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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas cooking range" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Natural Gas Variability In California: Environmental Impacts And Device Performance Combustion Modeling of Pollutant Emissions From a Residential Cooking Range  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of a larger study of liquefied natural gas impacts on device performance and pollutant emissions for existing equipment in California, this report describes a cmoputer modeling study of a partially premixed flame issueing from a single cooktop burner port. The model consisted of a reactive computational fluid dynamics three-dimensional spatial grid and a 71-species chemical mechanism with propane combustion capability. Simulations were conducted with a simplified fuel mixture containing methane, ethane, and propane in proportions that yield properties similar to fuels distributed throughout much of California now and in recent years (baseline fuel), as well as with two variations of simulated liquefied natural gas blends. A variety of simulations were conducted with baseline fuel to explore the effect of several key parameters on pollutant formation and other flame characteristics. Simulations started with fuel and air issuing through the burner port, igniting, and continuing until the flame was steady with time. Conditions at this point were analyzed to understand fuel, secondary air and reaction product flows, regions of pollutant formation, and exhaust concentrations of carbon monoxide, nitric oxide and formaldehyde. A sensitivity study was conducted, varying the inflow parameters of this baseline gs about real-world operating conditions. Flame properties responded as expected from reactive flow theory. In the simulation, carbon monoxide levels were influenced more by the mixture's inflow velocity than by the gas-to-air ratio in the mixture issuing from the inflow port. Additional simulations were executed at two inflow conditions - high heat release and medium heat release - to examine the impact of replacing the baseline gas with two mixtures representative of liquefied natural gas. Flame properties and pollutant generation rates were very similar among the three fuel mixtures.

Tonse, S. R.; Singer, B. C.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Ameren Illinois (Gas) - Cooking and Heating Business Efficiency Incentives  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ameren Illinois (Gas) - Cooking and Heating Business Efficiency Ameren Illinois (Gas) - Cooking and Heating Business Efficiency Incentives Ameren Illinois (Gas) - Cooking and Heating Business Efficiency Incentives < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Multi-Family Residential Nonprofit Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Design & Remodeling Other Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Maximum Rebate General: $600,000 Program Info Expiration Date 05/31/2013 State Illinois Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Custom: $1.20/therm saved/yr Steamers: $300-$1200 Fryer: $400 Griddle: $50/ln. ft. Ovens: custom Storage Water Heaters: $150/unit Tankless Water Heater: $300/unit Gas Boiler/Furnace Replacement: $400 - $6,000

3

Modeling Population Exposures to Pollutants Emitted from Natural Gas Cooking Burners  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and policy implications of gas cooking appliance emissions resulting from a transition from baseline NG to liquefied natural

Lobscheid, Agnes

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Pollutant exposures from unvented gas cooking burners: A simulation-based  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pollutant exposures from unvented gas cooking burners: A simulation-based Pollutant exposures from unvented gas cooking burners: A simulation-based assessment for Southern California Title Pollutant exposures from unvented gas cooking burners: A simulation-based assessment for Southern California Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2013 Authors Logue, Jennifer M., Neil E. Klepeis, Agnes B. Lobscheid, and Brett C. Singer Journal Environmental Health Perspectives Date Published 11/2013 Abstract Background: Residential natural gas cooking burners (NGCBs) can emit substantial quantities of pollutants and they are typically used without venting. Objective: Quantify pollutant concentrations and occupant exposures resulting from NGCB use in California homes. Methods: A mass balance model was applied to estimate time-dependent pollutant concentrations throughout homes and the "exposure concentrations" experienced by individual occupants. The model was applied to estimate nitrogen dioxide (NO2), carbon monoxide (CO), and formaldehyde (HCHO) concentrations for one week each in summer and winter for a representative sample of Southern California homes. The model simulated pollutant emissions from NGCBs, NO2 and CO entry from outdoors, dilution throughout the home, and removal by ventilation and deposition. Residence characteristics and outdoor concentrations of CO and NO2 were obtained from available databases. Ventilation rates, occupancy patterns, and burner use were inferred from household characteristics. Proximity to the burner(s) and the benefits of using venting range hoods were also explored. Replicate model executions using independently generated sets of stochastic variable values yielded estimated pollutant concentration distributions with geometric means varying less than 10%.

5

File:EIA-AK-CookInlet-Gas.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

File File Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » File:EIA-AK-CookInlet-Gas.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Alaska's Cook Inlet By 2001 Gas Reserve Class Size of this preview: 463 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(5,100 × 6,600 pixels, file size: 10.19 MB, MIME type: application/pdf) Description Alaska's Cook Inlet By 2001 Gas Reserve Class Sources Energy Information Administration Authors Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F. Morehouse; Jack Perrin; Robert F. King Related Technologies Oil, Natural Gas Creation Date 2005-09-01 Extent Regional Countries United States UN Region Northern America States Alaska File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time.

6

Gas ranges: latest indoor pollution target  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although a National Research Council study claims that unvented gas cooking and heating appliance are probably responsible for a large portions of the nitrogen dioxide exposures in the population, the data base for gas-stove emissions is actually too limited to be conclusive. The problem of indoor pollution more likely rests with the increased airtightness of houses rather than with gas combustion. In the last 5 years, the normal air flow in new houses has been reduced 80% through new insulation and building techniques designed to lower heating and cooling costs. Other elements contributing to indoor pollution are much more hazardous than gas combustion products: radon gas from the soil, formaldehyde for insulation and construction materials, and toxic chemicals from household aerosols and solvents.

O'Sullivan, S.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Mexico hopes its economy will soon be cooking with gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For the last 60 years, the logo of Mexico`s energy sector could easily have been a `No trespassing` sign. Everything from finding, storing, and transporting oil and gas to siting, financing, and operating powerplants has been handled by only two state-owned entities and controlled out of a handful of offices in Mexico City. Decentralization is changing the ground rules and playing field for all of corporate Mexico. But it`s hard to imagine any Mexican company being affected more than Pemex - and not just because of its size. Analysts believe that the company wants to spend more money looking for new oil and gas reserves, both on- and off-shore. But to justify a larger investment in exploration, the company needs a larger domestic market, and that will require an expanded gas pipeline system. Gas is the focus because Pemex already knows that industrial demand for it will soon skyrocket: Last year, CFE issued new regulations that call for all of its oil-burning powerplants to switch to natural gas by 1998 to help reduce emissions of SO{sub 2}.

Reyser, J.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Gloria Cook  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Senior Director Gloria Cook Contact Information contact contact us Gloria Cook Senior Director, Finance and Operations ...

9

Performance Assessment of U.S. Residential Cooking Exhaust Hoods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

curves relating airflow to duct static pressure, sound levels, and exhaust gas for centrifugal fan devices. Pollutant capture efficiency (CE) ranged from 98 gas cooking burners emit air pollutants1-3 at rates that can lead to indoor

10

Modeling Population Exposures to Pollutants Emitted from Natural Gas Cooking Burners  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We developed a physics-based data-supported model to investigate indoor pollutant exposure distributions resulting from use of natural gas cooking appliances across households in California. The model was applied to calculate time-resolved indoor concentrations of CO, NO2 and formaldehyde resulting from cooking burners and entry with outdoor air. Exposure metrics include 1-week average concentrations and frequency of exceeding ambient air quality standards. We present model results for Southern California (SoCal) using two air-exchange scenarios in winter: (1) infiltration-only, and (2) air exchange rate (AER) sampled from lognormal distributions derived from measurements. In roughly 40percent of homes in the SoCal cohort (N=6634) the 1-hour USEPA NO2 standard (190 ?g/m3) was exceeded at least once. The frequency of exceeding this standard was largely independent of AER assumption, and related primarily to building volume, emission rate and amount of burner use. As expected, AER had a more substantial impact on one-week average concentrations.

Lobscheid, Agnes; Singer, Brett C.; Klepeis, Neil E.

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Natural Gas Variability In California: Environmental Impacts...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Natural Gas Variability In California: Environmental Impacts And Device Performance, Combustion Modeling of Pollutant Emissions From a Residential Cooking Range Title Natural Gas...

12

Cooking Appliance Use in California Homes - Data Collected from a  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cooking Appliance Use in California Homes - Data Collected from a Cooking Appliance Use in California Homes - Data Collected from a Web-Based Survey Title Cooking Appliance Use in California Homes - Data Collected from a Web-Based Survey Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-5028E Year of Publication 2011 Authors Klug, Victoria L., Agnes B. Lobscheid, and Brett C. Singer Date Published August 2011 Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory City Berkeley, CA Keywords Range Hood Test Facility Abstract Cooking of food and use of natural gas cooking burners generate pollutants that can have substantial impacts on residential indoor air quality. The extent of these impacts depends on cooking frequency, duration and specific food preparation activities in addition to the extent to which exhaust fans or other ventilation measures (e.g. windows) are used during cooking. With the intent of improving our understanding of indoor air quality impacts of cooking-related pollutants, we created, posted and advertised a web-based survey about cooking activities in residences. The survey included questions similar to those in California's Residential Appliance Saturation Survey (RASS), relating to home, household and cooking appliance characteristics and weekly patterns of meals cooked. Other questions targeted the following information not captured in the RASS: (1) oven vs. cooktop use, the number of cooktop burners used and the duration of burner use when cooking occurs, (2) specific cooking activities, (3) the use of range hood or window to increase ventilation during cooking, and (4) occupancy during cooking. Specific cooking activity questions were asked about the prior 24 hours with the assumption that most people are able to recollect activities over this time period. We examined inter-relationships among cooking activities and patterns and relationships of cooking activities to household demographics. We did not seek to obtain a sample of respondents that is demographically representative of the California population but rather to inexpensively gather information from homes spanning ranges of relevant characteristics including the number of residents and presence or absence of children. This report presents the survey, the responses obtained, and limited analysis of the results.

13

Donald Cook  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Dr. Donald L. Cook serves as the Deputy Administrator for Defense Programs at the National Nuclear Security Administration. Appointed to the position by President Barack Obama, Dr. Cook was sworn...

14

COOKING APPLIANCE USE IN CALIFORNIA HOMES DATA COLLECTED FROM A WEB-BASED SURVEY  

SciTech Connect

Cooking of food and use of natural gas cooking burners generate pollutants that can have substantial impacts on residential indoor air quality. The extent of these impacts depends on cooking frequency, duration and specific food preparation activities in addition to the extent to which exhaust fans or other ventilation measures (e.g. windows) are used during cooking. With the intent of improving our understanding of indoor air quality impacts of cooking-related pollutants, we created, posted and advertised a web-based survey about cooking activities in residences. The survey included questions similar to those in California's Residential Appliance Saturation Survey (RASS), relating to home, household and cooking appliance characteristics and weekly patterns of meals cooked. Other questions targeted the following information not captured in the RASS: (1) oven vs. cooktop use, the number of cooktop burners used and the duration of burner use when cooking occurs, (2) specific cooking activities, (3) the use of range hood or window to increase ventilation during cooking, and (4) occupancy during cooking. Specific cooking activity questions were asked about the prior 24 hours with the assumption that most people are able to recollect activities over this time period. We examined inter-relationships among cooking activities and patterns and relationships of cooking activities to household demographics. We did not seek to obtain a sample of respondents that is demographically representative of the California population but rather to inexpensively gather information from homes spanning ranges of relevant characteristics including the number of residents and presence or absence of children. This report presents the survey, the responses obtained, and limited analysis of the results.

Klug, Victoria; Lobscheid, Agnes; Singer, Brett

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Definition: Biomass Cook Stove | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Biomass Cook Stove Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Biomass Cook Stove A Stove that is heated by burning wood, charcoal, animal dung or crop residue. Cook stoves are the most common way of cooking and heating food in developing countries.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition "Cooking stove" redirects here. For a kitchen cooker, stove, range, oven, or stove top, see Kitchen stove. In cooking, a cook stove is heated by burning wood, charcoal, animal dung or crop residue. Cook stoves are commonly used for cooking and heating food in developing countries. Developing countries consume little energy compared to developed nations; however, over 50% of the energy that they do use goes into cooking food.

16

Wide-range radioactive-gas-concentration detector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A wide-range radioactive-gas-concentration detector and monitor capable of measuring radioactive-gas concentrations over a range of eight orders of magnitude is described. The device is designed to have an ionization chamber sufficiently small to give a fast response time for measuring radioactive gases but sufficiently large to provide accurate readings at low concentration levels. Closely spaced parallel-plate grids provide a uniform electric field in the active region to improve the accuracy of measurements and reduce ion migration time so as to virtually eliminate errors due to ion recombination. The parallel-plate grids are fabricated with a minimal surface area to reduce the effects of contamination resulting from absorption of contaminating materials on the surface of the grids. Additionally, the ionization-chamber wall is spaced a sufficient distance from the active region of the ionization chamber to minimize contamination effects.

Anderson, D.F.

1981-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

17

Performance of Installed Cooking Exhaust Devices  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Performance of Installed Cooking Exhaust Devices Performance of Installed Cooking Exhaust Devices Title Performance of Installed Cooking Exhaust Devices Publication Type Journal Article Refereed Designation Refereed LBNL Report Number LBNL-5265E Year of Publication 2012 Authors Singer, Brett C., William W. Delp, Michael G. Apte, and Phillip N. Price Journal Indoor Air Volume 22 Issue 3 Pagination 224-234 Date Published 06/2012 Keywords carbon monoxide, natural gas burners, nitrogen dioxide, range hood, task ventilation, unvented combustion, indoor environment group, Range Hood Test Facility Abstract The performance metrics of airflow, sound, and combustion product capture efficiency (CE) were measured for a convenience sample of fifteen cooking exhaust devices, as installed in residences. Results were analyzed to quantify the impact of various device- and installation-dependent parameters on CE. Measured maximum airflows were 70% or lower than values noted on product literature for 10 of the devices. Above-the-cooktop devices with flat bottom surfaces (no capture hood) - including exhaust fan/microwave combination appliances - were found to have much lower CE at similar flow rates, compared to devices with capture hoods. For almost all exhaust devices and especially for rear-mounted downdraft exhaust and microwaves, CE was substantially higher for back compared with front burner use. Flow rate, and the extent to which the exhaust device extends over the burners that are in use, also had a large effect on CE. A flow rate of 95 liters per second (200 cubic feet per minute) was necessary, but not sufficient, to attain capture efficiency in excess of 75% for the front burners. A-weighted sound levels in kitchens exceeded 57 dB when operating at the highest fan setting for all 14 devices evaluated for sound performance.

18

Current Natural Gas Spot Prices: Well Above the Recent Price Range  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Current Natural Gas Spot Prices: Well Above the Recent Price Range. Previous slide: Next slide: Back to first slide: ... (generally borne out so far ...

19

Experimental Evaluation of Installed Cooking Exhaust Fan Performance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Experimental Evaluation of Installed Cooking Exhaust Fan Performance Experimental Evaluation of Installed Cooking Exhaust Fan Performance Title Experimental Evaluation of Installed Cooking Exhaust Fan Performance Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-4183E Year of Publication 2010 Authors Singer, Brett C., William W. Delp, and Michael G. Apte Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory City Berkeley Keywords airflow & pollutant transport group, cooktop, energy analysis and environmental impacts department, gas burners, indoor air quality, indoor environment department, kitchen, nitrogen dioxide, oven, pollutant emissions, range hood, residential, source control, task ventilation, technology, sustainability and impact assessment group Abstract The installed performance of cooking exhaust fans was evaluated through residential field experiments conducted on a sample of 15 devices varying in design and other characteristics. The sample included two rear downdraft systems, two under-cabinet microwave over range (MOR) units, three different installations of an under-cabinet model with grease screens across the bottom and no capture hood, two devices with grease screens covering the bottom of a large capture hood (one under-cabinet, one wall-mount chimney), four under-cabinet open hoods, and two open hoods with chimney mounts over islands. Performance assessment included measurement of airflow and sound levels across fan settings and experiments to quantify the contemporaneous capture efficiency for the exhaust generated by natural gas cooking burners. Capture efficiency is defined as the fraction of generated pollutants that are removed through the exhaust and thus not available for inhalation of household occupants. Capture efficiency (CE) was assessed for various configurations of burner use (e.g. single front, single back, combination of one front and one back, oven) and fan speed setting. Measured airflow rates were substantially lower than the levels noted in product literature for many of the units. This shortfall was observed for several units costing in excess of $1000. Capture efficiency varied widely (from <5% to roughly 100%) across devices and across conditions for some devices. As expected, higher capture efficiencies were achieved with higher fan settings and the associated higher air flow rates. In most cases, capture efficiencies were substantially higher for rear burners than for front burners. The best and most consistent performance was observed for open hoods that covered all cooktop burners and operated at higher airflow rates. The lowest capture efficiencies were measured when a front burner was used with a rear backdraft system or with lowest fan setting for above the range systems that do not cover the front burners.

20

Performance Assessment of U.S. Residential Cooking Exhaust Hoods  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Performance Assessment of U.S. Residential Cooking Exhaust Hoods Performance Assessment of U.S. Residential Cooking Exhaust Hoods Title Performance Assessment of U.S. Residential Cooking Exhaust Hoods Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-5545E Year of Publication 2012 Authors Delp, William W., and Brett C. Singer Journal Environmental Science & Technology Volume 46 Issue 11 Pagination 6167-6173 Date Published 05/08/2012 Keywords Range Hood Test Facility Abstract This study assessed the performance of seven new residential cooking exhaust hoods representing common U.S. designs. Laboratory tests were conducted to determine fan curves relating airflow to duct static pressure, sound levels, and exhaust gas capture efficiency for front and back cooktop burners and the oven. Airflow rate sensitivity to duct flow resistance was higher for axial fan devices than for centrifugal fan devices. Pollutant capture efficiency (CE) ranged from 98%, varying across hoods and with airflow and burner position for each hood. CE was higher for back burners relative to front burners, presumably because most hoods covered only part of the front burners. Open hoods had higher CE than those with grease screen and metal-covered bottoms. The device with the highest CE-exceeding 80% for oven and front burners-had a large, open hood that covered most of the front burners. The airflow rate for this hood surpassed the industry-recommended level of 118 L·s-1 (250 cfm) and produced sound levels too high for normal conversation. For hoods meeting the sound and fan efficacy criteria for Energy Star, CE was <30% for front and oven burners.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas cooking range" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Coyotes in Cook County  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coyotes in Cook County Coyotes in Cook County Nature Bulletin No. 2 Forest Preserve District of Cook County -- July 31, 1969 George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Superintendent of Conversation COYOTES IN COOK COUNTY One winter night, a Forest Preserve Ranger heard the yapping howl of some animal that made his hair stand on end. A few days later, a farmer in the Sag valley saw what appeared to be a wolf lope across a road. Finally, the ranger, concealed within sight of a faint path apparently used by wild dogs or foxes, shot a coyote. The little bunch of black bristles at the base of its tail, covering a scent gland beneath the skin identified it as being of the wolf family. The animal was sent to the Illinois Natural History Survey, at Urbana, where it was pronounced to be a prairie wolf (also known as the "brush" wolf). In the west it is generally known by its Spanish name: coyote.

22

Employee Worksheet Cooking Healthy Tips  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, strawberries, or pineapple to low fat chicken salad. s Mix it up! Mix 1/2 cup nonfat sour cream (or unflavored - reprint by permission only Cook Healthy... All the flavor without the fat Delicious taste without the salt cook Five "How To" Cooking Tips 1. Use lower fat ingredients. 2. Trim and skim fat. 3. Reduce fat

Burke, Peter

23

Corrective action decision document, Second Gas Station, Tonopah test range, Nevada (Corrective Action Unit No. 403)  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD) for Second Gas Station (Corrective Action Unit [CAU] No. 403) has been developed for the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) Nevada Environmental Restoration Project to meet the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) of 1996 as stated in Appendix VI, {open_quotes}Corrective Action Strategy{close_quotes} (FFACO, 1996). The Second Gas Station Corrective Action Site (CAS) No. 03-02-004-0360 is the only CAS in CAU No. 403. The Second Gas Station CAS is located within Area 3 of the Tonopah Test Range (TTR), west of the Main Road at the location of former Underground Storage Tanks (USTs) and their associated fuel dispensary stations. The TTR is approximately 225 kilometers (km) (140 miles [mi]) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada, by air and approximately 56 km (35 mi) southeast of Tonopah, Nevada, by road. The TTR is bordered on the south, east, and west by the Nellis Air Force Range and on the north by sparsely populated public land administered by the Bureau of Land Management and the U.S. Forest Service. The Second Gas Station CAS was formerly known as the Underground Diesel Tank Site, Sandia Environmental Restoration Site Number 118. The gas station was in use from approximately 1965 to 1980. The USTs were originally thought to be located 11 meters (m) (36 feet [ft]) east of the Old Light Duty Shop, Building 0360, and consisted of one gasoline UST (southern tank) and one diesel UST (northern tank) (DOE/NV, 1996a). The two associated fuel dispensary stations were located northeast (diesel) and southeast (gasoline) of Building 0360 (CAU 423). Presently the site is used as a parking lot, Building 0360 is used for mechanical repairs of vehicles.

NONE

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Portable solar cooking apparatus  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A portable solar cooking apparatus is described which consists of: at least first and second reflector panels, the first reflector panel having a shaped surface configuration for reflecting solar radiation generally toward a focal point, the second reflector panel also having a shaped surface configuration for reflecting solar radiation toward the focal point, the surface configuration of the first panel interfitting with the surface configuration of the second panel when the panels are placed face-to-face so that the first and second panels mutually support each other and occupy less thickness than without interfitting; and means for supporting material to be heated adjacent the focal point.

Ciambella, B.C.; Ciambella, D.P.; Ciambella, P.A.

1986-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

25

Definition: Solar Cooking | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cooking Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Solar Cooking A solar cooker, or solar oven, is a device which uses the energy of sunlight to heat food or drink to cook it or...

26

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings* ... 222 194 17...

27

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings ... 2,100...

28

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings* ... 1,928 1,316...

29

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Consumption Survey: Energy End-Use Consumption Tables Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All...

30

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings* ... 1,870 1,276...

31

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings* ... 1,602 1,397...

32

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings ... 2,037...

33

Soalr cooking in developing countries  

SciTech Connect

Solar cooking must overcome a number of obstacles to realize its potential to improve the lives of women in developing countries. Unlike historical interest in solar cooking, current interest derives from vital environmental and human needs. Deforestation and reliance on wood for cooking lead to many hardships, especially for women, and women in developing countries need access to technology and funding. If the woman builds the oven herself, it notonly makes her more willing to use it but the process empower her with new knowledge and kills. The physical design of the oven must be adapted to local conditions and materials for the oven should be inexpensive and locally available.

Stone, L.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Experimental Evaluation of Installed Cooking Exhaust Fan Performance  

SciTech Connect

The installed performance of cooking exhaust fans was evaluated through residential field experiments conducted on a sample of 15 devices varying in design and other characteristics. The sample included two rear downdraft systems, two under-cabinet microwave over range (MOR) units, three different installations of an under-cabinet model with grease screens across the bottom and no capture hood, two devices with grease screens covering the bottom of a large capture hood (one under-cabinet, one wall-mount chimney), four under-cabinet open hoods, and two open hoods with chimney mounts over islands. Performance assessment included measurement of airflow and sound levels across fan settings and experiments to quantify the contemporaneous capture efficiency for the exhaust generated by natural gas cooking burners.Capture efficiency is defined as the fraction of generated pollutants that are removed through the exhaust and thus not available for inhalation of household occupants. Capture efficiency (CE) was assessed for various configurations of burner use (e.g., single front, single back, combination of one front and one back, oven) and fan speed setting. Measured airflow rates were substantially lower than the levels noted in product literature for many of the units. This shortfall was observed for several units costing in excess of $1000. Capture efficiency varied widely (from<5percent to roughly 100percent) across devices and across conditions for some devices. As expected, higher capture efficiencies were achieved with higher fan settings and the associated higher air flow rates. In most cases, capture efficiencies were substantially higher for rear burners than for front burners. The best and most consistent performance was observed for open hoods that covered all cooktop burners and operated at higher airflow rates. The lowest capture efficiencies were measured when a front burner was used with a rear backdraft system or with lowest fan setting for above the range systems that do not cover the front burners.

Singer, Brett C.; Delp, William W.; Apte, Michael G.

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Experimental Evaluation of Installed Cooking Exhaust Fan Performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The installed performance of cooking exhaust fans was evaluated through residential field experiments conducted on a sample of 15 devices varying in design and other characteristics. The sample included two rear downdraft systems, two under-cabinet microwave over range (MOR) units, three different installations of an under-cabinet model with grease screens across the bottom and no capture hood, two devices with grease screens covering the bottom of a large capture hood (one under-cabinet, one wall-mount chimney), four under-cabinet open hoods, and two open hoods with chimney mounts over islands. Performance assessment included measurement of airflow and sound levels across fan settings and experiments to quantify the contemporaneous capture efficiency for the exhaust generated by natural gas cooking burners.Capture efficiency is defined as the fraction of generated pollutants that are removed through the exhaust and thus not available for inhalation of household occupants. Capture efficiency (CE) was assessed for various configurations of burner use (e.g., single front, single back, combination of one front and one back, oven) and fan speed setting. Measured airflow rates were substantially lower than the levels noted in product literature for many of the units. This shortfall was observed for several units costing in excess of $1000. Capture efficiency varied widely (fromfan settings and the associated higher air flow rates. In most cases, capture efficiencies were substantially higher for rear burners than for front burners. The best and most consistent performance was observed for open hoods that covered all cooktop burners and operated at higher airflow rates. The lowest capture efficiencies were measured when a front burner was used with a rear backdraft system or with lowest fan setting for above the range systems that do not cover the front burners.

Singer, Brett C.; Delp, William W.; Apte, Michael G.

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

J. M. Cook  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

-130 -130 J. M. Cook September 1988 .,.... THE GEOMERY OF COHESIVE MAGNET-cOIL WINDING Sumary - Duin the winding of a magnet-coil, the wire is pulled tightly across the surface of the iner part that has already been wound. If the ;w.ire is not a geodesic in the surface, it will tend to slip lateraly. Classical. dierential geometry is applied to the problem of widing the coil so as to minze this tendency. subject to the constraint that a prescribed mag- netic field be produced. NOTATION D subset of euclidean space x point (x1.xz.xs) in D r cure inD s arc-length parameterization of r Tex) tanent to r at x N(x) pricipal norma to r at x B(x) binorma to r at x ;(x) torsion of r at x K curature of r 6(x) Darboli vector ot r at x J(x) current density (vector) at x L layerin fu~tion (scalar) on D

37

SOLAR COOKING DISSEMINATION APPROACHES AND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To teach, disseminate, and promote solar cooking (and solar water pasteurization and drying) in Nepal, then in Mongolia and Peru. To provide solar technologies research and technology transfer. To initiate new programs. To overcome cultural barriers to solar cooking. My work started in 1992, when I retired from Hewlett Packard Comp where I was engineering manager. This allowed me to follow my dream to disseminate solar cooking in Nepal (and more recently in other developing countries). I choose Nepal because my frequent visits and solo-treks there during the past 21 years have sensitized me to the environmental deterioration, affecting the Himalayan region. Rapid growth in population and tourism has increased demands on a very delicate environment. Scarce natural resources such as fuelwood, which provides almost all of Nepal's energy needs, are being depleted rapidly. Smokey fires cause lung and eye problems. Solar cooking can significantly help decrease the very critical health and environmental problems of the country. In 1992 solar cooking and solar water pasteurization was not being practiced. My objective was to build a sustainable solar cooking program and search for a local organization that would be interested to champion this cause. I follow up each year for three months to insure success and start new initiatives.

Allart Ligtenberg

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Commercial Kitchen Ventilation Performance Report: Six-Burner Gas Range Top Under Wall-Mounted Canopy Hood  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents testing of ventilation requirements for a six-element gas range positioned under an exhaust-only canopy hood. This appliance and hood combination is one of a series undertaken to provide electric utilities and the foodservice industry with data to optimize the design of commercial kitchen ventilation systems and integrate exhaust requirements with space conditioning design.

1997-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

39

Structure of a Low-Level Jet over Lower Cook Inlet, Alaska  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During February 1982 a NOAA research aircraft investigated a cold, low-level jet blowing from a gap between mountain ranges on line west side of Cook Inlet, Alaska. The jet blew 200 km southeastward across Cook Inlet between the Kenai Peninsula ...

S. Allen Macklin; Nicholas A. Bond; Jeffrey P. Walker

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Long-range assessment of R and D policy for gas-related conversion technologies and unconventional natural gas resources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study analyzes the energy impacts on the US energy-economy system on a set of successful R and D programs. These programs are presumed to have led to the commercialization of innovative technologies that increase the US gaseous fuels resource base and promote the development of advanced natural gas conversion technologies for residential/commercial uses. The GRI and its principal subcontractor, TRW Incorporated, provided the detailed specifications of the energy conditions for both a Base Case and an R and D Policy Case. These conditions can be broadly categorized in terms of key energy resource price assumptions, energy resource availabilities, technology characterizations and market penetration guidelines for all energy technologies. Dale W. Jorgenson Associates (DJA) developed a set of demographic and economic projections including population, employment, and real GNP growth rates. The GRI and TRW staff provided the technology characterizations for most of the gas-related technologies and a number of other technologies. The data for the remaining technology characterizations were taken, for the most part, from Bhagat et al. This report presents the energy results from the BNL/DJA energy-economy system as executed under GRI specifications. It is intended to serve as a complement to the DJA report on the macro-economic consequences of these specifications. Certain assumption incorporated in the R and D and Base scenarios relating to market penetration were identified as particularly sensitive. In light of the uncertainty inherent in them, an additional set of sensitivity runs were requested by GRI and are presented in Appendix B.

Kydes, A.S.; Rabinowitz, J.

1980-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas cooking range" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Pollutant Removal Efficiency of Residential Cooking Exhaust Hoods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Capture efficiency (CE) of exhaust from a natural gas cooking range was quantified for three common designs of residential range hoods in laboratory experiments: (A) microwave exhaust combination; (B) short hood with grease-screen-covered air inlet at bottom; and (C) deep, open hood exhausting at top. Devices were evaluated at varying installation heights, at highest and lowest fan settings, and with the hood installed 15 cm away from back wall with intent to improve CE for front burners. Each configuration was evaluated for the oven and for three cooktop burner combinations (two back, two front, one front and one back). At highest fan settings and standard installation against the wall, Hoods A and C captured back cooktop burner exhaust at > 90 percent and Hood B at > 80 percent. In this configuration, CE for front burner exhaust was 73-78 percent for Hoods A and C but only 46-63 percent for Hood B. CEs followed similar patterns but were substantially lower on the lowest fan speed. Installing the hood away from the wall improved CE for oven and front burners on Hood A at low speed, but substantially reduced CE for back burners for all hoods at low and high speed.

Singer, Brett C.; Sherman, Alexander D.; Hotchi, Toshifumi; Sullivan, Douglas P.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Heart Healthy Home Cooking African American Style  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Heart Healthy Home Cooking African American Style With Every Heartbeat Is Life #12;#12;Heart Recipe Substitutions for Heart Healthy Cooking at the heart of African American family life and special celebrations. This recipe book brings together many

Bandettini, Peter A.

