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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas design capacity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

2. Gas Productive Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

2. Gas Productive Capacity Gas Capacity to Meet Lower 48 States Requirements The United States has sufficient dry gas productive capacity at the wellhead to meet ...

2

Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Summary)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Salt Caverns Storage Capacity Aquifers Storage Capacity Depleted Fields Storage Capacity Total Working Gas Capacity Working Gas Capacity of Salt Caverns Working Gas Capacity of...

3

Total Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity Working Gas Capacity of Salt Caverns Working Gas Capacity of Aquifers Working Gas Capacity of Depleted Fields Total Number of Existing Fields Number of Existing Salt...

4

Peak Underground Working Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Definitions Definitions Definitions Since 2006, EIA has reported two measures of aggregate capacity, one based on demonstrated peak working gas storage, the other on working gas design capacity. Demonstrated Peak Working Gas Capacity: This measure sums the highest storage inventory level of working gas observed in each facility over the 5-year range from May 2005 to April 2010, as reported by the operator on the Form EIA-191M, "Monthly Underground Gas Storage Report." This data-driven estimate reflects actual operator experience. However, the timing for peaks for different fields need not coincide. Also, actual available maximum capacity for any storage facility may exceed its reported maximum storage level over the last 5 years, and is virtually certain to do so in the case of newly commissioned or expanded facilities. Therefore, this measure provides a conservative indicator of capacity that may understate the amount that can actually be stored.

5

California Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) California Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

6

Mississippi Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Mississippi Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

7

Pennsylvania Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Pennsylvania Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

8

Washington Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Washington Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

9

Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. . Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity by State, December 31, 1996 (Capacity in Billion Cubic Feet) Table State Interstate Companies Intrastate Companies Independent Companies Total Number of Active Fields Capacity Number of Active Fields Capacity Number of Active Fields Capacity Number of Active Fields Capacity Percent of U.S. Capacity Alabama................. 0 0 1 3 0 0 1 3 0.04 Arkansas ................ 0 0 3 32 0 0 3 32 0.40 California................ 0 0 10 470 0 0 10 470 5.89 Colorado ................ 4 66 5 34 0 0 9 100 1.25 Illinois ..................... 6 259 24 639 0 0 30 898 11.26 Indiana ................... 6 16 22 97 0 0 28 113 1.42 Iowa ....................... 4 270 0 0 0 0 4 270 3.39 Kansas ................... 16 279 2 6 0 0 18 285 3.57 Kentucky ................ 6 167 18 49 0 0 24 216 2.71 Louisiana................ 8 530 4 25 0 0 12 555 6.95 Maryland ................ 1 62

10

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Pipeline Capacity and Utilization  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Pipeline Utilization & Capacity Pipeline Utilization & Capacity About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 2007/2008 with selected updates Natural Gas Pipeline Capacity & Utilization Overview | Utilization Rates | Integration of Storage | Varying Rates of Utilization | Measures of Utilization Overview of Pipeline Utilization Natural gas pipeline companies prefer to operate their systems as close to full capacity as possible to maximize their revenues. However, the average utilization rate (flow relative to design capacity) of a natural gas pipeline system seldom reaches 100%. Factors that contribute to outages include: Scheduled or unscheduled maintenance Temporary decreases in market demand Weather-related limitations to operations

11

Washington Natural Gas Underground Storage Acquifers Capacity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Acquifers Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Washington Natural Gas Underground Storage Acquifers Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

12

Missouri Natural Gas Underground Storage Acquifers Capacity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Acquifers Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Missouri Natural Gas Underground Storage Acquifers Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

13

Minnesota Natural Gas Underground Storage Acquifers Capacity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Acquifers Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Minnesota Natural Gas Underground Storage Acquifers Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

14

Peak Underground Working Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Peak Working Natural Gas Capacity. Data and Analysis from the Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

15

Total Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas Capacity Total Number of Existing Fields Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes...

16

,"Texas Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity",11,"Annual",2011,"6301988" ,"Release...

17

,"Nebraska Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Nebraska Underground Natural Gas...

18

,"Kentucky Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Kentucky Underground Natural Gas...

19

,"Wyoming Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Wyoming Underground Natural Gas...

20

,"Minnesota Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Minnesota Underground Natural Gas...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas design capacity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

,"Maryland Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Maryland Underground Natural Gas...

22

,"Indiana Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Indiana Underground Natural Gas...

23

,"Michigan Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Michigan Underground Natural Gas...

24

,"Arkansas Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Arkansas Underground Natural Gas...

25

,"Alabama Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Alabama Underground Natural Gas...

26

,"Oregon Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Oregon Underground Natural Gas...

27

,"New York Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New York Underground Natural Gas...

28

,"Missouri Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Missouri Underground Natural Gas...

29

,"Oklahoma Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Oklahoma Underground Natural Gas...

30

,"Kansas Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Kansas Underground Natural Gas...

31

,"Natural Gas Salt Caverns Storage Capacity "  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Salt Caverns Storage Capacity " ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Natural Gas...

32

,"Montana Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Montana Underground Natural Gas...

33

,"Virginia Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Virginia Underground Natural Gas...

34

,"Colorado Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Colorado Underground Natural Gas...

35

,"Utah Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Utah Underground Natural Gas...

36

,"Tennessee Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Tennessee Underground Natural Gas...

37

,"Louisiana Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Louisiana Underground Natural Gas...

38

,"Ohio Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Ohio Underground Natural Gas...

39

,"Illinois Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Illinois Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","52013" ,"Release...

40

Underground Natural Gas Working Storage Capacity - Energy Information  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Underground Natural Gas Working Storage Capacity Underground Natural Gas Working Storage Capacity With Data for November 2012 | Release Date: July 24, 2013 | Next Release Date: Spring 2014 Previous Issues Year: 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 Go Overview Natural gas working storage capacity increased by about 2 percent in the Lower 48 states between November 2011 and November 2012. The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) has two measures of working gas storage capacity, and both increased by similar amounts: Demonstrated maximum volume increased 1.8 percent to 4,265 billion cubic feet (Bcf) Design capacity increased 2.0 percent to 4,575 Bcf Maximum demonstrated working gas volume is an operational measure of the highest level of working gas reported at each storage facility at any time

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas design capacity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

California Interstate Natural Gas Pipeline Capacity Levels ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

PG&E Gas Transmission - NW Tuscarora Pipeline (Malin OR) 110 Mmcf/d 2,080 Mmcf/d Total Interstate Pipeline Capacity into California 7,435 Mmcf/d Net Natural Gas ...

42

Peak Underground Working Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Note: 1) 'Demonstrated Peak Working Gas Capacity' is the sum of the highest storage inventory level of working gas observed in each facility over the prior 5-year period as...

43

,"California Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"10312013 6:21:10 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: California Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290CA2"...

44

Underground Natural Gas Working Storage Capacity - Methodology  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Summary Prices Exploration & Reserves Production Imports/Exports Pipelines Storage Consumption All Natural Gas Data Reports Analysis & Projections Most Requested Consumption Exploration & Reserves Imports/Exports & Pipelines Prices Production Projections Storage All Reports ‹ See All Natural Gas Reports Underground Natural Gas Working Storage Capacity With Data for November 2012 | Release Date: July 24, 2013 | Next Release Date: Spring 2014 Previous Issues Year: 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 Go Methodology Demonstrated Peak Working Gas Capacity Estimates: Estimates are based on aggregation of the noncoincident peak levels of working gas inventories at individual storage fields as reported monthly over a 60-month period ending in November 2012 on Form EIA-191, "Monthly Natural Gas Underground Storage

45

Texas Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Texas Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Texas Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million...

46

"Assessment of the Adequacy of Natural Gas Pipeline Capacity...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

"Assessment of the Adequacy of Natural Gas Pipeline Capacity in the Northeast United States" Report Now Available "Assessment of the Adequacy of Natural Gas Pipeline Capacity in...

47

Assessment of the Adequacy of Natural Gas Pipeline Capacity in...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Assessment of the Adequacy of Natural Gas Pipeline Capacity in the Northeast United States - November 2013 Assessment of the Adequacy of Natural Gas Pipeline Capacity in the...

48

Estimates of Peak Underground Working Gas Storage Capacity in the ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Estimates of Peak Underground Working Gas Storage Capacity in the United States, 2009 Update The aggregate peak capacity for U.S. underground natural gas storage is ...

49

Lower 48 States Total Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

data. Release Date: 9302013 Next Release Date: 10312013 Referring Pages: Total Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity Lower 48 States Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity...

50

Indiana Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Indiana Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

51

Wyoming Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Wyoming Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

52

Louisiana Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Louisiana Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

53

Virginia Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Virginia Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

54

New Mexico Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) New Mexico Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

55

Illinois Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Illinois Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

56

New York Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) New York Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

57

Maryland Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Maryland Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

58

Oklahoma Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Oklahoma Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

59

Alabama Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Alabama Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

60

Kansas Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Kansas Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas design capacity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Utah Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Utah Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

62

Missouri Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Missouri Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

63

Oregon Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Oregon Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

64

Colorado Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Colorado Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

65

Montana Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Montana Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

66

Minnesota Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Minnesota Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

67

Arkansas Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Arkansas Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

68

Iowa Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Iowa Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

69

Nebraska Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Nebraska Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

70

Texas Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Texas Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

71

Kentucky Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Kentucky Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

72

Michigan Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Michigan Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

73

Ohio Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Ohio Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

74

Utah Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

124,465 124,465 124,465 124,465 124,465 124,465 2002-2013 Total Working Gas Capacity 54,898 54,898 54,898 54,898 54,898 54,898 2012-2013 Total Number of Existing Fields 3 3 3 3 3...

75

Ohio Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

577,944 577,944 577,944 577,944 577,944 577,944 2002-2013 Total Working Gas Capacity 230,350 228,030 228,030 228,030 228,030 230,828 2012-2013 Total Number of Existing Fields 24 24...

76

Michigan Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1,078,979 1,078,979 1,078,979 1,079,424 1,079,424 1,079,424 2002-2013 Total Working Gas Capacity 673,200 673,200 674,010 674,455 674,455 674,967 2012-2013 Total Number of Existing...

77

Maryland Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

64,000 64,000 64,000 64,000 64,000 64,000 1988-2011 Salt Caverns 0 1999-2011 Depleted Fields 64,000 64,000 64,000 64,000 64,000 64,000 1999-2011 Total Working Gas Capacity 17,300...

78

Pennsylvania Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

774,309 774,309 774,309 774,309 774,309 774,309 2002-2013 Total Working Gas Capacity 434,174 433,084 433,084 433,084 433,084 433,214 2012-2013 Total Number of Existing Fields 51 51...

79

Oregon Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

29,565 29,565 29,565 29,565 29,565 29,565 2002-2013 Total Working Gas Capacity 15,935 15,935 15,935 15,935 15,935 15,935 2012-2013 Total Number of Existing Fields 7 7 7 7 7 7...

80

Colorado Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

122,086 122,086 122,086 122,086 122,086 122,086 2002-2013 Total Working Gas Capacity 60,582 60,582 60,582 60,582 60,582 60,582 2012-2013 Total Number of Existing Fields 10 10 10 10...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas design capacity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Iowa Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

288,210 288,210 288,210 288,210 288,210 288,210 2002-2013 Total Working Gas Capacity 90,313 90,313 90,313 90,313 90,313 90,313 2012-2013 Total Number of Existing Fields 4 4 4 4 4 4...

82

Tennessee Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

1,200 1,200 1,200 1,200 0 1998-2011 Salt Caverns 0 1999-2011 Aquifers 0 1999-2011 Depleted Fields 1,200 1,200 1,200 1,200 0 1999-2011 Total Working Gas Capacity 860 860 0 2008-2011...

83

Arkansas Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

21,853 21,853 21,853 21,853 21,853 21,853 2002-2013 Total Working Gas Capacity 12,178 12,178 12,178 12,178 12,178 12,178 2012-2013 Total Number of Existing Fields 2 2 2 2 2 2...

84

Iowa Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

275,200 278,238 284,747 284,811 288,010 288,210 1988-2011 Aquifers 275,200 278,238 284,747 284,811 288,010 288,210 1999-2011 Depleted Fields 0 1999-2011 Total Working Gas Capacity...

85

Washington Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

43,316 39,341 39,287 39,210 41,309 43,673 1988-2011 Aquifers 43,316 39,341 39,287 39,210 41,309 43,673 1999-2011 Depleted Fields 0 1999-2011 Total Working Gas Capacity 23,033...

86

Virginia Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9,500 9,500 9,500 9,500 9,500 9,500 2002-2013 Total Working Gas Capacity 5,400 5,400 5,400 5,400 5,400 5,400 2012-2013 Total Number of Existing Fields 2 2 2 2 2 2...

87

Nebraska Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

39,469 34,850 34,850 34,850 34,850 34,850 1988-2011 Salt Caverns 0 1999-2011 Depleted Fields 39,469 34,850 34,850 34,850 34,850 34,850 1999-2011 Total Working Gas Capacity 13,619...

88

California Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

592,711 592,711 592,711 592,711 592,711 599,711 2002-2013 Total Working Gas Capacity 349,296 349,296 349,296 349,296 349,296 374,296 2012-2013 Total Number of Existing Fields 14 14...

89

Montana Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

376,301 376,301 376,301 376,301 376,301 376,301 2002-2013 Total Working Gas Capacity 197,501 197,501 197,501 197,501 197,501 197,501 2012-2013 Total Number of Existing Fields 5 5 5...

90

Missouri Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

32,505 32,940 32,876 10,889 11,502 13,845 1988-2011 Aquifers 32,505 32,940 32,876 10,889 11,502 13,845 1999-2011 Total Working Gas Capacity 11,276 3,040 3,656 6,000 2008-2011...

91

Maryland Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4,000 64,000 64,000 64,000 64,000 64,000 2002-2013 Total Working Gas Capacity 18,300 18,300 18,300 18,300 18,300 18,300 2012-2013 Total Number of Existing Fields 1 1 1 1 1 1...

92

Missouri Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

13,845 13,845 13,845 13,845 13,845 13,845 2002-2013 Total Working Gas Capacity 6,000 6,000 6,000 6,000 6,000 6...

93

Indiana Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

110,749 110,749 110,749 110,749 110,749 110,749 2002-2013 Total Working Gas Capacity 33,024 33,024 33,024 33,024 33,024 33,024 2012-2013 Total Number of Existing Fields 22 22 22 22...

94

Minnesota Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7,000 7,000 7,000 7,000 7,000 7,000 2002-2013 Total Working Gas Capacity 2,000 2,000 2,000 2,000 2,000 2...

95

West Virginia Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

524,332 524,337 524,337 524,337 524,337 524,337 2002-2013 Total Working Gas Capacity 256,454 257,322 257,319 257,315 257,311 258,072 2012-2013 Total Number of Existing Fields 30 30...

96

Illinois Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

999,931 999,931 999,931 999,931 999,931 1,000,281 2002-2013 Total Working Gas Capacity 302,962 302,962 302,962 302,962 302,962 303,312 2012-2013 Total Number of Existing Fields 28...

97

Oklahoma Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

370,838 370,838 370,838 370,838 370,838 370,838 2002-2013 Total Working Gas Capacity 180,358 180,358 180,358 180,358 180,358 180,358 2012-2013 Total Number of Existing Fields 13 13...

98

New York Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

245,579 245,579 245,779 245,779 245,779 245,779 2002-2013 Total Working Gas Capacity 129,026 129,026 129,221 129,221 129,221 129,551 2012-2013 Total Number of Existing Fields 26 26...

99

Louisiana Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

74,940 674,940 708,440 708,303 715,203 714,443 2002-2013 Total Working Gas Capacity 399,572 399,572 424,021 423,472 428,072 428,482 2012-2013 Total Number of Existing Fields 17 17...

100

Wyoming Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

124,937 124,937 124,937 157,985 157,985 157,985 2002-2013 Total Working Gas Capacity 48,705 48,705 48,705 73,705 73,705 73,705 2012-2013 Total Number of Existing Fields 9 9 9 9 9 9...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas design capacity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Kentucky Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

21,723 221,723 221,723 221,723 221,723 221,723 2002-2013 Total Working Gas Capacity 107,600 107,600 107,600 107,600 107,600 107,600 2012-2013 Total Number of Existing Fields 23 23...

102

Peak Underground Working Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Methodology Methodology Methodology Demonstrated Peak Working Gas Capacity Estimates: Estimates are based on aggregation of the noncoincident peak levels of working gas inventories at individual storage fields as reported monthly over a 60-month period ending in April 2010 on Form EIA-191M, "Monthly Natural Gas Underground Storage Report." The months of measurement for the peak storage volumes by facilities may differ; i.e., the months do not necessarily coincide. As such, the noncoincident peak for any region is at least as big as any monthly volume in the historical record. Data from Form EIA-191M, "Monthly Natural Gas Underground Storage Report," are collected from storage operators on a field-level basis. Operators can report field-level data either on a per reservoir basis or on an aggregated reservoir basis. It is possible that if all operators reported on a per reservoir basis that the demonstrated peak working gas capacity would be larger. Additionally, these data reflect inventory levels as of the last day of the report month, and a facility may have reached a higher inventory on a different day of the report month, which would not be recorded on Form EIA-191M.

103

Dry Gas-Well Capacity per New Gas-Well Completions  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Appendix C Dry Gas-Well Capacity per New Gas-Well Completion Dry gas-well gas productive capacity of about one billion cubic feet per day is added per 1,000 new gas ...

104

Louisiana Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Louisiana Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

105

Washington Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Washington Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

106

Iowa Natural Gas Underground Storage Acquifers Capacity (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Acquifers Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Iowa Natural Gas Underground Storage Acquifers Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

107

Tennessee Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Tennessee Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

108

Maryland Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Maryland Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

109

Tennessee Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Tennessee Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1...

110

Minnesota Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Minnesota Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

111

Nebraska Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Nebraska Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

112

California Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) California Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

113

Arkansas Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Arkansas Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

114

Colorado Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Colorado Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

115

Pennsylvania Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Pennsylvania Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

116

Oklahoma Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Oklahoma Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

117

Oregon Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Oregon Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

118

Ohio Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Ohio Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

119

Montana Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Montana Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

120

Mississippi Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Mississippi Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas design capacity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Natural gas, renewables dominate electric capacity additions in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Of the ten states with the highest levels of capacity additions, most of the new capacity uses natural gas or renewable energy sources.

122

Minnesota Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7,000 7,000 7,000 7,000 7,000 7,000 1988-2011 Aquifers 7,000 7,000 7,000 7,000 7,000 7,000 1999-2011 Total Working Gas Capacity 2,000 2,000 2,000 2,000 2008-2011 Aquifers 2,000...

123

New natural gas pipeline capacity adds service into Florida ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration based on BENTEK Energy, LLC Note: Daily natural gas flow data and daily pipeline capacity derived from Florida's Gas ...

124

U.S. natural gas processing capacity expands rapidly - Today ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... EIA tracks shut-in natural gas processing capacity through the emergency schedule on the survey of natural gas processing plants, Form EIA-757B.

125

Natural Gas Productive Capacity for the Lower-48 States  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

for the Lower-48 States for the Lower-48 States 6/4/01 Click here to start Table of Contents Natural Gas Productive Capacity for the Lower-48 States Natural Gas Productive Capacity for the Lower-48 States Natural Gas Productive Capacity for the Lower-48 States - Summary - Natural Gas Productive Capacity for the Lower-48 States - Summary - PPT Slide Natural Gas Productive Capacity for the Lower-48 States - Summary - Natural Gas Productive Capacity for the Lower-48 States - Methodology - Natural Gas Productive Capacity for the Lower-48 States - Methodology - Natural Gas Productive Capacity for the Lower-48 States - Methodology - PPT Slide PPT Slide PPT Slide PPT Slide PPT Slide PPT Slide PPT Slide PPT Slide PPT Slide PPT Slide PPT Slide Other Areas PPT Slide PPT Slide PPT Slide

126

Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Working Gas Capacity Total Number of Existing Fields Period: Monthly Annual Total Working Gas Capacity Total Number of Existing Fields Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History U.S. 9,072,508 9,104,181 9,111,242 9,117,296 9,132,250 9,171,017 1989-2013 Alaska 83,592 83,592 83,592 83,592 83,592 83,592 2013-2013 Lower 48 States 8,988,916 9,020,589 9,027,650 9,033,704 9,048,658 9,087,425 2012-2013 Alabama 35,400 35,400 35,400 35,400 35,400 35,400 2002-2013 Arkansas 21,853 21,853 21,853 21,853 21,853 21,853 2002-2013 California 592,711 592,711 592,711 599,711 599,711 599,711 2002-2013 Colorado 122,086 122,086 122,086 122,086 122,086 122,086 2002-2013

127

Alaska Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Alaska Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 17,902 17,902 83,592...

128

Evaluation of capacity release transactions in the natural gas industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this thesis is to analyze capacity release transactions in the natural gas industry and to state some preliminary conclusions about how the capacity release market is functioning. Given FERC's attempt to ...

Lautzenhiser, Stephen

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Montana Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Montana Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

130

Utah Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Utah Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

131

Virginia Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Virginia Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

132

Kansas Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Kansas Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

133

Alabama Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Alabama Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

134

Michigan Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Michigan Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

135

Maryland Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Maryland Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

136

Arkansas Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Arkansas Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

137

Iowa Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Iowa Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

138

Colorado Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Colorado Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

139

Illinois Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Illinois Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

140

Nebraska Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Nebraska Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas design capacity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

U.S. Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Acquifers Capacity...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Acquifers Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) U.S. Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Acquifers Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

142

Texas Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Texas Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

143

Ohio Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Ohio Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

144

Missouri Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Missouri Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

145

Oklahoma Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Oklahoma Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

146

Indiana Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Indiana Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

147

Wyoming Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Wyoming Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

148

Oregon Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Oregon Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

149

Kentucky Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Kentucky Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

150

New Mexico Natural Gas Underground Storage Acquifers Capacity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Acquifers Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) New Mexico Natural Gas Underground Storage Acquifers Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

151

New Mexico Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) New Mexico Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

152

New Mexico Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) New Mexico Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

153

Estimate of Maximum Underground Working Gas Storage Capacity in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Estimate of Maximum Underground Working Gas Storage Capacity in the United States: 2007 Update This report provides an update to an estimate for U.S. aggregate ...

154

Natural Gas Productive Capacity for the Lower-48 States  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

An analysis report from the Energy Information Administration which estimates the increases in natural gas productive capacity which should be expected in 2001, given ...

155

Estimates of Maximum Underground Working Gas Storage Capacity in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

report presents three alternative ... All facilities have a design ... • Some facilities are not operated at design capacity because of operational guidelines ...

156

Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases...

157

Underground Natural Gas Working Storage Capacity - Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum & Other Liquids. Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas

158

Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields Estimated Production Number of Producing Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil...

159

Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells...

160

Underground Natural Gas Working Storage Capacity - Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... Demonstrated maximum working gas volume is the sum of the highest storage inventory levels of working gas observed in each facility over the previous 5-year ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas design capacity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

GASCAP: Wellhead Gas Productive Capacity Model documentation, June 1993  

SciTech Connect

The Wellhead Gas Productive Capacity Model (GASCAP) has been developed by EIA to provide a historical analysis of the monthly productive capacity of natural gas at the wellhead and a projection of monthly capacity for 2 years into the future. The impact of drilling, oil and gas price assumptions, and demand on gas productive capacity are examined. Both gas-well gas and oil-well gas are included. Oil-well gas productive capacity is estimated separately and then combined with the gas-well gas productive capacity. This documentation report provides a general overview of the GASCAP Model, describes the underlying data base, provides technical descriptions of the component models, diagrams the system and subsystem flow, describes the equations, and provides definitions and sources of all variables used in the system. This documentation report is provided to enable users of EIA projections generated by GASCAP to understand the underlying procedures used and to replicate the models and solutions. This report should be of particular interest to those in the Congress, Federal and State agencies, industry, and the academic community, who are concerned with the future availability of natural gas.

Not Available

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Natural gas, renewables dominate electric capacity additions ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

These appear in a separate EIA survey collecting data on net metering and distributed generation. More capacity was added in the first half of 2012 than was retired.

163

,"West Virginia Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","West Virginia Underground Natural...

164

,"California Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California Underground Natural...

165

,"Natural Gas Depleted Fields Storage Capacity "  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Depleted Fields Storage Capacity " ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Natural...

166

,"Mississippi Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Mississippi Underground Natural...

167

,"Washington Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Washington Underground Natural...

168

,"New Mexico Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New Mexico Underground Natural...

169

,"Pennsylvania Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Pennsylvania Underground Natural...

170

Microsoft Word - GasCapacityReport3-17.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

for the Lower-48 States Executive Summary This analysis examines the availability of effective productive capacity to meet the projected wellhead demand for natural gas through 2003. Effective productive capacity is defined as the maximum production available from natural gas wells considering limitations of the production, gathering, and transportation systems. Surplus or unutilized capacity is the difference between the effective productive capacity and the actual production. This report contains projections of natural gas effective productive capacity in the Lower-48 States for 2003 and is based on prices and production forecasts in EIA's February 2003 Short Term Energy Outlook (STEO). The analysis projects an average surplus capacity of 5.6 Bcf/d in 2003 under STEO Base

171

Illinois Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 View History Total Storage Capacity 984,768 980,691...

172

Underground Natural Gas Working Storage Capacity - Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... (see Table 1), and why any given week's storage ... Demonstrated maximum working gas volume is the sum of the highest storage inventory levels of ...

173

Peak Underground Working Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Related Links: Storage Basics: ... natural gas consumption declined roughly 2 percent from the previous year a reflection of 2009's mild temperatures and weak ...

174

Michigan Natural Gas Underground Storage Salt Caverns Capacity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Michigan Natural Gas Underground Storage Salt Caverns Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9; 1990's:

175

,"U.S. Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

586-8800",,,"9302013 5:36:07 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity" "Sourcekey","N5290US2","NGAEPG0SACW0NUSMMCF","NA1394NUS8"...

176

Natural Gas Productive Capacity for the Lower 48 States  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas Productive Capacity for the Lower-48 States May 2001 Information about this presentation may be obtained from John Wood (john.wood@eia.doe.gov), Gary Long ...

177

,"New Mexico Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"10312013 6:21:22 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: New Mexico Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290NM2" "Date","New...

178

West Virginia Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

513,416 536,702 528,442 531,456 531,480 524,324 1988-2011 Salt Caverns 0 1999-2011 Depleted Fields 513,416 536,702 528,442 531,456 531,480 524,324 1999-2011 Total Working Gas...

179

Alabama Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Storage Capacity 19,300 26,900 26,900 32,900 35,400 35,400 1995-2012 Salt Caverns

180

Wyoming Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Storage Capacity 114,067 111,167 111,120 111,120 106,764 124,937 1988-2012

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas design capacity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Indiana Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Storage Capacity 114,294 114,937 114,274 111,271 111,313 110,749 1988-2012

182

Louisiana Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Storage Capacity 588,711 615,858 651,968 670,880 690,295 699,646 1988-2012

183

Montana Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Storage Capacity 374,201 374,201 376,301 376,301 376,301 376,301 1988-2012

184

Virginia Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Storage Capacity 9,560 6,200 9,500 9,500 9,500 9,500 1998-2012 Salt Caverns

185

Mississippi Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Storage Capacity 166,909 187,251 210,128 235,638 240,241 289,416 1988-2012

186

Pennsylvania Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Storage Capacity 759,365 759,153 776,964 776,822 776,845 774,309 1988-2012

187

Maryland Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Storage Capacity 64,000 64,000 64,000 64,000 64,000 64,000 1988-2012 Salt Caverns

188

Ohio Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Storage Capacity 572,477 572,477 580,380 580,380 580,380 577,944 1988-2012

189

Texas Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Storage Capacity 690,678 740,477 766,768 783,579 812,394 831,190 1988-2012

190

Kentucky Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Storage Capacity 220,359 220,359 220,368 221,751 221,751 221,751 1988-2012

191

Oregon Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Storage Capacity 29,415 29,415 29,565 29,565 29,565 28,750 1989-2012 Salt Caverns

192

Michigan Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Storage Capacity 1,060,558 1,062,339 1,069,405 1,069,898 1,075,472 1,078,979

193

Tennessee Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Storage Capacity 1,200 1,200 1,200 0 1998-2012 Salt Caverns 0 1999-2012

194

,"U.S. Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

586-8800",,,"9302013 5:36:07 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity" "Sourcekey","N5290US2","NA1393NUS2","NA1392NUS2","NA1391NUS2","...

