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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas conditioning eh" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

EHS 146  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environment, Health, & Safety Training Program EHS 0146 Fire Barrier Awareness training Course Syllabus Subject...

2

EHS 277  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environment, Health, & Safety Training Program EHS 277 - Confined Space Entry Supervisor Course Syllabus Subject...

3

EHS 275  

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Environment, Health, & Safety Training Program EHS 275 - Confined Space Hazards Course Syllabus Subject Category:...

4

EHS 276  

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Environment, Health, & Safety Training Program EHS 276 Fall Protection Safety Course Syllabus Subject Category:...

5

EHS 274  

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Environment, Health, & Safety Training Program EHS 274 - Confined Space Entry - Refresher Training Course Syllabus...

6

EHS 658  

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Environment, Health, & Safety Training Program EHS 0658 (GHS) Hazard Communication Update Course Syllabus Subject...

7

EHS 0205  

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205 - Crane/Hoist Operator Practical Training (Greater than 2 ton) 205 - Crane/Hoist Operator Practical Training (Greater than 2 ton) For first time operators, EHS 0205 practical training is to be completed after completing EHS 0206 classroom training. If you have already completed EHS 0206, or this is a refresher training, please continue. These are the steps for completing EHS 0205 Complete a medical exam at Health Services (510) 486-6266 to schedule appointment. Watch the crane safety video (http://www.lbl.gov/ehs/training/safetyflicks/) Complete the online written exam Go here NOTE: This is an open book exam based on PUB 3000 Chapter 27. You should reference this to complete the exam Schedule a practical The practical training is provided by qualified practical instructors. Please contact EHS Training to determine who can provide your

8

EHS Training: What's New  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

What's What's New What's New in EHS Training This is alist of projects that EHS Training is currently working on are has recently completed. For more information, contact James Basore at jdbasore@lbl.gov Updated: 8/15/2013 Instructional Video Projects Lockot/Tagout cord-n-plug Video is for new LOTO classroom training (EHS 0358) used as an activity Deveoped for Mark Scott Target date: August 2013 Safely moving pressurized gas cyclinders and cryogen dewars Short video is designed to raise awarenesss for how to safely move a pressurized gas cyclinder and cryogen dewar Target date: September 2013 New and Revised Training Courses New version of EHS0010 Overview of Environment, Health and Safety at LBNL Newly revised training addresses changes in organizational structure, and rebalances content to include traffic/pedestrian safety and

9

EHS 381  

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EHS0384 Electrical Equipment Safety Program Annual update for Surveyors EHS0384 Electrical Equipment Safety Program Annual update for Surveyors Course Syllabus Subject Category: General Course Prerequisite: None Course Length: 1 page information update to read Medical Approval: None Delivery Mode: online Frequency: Annual Course Purpose: This is to provide annual updates on changes that have occurred to the Electrical Equipment Safety Program. It is intended for electrical equipment surveyors. Course Objectives: * To understand changes to the Electrical Equipment Safety Program Subject Matter Expert: Mark Scott Training Compliance Requirements: 29 CFR 1910 Subpart S, NEC, Chapter 8 Web-based Exam: No Final Exam: No Course Instructional Materials: Online document

10

Fuel gas conditioning process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for conditioning natural gas containing C.sub.3+ hydrocarbons and/or acid gas, so that it can be used as combustion fuel to run gas-powered equipment, including compressors, in the gas field or the gas processing plant. Compared with prior art processes, the invention creates lesser quantities of low-pressure gas per unit volume of fuel gas produced. Optionally, the process can also produce an NGL product.

Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A. (Union City, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

UCSB Lab-specific Chemical Hygiene Plan 1 EH&S, Rev. 1/07  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) Compressed Gas Cylinders m) Lab Eyewear, Gloves, Lab Coats and Respirators at UCSB n) Power Failures o Nanomaterials n) SOP for Using Centrifuge #12;UCSB Lab-specific Chemical Hygiene Plan 2 EH&S, Rev. 1/07 1

Bigelow, Stephen

12

EHS342  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EHS 0342 Beryllium Hazard Communication Course Syllabus Subject Category: Beryllium Safety Program Course Prerequisite: None Course Length: 1 hour Medical Approval: None Delivery Mode: Web-Based Training Frequency: 2 Years Course Purpose: The goal of this course is to make you aware of the presence and health risks of beryllium metal used here at the Berkeley Lab and other DOE sites. This also includes informing you of the controls the Berkeley Lab uses to minimize these risks and providing you with resources for more information on beryllium disease and its prevention. Course Objectives: Upon completion of this training employees will be able to: 1. Identify characteristics of beryllium.

13

Environment, Health, & Safety Training Program EHS-511, EHS-512...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5.11 Environment, Health, & Safety Training Program EHS-511, EHS-512, EHS-513, EHS-514, and EHS-515 LBNL Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) Training Program COURSE SYLLABUS...

14

Environment, Health and Safety (EH&S): Industrial Hygiene Group...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EH&S A-Z Site Map Organization Chart EHS Internal Search EH&S Find a Lab Employee Environment, Health, & Safety Division Groups JHA Training Whom to Call Databases Ergonomics...

15

Microsoft Word - EHS 171.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

10 10 _____________________________ Environment, Health, & Safety _________ __________________ Training Program EHS0171 Compressed Gas and Pressure Safety Course Syllabus Subject Category: Compressed Gas and Pressure Safety Course Prerequisite: No Course Length: 2.5 hours Medical Approval: No Delivery Mode: Web-based Training Schedule: N/A Location/Time: N/A Course Purpose: This course is designed to provide information to enable employees/students to: 1. Safely work with compressed gasses in "typical" bottled gas applications at working pressures up to 150 psig 2. Assess the hazards associated with pressure vessels and vacuum systems.

16

Microsoft Word - EHS 802.docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 Reporting Adverse EHS Occurrences in ORPS Course Syllabus Subject Category: EHS Reporting Course Prerequisite: None Course Length: 15 minutes Medical Approval: None Delivery...

17

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

E A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z EHS Databases EHS Photo Management System EHS Standards Set for LBNL EHS Training Electrical Equipment Inspection Electrical...

18

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

O A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z One Minute 4 Safety Org Chart (EH&S Division) Org Chart (OCFOASD - EH&S) ORPS - Occurrence Reporting OSHA's Form 300A: Annual...

19

Microsoft Word - EHS 300.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environment, Health, & Safety Training Program EHS 300 Fiber optic Safety Course Syllabus Subject Category: Industrial...

20

Microsoft Word - EHS 39.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environment, Health, & Safety Training Program EHS 0039: Mentor Preparation Course Syllabus Subject Category: Safety...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas conditioning eh" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Microsoft Word - EHS 225.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environment, Health, & Safety Training Program EHS 225 Forklift Training & Recertification Course Syllabus Subject...

22

Microsoft Word - EHS0470 .doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environment, Health, & Safety Training Program EHS0470- General Employee Radiological Training (GERT) Subject Category:...

23

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Health Services HS Home Clinical Services Policies and Procedures Forms Contact Us EH&S Training images Building 26 (510) 486-6266 Mon-Fri, 7:30 am - 3:30 pm In case of Emergency:...

24

Microsoft Word - EHS 210.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environment, Health, & Safety Training Program EHS 0210 CraneHoist Operator-2 Tons (4,000 lbs) or less Course...

25

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS) Training  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EH&S Training images Contact Us General Questions ehstraining@lbl.gov 510-495-2228 Contact list for Training Staff EHS0470 - GERT Training Access the online GERT training Download...

26

Imperfect Bose Gas with Attractive Boundary Conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The free Bose gas with attractive boundary conditions is an interesting toy model for the study of Bose-Einstein Condensation (BEC), because one has BEC already in one dimension. Here we study for the first time the imperfect Bose gas with these boundary conditions and prove rigorously the occurence of condensation.

Lieselot Vandevenne; Andre Verbeure

2005-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

27

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

T A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Telemetry Training - EHS Transporting & Shipping Hazardous Materials...

28

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

G A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z GERT - General Employee Radiological Training (EHS0470)...

29

Method for hot gas conditioning  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for cracking and shifting a synthesis gas by the steps of providing a catalyst consisting essentially of alumina in a reaction zone; contacting the catalyst with a substantially oxygen free mixture of gases comprising water vapor and hydrocarbons having one or more carbon atoms, at a temperature between about 530.degree. C. (1000.degree. F.) to about 980.degree. C. (1800.degree. F.); and whereby the hydrocarbons are cracked to form hydrogen, carbon monoxide and/or carbon dioxide and the hydrogen content of the mixture increases with a corresponding decrease in carbon monoxide, and carbon formation is substantially eliminated.

Paisley, Mark A. (Upper Arlington, OH)

1996-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

30

Microsoft Word - EHS365.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

65 ~ Asbestos Containment Entry 65 ~ Asbestos Containment Entry Course Syllabus Subject Category: Occupational Health Course Prerequisite: EHS 339 Course Length: Approximately 1 hour Medical Approval: Yes (See note below) Delivery Mode: Online Schedule: If you cannot take online, class can be taught by outside agency by special request. These arrangements are made by the requester's respective Division support staff. Course Purpose: This course is designed for personnel who may need to enter asbestos containments, but not for the purpose of abatement. This course is a means for obtaining entry into containments when absolutely necessary, but it is not intended to allow unlimited access to containments nor is this training intended to be maintained on an annual basis with the exception of EH&S

31

Environment, Health and Safety (EH&S): Biosafety Manual: 5.0...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Control Plans (ECPs). PIs, work leads, workers, Division Safety Coordinators, and Environment, Health, and Safety (EH&S) Division Biosafety Program personnel have access to...

32

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EHS A-Z Index A A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Accident Statistics Accident Statistics Archive Acronyms AccidentIncident Reporting Activity Hazard Document...

33

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

D A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Databases - EHS Disability Management Division ISM Division Safety Committee Division Safety Coordinators Dosimetry Downloads...

34

Microsoft Word - EHS476.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

10 10 __________________________________ Environment, Health, & Safety ________________________________ Training Program EHS0476~ Radioactive Materials Driver Training Subject Category: Radioactive Materials Driver Transport Training Course Prerequisite: No Medical Approval: No Course Length: ~30 minutes Delivery Mode: Online Training Schedule: Take course as needed online Course Purpose: This course provides function specific drivers training for LBNL personnel who transport radioactive materials, via

35

Microsoft Word - EHS0473-2012 .doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environment, Health, & Safety Training Program EHS0473- Radiological Worker II Course Syllabus Subject Category: Radiation Protection Course...

36

Microsoft Word - EHS0471-2012.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environment, Health, & Safety Training Program EHS0471 - Radiological Worker I Course Syllabus Subject Category: Radiation Protection Course...

37

Fundamental mechanisms in flue-gas conditioning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall goal of this research project is to formulate a mathematical model of flue gas conditioning. This model will be based on an understanding of why ash properties, such as cohesivity and resistivity, are changed by conditioning. Such a model could serve as a component of the performance models of particulate control devices where flue gas conditioning is used. There are two specific objectives of this research project, which divide the planned research into two main parts. One part of the project is designed to determine how ash particles are modified by interactions with sorbent injection processes and to describe the mechanisms by which these interactions affect fine particle collection. The objective of the other part of the project is to identify the mechanisms by which conditioning agents, including chemically active compounds, modify the key properties of fine fly ash particles.

Dahlin, R.S.; Vann Bush, P.; Snyder, T.R.

1992-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

38

Fundamental mechanisms in flue gas conditioning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall goal of this research project is to formulate a mathematical model of flue gas conditioning. This model will be based on an understanding of why ask properties, such as cohesivity and resistivity, are changed by conditioning. Such a model could serve as a component of the performance models of particulate control devices where flue gas conditioning is used. There are two specific objectives of this research project, which divide the planned research into two main parts. One part of the project is designed to determine how ash particles are modified by interactions with sorbent injection processes and to describe the mechanisms by which these interactions affect fine particle collection. The objective of the other part of the project is to identify the mechanisms by which conditioning agents, including chemically active compounds, modify the key properties of fine fly ash particles.

Bush, P.V.; Snyder, T.R.

1992-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

39

EHS379 syllabus  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

379 Subcontractors Lockout/Tagout Orientation 379 Subcontractors Lockout/Tagout Orientation Course Syllabus Subject Category: Electrical Safety Course Prerequisite: None Course Length: 15 minutes Medical Approval: None Delivery Mode: online Frequency: One time Course Purpose: This course is required for subcontractors who will perform work involving lockout/tagout. The training explains the subcontractor LBNL Lockout/Tagout process so that each worker has a clear understanding of the safety expectations, the LOTO process, and the different roles and responsibilities associated with work that involves LOTO. Course Objectives: After completing this training, participants will be able to: * Recall the purpose of lockout/tagout * Identify conditions that require lockout/tagout

40

AFRD EH&S  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home Safety Tips Home Safety Tips AFRD homepage AFRD EH&S homepage Safety Tips for the Home Time to "Fall Back" on a New Smoke Detector Battery Traditionally when you turn your clocks back in the fall, you should also install a new battery in every household smoke, fire, or carbon monoxide detector (unless you use special batteries that are made to last many years in those applications). Fire Prevention Week is in October, a perfect time to get the safety aspects of your home ready for the holidays. Wildlands Fire: Are You Vulnerable? Are You Ready? Another aspect of fire safety for many of us involves wildlands fire. California's fire season is typically in the fall, when a heavy growth of plant life is drying out just in time for the "Diablo winds." Those who

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas conditioning eh" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Microsoft Word - EHS 317.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EHS 317 ~ Asbestos Class III Worker Refresher Course Syllabus Subject Category: Occupational Health Course Prerequisite: No Course Length: 1 Day Medical Approval: No Delivery Mode: Class Schedule: Through Qualified Offsite Vendor Location/Time: Offsite Vendor Course Purpose: This OSHA approved refresher course is a review course that teaches students two perform limited asbestos abatement activities related to maintenance work where the amount of asbestos material abated will fit into a standard 60"x60" waste bag or an asbestos glove-bag. By completing this review course, students will maintain credit as an OSHA training Class III worker and a Class III competent person. Course Objectives:

42

Microsoft Word - EHS 316.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EHS 316 ~ Asbestos Class III Worker Course Syllabus Subject Category: Occupational Health Course Prerequisite: No Course Length: 2 Days Medical Approval: No Delivery Mode: Class Schedule: Through Qualified Offsite Vendor Location/Time: Offsite Vendor Course Purpose: This OSHA approved course teaches students how to perform limited asbestos abatement activities related to maintenance work where the amount of asbestos material abated will fit into a standard 60"x60" waste bag or an asbestos glove-bag. By completing this course, students will receive credit as an OSHA training class III worker and a Class III competent person. Course Objectives:  Learn the history and uses of asbestos, health effects, and medical surveillance.

43

Microsoft Word - EHS0056.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8/2012 8/2012 _____________________________ Environment, Health, & Safety_______________________________ Training Program EHS0056 ~ Ergo Material Handling & Body Mechanics in Labs Course Syllabus Subject Category: Ergonomics Course Prerequisite: None Course Length: 15 minutes Medical Approval: None Delivery Mode: Web-based Training Schedule: Available 24/7 Course Purpose: Course provides a structure for applying ISM in work that involves handling and lifting heavy materials used in laboratory and mechanical settings. The training is based on a scenario that entails safely moving and installing a machine part onto a piece of scientific equipment. Video is used to demonstrate safe lifting techniques, and the planning process. The purpose of the course

44

AFRD EH&S: Safety People  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Key AFRD Safety Personnel These are some of the people who work to ensure safety, health, and environmental protection in AFRD. If you need advice or assistance or just want to say hello, drop us a line or stop by. Divisional Safety Officials Peter Seidl, Division Deputy and Safety Advisory Committee Representative Building 47, Room 102, x7653 Pat Thomas, AFRD Safety Coordinator Building 71, Room 251B, x6098 Cindy Donk, Administrative Staff Representative Building 47, Room 112B, x5430 Frank Rosado, ergonomics advocate Building 50A, Room 5104, x7368 Selected Contacts in the EH&S Division Bob Fairchild, LBNL Laser Safety Officer Building 75, Room 109, x2278 Linnea Wahl, EH&S Division Liaison Note: Ned Borglin is backup Building 75, Room 106, x7623 Herb Toor, EH&S Industrial Hygienist

45

EHS_ISMPlan_FY12_Final  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

science. EHS partners with scientists and stakeholders to maintain a high level of safety consciousness and performance by providing cost effective advice, processes, and tools....

46

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS): Site Map  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Website Map Website Map EHS Home spacer image arrow image EHS Division ISM Plan EHS A-Z Index Org Chart EH&S Internal Groups arrow image Environmental Services arrow image Health Services spacer image • Clinical Services spacer image • SAAR arrow image Industrial Hygiene spacer image • Group Members spacer image • Organizational Chart spacer image • Programs and Databases arrow image Operations spacer image • Admin Help Desk (EHSS) spacer image • IT Systems spacer image • Organization Chart arrow image Security and Emergency Operations spacer image • Emergency Services spacer image • Fire Department/Protection spacer image • ISSM spacer image • Site Access & Security arrow image Radiation Protection spacer image • Laser Safety spacer image • Radiation Safety

47

Fundamental mechanisms in flue gas conditioning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project is divided into four tasks. The Management Plan was developed in task 1. Task 2, Evaluation of Mechanisms in FGD Sorbent and Ash Interactions, focuses on the characteristics of binary mixtures of these distinct powders. Task 3, Evaluation of Mechanisms in Conditioning Agents and Ash, is designed to examine the effects of various conditioning agents on fine ash particles to determine the mechanisms by which these agents alter the physical properties of the ash. Tasks 2 and 3 began with an extensive literature search and the assembly of existing theories. This phase of the project is now complete. During the past quarter, initial preparations of laboratory equipment for laboratory testing have been made. A plan for initial laboratory tests has been submitted to the Project Manager for review. Laboratory testing will commence once these laboratory plans have been formally approved. The results of the work performed under task 2 and 3 will be included in a Flue Gas Conditioning Model that will be issued under task 4. The Final Report for the project will also be prepared under task 4.

Snyder, T.R.; Robinson, M.S.; Bush, P.V.

1992-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

48

Fundamental mechanisms in flue gas conditioning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project is divided into four tasks. Task 1 is the Development of a Management Plan. Task 2, Evaluation of Mechanisms in FGD Sorbent and Ash Interactions, focuses on the characteristics of binary mixtures of these distinct powders. Task 3, Evaluation of Mechanisms in Conditioning Agents and Ash, is designed to examine the effects of various conditioning agents on fine ash particles to determine the mechanisms by which these agents alter the physical properties of the ash. Tasks 2 and 3 began with an extensive literature search and the assembly of existing theories. The results of the work performed under Tasks 2 and 3 will be included in a Flue Gas Conditioning Model that will be issued under Task 4. The Final Report for the project will also be prepared under Task 4. This quarterly report covers four months in order to synchronize the reporting periods for this project with US Government quarters. Work performed on the project during the past quarter consisted almost entirely of the review of literature pertaining to the objectives of Tasks 2 and 3. The primary results of that review are discussed at length in Topical Reports 1 and 2, submitted January 9, 1992. As a consequence of the work described in the topical reports, several of the project's Measures of Success that were described in the first quarterly report have been achieved. This quarterly report will discuss these achievements.

Snyder, T.R.

1992-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

49

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS): Personal Protective Equipment...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

However, PPE is not a substitute for appropriate engineering controls. The Environment, Health and Safety (EH&S) Division advises on the protective equipment required for...

50

Microsoft Word - EHS383 syllabus - edits.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environment, Health, & Safety Training Program EHS0383 Electrical Equipment Inspector Training Course Syllabus Subject...

51

Training Program EHS 657 ~ Self-Transporting Hazardous Materials...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environment, Health, & Safety Training Program EHS 657 Self-Transporting Hazardous Materials Training Course Syllabus...

52

Training Program EHS 0611 ~ Universal Waste Regulatory Training  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environment, Health, & Safety Training Program EHS 0611 Universal Waste Regulatory Training Course Syllabus Subject...

53

Microsoft Word - EHS206_revised.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

________________________ _____Environment, Health, & Safety _____ ______________________ ________________________ _____Environment, Health, & Safety _____ ______________________ Training Program EHS 206 ~ Crane Hoist Operator -Greater than 2 Tons Course Syllabus Subject Category: Occupational Safety Course Prerequisite: No Course Length: Four hour lecture plus one hour practical Medical Approval: Every 3 years Delivery Mode: Classroom and hands-on practical Schedule: Quarterly or as needed Location/Time: EHS Training facility Course Purpose: This course has both a classroom and hands-on practical component. It is designed for individuals who, as part of their job, need to operate cranes on an incidental basis with a load greater than two ton. The primary objective of this course is to

54

Fundamental mechanisms in flue gas conditioning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We performed a wide variety of laboratory analyses during the past quarter. As with most of the work we performed during the previous quarter, our recent efforts were primarily directed toward the determination of the effects of adsorbed water on the cohesivity and tensile strength of powders. We also continued our analyses of dust cake ashes that have had the soluble compounds leached from their particle surfaces by repeated washings with water. Our analyses of leached and unleached dust cake ashes continued to provide some interesting insights into effects that compounds adsorbed on surfaces of ash particles can have on bulk ash behavior. As suggested by our literature review, our data indicate that water adsorption depends on particle morphology and on surface chemistry. Our measurements of tensile strength show, that for many of the samples we have analyzed a relative minimum in tensile strength exists for samples conditioned and tested at about 30% relative humidity. In our examinations of the effects of water conditioning on sample cohesivity, we determined that in the absence of absorption of water into the interior of the particles, cohesivity usually increases sharply when environments having relative humidities above 75% are used to condition and test the samples. Plans are under way to condition selected samples with (NH[sub 4])[sub 2]SO[sub 4], NH[sub 4]HSO[sub 4], CaCl[sub 2], organosiloxane, and SO[sub 3]. Pending approval, we will begin these conditioning experiments, and subsequent analyses of the conditioned samples.

Snyder, T.R.; Bush, P.V.

1993-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

55

Tracer Gas Transport under Mixed Convection Conditions in an Experimental  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tracer Gas Transport under Mixed Convection Conditions in an Experimental Tracer Gas Transport under Mixed Convection Conditions in an Experimental Atrium: Comparison Between Experiments and CFD Predictions Title Tracer Gas Transport under Mixed Convection Conditions in an Experimental Atrium: Comparison Between Experiments and CFD Predictions Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2006 Authors Jayaraman, Buvaneswari, Elizabeth U. Finlayson, Michael D. Sohn, Tracy L. Thatcher, Phillip N. Price, Emily E. Wood, Richard G. Sextro, and Ashok J. Gadgil Journal Atmospheric Environment Volume 40 Start Page Chapter Pagination 5236-5250 Keywords airflow and pollutant transport group, atria, indoor airflow and pollutant transport, indoor environment department, indoor pollutant dispersion, mixed convection, turbulence model

56

NOVEL GAS CLEANING/CONDITIONING FOR INTEGRATED GASIFICATION COMBINED CYCLE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Development efforts have been underway for decades to replace dry-gas cleaning technology with humid-gas cleaning technology that would maintain the water vapor content in the raw gas by conducting cleaning at sufficiently high temperature to avoid water vapor condensation and would thus significantly simplify the plant and improve its thermal efficiency. Siemens Power Generation, Inc. conducted a program with the Gas Technology Institute (GTI) to develop a Novel Gas Cleaning process that uses a new type of gas-sorbent contactor, the ''filter-reactor''. The Filter-Reactor Novel Gas Cleaning process described and evaluated here is in its early stages of development and this evaluation is classified as conceptual. The commercial evaluations have been coupled with integrated Process Development Unit testing performed at a GTI coal gasifier test facility to demonstrate, at sub-scale the process performance capabilities. The commercial evaluations and Process Development Unit test results are presented in Volumes 1 and 2 of this report, respectively. Two gas cleaning applications with significantly differing gas cleaning requirements were considered in the evaluation: IGCC power generation, and Methanol Synthesis with electric power co-production. For the IGCC power generation application, two sets of gas cleaning requirements were applied, one representing the most stringent ''current'' gas cleaning requirements, and a second set representing possible, very stringent ''future'' gas cleaning requirements. Current gas cleaning requirements were used for Methanol Synthesis in the evaluation because these cleaning requirements represent the most stringent of cleaning requirements and the most challenging for the Filter-Reactor Novel Gas Cleaning process. The scope of the evaluation for each application was: (1) Select the configuration for the Filter-Reactor Novel Gas Cleaning Process, the arrangement of the individual gas cleaning stages, and the probable operating conditions of the gas cleaning stages to conceptually satisfy the gas cleaning requirements; (2) Estimate process material & energy balances for the major plant sections and for each gas cleaning stage; (3) Conceptually size and specify the major gas cleaning process equipment; (4) Determine the resulting overall performance of the application; and (5) Estimate the investment cost and operating cost for each application. Analogous evaluation steps were applied for each application using conventional gas cleaning technology, and comparison was made to extract the potential benefits, issues, and development needs of the Filter-Reactor Novel Gas Cleaning technology. The gas cleaning process and related gas conditioning steps were also required to meet specifications that address plant environmental emissions, the protection of the gas turbine and other Power Island components, and the protection of the methanol synthesis reactor. Detailed material & energy balances for the gas cleaning applications, coupled with preliminary thermodynamic modeling and laboratory testing of candidate sorbents, identified the probable sorbent types that should be used, their needed operating conditions in each stage, and their required levels of performance. The study showed that Filter-Reactor Novel Gas Cleaning technology can be configured to address and conceptually meet all of the gas cleaning requirements for IGCC, and that it can potentially overcome several of the conventional IGCC power plant availability issues, resulting in improved power plant thermal efficiency and cost. For IGCC application, Filter-Reactor Novel Gas Cleaning yields 6% greater generating capacity and 2.3 percentage-points greater efficiency under the Current Standards case, and more than 9% generating capacity increase and 3.6 percentage-points higher efficiency in the Future Standards case. While the conceptual equipment costs are estimated to be only slightly lower for the Filter-Reactor Novel Gas Cleaning processes than for the conventional processes, the improved power plant capacity results in the potentia

Dennis A. Horazak; Richard A. Newby; Eugene E. Smeltzer; Rachid B. Slimane; P. Vann Bush; James L. Aderhold Jr; Bruce G. Bryan

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS) Training: Monthly Training Schedules  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EHS Training Calendar This Google Calendar lists all of the EHS Training sessions that have been scheduled. Please login using your LDAP to access the calendar. Click on the course...

58

Flue Gas Conditioning Trial at Rochester Gas and Electric Russell Station  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents data and results of a full-scale evaluation of two flue gas conditioning agents considered as upgrades for the existing electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) at Rochester Gas and Electric's (RG&E) Russell Station. The flue gas additives evaluated were anhydrous ammonia and a proprietary chemical agent, ADA-23.

1999-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

59

Lithium bromide absorption chiller passes gas conditioning field test  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A lithium bromide absorption chiller has been successfully used to provide refrigeration for field conditioning of natural gas. The intent of the study was to identify a process that could provide a moderate level of refrigeration necessary to meet the quality restrictions required by natural-gas transmission companies, minimize the initial investment risk, and reduce operating expenses. The technology in the test proved comparatively less expensive to operate than a propane refrigeration plant. Volatile product prices and changes in natural-gas transmission requirements have created the need for an alternative to conventional methods of natural-gas processing. The paper describes the problems with the accumulation of condensed liquids in pipelines, gas conditioning, the lithium bromide absorption cycle, economics, performance, and operating and maintenance costs.

Lane, M.J.; Huey, M.A. [Nicol and Associates, Richardson, TX (United States)

1995-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

60

Fundamental mechanisms in flue gas conditioning. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy`s Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (DOE/PETC) initiated this project as part of a program to study the control of fine particles from coal combustion. Our project focus was flue gas conditioning. Various conditioning processes have lowered operating costs and increased collection efficiency at utility particulate control devices. By improving fine particle collection, flue gas conditioning also helps to control the emission of toxic metals, which are concentrated in the fine particle fraction. By combining a review of pertinent literature, laboratory characterization of a variety of fine powders and ashes, pilot-scale studies of conditioning mechanisms, and field experiences, Southern Research Institute has been able to describe many of the key processes that account for the effects that conditioning can have on fine-particle collection. The overall goal of this research project was to explain the mechanisms by which various flue gas conditioning processes alter the performance of particulate control devices. Conditioning involves the modification of one or more of the parameters that determine the magnitude of the forces acting on the fly ash particles. Resistivity, chemistry, cohesivity, size distribution, and particle morphology are among the basic properties of fly ash that significantly influence fine particle collection. Modifications of particulate properties can result in improved or degraded control device performance. These modifications can be caused by (1) changes to the process design or operation that affect properties of the flue gas, (2) addition of particulate matter such as flue-gas desulfurization sorbents to the process effluent stream, (3) injection of reactive gases or liquids into the flue gas. We recommend that humidification be seriously considered as a flue gas conditioning option. 80 refs., 69 figs., 23 tabs.

Snyder, T.R.; Bush, P.V.; Dahlin, R.S.

1996-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas conditioning eh" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Biological conversion of synthesis gas. Limiting conditions/scale-up  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this research is to develop a technically and economically feasible process for biologically producing H(sub 2) from synthesis gas while, at the same time, removing harmful sulfur gas compounds. Six major tasks are being studied: 1. Culture development, where the best cultures are selected and conditions optimized for simultaneous hydrogen production and sulfur gas removal; 2. Mass transfer and kinetic studies in which equations necessary for process design are developed; 3. Bioreactor design studies, where the cultures chosen in Task 1 are utilized in continuous reaction vessels to demonstrate process feasibility and define operating conditions; 4. Evaluation of biological synthetic gas conversion under limiting conditions in preparation for industrial demonstration studies; 5. Process scale-up where laboratory data are scaled to larger-size units in preparation for process demonstration in a pilot-scale unit; and 6. Economic evaluation, where process simulations are used to project process economics and identify high cost areas during sensitivity analyses.