43

Long-Range Untethered Real-Time Live Gas Main Robotic Inspection System  

SciTech Connect

Under funding from the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Northeast Gas Association (NGA), Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) developed an untethered, wireless remote controlled inspection robot dubbed Explorer. The project entailed the design and prototyping of a wireless self-powered video-inspection robot capable of accessing live 6- and 8-inch diameter cast-iron and steel mains, while traversing turns and Ts and elbows under real-time control with live video feedback to an operator. The design is that of a segmented actively articulated and wheel-leg powered robot design, with fisheye imaging capability and self-powered battery storage and wireless real-time communication link. The prototype was functionally tested in an above ground pipe-network, in order to debug all mechanical, electrical and software subsystems, and develop the necessary deployment and retrieval, as well as obstacle-handling scripts. A pressurized natural gas test-section was used to certify it for operation in natural gas at up to 60 psig. Two subsequent live-main field-trials in both cast-iron and steel pipe, demonstrated its ability to be safely launched, operated and retrieved under real-world conditions. The system's ability to safely and repeatably exidrecover from angled and vertical launchers, traverse multi-thousand foot long pipe-sections, make T and varied-angle elbow-turns while wirelessly sending live video and handling command and control messages, was clearly demonstrated. Video-inspection was clearly shown to be a viable tool to understand the state of this critical buried infrastructure, irrespective of low- (cast-iron) or high-pressure (steel) conditions. This report covers the different aspects of specifications, requirements, design, prototyping, integration and testing and field-trialing of the Explorer platform.

Hagen Schempf; Daphne D'Zurko

2004-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

44

Conversion of Mixed Oxygenates Generated from Synthesis Gas to Fuel Range Hydrocarbon  

SciTech Connect

The growing dependence in the U.S. on foreign crude oil supplies and increased concerns regarding greenhouse gas emission has generated considerable interest in research to develop renewable and environmentally friendly liquid hydrocarbon transportation fuels. One of the strategies for achieving this is to produce intermediate compounds such as alcohols and other simple oxygenates from biomass generated synthesis gas (mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen) and further convert them into liquid hydrocarbons. The focus of this research is to investigate the effects of mixed oxygenates intermediate product compositions on the conversion step to produce hydrocarbon liquids. A typical mixed oxygenate stream is expected to contain water (around 50%), alcohols, such as methanol and ethanol (around 35%), and smaller quantities of oxygenates such as acetaldehyde, acetic acid and ethyl acetate. However the ratio and the composition of the mixed oxygenate stream generated from synthesis gas vary significantly depending on the catalyst used and the process conditions. Zeolite catalyzed deoxygenation of methanol accompanied by chain growth is well understood under Methanol-to-Gasoline (MTG) like reaction conditions using an H-ZSM-5 zeolite as the catalyst6-8. Research has also been conducted to a limited extent in the past with higher alcohols, but not with other oxygenates present9-11. Also there has been little experimental investigation into mixtures containing substantial amounts of water. The latter is of particular interest because water separation from the hydrocarbon product would be less energy intensive than first removing it from the oxygenate intermediate stream prior to hydrocarbon synthesis, potentially reducing overall processing costs.

Ramasamy, Karthikeyan K.; Gerber, Mark A.; Lilga, Michael A.; Flake, Matthew D.

2012-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

45

Long range forecast of power demands on the Baltimore Gas and Electric Company system. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

The report presents the results of an econometric forecast of peak and electric power demands for the Baltimore Gas and Electric Company (BGandE) through the year 2003. The report describes the methodology, the results of the econometric estimations and associated summary statistics, the forecast assumptions, and the calculated forecasts of energy usage and peak demand. Separate models were estimated for summer and winter residential electricity usage in both Baltimore city and the non-city portion of the BGandE service area. Equations were also estimated for commercial energy usage, industrial usage, streetlighting, and for losses plus Company use. Non-econometric techniques were used to estimate future energy use by Bethlehem Steel Corporation's Sparrows Point plant in Baltimore County, Conrail, and the Baltimore Mass Transit Administration underground rail system. Models of peak demand for summer and winter were also estimated.

Estomin, S.L.; Kahal, M.I.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Andrew R. Cook Publication List, BNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

R. Cook R. Cook Publications "Oxidation of Aqueous Polyselenide Solutions. A Mechanistic Pulse Radiolysis Study" A. Goldbach, M-L. Saboungi, J.A. Johnson, A.R. Cook, D. Meisel, J. Phys. Chem. A, 104(17), 4011 (2000). "Spur Decay of the Solvated Electron in Picosecond Radiolysis Measured with Time-Correlated Absorption Spectroscopy" D.M. Bartels, A.R. Cook, M. Mudaliar, C.D. Jonah, J. Phys. Chem. A., 104(8), 1686 (2000). "Capture of Charge Carriers at the Silica Nanoparticle / Water Interface" T. Schatz, A.R. Cook, D. Meisel, J. Phys. Chem. B., 103(46), 10209 (1999). "Charge Carrier Transfer Across the Silica Nanoparticle / Water Interface" T. Schatz, A.R. Cook, D. Meisel, J. Phys. Chem. B., 102(37), 7225 (1998). "Fluorescence of the 1,4-Benzoquinone Radical Anion" A.R. Cook, L.A. Curtiss, J.R. Miller, J. Am. Chem. Soc., 119(24), 5729 (1997).

47

Oil & Natural Gas Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Res., 104(B10), 22985-23003. Collett, T.S. (1992), Potential of gas hydrates outlined, Oil Gas J., 90(25), 84-87. 70 Cook, A.E., Goldberg, D., and R.L. Kleinberg (2008),...

48

Baseline Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Removals for Forest, Range, and Agricultural Lands in California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI has teamed with the California Energy Commission to study the potential of terrestrial carbon sequestration market opportunities in California. The three reports in this series cover 1) the baseline of changes in carbon stocks on forest, range, and agricultural lands in California for the decade of the 1990s (1011586); 2) the quantity and cost of carbon storage opportunities for forests, rangelands, and agricultural lands in California (1005465); and 3) the relative biomass carbon storage potential ...

2005-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

49

Development of a new dynamic gas flow-control system in the pressure range of 1 Pa-133 Pa  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new flow-control system (FCS-705) has been developed at Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science. The system is intended for calibration of vacuum gauges in the pressure range of 1 Pa-133 Pa by comparison method. This paper describes some basic characteristics of the system including; (1) the design and construction of the system, (2) the generation of stable pressures in the chamber, (3) achieving high upstream pressure limit by installing a short duct in the by-pass pumping line, and (4) investigation of the gas flow regimes within the short duct.

Hong, S. S.; Chung, J. W. [Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science, Daejeon 305-340 (Korea, Republic of); Khan, Wakil [Pakistan Vacuum Society, street 17, Islamabad (Pakistan)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

50

Development of Superior Sorbents for Separation of CO2 from Flue Gas at a Wide Temperature range during Coal Combustion  

SciTech Connect

A number basic sorbents based on CaO were synthesized, characterized with novel techniques and tested for sorption of CO{sub 2} and selected gas mixtures simulating flue gas from coal fired boilers. Our studies resulted in highly promising sorbents which demonstrated zero affinity for N{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, SO{sub 2}, and NO very low affinity for water, ultrahigh CO{sub 2} sorption capacities, and rapid sorption characteristics, CO{sub 2} sorption at a very wide temperature range, durability, and low synthesis cost. One of the 'key' characteristics of the proposed materials is the fact that we can control very accurately their basicity (optimum number of basic sites of the appropriate strength) which allows for the selective chemisorption of CO{sub 2} at a wide range of temperatures. These unique characteristics of this family of sorbents offer high promise for development of advanced industrial sorbents for the effective CO{sub 2} removal.

Panagiotis Smirniotis

2002-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

51

Diacylglycerol Oil, 2nd EditionChapter 19 Cooking Oil: Cooking Properties and Sensory Evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Diacylglycerol Oil, 2nd Edition Chapter 19 Cooking Oil: Cooking Properties and Sensory Evaluation Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry BDC39521BD1565B3519D1C1

52

Domestic food and sustainable design: a study of university student cooking and its impacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In four university student kitchens over twenty-one days, we captured participants' food preparation activity, quantified the greenhouse gas emissions and direct energy connected to the food and cooking, and talked to participants about their food practices. ... Keywords: energy, everyday life, food, greenhouse gas, practices, sustainability

Adrian K. Clear; Mike Hazas; Janine Morley; Adrian Friday; Oliver Bates

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Michigan Nuclear Profile - Donald C Cook  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Donald C Cook" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

54

File:EIA-AK-CookInlet-Liquids.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AK-CookInlet-Liquids.pdf AK-CookInlet-Liquids.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Alaska's Cook Inlet By 2001 Liquids Reserve Class Size of this preview: 463 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(5,100 × 6,600 pixels, file size: 10.19 MB, MIME type: application/pdf) Description Alaska's Cook Inlet By 2001 Liquids Reserve Class Sources Energy Information Administration Authors Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F. Morehouse; Jack Perrin; Robert F. King Related Technologies Oil, Natural Gas Creation Date 2005-09-01 Extent Regional Countries United States UN Region Northern America States Alaska File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment

55

Cooking Trends from 1993 to 2001 - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Household Size Still Affects Frequency of Cooking. Household size is another factor that relates to the frequency of meal-cooking at home.

56

Cooking Trends from 1993 to 2001  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Home Page U.S. Energy Information Administration's Residential Buildings Site, Cooking Trends from 1993 to 2001. If you need assistance viewing this page, call 202-586-8800. Energy Information Adiministration Homepage Home Page U.S. Energy Information Administration's Residential Buildings Site, Cooking Trends from 1993 to 2001. If you need assistance viewing this page, call 202-586-8800. Energy Information Adiministration Homepage Home > Residential > Residential Home Page > Cooking Trends from 1993 to 2001 Cooking Trends in the United States : Are We Really Becoming a Fast Food Country? Graphic of vegetables A popular perception is that Americans now spend less time in the kitchen than in the past. Has there been an identifiable trend toward cooking less in the 1990s, or have cooking habits remained relatively constant over that period? And what characteristics of American households can be seen to influence their cooking patterns? The Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) collects data on household characteristics as well as on residential energy consumption. The first RECS was conducted in 1978 and the eleventh and most recent survey was conducted in 2001. This report will refer to data collected in the 1993 and 2001 RECS.

57

DEVELOPMENT OF SUPERIOR SORBENTS FOR SEPARATION OF CO2 FROM FLUE GAS AT A WIDE TEMPERATURE RANGE DURING COAL COMBUSTION  

SciTech Connect

For this part of the project the studies focused on the development of novel sorbents for reducing the carbon dioxide emissions at high temperatures. Our studies focused on cesium doped CaO sorbents with respect to other major flue gas compounds in a wide temperature range. The thermo-gravimetric analysis of sorbents with loadings of CaO doped on 20 wt% cesium demonstrated high CO{sub 2} sorption uptakes (up to 66 wt% CO{sub 2}/sorbent). It is remarkable to note that zero adsorption affinity for N{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O and NO at temperatures as high as 600 C was observed. For water vapor and nitrogen oxide we observed a positive effect for CO{sub 2} adsorption. In the presence of steam, the CO{sub 2} adsorption increased to the highest adsorption capacity of 77 wt% CO{sub 2}/sorbent. In the presence of nitrogen oxide, the final CO{sub 2} uptake remained same, but the rate of adsorption was higher at the initial stages (10%) than the case where no nitrogen oxide was fed.

Panagiotis G. Smirniotis

2005-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

58

A chinese cooking robot for elderly and disabled people  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cooking themselves is very important and difficult for elderly and disabled people in daily life. This paper presents a cooking robot for those people who are confined to wheelchairs. The robot can automatically load ingredients, cook Chinese dishes, ... Keywords: Barrier-free design, Chinese dishes, Cooking robot, Elderly and disabled people

Wen-tao Ma; Wei-xin Yan; Zhuang Fu; Yan-zheng Zhao

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Performance of Installed Cooking Exhaust Devices  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Performance of Installed Cooking Exhaust Devices Performance of Installed Cooking Exhaust Devices Brett C. Singer, William W. Delp, Michael G. Apte, Philip N. Price Environmental Energy Technologies Division Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Berkeley, California, 94720 November 2011 Direct funding for this research was provided by the California Energy Commission through Contracts 500-05-026 and 500-08-061. Institutional support is provided to LBNL by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science under Contract DE-AC02-05CH11231. LBNL-5265E-r1(3) Singer et al., Performance of Installed Cooking Exhaust Devices LBNL-5265E-r1(3) Performance of Installed Cooking Exhaust Devices Brett C. Singer 1

60

Cook County- LEED Requirements for County Buildings  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

In 2002, Cook County enacted an ordinance requiring all new county buildings and all retrofitted county buildings to be built to LEED standards. Specifically, all newly constructed buildings and...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas cooking range" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Robert Cook, Environmental Data Science & Systems Staff  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry 18: 581 - 588. Cook, R.B., J.D. Joslin, S.M. McLaughlin, C. Egar, J. Knoepp, and C. Trettin. 1998. Effects of Acid Deposition on Forests....

62

Addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 403: Second Gas Station, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

This document constitutes an addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 403: Second Gas Station, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, September 1998 as described in the document Supplemental Investigation Report for FFACO Use Restrictions, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (SIR) dated November 2008. The SIR document was approved by NDEP on December 5, 2008. The approval of the SIR document constituted approval of each of the recommended UR removals. In conformance with the SIR document, this addendum consists of: This page that refers the reader to the SIR document for additional information The cover, title, and signature pages of the SIR document The NDEP approval letter The corresponding section of the SIR document This addendum provides the documentation justifying the cancellation of the UR for CAS 03-02-004-0360, Underground Storage Tanks. This UR was established as part of a Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) corrective action and is based on the presence of contaminants at concentrations greater than the action levels established at the time of the initial investigation (FFACO, 1996). Since this UR was established, practices and procedures relating to the implementation of risk-based corrective actions (RBCA) have changed. Therefore, this UR was reevaluated against the current RBCA criteria as defined in the Industrial Sites Project Establishment of Final Action Levels (NNSA/NSO, 2006). This re-evaluation consisted of comparing the original data (used to define the need for the UR) to risk-based final action levels (FALs) developed using the current Industrial Sites RBCA process. The re-evaluation resulted in a recommendation to remove the UR because contamination is not present at the site above the risk-based FALs. Requirements for inspecting and maintaining this UR will be canceled, and the postings and signage at this site will be removed. Fencing and posting may be present at this site that are unrelated to the FFACO UR such as for radiological control purposes as required by the NV/YMP Radiological Control Manual (NNSA/NSO, 2004). This modification will not affect or modify any non-FFACO requirements for fencing, posting, or monitoring at this site.

Grant Evenson

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Validation of a Long-Range Trajectory Model Using Gas Balloon Tracks from the Gordon Bennett Cup 95  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In September 1995, 18 gas balloon teams competed at the Gordon Bennett Cup, a long-distance ballooning event. The landing positions, travel times of all teams, and detailed information on the tracks of four teams are available. A special version ...

Kathrin Baumann; Andreas Stohl

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Advances in solar cooking: Proceedings of the first world conference on solar cooking  

SciTech Connect

Population growth and resource depletion have led to a need for new sources of cooking fuel in developing countries. Many poor villagers spend half of their time, or half of their income obtaining cooking fuel. Solar cooking can meet the needs of many of these people. People from eighteen countries met at this world conference to share experiences with design and performance of cookers, food, nutrition and health issues, and information dissemination strategies. A total of 27 individual papers were indexed separately for the data base.

Pejack, E. [ed.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

65

Don Cook Speaks at the 2011 LDRD Symposium | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Cook Speaks at the 2011 LDRD Symposium Dr. Cook opens up the 2011 LDRD Conference held in Washington, DC. From: NNSANews Views: 306 1 ratings Time: 11:34 More in Science &...

66

Pantex firefighters cook it up | National Nuclear Security Administrat...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > Pantex firefighters cook it up Pantex firefighters cook it up Posted By Office of Public...

67

Solar cooking : the development of a thermal battery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There are many rural area in the world where cooking fuel is very scarce. One solution to this problem is to use solar energy to cook food. However most people around the world like to cook large meals at night, when the ...

Cutting, Alexander Chatfield

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Implements a gas based on the ideal gas law. It should be noted that this model of gases is niave (from many perspectives). ...

69

Florida City Gas - Residential Energy Smart Rebate Program | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

City Gas - Residential Energy Smart Rebate Program City Gas - Residential Energy Smart Rebate Program Florida City Gas - Residential Energy Smart Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Heating Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Program Info State Florida Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Water Heater: $350 - $500 Tankless Water Heater: $550 - $ 675 Furnace: $500 - $725 Cooking Range: $100 - $200 Dryer: $100 - $150 Space Conditioning Conversion: $1,200 Provider Florida City Gas Florida City Gas (FCG) encourages residential customers to become more energy efficient by offering various rebates for the purchase and installation of efficient natural gas appliances. Rebate amounts depend on whether appliances are converted from a different power source or natural

70

Christine Anderson-Cook: An outstanding New Mexico woman  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Christine Anderson-Cook: An outstanding New Mexico woman Christine Anderson-Cook: An outstanding New Mexico woman Christine Anderson-Cook: an outstanding New Mexico woman Cook recognized for her technical leadership in statistics, extensive professional service at the national level, and mentorship of nearly 70 students. April 14, 2011 Christine Anderson-Cook Christine Anderson-Cook Contact Fred deSousa Communicatons Office (505) 665-3430 Email LOS ALAMOS, New Mexico, April 14, 2011-The New Mexico Commission on the Status of Women selected Los Alamos National Laboratory research statistician Christine Anderson-Cook as one of 20 women to receive the 26th Annual Governor's Award for Outstanding New Mexico Women. An awards banquet is scheduled for May 6 at the Hotel Albuquerque in Albuquerque. "We are extremely proud of Christine's accomplishments, both as an

71

File:EIA-AK-CookInlet-BOE.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CookInlet-BOE.pdf CookInlet-BOE.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Alaska's Cook Inlet By 2001 BOE Reserve Class Size of this preview: 463 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(5,100 × 6,600 pixels, file size: 10.19 MB, MIME type: application/pdf) Description Alaska's Cook Inlet By 2001 BOE Reserve Class Sources Energy Information Administration Authors Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F. Morehouse; Jack Perrin; Robert F. King Related Technologies Oil, Natural Gas Creation Date 2005-09-01 Extent Regional Countries United States UN Region Northern America States Alaska File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 16:55, 20 December 2010 Thumbnail for version as of 16:55, 20 December 2010 5,100 × 6,600 (10.19 MB) MapBot (Talk | contribs) Automated bot upload

72

Cook, Minnesota: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cook, Minnesota: Energy Resources Cook, Minnesota: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 47.8524181°, -92.6896184° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":47.8524181,"lon":-92.6896184,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

73

Cook Islands: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cook Islands: Energy Resources Cook Islands: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"390px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":-22.26876,"lon":-158.20312,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

74

Early Cook County Roads -- Part Two  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Two Two Nature Bulletin No. 739 January 18, 1964 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Seymour Simon, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor EARLY COOK COUNTY ROADS -- PART TWO -- THE PLANK ROAD ERA For ten years after Chicago, with a population of 4,170, was chartered as a city in 1837, its commerce and growth were crippled by wretched transportation to and from the hinterlands. During many periods of each year it was surrounded and isolated by mud. To be sure, there were dirt thoroughfares in all directions, graded and drained as best they could in those days, but not surfaced. No one who has never experienced it can appreciate how gooey and gluey a black prairie soil can be when wet. A wagon's wheels often become solid cylinders of mud as wide as a bass drum.

75

New passive solar cooking system. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The development of a solar cooking system which uses a phase change process to passively transfer heat from a collector to a cooker is presented. In the design of this cooking system steam is produced in the collector and then is used as the heat transfer fluid in the cooker. The most efficient use of the system is to heat food directly by condensing the steam onto the food, whereas a heat exchanger is necessary to heat an oven or a frying pan. A pressure cooker was successfully built and tested using the steam from the collector. Brief discussions on the collector design and performance, and heat storage phase change materials are provided. (BCS)

Schlussler, L.

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

How Chula Vista, California Is Turning Cooking Oil Into Savings |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

How Chula Vista, California Is Turning Cooking Oil Into Savings How Chula Vista, California Is Turning Cooking Oil Into Savings How Chula Vista, California Is Turning Cooking Oil Into Savings January 19, 2011 - 1:21pm Addthis Truck 51 of the Chula Vista Fire Department. Truck 51 of the Chula Vista Fire Department. John Young What does this project do? Reuses cooking oil that is normally considered waste, saving taxpayer dollars. Reduces reliance on foreign oil Cuts emissions Anyone who has ever worked in a restaurant probably shudders at the mention of having to dispose of used cooking oil. While not much can be done to eliminate this unpleasant kitchen task, what's changing is how that oil can be recycled to help reduce our dependence on foreign sources of energy. Used cooking oil is a key (and very low cost) ingredient in the production

77

Dr. Donald L. Cook | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Donald L. Cook | National Nuclear Security Administration Donald L. Cook | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > About Us > Our Leadership > Dr. Donald L. Cook Dr. Donald L. Cook Deputy Administrator for Defense Programs Dr. Donald L. Cook Dr. Donald L. Cook serves as the Deputy Administrator for Defense Programs at the National Nuclear Security Administration. Appointed to the position

78

The FlashBake oven: Lightwave oven delivers high-quality, quick cooking  

SciTech Connect

The FlashBake oven is a well-publicized new electrotechnology that over 40 utilities are promoting for commercial food service applications, but is it worth its high price? E Source research shows that this $5,000 to $8,500 lightwave oven can increase sales and profitability in a number of applications, thus paying for itself within months to a year or two. The FlashBake does so by cooking foods less than two inches thick in two minutes or less, as quickly as microwave ovens do, but with quality equal to or greater than that of conventional gas and electric ovens. The FlashBake makes sense for restaurants and kiosks that offer quick-order menus, as well as for full-menu restaurants that can use the FlashBake during slow periods (instead of larger ovens) and during busy periods (for extra capacity). In these target market applications, the FlashBake is likely to use less energy due to its extremely low idle energy use. It is not well suited to banquet and institutional kitchens that require large numbers of the same item to be cooked and ready simultaneously. The FlashBake has only one tray, so cooking large volumes may take longer, require more labor, and use more energy than a conventional oven that has multiple cooking racks. Energy use is rarely a major concern of those who buy FlashBake ovens, since energy for cooking represents a small fraction of a restaurant`s overall operating costs. The main selling point of the FlashBake is menu and productivity enhancement.

Gregerson, J.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

An integrated analytical framework for quantifying the LCOE of waste-to-energy facilities for a range of greenhouse gas emissions policy and technical factors  

SciTech Connect

This study presents a novel integrated method for considering the economics of waste-to-energy (WTE) facilities with priced greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions based upon technical and economic characteristics of the WTE facility, MSW stream, landfill alternative, and GHG emissions policy. The study demonstrates use of the formulation for six different policy scenarios and explores sensitivity of the results to ranges of certain technical parameters as found in existing literature. The study shows that details of the GHG emissions regulations have large impact on the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) of WTE and that GHG regulations can either increase or decrease the LCOE of WTE depending on policy choices regarding biogenic fractions from combusted waste and emissions from landfills. Important policy considerations are the fraction of the carbon emissions that are priced (i.e. all emissions versus only non-biogenic emissions), whether emissions credits are allowed due to reducing fugitive landfill gas emissions, whether biogenic carbon sequestration in landfills is credited against landfill emissions, and the effectiveness of the landfill gas recovery system where waste would otherwise have been buried. The default landfill gas recovery system effectiveness assumed by much of the industry yields GHG offsets that are very close to the direct non-biogenic GHG emissions from a WTE facility, meaning that small changes in the recovery effectiveness cause relatively larger changes in the emissions factor of the WTE facility. Finally, the economics of WTE are dependent on the MSW stream composition, with paper and wood being advantageous, metal and glass being disadvantageous, and plastics, food, and yard waste being either advantageous or disadvantageous depending upon the avoided tipping fee and the GHG emissions price.

Townsend, Aaron K., E-mail: aarontownsend@utexas.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station C2200, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Webber, Michael E. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station C2200, Austin, TX 78712 (United States)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

80

Dr. Donald L. Cook | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

and for Sandia's Safeguards and Security Technologies Program. From 1977-1999, Dr. Cook led efforts in pulsed power accelerator design and experimentation, fusion research,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas cooking range" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Alcoholic fermentation of sorghum without cooking  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sorgum was used as raw material for alcoholic fermentation without cooking. Two varieties of sorghum grown in Thailand, KU 439 and KU 257, contained 80.0 and 75.8% of total sugar. Optimum amount of sorghum for alcoholic fermentation should be between 30 and 35% (w/v) in the fermentation broth. In these conditions 13.0 and 12.6% (v/v) of alcohol could be obtained in 84 and 91.9% yield based on the theoretical value of the starch content from KU 439 and KU 257, respectively.

Thammarutwasik, P.; Koba, Y.; Ueda, S.

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Efficiency Maine Business Programs (Unitil Gas) - Commercial...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Boilers: 750-3,000 Steam Boiler: 800 or 1MBtuh Infrared Unit Heaters: 500 Natural Gas Warm-Air Unit Heaters: 600 CustomECM: Contact Unitil Cooking Equipment: 600-2000...

83

Avista Utilities (Gas)- Prescriptive Commercial Incentive Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Avista Utilities offers Natural Gas saving incentives to commercial customers on rate schedule 420 and 424. This program provides rebates for a variety of equipment and appliances including cooking...

84

Early Cook County Roads -- Part One  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

One One Nature Bulletin No. 738 January 11, 1964 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Seymour Simon, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor EARLY COOK COUNTY ROADS -- PARK ONE When Chicago was incorporated as a village in 1833 it was only a squalid hamlet of about 350 inhabitants and appeared to be so poorly situated that it was hopeless -- "crude cabins and flimsy shacks in a chaos of mud, rubbish and confusion. " Only a few feet above the level of Lake Michigan, the place was almost entirely surrounded by swamps and miles and miles of prairies that became nearly impassable after spring thaws and during periods of heavy rainfall. There were only two important routes that afforded access at all times. One was the Green Bay Trail, ancestor of North Clark St. in Chicago, Ridge Ave. in Evanston, and Green Bay Road north of that. The other, traveled by the soldiers coming from Detroit to build Fort Dearborn in 1803, used the Great Sauk Trail to La Porte, Indiana, then a trail northwesterly to what is now Michigan City, and the firm sands of the lake beach the rest of the way.

85

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings* ........................... 1,870 1,276 322 138 133 43.0 29.4 7.4 3.2 3.1 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 243 151 34 40 18 78.7 48.9 11.1 13.0 5.7 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 202 139 31 29 Q 54.8 37.6 8.5 7.9 Q 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 300 240 31 21 7 42.5 34.1 4.4 3.0 1.1 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 250 182 40 11 Q 41.5 30.2 6.6 1.9 Q 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 236 169 41 8 19 35.4 25.2 6.2 1.2 2.8 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 241 165 54 7 16 36.3 24.8 8.1 1.0 2.4 200,001 to 500,000 .................... 199 130 42 11 16 35.0 22.8 7.5 1.9 2.8 Over 500,000 ............................. 198

86

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings ............................. 2,037 1,378 338 159 163 42.0 28.4 7.0 3.3 3.4 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 249 156 35 41 18 78.6 49.1 11.0 12.9 5.6 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 218 147 32 31 7 54.8 37.1 8.1 7.9 1.7 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 343 265 34 25 18 43.8 33.9 4.4 3.2 2.3 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 270 196 41 13 Q 40.9 29.7 6.3 2.0 2.9 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 269 186 45 13 24 35.8 24.8 6.0 1.8 3.2 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 267 182 56 10 19 35.4 24.1 7.4 1.3 2.6 200,001 to 500,000 .................... 204 134 43 11 17 34.7 22.7 7.3 1.8 2.9 Over 500,000 .............................

87

Enabling nutrition-aware cooking in a smart kitchen  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a smart kitchen that can enhance the traditional meal preparation and cooking process by raising awareness of the nutrition facts in food ingredients that go into a meal. The goal is to promote healthy cooking. Our smart kitchen is augmented ... Keywords: context-aware computing, home computing, interaction design, kitchen, nutrition, smart environments, ubiquitous computing

Pei-yu Chi; Jen-hao Chen; Hao-hua Chu; Bing-Yu Chen

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Community and Economic Development Association of Cook County (CEDA) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Association of Cook County (CEDA) Association of Cook County (CEDA) Jump to: navigation, search Name Community and Economic Development Association of Cook County (CEDA) Place Chicago, IL Website http://www.cedaorg.net References CEDA Website[1] Information About Partnership with NREL Partnership with NREL Yes Partnership Type Test & Evaluation Partner Partnering Center within NREL Electricity Resources & Building Systems Integration LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! Community and Economic Development Association of Cook County (CEDA) is a company located in Chicago, IL. References ↑ "CEDA Website" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Community_and_Economic_Development_Association_of_Cook_County_(CEDA)&oldid=382336"

89

Changes in quality of whole cooked sorghum {Sorghum bicolor (l) Moench} using precooking methods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Four sorghum cultivars (white, sumac, high tannin and black) differing in kernel characteristics were evaluated for cooking quality using whole, cracked and decorticated kernels. Whole grain had longer minimum cooking time (MCT) and lower water uptake. MCT ranged from 20 to 55 min for all varieties. Soluble solid loses (SSL) were lower than for cracked grain (1.0 to 1.5%). Formation of a gruel-like texture, darker pericarp color, splitting and agglomeration of kernels occurred especially for white grain. Cracked sorghum had shorter MCT (8.8. to 17.5 min) but produced higher SSL (1.3 to 2.9%). Changes in color and appearance due to leaching of pigments especially for the sorghums with a pigmented testa occurred. Utilization of decorticated kernels reduced MCT (11 to 25.3 min), but nutritional value is affected with the removal of the pericarp, plus the SSL (0.5 to 0.7%) produced during cooking. The long grain rice types have comparatively lower values in terms of MCT (22 min) than whole sorghum and SSL are similar to values obtained for cracked grain (1.7 to 2.2%) showing a minimum of splitting. Short and medium rice grain shows relatively long cooking time (30 to 35 min) but no longer than cracked or decorticated sorghum and produced higher SSL (28% to 40%) during processing, showing extensive disintegration. When sorghum was precooked; cooking quality improved. The combination of dry heat and microwave reduced MCT and SSL from 31 to 49% and 6.6 to 41.3%, respectively for all varieties compared to the control. This treatment produced grain with softer texture, increased dietary fiber and higher antioxidant activity retention (67.8%) for the tannin varieties than the control (22.7%). Evaluations of cooking quality of whole sorghum and the application of precooking process have more applications than just preparation of rice-like products. Whole boiled sorghum could be used in the elaboration of nutraceutical foods like an ingredient for yogurts, desserts or side dishes like exotic salads with other cereals. The inclusion of whole boiled sorghum as an ingredient in foods is promising with excellent potential health benefits.