195

Natural gas storage working capacity grows 2% in 2012 - Today in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

This Week in Petroleum › Weekly Petroleum Status Report › Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report ... This lack of growth in natural gas storage capacity may be partly ...

196

Natural gas productive capacity for the lower 48 states 1985 through 1997  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This publication presents information on wellhead productive capacity and a projection of gas production requirements. A history of natural gas production and productive capacity at the wellhead, along with a projection of the same, is illustrated.

NONE

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

New Northeast natural gas pipeline capacity comes on-line - Today ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

natural gas; prices; states; production; crude oil; consumption; international; coal; generation; renewable; ... of capacity from Clarington, Ohio to York County ...

198

'81-'82 peakshaving capacity is gas industry's best ever  

SciTech Connect

During the 1981-82 winter, the US gas industry expected to draw its peakshaving supplies from (1) 58.40 billion CF of underground storage, (2) 5.21 billion CF of propane-air, (3) 8.99 billion CF of LNG, and (4) 0.27 billion CF of other sources. The industry's top peak-day sendout could reach 80-88 billion CF in a single 24-hr period. During 1981, underground-storage capacity continued its rising trend, while LNG-plant deliverability remained static and propane-air plant additions tapered off.

Hale, D.

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Gas characterization system functional design criteria  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is the functional design criteria for the gas characterization systems being placed on selected flammable gas watch-list tanks in support of the hydrogen mitigation tests.

Straalsund, E.K.

1995-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

200

AGA Producing Region Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) AGA Producing Region Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1994 2,026,828 2,068,220 2,068,220 2,068,428 2,068,428 2,068,428 2,074,428 2,082,928 2,082,928 2,082,928 2,082,928 2,082,928 1995 2,082,928 2,096,611 2,096,611 2,096,176 2,096,176 2,096,176 2,090,331 2,090,331 2,090,331 2,090,331 2,090,331 2,090,331 1996 2,095,131 2,106,116 2,110,116 2,108,116 2,110,116 2,127,294 2,126,618 2,134,784 2,140,284 2,140,284 2,144,784 2,144,784 1997 2,143,603 2,149,088 2,170,288 2,170,288 2,170,178 2,170,178 2,189,642 2,194,242 2,194,242 2,194,242 2,194,242 2,194,242 1998 2,194,242 2,194,242 2,194,242 2,194,242 2,194,242 2,205,540 2,205,540 2,205,540 2,205,540 2,205,540 2,205,540 2,197,859

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas design capacity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

AGA Western Consuming Region Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) AGA Western Consuming Region Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1994 1,226,103 1,232,392 1,232,392 1,232,392 1,232,392 1,232,392 1,232,392 1,232,392 1,232,392 1,232,392 1,232,392 1,232,392 1995 1,232,392 1,233,637 1,233,637 1,233,637 1,233,637 1,243,137 1,237,446 1,237,446 1,237,446 1,237,446 1,237,446 1,237,446 1996 1,237,446 1,237,446 1,237,446 1,237,446 1,237,446 1,228,208 1,270,505 1,270,505 1,270,505 1,270,505 1,270,505 1,270,505 1997 1,228,395 1,228,395 1,228,076 1,228,076 1,228,076 1,228,076 1,228,076 1,228,076 1,228,076 1,228,076 1,228,076 1,228,076 1998 1,228,076 1,228,076 1,228,076 1,228,076 1,228,076 1,122,586 1,122,586 1,122,586 1,122,586 1,122,586 1,122,586 1,122,586

202

AGA Eastern Consuming Region Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) AGA Eastern Consuming Region Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1994 4,737,921 4,727,501 4,727,501 4,727,501 4,727,501 4,727,501 4,727,501 4,727,501 4,727,446 4,727,446 4,727,446 4,727,509 1995 4,730,109 4,647,791 4,647,791 4,647,791 4,647,791 4,647,791 4,593,948 4,593,948 4,593,948 4,593,948 4,593,948 4,593,948 1996 4,593,948 4,600,548 4,603,048 4,603,048 4,607,048 4,740,509 4,740,509 4,742,309 4,743,309 4,743,309 4,743,309 4,743,309 1997 4,681,090 4,574,740 4,586,024 4,578,486 4,586,024 4,582,146 4,582,146 4,582,146 4,585,702 4,585,702 4,585,702 4,585,702 1998 4,585,702 4,585,702 4,585,702 4,585,702 4,585,702 4,799,753 4,799,753 4,799,753 4,799,753 4,799,753 4,799,753 4,805,622

203

"Assessment of the Adequacy of Natural Gas Pipeline Capacity in the  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

"Assessment of the Adequacy of Natural Gas Pipeline Capacity in "Assessment of the Adequacy of Natural Gas Pipeline Capacity in the Northeast United States" Report Now Available "Assessment of the Adequacy of Natural Gas Pipeline Capacity in the Northeast United States" Report Now Available November 27, 2013 - 3:13pm Addthis The Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability has released its "Assessment of the Adequacy of Natural Gas Pipeline Capacity in the Northeast United States" report. The report is now available for downloading. In 2005-06, the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE) conducted a study on the adequacy of interstate natural gas pipeline capacity serving the northeastern United States to meet natural gas demand in the event of a pipeline disruption. The study modeled gas demand for

204

Estimate of Maximum Underground Working Gas Storage Capacity in the United States: 2007 Update  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report provides an update to an estimate for U.S. aggregate natural gas storage capacity that was released in 2006.

Information Center

2007-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

205

Storage and capacity rights markets in the natural gas industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation presents a different approach at looking at market power in capacity rights markets that goes beyond the functional aspects of capacity rights markets as access to transportation services. In particular, ...

Paz-Galindo, Luis A.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Natural Gas Productive Capacity for the Lower-48 States 1985...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Administration, Office of Oil and Gas; and IHS Energy. Well Completions Forecast: Energy Information Administration, Office of Oil and Gas, Drilling Rig Model; and Model...

207

Additions to Capacity on the U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline Network: 2005  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

percent increase in capacity additions (see percent increase in capacity additions (see Box, "Capacity Measures," p. 4). Indeed, less new natural gas pipeline mileage was added in 2005 than in any year during the past decade. 1 Energy Information Administration, Office of Oil and Gas, August 2006 1 In 2005, at least 31 natural gas pipeline projects of varying profiles 2 were completed in the lower 48 States and the Gulf of Mexico (Figure 3, Table 1). Of these, 15 were expansions (increases in capacity) on existing natural gas pipelines while the other 16 were 9 system extensions or laterals associated with existing natural gas pipelines, 5 new natural gas pipeline systems, and 2 oil pipeline conversions. Expenditures for natural gas pipeline development amounted to less than $1.3

208

Assessment of the Adequacy of Natural Gas Pipeline Capacity in the  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Assessment of the Adequacy of Natural Gas Pipeline Capacity in the Assessment of the Adequacy of Natural Gas Pipeline Capacity in the Northeast United States - November 2013 Assessment of the Adequacy of Natural Gas Pipeline Capacity in the Northeast United States - November 2013 In 2005-06, the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE) conducted a study on the adequacy of interstate natural gas pipeline capacity serving the northeastern United States to meet natural gas demand in the event of a pipeline disruption. The study modeled gas demand for select market areas in the Northeast under a range of different weather conditions. The study then determined how interstate pipeline flow patterns could change in the event of a pipeline disruption to one or more of the pipelines serving the region in order to meet the gas demand. The results

209

Natural gas productive capacity for the lower 48 states 1984 through 1996, February 1996  

SciTech Connect

This is the fourth wellhead productive capacity report. The three previous ones were published in 1991, 1993, and 1994. This report should be of particular interest to those in Congress, Federal and State agencies, industry, and the academic community, who are concerned with the future availability of natural gas. The EIA Dallas Field Office has prepared five earlier reports regarding natural gas productive capacity. These reports, Gas Deliverability and Flow Capacity of Surveillance Fields, reported deliverability and capacity data for selected gas fields in major gas producing areas. The data in the reports were based on gas-well back-pressure tests and estimates of gas-in-place for each field or reservoir. These reports use proven well testing theory, most of which has been employed by industry since 1936 when the Bureau of Mines first published Monograph 7. Demand for natural gas in the United States is met by a combination of natural gas production, underground gas storage, imported gas, and supplemental gaseous fuels. Natural gas production requirements in the lower 48 States have been increasing during the last few years while drilling has remained at low levels. This has raised some concern about the adequacy of future gas supplies, especially in periods of peak heating or cooling demand. The purpose of this report is to address these concerns by presenting a 3-year projection of the total productive capacity of natural gas at the wellhead for the lower 48 States. Alaska is excluded because Alaskan gas does not enter the lower-48 States pipeline system. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) generates this 3-year projection based on historical gas-well drilling and production data from State, Federal, and private sources. In addition to conventional gas-well gas, coalbed gas and oil-well gas are also included.

NONE

1996-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

210

Heat capacity of a two-component superfluid Fermi gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate mean-field effects in two- component trapped Fermi gases in the superfluid phase, in the vicinity of s-wave Feshbach resonances. Within the resonance superfluidity approach (Holland et al., 2001) we calculate the ground state energy and the heat capacity as function of temperature. Heat capacity is analyzed for different trap aspect ratios. We find that trap anisotropy is an important factor in determining both the value of heat capacity near the transition temperature and the transition temperature itself.

Alexander V. Avdeenkov

2003-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

211

Natural gas productive capacity for the lower 48 States, 1980 through 1995  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to analyze monthly natural gas wellhead productive capacity in the lower 48 States from 1980 through 1992 and project this capacity from 1993 through 1995. For decades, natural gas supplies and productive capacity have been adequate to meet demand. In the 1970`s the capacity surplus was small because of market structure (split between interstate and intrastate), increasing demand, and insufficient drilling. In the early 1980`s, lower demand, together with increased drilling, led to a large surplus capacity as new productive capacity came on line. After 1986, this large surplus began to decline as demand for gas increased, gas prices fell, and gas well completions dropped sharply. In late December 1989, the decline in this surplus, accompanied by exceptionally high demand and temporary weather-related production losses, led to concerns about the adequacy of monthly productive capacity for natural gas. These concerns should have been moderated by the gas system`s performance during the unusually severe winter weather in March 1993 and January 1994. The declining trend in wellhead productive capacity is expected to be reversed in 1994 if natural gas prices and drilling meet or exceed the base case assumption. This study indicates that in the low, base, and high drilling cases, monthly productive capacity should be able to meet normal production demands through 1995 in the lower 48 States (Figure ES1). Exceptionally high peak-day or peak-week production demand might not be met because of physical limitations such as pipeline capacity. Beyond 1995, as the capacity of currently producing wells declines, a sufficient number of wells and/or imports must be added each year in order to ensure an adequate gas supply.

Not Available

1994-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

212

Toward an Ideal Polymer Binder Design for High-Capacity Battery...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Toward an Ideal Polymer Binder Design for High-Capacity Battery Anodes Title Toward an Ideal Polymer Binder Design for High-Capacity Battery Anodes Publication Type Journal Article...

213

New natural gas pipeline capacity adds service into Florida ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The lack of natural gas storage in Florida, as well as limited areas of gas production, makes the State dependent on two main supply pipelines for most of its natural ...

214

Estimates of Peak Underground Working Gas Storage Capacity in...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Administration report, The Basics of Underground Storage, http:www.eia.doe.govpuboilgasnaturalgasanalysispublicationsstoragebasicsstoragebasics.html. 2 Working gas is...

215

Gas characterization monitoring system functional design criteria  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to provide the functional design criteria for the Gas Characterization Monitoring Systems (Standard-E Hydrogen Monitoring Systems,) to be designed, fabricated and installed on the Waste Tank Farms in the Hanford 200 Areas.

Schneider, T.C.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

A scheme for reducing experimental heat capacity data of gas hydrates  

SciTech Connect

Experimental heat capacity data of simple gas hydrates on xenon, methane, ethane, and propane are reduced by application of classical thermodynamics and the ideal solid solution theory. It is shown that calculated heat capacities of the empty hydrate lattices of the structure 1 and 2 hydrates can be higher or lower than the heat capacity of ice. Similarly, the calculated partial molar heat capacity of the enclathrated gases are higher or lower than the corresponding experimental ideal gas heat capacity. These differences depend on the size of the guest relative to the cavity, the hydrate number, and the temperature. For estimation of the thermodynamic properties of the empty hydrate lattice, further experimental work is recommended. Within the present limitations, a consistent methodology is applied for the prediction of the heat capacity of a natural gas hydrate.

Avlonitis, D. (Aero-engines Factory, Elefsis (Greece). Division of Chemistry)

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Trends in natural gas storage capacity utilization vary by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-191, Monthly Underground Gas Storage Report and Short-Term Energy Outlook Note: Dashed lines indicate ...

218

U.S. Natural Gas Total Underground Storage Capacity (Million ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Home > Natural Gas > Navigator Energy Glossary: View History: Annual : Download Data (XLS File) ... Contact Us · Feedback · Privacy/Security · Careers · About EIA.

219

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Generalized Natural Gas...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas based on data through 20072008 with selected updates Generalized Natural Gas Pipeline Capacity Design Schematic Generalized Natural Gas Pipeline Capcity Design Schematic...

220

,"U.S. Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1989" 3,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1989" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","ng_stor_cap_dcu_nus_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/ng/ng_stor_cap_dcu_nus_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 7:03:21 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity" "Sourcekey","N5290US2","NGA_EPG0_SACW0_NUS_MMCF","NA1394_NUS_8" "Date","U.S. Total Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)","U.S. Working Natural Gas Total Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)","U.S. Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Count)"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas design capacity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Working natural gas storage capacity grows 3% year-over-year ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

EIA estimates that the demonstrated peak working gas capacity for underground storage in the lower 48 states rose 3%, or 136 billion cubic feet (Bcf), to 4,239 Bcf in ...

222

U.S. Total Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Total Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec; 1989: 8,119,368: 8,119,368: 8,119,368 ...

223

Natural gas pipeline capacity additions in 2011 - Today in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The U.S. Energy Information Administration estimates that U.S. natural gas pipeline companies added about 2,400 miles of new pipe to the grid as part ...

224

Figure A1. Natural gas processing plant capacity in the United States, 2013 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 5 Figure A1. Natural gas processing plant capacity in the United States, 2013 2012 Table A2. Natural gas processing plant capacity, by state, 2013 (million cubic feet per day) Alabama 1,403 Arkansas 24 California 926 Colorado 5,450 Florida 90 Illinois 2,100 Kansas 1,818 Kentucky 240 Louisiana 10,737 Michigan 479 Mississippi 1,123

225

Estimate of Maximum Underground Working Gas Storage Capacity in the United States  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report examines the aggregate maximum capacity for U.S. natural gas storage. Although the concept of maximum capacityseems quite straightforward, there are numerous issues that preclude the determination of a definitive maximum volume. Thereport presents three alternative estimates for maximum capacity, indicating appropriate caveats for each.

Information Center

2006-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

226

Huge natural gas reserves central to capacity work, construction plans in Iran  

SciTech Connect

Questions about oil production capacity in Iran tend to mask the country's huge potential as a producer of natural gas. Iran is second only to Russia in gas reserves, which National Iranian Gas Co. estimates at 20.7 trillion cu m. Among hurdles to Iran's making greater use of its rich endowment of natural gas are where and how to sell gas not used inside the country. The marketing logistics problem is common to other Middle East holders of gas reserves and a reason behind the recent proliferation of proposals for pipeline and liquefied natural gas schemes targeting Europe and India. But Iran's challenges are greater than most in the region. Political uncertainties and Islamic rules complicate long-term financing of transportation projects and raise questions about security of supply. As a result, Iran has remained mostly in the background of discussions about international trade of Middle Eastern gas. The country's huge gas reserves, strategic location, and existing transport infrastructure nevertheless give it the potential to be a major gas trader if the other issues can be resolved. The paper discusses oil capacity plans, gas development, gas injection for enhanced oil recovery, proposals for exports of gas, and gas pipeline plans.

Not Available

1994-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

227

Inlet Air Chillers for Gas Turbine Capacity Enhancement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides information and analysis to help power generation engineers assess the cost-effectiveness of using inlet air chillers to increase the net output capacity of combustion turbine and combined cycle generating units. It also provides an analysis of integrating the storage of chilled water or ice with the inlet air cooling system as a means of energy storage. This report provides new and updated information and analysis, building on information from previous Electric Power Research ...

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

A Benders decomposition approach for a distribution network design problem with consolidation and capacity considerations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We develop a model for a strategic freight-forwarding network design problem in which the design decisions involve the locations and capacities of consolidation and deconsolidation centers, and capacities on linehaul linkages as well as the shipment ... Keywords: Benders decomposition, Consolidation, Network design

Halit íSter; Homarjun Agrahari

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

U.S. Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Storage Capacity 8,402,216 8,498,535 8,655,740 8,763,798 8,849,125 8,991,335

230

FEMP Designated Product Assessment for Commercial Gas Water Heaters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FEMP Designated Product Assessment for Commercial Gas Waterrequirement for FEMP-designated products is generally set at

Lutz, Jim

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

What is the total working gas capacity in underground natural gas ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum & Other Liquids. Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas

232

Outlook for Regional Generation Capacity Balances: Report Series on Natural Gas and Power Reliability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The United States is in the midst of a power plant expansion boom, achieving record additions of natural gas-fired combustion turbines and combined-cycle units over the past two years, with 68,000 MW already added since 1998 and 17,000 MW more slated for completion by the end of 2001. This report provides a region-by-region accounting of how this new capacity -- plus hundreds of megawatts of possible additional natural gas and coal capacity -- may change reserve margins and result in many other impacts a...

2002-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

233

,"U.S. Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Depleted Fields Capacity (MMcf)" Depleted Fields Capacity (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","nga_epg0_sacwd_nus_mmcfa.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/nga_epg0_sacwd_nus_mmcfa.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

234

,"U.S. Natural Gas Underground Storage Acquifers Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Acquifers Capacity (MMcf)" Acquifers Capacity (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Natural Gas Underground Storage Acquifers Capacity (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1392_nus_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1392_nus_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:43:23 PM"

235

,"U.S. Working Natural Gas Total Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" Total Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Working Natural Gas Total Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","nga_epg0_sacw0_nus_mmcfa.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/nga_epg0_sacw0_nus_mmcfa.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

236

,"Alaska Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity (MMcf)" Capacity (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Alaska Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","ngm_epg0_sac_sal_mmcfm.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/ngm_epg0_sac_sal_mmcfm.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:57:12 PM"

237

,"Iowa Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity (MMcf)" Capacity (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Iowa Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5290ia2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5290ia2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:10 PM"

238

,"U.S. Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Salt Caverns Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Salt Caverns Capacity (MMcf)" Salt Caverns Capacity (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Salt Caverns Capacity (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","nga_epg0_sacws_nus_mmcfa.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/nga_epg0_sacws_nus_mmcfa.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

239

,"U.S. Natural Gas Number of Underground Storage Acquifers Capacity (Count)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Acquifers Capacity (Count)" Acquifers Capacity (Count)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Natural Gas Number of Underground Storage Acquifers Capacity (Count)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1392_nus_8a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1392_nus_8a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:43:23 PM"

240

,"U.S. Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Acquifers Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Acquifers Capacity (MMcf)" Acquifers Capacity (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Acquifers Capacity (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","nga_epg0_sacwa_nus_mmcfa.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/nga_epg0_sacwa_nus_mmcfa.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas design capacity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Method for designing gas tag compositions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

For use in the manufacture of gas tags such as employed in a nuclear reactor gas tagging failure detection system, a method for designing gas tagging compositions utilizes an analytical approach wherein the final composition of a first canister of tag gas as measured by a mass spectrometer is designated as node No. 1. Lattice locations of tag nodes in multi-dimensional space are then used in calculating the compositions of a node No. 2 and each subsequent node so as to maximize the distance of each node from any combination of tag components which might be indistinguishable from another tag composition in a reactor fuel assembly. Alternatively, the measured compositions of tag gas numbers 1 and 2 may be used to fix the locations of nodes 1 and 2, with the locations of nodes 3-N then calculated for optimum tag gas composition. A single sphere defining the lattice locations of the tag nodes may be used to define approximately 20 tag nodes, while concentric spheres can extend the number of tag nodes to several hundred. 5 figures.

Gross, K.C.

1995-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

242

Method for designing gas tag compositions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

For use in the manufacture of gas tags such as employed in a nuclear reactor gas tagging failure detection system, a method for designing gas tagging compositions utilizes an analytical approach wherein the final composition of a first canister of tag gas as measured by a mass spectrometer is designated as node #1. Lattice locations of tag nodes in multi-dimensional space are then used in calculating the compositions of a node #2 and each subsequent node so as to maximize the distance of each node from any combination of tag components which might be indistinguishable from another tag composition in a reactor fuel assembly. Alternatively, the measured compositions of tag gas numbers 1 and 2 may be used to fix the locations of nodes 1 and 2, with the locations of nodes 3-N then calculated for optimum tag gas composition. A single sphere defining the lattice locations of the tag nodes may be used to define approximately 20 tag nodes, while concentric spheres can extend the number of tag nodes to several hundred.

Gross, Kenny C. (1433 Carriage La., Bolingbrook, IL 60440)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Status of Natural Gas Pipeline System Capacity Entering the 2000-2001 Heating Season  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This special report looks at the capabilities of the national natural gas pipeline network in 2000 and provides an assessment of the current levels of available capacity to transport supplies from production areas to markets throughout the United States during the upcoming heating season. It also examines how completion of currently planned expansion projects and proposed new pipelines would affect the network.

Information Center

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Designing Rules for the Capacity Market Hlne Le Cadre Michal Soubra  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this article, the energy market is a modeled as a Stackelberg game involving three categories of agents per unit of demand. Finally, coupling the energy and the capacity markets, we design rules for the ca the liberalization of the energy market and imposes the creation of a capacity market in 2015 which long term goal

245

Natural gas repowering creates new capacity and efficiency options for utilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Repowering of aging electrical generation units in the U.S. is becoming increasingly accepted as a key technology for meeting future electrical demands. Repowering of steam electric generating capacity can be broadly defined as the replacement of existing equipment with new, more efficient systems that also offer lower emissions and substantially increased capacity. The feasibility of repowering units has been largely established. The basic equipment needed for gas-based repowering, including state-of-the-art gas turbines and heat recovery steam generators, are considered established and mature technologies by the utility industry. Nevertheless, important questions exist about the future of the repowering market. GRI had addressed these issues through three different projects in the last year: A technology-based, bottom-up study of repowering issues and markets; A top-down, capacity growth/demographic study of repowering markets; and A workshop with gas equipment and electric utility representative to discuss the future of gas repowering. These studies are summarized.

NONE

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Additions to Capacity on the U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline Network: 2007  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Information Administration, Office of Oil and Gas, July 2008 1 U.S. natural gas pipeline construction activity accelerated in 2007 with capacity additions to the grid totaling nearly 14.9 billion cubic feet (Bcf) of daily deliverability (Figure 1). These additions were the largest of any year in the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) 10-year database of pipeline construction activity. The increased level of natural gas pipeline construction activity in 2007 conformed to a growth trend that began slowly in 2005 and intensified in 2006. In 2007, about 1,700 miles of pipeline were installed, which was greater than in any year since 2003 (Figure 2). The expansion cycle for natural gas pipeline construction is occurring at the same time as the development of the

247

Additions to Capacity on the U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline Network: 2007  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Information Administration, Office of Oil and Gas, July 2008 1 U.S. natural gas pipeline construction activity accelerated in 2007 with capacity additions to the grid totaling nearly 14.9 billion cubic feet (Bcf) of daily deliverability (Figure 1). These additions were the largest of any year in the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) 10-year database of pipeline construction activity. The increased level of natural gas pipeline construction activity in 2007 conformed to a growth trend that began slowly in 2005 and intensified in 2006. In 2007, about 1,700 miles of pipeline were installed, which was greater than in any year since 2003 (Figure 2). The expansion cycle for natural gas pipeline construction is occurring at the same time as the development of the

248

,"California Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5290ca2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5290ca2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:09 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: California Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290CA2" "Date","California Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" 37271,388480 37302,475720 37330,475720 37361,475720

249

,"Utah Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5290ut2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5290ut2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:25 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Utah Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290UT2" "Date","Utah Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" 32324,114980 32689,114980 33054,114980 33419,114980 33785,114980 34150,114980

250

,"Nebraska Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5290ne2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5290ne2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:18 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Nebraska Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290NE2" "Date","Nebraska Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" 32324,88438 32689,88438 33054,143311 33419,93311 33785,93311

251

,"Utah Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5290ut2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5290ut2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:25 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Utah Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290UT2" "Date","Utah Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" 37271,129480 37302,129480 37330,129480 37361,129480 37391,129480

252

,"Michigan Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5290mi2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5290mi2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:15 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Michigan Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290MI2" "Date","Michigan Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" 32324,982362 32689,982362 33054,994542 33419,995181 33785,994281

253

,"Virginia Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5290va2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5290va2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:26 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Virginia Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290VA2" "Date","Virginia Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" 37271,4967 37302,4967 37330,4967 37361,4967 37391,4967

254

,"Wyoming Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5290wy2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5290wy2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:27 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Wyoming Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290WY2" "Date","Wyoming Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" 32324,103831 32689,103830 33054,106130 33419,106130 33785,105668

255

,"Washington Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5290wa2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5290wa2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:26 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Washington Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290WA2" "Date","Washington Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" 37271,37300 37302,37300 37330,37300 37361,37300

256

,"Tennessee Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","12/2012" Monthly","12/2012" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5290tn2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5290tn2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:23 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Tennessee Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290TN2" "Date","Tennessee Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" 37271,1200 37302,1200 37330,1200 37361,1200

257

,"Texas Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5290tx2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5290tx2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:24 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Texas Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290TX2" "Date","Texas Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" 32324,590248 32689,589780 33054,586502 33419,589018 33785,595229 34150,598782

258

,"Pennsylvania Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5290pa2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5290pa2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:22 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Pennsylvania Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290PA2" "Date","Pennsylvania Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" 32324,805394 32689,805393 33054,640938 33419,640938

259

,"Arkansas Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5290ar2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5290ar2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:08 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Arkansas Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290AR2" "Date","Arkansas Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" 32324,36147 32689,31447 33054,31277 33419,31277 33785,31277 34150,31277

260

,"Colorado Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5290co2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5290co2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:10 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Colorado Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290CO2" "Date","Colorado Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" 37271,100227 37302,100227 37330,100227 37361,100227

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas design capacity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

,"Louisiana Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5290la2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5290la2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:14 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Louisiana Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290LA2" "Date","Louisiana Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" 37271,580037 37302,580037 37330,580037 37361,580037

262

,"Kansas Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5290ks2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5290ks2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:12 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Kansas Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290KS2" "Date","Kansas Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" 32324,334925 32689,334925 33054,301199 33419,301199 33785,290571

263

,"Kentucky Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5290ky2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5290ky2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:13 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Kentucky Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290KY2" "Date","Kentucky Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" 37271,219914 37302,219914 37330,219914 37361,219914