Basu, R.; Klasson, K.T.; Takriff, M.; Clausen, E.C.; Gaddy, J.L.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Gas Powered Air Conditioning Absorption vs. Engine-Drive  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It used to be that the only alternative to costly electric air conditioning was the double-effect gas-fired absorption chiller/heaters. Beginning in the 1980's, they were the "star" equipment promoted by gas companies throughout the nation. Although not a new technology at the time, neither was the gas engine. But now in the 19901s, gas engine-drive (GED) chillers have "hit" the air conditioning market with a "bang". In the Lone Star Gas Company area in 1995, GED chillers are now being considered in as many projects as are Absorption. units. Where once the only studies being analyzed were absorption vs. electric chiller operation costs. Now, the choice is: Why, Where, and How to choose between gas fired Absorption and GED chillers. WHY Absorption or Engine ? . Absorption uses the most environmentally friendly refrigerant - water. . Absorption chillers are chiller/heaters Absorption chillers are manufactured by the four US major manufacturers Absorption chillers have few moving parts . Engine chillers provide "free" hot water Engine chillers retrofit with DX systems . Engine chillers use less gas per ton WHERE Do Absorption And Engine Chillers Belong? . Absorption: Office buildings, restaurants, industries, churches, universities . Engine: Hospitals, universities, hotels, apartments, industries HOW To Choose Between Absorption And Engine Chillers? Energy cost Operation and maintenance costs Equipment cost Environmental concerns Thermal requirements . Space requirements Staff experience

Phillips, J. N.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Flue gas conditioning for improved particle collection in electrostatic precipitators  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this research program is to identify and evaluate a variety of additives capable of increasing particle cohesion which could be used for improving collection efficiency in an ESP. A three-phase screening process will be used to provide the, evaluation of many additives in a logical and cost-effective manner. The three step approach involves the following experimental setups: 1. Provide a preliminary screening in the laboratory by measuring the effects of various conditioning agents on reentrainment of flyash particles in an electric field operating at simulated flue gas conditions. 2. Evaluate the successful additives using a 100 acfm bench-scale ESP operating on actual flue gas. 3. Obtain the data required for scaling up the technology by testing the two or three most promising conditioning agents at the pilot scale.

Durham, M.D.

1992-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

64

Environment, Health, & Safety Training Program EHS-156 Building...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environment, Health, & Safety Training Program EHS-156 Building Managers Orientation COURSE SYLLABUS Subject Category: Building Managers Schedule: As requested Course Length: 2.0...

65

Training Program EHS 745 ~ Hepatitis B Medical Surveillance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

45 Hepatitis B Medical Surveillance Course Syllabus Subject Category: Bio Safety Course Prerequisite: EHS 735 Course Length: 10 minutes Medical Approval: No Delivery Mode: Online...

66

Determination of e/h, Using Macroscopic Quantum Phase ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 19104 The implications of the new determination of e/h using the ac Josephson effect in superconductors for both quantum ...

2011-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

67

Training Program EHS 604 ~ Hazardous Waste Generator Training  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

604 Hazardous Waste Generator Training Course Syllabus Subject Category: Waste Management Course Prerequisite: EHS0348 or equivalent Course Length: 45 minutes Medical Approval:...

68

Eh:2,' %9'j-& : : _.i  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Eh:2,' %9'j-& : : _.i. Eh:2,' %9'j-& : : _.i. Gn Februnrp 23, 1951 the subject test naa run redueiafi three 3-M J,$/l60-D pickled arnrSm alpha mlled rods to 3/4&D at roan tmqmatwe with a +HP (Torrington size 6) eager and two piece die. ihendons and Fmkeull hurdnem of the bare before and after reduction are taulatei on the attaohed abart, to,*hmr r&h the dim~~Icne after (ijJilT~~8txakhtti-ng at..Qntkoff3t+el Capany*, flkrdnass readlngymiw @ken on-a-hand fued flat akthe center of the bur In eaah Cal.. ;_, ". ". : - -81l the bras PRT~ h6.i f& riO* 3,492 818 paSSed .&%%~ht thou* pnd Lleuuured 3.2 !dlaHJvelml~~ The dies were rdxwsaad ad sZter the srcmd $&+a the tma appaxred, dth rou& measurslPent* to be 0.h he .other two were then gmee~ rap through, turned end the other + emaged. The

69

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS): Safety Concerns Form  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Concerns Concerns TOP Last upd EHSS Safety Concerns Please use this form to submit your safety concerns. Please provide your name and email address to receive updates. You may select the anonymous option below if you wish, but you will not receive status updates. * = Required Information. Report Date* MM/DD/YY Incident Location* Building or Street Name or Landmark Requester First/Last Name Division AFRD ALS BSO CSD CRD ESD ENG EETD EHS FAC GEN CFO HR IT LSD MSD NERSC NSD PAD PSD PBD PHY SND OPS Institutional or Divisional Institutional Divisional Email Address @lbl.gov Urgency* High: Fatality or injury probable if not corrected -- Medium: Injury possible if not corrected -- Low: Injury unlikely if not corrected, but non-compliant condition/behavior Low Medium High Detailed Description*

70

Update on EH-23 activities in Calendar Year 1993  

SciTech Connect

This report briefly describes the activities undertaken by the US DOE`s Office of Environmental Guidance (EH-23) of the Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Environment (EH-20) in Calendar Year (CY) 1993 in seven major areas: (1) regulatory review and analysis; (2) environmental policy and guidance; (3) environmental training courses and workshops; (4) workgroups and committees; (5) environmental regulatory management support; (6) special projects and other activities; and (7) special presentations. A list of selected environmental guidance memoranda and documents distributed by EH-23 in CY 1993 is also included.

Not Available

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Concrete decontamination by Electro-Hydraulic Scabbling (EHS)  

SciTech Connect

EHS is being developed for decontaminating concrete structures from radionuclides, organic substances, and hazardous metals. EHS involves the generation of powerful shock waves and intense cavitation by a strong pulsed electric discharge in a water layer at the concrete surface; high impulse pressure results in stresses which crack and peel off a concrete layer of controllable thickness. Scabbling produces contaminated debris of relatively small volume which can be easily removed, leaving clean bulk concrete. Objective of Phase I was to prove the technical feasibility of EH for controlled scabbling and decontamination of concrete. Phase I is complete.

NONE

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Assessment of API Thread Connections Under Tight Gas Well Conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The modern oil and gas industry of America has seen most of the high quality, easily obtainable resources, already produced, thus causing wells to be drilled deeper in search for unconventional resources. This means Oil Country Tubular Goods (OCTG) must improve in order to withstand harsher conditions; especially the ability of connections to effectively create leak tight seals. This study investigates the use of thread connections in tight gas fields; therefore, an insight into their potential to contribute to fulfilling the energy demands is necessary. Also, a survey of completed projects done in tight gas fields can provide vital information that will establish the minimum requirements thread connection must meet to perform its functions. To make suitable adjustments to ensure safe and efficient operations we must thoroughly understand the many aspects of thread connections. To have this understanding, a review of previous works was carried out that highlights the capabilities and imitations of thread connections. In addition to reviewing previous work done on thread connections; this study measured the viscosity of thread compounds under variable conditions. It was found that viscosity of thread compound falls in the range of 285,667 cP and 47,758 cP when measured between 32.9 degrees F and 121.5 degrees F. This can be very important because thread compound is essential to the function of thread connections. The knowledge of its viscosity can help choose the most suitable compound. By knowing the value of the viscosity of a thread compound it can also be used to form an analytical assessment of the grooved plate method by providing a means to calculate a pressure gradient which impacts the leakage.

Bourne, Dwayne

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

EHS 0288 GEM Training Rev 00  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EHSS EHSS T raining V 1 u pdated 4 /17/2013 EHS 0 228: G EM T raining f or E HSS P ersonnel Required s teps t o b ecoming a uthorized t o d rive a n E HSS G EM e lectric v ehicle: 1. Trainee r eads t he following p olicy a nd d riving rules ( page 1 ) 2. GEM c ustodian p rovides v ehicle o rientation ( page 2 & 3) 3. Trainee r eceives c ourse c redit (page 4 ) Traffic a nd S afety R egulations * All C alifornia d riving r ules a pply w hen o perating a G EM v ehicle; t he d river m ust h ave a v alid state---issued d river's l icense. ( NOTE: Y ou c an f ind t he C alifornia V ehicle C ode u sing G oogle Search o n y our c omputer). * Driver s hould f amiliarize t hemselves w ith t he o wner's m anual. * The d river a nd p assenger m ust w ear s eatbelts w henever t he v ehicle i s i n m otion. * Never u se a c ommunication d evice s uch a s

74

Condition based management of gas turbine engine using neural networks.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This research work is focused on the development of the hybrid neural network model to asses the gas turbines compressor health. Effects of various gas (more)

Muthukumar, Krishnan.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Photon Sciences Directorate | 2010 Annual Report | EHS Group Expands  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Photon Sciences EHS Group Expands, Photon Sciences EHS Group Expands, Evolves in 2010 Steve Hoey "We're proud of the excellent safety record we earned in 2010. It would not have been possible without the hard work, dedication, and experience of the EHS staff and the continuing efforts of our contractors to work more safely." - Steve Hoey Manager, Environment, Safety and Health Fiscal year 2010 was busy for Environment, Safety, and Health (ESH) staff in the Photon Sciences Directorate, due in no small part to the year-long strategic planning leading up to the reorganization of the directorate at year's end and the continuing rapid growth of NSLS-II. Photon Sciences ESH already has an excellent safety record under its belt. In 2010, as was the case with the Laboratory as a whole, a strong emphasis

76

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS): Safety Minute  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Numbers & Contacts (PDF, PPT) Emergency Response Guide (PDF, PPT) Occurence Reporting (ORPS) (PDF, PPT) Reporting Hazardous Conditions (PDF, PPT) Reporting Safety Concerns (PDF,...

77

NOVEL GAS CLEANING/CONDITIONING FOR INTEGRATED GASIFICATION COMBINED CYCLE  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this program is to develop and evaluate novel sorbents for the Siemens Westinghouse Power Company's (SWPC's) ''Ultra-Clean Gas Cleaning Process'' for reducing to near-zero levels the sulfur- and chlorine-containing gas emissions and fine particulate matter (PM2.5) caused by fuel bound constituents found in carbonaceous materials, which are processed in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) technologies.

Javad Abbasian

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Investigation of air supply conditions in the room of a B11type gas appliance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Hungary, the prevalently used "B11" type gas appliances equipped with atmospheric burner and they have a draught hood beyond the outlet of the appliance. For the appropriate adjustment of the gas boiler to the conditions of the building, ... Keywords: CFD method, air supply, chimney, design requirements, gas appliances, numerical modelling

Lajos Barna; Rbert Goda

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Projecting Insect Voltinism Under High and Low Greenhouse Gas Emission Conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

REVIEW Projecting Insect Voltinism Under High and Low Greenhouse Gas Emission Conditions SHI CHEN,1 change can alter insect voltinism under varying greenhouse gas emissions scenarios by using input climate data until 2099 under both high (A1?) and low (B1) greenhouse gas emission scenarios, we used

80

Effects of natural gas composition on ignition delay under diesel conditions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Effects of variations in natural gas composition on autoignition of natural gas under direct-injection (DI) diesel engine conditions were studied experimentally in a constant-volume combustion vessel and computationally using a chemical kinetic model. Four fuel blends were investigated: pure methane, a capacity weighted mean natural gas, a high ethane content natural gas, and a natural gas with added propane typical of peak shaving conditions. Experimentally measured ignition delays were longest for pure methane and became progressively shorter as ethane and propane concentrations increased. At conditions characteristic of a DI compression ignition natural gas engine at Top Dead Center (CR=23:1, p = 6.8 MPa, T = 1150K), measured ignition delays for the four fuels varied from 1.8 ms for the peak shaving and high ethane gases to 2.7 ms for pure methane. Numerically predicted variations in ignition delay as a function of natural gas composition agreed with these measurements.

Naber, J.D.; Siebers, D.L. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States); Di Julio, S.S. [California State Univ., Northridge, CA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Westbrook, C.K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1993-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas conditioning eh" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS): Industrial Hygiene: Programs: Hearing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hearing Conservation Noise sources at the Berkeley Lab are associated with, but not limited to, the Facilities and Engineering shops, mechanical rooms throughout the site, construction projects, and emergency generators. Engineering controls, such as enclosing noise sources (i.e., pumps, generators) and acoustical material (i.e., mechanical room walls and ceilings) are implemented when feasible. EH&S Industrial Hygienists evaluate high noise areas with sound level meters and noise dosimeters to determine if employees need to be enrolled in the Lab's Hearing Conservation Program. Employees enrolled in the Program receive a baseline audiogram and training and annually thereafter. Employees exposed to noise sources in excess of 85 decibels will be enrolled in the Program. Hearing protection must be made available

82

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS) Training: Monthly Training Schedules  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Register for Classroom Training Register for Classroom Training Register yourself Click here to register for EHSS classroom training. After you login to the HRIS Self-Service website, you will be able to search for a course and enroll. After you successfully enroll, you will receive confirmation via email. OR Register others To register others please email ehs_training@lbl.gov with the name of the course, the date you are requesting enrollment and the name and employee id number of the individual you would like to register. If you have any questions regarding enrolling others please contact the EHSS Training Office at x2228 or 510-495-2228. How to Get Help: If you have questions about enrolling in classroom training, contact the EHSS Training Program Assistant at (510) 495-2228. Email: ehs_training.lbl.gov

83

Effects of microbial processes on gas generation under expected WIPP repository conditions: Annual report through 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microbial processes involved in gas generation from degradation of the organic constituents of transuranic waste under conditions expected at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) repository are being investigated at Brookhaven National Laboratory. These laboratory studies are part of the Sandia National Laboratories -- WIPP Gas Generation Program. Gas generation due to microbial degradation of representative cellulosic waste was investigated in short-term ( 6 months) experiments by incubating representative paper (filter paper, paper towels, and tissue) in WIPP brine under initially aerobic (air) and anaerobic (nitrogen) conditions. Samples from the WIPP surficial environment and underground workings harbor gas-producing halophilic microorganisms, the activities of which were studied in short-term experiments. The microorganisms metabolized a variety of organic compounds including cellulose under aerobic, anaerobic, and denitrifying conditions. In long-term experiments, the effects of added nutrients (trace amounts of ammonium nitrate, phosphate, and yeast extract), no nutrients, and nutrients plus excess nitrate on gas production from cellulose degradation.

Francis, A.J.; Gillow, J.B.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

NOVEL GAS CLEANING/ CONDITIONING FOR INTEGRATED GASIFICATION COMBINED CYCLE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

INTEGRATED GASIFICATION COMBINED CYCLE VOLUME I - CONCEPTUAL COMMERCIAL EVALUATION OPTIONAL PROGRAM FINAL REPORT September 1, 2001 - December 31, 2005 By Dennis A. Horazak (Siemens), Program Manager Richard A. Newby (Siemens) Eugene E. Smeltzer (Siemens) Rachid B. Slimane (GTI) P. Vann Bush (GTI) James L. Aderhold, Jr. (GTI) Bruce G. Bryan (GTI) December 2005 DOE Award Number: DE-AC26-99FT40674 Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Prepared by Siemens Power Generation, Inc. 4400 Alafaya Trail Orlando, FL 32826 & Gas Technology Institute 1700 S. Mt. Prospect Rd. Des Plaines, Illinois 60018 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government.

85

UCSB Lab-specific Chemical Hygiene Plan 1 EH&S, Rev. 1/07  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) Earthquake l) Compressed Gas Cylinders m) Lab Coats for working with Flammable Liquids and Pyrophorics for Using Engineered Nanomaterials n) SOP for Using Centrifuge #12;UCSB Lab-specific Chemical Hygiene Plan 2

Akhmedov, Azer

86

Bhopal Gas Leak: A Numerical Investigation of the Prevailing Meteorological Conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A three-dimensional mesoscale model was used to understand the meteorological conditions and the influence of the terrain on the local flow pattern during the Bhopal methyl isocyanate (MIC) gas leak. The study reveals that under the prevailing ...

Maithili Sharan; S. G. Gopalakrishnan; R. T. McNider; M. P. Singh

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Environment, Health, & Safety Training Program EHS-155 Building Emergency Team Seminars  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 Building Emergency Team Seminars COURSE SYLLABUS Subject Category: Building Emergency Teams Schedule: Quarterly Course Length: 2.0 hours Medical Approval: None Delivery Method: Classroom Location/Time: To be determined Course Prerequisites: EHS 154; EHS 116; EHS 530 Retraining/Recertification: N/A Course Purpose: This course is designed for Lab employees who have been assigned as members of Building Emergency Teams (BETs) and have received the basic training required (EHS 154, EHS 116, EHS 530). These seminars will update and refresh the skills already learned, i.e.: responsibilities of fire department; utility turn off switches; rescue boxes; first aid triage, etc. Course Objectives: * To update BET members on skills learned in initial training.

88

Effects of microbial processes on gas generation under expected WIPP repository conditions: Annual report through 1992  

SciTech Connect

Microbial processes involved in gas generation from degradation of the organic constituents of transuranic waste under conditions expected at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) repository are being investigated at Brookhaven National Laboratory. These laboratory studies are part of the Sandia National Laboratories -- WIPP Gas Generation Program. Gas generation due to microbial degradation of representative cellulosic waste was investigated in short-term (< 6 months) and long-term (> 6 months) experiments by incubating representative paper (filter paper, paper towels, and tissue) in WIPP brine under initially aerobic (air) and anaerobic (nitrogen) conditions. Samples from the WIPP surficial environment and underground workings harbor gas-producing halophilic microorganisms, the activities of which were studied in short-term experiments. The microorganisms metabolized a variety of organic compounds including cellulose under aerobic, anaerobic, and denitrifying conditions. In long-term experiments, the effects of added nutrients (trace amounts of ammonium nitrate, phosphate, and yeast extract), no nutrients, and nutrients plus excess nitrate on gas production from cellulose degradation.

Francis, A.J.; Gillow, J.B.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Managing EHS of PV-Related Equipment at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Managing environment, health, and safety (EHS) risks at a national laboratory, or university, can be intimidating to a researcher who is focused on research results. Laboratory research and development (R&D) operations are often driven by scientists with limited engineering support and lack well-refined equipment development resources. To add to the burden for a researcher, there is a plethora of codes, standards, and regulations that govern the safe installation and operation of photovoltaic-related R&D equipment -- especially those involving hazardous production materials. To help guide the researcher through the vast list of requirements, the EHS office at NREL has taken a variety of steps. Organizationally, the office has developed hazard-specific laboratory-level procedures to govern particular activities. These procedures are a distillation of appropriate international codes, fire agencies, SEMI standards, U.S. Department of Energy orders, and other industry standards to those necessary and sufficient to govern the safe operation of a given activity. The EHS office works proactively with researchers after a concept for a new R&D capability is conceived to help guide the safe design, acquisition, installation, and operation of the equipment. It starts with a safety assessment at the early stages such that requirements are implemented to determine the level of risk and degree of complexity presented by the activity so appropriate controls can be put in place to manage the risk. As the equipment requirements and design are refined, appropriate equipment standards are applied. Before the 'to-build' specifications are finalized, a process hazard analysis is performed to ensure that no single-point failure presents an unacceptable risk. Finally, as the tool goes through construction and installation stages, reviews are performed at logical times to ensure that the requisite engineering controls and design are in place and operational. Authorization to operate is not given until adherence to these requirements is fully verified and documented. Operations continue under the conditions defined through this process and are reviewed with changing processes.

McCuskey, T.; Nelson, B. P.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Microbial Gas Generation Under Expected Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Repository Conditions: Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gas generation from the microbial degradation of the organic constituents of transuranic (TRU) waste under conditions expected in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) was investigated. The biodegradation of mixed cellulosic materials and electron-beam irradiated plastic and rubber materials (polyethylene, polyvinylchloride, hypalon, leaded hypalon, and neoprene) was examined. We evaluated the effects of environmental variables such as initial atmosphere (air or nitrogen), water content (humid ({approx}70% relative humidity, RH) and brine inundated), and nutrient amendments (nitogen phosphate, yeast extract, and excess nitrate) on microbial gas generation. Total gas production was determined by pressure measurement and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and methane (CH{sub 4}) were analyzed by gas chromatography; cellulose degradation products in solution were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography. Microbial populations in the samples were determined by direct microscopy and molecular analysis. The results of this work are summarized.

Gillow, J.B.; Francis, A.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

CdTe PV: Real and Perceived EHS Risks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As CdTe photovoltaics reached commercialization, questions have been raised about potential cadmium emissions from CdTe PV modules. Some have attacked the CdTe PV technology as unavoidably polluting the environment, and made comparisons of hypothetical emissions from PV modules to cadmium emissions from coal fired power plants. This paper gives an overview of the technical issues pertinent to these questions and further explores the potential of EHS risks during production, use and decommissioning of CdTe PV modules. The following issues are discussed: (a) The physical and toxicological properties of CdTe, (b) comparisons of Cd use in CdTe PV with its use in other technologies and products, and the (c) the possibility of CdTe releases from PV modules.

Fthenakis, V.; Zweibel, K.

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

A Manual on the Use of Flue Gas Conditioning for ESP Performance Enhancement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flue gas conditioning can boost the effectiveness of electrostatic precipitators. This manual quantifies both the performance and the cost-benefits, with low-sulfur coals for example cases. It also outlines a procedure that will allow utilities to make estimates for their own units.

1985-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

93

Flue gas conditioning for improved particle collection in electrostatic precipitators. Quarterly technical report  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this research program is to identify and evaluate a variety of additives capable of increasing particle cohesion which could be used for improving collection efficiency in an ESP. A three-phase screening process will be used to provide the, evaluation of many additives in a logical and cost-effective manner. The three step approach involves the following experimental setups: 1. Provide a preliminary screening in the laboratory by measuring the effects of various conditioning agents on reentrainment of flyash particles in an electric field operating at simulated flue gas conditions. 2. Evaluate the successful additives using a 100 acfm bench-scale ESP operating on actual flue gas. 3. Obtain the data required for scaling up the technology by testing the two or three most promising conditioning agents at the pilot scale.

Durham, M.D.

1992-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

94

Hybrid particle traps and conditioning procedure for gas insulated transmission lines  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas insulated transmission line includes an outer sheath, an inner condor within the outer sheath, insulating supports supporting the inner conductor within the outer sheath, and an insulating gas electrically insulating the inner conductor from the outer sheath. An apertured particle trapping ring is disposed within the outer sheath, and the trapping ring has a pair of dielectric members secured at each longitudinal end thereof, with the dielectric members extending outwardly from the trapping ring along an arc. A support sheet having an adhesive coating thereon is secured to the trapping ring and disposed on the outer sheath within the low field region formed between the trapping ring and the outer sheath. A conditioning method used to condition the transmission line prior to activation in service comprises applying an AC voltage to the inner conductor in a plurality of voltage-time steps, with the voltage-time steps increasing in voltage magnitude while decreasing in time duration.

Dale, Steinar J. (Monroeville, PA); Cookson, Alan H. (Churchill, PA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Assessment of existing H2/O2 chemical reaction mechanisms at reheat gas turbine conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper provides detailed comparisons of chemical reaction mechanisms of H2 applicable at high preheat temperatures and pressures relevant to gas turbine and particularly Alstom's reheat gas turbine conditions. It is shown that the available reaction mechanisms exhibit large differences in several important elementary reaction coefficients. The reaction mechanisms are assessed by comparing ignition delay and laminar flame speed results obtained from CHEMKIN with available data, however, the amount of data at these conditions is scarce and a recommended candidate among the mechanisms can presently not be selected. Generally, the results with the GRI-Mech and Leeds mechanisms deviate from the Davis, Li, O'Conaire, Konnov and San Diego mechanisms, but there are also significant deviations between the latter five mechanisms that altogether are better adapted to hydrogen. The differences in ignition delay times between the dedicated hydrogen mechanisms (O'Conaire, Li and Konnov) range from approximately a maxim...

Weydahl, Torleif; Seljeskog, Morten; Haugen, Nils Erland L

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

AFRD EH&S  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

means), not reiteration of items that are readily available from their original sources. Job Hazards Analysis (JHA) An online questionnaire taken by every employee at least once a...

97

AFRD EH&S  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

exercise their established skills in a familiar area on behalf of an ongoing effort. The Job Hazards Analysis (JHA) is the tool that provides baseline guidance for everyone,...

98

AFRD EH&S  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

worse. On windy days, watch for falling branches. More importantly, watch for the debris that has already fallen. Walking under a tree that has dropped twigs, seed pods or...

99

AFRD EH&S  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environment, Health, and Safety Emergency: Protect life and get help Life-threatening emergency: Call 7911 (landline phones on main site); 911 (cell) Examples: fire; serious...

100

Flue Gas Conditioning to Reduce Particulate Emissions in Industrial Coal-Fired Boilers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chemical technology has been used successfully to solve many of the operational and emissions problems that result from burning coal. This paper describes the use of blended chemical flue gas conditioners to significantly reduce particulate emissions in coal-fired industrial boilers. In many cases, these chemical conditioning agents have increased the efficiency of electrostatic precipitators and mechanical collectors by more than fifty percent. The effectiveness of this technology has been demonstrated on units generating 50,000 to 200,000 lbs./hr. steam. Results achieved at various industrial plants under actual operating conditions are presented.

Miller, B.; Keon, E.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas conditioning eh" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

The Effect of Higher Hydrocarbons on the Ignition Delay of Natural Gas Fuels at Gas Turbine Conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This investigation focuses on studying autoignition of fuels primarily used for stationary gas turbine operation today and others that are garnering interest for future use. Most stationary gas turbine engines operate today on natural gas. Natural gas can either come from domestic or foreign sources. Natural gas from foreign sources is typically imported as a chilled liquid, so it is commonly referred to as liquefied natural gas (LNG). Variations in fuel characteristics at the source, coupled with fuel q...

2009-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

102

Determination of process conditions for the spray nozzle for the DWPF melter off-gas HEME  

SciTech Connect

The DWPF melter off-gas systems have High Efficiency Mist Eliminators (HEME) upstream of the High Efficiency Particulates Air filters (HEPA) to remove fine mist and particulates from the off-gas. To have an acceptable filter life and an efficient HEME operation, air atomized water is sprayed into the melter off-gas and onto the HEME surface. The water spray keeps the HEME wet, which dissolves the soluble particulates and enhances the HEME efficiency. DWPF Technical requested SRL to determine the conditions for the DWPF nozzle which will give complete atomization of water so that the HEME will operate efficiently. Since the air pressure and flow rate to generate the desired spray are not known before hand, an experiment was performed in two stages. The first stage involved preliminary tests which mapped out a general operating region for producing the desired spray pattern. Afterward, all the gages and meters were changed to suitable ranges for the conditions which generated an acceptable spray. This report summarizes the results and the conclusions of the second stage experiment.

Lee, L.

1991-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

103

WATER-GAS SHIFT KINETICS OVER IRON OXIDE CATALYSTS AT MEMBRANE REACTOR CONDITIONS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report covers the second year of a project investigating water-gas shift catalysts for use in membrane reactors. It has been established that a simple iron high temperature shift catalyst becomes ineffective in a membrane reactor because the reaction rate is severely inhibited by the build-up of the product CO{sub 2}. During the past year, an improved microkinetic model for water-gas shift over iron oxide was developed. Its principal advantage over prior models is that it displays the correct asymptotic behavior at all temperatures and pressures as the composition approaches equilibrium. This model has been used to explore whether it might be possible to improve the performance of iron high temperature shift catalysts under conditions of high CO{sub 2} partial pressure. The model predicts that weakening the surface oxygen bond strength by less than 5% should lead to higher catalytic activity as well as resistance to rate inhibition at higher CO{sub 2} partial pressures. Two promoted iron high temperature shift catalysts were studied. Ceria and copper were each studied as promoters since there were indications in the literature that they might weaken the surface oxygen bond strength. Ceria was found to be ineffective as a promoter, but preliminary results with copper promoted FeCr high temperature shift catalyst show it to be much more resistant to rate inhibition by high levels of CO{sub 2}. Finally, the performance of sulfided CoMo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts under conditions of high CO{sub 2} partial pressure was simulated using an available microkinetic model for water-gas shift over this catalyst. The model suggests that this catalyst might be quite effective in a medium temperature water-gas shift membrane reactor, provided that the membrane was resistant to the H{sub 2}S that is required in the feed.

Carl R.F. Lund

2001-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

104

Fundamental mechanisms in flue gas conditioning. Quarterly report, October 1994--December 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project is divided into four tasks. We developed our Management Plan in Task 1. Task 2, Evaluation of Mechanisms in FGD Sorbent and Ash Interactions, focused on characteristics of binary mixtures of these distinct powders. Task 3, Evaluation of Mechanisms in Conditioning Agents and Ash, was designed to examine effects of various conditioning agents on fine ash particles to determine mechanisms by which these agents alter physical properties of ash. We began Tasks 2 and 3 with an extensive literature search and assembly of existing theories. We completed this phase of the project with publication of two special Topical Reports. During the next phase of the project we analyzed a variety of fly ashes and fine powders in the laboratory. Pilot-scale evaluations were then performed to verify the results we obtained in these laboratory analyses. Under Task 4 we will issue our Final Report that will summarize the results of our laboratory and pilot-scale work and will also include a Flue Gas Conditioning Model. In our literature reviews reported in Topical Reports 1 and 2, we emphasized the roles adsorbed water can have in controlling bulk properties of powders. The experiments we performed were primarily designed to define the extent to which water affects key properties of ashes, powders, and mixtures of sorbents and ashes. We have recently completed a series of pilot-scale tests designed to determine the effects that adsorbed water has on fabric filtration and electrostatic precipitation of entrained fly ash particles in actual flue gas environments.

Snyder, T.R.

