsaw (Poland); University of technology, faculty of Process and Chemical Engineering, Warsaw (Poland); Tyminski, Bogdan; Zimek, Zbigniew; Pawelec, Andrzej [Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, Warsaw (Poland); Licki, Janusz [Institute of Atomic Energy, Swierk (Poland)

2003-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

412

NETL: Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP) - Round 2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Flue Gas Desulfurization Demonstration Project - Project Brief [PDF-250KB] Advanced Flue Gas Desulfurization Demonstration Project - Project Brief [PDF-250KB] Pure Air on the Lake L.P., Chesterton, IN PROGRAM PUBLICATIONS Final Reports Advanced Flue Gas Desulfurization (AFGD) Demonstration Project, Final Technical Report, Volume II: Project Performance and Economics [PDF-25MB] (Apr 1996) CCT Reports: Project Performance Summaries, Post-Project Assessments, & Topical Reports Advanced Flue Gas Desulfurization (AFGD) Demonstration Project: A DOE Assessment [PDF-235KB] (Aug 2001) Advanced Flue Gas Desulfurization Demonstration Project, Project Performance Summary [PDF-1.96MB] (June 1999) Advanced Technologies for the Control of Sulfur Dioxide Emissions from Coal-Fired Boilers, Topical Report No.12 [PDF-1.28MB] (June 1999) Design Reports

413

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY PHILLIPS PETROLEUM, INC. FOR AN ADVANCED WAIVER OF  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PHILLIPS PETROLEUM, INC. FOR AN ADVANCED WAIVER OF PHILLIPS PETROLEUM, INC. FOR AN ADVANCED WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN INVENTION RIGHTS UNDER DOE SOLICITAION NO. DE-PS26-0