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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas composition monitor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Tunable Diode Laser Sensors to Monitor Temperature and Gas Composition...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Diode Laser Sensors to Monitor Temperature and Gas Composition for High Temperature Coal Gasification Systems Description Sensing and measuring temperature and gas compositions in...

2

Online monitoring of aluminium primary production gas composition ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tunable diode laser (TDL) analyzers retrofitted with sapphire optical windows allow for online monitoring of raw gas composistion. These systems are however  ...

3

Real-Time Fuel Gas Composition Sensor  

gas, coalbed methane, and biogas. The problem, though, is that the composition of the gas from these reserves varies widely. Unconventional gas often contains

4

Gas characterization monitoring system functional design criteria  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to provide the functional design criteria for the Gas Characterization Monitoring Systems (Standard-E Hydrogen Monitoring Systems,) to be designed, fabricated and installed on the Waste Tank Farms in the Hanford 200 Areas.

Schneider, T.C.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Real-Time Fuel Gas Composition Sensor  

reserves- shale gas, coalbed methane, and biogas. The problem, though, is that the composition of the gas from these reserves varies widely.

6

Adequate monitoring of service compositions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Monitoring is essential to validate the runtime behaviour of dynamic distributed systems. However, monitors can inform of relevant events as they occur, but by their very nature they will not report about all those events that are not happening. In ... Keywords: Adequacy criteria, Branch coverage, Choreography, Monitoring, Operation coverage

Antonia Bertolino; Eda Marchetti; Andrea Morichetta

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Composition for absorbing hydrogen from gas mixtures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hydrogen storage composition is provided which defines a physical sol-gel matrix having an average pore size of less than 3.5 angstroms which effectively excludes gaseous metal hydride poisons while permitting hydrogen gas to enter. The composition is useful for separating hydrogen gas from diverse gas streams which may have contaminants that would otherwise render the hydrogen absorbing material inactive.

Heung, Leung K. (Aiken, SC); Wicks, George G. (Aiken, SC); Lee, Myung W. (Aiken, SC)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Comparison of Furnace Flue Gas Temperature Monitors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of a temperature monitor comparison study performed at Ameren Sioux Station, in Missouri. The study compared the accuracy and ease of use of two radiation-based monitors, an Infra-View and SpectraTemp, and a newer tunable-diode laser (TDL) absorption-based device, the LTS-100. The instruments, installed in the upper furnace and allowed to run continuously for approximately 8 weeks, monitored and recorded exit gas temperatures during normal boiler operation and one brief...

2006-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

9

Damage analysis of composite pressure vessels using acoustic emission monitoring.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Composite pressure vessels (CPVs) fabricated using a metal or plastic liner under a composite structural skin are commonly used for natural gas storage on road… (more)

Chou, H

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Method for designing gas tag compositions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

For use in the manufacture of gas tags such as employed in a nuclear reactor gas tagging failure detection system, a method for designing gas tagging compositions utilizes an analytical approach wherein the final composition of a first canister of tag gas as measured by a mass spectrometer is designated as node No. 1. Lattice locations of tag nodes in multi-dimensional space are then used in calculating the compositions of a node No. 2 and each subsequent node so as to maximize the distance of each node from any combination of tag components which might be indistinguishable from another tag composition in a reactor fuel assembly. Alternatively, the measured compositions of tag gas numbers 1 and 2 may be used to fix the locations of nodes 1 and 2, with the locations of nodes 3-N then calculated for optimum tag gas composition. A single sphere defining the lattice locations of the tag nodes may be used to define approximately 20 tag nodes, while concentric spheres can extend the number of tag nodes to several hundred. 5 figures.

Gross, K.C.