1995-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

105

EHS Subject Matter Expert List 9/27/2013 https://sharepoint.rmps.cornell.edu:8445/ehs/ehs/Shared Documents/ALL_STAFF_SME  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-254-4733 Centrifuge Stuart, Ralph 802-316-9571 Coolbaugh, Brenda 607-254-5085 CERCLA/EPCRA Herbold-Miller, Ilene 607-316-9571 Sweet, Ellen 315-730-8896 Compost English, Barb 607-254-4733 Murphy, Andrew 607-254-8519 Compressed Gas

Pawlowski, Wojtek

106

Fundamental mechanisms in flue gas conditioning. Quarterly report, January 1994--March 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We are currently performing a series of pilot-scale tests designed to determine the effects that adsorbed water has on fabric filtration and electrostatic precipitation of entrained fly ash particles in actual flue gas environments. We are investigating two key phenomena in our pilot-scale tests. The first is the ability of flue gas humidification to increase ash cohesivity through the creation of liquid bridges between particles collected in a fabric filter. Increasing cohesivity through the development of liquid bridges was demonstrated in our laboratory measurements of tensile strength and uncompacted bulk porosity, and in filtration studies performed for DOE/PETC under an earlier contract. With the range of coals that will be fired in Southern Research Institute`s Coal Combustion Facility (CCF), filtration tests should verify how different fly ashes react to water conditioning in actual flue gas environments. The CCF provides a valuable test location for our studies. The second phenomenon we plan to study is the electrostatic reentrainment of previously collected ash particles in an ESP. We have prepared a small ESP for use in our pilot-scale tests. Our laboratory studies have shown the effects that relative humidity can have on the forces that hold the collected ash on the grounded ESP plate.

Snyder, T.R.

1994-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

107

Comparisons of diffusive and advective fluxes of gas phase volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in unsaturated zones under natural conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is traditionally treated as the dominant mechanism of gas transport in unsaturated zones under natural conditions of the gas pressure are less than 5% [32], which is satisfied in natural attenuation. At the ground surface contri- bution of the advective flux is a more important concern in natural attenuation. According to Fig

Zhan, Hongbin

108

WATER-GAS SHIFT KINETICS OVER IRON OXIDE CATALYSTS AT MEMBRANE REACTOR CONDITIONS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The kinetics of water-gas shift were studied over ferrochrome catalysts under conditions with high carbon dioxide partial pressures, such as would be expected in a membrane reactor. The catalyst activity is inhibited by increasing carbon dioxide partial pressure. A microkinetic model of the reaction kinetics was developed. The model indicated that catalyst performance could be improved by decreasing the strength of surface oxygen bonds. Literature data indicated that adding either ceria or copper to the catalyst as a promoter might impart this desired effect. Ceria-promoted ferrochrome catalysts did not perform any better than unpromoted catalyst at the conditions tested, but copper-promoted ferrochrome catalysts did offer an improvement over the base ferrochrome material. A different class of water-gas shift catalyst, sulfided CoMo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} is not affected by carbon dioxide and may be a good alternative to the ferrochrome system, provided other constraints, notably the requisite sulfur level and maximum temperature, are not too limiting. A model was developed for an adiabatic, high-temperature water-gas shift membrane reactor. Simulation results indicate that an excess of steam in the feed (three moles of water per mole of CO) is beneficial even in a membrane reactor as it reduces the rate of adiabatic temperature rise. The simulations also indicate that much greater improvement can be attained by improving the catalyst as opposed to improving the membrane. Further, eliminating the inhibition by carbon dioxide will have a greater impact than will increasing the catalyst activity (assuming inhibition is still operative). Follow-up research into the use of sulfide catalysts with continued kinetic and reactor modeling is suggested.

Carl R.F. Lund

2002-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

109

Fundamental mechanisms in flue gas conditioning. Quarterly report, April--June 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project is divided into four tasks. The author developed a Management Plan in Task 1. Task 2, Evaluation of Mechanisms in FGD Sorbent and Ash Interactions, focuses on characteristics of binary mixtures of these distinct powders. Task 3, Evaluation of Mechanisms in Conditioning Agents and Ash, is designed to examine effects of various conditioning agents on fine ash particles to determine mechanisms by which these agents alter physical properties of ash. The author began Tasks 2 and 3 with an extensive literature search and assembly of existing theories. He completed this phase of the project with publication of two special Topical Reports. During the past several quarters he performed analyses of the samples in the database. Pilot-scale evaluations have begun and will continue through the next two quarters. The author will include the results of laboratory and pilot-scale work performed under Tasks 2 and 3 in a Flue Gas Conditioning Model that will be issued under Task 4. The Final Report for the project will also be prepared under Task 4. In the literature reviews reported in Topical Reports 1 and 2, the author emphasized the roles adsorbed water can have in controlling bulk properties of powders. The experiments performed were primarily designed to define the extent to which water affects key properties of ashes, powders, and mixtures of sorbents and ashes. The author is currently performing a series of pilot-scale tests designed to determine the effects that absorbed water has on fabric filtration and electrostatic precipitation of entrained fly ash particles in actual flue gas environments.

Snyder, T.R.

1994-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

110

Fundamental mechanisms in flue gas conditioning. Topical report No. 2, Literature review and assembly of theories on the interactions of ash and conditioning agents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall goal of this research project is to formulate a mathematical model of flue gas conditioning. This model will be based on an understanding of why ask properties, such as cohesivity and resistivity, are changed by conditioning. Such a model could serve as a component of the performance models of particulate control devices where flue gas conditioning is used. There are two specific objectives of this research project, which divide the planned research into two main parts. One part of the project is designed to determine how ash particles are modified by interactions with sorbent injection processes and to describe the mechanisms by which these interactions affect fine particle collection. The objective of the other part of the project is to identify the mechanisms by which conditioning agents, including chemically active compounds, modify the key properties of fine fly ash particles.

Bush, P.V.; Snyder, T.R.

1992-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

111

Fundamental mechanisms in flue gas conditioning. Quarterly report, January 1992--March 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project is divided into four tasks. The Management Plan was developed in task 1. Task 2, Evaluation of Mechanisms in FGD Sorbent and Ash Interactions, focuses on the characteristics of binary mixtures of these distinct powders. Task 3, Evaluation of Mechanisms in Conditioning Agents and Ash, is designed to examine the effects of various conditioning agents on fine ash particles to determine the mechanisms by which these agents alter the physical properties of the ash. Tasks 2 and 3 began with an extensive literature search and the assembly of existing theories. This phase of the project is now complete. During the past quarter, initial preparations of laboratory equipment for laboratory testing have been made. A plan for initial laboratory tests has been submitted to the Project Manager for review. Laboratory testing will commence once these laboratory plans have been formally approved. The results of the work performed under task 2 and 3 will be included in a Flue Gas Conditioning Model that will be issued under task 4. The Final Report for the project will also be prepared under task 4.

Snyder, T.R.; Robinson, M.S.; Bush, P.V.

1992-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

112

Fundamental mechanisms in flue gas conditioning. Quarterly report, September 1991--December 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project is divided into four tasks. Task 1 is the Development of a Management Plan. Task 2, Evaluation of Mechanisms in FGD Sorbent and Ash Interactions, focuses on the characteristics of binary mixtures of these distinct powders. Task 3, Evaluation of Mechanisms in Conditioning Agents and Ash, is designed to examine the effects of various conditioning agents on fine ash particles to determine the mechanisms by which these agents alter the physical properties of the ash. Tasks 2 and 3 began with an extensive literature search and the assembly of existing theories. The results of the work performed under Tasks 2 and 3 will be included in a Flue Gas Conditioning Model that will be issued under Task 4. The Final Report for the project will also be prepared under Task 4. This quarterly report covers four months in order to synchronize the reporting periods for this project with US Government quarters. Work performed on the project during the past quarter consisted almost entirely of the review of literature pertaining to the objectives of Tasks 2 and 3. The primary results of that review are discussed at length in Topical Reports 1 and 2, submitted January 9, 1992. As a consequence of the work described in the topical reports, several of the project`s Measures of Success that were described in the first quarterly report have been achieved. This quarterly report will discuss these achievements.

Snyder, T.R.

1992-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

113

Silicon Carbide Micro-devices for Combustion Gas Sensing under Harsh Conditions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A sensor based on the wide bandgap semiconductor, silicon carbide (SiC), has been developed for the detection of combustion products in power plant environments. The sensor is a catalytic gate field effect device, Pt/SiO{sub 2}/SiC that can detect hydrogen-containing species in chemically reactive, high temperature (600 C) environments. We demonstrate that the device can be used as a hydrogen monitor in syngas applications of common interferants as well as sulfur and water vapor. These measurements were made in the Catalyst Screening Unit at NETL, Morgantown under atmospheric conditions. The sensor response to hydrogen gas at 350 C is 240 mV/decade, this is significantly higher than the device response to room temperature gas or that predicted from vacuum chamber studies. The enhanced catalytic activity of the platinum sensing film under energy plant operating conditions was investigated via AFM, x-ray diffraction, TEM and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Our characterization indicated that exposure to high temperature gases significantly modifies the morphology of the Pt catalytic film and the Pt/SiO{sub 2} interfacial region, which we tentatively attribute to the enhanced hydrogen sensitivity of the sensing film. A model for the hydrogen/oxygen response of the SiC device under atmospheric conditions was developed. It is based on two independent phenomena: a chemically induced shift in the metal-semiconductor work function difference and the passivation/creation of charged states at the SiO{sub 2}-SiC interface. The optimum operating set point for the SiC sensor with respect to response time and long term reliability was determined to be close to mid-gap. Ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) techniques were used to investigate the effects of sulfur contamination on the Pt gate. Exposure to hydrogen sulfide, even in the presence of hydrogen or oxygen at partial pressures of 20-600 times greater than the H2S level, rapidly coated the gate with a monolayer of sulfur. Although hydrogen exposure could not remove the adsorbed sulfur, oxygen was effective at removing sulfur with no evidence of irreversible changes in device behavior. The role of oxygen in the functioning of the SiC sensors was also investigated. All of the results are consistent with oxygen acting through its surface reactions with hydrogen, including the need for oxygen to reset the device to a fully hydrogen-depleted state and competition between hydrogen oxidation and hydrogen diffusion to metal/oxide interface sites. A strong sensor response to the unsaturated linear hydrocarbon propene (C{sub 3}H{sub 6}) was observed.

Ruby Ghosh; Reza Loloee; Roger Tobin

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

114

ADVANCED FLUE GAS CONDITIONING AS A RETROFIT UPGRADE TO ENHANCE PM COLLECTION FROM COAL-FIRED ELECTRIC UTILITY BOILERS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy and ADA Environmental Solutions have begun a project to develop commercial flue gas conditioning additives. The objective is to develop conditioning agents that can help improve particulate control performance of smaller or under-sized electrostatic precipitators on utility coal-fired boilers. The new chemicals will be used to control both the electrical resistivity and the adhesion or cohesivity of the flyash. There is a need to provide cost-effective and safer alternatives to traditional flue gas conditioning with SO{sub 3} and ammonia. During the second reporting quarter for this project, design and development is continuing on an electrostatic tensiometer to measure cohesion of flyash layers. A dedicated test fixture to automate flyash electrical resistivity testing is also underway. Ancillary instrumentation to control gas humidification within these test fixtures is also under construction.

Kenneth E. Baldrey

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Transportation of Chemicals EHS has been made aware of two occurrences of individuals attempting to transport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transportation of Chemicals EHS has been made aware of two occurrences of individuals attempting to transport chemicals improperly. These occurrences could have resulted in serious injury to the individuals or could have resulted in violations with the rules and regulations governing the transportation

Yener, Aylin

116

Laboratory Investigations of a Low-Swirl Injector with H2 and CH4 at Gas Turbine Conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laboratory experiments were conducted at gas turbine and atmospheric conditions (0.101 flames produced by a low-swirl injector (LSI) for gas turbines. The objective was to investigate the effects of hydrogen on the combustion processes for the adaptation to gas turbines in an IGCC power plant. The experiments at high pressures and temperatures showed that the LSI can operate with 100% H{sub 2} at up to {phi} = 0.5 and has a slightly higher flashback tolerance than an idealized high-swirl design. With increasing H{sub 2} fuel concentration, the lifted LSI flame begins to shift closer to the exit and eventually attaches to the nozzle rim and assumes a different shape at 100% H{sub 2}. The STP experiments show the same phenomena. The analysis of velocity data from PIV shows that the stabilization mechanism of the LSI remains unchanged up to 60% H{sub 2}. The change in the flame position with increasing H{sub 2} concentration is attributed to the increase in the turbulent flame speed. The NO{sub x} emissions show a log linear dependency on the adiabatic flame temperature and the concentrations are similar to those obtained previously in a LSI prototype developed for natural gas. These results show that the LSI exhibits the same overall behaviors at STP and at gas turbine conditions. Such insight will be useful for scaling the LSI to operate at IGCC conditions.

Cheng, R. K.; Littlejohn, D.; Strakey, P.A.; Sidwell, T.

2008-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

117

Study of the Effects of Ambient Conditions Upon the Performance of Fan Powered, Infrared Natural Gas Burners  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this investigation was to characterize the operation of a fan-powered, infrared burner (IR burner) at various gas compositions and ambient conditions, develop numerical model to simulate the burner performances, and provide design guidelines for appliances containing PIR burners for satisfactory performance.

Clark Atlanta University

2002-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

118

Gas conditioning and processing. Volume II. Absorption and fractionation; pumping, compression and expansion; refrigeration; hydrate inhibition, dehydration and process control  

SciTech Connect

Volume II of a two volume publication is presented in which aspects of conditioning and/or processing of natural gas for sale are examined. Chapters are included on absorption and fractionation, compression and expansion of fluids, refrigeration systems, liquefaction processes, water-hydrocarbon system behavior, dehydration and sweetening, adsorption processing, sulfur recovery, process control, and cost estimation. (JRD)

Campbell, J.M.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Advanced Gas Turbine Guidelines: Hot Gas Path Parts Condition and Remaining Life Assessment for GE 7FA in Baseload Operation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Based on two years experience operating four advanced gas turbines (AGT) General Electric MS 7221 FA at Martin CC of Florida Power & Light (FP&L), this guideline describes the operating and maintenance philosophy used for baseload AGT units and the integrity of the hot path components and their remaining life. The guideline will assist utilities operating the GE MS 7221FA class AGT plan inspections and comparisons with other units in this class.

1997-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

120

Reducing Energy Consumption through Optimization of the Operating Conditions of the Gas Trunk Pipeline.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Gas supplying process for consumers needs sufficient share of energy for upstream, midstream and downstream purposes. In spite of a huge amount of great (more)

Albutov, Alexey

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas conditioning eh" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

ADVANCED FLUE GAS CONDITIONING AS A RETROFIT UPGRADE TO ENHANCE PM COLLECTION FROM COAL-FIRED ELECTRIC UTILITY BOILERS  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy and ADA Environmental Solutions are engaged in a project to develop commercial flue gas conditioning additives. The objective is to develop conditioning agents that can help improve particulate control performance of smaller or under-sized electrostatic precipitators on utility coal-fired boilers. The new chemicals will be used to control both the electrical resistivity and the adhesion or cohesivity of the fly ash. There is a need to provide cost-effective and safer alternatives to traditional flue gas conditioning with SO{sub 3} and ammonia. During this reporting quarter, progress was made in obtaining an industry partner for a long-term demonstration and in technology transfer activities. Engineering and equipment procurement activities related to the long-term demonstration were also completed.

Kenneth E. Baldrey

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Hot Gas Conditioning: Recent Progress with Larger-Scale Biomass Gasification Systems; Update and Summary of Recent Progress  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As a result of environmental and policy considerations, there is increasing interest in using renewable biomass resources as feedstock for power, fuels, and chemicals and hydrogen. Biomass gasification is seen as an important technology component for expanding the use of biomass. Advanced biomass gasification systems provide clean products that can be used as fuel or synthesis gases in a variety of environmentally friendly processes. Advanced end-use technologies such as gas turbines or synthesis gas systems require high quality gases with narrowly defined specifications. Other systems such as boilers may also have fuel quality requirements, but they will be substantially less demanding. The gas product from biomass gasifiers contains quantities of particulates, tars, and other constituents that may exceed these specified limits. As a result, gas cleaning and conditioning will be required in most systems. Over the past decade, significant research and development activities have been conducted on the topic of gas cleanup and conditioning. This report provides an update of efforts related to large-scale biomass gasification systems and summarizes recent progress. Remaining research and development issues are also summarized.

Stevens, D. J.

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Environment, Health and Safety (EH&S): Biosafety Manual: 6.0 Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6.0 Assessment and Improvement check mark 6.0 Assessment and Improvement check mark The fifth core function of Integrated Safety Management (ISM) requires that feedback and continuous improvement are incorporated into the work cycle for activities that involve work with biological materials or exposure to biological materials. This function is accomplished when supervisors, work leads, principal investigators (PIs), line management, Environment, Health, and Safety (EH&S), and others assess and continuously improve the biosafety of work conducted at LBNL. See PUB-3000, Chapter 26, Section 26.9, for a description of how LBNL assessment and improvement processes are incorporated into work with biological materials and the Biosafety Program. The bulleted paragraphs below provide an overview of assessment and improvement processes and

124

Test conditions for evaluating natural gas storage properties of adsorbents. Topical report, December 1993-March 1994  

SciTech Connect

The growing interest in using adsorbed natural gas (ANG) as a vehicle fuel has led to requests for information about adsorbent property and performance requirements. The general lack of comprehensive technical information about these issues points to the need for expanded data gathering and analysis efforts. The technical information compiled in this report should assist gas industry personnel and others in developing reliable testing protocols for evaluating adsorbent properties and assessing the performance of ANG as a vehicle fuel.

Tramposch, W.G.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Concrete decontamination by electro-hydraulic scabbling (EHS). Final report  

SciTech Connect

Contamination of concrete structures by radionuclides, hazardous metals and organic substances (including PCB`s) occurs at many DOE sites. The contamination of concrete structures (walls, floors, ceilings, etc.) varies in type, concentration, and especially depth of penetration into the concrete. In many instances, only the surface layer of concrete is contaminated, up to a depth of one inch, according to estimates provided in the R and D ID document. Then, removal of the concrete surface layer (scabbling) is considered to be the most effective decontamination method. Textron Systems Corp. (TSC) has developed a scabbling concept based on electro-mechanical phenomena accompanying strong electric pulses generated by applying high voltage at the concrete/water interface. Depending on the conditions, the electric discharge may occur either through a waste layer or through the concrete body itself. This report describes the development, testing, and results of this electro-mechanical process. Phase 1 demonstrated the feasibility of the process for the controlled removal of a thin layer of contaminated concrete. Phase 2 designed, fabricated, and tested an integrated subscale unit. This was tested at Fernald. In Phase 3, the scabbling unit was reconfigured to increase its power and processing rate. Technology transfer to an engineering contracting company is continuing.

NONE

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Published in `AI Communications 9 journal', pp1-17. Published by IOS Press (1996) TIGERTM: Knowledge Based Gas Turbine Condition Monitoring  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: Knowledge Based Gas Turbine Condition Monitoring Dr. Robert Milne and Dr. Charlie Nicol Intelligent, 11 Colon, Barcelona, 08222 Terrassa. Spain 1. INTRODUCTION Given the critical nature of gas turbines and increasing the availability of the gas turbine. Routine preventative maintenance techniques have been used

Travé-Massuyès, Louise

127

Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Implements a gas based on the ideal gas law. It should be noted that this model of gases is niave (from many perspectives). ...

128

Laboratory Investigations of a Low-Swirl Injector with H2 and CH4 at Gas Turbine Conditions  

SciTech Connect

Laboratory experiments were conducted at gas turbine and atmospheric conditions (0.101 < P{sub 0} < 0.810 MPa, 298 < T{sub 0} < 580K, 18 < U{sub 0} < 60 m/s) to characterize the overall behaviors and emissions of the turbulent premixed flames produced by a low-swirl injector (LSI) for gas turbines. The objective was to investigate the effects of hydrogen on the combustion processes for the adaptation to gas turbines in an IGCC power plant. The experiments at high pressures and temperatures showed that the LSI can operate with 100% H{sub 2} at up to {phi} = 0.5 and has a slightly higher flashback tolerance than an idealized high-swirl design. With increasing H{sub 2} fuel concentration, the lifted LSI flame begins to shift closer to the exit and eventually attaches to the nozzle rim and assumes a different shape at 100% H{sub 2}. The STP experiments show the same phenomena. The analysis of velocity data from PIV shows that the stabilization mechanism of the LSI remains unchanged up to 60% H{sub 2}. The change in the flame position with increasing H{sub 2} concentration is attributed to the increase in the turbulent flame speed. The NO{sub x} emissions show a log linear dependency on the adiabatic flame temperature and the concentrations are similar to those obtained previously in a LSI prototype developed for natural gas. These results show that the LSI exhibits the same overall behaviors at STP and at gas turbine conditions. Such insight will be useful for scaling the LSI to operate at IGCC conditions.

Cheng, R. K.; Littlejohn, D.; Strakey, P.A.; Sidwell, T.

2008-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

129

Report on field experiment program lithium bromide absorption chiller: Field gas conditioning project, Grayson County, Texas. Topical report, May 1991-December 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary objective of the project was to determine the applicability of using commercial absorption air conditioning technology in an oil and gas field environment to condition natural gas to meet contractual limitations. Operational and maintenance requirements were documented throughout the test period of 1992 through 1994.

Lane, M.J.; Kilbourn, R.A.; Huey, M.A.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

ADVANCED FLUE GAS CONDITIONING AS A RETROFIT UPGRADE TO ENHANCE PM COLLECTION FROM COAL-FIRED ELECTRIC UTILITY BOILERS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ADA Environmental Solutions (ADA-ES) has successfully completed a research and development program granted by the Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to develop a family of non-toxic flue gas conditioning agents to provide utilities and industries with a cost-effective means of complying with environmental regulations on particulate emissions and opacity. An extensive laboratory screening of potential additives was completed followed by full-scale trials at four utility power plants. The developed cohesivity additives have been demonstrated on a 175 MW utility boiler that exhibited poor collection of unburned carbon in the electrostatic precipitator. With cohesivity conditioning, opacity spiking caused by rapping reentrainment was reduced and total particulate emissions were reduced by more than 30%. Ammonia conditioning was also successful in reducing reentrainment on the same unit. Conditioned fly ash from the process is expected to be suitable for dry or wet disposal and for concrete admixture.

C. Jean Bustard

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

In situ x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies of gas/solidinterfaces at near-ambient conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is a quantitative, chemically specific technique with a probing depth of a few angstroms to a few nanometers. It is therefore ideally suited to investigate the chemical nature of the surfaces of catalysts. Because of the scattering of electrons by gas molecules, XPS is generally performed under vacuum conditions. However, for thermodynamic and/or kinetic reasons, the catalyst's chemical state observed under vacuum reaction conditions is not necessarily the same as that of a catalyst under realistic operating pressures. Therefore, investigations of catalysts should ideally be performed under reaction conditions, i.e., in the presence of a gas or gas mixtures. Using differentially pumped chambers separated by small apertures, XPS can operate at pressures of up to 1 Torr, and with a recently developed differentially pumped lens system, the pressure limit has been raised to about 10 Torr. Here, we describe the technical aspects of high-pressure XPS and discuss recent applications of this technique to oxidation and heterogeneous catalytic reactions on metal surfaces.

Bluhm, Hendrik; Havecker, Michael; Knop-Gericke, Axel; Kiskinova,Maya; Schlogl, Robert; Salmeron, Miquel

2007-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

132

Molecular dynamics study of nanoparticle evolution in a background gas under laser ablation conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Molecular dynamics study of nanoparticle evolution in a background gas under laser ablation,7] are used to explain the evaporation­condensation process. Molecular dynamics (MD) method [4,5,8,9] directly simulates molecular movement and interactions and can be used to investigate the evaporation process

Zhigilei, Leonid V.

133

EHS363  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 - Computer Room Training Limited 3 - Computer Room Training Limited Course Syllabus Subject Category: Computer room safety Course Prerequisite: None Course Length: 1 hour Medical Approval: None Delivery Mode: Web-based Training Frequency: Every 3 years Course Purpose: The purpose of this course is to provide personnel with training needed to work unescorted in the institutional computer rooms. The course provides awareness of fire protection, seismic safety, electrical safety and work procedures relevant to computer rooms. Course Objectives: Upon completion of this course participants will be able to: * Recall appropriate responses to smoke, fire, or fire alarm in Computing Science-controlled computer rooms * Recall appropriate response to a building fire alarm * Recall basic electrical safety practices for computer rooms

134

EHS 344  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Subject Matter Expert: Larry Mclouth Training Compliance Requirements: DOE Notice 456.1 The Safe Handling of Unbound Engineered Nanoparticles Course Instructional Materials:...

135

EHS0356  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Instructional Designer: Brooke Vaughn Training Compliance Requirements: DOE Notice 456.1 The Safe Handling of Unbound Engineered Nanoparticles, Chemical Hygiene and Safety...

136

EHS361  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 - Institutional Computer Room Training 1 - Institutional Computer Room Training Course Syllabus Subject Category: Computer room safety Course Prerequisite: None Course Length: 1 hour Medical Approval: None Delivery Mode: Web-based Training Frequency: Every 3 years Course Purpose: The goal of this course is to provide employees with the training needed to work unescorted in the institutional computer rooms which have as fire protection: halon, emergency power off, or "clean agent" fire extinguishers. A secondary goal is to provide the basic understanding of essential safe work procedures common to work in these computer rooms. Course Objectives: Upon completion of this course participants will be able to: * Recall appropriate responses to smoke, fire, or fire alarm in Computing Science Division controlled computer

137

In situ parametric study of alkali release in pulverized coal combustion: Effects of operating conditions and gas composition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work concerns a parametric study of alkali release in a lab-scale, pulverized coal combustor (drop tube reactor) at atmospheric pressure. Measurements were made at steady reactor conditions using excimer laser fragmentation fluorescence (ELIF) and with direct optical access to the flue gas pipe. In this way, absolute gas-phase alkali species could be determined in situ, continuously, with sub-ppb sensitivity, directly in the flue gas. A hard coal was fired in the range 1000-1300{sup o}C, for residence times in the range 3-5 s and for air numbers {lambda} (air/fuel ratios) from 1.15 to 1.50. In addition, the amount of chlorine, water vapor and sulfur, respectively, was increased in known amounts by controlled dosing of HCl, H{sub 2}O and SO{sub 2} into the combustion gas to determine effects of these components on release or capture of the alkali species. The experimental results are also compared with values calculated using ash/fuel analyses and sequential extraction to obtain a fuller picture of alkali release in pulverized fuel combustion. 27 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

H. Schuermann; P.B. Monkhouse; S. Unterberger; K.R.G. Hein [Universitaet Stuttgart, Stuttgart (Germany). Institut fuer Verfahrenstechnik und Dampfkesselwesen

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Fundamental mechanisms in flue gas conditioning. Quarterly report, October 1992--December 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We performed a wide variety of laboratory analyses during the past quarter. As with most of the work we performed during the previous quarter, our recent efforts were primarily directed toward the determination of the effects of adsorbed water on the cohesivity and tensile strength of powders. We also continued our analyses of dust cake ashes that have had the soluble compounds leached from their particle surfaces by repeated washings with water. Our analyses of leached and unleached dust cake ashes continued to provide some interesting insights into effects that compounds adsorbed on surfaces of ash particles can have on bulk ash behavior. As suggested by our literature review, our data indicate that water adsorption depends on particle morphology and on surface chemistry. Our measurements of tensile strength show, that for many of the samples we have analyzed a relative minimum in tensile strength exists for samples conditioned and tested at about 30% relative humidity. In our examinations of the effects of water conditioning on sample cohesivity, we determined that in the absence of absorption of water into the interior of the particles, cohesivity usually increases sharply when environments having relative humidities above 75% are used to condition and test the samples. Plans are under way to condition selected samples with (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4}, NH{sub 4}HSO{sub 4}, CaCl{sub 2}, organosiloxane, and SO{sub 3}. Pending approval, we will begin these conditioning experiments, and subsequent analyses of the conditioned samples.

Snyder, T.R.; Bush, P.V.

1993-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

139

EH AND S ANALYSIS OF DYE-SENSITIZED PHOTOVOLTAIC SOLAR CELL PRODUCTION.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Photovoltaic solar cells based on a dye-sensitized nanocrystalline titanium dioxide photoelectrode have been researched and reported since the early 1990's. Commercial production of dye-sensitized photovoltaic solar cells has recently been reported in Australia. In this report, current manufacturing methods are described, and estimates are made of annual chemical use and emissions during production. Environmental, health and safety considerations for handling these materials are discussed. This preliminary EH and S evaluation of dye-sensitized titanium dioxide solar cells indicates that some precautions will be necessary to mitigate hazards that could result in worker exposure. Additional information required for a more complete assessment is identified.

BOWERMAN,B.; FTHENAKIS,V.

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

efA. r rrOea IWIt 5/rf 5eh/#,tz-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

efA. r rrOea IWIt 5/rf 5eh/#,tz- CD®®0 Pre~~m~nary Autumn Quarter Facu~ty/Adv~ser Copy " ,,' . , . #12;I' I. i' i Time Schedule'· Preliminary . Autumn Quarter 1987 P· I I M 1 1 Laatdaytol r eregstratSln~heelChairs or with ~e..r.mobility ·llmltatlons shoulc;t procee to 2e4 Schmitz to'register or add/~op ,courses instead

Washington at Seattle, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas conditioning eh" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

AFRD EH&S News  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

like to thank Gang Huang for his service as Division Safety Coordinator. A "GEM" of a Safety Idea: Stay Onsite The GEM electric scooters are restricted to onsite use only until...