264

,"Ohio Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5290oh2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5290oh2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:21 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Ohio Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290OH2" "Date","Ohio Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" 37271,573784 37302,573784 37330,573784 37361,573784 37391,573784

265

,"Mississippi Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5290ms2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5290ms2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:17 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Mississippi Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290MS2" "Date","Mississippi Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" 37271,134012 37302,134012 37330,134012

266

,"Minnesota Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5290mn2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5290mn2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:15 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Minnesota Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290MN2" "Date","Minnesota Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" 32324,7000 32689,7000 33054,7000 33419,7000 33785,7000 34150,7000

267

,"Pennsylvania Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5290pa2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5290pa2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:23 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Pennsylvania Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290PA2" "Date","Pennsylvania Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" 37271,713818 37302,713818 37330,713818

268

,"Maryland Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5290md2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5290md2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:14 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Maryland Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290MD2" "Date","Maryland Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" 32324,61978 32689,61978 33054,61978 33419,61978 33785,62400 34150,62400

269

,"Kansas Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5290ks2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5290ks2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:12 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Kansas Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290KS2" "Date","Kansas Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" 37271,301502 37302,301502 37330,301502 37361,301502

270

,"Arkansas Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5290ar2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5290ar2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:08 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Arkansas Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290AR2" "Date","Arkansas Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" 37271,22000 37302,22000 37330,22000 37361,22000

271

,"Montana Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5290mt2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5290mt2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:18 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Montana Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290MT2" "Date","Montana Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" 32324,373963 32689,373960 33054,373960 33419,373960 33785,375010

272

,"Minnesota Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5290mn2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5290mn2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:16 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Minnesota Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290MN2" "Date","Minnesota Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" 37271,7000 37302,7000 37330,7000 37361,7000

273

,"Indiana Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5290in2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5290in2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:11 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Indiana Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290IN2" "Date","Indiana Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" 32324,114603 32689,112045 33054,97332 33419,102246 33785,106176

274

,"Oklahoma Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5290ok2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5290ok2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:21 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Oklahoma Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290OK2" "Date","Oklahoma Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" 32324,377189 32689,364887 33054,362616 33419,362616 33785,359616

275

,"Texas Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5290tx2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5290tx2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:24 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Texas Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290TX2" "Date","Texas Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" 37271,699324 37302,698258 37330,699324 37361,699324

276

,"Oregon Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5290or2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5290or2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:22 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Oregon Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290OR2" "Date","Oregon Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" 37271,17755 37302,21080 37330,21080 37361,21080 37391,21080

277

,"Louisiana Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5290la2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5290la2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:13 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Louisiana Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290LA2" "Date","Louisiana Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" 32324,559019 32689,559019 33054,550823 33419,559823 33785,539200

278

,"Indiana Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5290in2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5290in2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:11 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Indiana Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290IN2" "Date","Indiana Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" 37271,109310 37302,109310 37330,109310 37361,109310

279

,"Alabama Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5290al2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5290al2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:08 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Alabama Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290AL2" "Date","Alabama Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" 37271,5280 37302,5280 37330,5280 37361,5280 37391,5280

280

,"Colorado Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5290co2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5290co2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:09 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Colorado Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290CO2" "Date","Colorado Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" 32324,82662 32689,82662 33054,98999 33419,98999 33785,105790

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas design capacity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

,"Mississippi Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5290ms2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5290ms2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:17 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Mississippi Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290MS2" "Date","Mississippi Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" 32324,108171 32689,108207 33054,108601 33419,114621 33785,114627

282

,"Michigan Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5290mi2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5290mi2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:15 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Michigan Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290MI2" "Date","Michigan Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" 37271,1070717 37302,1070717 37330,1070717 37361,1070717

283

,"Nebraska Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5290ne2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5290ne2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:19 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Nebraska Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290NE2" "Date","Nebraska Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" 37271,39469 37302,39469 37330,39469 37361,39469

284

,"Ohio Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5290oh2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5290oh2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:20 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Ohio Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290OH2" "Date","Ohio Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" 32324,612547 32689,612547 33054,591494 33419,591494 33785,591494 34150,594644

285

,"Alabama Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5290al2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5290al2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:07 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Alabama Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290AL2" "Date","Alabama Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" 34880,2600 35246,3280 35611,3280 35976,3280 36341,3280 36707,3280

286

,"Wyoming Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5290wy2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5290wy2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:28 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Wyoming Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290WY2" "Date","Wyoming Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" 37271,105869 37302,105869 37330,105869 37361,105869

287

,"Washington Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5290wa2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5290wa2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:26 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Washington Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290WA2" "Date","Washington Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" 32324,36400 32689,36400 33054,32100 33419,34100 33785,34100

288

,"Oregon Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5290or2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5290or2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:22 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Oregon Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290OR2" "Date","Oregon Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" 32689,9791 33054,9791 33419,9791 33785,11445 34150,11445 34515,11622

289

,"U.S. Natural Gas Underground Storage Salt Caverns Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Salt Caverns Capacity (MMcf)" Salt Caverns Capacity (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Natural Gas Underground Storage Salt Caverns Capacity (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1393_nus_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1393_nus_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:43:34 PM"

290

,"U.S. Natural Gas Number of Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Count)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Depleted Fields Capacity (Count)" Depleted Fields Capacity (Count)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Natural Gas Number of Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Count)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1391_nus_8a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1391_nus_8a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:43:06 PM"

291

,"U.S. Natural Gas Number of Underground Storage Salt Caverns Capacity (Count)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Salt Caverns Capacity (Count)" Salt Caverns Capacity (Count)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Natural Gas Number of Underground Storage Salt Caverns Capacity (Count)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1393_nus_8a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1393_nus_8a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:43:34 PM"

292

,"U.S. Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Depleted Fields Capacity (MMcf)" Depleted Fields Capacity (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1391_nus_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1391_nus_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:43:05 PM"

293

A Computational Approach to the Real Option Management of Network Contracts for Natural Gas Pipeline Transport Capacity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Commodity merchants use real option models to manage their operations. A central element of such a model is its underlying operating policy. We focus on network contracts for the transport capacity of natural gas pipelines, specific energy conversion ... Keywords: Monte Carlo simulation, capacity valuation, commodity and energy conversion assets, energy-related operations, heuristics, math programming, natural gas pipelines, operations management practice, operations management/finance interface, petroleum/natural gas industries, real options, sensitivities, spread options

Nicola Secomandi; Mulan X. Wang

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Analytical Estimation of CO2 Storage Capacity in Depleted Oil and Gas Reservoirs Based on Thermodynamic State Functions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Numerical simulation has been used, as common practice, to estimate the CO2 storage capacity of depleted reservoirs. However, this method is time consuming, expensive and requires detailed input data. This investigation proposes an analytical method to estimate the ultimate CO2 storage in depleted oil and gas reservoirs by implementing a volume constrained thermodynamic equation of state (EOS) using the reservoir?s average pressure and fluid composition. This method was implemented in an algorithm which allows fast and accurate estimations of final storage, which can be used to select target storage reservoirs, and design the injection scheme and surface facilities. Impurities such as nitrogen and carbon monoxide, usually contained in power plant flue gases, are considered in the injection stream and can be handled correctly in the proposed algorithm by using their thermodynamic properties into the EOS. Results from analytical method presented excellent agreement with those from reservoir simulation. Ultimate CO2 storage capacity was predicted with an average difference of 1.3%, molar basis, between analytical and numerical methods; average oil, gas, and water saturations were also matched. Additionally, the analytical algorithm performed several orders of magnitude faster than numerical simulation, with an average of 5 seconds per run.

Valbuena Olivares, Ernesto

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Direct experimental evidence for a negative heat capacity in the liquid-to-gas like phase transitionin hydrogen cluster ions backbending of the caloric curve  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Direct experimental evidence for a negative heat capacity in the liquid-to-gas like phase transitionin hydrogen cluster ions

Gobet, F; Farizon, M; Gaillard, M J; Buchet, J P; Carré, M; Schreier, P; Märk, T D

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Improving Gas-Fired Heat Pump Capacity and Performance by Adding a Desiccant Dehumidification Subsystem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper examines the merits of coupling a desiccant dehumidification subsystem to a gas-engine- driven vapor compression air conditioner. A system is identified that uses a rotary, silica gel, parallel-plate dehumidifier. Dehumidifier data and analysis are based on recent tests. The dehumidification subsystem processes the fresh air portion and handles the latent portion of the load. Adding the desiccant subsystem increases the gas-based coefficient of performance 40% and increases the cooling capacity 50%. Increased initial manufacturing costs are estimated at around $500/ton ($142/kW) for volume production. This cost Level is expected to reduce the total initial cost per ton compared to a system without the desiccant subsystem.

Parsons, B. K.; Pesaran, A. A.; Bharathan, D.; Shelpuk, B. C.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Network Configuration & System Design  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Network Configuration & System Design Network Configuration & System Design About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 2007/2008 with selected updates Network Configuration and System Design Overview | Transmission/Storage | Design Criteria | Importance of Storage| Overall Pipeline System Configuration Overview A principal requirement of the natural gas transmission system is that it be capable of meeting the peak demand of its shippers who have contracts for firm service. To meet this requirement, the facilities developed by the natural gas transmission industry are a combination of transmission pipelines to bring the gas to the market areas and of underground natural gas storage sites and liquefied natural gas (LNG) peaking facilities located in the market areas.

298

,"U.S. Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

12,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1988" 12,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1988" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","ng_stor_cap_dcu_nus_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/ng/ng_stor_cap_dcu_nus_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 7:03:21 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity" "Sourcekey","N5290US2","NA1393_NUS_2","NA1392_NUS_2","NA1391_NUS_2","NGA_EPG0_SACW0_NUS_MMCF","NGA_EPG0_SACWS_NUS_MMCF","NGA_EPG0_SACWA_NUS_MMCF","NGA_EPG0_SACWD_NUS_MMCF","NA1394_NUS_8","NA1393_NUS_8","NA1392_NUS_8","NA1391_NUS_8"

299

Starter systems designed for efficient air/gas comsumption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper examines engine starting systems designed by Pow-R-Quik. Pow-R-Quik's most recent product line includes several models that are designed to start most diesel and natural gas engines. Pow-R-Quick also offers air starting systems for a wide range of gas turbine applications. The model DS16, air or gas starter, is designed for engines with a displacement up to 500 cid diesel and up to 1000 cid natural gas. The DS60 model is also an air or gas operated starter with specially designed heavy duty bearings for maximum performance. To prove out starter durability and performance, Pow-R-Quik has installed three fully instrumented diesel engine test cells. The number of starts that can be achieved ranges from zero to 99,000. The system can be set to regulate the air for low or high pressure starts, control the lubricant, etc.

Not Available

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Functional design criteria for the retained gas sampler system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A Retained Gas Sampler System (RGSS) is being developed to capture and analyze waste samples from Hanford Flammable Gas Watch List Tanks to determine both the quantity and composition of gases retained in the waste. The RGSS consists of three main components: the Sampler, Extractor, and Extruder. This report describes the functional criteria for the design of the RGSS components. The RGSS Sampler is based on the WHC Universal Sampler design with modifications to eliminate gas leakage. The primary function of the Sampler is to capture a representative waste sample from a tank and transport the sample with minimal loss of gas content from the tank to the laboratory. The function of the Extruder is to transfer the waste sample from the Sampler to the Extractor. The function of the Extractor is to separate the gases from the liquids and solids, measure the relative volume of gas to determine the void fraction, and remove and analyze the gas constituents.

Wootan, D.W.

1995-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas design capacity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Design of indoor communication infrastructure for ultra-high capacity next generation wireless services  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

identification (RFID) tags to wirelessly track all manner of things. In 2009 alone over 2.4 billion RFID tags were produced [4]. The growth in the use of mobile devices, wireless internet devices and RFID tags is summarised in Figure 1.1. The increasing size... . Finally, the design of DAS to support emerging wireless protocols, such as 802.11ac, that have large numbers of MIMO streams (4-8) is considered. In such cases, capacity is best enhanced by sending multiple MIMO streams to single remote locations...

Gordon, George S. D.

2013-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

302

Fail-Safe Design for Large Capacity Lithium-Ion Battery Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A fault leading to a thermal runaway in a lithium-ion battery is believed to grow over time from a latent defect. Significant efforts have been made to detect lithium-ion battery safety faults to proactively facilitate actions minimizing subsequent losses. Scaling up a battery greatly changes the thermal and electrical signals of a system developing a defect and its consequent behaviors during fault evolution. In a large-capacity system such as a battery for an electric vehicle, detecting a fault signal and confining the fault locally in the system are extremely challenging. This paper introduces a fail-safe design methodology for large-capacity lithium-ion battery systems. Analysis using an internal short circuit response model for multi-cell packs is presented that demonstrates the viability of the proposed concept for various design parameters and operating conditions. Locating a faulty cell in a multiple-cell module and determining the status of the fault's evolution can be achieved using signals easily measured from the electric terminals of the module. A methodology is introduced for electrical isolation of a faulty cell from the healthy cells in a system to prevent further electrical energy feed into the fault. Experimental demonstration is presented supporting the model results.

Kim, G. H.; Smith, K.; Ireland, J.; Pesaran, A.

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

303

Design of high-efficiency turbomachinery and gas turbines  

SciTech Connect

The present treatment of pump, compressor, and turbine turbomachinery emphasizes thermodynamics, design methods, and the use that can be made of relatively simple rules for the choosing of cycle types, vector diagrams, blading types, heat exchanger configurations, etc. Gas dynamics are treated to the virtual exclusion of mechanical design considerations, although a brief historical account of the family of turbomachine systems notes gradual structural as well as thermodynamic and gas dynamic refinements. The complete systems described and analyzed include aircraft, marine, and electrical power generation gas turbines, steam turbines, and hydraulic pumps and turbines. Both axial and centrifugal flow turbomachine types are considered. 112 references.

Wilson, D.G.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Basic criticality relations for gas core design  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Minimum critical fissile concentrations are calculated for U-233, U-235, Pu-239, and Am-242m mixed homogeneously with hydrogen at temperatures to 15,000K. Minimum critical masses of the same mixtures in a 1000 liter sphere are also calculated. It is shown that propellent efficiencies of a gas core fizzler engine using Am-242m as fuel would exceed those in a solid core engine as small as 1000L operating at 100 atmospheres pressure. The same would be true for Pu-239 and possibly U-233 at pressures of 1000 atm. or at larger volumes.

Tanner, J.E.

1992-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

305

Negative heat capacity in the critical region of nuclear fragmentation: an experimental evidence of the liquid-gas phase transition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An experimental indication of negative heat capacity in excited nuclear systems is inferred from the event by event study of energy fluctuations in $Au$ quasi-projectile sources formed in $Au+Au$ collisions at 35 A.MeV. The excited source configuration is reconstructed through a calorimetric analysis of its de-excitation products. Fragment partitions show signs of a critical behavior at about 5 A.MeV excitation energy. In the same energy range the heat capacity shows a negative branch providing a direct evidence of a first order liquid gas phase transition.

M. D'Agostino; F. Gulminelli; Ph. Chomaz; M. Bruno; F. Cannata; R. Bougault; N. Colonna; F. Gramegna; I. Iori; N. Le Neindre; G. V. Margagliotti; P. F. Mastinu; P. M. Milazzo; A. Moroni; G. Vannini

1999-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

306

A Parametric Physics Based Creep Life Prediction Approach to Gas Turbine Blade Conceptual Design .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The required useful service lives of gas turbine components and parts are naturally one of the major design constraints limiting the gas turbine design space.… (more)

Smith, Marcus Edward Brockbank

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Gas Turbine/Solar Parabolic Trough Hybrid Designs: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A strength of parabolic trough concentrating solar power (CSP) plants is the ability to provide reliable power by incorporating either thermal energy storage or backup heat from fossil fuels. Yet these benefits have not been fully realized because thermal energy storage remains expensive at trough operating temperatures and gas usage in CSP plants is less efficient than in dedicated combined cycle plants. For example, while a modern combined cycle plant can achieve an overall efficiency in excess of 55%; auxiliary heaters in a parabolic trough plant convert gas to electricity at below 40%. Thus, one can argue the more effective use of natural gas is in a combined cycle plant, not as backup to a CSP plant. Integrated solar combined cycle (ISCC) systems avoid this pitfall by injecting solar steam into the fossil power cycle; however, these designs are limited to about 10% total solar enhancement. Without reliable, cost-effective energy storage or backup power, renewable sources will struggle to achieve a high penetration in the electric grid. This paper describes a novel gas turbine / parabolic trough hybrid design that combines solar contribution of 57% and higher with gas heat rates that rival that for combined cycle natural gas plants. The design integrates proven solar and fossil technologies, thereby offering high reliability and low financial risk while promoting deployment of solar thermal power.

Turchi, C. S.; Ma, Z.; Erbes, M.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

FEMP Designated Product Assessment for Commercial Gas Water Heaters  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FEMP Designated Product Assessment for Commercial Gas Water Heaters FEMP Designated Product Assessment for Commercial Gas Water Heaters Title FEMP Designated Product Assessment for Commercial Gas Water Heaters Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-5514E Year of Publication 2010 Authors Lutz, James D. Subsidiary Authors Energy Analysis Department Document Number LBNL-5514E Pagination 8 Date Published April 1 Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory City Berkeley ISBN Number LBNL-5514E Abstract None Notes This work was supported by the Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Office of Building Technology, State, and Community Programs, of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. Attachment Size PDF 240.22 KB Google Scholar BibTex RIS RTF XML Alternate URL: http://eetd.lbl.gov/node/50317

309

Preconceptual design of the gas-phase decontamination demonstration cart  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Removal of uranium deposits from the interior surfaces of gaseous diffusion equipment will be a major portion of the overall multibillion dollar effort to decontaminate and decommission the gaseous diffusion plants. Long-term low-temperature (LTLT) gas-phase decontamination is being developed at the K-25 Site as an in situ decontamination process that is expected to significantly lower the decontamination costs, reduce worker exposure to radioactive materials, and reduce safeguard concerns. This report documents the preconceptual design of the process equipment that is necessary to conduct a full-scale demonstration of the LTLT method in accordance with the process steps listed above. The process equipment and method proposed in this report are not intended to represent a full-scale production campaign design and operation, since the gas evacuation, gas charging, and off-gas handling systems that would be cost effective in a production campaign are not cost effective for a first-time demonstration. However, the design presented here is expected to be applicable to special decontamination projects beyond the demonstration, which could include the Deposit Recovery Program. The equipment will therefore be sized to a 200 ft size 1 converter (plus a substantial conservative design margin), which is the largest item of interest for gas phase decontamination in the Deposit Recovery Program. The decontamination equipment will allow recovery of the UF{sub 6}, which is generated from the reaction of ClF{sub 3} with the uranium deposits, by use of NaF traps.

Munday, E.B.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

An expert system prototype for designing natural gas cogeneration plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cogeneration plants are units that simultaneously produce electricity and useful heat from the same fuel. In such plants different components (prime movers, pumps, steam generators, etc.) are combined in order to meet electricity and useful heat loads ... Keywords: Cogeneration, Engineering design, Expert systems, Natural gas

José Alexandre Matelli; Edson Bazzo; Jonny Carlos da Silva

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Process Design and Integration of Shale Gas to Methanol  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent breakthroughs in horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing technology have made huge reservoirs of previously untapped shale gas and shale oil formations available for use. These new resources have already made a significant impact on the United States chemical industry and present many opportunities for new capital investments and industry growth. As in conventional natural gas, shale gas contains primarily methane, but some formations contain significant amounts of higher molecular weight hydrocarbons and inorganic gases such as nitrogen and carbon dioxide. These differences present several technical challenges to incorporating shale gas with current infrastructure designed to be used with natural gas. However, each shale presents opportunities to develop novel chemical processes that optimize its composition in order to more efficiently and profitably produce valuable chemical products. This paper is aimed at process synthesis, analysis, and integration of different processing pathways for the production of methanol from shale gas. The composition of the shale gas feedstock is assumed to come from the Barnett Shale Play located near Fort Worth, Texas, which is currently the most active shale gas play in the US. Process simulation and published data were used to construct a base-case scenario in Aspen Plus. The impact of different processing pathways was analyzed. Key performance indicators were assessed. These include overall process targets for mass and energy, economic performance, and environmental impact. Finally, the impact of several factors (e.g., feedstock composition, design and operating variables) is studied through a sensitivity analysis. The results show a profitable process above a methanol selling price of approximately $1.50/gal. The sensitivity analysis shows that the ROI depends much more heavily on the selling price of methanol than on the operating costs. Energy integration leads to a savings of $30.1 million per year, or an increase in ROI of 2% points. This also helps offset some of the cost required for the oxygen necessary for syngas generation through partial oxidation. For a sample shale gas composition with high levels of impurities, preprocessing costs require a price differential of $0.73/MMBtu from natural gas. The process is also environmentally desirable because shale gas does not lead to higher GHG emissions than conventional natural gas. More water is required for hydraulic fracturing, but some of these concerns can be abated through conservation techniques and regulation.

Ehlinger, Victoria M.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

New Northeast natural gas pipeline capacity comes on-line - Today ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Solar › Energy in Brief ... Ohio to York County, Pennsylvania. 300 Line Expansion Project, operated by Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company, began service on Nov 1, 2011.

313

Major Changes in Natural Gas Pipeline Transportation Capacity, 1998-2008  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This presentation graphically illustrates the areas of major growth on the national natural gas pipeline transmission network between 1998 and the end of 2008.

Information Center

2008-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

314

Working natural gas storage capacity grows 3% year-over-year | U.S ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

tags: natural gas storage. Email Updates. RSS Feeds. Facebook. Twitter. YouTube. Add us to your site. Have a question, comment, or suggestion for a future article?

315

Economic Modeling of Mid-Term Gas Demand and Electric Generation Capacity Trends  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. power sector natural gas use over the next 10 to 20 years is a topic of significant uncertainty and debate. The industry expects the power sector to be the principal source of growth in national gas demand in the short run; and the manner in which it drives demand and affects the market over the "mid term," to 2020-2030, is an important consideration for planners in both the electric and gas industries. With abundant, relatively low-priced supplies, gas-fired generation can be a strong competito...

2009-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

316

Guidelines for Induced Flue Gas Recirculation: Volume 1: Reducing Air/Gas System Resistance and Enhancing Fan Capacity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document guides users through a logical sequence, or "road map," of activities and decisions for optimizing solutions for fans, ducts, and related equipment in fossil plant combustion air and gas systems.

1999-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

317

Preliminary gas turbine combustor design using a network approach  

SciTech Connect

The preliminary design process of a gas turbine combustor often involves the use of cumbersome, geometry restrictive semi-empirical models. The objective of this analysis is the development of a versatile design tool for gas turbine combustors, able to model all conceivable combustor types. A network approach is developed that divides the flow into a number of independent semi-empirical subflows. A pressure-correction methodology solves the continuity equation and a pressure-drop/flow rate relationship. The development of a full conjugate heat transfer model allows the calculation of flame tube heat loss in the presence of cooling films, annulus heat addition, and flame tube feature heat pick-up. A constrained equilibrium calculation, incorporating mixing and recirculation models, simulates combustion processes. Comparison of airflow results to a well-validated combustor design code showed close agreement. The versatility of the network solver is illustrated with comparisons to experimental data from a reverse flow combustor.

Stuttaford, P.J.; Rubini, P.A. [Cranfield Univ. (United Kingdom). School of Mechanical Engineering

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Optimization for Design and Operation of Natural Gas Transmission Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study addresses the problem of designing a new natural gas transmission network or expanding an existing network while minimizing the total investment and operating costs. A substantial reduction in costs can be obtained by effectively designing and operating the network. A well-designed network helps natural gas companies minimize the costs while increasing the customer service level. The aim of the study is to determine the optimum installation scheduling and locations of new pipelines and compressor stations. On an existing network, the model also optimizes the total flow through pipelines that satisfy demand to determine the best purchase amount of gas. A mixed integer nonlinear programming model for steady-state natural gas transmission problem on tree-structured network is introduced. The problem is a multi-period model, so changes in the network over a planning horizon can be observed and decisions can be made accordingly in advance. The problem is modeled and solved with easily accessible modeling and solving tools in order to help decision makers to make appropriate decisions in a short time. Various test instances are generated, including problems with different sizes, period lengths and cost parameters, to evaluate the performance and reliability of the model. Test results revealed that the proposed model helps to determine the optimum number of periods in a planning horizon and the crucial cost parameters that affect the network structure the most.

Dilaveroglu, Sebnem 1986-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Gas Turbine and Combined-Cycle Capacity Enhancement: Second Interim Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project helps resource planners find more cost-effective ways to add capacity to already-installed peakers, than the purchase, permitting, and siting of new units. The project focuses on techniques whose incremental costs are far below the cost of installing new generation.

1995-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

320

Hydrogen mitigation Gas Characterization System: System design description  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Gas Characterization System (GCS) design is described for flammable gas monitoring. Tank 241-SY-101 (SY-101) is known to experience periodic tank level increases and decreases during which hydrogen gas is released. It is believed that the generated gases accumulate in the solids-containing layer near the bottom of the tank. Solids and gases are also present in the crust and may be present in the interstitial liquid layer. The accumulation of gases creates a buoyancy that eventually overcomes the density and bonding strength of the bottom layer. When this happens, the gas from the bottom layer is released upward through the liquid layer to the vapor space above the tank crust. Previous monitoring of the vapor space gases during such an event indicates hydrogen release concentrations greater than the lower flammability limit (LFL) of hydrogen in a partial nitrous oxide atmosphere. Tanks 241-AN-105, 241-AW-101, and 241-SY-103 have been identified as having the potential to behave similar to SY-101. These waste tanks have been placed on the flammable gas watch list (FGWL). All waste tanks on the FGWL will have a standard hydrogen monitoring system (SHMS) installed to measure hydrogen. In the event that hydrogen levels exceed 0.75% by volume, additional characterization will be required. The purpose of this additional vapor space characterization is to determine the actual lower flammability limit of these tanks, accurately measure low baseline gas release concentrations, and to determine potential hazards associated with larger Gas Release Events (GREs). The instruments to be installed in the GCS for vapor monitoring will allow accurate analysis of samples from the tank vapor space. It will be possible to detect a wide range of hydrogen from parts per million to percent by volume, as well as other gas species suspected to be generated in waste tanks.

Schneider, T.C.

1998-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas design capacity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Localities and their natural gas : stories of problem diffusion, state preemption, and local government capacity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The rapid rise of oil and gas production in the United States poses a new set of policy challenges for local governments. Striving to balance the goals of encouraging economic growth and mitigating its side effects, local ...

Agatstein, Jessica C

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Design, Modeling, and Capacity Planning for Micro-Solar Power Sensor Jay Taneja, Jaein Jeong, David Culler  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Design, Modeling, and Capacity Planning for Micro-Solar Power Sensor Networks Jay Taneja, Jaein,jaein,culler}@cs.berkeley.edu Abstract This paper describes a systematic approach to building micro-solar power subsystems for wireless of engineering, sizing, and analyzing the power subsystem. Many tools and calculators are available for macro-solar

Culler, David E.

323

Design features and availability of liquefied gas carriers  

SciTech Connect

A discussion covers the growth of seaborne LPG trade, various designs of liquefied gas carriers (independent tank, of semimembrane, and integral tank) for the transportation of LPG within the framework of the Intergovernmental Maritime Consultative Organization (IMCO) code as well as U.S. Coast Guard regulations including insulation systems, ballast storage between the cargo tank and the hull, and methods by which the cargo tank either supports the weight of the cargo or transfers it to the hull; the development of the world liquefied gas carrier fleet including pressurized ships, combination ships (which can carry cargo either partially or fully pressurized and/or fully refrigerated) and the fully refrigerated ships; new design developments; tanker availability; and their economic impact on the transportation costs of seaborne LPG.