Calderon de Zacatares, Vilma Ruth

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Investigation of Combustion Kinetic Cooking Oil Tar Samples with Thermogravimetric Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The cooking fire not only brought huge economic losses and adverse social impact. The combustible material of fire in fog discharge pipe is the cooking oil tar. In order to solve the problem of fire in fog discharge pipe, it is necessary to research ... Keywords: combustion science, fog discharge pipe of cooking, cooking oil tar, combustion characteristics, reaction kinetics

Xie Zheng-wen; Su Kai-yu; Wu Chao

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Energy-Efficient Cooking for Winter | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cooking for Winter Cooking for Winter Energy-Efficient Cooking for Winter September 30, 2008 - 4:06pm Addthis Jen Carter What does this mean for me? Use your kitchen more efficiently when the seasons turn cold to help save energy and money at home. When I was growing up, the most poignant harbinger of winter wasn't the smell of fallen leaves or the slowly shortening days; it was the first time I came home from school to find a pot of my mother's homemade chicken soup simmering gently on the stove. That pot would be the first of many. As long as the thermometer outside the kitchen window hovered around freezing, my mother's weekly pot of soup remained a household staple. I've noticed much the same seasonal shift in my own kitchen. When summer's heat starts to make cooking oppressive, I turn off the oven and embrace the

92

List of Commercial Cooking Equipment Incentives | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cooking Equipment Incentives Cooking Equipment Incentives Jump to: navigation, search The following contains the list of 39 Commercial Cooking Equipment Incentives. CSV (rows 1 - 39) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active AEP Ohio - Commercial New Construction Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Ohio) Utility Rebate Program Ohio Commercial Industrial Local Government Municipal Utility Nonprofit Schools State Government Central Air conditioners Chillers Comprehensive Measures/Whole Building Custom/Others pending approval Energy Mgmt. Systems/Building Controls Heat pumps Lighting Lighting Controls/Sensors Motor VFDs Motors Water Heaters Commercial Cooking Equipment Commercial Refrigeration Equipment Room Air Conditioners Yes Agricultural Energy Efficiency Program (New York) State Rebate Program New York Agricultural Agricultural Equipment

93

Pantex firefighters cook it up | National Nuclear Security Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

firefighters cook it up | National Nuclear Security Administration firefighters cook it up | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > Pantex firefighters cook it up Pantex firefighters cook it up Posted By Office of Public Affairs B&W Pantex volunteers dish up barbecue at the recent Amarillo Chamber of Commerce Good Times Celebration and Barbecue Cookoff. For more than a

94

Don Cook talks about future of Pantex mission | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Follow this link to skip to the main content Facebook Flickr RSS Twitter YouTube Don Cook talks about future of Pantex mission | National Nuclear Security Administration Our...

95

Bio-Terre Cook Farm Anaerobic Digester Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report details the preliminary research and construction of a novel low temperature earthen cell for anaerobic digestion and biogas production facility at Cook Feeders Ltd., a 6,000 head swine finisher operation, located in central Manitoba, Canada.

2005-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

96

SC/51/SM11 AERIAL SURVEYS OF BELUGA WHALES IN COOK INLET, ALASKA,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The National Marine Mammal Laboratory (NMML), in cooperation with the NMFS Alaska Regional Office, the Alaska Beluga Whale Committee (ABWC) and the Cook Inlet Marine Mammal Council (CIMMC), conducted an aerial survey of the beluga whale population in Cook Inlet, Alaska, during 9-15 June 1998. The 39.4 hr survey was flown in a twin-engine, high-wing aircraft at an altitude of 244 m (800 ft) altitude and speed of 185 km/hr (100 kt) along a trackline 1.4 km from shore. This provided complete coverage of coastal areas around the entire inlet (1,388 km) one or more times and 1,320 km of transects across the inlet. Throughout most of this survey, a test of sighting rates was conducted with multiple independent observers on the coastal (left) side of the plane, where virtually all sightings occur. A single observer and a computer operator/data recorder were on the right side. After finding beluga groups, a series of aerial passes were made to allow at least two pairs of observers to make 4 or more counts of each group. The sum of the aerial estimates (using median counts from each site, not corrected for missed whales) ranged from 173 to 192 whales, depending on survey day. There were 57-109 belugas counted near the Susitna River, 42-93 in Knik Arm and 23-42 in Chickaloon Bay, but only one (dead) beluga whale was found in lower Cook Inlet.

David J. Rugh; Roderick C. Hobbs; Kim E. W. Shelden; Barbara A. Mahoney; Laura K. Litzky

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Improved Biomass Cooking Stoves | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Improved Biomass Cooking Stoves Improved Biomass Cooking Stoves Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Improved Biomass Cooking Stoves Agency/Company /Organization: various Sector: Energy Focus Area: Biomass Phase: Determine Baseline, Evaluate Options, Prepare a Plan, Create Early Successes Topics: Co-benefits assessment, - Energy Access Resource Type: Case studies/examples, Guide/manual, Presentation, Video User Interface: Website Website: ttp://www.bioenergylists.org/ Cost: Free Language: "English, Spanish; Castilian" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volapük, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

98

Performance of Installed Cooking Exhaust Devices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The performance metrics of airflow, sound, and combustion product capture efficiency (CE) were measured for a convenience sample of fifteen cooking exhaust devices, as installed in residences. Results were analyzed to quantify the impact of various device- and installation-dependent parameters on CE. Measured maximum airflows were 70% or lower than values noted on product literature for 10 of the devices. Above-the-cooktop devices with flat bottom surfaces (no capture hood) including exhaust fan/microwave combination appliances were found to have much lower CE at similar flow rates, compared to devices with capture hoods. For almost all exhaust devices and especially for rear-mounted downdraft exhaust and microwaves, CE was substantially higher for back compared with front burner use. Flow rate, and the extent to which the exhaust device extends over the burners that are in use, also had a large effect on CE. A flow rate of 95 liters per second (200 cubic feet per minute) was necessary, but not sufficient, to attain capture efficiency in excess of 75% for the front burners. A-weighted sound levels in kitchens exceeded 57 dB when operating at the highest fan setting for all 14 devices evaluated for sound performance.

Singer, Brett C.; Delp, William W.; Apte, Michael G.; Price, Philip N.

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Natural Gas Variability In California: Environmental Impacts And Device  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Natural Gas Variability In California: Environmental Impacts And Device Natural Gas Variability In California: Environmental Impacts And Device Performance - Experimental Evaluation Of Installed Cooking Exhaust Fan Performance Title Natural Gas Variability In California: Environmental Impacts And Device Performance - Experimental Evaluation Of Installed Cooking Exhaust Fan Performance Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2011 Authors Singer, Brett C., William W. Delp, and Michael G. Apte Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory City Berkeley, CA Keywords energy analysis and environmental impacts department Abstract The installed performance of cooking exhaust fans was evaluated through residential field experiments conducted on a sample of 15 devices varying in design and other characteristics. The sample included two rear downdraft systems, two under-cabinet microwave over range units, three different installations of an under-cabinet model with grease screens across the bottom and no capture hood, two devices with grease screens covering the bottom of a large capture hood (one under-cabinet, one wall-mount chimney), four under-cabinet open hoods, and two open hoods with chimney mounts over islands. Performance assessment included measurement of airflow and sound levels across fan settings and experiments to quantify the contemporaneous capture efficiency for the exhaust generated by natural gas cooking burners. Capture efficiency is defined as the fraction of generated pollutants that are removed through the exhaust and thus not available for inhalation of household occupants. Capture efficiency was assessed for various configurations of burner use (e.g., single front, single back, combination of one front and one back, oven) and fan speed setting. Measured airflow rates were substantially lower than the levels noted in product literature for many of the units. This shortfall was observed for several units costing more than $1000. Capture efficiency varied widely (from < 5 percent to roughly 100 percent) across devices and across conditions for some devices. As expected, higher capture efficiencies were achieved with higher fan settings and the associated higher air flow rates. In most cases, capture efficiencies were substantially higher for rear burners than for front burners. The best and most consistent performance was observed for open hoods that covered all cooktop burners and operated at higher airflow rates. The lowest capture efficiencies were measured when a front burner was used with a rear backdraft system or with lowest fan setting for above-the-range systems that do not cover the front burners.

100

"Cook"ing at Y-12 for 70 years | Y-12 National Security Complex  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

"Cook"ing at Y-12 ... "Cook"ing at Y-12 ... "Cook"ing at Y-12 for 70 years Posted: December 5, 2013 - 4:48pm At a Nov. 14 visit to Y-12, National Nuclear Security Administration's Deputy Administrator for Defense Don Cook shared his outlook on the future and his thanks to employees for continuing their 70-year tradition of making America safer. "There are three things to remember," Cook told a meeting of NNSA Production Office and Y-12 employees. "We have an enduring mission. Y-12 plays a key role in it. And a nuclear deterrent remains the ultimate insurance policy for America." Cook also shared his thanks for preparing for the potential furlough in October because of the government shutdown and lack of appropriations. During what was the longest government shutdown to date, Cook said Y-12

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas cooking range" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Commercial Cooking Equipment | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Clean Energy Analysis Low Emission Development Strategies Oil & Gas Smart Grid Solar U.S. OpenLabs Utilities Water Wind Page Actions View source History View New Pages...

102

Don Cook discusses NNSA's Defense Programs at Woodrow Wilson Center |  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

discusses NNSA's Defense Programs at Woodrow Wilson Center | discusses NNSA's Defense Programs at Woodrow Wilson Center | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > Don Cook discusses NNSA's Defense Programs at ... Don Cook discusses NNSA's Defense Programs at Woodrow Wilson Center Posted By Office of Public Affairs Cook at WW

103

Respiratory symptoms in Indian women using domestic cooking fuels  

SciTech Connect

The effect of domestic cooking fuels producing various respiratory symptoms was studied in 3,701 women. Of these, 3,608 were nonsmoking women who used four different types of cooking fuels: biomass, LPG, kerosene, and mixed fuels. The overall respiratory symptoms were observed in 13 percent of patients. Mixed fuel users experienced more respiratory symptoms (16.7 percent), followed by biomass (12.6 percent), stove (11.4 percent), and LPG (9.9 percent). Chronic bronchitis in chulla users was significantly higher than that in kerosene and LPG users (p less than 0.05). Dyspnea and postnasal drip were significantly higher in the women using mixed fuels. Smoking women who are also exposed to cooking fuels experienced respiratory symptoms more often than nonsmokers (33.3 percent vs 13 percent).

Behera, D.; Jindal, S.K. (Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh (India))

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Microsoft PowerPoint - 16.1225_Terry Cooke-Davies - Project Complexity...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

225Terry Cooke-Davies - Project Complexity as of 16 Mar Microsoft PowerPoint - 16.1225Terry Cooke-Davies - Project Complexity as of 16 Mar Microsoft PowerPoint - 16.1225Terry...

105

Methods for differentiating recycled cooking oil needed in China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Researchers from the West China School of Public Health at Sichuan University in Chengdu, China, explain why the reuse of recycled cooking oil, or gutter oil, is such a difficult problem for government and public health officials to address. Methods for

106

McCook Public Power District | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

McCook Public Power District McCook Public Power District Place Nebraska Utility Id 10550 Utility Location Yes Ownership P NERC Location SPP NERC SPP Yes RTO SPP Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Area Lighting HPS Non-Metered Lighting Area Lighting HPS Residential/Non-Domestic Metered Lighting Area Lighting HPS Residential/Non-Domestic Unmetered Lighting Area Lighting HPS Street Lighting Lighting Commercial Oil Commercial Commercial Oil, Load Management Rates Commercial Idel Fee 1 Phase Commercial Idel Fee 3 Phase 150-250 HP Commercial

107

February 9, 2004, Board Public Meeting Presentations - Beverly A. Cook  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Beverly Cook, Assistant Secretary Beverly Cook, Assistant Secretary Environment, Safety and Health U.S. Department of Energy Before the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board February 9,2004 Thank you, Mr. Chairman, and members of the Board, for this opportunity to address you today. You have invited me to speak on the roles and responsibilities of the Office of Environment, Safety and Health in the oversight process. In keeping with some of the questions you have sent to me, I would like to expand my remarks somewhat to the role of EH in assuring safety of the operations of the Department of Energy. I will speak to both my role personally, and that of my organization. I will also address efforts underway to improve DOES performance, and where I continue to be concerned. I would like to start with some of my overall assumptions. I absolutely believe that our

108

MHK Projects/Cook Inlet Tidal Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cook Inlet Tidal Energy Cook Inlet Tidal Energy < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":60.6893,"lon":-151.437,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

109

Preliminary evaluation of wind energy potential: Cook Inlet area, Alaska  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes work on a project performed under contract to the Alaska Power Administration (APA). The objective of this research was to make a preliminary assessment of the wind energy potential for interconnection with the Cook Inlet area electric power transmission and distribution systems, to identify the most likely candidate regions (25 to 100 square miles each) for energy potential, and to recommend a monitoring program sufficient to quantify the potential.

Hiester, T.R.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Effects of cooking on sweet sorghum juice fermentation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Full scale ethanol plant and laboratory fermentation on sweet sorghum juice show not cooking prior to fermentation results in poor sugar to alcohol conversion. Sugar conversion was much higher when heating for microbial control to 60 degrees C and 85 degrees C with no significant difference between the two. Changes in sugar content of the juice through the season had no effect on fermentation efficiency.

Rein, B.; Ogden, R.; Walker, C.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Effects of cooking on sweet sorghum juice fermentation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Full scale ethanol plant and laboratory fermentation on sweet sorghum juice show not cooking prior to fermentation results in poor sugar to alcohol conversion. Sugar conversion was much higher when heating for microbial control to 60/sup 0/C and 85/sup 0/C with no significant difference between the two. Changes in sugar content of the juice through the season had no effect on fermentation efficiency.

Rein, B.; Ogden, R.; Walker, C.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Pairing, Off-Diagonal Long-Range Order, and Quantum Phase Transition in Strongly Attracting Ultracold Bose Gas Mixtures in Tight Waveguides  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A model of two 1D ideal Bose gases A and B with strong odd-wave AB attractions induced by a p-wave AB Feshbach resonance is studied. The model is solved exactly by a Bose-Bose duality mapping, and it is shown that there is no A-component or B-component Bose-Einstein condensation and no AB-pair off-diagonal long-range order (ODLRO), but both AA-pair and BB-pair ODLRO. After generalization by adding even-wave AA and BB repulsions and reducing the strength of the odd-wave AB attraction by Feshbach resonance detuning, a quantum phase transition occurs between a phase with AB contact nodes and one with no such nodes.

Girardeau, M. D. [College of Optical Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721 (United States)

2009-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

113

A Seismic Attribute Study to Assess Well Productivity in the Ninilchik Field, Cook Inlet Basin, Alaska.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Coal bed methane which has formed in the Tertiary Kenai Group strata has been produced from the Ninilchik field of Cook Inlet, Alaska since 2001. (more)

Sampson, Andrew

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Table B27. Cooking Energy Sources, Number of Buildings and Floorspace...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7. Cooking Energy Sources, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1999" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)",,,,,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings","All Buildings...

115

SC/49/SM20 AERIAL SURVEYS OF BELUGA WHALES IN COOK INLET, ALASKA,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The National Marine Mammal Laboratory (NMML), in cooperation with the NMFS Alaska Regional Office, the Alaska Beluga Whale Committee (ABWC) and the Cook Inlet Marine Mammal Council (CIMMC), conducted an aerial survey of the beluga whale population in Cook Inlet, Alaska, during 8-10 June 1997. This provided a thorough coverage of the coasts around the entire inlet (1,388 km). Therefore, 100 % of the coastal areas where belugas were expected to be during this season were searched one or more times. The 23 hr survey was flown in a twin-engine, high-wing aircraft at 244 m (800 ft) altitude and 185 km/hr (100 kt) along a trackline 1.4 km from shore. Throughout most of this survey, a test of sighting rates was conducted with multiple independent observers on the coastal (left) side of the plane, where virtually all sightings occur. A single observer and a computer operator/data recorder were on the right side. After finding beluga groups, a series of aerial passes were made to allow at least two pairs of observers to make 4 or more counts of whales. The sum of the aerial estimates (using median counts from each site, not corrected for missed whales) ranged from 217 to 264 whales, depending on survey day. Only 1 beluga whale was found in lower Cook Inlet, 51-73 were counted near the Susitna River, 139-161 were seen in Knik Arm and 26-29 were counted in Chickaloon Bay. Combining data from 1994-97, almost half (46%) of the initial sightings occurred>1.4 km from the aircraft- the perimeter of the standard viewing area- with mean sighting distances of 1.2 km for small groups ( = 20). In only 8 of 59 instances were whale groups>1.4 km from the trackline. Of 106 groups recorded by paired, independent observers in 1994-97, 20 were reported by only one primary observer, while 86 (81%) were reported by both observers.

David J. Rugh; Roderick C. Hobbs; Kim E. W. Shelden; Janice M. Waite

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

A modified concentrating type solar oven for outdoor cooking  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solar cookers offer a partial solution to many problems for the poor developing areas of the world. In these regions energy used for cooking sometimes comprises four fifths of the total energy demand. Solar cookers are generally four catagories: direct focusing, oven, ovenfocusing and indirect types. The direct focusing types failed to boil water under windy conditions due to excessive convection losses from the bare cooking pot placed at the concentrator focus. The oven type cookers, such as Telkes oven, observe the rules of energy conservation and thus are more efficient and less affected by windy weather. However, this oven suffers from two major problems. First, tilting the oven could cause food spillage unless a hinged support is used for the pot. This adds complication to the design of Telkes oven. Second, the solar radiation is added to the pot from the top for high solar altitude angles. This leads to poor heat transfer to the food inside the pot. The advantages of concentrating and oven cookers can be obtained by widding of a point focus concentrator to a new oven type receiver. In this paper the concept and design details of such an oven are introduced. Theoretical and experimental analyses of the developed cooker are given.

Khalifa, A.M.A.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Achieving a ten percent greenhouse gas reduction by 2020 Response to  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ERG/200801 Achieving a ten percent greenhouse gas reduction by 2020 Response to The Nova Scotia. Sandy Cook. #12;Achieving a ten percent greenhouse gas reduction by 2020 1 Introduction In April 2007 matters. Central to the act is the government's commitment to reducing greenhouse gas emissions

Hughes, Larry

118

CHARACTERISTICS OF RANGE HOODS IN CALIFORNIA HOMES DATA COLLECTED FROM A REAL ESTATE WEB SITE  

SciTech Connect

Venting range hoods are important residential ventilation components that remove pollutants generated by cooking activities and natural gas cooking burners. To address the lack of data on range hood installations in California, we conducted a survey by examining photographs of homes for sale or rent listed on a popular real estate web site. The survey was conducted in November 2010 and AprilMay 2011. Posted photos of the homes were reviewed to determine if a hood was installed, the type of hood, and two installation details that can impact performance, namely the height above the cooktop and the degree to which the hood covers the cooktop burners. We additionally collected information about the homes, including asking price for purchase or rent, type of building (e.g. detached house, townhouse or apartment), building age, floor area, and cooktop fuel type. Listings were first sampled to focus on homes built since 2005, then randomly sampled to include varied prices and locations around the state. Data were obtained for 1002 homes built between 1865 and 2011 (median year built 1989). Homes for sale varied in asking price from $16,000 to $16,500,000 (median $353,000) and homes for rent varied from $500 to $25,000 (median $2125) per month. Approximately 74% of the sample had natural gas cooktops. In this sample, natural gas cooktops were more prevalent in more expensive homes than in less expensive homes. Across the entire sample, 7.4 % appeared to have no hood installed, 33% had a short hood, 13% had a deep hood and 47% had a microwave over the range. The percentage of these hoods that vent to the outdoors could not be determined. Hood type was related to coverage of the cooktop. For deep hoods, 76% appeared to cover most or all of the cooktop burners. For short hoods, 70% covered about three quarters of the cooktop. And for microwaves the vast majority (96%) covered the back burners but not the front burners. Hood type was also correlated with asking price or monthly rent, with deep hoods most common in the most expensive homes. Hood type was also correlated with home age, with microwave hoods more common in newer homes. Installation height was related to device type with microwaves installed lower (closer) to the cooktop (median 18 inches), and short hoods (median 28 inches) and deep hoods (median 30 inches) installed higher. Deep range hoods are more common with natural gas cooktops than with electric cooktops, and slightly fewer homes with natural gas cooktops lack a range hood (7%) than homes with electric cooktops (9%). This study provides limited but useful information about the characteristics of range hoods in California homes and demonstrates the potential value of non-traditional forms of data collection.

Klug, Victoria; Singer, Brett; Bedrosian, Tod; DCruz, Chris

2011-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

119

How Do You Save Energy and Stay Cool While Cooking in the Summer? |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Stay Cool While Cooking in the Summer? and Stay Cool While Cooking in the Summer? How Do You Save Energy and Stay Cool While Cooking in the Summer? August 19, 2010 - 7:30am Addthis On Monday, Andrea discussed some ways you can keep cooking during the summer while saving energy and staying cool. How do you save energy and stay cool while cooking in the summer? Each Thursday, you have the chance to share your thoughts on a question about energy efficiency or renewable energy for consumers. Please comment with your answers, and also feel free to respond to other comments. E-mail your responses to the Energy Saver team at consumer.webmaster@nrel.gov. Addthis Related Articles How Do You Save Energy in the Summer? How Do You Save Energy When Entertaining in the Summer? At What Temperature Do You Set Your Thermostat in the Summer

120

AERIAL SURVEYS OF BELUGA IN COOK INLET, ALASKA,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) conducted an aerial survey of the beluga population in Cook Inlet, Alaska, during 4-11 June 2002. The 45 hr survey was flown in a twin-engine, high-wing aircraft at an altitude of 244 m (800 ft) and speed of 185 km/hr (100 kt), consistent with NMFS surveys conducted each year since 1993. The flights in June 2002 included one or more surveys of coastal areas (flown 1.4 km offshore) around the entire Inlet and 1,234 km of transects across the Inlet, effectively searching more than 26 % of Cook Inlet but nearly 100 % of the coastal areas. Paired, independent observers searched on the coastal (left) side of the plane, where virtually all beluga sightings occur, while a single observer was on the right. A computer operator/data recorder was also on the left side. After finding beluga groups, a series of aerial passes were made with two pairs of primary observers each making 4 or more independent counts of each group. Median counts made in optimal viewing conditions on 2 to 6 different days were 0-93 beluga in the Susitna Delta (between the Beluga and Little Susitna Rivers), 54-97 in Knik Arm (there appeared to be exchanges of whales between the Susitna area and Knik Arm), and 10-11 in Chickaloon Bay. No belugas were seen elsewhere. This sighting distribution has been consistent in June or July most years since 1996. The sum of the median aerial estimates (a very rough but quick index of relative abundance, not corrected for estimates of whales missed) for June 2002 is 192 belugas. This

David J. Rugh; Barbara A. Mahoney; Laura K. Litzky; Brad Smith

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas cooking range" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Viability of waste-based cooking fuels for Developing countries : combustion emissions and field feasibility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biomass-derived cooking fuels are used by three billion people worldwide. The drawbacks of such fuels, typically wood or wood-derived charcoal, include health hazards, negative environmental effects, and perpetuation of ...

Banzaert, Amy, 1976-

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Compilation of Published PM2.5 Emission Rates for Cooking, Candles...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Compilation of Published PM2.5 Emission Rates for Cooking, Candles and Incense for Use in Modeling of Exposures in Residences Title Compilation of Published PM2.5 Emission Rates...

123

Alcohol production from various enzyme-converted starches with or without cooking  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effectiveness of alcoholic fermentation was compared by measuring alcoholic yields from various starch mashes, both cooked and uncooked. Alcohol yields from cooked and liquefied starch by bacterial ..cap alpha..-amylase were 93.9% for corn, 92.0% for cassava, 90.6% for potato, and 73.0% for babassu, whereas alcohol yields from raw starch were 90.0% for corn, 89.0% for cassava, 48.9% for babassu, and 11.4% for potato. (JMT)

Park, Y.K.; Rivera, B.C.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Performance of Charcoal Cookstoves for Haiti, Part 2: Results from the Controlled Cooking Test  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Five charcoal cookstoves were tested using a Controlled Cooking Test (CCT) developed from cooking practices in Haiti. Cookstoves were tested for total burn time, specific fuel consumption, and emissions of carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), and the ratio of carbon monoxide to carbon dioxide (CO/CO{sub 2}). These results are presented in this report along with LBNL testers observations regarding the usability of the stoves.

Lask, Kathleen; Jones, Jennifer; Booker, Kayje; Ceballos, Cristina; Yang, Nina; Gadgil, Ashok

2011-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

125

Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrate Joint Industry Project Leg II: Walker Ridge 313 LWD Operations and Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cook Cook 1 , Gilles Guerin 1 , Stefan Mrozewski 1 , Timothy Collett 2 , & Ray Boswell 3 Walker Ridge 313 LWD Operations and Results Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrate Joint Industry Project Leg II: 1 Borehole Research Group Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University Palisades, NY 10964 E-mail: Cook: acook@ldeo.columbia.edu Guerin: guerin@ldeo.columbia.edu Mrozewski: stefan@ldeo.columbia.edu 3 National Energy Technology Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507 E-mail: ray.boswell@netl.doe.gov 2 US Geological Survey Denver Federal Center, MS-939 Box 25046 Denver, CO 80225 E-mail:

126

The response of the North American Monsoon to increased greenhouse gas forcing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The response of the North American Monsoon to increased greenhouse gas forcing B. I. Cook1,2 and R 2013. [1] We analyze the response of the North American Monsoon (NAM) to increased greenhouse gas (GHG Intercomparison Project version 5 (CMIP5). Changes in total monsoon season rainfall with GHG warming are small

127

Definition: Natural gas | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Natural gas Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Natural gas A hydrocarbon gas obtained from underground sources, often in association with petroleum and coal deposits.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Natural gas is a naturally occurring hydrocarbon gas mixture consisting primarily of methane, but commonly includes varying amounts of other higher alkanes and even a lesser percentage of carbon dioxide, nitrogen, and hydrogen sulfide. Natural gas is an energy source often used for heating, cooking, and electricity generation. It is also used as fuel for vehicles and as a chemical feedstock in the manufacture of plastics and other commercially important organic chemicals. Natural gas is found in

128

Alabama Gas Corporation - Residential Natural Gas Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alabama Gas Corporation - Residential Natural Gas Rebate Program Alabama Gas Corporation - Residential Natural Gas Rebate Program Alabama Gas Corporation - Residential Natural Gas Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Program Info State Alabama Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Furnace (Replacement): $200 Dryer (Replacement): $100 Natural Gas Range/Cooktop (Replacement): $100 Water Heaters (Replacement): $200 Tankless Water Heaters (Replacement): $200 Provider Alabama Gas Corporation Alabama Gas Corporation (Alagasco) offers various rebates to its residential customers who replace older furnaces, water heaters, cooktops, ranges and clothes dryers with new, efficient equipment. All equipment

129

Thomas B. Cook,1971 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Thomas B. Cook,1971 Thomas B. Cook,1971 The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award Lawrence Award Home Nomination & Selection Guidelines Award Laureates 2000's 1990's 1980's 1970's 1960's Ceremony The Life of Ernest Orlando Lawrence Contact Information The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award U.S. Department of Energy SC-2/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-9395 E: lawrence.award@science.doe.gov 1970's Thomas B. Cook,1971 Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Weapons: For his significant contributions to the study of nuclear weapons effects, for his original work in the translation of this knowledge into advanced technology for peaceful and military uses of atomic energy, and for his outstanding contributions to the nation through his service as an

130

Cooking Up Hot Quark Soup | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cooking Up Hot Quark Soup Cooking Up Hot Quark Soup Stories of Discovery & Innovation Cooking Up Hot Quark Soup Enlarge Photo Image courtesy of Brookhaven National Laboratory These images contrast the degree of interaction and collective motion, or "flow," among quarks in the predicted gaseous quark-gluon plasma state (Figure on left, see mpeg animation ) vs. the liquid state that has been observed in gold-gold collisions at RHIC (Figure on right, see mpeg animation ). The green "force lines" and collective motion (visible on the animated version only) show the much higher degree of interaction and flow among the quarks in what is now being described as a nearly "perfect" liquid. Enlarge Photo Photo courtesy of Brookhaven National Laboratory Brookhaven National Laboratory's Relativistic

131

Efficient Cook Stoves for Darfur : Future Technologies : From the Lab to  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Efficient Cook Stoves for Darfur Efficient Cook Stoves for Darfur From the Lab to the Marketplace Ten Years Later, Energy Efficient Technologies from Research at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Berkeley Lab logo (left) with six rows of gray dots transitioning to a line art drawing of a cityscape and residential houses. Efficient Cook Stoves for Darfur Beginning in 2003, hundreds of thousands of people have been killed, and another 2.2 million have become internal refugees in the Darfur region of Sudan. Although the refugees are relatively safe inside the refugee camps, they risk murder and rape when they leave to fetch firewood. To reduce the amount of firewood the refugees need, Berkeley Lab scientist Ashok Gadgil modified an existing cookstove design to create one that is 75% more

132

Automotive Powertrain Control: A Survey Jeffrey A. Cook, Jing Sun  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Typically, NOx reduction is accomplished by reducing combustion temperature through exhaust gas the HEGO sensor upstream of the catalyst. This control-point shift causes a dramatic reduction in NOx reduction require improved fuel economy. Customers demand performance and efficiency. All

Grizzle, Jessy W.

133

Gas turbine engines  

SciTech Connect

A core engine or gas generator is described for use in a range of gas turbine engines. A multi-stage compressor and a single stage supersonic turbine are mounted on a single shaft. The compressor includes a number of stages of variable angle and the gas generator has an annular combustion chamber.

MacDonald, A.G.

1976-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

134

MS_NatGas_Studyguide.indd  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

GAS-FUELING THE GAS-FUELING THE BLUE FLAME Natural Gas: It is colorless, shapeless, and in its pure form, odorless. For many years, it was discarded as worthless. Even today, some countries (although not the United States) still get rid of it by burning it in giant fl ares, so large they can be seen from the Space Shuttle. Yet, it is one of the most valuable fuels we have. Natural gas is made up mainly of a chemical called methane: a simple compound that has a carbon atom surrounded by four hydrogen atoms. Methane is highly fl ammable and burns almost completely. Th ere is no ash and very little air pollution. Natural gas provides nearly one-quarter of all the energy used in the United States. It is especially important in homes, where it supplies nearly half of all the energy used for cooking,

135

A fuzzy mixed integer goal programming approach for cooking and heating energy planning in rural India  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, a fuzzy mixed integer goal programming model (FMIGP) has been developed for rural cooking and heating energy planning in the Chikhli taluka of Buldhana district, Maharashtra, Central India. The model considers various scenarios such as ... Keywords: Energy planning, Fuzzy goal programming, Fuzzy sets

A. M. Jinturkar; S. S. Deshmukh

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

A study of object naming according to the manufacturing processes in a cooking activity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Usually, an intermediate object that appears for a short time during a process of production, for instance "minced onion," does not have a common and specific name. In this paper, we study how people designate such an intermediate object using their ... Keywords: cooking, human-robot communication, intermediate object, manufacturing process, natural language understanding, object naming, object recognition, recipe

Yoko Yamakata; Takuya Funatomi; Koh Kakusho; Michihiko Minoh

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

FoodManager: a cooking, eating and appliance controlling support system for the elderly  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

These days, many support systems are being developed to improve independence and quality of life of elderly and impaired people at home. Most of them have been hitherto focused on providing home healthcare-related services, and little attention has been ... Keywords: ambient assisted living, cooking, eating, elderly people, smart kitchen

Rosa Iglesias; Ibai Ibarguren; Nuria Gmez de Segura; Julen Ugalde; Leticia Coello; Miren Iturburu

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Cooking with Healthier Fats and Oils When you do use fats  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oil Margarine (stick) Cottonseed Oil Chicken Fat Lard Beef Tallow Bacon Grease Palm Oil Butter CoconutCooking with Healthier Fats and Oils When you do use fats and oils, choose those with less saturated fat, trans fat, and cholesterol. parent tips Percent of Saturated Fat Choose

Bandettini, Peter A.