142

Silicon Carbide Micro-devices for Combustion Gas Sensing under Harsh Conditions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A sensor based on the wide bandgap semiconductor, silicon carbide (SiC), has been developed for the detection of combustion products in power plant environments. The sensor is a catalytic gate field effect device that can detect hydrogen-containing species in chemically reactive, high temperature environments. For fast and stable sensor response measurements, a gate activation process is required. Activation of all sensors took place by switching back and forth between oxidizing (1.0% oxygen in nitrogen) and reducing (10% hydrogen in nitrogen) gases for several hours at a sensor temperature {ge}620 C. All 52 devices on the sensor chip were activated simultaneously by flooding the entire chip with gas. The effects of activation on surface morphology and structure of Pt gates before and after activation were investigated. The optical images obtained from Pt gates demonstrated a clear transition from a smooth and shiny surface to a grainy and cloudy surface morphology. XRD scans collected from Pt gates suggest the presence of an amorphous layer and species other than Pt (111) after activation. The reliability of the gate insulator of our metal-oxide-SiC sensors for long-term device operation at 630 C was studied. We find that the dielectric is stable against breakdown due to electron injection from the substrate with gate leakage current densities as low at 5nA/cm{sup 2} at 630 C. We also designed and constructed a new nano-reactor capable of high gas flow rates at elevated pressure. Our reactor, which is a miniature version of an industrial reactor, is designed to heat the flowing gas up to 700 C. Measurements in ultrahigh vacuum demonstrated that hydrogen sulfide readily deposits sulfur on the gate surface, even at the very high hydrogen/hydrogen sulfide ratios (10{sup 3}-10{sup 5}) expected in applications. Once deposited, the sulfur adversely affects sensor response, and could not be removed by exposure to hydrogen at the temperatures and pressures accessible in the ultrahigh vacuum experiments. Oxygen exposures, however, were very effective at removing sulfur, and the device performance after sulfur removal was indistinguishable from performance before exposure to H{sub 2}S.

Ruby N. Ghosh; Reza Loloee; Roger G. Tobin; Yung Ho Kahng

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Fundamental mechanisms in flue gas conditioning. Quarterly report, January 1993--March 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Our recent laboratory efforts were primarily directed toward the determination of the effects of adsorbed water on the tensile strength of powders and the development of apparatus for Experiment 3.5. As suggested by our literature review, our data indicate that water adsorption depends on particle morphology and on surface chemistry. Our measurements of tensile strength show that, for many of the samples we have analyzed, a relative minimum in tensile strength exists for samples conditioned and tested at about 30% relative humidity. Under Experiment 3.5, which began during this last quarter, we have been developing a system capable of conditioning selected samples with (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4}, NH{sub 4}HSO{sub 4}CaCl{sub 2}, organosiloxane, and SO{sub 3}.

Snyder, T.R.; Vann Bush, P.

1993-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

144

Fundamental mechanisms in flue gas conditioning. Quarterly report, April 1993--June 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The experiments we have been performing are primarily designed to define the extent to which water affects key properties of ashes, powders, and mixtures of sorbents and ashes. We have included selected data from prior quarterly reports in this report for the sake of completeness, and for comparisons with newly-acquired data. In several places in this report samples are referred to by their identification (SID) numbers. Table I provides a brief description of all the samples we have used in this project along with their SID numbers. As suggested by our literature review, our data indicate that water adsorption depends on particle morphology and surface chemistry. Our recent laboratory efforts were primarily directed toward the determination of the effects of adsorbed water on the tensile and cohesive strengths of powders, the development of apparatus for SO{sub 3} and organosiloxane conditioning, and the conditioning of powders and ashes with organosiloxane.

Snyder, T.R.

1993-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

145

Gas Turbine Condition Monitoring and Predictive Maintenance Capability Analysis Between Aviation and Power Generation Industries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study compares and contrasts aviation and power generation condition monitoring and fault diagnosis. The report provides an overview of the technology, process, sensor suite and decision-making processes for both industries. The study highlights the level of decision automation and the structure to automatically initiate a maintenance process in aviation as one of the key differences between the two industries. This automation has important potential cost and operational benefits for the power gener...

2007-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

146

SILICON CARBIDE MICRO-DEVICES FOR COMBUSTION GAS SENSING UNDER HARSH CONDITIONS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A sensor based on the wide bandgap semiconductor, silicon carbide (SiC), has been developed for the detection of combustion products in power plant environments. The sensor is a catalytic gate field effect device that can detect hydrogen containing species in chemically reactive, high temperature environments. For these capacitive sensors we have determined that the optimum sensor operating point in terms of sensor lifetime and response time is at midgap. Detailed measurements of the oxide leakage current as a function of temperature were performed to investigate the high temperature reliability of the devices. In addition, robust metallization and electrical contacting techniques have been developed for device operation at elevated temperatures. To characterize the time response of the sensor responses in the millisecond range, a conceptually new apparatus has been built. Using laser induced fluorescence imaging techniques we have shown that the gas underneath the sensor can be completely exchanged with a time constant under 1 millisecond. Ultrahigh vacuum studies of the surface chemistry of the platinum gate have shown that sensor deactivation by adsorbed sulfur is a possible problem. Investigations on the chemical removal of sulfur by catalytic oxidation or reduction are continuing.

Ruby N. Ghosh; Peter Tobias; Roger G. Tobin

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Laboratory Investigations of a Low-Swirl Injector with H2 and CH4 at Gas Turbine Conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Journal of Engineering for Gas Turbines and Power, 130 C. K.Journal of Engineering for Gas Turbines and Power, 130 (2) (of Engineering for Gas Turbines and Power-Transactions of

Cheng, R. K.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Versatile 0. 5 TW electron beam facility for power conditioning studies of large rare-gas/halide lasers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rare-gas/halide lasers which are being developed for Inertial Confinement Fusion will require large area, low impedance electron beam drivers. A wide range of electron beam parameters are being considered for future systems in an effort to optimize the overall system design. A number of power conditioning issues must be investigated in order to obtain a better understanding of the various trade-offs involved in making such optimizations. The RAYITO electron beam accelerator is being designed and built at Sandia National Laboratories and will be used for such investigations. It will be capable of operating in either a 2 or 4 ohm configuration at 1 MV, 50 ns or 0.8 MV, 200 ns. Design details for RAYITO are presented in this paper. Experiments planned for this facility are also discussed.

Ramirez, J. J.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

EHS0749 PI rDNA Responsibilities Syllabus Form 01=03=13  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EHS 749 ~ PI Recombinant DNA (rDNA) Responsibilities Course Syllabus Subject Category: Biosafety Course Prerequisite: None Course Length: 10 minutes Medical Approval: None Delivery Mode: Online Schedule: Available online Location/Time: N/A Course Purpose: Ensure that principle investigators (PIs) of non-exempt recombinant research are aware of their responsibilities and expectations under the NIH Guidelines Course Objectives: Awareness of the following: * NIH Guidelines for Research Involving Recombinant or Synthetic Nucleic Acid Molecules * LBNL and non-exempt rDNA experiments are subject to the NIH Guidelines * Biosafety Manual and Biosafety Work Authorizations contain NIH and other biosafety requirements * NIH Office of Biotechnology Activities (OBA) is the agency that oversees the NIH Guidelines

150

Study of the effects of ambient conditions upon the performance of fan powdered, infrared, natural gas burners. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1, 1996--March 31, 1996  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this investigation is to characterize the operation of fan powered infrared burner (PER) at various gas compositions and ambient conditions and develop design guidelines for appliances containing PER burners for satisfactory performance. During this past quarter, a porous radiant burner testing facility consisting of a commercial deep-fat fryer, an FTIR based spectral radiance measurement system, a set of flue gas analysis components, and a fuel gas mixing station was constructed. The measurement capabilities of the system were tested using methane and the test results were found to be consistent with the literature. Various gas mixtures were tested. Results indicated that the stability limits of the burner and emissions vary with fuel gas composition and air/fuel ratio. However, the maximum radiant efficiency of the burner remained constant. Results obtained from this study can be useful to develop optimum design guidelines for PER burner manufacturers.

Bai, T.; Yeboah, Y.D.; Sampath, R.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Laboratory Investigations of a Low-Swirl Injector with H2 and CH4 at Gas Turbine Conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Engineering for Gas Turbines and Power, 130 C. K. Chan,support of the U.S. DOE Turbines program is also gratefullyof Engineering for Gas Turbines and Power, 130 (2) (2008)

Cheng, R. K.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Fundamental mechanisms in flue-gas conditioning. Topical report No. 1, Literature review and assembly of theories on the interactions of ash and FGD sorbents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall goal of this research project is to formulate a mathematical model of flue gas conditioning. This model will be based on an understanding of why ash properties, such as cohesivity and resistivity, are changed by conditioning. Such a model could serve as a component of the performance models of particulate control devices where flue gas conditioning is used. There are two specific objectives of this research project, which divide the planned research into two main parts. One part of the project is designed to determine how ash particles are modified by interactions with sorbent injection processes and to describe the mechanisms by which these interactions affect fine particle collection. The objective of the other part of the project is to identify the mechanisms by which conditioning agents, including chemically active compounds, modify the key properties of fine fly ash particles.

Dahlin, R.S.; Vann Bush, P.; Snyder, T.R.

1992-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

153

Application of Condition-Based Monitoring Techniques for Remote Monitoring of a Simulated Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plant  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents research into the adaptation of monitoring techniques from maintainability and reliability (M&R) engineering for remote unattended monitoring of gas centrifuge enrichment plants (GCEPs) for international safeguards. Two categories of techniques are discussed: the sequential probability ratio test (SPRT) for diagnostic monitoring, and sequential Monte Carlo (SMC or, more commonly, particle filtering ) for prognostic monitoring. Development and testing of the application of condition-based monitoring (CBM) techniques was performed on the Oak Ridge Mock Feed and Withdrawal (F&W) facility as a proof of principle. CBM techniques have been extensively developed for M&R assessment of physical processes, such as manufacturing and power plants. These techniques are normally used to locate and diagnose the effects of mechanical degradation of equipment to aid in planning of maintenance and repair cycles. In a safeguards environment, however, the goal is not to identify mechanical deterioration, but to detect and diagnose (and potentially predict) attempts to circumvent normal, declared facility operations, such as through protracted diversion of enriched material. The CBM techniques are first explained from the traditional perspective of maintenance and reliability engineering. The adaptation of CBM techniques to inspector monitoring is then discussed, focusing on the unique challenges of decision-based effects rather than equipment degradation effects. These techniques are then applied to the Oak Ridge Mock F&W facility a water-based physical simulation of a material feed and withdrawal process used at enrichment plants that is used to develop and test online monitoring techniques for fully information-driven safeguards of GCEPs. Advantages and limitations of the CBM approach to online monitoring are discussed, as well as the potential challenges of adapting CBM concepts to safeguards applications.

Hooper, David A [ORNL; Henkel, James J [ORNL; Whitaker, Michael [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

H2O Maser Emission in Circumstellar Envelopes around AGB Stars: Physical Conditions in Gas-Dust Clouds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The pumping of 22.2-GHz H$_2$O masers in the circumstellar envelopes of asymptotic giant branch stars has been simulated numerically. The physical parameters adopted in the calculations correspond to those of the circumstellar envelope around IK Tau. The one-dimensional plane-parallel structure of the gas-dust cloud is considered. The statistical equilibrium equations for the H$_2$O level populations and the thermal balance equations for the gas-dust cloud are solved self-consistently. The calculations take into account 410 rotational levels belonging to the five lowest vibrational levels of H$_2$O. The stellar radiation field is shown to play an important role in the thermal balance of the gas-dust cloud due to the absorption of emission in rotational-vibrational H$_2$O lines. The dependence of the gain in the 22.2-GHz maser line on the gas density and H$_2$O number density in the gas-dust cloud is investigated. Gas densities close to the mean density of the stellar wind, 10$^7-10^8$ cm$^{-3}$, and a high re...

Nesterenok, Aleksandr

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Incorporating Offset Projects into Corporate Greenhouse Gas Strategies: Risk Management Under Conditions of Policy and Market Uncert ainty  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides information for electric sector companies considering the development of project-based strategies to offset or reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, as well as insights to help them assess what kinds of projects and strategies are appropriate to their own situations. Effective project-based strategies link investments in specific activities with the emissions reductions they generate, resulting in the creation of mitigation credits with economic value in the emerging GHG marketplace...

2003-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

156

Combustion Turbine Combined Cycle Technology Developments, Reliability Issues, and Related Market Conditions: EPRI Gas Turbine Exper ience and Intelligence Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Deregulating power generation markets worldwide present both business opportunities and challenges for combustion turbine (CT) plant owners, operators, and project developers. The "EPRI Gas Turbine Experience and Intelligence Report" (GTE&IR) provides concise, well-organized, up-to-date technical, strategic, and business information for combustion turbine (CT) power producers. This technical report assembles all of the content from the most recent three years of GTE&IR (seven editions) into a single docu...

2001-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

157

CHARACTERIZATION OF CONDITIONS OF NATURAL GAS STORAGE RESERVOIRS AND DESIGN AND DEMONSTRATION OF REMEDIAL TECHNIQUES FOR DAMAGE MECHANISMS FOUND THEREIN  

SciTech Connect

The underground gas storage (UGS) industry uses over 400 reservoirs and 17,000 wells to store and withdrawal gas. As such, it is a significant contributor to gas supply in the United States. It has been demonstrated that many UGS wells show a loss of deliverability each year due to numerous damage mechanisms. Previous studies estimate that up to one hundred million dollars are spent each year to recover or replace a deliverability loss of approximately 3.2 Bscf/D per year in the storage industry. Clearly, there is a great potential for developing technology to prevent, mitigate, or eliminate the damage causing deliverability losses in UGS wells. Prior studies have also identified the presence of several potential damage mechanisms in storage wells, developed damage diagnostic procedures, and discussed, in general terms, the possible reactions that need to occur to create the damage. However, few studies address how to prevent or mitigate specific damage types, and/or how to eliminate the damage from occurring in the future. This study seeks to increase our understanding of two specific damage mechanisms, inorganic precipitates (specifically siderite), and non-darcy damage, and thus serves to expand prior efforts as well as complement ongoing gas storage projects. Specifically, this study has resulted in: (1) An effective lab protocol designed to assess the extent of damage due to inorganic precipitates; (2) An increased understanding of how inorganic precipitates (specifically siderite) develop; (3) Identification of potential sources of chemical components necessary for siderite formation; (4) A remediation technique that has successfully restored deliverability to storage wells damaged by the inorganic precipitate siderite (one well had nearly a tenfold increase in deliverability); (5) Identification of the types of treatments that have historically been successful at reducing the amount of non-darcy pressure drop in a well, and (6) Development of a tool that can be used by operators to guide treatment selection in wells with significant non-darcy damage component. In addition, the effectiveness of the remediation treatment designed to reduce damage caused by the inorganic precipitate siderite was measured, and the benefits of this work are extrapolated to the entire U.S. storage industry. Similarly the potential benefits realized from more effective identification and treatment of wells with significant nondarcy damage component are also presented, and these benefits are also extrapolated to the entire U.S. storage industry.

J.H. Frantz Jr; K.G. Brown; W.K. Sawyer; P.A. Zyglowicz; P.M. Halleck; J.P. Spivey

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Energy Savings and Economics of Advanced Control Strategies for Packaged Air-Conditioning Units with Gas Heat  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) with funding from the U.S. Department of Energy's Building Technologies Program (BTP) evaluated a number of control strategies that can be implemented in a controller, to improve the operational efficiency of the packaged air conditioning units. The two primary objectives of this research project are: (1) determine the magnitude of energy savings achievable by retrofitting existing packaged air conditioning units with advanced control strategies not ordinarily used for packaged units and (2) estimating what the installed cost of a replacement control with the desired features should be in various regions of the U.S. This document reports results of the study.

Wang, Weimin; Katipamula, Srinivas; Huang, Yunzhi; Brambley, Michael R.

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

159

Proceedings: EPRI Workshop on Condition and Remaining Life Assessment of Hot Gas Path Components of Combustion Turbines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The severity of modern combustion turbine operation is a reflection of industry competition to achieve higher thermal efficiency. This competitive stance has resulted in new turbine designs and material systems that have at times outpaced condition and remaining life assessment (CARLA) technology. These proceedings summarize a two-day workshop on CARLA technology for hot section components of large combustion turbines.

2000-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

160

Environemental Health and Safety www.ehs.cornell.edu October 2010 When a large-scale disaster occurs, there response systems are place, but emergency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Environemental Health and Safety ­ www.ehs.cornell.edu October 2010 When a large-scale disaster occurs, there response systems are place, but emergency responders can't be everywhere, helping everyone in your home or work, and the disasters that are most likely to occur in your community. Talk about what

Manning, Sturt

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas conditioning eh" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Chemical Spills, Releases, Explosions, Exposures, or Injuries (includes corrosive, reactive, flammable, and toxic chemicals in solid, liquid or gas form)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chemical Spills, Releases, Explosions, Exposures, or Injuries (includes corrosive, reactive, flammable, and toxic chemicals in solid, liquid or gas form) EHS Contact: Kate Lumley-Sapanski (kxl3@psu apply: When to Report: · All chemical exposures or explosions requiring medical attention must

Yener, Aylin

162

Report on the EH special review of occupational safety and health programs for the Hanford high-level waste tanks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents a review of the occupational safety and health programs currently in effect at the tank farms located at the Hanford Reservation in Washington State. The review was undertaken by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health (EH) at the request of the Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) to determine whether issues important to worker safety and health have been properly identified, prioritized, and resolved. To carry out this task, four categories of safety and health activities were reviewed. The first category involved examination of management issues associated with the toxicity, flammability, and explosivity of gases and vapors generated by wastes. The second focused on waste tank characterization and technology programs that have been initiated at Hanford to identify, characterize and mitigate hazards associated with tanks generating hydrogen or containing ferrocyanides or organic compounds. The third evaluated worker safety and health programs necessary to support hazardous waste site operations it the tank farms. The fourth dealt with interim corrective actions currently in place, pending full implementation of site-specific safety and health programs to address waste vapor toxicity, flammability, and explosivity hazards.

Not Available

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Impact of Natural Gas Market Conditions on Fuel Flexibility Needs for Existing and New Power Generation: Report Series on Natural Ga s and Power Reliability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ongoing surge in new gas-fired capacity is changing the landscape of how natural gas will be used for power generation, leading to some surprising effects. While the new machines bring greater efficiency, the exit of dual-fuel units leads to a loss in fuel flexibility, greater natural gas price volatility, and less reliability of natural gas-fired generation. This report explores these effects systematically, bringing fresh insight on gas use in the electric sector, its market effects, and the ever-c...

2002-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

164

Study of the effects of ambient conditions upon the performance of fan powered, infrared, natural gas burners. Quarterly report, April 1, 1996 - June 30, 1996  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A porous radiant burner testing facility consisting of a commercial deep-fat fryer, an FTIR based spectral radiance measurement system, a set of flue gas analysis components, and a fuel gas mixing station was constructed. The measurement capabilities of the system were tested using methane and the test results were found to be consistent with the literature. Following the validation of the measurement system, various gas mixtures were tested to study the effect of gas compositions have on burner performance. Results indicated that the emissions vary with fuel gas composition and air/fuel ratio. The maximum radiant efficiency of the burner was obtained close to air/fuel ratio of 1.

Bai, T.; Yeboah, Y.D.; Sampath, R.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Residual gas analysis (RGA) and shear strength characteristics of a silver-filled epoxy and polyimide under long-term, high-temperature storage conditions. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Introduction of organic materials into hermetically sealed electronic packages increases the risk of failure due to contamination. The contaminants of concern are moisture and ionics. This combination can lead to unwanted electrical pathways and/or corrosion. To minimize sealed-in moisture, packages are vacuum-baked for 16 hours at 200 C and Au/Sn solder-sealed i a glove box purged with dry nitrogen. Even following this procedure, the package plating and organic adhesive can still outgas moisture during high-temperature storage. Long-term aging characteristics for a silver-filled epoxy and a silver-filled polyimide were investigated. Leadless chip carriers (LCCs) containing die attached with epoxy or polyimide were aged at 25 C, 100 C, 150 C, and 200 C for up to six months. Residual gas analysis (RGA) and die shear testing were performed on each package. Results indicate that the epoxy can withstand storage at 150 C with no increase in internal moisture. The polyimide could only be stored at 100 C. No loss in shear strength for epoxy or polyimide was noted at any storage condition.

Adams, B.E.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Gas-phase mercury oxidation: effects on bromine, chlorine and SO2 under air firing and oxy-fuel conditions, experimental and modeling study.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The mercury in coal is emitted in its elemental state when the coal is burned. As the combustion flue gas cools, reactions under homogeneous and (more)

Buitrago, Paula Andrea

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

EHS0381 - February 2013  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Table o f C ontents Introduction ............................................................................................................................... 3 Learning O bjectives .................................................................................................................... 3 Glossary of Terms ....................................................................................................................... 3 Your Responsibility ..................................................................................................................... 4 What Equipment Do I survey? ................................................................................................ 4 Instructions . ...............................................................................................................................

168

EHS0288 Syllabus  

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0228 GEM Car Operator Training Course Syllabus Subject Category: Driver Safety Course Prerequisite: None Course Length: 20 minutes Medical Approval: None Delivery Mode: One on One...

169

Development of Simulation System for Hot Gas Filtration by Ceramic Candle Filters on High Temperature and/or High Pressure Conditions  

SciTech Connect

Hot gas filtration from industrial processes offers various advantages in terms of improvement of process efficiencies, heat recovery and protection of plant installation. Especially hot gas filtration is an essential technology for pressurized fluidized bed combustion (PFBC) and integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC).

Park, S.J.; Lim, J.H.; Kim, S.D.; Choi, H.K.; Park, H,S.; Park, Y.O.

2002-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

170

(Created 1/13) UNL Environmental Health and Safety (402) 472-4925 http://ehs.unl.edu  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as an extinguishing agent. Use sand or powdered limestone to smother the fire. Hazards of Substances that Emit identity, physical state, and quantity used are available. These techniques range from use of gas-tight syringes to glove boxes. If using a gas tight syringe technique, use a syringe with ample extra volume

Farritor, Shane

171

Beam lifetime and emittance growth in RHIC under normal operating conditions with the hydrogen gas jet, the cluster-jet and pellet targets  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The inelastic scattering of the beam and the residual gas molecules in RHIC could represent one of the limitations on the beam life time and emittance growth. This report covers the dominant central nuclear collisions influence on the beam lifetime and transverse emittance growth. The cross sections for the beam-gas electron radiative captures are an order of magnitude smaller. The capture cross sections include the radiative and non-radiative capture, and the capture from the electron-positron pair creation from the 'vacuum capture'.

Trbojevic, D.

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

ends up in Clarington was delivered upstream. El Paso Natural Gas Pipeline issued an Emergency Critical Operating Condition Declaration for February 2 until further notice....

173

(Created 12/04; Revised 10/05, 11/05, 10/06, 8/09; Reviewed 12/11) UNL Environmental Health and Safety (402) 472-4925 http://ehs.unl.edu  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. · Handle and dispose of ash and other residual material from incineration in accordance with EHS procedures Sources. · Monitor automated incinerator operating systems, coordinate a response to system failures of journey-level personnel in the repair and maintenance of incinerator components and systems, as needed

Farritor, Shane

174

Aadland, R.K., and E.H. Bennett. 1979. Geologic Map of the Sandpoint Quadrangle, Idaho and Washington: Idaho Geological Survey, 1:250,000 Scale, 1 Plate.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

503 Aadland, R.K., and E.H. Bennett. 1979. Geologic Map of the Sandpoint Quadrangle, Idaho and Washington: Idaho Geological Survey, 1:250,000 Scale, 1 Plate. Abbot, A. H. and Duvenack. 1939. 1934. Roadside Geology of Idaho: Mountain Press Publishing, Missoula, MT, 393 pp. Anders, P. and D. Richards

175

Gas laser  

SciTech Connect

According to the invention, the gas laser comprises a housing which accommodates two electrodes. One of the electrodes is sectional and has a ballast resistor connected to each section. One of the electrodes is so secured in the housing that it is possible to vary the spacing between the electrodes in the direction of the flow of a gas mixture passed through an active zone between the electrodes where the laser effect is produced. The invention provides for a maximum efficiency of the laser under different operating conditions.

Kosyrev, F. K.; Leonov, A. P.; Pekh, A. K.; Timofeev, V. A.

1980-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

176

Environmental, Health and Safety Assessment: ATS 7H Program (Phase 3R) Test Activities at the GE Power Systems Gas Turbine Manufacturing Facility, Greenville, SC  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

International Technology Corporation (IT) was contracted by General Electric Company (GE) to assist in the preparation of an Environmental, Health and Safety (HI&3) assessment of the implementation of Phase 3R of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) 7H program at the GE Gas Turbines facility located in Greenville, South Carolina. The assessment was prepared in accordance with GE's contractual agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy (GE/DOE Cooperative Agreement DE-FC21-95MC3 1176) and supports compliance with the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1970. This report provides a summary of the EH&S review and includes the following: General description of current site operations and EH&S status, Description of proposed ATS 7H-related activities and discussion of the resulting environmental, health, safety and other impacts to the site and surrounding area. Listing of permits and/or licenses required to comply with federal, state and local regulations for proposed 7H-related activities. Assessment of adequacy of current and required permits, licenses, programs and/or plans.

None

1998-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

177

SC: Gas Heater | The Better Buildings Alliance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Space Conditioning Install a gas heater that uses 10% less energy using the gas heater specification Activities Technology Solutions Teams Lighting & Electrical Space...

178

Fuel conditioning process  

SciTech Connect

A fuel conditioning process and apparatus for use where natural gas is compressed by a field compressor driven by a natural gas powered engine. The fuel portion of the compressed raw natural gas is passed through an adsorption vessel containing an adsorbent material capable of adsorbing impurities. The outlet gas from the adsorption vessel is accumulated and mixed for averaging and controlling the heating value of the outlet gas used for fuel. Regeneration of the adsorption material, when employing multiple adsorption vessels, is accomplished by connecting one adsorption vessel to the suction side of the compressor, purified gas from another adsorption vessel in adsorption service is backflowed through the loaded adsorption vessel to desorb the previously adsorbed impurities, the flow of the compressed raw natural gas to the other adsorption vessel is terminated and the pressure within the two adsorption vessels is equalized. The regenerated adsorption vessel is then repressured with the compressed raw natural gas prior to returning it to the adsorption mode.

McGill, J. C.; Alley, J. R.; Coombs, D. W.

1985-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

179

Thermodynamics of Chaplygin gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We clarify thermodynamics of the Chaplygin gas by introducing the integrability condition. All thermal quantities are derived as functions of either volume or temperature. Importantly, we find a new general equation of state, describing the Chaplygin gas completely. We confirm that the Chaplygin gas could show a unified picture of dark matter and energy which cools down through the universe expansion without any critical point (phase transition).

Yun Soo Myung

2008-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

180

Thermodynamics of Chaplygin gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We clarify thermodynamics of the Chaplygin gas by introducing the integrability condition. All thermal quantities are derived as functions of either volume or temperature. Importantly, we find a new general equation of state, describing the Chaplygin gas completely. We confirm that the Chaplygin gas could show a unified picture of dark matter and energy which cools down through the universe expansion without any critical point (phase transition).

Myung, Yun Soo

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas conditioning eh" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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181

Environment, Health and Safety (EH&S): Biosafety Manual: Appendix...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

B Pathogen and Toxin Lists B.1 Introduction and Scope Pathogens and toxins are discussed in detail in Section 3.3.2 of this manual. This appendix provides the following lists of...

182

Environment, Health and Safety (EH&S): Biosafety Manual: Appendix...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

adult humans, and present minimal potential hazard to laboratory personnel and the environment. BL1 laboratories are not necessarily separated from the general traffic patterns...

183

Environment, Health and Safety (EH&S): Biosafety Manual: Appendix...  

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in hosts such as laboratory workers, the general public, and other organisms in the environment. The decontamination process, level, antimicrobial, frequency, and specific method...

184

Environment, Health and Safety (EH&S): Biosafety Manual  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Narratives Accident Statistics Accident Statistics Archive AHD Database Chair Massage Program Chemical Hygiene Chemical Management System (CMS) Controlled Substance Program DSC &...

185

Environment, Health and Safety (EH&S): Biosafety Manual: Appendix...  

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G Biological Spills and Cleanup G.1 Introduction and Scope Hazards need to be assessed and a safe response must be implemented for each spill situation. This appendix provides...

186

Environment, Health and Safety (EH&S): Site Access: Commuter...  

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including the following (see website below for additional carriers): BART AC Transit Amtrak Muni SamTrans Caltrain You may sign up online with WageWorks or call their Customer...

187

Environment, Health and Safety (EH&S): Biosafety Manual: Appendix...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(BWC), has been in force since 1975. The BWC is the first multilateral disarmament treaty banning an entire category of weapons. It effectively prohibits the development,...

188

Fundamental mechanisms in flue gas conditioning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

SEM pictures of the three mixtures of sorbent and ash from the DITF and the base line ESP hopper ash from Muskingum are shown in Figures 1 through 4. The effects of sorbent addition on particle morphology are evident in Figures 2 through 4 by the presence of irregularly shaped particles and deposits on the surfaces of the spherical fly ash particles. In contrast, the base Ene ash particles have the characteristic relatively smooth, spherical morphology normally associated with pulverized-coal (PC) fly ashes. Resistivity determinations made on these four ashes in ascending and descending temperature modes. These data are shown in Figures 5 and 6. Sorbent injection processes performed at the DITF lowered the duct temperature to around 165{degrees}F from about 350{degrees}F for base line operation. Consequently, during collection in the ESP, the particulate matter from the sorbent injection processes had a significantly lower resitivity (approximately 4 {times} 10{sup 7} {Omega}-cm) than the base line ash (approximately 3 {times} 10{sup 11} {Omega}-cm at 350{degrees}F). Specific surface areas and true particle densities have been measured for the four samples obtained from the DOE/PETC Duct Injection Test Facility. These data are summarized in Table 4. The primary difference indicated by these initial analyses of these four samples is the significant increase in specific surface area due to sorbent addition. The specific surface areas of the three sorbent and ash mixtures from the DITF are quite similar.

Snyder, T.R.; Vann Bush, P.

1992-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

189

NETL: Control Technology: Flue Gas Conditioning  

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a proven means of increasing the collection efficiency of an electrostatic precipitator (ESP). However, a new class of additives is needed because currently available agglomerating...