Rasch, J.M.B.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Hydrogen and Oxygen Gas Monitoring System Design and Operation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper describes pertinent design practices of selecting types of monitors, monitor unit placement, setpoint selection, and maintenance considerations for gas monitors. While hydrogen gas monitors and enriched oxygen atmosphere monitors as they would be needed for hydrogen production experiments are the primary focus of this paper, monitors for carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide are also discussed. The experiences of designing, installing, and calibrating gas monitors for a laboratory where experiments in support of the DOE Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative (NHI) are described along with codes, standards, and regulations for these monitors. Information from the literature about best operating practices is also presented. The NHI program has two types of activities. The first, near-term activity is laboratory and pilot-plant experimentation with different processes in the kilogram per day scale to select the most promising types of processes for future applications of hydrogen production. Prudent design calls for indoor gas monitors to sense any hydrogen leaks within these laboratory rooms. The second, longer-term activity is the prototype, or large-scale plants to produce tons of hydrogen per day. These large, outdoor production plants will require area (or “fencepost”) monitoring of hydrogen gas leaks. Some processes will have oxygen production with hydrogen production, and any oxygen releases are also safety concerns since oxygen gas is the strongest oxidizer. Monitoring of these gases is important for personnel safety of both indoor and outdoor experiments. There is some guidance available about proper placement of monitors. The fixed point, stationary monitor can only function if the intruding gas contacts the monitor. Therefore, monitor placement is vital to proper monitoring of the room or area. Factors in sensor location selection include: indoor or outdoor site, the location and nature of potential vapor/gas sources, chemical and physical data of the gases or vapors, liquids with volatility need sensors near the potential sources of release, nature and concentration of gas releases, natural and mechanical ventilation, detector installation locations not vulnerable to mechanical or water damage from normal operations, and locations that lend themselves to convenient maintenance and calibration. The guidance also states that sensors should be located in all areas where hazardous accumulations of gas may occur. Such areas might not be close to release points but might be areas with restricted air movement. Heavier than air gases are likely to accumulate in pits, trenches, drains, and other low areas. Lighter than air gases are more likely to accumulate in overhead spaces, above drop ceilings, etc. In general, sensors should be located close to any potential sources of major release of gas. The paper gives data on monitor sensitivity and expected lifetimes to support the monitor selection process. Proper selection of indoor and outdoor locations for monitors is described, accounting for the vapor densities of hydrogen and oxygen. The latest information on monitor alarm setpoint selection is presented. Typically, monitors require recalibration at least every six months, or more frequently for inhospitable locations, so ready access to the monitors is an important issue to consider in monitor siting. Gas monitors, depending on their type, can be susceptible to blockages of the detector element (i.e., dus

Lee C. Cadwallader; Kevin G. DeWall; J. Stephen Herring

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Conceptual Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) terminal design for Kuwait  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This research study investigated a new conceptual design for a modular structural configuration incorporating storage for Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) within the base of the platform structure. The structure, referred to as a modified gravity base concrete structure (MGBCS), was envisioned specifically to be constructed at a suitable site off the coast of Kuwait. Coastal offshore bathometric information, environmental data and existing data on onshore facilities were examined in the site selection portion of the study. A finite element model of the MGBCS was developed using an industry standard finite element code that allows preliminary sizes of structural models to meet appropriate design codes. A variety of parametric and design load scenarios were investigated. This research tackles some preliminary issues that are adequate for an initial evaluation of the proposed design concept. The proposed design concept needs a lot more scrutiny in order to be sufficiently developed as a concept where it can be confirmed as a truly viable concept and investment. It was confirmed that quartering sea conditions, waves approaching at a 45 degree angle, are the most critical scenarios for the terminal based on maximum values and ranges of shears and moments. In addition, there are several interesting issues in this concept that should be further looked at for this design to be further developed. The limitations of our study must be mitigated in future designs if the proposed design concept is to be carried to the implementation stage.

Aljeeran, Fares

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects 00516 North Dakota Refining Capacity Study  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

North Dakota Refining Capacity Study North Dakota Refining Capacity Study DE-FE0000516 Goal The objective of the North Dakota Refining Capacity study is to assess the feasibility of increasing the oil refinery capacity in North Dakota, and, if possible, determine the scale of such an expansion, the slate of refined product(s) that would produce the most economic benefit, and the preferred ownership model, i.e., private, public or private-public. Performer North Dakota Association of Rural Electric Cooperatives (NDAREC) Corval Group, partnered with Purvin & Gertz and Mustang Engineering Background The genesis of this study came from an April 2008 report issued by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) asserting that North Dakota and Montana have an estimated 3.0 to 4.3 billion barrels of undiscovered, technically recoverable oil in an area known as the Bakken Formation. This assessment shows a 25-fold increase in the amount of recoverable oil compared to the USGS 1995 estimate of 151 million barrels of oil. The Bakken Formation estimate is larger than all other current USGS oil assessments of the lower 48 states and is the largest "continuous" oil accumulation ever assessed by the USGS. The new report points out that the new geologic models applied to the Bakken Formation, advances in drilling and production technologies, and recent oil discoveries have resulted in these substantially larger technically recoverable oil volumes. About 105 million barrels of oil were produced from the Bakken Formation by the end of 2007. In 2008, the formation produced another 27.2 million barrels of oil, which represented 43% of the stateÂ’s annual oil production of some 62.3 million barrels. Even though oil prices have dropped significantly in recent months, it appears that oil production from this formation will continue strong for decades to come. Most recently, a major production find has occurred in the Three Forks formation underlying the Bakken. This find is still undergoing significant testing, but early evidence suggests it represents another significant recoverable pool of oil in western North Dakota.

327

Working natural gas storage capacity grows 3% year-over-year ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The four new facilities accounted for nearly 38 Bcf of the year-on-year ... as a percentage of design ... Report provides access to an interactive query ...

328

Army Solid State Laser Program: Design, Operation, and Mission Analysis for a Heat-Capacity Laser  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Solid-state lasers have held great promise for the generation of high-average-power, high-quality output beams for a number of decades. However, the inherent difficulty of scaling the active solid-state gain media while continuing to provide efficient cooling has limited demonstrated powers to <5kW. Even at the maximum demonstrated average powers, the output is most often delivered as continuous wave (CW) or as small energy pulses at high pulse repetition frequency (PRF) and the beam divergence is typically >10X the diffraction limit. Challenges posed by optical distortions and depolarization arising from internal temperature gradients in the gain medium of a continuously cooled system are only increased for laser designs that would attempt to deliver the high average power in the form of high energy pulses (>25J) from a single coherent optical aperture. Although demonstrated phase-locking of multiple laser apertures may hold significant promise for the future scaling of solid-state laser systems,1 the continuing need for additional technical development and innovation coupled with the anticipated complexity of these systems effectively limits this approach for near-term multi-kW laser operation outside of a laboratory setting. We have developed and demonstrated a new operational mode for solid-state laser systems in which the cooling of the gain medium is separated in time from the lasing cycle. In ''heat-capacity'' operation, no cooling takes place during lasing. The gain medium is pumped very uniformly and the waste heat from the excitation process is stored in the solid-state gain medium. By depositing the heat on time scales that are short compared to thermal diffusion across the optical aperture, very high average power operation is possible while maintaining low optical distortions. After a lasing cycle, aggressive cooling can then take place in the absence of lasing, limited only by the fracture limit of the solid-state medium. This mode of operation is ideally suited for applications that require 1-30s engagements at very high average power. If necessary, multiple laser apertures can provide continuous operation. Land Combat mission analysis of a stressing air defense scenario including a dense attack of rockets, mortars, and artillery has indicated that multiple HEL weapon systems, based on the solid state, heat capacity laser concept, can provide significantly improved protection of high value battlefield assets. We will present EADSIM results for two government-supplied scenarios, one with temporally high threat density over a fairly large defended area, and one with fewer threats concentrating on a single defended asset. Implications for weapon system requirements will be presented. In order to demonstrate the operation of a high average power heat-capacity laser system, we have developed a flashlamp-pumped Nd:glass laser with output energies in the range of 500-1000J/pulse in a 10 x 10cm{sup 2} beam. With a repetition frequency of 20Hz, an average power of 13kW has been demonstrated for operational periods of up to 10s using a stable optical resonator (see enclosed figure). Using an M=1.4 unstable resonator, a beam divergence of 5X diffraction-limited has been measured with no active wavefront correction. An adaptively corrected unstable resonator that incorporates an intracavity deformable mirror controlled by feedback from an external wavefront sensor will provide <2X diffraction-limited output integrated over an entire 10s run at an average power of 10kW. A very similar laser architecture in which the Nd:glass is replaced by Nd:GGG and the flashlamps are replaced by large diode-laser arrays will enable the scaling of the output average power from the demonstrated 10kW to 100kW (500J/pulse at 200Hz). Risk reduction experiments for diode-pumped Nd:GGG, the fabrication of large Nd:GGG amplifier slabs, as well as the progress toward a sub-scale amplifier testbed pumped by diode arrays with total of 1MW peak power will also be presented.

Dane, C B; Flath, L; Rotter, M; Fochs, S; Brase, J; Bretney, K

2001-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

329

Combustor design tool for a gas fired thermophotovoltaic energy converter  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Recently, there has been a renewed interest in thermophotovoltaic (TPV) energy conversion. A TPV device converts radiant energy from a high temperature incandescent emitter directly into electricity by photovoltaic cells. The current Department of Energy sponsored research involves the design, construction and demonstration of a prototype TPV converter that uses a hydrocarbon fuel (such as natural gas) as the energy source. As the photovoltaic cells are designed to efficiently convert radiant energy at a prescribed wavelength, it is important that the temperature of the emitter be nearly constant over its entire surface. The US Naval Academy has been tasked with the development of a small emitter (with a high emissivity) that can be maintained at 1,756 K (2,700 F). This paper describes the computer spreadsheet model that was developed as a tool to be used for the design of the high temperature emitter.

Lindler, K.W.; Harper, M.J. [Naval Academy, Annapolis, MD (United States). Naval Architecture, Ocean and Marine Engineering Dept.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Survivable IP topology design with re-use of backup wavelength capacity in optical backbone networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In IP-over-WDM networks, wavelength circuits are often protected by dedicated backup circuits. Especially with future deployment of 100 G transmission systems, this will induce huge under-utilization of backup resources. Network utilization can be boosted ... Keywords: Backup capacity, IP-over-WDM networks, Packet services, Survivable IP topology, Wavelength services

Chaitanya S. K. Vadrevu; Massimo Tornatore

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

FEMP Designated Product Assessment for Commercial Gas Water Heaters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

calculated at a federal natural gas price of $.90 per thermaverage commercial price of natural gas using a discount

Lutz, Jim

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

A Solution Algorithm for Long Haul Freight Network Design Using Shipper-Carrier Freight Flow Prediction with Explicit Capacity Constraints  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PREDICTION WITH EXPLICIT CAPACITY CONSTRAINTS Pruttipong “Additionally, an explicit capacity constraint is used toAdditionally, an explicit capacity constraint is used to

Apivatanagul, Pruttipong “Palm”; Regan, A C

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Tradeoffs among Free-flow Speed, Capacity, Cost, and Environmental Footprint in Highway Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Highway Design Chen Feng Ng, California State University,in Highway Design Chen Feng Ng and Kenneth A. Small May 17,R42 Contacts: Chen Feng Ng (corresponding author) Department

Ng, Chen Feng; Small, Kenneth

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Design and implementation of an economic gas leakage detector  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gas leakage is a major concern with residential, commercial premises and gas powered transportation vehicles. One of the preventive measures to avoid the danger associated with gas leakage is to install a gas leakage detector at vulnerable locations. ... Keywords: LPG, audio-visual alarm, gas leakage detection, leakage exposure limits, safety system

A. Mahalingam; R. T. Naayagi; N. E. Mastorakis

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Heat Exchanger Design for Solar Gas-Turbine Power Plant.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The aim of this project is to select appropriate heat exchangers out of available gas-gas heat exchangers for used in a proposed power plant.… (more)

Yakah, Noah

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Designing nanostructured heterogeneous catalysts to exploit pulsing in gas-liquid packed bed reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

41 Designing nanostructured heterogeneous catalysts to exploit pulsing in gas-liquid packed bed nanostructured catalysts for gas-liquid reactions, which have a system of macro pores designed to take advantage in volume of gas-liquid packed bed reactors (a.k.a. "trickle" beds) by an order of magnitude or more because

McCready, Mark J.

337

CONTROL ISSUES IN THE DESIGN OF A GAS TURBINE CYCLE FOR CO2 CAPTURE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CONTROL ISSUES IN THE DESIGN OF A GAS TURBINE CYCLE FOR CO2 CAPTURE Query Sheet Q1: AU: short title OF A GAS TURBINE CYCLE FOR CO2 CAPTURE Lars Imsland, Dagfinn Snarheim, and Bjarne A. Foss Department-closed / gas turbine cycle for capture. Some control strategies and their interaction with the process design

Foss, Bjarne A.

338

DESIGN OF SMALL SCALE GAS TURBINE SYSTEMS FOR UNMANNED-AERIAL VEHICLES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DESIGN OF SMALL SCALE GAS TURBINE SYSTEMS FOR UNMANNED-AERIAL VEHICLES (AERSP 597/497-K) SPRING 814 865 9871 cxc11@psu.edu Summary : The proposed course is a three-credit gas turbine design course will be evaluated against (agreed) deadlines by the instructor. A number of lecturers from the gas turbine industry

Camci, Cengiz

339

Development and Implementation of Interactive/Visual Software for Simple Aircraft Gas Turbine Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Development and Implementation of Interactive/Visual Software for Simple Aircraft Gas Turbine of software to analyze and design gas turbine systems has been an important part of this course since 1988 of this project was to develop MS Windows based software: Simple Aircraft Gas Turbine Design, that is easy to use

Ghajar, Afshin J.

340

TECHNOLOGIES TO ENHANCE THE OPERATION OF EXISTING NATURAL GAS COMPRESSION INFRASTRUCTURE - MANIFOLD DESIGN FOR CONTROLLING ENGINE AIR BALANCE  

SciTech Connect

This document provides results and conclusions for Task 15.0--Detailed Analysis of Air Balance & Conceptual Design of Improved Air Manifolds in the ''Technologies to Enhance the Operation of Existing Natural Gas Compression Infrastructure'' project. SwRI{reg_sign} is conducting this project for DOE in conjunction with Pipeline Research Council International, Gas Machinery Research Council, El Paso Pipeline, Cooper Compression, and Southern Star, under DOE contract number DE-FC26-02NT41646. The objective of Task 15.0 was to investigate the perceived imbalance in airflow between power cylinders in two-stroke integral compressor engines and develop solutions via manifold redesign. The overall project objective is to develop and substantiate methods for operating integral engine/compressors in gas pipeline service, which reduce fuel consumption, increase capacity, and enhance mechanical integrity.

Gary D. Bourn; Ford A. Phillips; Ralph E. Harris

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas design capacity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Design for a gas chromatograph for characterizing desiccant material  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To characterize solar desiccant cooling materials, a gas chromatograph has been designed. The chromatograph can record breakthrough curves and equilibrium data under widely varying conditions so that the rates and heats of sorption may be determined. This information may then be used in analyzing models for the construction of desiccant cooling systems which use solar heating for the drying cycle. The effects of desiccant geometry upon bed packing are minimal. However, the effects of desiccant geometry upon the pressure differential across the bed and upon the rate controlling processes may be strong, and these must be investigated thoroughly. Ranges for flow rates and for control of the physical parameters have been selected to encompass those that may be encountered in practical systems. A list of equipment and materials of construction is presented together with a brief description of the operation of the equipment.

Pitts, R.; Czanderna, A.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

DESIGN STUDY OF A NUCLEAR POWER PLANT FOR 100-KW ELECTRIC AND 400-KW HEAT CAPACITY  

SciTech Connect

A conceptional design study was made of a lowpower ''package'' reactor plant for the production of 100 kw of electrical power and 400 kw of heat at remote Arctic installations. The power plant steam generator is proposed to be an unmanned, heterogeneous, boilingtype reactor capable of continuous operation for extended periods. The design is based on data derived from experiments with boiling-type reactors conducted by Argorne at the Reactor Testing Station, Arco, Idaho.

Treshow, M.; Snider, A.R.; Shaftman, D.H.

1955-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Natural Gas - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) -...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

gas capacity, which is the sum of the highest observed working natural gas storage inventory level in each facility over the prior 5-year period; and working gas design...

344

Criticality safety and shielding design issues in the development of a high-capacity cask for truck transport  

SciTech Connect

General Atomics (GA) will be submitting an application for certification to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for the GA-4 and GA-9 Casks In 1992. The GA-4 and GA-9 Casks are high-capacity legal weight truck casks designed to transport light water reactor spent fuel assemblies. To maintain a capacity of four pressurized-water-reactor (PWR) spent fuel assemblies, the GA-4 Cask uses burnup credit as part of the criticality control for initial enrichments over 3.0 wt% U-235. Using the US Department of Energy (DOE) Burnup Credit Program as a basis, GA has performed burnup credit analysis which is included in the Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP). The GA-9 Cask can meet the criticality safety requirements using the ``fresh fuel`` assumption. Our approach to shielding design is to optimize the GA-4 and GA-9 Cask shielding configurations for minimum weights and maximum payloads. This optimization involves the use of the most effective shielding material, square cross-section geometry with rounded corners and tapered neutron shielding sections in the non-fuel regions.

Boshoven, J.K.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Criticality safety and shielding design issues in the development of a high-capacity cask for truck transport  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

General Atomics (GA) will be submitting an application for certification to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for the GA-4 and GA-9 Casks In 1992. The GA-4 and GA-9 Casks are high-capacity legal weight truck casks designed to transport light water reactor spent fuel assemblies. To maintain a capacity of four pressurized-water-reactor (PWR) spent fuel assemblies, the GA-4 Cask uses burnup credit as part of the criticality control for initial enrichments over 3.0 wt% U-235. Using the US Department of Energy (DOE) Burnup Credit Program as a basis, GA has performed burnup credit analysis which is included in the Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP). The GA-9 Cask can meet the criticality safety requirements using the fresh fuel'' assumption. Our approach to shielding design is to optimize the GA-4 and GA-9 Cask shielding configurations for minimum weights and maximum payloads. This optimization involves the use of the most effective shielding material, square cross-section geometry with rounded corners and tapered neutron shielding sections in the non-fuel regions.

Boshoven, J.K.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Total Working Gas Capacity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Monthly Annual Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History U.S. 4,211,193 4,327,844 4,410,224 4,483,650 4,576,356 2008-2012 Alabama 20,900 20,900 25,150 27,350 27,350 2008-2012 Arkansas 14,500 13,898 13,898 12,036 12,178 2008-2012 California 283,796 296,096 311,096 335,396 349,296 2008-2012 Colorado 42,579 48,129 49,119 48,709 60,582 2008-2012 Illinois 296,318 303,761 303,500 302,385 302,962 2008-2012 Indiana 32,769 32,157 32,982 33,024 33,024 2008-2012 Iowa 87,350 87,414 90,613 91,113 90,313 2008-2012 Kansas 119,260 119,339 123,190 123,225 123,343 2008-2012 Kentucky

347

Design of a Thermally-Actuated Gas Lift Safety Valve  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gas-lifted oil wells are susceptible to failure through malfunction of gas lift valve assemblies (GLV). One failure mode occurs when the GLV check valve fails and product passes into the well annulus, potentially reaching ...

Gilbertson, Eric W.

348

Design of an electronically-actuated gas lift safety valve  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gas lift valves are widely used in oil production fields to pump recycled gas and nitrogen into the production tubing, to sustain production by aerating the oil and lifting it to the ground or sea surface. Today's industry ...

Yu, Changkuan, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Design of a real time switching control scheme for capacity compensation of distribution feeders  

SciTech Connect

A new control scheme for multilevel control of capacitors on radial distribution feeders is developed for implementation by an on-line, substation-based computer. The control objectives are the minimization of radial feeder losses of energy and power. Control is exercised through multilevel switching of existing shunt-connected static capacitors. It is shown how time-varying load data on existing feeders obtained through measurements at the substation can be taken into account. When reactive-load duration curves can be constructed for existing feeders, it is also shown how to optimally design the control scheme to include fixed and non-simultaneously switched capacitors.

Grainger, J.J.; El-Kib, A.A.; Lee, S.H.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Natural gas fired electric generating technology: A key to the adequacy of electric generating capacity in North American Electric Reliability Councils. Topical report, May 1991  

SciTech Connect

Development and implementation of an enhanced modeling system for electricity market analysis is explained. The relevant geographic areas that must be used for accurate supply and demand modeling and analysis are defined. There is no national market for electricity in the United States. Surplus hydroelectric capacity from the Pacific Northwest cannot be made available in Florida. Any model of U.S. electricity consumer and producer interaction that does not differentiate by region would produce misleading results. The expected natural gas-dominated capacity expansion phase in electricity markets is described.

Makovick, L.

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

A comparison between the performance of different silencer designs for gas turbine exhaust systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A comparison between the performance of different silencer designs for gas turbine exhaust systems in more specialist applications, such as the exhaust systems of gas turbines, different silencer experiments are carried out with the aim of investigating performance of silencers used on gas turbines

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

352

Control structure design for stabilizing unstable gas-lift oil wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Control structure design for stabilizing unstable gas-lift oil wells Esmaeil Jahanshahi, Sigurd valve is the recommended solution to prevent casing-heading instability in gas-lifted oil wells. Focus to be effective to stabilize this system. Keywords: Oil production, two-phase flow, gas-lift, controllability, H

Skogestad, Sigurd

353

Investigating the efficiency of gas turbines in off-design operation  

SciTech Connect

Experimental data on the performance of gas turbines for eight gas turbine power plants are presented and compared for the purpose of determining the efficiency of gas turbines in off-design operation such as during start-up or at less than rated speeds. (LCL)

Ol' Khovskii, G.G.; Ol' Khovskaya, N.I.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Compact Filter Design for Gas Treatment Centers - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An Innovative Compact Heat Exchanger Solution for Aluminium Off-Gas Cooling and Heat Recovery · Autonomous Vehicle and Smelter Technologies · Compact ...

355

Gas Turbine/Solar Parabolic Trough Hybrid Design Using Molten Salt Heat Transfer Fluid: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Parabolic trough power plants can provide reliable power by incorporating either thermal energy storage (TES) or backup heat from fossil fuels. This paper describes a gas turbine / parabolic trough hybrid design that combines a solar contribution greater than 50% with gas heat rates that rival those of natural gas combined-cycle plants. Previous work illustrated benefits of integrating gas turbines with conventional oil heat-transfer-fluid (HTF) troughs running at 390?C. This work extends that analysis to examine the integration of gas turbines with salt-HTF troughs running at 450 degrees C and including TES. Using gas turbine waste heat to supplement the TES system provides greater operating flexibility while enhancing the efficiency of gas utilization. The analysis indicates that the hybrid plant design produces solar-derived electricity and gas-derived electricity at lower cost than either system operating alone.

Turchi, C. S.; Ma, Z.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Design of a High Temperature Small Particle Solar Receiver for Powering a Gas Turbine Engine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Design of a High Temperature Small Particle Solar Receiver for Powering a Gas Turbine Engine Dr. Fletcher Miller SDSU Department of Mechanical Engineering Abstract Solar thermal power for electricity will describe the design of a high temperature solar receiver capable of driving a gas turbine for power

Ponce, V. Miguel

357

Design Evolution, Durability and Reliability of Alstom Heavy-Duty Gas Turbines: Pedigree Matrices, Volume 5  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advanced technology heavy-duty gas turbines carry a degree of technical risk because of new technologies used in their design. This report reviews the design evolution of specific Alstom (formerly ABB) industrial gas turbines in a standard format, which allows a qualitative and quantitative assessment of the technical risks involved in their operation. The report establishes a pedigree matrix, or qualitative analysis, for standard production and newly introduced heavy-duty gas turbines, including ...

2013-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

358

Design Evolution, Durability and Reliability of General Electric Aeroderivative Gas Turbines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report reviews the design evolution and experience base of General Electric (GE) aeroderivative gas turbines in a comprehensive format, which facilitates an assessment of the technical risks involved in operating these high-technology gas turbines. The report establishes a pedigree matrix for standard production GE LM2500, LM6000, and LMS100 aeroderivative gas turbines, describing their design features. In addition, it provides a reliability, availability, and maintainability (RAM) assessment ...

2012-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

359

GENERATING CAPACITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Evidence from the U.S. and some other countries indicates that organized wholesale markets for electrical energy and operating reserves do not provide adequate incentives to stimulate the proper quantity or mix of generating capacity consistent with mandatory reliability criteria. A large part of the problem can be associated with the failure of wholesale spot market prices for energy and operating reserves to rise to high enough levels during periods when generating capacity is fully utilized. Reforms to wholesale energy markets, the introduction of well-design forward capacity markets, and symmetrical treatment of demand response and generating capacity resources to respond to market and institutional imperfections are discussed. This policy reform program is compatible with improving the efficiency of spot wholesale electricity markets, the continued evolution of competitive retail markets, and restores incentives for efficient investment in generating capacity consistent with operating reliability criteria applied by system operators. It also responds to investment disincentives that have been associated with volatility in wholesale energy prices, limited hedging opportunities and to concerns about regulatory opportunism. 1

Paul L. Joskow; Paul L. Joskow; Paul L. Joskow

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Power Plant Profitability and Investment in the Central United States: Impact of New Gas Capacity on Generation and Repowering Economics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the past 12 months, announcements of capacity additions by 2005 in the midwest have jumped from 20,000 to 60,000 MW. This report examines how just a portion of this capacity, if built, could affect the profitability of new and existing power plants.

2000-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas design capacity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Helium turbine design for a 1000 MWe gas-cooled fast breeder reactor with closed gas turbine cycle  

SciTech Connect

This report deals exclusively with the preliminary design of a double-flooded helium turbine for a 1000 MWe gas-cooled fast breeder reactor. The influence is studied of several parameters, such as hub ratio, exit angle of the turbine wheel and inlet angle of the guide wheel, on the designed size of the turbine and the centrifugal stress of the blading, in order to get a survey which is helpful in the preliminary design.

Savatteri, C.

1973-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

362

Intercooler flow path for gas turbines: CFD design and experiments  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) program was created by the U.S. Department of Energy to develop ultra-high efficiency, environmentally superior, and cost competitive gas turbine systems for generating electricity. Intercooling or cooling of air between compressor stages is a feature under consideration in advanced cycles for the ATS. Intercooling entails cooling of air between the low pressure (LP) and high pressure (HP) compressor sections of the gas turbine. Lower air temperature entering the HP compressor decreases the air volume flow rate and hence, the compression work. Intercooling also lowers temperature at the HP discharge, thus allowing for more effective use of cooling air in the hot gas flow path.

Agrawal, A.K.; Gollahalli, S.R.; Carter, F.L. [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States)] [and others

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

363

Flammable gas tank exhauster interlock (FGTEI) computer software design description  

SciTech Connect

Modicon Compact Programmable Logic Controller (PLC). The device configuration integrates the isolation and current-carrying capacities of mechanical relays with the logic and programming sophistication of the PLC. This document provides descriptions of components and tasks involved in the PLC system for controlling and monitoring the FGTEI. All control functions required by the PLC, and how they are implemented, are described in detail.