139

DOE/EA-1662: Environmmental Assessment for Energy Conservation Standards for Cooking Products (April 2009)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environmental Assessment Environmental Assessment for 10 CFR Part 430 Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Certain Consumer Products (Dishwashers, Dehumidifiers, Microwave Ovens, and Electric and Gas Kitchen Ranges and Ovens) and for Certain Commercial and Industrial Equipment (Commercial Clothes Washers) April 2009 CHAPTER 16. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT TABLE OF CONTENTS 16.1 INTRODUCTION ......................................................................................................... 16-1 16.2 AIR EMISSIONS ANALYSIS...................................................................................... 16-1 16.2.1 Air Emissions Descriptions............................................................................................ 16-1

140

RADIO RANGING DEVICE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radio ranging device is described. It utilizes a super regenerative detector-oscillator in which echoes of transmitted pulses are received in proper phase to reduce noise energy at a selected range and also at multiples of the selected range.

Nieset, R.T.

1961-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas cooking range" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Range Fuels | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fuels Fuels Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Range Fuels Name Range Fuels Address 11101 W. 120th Avenue Place Broomfield, Colorado Zip 80021 Sector Biomass Product Uses a thermochemical process to turn biomass into synthetic gas and then fuel Website http://www.rangefuels.com/ Coordinates 39.915572°, -105.122053° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.915572,"lon":-105.122053,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

142

Measurements of coefficients of discharge for concentric flange-tapped square-edged orifice meters in natural gas over the Reynolds Number range 25,000 to 16,000,000. Technical note (Final)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The report describes the data acquisition systems and procedures used in the American Petroleum Institute (API)-sponsored orifice discharge coefficient project performed in natural gas flows and conducted at the test loop of the Natural Gas Pipeline Company of America (NGPL) in Joliet, Illinois. Measurements of orifice discharge coefficients for 6- and 10-inch diameter orifice meter runs were made using critical venturis for mass flowrate measurement with associated measurement of pressures and temperatures. Eleven venturis were calibrated at the Colorado Engineering Experiment Station, Inc. (CEESI). Measurements of absolute and differential pressure and temperature for venturi and orifice meter conditions were made using an automated data acquisition system. Temperature and pressure measurements were directly related to U.S. national measurement standards. Daily calibration of absolute and differential pressure transducers using pressure working standards was designed into the measurement procedures. Collected over a 2-year period, the database contains tests on 44 orifice plates in 8 beta ratios for two meter sizes (6- and 10-inches). The database contains 1,345 valid test points.

Whetstone, J.R.; Cleveland, W.G.; Bateman, B.R.; Sindt, C.F.

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

"1. Monroe","Coal","Detroit Edison Co",2944 "2. Donald C Cook","Nuclear","Indiana Michigan Power Co",2069  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Michigan" Michigan" "1. Monroe","Coal","Detroit Edison Co",2944 "2. Donald C Cook","Nuclear","Indiana Michigan Power Co",2069 "3. Ludington","Pumped Storage","Consumers Energy Co",1872 "4. Midland Cogeneration Venture","Gas","Midland Cogeneration Venture",1849 "5. Dan E Karn","Coal","Consumers Energy Co",1791 "6. Belle River","Coal","Detroit Edison Co",1518 "7. J H Campbell","Coal","Consumers Energy Co",1451 "8. St Clair","Coal","Detroit Edison Co",1397 "9. Fermi","Nuclear","Detroit Edison Co",1133

144

Long range dependence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The notion of long range dependence is discussed from a variety of points of view, and a new approach is suggested. A number of related topics is also discussed, including connections with non-stationary processes, with ergodic theory, self-similar processes ... Keywords: large deviations, long range dependence, rare events

Gennady Samorodnitsky

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

GAS TURBINES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the age of volatile and ever increasing natural gas fuel prices, strict new emission regulations and technological advancements, modern IGCC plants are the answer to growing market demands for efficient and environmentally friendly power generation. IGCC technology allows the use of low cost opportunity fuels, such as coal, of which there is a more than a 200-year supply in the U.S., and refinery residues, such as petroleum coke and residual oil. Future IGCC plants are expected to be more efficient and have a potential to be a lower cost solution to future CO2 and mercury regulations compared to the direct coal fired steam plants. Siemens has more than 300,000 hours of successful IGCC plant operational experience on a variety of heavy duty gas turbine models in Europe and the U.S. The gas turbines involved range from SGT5-2000E to SGT6-3000E (former designations are shown on Table 1). Future IGCC applications will extend this experience to the SGT5-4000F and SGT6-4000F/5000F/6000G gas turbines. In the currently operating Siemens 60 Hz fleet, the SGT6-5000F gas turbine has the most operating engines and the most cumulative operating hours. Over the years, advancements have increased its performance and decreased its emissions and life cycle costs without impacting reliability. Development has been initiated to verify its readiness for future IGCC application including syngas combustion system testing. Similar efforts are planned for the SGT6-6000G and SGT5-4000F/SGT6-4000F models. This paper discusses the extensive development programs that have been carried out to demonstrate that target emissions and engine operability can be achieved on syngas operation in advanced F-class 50 Hz and 60 Hz gas turbine based IGCC applications.

Power For L; Satish Gadde; Jianfan Wu; Anil Gulati; Gerry Mcquiggan; Berthold Koestlin; Bernd Prade

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

will benefit a wide range of industries, as well as the primary stakeholders within the oil and gas industry. Significant gas resources in the U.S. are in deep, HTHP reservoirs. A...

147

Electric Commercial Cooking Appliance Development Needs: Preparation and Characterization of Chromium- Coated Residual Heat Removal System Piping  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Foodservice establishments are the most energy-intensive customers in the commercial sector. This report addresses the need to improve the energy efficiency of electric cooking appliances by identifying current market opportunities and technologies for further development.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Data Assimilation R. L. Coulter, T. J. Martin, and D. R. Cook  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

R. L. Coulter, T. J. Martin, and D. R. Cook R. L. Coulter, T. J. Martin, and D. R. Cook Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, IL 60439 To investigate these problems, ARM science team members conducted two field studies near Boardman, Oregon, during June of 1991 and 1992. The site was chosen to provide strong contrasts in surface moisture while minimizing the differences in topography. The region, described in detail by Doran et al. (1992), consists of a substantial dry steppe (desert) upwind of an extensive area of heavily irrigated farm land, 15 km in width and divided into 800-m-diameter circular fields in a close packed array, in which wheat, alfalfa, corn, or potatoes were grown (Figure 1). A full rotation of the irrigation arm was completed approximately once every 28 or 35 h during the growing season. This region provides marked

149

McCook County, South Dakota: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

McCook County, South Dakota: Energy Resources McCook County, South Dakota: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 43.6310744°, -97.3516558° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.6310744,"lon":-97.3516558,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

150

Effects of cooking on levels of PCBs in the fillets of winter flounder (Pseudopleuronectes americanus)  

SciTech Connect

The Pacific Northwest Laboratory and Battelle Ocean Sciences performed a study to determine the effect of cooking on polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) levels in the fillets of winter flounder (Pseudopleuronectes americanus). Broiling, pan frying, and deep frying in oil were tested on fillets from 21 fish collected from New Bedford Harbor, Massachusetts, on February 21, 1991. The evaluation involved estimating the change in PCB concentrations using a mass-balance approach that factored the change in fillet weight resulting from cooking with the changes in PCB concentration expressed on a precooked wet-weight basis. Deep frying in oil resulted in a 47% reduction in total PCB levels in fillet tissue. Additionally, deep frying caused a 40% reduction in fillet mass. Pan frying and broiling resulted in statistically in insignificant increases in total PCB levels of 15% and 17%, respectively. Fillet mass reductions resulting from pan frying and broiling were 7% and 15%, respectively. The effects of cooking on 18 individual congeners generally paralleled the results observed for total PCB. All 18 congeners were significantly reduced by deep frying. Congener Cl{sub 2}(08) also was significantly reduced by either pan frying. Congeners Cl{sub 5}(105) and Cl{sub 5}(118) showed apparent significant increases in concentrations following pan frying. Congeners Cl{sub 5}(105), Cl{sub 5}(118), and C1{sub 6}(138) showed significant increases in concentration following broiling.

Poston, T.M. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Durell, G.S.; Koczwara, G.; Spellacy, A.M. [Battelle Ocean Sciences, Duxbury, MA (United States)

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Alabama Gas Corporation- Residential Natural Gas Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Alabama Gas Corporation (Alagasco) offers various rebates to its residential customers who replace older furnaces, water heaters, cooktops, ranges and clothes dryers with new, efficient equipment....

152

New Mexico Gas Company - Commercial Efficiency Programs | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial Efficiency Programs Commercial Efficiency Programs New Mexico Gas Company - Commercial Efficiency Programs < Back Eligibility Commercial Institutional Schools Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Other Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Program Info Expiration Date 3/31/2013 State New Mexico Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Storage Water Heater: $550 - 700 Tankless Water Heater: $250 - $300 Commercial Clothes Washer: $100 Furnace: $400 - $500 Boiler: $50 Condensing Boiler: $600 Gas Griddle: $50 Steam Cooker: $50 Gas Convection Oven: $1,000 Fryer: $700 Dish Washer: $150 Custom: $0.75/therm SCORE Pilot Program: Varies, contact New Mexico Gas Company The New Mexico Gas Company Commercial Energy Efficiency programs provide energy savings for businesses using natural gas for cooking and water

153

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

increases ranged from 5 to 16 cents at every market location tracked by Natural Gas Intelligence. And even though the storm was fast-moving and short-lived, cash prices for the...

154

RADIO RANGING DEVICE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A description is given of a super-regenerative oscillator ranging device provided with radiating and receiving means and being capable of indicating the occurrence of that distance between itself and a reflecting object which so phases the received echo of energy of a preceding emitted oscillation that the intervals between oscillations become uniform.

Bogle, R.W.

1960-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

155

High dynamic range imaging  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current display devices can display only a limited range of contrast and colors, which is one of the main reasons that most image acquisition, processing, and display techniques use no more than eight bits per color channel. This course outlines recent ...

Paul Debevec; Erik Reinhard; Greg Ward; Sumanta Pattanaik

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

RANGE DESIGN CRITERIA  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

RANGE DESIGN CRITERIA RANGE DESIGN CRITERIA U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Office of Health, Safety and Security AVAILABLE ONLINE AT: INITIATED BY: http://www.hss.energy.gov Office of Health, Safety and Security Notices This document is intended for the exclusive use of elements of the Department of Energy (DOE), to include the National Nuclear Security Administration, their contractors, and other government agencies/individuals authorized to use DOE facilities. DOE disclaims any and all liability for personal injury or property damage due to use of this document in any context by any organization, group, or individual, other than during official government activities. Local DOE management is responsible for the proper execution of firearms-related programs for

157

Neutron range spectrometer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A neutron range spectrometer and method for determining the neutron energy spectrum of a neutron emitting source are disclosed. Neutrons from the source are colliminated along a collimation axis and a position sensitive neutron counter is disposed in the path of the collimated neutron beam. The counter determines positions along the collimation axis of interactions between the neutrons in the neutron beam and a neutron-absorbing material in the counter. From the interaction positions, a computer analyzes the data and determines the neutron energy spectrum of the neutron beam. The counter is preferably shielded and a suitable neutron-absorbing material is He-3. 1 fig.

Manglos, S.H.

1988-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

158

Natural-gas liquids  

SciTech Connect

Casinghead gasoline or natural gasoline, now more suitably known as natural-gas liquids (NGL), was a nuisance when first found, but was developed into a major and profitable commodity. This part of the petroleum industry began at about the turn of the century, and more than 60 yr later the petroleum industry recovers approx. one million bbl of natural-gas liquids a day from 30 billion cu ft of natural gas processed in more than 600 gasoline plants. Although casinghead gasoline first was used for automobile fuel, natural-gas liquids now are used for fuel, industrial solvents, aviation blending stock, synthetic rubber, and many other petrochemical uses. Production from the individual plants is shipped by tank car, tank truck, pipeline, and tankers all over the world. Most of the natural-gas liquids come from wet natural gas which contains a considerable quantity of vapor, ranging from 0.5 to 6 gal/Mcf, and some particularly rich gases contain even more which can be liquefied. Nonassociated gas is generally clean, with a comparatively small quantity of gasoline, 0.1 to 0.5 gas/Mcf. The natural-gas liquids branch of the industry is build around the condensation of vapors in natural gas. Natural-gas liquids are processed either by the compression method or by adsorption processes.

Blackstock, W.B.; McCullough, G.W.; McCutchan, R.C.

1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Lake Gas Recovery Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Lake Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Facility Lake Gas Recovery Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Cook County, Illinois Coordinates 41.7376587°, -87.697554° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.7376587,"lon":-87.697554,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

160

CID Gas Recovery Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CID Gas Recovery Biomass Facility CID Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name CID Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Facility CID Gas Recovery Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Cook County, Illinois Coordinates 41.7376587°, -87.697554° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.7376587,"lon":-87.697554,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas cooking range" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Efficiency Maine Business Programs (Unitil Gas) - Commercial Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Efficiency Maine Business Programs (Unitil Gas) - Commercial Energy Efficiency Maine Business Programs (Unitil Gas) - Commercial Energy Efficiency Programs (Maine) Efficiency Maine Business Programs (Unitil Gas) - Commercial Energy Efficiency Programs (Maine) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Institutional Multi-Family Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Appliances & Electronics Program Info State Maine Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Furnaces; $1000 Condensing Boilers: $1500 - $4500 Non-Condensing Boilers: $750-$3,000 Steam Boiler: $800 or $1/MBtuh Infrared Unit Heaters: $500 Natural Gas Warm-Air Unit Heaters: $600 Custom/ECM: Contact Unitil Cooking Equipment: $600-$2000 Provider Rebate Program Efficiency Maine offers natural gas efficiency rebates to Unitil customers.

162

Range imaging laser radar  

SciTech Connect

A laser source is operated continuously and modulated periodically (typicy sinusoidally). A receiver imposes another periodic modulation on the received optical signal, the modulated signal being detected by an array of detectors of the integrating type. Range to the target determined by measuring the phase shift of the intensity modulation on the received optical beam relative to a reference. The receiver comprises a photoemitter for converting the reflected, periodically modulated, return beam to an accordingly modulated electron stream. The electron stream is modulated by a local demodulation signal source and subsequently converted back to a photon stream by a detector. A charge coupled device (CCD) array then averages and samples the photon stream to provide an electrical signal in accordance with the photon stream.

Scott, Marion W. (Albuquerque, NM)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Lunar Laser Ranging Science  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analysis of Lunar Laser Ranging (LLR) data provides science results: gravitational physics and ephemeris information from the orbit, lunar science from rotation and solid-body tides, and Earth science. Sensitive tests of gravitational physics include the Equivalence Principle, limits on the time variation of the gravitational constant G, and geodetic precession. The equivalence principle test is used for an accurate determination of the parametrized post-Newtonian (PPN) parameter \\beta. Lunar ephemerides are a product of the LLR analysis used by current and future spacecraft missions. The analysis is sensitive to astronomical parameters such as orbit, masses and obliquity. The dissipation-caused semimajor axis rate is 37.9 mm/yr and the associated acceleration in orbital longitude is -25.7 ''/cent^2, dominated by tides on Earth with a 1% lunar contribution. Lunar rotational variation has sensitivity to interior structure, physical properties, and energy dissipation. The second-degree lunar Love numbers are detected; k_2 has an accuracy of 11%. Lunar tidal dissipation is strong and its Q has a weak dependence on tidal frequency. A fluid core of about 20% the Moon's radius is indicated by the dissipation data. Evidence for the oblateness of the lunar fluid-core/solid-mantle boundary is getting stronger. This would be independent evidence for a fluid lunar core. Moon-centered coordinates of four retroreflectors are determined. Station positions and motion, Earth rotation variations, nutation, and precession are determined from analyses. Extending the data span and improving range accuracy will yield improved and new scientific results. Adding either new retroreflectors or precise active transponders on the Moon would improve the accuracy of the science results.

James G. Williams; Dale H. Boggs; Slava G. Turyshev; J. Todd Ratcliff

2004-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

164

Gas, Mister, not gasoline  

SciTech Connect

A prototype rechargeable CNG commuter car with an LP-gas standby reserve avoids the need for area fueling stations while providing an emergency range-extending technique through its LPG system. Operating on a household power line, the charging compressor fills each tank to 1000 psig at an electric cost of less than 7 cents/100 CF of compressed gas. The four fuel tanks weigh only 120 lb and give the small Opel GT car a range of 75 miles. A 10-gal LPG tank adds 300 miles to this range.

Axworthy, R.T.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Can Deployment of Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Put Downward Pressure on Natural Gas Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a reduction in U.S. natural gas consumption, ranging fromhigh gas demand on U.S. natural gas consumption and price inU.S. wellhead price of natural gas and total gas consumption

Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Alcoholic fermentation of raw cassava starch by Rhizopus koji without cooking  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using only wheat bran koji from the Rhizopus strain, raw cassava starch and cassava pellets converted reasonably well to alcohol (ethanol) without cooking at 35 degrees C and pH 4.5-5.0. When the initial broth contained 30 g raw cassava starch, 10 g Rhizopus species koji, and 100 mL tap water, 12.1 g of alcohol was recovered by final distillation from fermented broth. In this case, 12.1 g alcohol corresponds to an 85.5% conversion rate based on the theoretical value of the starch content. When the initial broth contained 40 g cassava starch, 14.1 g of alcohol was recovered, where 14.1 g corresponds to a 74.5% conversion rate. The alcoholic fermentation process described in the present work is considered more effective and reasonable than the process using raw starch without cooking reported until now, since the new process makes it unnecessary to add yeast cells and glucoamylase preparation. (Refs. 15).

Fuijo, Y.; Suyanadona, P.; Attasampunna, P.; Ueda, S.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Alcoholic fermentation of raw cassava starch by Rhizopus koji without cooking  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using only wheat bran koji from the Rhizopus strain, raw cassava starch and casava pellets converted reasonably well to alcohol (ethanol) without cooking at 35/sup 0/C and pH 4.5-5.0. When the initial broth contained 30 g raw cassava starch, 10 g Rhizopus sp. koji, and 100 mL tap water, 12.1 g of alcohol was recovered by final distillation from fermented broth. In this case, 12.1 g alcohol corresponds to an 85.5% conversion rate based on the theoretical value of the starch content. When the initial broth contained 40 g cassava starch, 14.1 g of alcohol was recovered, where 14.1 g corresponds to a 74.5% conversion rate. The alcoholic fermentation process described in the present work is considered more effective and reasonable than the process using raw starch without cooking reported until now, since the new process makes it unnecessary to add yeast cells and glucoamylase preparation.

Fujio, Y.; Suyanadona, P.; Attasampunna, P.; Ueda, S.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Ruslands Gas.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This paper is about Russian natural gas and the possibility for Russia to use its reserves of natural gas politically towards the European Union to (more)

Elkjr, Jonas Bondegaard

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Gas intrusion into SPR caverns  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The conditions and occurrence of gas in crude oil stored in Strategic Petroleum Reserve, SPR, caverns is characterized in this report. Many caverns in the SPR show that gas has intruded into the oil from the surrounding salt dome. Historical evidence and the analyses presented here suggest that gas will continue to intrude into many SPR caverns in the future. In considering why only some caverns contain gas, it is concluded that the naturally occurring spatial variability in salt permeability can explain the range of gas content measured in SPR caverns. Further, it is not possible to make a one-to-one correlation between specific geologic phenomena and the occurrence of gas in salt caverns. However, gas is concluded to be petrogenic in origin. Consequently, attempts have been made to associate the occurrence of gas with salt inhomogeneities including anomalies and other structural features. Two scenarios for actual gas intrusion into caverns were investigated for consistency with existing information. These scenarios are gas release during leaching and gas permeation through salt. Of these mechanisms, the greater consistency comes from the belief that gas permeates to caverns through the salt. A review of historical operating data for five Bryan Mound caverns loosely supports the hypothesis that higher operating pressures reduce gas intrusion into caverns. This conclusion supports a permeability intrusion mechanism. Further, it provides justification for operating the caverns near maximum operating pressure to minimize gas intrusion. Historical gas intrusion rates and estimates of future gas intrusion are given for all caverns.

Hinkebein, T.E.; Bauer, S.J.; Ehgartner, B.L.; Linn, J.K.; Neal, J.T.; Todd, J.L.; Kuhlman, P.S.; Gniady, C.T. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Underground Storage Technology Dept.; Giles, H.N. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States). Strategic Petroleum Reserve

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Natural Gas Pathways and Fuel Economy Guide Comparison  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

I presentation slides: Natural Gas pathways and Fuel economy Guide Comparison Bob Wimmer, Toyota Natural Gas Pathways Toyota estimation Vehicle Total Fuel efficiency Range...

171

Long Range Ordered (LRO) Superalloys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Specialty Steel Division. Mayer Street. Bridgeville, ... Designers of components for use in the gas turbine industry continually desire materials with improved high

172

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. 5, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Friday, November 13, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, November 4, 2009) Natural gas spot prices fell over the week at most market locations, declining on average 16 cents per million Btu (MMBtu). Decreases ranged between 2 cents and 77 cents per MMBtu. In the few trading locations where prices rose, increases were modest, ranging between 1 and 4 cents per MMBtu. The Henry Hub natural gas spot price fell 10 cents on the week, closing at $4.49 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the December 2009 natural gas contract fell 34 cents per MMBtu, or 7 percent. The November contract expired on Wednesday, October 28, at $4.289 per MMBtu.

173

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. 3, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: September 10, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, September 2, 2009) Natural gas prices posted significant decreases at both the spot and futures markets since last Wednesday. Spot prices fell at all market locations in the lower 48 States, with decreases ranging between 7 and 68 cents per million Btu (MMBtu). The price at the Henry Hub spot market fell to $2.25 per MMBtu, decreasing by 51 cents or 18 percent. As of yesterday, the price of natural gas at the Henry Hub was the lowest since February 15, 2002, when natural gas at this location traded at $2.18 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the natural gas futures

174

Synthesis gas production  

SciTech Connect

Raw synthesis gas produced by the gasification of coal, heavy oil or similar carbonaceous material is contacted with a reforming catalyst at a temperature in the range between about 1000/sup 0/ and about 1800/sup 0/F and at a pressure between about 100 and about 2000 psig prior to adjustment of the carbon monoxide-to-hydrogen ratio and treatment of the gas to increase its Btu content. This catalytic reforming step eliminates C/sub 2/+ compounds in the gas which tend to form tarry downstream waste products requiring further treatment, obviates polymerization problems which may otherwise interfere with upgrading of the gas by means of the water gas shift and methanation reactions, and improves overall process thermal efficiency by making possible efficient low level heat recovery.

Kalina, T.; Moore, R.E.

1977-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

175

Weapons assessment efficiencies through use of nondestructive laser gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Weapons assessment efficiencies through use of nondestructive laser Weapons assessment efficiencies through use of nondestructive laser gas sampling Weapons assessment efficiencies through use of nondestructive laser gas sampling Nondestructive laser welding process far less expensive, no underground testing. June 8, 2012 Nondestructive Laser Gas Sampling Nondestructive Laser Gas Sampling is expected to save several million dollars per year and requires no underground testing. "We're continually innovating and working to improve the way we do business, and NDLGS is a big step for us," said National Nuclear Security Administration Deputy Administrator for Defense Programs Don Cook. New weapons assessment technology engineered: nondestructive laser welding process far less expensive, no underground testing Valveless Laser Processing

176

Nuclear Power Plant License Renewal Environmental Compliance Program: Donald C. Cook Nuclear Case Study, Phase 1--Preliminary Planni ng  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes preliminary environmental compliance planning activities that American Electric Power (AEP) is taking to preserve the option of renewing the Donald C. Cook Nuclear Plant license. The activities are based on a program plan manual published previously by EPRI. The report includes an evaluation of the usefulness of that manual.

1997-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

177

AOCS/SFA Edible Oils Manual, 2nd EditionChapter 7 Use of Edible Oil in the Cooking Process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

AOCS/SFA Edible Oils Manual, 2nd Edition Chapter 7 Use of Edible Oil in the Cooking Process Food Science eChapters Food Science & Technology AOCS 8E134A7EA3AB61D946A428416A4138F4 Press Downloadable pdf of

178

Life-cycle analysis of shale gas and natural gas.  

SciTech Connect

The technologies and practices that have enabled the recent boom in shale gas production have also brought attention to the environmental impacts of its use. Using the current state of knowledge of the recovery, processing, and distribution of shale gas and conventional natural gas, we have estimated up-to-date, life-cycle greenhouse gas emissions. In addition, we have developed distribution functions for key parameters in each pathway to examine uncertainty and identify data gaps - such as methane emissions from shale gas well completions and conventional natural gas liquid unloadings - that need to be addressed further. Our base case results show that shale gas life-cycle emissions are 6% lower than those of conventional natural gas. However, the range in values for shale and conventional gas overlap, so there is a statistical uncertainty regarding whether shale gas emissions are indeed lower than conventional gas emissions. This life-cycle analysis provides insight into the critical stages in the natural gas industry where emissions occur and where opportunities exist to reduce the greenhouse gas footprint of natural gas.

Clark, C.E.; Han, J.; Burnham, A.; Dunn, J.B.; Wang, M. (Energy Systems); ( EVS)

2012-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

179

Build an oven, cook a meal: How solar energy empowered women in Costa Rica  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A pilot solar cooking project in the hot, northern province of Guanacaste promises to serve as a model for community groups wanting to build their own solar ovens. An $8,000 (US) grant has been awarded by the Canadian Embassy in Costa Rica to take the Guanacaste project into a second stage in 1990-91. Two construction workshops, with twelve participants in each, are planned in communities near Oriente. Three women from the Oriente group will have paid jobs as organizational facilitators and workshop supervisors. In popular education this is called the multiplier effect - the users of solar cookers construct the ovens themselves, and then instruct others to do the same. 3 refs.

Blankenship, J. (Canadian Univ. Service Organization, San Jose (Costa Rica))

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

The WIRED Survey. IV. New Dust Disks from the McCook & Sion White Dwarf Catalog  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have compiled photometric data from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer All Sky Survey and other archival sources for the more than 2200 objects in the original McCook & Sion Catalog of Spectroscopically Identified White Dwarfs. We applied color-selection criteria to identify 28 targets whose infrared spectral energy distributions depart from the expectation for the white dwarf photosphere alone. Seven of these are previously known white dwarfs with circumstellar dust disks, five are known central stars of planetary nebulae, and six were excluded for being known binaries or having possible contamination of their infrared photometry. We fit white dwarf models to the spectral energy distributions of the remaining ten targets, and find seven new candidates with infrared excess suggesting the presence of a circumstellar dust disk. We compare the model dust disk properties for these new candidates with a comprehensive compilation of previously published parameters for known white dwarfs with dust disks....

Hoard, D W; Wachter, Stefanie; Leisawitz, David T; Cohen, Martin

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas cooking range" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Long range Energy Alternatives Planning (LEAP) System | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Long range Energy Alternatives Planning (LEAP) System Long range Energy Alternatives Planning (LEAP) System (Redirected from LEAP) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Long range Energy Alternatives Planning System Agency/Company /Organization: Stockholm Environment Institute Sector: Climate, Energy Focus Area: Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Biomass, - Anaerobic Digestion, - Biofuels, - Biomass Combustion, - Biomass Gasification, - Biomass Pyrolysis, - Landfill Gas, - Waste to Energy, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, - Central Plant, Food Supply, Forestry, Geothermal, Goods and Materials, - Embodied Energy, - Materials, Greenhouse Gas, Ground Source Heat Pumps, Hydrogen, Industry, - Industrial Processes, Offsets and Certificates, People and Policy, Solar, - Concentrating Solar Power, - Solar Hot Water, - Solar PV, - Solar Ventilation Preheat, Transportation, Water Conservation, Water Power, Wind

182

Long range Energy Alternatives Planning (LEAP) System | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Long range Energy Alternatives Planning (LEAP) System Long range Energy Alternatives Planning (LEAP) System Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Long range Energy Alternatives Planning System Agency/Company /Organization: Stockholm Environment Institute Sector: Climate, Energy Focus Area: Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Biomass, - Anaerobic Digestion, - Biofuels, - Biomass Combustion, - Biomass Gasification, - Biomass Pyrolysis, - Landfill Gas, - Waste to Energy, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, - Central Plant, Food Supply, Forestry, Geothermal, Goods and Materials, - Embodied Energy, - Materials, Greenhouse Gas, Ground Source Heat Pumps, Hydrogen, Industry, - Industrial Processes, Offsets and Certificates, People and Policy, Solar, - Concentrating Solar Power, - Solar Hot Water, - Solar PV, - Solar Ventilation Preheat, Transportation, Water Conservation, Water Power, Wind

183

Gas purification  

SciTech Connect

Natural gas having a high carbon dioxide content is contacted with sea water in an absorber at or near the bottom of the ocean to produce a purified natural gas.

Cook, C.F.; Hays, G.E.

1982-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

184

Natural Gas  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas. Under the baseline winter weather scenario, EIA expects end-of-October working gas inventories will total 3,830 billion cubic feet (Bcf) and end March ...

185

Columbia Gas of Massachusetts - Commercial Energy Efficiency...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Heat recovery, Processing and Manufacturing Equipment, Programmable Thermostats, Steam-system upgrades, Water Heaters, Commercial Cooking Equipment, Tankless Water Heaters...

186

Gas Week  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Presented by: Guy F. Caruso, EIA AdministratorPresented to: Gas WeekHouston, TexasSeptember 24, 2003

Information Center

2003-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

187

Evaluation of antioxidative/antimicrobial potential of Oriental nutraceutical herb extracts in raw and cooked goat meat and beef products  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study was conducted to determine the effects of alcohol extracts of several Oriental nutraceutical herbs on storage properties of raw and cooked ground goat meat and beef. White peony root, red peony root, sappanwood stem, rehmania root, moutan cortex root, angelica root, and rosemary leaves were dehydrated, extracted with 95% ethanol, and freed of the solvent. The sappanwood, moutan cortex, and rosemary samples contained the largest amounts of total phenolics. Extracts were added to ground goat meat, and treated meat samples were aerobically stored at 4C for 6 days, with or without cooking. Each herbal extract was also added to ground beef at 0.25% (w/w), with or without adding NaCl at 2% (w/w), and stored as raw and cooked patties. Peony (red or white) root extracts, whether added at 0.5, 1, or 2% levels, showed strong antioxidant effects in cooked goat meat, decreasing TBARS content more than 90% at day 6. The extracts were less antioxidative in raw goat meat, lowering the day-6 TBARS content less than 50%. The extracts from rehmania root, sappanwood, and moutan cortex were as antioxidative as the extracts from red and white peony roots, decreasing the TBARS content in cooked goat meat more than 88% at day 6. When red peony root extract was evaluated for antimicrobial activity in raw goat meat, it decreased APCs at day 3, but not at day 6. Extracts from white and red peony roots, sappanwood, moutan cortex, and rosemary were highly antioxidative in both raw and cooked beef patties, decreasing TBARS more than 88% by day 6. However, rehmania and angelica root extracts were less inhibitory. The antioxidant activity of the herbal extracts correlated (P 0.05) with total phenolic levels. All the extracts, other than rosemary extract, showed no antimicrobial activity in raw beef patties at either day 3 or day 6, presumably due to the relatively high microbial counts found in the initial untreated meat. Rosemary extract decreased APCs only at day 3.