190

167 Normalizing Condition-Microstructures-Mechanical Properties ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... gas household usage, of which consumption is constantly expanding especially in ... 019 Effect of Cooling Conditions on the Glass Forming Ability of the TeO2...

191

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LBNL/PUB-3092 LBNL/PUB-3092 Guidelines for Generators to Meet HWHF Acceptance Requirements for Hazardous, Radioactive, and Mixed Wastes at Berkeley Lab Waste Management Group Environment, Health, and Safety Division Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory University of California Berkeley, California 94720 Revision 7.1 October 2011 1. Hazardous Wastes. 1- 1 Summary of Hazardous Waste Requirements. 1- 2 1.1 How Do I Know If My Waste Is Hazardous?. 1- 3 1.1.1 Characteristic Waste. 1- 4 1.1.1.1 Ignitability. 1- 4 1.1.1.2 Corrosivity. 1- 4 1.1.1.3 Reactivity. 1- 5 1.1.1.4 Toxicity. 1- 5 1.1.2 Listed Waste. 1- 6 1.1.3 Chemical Compatibility. 1- 7 1.1.4 Excess Laboratory Chemicals and Laboratory Cleanouts. 1- 10 1.1.5 Unknowns. 1- 10

192

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS)  

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Berkeley Lab Recycling Guide Berkeley Lab Recycling Guide The Berkeley Lab supports the philosophy that prevention is superior to remediation. The goal of waste minimization is to incorporate pollution prevention into the decision-making process at every level throughout the Lab. Additionally, where waste generation is unavoidable, the preference is to reuse or recycle. Reduce Source reduction is to garbage what preventive medicine is to health: a means of eliminating a problem before it can happen. Reduce the amount of paper you use. Use electronic transfer of information. Reduce disposal costs: By decreasing office waste you can dramatically lower the costs of garbage pick-up service. Reduce pollution: The manufacturing of new paper products from recycled materials results in a 74 percent reduction in air pollution and

193

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS)  

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M A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Massage Master Emergency Plan Medical - Health Services at the Lab Memorandum of Understanding - UCBLBNL Moving Hazardous...

194

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS)  

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to assist Berkeley Lab supervisors and managers in conducting discussions on environment, safety and health topics with their staff. Each slide delivers focused talking...

195

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS)  

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R A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Radiation Protection Radiation Safety Radiation Safety Committee REMS - Radiation Exposure Monitoring System Report Accident...

196

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS)  

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I A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Integrated Safety Management (ISM) Plan Integrated Safety Management (ISM) Plan Archives Industrial Hygiene Injury and Illness...

197

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environment, Safety and Health Standards Set for LBNL Environment, Safety and Health Standards Set for LBNL Due to a recent Contract 31 action, the Necessary and Sufficient process...

198

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS)  

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F A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Facility Safety Plan Feedback Fire Department 510-486-6015 Fire DepartmentProtection First Aid...

199

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

J A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z JHA - Job Hazards Analysis JHA (Subcontractor)...

200

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

V A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Vendor Ventilation Database Visitor: Request Gate Pass and Visitor Request Form...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas conditioning eh" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS)  

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H A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Hazardous Materials Business Plan Hazardous Materials Transportation & Shipping Hazardous Waste Requisition Hazardous Waste...

202

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A-Z Index B A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Badging Battery Disposal Beryllium Web Course Biosafety Authorization System Biosafety Manual (LBNL-3435E) Building...

203

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

L A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Laser Management System Laser Safety LBNL Safety Advisory Committee LCATS - LBNL Corrective Action Tracking System Lessons...

204

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS)  

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C A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z CATS (Corrective Action Tracking System) Chair Massage Program Checklist - Safety Walk Around Check List for Managers Chemical...

205

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

recommendations to the Laboratory Director on the development and implementation of Environment, Safety & Health (ES&H) policy, guidelines, codes and regulatory interpretation. It...

206

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Concerns Training SubcontractorsVendors (SJHA) Waste Management What We Do The EnvironmentHealthSafety division helps Berkeley Lab staff perform their work safely and in an...

207

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS)  

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W A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Waste (E-Waste) Waste (Hazardous Waste) Waste Management Waste (Mixed Waste) Waste (Radioactive Waste) Website Map Who To Call...

208

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

P A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z PUB-3000 - Health & Safety Manual PUB-3092 - Waste Generator Guidelines PUB-3140 - Integrated Safety Management Plan (ISM)...

209

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

S S A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z SAAR - Supervisor's Accident Analysis Report SAAR for Division Safety Coordinators Safety Concerns/Comments Safety Engineering (Division) Safety Committee Safety Advisory Committee (LBNL) Safety Coordinator and Liaison Resources Safety Flicks Safety Shoes Safety Walk Around Check List Safety Walk Around Check List for Managers Satellite Accumulation Areas Security call x5472 Security and Emergency Operations Shipping & Transporting Hazardous Materials Shoemobile (schedule) (form) Site Access (parking permits, gate passes, buses) Site Environmental Report Site Map SJHA Spot Award Program Stop Work Policy Stretch Break Software-RSIGuard Subcontractor Job Hazard Analysis

210

AFRD EH&S  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Office Health and Safety Tips Office Health and Safety Tips Safety and Health Tips for the Office Ergonomics: Computers Should Help, Not Hurt Ergonomics, the science of how people interact with their tasks and technologies, is worth considering in any work context. However, it is especially important in the use of computers, where anything from avoidable, short-lived pain to debilitating injuries can insidiously sneak up on you. The Environment, Health, and Safety Division has an extensive ergonomics site that covers not only computers but also other common troublemakers. To learn more about what the LBNL ergonomics team does, and how can it help you, read the February 2012 issue of Ergonomics News Flash. We encourage everyone to explore LBNL's online ergo site. Mouse over the "Ergonomics" menu item to choose from a variety of resources, including training courses, a display center where you can try out popular ergonomic aids, and sources of in-person advice. A good first step is the quick, easy online ergonomic screening. Go through the simple process (if you have more than one computer, answer in terms of the one that you find most ergonomically bothersome) and your risk will be rated in the "green," "yellow," or "red" zone. Red-zone results will get an automatic follow-up for in-person evaluation. (Anyone can request an ergonomic evaluation regardless of this score.) This online self-evaluation is recommended for everyone who reports more than four hours a day of computer use on their Job Hazards Questionnaire. Others who use computers are welcome to take it too, of course.

211

AFRD EH&S  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Welcome Aboard Welcome Aboard This page is meant especially for new employees and participating guests and students, including those who are also new to California. It supplements the formal orientation programs that you went through when you first arrived at the Lab. Many things you would do for yourself at home or at some institutions with hardly a second thought are subject to special rules here at LBNL. They may be forbidden, for instance; approached in different ways; or restricted to trained crafts and trades people who plan their work, get it authorized, and perform it to professional standards. These restrictions follow from our responsibility to fellow employees and the community, and our high public profile. We must be not only safe and environmentally responsible,

212

Microsoft Word - EHS 804.docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

responsibilities of others involved in the process. It also provides an example of the ORPS process based on Course Objectives: Upon successful completion of this training, the...

213

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

storage tanks with environmentally safe double walled tanks, the renovation of many cooling towers, the reengineering of the main photographic shop to fully electronic...

214

Gas intrusion into SPR caverns  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The conditions and occurrence of gas in crude oil stored in Strategic Petroleum Reserve, SPR, caverns is characterized in this report. Many caverns in the SPR show that gas has intruded into the oil from the surrounding salt dome. Historical evidence and the analyses presented here suggest that gas will continue to intrude into many SPR caverns in the future. In considering why only some caverns contain gas, it is concluded that the naturally occurring spatial variability in salt permeability can explain the range of gas content measured in SPR caverns. Further, it is not possible to make a one-to-one correlation between specific geologic phenomena and the occurrence of gas in salt caverns. However, gas is concluded to be petrogenic in origin. Consequently, attempts have been made to associate the occurrence of gas with salt inhomogeneities including anomalies and other structural features. Two scenarios for actual gas intrusion into caverns were investigated for consistency with existing information. These scenarios are gas release during leaching and gas permeation through salt. Of these mechanisms, the greater consistency comes from the belief that gas permeates to caverns through the salt. A review of historical operating data for five Bryan Mound caverns loosely supports the hypothesis that higher operating pressures reduce gas intrusion into caverns. This conclusion supports a permeability intrusion mechanism. Further, it provides justification for operating the caverns near maximum operating pressure to minimize gas intrusion. Historical gas intrusion rates and estimates of future gas intrusion are given for all caverns.

Hinkebein, T.E.; Bauer, S.J.; Ehgartner, B.L.; Linn, J.K.; Neal, J.T.; Todd, J.L.; Kuhlman, P.S.; Gniady, C.T. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Underground Storage Technology Dept.; Giles, H.N. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States). Strategic Petroleum Reserve

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Table 1. Natural Gas Consumption and Expenditures in U.S ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Appliances Households Using Natural Gas (million) ... 1 A small amount of natural gas used for air conditioning is included in "Natural Gas" under "All Uses".

216

Comparing Price Forecast Accuracy of Natural Gas Models and Futures Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

about natural gas supply and demand. As a result, someCalibrating natural gas supply and demand conditions withelectricity and natural gas markets, demand-side management

Wong-Parodi, Gabrielle; Dale, Larry; Lekov, Alex

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Ruslands Gas.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This paper is about Russian natural gas and the possibility for Russia to use its reserves of natural gas politically towards the European Union to (more)

Elkjr, Jonas Bondegaard

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Gas purification  

SciTech Connect

Natural gas having a high carbon dioxide content is contacted with sea water in an absorber at or near the bottom of the ocean to produce a purified natural gas.

Cook, C.F.; Hays, G.E.

1982-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

219

Natural Gas  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas. Under the baseline winter weather scenario, EIA expects end-of-October working gas inventories will total 3,830 billion cubic feet (Bcf) and end March ...

220

Gas Week  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Presented by: Guy F. Caruso, EIA AdministratorPresented to: Gas WeekHouston, TexasSeptember 24, 2003

Information Center

2003-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas conditioning eh" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Natural Gas | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Sources » Fossil » Natural Gas Energy Sources » Fossil » Natural Gas Natural Gas November 20, 2013 Energy Department Expands Research into Methane Hydrates, a Vast, Untapped Potential Energy Resource of the U.S. Projects Will Determine Whether methane Hydrates Are an Economically and Environmentally Viable Option for America's Energy Future November 15, 2013 Energy Department Authorizes Additional Volume at Proposed Freeport LNG Facility to Export Liquefied Natural Gas The Department of Energy announced the conditional authorization for Freeport LNG Expansion, L.P. and FLNG Liquefaction, LLC to export liquefied natural gas to countries that do not have a Free Trade Agreement with the U.S. This is the fifth conditional authorization the Department has announced. October 31, 2013 Sacramento Utility to Launch Concentrating Solar Power-Natural Gas Project

222

NETL: Gasification Systems - Gas Cleaning  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cleaning Cleaning Chemicals from Coal Complex Chemicals from Coal Complex (Eastman Company) Novel gas cleaning and conditioning are crucial technologies for achieving near-zero emissions, while meeting gasification system performance and cost targets. DOE's Gasification Systems program supports technology development in the area of gas cleaning and conditioning, including advanced sorbents and solvents, particulate filters, and other novel gas-cleaning approaches that remove and convert gas contaminants into benign and marketable by-products. To avoid the cost and efficiency penalties associated with cooling the gas stream to temperatures at which conventional gas clean-up systems operate, novel processes are being developed that operate at mild to high temperatures and incorporate multi-contaminant control to

223

Tennessee Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Tennessee Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

224

Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

225

Arkansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Arkansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

226

Oklahoma Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Oklahoma Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

227

Louisiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Louisiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

228

Maryland Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Maryland Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

229

Kentucky Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Kentucky Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

230

Pennsylvania Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Pennsylvania Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

231

Michigan Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Michigan Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

232

Colorado Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Colorado Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

233

The Robust Gas Turbine Project M.I.T. Gas Turbine Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 The Robust Gas Turbine Project M.I.T. Gas Turbine Laboratory Prof. David Darmofal, Prof. Daniel and in-service conditions is a key factor in gas turbine product quality. While a given design may these improved engines. The M.I.T. Gas Turbine Laboratory (GTL) has a long history of developing advanced

Waitz, Ian A.

234

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9, 2001 9, 2001 Prices headed up the middle of last week despite seasonal or cooler temperatures everywhere but California (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation from Normal Temperatures Map) and the July 4th holiday, regarded as one of the lowest natural gas consumption days. As expected, the resulting 10-cent-per-MMBtu gain at the Henry Hub on Thursday compared with the previous Friday was undone the following day. The futures price for August delivery was able to stay ahead of the previous week by 12.2 cents to settle at $3.218 on Friday. Spot natural gas prices for large packages in southern California increased as much as $2.71 per MMBtu as temperatures soared and gas-fired power plants endeavored to meet air conditioning demand. Prices started to recede as temperatures abated by the end of the week. Strong gas supplies across the country supported another hefty net addition to storage of 105 Bcf.

235

GAS DISCHARGE DEVICES  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus utilized in introducing tritium gas into envelope of a gas discharge device for the purpose f maintaining the discharge path in ionized condition is described. ln addition to the cathode and anode, the ischarge device contains a zirconium or tantalum ilament arranged for external excitation and a metallic seed containing tritium, and also arranged to have a current passed through it. Initially, the zirconium or tantalum filament is vaporized to deposit its material adjacent the main discharge region. Then the tritium gas is released and, due to its affinity for the first released material, it deposits in the region of the main discharge where it is most effective in maintaining the discharge path in an ionized condition.

Jefferson, S.

1958-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

236

Evolution of simple configurations of gravitating gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We considered the dynamics of gravitating gas - a continuous media with peculiar properties. The exact solutions of its Euler equations for simple initial conditions is obtained.

G. P. Pronko

2011-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

237

Gas Flowmeter Calibrations with the 26 m PVTt Standard  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... thermal mass flow meters, and turbine meters. ... the conditions of usage (ie, gas type, temperature ... a NIST calibration to conditions or gases that were ...

2012-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

238

Natural Gas  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Energy Department supports research and policy options to ensure environmentally sustainable domestic and global supplies of oil and natural gas.

239

Gas separating  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Feed gas is directed tangentially along the non-skin surface of gas separation membrane modules comprising a cylindrical bundle of parallel contiguous hollow fibers supported to allow feed gas to flow from an inlet at one end of a cylindrical housing through the bores of the bundled fibers to an outlet at the other end while a component of the feed gas permeates through the fibers, each having the skin side on the outside, through a permeate outlet in the cylindrical casing. 3 figs.

Gollan, A.

1988-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

240

Missouri Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Missouri Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas conditioning eh" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

North American Natural Gas Markets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes die research by an Energy Modeling Forum working group on the evolution of the North American natural gas markets between now and 2010. The group's findings are based partly on the results of a set of economic models of the natural gas industry that were run for four scenarios representing significantly different conditions: two oil price scenarios (upper and lower), a smaller total US resource base (low US resource case), and increased potential gas demand for electric generation (high US demand case). Several issues, such as the direction of regulatory policy and the size of the gas resource base, were analyzed separately without the use of models.

Not Available

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Drill string gas data  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Data and supporting documentation were compiled and analyzed for 26 cases of gas grab samples taken during waste-tank core sampling activities between September 1, 1995 and December 31, 1997. These cases were tested against specific criteria to reduce uncertainties associated with in-tank sampling location and conditions. Of the 26 possible cases, 16 qualified as drill-string grab samples most likely to represent recently released waste gases. The data from these 16 ``confirmed`` cases were adjusted to remove non-waste gas contributions from core-sampling activities (argon or nitrogen purge), the atmospheric background, and laboratory sampler preparation (helium). The procedure for subtracting atmospheric, laboratory, and argon purge gases was unambiguous. No reliable method for determining the exact amount of nitrogen purge gas was established. Thus, the final set of ``Adjusted`` drill string gas data for the 6 nitrogen-purged cases had a greater degree of uncertainty than the final results for the 10 argon-purged cases. Including the appropriate amounts of uncertainty, this final set of data was added to the set of high-quality results from the Retained Gas Sampler (RGS), and good agreement was found for the N{sub 2}, H{sub 2}, and N{sub 2}O mole fractions sampled from common tanks. These results indicate that under favorable sampling conditions, Drill-String (DS) grab samples can provide reasonably accurate information about the dominant species of released gas. One conclusion from this set of total gas data is that the distribution of the H{sub 2} mole fractions is bimodal in shape, with an upper bound of 78%.

Siciliano, E.R.

1998-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

243

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

,366 ,366 95,493 1.08 0 0.00 1 0.03 29,406 0.56 1,206 0.04 20,328 0.64 146,434 0.73 - Natural Gas 1996 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: South Carolina South Carolina 88. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas South Carolina, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ...........................................

244

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0,216 0,216 50,022 0.56 135 0.00 49 1.67 85,533 1.63 8,455 0.31 45,842 1.45 189,901 0.95 - Natural Gas 1996 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: M a r y l a n d Maryland 68. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Maryland, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 9 7 7 7 8 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 33 28 26 22 135 From Oil Wells ...........................................

245

Hot conditioning equipment conceptual design report  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the conceptual design of the Hot Conditioning System Equipment. The Hot conditioning System will consist of two separate designs: the Hot Conditioning System Equipment; and the Hot Conditioning System Annex. The Hot Conditioning System Equipment Design includes the equipment such as ovens, vacuum pumps, inert gas delivery systems, etc.necessary to condition spent nuclear fuel currently in storage in the K Basins of the Hanford Site. The Hot Conditioning System Annex consists of the facility of house the Hot Conditioning System. The Hot Conditioning System will be housed in an annex to the Canister Storage Building. The Hot Conditioning System will consist of pits in the floor which contain ovens in which the spent nuclear will be conditioned prior to interim storage.

Bradshaw, F.W., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

246

Gas-Saving Tips  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Gas-Saving Tips Gas-Saving Tips Some consumers believe fuel economy ratings are a fixed number, like engine size or cargo volume. However, a vehicle's fuel economy can vary significantly due to several factors, including how the vehicle is driven, the vehicle's mechanical condition, and the environment in which it is driven. That's good news. It means you may be able to improve your vehicle's gas mileage through proper maintenance and driving habits. In fact, studies suggest the average driver can improve his/her fuel economy by roughly 10 percent. Here are a few simple tips to help you get the best possible fuel economy from your vehicle and reduce your fuel costs. Adopt Good Driving Habits Drive Sensibly Aggressive driving (speeding, rapid acceleration and braking)

247

Charts estimate gas-turbine site performance  

SciTech Connect

Nomographs have been developed to simplify site performance estimates for various types of gas turbine engines used for industrial applications. The nomographs can provide valuable data for engineers to use for an initial appraisal of projects where gas turbines are to be considered. General guidelines for the selection of gas turbines are also discussed. In particular, site conditions that influence the performance of gas turbines are described.

Dharmadhikari, S.

1988-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

248

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

21,547 21,547 4,916 0.06 0 0.00 0 0.00 7,012 0.13 3 0.00 7,099 0.22 19,031 0.10 N e w H a m p s h i r e New Hampshire 77. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New Hampshire, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

249

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

139,881 139,881 26,979 0.30 463 0.00 115 3.92 27,709 0.53 19,248 0.70 28,987 0.92 103,037 0.52 A r i z o n a Arizona 50. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Arizona, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 6 6 6 7 7 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 721 508 711 470 417 From Oil Wells ........................................... 72 110 48 88 47 Total.............................................................. 794 618 759 558 464 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease

250

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Middle Middle Atlantic Middle Atlantic 37. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Middle Atlantic, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,857 1,981 2,042 1,679 1,928 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 36,906 36,857 26,180 37,159 38,000 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 161,372 152,717 140,444 128,677 152,494 From Oil Wells ........................................... 824 610 539 723 641 Total.............................................................. 162,196 153,327 140,982 129,400 153,134 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

251

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

386,690 386,690 102,471 1.16 0 0.00 43 1.47 142,319 2.72 5,301 0.19 98,537 3.12 348,671 1.74 M i n n e s o t a Minnesota 71. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Minnesota, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

252

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,108,583 1,108,583 322,275 3.63 298 0.00 32 1.09 538,749 10.28 25,863 0.95 218,054 6.90 1,104,972 5.52 I l l i n o i s Illinois 61. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Illinois, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 382 385 390 372 370 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 337 330 323 325 289 From Oil Wells ........................................... 10 10 10 10 9 Total.............................................................. 347 340 333 335 298 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ...............

253

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

286,485 286,485 71,533 0.81 25 0.00 31 1.06 137,225 2.62 5,223 0.19 72,802 2.31 286,814 1.43 M i s s o u r i Missouri 73. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Missouri, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 5 8 12 15 24 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 27 14 8 16 25 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 27 14 8 16 25 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

254

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

411,951 411,951 100,015 1.13 0 0.00 5 0.17 114,365 2.18 45,037 1.65 96,187 3.05 355,609 1.78 Massachusetts Massachusetts 69. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Massachusetts, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

255

Natural gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

www.eia.gov Over time the electricity mix gradually shifts to lower-carbon options, led by growth in natural gas and renewable generation U.S. electricity net generation trillion kilowatthours 6

Adam Sieminski Administrator; Adam Sieminski Usnic; Adam Sieminski Usnic

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

226,798 226,798 104,124 1.17 0 0.00 0 0.00 58,812 1.12 2,381 0.09 40,467 1.28 205,783 1.03 North Carolina North Carolina 81. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas North Carolina, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

257

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

68,747 68,747 34,577 0.39 0 0.00 34 1.16 14,941 0.29 0 0.00 11,506 0.36 61,058 0.31 I d a h o Idaho 60. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Idaho, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation.......................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented

258

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 0 0.00 0 0.00 0 0.00 540 0.01 0 0.00 2,132 0.07 2,672 0.01 H a w a i i Hawaii 59. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Hawaii, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation.......................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared

259

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

483,052 483,052 136,722 1.54 6,006 0.03 88 3.00 16,293 0.31 283,557 10.38 41,810 1.32 478,471 2.39 F l o r i d a Florida 57. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Florida, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 47 50 98 92 96 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 7,584 8,011 8,468 7,133 6,706 Total.............................................................. 7,584 8,011 8,468 7,133 6,706 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ...............

260

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

291,898 291,898 113,995 1.29 0 0.00 4 0.14 88,078 1.68 3,491 0.13 54,571 1.73 260,140 1.30 I o w a Iowa 63. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Iowa, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation.......................... 0 0 0

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas conditioning eh" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Vehicle Fuel: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: New England New England 36. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New England, 1992-1996 Table 691,089 167,354 1.89 0 0.00 40 1.36 187,469 3.58 80,592 2.95 160,761 5.09 596,215 2.98 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................

262

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

29,693 29,693 0 0.00 0 0.00 6 0.20 17,290 0.33 0 0.00 16,347 0.52 33,644 0.17 District of Columbia District of Columbia 56. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas District of Columbia, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

263

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

42,980 42,980 14,164 0.16 0 0.00 1 0.03 9,791 0.19 23,370 0.86 6,694 0.21 54,020 0.27 D e l a w a r e Delaware 55. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Delaware, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

264

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-49,536 -49,536 7,911 0.09 49,674 0.25 15 0.51 12,591 0.24 3 0.00 12,150 0.38 32,670 0.16 North Dakota North Dakota 82. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas North Dakota, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 496 525 507 463 462 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 104 101 104 99 108 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 12,461 18,892 19,592 16,914 16,810 From Oil Wells ........................................... 47,518 46,059 43,640 39,760 38,906 Total.............................................................. 59,979 64,951 63,232 56,674 55,716 Repressuring ................................................

265

Passive gas separator and accumulator device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A separation device employing a gas separation filter and swirler vanes for separating gas from a gas-liquid mixture is provided. The cylindrical filter utilizes the principle that surface tension in the pores of the filter prevents gas bubbles from passing through. As a result, the gas collects in the interior region of the filter and coalesces to form larger bubbles in the center of the device. The device is particularly suited for use in microgravity conditions since the swirlers induce a centrifugal force which causes liquid to move from the inner region of the filter, pass the pores, and flow through the outlet of the device while the entrained gas is trapped by the filter. The device includes a cylindrical gas storage screen which is enclosed by the cylindrical gas separation filter. The screen has pores that are larger than those of the filters. The screen prevents larger bubbles that have been formed from reaching and interfering with the pores of the gas separation filter. The device is initially filled with a gas other than that which is to be separated. This technique results in separation of the gas even before gas bubbles are present in the mixture. Initially filling the device with the dissimilar gas and preventing the gas from escaping before operation can be accomplished by sealing the dissimilar gas in the inner region of the separation device with a ruptured disc which can be ruptured when the device is activated for use. 3 figs.

Choe, H.; Fallas, T.T.

1994-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

266

Natural gas demand at power plants was high in summer 2012 - Today ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural gas use for power generation rose this summer because of hot-weather-driven electricity demand for air conditioning coupled with low natural gas prices.

267

Natural Gas | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

May 23, 2013 May 23, 2013 Secretary Moniz on Natural Gas and Renewables May 17, 2013 Energy Department Authorizes Second Proposed Facility to Export Liquefied Natural Gas Freeport LNG Terminal on Quintana Island, Texas Authorized to Export Liquefied Natural Gas to Non-Free Trade Agreement Countries May 17, 2013 FE DOCKET NO. 10-161-LNG ORDER CONDITIONALLY GRANTING LONG-TERM MULTI-CONTRACT AUTHORIZATION TO EXPORT LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS BY VESSEL FROM THE FREEPORT LNG TERMINAL ON QUINTANA ISLAND, TEXAS TO NON-FREE TRADE AGREEMENT NATIONS April 24, 2013 The new hybrid solar-natural gas system from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) works through concentrating solar power, which uses a reflecting surface to concentrate the sun's rays like a magnifying glass. In the case of the new system from PNNL, a mirrored parabolic dish directs sunbeams to a central point, where a device absorbs the solar heat to make syngas.| Photo courtesy of PNNL.

268

Gas Delivered  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. Average . Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers, 1980-1996 Figure 1980 1982 1984 1986 1988 1990 1992 1994 1996 0 2 4 6 8 10 0 40 80 120 160 200 240 280 320 Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet Dollars per Thousand Cubic Meters Nominal Dollars Constant Dollars Sources: Nominal dollars: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition." Constant dollars: Prices were converted to 1995 dollars using the chain-type price indexes for Gross Domestic Product (1992 = 1.0) as published by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Economic Analysis. Residential: Prices in this publication for the residential sector cover nearly all of the volumes of gas delivered. Commercial and Industrial: Prices for the commercial and industrial sectors are often associated with

269

GAS TURBINES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the age of volatile and ever increasing natural gas fuel prices, strict new emission regulations and technological advancements, modern IGCC plants are the answer to growing market demands for efficient and environmentally friendly power generation. IGCC technology allows the use of low cost opportunity fuels, such as coal, of which there is a more than a 200-year supply in the U.S., and refinery residues, such as petroleum coke and residual oil. Future IGCC plants are expected to be more efficient and have a potential to be a lower cost solution to future CO2 and mercury regulations compared to the direct coal fired steam plants. Siemens has more than 300,000 hours of successful IGCC plant operational experience on a variety of heavy duty gas turbine models in Europe and the U.S. The gas turbines involved range from SGT5-2000E to SGT6-3000E (former designations are shown on Table 1). Future IGCC applications will extend this experience to the SGT5-4000F and SGT6-4000F/5000F/6000G gas turbines. In the currently operating Siemens 60 Hz fleet, the SGT6-5000F gas turbine has the most operating engines and the most cumulative operating hours. Over the years, advancements have increased its performance and decreased its emissions and life cycle costs without impacting reliability. Development has been initiated to verify its readiness for future IGCC application including syngas combustion system testing. Similar efforts are planned for the SGT6-6000G and SGT5-4000F/SGT6-4000F models. This paper discusses the extensive development programs that have been carried out to demonstrate that target emissions and engine operability can be achieved on syngas operation in advanced F-class 50 Hz and 60 Hz gas turbine based IGCC applications.

Power For L; Satish Gadde; Jianfan Wu; Anil Gulati; Gerry Mcquiggan; Berthold Koestlin; Bernd Prade

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Characterization of liquefied natural gas tanker steel from cryogenic to fire temperatures.  

SciTech Connect

The increased demand for Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) as a fuel source in the U.S. has prompted a study to improve our capability to predict cascading damage to LNG tankers from cryogenic spills and subsequent fire. To support this large modeling and simulation effort, a suite of experiments were conducted on two tanker steels, ABS Grade A steel and ABS Grade EH steel. A thorough and complete understanding of the mechanical behavior of the tanker steels was developed that was heretofore unavailable for the span of temperatures of interest encompassing cryogenic to fire temperatures. This was accomplished by conducting several types of experiments, including tension, notched tension and Charpy impact tests at fourteen temperatures over the range of -191 C to 800 C. Several custom fixtures and special techniques were developed for testing at the various temperatures. The experimental techniques developed and the resulting data will be presented, along with a complete description of the material behavior over the temperature span.

Dempsey, J. Franklin (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Wellman, Gerald William (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Antoun, Bonnie R.; Connelly, Kevin; Kalan, Robert J. (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM)

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Nebraska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Nebraska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9; 1980's: 15:

272

Mississippi Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Mississippi Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9; 1980's:

273

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on October 25, 2007) 8, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on October 25, 2007) Natural gas spot prices increased since Wednesday, October 10, at nearly all market locations. For the week (Wednesday to Wednesday), the price at the Henry Hub increased $0.32 per MMBtu, or about 5 percent, to $7.11 per MMBtu. The NYMEX futures contract for November delivery at the Henry Hub rose 45 cents since last Wednesday to close yesterday at $7.458 per MMBtu. Natural gas in storage as of Friday, October 12, was 3,375 Bcf, which is 6.7 percent above the 5-year average. Despite the seemingly favorable supply conditions and little weather-related natural gas demand, natural gas prices continued their upward movement of the past 6 weeks. The Henry Hub spot price exceeded the $7-per MMBtu mark in this week's trading for the first time in 2 months. One factor in the recent run-up in prices may be the relatively low imports of liquefied natural gas (LNG) to the Lower 48 States. LNG imports have averaged less than 1 Bcf per day during the first half of October, based on the sendout data published on companies' websites. LNG cargoes instead are heading to Europe and Asia, where buyers continue to purchase LNG at much higher prices than have prevailed in U.S. markets. A likely influence on natural gas prices is the spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil, which reached yet another record high on Tuesday, but decreased slightly during yesterday's trading to $87.19 per barrel or $15.03 per MMBtu. On the week, however, the WTI increased $5.89 per barrel or about 7 percent.