Smith, S.0.

1996-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

364

Flammable gas tank exhauster interlock (FGTEI) computer software design description  

SciTech Connect

Modicon Compact Programmable Logic Controller (PLC). The device configuration integrates the isolation and current- carrying capacities of mechanical relays with the logic and programming sophistication of the PLC. This revised document provides descriptions of components and tasks involved in the PLC system for controlling and monitoring the FGTEI. All control functions required by the PLC, and how they are implemented, are described in detail.

Smith, S.O., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

365

Flammable gas tank exhauster interlock (LFGTEI) computer software design description  

SciTech Connect

Modicon Compact Programmable Logic Controller (PLC). The device configuration integrates the isolation and current- carrying capacities of mechanical relays with the logic and programming sophistication of the PLC. This revised document provides descriptions of components and tasks involved in the PLC system for controlling and monitoring the FGTEI. All control functions required by the PLC, and how they are implemented, are described in detail.

Smith, S.O.; Irvitt, R.W., Fluor Daniel Hanford

1997-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

366

Summary report on the design of the retained gas sampler system (retained gas sampler, extruder and extractor)  

SciTech Connect

This document summarizes work performs in Fiscal Year 1994 to develop the three main components of Retained Gas Sampler System (RGSS). These primary components are the Retained Gas Sampler (RGS), the Retained Gas Extruder (RGE), and the Retained Gas Extractor (RGEx). The RGS is based on the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) Universal Sampler design, and includes modifications to reduce gas leakage. The primary data priorities for the RGSS are to measure the void fraction and the flammable gas concentration in the waste sample. Significant progress has been made in developing the RGSS. The RGSS is being developed by WHC to extract a representative waste sample from a Flammable Gas Watch List Tanks and to measure both the amount and composition of free and {open_quotes}bound{close_quotes} gases. Sudden releases of flammable gas mixtures are a safety concern for normal waste storage operations and eventual waste retrieval. Flow visualization testing was used to identify important fluid dynamic issues related to the sampling process. The primary data priorities for the RGSS are to measure the void fraction and the flammable gas concentration in the waste sample. The safety analysis for the RGSS is being performed by Los Alamos National Laboratory and is more than sixty percent (60%) complete.

Wootan, D.W.; Bolden, R.C.; Bridges, A.E.; Cannon, N.S.; Chastain, S.A.; Hey, B.E.; Knight, R.C.; Linschooten, C.G.; Pitner, A.L.; Webb, B.J.

1994-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

367

FEMP Designated Product Assessment for Commercial Gas Water Heaters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

boilers is 80%. The maximum standby loss is specified usingrate. 8 There is no maximum standby loss specified for gas-of hot water use, standby losses are not a significant part

Lutz, Jim

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Acoustic Design of Aircraft Gas Turbine Test Cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The high noise level associated with aircraft gas turbine operation creates two noise problems: (1) The reduction of the noise in the neighborhood of the installation to an acceptable level

R. O. Fehr; R. J. Wells; T. L. Bray

1952-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

DOE, RTI to Design and Build Gas Cleanup System for IGCC Power Plants |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE, RTI to Design and Build Gas Cleanup System for IGCC Power DOE, RTI to Design and Build Gas Cleanup System for IGCC Power Plants DOE, RTI to Design and Build Gas Cleanup System for IGCC Power Plants July 13, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announces a collaborative project with Research Triangle Institute (RTI) International to design, build, and test a warm gas cleanup system to remove multiple contaminants from coal-derived syngas. The 50-MWe system will include technologies to remove trace elements such as mercury and arsenic, capture the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide (CO2), and extract more than 99.9 percent of the sulfur from the syngas. A novel process to convert the extracted sulfur to a pure elemental sulfur product will also be tested. This project supports DOE's vision of coal power plants with near-zero

370

DOE, RTI to Design and Build Gas Cleanup System for IGCC Power Plants |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE, RTI to Design and Build Gas Cleanup System for IGCC Power DOE, RTI to Design and Build Gas Cleanup System for IGCC Power Plants DOE, RTI to Design and Build Gas Cleanup System for IGCC Power Plants July 13, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announces a collaborative project with Research Triangle Institute (RTI) International to design, build, and test a warm gas cleanup system to remove multiple contaminants from coal-derived syngas. The 50-MWe system will include technologies to remove trace elements such as mercury and arsenic, capture the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide (CO2), and extract more than 99.9 percent of the sulfur from the syngas. A novel process to convert the extracted sulfur to a pure elemental sulfur product will also be tested. This project supports DOE's vision of coal power plants with near-zero

371

The Design and Development of An Externally Fired Steam Injected Gas Turbine for Cogeneration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes the theoretical background and the design and development of a prototype externally fired steam injected (ECSI) gas turbine which has a potential to utilize lower grade fuels. The system is designed around a 2 shaft 360 HP gas turbine. Several modifications to the gas turbine (Brayton Cycle) and the effects of cycle parameters such as pressure ratio and turbine inlet temperature are discussed. Steams injected cycles are examined and the concept of the ECSI gas turbine is introduced. The discussion includes criteria for selecting a suitable heat exchanger and considerations for start-up cycles. The feasibility of the concept and discussion of problem areas in the prototype are discussed.

Boyce, M. P.; Meher-Homji, C.; Ford, D.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

TWRS hydrogen mitigation gas characterization system design and fabrication engineering task plan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The flammable gas watch-list (FGWL) tanks, which have demonstrated a gas release event (GRE) exceeding 0.625% hydrogen by volume will require additional characterization. The purpose of this additional characterization is to accurately measure the flammable and hazardous gas compositions and resulting lower flammability limit (LFL) of the tank vapor space during baseline and GRE emissions. Data from this characterization will help determine methods to resolve the unreviewed safety questions for the FGWL tanks. This document details organization responsibilities and engineering requirements for the design and fabrication of two gas characterization systems used to monitor flammable gas watch-list tanks.

Straalsund, E.K.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Final design review report for the RMCS Flammable Gas Detection Interlock  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report document the completion of the formal design review for the RMCS (Rotary Mode Core Sampling) flammable gas detector interlock. This hydrogen/flammable gas interlock, a proposed addition to the RMCS system portable exhauster, in intended to support core sampling operations in waste tanks requiring flammable gas controls. The objective of this review was to approve new drawings at the 100% design completion state. The conclusion reached by the review committee was that the design was acceptable and efforts should continue toward fabrication and delivery.

Corbett, J.E., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

374

Design for safety framework for offshore oil and gas platforms.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This main aim of this work is to develop a “design for safety” based risk assessment technique for the offshore platforms in order to facilitate… (more)

Umar, Abubakar Attah

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

The design, selection, and application of oil-free screw compressors for fuel gas service  

SciTech Connect

Fuel gas compressors installed in cogeneration systems must be highly reliable and efficient machines. The screw compressor can usually be designed to meet most of the gas flow rates and pressure conditions generally required for such installations. To an ever-increasing degree, alternative sources are being found for the fuel gas supply, such as coke-oven gas, blast-furnace gas, flare gas, landfill gas, and synthesis gas from coal gasification or from pyrolysis. A feature of the oil-free screw compressor when such gases are being considered is the isolation of the gas compression space from the bearing and gear lubrication system by using positive shaft seals. This ensures that the process gas cannot be contaminated by the lubricating oil, and that there is not risk of loss of lubricant viscosity by gas solution in the oil. This feature enables the compressed gas to contain relatively high levels of particulate contamination without danger of ``sludge`` formation, and also permits the injection of water or liquid solvents into the compression space, to reduce the temperature rise due to the heat of compression, or to ``wash`` any particulate manner through the compressor.

Lelgemann, K.D. [MAN Gutehoffnungshuette AG, Oberhausen (Germany)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Design and component integration of a T63-A-700 gas turbine engine test facility ; .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A gas turbine engine test cell was developed integrating an Allison T63-A-700 helicopter engine with a superflow water brake dynamometer power absorber. Design specifications were… (more)

Eckerle, Brian P.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Capacity Markets for Electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Designing Markets for Electricity. Wiley IEEE Press. [25]in the England and Wales Electricity Market”, Power WorkingFelder (1996), “Should Electricity Markets Have a Capacity

Creti, Anna; Fabra, Natalia

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Design and development of a vehicle routing system under capacity, time-windows and rush-order reloading considerations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this research is to present the design and development of a routing system, custom developed for a fence manufacturing company in the continental US. The objective of the routing module of the system is to generate least cost routes from the home-center of the company to a set of delivery locations. Routes are evolved for a set of customer locations based on the sales order information and are frequently modified to include rush orders. These routes are such that each delivery is made within a given time window. Further, total truckload of all delivery locations over any particular route is not allowed to exceed the weight and volume capacities of the truck. The basic system modules such as user interface functions and database are designed using MS Access 2000. An interface module to retrieve data from existing ERP system of the company is developed to import pick-ticket information. A customer inter-distance maintenance module is designed with the abilities of a learning tool to reduce information retrieval time between the routing system and the GIS server. The Graphical User Interface with various screen forms and printable reports is developed along with the routing module to achieve complete system functionality and to provide an efficient logistics solution. This problem, formulated as a mixed-integer program, is of particular interest due to its generality to model problem scenarios in the production shop such as job-shop scheduling, material handling, etc. This problem is coded and solved for instances with different input parameters using AMPL/CPLEX. Results of test runs for the company data show that the solution time increases exponentially with the number of customers. Hence, a heuristic approach is developed and implemented. Sample runs with small instances are solved for optimality using AMPL/CPLEX and are used to compare the performance of the heuristics. However, test runs solved using the heuristics for larger instances are compared with the manual routing costs. The comparison shows a considerable cost savings for heuristic solutions. Further, a what-if analysis module is implemented to aid the dispatcher in choosing input parameters based on sensitivity analysis. In conclusion, further improvement of the routing system and future research directions are proposed.

Easwaran, Gopalakrishnan

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

DESIGN, FABRICATION, AND TESTING OF AN ADVANCED, NON-POLLUTING TURBINE DRIVE GAS GENERATOR  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this report period was to continue the development of the Gas Generator design, fabrication and test of the non-polluting unique power turbine drive Gas Generator. Focus during this past report period has been to continue completion the Gas Generator design, completing the brazing and bonding experiments to determine the best method and materials necessary to fabricate the Gas Generator hardware, continuing to making preparations for fabricating and testing this Gas Generator and commencing with the fabrication of the Gas Generator hardware and ancillary hardware. Designs have been completed sufficiently such that Long Lead Items [LLI] have been ordered and upon arrival will be readied for the fabrication process. The keys to this design are the platelet construction of the injectors that precisely measures/meters the flow of the propellants and water all throughout the steam generating process and the CES patented gas generating cycle. The Igniter Assembly injector platelets fabrication process has been completed and bonded to the Igniter Assembly and final machined. The Igniter Assembly is in final assembly and is being readied for testing in the October 2001 time frame. Test Plan dated August 2001, was revised and finalized, replacing Test Plan dated May 2001.

Unknown

2002-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

380

Impact Of Melter Internal Design On Off-Gas Flammability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to: (1) identify the more dominant design parameters that can serve as the quantitative measure of how prototypic a given melter is, (2) run the existing DWPF models to simulate the data collected using both DWPF and non-DWPF melter configurations, (3) confirm the validity of the selected design parameters by determining if the agreement between the model predictions and data is reasonably good in light of the design and operating conditions employed in each data set, and (4) run Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations to gain new insights into how fluid mixing is affected by the configuration of melter internals and to further apply the new insights to explaining, for example, why the agreement is not good.

Choi, A. S.; Lee, S. Y.

2012-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas design capacity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

DESIGN, FABRICATION, AND TESTING OF AN ADVANCED, NON-POLLUTING TURBINE DRIVE GAS GENERATOR  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this report period were to complete the development of the Gas Generator design, which was done; fabricate and test of the non-polluting unique power turbine drive gas Gas Generator, which has been postponed. Focus during this report period has been to complete the brazing and bonding necessary to fabricate the Gas Generator hardware, continue making preparations for fabricating and testing the Gas Generator, and continuing the fabrication of the Gas Generator hardware and ancillary hardware in preparation for the test program. Fabrication is more than 95% complete and is expected to conclude in early May 2002. the test schedule was affected by relocation of the testing to another test supplier. The target test date for hot fire testing is now not earlier than June 15, 2002.

Unknown

2002-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

382

Visualization of Atomization Gas Flow and Melt Break-up Effects in Response to Nozzle Design  

SciTech Connect

Both powder particle size control and efficient use of gas flow energy are highly prized goals for gas atomization of metal and alloy powder to minimize off-size powder inventory (or 'reverb') and excessive gas consumption. Recent progress in the design of close-coupled gas atomization nozzles and the water model simulation of melt feed tubes were coupled with previous results from several types of gas flow characterization methods, e.g., aspiration measurements and gas flow visualization, to make progress toward these goals. Size distribution analysis and high speed video recordings of gas atomization reaction synthesis (GARS) experiments on special ferritic stainless steel alloy powders with an Ar+O{sub 2} gas mixture were performed to investigate the operating mechanisms and possible advantages of several melt flow tube modifications with one specific gas atomization nozzle. In this study, close-coupled gas atomization under closed wake gas flow conditions was demonstrated to produce large yields of ultrafine (dia.<20 {mu}m) powders (up to 32%) with moderate standard deviations (1.62 to 1.99). The increased yield of fine powders is consistent with the dual atomization mechanisms of closed wake gas flow patterns in the near-field of the melt orifice. Enhanced size control by stabilized pre-filming of the melt with a slotted trumpet bell pour tube was not clearly demonstrated in the current experiments, perhaps confounded by the influence of the melt oxidation reaction that occurred simultaneously with the atomization process. For this GARS variation of close-coupled gas atomization, it may be best to utilize the straight cylindrical pour tube and closed wake operation of an atomization nozzle with higher gas mass flow to promote the maximum yields of ultrafine powders that are preferred for the oxide dispersion strengthened alloys made from these powders.

Anderson, Iver; Rieken, Joel; Meyer, John; Byrd, David; Heidloff, Andy

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

F-Class Gas Turbine Technology Summary: Design Features, Reliability Statistics, and Durability Issues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the design features and capabilities of current F-class gas turbine models, and includes reliability/availability statistics and a summary of durability issues. The design matrix table includes models GT24/GT26 by Alstom, 7FA/9FA and 7FB/9FB by General Electric, M501F/M701F by Mitsubishi, and W501F by Siemens, presented in a format that facilitates a comparison of their design characteristics.BackgroundGas turbine technology continues ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

384

Design Evolution, Durability and Reliability of Mitsubishi Heavy-Duty Gas Turbines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advanced, heavy-duty gas turbines carry a degree of technical risk because of new technologies incorporated into their designs. This report reviews the design evolution of specific Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., heavy-duty industrial gas turbines in a standard format that facilitates an assessment of technical risks involved in their operation. The pedigree matrix includes performance and design features of the M501D/701D, M501F/701F, M501G/701G, M501H/701H, and M501J/701J machines. The report ...

2012-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

385

Outlook for Capacity Retirements Following U.S. Boom in New Supplies: Report Series on Natural Gas and Power Reliability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

While entrepreneurial exuberance for power plant development has evaporated in the face of market saturation, depressed power prices, and tightening credit, the legacy of the power plant building boom is record additions of gas-fired turbines and combined cycle units between 1998 and 2007. These are contributing to a wave of fossil plant retirements, projected for the first time in this report. The combination of recent cancellations and impending retirements reduces the outlook for overbuilding, yet res...

2003-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

386

CE to do 150-MW coal-gas-retrofit design study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Combustion Engineering (CE) has a $5 million DOE contract to design a coal gasifier that will convert eastern coal into a fuel gas and replace the oil and gas now burned in a Gulf States Utility unit. A pilot unit which has been converting Pittsburgh No. 8 seam coal into 110-Btu fuel gas will be scaled up. The company will also begin testing four other coal types. CE finds that retrofitting an air-blown atmospheric pressure system is cost-effective, but warns that the costs of a large-scale intergrated plant are still speculative. (DCK)

Not Available

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Design Evolution, Durability and Reliability of General Electric Heavy-Duty Gas Turbines: Pedigree Matrices, Volume 3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The advanced technology heavy-frame gas turbines being introduced into the market today carry a degree of technical risk because of new technologies incorporated into their design. This report reviews the design evolution of specific General Electric (GE) industrial gas turbines in a standard format, which allows an assessment of the technical risks involved in operating these high-technology gas turbines. The report also establishes a pedigree matrix for standard production heavy-frame gas ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

388

Design and off-design analysis of a centrifugal compressor for natural gas.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Centrifugal is the main compressor type used in process industries and pipelines. This work presents the design of a centrifugal compressor in three steps. The… (more)

Sandro Kojiro Kurauchi

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Conceptual Design for a High-Temperature Gas Loop Test Facility  

SciTech Connect

This report documents an early-stage conceptual design for a high-temperature gas test loop. The objectives accomplished by the study include, (1) investigation of existing gas test loops to determine ther capabilities and how the proposed system might best complement them, (2) development of a preliminary test plan to help identify the performance characteristics required of the test unit, (3) development of test loop requirements, (4) development of a conceptual design including process flow sheet, mechanical layout, and equipment specifications and costs, and (5) development of a preliminary test loop safety plan.

James B. Kesseli

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

NATURAL GAS HYDRATES STORAGE PROJECT PHASE II. CONCEPTUAL DESIGN AND ECONOMIC STUDY  

SciTech Connect

DOE Contract DE-AC26-97FT33203 studied feasibility of utilizing the natural-gas storage property of gas hydrates, so abundantly demonstrated in nature, as an economical industrial process to allow expanded use of the clean-burning fuel in power plants. The laboratory work achieved breakthroughs: (1) Gas hydrates were found to form orders of magnitude faster in an unstirred system with surfactant-water micellar solutions. (2) Hydrate particles were found to self-pack by adsorption on cold metal surfaces from the micellar solutions. (3) Interstitial micellar-water of the packed particles were found to continue forming hydrates. (4) Aluminum surfaces were found to most actively collect the hydrate particles. These laboratory developments were the bases of a conceptual design for a large-scale process where simplification enhances economy. In the design, hydrates form, store, and decompose in the same tank in which gas is pressurized to 550 psi above unstirred micellar solution, chilled by a brine circulating through a bank of aluminum tubing in the tank employing gas-fired refrigeration. Hydrates form on aluminum plates suspended in the chilled micellar solution. A low-grade heat source, such as 110 F water of a power plant, circulates through the tubing bank to release stored gas. The design allows a formation/storage/decomposition cycle in a 24-hour period of 2,254,000 scf of natural gas; the capability of multiple cycles is an advantage of the process. The development costs and the user costs of storing natural gas in a scaled hydrate process were estimated to be competitive with conventional storage means if multiple cycles of hydrate storage were used. If more than 54 cycles/year were used, hydrate development costs per Mscf would be better than development costs of depleted reservoir storage; above 125 cycles/year, hydrate user costs would be lower than user costs of depleted reservoir storage.

R.E. Rogers

1999-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

391

Understanding the Design and Performance of Emissions Trading Systems for Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

SciTech Connect

Research Spotlight presents new research findings and projects underway at Resources for the Future that are relevant to the analysis of climate change policy. As interest in greenhouse gas trading policies grows in the United States and other Annex I countries, so does the need for stronger analytical tools. The paper by Tietenberg in this collection lays out some of the principal conceptual issues that analysts face in providing more accurate and relevant tools and results for decisionmakers. In this paper we build on Tietenberg's analysis to consider some of the key modeling challenges that analysts face in developing an improved capacity for quantitatively assessing real-world policies.

Toman, M.

1999-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

392

6000 tpd SRC-I Demonstration Plant gas systems. Design baseline package, Volume 8. [DEA process  

SciTech Connect

Volume 8 contains the design of the fuel gas desulfurization process (DEA) and of the liquefied petroleum gases (LPG) section of the plant. The removal of acid gases is accomplished by intimately contacting the feed stream with the descending DEA solution. A partially regenerated semi-lean DEA solution is fed to an intermediate tray of the column for the bulk removal of H/sub 2/S and CO/sub 2/ while a fully regenerated lean DEA solution is fed at the top tray for the removal of the remaining acid gases in the top section of the absorber. The lean solution stream temperature is maintained at 10 to 15/sup 0/F above the absorber feed gas temperature to prevent hydrocarbon condensation in the column with consequent foaming and flooding of the column. The overhead gas (Stream 6305) leaving the H.P. DEA absorber is cooled and passed through the Sweet Gas K.O. Drum (bottom section of V-15305) to separate any condensate. The gas leaving the drum is further contacted with a 3 weight percent caustic solution in the bottom section of the Treated Gas Wash Column (T-15303) for removal of residual acid gases in order to comply with the sweet gas specifications of 1 ppMv H/sub 2/S and 10 ppMv CO/sub 2/. The LPG Recovery Unit is designed to process 15.95 MMSCFD of low pressure fuel reject gas from the HPU to recover approximately 60 percent of the propane and most of the heavier hydrocarbons. The recovered hydrocarbons are produced as liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) product. Specifications for the LPG product are: (1) Ethane/Propane (Vol/Vol) 0.02; and (2) LPG product should meet GPA Publication 2140-77 Commercial B-P mixture specifications.

1983-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

393

The convergence of market designs for adequate generating capacity with special attention to the CAISO's resource adequacy problem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper compares market designs intended to solve the resource adequacy (RA) problem, and finds that, in spite of rivalrous claims, the most advanced designs have nearly converged. The original dichotomy between approaches ...

Cramton, Peter C.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Core design and reactor physics of a breed and burn gas-cooled fast reactor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In order to fulfill the goals set forth by the Generation IV International Forum, the current NERI funded research has focused on the design of a Gas-cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) operating in a Breed and Burnm (B&B) fuel cycle ...

Yarsky, Peter

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Design Configurations for a Very High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Designed to Generate Electricity and Hydrogen  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor is being envisioned that will generate not just electricity, but also hydrogen to charge up fuel cells for cars, trucks and other mobile energy uses. INL engineers studied various heat-transfer working fluids—including helium and liquid salts—in seven different configurations. In computer simulations, serial configurations diverted some energy from the heated fluid flowing to the electric plant and hydrogen production plant. In anticipation of the design, development and procurement of an advanced power conversion system for HTGR, this study was initiated to identify the major design and technology options and their tradeoffs in the evaluation of power conversion system (PCS) coupled to hydrogen plant. In this study, we investigated a number of design configurations and performed thermal hydraulic analyses using various working fluids and various conditions (Oh, 2005). This paper includes a portion of thermal hydraulic results based on a direct cycle and a parallel intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) configuration option.

Conference preceedings

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Impurity Capacities of Slags  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Decomposition of Methane during Oxide Reduction Using Natural gas · Delivering a National Process Design Unit with Industry Support · Development of a ...

397

Modeling Capacity Reservation Contract  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we model a scenario where a chip designer (buyer) buys capacity from chip manufacturers (suppliers) in the presence of demand uncertainty faced by the buyer. We assume that the buyer knows the probability distribution of his demand. The supplier offers the buyer to reserve capacity in advance at a price that is lower than the historical average of the spot price. The supplier’s price (if the buyer reserves capacity in advance) is function of her capacity, demand for her capacity, unit production cost, the average spot market price and the amount of capacity reserved by the buyer. Based on these parameters we derive the price the suppliers will charge. We formulate the problem from the buyer’s perspective. The buyer’s decisions are how much capacity to reserve and from how many suppliers. The optimal solution is obtained numerically. Our model addresses the following issues that are not covered in the current literature on capacity reservation models. In the existing literature the supplier’s price is an exogenous parameter. We model the supplier’s price from relevant parameters mentioned above. This makes our model richer. For example, if the expected capacity utilization for the supplier is likely to be low then the supplier will charge a lower price for capacity reservation. In reality, the buyer sources from multiple suppliers. Most mathematical models on capacity reservation, we are aware of, assumes a single buyer and a single supplier. We generalize this to a single buyer and multiple suppliers.

Jishnu Hazra; B. Mahadevan; Sudhi Seshadri

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Advanced Off-Gas Control System Design For Radioactive And Mixed Waste Treatment  

SciTech Connect

Treatment of radioactive and mixed wastes is often required to destroy or immobilize hazardous constituents, reduce waste volume, and convert the waste to a form suitable for final disposal. These kinds of treatments usually evolve off-gas. Air emission regulations have become increasingly stringent in recent years. Mixed waste thermal treatment in the United States is now generally regulated under the Hazardous Waste Combustor (HWC) Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) standards. These standards impose unprecedented requirements for operation, monitoring and control, and emissions control. Off-gas control technologies and system designs that were satisfactorily proven in mixed waste operation prior to the implementation of new regulatory standards are in some cases no longer suitable in new mixed waste treatment system designs. Some mixed waste treatment facilities have been shut down rather than have excessively restrictive feed rate limits or facility upgrades to comply with the new standards. New mixed waste treatment facilities in the U. S. are being designed to operate in compliance with the HWC MACT standards. Activities have been underway for the past 10 years at the INL and elsewhere to identify, develop, demonstrate, and design technologies for enabling HWC MACT compliance for mixed waste treatment facilities. Some specific off-gas control technologies and system designs have been identified and tested to show that even the stringent HWC MACT standards can be met, while minimizing treatment facility size and cost.

Nick Soelberg

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Licensing topical report: interpretation of general design criteria for high-temperature gas-cooled reactors  

SciTech Connect

This Licensing Topical Report presents a set of General Design Criteria (GDC) which is proposed for applicability to licensing of graphite-moderated, high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs). Modifications as necessary to reflect HTGR characteristics and design practices have been made to the GDC derived for applicability to light-water-cooled reactors and presented in Appendix A of Part 50, Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, including the Introduction, Definitions, and Criteria. It is concluded that the proposed set of GDC affords a better basis for design and licensing of HTGRs.

Orvis, D.D.; Raabe, P.H.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Fire protection considerations for the design and operation of liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) storage facilities  

SciTech Connect

This standard addresses the design, operation, and maintenance of LPG storage facilities from the standpoint of prevention and control of releases, fire-protection design, and fire-control measures, as well as the history of LPG storage facility failure, facility design philosophy, operating and maintenance procedures, and various fire-protection and firefighting approaches and presentations. The storage facilities covered are LPG installations (storage vessels and associated loading/unloading/transfer systems) at marine and pipeline terminals, natural gas processing plants, refineries, petrochemical plants, and tank farms.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas design capacity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Design and construction of a thermophotovoltaic generator using turbine combustion gas  

SciTech Connect

This US Naval Academy project involves the development of a prototype thermophotovoltaic (TPV) generator that uses a General Electric T-58 helicopter gas turbine as the heat source. The goals of this project were to demonstrate the viability of using TPV and external combustion gases to generate electricity, and develop a system which could also be used for materials testing. The generator was modularly designed so that different materials could be tested at a later date. The combustion gas was tapped from the T-58`s combustor through one of the two igniter ports and extracted through a silicon carbide matrix ceramic composite tube into a similarly constructed ceramic composite radiant emitter. The ceramic radiant emitters is heated by the combustion gas via convection, and then serves the TPV generator by radiating the heat outwards where it can be absorbed by thermophotovoltaic cells and converted directly into electricity. The gas turbine and generator module are monitored by a data acquisition system that performs both data collection and control functions. This paper details the design of the TPV generator. It also gives results of initial tests with the gas turbine.