Han, Jaejoon

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Tennessee Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Tennessee Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

189

Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

190

Arkansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Arkansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

191

Oklahoma Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Oklahoma Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

192

Louisiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Louisiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

193

Maryland Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Maryland Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

194

Kentucky Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Kentucky Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

195

Pennsylvania Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Pennsylvania Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

196

Colorado Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Colorado Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

197

Michigan Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Michigan Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

198

Deepwater Oil & Gas Resources  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The United States has significant natural gas and oil reserves. But many of these resources are increasingly harder to locate and bring into production. To help meet this challenge, the U.S. Department of Energys Office of Fossil Energy over the years has amassed wide ranging expertise in areas related to deepwater resource location, production, safety and environmental protection.

199

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6, 2009 6, 2009 Next Release: July 23, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, July 15, 2009) Natural gas spot prices rose during the week in all trading locations. Price increases ranged between 6 cents and 48 cents per million Btu (MMBtu), with the biggest increases occurring in the Rocky Mountain region. During the report week, the spot price at the Henry Hub increased 15 cents or 5 percent to $3.37 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the natural gas near-month contract (August 2009) decreased 7 cents to $3.283 per MMBtu from $3.353 the previous week. During its tenure as the near-month contract, the August 2009 contract has lost 66 cents. As of Friday, July 10, 2009, working gas in storage rose to 2,886

200

Natural Gas Prices: Well Above Recent Averages  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The recent surge in spot prices at the Henry Hub are well above a typical range for 1998 ... gas prices gradually declining after the winter heating . ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas cooking range" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Range of Glaciers: The Exploration of the Northern Cascade Range  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

D. Hook, Reference Librarian, University of Idaho Library,Moscow, Idaho 83844-2350, (208) 885-6066.Robert D. Hook University of Idaho, USA Fred Beckey. Range

Hook, Robert D.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

NSTAR (Gas) - Commercial Energy Efficiency Programs | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NSTAR (Gas) - Commercial Energy Efficiency Programs NSTAR (Gas) - Commercial Energy Efficiency Programs NSTAR (Gas) - Commercial Energy Efficiency Programs < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Other Appliances & Electronics Commercial Weatherization Water Heating Program Info State Massachusetts Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Forced Hot Water Boilers: $500-$15,000 Boiler Reset Controls: $225 Condensing Unit or Water Heater: $500 On-Demand Unit Heater: $1000 or $1600 Warm Air Furnaces: $400-$800 Indirect Water Heater/Boiler: $400 Tankless Water Heater: $500 or $800 Storage Water Heaters: $50 or $100 Low Intensity Infrared Heating Units: $500 High Efficiency Cooking Equipment: up to $1,000 Steam Traps: $25 Programmable Thermostats: $25

203

Property:Wave Period Range(s) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wave Period Range(s) Wave Period Range(s) Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Wave Period Range(s) Property Type String Pages using the property "Wave Period Range(s)" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 1 1.5-ft Wave Flume Facility + 10.0 + 10-ft Wave Flume Facility + 0.0 + 11-ft Wave Flume Facility + 10.0 + 2 2-ft Flume Facility + 10.0 + 3 3-ft Wave Flume Facility + 10.0 + 5 5-ft Wave Flume Facility + 10.0 + 6 6-ft Wave Flume Facility + 10.0 + A Alden Large Flume + 2.1 + Alden Small Flume + 0.0 + Alden Wave Basin + 1.0 + B Breakwater Research Facility + 0.0 + C Carderock Maneuvering & Seakeeping Basin + 0.0 + Carderock Tow Tank 2 + 0.0 + Carderock Tow Tank 3 + 0.0 + Chase Tow Tank + 3.1 + Coastal Harbors Modeling Facility + 2.3 +

204

Environmental review for Site A/Plot M, Palos Forest Preserve, Cook County, Illinois  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is an environmental review of two sites known as Site A and Plot M, which are located in the Palos Forest Preserve of the Forest Preserve District of Cook County, approximately 20 mi southwest of downtown Chicago and about 3 mi east of the current site of Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). An enlarged map of the area around the sites is shown in a figure. Site A covers about 19 acres, and Plot M covers about 1 acre. This document consists of the following sections: a review of the site history and environment, a description of the conceptual pathway models for both Site A and Plot M and a brief discussion of previous sampling events, a discussion of possible transport pathways, an evaluation of the Phase 2 Work Plan for Site A, a review of the applicable or relevant and appropriate regulations (ARARs), and recommendations for future study. The recommendations are based on an evaluation of previously collected data. Where data were sufficient, a geologic conceptual model was developed. If data were not sufficient to develop a model, recommendations for data collection are made. A new base map was developed for the site by using the base survey conducted in the 1940s, aerial photographs dating back to 1948, and site visits.

Biang, R.P.; Yuen, C.R.; Avci, H.I.; Haffenden, R.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Gas mixtures for gas-filled particle detectors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Improved binary and tertiary gas mixtures for gas-filled particle detectors are provided. The components are chosen on the basis of the principle that the first component is one gas or mixture of two gases having a large electron scattering cross section at energies of about 0.5 eV and higher, and the second component is a gas (Ar) having a very small cross section at and below aout 0.5 eV, whereby fast electrons in the gaseous mixture are slowed into the energy range of about 0.5 eV where the cross section for the mixture is small and hence the electron mean free path is large. The reduction in both the cross section and the electron energy results in an increase in the drift velocity of the electrons in the gas mixtures over that for the separate components for a range of E/P (pressure-reduced electron field) values. Several gas mixtures are provided that provide faster response in gas-filled detectors for convenient E/P ranges as compared with conventional gas mixtures.

Christophorou, Loucas G. (Oak Ridge, TN); McCorkle, Dennis L. (Knoxville, TN); Maxey, David V. (Knoxville, TN); Carter, James G. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Improved gas mixtures for gas-filled radiation detectors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Improved binary and ternary gas mixtures for gas-filled radiation detectors are provided. The components are chosen on the basis of the principle that the first component is one molecular gas or mixture of two molecular gases having a large electron scattering cross section at energies of about 0.5 eV and higher, and the second component is a noble gas having a very small cross section at and below about 1.0 eV, whereby fast electrons in the gaseous mixture are slowed into the energy range of about 0.5 eV where the cross section for the mixture is small and hence the electron mean free path is large. The reduction in both the cross section and the electron energy results in an increase in the drift velocity of the electrons in the gas mixtures over that for the separate components for a range of E/P (pressure-reduced electric field) values. Several gas mixtures are provided that provide faster response in gas-filled detectors for convenient E/P ranges as compared with conventional gas mixtures.

Christophorou, L.G.; McCorkle, D.L.; Maxey, D.V.; Carter, J.G.

1980-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

207

Gas mixtures for gas-filled radiation detectors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Improved binary and ternary gas mixtures for gas-filled radiation detectors are provided. The components are chosen on the basis of the principle that the first component is one molecular gas or mixture of two molecular gases having a large electron scattering cross section at energies of about 0.5 eV and higher, and the second component is a noble gas having a very small cross section at and below about 1.0 eV, whereby fast electrons in the gaseous mixture are slowed into the energy range of about 0.5 eV where the cross section for the mixture is small and hence the electron mean free path is large. The reduction in both the cross section and the electron energy results in an increase in the drift velocity of the electrons in the gas mixtures over that for the separate components for a range of E/P (pressure-reduced electric field) values. Several gas mixtures are provided that provide faster response in gas-filled detectors for convenient E/P ranges as compared with conventional gas mixtures.

Christophorou, Loucas G. (Oak Ridge, TN); McCorkle, Dennis L. (Knoxville, TN); Maxey, David V. (Knoxville, TN); Carter, James G. (Knoxville, TN)

1982-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

208

Natural Gas  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Energy Department supports research and policy options to ensure environmentally sustainable domestic and global supplies of oil and natural gas.

209

Gas separating  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Feed gas is directed tangentially along the non-skin surface of gas separation membrane modules comprising a cylindrical bundle of parallel contiguous hollow fibers supported to allow feed gas to flow from an inlet at one end of a cylindrical housing through the bores of the bundled fibers to an outlet at the other end while a component of the feed gas permeates through the fibers, each having the skin side on the outside, through a permeate outlet in the cylindrical casing. 3 figs.

Gollan, A.

1988-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

210

Missouri Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Missouri Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6

211

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

,366 ,366 95,493 1.08 0 0.00 1 0.03 29,406 0.56 1,206 0.04 20,328 0.64 146,434 0.73 - Natural Gas 1996 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: South Carolina South Carolina 88. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas South Carolina, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ...........................................

212

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0,216 0,216 50,022 0.56 135 0.00 49 1.67 85,533 1.63 8,455 0.31 45,842 1.45 189,901 0.95 - Natural Gas 1996 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: M a r y l a n d Maryland 68. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Maryland, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 9 7 7 7 8 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 33 28 26 22 135 From Oil Wells ...........................................

213

APS Long Range Operations Schedule  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Shutdown Planning Shutdown Planning Planning Templates Shutdown Planning Schedules: Current Shutdown Schedule Archives: 2006 - 2013 APS Long-Range Operations Schedule: 2014 Archives: 2013 | 2012 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 2003 | 2002 | 2001 | 2000 1999 | 1998 | 1997 | 1996 APS Long-Range Operations Schedule (Fiscal Year 2014) Alternate Formats: iCal | Excel | PDF APS Long-Range Operation Schedule 2013-3 2014-1 2014-2 Sep Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2

214

Adaptively parallelizing distributed range queries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We consider the problem of how to best parallelize range queries in a massive scale distributed database. In traditional systems the focus has been on maximizing parallelism, for example by laying out data to achieve the highest throughput. However, ...

Ymir Vigfusson; Adam Silberstein; Brian F. Cooper; Rodrigo Fonseca

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. 4, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: October 1, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, September 23, 2009) Natural gas prices posted across-the-board increases at both the spot and futures markets since last Wednesday. Spot prices rose at almost all market locations in the lower 48 States, with increases ranging between 2 and 23 cents per million Btu (MMBtu). The price at the Henry Hub spot market rose to $3.43 per MMBtu, increasing by 15 cents or about 5 percent. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the natural gas futures contract for October delivery increased by 10 cents to $3.860 per MMBtu. The November contract also posted gains this week, albeit much smaller at 4

216

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4, 2009 4, 2009 Next Release: May 21, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, May 13, 2009) Since Wednesday, May 6, natural gas spot prices rose at most market locations in the Lower 48 States, with increases ranging between 49 and 95 cents per million Btu (MMBtu). Prices at the Henry Hub climbed by 75 cents per MMBtu, or about 20 percent, to $4.42 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for June delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday, May 13, at $4.333 per MMBtu, increasing by 45 cents or about 11 percent during the report week. Natural gas in storage was 2,013 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of May 8, which is about 23 percent above the 5-year average (2004-2008),

217

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 3, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, May 20, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, May 12, 2010) Natural gas spot prices increased at nearly all market locations in the lower 48 States, with price hikes ranging between 6 and 30 cents per million Btu (MMBtu). The Henry Hub spot price ended the report week yesterday, May 12, at $4.18 per MMBtu, 18 cents higher than the preceding week. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for June delivery at the Henry Hub ended trading yesterday at $4.284 per MMBtu, increasing by 29 cents or about 7 percent during the report week. Natural gas in storage increased to 2,089 billion cubic feet (Bcf)

218

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 5, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, September 22, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, September 14, 2011) A touch of autumn in the air combined with hopes for the eventual return of winter was likely the catalyst enabling natural gas prices to recapture the $4 mark this week despite an environment of negative consumption fundamentals and continued strong production. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the October 2011 natural gas contract advanced 9.9 cents per million Btu (MMBtu) to close at $4.039 per MMBtu over the week. The Henry Hub price oscillated in a similar but narrow range before closing up 5 cents for the week at $4.01 per MMBtu on September 14. Working natural gas in storage rose last week to 3,112 billion cubic

219

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1, 2009 1, 2009 Next Release: May 28, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, May 20, 2009) Natural gas prices at most trading locations fell on the week because of mild weather as well as continued weakness in the economy. Declines ranged between 37 cents at the Dracut trading area in the Northeast to 90 cents at the El Paso non-Bondad area in the Rocky Mountains. The Henry Hub spot price fell by 67 cents during the week to $3.75 per million Btu (MMBtu). Moving in the opposite direction of natural gas prices, the price of the West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil contract rose on the week to $61.45 per barrel, or $10.59 per MMBtu. Oil prices are now at their highest level since November 10, 2008, having more than doubled since falling to a

220

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9, 2009 9, 2009 Next Release: February 26, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, February 18, 2009) Since Wednesday, February 11, natural gas spot prices declined at virtually all market locations in the Lower 48 States, with decreases ranging between 3 and 78 cents per MMBtu. Prices at the Henry Hub fell 33 cents per million Btu (MMBtu), or about 7 percent, to $4.35 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for March delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday (February 18) at $4.214 per MMBtu, declining 32 cents per MMBtu or about 7 percent during the report week. Natural gas in storage was 1,996 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of February 13, which is about 8.4 percent above the 5-year average

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas cooking range" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7, 2009 7, 2009 Next Release: September 3, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, August 26, 2009) Since Wednesday, August 19, natural gas spot prices fell at all market locations, with decreases ranging between 10 and 39 cents per million Btu (MMBtu). Prices at the Henry Hub declined by 26 cents per MMBtu, or about 9 percent, to $2.76 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for September delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday, August 26, at $2.91 per MMBtu, decreasing by 21 cents or about 7 percent during the report week. Natural gas in storage was 3,258 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of August 21, which is about 18 percent above the 5-year average (2004-2008),

222

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2009 2, 2009 Next Release: March 19, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, March 11, 2009) Since Wednesday, March 4, natural gas spot prices declined at most market locations in the Lower 48 States, with decreases ranging up to 59 cents per million Btu (MMBtu). Prices at the Henry Hub fell 31 cents per MMBtu, or about 7 percent, to $3.92 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for April delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday, March 11, at $3.80 per MMBtu, declining 54 cents per MMBtu or about 12 percent during the report week. Natural gas in storage was 1,681 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of March 6, which is about 13 percent above the 5-year average (2004-2008),

223

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6, 2009 6, 2009 Next Release: August 13, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, August 5, 2009) Natural gas prices posted increases at both the spot and futures markets since last Wednesday, with price increases at the spot market ranging between 12 and 43 cents per million Btu (MMBtu). During the report week, the price at the Henry Hub spot market rose to $3.61 per MMBtu, increasing by 20 cents or 5.9 percent. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the natural gas futures contract for September delivery increased by 49 cents to $4.042 per MMBtu. The September futures contract closed above $4.00 per MMBtu for the first time since June 19 on Monday, reaching $4.031 per MMBtu. The near-month

224

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9, 2009 9, 2009 Next Release: April 16, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, April 8, 2009) Since Wednesday, April 1, natural gas spot prices declined at most market locations in the Lower 48 States, with decreases ranging up to 40 cents per million Btu (MMBtu). Prices at the Henry Hub fell by 6 cents per MMBtu, or about 2 percent, to $3.50. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for May delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday, April 8, at $3.63 per MMBtu, declining by 7 cents or about 2 percent during the report week. Natural gas in storage was 1,674 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of April 3, which is about 23 percent above the 5-year average (2004-2008),

225

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. 8, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: October 15, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, October 7, 2009) Since last Wednesday, September 30, natural gas prices rose across the board, with increases ranging between 37 cents and $1.32 per million Btu (MMBtu). Natural gas prices oscillated by large amounts at most market locations across the United States. The Henry Hub began the report week at $3.24 per MMBtu, fell to $2.32 on October 2, and ended trading yesterday at $3.70 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the near-month contract for November ended the week at $4.904 per MMBtu, a slight increase from the previous week’s value of $4.841 per MMBtu.

226

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. 2, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: October 29, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, October 21, 2009) Since Wednesday, October 14, natural gas spot prices increased at all market locations in the lower 48 States, with price hikes generally ranging between $0.31 and $1.14 per million Btu (MMBtu). Prices at the Henry Hub climbed 98 cents per MMBtu, or about 26 percent, to $4.80 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for November delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday, October 21, at $5.10 per MMBtu, increasing by 66 cents or about 15 percent during the report week. Natural gas in storage was a record-setting 3,734 billion cubic feet

227

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 4, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, October 21, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, October 13, 2010) Natural gas spot prices posted gains at most markets across the lower 48 States since Wednesday, October 6, accompanied by double-digit increases in trading since the holiday weekend. Price increases on the week ranged up to 25 cents per million Btu (MMBtu), with the Henry Hub natural gas spot price increasing $0.02 per MMBtu since last Wednesday, averaging $3.58 per MMBtu in trading yesterday, October 13. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for November delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday at $3.696 per MMBtu, falling by $0.169, or about 4 percent, since the previous Wednesday.

228

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

16, 2009 16, 2009 Next Release: April 23, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, April 15, 2009) Since Wednesday, April 8, natural gas spot prices increased at most market locations in the Lower 48 States, with some exceptions including those in the Northeast, Midwest, and Midcontinent. Despite this week’s upticks at most locations, natural gas spot prices remain at relatively low levels and have continued to trade within a limited range for the past 4 weeks. The Henry Hub spot market prices gained about 10 cents or 2.9 percent per million Btu (MMBtu), ending trading yesterday at $3.60 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for May delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday (April 15) at $3.693

229

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9, 2009 9, 2009 Next Release: July 16, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, July 8, 2009) Natural gas prices posted across-the-board decreases at both the spot and futures markets since last Wednesday. Price decreases at the spot market ranged between 1 and 44 cents per million Btu (MMBtu), although a few points in the lower 48 States posted small increases. During the report week, the price at the Henry Hub spot market fell to $3.22 per MMBtu, decreasing by 11 percent since last Wednesday. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the natural gas futures contract for August delivery lost 44.2 cents and ended the report week at $3.353 per MMBtu. The price for the August 2009 contract has posted a

230

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. 9, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: November 5, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, October 28, 2009) Natural gas prices posted decreases at both the spot and futures markets since last Wednesday. Spot prices fell at virtually all market locations in the lower 48 States, with decreases ranging between 6 and 46 cents per million Btu (MMBtu). However, a couple trading locations did post gains this week. The price at the Henry Hub spot market fell 21 cents or about 4 percent, ending trading yesterday at $4.59 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the natural gas futures contract for November delivery expired yesterday at $4.289 per MMBtu, falling 81 cents or about 16 percent since last Wednesday. The December

231

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

68,747 68,747 34,577 0.39 0 0.00 34 1.16 14,941 0.29 0 0.00 11,506 0.36 61,058 0.31 I d a h o Idaho 60. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Idaho, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation.......................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented

232

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 0 0.00 0 0.00 0 0.00 540 0.01 0 0.00 2,132 0.07 2,672 0.01 H a w a i i Hawaii 59. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Hawaii, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation.......................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared

233

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

483,052 483,052 136,722 1.54 6,006 0.03 88 3.00 16,293 0.31 283,557 10.38 41,810 1.32 478,471 2.39 F l o r i d a Florida 57. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Florida, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 47 50 98 92 96 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 7,584 8,011 8,468 7,133 6,706 Total.............................................................. 7,584 8,011 8,468 7,133 6,706 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ...............

234

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

291,898 291,898 113,995 1.29 0 0.00 4 0.14 88,078 1.68 3,491 0.13 54,571 1.73 260,140 1.30 I o w a Iowa 63. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Iowa, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation.......................... 0 0 0

235

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Vehicle Fuel: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: New England New England 36. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New England, 1992-1996 Table 691,089 167,354 1.89 0 0.00 40 1.36 187,469 3.58 80,592 2.95 160,761 5.09 596,215 2.98 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................

236

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

42,980 42,980 14,164 0.16 0 0.00 1 0.03 9,791 0.19 23,370 0.86 6,694 0.21 54,020 0.27 D e l a w a r e Delaware 55. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Delaware, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

237

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-49,536 -49,536 7,911 0.09 49,674 0.25 15 0.51 12,591 0.24 3 0.00 12,150 0.38 32,670 0.16 North Dakota North Dakota 82. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas North Dakota, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 496 525 507 463 462 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 104 101 104 99 108 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 12,461 18,892 19,592 16,914 16,810 From Oil Wells ........................................... 47,518 46,059 43,640 39,760 38,906 Total.............................................................. 59,979 64,951 63,232 56,674 55,716 Repressuring ................................................

238

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

21,547 21,547 4,916 0.06 0 0.00 0 0.00 7,012 0.13 3 0.00 7,099 0.22 19,031 0.10 N e w H a m p s h i r e New Hampshire 77. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New Hampshire, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

239

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

139,881 139,881 26,979 0.30 463 0.00 115 3.92 27,709 0.53 19,248 0.70 28,987 0.92 103,037 0.52 A r i z o n a Arizona 50. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Arizona, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 6 6 6 7 7 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 721 508 711 470 417 From Oil Wells ........................................... 72 110 48 88 47 Total.............................................................. 794 618 759 558 464 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease

240

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Middle Middle Atlantic Middle Atlantic 37. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Middle Atlantic, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,857 1,981 2,042 1,679 1,928 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 36,906 36,857 26,180 37,159 38,000 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 161,372 152,717 140,444 128,677 152,494 From Oil Wells ........................................... 824 610 539 723 641 Total.............................................................. 162,196 153,327 140,982 129,400 153,134 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas cooking range" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

386,690 386,690 102,471 1.16 0 0.00 43 1.47 142,319 2.72 5,301 0.19 98,537 3.12 348,671 1.74 M i n n e s o t a Minnesota 71. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Minnesota, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

242

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,108,583 1,108,583 322,275 3.63 298 0.00 32 1.09 538,749 10.28 25,863 0.95 218,054 6.90 1,104,972 5.52 I l l i n o i s Illinois 61. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Illinois, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 382 385 390 372 370 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 337 330 323 325 289 From Oil Wells ........................................... 10 10 10 10 9 Total.............................................................. 347 340 333 335 298 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ...............

243

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

286,485 286,485 71,533 0.81 25 0.00 31 1.06 137,225 2.62 5,223 0.19 72,802 2.31 286,814 1.43 M i s s o u r i Missouri 73. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Missouri, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 5 8 12 15 24 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 27 14 8 16 25 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 27 14 8 16 25 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

244

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

411,951 411,951 100,015 1.13 0 0.00 5 0.17 114,365 2.18 45,037 1.65 96,187 3.05 355,609 1.78 Massachusetts Massachusetts 69. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Massachusetts, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

245

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

226,798 226,798 104,124 1.17 0 0.00 0 0.00 58,812 1.12 2,381 0.09 40,467 1.28 205,783 1.03 North Carolina North Carolina 81. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas North Carolina, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

246

Natural gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

www.eia.gov Over time the electricity mix gradually shifts to lower-carbon options, led by growth in natural gas and renewable generation U.S. electricity net generation trillion kilowatthours 6

Adam Sieminski Administrator; Adam Sieminski Usnic; Adam Sieminski Usnic

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

29,693 29,693 0 0.00 0 0.00 6 0.20 17,290 0.33 0 0.00 16,347 0.52 33,644 0.17 District of Columbia District of Columbia 56. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas District of Columbia, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

248

Gas-driven microturbine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This paper describes an invention which relates to microtechnology and the fabrication process for developing microelectrical systems. It describes a means for fabricating a gas-driven microturbine capable of providing autonomous propulsion in which the rapidly moving gases are directed through a micromachined turbine to power devices by direct linkage or turbo-electric generators components in a domain ranging from tenths of micrometers to thousands of micrometers.

Sniegowski, J.J.; Rodgers, M.S.; McWhorter, P.J.; Aeschliman, D.P.; Miller, W.M.

1996-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

249

RANGE INCREASER FOR PNEUMATIC GAUGES  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved pneumatic gage is offered in which the linear range has been increased without excessive air consumption. This has been accomplished by providing an expansible antechamber connected to the nozzle of the gage so that the position of the nozzle with respect to the workpiece is varied automatically by variation in pressure within the antechamber. This arrangement ensures that the nozzle-to-workpiece clearance is maintained within certain limits, thus obtaining a linear relation of air flow to nozzle-to-workpiece clearance over a wider range.

Fowler, A.H.; Seaborn, G.B. Jr.

1960-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

250

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... kitchens; cooking appliances; cooking tops; energy consumption; energy efficiency; kitchen appliances; microwave ovens; ovens; ranges; test ...

251

Long-Term Surveillance Plan for the Site A/Plot M Sites, Palos Forest Preserve, Cook COunty, Illinois  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Long-Term Surveillance Plan for the Site A/Plot M Sites Palos Forest Preserve, Cook County, Illinois September 1999 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office Grand Junction, Colorado Work Performed Under DOE Contract Number DE-AC13-96GJ87335 Task Order Number MAC 99-06 Document Number S00218 DOE/Grand Junction Office Site A/Plot M LTSP September 1999 Page iii Contents 1.0 Introduction......................................................................................................................... 1- 1 1.1 Purpose....................................................................................................................... 1- 1 1.2 Legal and Regulatory Requirements.......................................................................... 1- 1

252

Vehicle Technologies Office: Natural Gas Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Natural Gas Research Natural Gas Research Natural gas offers tremendous opportunities for reducing the use of petroleum in transportation. Medium and heavy-duty fleets, which have significant potential to use natural gas, currently consume more than a third of the petroleum in transportation in the U.S. Natural gas is an excellent fit for a wide range of heavy-duty applications, especially transit buses, refuse haulers, and Class 8 long-haul or delivery trucks. In addition, natural gas can be a very good choice for light-duty vehicle fleets with central refueling. See the Alternative Fuels Data Center for a description of the uses and benefits of natural gas vehicles or its Laws and Incentives database for information on tax incentives. The Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) supports the development of natural gas engines and research into renewable natural gas production.

253

Characterization of novel rice germplasm from West Africa and genetic marker associations with rice cooking quality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Genetic resource enhancement is the foundation of any good breeding program. Landraces from West Africa, interspecifics between Oryza sativa and Oryza glaberrima and improved lines from the West African Rice Development Association and other research centers were introduced to the Beaumont Rice Research center for in situ evaluation and characterization. Beside the introduction of seeds, milled samples were also introduced for grain chemistry analysis. Field evaluation combined with physicochemical and molecular characterization revealed unique characteristics among African germplasm. New rice for Africa (NERICA) lines performed well in the USA environment. Varieties like Nerica 2, Nerica 3, Nerica 4, and Nerica 5 need more attention because of their superior performance in yield and grain quality. Landraces did not perform well due to their height and late maturity and their resulting problems with lodging. The rapid visco analyzer RVA profiles showed that the cultivar Jaya has unusually strong paste viscosity features. Comparing West Africa samples grown in Cote dâ??Ivoire with those grown in Texas, parameters like AA, ASV, Hot, Cool, and CT were not stongly affected by the environment. According to the Stbk value, cultivars grown in Cote dâ??Ivoire will cook softer than when they were grown in Texas. The lack of the environmental effect is somewhat surprising considering the difference in latitude, soil types, weather patterns, and management practices between the two locations. Apparent amylose is a key element to characterize a rice cultivar; however certain varieties like Cocodrie and Dixiebelle have similar apparent amylose content but dramatically different functional qualities. A population derived from Cocodrie and Dixiebelle was developed for genotypic and phenotypic analysis of grain chemistry traits that affect functionality. It was concluded that the amount of soluble amylose in the grain had a significant effect on flour pasting properties, even when total apparent amylose content did not vary. Marker association studies revealed that the Waxy microsatellite and the Waxy exon 10 SNP markers were associated with soluble amylose content and RVA characteristics. These markers will speed up the development of new rice cultivars with desirable quality characteristics in West Africa and in the USA.

Traore, Karim

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

BC gas takes new approach to gas supply optimization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wide-ranging changes have taken place in the US and Canada since the mid-1980s in the way that local gas distribution utilities and large industrial customers contract for their gas supplies. This paper reports that these changes have been brought about by open-access policies, the intent of which was to allow customers more latitude to make their gas purchase and transportation arrangements and to improve the access of shippers to available gas transmission capacity. The effects of the new open-access regime have been profound on both sides of the border. More than 70% of North American gas supplies are now sold under unbundled arrangements in which gas supply is contracted under separate commodity and transportation agreements. For local distribution utilities, the numbers of potential supply options have become extremely large. Analysis of these options has become increasingly complex with the need to take account of complicated contract provisions, a wider range of storage options and swap arrangements with other utilities, opportunities for some customers to purchase gas directly and uncertainty about future demand, prices and supplier reliability.

Cawdery, J.; Swoveland, C. (Quantalytics Inc., Vancouver, British Columbia (CA))

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Range gated strip proximity sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A range gated strip proximity sensor uses one set of sensor electronics and a distributed antenna or strip which extends along the perimeter to be sensed. A micro-power RF transmitter is coupled to the first end of the strip and transmits a sequence of RF pulses on the strip to produce a sensor field along the strip. A receiver is coupled to the second end of the strip, and generates a field reference signal in response to the sequence of pulse on the line combined with received electromagnetic energy from reflections in the field. The sensor signals comprise pulses of radio frequency signals having a duration of less than 10 nanoseconds, and a pulse repetition rate on the order of 1 to 10 MegaHertz or less. The duration of the radio frequency pulses is adjusted to control the range of the sensor. An RF detector feeds a filter capacitor in response to received pulses on the strip line to produce a field reference signal representing the average amplitude of the received pulses. When a received pulse is mixed with a received echo, the mixing causes a fluctuation in the amplitude of the field reference signal, providing a range-limited Doppler type signature of a field disturbance. 6 figs.

McEwan, T.E.

1996-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

256

Range gated strip proximity sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A range gated strip proximity sensor uses one set of sensor electronics and a distributed antenna or strip which extends along the perimeter to be sensed. A micro-power RF transmitter is coupled to the first end of the strip and transmits a sequence of RF pulses on the strip to produce a sensor field along the strip. A receiver is coupled to the second end of the strip, and generates a field reference signal in response to the sequence of pulse on the line combined with received electromagnetic energy from reflections in the field. The sensor signals comprise pulses of radio frequency signals having a duration of less than 10 nanoseconds, and a pulse repetition rate on the order of 1 to 10 MegaHertz or less. The duration of the radio frequency pulses is adjusted to control the range of the sensor. An RF detector feeds a filter capacitor in response to received pulses on the strip line to produce a field reference signal representing the average amplitude of the received pulses. When a received pulse is mixed with a received echo, the mixing causes a fluctuation in the amplitude of the field reference signal, providing a range-limited Doppler type signature of a field disturbance.

McEwan, Thomas E. (Livermore, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Gas Delivered  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. Average . Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers, 1980-1996 Figure 1980 1982 1984 1986 1988 1990 1992 1994 1996 0 2 4 6 8 10 0 40 80 120 160 200 240 280 320 Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet Dollars per Thousand Cubic Meters Nominal Dollars Constant Dollars Sources: Nominal dollars: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition." Constant dollars: Prices were converted to 1995 dollars using the chain-type price indexes for Gross Domestic Product (1992 = 1.0) as published by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Economic Analysis. Residential: Prices in this publication for the residential sector cover nearly all of the volumes of gas delivered. Commercial and Industrial: Prices for the commercial and industrial sectors are often associated with

258

Gas laser  

SciTech Connect

According to the invention, the gas laser comprises a housing which accommodates two electrodes. One of the electrodes is sectional and has a ballast resistor connected to each section. One of the electrodes is so secured in the housing that it is possible to vary the spacing between the electrodes in the direction of the flow of a gas mixture passed through an active zone between the electrodes where the laser effect is produced. The invention provides for a maximum efficiency of the laser under different operating conditions.