274

On the superficial gas velocity in deep gas-solids fluidized beds  

SciTech Connect

The superficial gas velocity is one of the key parameters used to determine the flow hydrodynamics in gassolids fluidized beds. However, the superficial velocity varies with height in practice, and there is no consistent basis for its specification. Different approaches to determine the superficial gas velocity in a deep gassolids system are shown to cause difficulties in developing models and in comparing predictions with experimental results. In addition, the reference conditions for superficial gas velocity are important in modeling of deep gassolids systems where there is a considerable pressure drop.

Li, Tingwen; Grace, John; Shadle, Lawrence; Guenther, Chris

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

275

On the Superficial Gas Velocity in Deep Gas-Solid Fluidized Beds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The superficial gas velocity is one of the key parameters used to determine the flow hydrodynamics in gassolids fluidized beds. However, the superficial velocity varies with height in practice, and there is no consistent basis for its specification. Different approaches to determine the superficial gas velocity in a deep gassolids system are shown to cause difficulties in developing models and in comparing predictions with experimental results. In addition, the reference conditions for superficial gas velocity are important in modeling of deep gassolids systems where there is a considerable pressure drop.

Li, Tingwen; Grace, John; Shadle, Lawrence; Guenther, Chris

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

276

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,554,530 1,554,530 311,229 3.51 3,094,431 15.67 442 15.08 299,923 5.72 105,479 3.86 210,381 6.66 927,454 4.64 Mountain Mountain 43. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Mountain, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 38,711 38,987 37,366 39,275 38,944 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 30,965 34,975 38,539 38,775 41,236 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 2,352,729 2,723,393 3,046,159 3,131,205 3,166,689 From Oil Wells ........................................... 677,771 535,884 472,397 503,986 505,903 Total.............................................................. 3,030,499 3,259,277 3,518,556

277

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,592,465 1,592,465 716,648 8.08 239,415 1.21 182 6.21 457,792 8.73 334,123 12.23 320,153 10.14 1,828,898 9.14 South Atlantic South Atlantic 40. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas South Atlantic, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 3,307 3,811 4,496 4,427 4,729 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 39,412 35,149 41,307 37,822 36,827 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 206,766 208,892 234,058 236,072 233,409 From Oil Wells ........................................... 7,584 8,011 8,468 7,133 6,706 Total.............................................................. 214,349 216,903 242,526 243,204 240,115

278

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,999,161 1,999,161 895,529 10.10 287,933 1.46 1,402 47.82 569,235 10.86 338,640 12.39 308,804 9.78 2,113,610 10.57 Pacific Contiguous Pacific Contiguous 44. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Pacific Contiguous, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 3,896 3,781 3,572 3,508 2,082 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 1,142 1,110 1,280 1,014 996 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 156,635 124,207 117,725 96,329 88,173 From Oil Wells ........................................... 294,800 285,162 282,227 289,430 313,581 Total.............................................................. 451,435 409,370

279

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-122,394 -122,394 49,997 0.56 178,984 0.91 5 0.17 37,390 0.71 205 0.01 28,025 0.89 115,622 0.58 West Virginia West Virginia 96. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas West Virginia, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 2,356 2,439 2,565 2,499 2,703 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 38,250 33,716 39,830 36,144 35,148 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... E 182,000 171,024 183,773 186,231 178,984 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. E 182,000 171,024 183,773 186,231 178,984 Repressuring ................................................

280

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

134,294 32,451 0.37 0 0.00 32 1.09 43,764 0.83 10,456 0.38 39,786 1.26 126,488 0.63 C o n n e c t i c u t Connecticut 54. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Connecticut, 1992-1996...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas conditioning eh" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

73,669 73,669 141,300 1.59 221,822 1.12 3 0.10 46,289 0.88 33,988 1.24 31,006 0.98 252,585 1.26 A r k a n s a s Arkansas 51. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Arkansas, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,750 1,552 1,607 1,563 1,470 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 3,500 3,500 3,500 3,988 4,020 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 171,543 166,273 161,967 161,390 182,895 From Oil Wells ........................................... 39,364 38,279 33,446 33,979 41,551 Total.............................................................. 210,906 204,552 195,413 195,369 224,446 Repressuring ................................................

282

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-1,080,240 -1,080,240 201,024 2.27 1,734,887 8.78 133 4.54 76,629 1.46 136,436 4.99 46,152 1.46 460,373 2.30 O k l a h o m a Oklahoma 84. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Oklahoma, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 13,926 13,289 13,487 13,438 13,074 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 28,902 29,118 29,121 29,733 29,733 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 1,674,405 1,732,997 1,626,858 1,521,857 1,467,695 From Oil Wells ........................................... 342,950 316,945 308,006 289,877 267,192 Total.............................................................. 2,017,356 2,049,942 1,934,864

283

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7,038,115 7,038,115 3,528,911 39.78 13,646,477 69.09 183 6.24 408,861 7.80 1,461,718 53.49 281,452 8.91 5,681,125 28.40 West South Central West South Central 42. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas West South Central, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 87,198 84,777 88,034 88,734 62,357 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 92,212 95,288 94,233 102,525 102,864 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 11,599,913 11,749,649 11,959,444 11,824,788 12,116,665 From Oil Wells ........................................... 2,313,831 2,368,395 2,308,634 2,217,752 2,151,247 Total..............................................................

284

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

77,379 77,379 94,481 1.07 81,435 0.41 8 0.27 70,232 1.34 1,836 0.07 40,972 1.30 207,529 1.04 K e n t u c k y Kentucky 65. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Kentucky, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,084 1,003 969 1,044 983 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 12,483 12,836 13,036 13,311 13,501 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 79,690 86,966 73,081 74,754 81,435 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 79,690 86,966 73,081 74,754 81,435 Repressuring ................................................

285

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-67,648 -67,648 75,616 0.85 480,828 2.43 0 0.00 16,720 0.32 31,767 1.16 29,447 0.93 153,549 0.77 Pacific Noncontiguous Pacific Noncontiguous 45. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Pacific Noncontiguous, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 9,638 9,907 9,733 9,497 9,294 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 112 113 104 100 102 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 198,603 190,139 180,639 179,470 183,747 From Oil Wells ........................................... 2,427,110 2,588,202 2,905,261 3,190,433 3,189,837 Total.............................................................. 2,625,713 2,778,341

286

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-310,913 -310,913 110,294 1.24 712,796 3.61 2 0.07 85,376 1.63 22,607 0.83 57,229 1.81 275,508 1.38 K a n s a s Kansas 64. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Kansas, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 9,681 9,348 9,156 8,571 7,694 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 18,400 19,472 19,365 22,020 21,388 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 580,572 605,578 628,900 636,582 629,755 From Oil Wells ........................................... 79,169 82,579 85,759 86,807 85,876 Total.............................................................. 659,741 688,157 714,659 723,389 715,631 Repressuring ................................................

287

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

819,046 819,046 347,043 3.91 245,740 1.24 40 1.36 399,522 7.62 32,559 1.19 201,390 6.38 980,555 4.90 M i c h i g a n Michigan 70. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Michigan, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,223 1,160 1,323 1,294 2,061 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 3,257 5,500 6,000 5,258 5,826 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 120,287 126,179 136,989 146,320 201,123 From Oil Wells ........................................... 80,192 84,119 91,332 97,547 50,281 Total.............................................................. 200,479 210,299 228,321 243,867 251,404 Repressuring ................................................

288

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

W W y o m i n g -775,410 50,253 0.57 666,036 3.37 14 0.48 13,534 0.26 87 0.00 9,721 0.31 73,609 0.37 Wyoming 98. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Wyoming, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 10,826 10,933 10,879 12,166 12,320 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 3,111 3,615 3,942 4,196 4,510 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 751,693 880,596 949,343 988,671 981,115 From Oil Wells ........................................... 285,125 142,006 121,519 111,442 109,434 Total.............................................................. 1,036,817 1,022,602 1,070,862 1,100,113 1,090,549 Repressuring

289

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-67,648 -67,648 75,616 0.85 480,828 2.43 0 0.00 16,179 0.31 31,767 1.16 27,315 0.86 150,877 0.75 A l a s k a Alaska 49. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Alaska, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 9,638 9,907 9,733 9,497 9,294 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 112 113 104 100 102 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 198,603 190,139 180,639 179,470 183,747 From Oil Wells ........................................... 2,427,110 2,588,202 2,905,261 3,190,433 3,189,837 Total.............................................................. 2,625,713 2,778,341 3,085,900 3,369,904 3,373,584 Repressuring

290

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

628,189 628,189 449,511 5.07 765,699 3.88 100 3.41 528,662 10.09 39,700 1.45 347,721 11.01 1,365,694 6.83 West North Central West North Central 39. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas West North Central, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 10,177 9,873 9,663 9,034 8,156 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 18,569 19,687 19,623 22,277 21,669 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 594,551 626,728 651,594 655,917 648,822 From Oil Wells ........................................... 133,335 135,565 136,468 134,776 133,390 Total.............................................................. 727,886 762,293

291

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,048,760 1,048,760 322,661 3.64 18,131 0.09 54 1.84 403,264 7.69 142,688 5.22 253,075 8.01 1,121,742 5.61 N e w Y o r k New York 80. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New York, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 329 264 242 197 232 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 5,906 5,757 5,884 6,134 6,208 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 22,697 20,587 19,937 17,677 17,494 From Oil Wells ........................................... 824 610 539 723 641 Total.............................................................. 23,521 21,197 20,476 18,400 18,134 Repressuring ................................................

292

Natural Gas  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

3.91 119,251 0.60 229 7.81 374,824 7.15 2,867 0.10 189,966 6.01 915,035 4.57 O h i o Ohio 83. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Ohio, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996...

293

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0.00 53 1.81 147,893 2.82 7,303 0.27 93,816 2.97 398,581 1.99 W i s c o n s i n Wisconsin 97. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Wisconsin, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994...

294

Gas Prices  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Prices Gasoline Prices for U.S. Cities Click on the map to view gas prices for cities in your state. AK VT ME NH NH MA MA RI CT CT DC NJ DE DE NY WV VA NC SC FL GA AL MS TN KY IN...

295

Natural Gas  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

10,799 1,953 0.02 0 0.00 0 0.00 2,523 0.05 24 0.00 2,825 0.09 7,325 0.04 V e r m o n t Vermont 93. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Vermont, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995...

296

Natural Gas  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

845,998 243,499 2.75 135,000 0.68 35 1.19 278,606 5.32 7,239 0.26 154,642 4.90 684,022 3.42 P e n n s y l v a n i a Pennsylvania 86. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas...

297

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

16 (next release 2:00 p.m. on February 23, 2006) 16 (next release 2:00 p.m. on February 23, 2006) Winter-like conditions in much of the East this past weekend transitioned to above-normal temperatures, contributing to a further decline in natural gas spot prices this week (Wednesday, February 8 - Wednesday, February 15). On the week the Henry Hub spot price declined 57 cents per MMBtu to $7.31. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), prices for futures contracts also registered significant declines. The futures contract for March delivery, which is the last contract for the current heating season, declined 66.9 cents per MMBtu on the week to $7.066. Relatively high levels of natural gas in working storage and falling prices for competing fuels likely contributed to falling natural gas prices this week. Working gas in storage as of Friday, February 10, was 2,266 Bcf, which is 43.9 percent above the 5-year (2001-2005) average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil decreased $4.90 per barrel on the week to $57.61, or $9.93 per MMBtu.

298

Carbon sequestration in natural gas reservoirs: Enhanced gas recovery and natural gas storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by numerical simulation below. pipeline gas shalecushion gas sand shale CH4 working gas CH4 working gas sand

Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Unconventional Natural Gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Natural Gas Unconventional Natural Gas Los Alamos scientists are committed to the efficient and environmentally-safe development of major U.S. natural gas and oil resources....

300

Underground Natural Gas Storage  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Underground Natural Gas Storage. Measured By. Disseminated Through. Monthly Survey of Storage Field Operators -- asking injections, withdrawals, base gas, working gas.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas conditioning eh" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

,"Texas Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Texas Natural Gas Imports Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Price of Texas Natural Gas Exports...

302

,"Mississippi Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Mississippi Natural Gas Imports Price All Countries (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Mississippi Natural Gas...

303

,"Montana Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Montana Natural Gas Imports Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Price of Montana Natural Gas Exports...

304

,"Michigan Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Michigan Natural Gas Imports Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Price of Michigan Natural Gas Exports...

305

2. Gas Productive Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

2. Gas Productive Capacity Gas Capacity to Meet Lower 48 States Requirements The United States has sufficient dry gas productive capacity at the wellhead to meet ...

306

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 6, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, September 23, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, September 15, 2010) Natural gas spot prices increased this report week (Wednesday to Wednesday, September 8–15), likely supported by demand in the electric power sector from late-season heat and associated air-conditioning demand in much of the country. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price increased by $0.25 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $4.06 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the October futures contract increased in 4 out of 5 trading days for a total gain during the report week of about $0.18 per MMBtu. The price of the

307

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. 7, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, January 7, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, December 16, 2009) Changes in natural gas spot prices this report week (December 9-16) reflected extremely cold weather conditions moving across the country. In response to varying levels of demand for space heating, spot prices increased east of the Mississippi River but declined in the West. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price increased $0.30 to $5.57 per million Btu (MMBtu). At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), prices for futures contracts also rose with expectations of higher demand in response to this month’s trend of colder-than-normal temperatures. The futures contract for

308

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 3, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, January 20, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, January 12, 2011) Wholesale natural gas prices at most market locations east of the Mississippi River moved higher this week as a bitter cold moved into the eastern half of the country. West of the Mississippi River, a gradual warming trend resulted in lower prices. During the report week (January 5-12), the Henry Hub spot price increased $0.03 to $4.55 per million Btu (MMBtu). At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices increased during the report week, likely in part due to forecasts of continuing cold weather and improving economic conditions. The futures

309

Shale gas is natural gas trapped inside  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Shale gas is natural gas trapped inside formations of shale - fine grained sedimentary rocks that can be rich sources of petroleum and natural gas. Just a few years ago, much of...

310

GAS SEAL  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A seal is described for a cover closing an opening in the top of a pressure vessel that may house a nuclear reactor. The seal comprises a U-shaped trough formed on the pressure vessel around the opening therein, a mass of metal in the trough, and an edge flange on the cover extending loosely into the trough and dipping into the metal mass. The lower portion of the metal mass is kept melted, and the upper portion, solid. The solid pontion of the metal mass prevents pressure surges in the vessel from expelling the liquid portion of the metal mass from the trough; the liquld portion, thus held in place by the solid portion, does not allow gas to go through, and so gas cannot escape through shrinkage holes in the solid portion.

Monson, H.; Hutter, E.

1961-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

311

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ... 152 170 165 195 224 Production (million cubic feet)...

312

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ... 280 300 225 240 251 Production (million cubic feet)...

313

Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production (Volumes in Million Cubic Feet) Data Series: ... coalbed production data are included in Gas Well totals.

314

Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Withdrawals from Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells Repressuring Vented and Flared...

315

Natural Gas Vehicles  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Natural gas vehicles (NGVs) are either fueled exclusively with compressed natural gas or liquefied natural gas (dedicated NGVs) or are capable of natural gas and gasoline fueling (bi-fuel NGVs).

316

Natural Gas Monthly  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas: Gas in place at the time that a reservoir was converted to use as an underground storage reservoir, as in contrast to injected gas volumes. Natural Gas: A gaseous mixture...

317

Coal Beneficiation by Gas Agglomeration  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Coal beneficiation is achieved by suspending coal fines in a colloidal suspension of microscopic gas bubbles in water under atmospheric conditions to form small agglomerates of the fines adhered by the gas bubbles. The agglomerates are separated, recovered and resuspended in water. Thereafter, the pressure on the suspension is increased above atmospheric to deagglomerate, since the gas bubbles are then re-dissolved in the water. During the deagglomeration step, the mineral matter is dispersed, and when the pressure is released, the coal portion of the deagglomerated gas-saturated water mixture reagglomerates, with the small bubbles now coming out of the solution. The reagglomerate can then be separated to provide purified coal fines without the mineral matter.

Thomas D. Wheelock; Meiyu Shen

2000-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

318

Gas Metrology Portal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... automobile industry meeting more stringent more. Audit of EPA Protocol Gas Suppliers EPA Protocol gas mixture calibration ...

2012-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

319

REVISED NATURAL GAS MARKET ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pipeline reverses and expands to allow the flow of regasified LNG from the Costa Azul LNG terminal in Baja natural gas LNG terminal in Southern California and one assuming dry hydro conditions. For all cases the "lower 48" states was expected to increase by 1.6 percent per year. · Proposed LNG facilities on the East

320

Method for detecting gas turbine engine flashback  

SciTech Connect

A method for monitoring and controlling a gas turbine, comprises predicting frequencies of combustion dynamics in a combustor using operating conditions of a gas turbine, receiving a signal from a sensor that is indicative of combustion dynamics in the combustor, and detecting a flashback if a frequency of the received signal does not correspond to the predicted frequencies.

Singh, Kapil Kumar; Varatharajan, Balachandar; Kraemer, Gilbert Otto; Yilmaz, Ertan; Lacy, Benjamin Paul

2012-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas conditioning eh" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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321

2007 FINAL NATURAL GAS MARKET ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.............................................................. 66 Figure 49: LNG Flows from Terminal the flow of regasified LNG from the Costa Azul LNG terminal in Baja California. The intrastate pipeline natural gas (LNG) terminal in Southern California, and one assuming dry hydro conditions. This final

322

Conservation of Oil and Gas (Texas)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This legislation prohibits the production, storage, or transportation of oil or gas in a manner, in an amount, or under conditions that constitute waste. Actions which may lead to the waste of oil...

323

Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

than average, which means that price volatility can be expected to continue in these tight market conditions. Natural gas demand in 2004 is expected to rise as industrial...

324

Louisville Gas & Electric- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Kentucky)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Louisville Gas & Electric's Home Energy Rebate program provides incentives for residential customers to upgrade to energy efficiency home appliances and heat and air conditioning equipment. ...

325

Withdrawals from Working Natural Gas Stocks During Summer 2006  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

natural gas for air conditioning. According to the Edison Electric Institute, electricity consumption reached record highs during the week ended July ...

326

Microsoft Word - EHS 339_syllabus.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

39 ~ Asbestos Awareness 39 ~ Asbestos Awareness Course Syllabus Subject Category: Occupational Health Course Prerequisite: No Course Length: Approximately 1 hour Medical Approval: No Delivery Mode: Online Schedule: If you cannot take online, class is taught by special request Course Purpose: This course is designed to familiarize employees about: 1. The types of building materials that may contain asbestos 2. The physical properties of asbestos material that make it hazardous 3. The health effects associated with exposure 4. Factors that affect risk of exposure 5. How to respond to a spill 6. What to do if they suspect a material may contain asbestos Course Objectives:  Physical properties of asbestos and the types of materials that contain asbestos

327

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS): Safety Minute  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(PDF, PPT) Badge Return (LBNL) (PDF, PPT) Battery Management (PDF, PPT) Bicycle Safety (PDF, PPT) Construction-Related Mercury Spills (PDF, PPT) Construction Vehicle Safety...

328

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS): Safety Engineering  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Safety Engineering Safety Engineering provides occupational safety services to support the Lab's mission. This includes injury and illness prevention and loss control systems for...

329

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS): Health Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Contact Us Office Location: Building 26 Phone: (510) 486-6266 Hours: Monday-Friday, 7:30 am - 3:30 pm In case of Emergency, Dial: 7-911 General Questions Name Role Image of...

330

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS): Health Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Policies and Procedures Clinical Services First Aid Kit Policy LBNL Immunization Policy LBNL Serum Banking Policy Rights of Patients Responsibilities of Patients Privacy Policy...

331

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS): Health Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Forms Beryllium Health Surveillance Program Summary Beryllium-Associated Workers: Medical Surveillance Beryllium Health Surveillance Program Forms Appendix B to the Preamble...

332

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS): Division Liaisons  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Division Liaisons EHSS Division Liaisons are responsible for putting you in touch with the right person and for assuring that your EHSS problems are addressed promptly. Please also...

333

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS): Lessons Learned  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lessons Learned Lessons Learned Lessons Home Lessons Learned Database Lessons Learned The Berkeley Lab Lessons Learned Program is managed by the Office of Contract Assurance (OCA). It was developed to help the Laboratory community learn from our mistakes (and the mistakes of others) so that we don't repeat them. Through various sources, we identify events such as accidents, mishaps and near misses and translate them into corrective actions to prevent their recurrence. The ultimate goal of the Lessons Learned Program is to continually improve our performance on an ongoing basis. This is one of the central tenets of the Laboratory's assurance program. We use several different sources of information for our Lessons Learned Program. These include: The Lessons Learned database. Use the Lessons Learned database to enter Lessons Learned and Best Practices, and to view the Lessons Learned Library.

334

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS): JHA FAQ  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Job Hazards Analysis FAQ Job Hazards Analysis FAQ Topics JHA Basics Accessing the JHA Benefits of the JHA Work Lead JHA Work Groups Taking Your JHA Correcting Your JHA Training Profile JHA Basics Back to top Q: What is a JHA? A: The Job Hazards Analysis (JHA) process provides a documented mechanism to answer the question "How do I know that I'm doing my job safely?" It is a methodical analysis tool used by highly effective organizations to identify and eliminate workplace hazards before they can cause harm. Job Hazards Analysis is a tool used by LBNL to address the five core functions of Integrated Safety Management namely Plan the Work by identifying the tasks to be performed; Analyze the Hazards of the Work; Determine the Controls necessary to safely perform the Work; Perform the Work utilizing the prescribed Controls; and

335

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS): JHA  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

JHA JHA Home JHA FAQ JHA Help Center JHA Login Page Pub-3000 Chapter 32: JHA Job Hazards Analysis A part of the work planning process, Workers and Work Leads are required to plan all work: determine the tasks that will be performed, consider the hazards, risks, and concerns associated with those tasks, and implement appropriate controls. The primary tool for work planning at the Line Management level is the Job Hazards Analysis (JHA). cartoon Click on the above image to learn more about the JHA. Download the PDF Version of the Flash animation Download the Step by Step Instructions for: An Individual A Supervisor (who is not a Work Lead) A Work Lead Adding Description of Work to your Work Group or Individual JHA For JHA help email jha@lbl.gov. TOP Last updated 08/07

336

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS): Safety Minute  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

at Home (PDF, PPT) Emergency Response - Tips for Home (PDF, PPT) Household Hazardous Waste (PDF, PPT) Preventing Fires at Home (PDF, PPT) Tire Safety (PDF, PPT) Vehicle Inspections...

337

Microsoft Word - EHS 161 syllabus.docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

such as Laser eyewear, respiratory protection, hearing protection, fall protection, welding or electrical PPE (and other types of specialty PPE) because these are covered in...

338

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS): Safety Minute  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(PDF, PPT) Badge Return (LBNL) (PDF, PPT) Counterintelligence (PDF, PPT) Export Control (PDF, PPT) Fraud, Waste and Abuse at LBNL (PDF, PPT) International Researchers & Scholars...

339

Improved Characterization of Nanoparticle Clusters for EHS ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... ultracentrifugation. ACS Nano, Articles ASAP (As Soon As Publishable). Publication Date (Web): Sept. 3, 2011 DOI: 10.1021/nn202645b. ...

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

340

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS): Safety Minute  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Training (PDF, PPT) Job Hazards Analysis (JHA) (PDF, PPT) Job Hazards Analysis (JHA): Updating Your JHA (PDF, PPT) Job Hazards Analysis (JHA): Working Safely (PDF, PPT) Radiation...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas conditioning eh" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS): Safety Minute  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Authorizations (PDF, PPT) Job Hazards Analysis (JHA) (PDF, PPT) Job Hazards Analysis (JHA): Updating Your JHA (PDF, PPT) Job Hazards Analysis (JHA): Working Safely (PDF, PPT) Work...

342

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS): Laser Safety  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laser Safety Home Whom to Call Analysis of Laser Safety Occurrences: 2005-2011 Laser Bio-effects Laser Classification Laser Disposal Guide Laser Forms Laser Newsletter Laser Lab...

343

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS) Training: Staff  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Training Staff James Basore: EHSS Training Manager, JDBasore@lbl.gov (510) 486-7524 Carmen Ayala: EHSS Training Program Assistant, CAyala@lbl.gov (510-495-2228) Fax (510) 486-2384...

344

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS): Databases  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

System) (for findings 122005 to present) Chemical Management System Confined Spaces Inventory Electrical Safety Emergency Services Program Database Ergonomics Database (to read...

345

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS): Safety Minute  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Shop Area (PDF, PPT) Chemical Inventory (PDF, PPT) Chemical Management System - Consumer Products (PDF, PPT) Earthquake Restraints (PDF, PPT) Equipment Use (PDF, PPT) Ladder Safety...

346

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS): Safety Minute  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mistakes in Managing (PDF, PPT) Biohazardous Waste, Managing (PDF, PPT) Chemical Inventory (PDF, PPT) Chemical Management System - Consumer Products (PDF, PPT) Chemical Safety...

347

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS): Safety Minute  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Guidelines - 1 of 2 (PDF, PPT) Computer Monitor Height Guidelines - 2 of 2 (PDF, PPT) Computers: Do You Know Your Keyboard Shortcuts (Windows)? (PDF, PPT) Computers: Take Frequent...

348

Method and apparatus for manufacturing gas tags  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

For use in the manufacture of gas tags employed in a gas tagging failure detection system for a nuclear reactor, a plurality of commercial feed gases each having a respective noble gas isotopic composition are blended under computer control to provide various tag gas mixtures having selected isotopic ratios which are optimized for specified defined conditions such as cost. Using a new approach employing a discrete variable structure rather than the known continuous-variable optimization problem, the computer controlled gas tag manufacturing process employs an analytical formalism from condensed matter physics known as stochastic relaxation, which is a special case of simulated annealing, for input feed gas selection. For a tag blending process involving M tag isotopes with N distinct feed gas mixtures commercially available from an enriched gas supplier, the manufacturing process calculates the cost difference between multiple combinations and specifies gas mixtures which approach the optimum defined conditions. The manufacturing process is then used to control tag blending apparatus incorporating tag gas canisters connected by stainless-steel tubing with computer controlled valves, with the canisters automatically filled with metered quantities of the required feed gases.

Gross, Kenny C. (Bolingbrook, IL); Laug, Matthew T. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Method and apparatus for manufacturing gas tags  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

For use in the manufacture of gas tags employed in a gas tagging failure detection system for a nuclear reactor, a plurality of commercial feed gases each having a respective noble gas isotopic composition are blended under computer control to provide various tag gas mixtures having selected isotopic ratios which are optimized for specified defined conditions such as cost. Using a new approach employing a discrete variable structure rather than the known continuous-variable optimization problem, the computer controlled gas tag manufacturing process employs an analytical formalism from condensed matter physics known as stochastic relaxation, which is a special case of simulated annealing, for input feed gas selection. For a tag blending process involving M tag isotopes with N distinct feed gas mixtures commercially available from an enriched gas supplier, the manufacturing process calculates the cost difference between multiple combinations and specifies gas mixtures which approach the optimum defined conditions. The manufacturing process is then used to control tag blending apparatus incorporating tag gas canisters connected by stainless-steel tubing with computer controlled valves, with the canisters automatically filled with metered quantities of the required feed gases. 4 figs.

Gross, K.C.; Laug, M.T.

1996-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

350

SLE($?,?$)and Boundary Coulomb Gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider the coulomb gas model on the upper half plane with different boundary conditions, namely Drichlet, Neuman and mixed. We related this model to SLE($\\kappa,\\rho$) theories. We derive a set of conditions connecting the total charge of the coulomb gas, the boundary charges, the parameters $\\kappa$ and $\\rho$. Also we study a free fermion theory in presence of a boundary and show with the same methods that it would lead to logarithmic boundary changing operators.

S. Moghimi-Araghi; M. A. Rajabpour; S. Rouhani

2005-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

351

Seeking prospects for enhanced gas recovery  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As part of the Institute of Gas Technology's (IGT) ongoing research on unconventional natural gas sources, a methodology to locate gas wells that had watered-out under over-pressured conditions was developed and implemented. Each year several trillion cubic feet (Tcf) of gas are produced from reservoirs that are basically geopressured aquifers with large gas caps. As the gas is produced, the gas-water interface moves upward in the sandstone body trapping a portion of gas at the producing reservoir pressure. The methodology for identifying such formations consisted of a computer search of a large data base using a series of screening criteria to select or reject wells. The screening criteria consisted of depth cutoff, minimum production volume, minimum pressure gradient, and minimum water production. Wells chosen by the computer search were further screened manually to seek out those wells that exhibited rapid and large increases in water production with an associated quick decline in gas production indicating possible imbibition trapping of gas in the reservoir. The search was performed in an attempt to characterize the watered-out geopressured gas cap resource. Over 475 wells in the Gulf Coast area of Louisiana and Texas were identified as possible candidates representing an estimated potential of up to about 1 Tcf (2.83 x 10/sup 10/ m/sup 3/) of gas production through enhanced recovery operations. A process to determine the suitability of a watered-out geopressured gas cap reservoir for application of enhanced recovery is outlined. This paper addresses the identification of a potential gas source that is considered an unconventional resource. The methodology developed to identify watered-out geopressured gas cap wells can be utilized in seeking other types of watered-out gas reservoirs with the appropriate changes in the screening criteria. 12 references, 2 figures, 5 tables.