Erickson, T.A.; Lindler, K.W.; Harper, M.J. [Naval Academy, Annapolis, MD (United States). Dept. of Naval Architecture, Ocean, and Marine Engineering

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Innovative coke oven gas cleaning system for retrofit applications. Volume 1, Public design report  

SciTech Connect

This Public Design Report provides, in a single document, available nonproprietary design -information for the ``Innovative Coke Oven Gas Cleaning System for Retrofit Applications`` Demonstration Project at Bethlehem Steel Corporation`s Sparrows Point, Maryland coke oven by-product facilities. This project demonstrates, for the first time in the United States, the feasibility of integrating four commercially available technologies (processes) for cleaning coke oven gas. The four technologies are: Secondary Gas Cooling, Hydrogen Sulfide and Ammonia Removal, Hydrogen Sulfide and Ammonia Recovery, and Ammonia Destruction and Sulfur Recovery. In addition to the design aspects, the history of the project and the role of the US Department of,Energy are briefly discussed. Actual plant capital and projected operating costs are also presented. An overview of the integration (retrofit) of the processes into the existing plant is presented and is followed by detailed non-proprietary descriptions of the four technologies and their overall effect on reducing the emissions of ammonia, sulfur, and other pollutants from coke oven gas. Narrative process descriptions, simplified process flow diagrams, input/output stream data, operating conditions, catalyst and chemical requirements, and utility requirements are given for each unit. Plant startup provisions, environmental considerations and control monitoring, and safety considerations are also addressed for each process.

Not Available

1994-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

403

Design, analyses and experimental study of a foil gas bearing with compression springs as a compliance support  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new foil bearing with compression springs is designed, built, analyzed, and tested. This foil gas bearing uses a series of compression springs as a compliant structure instead of corrugated bump foils. A spring model to estimate the stiffness of compression springs was developed and showed a good level of agreement with the experimental results. The spring dynamics model was combined with a non-linear orbit simulation to investigate the non-linear behavior of foil gas bearings. The approach could also predict the structural loss factor given the geometry of the underlying springs. A series of rotor-bearing orbit simulations using the compression spring with stiffness of the free-free case, predicted the critical speed and the onset speed of instability at around 7500 rpm and 14,500 rpm with a WFR ~ 0.5. The low critical speed was due to the relatively soft support. The hydrodynamic rotor instability was predicted under the equivalent viscous damping extracted from the spring dynamics, implying the viscous damping alone within the spring cannot suppress hydrodynamic instability of the foil gas bearings. The load capacity of the compression spring foil gas bearing was measured at 20,000 rpm with and without air cooling, to demonstrate the feasibility of the new foil bearing. The constructed bearing with rather soft springs showed a small load capacity of 96N at 20,000 rpm under no cooling. The developed cooling method using direct air supply holes machined on the bearing sleeve, proved to be very effective in cooling the test bearing. The measured level of structural stiffness and damping evidenced the existence of a necessary level of damping for stable bearing operation. The structural stiffness was highly nonlinear and showed different behavior for static loading and the sinusoidal dynamic loading. The measured equivalent viscous damping coefficients increased with the applied load amplitude. A series of parametric design studies were performed to investigate the effects of various design parameters on the bearing stiffness and overall rotordynamic performance. Rotor-bearing orbit simulations showed there is a range of spring stiffness for high onset speeds of instability. Increasing the pitch of the spring while maintaining the same stiffness increased the structural loss factor slightly, manifesting a smaller number of coils is better in terms of damping. The onset speed of instability increases slightly with the rotor mass due to increased static eccentricity and presumably smaller cross-coupled stiffness. However, increasing the rotor mass in order to render a high eccentricity was not effective in increasing the onset speed of instability because of reduced natural frequency and increased inertia. Instead, orbit simulations confirmed that small rotor mass with external loading is the most effective way to increase the bearing stability.

Song, Ju Ho

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Method and apparatus for reliable gas supply  

SciTech Connect

A method is described for supplying gas to a receiving point at a flowrate at least equal to a design gas usage rate comprising: (A) passing liquid from a liquid reservoir into an atmospheric vaporizer having a rated capacity at least equal to the design gas usage rate; (B) passing the liquid through the atmospheric vaporizer while heating the liquid by indirect heat exchange with ambient air to produce heated fluid; (C) passing substantially all of the heated fluid from the atmospheric vaporizer into a powered heat exchanger having a rated capacity at least equal to the design gas usage rate; (D) passing the heated fluid through the powered heat exchanger while heating the heated fluid by indirect heat exchange with hot fluid to produce product gas; and (E) passing product gas to the receiving point at a flowrate at least equal to the design gas usage rate.

Borcuch, J.P.; Thompson, D.R.

1989-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

405

Design and Implementation of Energized Fracture Treatment in Tight Gas Sands  

SciTech Connect

Hydraulic fracturing is essential for producing gas and oil at an economic rate from low permeability sands. Most fracturing treatments use water and polymers with a gelling agent as a fracturing fluid. The water is held in the small pore spaces by capillary pressure and is not recovered when drawdown pressures are low. The un-recovered water leaves a water saturated zone around the fracture face that stops the flow of gas into the fracture. This is a particularly acute problem in low permeability formations where capillary pressures are high. Depletion (lower reservoir pressures) causes a limitation on the drawdown pressure that can be applied. A hydraulic fracturing process can be energized by the addition of a compressible, sometimes soluble, gas phase into the treatment fluid. When the well is produced, the energized fluid expands and gas comes out of solution. Energizing the fluid creates high gas saturation in the invaded zone, thereby facilitating gas flowback. A new compositional hydraulic fracturing model has been created (EFRAC). This is the first model to include changes in composition, temperature, and phase behavior of the fluid inside the fracture. An equation of state is used to evaluate the phase behavior of the fluid. These compositional effects are coupled with the fluid rheology, proppant transport, and mechanics of fracture growth to create a general model for fracture creation when energized fluids are used. In addition to the fracture propagation model, we have also introduced another new model for hydraulically fractured well productivity. This is the first and only model that takes into account both finite fracture conductivity and damage in the invaded zone in a simple analytical way. EFRAC was successfully used to simulate several fracture treatments in a gas field in South Texas. Based on production estimates, energized fluids may be required when drawdown pressures are smaller than the capillary forces in the formation. For this field, the minimum CO{sub 2} gas quality (volume % of gas) recommended is 30% for moderate differences between fracture and reservoir pressures (2900 psi reservoir, 5300 psi fracture). The minimum quality is reduced to 20% when the difference between pressures is larger, resulting in additional gas expansion in the invaded zone. Inlet fluid temperature, flow rate, and base viscosity did not have a large impact on fracture production. Finally, every stage of the fracturing treatment should be energized with a gas component to ensure high gas saturation in the invaded zone. A second, more general, sensitivity study was conducted. Simulations show that CO{sub 2} outperforms N{sub 2} as a fluid component because it has higher solubility in water at fracturing temperatures and pressures. In fact, all gas components with higher solubility in water will increase the fluid's ability to reduce damage in the invaded zone. Adding methanol to the fracturing solution can increase the solubility of CO{sub 2}. N{sub 2} should only be used if the gas leaks-off either during the creation of the fracture or during closure, resulting in gas going into the invaded zone. Experimental data is needed to determine if the gas phase leaks-off during the creation of the fracture. Simulations show that the bubbles in a fluid traveling across the face of a porous medium are not likely to attach to the surface of the rock, the filter cake, or penetrate far into the porous medium. In summary, this research has created the first compositional fracturing simulator, a useful tool to aid in energized fracture design. We have made several important and original conclusions about the best practices when using energized fluids in tight gas sands. The models and tools presented here may be used in the future to predict behavior of any multi-phase or multi-component fracturing fluid system.

Mukul Sharma; Kyle Friehauf

2009-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

406

? Capacity-based design [Preliminary for Part 2] 2. Energy Harvesting Networks Transmission Completion Time Minimization for single link  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transmission Completion Time Minimization for single link w / finite battery Extension to fading channels Transmission policies with inefficient energy storage IEEE ICC 2013, Budapest, Hungary 6/9/2013 Goals ? Energy Efficiency (EE): What it meant last decade; what it means today ? From a communication network design perspective what should we care about for energy efficient design of cellular/conventional wireless networks? (greenish) rechargeable/energy harvesting networks? (green) ? Communication with energy harvesting nodes Green, self-sufficient nodes with extended network lifetime Relatively new field with increasing interest IEEE ICC 2013, Budapest, Hungary 6/9/2013 Prerequisites for the Tutorial

Aylin Yener; Short Term; Throughput Maximization

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Independent design review report for truck {number_sign}1 modifications for flammable gas tanks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The East and West Tank Farm Standing Order 97-01 requires that the PMST be modified to include purging of the enclosed space underneath the shielded receiver weather cover per National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) 496, Purged and Pressurized Enclosures for Electrical Equipment. The Standing Order also requires that the PMST be modified by replacing the existing electrical remote latch (RLU) unit with a mechanical remote latch unit. As the mechanical remote latch unit was exactly like the RLU installed on the Rotary Mode Core Sampler Trucks (RMCST) and the design for the RMCST went through formal design review, replacing the RLU was done utilizing informal design verification and was completed per work package ES-97-0028. As the weather cover purge was similar to the design for the RMCSTS, this design was reviewed using the independent review method with multiple independent reviewers. A function design criteria (WHC-SD-WM-FDC-048, Functional Design Criteria for Core Sampling in Flammable Gas Watch List Tanks) provided the criteria for the modifications. The review consisted of distributing the design review package to the reviewers and collecting and dispositioning the RCR comments. The review package included the ECNs for review, the Design Compliance Matrix, copies of all drawings affected, and copies of outstanding ECNs against these drawings. A final meeting was held to ensure that all reviewers were aware of the changes to ECNs from incorporation of RCR comments.

Wilson, G.W.

1997-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

408

Preliminary design for hot dirty-gas control-valve test facility. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of a preliminary design and cost estimating effort for a facility for the testing of control valves in Hot Dirty Gas (HDGCV) service. This design was performed by Mittelhauser Corporation for the United States Department of Energy's Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC). The objective of this effort was to provide METC with a feasible preliminary design for a test facility which could be used to evaluate valve designs under simulated service conditions and provide a technology data base for DOE and industry. In addition to the actual preliminary design of the test facility, final design/construction/operating schedules and a facility cost estimate were prepared to provide METC sufficient information with which to evaluate this design. The bases, assumptions, and limitations of this study effort are given. The tasks carried out were as follows: METC Facility Review, Environmental Control Study, Gas Generation Study, Metallurgy Review, Safety Review, Facility Process Design, Facility Conceptual Layout, Instrumentation Design, Cost Estimates, and Schedules. The report provides information regarding the methods of approach used in the various tasks involved in the completion of this study. Section 5.0 of this report presents the results of the study effort. The results obtained from the above-defined tasks are described briefly. The turnkey cost of the test facility is estimated to be $9,774,700 in fourth quarter 1979 dollars, and the annual operating cost is estimated to be $960,000 plus utilities costs which are not included because unit costs per utility were not available from METC.

Not Available

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Demonstration plant engineering and design. Phase I. The pipeline gas demonstration plant. Volume 9. Plant Section 800: product gas compression and drying  

SciTech Connect

Contract No. EF-77-C-01-2542 between Conoco Inc. and the US Department of Energy provides for the design, construction, and operation of a demonstration plant capable of processing bituminous caking coals into clean pipeline quality gas. The project is currently in the design phase scheduled to be completed in June 1981. One of the major efforts of Phase I is the completion of the process design and the project engineering design of the Demonstration Plant. This design effort has been completed. A report of the design effort is being issued in 24 volumes. This is Volume 9 which reports the design of Plant Section 800 - Product Gas Compression and Drying. Plant Section 800 compresses, cools, and drys the SNG product to conditions and specifications required for pipeline use. A conventional triethylene glycol (TEG) gas drying unit is employed to reduce the moisture content of the SNG to less than 7 pounds per million standard cubic feet. The product SNG has a minimum pressure of 800 psig and a maximum temperature of 100/sup 0/F. This section also includes the product gas analysis, metering, and totalizing instruments. It is designed to remove 3144 pounds of water from 19 million SCFC of SNG product. Volume 9 contains the following design information: process operation; design basis; heat and material balance; stream compositions; utility, chemical and catalyst summary; major equipment and machinery list; major equipment and machinery requisitions; instrument list; instrument requisitions; line lists; process flow diagram; engineering flow diagrams; and section plot plan.

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Preliminary Failure Modes and Effects Analysis of the US Massive Gas Injection Disruption Mitigation System Design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of a preliminary failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA) of a candidate design for the ITER Disruption Mitigation System. This candidate is the Massive Gas Injection System that provides machine protection in a plasma disruption event. The FMEA was quantified with “generic” component failure rate data as well as some data calculated from operating facilities, and the failure events were ranked for their criticality to system operation.

Lee C. Cadwallader

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Advanced design nuclear power plants: Competitive, economical electricity. An analysis of the cost of electricity from coal, gas and nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect

This report presents an updated analysis of the projected cost of electricity from new baseload power plants beginning operation around the year 2000. Included in the study are: (1) advanced-design, standardized nuclear power plants; (2) low emissions coal-fired power plants; (3) gasified coal-fired power plants; and (4) natural gas-fired power plants. This analysis shows that electricity from advanced-design, standardized nuclear power plants will be economically competitive with all other baseload electric generating system alternatives. This does not mean that any one source of electric power is always preferable to another. Rather, what this analysis indicates is that, as utilities and others begin planning for future baseload power plants, advanced-design nuclear plants should be considered an economically viable option to be included in their detailed studies of alternatives. Even with aggressive and successful conservation, efficiency and demand-side management programs, some new baseload electric supply will be needed during the 1990s and into the future. The baseload generating plants required in the 1990s are currently being designed and constructed. For those required shortly after 2000, the planning and alternatives assessment process must start now. It takes up to ten years to plan, design, license and construct a new coal-fired or nuclear fueled baseload electric generating plant and about six years for a natural gas-fired plant. This study indicates that for 600-megawatt blocks of capacity, advanced-design nuclear plants could supply electricity at an average of 4.5 cents per kilowatt-hour versus 4.8 cents per kilowatt-hour for an advanced pulverized-coal plant, 5.0 cents per kilowatt-hour for a gasified-coal combined cycle plant, and 4.3 cents per kilowatt-hour for a gas-fired combined cycle combustion turbine plant.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Material Control and Accounting Design Considerations for High-Temperature Gas Reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The subject of this report is domestic safeguards and security by design (2SBD) for high-temperature gas reactors, focusing on material control and accountability (MC&A). The motivation for the report is to provide 2SBD support to the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project, which was launched by Congress in 2005. This introductory section will provide some background on the NGNP project and an overview of the 2SBD concept. The remaining chapters focus specifically on design aspects of the candidate high-temperature gas reactors (HTGRs) relevant to MC&A, Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) requirements, and proposed MC&A approaches for the two major HTGR reactor types: pebble bed and prismatic. Of the prismatic type, two candidates are under consideration: (1) GA's GT-MHR (Gas Turbine-Modular Helium Reactor), and (2) the Modular High-Temperature Reactor (M-HTR), a derivative of Areva's Antares reactor. The future of the pebble-bed modular reactor (PBMR) for NGNP is uncertain, as the PBMR consortium partners (Westinghouse, PBMR [Pty] and The Shaw Group) were unable to agree on the path forward for NGNP during 2010. However, during the technology assessment of the conceptual design phase (Phase 1) of the NGNP project, AREVA provided design information and technology assessment of their pebble bed fueled plant design called the HTR-Module concept. AREVA does not intend to pursue this design for NGNP, preferring instead a modular reactor based on the prismatic Antares concept. Since MC&A relevant design information is available for both pebble concepts, the pebble-bed HTGRs considered in this report are: (1) Westinghouse PBMR; and (2) AREVA HTR-Module. The DOE Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) sponsors the Fuel Cycle Research and Development program (FCR&D), which contains an element specifically focused on the domestic (or state) aspects of SBD. This Material Protection, Control and Accountancy Technology (MPACT) program supports the present work summarized in this report, namely the development of guidance to support the consideration of MC&A in the design of both pebble-bed and prismatic-fueled HTGRs. The objective is to identify and incorporate design features into the facility design that will cost effectively aid in making MC&A more effective and efficient, with minimum impact on operations. The theft of nuclear material is addressed through both MC&A and physical protection, while the threat of sabotage is addressed principally through physical protection.

Trond Bjornard; John Hockert

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Working Gas Capacity of Aquifers  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

96,950 396,092 364,228 363,521 367,108 2008-2012 96,950 396,092 364,228 363,521 367,108 2008-2012 Alabama 0 2012-2012 Arkansas 0 2012-2012 California 0 0 2009-2012 Colorado 0 2012-2012 Illinois 244,900 252,344 216,132 215,017 215,594 2008-2012 Indiana 19,978 19,367 19,437 19,479 19,215 2008-2012 Iowa 87,350 87,414 90,613 91,113 90,313 2008-2012 Kansas 0 2012-2012 Kentucky 6,629 6,629 6,629 6,629 6,629 2008-2012 Louisiana 0 2012-2012 Michigan 0 2012-2012 Minnesota 2,000 2,000 2,000 2,000 2,000 2008-2012 Mississippi 0 2012-2012 Missouri 11,276 3,040 3,656 6,000 6,000 2008-2012 Montana 0 2012-2012 New Mexico 0 2012-2012 New York 0 2012-2012 Ohio 0 2012-2012 Oklahoma 31 2012-2012 Oregon 0 2012-2012 Pennsylvania 942 2012-2012 Tennessee 0 2012-2012 Texas 0 2012-2012 Utah 948 948 939 939 948 2008-2012

414

Working Gas Capacity of Aquifers  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

96,950 396,092 364,228 363,521 367,108 2008-2012 96,950 396,092 364,228 363,521 367,108 2008-2012 Alabama 0 2012-2012 Arkansas 0 2012-2012 California 0 0 2009-2012 Colorado 0 2012-2012 Illinois 244,900 252,344 216,132 215,017 215,594 2008-2012 Indiana 19,978 19,367 19,437 19,479 19,215 2008-2012 Iowa 87,350 87,414 90,613 91,113 90,313 2008-2012 Kansas 0 2012-2012 Kentucky 6,629 6,629 6,629 6,629 6,629 2008-2012 Louisiana 0 2012-2012 Michigan 0 2012-2012 Minnesota 2,000 2,000 2,000 2,000 2,000 2008-2012 Mississippi 0 2012-2012 Missouri 11,276 3,040 3,656 6,000 6,000 2008-2012 Montana 0 2012-2012 New Mexico 0 2012-2012 New York 0 2012-2012 Ohio 0 2012-2012 Oklahoma 31 2012-2012 Oregon 0 2012-2012 Pennsylvania 942 2012-2012 Tennessee 0 2012-2012 Texas 0 2012-2012 Utah 948 948 939 939 948 2008-2012

415

Natural Gas Aquifers Storage Capacity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,347,516 1,351,832 1,340,633 1,233,017 1,231,897 1,237,269 1,347,516 1,351,832 1,340,633 1,233,017 1,231,897 1,237,269 1999-2012 Alabama 0 1999-2012 Arkansas 0 1999-2012 California 0 0 1999-2012 Colorado 0 1999-2012 Illinois 876,960 874,384 885,848 772,381 777,294 779,862 1999-2012 Indiana 81,490 81,991 81,328 81,268 81,310 80,746 1999-2012 Iowa 278,238 284,747 284,811 288,010 288,210 288,210 1999-2012 Kansas 0 1999-2012 Kentucky 9,567 9,567 9,567 9,567 9,567 9,567 1999-2012 Louisiana 0 1999-2012 Michigan 0 1999-2012 Minnesota 7,000 7,000 7,000 7,000 7,000 7,000 1999-2012 Mississippi 0 1999-2012 Missouri 32,940 32,876 10,889 11,502 13,845 13,845 1999-2012 Montana 0 1999-2012 New Mexico 0 1999-2012 New York 0 1999-2012 Ohio 0 1999-2012 Oklahoma 170 1999-2012 Oregon 0 1999-2012 Pennsylvania

416

Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operable Capacity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

(Barrels per Calendar Day) (Barrels per Calendar Day) Data Series: Total Number of Operable Refineries Number of Operating Refineries Number of Idle Refineries Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operable Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operating Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Idle Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operable Capacity (B/SD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operating Capacity (B/SD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Idle Capacity (B/SD) Vacuum Distillation Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Total Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Delayed Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD Thermal Cracking Fluid Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Visbreaking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Other/Gas Oil Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Cracking Fresh Feed Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Cracking Recycle Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Distillate Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Gas Oil Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Residual Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming Low Pressure Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming High Pressure Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating/Desulfurization Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Naphtha/Reformer Feed Charge Cap (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Gasoline Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Heavy Gas Oil Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Distillate Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Kerosene/Jet Fuel Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Diesel Fuel Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Other Distillate Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Residual/Other Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Residual Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Other Oils Charge Capacity (B/SD) Fuels Solvent Deasphalting Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Total Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Catalytic Cracking Fresh Feed Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Period:

417

Turbine cooling configuration selection and design optimization for the high-reliability gas turbine. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The potential of advanced turbine convectively air-cooled concepts for application to the Department of Energy/Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Advanced Liquid/Gas-Fueled Engine Program was investigated. Cooling of turbine airfoils is critical technology and significant advances in cooling technology will permit higher efficiency coal-base-fuel gas turbine energy systems. Two new airfoil construction techniques, bonded and wafer, were the principal designs considered. In the bonded construction, two airfoil sections having intricate internal cooling configurations are bonded together to form a complete blade or vane. In the wafer construction, a larger number (50 or more) of wafers having intricate cooling flow passages are bonded together to form a complete blade or vane. Of these two construction techniques, the bonded airfoil is considered to be lower in risk and closer to production readiness. Bonded airfoils are being used in aircraft engines. A variety of industrial materials were evaluated for the turbine airfoils. A columnar grain nickel alloy was selected on the basis of strength and corrosion resistance. Also, cost of electricity and reliability were considered in the final concept evaluation. The bonded airfoil design yielded a 3.5% reduction in cost-of-electricity relative to a baseline Reliable Engine design. A significant conclusion of this study was that the bonded airfoil convectively air-cooled design offers potential for growth to turbine inlet temperatures above 2600/sup 0/F with reasonable development risk.

Smith, M J; Suo, M

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

DESIGN OF A CONTAINMENT VESSEL CLOSURE FOR SHIPMENT OF TRITIUM GAS  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a design summary of the containment vessel closure for the Bulk Tritium Shipping Package (BTSP). This new package is a replacement for a package that has been used to ship tritium in a variety of content configurations and forms since the early 1970s. The new design is based on changes in the regulatory requirements. The BTSP design incorporates many improvements over its predecessor by implementing improved testing, handling, and maintenance capabilities, while improving manufacturability and incorporating new engineered materials that enhance the package's ability to withstand dynamic loading and thermal effects. This paper will specifically summarize the design philosophy and engineered features of the BTSP containment vessel closure. The closure design incorporates a concave closure lid, metallic C-Ring seals for containing tritium gas, a metal bellows valve and an elastomer O-Ring for leak testing. The efficient design minimizes the overall vessel height and protects the valve housing from damage during postulated drop and crush scenarios. Design features will be discussed.

Eberl, K; Paul Blanton, P

2007-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

419

Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Implements a gas based on the ideal gas law. It should be noted that this model of gases is niave (from many perspectives). ...

420

Development and analytical validation of a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method for the assessment of gastrointestinal permeability and intestinal absorptive capacity in dogs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Assessment of gastrointestinal permeability in vivo is considered a suitable method for the evaluation of gastrointestinal mucosal integrity. Probes commonly used include lactulose (L) and rhamnose (R) for the assessment of intestinal permeability, xylose (X) and 3-O-methylglucose (M) for the evaluation of intestinal absorptive capacity, and sucrose (S) for the assessment of gastric permeability. Traditionally, various methods have been used to quantify these markers in the urine after orogastric administration. However, urine collection is difficult and uncomfortable. A protocol based on the analysis of blood samples would be easier to perform. Thus, the aim of the first part of this project was to develop and validate a new gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method for the quantification of five sugar probes in canine serum. The method was sensitive, accurate, precise, and reproducible for the simultaneous quantification of 5 sugar probes in serum. The aim of the second part of this project was to assess the kinetic profiles of these 5 sugar probes in serum after orogastric administration in dogs and to determine the optimal time point for sample collection. Dogs received a solution containing L (10 g/L), R (10 g/L), X (10 g/L), M (5 g/L), and S (40 g/L) by orogastric intubation. Baseline blood samples were collected. Subsequent timed blood samples were taken for a 24 hours period. Significant changes in serum concentrations of all 5 sugars were detected after administration of the test dose (p<0.0001 for all 5 probes). Serum concentrations of L and R were significantly different from baseline concentrations from 90 to 240 and from 60 to 300 min post dosing respectively, and those of X, M, and S were significantly different from 30 to 240 min after dosing (p<0.05 for all 5 probes). Variations of the mean sugar concentrations of all dogs at 90, 120, and 180 minutes were analyzed using a Kruskal-Wallis test. Based on the results, only two blood samples, one taken at baseline and a second sample obtained between 90 and 180 after dosing, appear to be sufficient for assessment of intestinal permeability and mucosal absorptive capacity using these sugar probes.

Rodriguez Frausto, Heriberto

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas design capacity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Computer-Aided Design Reveals Potential of Gas Turbine Cogeneration in Chemical and Petrochemical Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gas turbine cogeneration cycles provide a simple and economical solution to the problems created by rising fuel and electricity costs. These cycles can be designed to accommodate a wide range of electrical, steam, and process heating demands. The optimum cycle is typically based on an analysis of the plant's electrical / steam / process heating requirements, an evaluation of the potential for selling to or permit wheeling by utilities of electrical power under PURPA guidelines, and application of pertinent investment decision criteria. The study that identifies the best solution to the problem must contain sufficient detail to support a plan of action by management. This paper addresses how computer-aided design techniques support the effort necessary to fully evaluate several alternative cycle designs in a short time frame. It includes examples for a new power unit as well as for cycles which require modifications to existing process and steam generating equipment in a medium-sized chemical plant.

Nanny, M. D.; Koeroghlian, M. M.; Baker, W. J.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Working crude oil storage capacity at Cushing, Oklahoma rises ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Greenhouse gas data, ... as reported in EIA's recently released report on Working and Net Available Shell Storage Capacity. Utilization of working storage capacity ...

423

Forward capacity market CONEfusion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In ISO New England and PJM it was assumed that sponsors of new capacity projects would offer them into the newly established forward centralized capacity markets at prices based on their levelized net cost of new entry, or ''Net CONE.'' But the FCCMs have not operated in the way their proponents had expected. To clear up the CONEfusion, FCCM designs should be reconsidered to adapt them to the changing circumstances and to be grounded in realistic expectations of market conduct. (author)

Wilson, James F.

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

424

Models, Calculation and Optimization of Gas Networks, Equipment and Contracts for Design, Operation, Booking and Accounting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There are proposed models of contracts, technological equipment and gas networks and methods of their optimization. The flow in network undergoes restrictions of contracts and equipment to be operated. The values of sources and sinks are provided by contracts. The contract models represent (sub-) networks. The simplest contracts represent either nodes or edges. Equipment is modeled by edges. More sophisticated equipment is represented by sub-networks. Examples of such equipment are multi-poles and compressor stations with many entries and exits. The edges can be of different types corresponding to equipment and contracts. On such edges, there are given systems of equation and inequalities simulating the contracts and equipment. On this base, the methods proposed that allow: calculation and control of contract values for booking on future days and for accounting of sales and purchases; simulation and optimization of design and of operation of gas networks. These models and methods are realized in software syst...