Kosyrev, F. K.; Leonov, A. P.; Pekh, A. K.; Timofeev, V. A.

1980-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

259

Nebraska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Nebraska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9; 1980's: 15:

260

Mississippi Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Mississippi Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9; 1980's:

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas cooking range" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

APS Long Range Operations Schedule  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2) 2) Alternate Formats: iCal | Excel | PDF APS Long-Range Operation Schedule 2011-3 2012-1 2012-2 Sep Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5

262

APS Long Range Operations Schedule  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1) 1) Alternate Formats: iCal | Excel | PDF APS Long-Range Operation Schedule 2010-3 2011-1 2011-2 Sep Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5

263

APS Long Range Operations Schedule  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3) 3) Alternate Formats: iCal | Excel | PDF APS Long-Range Operation Schedule 2012-3 2013-1 2013-2 Sep Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5

264

Extended-range tiltable micromirror  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A tiltable micromirror device is disclosed in which a micromirror is suspended by a progressive linkage with an electrostatic actuator (e.g. a vertical comb actuator or a capacitive plate electrostatic actuator) being located beneath the micromirror. The progressive linkage includes a pair of torsion springs which are connected together to operate similar to a four-bar linkage with spring joints. The progressive linkage provides a non-linear spring constant which can allow the micromirror to be tilted at any angle within its range substantially free from any electrostatic instability or hysteretic behavior.

Allen, James J. (Albuquerque, NM); Wiens, Gloria J. (Newberry, FL); Bronson, Jessica R. (Gainesville, FL)

2009-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

265

STOCK DEFINITION AND GEOGRAPHIC RANGE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sperm whales are found throughout the world's oceans in deep waters to the edge of the ice at both poles (Leatherwood and Reeves 1983; Rice 1989; Whitehead 2002). Sperm whales throughout the world exhibit a geographic social structure where females and juveniles of both sexes occur in mixed groups and inhabit tropical and subtropical waters. Males, as they mature, initially form bachelor groups but eventually become more socially isolated and more wide-ranging, inhabiting temperate and polar waters as well (Whitehead 2003). Sperm whales were commercially hunted in the Caribbean Sea by American whalers from sailing vessels until the early 1900s

Puerto Rico; U. S. Virgin Isl; S Stock

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

73,669 73,669 141,300 1.59 221,822 1.12 3 0.10 46,289 0.88 33,988 1.24 31,006 0.98 252,585 1.26 A r k a n s a s Arkansas 51. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Arkansas, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,750 1,552 1,607 1,563 1,470 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 3,500 3,500 3,500 3,988 4,020 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 171,543 166,273 161,967 161,390 182,895 From Oil Wells ........................................... 39,364 38,279 33,446 33,979 41,551 Total.............................................................. 210,906 204,552 195,413 195,369 224,446 Repressuring ................................................

267

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-1,080,240 -1,080,240 201,024 2.27 1,734,887 8.78 133 4.54 76,629 1.46 136,436 4.99 46,152 1.46 460,373 2.30 O k l a h o m a Oklahoma 84. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Oklahoma, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 13,926 13,289 13,487 13,438 13,074 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 28,902 29,118 29,121 29,733 29,733 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 1,674,405 1,732,997 1,626,858 1,521,857 1,467,695 From Oil Wells ........................................... 342,950 316,945 308,006 289,877 267,192 Total.............................................................. 2,017,356 2,049,942 1,934,864

268

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7,038,115 7,038,115 3,528,911 39.78 13,646,477 69.09 183 6.24 408,861 7.80 1,461,718 53.49 281,452 8.91 5,681,125 28.40 West South Central West South Central 42. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas West South Central, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 87,198 84,777 88,034 88,734 62,357 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 92,212 95,288 94,233 102,525 102,864 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 11,599,913 11,749,649 11,959,444 11,824,788 12,116,665 From Oil Wells ........................................... 2,313,831 2,368,395 2,308,634 2,217,752 2,151,247 Total..............................................................

269

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

77,379 77,379 94,481 1.07 81,435 0.41 8 0.27 70,232 1.34 1,836 0.07 40,972 1.30 207,529 1.04 K e n t u c k y Kentucky 65. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Kentucky, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,084 1,003 969 1,044 983 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 12,483 12,836 13,036 13,311 13,501 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 79,690 86,966 73,081 74,754 81,435 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 79,690 86,966 73,081 74,754 81,435 Repressuring ................................................

270

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-67,648 -67,648 75,616 0.85 480,828 2.43 0 0.00 16,720 0.32 31,767 1.16 29,447 0.93 153,549 0.77 Pacific Noncontiguous Pacific Noncontiguous 45. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Pacific Noncontiguous, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 9,638 9,907 9,733 9,497 9,294 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 112 113 104 100 102 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 198,603 190,139 180,639 179,470 183,747 From Oil Wells ........................................... 2,427,110 2,588,202 2,905,261 3,190,433 3,189,837 Total.............................................................. 2,625,713 2,778,341

271

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-310,913 -310,913 110,294 1.24 712,796 3.61 2 0.07 85,376 1.63 22,607 0.83 57,229 1.81 275,508 1.38 K a n s a s Kansas 64. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Kansas, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 9,681 9,348 9,156 8,571 7,694 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 18,400 19,472 19,365 22,020 21,388 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 580,572 605,578 628,900 636,582 629,755 From Oil Wells ........................................... 79,169 82,579 85,759 86,807 85,876 Total.............................................................. 659,741 688,157 714,659 723,389 715,631 Repressuring ................................................

272

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

819,046 819,046 347,043 3.91 245,740 1.24 40 1.36 399,522 7.62 32,559 1.19 201,390 6.38 980,555 4.90 M i c h i g a n Michigan 70. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Michigan, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,223 1,160 1,323 1,294 2,061 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 3,257 5,500 6,000 5,258 5,826 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 120,287 126,179 136,989 146,320 201,123 From Oil Wells ........................................... 80,192 84,119 91,332 97,547 50,281 Total.............................................................. 200,479 210,299 228,321 243,867 251,404 Repressuring ................................................

273

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

W W y o m i n g -775,410 50,253 0.57 666,036 3.37 14 0.48 13,534 0.26 87 0.00 9,721 0.31 73,609 0.37 Wyoming 98. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Wyoming, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 10,826 10,933 10,879 12,166 12,320 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 3,111 3,615 3,942 4,196 4,510 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 751,693 880,596 949,343 988,671 981,115 From Oil Wells ........................................... 285,125 142,006 121,519 111,442 109,434 Total.............................................................. 1,036,817 1,022,602 1,070,862 1,100,113 1,090,549 Repressuring

274

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-67,648 -67,648 75,616 0.85 480,828 2.43 0 0.00 16,179 0.31 31,767 1.16 27,315 0.86 150,877 0.75 A l a s k a Alaska 49. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Alaska, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 9,638 9,907 9,733 9,497 9,294 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 112 113 104 100 102 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 198,603 190,139 180,639 179,470 183,747 From Oil Wells ........................................... 2,427,110 2,588,202 2,905,261 3,190,433 3,189,837 Total.............................................................. 2,625,713 2,778,341 3,085,900 3,369,904 3,373,584 Repressuring

275

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

628,189 628,189 449,511 5.07 765,699 3.88 100 3.41 528,662 10.09 39,700 1.45 347,721 11.01 1,365,694 6.83 West North Central West North Central 39. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas West North Central, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 10,177 9,873 9,663 9,034 8,156 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 18,569 19,687 19,623 22,277 21,669 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 594,551 626,728 651,594 655,917 648,822 From Oil Wells ........................................... 133,335 135,565 136,468 134,776 133,390 Total.............................................................. 727,886 762,293

276

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,048,760 1,048,760 322,661 3.64 18,131 0.09 54 1.84 403,264 7.69 142,688 5.22 253,075 8.01 1,121,742 5.61 N e w Y o r k New York 80. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New York, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 329 264 242 197 232 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 5,906 5,757 5,884 6,134 6,208 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 22,697 20,587 19,937 17,677 17,494 From Oil Wells ........................................... 824 610 539 723 641 Total.............................................................. 23,521 21,197 20,476 18,400 18,134 Repressuring ................................................

277

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,554,530 1,554,530 311,229 3.51 3,094,431 15.67 442 15.08 299,923 5.72 105,479 3.86 210,381 6.66 927,454 4.64 Mountain Mountain 43. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Mountain, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 38,711 38,987 37,366 39,275 38,944 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 30,965 34,975 38,539 38,775 41,236 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 2,352,729 2,723,393 3,046,159 3,131,205 3,166,689 From Oil Wells ........................................... 677,771 535,884 472,397 503,986 505,903 Total.............................................................. 3,030,499 3,259,277 3,518,556

278

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,592,465 1,592,465 716,648 8.08 239,415 1.21 182 6.21 457,792 8.73 334,123 12.23 320,153 10.14 1,828,898 9.14 South Atlantic South Atlantic 40. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas South Atlantic, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 3,307 3,811 4,496 4,427 4,729 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 39,412 35,149 41,307 37,822 36,827 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 206,766 208,892 234,058 236,072 233,409 From Oil Wells ........................................... 7,584 8,011 8,468 7,133 6,706 Total.............................................................. 214,349 216,903 242,526 243,204 240,115

279

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,999,161 1,999,161 895,529 10.10 287,933 1.46 1,402 47.82 569,235 10.86 338,640 12.39 308,804 9.78 2,113,610 10.57 Pacific Contiguous Pacific Contiguous 44. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Pacific Contiguous, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 3,896 3,781 3,572 3,508 2,082 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 1,142 1,110 1,280 1,014 996 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 156,635 124,207 117,725 96,329 88,173 From Oil Wells ........................................... 294,800 285,162 282,227 289,430 313,581 Total.............................................................. 451,435 409,370

280

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-122,394 -122,394 49,997 0.56 178,984 0.91 5 0.17 37,390 0.71 205 0.01 28,025 0.89 115,622 0.58 West Virginia West Virginia 96. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas West Virginia, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 2,356 2,439 2,565 2,499 2,703 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 38,250 33,716 39,830 36,144 35,148 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... E 182,000 171,024 183,773 186,231 178,984 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. E 182,000 171,024 183,773 186,231 178,984 Repressuring ................................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas cooking range" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

134,294 32,451 0.37 0 0.00 32 1.09 43,764 0.83 10,456 0.38 39,786 1.26 126,488 0.63 C o n n e c t i c u t Connecticut 54. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Connecticut, 1992-1996...

282

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0.00 53 1.81 147,893 2.82 7,303 0.27 93,816 2.97 398,581 1.99 W i s c o n s i n Wisconsin 97. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Wisconsin, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994...

283

Natural Gas  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

3.91 119,251 0.60 229 7.81 374,824 7.15 2,867 0.10 189,966 6.01 915,035 4.57 O h i o Ohio 83. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Ohio, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996...

284

Natural Gas  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

10,799 1,953 0.02 0 0.00 0 0.00 2,523 0.05 24 0.00 2,825 0.09 7,325 0.04 V e r m o n t Vermont 93. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Vermont, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995...

285

Natural Gas  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

845,998 243,499 2.75 135,000 0.68 35 1.19 278,606 5.32 7,239 0.26 154,642 4.90 684,022 3.42 P e n n s y l v a n i a Pennsylvania 86. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas...

286

Gas Prices  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Prices Gasoline Prices for U.S. Cities Click on the map to view gas prices for cities in your state. AK VT ME NH NH MA MA RI CT CT DC NJ DE DE NY WV VA NC SC FL GA AL MS TN KY IN...

287

Live Fire Range Environmental Assessment  

SciTech Connect

The Central Training Academy (CTA) is a DOE Headquarters Organization located in Albuquerque, New Mexico, with the mission to effectively and efficiently educate and train personnel involved in the protection of vital national security interests of DOE. The CTA Live Fire Range (LFR), where most of the firearms and tactical training occurs, is a complex separate from the main campus. The purpose of the proposed action is to expand the LFR to allow more options of implementing required training. The Department of Energy has prepared this Environmental Assessment (EA) for the proposed construction and operation of an expanded Live Fire Range Facility at the Central Training Academy in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Based on the analysis in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement is not required and DOE is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

None

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

November 18 (No issue Thanksgiving week; next release 2:00 p.m. on December 2) November 18 (No issue Thanksgiving week; next release 2:00 p.m. on December 2) Natural gas spot and futures prices fell for a third consecutive week (Wednesday to Wednesday, November 10-17), as temperatures for most of the nation continued to be moderate to seasonal. At the Henry Hub, the spot price declined 6 cents on the week, for the smallest week-on-week decrease in the nation. Spot gas traded there yesterday (Wednesday, November 17) at $6.06 per MMBtu. Price declines at the majority of market locations ranged from around a dime to nearly 60 cents per MMBtu. On the NYMEX, the price for the near-month natural gas futures contract (for December delivery) fell by almost 40 cents on the week, settling yesterday at $7.283 per MMBtu. EIA reported that working gas inventories in underground storage were 3,321 Bcf as of Friday, November 12, which is 9 percent greater than the previous 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil declined for a fourth consecutive week, dropping $1.85 per barrel ($0.32 per MMBtu), or nearly 4 percent, from last Wednesday's level, to trade yesterday at $46.85 per barrel ($8.08 per MMBtu).

289

Exhaust gas reactor  

SciTech Connect

A reactor for the oxidation of unburned and partially burned components in the exhaust gas from an internal combustion engine comprising a chamber which is substantially circular in cross sections perpendicular to its axis, one or more inlet pipes which pass a mixture of exhaust gas and air substantially tangentially into the chamber near to one end thereof, and an outlet pipe near to the other end of the chamber and which is so arranged that exhaust gas leaves the chamber substantially tangentially. The tangential inlet and tangential outlet of gases minimizes energy losses in the gas passing through the reactor. The ratio of the cross-sectional areas of the inlet pipe(s) to reactor chamber is preferably from 1:9 to 25:36, and similar ranges of crosssectional area ratios are preferred for the outlet pipe and chamber. The ratio of the length of the reaction chamber to diameter is preferably from 1:1 to 4:1. The chamber may be cylindrical or divergent from inlet end to outlet end and may be thermally insulated.

Camarsa, M.; Cocchiara, F.; Garcea, G.P.

1981-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

290

Cascade Natural Gas - Commercial Efficiency Rebate Program (Washington...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Boilers, Building Insulation, Clothes Washers, Dishwasher, Doors, Furnaces, Steam-system upgrades, Water Heaters, Commercial Cooking Equipment, Food Service Equipment,...

291

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 2, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, April 29, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, April 21, 2010) Natural gas spot prices fell during the week at locations across the country, with declines ranging from 12 to 62 cents per million Btu (MMBtu). The Henry Hub spot price fell 19 cents, or about 5 percent, averaging $3.96 per MMBtu yesterday, April 21. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the value of the futures contract for May 2010 delivery at the Henry Hub fell about 6 percent, from $4.199 per MMBtu on April 14 to $3.955 per MMBtu on April 21. The West Texas Intermediate crude oil spot price fell 3 percent since last Wednesday to $82.98 per barrel, or $14.31 per MMBtu.

292

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. , 2009 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: October 8, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, September 30, 2009) Since Wednesday, September 23, natural gas spot prices fell at most market locations, with decreases generally ranging between 10 and 30 cents per million Btu (MMBtu). Prices at the Henry Hub declined by 19 cents per MMBtu, or about 5 percent, to $3.24 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for November delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday, September 30, at $4.84 per MMBtu, increasing by 9 cents or about 2 percent during the report week. The contract for October delivery expired on September 28 at $3.73 per MMBtu, increasing nearly 70 cents per MMBtu or 21 percent during its

293

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1, 2008 1, 2008 Next Release: August 28, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (Wednesday, August 13, to Wednesday, August 20) During the report week (Wednesday-Wednesday, August 13-20), natural gas prices continued their overall declines in the Lower 48 States, with decreases ranging between 1 and 58 cents per million British thermal units (MMBtu). However, there were a few exceptions in the Rocky Mountains, where the only average regional price increase on the week was recorded. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), prices for the September delivery contract decreased 38 cents per MMBtu, settling yesterday at $8.077. On Monday and Tuesday, the September contract price dipped below $8 per MMBtu, reaching this level for the first time since

294

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5, 2009 5, 2009 Next Release: February 12, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, February 4, 2009) Natural gas spot prices decreased in half of the trading regions in the Lower 48 States this report week. Generally, areas east of the Rockies and particularly those that experienced frigid temperatures posted weekly price increases. However, there were some exceptions, including the Midcontinent and East Texas. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures trading for the near-month contract was fairly volatile, with daily price changes ranging between a 16-cent loss and a 16-cent increase. The March 2009 contract ended trading yesterday 18 cents higher than on the previous Wednesday.

295

A Lifecycle Emissions Model (LEM): Lifecycle Emissions from Transportation Fuels, Motor Vehicles, Transportation Modes, Electricity Use, Heating and Cooking Fuels, and Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

report. Note on natural gas storage Natural gas is stored innatural gas storage..2.6 TCF of natural gas were added to storage facilities and

Delucchi, Mark

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Unconventional Natural Gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Natural Gas Unconventional Natural Gas Los Alamos scientists are committed to the efficient and environmentally-safe development of major U.S. natural gas and oil resources....

297

Underground Natural Gas Storage  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Underground Natural Gas Storage. Measured By. Disseminated Through. Monthly Survey of Storage Field Operators -- asking injections, withdrawals, base gas, working gas.

298

,"Texas Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Texas Natural Gas Imports Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Price of Texas Natural Gas Exports...

299

,"Mississippi Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Mississippi Natural Gas Imports Price All Countries (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Mississippi Natural Gas...

300

,"Montana Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Montana Natural Gas Imports Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Price of Montana Natural Gas Exports...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas cooking range" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

,"Michigan Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Michigan Natural Gas Imports Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Price of Michigan Natural Gas Exports...

302

2. Gas Productive Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

2. Gas Productive Capacity Gas Capacity to Meet Lower 48 States Requirements The United States has sufficient dry gas productive capacity at the wellhead to meet ...

303

GAS SEAL  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A seal is described for a cover closing an opening in the top of a pressure vessel that may house a nuclear reactor. The seal comprises a U-shaped trough formed on the pressure vessel around the opening therein, a mass of metal in the trough, and an edge flange on the cover extending loosely into the trough and dipping into the metal mass. The lower portion of the metal mass is kept melted, and the upper portion, solid. The solid pontion of the metal mass prevents pressure surges in the vessel from expelling the liquid portion of the metal mass from the trough; the liquld portion, thus held in place by the solid portion, does not allow gas to go through, and so gas cannot escape through shrinkage holes in the solid portion.

Monson, H.; Hutter, E.

1961-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

304

Carbon sequestration in natural gas reservoirs: Enhanced gas recovery and natural gas storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by numerical simulation below. pipeline gas shalecushion gas sand shale CH4 working gas CH4 working gas sand

Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Shale gas is natural gas trapped inside  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Shale gas is natural gas trapped inside formations of shale - fine grained sedimentary rocks that can be rich sources of petroleum and natural gas. Just a few years ago, much of...

306

COPIES: Iron Range Legislative Delegation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dear Legislators: We are pleased to present the annual report on our research regarding the health status of taconite workers and Iron Range community air quality. This report, as in the past, details the progress made by the University of Minnesota School of Public Health and the Natural Resources Research Institute (NRRI) in all research areas, including occupational exposure, mortality and incidence studies, the respiratory health survey of taconite workers and spouses and the environmental study of airborne particles. In addition, this report contains specific information regarding the assessment of mesothelioma as it pertains to exposure to mineral fibers, referred to as elongate mineral particles (EMP). For this report, the EMP measurement is a standard technique that identifies those fibers (EMP) considered long (over 5 microns). Although the research team felt this was the most important exposure to be assessed with the cases of mesothelioma, in the next several months there will be additional analyses that may provide further insight, including exposure to short EMP, silica and respirable dust. A final report is planned for the end of the year when all components are expected to be completed.

Sen Tony Lourey; Rep Tim Mahoney; Rep Sheldon Johnson; Rep David Dill; Rep Mary Murphy; Sen Tom Bakk; Rep John Persell; Rep Tom Anzelc; Sen Tom Saxhaug; Rep Carly Melin; Rep Jason Metsa

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

How regulators should use natural gas price forecasts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Natural gas prices are critical to a range of regulatory decisions covering both electric and gas utilities. Natural gas prices are often a crucial variable in electric generation capacity planning and in the benefit-cost relationship for energy-efficiency programs. High natural gas prices can make coal generation the most economical new source, while low prices can make natural gas generation the most economical. (author)

Costello, Ken

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

308

A Lagrangian Long-Range Transport Model with Atmospheric Boundary Layer Chemistry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The present paper reports on the combination of a chemical model for the gas phase chemistry of the atmospheric boundary layer, with a Lagrangian model for the long-range transport of air pollutants. The resulting combined chemistry/transport ...

Anton Eliassen; Jrgen Saltbones; Frode Stordal; ystein Hov; Ivar S. A. Isaksen; Frode Stordal

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ... 152 170 165 195 224 Production (million cubic feet)...

310

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ... 280 300 225 240 251 Production (million cubic feet)...

311

Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production (Volumes in Million Cubic Feet) Data Series: ... coalbed production data are included in Gas Well totals.

312

Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Withdrawals from Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells Repressuring Vented and Flared...

313

Microsoft PowerPoint - 16.1225_Terry Cooke-Davies - Project Complexity as of 16 Mar  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Complexity Complexity Dr Terry Cooke-Davies, Group Chairman Group Chairman, Human Systems International Talking about Complexity Talking about Complexity Causes of Complexity in Projects Projects Today's Talk Responses to Complexity y 2 Why do we do it, and what do we mean when we are Talking about Complexity? g p y 3 What is Complexity? * No generally agreed definition What is Complexity? No generally agreed definition - "If you don't know what will happen when you kick it, then it is complex." * Any definition risks being inadequate * Any definition risks being inadequate - "Complex" is different from "Complicated" - Complexity is both relative and absolute. What is Complexity p y 4 Why are we so interested in it? * Need for managers of more challenging projects F il f

314

Subject: Proposed 216(h) Regulations To: Brian.Mills@hq.doe.gov and Lot.Cooke@hq.doe.gov.  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

February 12, 2012 February 12, 2012 Subject: Proposed 216(h) Regulations To: Brian.Mills@hq.doe.gov and Lot.Cooke@hq.doe.gov. We appreciate the opportunity to review the Proposed Regulation for 216(h) of the FPA (16 U.S.C. 824p(h)) and provide comments. After review of the proposed rule, we believe a few changes to the text could greatly improve in the likelihood of reducing the time and cost of necessary environmental reviews, consultations, and permit processing for electric transmission facilities crossing Federal Lands while increasing the efficiency and coordination intended by that section of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 and the nine-agency MOU. Comments are organized by section, with explanation and proposed changes in the wording of a specific section of the proposed rule made in bold.

315

ECOR VAP Flux Corrections, Gap-filling, and Results David R. Cook, Meredith Franklin, Donna J. Holdridge  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ECOR VAP Flux Corrections, Gap-filling, and Results ECOR VAP Flux Corrections, Gap-filling, and Results David R. Cook, Meredith Franklin, Donna J. Holdridge Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research, Climate Change Research Division, under contract DE-AC02-06CH11357, as part of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program. Argonne National Laboratory is managed by UChicago Argonne, LLC for the U.S. Department of Energy ABSTRACT An eddy correlation (ECOR) value-added product (VAP) has been developed that uses ECOR temperature, humidity, and wetness state (or default values of the same) to determine corrections to and gap-filling of the flux measurements. An outlier routine is used to remove obvious incorrect data before gap-filling is performed.

316

Long-Range Neutron Detection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A neutron detector designed for detecting neutron sources at distances of 50 to 100 m has been constructed and tested. This detector has a large surface area (1 m{sup 2}) to enhance detection efficiency, and it contains a collimator and shielding to achieve direction sensitivity and reduce background. An unusual feature of the detector is that it contains no added moderator, such as polyethylene, to moderate fast neutrons before they reach the {sup 3}He detector. As a result, the detector is sensitive mainly to thermal neutrons. The moderator-free design reduces the weight of the detector, making it more portable, and it also aids in achieving directional sensitivity and background reduction. Test results show that moderated fission-neutron sources of strength about 3 x 10{sup 5} n/s can be detected at a distance out to 70 m in a counting time of 1000 s. The best angular resolution of the detector is obtained at distances of 30 m or less. As the separation .distance between the source and detector increases, the contribution of scattered neutrons to the measured signal increases with a resultant decrease in the ability to detect the direction to a distant source. Applications for which the long-range detector appears to be suitable include detecting remote neutron sources (including sources in moving vehicles) and monitoring neutron storage vaults for the intrusion of humans and the effects they make on the detected neutron signal. Also, the detector can be used to measure waste for the presence of transuranic material in the presence of high gamma-ray background. A test with a neutron source (3 x 10{sup 5} n/s) in a vehicle showed that the detector could readily measure an increase in count rate at a distance of 10 m for vehicle speeds up to 35 mph (the highest speed tested). These results. indicate that the source should be detectable at this distance at speeds up to 55 mph.

AJ Peurrung; DC Stromswold; RR Hansen; PL Reeder; DS Barnett

1999-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

317

The effects of cooking, storage, and ionizing irradiation on carotenoids, antioxidant activity, and phenolics in potato (Solanum tuberosum L.)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Past research conducted by our lab demonstrated that potatoes contain significant levels of phytochemicals important to human health. However, since potatoes are not consumed raw, it is important to determine the effects of processing on these levels. Therefore, the changes in carotenoid content, antioxidant activity, and phenolic content were investigated using combinations of cultivars, cooking methods, storage treatments, and low-dose ionizing irradiation. Carotenoid content was measured via absorbance at 445 nm, 450 nm, and HPLC identification. Antioxidant activity was measured initially and at stabilization via the DPPH method and phenolic content was measured via the Folin method and HPLC identification. Microwaved, baked, fried, and raw potato samples contained more carotenoids than boiled samples. The samples microwaved, baked, and fried contained higher antioxidant activity and phenolics than the boiled or raw samples. However, the compound quercetin dihydrate appeared to decrease with cooking. Carotenoids, antioxidant activity, and phenolics appeared to decrease with storage; however, high storage temperatures and long storage times were believed to cause a dehydration and concentration of compounds, which caused levels to be equal to or greater than before storage. However, this decreasing trend was not linear and there were multiple significant interactions. The compound chlorogenic acid appeared to be quite sensitive to high temperature storage. Irradiation dose appeared to have only a minor, if any, effect on carotenoid levels. The interaction between storage time and irradiation dose was very influential on antioxidant activity. In early stages of storage, higher doses of irradiation had greater antioxidant activity, while, with continued storage, low doses had higher antioxidant activity. Exposure to irradiation appeared to cause an increase in phenolic content, determined by the Folin method. There may be a stimulation, induction, or release of some compounds due to processing; however, its magnitude is not believed to be as great as genetic control. The effects of processing can not be denied and should continue to be investigated. Future studies investigating the health properties of fruits and vegetables, particularly potatoes should include processing effects.

Blessington, Tyann

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

What are natural gas liquids and how are they used? - Today in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration ... solar, wind, geothermal, biomass and ethanol. ... burned for space heat and cooking, ...

319

Natural Gas Vehicles  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Natural gas vehicles (NGVs) are either fueled exclusively with compressed natural gas or liquefied natural gas (dedicated NGVs) or are capable of natural gas and gasoline fueling (bi-fuel NGVs).

320

Natural Gas Monthly  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas: Gas in place at the time that a reservoir was converted to use as an underground storage reservoir, as in contrast to injected gas volumes. Natural Gas: A gaseous mixture...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas cooking range" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Proceedings: EPRI Manufactured Gas Plants 2003 Forum  

SciTech Connect

The EPRI Manufactured Gas Plants 2003 Forum covered a range of topics related to remediation and management of former manufactured gas plant (MGP) sites, with emphasis on technological advances and current issues associated with site cleanup. In specific, the forum covered MGP coal-tar delineation, soil and groundwater remediation technologies, improvements in air monitoring, and ecological risk characterization/risk management tools.

None

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Liquefied natural gas meets a quarter of New England's average ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural gas prices in Europe and Asia have ranged much higher, reaching $10-$16/MMBtu. As a result, other LNG markets are typically served first, ...

323

Gas Metrology Portal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... automobile industry meeting more stringent more. Audit of EPA Protocol Gas Suppliers EPA Protocol gas mixture calibration ...

2012-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

324

MidAmerican Energy (Gas) - Commercial EnergyAdvantage Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MidAmerican Energy (Gas) - Commercial EnergyAdvantage Rebate MidAmerican Energy (Gas) - Commercial EnergyAdvantage Rebate Program MidAmerican Energy (Gas) - Commercial EnergyAdvantage Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Industrial Institutional Nonprofit Schools Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Cooling Other Construction Manufacturing Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Maximum Rebate Insulation: 70% of cost Program Info State Illinois Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Furnaces: $250-$350 Boilers: $100-$400 Water Heaters: $50 Programmable Thermostats: $20 Cooking Equipment: Varies widely Attic/Roof/Ceiling Insulation: $0.015/R-value increase per sq. ft. Sidewall Insulation: $0.01/R-value increase per sq. ft.

325

Long-Range EV Charging Infrastructure Plan  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

scenario for adoption rates. There are far too many moving parts to arrive at a specific forecast, as gas prices, fuel taxes, biofuel technologies, battery costs, consumer...

326

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 (next release 2:00 p.m. on October 14) 7 (next release 2:00 p.m. on October 14) Natural gas spot and futures prices generally moved in opposite directions for the week (Wednesday to Wednesday, September 29-October 6), as spot prices fell at most market locations, while futures prices continued to climb higher. In yesterday's (Wednesday, October 6) trading at the Henry Hub, the spot price for natural gas averaged $6.00 per MMBtu, down 23 cents per MMBtu, or close to 4 percent, from the previous Wednesday. On the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for November delivery gained $0.134 per MMBtu on the week, or about 2 percent, as it settled yesterday at $7.045. Settlement prices for contracts for gas delivery in December 2004 through March 2005 rose much more sharply, with increases ranging from just over 40 cents to nearly 60 cents per MMBtu. EIA reported that inventories were 3,092 Bcf as of Friday, October 1, which is 6.9 percent greater than the previous 5-year average for the week. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate crude oil rose $2.45 per barrel (42 cents per MMBtu) on the week, or about 5 percent, to yesterday's record-high price of $51.98 per barrel ($8.96 per MMBtu).

327

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

June 27, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on July 5) June 27, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on July 5) Since Wednesday, June 19, natural gas spot prices increased at most locations, despite declines ranging between 5 and 14 cents per MMBtu on Wednesday, June 26. For the week, prices at the Henry Hub increased 19 cents to $3.42 per MMBtu, which is an increase of almost 6 percent. High temperatures and rising crude oil prices contributed to increased cooling demand for gas, which spurred the price hikes. The NYMEX futures contract for July delivery at the Henry Hub expired yesterday (June 26) at $3.278 per MMBtu, falling over 17 cents in its final day of trading. Natural gas in storage increased to 2,184 Bcf, which exceeds the 5-year average by more 20 than percent. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $1.10 per barrel or over 4 percent since last Wednesday, trading at $26.67 per barrel or $4.60 per MMBtu.