1995-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

11

Method for designing gas tag compositions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

For use in the manufacture of gas tags such as employed in a nuclear reactor gas tagging failure detection system, a method for designing gas tagging compositions utilizes an analytical approach wherein the final composition of a first canister of tag gas as measured by a mass spectrometer is designated as node #1. Lattice locations of tag nodes in multi-dimensional space are then used in calculating the compositions of a node #2 and each subsequent node so as to maximize the distance of each node from any combination of tag components which might be indistinguishable from another tag composition in a reactor fuel assembly. Alternatively, the measured compositions of tag gas numbers 1 and 2 may be used to fix the locations of nodes 1 and 2, with the locations of nodes 3-N then calculated for optimum tag gas composition. A single sphere defining the lattice locations of the tag nodes may be used to define approximately 20 tag nodes, while concentric spheres can extend the number of tag nodes to several hundred.

Gross, Kenny C. (1433 Carriage La., Bolingbrook, IL 60440)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Real-Time Raman Gas Composition Sensor.pdf  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MotivationChallenges Industries that utilize natural gas, gasifier syngas, biogas, landfill gas, or any type of fuel gas can benefit from knowing the composition of...

13

Fiber-Optic Sensors to Monitor Deepwater Oil and Gas ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fiber-Optic Sensors to Monitor Deepwater Oil and Gas Pipelines. Partnering Organization: Luna Innovations, Incorporated, Blacksburg, VA. ...

14

Gas tracer composition and method  

SciTech Connect

The invention provides a method for tagging methane by adding thereto one or more of the tracer compounds sulfur hexafluoride and chloropentafluoroethane. The methane being tagged is normally being stored in underground storage fields to provide identity and proof of ownership of the gas. The two tracer compounds are readily detectable at very low concentrations by electron capture gas chromatography apparatus which can be made portable and thus suitable for use in the field.

Malcosky, N. D.; Koziar, G.

1985-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

15

Apparatus and method for monitoring of gas having stable isotopes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Gas having stable isotopes is monitored continuously by using a system that sends a modulated laser beam to the gas and collects and transmits the light not absorbed by the gas to a detector. Gas from geological storage, or from the atmosphere can be monitored continuously without collecting samples and transporting them to a lab.

Clegg, Samuel M; Fessenden-Rahn, Julianna E

2013-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

16

Oxygen sensor for monitoring gas mixtures containing hydrocarbons  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas sensor measures O.sub.2 content of a reformable monitored gas containing hydrocarbons H.sub.2 O and/or CO.sub.2, preferably in association with an electrochemical power generation system. The gas sensor has a housing communicating with the monitored gas environment and carries the monitored gas through an integral catalytic hydrocarbon reforming chamber containing a reforming catalyst, and over a solid electrolyte electrochemical cell used for sensing purposes. The electrochemical cell includes a solid electrolyte between a sensor electrode that is exposed to the monitored gas, and a reference electrode that is isolated in the housing from the monitored gas and is exposed to a reference gas environment. A heating element is also provided in heat transfer communication with the gas sensor. A circuit that can include controls operable to adjust operations via valves or the like is connected between the sensor electrode and the reference electrode to process the electrical signal developed by the electrochemical cell. The electrical signal varies as a measure of the equilibrium oxygen partial pressure of the monitored gas. Signal noise is effectively reduced by maintaining a constant temperature in the area of the electrochemical cell and providing a monitored gas at chemical equilibria when contacting the electrochemical cell. The output gas from the electrochemical cell of the sensor is fed back into the conduits of the power generating system.

Ruka, Roswell J. (Pittsburgh, PA); Basel, Richard A. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Oxygen sensor for monitoring gas mixtures containing hydrocarbons  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas sensor measures O{sub 2} content of a reformable monitored gas containing hydrocarbons, H{sub 2}O and/or CO{sub 2}, preferably in association with an electrochemical power generation system. The gas sensor has a housing communicating with the monitored gas environment and carries the monitored gas through an integral catalytic hydrocarbon reforming chamber containing a reforming catalyst, and over a solid electrolyte electrochemical cell used for sensing purposes. The electrochemical cell includes a solid electrolyte between a sensor electrode that is exposed to the monitored gas, and a reference electrode that is isolated in the housing from the monitored gas and is exposed to a reference gas environment. A heating element is also provided in heat transfer communication with the gas sensor. A circuit that can include controls operable to adjust operations via valves or the like is connected between the sensor electrode and the reference electrode to process the electrical signal developed by the electrochemical cell. The electrical signal varies as a measure of the equilibrium oxygen partial pressure of the monitored gas. Signal noise is effectively reduced by maintaining a constant temperature in the area of the electrochemical cell and providing a monitored gas at chemical equilibria when contacting the electrochemical cell. The output gas from the electrochemical cell of the sensor is fed back into the conduits of the power generating system. 4 figs.