Ostromuhov, Leonid A

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Applying combined pinch and exergy analysis to closed-cycle gas turbine system design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pinch technology has developed into a powerful tool for thermodynamic analysis of chemical processes and associated utilities, resulting in significant energy savings. Conventional pinch analysis identifies the most economical energy consumption in terms of heat loads and provides practical design guidelines to achieve this. However, in analyzing systems involving heat and power, for example, steam and gas turbines, etc., pure heat load analysis is insufficient. Exergy analysis, on the other hand, provides a tool for heat and power analysis, although at times it does not provide clear practical design guideline. An appropriate combination of pinch and exergy analysis can provide practical methodology for the analysis of heat and power systems. The methodology has been successfully applied to refrigeration systems. This paper introduces the application of a combined pinch and exergy approach to commercial power plants with a demonstration example of a closed-cycle gas turbine (CCGT) system. Efficiency improvement of about 0.82 percent (50.2 to 51.02 percent) can be obtained by application of the new approach. More importantly, the approach can be used as an analysis and screening tool for the various design improvements and is generally applicable to any commercial power generation facility.

Dhole, V.R.; Zheng, J.P. [Univ. of Manchester (United Kingdom). Inst. of Science and Technology

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Design and Performance of a Low Btu Fuel Rich-Quench-Lean Gas Turbine Combustor  

SciTech Connect

General Electric Company is developing gas turbines and a high temperature desulfurization system for use in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants. High temperature desulfurization, or hot gas cleanup (HGCU), offers many advantages over conventional low temperature desulfurization processes, but does not reduce the relatively high concentrations of fuel bound nitrogen (FBN) that are typically found in low Btu fuel. When fuels containing bound nitrogen are burned in conventional gas turbine combustors, a significant portion of the FBN is converted to NO{sub x}. Methods of reducing the NO{sub x} emissions from IGCC power plants equipped with HGCU are needed. Rich-quench-lean (RQL) combustion can decrease the conversion of FBN to NO{sub x} because a large fraction of the FBN is converted into non-reactive N{sub 2} in a fuel rich stage. Additional air, required for complete combustion, is added in a quench stage. A lean stage provides sufficient residence time for complete combustion. Objectives General Electric has developed and tested a rich-quench-lean gas turbine combustor for use with low Btu fuels containing FBN. The objective of this work has been to design an RQL combustor that has a lower conversion of FBN to N{sub x} than a conventional low Btu combustor and is suitable for use in a GE heavy duty gas turbine. Such a combustor must be of appropriate size and scale, configuration (can-annular), and capable of reaching ``F`` class firing conditions (combustor exit temperature = 2550{degrees}F).

Feitelberg, A.S.; Jackson, M.R.; Lacey, M.A.; Manning, K.S.; Ritter, A.M.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

427

Test container design/fabrication/function for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant gas generation experiment glovebox  

SciTech Connect

The gas generation experiments (GGE) are being conducted at Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL0W) with contact handled transuranic (CH-TRU) waste in support of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in Carlsbad, New Mexico. The purpose of the GGE is to determine the different quantities and types of gases that would be produced and the gas-generation rates that would develop if brine were introduced to CH-TRU waste under post-closure WIPP disposal room conditions. The experiment requires that a prescribed matrix of CH-TRU waste be placed in a 7.5 liter test container. After loaded with the CH-TRU waste, brine and inoculum mixtures (consisting of salt and microbes indigenous to the Carlsbad, New Mexico region) are added to the waste. The test will run for an anticipated time period of three to five years. The test container itself is an ASME rated pressure vessel constructed from Hastelloy C276 to eliminate corrosion that might contaminate the experimental results. The test container is required to maintain a maximum 10% head space with a maximum working pressure of 17.25 MPa (2,500 psia). The test container is designed to provide a gas sample of the head space without the removal of brine. Assembly of the test container lid and process valves is performed inside an inert atmosphere glovebox. Glovebox mockup activities were utilized from the beginning of the design phase to ensure the test container and associated process valves were designed for remote handling. In addition, test container processes (including brine addition, sparging, leak detection, and test container pressurization) are conducted inside the glovebox.

Knight, C.J.; Russell, N.E.; Benjamin, W.W.; Rosenberg, K.E.; Michelbacher, J.A.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Key Issues in Designing Mechanisms to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Deforestation and Degradation (REDD)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 2008, EPRI launched the EPRI Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Emissions Offset Policy Dialogue project. The goals of this project are 1) to inform key constituencies involved in the development of U.S. climate mitigation strategies and policies about GHG emissions offset–related policies and design issues and 2) to provide a forum in which representatives of key sectors of the U.S. economy and communities involved in the ongoing development and debate on climate change policies can discuss these issues. On May 13...

2009-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

429

Safeguards-by-Design: Guidance for High Temperature Gas Reactors (HTGRs) With Pebble Fuel  

SciTech Connect

The following is a guidance document from a series prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), under the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI), to assist facility designers and operators in implementing international Safeguards-by-Design (SBD). SBD has two main objectives: (1) to avoid costly and time consuming redesign work or retrofits of new nuclear fuel cycle facilities and (2) to make the implementation of international safeguards more effective and efficient at such facilities. In the long term, the attainment of these goals would save industry and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) time, money, and resources and be mutually beneficial. This particular safeguards guidance document focuses on pebble fuel high temperature gas reactors (HTGR). The purpose of the IAEA safeguards system is to provide credible assurance to the international community that nuclear material and other specified items are not diverted from peaceful nuclear uses. The safeguards system consists of the IAEA’s statutory authority to establish safeguards; safeguards rights and obligations in safeguards agreements and additional protocols; and technical measures implemented pursuant to those agreements. Of foremost importance is the international safeguards agreement between the country and the IAEA, concluded pursuant to the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT). According to a 1992 IAEA Board of Governors decision, countries must: notify the IAEA of a decision to construct a new nuclear facility as soon as such decision is taken; provide design information on such facilities as the designs develop; and provide detailed design information based on construction plans at least 180 days prior to the start of construction, and on "as-built" designs at least 180 days before the first receipt of nuclear material. Ultimately, the design information will be captured in an IAEA Design Information Questionnaire (DIQ), prepared by the facility operator, typically with the support of the facility designer. The IAEA will verify design information over the life of the project. This design information is an important IAEA safeguards tool. Since the main interlocutor with the IAEA in each country is the State Regulatory Authority/SSAC (or Regional Regulatory Authority, e.g. EURATOM), the responsibility for conveying this design information to the IAEA falls to the State Regulatory Authority/SSAC.

Philip Casey Durst; Mark Schanfein

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

U.S. Refinery Catalytic Hydrocracking, Gas Oil Downstream Charge ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Cat. Hydro-Cracking Gas Oil Downstream Charge Capacity ; Cat. Hydro-Cracking Gas Oil Downstream Charge Capacity ; U.S. Downstream Charge Capacity of Operable ...

431

Design and Development of Gas-Liquid Cylindrical Cyclone Compact Separators for Three-Phase Flow  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this five-year project (October, 1997--September, 2002) is to expand the current research activities of Tulsa University Separation Technology Projects (TUSTP) to multiphase oil/water/gas separation. This project will be executed in two phases. Phase I (1997--2000) will focus on the investigations of the complex multiphase hydrodynamic flow behavior in a three-phase Gas-Liquid Cylindrical Cyclone (GLCC) Separator. The activities of this phase will include the development of a mechanistic model, a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulator, and detailed experimentation on the three-phase GLCC. The experimental and CFD simulation results will be suitably integrated with the mechanistic model. In Phase II (2000--2002), the developed GLCC separator will be tested under high pressure and real crudes conditions. This is crucial for validating the GLCC design for field application and facilitating easy and rapid technology deployment. Design criteria for industrial applications will be developed based on these results and will be incorporated into the mechanistic model by TUSTP.

Mohan, Ram S.; Shoham, Ovadia

1999-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

432

Design and Development of Gas-Liquid Cylindrical Cyclone Compact Separators for Three-Phase Flow  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this five-year project (October 1997--September 2002) was to expand the current research activities of Tulsa University Separation Technology Projects (TUSTP) to multiphase oil/water/gas separation. This project was executed in two phases. Phase I (1997--2000) focused on the investigations of the complex multiphase hydrodynamic flow behavior in a three-phase Gas-Liquid Cylindrical Cyclone (GLCC) Separator. The activities of this phase included the development of a mechanistic model, a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulator, and detailed experimentation on the three-phase GLCC. The experimental and CFD simulation results will be suitably integrated with the mechanistic model. In Phase II (2000--2002), the developed GLCC separator will be tested under high pressure and real crude conditions. This is crucial for validating the GLCC design for field application and facilitating easy and rapid technology deployment. Design criteria for industrial applications will be developed based on these results and will be incorporated into the mechanistic model by TUSTP.

Mohan, R.S.; Shoham, O.

2001-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

433

Optimal design of a gas transmission network: A case study of the Turkish natural gas pipeline network system.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Turkey is located between Europe, which has increasing demand for natural gas and the geographies of Middle East, Asia and Russia, which have rich and… (more)

Gunes, Ersin Fatih

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Electric Capacity | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Capacity Capacity Dataset Summary Description The New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development publishes an annual Energy Outlook, which presents projections of New Zealand's future energy supply, demand, prices and greenhouse gas emissions. The principle aim of these projections is to inform the national energy debate. Included here are the model results for electricity and generation capacity. The spreadsheet provides an interactive tool for selecting which model results to view, and which scenarios to evaluate; full model results for each scenario are also included. Source New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development Date Released Unknown Date Updated December 15th, 2010 (3 years ago) Keywords Electric Capacity Electricity Generation New Zealand projections

435

Recent mix of electric generating capacity additions more diverse ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural gas combined-cycle plants accounted for about 68% of the total natural gas-fired capacity added between 1999 and 2010.

436

Figure 29. Power sector electricity generation capacity by fuel in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Power sector electricity generation capacity by fuel in five cases, 2011 ... Natural gas combined cycle Natural gas combustion turbine Nuclear Renewable/other Reference

437

Windback seal design for gas compressors: a numerical and experimental study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Seals are considered one of the important flow elements of a turbomachinery device. Traditional labyrinth seals have proven their performance functionality by reducing leakage rates. Significant improvements on labyrinth seal functionality were obtained through altering the design geometry of labyrinth seals to prevent contamination across a seal and maintaining small leakage flowrates. This results in a windback seal that has only one tooth which continuously winds around the shaft like a screw thread. These seals are used in gas compressors to isolate the gas face seal from bearing oil. A purge gas is passed through the seal into the bearing housing. The helical design allows the seal to clear itself of any oil contamination. Windback seal performance is controlled through changing the seal geometry. A 2D graphical design tool for calculating the total and cavity leakage flowrates for windback seals is introduced. The effectiveness of the Fluent CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) commercial code to accurately predict the leakage rate for windback seals was evaluated. The objective is to determine if CFD simulations can be used along with a few experimental tests to study windback seals of this design with air as the working fluid. Comparison of measurement and predictions for a windback seal using the �º-�µ turbulence model with enhanced wall treatment functions show predictions and measurements comparing very well with a maximum difference of 5% for leakage rate. Similarly, the leakage rate of the tested smooth seal compares favorably with two dimensional CFD predictions, with a difference of 2%-11% and 8%-15% using laminar and �º-�µ turbulent flow models, respectively. The variation of leakage with shaft speed and pressure ratio across the seals is accurately predicted by the CFD simulations. Increasing the rotor speed to 15000 rpm increases the measured leakage flowrate for the windback seal by 2% at high differential pressure and 4.5% at low differential pressure, and decreases it by 10 % for the smooth seal. The effects of seal clearance, tooth pitch, cavity depth and the tooth number of starts on leakage flowrate, velocity and pressure distributions were studied numerically for three differential pressures and four rotor speeds.

Al-Ghasem, Adnan Mahmoud

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Recent mix of electric generating capacity additions more diverse ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

tags: natural gas generation capacity electricity. Email Updates. RSS Feeds. Facebook. Twitter. YouTube. Add us to your site.

439

Safeguards-by-Design:Guidance for High Temperature Gas Reactors (HTGRs) With Prismatic Fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Introduction and Purpose The following is a guidance document from a series prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), under the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI), to assist facility designers and operators in implementing international Safeguards-by-Design (SBD). SBD has two main objectives: (1) to avoid costly and time consuming redesign work or retrofits of new nuclear fuel cycle facilities and (2) to make the implementation of international safeguards more effective and efficient at such facilities. In the long term, the attainment of these goals would save industry and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) time, money, and resources and be mutually beneficial. This particular safeguards guidance document focuses on prismatic fuel high temperature gas reactors (HTGR). The purpose of the IAEA safeguards system is to provide credible assurance to the international community that nuclear material and other specified items are not diverted from peaceful nuclear uses. The safeguards system consists of the IAEA’s statutory authority to establish safeguards; safeguards rights and obligations in safeguards agreements and additional protocols; and technical measures implemented pursuant to those agreements. Of foremost importance is the international safeguards agreement between the country and the IAEA, concluded pursuant to the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT). According to a 1992 IAEA Board of Governors decision, countries must: notify the IAEA of a decision to construct a new nuclear facility as soon as such decision is taken; provide design information on such facilities as the designs develop; and provide detailed design information based on construction plans at least 180 days prior to the start of construction, and on "as-built" designs at least 180 days before the first receipt of nuclear material. Ultimately, the design information will be captured in an IAEA Design Information Questionnaire (DIQ), prepared by the facility operator, typically with the support of the facility designer. The IAEA will verify design information over the life of the project. This design information is an important IAEA safeguards tool. Since the main interlocutor with the IAEA in each country is the State Regulatory Authority/SSAC (or Regional Regulatory Authority, e.g. EURATOM), the responsibility for conveying this design information to the IAEA falls to the State Regulatory Authority/SSAC. For the nuclear industry to reap the benefits of SBD (i.e. avoid cost overruns and construction schedule slippages), nuclear facility designers and operators should work closely with the State Regulatory Authority and IAEA as soon as a decision is taken to build a new nuclear facility. Ideally, this interaction should begin during the conceptual design phase and continue throughout construction and start-up of a nuclear facility. Such early coordination and planning could influence decisions on the design of the nuclear material processing flow-sheet, material storage and handling arrangements, and facility layout (including safeguards equipment), etc.

Mark Schanfein; Casey Durst

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Oklahoma Refinery Catalytic Hydrotreating, Heavy Gas Oil ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Cat. Hydro. Heavy Gas Oil Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD)y ; Oklahoma Downstream Charge Capacity of Operable Petroleum Refineries ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas design capacity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Mississippi Refinery Catalytic Hydrotreating, Heavy Gas Oil ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Cat. Hydro. Heavy Gas Oil Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD)y ; Mississippi Downstream Charge Capacity of Operable Petroleum Refineries ...

442

Design and Initial Development of Monolithic Cross-Flow Ceramic Hot-Gas Filters  

SciTech Connect

Advanced, coal-fueled, power generation systems utilizing pressurized fluidized bed combustion (PFBC) and integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) technologies are currently being developed for high-efficiency, low emissions, and low-cost power generation. In spite of the advantages of these promising technologies, the severe operating environment often leads to material degradation and loss of performance in the barrier filters used for particle entrapment. To address this problem, LoTEC Inc., and Oak Ridge National Laboratory are jointly designing and developing a monolithic cross-flow ceramic hot-gas filter. The filter concept involves a truly monolithic cross-flow design that is resistant to delamination, can be easily fabricated, and offers flexibility of geometry and material make-up. During Phase I of the program, a thermo-mechanical analysis was performed to determine how a cross-flow filter would respond both thermally and mechanically to a series of thermal and mechanical loads. The cross-flow filter mold was designed accordingly, and the materials selection was narrowed down to Ca{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 0.5}Zr{sub 4}P{sub 6}O{sub 24} (CS-50) and 2Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-3SiO{sub 2} (mullite). A fabrication process was developed using gelcasting technology and monolithic cross-flow filters were fabricated. The program focuses on obtaining optimum filter permeability and testing the corrosion resistance of the candidate materials.

Barra, C.; Limaye, S.; Stinton, D.P.; Vaubert, V.M.

1999-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

443

Optimal Design of Offshore Natural-Gas Pipeline Systems B. Rothfarb; H. Frank; D. M. Rosenbaum; K. Steiglitz; D. J. Kleitman  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optimal Design of Offshore Natural-Gas Pipeline Systems B. Rothfarb; H. Frank; D. M. Rosenbaum; K@jstor.org. http://www.jstor.org Mon Oct 22 13:48:01 2007 #12;OPTIMAL DESIGN OF OFFSHORE NATURAL-GAS PIPELINEAnolog,tj, Cambridge, Massachusetts (Received January 28, 1969) The exploitation of offshore natural gas reserves

Steiglitz, Kenneth

444

Containment Versus Confinement for High-Temperature Gas Reactors: Regulatory, Design Basis, Siting, and Cost/Economic Considerations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides the results of an investigation pertaining to the use of the confinement that has been proposed for the high temperature and very high temperature gas reactors (HTGR, VHTR). No comprehensive study of this question has been published since 1985. All power reactor designs to go into commercial service in the United States were light water reactors (LWR), except for Fort St. Vrain (FSV) and Peach Bottom Unit 1, which were steam cycle helium gas cooled reactors. All designs use a leak-ti...

2005-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

445

Repowering Fossil Steam Plants with Gas Turbines and Heat Recovery Steam Generators: Design Considerations, Economics, and Lessons L earned  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes repowering fossil steam plants using gas turbines (GTs) and heat recovery steam generators (HRSGs) in combined-cycle mode. Design considerations and guidance, comparative economics, and lessons learned in the development of such projects are included. Various other methods of fossil plant repowering with GTs are also briefly discussed. The detailed results and comparisons that are provided relate specifically to a generic GT/HRSG repowering. Design parameters, limitations, schedulin...

2012-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

446

A Robust Infrastructure Design for Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plant Unattended Online Enrichment Monitoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An online enrichment monitor (OLEM) is being developed to continuously measure the relative isotopic composition of UF6 in the unit header pipes of a gas centrifuge enrichment plant (GCEP). From a safeguards perspective, OLEM will provide early detection of a facility being misused for production of highly enriched uranium. OLEM may also reduce the number of samples collected for destructive assay and if coupled with load cell monitoring can provide isotope mass balance verification. The OLEM design includes power and network connections for continuous monitoring of the UF6 enrichment and state of health of the instrument. Monitoring the enrichment on all header pipes at a typical GCEP could require OLEM detectors on each of the product, tails, and feed header pipes. If there are eight process units, up to 24 detectors may be required at a modern GCEP. Distant locations, harsh industrial environments, and safeguards continuity of knowledge requirements all place certain demands on the network robustness and power reliability. This paper describes the infrastructure and architecture of an OLEM system based on OLEM collection nodes on the unit header pipes and power and network support nodes for groupings of the collection nodes. A redundant, self-healing communications network, distributed backup power, and a secure communications methodology. Two candidate technologies being considered for secure communications are the Object Linking and Embedding for Process Control Unified Architecture cross-platform, service-oriented architecture model for process control communications and the emerging IAEA Real-time And INtegrated STream-Oriented Remote Monitoring (RAINSTORM) framework to provide the common secure communication infrastructure for remote, unattended monitoring systems. The proposed infrastructure design offers modular, commercial components, plug-and-play extensibility for GCEP deployments, and is intended to meet the guidelines and requirements for unattended and remotely monitored safeguards systems.

Younkin, James R [ORNL; Rowe, Nathan C [ORNL; Garner, James R [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Capacity Markets for Electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ternative Approaches for Power Capacity Markets”, Papers andand Steven Stoft, “Installed Capacity and Price Caps: Oil onElectricity Markets Have a Capacity requirement? If So, How

Creti, Anna; Fabra, Natalia

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Demonstration plant engineering and design. Phase I: the pipeline gas demonstration plant. Volume 7. Plant Section 500 - shift/methanation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Contract No. EF-77-C-01-2542 between Conoco Inc. and the US Department of Energy provides for the design, construction, and operation of a demonstration plant capable of processing bituminous caking coals into clean pipeline quality gas. The project is currently in the design phase (Phase I). This phase is scheduled to be completed in June 1981. One of the major efforts of Phase I is the completion of the process design and the project engineering design of the Demonstration Plant. A report of the design effort is being issued in 24 volumes. This is Volume 7 which reports the design of Plant Section 500 - Shift/Methanation. The shift/methanation process is used to convert the purified synthesis gas from the Rectisol unit (Plant Section 400) into the desired high-Btu SNG product. This is accomplished in a series of fixed-bed adiabatic reactors. Water is added to the feed gas to the reactors to effect the requisite reactions. A nickel catalyst is used in the shift/methanation process, and the only reaction products are methane and carbon dioxide. The carbon dioxide is removed from the SNG in Plant Sectin 600 - CO/sub 2/ Removal. After carbon dioxide removal from the SNG, the SNG is returned to Plant Section 500 for final methanation. The product from the final methanation reactor is an SNG stream having a gross heating value of approximately 960 Btu per standard cubic foot. The shift/methanation unit at design conditions produces 19 Million SCFD of SNG from 60 Million SCFD of purified synthesis gas.

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

electricity generating capacity | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

generating capacity generating capacity Dataset Summary Description The New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development publishes energy data including many datasets related to electricity. Included here are three electricity generating capacity datasets: annual operational electricity generation capacity by plant type (1975 - 2009); estimated generating capacity by fuel type for North Island, South Island and New Zealand (2009); and information on generating plants (plant type, name, owner, commissioned date, and capacity), as of December 2009. Source New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development Date Released Unknown Date Updated July 03rd, 2009 (5 years ago) Keywords biomass coal Electric Capacity electricity generating capacity geothermal Hydro Natural Gas wind Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon Operational Electricity Generation Capacity by Plant Type (xls, 42.5 KiB)

450

Conceptual Design study of Small Long-life Gas Cooled Fast Reactor With Modified CANDLE Burn-up Scheme  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, conceptual design study of Small Long-life Gas Cooled Fast Reactors with Natural Uranium as Fuel Cycle Input has been performed. In this study Gas Cooled Fast Reactor is slightly modified by employing modified CANDLE burn-up scheme so that it can use Natural Uranium as fuel cycle input. Due to their hard spectrum, GCFR in this study showed very good performance in converting U-238 to plutonium in order to maintain the operation condition requirement of long-life reactors. Due to the limitation of thermal hydraulic aspects, the average power density of the proposed design is selected about 70 W/cc. With such condition we got an optimal design of 325 MWt reactors which can be operated 10 years without refueling and fuel shuffling and just need natural uranium as fuel cycle input. The average discharge burn-up is about 290 GWd/ton HM.

Nur Asiah, A.; Su'ud, Zaki [Nuclear Physics and Biophysics Research Division, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Institut Teknologi Bandung (Indonesia); Ferhat, A. [National Nuclear Energ Agency of Indonesia (BATAN) (Indonesia); Sekimoto, H. [Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors, Tokyo Institute of Technology (Japan)

2010-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

451

Gulf Coast (PADD 3) Shell Storage Capacity at Operable Refineries  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Propane/Propylene: 4,376: 3,520: 3,565-----1982-2013: ... Notes: Shell storage capacity is the design capacity of the tank. See Definitions, Sources, ...

452

Equipment Design and Cost Estimation for Small Modular Biomass Systems, Synthesis Gas Cleanup, and Oxygen Separation Equipment; Task 2: Gas Cleanup Design and Cost Estimates -- Wood Feedstock  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As part of Task 2, Gas Cleanup and Cost Estimates, Nexant investigated the appropriate process scheme for treatment of wood-derived syngas for use in the synthesis of liquid fuels. Two different 2,000 metric tonne per day gasification schemes, a low-pressure, indirect system using the gasifier, and a high-pressure, direct system using gasification technology were evaluated. Initial syngas conditions from each of the gasifiers was provided to the team by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. Nexant was the prime contractor and principal investigator during this task; technical assistance was provided by both GTI and Emery Energy.

Nexant Inc.

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Design of an Online Fission Gas Monitoring System for Post-irradiation Examination Heating Tests of Coated Fuel Particles for High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new Fission Gas Monitoring System (FGMS) has been designed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for use of monitoring online fission gas-released during fuel heating tests. The FGMS will be used with the Fuel Accident Condition Simulator (FACS) at the Hot Fuels Examination Facility (HFEF) located at the Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) within the INL campus. Preselected Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) TRISO (Tri-isotropic) fuel compacts will undergo testing to assess the fission product retention characteristics under high temperature accident conditions. The FACS furnace will heat the fuel to temperatures up to 2,000ºC in a helium atmosphere. Released fission products such as Kr and Xe isotopes will be transported downstream to the FGMS where they will accumulate in cryogenically cooledcollection traps and monitored with High Purity Germanium (HPGe) detectors during the heating process. Special INL developed software will be used to monitor the accumulated fission products and will report data in near real-time. These data will then be reported in a form that can be readily available to the INL reporting database. This paper describes the details of the FGMS design, the control and acqusition software, system calibration, and the expected performance of the FGMS. Preliminary online data may be available for presentation at the High Temperature Reactor (HTR) conference.

Dawn Scates

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

U.S. Virgin Islands Refinery Catalytic Hydrocracking/Gas Oil ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Cat. Hydro-Cracking Gas Oil Downstream Charge Capacity ; Cat. Hydro-Cracking Gas Oil Downstream Charge Capacity ; Virgin Islands Downstream Charge Capacity of ...

455

Clean air program: Design guidelines for bus transit systems using liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) as an alternative fuel. Final report, July 1995-April 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Federal Transit Administration (FTA) has initiated the development of `Design Guidelines for Bus Transit Systems Using Alternative Fuels.` This report provides design guidelines for the safe uses of Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG). It forms a part of the series of individual monographs being published by the FTA on (the guidelines for the safe use of) Compressed Natural Gas (CNG), Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG), Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG) and alcohol fuels (Methanol and Ethanol). Each report in this series describes for the subject fuel the important fuel properties, guidelines for the design and operation of bus fueling, storage and maintenance facilities, issues on personnel training and emergency preparedness.

Raj, P.K.; Hathaway, W.T.; Kangas, R.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Optimal fracture treatment design for dry gas wells maximizes well performance in the presence of non-Darcy flow effects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis presents a methodology based on Proppant Number approach for optimal fracture treatment design of natural gas wells considering non-Darcy flow effects in the design process. Closure stress is taken into account, by default, because it is the first factor decreasing propped pack permeability at in-situ conditions. Gel damage was also considered in order to evaluate the impact of incorporating more damaging factors on ultimate well performance and optimal geometry. Effective fracture permeability and optimal fracture geometry are calculated through an iterative process. This approach was implemented in a spreadsheet. Non-Darcy flow is described by the ? factor. All ? factor correlations available in the literature were evaluated. It is recommended to use the correlation developed specifically for the given type of proppant and mesh size, if available. Otherwise, the Pursell et al. or the Martins et al. equations are recommended as across the board reliable correlations for predicting non-Darcy flow effects in the propped pack. The proposed methodology was implemented in the design of 11 fracture treatments of 3 natural tight gas wells in South Texas. Results show that optimal fracture design might increase expected production in 9.64 MMscf with respect to design that assumes Darcy flow through the propped pack. The basic finding is that for a given amount of proppant shorter and wider fractures compensate the non-Darcy and/or gel damage effect. Dynamic programming technique was implemented in design of multistage fractures for one of the wells under study for maximizing total gas production. Results show it is a powerful and simple technique for this application. It is recommended to expand its use in multistage fracture designs.