Doherty, M.G.; Randolph, P.L.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 (next release 2:00 p.m. on June 16) 9 (next release 2:00 p.m. on June 16) Higher demand for natural gas from power generators meeting air-conditioning needs likely contributed to natural gas spot prices climbing $0.38 to $1.28 per MMBtu at most trading locations since Wednesday, June 1. On the week (Wednesday-Wednesday, June 1-8), the Henry Hub spot price rose 86 cents per MMBtu to $7.22. The NYMEX futures contract for July delivery gained 21.1 cents per MMBtu on the week to a daily settlement price of $7.00 on Wednesday, June 8. Working gas in storage as of Friday, June 3, increased to 1,890 Bcf, which is 20.2 percent above the 5-year (2000-2004) average inventory for the week. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil decreased $1.89 per barrel on the week to $52.51, or $9.05 per MMBtu.

353

Gas stream cleanup  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the current status and recent accomplishments of gas stream cleanup (GSCU) projects sponsored by the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The primary goal of the Gas Stream Cleanup Program is to develop contaminant control strategies that meet environmental regulations and protect equipment in advanced coal conversion systems. Contaminant control systems are being developed for integration into seven advanced coal conversion processes: Pressurized fludized-bed combustion (PFBC), Direct coal-fueled turbine (DCFT), Intergrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC), Gasification/molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC), Gasification/solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC), Coal-fueled diesel (CFD), and Mild gasification (MG). These advanced coal conversion systems present a significant challenge for development of contaminant control systems because they generate multi-contaminant gas streams at high-pressures and high temperatures. Each of the seven advanced coal conversion systems incorporates distinct contaminant control strategies because each has different contaminant tolerance limits and operating conditions. 59 refs., 17 figs., 5 tabs.

Bossart, S.J.; Cicero, D.C.; Zeh, C.M.; Bedick, R.C.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

TECHNETIUM SORPTION BY CEMENTITIOUS MATERIALS UNDER REDUCING CONDITIONS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to measure Tc sorption to cementitious materials under reducing conditions to simulate Saltstone Disposal Facility conditions. Earlier studies were conducted and the experimental conditions were found not to simulate those of the facility. Through a five month subcontract with Clemson University, sorption of {sup 99}Tc to four cementitious materials was examined within an anaerobic glovebag targeting a 0.1% H2(g)/ 99.9% N{sub 2}(g) atmosphere. Early experiments based on Tc sorption and Eh indicated that 0.1% H{sub 2}(g) (a reductant) was necessary to preclude experimental impacts from O{sub 2}(g) diffusion into the glovebag. Preliminary data to date (up to 56 days) indicates that sorption of {sup 99}Tc to cementitious materials increased with increasing slag content for simulated saltstone samples. This is consistent with the conceptual model that redox active sulfide groups within the reducing slag facilitate reduction of Tc(VII) to Tc(IV). These experiments differ from previous experiments where a 2% H{sub 2}(g) atmosphere was maintained (Kaplan et al., 2011 (SRNL-STI-2010-00668)). The impact of the 2% H{sub 2}(g) reducing atmosphere on this data was examined and determined to cause the reduction of Tc in experimental samples without slag. In the present ongoing study, after 56 days, Tc sorption by the 50-year old cement samples (no slag) was undetectable, whereas Tc sorption in the cementitious materials containing slag continues to increase with contact time (measured after 1, 4, 8, 19 and 56 days). Sorption was not consistent with spike concentrations and steady state has not been demonstrated after 56 days. The average conditional K{sub d} value for the Vault 2 cementitious material was 6,362 mL/g (17% slag), for the TR547 Saltstone (45% slag) the conditional K{sub d} was 1258 mL/g, and for TR545 (90% slag) the conditional K{sub d} was 12,112 mL/g. It is anticipated that additional samples will be collected until steady state conditions are established to permit measuring more representative K{sub d} and solubility values under these experimental conditions.

Kaplan, D.; Estes, S.; Arai, Y.; Powell, B.

2012-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

355

North American Natural Gas Markets. Volume 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes die research by an Energy Modeling Forum working group on the evolution of the North American natural gas markets between now and 2010. The group`s findings are based partly on the results of a set of economic models of the natural gas industry that were run for four scenarios representing significantly different conditions: two oil price scenarios (upper and lower), a smaller total US resource base (low US resource case), and increased potential gas demand for electric generation (high US demand case). Several issues, such as the direction of regulatory policy and the size of the gas resource base, were analyzed separately without the use of models.

Not Available

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Recovery of Water from Boiler Flue Gas  

SciTech Connect

This project dealt with use of condensing heat exchangers to recover water vapor from flue gas at coal-fired power plants. Pilot-scale heat transfer tests were performed to determine the relationship between flue gas moisture concentration, heat exchanger design and operating conditions, and water vapor condensation rate. The tests also determined the extent to which the condensation processes for water and acid vapors in flue gas can be made to occur separately in different heat transfer sections. The results showed flue gas water vapor condensed in the low temperature region of the heat exchanger system, with water capture efficiencies depending strongly on flue gas moisture content, cooling water inlet temperature, heat exchanger design and flue gas and cooling water flow rates. Sulfuric acid vapor condensed in both the high temperature and low temperature regions of the heat transfer apparatus, while hydrochloric and nitric acid vapors condensed with the water vapor in the low temperature region. Measurements made of flue gas mercury concentrations upstream and downstream of the heat exchangers showed a significant reduction in flue gas mercury concentration within the heat exchangers. A theoretical heat and mass transfer model was developed for predicting rates of heat transfer and water vapor condensation and comparisons were made with pilot scale measurements. Analyses were also carried out to estimate how much flue gas moisture it would be practical to recover from boiler flue gas and the magnitude of the heat rate improvements which could be made by recovering sensible and latent heat from flue gas.

Edward Levy; Harun Bilirgen; Kwangkook Jeong; Michael Kessen; Christopher Samuelson; Christopher Whitcombe

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

357

Definition: Equipment Condition Monitor | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Condition Monitor Condition Monitor Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Equipment Condition Monitor A monitoring device that automatically measures and communicates equipment characteristics that are related to the "health" and maintenance of the equipment. These characteristics can include, but are not limited to temperature, dissolved gas, and loading. These devices can automatically generate alarm signals if conditions exceed preset thresholds.[1] Related Terms sustainability References ↑ https://www.smartgrid.gov/category/technology/equipment_condition_monitor [[C LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. ategory: Smart Grid Definitions|Template:BASEPAGENAME]] Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Equipment_Condition_Monitor&oldid=502601"

358

Gas hydrates: Technology status report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) assumed the responsibility for expanding the knowledge base and for developing methods to recover gas from hydrates. These are ice-like mixtures of gas and water where gas molecules are trapped within a framework of water molecules. This research is part of the Unconventional Gas Recovery (UGR) program, a multidisciplinary effort that focuses on developing the technology to produce natural gas from resources that have been classified as unconventional because of their unique geologies and production mechanisms. Current work on gas hydrates emphasizes geological studies; characterization of the resource; and generic research, including modeling of reservoir conditions, production concepts, and predictive strategies for stimulated wells. Complementing this work is research on in situ detection of hydrates and field tests to verify extraction methods. Thus, current research will provide a comprehensive technology base from which estimates of reserve potential can be made, and from which industry can develop recovery strategies. 7 refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs.

Not Available

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

In situ Gas Conditioning in Fuel Reforming for Hydrogen Generation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The production of hydrogen for fuel cell applications requires cost and energy efficient technologies. The Absorption Enhanced Reforming (AER), developed at ZSW with industrial partners, is aimed to simplify the process by using a high temperature in situ CO2 absorption. The in situ CO2 removal results in shifting the steam reforming reaction equilibrium towards increased hydrogen concentration (up to 95 vol%). The key part of the process is the high temperature CO2 absorbent. In this contribution results of Thermal Gravimetric Analysis (TGA) investigations on natural minerals, dolomites, silicates and synthetic absorbent materials in regard of their CO2 absorption capacity and absorption/desorption cyclic stability are presented and discussed. It has been found that the inert parts of the absorbent materials have a structure stabilizing effect, leading to an improved cyclic stability of the materials.

Bandi, A.; Specht, M.; Sichler, P.; Nicoloso, N.

2002-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

360

Strong Pacific Northwest hydro conditions affect natural gas used ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Includes hydropower, solar, wind, geothermal, biomass and ethanol. Nuclear & Uranium. Uranium fuel, nuclear reactors, generation, spent fuel. Total Energy.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas conditioning eh" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Table C27. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Insulation Upgrade ..... Q 32 35 Q 771 664 Q 41.4 53.3 Other Renovation ..... Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q No Renovations Since 1980 ...

362

Process for the desulfurization of flue gas  

SciTech Connect

A process for the removal of sulfur oxides from gases is described that is comprised of the steps of contacting the gas with a cerium oxide sorbent at conditions whereby the sulfur oxides present in the gas are sorbed by the cerium oxide sorbent and regenerate the cerium oxide sorbent by contacting it with a reducing atmosphere at conditions whereby the sorbent is substantially converted to a sulfur-free state. The gas may be an exhaust gas, e.g., from an automobile or a flue gas. This invention is especially preferred for treating flue gas. In this preferred embodiment, the flue gas may be contacted with the cerium oxide sorbent at a temperature of from 300/sup 0/ to 800/sup 0/C, to form cerium sulfate and/or sulfite and the sorbent is regenerated by contacting with a reducing gas, for example, hydrogen in admixture with steam or other inert gases at a temperature of from 500/sup 0/ to 800/sup 0/C to convert the cerium sulfate or sulfite to cerium oxide. During the regeneration step, the desorbed species is initially sulfur dioxide. However, when about 50% of the sulfur is removed from the sorbent, the desorbed species becomes H/sub 2/S. Thus, the instant invention provides SO/sub 2/ and H/sub 2/S in admixture with the excess reducing gas, which can be fed conveniently to the Claus plant for conversion into elemental sulfur.

Longo, J.M.

1977-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

363

Semiclassical energy conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present and develop several nonlinear energy conditions suitable for use in the semiclassical regime. In particular, we consider the recently formulated "flux energy condition" (FEC), and the novel "trace-of-square" (TOSEC) and "determinant" (DETEC) energy conditions. As we shall show, these nonlinear energy conditions behave much better than the classical linear energy conditions in the presence of semiclassical quantum effects. Moreover, whereas the quantum extensions of these nonlinear energy conditions seem to be quite widely satisfied as one enters the quantum realm, analogous quantum extensions are generally not useful for the linear classical energy conditions.

Martin-Moruno, Prado

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells...

365

Lake Charles, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Lake Charles, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Trinidad and Tobago (Million Cubic Feet) Lake Charles, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Trinidad...

366

Cameron, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Trinidad...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Trinidad and Tobago (Million Cubic Feet) Cameron, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Trinidad and Tobago (Million...

367

Savine Pass, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Savine Pass, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Trinidad and Tobago (Million Cubic Feet) Savine Pass, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Trinidad and...

368

Golden Pass, TX Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports (price...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Golden Pass, TX Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports (price) (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Golden Pass, TX Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports (price) (Dollars per...

369

North Dakota Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) North Dakota Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) North Dakota Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas...

370

Oklahoma Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Oklahoma Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Oklahoma Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas...

371

Arkansas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Arkansas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Arkansas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas...

372

Montana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Montana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Montana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

373

Ohio Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Ohio Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Ohio Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

374

Wyoming Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Wyoming Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Wyoming Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

375

Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas...

376

Pennsylvania Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Pennsylvania Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Pennsylvania Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas...

377

California Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) California Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) California Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas...

378

New Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) New Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) New Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas...

379

Louisiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Louisiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Louisiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas...

380

West Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Annual Download Data (XLS File) West Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) West Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas conditioning eh" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Michigan Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Michigan Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Michigan Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas...

382

Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

383

Colorado Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Colorado Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Colorado Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas...

384

Savine Pass, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Savine Pass, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Egypt (Million Cubic Feet) Savine Pass, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Egypt (Million Cubic Feet)...

385

Highgate Springs, VT Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Highgate Springs, VT Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Canada (Million Cubic Feet) Highgate Springs, VT Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Canada (Million...

386

Northeast Gateway, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gateway, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Egypt (Million Cubic Feet) Northeast Gateway, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Egypt (Million Cubic...

387

South Dakota Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) South Dakota Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) South Dakota Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells...

388

South Dakota Natural Gas Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) South Dakota Natural Gas Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic Feet) South Dakota Natural Gas Removed from Natural Gas...

389

Rapid Gas Hydrate Formation Process Opportunity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gas Hydrate Formation Process Gas Hydrate Formation Process Opportunity The Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is seeking collaborative research and licensing partners interested in implementing United States Non-provisional Patent Application entitled "Rapid Gas Hydrate Formation Process." Disclosed in this application is a method and device for producing gas hydrates from a two-phase mixture of water and a hydrate forming gas such as methane (CH 4 ) or carbon dioxide (CO 2 ). The two-phase mixture is created in a mixing zone, which may be contained within the body of the spray nozzle. The two-phase mixture is subsequently sprayed into a reaction vessel, under pressure and temperature conditions suitable for gas hydrate formation. The reaction

390

ComEd, Nicor Gas, Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas - Bonus Rebate...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ComEd, Nicor Gas, Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas - Bonus Rebate Program (Illinois) ComEd, Nicor Gas, Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas - Bonus Rebate Program (Illinois) Eligibility...

391

South Dakota Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Annual Download Data (XLS File) South Dakota Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) South Dakota Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas...

392

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ... 22,442 22,117 23,554 18,774 16,718 Production...

393

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

2004 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year... 341,678 373,304 387,772 393,327 405,048 Production...

394

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ... 1,169 1,244 1,232 1,249 1,272 Production (million...

395

International Energy Outlook - Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas International Energy Outlook 2004 Natural Gas Natural gas is the fastest growing primary energy source in the IEO2004 forecast. Consumption of natural gas is projected...

396

Gas Utilities (New York)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This chapter regulates natural gas utilities in the State of New York, and describes standards and procedures for gas meters and accessories, gas quality, line and main extensions, transmission and...

397

Technetium Sorption by Cementitious Materials Under Reducing Conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to measure technetium ({sup 99}Tc) sorption to cementitious materials under reducing conditions to simulate Saltstone Disposal Facility conditions. {sup 99}Tc(VII) batch sorption experiments were conducted for 319 days in an inert glovebag with a variety of cementitious materials (aged cement, Vault 2, TR545, and TR547) containing varying amounts of blast furnace slag. Between 154 and 319 days, the {sup 99}Tc aqueous concentrations tended to remain constant and samples amended with different initial {sup 99}Tc concentrations, tended to merge at about 10{sup -9} M for Vault 2 (17% slag) and TR545 (90% slag) and 10{sup -8} M for TR547 (45% slag). This data provided strong evidence that solubility, and not adsorption (K{sub d} values), was controlling aqueous {sup 99}Tc concentrations. Laboratory data superimposed over thermodynamic speciation diagrams further supported the conclusion that solubility, and not adsorption controlled {sup 99}Tc aqueous concentrations. The oxidation state of the aqueous {sup 99}Tc at the end of the sorption experiment was determined by solvent extraction to be almost entirely {sup 99}Tc(VII). The pH of the present system was ~11.8. Previously proposed solubility controlling phases including Tc-sulfides may be present, but do not appear to control solubility. After the 319 day sorption period, the suspensions were removed from the glovebag and a desorption step under oxic conditions was conducted for 20 days by adding oxic, pH-buffered solutions to the suspensions. {sup 99}Tc aqueous concentrations increased by more than an order of magnitude and Eh increased by several hundred millivolts within 24 hours after the introduction of the oxic solutions. These desorption results are consistent with re-oxidation and dissolution/desorption of {sup 99}Tc(IV) phases possibly present in the cementitious materials after the anoxic sorption step of the experiment. Aqueous {sup 99}Tc concentrations continued to increase slowly until the termination of the desorption experiment after 20 days. Although the cementitious materials investigated demonstrated the ability to strongly sequester aqueous {sup 99}Tc under anoxic conditions, the introduction of oxygen resulted in the rapid remobilization of {sup 99}Tc. These studies provide experimental support for the use of a solubility based model under reducing saltstone conditions where Tc(IV) is expected to be the dominant species. The existing Kd model would be appropriate for oxidized saltstone conditions (aged saltstone, not directly evaluated in this study) where Tc(VII) is expected to be the dominant species.

Kaplan, Daniel I. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Estes, Shanna L. [Environmental Engineering and Earth Sciences, Clemson University, Clemson, SC (United States); Powell, Brian A. [Environmental Engineering and Earth Sciences, Clemson University, Clemson, SC (United States)

2012-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

398

Gas amplified ionization detector for gas chromatography  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas-amplified ionization detector for gas chromatography which possesses increased sensitivity and a very fast response time is described. Solutes eluding from a gas chromatographic column are ionized by uv photoionization of matter eluting therefrom. The detector is capable of generating easily measured voltage signals by gas amplification/multiplication of electron products resulting from the uv photoionization of at least a portion of each solute passing through the detector. 4 figs.

Huston, G.C.

1989-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

399

Gas lift systems make ideal offshore workers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With a low initial installation cost and small footprint, gas lift systems are well suited for offshore installations where compressed gas is usually already available. These systems are used on multiple and slimhole completions and handle sandy conditions well. They are also used to kick off wells that will flow naturally once the heavier completion fluids leave the production string. Gas lift itself is a mature workaday technology. Measurement and control of gas flow is an area of intense development in gas lift technology. One new control method involves production of multiple completions through a single wellbore. Typically, gas lift valves are opened and closed through tubing pressure. But downhole measurement technology does not yet yield information good enough for stable gas lift control of multiple completions. Gas lift is proving to be a useful AL technique in conjunction with electric submersible pumps (ESP). Located above the ESP pump, the gas lift can reduce the head and allow greater flow. This is helpful when small casing restricts the size of the downhole ESP pump. Wells can usually be produced by the gas lift alone in case of ESP failure, or by replacing the ESP where schedules, high repair costs or low prices rule out repair.

NONE

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Natural Gas Spot Price Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 of 17 7 of 17 Notes: Despite signs that domestic natural gas production has begun to turn around (the Texas Railroad Commission now reports year-to-date (through Sep.) gains in Texas gas production of 1.2 percent, compared to a 4.7-percent decline for the same months in 1999 versus 1998) the reality of the U.S. gas market is that supply responses have been too little, too late to prevent record-high spot prices and prospects for very high average prices this winter. We now expect to see peak monthly spot wellhead prices this winter of over $6.00 per thousand cubic feet (mcf) (December). Last month we maintained confidence that conditions would improve enough to keep the $5.10 per mcf recorded in October as the peak for this heating season. With partial data available, a monthly average value of about $5.60 per mcf looks likely for

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas conditioning eh" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Experimental apparatus for simultaneous dehydration and sweetening of natural gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An experimental apparatus was designed and built for the purpose of studying the feasibility of solvent mixtures for the simultaneous dehydration and sweetening of natural gas. The apparatus is versatile and can be used to study gas-solvent systems other than natural gas. The system is capable of operating within limits established by flooding conditions and the limitations of the solvent pump and gas circulating compressor. Calibration and system shakedown runs were performed to test the apparatus for operability

Pace, Christopher Lee

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Natural Gas Annual Archives  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum & Other Liquids. Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas

403

Liquefied Natural Gas  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum & Other Liquids. Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas

404

EIA - Natural Gas Publications  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

and a weather snapshot. Monthly Natural Gas Monthly Natural and supplemental gas production, supply, consumption, disposition, storage, imports, exports, and prices in the...

405

Natural Gas Annual 2005  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Oil and Gas Field Code Master List ... Hawaii, 2001-2005 ... Energy Information Administration/Natural Gas Annual 2005 vii 54.

406

Natural Gas Exports (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Estimates for Canadian pipeline volumes are derived from the Office of Fossil Energy, Natural Gas Imports and Exports, and EIA estimates of dry natural gas imports.

407

Gas scrubbing liquids  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Fully chlorinated and/or fluorinated hydrocarbons are used as gas scrubbing liquids for preventing noxious gas emissions to the atmosphere.

Lackey, Walter J. (Oak Ridge, TN); Lowrie, Robert S. (Oak Ridge, TN); Sease, John D. (Knoxville, TN)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Natural Gas Processed  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases...

409

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

natural gas prices, successful application of horizontal drilling, and hydraulic fracturing, as well as significant investments made by natural gas companies in production...

410

Natural Gas Dry Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Withdrawals from Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells Repressuring Vented and Flared...

411

Natural Gas Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas Production. Measured By. Disseminated Through. Survey of Producing States and Mineral Management Service Evolving Estimate in Natural Gas Monthly.

412

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

7, 2009 Next Release: May 14, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, May 6, 2009) Natural gas...

413

February Natural Gas Monthly  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas Annual. Preliminary Monthly Data Preliminary monthly data in the "balancing item" cat- egory are calculated by subtracting dry gas production, withdrawals from storage,...

414

November Natural Gas Monthly  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas Annual. Preliminary Monthly Data Preliminary monthly data in the "balancing item" cat- egory are calculated by subtracting dry gas production, withdrawals from storage,...

415

January Natural Gas Monthly  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas Annual. Preliminary Monthly Data Preliminary monthly data in the "balancing item" cat- egory are calculated by subtracting dry gas production, withdrawals from storage,...

416

March Natural Gas Monthly  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas Annual. Preliminary Monthly Data Preliminary monthly data in the "balancing item" cat- egory are calculated by subtracting dry gas production, withdrawals from storage,...

417

May Natural Gas Monthly  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas Annual. Preliminary Monthly Data Preliminary monthly data in the "balancing item" cat- egory are calculated by subtracting dry gas production, withdrawals from storage,...

418

CONTINUOUS GAS ANALYZER  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reagent gas and a sample gas are chemically combined on a continuous basis in a reaction zone maintained at a selected temperature. The reagent gas and the sample gas are introduced to the reaction zone at preselected. constant molar rates of flow. The reagent gas and the selected gas in the sample mixture combine in the reaction zone to form a product gas having a different number of moles from the sum of the moles of the reactants. The difference in the total molar rates of flow into and out of the reaction zone is measured and indicated to determine the concentration of the selected gas.

Katz, S.; Weber, C.W.

1960-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

419

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

8 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

420

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas conditioning eh" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

6 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

422

Air Conditioning and lungs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Air Conditioning and lungs Name: freeman Status: NA Age: NA Location: NA Country: NA Date: Around 1993 Question: What affect does air conditioning have upon the lungs of the...

423

Date","Time if available","Events -- Flow Conditions","Collection  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

-- Flow Conditions","Collection" "applicationvnd.ms-excel",,"Explosion and fire; oil and gas flow up riser to ocean surface","None" "applicationvnd.ms-excel",,"Rig sinks;...

424

Natural gas production from Arctic gas hydrates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The natural gas hydrates of the Messoyakha field in the West Siberian basin of Russia and those of the Prudhoe Bay-Kuparuk River area on the North Slope of Alaska occur within a similar series of interbedded Cretaceous and Tertiary sandstone and siltstone reservoirs. Geochemical analyses of gaseous well-cuttings and production gases suggest that these two hydrate accumulations contain a mixture of thermogenic methane migrated from a deep source and shallow, microbial methane that was either directly converted to gas hydrate or was first concentrated in existing traps and later converted to gas hydrate. Studies of well logs and seismic data have documented a large free-gas accumulation trapped stratigraphically downdip of the gas hydrates in the Prudhoe Bay-Kuparuk River area. The presence of a gas-hydrate/free-gas contact in the Prudhoe Bay-Kuparuk River area is analogous to that in the Messoyakha gas-hydrate/free-gas accumulation, from which approximately 5.17x10[sup 9] cubic meters (183 billion cubic feet) of gas have been produced from the hydrates alone. The apparent geologic similarities between these two accumulations suggest that the gas-hydrated-depressurization production method used in the Messoyakha field may have direct application in northern Alaska. 30 refs., 15 figs., 3 tabs.

Collett, T.S. (Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

15 (next release 2:00 p.m. on June 22, 2006) 15 (next release 2:00 p.m. on June 22, 2006) Natural gas spot prices increased at almost all locations this week (Wednesday - Wednesday, June 7-14) as wide ranging temperatures across the country affected some regional demand for both heating and air conditioning needs. The Henry Hub spot price rose 27 cents, or about 5 percent, to $6.09 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), prices also increased for almost all the futures contracts listed. The NYMEX contract for July delivery rose about 62 cents, or about 10 percent, since last Wednesday to settle at $6.590 per MMBtu yesterday (June 14). Natural gas in storage as of Friday, June 9 was 2,397 Bcf, which is 37.9 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil declined $1.78 per barrel, or about 3 percent, since last Wednesday, trading yesterday at $69.12 per barrel or $11.92 per MMBtu.

426

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

27 (next release 2:00 p.m. on February 3) 27 (next release 2:00 p.m. on February 3) Cold temperatures in parts of the Midwest and the Northeast lifted aggregate demand this week, resulting in higher natural gas spot prices at most market locations in the Lower 48 States. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday, January 19-26), spot prices at the Henry Hub increased 23 cents per MMBtu, or about 3.7 percent, to $6.44. Prices in the Northeast surged as extreme wintry conditions moved into the region, and constraints on interstate pipelines limited supply options for incremental deliveries. Yesterday (January 26), the price of the futures contract for February delivery at the Henry Hub settled at $6.388 per MMBtu, increasing roughly 10 cents, or 1.5 percent, since last Wednesday. Natural gas in storage was 2,270 Bcf as of January 21, which is 14.0 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil gained $1.19 per barrel or about 2.5 percent since last Wednesday, climbing to $48.80 per barrel or $8.41 per MMBtu.

427

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

14 (next release 2:00 p.m. on December 21, 2006) 14 (next release 2:00 p.m. on December 21, 2006) Softening natural gas market conditions led to spot price decreases at most market locations in the Lower 48 States since Wednesday, December 6, with decreases ranging between $0.02 and $1.22 per MMBtu. The few price increases on the week were mostly confined to market locations west of the Rocky Mountains. On Wednesday, December 13, prices at the Henry Hub averaged $7.21 per MMBtu, decreasing $0.13 per MMBtu, or about 2 percent, since the previous Wednesday. The prices of futures contracts through December 2007 changed only slightly since December 6. The price for the January delivery contract decreased about 5 cents per MMBtu, or about 1 percent on the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), settling at $7.673 per MMBtu yesterday (December 13). Natural gas in storage was 3,238 Bcf as of December 8, which is 7.5 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil decreased 86 cents per barrel, or about 1 percent on the week to $61.34 per barrel or $10.58 per MMBtu.

428

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

15, 2004 (next release 2:00 p.m. on January 22) 15, 2004 (next release 2:00 p.m. on January 22) Since Wednesday, January 7, natural gas spot prices have decreased at most market locations in the Lower 48 States outside of the Northeast region. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), prices at the Henry Hub decreased 89 cents or about 13 percent to $5.74 per MMBtu. Despite widespread declines elsewhere, prices in the Northeast region surged to more than seven times last week's levels at some market locations as extreme wintry conditions moved into the region. Yesterday (January 14), the price of the NYMEX futures contract for February delivery at the Henry Hub settled at $6.387 per MMBtu, decreasing roughly 49 cents or 7 percent since last Wednesday. Natural gas in storage was 2,414 Bcf as of January 9, which is 8.3 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil gained $1.05 per barrel or about 3 percent since last Wednesday, climbing to $34.62 per barrel or $5.969 per MMBtu.

429

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

July 7 (next release 2:00 p.m. on July 14) July 7 (next release 2:00 p.m. on July 14) Natural gas spot prices increased sharply this week (Wednesday-Wednesday, June 29-July 6), as two tropical storms have disrupted production in the Gulf of Mexico and power generation demand to meet air-conditioning load has remained strong. For the week, the price at the Henry Hub increased $0.61 per MMBtu to $7.68. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the futures contract for August delivery at the Henry Hub moved approximately 60 cents per MMBtu higher to settle yesterday (Wednesday, July 6) at $7.688. Natural gas in storage was 2,186 Bcf as of Friday, July 1, which is 12.4 percent above the 5-year average inventory for the report week. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $4.01 per barrel or about 7 percent since last Wednesday to trade yesterday at an all-time high of $61.24 per barrel or $10.56 per MMBtu.

430

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 15) 8, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 15) Spot and futures prices seesawed throughout the week (Wednesday to Wednesday, April 30-May 7) with no clear underlying trend, however prices ended trading yesterday at uniformly higher levels than one week ago. The weather's influence on gas demand was muted, as temperatures in most areas of the country were generally comfortably spring-like, except for some parts of the Southeast and Southwest, where summer-like temperatures prompted some early air conditioning load. The Henry Hub average spot price increased 23 cents from the previous Wednesday (April 30) to $5.48 per MMBtu. The daily settlement price of the NYMEX futures contract for June delivery rose $0.275 on the week, ending at $5.660 per MMBtu in yesterday's trading. The EIA reported that 821 Bcf of gas was held in storage as of Friday, May 2, which is 39.9 percent less than the 5-year average. The average spot price for West Texas Intermediate crude oil traded in a narrow range of less than $1 per barrel during the week, and ended trading yesterday with a small increase of 15 cents on the week, at $26.24 per barrel, or $4.52 per MMBtu.

431

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

August 3 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 10, 2006) August 3 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 10, 2006) Natural gas spot prices increased sharply this week (Wednesday-Wednesday, July 26 - August 2), as demand for power generation remained high in order to meet air-conditioning load and crude oil continued to trade near record-high prices. For the week, the price at the Henry Hub increased $1.94 per MMBtu, or about 29 percent, to $8.65. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the August contract expired last Thursday, July 27, at $7.042 per MMBtu, about $1.16 more than the previous month's settlement. The price of the futures contract for September delivery at the Henry Hub moved about 83 cents per MMBtu higher on the week to settle yesterday (Wednesday, August 2) at $7.799. Natural gas in storage was 2,775 Bcf as of Friday, July 28, which is 19.2 percent higher than the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $2.34 per barrel or about 3 percent, since last Wednesday (July 26) to trade yesterday at $76.16 per barrel or $13.13 per MMBtu.