Ruka, R.J.; Basel, R.A.

1996-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

18

Assessment of Gas Turbine Combustion Dynamics Monitoring Technologies: Interim Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report examines commercially available combustion dynamics monitoring systems (CDMS) and monitoring centers for use on gas turbine engines, specifically 7FA, 501F/5000F/8000H engines. The report provides a current review of combustion monitoring issues and methods, details of operation and available features for various CDMS, including, interviews with equipment suppliers and monitoring center providers, and end-user interviews.BackgroundGas turbines are ...

2013-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

19

Advanced Sensor Approaches for Monitoring and Control of Gas...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Contract Value (327,501 DOE) Advanced Sensor Approaches For Monitoring and Control Of Gas Turbine Combustors Georgia Institute of Technology JSTL 101905 Advanced Sensors 10...

20

Automated Soil Gas Monitoring Chamber - Oak Ridge National ...  

Automated Soil Gas Monitoring Chamber ... A chamber for trapping soil gases as they evolve from the soil without disturbance to the soil and to the natural

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas composition monitor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Spatiotemporal anomaly detection in gas monitoring sensor networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we use Bayesian Networks as a means for unsupervised learning and anomaly (event) detection in gas monitoring sensor networks for underground coal mines. We show that the Bayesian Network model can learn cyclical baselines for gas concentrations, ...

X. Rosalind Wang; Joseph T. Lizier; Oliver Obst; Mikhail Prokopenko; Peter Wang

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Remote Gas Well Monitoring Technology Applied to Marcellus Shale Site |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Remote Gas Well Monitoring Technology Applied to Marcellus Shale Remote Gas Well Monitoring Technology Applied to Marcellus Shale Site Remote Gas Well Monitoring Technology Applied to Marcellus Shale Site February 10, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - A technology to remotely monitor conditions at energy-rich Marcellus Shale gas wells to help insure compliance with environmental requirements has been developed through a research partnership funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). NETL-RUA researcher Dr. Michael McCawley hasdeveloped a technology to remotely monitor theenvironment around energy-rich Marcellus Shale gas wells. Photo courtesy of West Virginia University.The technology - which involves three wireless monitoring modules to measure volatile organic compounds, dust, light and sound - is currently being tested at a Marcellus

23

Monitoring and Assessment of Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Mitigation  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Mitigation Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Mitigation Potential in Agriculture Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Monitoring and Assessment of Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Mitigation Potential in Agriculture (MAGHG) Name Monitoring and Assessment of Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Mitigation Potential in Agriculture (MAGHG) Agency/Company /Organization Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Sector Climate, Land Focus Area Agriculture, Greenhouse Gas Topics GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, -LEDS Resource Type Dataset, Technical report Website http://www.fao.org/climatechan References MICCA Website[1] The overall objective of the MAGHG project is to support developing countries assess and report their greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from

24

Variability of Gas Composition and Flux Intensity in Natural Marine Hydrocarbon Seeps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of gas composition and flux intensity in natural marineof gas composition and flux intensity in natural marine

Clark, J F; Schwager, Katherine; Washburn, Libe

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

UNFCCC-Consolidated baseline and monitoring methodology for landfill gas  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

UNFCCC-Consolidated baseline and monitoring methodology for landfill gas UNFCCC-Consolidated baseline and monitoring methodology for landfill gas project activities Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: UNFCCC-Consolidated baseline and monitoring methodology for landfill gas project activities Agency/Company /Organization: United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) Sector: Climate, Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Non-renewable Energy, - Landfill Gas Topics: Baseline projection, GHG inventory Resource Type: Guide/manual Website: cdm.unfccc.int/public_inputs/meth/acm0001/index.html Cost: Free Language: English References: UNFCCC-Consolidated baseline and monitoring methodology for landfill gas project activities[1] This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. References