Lopez Hernandez, Henry De Jesus

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

High Capacity Immobilized Amine Sorbents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Capacity Immobilized Amine Sorbents Capacity Immobilized Amine Sorbents Opportunity The Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory is seeking licensing partners interested in implementing United States Patent Number 7,288,136 entitled "High Capacity Immobilized Amine Sorbents." Disclosed in this patent is the invention of a method that facilitates the production of low-cost carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) sorbents for use in large-scale gas-solid processes. This method treats an amine to increase the number of secondary amine groups and impregnates the amine in a porous solid support. As a result of this improvement, the method increases CO 2 capture capacity and decreases the cost of using an amine-enriched solid sorbent in CO 2 capture systems. Overview The U.S. Department of Energy has placed a high priority on the separation

458

Equipment Design and Cost Estimation for Small Modular Biomass Systems, Synthesis Gas Cleanup, and Oxygen Separation Equipment; Task 2: Gas Cleanup Design and Cost Estimates -- Black Liquor Gasification  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As part of Task 2, Gas Cleanup and Cost Estimates, Nexant investigated the appropriate process scheme for removal of acid gases from black liquor-derived syngas for use in both power and liquid fuels synthesis. Two 3,200 metric tonne per day gasification schemes, both low-temperature/low-pressure (1100 deg F, 40 psi) and high-temperature/high-pressure (1800 deg F, 500 psi) were used for syngas production. Initial syngas conditions from each of the gasifiers was provided to the team by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and Princeton University. Nexant was the prime contractor and principal investigator during this task; technical assistance was provided by both GTI and Emery Energy.

Nexant Inc.

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

FAQs about Storage Capacity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

about Storage Capacity about Storage Capacity How do I determine if my tanks are in operation or idle or non-reportable? Refer to the following flowchart. Should idle capacity be included with working capacity? No, only report working capacity of tanks and caverns in operation, but not for idle tanks and caverns. Should working capacity match net available shell in operation/total net available shell capacity? Working capacity should be less than net available shell capacity because working capacity excludes contingency space and tank bottoms. What is the difference between net available shell capacity in operation and total net available shell capacity? Net available shell capacity in operation excludes capacity of idle tanks and caverns. What do you mean by transshipment tanks?

460

Mutual Design Considerations for Overhead AC Transmission Lines and Gas Transmission Pipelines, Volume 1: Engineering Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This reference book presents data on an investigation into the mutual effects of electric power transmission lines and natural gas transmission pipelines sharing rights-of-way. Information is useful to both power and pipeline industry users.

1978-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas design capacity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Heat exchanger design for thermoelectric electricity generation from low temperature flue gas streams  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An air-to-oil heat exchanger was modeled and optimized for use in a system utilizing a thermoelectric generator to convert low grade waste heat in flue gas streams to electricity. The NTU-effectiveness method, exergy, and ...

Latcham, Jacob G. (Jacob Greco)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Optimization of the controlling design parameters of fluidised bed gas-solid heat exchangers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Generalised analytical correlations relating heat transfer coefficient, mass velocity of gas, tube diameter, bed particle size and relative pitch have been formulated based on experimental data reported in literature. These correlations are used to predict ...

V. N. Vedamurthy; T. Janakirajan; S. Natarajan; C. P. Sarathy

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Ocean thermal energy conversion gas desorption studies. Volume 1. Design of experiments. [Open-cycle power systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Seawater deaeration is a process affecting almost all proposed Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) open-cycle power systems. If the noncondensable dissolved air is not removed from a power system, it will accumulate in thecondenser, reduce the effectiveness of condensation, and result in deterioration of system performance. A gas desorption study is being conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) with the goal of mitigating these effects; this study is designed to investigate the vacuum deaeration process for low-temperature OTEC conditions where conventional steam stripping deaeration may not be applicable. The first in a series describing the ORNL studies, this report (1) considers the design of experiments and discusses theories of gas desorption, (2) reviews previous relevant studies, (3) describes the design of a gas desorption test loop, and (4) presents the test plan for achieving program objectives. Results of the first series of verification tests and the uncertainties encountered are also discussed. A packed column was employed in these verification tests and test data generally behaved as in previous similar studies. Results expressed as the height of transfer unit (HTU) can be correlated with the liquid flow rate by HTU = 4.93L/sup 0/ /sup 25/. End effects were appreciable for the vacuum deaeration system, and a correlation of them to applied vacuum pressure was derived.

Golshani, A.; Chen, F.C.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Capacity Markets and Market Stability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The good news is that market stability can be achieved through a combination of longer-term contracts, auctions for far enough in the future to permit new entry, a capacity management system, and a demand curve. The bad news is that if and when stable capacity markets are designed, the markets may seem to be relatively close to where we started - with integrated resource planning. Market ideologues will find this anathema. (author)

Stauffer, Hoff

2006-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

465

Design Calculations for Gas Flow & Diffusion Behavior in the large Diameter Container & Cask  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the calculations for the gas behavior in the void volumes or gas spaces of the sludge Large Diameter Container (LDC) and Cask. The objective is to prevent flammable gas conditions in the LDC and Cask gas spaces. This is achieved by the Active Inert Ventilation System (AIVS), which uses argon gas for dilution purposes. With AIVS, the oxygen content is kept below 5 vol% in the LDC, and the hydrogen content is kept below 4 vol% in the Cask before its purge at the KE Basin. After the Cask sweep-through purge with argon at the KE Basin, oxygen is kept below 5% in both the Cask and the LDC. The analysis here assumes that any oxygen generated in the sludge is consumed by the uranium and uranium dioxide (SNF-18133, ''Gas Behavior in Large Diameter Containers (LDCs) During and Following Loading with 105K East Sludge''). Thus, oxygen production from radiolysis is intentionally not included in this report, but hydrogen from radiolysis and from chemical reactions between uranium and water are considered, depending on the scenario being analyzed. The analysis starts immediately after the final decant at K Basin, when argon is assumed to be the only gas in the LDC gas space, except for the normal water vapor. The oxygen ingress is calculated during the disconnecting of the lines hoses from the LDC, during the time that air is surrounding the LDC with two NucFil-type filters in place after the disconnect, before the Cask is sealed, and, finally, during the sweep-through Cask purge. Dissolution of oxygen from water due to increasing sludge temperatures (mainly during hot transport to the T Plant) is also included.

PIEPHO, M.G.

2003-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

466

Balance of Plant System Analysis and Component Design of Turbo-Machinery for High Temperature Gas Reactor Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Modular Pebble Bed Reactor system (MPBR) requires a gas turbine cycle (Brayton cycle) as the power conversion system for it to achieve economic competitiveness as a Generation IV nuclear system. The availability of controllable helium turbomachinery and compact heat exchangers are thus the critical enabling technology for the gas turbine cycle. The development of an initial reference design for an indirect helium cycle has been accomplished with the overriding constraint that this design could be built with existing technology and complies with all current codes and standards. Using the initial reference design, limiting features were identified. Finally, an optimized reference design was developed by identifying key advances in the technology that could reasonably be expected to be achieved with limited R&D. This final reference design is an indirect, intercooled and recuperated cycle consisting of a three-shaft arrangement for the turbomachinery system. A critical part of the design process involved the interaction between individual component design and overall plant performance. The helium cycle overall efficiency is significantly influenced by performance of individual components. Changes in the design of one component, a turbine for example, often required changes in other components. To allow for the optimization of the overall design with these interdependencies, a detailed steady state and transient control model was developed. The use of the steady state and transient models as a part of an iterative design process represents a key contribution of this work. A dynamic model, MPBRSim, has been developed. The model integrates the reactor core and the power conversion system simultaneously. Physical parameters such as the heat exchangers; weights and practical performance maps such as the turbine characteristics and compressor characteristics are incorporated into the model. The individual component models as well as the fully integrated model of the power conversion system have been verified with an industry-standard general thermal-fluid code Flownet. With respect to the dynamic model, bypass valve control and inventory control have been used as the primary control methods for the power conversion system. By performing simulation using the dynamic model with the designed control scheme, the combination of bypass and inventory control was optimized to assure system stability within design temperature and pressure limits. Bypass control allows for rapid control system response while inventory control allows for ultimate steady state operation at part power very near the optimum operating point for the system. Load transients simulations show that the indirect, three-shaft arrangement gas turbine power conversion system is stable and controllable. For the indirect cycle the intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) is the interface between the reactor and the turbomachinery systems. As a part of the design effort the IHX was identified as the key component in the system. Two technologies, printed circuit and compact plate-fin, were investigated that have the promise of meeting the design requirements for the system. The reference design incorporates the possibility of using either technology although the compact plate-fin design was chosen for subsequent analysis. The thermal design and parametric analysis with an IHX and recuperator using the plate-fin configuration have been performed. As a three-shaft arrangement, the turbo-shaft sets consist of a pair of turbine/compressor sets (high pressure and low pressure turbines with same-shaft compressor) and a power turbine coupled with a synchronous generator. The turbines and compressors are all axial type and the shaft configuration is horizontal. The core outlet/inlet temperatures are 900/520 C, and the optimum pressure ratio in the power conversion cycle is 2.9. The design achieves a plant net efficiency of approximately 48%.

Ronald G. Ballinger Chunyun Wang Andrew Kadak Neil Todreas

2004-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

467

Shannon capacity of nonlinear regenerative channels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We compute Shannon capacity of nonlinear channels with regenerative elements. Conditions are found under which capacity of such nonlinear channels is higher than the Shannon capacity of the classical linear additive white Gaussian noise channel. We develop a general scheme for designing the proposed channels and apply it to the particular nonlinear sine-mapping. The upper bound for regeneration efficiency is found and the asymptotic behavior of the capacity in the saturation regime is derived.

Sorokina, M A

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

California Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) California Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic...

469

New Mexico Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) New Mexico Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet)...

470

Comparison of Productive Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Appendix B Comparison of Productive Capacity Comparisons of base case productive capacities for this and all previous studies were made (Figure B1).

471

Tables - Refinery Capacity Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Tables: 1: Number and Capacity of Operable Petroleum Refineries by PAD District and State as of January 1, 2009: PDF: 2: Production Capacity of Operable ...

472

Summary of Industry Surveys on Future Capacity Commitments  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration Natural Gas 1996: Issues and Trends 141 Appendix C Summary of Industry Surveys on Future Capacity Commitments Table C1.

473

Rate impacts and key design elements of gas and electric utility decoupling: a comprehensive review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Opponents of decoupling worry that customers will experience frequent and significant rate increases as a result of its adoption, but a review of 28 natural gas and 17 electric utilities suggests that decoupling adjustments are both refunds to customers as well as charges and tend to be small. (author)

Lesh, Pamela G.

2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

474

Design, fabrication, and testing of a miniature impulse turbine driven by compressed gas.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A miniature impulse turbine has been developed at the Rochester Institute of Technology. The goal of this project was to design, fabricate, and test a… (more)

Holt, Daniel B.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Design of a high-pressure research flow loop for the experimental investigation of liquid loading in gas wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Liquid loading in producing gas wells is the inability of the produced gas to remove produced liquids from the wellbore. A review of existing flow loops worldwide revealed that specialized areas of research such as liquid loading in gas wells are still lacking dedicated test facilities. This project presents the design of a new dedicated facility to be located at the TowerLab at the Richardson building with adequate operating conditions to reproduce the flow regimes encountered prior to and after the onset of liquid loading in gas wells. The facility consists of a compressed air system, pipelines for air and water, a pressure vessel containing glass beads, an injection manifold, and flow control and monitoring devices. Our results show that three compressors working in parallel is the most technical and economic configuration for the TowerLab based on the overall costs provided by the supplier, the footprint but most importantly the flexibility. The design of the pressure vessel required a cylindrical body with top and bottom welded-flat head covers with multiple openings to minimize its weight. The pipelines connecting major equipment and injection manifold located at the pressure vessel were selected based on the superficial velocities for air and water. These values also showed the need for independent injection using two manifolds instead of commingling flow through a tee joint. The use of digital pressure gauges with an accuracy of 0.05 to 25% and coriolis or vortex meters to measure air flowrate is also suggested. For the water line, installation of turbine meters results in the most economic approach.

Fernandez Alvarez, Juan Jose

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

High capacity immobilized amine sorbents  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is provided for making low-cost CO.sub.2 sorbents that can be used in large-scale gas-solid processes. The improved method entails treating an amine to increase the number of secondary amine groups and impregnating the amine in a porous solid support. The method increases the CO.sub.2 capture capacity and decreases the cost of utilizing an amine-enriched solid sorbent in CO.sub.2 capture systems.

Gray, McMahan L. (Pittsburgh, PA); Champagne, Kenneth J. (Fredericktown, PA); Soong, Yee (Monroeville, PA); Filburn, Thomas (Granby, CT)

2007-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

477

Preliminary Design Study of Medium Sized Gas Cooled Fast Reactor with Natural Uranium as Fuel Cycle Input  

SciTech Connect

In this study a feasibility design study of medium sized (1000 MWt) gas cooled fast reactors which can utilize natural uranium as fuel cycle input has been conducted. Gas Cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) is among six types of Generation IV Nuclear Power Plants. GFR with its hard neuron spectrum is superior for closed fuel cycle, and its ability to be operated in high temperature (850 deg. C) makes various options of utilizations become possible. To obtain the capability of consuming natural uranium as fuel cycle input, modified CANDLE burn-up scheme[1-6] is adopted this GFR system by dividing the core into 10 parts of equal volume axially. Due to the limitation of thermal hydraulic aspects, the average power density of the proposed design is selected about 70 W/cc. As an optimization results, a design of 1000 MWt reactors which can be operated 10 years without refueling and fuel shuffling and just need natural uranium as fuel cycle input is discussed. The average discharge burn-up is about 280 GWd/ton HM. Enough margin for criticality was obtained for this reactor.

Meriyanti; Su'ud, Zaki; Rijal, K. [Nuclear Physics and Biophysics Research Division, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Institut Teknologi Bandung (Indonesia); Zuhair; Ferhat, A. [National Nuclear Energ Agency of Indonesia (BATAN) (Indonesia); Sekimoto, H. [Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors, Tokyo Institute of Technology (Japan)

2010-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

478

The economical production of alcohol fuels from coal-derived synthesis gas: Case studies, design, and economics  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project is a combination of process simulation and catalyst development aimed at identifying the most economical method for converting coal to syngas to linear higher alcohols to be used as oxygenated fuel additives. There are two tasks. The goal of Task 1 is to discover, study, and evaluate novel heterogeneous catalytic systems for the production of oxygenated fuel enhancers from synthesis gas, and to explore, analytically and on the bench scale, novel reactor and process concepts for use in converting syngas to liquid fuel products. The goal of Task 2 is to simulate, by computer, energy efficient and economically efficient processes for converting coal to energy (fuel alcohols and/or power). The primary focus is to convert syngas to fuel alcohols. This report contains results from Task 2. The first step for Task 2 was to develop computer simulations of alternative coal to syngas to linear higher alcohol processes, to evaluate and compare the economics and energy efficiency of these alternative processes, and to make a preliminary determination as to the most attractive process configuration. A benefit of this approach is that simulations will be debugged and available for use when Task 1 results are available. Seven cases were developed using different gasifier technologies, different methods for altering the H{sub 2}/CO ratio of the syngas to the desired 1.1/1, and with the higher alcohol fuel additives as primary products and as by-products of a power generation facility. Texaco, Shell, and Lurgi gasifier designs were used to test gasifying coal. Steam reforming of natural gas, sour gas shift conversion, or pressure swing adsorption were used to alter the H{sub 2}/CO ratio of the syngas. In addition, a case using only natural gas was prepared to compare coal and natural gas as a source of syngas.

NONE

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

A Case Based System for Oil and Gas Well Design with Risk Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A case base system for a complex problem like oil field design needs to be richer than the usual case based reasoning system. Genesis, the system described in this paper contains large heterogeneous cases with metalevel knowledge. A multi-level indexing ... Keywords: case based systems, information extraction, knowledge sharing, oil well design, risk assessment

Simon Kravis; Rosemary Irrgang

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Design and operation of the coke-oven gas sulfur removal facility at Geneva Steel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The coke-oven gas sulfur removal facility at Geneva Steel utilizes a combination of two technologies which had never been used together. These two technologies had proven effective separately and now in combination. However, it brought unique operational considerations which has never been considered previously. The front end of the facility is a Sulfiban process. This monoethanolamine (MEA) process effectively absorbs hydrogen sulfide and other acid gases from coke-oven gas. The final step in sulfur removal uses a Lo-Cat II. The Lo-Cat process absorbs and subsequently oxidizes H{sub 2}S to elemental sulfur. These two processes have been effective in reducing sulfur dioxide emissions from coke-oven gas by 95%. Since the end of the start-up and optimization phase, emission rate has stayed below the 104.5 lb/hr limit of equivalent SO{sub 2} (based on a 24-hr average). In Jan. 1995, the emission rate from the sulfur removal facility averaged 86.7 lb/hr with less than 20 lb/hr from the Econobator exhaust. The challenges yet to be met are decreasing the operating expenses of the sulfur removal facility, notably chemical costs, and minimizing the impact of the heating system on unit reliability.

Havili, M.U.; Fraser-Smyth, L.L.; Wood, B.W. [Geneva Steel, Provo, UT (United States)

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas design capacity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Performance improvement of Gas-Liquid Cylindrical Cyclone separator using different design for tangential inlet  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The concept of compact separation is attractive in a number of operating environments. These include offshore and arctic operations, where both space and weight are at a premium, and downhole processing where space is very limited. Compact separators often rely on centrifugal forces to enhance the separation process and are therefore highly dependent on inlet geometry. This paper investigates expanding the operational envelope of a compact Gas-Liquid Cylindrical Cyclone separator through the use of a novel inlet, which can be easily altered to respond to changing well conditions. To demonstrate the importance of inlet geometry, historical production from the Gloyd-Mitchell zone of the Rodessa Field in Louisiana was examined over a 40-month period. As in most oil field production, there were significant changes in the water cut and GOR. This field data clearly shows that a compact separator equipped with single inlet geometry is not capable of performing effectively over the wide range of conditions exhibited in a typical oil field. This thesis considers the hydrodynamics of the separator inlet. Three different inlet geometries were investigated through the use of a changeable inlet sleeve. New experimental data were acquired utilizing a 7.62-cm I.D compact separator, which was 3.0 m in height. The effect of inlet geometry on separator performance was investigated over a wide range of flow conditions. Fluid viscosities from 1-12 cp and the effect of fluid level within the separator were also examined. The results indicate that the operational envelope for liquid carry-over and gas carry-under can be expanded by more that 300% by altering the inlet to respond to changing field conditions. A new model is proposed to define the operational envelope. This approximate method is simple to calculate, and offers a good approximation for the operability area for gas-liquid cylindrical cyclone compact separator. This study shows that efficient operability of the gas-liquid cylindrical cyclone is obtained when tangential acceleration of the incoming gas-liquid mixture is 50 to100 times the acceleration of gravity (50-100 G's).

Barbuceanu, Nicolae

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Design of compact intermediate heat exchangers for gas cooled fast reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Two aspects of an intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) for GFR service have been investigated: (1) the intrinsic characteristics of the proposed compact printed circuit heat exchanger (PCHE); and (2) a specific design optimizing ...

Gezelius, Knut, 1978-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

CALIOP: a multichannel design code for gas-cooled fast reactors. Code description and user's guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

CALIOP is a design code for fluid-cooled reactors composed of parallel fuel tubes in hexagonal or cylindrical ducts. It may be used with gaseous or liquid coolants. It has been used chiefly for design of a helium-cooled fast breeder reactor and has built-in cross section information to permit calculations of fuel loading, breeding ratio, and doubling time. Optional cross-section input allows the code to be used with moderated cores and with other fuels.

Thompson, W.I.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Equipment Design and Cost Estimation for Small Modular Biomass Systems, Synthesis Gas Cleanup, and Oxygen Separation Equipment; Task 2.3: Sulfur Primer  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This deliverable is Subtask 2.3 of Task 2, Gas Cleanup Design and Cost Estimates, of NREL Award ACO-5-44027, ''Equipment Design and Cost Estimation for Small Modular Biomass Systems, Synthesis Gas Cleanup and Oxygen Separation Equipment''. Subtask 2.3 builds upon the sulfur removal information first presented in Subtask 2.1, Gas Cleanup Technologies for Biomass Gasification by adding additional information on the commercial applications, manufacturers, environmental footprint, and technical specifications for sulfur removal technologies. The data was obtained from Nexant's experience, input from GTI and other vendors, past and current facility data, and existing literature.

Nexant Inc.

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Pennsylvania Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Pennsylvania Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1...

486

Network Routing Capacity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We define the routing capacity of a network to be the supremum of all possible fractional message throughputs achievable by routing. We prove that the routing capacity of every network is achievable and rational, we present an algorithm for its computation, and we prove that every non-negative rational number is the routing capacity of some network. We also determine the routing capacity for various example networks. Finally, we discuss the extension of routing capacity to fractional coding solutions and show that the coding capacity of a network is independent of the alphabet used.

Jillian Cannons; Randall Dougherty; Christopher Freiling; Kenneth Zeger

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Design of experiment and Montecarlo simulation as support for gas turbine power plant availabilty estimation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Maintenance is an important aspect in order to guarantee the efficiency of industrial facilities. For power plants the high availability ratios can be obtained only with preventive maintenance but the result costs increases rapidly. In order to reduce ... Keywords: design of experiment, fuzzy logic, model estimation, montecarlo simulation, reliability

Enrico Briano; Claudia Caballini; Pietro Giribone; Roberto Revetria

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Conversion of forest residues to a methane-rich gas. Detailed economic feasibility study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An economic evaluation of the application of the multi-solid fluid reactor design to wood gasification was completed. The processing options examined include plant capacity, production of a high-Btu (1006 Btu/SCF HHV) gas versus an intermediate-Btu gas (379 Btu/SCF HHV), and operating pressure. 9 figs., 29 tabs.

Not Available

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

CHARACTERIZATION OF CONDITIONS OF NATURAL GAS STORAGE RESERVOIRS AND DESIGN AND DEMONSTRATION OF REMEDIAL TECHNIQUES FOR DAMAGE MECHANISMS FOUND THEREIN  

SciTech Connect

The underground gas storage (UGS) industry uses over 400 reservoirs and 17,000 wells to store and withdrawal gas. As such, it is a significant contributor to gas supply in the United States. It has been demonstrated that many UGS wells show a loss of deliverability each year due to numerous damage mechanisms. Previous studies estimate that up to one hundred million dollars are spent each year to recover or replace a deliverability loss of approximately 3.2 Bscf/D per year in the storage industry. Clearly, there is a great potential for developing technology to prevent, mitigate, or eliminate the damage causing deliverability losses in UGS wells. Prior studies have also identified the presence of several potential damage mechanisms in storage wells, developed damage diagnostic procedures, and discussed, in general terms, the possible reactions that need to occur to create the damage. However, few studies address how to prevent or mitigate specific damage types, and/or how to eliminate the damage from occurring in the future. This study seeks to increase our understanding of two specific damage mechanisms, inorganic precipitates (specifically siderite), and non-darcy damage, and thus serves to expand prior efforts as well as complement ongoing gas storage projects. Specifically, this study has resulted in: (1) An effective lab protocol designed to assess the extent of damage due to inorganic precipitates; (2) An increased understanding of how inorganic precipitates (specifically siderite) develop; (3) Identification of potential sources of chemical components necessary for siderite formation; (4) A remediation technique that has successfully restored deliverability to storage wells damaged by the inorganic precipitate siderite (one well had nearly a tenfold increase in deliverability); (5) Identification of the types of treatments that have historically been successful at reducing the amount of non-darcy pressure drop in a well, and (6) Development of a tool that can be used by operators to guide treatment selection in wells with significant non-darcy damage component. In addition, the effectiveness of the remediation treatment designed to reduce damage caused by the inorganic precipitate siderite was measured, and the benefits of this work are extrapolated to the entire U.S. storage industry. Similarly the potential benefits realized from more effective identification and treatment of wells with significant nondarcy damage component are also presented, and these benefits are also extrapolated to the entire U.S. storage industry.

J.H. Frantz Jr; K.G. Brown; W.K. Sawyer; P.A. Zyglowicz; P.M. Halleck; J.P. Spivey

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

GAS COOLED PEBBLE BED REACTOR FOR A LARGE CENTRAL STATION. Reactor Design and Feasibility Study  

SciTech Connect

An optimum econonic design for a high temperature, helium cooled, central station reactor power plant of about 400 Mw of electric power was determined. The core consists of a randomly packed bed of unclad graphite spheres, approximately one in. in diameter, impregnated with U/sup 233/ and thorium such that a conversion ratio of near unity is achieved. The high temperature helium permits steam conditions, at the turbine throttle, of 1000 deg F and 1450 psia. (auth)

Schock, A.; Bruley, D.F.; Culver, H.N.; Ianni, P.W.; Kaufman, W.F.; Schmidt, R.A.; Supp, R.E.

1957-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Pennsylvania Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alaska Lower 48 States Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Alaska Lower 48 States Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View

492

Oklahoma Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alaska Lower 48 States Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Alaska Lower 48 States Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View

493

Natural Gas Depleted Fields Storage Capacity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6,801,291 6,805,490 6,917,547 7,074,773 7,104,948 7,038,245 6,801,291 6,805,490 6,917,547 7,074,773 7,104,948 7,038,245 1999-2012 Alabama 11,000 11,000 11,000 11,000 13,500 13,500 1999-2012 Arkansas 22,000 22,000 21,760 21,760 21,359 21,853 1999-2012 California 487,711 498,705 513,005 542,511 570,511 592,411 1999-2012 Colorado 98,068 95,068 105,768 105,768 105,858 124,253 1999-2012 Illinois 103,731 103,606 103,606 218,106 220,070 220,070 1999-2012 Indiana 32,804 32,946 32,946 30,003 30,003 30,003 1999-2012 Iowa 0 1999-2012 Kansas 287,996 281,291 281,370 283,891 283,800 283,974 1999-2012 Kentucky 210,792 210,792 210,801 212,184 212,184 212,184 1999-2012 Louisiana 527,051 527,051 528,626 528,626 528,626 402,626 1999-2012 Maryland 64,000 64,000 64,000 64,000 64,000 64,000 1999-2012

494

Mississippi Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alaska Lower 48 States Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Alaska Lower 48 States Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View

495

Wyoming Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alaska Lower 48 States Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Alaska Lower 48 States Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View

496

Texas Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alaska Lower 48 States Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Alaska Lower 48 States Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View

497

Louisiana Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alaska Lower 48 States Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Alaska Lower 48 States Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View

498

Utah Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

129,480 129,480 129,480 129,480 129,480 124,465 1988-2011 Salt Caverns 0 1999-2011 Aquifers 11,980 11,980 11,980 11,980 11,980 4,265 1999-2011 Depleted Fields 117,500 117,500...

499

Working Gas Capacity of Salt Caverns  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

230,456 271,785 312,003 351,017 2008-2011 Alabama 11,900 11,900 16,150 16,150 2008-2011 Arkansas 0 2011-2011 California 0 2011-2011 Colorado 0 2011-2011 Illinois 0 2011-2011...

500

Pennsylvania Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Area: Period: Download ... 51: 1999-2011-= No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data ...