328

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

10 (next release 2:00 p.m. on March 17) 10 (next release 2:00 p.m. on March 17) Natural gas spot prices increased this week (Wednesday to Wednesday, March 2-9) as a late season cold front moved into major gas-consuming regions of the country, bringing a reminder that the end of winter is still two weeks away. Spot prices climbed 17 to 76 cents per MMBtu at trading locations in the Lower 48 States since last Wednesday. Price changes in the Northeast were at the higher end of the range, while trading in the West resulted in gains at the lower end. The Henry Hub spot price increased 38 cents per MMBtu, or 5.7 percent, to $6.99. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for April delivery gained 16.3 cents per MMBtu, settling at $6.880 on Wednesday, March 9. Natural gas in storage as of Friday, March 4, decreased to 1,474 Bcf, which is 25.7 percent above the 5-year (2000-2004) average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil traded at near-record highs, rising $1.75 per barrel on the week to yesterday's closing price of $54.75 per barrel, or $9.44 per MMBtu.

329

Natural Gas Processing: The Crucial Link Between Natural Gas Production and Its Transportation to Market  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Processing: The Crucial Link Between Natural Gas Production Processing: The Crucial Link Between Natural Gas Production and Its Transportation to Market Energy Information Administration, Office of Oil and Gas, January 2006 1 The natural gas product fed into the mainline gas transportation system in the United States must meet specific quality measures in order for the pipeline grid to operate properly. Consequently, natural gas produced at the wellhead, which in most cases contains contaminants 1 and natural gas liquids, 2 must be processed, i.e., cleaned, before it can be safely delivered to the high-pressure, long-distance pipelines that transport the product to the consuming public. Natural gas that is not within certain specific gravities, pressures, Btu content range, or water content levels will

330

Help:Range blocks | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Range blocks Jump to: navigation, search Range blocks are technical restrictions applied through Special:Blockip to a group of IP addresses that prevent them from editing, creating...

331

Charge exchange stripping cell measurements over a wide pressure range  

SciTech Connect

The efficiency of the stripping cell incorporated in a charge exchange analyzer has been measured over a pressure range of 1.8 to 130 mtorr and over an energy range of 1 to 130 keV/amu. In these measurements, a beam of hydrogen atoms was ionized by helium gas. As a by-product of the measurements, the scattering cross section was also measured. At the lowest pressure, the scattering cross section compared well with those measured previously; at high pressure, the cross section no longer followed an energy power law. The analyzer efficiency (defined as the fraction of the atoms that is ionized and not lost through scattering) can be modeled over the entire range of energy and pressure by including the measured scattering cross sections.

Colchin, R.J.; Roquemore, A.L.; Scott, S.D.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Holiday Notice: Holiday Notice: Due to the federal holiday in observance of Martin Luther King Day on Monday, January 21, 2002, the next issue of the Natural Gas Weekly Update will be published on Tuesday, January 22, 2002. Overview: Monday, January 14, 2002 Natural gas prices were generally lower last week as the fundamentals of ample working gas in storage and very little temperature-driven swing demand dominated the market. With little in the way of market-changing developments, trading in both the spot and futures markets tended to occur in relatively small price ranges throughout the week. The warming trend begun late in the previous week continued nearly unabated through last week, with the heavy gas-consuming areas of the Midwest and Northeast recording many of the greatest deviations above daily normal temperatures. Philadelphia, New York City, and Buffalo, NY had at least 3 days of temperatures that were 10 or more degrees above normal; Chicago's temperature reached an unusually warm 26 degrees above normal on Wednesday. (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation Map) Spot prices at the Henry Hub moved down moderately from the previous week, ending trading on Friday at $2.31, down 5 cents from the previous Friday. On the NYMEX, the futures contract for February delivery at the Henry Hub declined by $0.071 from the previous Friday, settling on Friday, January 11 at $2.204 per MMBtu. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate crude oil also fell, dipping below $20 per barrel for the first time in the New Year, ending trading last Friday at $19.67 per barrel, or $3.39 per MMBtu, down $1.80 per barrel, or $0.31 per MMBtu, from Friday, January 4.

333

Gas Mileage of 2014 Vehicles by Land Rover  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

19 Highway 2014 Land Rover Range Rover FFV 8 cyl, 5.0 L, Automatic (S8), Premium Gas or E85 Compare 2014 Land Rover Range Rover FFV Prem 14 City 16 Combined 19 Highway E85 9 City...

334

Fuel gas conditioning process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for conditioning natural gas containing C.sub.3+ hydrocarbons and/or acid gas, so that it can be used as combustion fuel to run gas-powered equipment, including compressors, in the gas field or the gas processing plant. Compared with prior art processes, the invention creates lesser quantities of low-pressure gas per unit volume of fuel gas produced. Optionally, the process can also produce an NGL product.

Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A. (Union City, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Gas Bubbles and Gas Pancakes at Liquid/Solid Interface: A Continuum Theory Incorporated with Molecular Interactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The states of gas accumulated at the liquid-solid interface are analyzed based on the continuum theory where the Hamaker constant is used to describe the long-range interaction at the microscopic scale. The Hamaker constant is always negative, whereas the gas spreading coefficient can be either sign. Despite the complexity of gas, including that the density profile may not be uniform due to absorption on both solid and liquid surfaces, we predict three possible gas states at the liquid-solid interface, i.e. complete wetting, partial wetting and pseudopartial wetting. These possible gas states correspond respectively to a gas pancake (or film) surrounded by a wet solid, a gas bubble with a finite contact angle, and a gas bubble(s) coexisting with a gas pancake. Typical thickness of the gas pancakes is at the nanoscale within the force range of the long-range interaction, whereas the radius of the gas bubbles can be large. The state of gas bubble(s) coexisting with a gas film is predicted theoretically for the first time. Our theoretical results can contribute to the development of a unified picture of gas nucleation at the liquid-solid interface.

Zhaoxia Li; Xuehua Zhang; Lijuan Zhang; Xiaocheng Zeng; Jun Hu; Haiping Fang

2006-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

336

Natural gas 1994: Issues and trends  

SciTech Connect

This report provides an overview of the natural gas industry in 1993 and early 1994 (Chapter 1), focusing on the overall ability to deliver gas under the new regulatory mandates of Order 636. In addition, the report highlights a range of issues affecting the industry, including: restructuring under Order 636 (Chapter 2); adjustments in natural gas contracting (Chapter 3); increased use of underground storage (Chapter 4); effects of the new market on the financial performance of the industry (Chapter 5); continued impacts of major regulatory and legislative changes on the natural gas market (Appendix A).

Not Available

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Short-Range Atmospheric Dispersion of Carbon Dioxide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

layer model for heavy gas dispersion from natural sources:data to analyze dense gas dispersion modeling issues. Atmosforum (perf) dense gas dispersion modeling project. Atmos

Cortis, Andrea; Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Determination of compliance with PL 92-500 Section 316(b) for the Donald C. Cook Nuclear Power Plant of the Indiana and Michigan Power Company  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Region III of the US Fish and Wildlife Service contracted with the Division of Environmental Impact Studies, Argonne National Laboratory, to make the 316(b) determination for the Donald C. Cook Nuclear Power Plant of the Indiana and Michigan Power Company and to make recommendations for improvement in intake design to facilitate compliance. To conduct this assessment, appropriate literature on screening systems and reports furnished by the applicant on intake design and operation and on ecological studies at the site were reviewed. Modifications of the location and design of the existing intake and possibilities of retrofitting with fine-mesh screening to screen larval forms of fishes were examined. It was determined that currently there is no dictated need for fine-mesh screening of intake flow at the D.C. Cook Nuclear Power Plant.

Sharma, R K; Freeman, III, R F

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells...

340

Savine Pass, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Savine Pass, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Egypt (Million Cubic Feet) Savine Pass, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Egypt (Million Cubic Feet)...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas cooking range" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Highgate Springs, VT Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Highgate Springs, VT Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Canada (Million Cubic Feet) Highgate Springs, VT Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Canada (Million...

342

Northeast Gateway, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gateway, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Egypt (Million Cubic Feet) Northeast Gateway, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Egypt (Million Cubic...

343

Lake Charles, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Lake Charles, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Trinidad and Tobago (Million Cubic Feet) Lake Charles, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Trinidad...

344

Cameron, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Trinidad...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Trinidad and Tobago (Million Cubic Feet) Cameron, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Trinidad and Tobago (Million...

345

Savine Pass, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Savine Pass, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Trinidad and Tobago (Million Cubic Feet) Savine Pass, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Trinidad and...

346

Golden Pass, TX Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports (price...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Golden Pass, TX Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports (price) (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Golden Pass, TX Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports (price) (Dollars per...

347

North Dakota Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) North Dakota Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) North Dakota Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas...

348

Oklahoma Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Oklahoma Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Oklahoma Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas...

349

Arkansas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Arkansas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Arkansas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas...

350

Montana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Montana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Montana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

351

Ohio Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Ohio Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Ohio Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

352

Wyoming Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Wyoming Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Wyoming Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

353

Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas...

354

Pennsylvania Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Pennsylvania Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Pennsylvania Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas...

355

California Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) California Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) California Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas...

356

New Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) New Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) New Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas...

357

Louisiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Louisiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Louisiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas...

358

West Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Annual Download Data (XLS File) West Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) West Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas...

359

Michigan Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Michigan Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Michigan Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas...

360

Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas cooking range" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Colorado Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Colorado Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Colorado Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas...

362

South Dakota Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) South Dakota Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) South Dakota Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells...

363

South Dakota Natural Gas Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) South Dakota Natural Gas Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic Feet) South Dakota Natural Gas Removed from Natural Gas...

364

A Lifecycle Emissions Model (LEM): Lifecycle Emissions from Transportation Fuels, Motor Vehicles, Transportation Modes, Electricity Use, Heating and Cooking Fuels, and Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

n.a. n.a. CNG = compressed natural gas; LNG = ;liquefiedgases; CNG = compressed natural gas; Exh. = exhausthydrogen CNG = compressed natural gas CO = carbon monoxide

Delucchi, Mark

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ... 22,442 22,117 23,554 18,774 16,718 Production...

366

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

2004 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year... 341,678 373,304 387,772 393,327 405,048 Production...

367

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ... 1,169 1,244 1,232 1,249 1,272 Production (million...

368

Science and Technology review: The search for mutagens from cooked foods  

SciTech Connect

This past year and a half has been one of the most unsettled periods in the history of the Livermore Laboratory. Our laboratory, like all federal laboratories, has felt the winds of change from Washington. Various committees are questioning the way in which the federal government supports scientific research and the appropriateness of certain to programs. Science and Technology Review is one of the principal mechanisms by which we inform and educate a broad readership about our research programs and accomplishments. Much of the Laboratory`s research is at the cutting edge of science and technology, making it particularly challenging to describe state-of-the-art accomplishments and their significance in widely understood terms. Our goal is that the articles presented here represent the full range of projects at Livermore and convey the challenge and excitement of working at the frontiers of science and technology.

NONE

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Microbiological, sensory, color and chemical characteristics of vacuum-packaged ground beef patties and cooked beef top rounds treated with the salts of various organic acids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The study was conducted in two phases. In Phase 1, vacuum-packaged ground beef patties containing sodium lactate, sodium propionate, sodium acetate and sodium citrate at various levels and combinations were stored up to 28 days at 4'C. Addition of sodium lactate alone or in combination with sodium propionate increased the shelf life of the patties by decreasing microbiological growth, decreasing negative flavor notes associated with lipid oxidation and decreasing water activity. Lean color of the patties also was improved by the addition of sodium lactate alone or in combination with sodium propionate. Lipid oxidation as measured by TBA (2-thiobarbituric acid) analysis was unaffected by treatment addition. In Phase 11, cooked vacuum-packaged beef top rounds containing 3% sodium lactate or 3 or 4% sodium lactate in combination with 0. 1 or 0.2% sodium propionate were stored for up to 84 days at 4'C. Addition of any of the treatments to the roasts in this phase greatly reduced total APCs (Aerobic Plate Counts). Positive flavor notes associated with fresh beef were enhanced by ingredient addition and tended to be highest in roasts containing 3% sodium lactate + 0.2% sodium propionate. Cooked roast beef color was enhanced by the additon of sodium lactate alone or in combination with 0. I % sodium propionate. Lipid oxidation and water activity were decreased by the addition of sodium lactate in combination with sodium propionate and pH and cooked yield were increased with any level and combination of ingredient addition.

Maca, Jennifer Vahalik

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Gas Utilities (New York)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This chapter regulates natural gas utilities in the State of New York, and describes standards and procedures for gas meters and accessories, gas quality, line and main extensions, transmission and...

371

Gas amplified ionization detector for gas chromatography  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas-amplified ionization detector for gas chromatography which possesses increased sensitivity and a very fast response time is described. Solutes eluding from a gas chromatographic column are ionized by uv photoionization of matter eluting therefrom. The detector is capable of generating easily measured voltage signals by gas amplification/multiplication of electron products resulting from the uv photoionization of at least a portion of each solute passing through the detector. 4 figs.

Huston, G.C.

1989-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

372

Case Study - Liquefied Natural Gas  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Environmental Environmental Science Enviro Express Kenworth LNG tractor. Connecticut Clean Cities Future Fuels Project Case Study - Liquefied Natural Gas As a part of the U.S. Department of Energy's broad effort to develop cleaner transportation technologies that reduce U.S. dependence on imported oil, this study examines advanced 2011 natural gas fueled trucks using liquefied natural gas (LNG) replacing older diesel fueled trucks. The trucks are used 6 days per week in regional city-to-landfill long hauls of incinerator waste with two fills per day. This is a workable fit for the limited range LNG trucks. Reduction of fuel costs and harmful emissions relative to the replaced trucks are significant. Introduction The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act legislation

373

ComEd, Nicor Gas, Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas - Bonus Rebate...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ComEd, Nicor Gas, Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas - Bonus Rebate Program (Illinois) ComEd, Nicor Gas, Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas - Bonus Rebate Program (Illinois) Eligibility...

374

South Dakota Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Annual Download Data (XLS File) South Dakota Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) South Dakota Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas...

375

International Energy Outlook - Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas International Energy Outlook 2004 Natural Gas Natural gas is the fastest growing primary energy source in the IEO2004 forecast. Consumption of natural gas is projected...

376

Assessment of hot gas contaminant control  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this work is to gather data and information to assist DOE in responding to the NRC recommendation on hot gas cleanup by performing a comprehensive assessment of hot gas cleanup systems for advanced coal-based Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) and Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC) including the status of development of the components of the hot gas cleanup systems, and the probable cost and performance impacts. The scope and time frame of information gathering is generally responsive to the boundaries set by the National Research council (NRC), but includes a broad range of interests and programs which cover hot gas cleanup through the year 2010. As the status of hot gas cleanup is continually changing, additional current data and information are being obtained for this effort from this 1996 METC Contractors` Review Meeting as well as from the 1996 Pittsburgh Coal Conference, and the University of Karlsruhe Symposium. The technical approach to completing this work consists of: (1) Determination of the status of hot gas cleanup technologies-- particulate collection systems, hot gas desulfurization systems, and trace contaminant removal systems; (2) Determination of hot gas cleanup systems cost and performance sensitivities. Analysis of conceptual IGCC and PFBC plant designs with hot gas cleanup have been performed. The impact of variations in hot gas cleanup technologies on cost and performance was evaluated using parametric analysis of the baseline plant designs and performance sensitivity.

Rutkowski, M.D.; Klett, M.G.; Zaharchuk, R.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

377

Medium- and Long-Range Forecasting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In contrast to short and extended range forecasts, predictions for periods beyond 5 days use time-averaged, midtropospheric height fields as their primary guidance. As time ranges are increased to 3O- and 90-day outlooks, guidance increasingly ...

A. James Wagner

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Natural Gas Annual Archives  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum & Other Liquids. Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas

379

Liquefied Natural Gas  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum & Other Liquids. Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas

380

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

natural gas prices, successful application of horizontal drilling, and hydraulic fracturing, as well as significant investments made by natural gas companies in production...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas cooking range" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Gas scrubbing liquids  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Fully chlorinated and/or fluorinated hydrocarbons are used as gas scrubbing liquids for preventing noxious gas emissions to the atmosphere.

Lackey, Walter J. (Oak Ridge, TN); Lowrie, Robert S. (Oak Ridge, TN); Sease, John D. (Knoxville, TN)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Natural Gas Processed  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases...

383

Natural Gas Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas Production. Measured By. Disseminated Through. Survey of Producing States and Mineral Management Service Evolving Estimate in Natural Gas Monthly.

384

EIA - Natural Gas Publications  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

and a weather snapshot. Monthly Natural Gas Monthly Natural and supplemental gas production, supply, consumption, disposition, storage, imports, exports, and prices in the...

385

Natural Gas Annual 2005  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Oil and Gas Field Code Master List ... Hawaii, 2001-2005 ... Energy Information Administration/Natural Gas Annual 2005 vii 54.

386

Natural Gas Exports (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Estimates for Canadian pipeline volumes are derived from the Office of Fossil Energy, Natural Gas Imports and Exports, and EIA estimates of dry natural gas imports.

387

February Natural Gas Monthly  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas Annual. Preliminary Monthly Data Preliminary monthly data in the "balancing item" cat- egory are calculated by subtracting dry gas production, withdrawals from storage,...

388

November Natural Gas Monthly  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas Annual. Preliminary Monthly Data Preliminary monthly data in the "balancing item" cat- egory are calculated by subtracting dry gas production, withdrawals from storage,...

389

January Natural Gas Monthly  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas Annual. Preliminary Monthly Data Preliminary monthly data in the "balancing item" cat- egory are calculated by subtracting dry gas production, withdrawals from storage,...

390

March Natural Gas Monthly  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas Annual. Preliminary Monthly Data Preliminary monthly data in the "balancing item" cat- egory are calculated by subtracting dry gas production, withdrawals from storage,...

391

May Natural Gas Monthly  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas Annual. Preliminary Monthly Data Preliminary monthly data in the "balancing item" cat- egory are calculated by subtracting dry gas production, withdrawals from storage,...

392

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

7, 2009 Next Release: May 14, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, May 6, 2009) Natural gas...

393

CONTINUOUS GAS ANALYZER  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reagent gas and a sample gas are chemically combined on a continuous basis in a reaction zone maintained at a selected temperature. The reagent gas and the sample gas are introduced to the reaction zone at preselected. constant molar rates of flow. The reagent gas and the selected gas in the sample mixture combine in the reaction zone to form a product gas having a different number of moles from the sum of the moles of the reactants. The difference in the total molar rates of flow into and out of the reaction zone is measured and indicated to determine the concentration of the selected gas.

Katz, S.; Weber, C.W.

1960-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

394

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

8 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

395

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

396

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

6 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

397

Natural Gas Dry Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Withdrawals from Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells Repressuring Vented and Flared...

398

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Overview: Thursday April 11, 2002 Overview: Thursday April 11, 2002 Natural gas prices have declined substantially in the past 7 days. Spot prices at most market locations across the country finished the day on Wednesday, April 10 down slightly. However the cumulative difference from the previous Wednesday ranged between $0.21 and $0.89 per MMBtu. Prices at the Henry Hub declined 43 cents per MMBtu from the previous Wednesday to trade at $3.25 yesterday. On the NYMEX, the price of the futures contract for May delivery at the Henry Hub settled at $3.184 per MMBtu, down roughly 32 cents since last Wednesday. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil declined $1.40 per barrel since the previous Wednesday, trading at $26.15 per barrel or $4.51 per MMBtu. Prices:

399

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

14 (next release 2:00 p.m. on December 21, 2006) 14 (next release 2:00 p.m. on December 21, 2006) Softening natural gas market conditions led to spot price decreases at most market locations in the Lower 48 States since Wednesday, December 6, with decreases ranging between $0.02 and $1.22 per MMBtu. The few price increases on the week were mostly confined to market locations west of the Rocky Mountains. On Wednesday, December 13, prices at the Henry Hub averaged $7.21 per MMBtu, decreasing $0.13 per MMBtu, or about 2 percent, since the previous Wednesday. The prices of futures contracts through December 2007 changed only slightly since December 6. The price for the January delivery contract decreased about 5 cents per MMBtu, or about 1 percent on the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), settling at $7.673 per MMBtu yesterday (December 13). Natural gas in storage was 3,238 Bcf as of December 8, which is 7.5 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil decreased 86 cents per barrel, or about 1 percent on the week to $61.34 per barrel or $10.58 per MMBtu.

400

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 15) 8, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 15) Spot and futures prices seesawed throughout the week (Wednesday to Wednesday, April 30-May 7) with no clear underlying trend, however prices ended trading yesterday at uniformly higher levels than one week ago. The weather's influence on gas demand was muted, as temperatures in most areas of the country were generally comfortably spring-like, except for some parts of the Southeast and Southwest, where summer-like temperatures prompted some early air conditioning load. The Henry Hub average spot price increased 23 cents from the previous Wednesday (April 30) to $5.48 per MMBtu. The daily settlement price of the NYMEX futures contract for June delivery rose $0.275 on the week, ending at $5.660 per MMBtu in yesterday's trading. The EIA reported that 821 Bcf of gas was held in storage as of Friday, May 2, which is 39.9 percent less than the 5-year average. The average spot price for West Texas Intermediate crude oil traded in a narrow range of less than $1 per barrel during the week, and ended trading yesterday with a small increase of 15 cents on the week, at $26.24 per barrel, or $4.52 per MMBtu.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas cooking range" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

11, 2002 11, 2002 On Friday, spot gas traded at the Henry Hub for $2.20 per MMBtu, marking no change from the price on the previous Friday. Last week spot prices at the Henry Hub traded within a tight range of $2.14-$2.20 per MMBtu. Temperatures in much of the country returned to above normal in the second half of the week and the National Weather Service's (NWS) latest 6-to 10-day forecast called for this pattern to continue through the weekend and all of this week. (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation Map) This dominant pattern of above normal temperatures has resulted in heating degree days thus far this winter that are 16 percent lower than normal. At the NYMEX, the settlement price for the March contract ended the week up almost 5 cents at $2.191 per MMBtu. Natural gas stocks remained well above last year's level as estimated net withdrawals were 82 Bcf during the last week of January. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil moved down 15 cents last week and ended Friday trading at $20.25 per barrel or $3.49 per MMBtu.

402

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

13, 2001 13, 2001 Spot prices for natural gas appeared to stabilize just above the $3.00 mark during the week ended August 10, 2001, as the price at the Henry Hub in Louisiana varied between $3.14 and $2.98 per million Btu. Net injections of natural gas into storage for the previous week again fell within the range of market expectations reported in the trade press and contributed to the stability of the price level. However, due to warmer-than-normal temperatures in the Northeast, Midwest, and parts of the Southwest and Southeast, prices at the Henry Hub increased early in the week before decreasing and finishing over 2 percent lower than the previous week. (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation from Normal Temperatures Map) The price of West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil finished the week at $28.10 per barrel or $4.84 per million Btu, an increase of almost 2 percent above the previous Friday.

403

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Thursday, December 19 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on January 3) Thursday, December 19 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on January 3) Natural gas spot prices on Wednesday, December 18, were higher than the previous Wednesday at most locations in the Lower 48 States, climbing between 20 and 60 cents per MMBtu. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), prices at the Henry Hub increased 36 cents or roughly 8 percent to $4.86 per MMBtu. The price of the NYMEX futures contract for January delivery at the Henry Hub has increased nearly 57 cents since last Wednesday to settle at $5.278 per MMBtu yesterday (December 18). Natural gas in storage decreased to 2,635 Bcf, which is below the 5-year average by over 5 percent, but well within the 5-year historical range. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $2.95 per barrel or about 11 percent since last Wednesday to trade at $30.44 per barrel or $5.248 per MMBtu.

404

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 (next release 2:00 p.m. on February 9, 2006) 2 (next release 2:00 p.m. on February 9, 2006) Since Wednesday, January 25, natural gas spot prices have increased at most market locations in the Lower 48 States, with increases ranging between 20 and 67 cents per MMBtu or about 2 to 8 percent at most markets. On Wednesday, February 1, prices at the Henry Hub averaged $8.71 per MMBtu, reflecting an increase of $0.21 per MMBtu or about 2 percent since Wednesday, January 25. The futures contract for February delivery at the Henry Hub closed at $8.40 per MMBtu on Friday, January 27, falling about 6 cents per MMBtu since Wednesday, January 25. By February 1, the futures contract for March delivery at the Henry Hub increased about 9 cents per MMBtu or about 1 percent since Wednesday, January 25. Natural gas in storage was 2,406 Bcf as of January 27, which is about 28 percent above the 5-year average. Since January 25, the spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $1.01 per barrel, or about 1.5 percent to $66.61 per barrel or $11.48 per MMBtu.

405

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 29) 2, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 29) Natural gas prices continued their upward trend for a second consecutive week with most market locations in the Lower 48 States registering gains of up to 25 cents per MMBtu since Wednesday, August 14. Continued hot temperatures across the country and an increase in oil prices resulted in prices generally ranging between $3.15 and $3.25 per MMBtu along the Gulf Coast, representing new 8-week highs. At the NYMEX, the price for the futures contract for September delivery closed on Wednesday, August 21, at $3.274 per MMBtu, an increase of just over 36 cents, or about 12.5 percent, on the week. Working gas in storage for the week ended Friday, August 16 was 2,657 Bcf, which exceeds the average for the previous 5 years by 13.1 percent. On the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), the spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil gained $2.18 to end trading yesterday at $30.37 per barrel, or $5.24 per MMBtu

406

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

15 (next release 2:00 p.m. on June 22, 2006) 15 (next release 2:00 p.m. on June 22, 2006) Natural gas spot prices increased at almost all locations this week (Wednesday - Wednesday, June 7-14) as wide ranging temperatures across the country affected some regional demand for both heating and air conditioning needs. The Henry Hub spot price rose 27 cents, or about 5 percent, to $6.09 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), prices also increased for almost all the futures contracts listed. The NYMEX contract for July delivery rose about 62 cents, or about 10 percent, since last Wednesday to settle at $6.590 per MMBtu yesterday (June 14). Natural gas in storage as of Friday, June 9 was 2,397 Bcf, which is 37.9 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil declined $1.78 per barrel, or about 3 percent, since last Wednesday, trading yesterday at $69.12 per barrel or $11.92 per MMBtu.

407

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

June 30 (next release 2:00 p.m. on July 7) June 30 (next release 2:00 p.m. on July 7) Natural gas spot prices dropped in almost all locations this week (Wednesday - Wednesday, June 22-29) partly because of a decline in cooling demand across much of the Lower 48 States. The Henry Hub spot price decreased 33 cents, or about 4.5 percent, to $7.07 per MMBtu, while locations in the West generally saw the largest decreases ranging between 27 cents and 71 cents per MMBtu. The price of the NYMEX futures contract for July delivery expired Tuesday (June 28) at $6.976, decreasing about 47 cents per MMBtu, or 6.2 percent, since last Wednesday (June 22). Natural gas in storage as of Friday, June 24 was 2,123 Bcf, which is 14.7 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil declined $1.04 per barrel, or about 2 percent, since last Wednesday, ending trading yesterday (June 29) at $57.28. The WTI crude oil spot price experienced an all-time high price of $59.78 per barrel on Monday, June 27.

408

Natural gas conversion process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The experimental apparatus was dismantled and transferred to a laboratory space provided by Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) which is already equipped with a high-ventilation fume hood. This will enable us to make tests at higher gas flow rates in a safe environment. Three papers presented at the ACS meeting in San Francisco (Symposium on Natural Gas Upgrading II) April 5--10, 1992 show that the goal of direct catalytic conversion of Methane into heavier Hydrocarbons in a reducing atmosphere is actively pursued in three other different laboratories. There are similarities in their general concept with our own approach, but the temperature range of the experiments reported in these recent papers is much lower and this leads to uneconomic conversion rates. This illustrates the advantages of Methane activation by a Hydrogen plasma to reach commercial conversion rates. A preliminary process flow diagram was established for the Integrated Process, which was outlined in the previous Quarterly Report. The flow diagram also includes all the required auxiliary facilities for product separation and recycle of the unconverted feed as well as for the preparation and compression of the Syngas by-product.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Natural gas production from Arctic gas hydrates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The natural gas hydrates of the Messoyakha field in the West Siberian basin of Russia and those of the Prudhoe Bay-Kuparuk River area on the North Slope of Alaska occur within a similar series of interbedded Cretaceous and Tertiary sandstone and siltstone reservoirs. Geochemical analyses of gaseous well-cuttings and production gases suggest that these two hydrate accumulations contain a mixture of thermogenic methane migrated from a deep source and shallow, microbial methane that was either directly converted to gas hydrate or was first concentrated in existing traps and later converted to gas hydrate. Studies of well logs and seismic data have documented a large free-gas accumulation trapped stratigraphically downdip of the gas hydrates in the Prudhoe Bay-Kuparuk River area. The presence of a gas-hydrate/free-gas contact in the Prudhoe Bay-Kuparuk River area is analogous to that in the Messoyakha gas-hydrate/free-gas accumulation, from which approximately 5.17x10[sup 9] cubic meters (183 billion cubic feet) of gas have been produced from the hydrates alone. The apparent geologic similarities between these two accumulations suggest that the gas-hydrated-depressurization production method used in the Messoyakha field may have direct application in northern Alaska. 30 refs., 15 figs., 3 tabs.

Collett, T.S. (Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Variance Analysis of Wind and Natural Gas Generation under Different Market Structures: Some Observations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Variance Analysis of Wind and Variance Analysis of Wind and Natural Gas Generation under Different Market Structures: Some Observations Brian Bush, Thomas Jenkin, David Lipowicz, and Douglas J. Arent National Renewable Energy Laboratory Roger Cooke Resources for the Future Technical Report NREL/TP-6A20-52790 January 2012 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Variance Analysis of Wind and Natural Gas Generation under Different Market Structures: Some Observations Brian Bush, Thomas Jenkin, David Lipowicz,

411

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on July 26, 2007) 9, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on July 26, 2007) Since Wednesday, July 11, natural gas spot prices decreased at virtually all markets in the Lower 48 States. Prices at the Henry Hub declined 41 cents per MMBtu, or 6 percent, since Wednesday, July 11, to $6.24 per MMBtu. At the NYMEX, the futures contract for August delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday (July 18) at $6.528 per MMBtu, falling 7 cents per MMBtu, or 1 percent since last Wednesday, July 11. Natural gas in storage was 2,692 Bcf as of July 13, which is 15.7 percent above the 5-year average (2002-2006). The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil gained $2.45 per barrel on the week (Wednesday-Wednesday) to $75.03 per barrel or $12.94 per MMBtu. Prices: Natural gas prices fell at virtually all market locations since last Wednesday, July 11, with declines of 25 to 50 cents per MMBtu or about 4 to 12 percent. Moderating temperatures in most areas of the Lower 48 States likely accounted for the widespread declines, as cooler temperatures mitigated cooling demand for natural gas. On a regional basis, price declines averaged between 18 and 58 cents per MMBtu, or 3 and 13 percent, since last Wednesday, July 11. The largest price decreases since last Wednesday, July 11, occurred principally in the Rocky Mountain region, where prices fell by more than 57 cents per MMBtu, or 13 percent on average. By far, the smallest decreases occurred in the Arizona/Nevada and Florida regions, where prices fell by 18 and 24 cents per MMBtu on average, respectively, with the Florida citygate posting the highest price in the Lower 48 States at $8.00 per MMBtu. Elsewhere, average price decreases by region ranged between 30 and 43 cents per MMBtu. Despite these declines and lower electric generation demand relative to last year, prices generally exceeded levels reported last year at this time, with prices at the Henry Hub $0.22 per MMBtu or 4 percent above last year's level. The principal exception to the year-over-year price increases occurred in the Rocky Mountain region, where prices at selected markets were between $1.87 and $2.28 per MMBtu or about 35 and 43 percent below last year's level.