26

Hydrogen and Oxygen Gas Monitoring System Design and Operation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper describes pertinent design practices of selecting types of monitors, monitor unit placement, setpoint selection, and maintenance considerations for gas monitors. While hydrogen gas monitors and enriched oxygen atmosphere monitors as they would be needed for hydrogen production experiments are the primary focus of this paper, monitors for carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide are also discussed. The experiences of designing, installing, and calibrating gas monitors for a laboratory where experiments in support of the DOE Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative (NHI) are described along with codes, standards, and regulations for these monitors. Information from the literature about best operating practices is also presented. The NHI program has two types of activities. The first, near-term activity is laboratory and pilot-plant experimentation with different processes in the kilogram per day scale to select the most promising types of processes for future applications of hydrogen production. Prudent design calls for indoor gas monitors to sense any hydrogen leaks within these laboratory rooms. The second, longer-term activity is the prototype, or large-scale plants to produce tons of hydrogen per day. These large, outdoor production plants will require area (or “fencepost”) monitoring of hydrogen gas leaks. Some processes will have oxygen production with hydrogen production, and any oxygen releases are also safety concerns since oxygen gas is the strongest oxidizer. Monitoring of these gases is important for personnel safety of both indoor and outdoor experiments. There is some guidance available about proper placement of monitors. The fixed point, stationary monitor can only function if the intruding gas contacts the monitor. Therefore, monitor placement is vital to proper monitoring of the room or area. Factors in sensor location selection include: indoor or outdoor site, the location and nature of potential vapor/gas sources, chemical and physical data of the gases or vapors, liquids with volatility need sensors near the potential sources of release, nature and concentration of gas releases, natural and mechanical ventilation, detector installation locations not vulnerable to mechanical or water damage from normal operations, and locations that lend themselves to convenient maintenance and calibration. The guidance also states that sensors should be located in all areas where hazardous accumulations of gas may occur. Such areas might not be close to release points but might be areas with restricted air movement. Heavier than air gases are likely to accumulate in pits, trenches, drains, and other low areas. Lighter than air gases are more likely to accumulate in overhead spaces, above drop ceilings, etc. In general, sensors should be located close to any potential sources of major release of gas. The paper gives data on monitor sensitivity and expected lifetimes to support the monitor selection process. Proper selection of indoor and outdoor locations for monitors is described, accounting for the vapor densities of hydrogen and oxygen. The latest information on monitor alarm setpoint selection is presented. Typically, monitors require recalibration at least every six months, or more frequently for inhospitable locations, so ready access to the monitors is an important issue to consider in monitor siting. Gas monitors, depending on their type, can be susceptible to blockages of the detector element (i.e., dus

Lee C. Cadwallader; Kevin G. DeWall; J. Stephen Herring

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Monitoring system improves maintenance for North Sea industrial gas turbines  

SciTech Connect

A change in maintenance emphasis and installation of a computerized condition-monitoring system for Type-H industrial gas turbines on Ekofisk platforms have led to more efficient use of manpower and more-productive machinery.

Cullen, J.P. (Phillips Petroleum Co., Tanager (NO))

1988-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

28

Natural Gas Pipeline Research: Best Practices in Monitoring Technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural Gas Pipeline Research: Best Practices in Monitoring Technology Energy Systems Research pipelines from outofstate supply basins located in the southwestern United States, the Rocky Mountains, and Canada. These pipelines run throughout the state, including underneath high population areas

29

Real-Time Fuel Gas Composition Sensor - Energy Innovation Portal  

... is that the composition of the gas from these sources varies widely. Fuel burns differently with differing ratios of methane, propane, and other combustible gases.

30

Summary of gas release events detected by hydrogen monitoring  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper summarizes the results of monitoring tank headspace for flammable gas release events. In over 40 tank years of monitoring the largest detected release in a single-shell tank is 2.4 cubic meters of Hydrogen. In the double-shell tanks the largest release is 19.3 cubic meters except in SY-101 pre mixer pump installation condition.