432

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

August 4 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 11) August 4 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 11) Natural gas spot prices increased sharply this week (Wednesday-Wednesday, July 27 - August 3), as demand for power generation remained high in order to meet air-conditioning load and crude oil continued to trade near record-high prices. For the week, the price at the Henry Hub increased $1.25 per MMBtu, or about 17 percent, to $8.75. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the futures contract for September delivery at the Henry Hub moved about 76 cents per MMBtu higher to settle yesterday (Wednesday, August 3) at $8.351. Natural gas in storage was 2,420 Bcf as of Friday, July 29, which is 7.6 percent higher than the 5-year average. However, the hot temperatures throughout the Lower 48 States have slowed net injections in the past several weeks. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $1.64 per barrel or about 3 percent, since last Wednesday (July 27) to trade yesterday at $60.76 per barrel or $10.48 per MMBtu.

433

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

22, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on March 1, 2007) 22, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on March 1, 2007) As the weather has made the transition from extreme cold to much more moderate conditions this week, natural gas spot prices have declined in much of the country. For the week (Wednesday to Wednesday, February 14-21), the Henry Hub spot price declined $1.40 per MMBtu to $7.51 as prices for next-day delivery responded to reduced demand for space-heating. However, the bitter and widespread cold of the first 2 weeks of February likely contributed to revised expectations of future storage levels, leading to increased futures prices this week. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price for the futures contract for March delivery at the Henry Hub increased 41 cents per MMBtu or about 5.6 percent. Generally, futures prices for delivery months through next summer increased by more than 4 percent. Working gas in storage as of Friday, February 16, was 1,865 Bcf, which is 10.8 percent above the 5-year (2002-2006) average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $1.40 per barrel on the week to $59.40, or $10.24 per MMBtu.

434

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on April 26, 2007) 9, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on April 26, 2007) With winter-like conditions finally moving toward the moderate temperatures (and less heating demand) of spring, natural gas spot prices have eased across most of the country. During the report week (Wednesday-Wednesday, April 11-18), the Henry Hub spot price declined 42 cents per MMBtu to $7.54. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), prices for futures contracts also were lower. The futures contract for May delivery decreased 35.8 cents per MMBtu on the week to $7.497. Working gas in storage as of Friday, April 13, was 1,546 Bcf, which is 22.1 percent above the 5-year (2002-2006) average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $1.16 per barrel on the week to $63.14, or $10.89 per MMBtu.

435

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 6, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, June 2, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, May 25, 2011) Warmer weather moved into major population centers this report week, increasing demand at electric power plants in order to meet air-conditioning needs. Prices moved higher at most trading locations in the lower 48 States, with the biggest increases occurring in the Southeast. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price increased $0.21 to $4.36 per million Btu (MMBtu). At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices also increased as the weather outlook suggested higher weather-related consumption for the remaining days of May. The futures contract for June

436

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 8, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, August 25, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, August 17, 2011) Natural gas prices across the country declined this week, as relief from the high temperatures earlier this month continued to lessen air conditioning load. The Henry Hub spot price fell 12 cents from $4.09 per million Btu (MMBtu) last Wednesday, August 10, to $3.97 per MMBtu yesterday, August 17, falling below $4 for the first time since March of 2010. Prices at numerous points across the country also averaged below $4 yesterday. At the New York Mercantile Exchange, the price of the near-month contract (September 2011) fell by $0.070 per MMBtu, from $4.003 per MMBTU last Wednesday to $3.933 yesterday.

437

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

16, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 16, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, January 6, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, December 15, 2010) Extremely cold weather conditions moving across the country boosted demand for space heating this report week (December 8-15). Spot prices nonetheless decreased in most markets (with the exception of several in the Northeast), likely influenced by storage for winter usage remaining near historical highs and very strong current supplies. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price decreased $0.24 to $4.22 per million Btu (MMBtu). At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), prices for futures contracts also decreased with expectations of ample supply levels for this

438

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Natural Gas Pipeline Mileage...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Home > Natural Gas > About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines > Natural Gas Pipeline Mileage by State About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through...

439

Conditional belief types  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study type spaces where a players type at a state is a conditional probability on the space. We axiomatize these type spaces using conditional belief operators, and examine three additional axioms of increasing strength. First, introspection, which requires the agent to be unconditionally certain of her beliefs. Second, echo, according to which the unconditional beliefs implied by the condition must be held given the condition. Third, determination, which says that the conditional beliefs are the unconditional beliefs that are conditionally certain. The echo axiom implies that conditioning on an event is the same as conditioning on the event being certain, which formalizes the standard informal interpretation of conditioning in probability theory. The echo axiom also implies that the conditional probability given an event is a prior of the unconditional probability. The game-theoretic application of our model, which we treat in the context of an example, sheds light on a number of basic issues in the analysis of extensive form games. Type spaces are closely related to the sphere models of counterfactual conditionals and to models of hypothetical knowledge, and we discuss these relationships in detail.

Alfredo Di; Tillio Joseph; Y. Halpern; Dov Samet

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Transportation and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fuels (eg diesel, compressed natural gas). Electricity (infossil fuels, such as compressed natural gas and liquefied

Lutsey, Nicholas P.; Sperling, Dan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas conditioning eh" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Natural gas content of geopressured aquifers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

It is hypothesized that free, but immobile, natural gas is trapped in pores in geopressured aquifers and that this gas becomes mobile as aquifer pressure is reduced by water production. Computer simulation reveals this hypothesis is a plausible explanation for the high gas/water ratio observed from the No. 1 sand in the Edna Delcambre No. 1 well. In this Delcambre well test, the gas/water ratio increased from the solution gas value of less than 20 SCF/bbl to more than 50 SCF/bbl during production of 32,000 barrels of water in 10 days. Bottom hole pressure was reduced from 10,846 to 9,905 psia. The computer simulation reveals that such increased gas production requires relative permeability to gas(k{sub rg}) increase from less than 10{sup -4} to about 10{sup -3} due to a decrease in fractional water saturation of pores (S{sub w}) of only about 0.001. Further, assuming drainage relative permeabilities are as calculated by the method of A.T. Corey{sup 1}, initial gas saturation of pores must be greater than 0.065. Means for achieving these initial conditions during geological time will be qualitatively discussed, and the effect of trapped gas upon long-term production will be described.

Randolph, Philip L.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

GAS INJECTION/WELL STIMULATION PROJECT  

SciTech Connect

Driver Production proposes to conduct a gas repressurization/well stimulation project on a six well, 80-acre portion of the Dutcher Sand of the East Edna Field, Okmulgee County, Oklahoma. The site has been location of previous successful flue gas injection demonstration but due to changing economic and sales conditions, finds new opportunities to use associated natural gas that is currently being vented to the atmosphere to repressurize the reservoir to produce additional oil. The established infrastructure and known geological conditions should allow quick startup and much lower operating costs than flue gas. Lessons learned from the previous project, the lessons learned form cyclical oil prices and from other operators in the area will be applied. Technology transfer of the lessons learned from both projects could be applied by other small independent operators.

John K. Godwin

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Hydraulic Fracturing and Horizontal Gas Well Drilling Reference List Updated December 7, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

://www.state.nj.us/drbc/ Hydrologic conditions #12; Policies & regulations Natural gas related water withdrawal information associated with the industry The Future of Natural Gas (2011) MIT http://web.mit.edu/mitei/research/studies/natural-gas-2011.shtml An analysis of the role of natural gas in our energy future under a variety of possible

Manning, Sturt

444

Electricity and Natural Gas Efficiency Improvements for Residential Gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Natural Gas Efficiency Improvements for Residential Gas and Natural Gas Efficiency Improvements for Residential Gas Furnaces in the U.S. Title Electricity and Natural Gas Efficiency Improvements for Residential Gas Furnaces in the U.S. Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-59745 Year of Publication 2006 Authors Lekov, Alexander B., Victor H. Franco, Stephen Meyers, James E. McMahon, Michael A. McNeil, and James D. Lutz Document Number LBNL-59745 Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory City Berkeley Abstract This paper presents analysis of the life-cycle costs for individual households and the aggregate energy and economic impacts from potential energy efficiency improvements in U.S. residential furnaces. Most homes in the US are heated by a central furnace attached to ducts for distributing heated air and fueled by natural gas. Electricity consumption by a furnace blower is significant, comparable to the annual electricity consumption of a major appliance. Since the same blower unit is also used during the summer to circulate cooled air in centrally air conditioned homes, electricity savings occur year round. Estimates are provided of the potential electricity savings from more efficient fans and motors. Current regulations require new residential gas-fired furnaces (not including mobile home furnaces) to meet or exceed 78% annual fuel utilization efficiency (AFUE), but in fact nearly all furnaces sold are at 80% AFUE or higher. The possibilities for higher fuel efficiency fall into two groups: more efficient non-condensing furnaces (81% AFUE) and condensing furnaces (90-96% AFUE). There are also options to increase the efficiency of the furnace blower. This paper reports the projected national energy and economic impacts of requiring higher efficiency furnaces in the future. Energy savings vary with climate, with the result that condensing furnaces offer larger energy savings in colder climates. The range of impacts for a statistical sample of households and the percent of households with net savings in life cycle cost are shown. Gas furnaces are somewhat unusual in that the technology does not easily permit incremental change to the AFUE above 80%. Achieving significant energy savings requires use of condensing technology, which yields a large efficiency gain (to 90% or higher AFUE), but has a higher cost. With respect to electricity efficiency design options, the ECM has a negative effect on the average LCC. The current extra cost of this technology more than offsets the sizable electricity savings.

445

Help with gas contracts offered in manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A loose-leaf manual published by the Federal Programs Advisory Service, provides information on natural gas contracts. The manual consists of four chapters which treat four basic types of gas contracts: sales for resale, direct sales, transportation agreements, and brokerage/reseller agreements. Each chapter includes sample clauses, analyses of selected issues (such as price, quantity, quality, and delivery conditions) and references to court and agency divisions.

John, D.; Hengerer, E. (eds.)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Terms and Conditions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Terms and Conditions Terms and Conditions Terms and Conditions As a premier national research and development laboratory, LANL seeks to do business with qualified companies that offer value and high quality products and services. Contact Small Business Office (505) 667-4419 Email Use information below as guideline to doing business An "Appendix SFA-1" contains FAR and DEAR Clauses that are incorporated by reference into a particular subcontract. "Exhibit A General Conditions" are the general terms and conditions applicable to a particular subcontract. Note: The contents of the SFA-1 and Exhibit A (below) are not the only terms and conditions that will be in a LANS subcontract but represent the terms that generally do not change in a particular type of procurement. The

447

EH&S Group 9 Health & Safety Committee Meeting June 12, 2008  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-term use electric pedal-assisted bicycles on campus. The bicycles will be located outside the Health't be liable for accidents, as the vendor carries the risk. In addition, Motor Pool now has plug-in hybrid cars

448

EH&S Standards Set for LBNL Rev 7/16/2009 Page 1 of 9  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(2000) ANSI Z49.1, Safety In Welding, Cutting, and Allied Processes, Sections 4.3 and E4.3 (1999) NFPA 70, National Electrical Code (2005) NFPA 70E, Standard for Electrical Safety in the Workplace (2004. 68 - Chemical Accident Prevention Provisions g. 82 - Protection of Stratospheric Ozone 41. 40 CFR 110

449

Environmental Health & Safety Risk Categories for EH&S Laboratory Inspections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and safety certification Training/ SOPs Risk Category Training and Procedure Requirements Level 1 - Requires Revised 01/11/2011 "Carcinogens" are chemicals which cause cancer. For the purpose of the CHP, chemicals

Elser, Jim

450

Movements in air conditioning.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Movements in Air Conditioning is a collection of poems that explores the obstacles inherent in creating a new sense of home in a country that (more)

Hitt, Robert D. (Robert David)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Operating Conditions Opportunity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Components in Aggressive Operating Conditions Opportunity Research is active on the patent-pending technology, titled "3-Dimensional Functionally Gradient Coatings for...

452

Utah Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Utah Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

453

Arizona Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Arizona Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

454

Kansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Kansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

455

Alaska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Alaska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

456

North Dakota Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) North Dakota Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

457

Montana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Montana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

458

West Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) West Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

459

Wyoming Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Wyoming Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

460

Indiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Indiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas conditioning eh" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

New York Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) New York Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

462

Nevada Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Nevada Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

463

Oregon Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Oregon Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

464

Alabama Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Alabama Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

465

Ohio Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Ohio Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

466

Carbon sequestration in natural gas reservoirs: Enhanced gas recovery and natural gas storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as cushion gas for natural gas storage, Energy and Fuels,GAS RECOVERY AND NATURAL GAS STORAGE Curtis M. Oldenburgits operation as a natural gas storage reservoir. In this

Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

New Mexico Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) New Mexico Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

468

Texas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Texas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

469

Adaptive simulation of gas turbine performance  

SciTech Connect

A method is presented allowing the simulation of gas turbine performance with the possibility of adapting to engine particularities. Measurements along the gas path are used, in order to adapt a given performance model by appropriate modification of the component maps. The proposed method can provide accurate simulation for engines of the same type, differing due to manufacturing or assembly tolerances. It doesn't require accurate component maps, as they are derived during the adaptation process. It also can be used for health monitoring purposes, introducing thus a novel approach for component condition assessment. The effectiveness of the proposed method is demonstrated by application to an industrial gas turbine.

Stamatis, A.; Mathioudakis, K.; Papailiou, K.D. (Ethnikon Metsovion Polytechneion, Athens (Greece))

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Fission gas release restrictor for breached fuel rod  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In the event of a breach in the cladding of a rod in an operating liquid metal fast breeder reactor, the rapid release of high-pressure gas from the fission gas plenum may result in a gas blanketing of the breached rod and rods adjacent thereto which impairs the heat transfer to the liquid metal coolant. In order to control the release rate of fission gas in the event of a breached rod, the substantial portion of the conventional fission gas plenum is formed as a gas bottle means which includes a gas pervious means in a small portion thereof. During normal reactor operation, as the fission gas pressure gradually increases, the gas pressure interiorly of and exteriorly of the gas bottle means equalizes. In the event of a breach in the cladding, the gas pervious means in the gas bottle means constitutes a sufficient restriction to the rapid flow of gas therethrough that under maximum design pressure differential conditions, the fission gas flow through the breach will not significantly reduce the heat transfer from the affected rod and adjacent rods to the liquid metal heat transfer fluid flowing therebetween.

Kadambi, N. Prasad (Gaithersburg, MD); Tilbrook, Roger W. (Monroeville, PA); Spencer, Daniel R. (Unity Twp., PA); Schwallie, Ambrose L. (Greensburg, PA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Gas-cooled nuclear reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas-cooled nuclear reactor includes a central core located in the lower portion of a prestressed concrete reactor vessel. Primary coolant gas flows upward through the core and into four overlying heat-exchangers wherein stream is generated. During normal operation, the return flow of coolant is between the core and the vessel sidewall to a pair of motor-driven circulators located at about the bottom of the concrete pressure vessel. The circulators repressurize the gas coolant and return it back to the core through passageways in the underlying core structure. If during emergency conditions the primary circulators are no longer functioning, the decay heat is effectively removed from the core by means of natural convection circulation. The hot gas rising through the core exits the top of the shroud of the heat-exchangers and flows radially outward to the sidewall of the concrete pressure vessel. A metal liner covers the entire inside concrete surfaces of the concrete pressure vessel, and cooling tubes are welded to the exterior or concrete side of the metal liner. The gas coolant is in direct contact with the interior surface of the metal liner and transfers its heat through the metal liner to the liquid coolant flowing through the cooling tubes. The cooler gas is more dense and creates a downward convection flow in the region between the core and the sidewall until it reaches the bottom of the concrete pressure vessel when it flows radially inward and up into the core for another pass. Water is forced to flow through the cooling tubes to absorb heat from the core at a sufficient rate to remove enough of the decay heat created in the core to prevent overheating of the core or the vessel.

Peinado, Charles O. (La Jolla, CA); Koutz, Stanley L. (San Diego, CA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Gas-path leakage seal for a gas turbine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas-path leakage seal for generally sealing a gas-path leakage-gap between spaced-apart first and second members of a gas turbine (such as combustor casing segments). The seal includes a generally imperforate foil-layer assemblage which is generally impervious to gas and is located in the leakage-gap. The seal also includes a cloth-layer assemblage generally enclosingly contacting the foil-layer assemblage. In one seal, the first edge of the foil-layer assemblage is left exposed, and the foil-layer assemblage resiliently contacts the first member near the first edge to reduce leakage in the "plane" of the cloth-layer assemblage under conditions which include differential thermal growth of the two members. In another seal, such leakage is reduced by having a first weld-bead which permeates the cloth-layer assemblage, is attached to the metal-foil-layer assemblage near the first edge, and unattachedly contacts the first member.

Wolfe, Christopher E. (Schenectady, NY); Dinc, Osman S. (Troy, NY); Bagepalli, Bharat S. (Schenectady, NY); Correia, Victor H. (New Lebanon, NY); Aksit, Mahmut F. (Troy, NY)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Gas-path leakage seal for a gas turbine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas-path leakage seal is described for generally sealing a gas-path leakage-gap between spaced-apart first and second members of a gas turbine (such as combustor casing segments). The seal includes a generally imperforate foil-layer assemblage which is generally impervious to gas and is located in the leakage-gap. The seal also includes a cloth-layer assemblage generally enclosingly contacting the foil-layer assemblage. In one seal, the first edge of the foil-layer assemblage is left exposed, and the foil-layer assemblage resiliently contacts the first member near the first edge to reduce leakage in the ``plane`` of the cloth-layer assemblage under conditions which include differential thermal growth of the two members. In another seal, such leakage is reduced by having a first weld-bead which permeates the cloth-layer assemblage, is attached to the metal-foil-layer assemblage near the first edge, and unattachedly contacts the first member. 4 figs.

Wolfe, C.E.; Dinc, O.S.; Bagepalli, B.S.; Correia, V.H.; Aksit, M.F.

1996-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

474

Simplified Space Conditioning  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Simplified Space Conditioning Simplified Space Conditioning Duncan Prahl, RA IBACOS, Inc. Building America Technical Update April 29, 2013 Simplified Space Conditioning Rethinking HVAC Design * Traditional Method - Assume envelope losses dictate the load - Room by room load analysis - Pick Equipment and distribute to meet the load in each room * New Method - Consider how the occupants live in the building - Seriously consider internal gains in both heating and cooling - Consider ventilation strategy - Design system Simplified Space Conditioning If you are: * A production builder * Participating in "above code" programs * Following ACCA Manual RS or ASHRAE 55 * Need to prove "delivering heat to each habitable room" * Concerned about litigation * Play it safe, Use Manual J, S & D and condition every

475

NREL: Vehicle Ancillary Loads Reduction - Air Conditioning and Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Conditioning and Emissions Conditioning and Emissions Air conditioning and indirect emissions go together in the sense that when a vehicle's air conditioning system is in use, fuel economy declines. When more petroleum fuel is burned, more pollution and greenhouse gases are emitted. An additional, "direct" source of greenhouse gas emissions is the refrigerant used in air conditioning. Called HFC-134a, this pressurized gas tends to seep through tiny openings and escapes into the atmosphere. It can also escape during routine service procedures such as system recharging. NREL's Vehicle Ancillary Loads Reduction team applied its vehicle systems modeling expertise in a study to predict fuel consumption and indirect emissions resulting from the use of vehicle air conditioning. The analysis

476

Natural gas imports and exports: First quarter report 1995  

SciTech Connect

The Office of Fuels Programs prepares quarterly reports summarizing the data provided by companies authorized to import or export natural gas. Companies are required, as a condition of their authorizations, to file quarterly reports with the OFP. This quarter`s focus is market penetration of gas imports into New England. Attachments show the following: % takes to maximum firm contract levels and weighted average per unit price for the long-term importers, volumes and prices of gas purchased by long-term importers and exporters, volumes and prices for gas imported on short-term or spot market basis, and gas exported short-term to Canada and Mexico.

NONE

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Restricted Natural Gas Supply Case (released in AEO2005)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The restricted natural gas supply case provides an analysis of the energy-economic implications of a scenario in which future gas supply is significantly more constrained than assumed in the reference case. Future natural gas supply conditions could be constrained because of problems with the construction and operation of large new energy projects, and because the future rate of technological progress could be significantly lower than the historical rate. Although the restricted natural gas supply case represents a plausible set of constraints on future natural gas supply, it is not intended to represent what is likely to happen in the future.

Information Center

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Measurements of gas permeability on crushed gas shale.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In the last decade, more attention has been given to unconventional gas reservoirs, including tight gas shales. Accurate description of gas transport and permeability measurements (more)

Guarnieri, R.V.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Natural Gas Transmission...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Transmission Path Diagram About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 20072008 with selected updates Natural Gas Transmission Path Natural...

480

Montana-Dakota Utilities (Gas) - Commercial Natural Gas Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial Natural Gas Efficiency Rebate Program Montana-Dakota Utilities (Gas) - Commercial Natural Gas Efficiency Rebate Program Eligibility Commercial Savings For Other Heating...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas conditioning eh" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Baltimore Gas and Electric Company (Gas) - Residential Energy...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

(Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Baltimore Gas and Electric Company (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Eligibility Residential Savings For...

482

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Generalized Natural Gas...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas based on data through 20072008 with selected updates Generalized Natural Gas Pipeline Capacity Design Schematic Generalized Natural Gas Pipeline Capcity Design Schematic...

483

Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells...

484

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Natural Gas Transportation...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Corridors > Major U.S. Natural Gas Transportation Corridors Map About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 20072008 with selected updates...

485

Long-term vs. Short-term Contracts; A European perspective on natural gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper analyses the economics of long-term gas contracts under changing institutional conditions, mainly gas sector liberalisation. The paper is motivated by the increasingly tense debate in continental Europe, UK and the US on the security...

Neuhoff, Karsten; von Hirschhausen, Christian

2006-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

486

Gas Hydrates Research Programs: An International Review  

SciTech Connect

Gas hydrates sediments have the potential of providing a huge amount of natural gas for human use. Hydrate sediments have been found in many different regions where the required temperature and pressure conditions have been satisfied. Resource exploitation is related to the safe dissociation of the gas hydrate sediments. Basic depressurization techniques and thermal stimulation processes have been tried in pilot efforts to exploit the resource. There is a growing interest in gas hydrates all over the world due to the inevitable decline of oil and gas reserves. Many different countries are interested in this valuable resource. Unsurprisingly, developed countries with limited energy resources have taken the lead in worldwide gas hydrates research and exploration. The goal of this research project is to collect information in order to record and evaluate the relative strengths and goals of the different gas hydrates programs throughout the world. A thorough literature search about gas hydrates research activities has been conducted. The main participants in the research effort have been identified and summaries of their past and present activities reported. An evaluation section discussing present and future research activities has also been included.

Jorge Gabitto; Maria Barrufet

2009-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

487

Physical Properties of Gas Hydrates: A Review  

SciTech Connect

Methane gas hydrates in sediments have been studied by several investigators as a possible future energy resource. Recent hydrate reserves have been estimated at approximately 1016?m3 of methane gas worldwide at standard temperature and pressure conditions. In situ dissociation of natural gas hydrate is necessary in order to commercially exploit the resource from the natural-gas-hydrate-bearing sediment. The presence of gas hydrates in sediments dramatically alters some of the normal physical properties of the sediment. These changes can be detected by field measurements and by down-hole logs. An understanding of the physical properties of hydrate-bearing sediments is necessary for interpretation of geophysical data collected in field settings, borehole, and slope stability analyses; reservoir simulation; and production models. This work reviews information available in literature related to the physical properties of sediments containing gas hydrates. A brief review of the physical properties of bulk gas hydrates is included. Detection methods, morphology, and relevant physical properties of gas-hydrate-bearing sediments are also discussed.

Gabitto, Jorge [Prairie View A& M University; Tsouris, Costas [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Albany Interim Landfill gas extraction and mobile power system: Using landfill gas to produce electricity. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Albany Interim Landfill Gas Extraction and Mobile Power System project served three research objectives: (1) determination of the general efficiency and radius of influence of horizontally placed landfill gas extraction conduits; (2) determination of cost and effectiveness of a hydrogen sulfide gas scrubber utilizing Enviro-Scrub{trademark} liquid reagent; and (3) construction and evaluation of a dual-fuel (landfill gas/diesel) 100 kW mobile power station. The horizontal gas extraction system was very successful; overall, gas recovery was high and the practical radius of influence of individual extractors was about 50 feet. The hydrogen sulfide scrubber was effective and its use appears feasible at typical hydrogen sulfide concentrations and gas flows. The dual-fuel mobile power station performed dependably and was able to deliver smooth power output under varying load and landfill gas fuel conditions.

NONE

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

July 1 (next release 2:00 p.m. on July 8) July 1 (next release 2:00 p.m. on July 8) Since Wednesday, June 23, natural gas spot prices have decreased at virtually all market locations in the Lower 48 States. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), prices at the Henry Hub decreased 24 cents or about 4 percent to $6.05 per MMBtu. Yesterday (June 30), the price of the NYMEX futures contract for August delivery at the Henry Hub settled at $6.155 per MMBtu, decreasing roughly 33 cents or about 5 percent since last Wednesday. Natural gas in storage was 1,938 Bcf as of June 25 which is 0.5 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil fell 64 cents per barrel or nearly 2 percent on the week to $36.92 per barrel or $6.37 per MMBtu. Prices: Widespread moderate temperature conditions and falling crude oil prices contributed to price declines of between 10 and 49 cents per MMBtu at virtually all market locations in the Lower 48 States since last Wednesday, June 2, with declines exceeding 30 cents per MMBtu at most market locations. After prices climbed 10 to 20 cents per MMBtu at most market locations on Thursday, June 24, they then fell during the next four trading days. The steepest declines occurred principally in the Northeast, Louisiana, and Texas regions, where prices fell more than 35 cents per MMBtu since last week. Despite these widespread declines, prices remain high relative to last year's levels, exceeding last year's level by more than 8 percent. For example, prices at the Henry Hub are 70 cents or 13 percent above last year's level.

490

Cost Sensitive Conditional Planning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

While POMDPs provide a general platform for conditional planning under a wide range of quality metrics they have limited scalability. On the other hand, uniform probability conditional planners scale very well, but many lack the ability to optimize plan quality metrics. We present an innovation to planning graph based heuristics that helps uniform probability conditional planners both scale and generate high quality plans when using actions with non uniform costs. We make empirical comparisons with two state of the art planners to show the benefit of our techniques.

Daniel Bryce; Subbarao Kambhampati

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

December Natural Gas Monthly  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

DOEEIA-0130(9712) Distribution CategoryUC-950 Natural Gas Monthly December 1997 Energy Information Administration Office of Oil and Gas U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC...

492

Natural Gas Annual, 2001  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 EIA Home > Natural Gas > Natural Gas Data Publications Natural Gas Annual, 2001 The Natural Gas Annual, 2001 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2001. Summary data are presented for each State for 1997 to 2001. The data that appear in the tables of the Natural Gas Annual, 2001 are available as self-extracting executable files in ASCII TXT or CSV file format. This volume emphasizes information for 2001, although some tables show a five-year history. Please read the file entitled README.V1 for a description and documentation of information included in this file. Also available are files containing the following data: Summary Statistics - Natural Gas in the United States, 1997-2001 (Table 1) ASCII TXT, and Natural Gas Supply and Disposition by State, 2001 (Table 2) ASCII TXT.

493

Southern California Gas Co  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Southern California Gas Co ... 236,147,041 98,326,527 274,565,356 690,930 139,093,560 748,823,414 Lone Star Gas Co......

494

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Btu per cubic foot as published in Table A2 of the Annual Energy Review 2001. Source: Energy Information Administration, Office of Oil and Gas. Storage: Working gas in storage...

495

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

to withdraw natural gas from storage to meet current demand. Wellhead Prices Annual Energy Review More Price Data Storage Working gas in storage decreased to 2,406 Bcf as of...

496

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

natural gas futures also reversed gains made in the previous week. Wellhead Prices Annual Energy Review More Price Data Storage Working natural gas in storage increased by 63 Bcf...

497

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Working gas in storage was 3,121 Bcf as of Friday, Oct 24, 2003, according to the Energy Information Administration (EIA) Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report. This is 2.7...

498

Recirculating rotary gas compressor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A positive displacement, recirculating Roots-type rotary gas compressor is described which operates on the basis of flow work compression. The compressor includes a pair of large diameter recirculation conduits which return compressed discharge gas to the compressor housing, where it is mixed with low pressure inlet gas, thereby minimizing adiabatic heating of the gas. The compressor includes a pair of involutely lobed impellers and an associated port configuration which together result in uninterrupted flow of recirculation gas. The large diameter recirculation conduits equalize gas flow velocities within the compressor and minimize gas flow losses. The compressor is particularly suited to applications requiring sustained operation at higher gas compression ratios than have previously been feasible with rotary pumps, and is particularly applicable to refrigeration or other applications requiring condensation of a vapor. 12 figs.

Weinbrecht, J.F.

1992-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

499

Recirculating rotary gas compressor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A positive displacement, recirculating Roots-type rotary gas compressor which operates on the basis of flow work compression. The compressor includes a pair of large diameter recirculation conduits (24 and 26) which return compressed discharge gas to the compressor housing (14), where it is mixed with low pressure inlet gas, thereby minimizing adiabatic heating of the gas. The compressor includes a pair of involutely lobed impellers (10 and 12) and an associated port configuration which together result in uninterrupted flow of recirculation gas. The large diameter recirculation conduits equalize gas flow velocities within the compressor and minimize gas flow losses. The compressor is particularly suited to applications requiring sustained operation at higher gas compression ratios than have previously been feasible with rotary pumps, and is particularly applicable to refrigeration or other applications requiring condensation of a vapor.

Weinbrecht, John F. (601 Oakwood Loop, NE., Albuquerque, NM 87123)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

500

,"Kentucky Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet)","Kentucky Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)" 28306,451,1,35,17,,,10,3,0,48...