412

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Natural Gas Pipeline Mileage...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Home > Natural Gas > About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines > Natural Gas Pipeline Mileage by State About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through...

413

Transportation and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fuels (eg diesel, compressed natural gas). Electricity (infossil fuels, such as compressed natural gas and liquefied

Lutsey, Nicholas P.; Sperling, Dan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Performance test reports and comparison of emission characteristics of prototype liquid multifuel burners developed for US military field cooking applications  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to provide data to the U.S. Army Natick RD&E Center on the performance of three prototype burners, which have the capability of firing with multiple types of fuels (diesel and JP-8), and the conventional gasoline-fired M-2 burner. The prototype burners are intended to replace the M-2 unit currently used in food cooking appliances in the Army. The burners supplied to Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) for the purpose of testing under this project included one M-2 unit, one M-3 prototype unit designed by Natick, one Babington prototype unit designed by Babington Engineering, and one ITR prototype designed by International Thermal Research Ltd. It should be noted, however, that after the project began, Babington Engineering provided an upgraded prototype unit for testing which replaced the unit initially provided by the Natick Center. The M-3 unit replaced the Karcher unit listed in the contract. The test procedures which were described in a Test Method Report allowed for the measurement of the concentrations of specific compounds emitted from the burners. These compounds included oxygen (O{sub 2}), carbon monoxide (CO), oxides of nitrogen (NOx), formaldehyde, and particulate emissions. The level of smoke produced was also measured by using a Bacharach Smoke Number system (ASTM Standard D2156). A separate Performance Test Report for each burner was prepared as part of this project, and is attached as part of this report. In those reports details of the measurement techniques, instrumentation, test operating conditions, and data for each burner were included. This paper provides a summary and a comparison of the results for all burners. A brief discussion of emissions from other similar small oil combustion systems is also part of this document to provide perspective on the type of contaminants and levels expected from these systems.

Litzke, W.; Celebi, Y.; McDonald, R.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Electricity and Natural Gas Efficiency Improvements for Residential Gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Natural Gas Efficiency Improvements for Residential Gas and Natural Gas Efficiency Improvements for Residential Gas Furnaces in the U.S. Title Electricity and Natural Gas Efficiency Improvements for Residential Gas Furnaces in the U.S. Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-59745 Year of Publication 2006 Authors Lekov, Alexander B., Victor H. Franco, Stephen Meyers, James E. McMahon, Michael A. McNeil, and James D. Lutz Document Number LBNL-59745 Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory City Berkeley Abstract This paper presents analysis of the life-cycle costs for individual households and the aggregate energy and economic impacts from potential energy efficiency improvements in U.S. residential furnaces. Most homes in the US are heated by a central furnace attached to ducts for distributing heated air and fueled by natural gas. Electricity consumption by a furnace blower is significant, comparable to the annual electricity consumption of a major appliance. Since the same blower unit is also used during the summer to circulate cooled air in centrally air conditioned homes, electricity savings occur year round. Estimates are provided of the potential electricity savings from more efficient fans and motors. Current regulations require new residential gas-fired furnaces (not including mobile home furnaces) to meet or exceed 78% annual fuel utilization efficiency (AFUE), but in fact nearly all furnaces sold are at 80% AFUE or higher. The possibilities for higher fuel efficiency fall into two groups: more efficient non-condensing furnaces (81% AFUE) and condensing furnaces (90-96% AFUE). There are also options to increase the efficiency of the furnace blower. This paper reports the projected national energy and economic impacts of requiring higher efficiency furnaces in the future. Energy savings vary with climate, with the result that condensing furnaces offer larger energy savings in colder climates. The range of impacts for a statistical sample of households and the percent of households with net savings in life cycle cost are shown. Gas furnaces are somewhat unusual in that the technology does not easily permit incremental change to the AFUE above 80%. Achieving significant energy savings requires use of condensing technology, which yields a large efficiency gain (to 90% or higher AFUE), but has a higher cost. With respect to electricity efficiency design options, the ECM has a negative effect on the average LCC. The current extra cost of this technology more than offsets the sizable electricity savings.

416

Characteristics of Natural Gas Trading and Exchanges  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Interest in energy trading grew exponentially during 2008 with numerous U.S. Congressional hearings on the influence of speculation on oil prices. Natural gas is an extremely important fuel in the electric industry, accounting for 54% of annual fuel expenses and frequently driving power prices. In a very timely report, this study examines the phenomenon of natural gas trading, which has experienced rapid growth across a wide range of markets. As best as can be gleaned from existing data, this report trac...

2008-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

417

The United States has significant natural gas  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

United States has significant natural gas United States has significant natural gas and oil reserves. But many of these resources are increasingly harder to locate and bring into production. To help meet this challenge, the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy over the years has amassed wide ranging expertise in areas related to deepwater resource location, production, safety and environmental protection. The goal of these activities has been to not only help overcome

418

Obtaining pressures in the 10?5 Pa range with oil?sealed rotary vacuum pumps  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Trapped oil?sealed rotary pumps are usually considered capable of ultimate pressures no lower than about 10?3 Pa. Experiments are described which confirm that most of this residual gas originates from air dissolved in the pump oil. Replacement of the air with a less soluble gas (helium) or an easily trapped gas (carbon dioxide) is shown to give a useful reduction in ultimate pressure and to reduce the oxygen partial pressure to essentially zero. Operation with completely degassed oil is shown to give ultimate pressures in the 10?5 Pa range. The design of pumps based on these principles is discussed.

B. R. F. Kendall

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

PowerPlex Fusion Product Size Ranges  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The schematic diagram illustrates the fluorescent dye label color and relative PCR product size ranges for the various STR loci present in this ...

2012-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

420

Physics Out Loud - Short-range Correlations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) Previous Video (Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD)) Physics Out Loud Main Index Next Video (SRF Accelerator Cavities) SRF Accelerator Cavities Short-range...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas cooking range" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

HY RID WIDE RANGE TRANSIMPEDAN E AMPLIFIER  

TRANSIMPEDAN E AMPLIFIER TE HNOLOGY SUMMARY Many applications require wide range detection, where detector current is converted to a voltage by a

422

Peak Underground Working Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Definitions Definitions Definitions Since 2006, EIA has reported two measures of aggregate capacity, one based on demonstrated peak working gas storage, the other on working gas design capacity. Demonstrated Peak Working Gas Capacity: This measure sums the highest storage inventory level of working gas observed in each facility over the 5-year range from May 2005 to April 2010, as reported by the operator on the Form EIA-191M, "Monthly Underground Gas Storage Report." This data-driven estimate reflects actual operator experience. However, the timing for peaks for different fields need not coincide. Also, actual available maximum capacity for any storage facility may exceed its reported maximum storage level over the last 5 years, and is virtually certain to do so in the case of newly commissioned or expanded facilities. Therefore, this measure provides a conservative indicator of capacity that may understate the amount that can actually be stored.

423

Up in Smoke: The Influence of Household Behavior on the Long-Run Impact of Improved Cooking Stoves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is conventional wisdom that it is possible to reduce exposure to indoor air pollution, improve health outcomes, and decrease greenhouse gas emissions in the rural areas of developing countries through the adoption of ...

Hanna, Rema

424

Up in Smoke: The Influence of Household Behavior on the Long-Run Impact of Improved Cooking Stoves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is conventional wisdom that it is possible to reduce exposure to indoor air pollution, improve health outcomes, and decrease greenhouse gas emissions in rural areas of developing countries through the adoption of improved ...

Hanna, Rema

2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

425

Adaptive Range Counting and Other Frequency-Based Range Query Problems.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??We consider variations of range searching in which, given a query range, our goal is to compute some function based on frequencies of points that (more)

Wilkinson, Bryan T.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Gas Lasers for Strong Field Applications  

SciTech Connect

Atomic, molecular and excimer gas lasers employ variety of pumping schemes including electric discharge, optical, or chemical reactions and cover a broad spectral range from UV to far-IR. Several types of gas lasers are capable to produce multi-kilojoule pulses and kilowatts of average power. Among them, excimer and high-pressure molecular lasers have sufficient bandwidth for producing pico- and femtosecond pulses. Projects are under way and prospects are open to bring ultra-fast gas laser technology to the front lines of the advanced accelerator applications.

Pogorelsky, I.V. [Accelerator Test Facility, Brookhaven National Laboratory, 820, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)

2004-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

427

GAS LASERS FOR STRONG-FIELD APPLICATIONS.  

SciTech Connect

Atomic-, molecular- and excimer-gas lasers employ variety of pumping schemes including electric discharge, optical, or chemical reactions and cover a broad spectral range from UV to far-IR. Several types of gas lasers can produce multi-kilojoule pulses and kilowatts of average power. Among them, excimer- and high-pressure molecular lasers have sufficient bandwidth for generating pico- and femtosecond pulses. Projects are underway and prospects are opening up to bring ultrafast gas laser technology to the front lines of advanced accelerator applications.

POGORELSKY,I.V.

2004-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

428

Control apparatus for hot gas engine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A mean pressure power control system for a hot gas (Stirling) engine utilizing a plurality of supply tanks for storing a working gas at different pressures. During pump down operations gas is bled from the engine by a compressor having a plurality of independent pumping volumes. In one embodiment of the invention, a bypass control valve system allows one or more of the compressor volumes to be connected to the storage tanks. By selectively sequencing the bypass valves, a capacity range can be developed over the compressor that allows for lower engine idle pressures and more rapid pump down rates.

Stotts, Robert E. (Clifton Park, NY)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Range search on multidimensional uncertain data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In an uncertain database, every object o is associated with a probability density function, which describes the likelihood that o appears at each position in a multidimensional workspace. This article studies two types of range retrieval ... Keywords: Uncertain databases, range search

Yufei Tao; Xiaokui Xiao; Reynold Cheng

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Molecular communication options for long range nanonetworks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nanotechnology is an emerging field of science devoted to provide new opportunities in a vast range of areas. In this paper, different techniques are proposed to enable the long range interconnection of nano-machines, deployed over distances from a few ... Keywords: Axons and action potential, Fluorescent proteins, MOLED, Molecular communication, Nanonetworks

Llus Parcerisa Gin; Ian F. Akyildiz

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Utah Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Utah Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

432

Arizona Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Arizona Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

433

Kansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Kansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

434

Alaska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Alaska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

435

North Dakota Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) North Dakota Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

436

Montana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Montana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

437

West Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) West Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

438

Wyoming Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Wyoming Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

439

Indiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Indiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

440

New York Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) New York Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas cooking range" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Nevada Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Nevada Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

442

Oregon Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Oregon Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

443

Alabama Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Alabama Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

444

Ohio Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Ohio Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

445

Carbon sequestration in natural gas reservoirs: Enhanced gas recovery and natural gas storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as cushion gas for natural gas storage, Energy and Fuels,GAS RECOVERY AND NATURAL GAS STORAGE Curtis M. Oldenburgits operation as a natural gas storage reservoir. In this

Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

New Mexico Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) New Mexico Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

447

Texas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Texas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

448

SourceGas - Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of qualifying furnaces, hydronic heating systems, high efficiency water heaters, boilers, boiler controls and commercial cooking equipment. . Custom measures are also...

449

Avista Utilities (Gas and Electric)- Commercial Food Equipment Rebates  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Avista Utilities offers incentives to customers who improve efficiency through electric food service equipment retrofits. A variety of cooking and refrigeration equipment are eligible for rebates...

450

Avista Utilities (Gas & Electric)- Commercial Food Equipment Rebates  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Avista Utilities offers incentives to customers who improve efficiency through food service equipment retrofits. A variety of cooking and refrigeration equipment are eligible for rebates through...

451

Impact of Natural Gas Price Decontrol on Gas Supply, Demand and Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Major analysis completed recently by the gas transmission and distribution industry concludes that available supplies of gas energy will fall into the range of 23-31 trillion cubic feet (Tcf) by the year 2000, as conventional gas production is increasingly supplemented by supplies from coal gasification, Alaska, unconventional sources, LNG, Canada, and Mexico. At the same time, however, gas demand is characterized by price-induced conservation in all markets, together with continuing gas demand constraints and financial burdens imposed by Government regulators at all levels. With these restrictions and burdens eased, the gas industry can rebuild its marketing acumen and capacity. Thus, gas demand may likely increase in both the traditional heating and industrial fuel and feedstock applications, as well as such new non-traditional uses as cogeneration, natural gas vehicles and select gas use with coal. With regard to impending gas price decontrol, analyses conducted by the American Gas Association (A.G.A.), as well as studies by the U.S. Department of Energy and other groups, concur in the important finding that natural gas will be able to compete with alternate fuels in the energy marketplace after decontrol, as long as indefinite price escalators and other rigidities in gas purchase contracts can be defused so as to enable the market system to operate successfully. A.G.A.'s analysis, indeed, concluded that gas prices are rising rapidly enough under the existing law between now and 1985, so that concerns of a sudden price increase after deregulation in that year may be somewhat overstated, as long as the indefinite price escalators are defused.

Schlesinger, B.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on February 8, 2007) 1, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on February 8, 2007) Since Wednesday, January 24, natural gas spot prices have increased at most market locations in the Lower 48 States, with increases ranging between 9 and 60 cents per MMBtu or about 1.1 to 8.4 percent at most markets. On Wednesday, January 31, prices at the Henry Hub averaged $7.75 per MMBtu, reflecting an increase of 29 cents per MMBtu or about 4 percent since Wednesday, January 24. The futures contract for February delivery at the Henry Hub closed at $6.917 per MMBtu on Monday, January 29, decreasing about 50 cents per MMBtu since Wednesday, January 24. By yesterday, (January 31), the futures contract for March 2007 delivery at the Henry Hub increased about 29 cents per MMBtu or about 4 percent since Wednesday, January 24. Natural gas in storage was 2,571 Bcf as of January 26, which is about 21 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $3.93 per barrel, or 7.3 percent to $58.17 per barrel or $10.03 per MMBtu. This week's WTI price change was the highest week-on-week increase since the week ended November 29, 2006, when crude oil increased $5.17 per barrel or $0.89 per MMBtu. Despite this week's relatively high increase, crude oil prices remain about 14.3 percent lower than a year ago.

453

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

17, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on July 24) 17, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on July 24) Spot and futures prices fell significantly during the week (Wednesday-Wednesday, July 9-16), as working gas inventories continued to grow strongly, intense summer heat was limited almost exclusively to the mountainous regions of the West, and Hurricane Claudette's immediate effect on prices was minimal. In trading at the Henry Hub, spot prices fell 56 cents from the previous Wednesday (July 9), to an even $5 per MMBtu. On the NYMEX, the settlement price of the futures contract for August delivery dipped below $5 per MMBtu, as it closed yesterday (July 16) at $4.934 per MMBtu-the first sub-$5 settlement for a near-month contract in nearly 4 months. EIA reported that working gas inventories were 1,866 Bcf as of Friday, July 11, which is 13.9 percent below the previous 5-year (1998-2002) average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil traded in a narrow range between $31.04 and $31.60 per barrel for the week. It ended trading yesterday with a decline of 40 cents per barrel to $31.20, or about $5.38 per MMBtu, as oil markets also reacted to Hurricane Claudette's limited impact on infrastructure and production. For the week, WTI showed a modest gain of $0.33 per barrel ($0.03 per MMBtu).

454

STAR FORMATION IN ATOMIC GAS  

SciTech Connect

Observations of nearby galaxies have firmly established, over a broad range of galactic environments and metallicities, that star formation occurs exclusively in the molecular phase of the interstellar medium (ISM). Theoretical models show that this association results from the correlation between chemical phase, shielding, and temperature. Interstellar gas converts from atomic to molecular only in regions that are well shielded from interstellar ultraviolet (UV) photons, and since UV photons are also the dominant source of interstellar heating, only in these shielded regions does the gas become cold enough to be subject to Jeans instability. However, while the equilibrium temperature and chemical state of interstellar gas are well correlated, the timescale required to reach chemical equilibrium is much longer than that required to reach thermal equilibrium, and both timescales are metallicity-dependent. Here I show that the difference in timescales implies that, at metallicities below a few percent of the solar value, well shielded gas will reach low temperatures and proceed to star formation before the bulk of it is able to convert from atomic to molecular. As a result, at extremely low metallicities, star formation will occur in a cold atomic phase of the ISM rather than a molecular phase. I calculate the observable consequences of this result for star formation in low-metallicity galaxies, and I discuss how some current numerical models for H{sub 2}-regulated star formation may need to be modified.

Krumholz, Mark R., E-mail: krumholz@ucolick.org [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Measurements of gas permeability on crushed gas shale.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In the last decade, more attention has been given to unconventional gas reservoirs, including tight gas shales. Accurate description of gas transport and permeability measurements (more)

Guarnieri, R.V.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Generalized Natural Gas...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas based on data through 20072008 with selected updates Generalized Natural Gas Pipeline Capacity Design Schematic Generalized Natural Gas Pipeline Capcity Design Schematic...

457

Baltimore Gas and Electric Company (Gas) - Residential Energy...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

(Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Baltimore Gas and Electric Company (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Eligibility Residential Savings For...

458

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Natural Gas Transportation...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Corridors > Major U.S. Natural Gas Transportation Corridors Map About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 20072008 with selected updates...

459

Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells...

460

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Natural Gas Transmission...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Transmission Path Diagram About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 20072008 with selected updates Natural Gas Transmission Path Natural...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas cooking range" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Montana-Dakota Utilities (Gas) - Commercial Natural Gas Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial Natural Gas Efficiency Rebate Program Montana-Dakota Utilities (Gas) - Commercial Natural Gas Efficiency Rebate Program Eligibility Commercial Savings For Other Heating...

462

Techniques for optically compressing light intensity ranges  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pin hole camera assembly for use in viewing an object having a relatively large light intensity range, for example a crucible containing molten uranium in an atomic vapor laser isotope separator (AVLIS) system is disclosed herein. The assembly includes means for optically compressing the light intensity range appearing at its input sufficient to make it receivable and decipherable by a standard video camera. A number of different means for compressing the intensity range are disclosed. These include the use of photogray glass, the use of a pair of interference filters, and the utilization of a new liquid crystal notch filter in combination with an interference filter. 18 figs.

Rushford, M.C.

1989-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

463

Techniques for optically compressing light intensity ranges  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pin hole camera assembly for use in viewing an object having a relatively large light intensity range, for example a crucible containing molten uranium in an atomic vapor laser isotope separator (AVLIS) system is disclosed herein. The assembly includes means for optically compressing the light intensity range appearing at its input sufficient to make it receivable and decipherable by a standard video camera. A number of different means for compressing the intensity range are disclosed. These include the use of photogray glass, the use of a pair of interference filters, and the utilization of a new liquid crystal notch filter in combination with an interference filter.

Rushford, Michael C. (Livermore, CA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Thermal instability in the collisionally cooled gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have presented the non-equilibrium (time-dependent) cooling rate and ionization state calculations for a gas behind shock waves with $v \\sim 50-150$ km s$^{-1}$ ($T_s \\sim 0.5 - 6\\times 10^5$ K). Such shock waves do not lead to the radiative precursor formation, i.e. the thermal evolution of a gas behind the shock waves are controlled by collisions only. We have found that the cooling rate in a gas behind the shock waves with $v \\sim 50-120$ km s$^{-1}$ ($T_s \\sim 0.5 - 3\\times 10^5$ K) differs considerably from the cooling rate for a gas cooled from $T = 10^8$ K. It is well-known that a gas cooled from $T = 10^8$ K is thermally unstable for isobaric and isochoric perturbations at $T \\simgt 2\\times 10^4$ K. We have studied the thermal instability in a collisionally controlled gas for shock waves with $v \\sim 50-150$ km s$^{-1}$. We have found that the temperature range, where the postshock gas is thermally unstable, is significantly modified and depends on both gas metallicity and ionic composition of a ga...

Vasiliev, Evgenii O

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Technically recoverable Devonian shale gas in Ohio  

SciTech Connect

The technically recoverable gas from Devonian shale (Lower and Middle Huron) in Ohio is estimated to range from 6.2 to 22.5 Tcf, depending on the stimulation method and pattern size selected. This estimate of recovery is based on the integration of the most recent data and research on the Devonian Age gas-bearing shales of Ohio. This includes: (1) a compilation of the latest geologic and reservoir data for the gas in-place; (2) analysis of the key productive mechanisms; and, (3) examination of alternative stimulation and production strategies for most efficiently recovering this gas. Beyond a comprehensive assembly of the data and calculation of the technically recoverable gas, the key findings of this report are as follows: a substantial volume of gas is technically recoverable, although advanced (larger scale) stimulation technology will be required to reach economically attractive gas production rates in much of the state; well spacing in certain of the areas can be reduced by half from the traditional 150 to 160 acres per well without severely impairing per-well gas recovery; and, due to the relatively high degree of permeability anisotropy in the Devonian shales, a rectangular, generally 3 by 1 well pattern leads to optimum recovery. Finally, although a consistent geological interpretation and model have been constructed for the Lower and Middle Huron intervals of the Ohio Devonian shale, this interpretation is founded on limited data currently available, along with numerous technical assumptions that need further verification. 11 references, 21 figures, 32 tables.

Kuushraa, V.A.; Wicks, D.E.; Sawyer, W.K.; Esposito, P.R.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Short-range atmospheric dispersion of carbon dioxide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

important. We model dense gas dispersion using the steady-eld data to analyze dense gas dispersion mod- eling issues.element modeling of gas dispersion in the atmosphere. In:

Cortis, A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

2006 Long Range Development Plan Final Environmental Impact Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ANNUAL ELECTRICITY AND NATURAL GAS DEMAND Utility CurrentAnnual Electricity and Natural Gas Demand V-1 Comparison of2002). The projected demand for natural gas at LBNL is also

Philliber, Jeff

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Long range interactions in nanoscale science  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Our understanding of the long range electrodynamic, electrostatic, and polar interactions that dominate the organization of small objects at separations beyond an interatomic bond length is reviewed. From this basic-forces ...

Rajter, Richard F.

469

Factors affecting home range of mallard pairs  

SciTech Connect

Certain habitat and social factors were investigated for their effect on home range size of mallard (Anas platyhynchos) pairs breeding in a forested region of north-central Minnesota during the spring of 1971--72. Data from 31 radio-marked hens and drakes were used, but primary emphasis was placed on 8 pairs (5 with both members of the pair marked). Pairs were radio-tracked on river marsh areas, river channels, and large sand lakes to provide comparative data for evaluating home range size differences. Home ranges varied from an average of 53 ha for pairs using primarily river habitat to 871 ha for pairs using only large sand lakes. River and lake shorelines varied considerably in species and density of vegetation. Interaction between pairs as well as density of flocked males appeared to be influenced by these habitat differences with resultant effects on home range sizes.

Riechmann, J.H.

1976-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Range resolution of unequal strength targets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper examines the problem of resolving targets whose amplitudes may differ. A common metric used for resolution that assumes targets of equal strength is modified for the subject scenario. An expression for range ...

Carlson, Blair D.

471

Underwater vehicle localization using range measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis investigates the problem of cooperative navigation of autonomous marine vehicles using range-only acoustic measurements. We consider the use of a single maneuvering autonomous surface vehicle (ASV) to aid the ...

Papadopoulos, Ge?rgios

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Smart grid e PLC: TOA ranging.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In questo lavoro vengono presentati alcuni standard PLC (PowerLine Communication) nell'ottica del loro utilizzo in applicazioni di ranging in piccole reti intelligenti (micro smart grid). (more)

Danzi, Pietro

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

A Lifecycle Emissions Model (LEM): Lifecycle Emissions from Transportation Fuels, Motor Vehicles, Transportation Modes, Electricity Use, Heating and Cooking Fuels, and Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fuel or power generation (coal, natural gas, fuel oil,generation mix for power used to compress fossil natural gas.power (% of electricity generation [EVs, hydrogen vehicles]) NGL = natural gas

Delucchi, Mark

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

A Lifecycle Emissions Model (LEM): Lifecycle Emissions from Transportation Fuels, Motor Vehicles, Transportation Modes, Electricity Use, Heating and Cooking Fuels, and Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

supplemental data) -- natural gas supply and disposition (petroleum, coal, or natural-gas supply of the U. S. (or ofAnnual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and

Delucchi, Mark

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

A Lifecycle Emissions Model (LEM): Lifecycle Emissions from Transportation Fuels, Motor Vehicles, Transportation Modes, Electricity Use, Heating and Cooking Fuels, and Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

emissions for natural-gas power plants. Moreover, the CH4separately from the natural gas-to-power plants fuelcycle,= of total natural-gas used by power plants, the fraction

Delucchi, Mark

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Natural Gas Annual, 2001  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 EIA Home > Natural Gas > Natural Gas Data Publications Natural Gas Annual, 2001 The Natural Gas Annual, 2001 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2001. Summary data are presented for each State for 1997 to 2001. The data that appear in the tables of the Natural Gas Annual, 2001 are available as self-extracting executable files in ASCII TXT or CSV file format. This volume emphasizes information for 2001, although some tables show a five-year history. Please read the file entitled README.V1 for a description and documentation of information included in this file. Also available are files containing the following data: Summary Statistics - Natural Gas in the United States, 1997-2001 (Table 1) ASCII TXT, and Natural Gas Supply and Disposition by State, 2001 (Table 2) ASCII TXT.

477

December Natural Gas Monthly  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

DOEEIA-0130(9712) Distribution CategoryUC-950 Natural Gas Monthly December 1997 Energy Information Administration Office of Oil and Gas U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC...

478

Oil and Gas Exploration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Metals Industrial Minerals Oil and Gas Geothermal Exploration Development Mining Processing Nevada, oil and gas, and geothermal activities and accomplishments in Nevada: production statistics, exploration and development including drilling for petroleum and geothermal resources, discoveries of ore

Tingley, Joseph V.

479

Recirculating rotary gas compressor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A positive displacement, recirculating Roots-type rotary gas compressor is described which operates on the basis of flow work compression. The compressor includes a pair of large diameter recirculation conduits which return compressed discharge gas to the compressor housing, where it is mixed with low pressure inlet gas, thereby minimizing adiabatic heating of the gas. The compressor includes a pair of involutely lobed impellers and an associated port configuration which together result in uninterrupted flow of recirculation gas. The large diameter recirculation conduits equalize gas flow velocities within the compressor and minimize gas flow losses. The compressor is particularly suited to applications requiring sustained operation at higher gas compression ratios than have previously been feasible with rotary pumps, and is particularly applicable to refrigeration or other applications requiring condensation of a vapor. 12 figs.

Weinbrecht, J.F.

1992-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

480

Recirculating rotary gas compressor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A positive displacement, recirculating Roots-type rotary gas compressor which operates on the basis of flow work compression. The compressor includes a pair of large diameter recirculation conduits (24 and 26) which return compressed discharge gas to the compressor housing (14), where it is mixed with low pressure inlet gas, thereby minimizing adiabatic heating of the gas. The compressor includes a pair of involutely lobed impellers (10 and 12) and an associated port configuration which together result in uninterrupted flow of recirculation gas. The large diameter recirculation conduits equalize gas flow velocities within the compressor and minimize gas flow losses. The compressor is particularly suited to applications requiring sustained operation at higher gas compression ratios than have previously been feasible with rotary pumps, and is particularly applicable to refrigeration or other applications requiring condensation of a vapor.

Weinbrecht, John F. (601 Oakwood Loop, NE., Albuquerque, NM 87123)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas cooking range" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Btu per cubic foot as published in Table A2 of the Annual Energy Review 2001. Source: Energy Information Administration, Office of Oil and Gas. Storage: Working gas in storage...

482

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

to withdraw natural gas from storage to meet current demand. Wellhead Prices Annual Energy Review More Price Data Storage Working gas in storage decreased to 2,406 Bcf as of...

483

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

natural gas futures also reversed gains made in the previous week. Wellhead Prices Annual Energy Review More Price Data Storage Working natural gas in storage increased by 63 Bcf...

484

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Working gas in storage was 3,121 Bcf as of Friday, Oct 24, 2003, according to the Energy Information Administration (EIA) Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report. This is 2.7...

485

Natural gas annual 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience. The 1996 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas from it`s production to it`s end use.

NONE

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Southern California Gas Co  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Southern California Gas Co ... 236,147,041 98,326,527 274,565,356 690,930 139,093,560 748,823,414 Lone Star Gas Co......

487

,"Kentucky Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet)","Kentucky Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)" 28306,451,1,35,17,,,10,3,0,48...

488

,"Oklahoma Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet)","Oklahoma Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)" 28306,13889,36,837,1016,,,1129,181,...

489

,"Florida Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet)","Florida Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)" 28306,151,-1,1,6,,,0,0,0,36...

490

,"Wyoming Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet)","Wyoming Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)" 28306,6305,-3,226,165,,,884,391,10,...

491

,"Ohio Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet)","Ohio Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)" 28306,495,-3,48,11,,,113,0,31,60...

492

,"Kansas Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet)","Kansas Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)" 28306,11457,-3,122,171,,,219,21,7,7...

493

,"Utah Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet)","Utah Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)" 28306,877,0,37,79,,,93,32,2,62...

494

Multiple-tracer gas analyzer  

SciTech Connect

A multi-gas tracer system has been designed, built, and used on an explosively fractured oil shale rubble bed. This paper deals exclusively with the hardware, software, and overall operation of the tracer system. This system is a field portable, self-contained unit, which utilizes a mass spectrometer for gas analysis. The unit has a 20 channel sample port capability and is controlled by a desk top computer. The system is configured to provide a dynamic sensitivity range of up to six orders of magnitude. A roots blower is manifolded to the unit to provide continuous flow in all sample lines. The continuous flow process allows representative samples as well as decreasing the time between each measurement. Typical multiplex cycle time to evaluate four unique gases is approximately 12 seconds.

Uhl, J.E.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

Gas turbines for the future  

SciTech Connect

Utility gas turbine technology has been advancing fairly rapidly, one reason being that it shares in the benefits of the research and development for aviation gas turbines. In general, turbine progress is characterized by large, incremental advances in performance. At intervals of approx. 15 yr, new-generation turbines are introduced, refined, and eventually installed in relatively large numbers. A new generation of turbines is being readied for the market that will have power ratings into the 130- to 150-MW range (simple cycle), significantly higher than the 70 to 100 MW now in service. When the new turbines are installed in combined-cycle plants, the efficiency levels are expected to rise from the present value of approx. 42% higher heating value to approx. 46%.

Cohn, A.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

Natural Gas Prices Are Above the Typical Range for the Past 2 Years  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Below average storage injections may be attributable, at least in part, to poor price incentives: high current prices and limited price increases are expected by ...

497

TECHNICAL REPORTS The greenhouse gas (GHG) impact of composting a range  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of antibiotic resistance alleviated the inhibition of ERY (1­ 200 mg/L) on biogas production and on butyric acid

Brown, Sally

498

Cooking with Corn Syrup  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This fact sheet describes the nutritional value and safe storage of corn syrup, a commodity food. It also offers food preparation ideas.

Anding, Jenna

2001-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

499

Cooking with Green Beans  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This fact sheet describes the nutritional value and safe storage of green beans, a commodity food. It also offers food preparation ideas.

Anding, Jenna

2008-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

500

Natural Gas Outlook  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Presented by: Guy F. Caruso, EIA AdministratorPresented to: Ohio Oil & Gas Association ConferenceMarch 12, 2004

Information Center

2004-03-12T23:59:59.000Z