MCCAIN, D.J.

1999-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

31

Indirect Gas Species Monitoring Using Tunable Diode Lasers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for indirect gas species monitoring based on measurements of selected gas species is disclosed. In situ absorption measurements of combustion species are used for process control and optimization. The gas species accessible by near or mid-IR techniques are limited to species that absorb in this spectral region. The absorption strength is selected to be strong enough for the required sensitivity and is selected to be isolated from neighboring absorption transitions. By coupling the gas measurement with a software sensor gas, species not accessible from the near or mid-IR absorption measurement can be predicted.

Von Drasek, William A. (Oak Forest, IL); Saucedo, Victor M. (Willowbrook, IL)

2005-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

32

Results of gas monitoring of double-shell flammable gas watch list tanks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Tanks 103-SY; 101-AW; 103-, 104-, and 105-AN are on the Flammable Gas Watch List. Recently, standard hydrogen monitoring system (SHMS) cabinets have been installed in the vent header of each of these tanks. Grab samples have been taken once per week, and a gas chromatograph was installed on tank 104-AN as a field test. The data that have been collected since gas monitoring began on these tanks are summarized in this document.

Wilkins, N.E.

1995-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

33

Monitoring and analyzing waste glass compositions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device and method are described for determining the viscosity of a fluid, preferably molten glass. The apparatus and method use the velocity of rising bubbles, preferably helium bubbles, within the molten glass to determine the viscosity of the molten glass. The bubbles are released from a tube positioned below the surface of the molten glass so that the bubbles pass successively between two sets of electrodes, one above the other, that are continuously monitoring the conductivity of the molten glass. The measured conductivity will change as a bubble passes between the electrodes enabling an accurate determination of when a bubble has passed between the electrodes. The velocity of rising bubbles can be determined from the time interval between a change in conductivity of the first electrode pair and the second, upper electrode pair. The velocity of the rise of the bubbles in the glass melt is used in conjunction with other physical characteristics, obtained by known methods, to determine the viscosity of the glass melt fluid and, hence, glass quality. 2 figures.

Schumacher, R.F.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Monitoring and analyzing waste glass compositions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device and method for determining the viscosity of a fluid, preferably molten glass. The apparatus and method uses the velocity of rising bubbles, preferably helium bubbles, within the molten glass to determine the viscosity of the molten glass. The bubbles are released from a tube positioned below the surface of the molten glass so that the bubbles pass successively between two sets of electrodes, one above the other, that are continuously monitoring the conductivity of the molten glass. The measured conductivity will change as a bubble passes between the electrodes enabling an accurate determination of when a bubble has passed between the electrodes. The velocity of rising bubbles can be determined from the time interval between a change in conductivity of the first electrode pair and the second, upper electrode pair. The velocity of the rise of the bubbles in the glass melt is used in conjunction with other physical characteristics, obtained by known methods, to determine the viscosity of the glass melt fluid and, hence, glass quality.

Schumacher, Ray F. (Aiken, SC)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

On-line ultrasonic gas entrainment monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus employing ultrasonic energy for detecting and measuring the quantity of gas bubbles present in liquids being transported through pipes. An ultrasonic transducer is positioned along the longitudinal axis of a fluid duct, oriented to transmit acoustic energy radially of the duct around the circumference of the enclosure walls. The back-reflected energy is received centrally of the duct and interpreted as a measure of gas entrainment. One specific embodiment employs a conical reflector to direct the transmitted acoustic energy radially of the duct and redirect the reflected energy back to the transducer for reception. A modified embodiment employs a cylindrical ultrasonic transducer for this purpose.

Day, Clifford K. (Richland, WA); Pedersen, Herbert N. (Richland, WA)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Porous Coordination Polymer Composite Membranes for Gas ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This novel architecture should allow the porous coordination polymer to sieve the gas molecules, while being bound into a sealable, gas-tight structure which is ...

37

Multifunctional Nanowire/Film Composites-Based Bimodular Sensors for In Situ, Real-Time High Temperature Gas Detection  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Multifunctional Nanowire/Film Multifunctional Nanowire/Film Composites-Based Bimodular Sensors for In Situ, Real-Time High Temperature Gas Detection Background Real time monitoring of combustion gas composition is important for improving the efficiency of combustion processes and reducing the emission of pollutants. However, such measurement usually requires sensors to be operated at high temperatures in harsh environments. Currently, commercially available sensor technology capable of withstanding such harsh environments is extremely

38

Flammable gas tank safety program: Technical basis for gas analysis and monitoring  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Several Hanford waste tanks have been observed to exhibit periodic releases of significant quantities of flammable gases. Because potential safety issues have been identified with this type of waste behavior, applicable tanks were equipped with instrumentation offering the capability to continuously monitor gases released from them. This document was written to cover three primary areas: (1) describe the current technical basis for requiring flammable gas monitoring, (2) update the technical basis to include knowledge gained from monitoring the tanks over the last three years, (3) provide the criteria for removal of Standard Hydrogen Monitoring System(s) (SHMS) from a waste tank or termination of other flammable gas monitoring activities in the Hanford Tank farms.

Estey, S.D.

1998-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

39

Real-TIme Raman Gas Composition Analyzer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analyzer Analyzer Opportunity The Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is seeking collaborative research partners interested in implementing United States Provisional Patent Application entitled "Gas Sensing System Employing Raman Scattering". Disclosed in this application is a gas analyzing sensor that characterizes gaseous fuel, exhaust gases, or other process gas streams. The sensor reports concentrations of all majority gases at better than 0.3% accuracy in 1 second or less, and can be used for real-time gas analysis and system control. The sensor relies on novel techniques to enhance usually weak spontaneous Raman emissions from sample gases, enabling the application of Raman spectroscopy to rapid gas analysis. No commercially available sensor or sensing

40

Fluid Inclusion Gas Compositions From An Active Magmatic-Hydrothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fluid Inclusion Gas Compositions From An Active Magmatic-Hydrothermal Fluid Inclusion Gas Compositions From An Active Magmatic-Hydrothermal System- A Case Study Of The Geysers Geothermal Field, Usa Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Fluid Inclusion Gas Compositions From An Active Magmatic-Hydrothermal System- A Case Study Of The Geysers Geothermal Field, Usa Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Hydrothermal alteration and the active vapor-dominated geothermal system at The Geysers, CA are related to a composite hypabyssal granitic pluton emplaced beneath the field 1.1 to 1.2 million years ago. Deep drill holes provide a complete transect across the thermal system and samples of the modern-day steam. The hydrothermal system was liquid-dominated prior to formation of the modern vapor-dominated regime at 0.25 to 0.28 Ma. Maximum

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas composition monitor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

New generation enrichment monitoring technology for gas centrifuge enrichment plants  

SciTech Connect

The continuous enrichment monitor, developed and fielded in the 1990s by the International Atomic Energy Agency, provided a go-no-go capability to distinguish between UF{sub 6} containing low enriched (approximately 4% {sup 235}U) and highly enriched (above 20% {sup 235}U) uranium. This instrument used the 22-keV line from a {sup 109}Cd source as a transmission source to achieve a high sensitivity to the UF{sub 6} gas absorption. The 1.27-yr half-life required that the source be periodically replaced and the instrument recalibrated. The instrument's functionality and accuracy were limited by the fact that measured gas density and gas pressure were treated as confidential facility information. The modern safeguarding of a gas centrifuge enrichment plant producing low-enriched UF{sub 6} product aims toward a more quantitative flow and enrichment monitoring concept that sets new standards for accuracy stability, and confidence. An instrument must be accurate enough to detect the diversion of a significant quantity of material, have virtually zero false alarms, and protect the operator's proprietary process information. We discuss a new concept for advanced gas enrichment assay measurement technology. This design concept eliminates the need for the periodic replacement of a radioactive source as well as the need for maintenance by experts. Some initial experimental results will be presented.

Ianakiev, Kiril D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Alexandrov, Boian, S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Boyer, Brian, D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hill, Thomas, R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Macarthur, Duncan, W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Marks, Thomas [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Moss, Calvin, E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sheppard, Gregory, A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swinhoe, Martyn, T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Monitoring radioactive xenon gas in room air using activated charcoal  

SciTech Connect

A method for monitoring room air for radioactive xenon gas is described. It uses activated charcoal vials, a vacuum source and a well-type scintillation counter. The method may be adapted for detection and identification of any radioactive gas excluding those with ultra-short half-lives. Sampling room air during xenon-133 ({sup 133}Xe) ventilation lung studies was performed using this technique. The results show that low concentrations of {sup 133}Xe in room air can be reliably detected and that staff exposure to {sup 133}Xe at this institution was within ICRP recommendations.

Langford, J.; Thompson, G. (Princess Margaret Hospital for Children, Perth (Australia) Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Perth (Australia))

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Microfabricated BTU monitoring device for system-wide natural gas monitoring.  

SciTech Connect

The natural gas industry seeks inexpensive sensors and instrumentation to rapidly measure gas heating value in widely distributed locations. For gas pipelines, this will improve gas quality during transfer and blending, and will expedite accurate financial accounting. Industrial endusers will benefit through continuous feedback of physical gas properties to improve combustion efficiency during use. To meet this need, Sandia has developed a natural gas heating value monitoring instrument using existing and modified microfabricated components. The instrument consists of a silicon micro-fabricated gas chromatography column in conjunction with a catalytic micro-calorimeter sensor. A reference thermal conductivity sensor provides diagnostics and surety. This combination allows for continuous calorimetric determination with a 1 minute analysis time and 1.5 minute cycle time using air as a carrier gas. This system will find application at remote natural gas mining stations, pipeline switching and metering stations, turbine generators, and other industrial user sites. Microfabrication techniques will allow the analytical components to be manufactured in production quantities at a low per-unit cost.

Einfeld, Wayne; Manginell, Ronald Paul; Robinson, Alex Lockwood; Moorman, Matthew Wallace

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Assessment of Gas Turbine Compressor Health Monitoring Technologies: Interim Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A major risk item in gas turbine machinery is compressor rotor/stator blade failure, which can lead to the downstream propagation of components through the compressor. Several events of this nature have occurred over the last few years, in some cases causing catastrophic damage to the entire compressor. In response to these issues, a number of compressor monitoring approaches have been proposed, with different degrees of commercial penetration and technological readiness. The simplest approach is to ...

2013-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

45

Improving the gas-chromatographic determination of the composition of the gas liberated from a battery  

SciTech Connect

Normally, gas chromatography is used for analyzing the gas composition that is liberated when batteries operate. Earlier work describes a gas-chromatographic technique for determining the composition of gas liberated from a battery. According to this reference, the gas is collected in an inverted burette over water. The gas is either sampled with a batching valve or with a medical syringe, which pierces the connecting vacuum hoses. The gas sample is injected into the chromatographic evaporator, and is separated on the chromatographic column into its individual components, each of which is analyzed on the detector. The method described was used to study gas liberation during the storage of charged nickel-zinc batteries. In the method described above, a high proportion of the gas specimen that accumulates and is collected in the measuring system occurs in the dead space volume. In this situation, it is very difficult to determine the liberated gas composition with a high degree of accuracy when the gas is liberated at low rates. Moreover, this method does not provide reliable system air tightness during long term operation of the batteries. 5 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

Dmitriev, V.V.; Zubov, M.S.; Baulov, V.I.; Toguzov, B.M.

1992-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

46

Defect Analysis of Vehicle Compressed Natural Gas Composite Cylinder  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Defect Analysis of Vehicle Defect Analysis of Vehicle Compressed Natural Gas Composite Cylinder A China Paper on Type 4 Cylinder, translated and presented by J. P. Hsu, PhD, Smart Chemistry Reason for Defect Analysis of CNG Composite Cylinder * Safety Issue - Four explosion accidents of auto used CNG composite material cylinders resulting huge personnel and vehicles loss. * Low Compliance Rate - Inspect 12119 Auto used CNG composite cylinders and only 3868 are qualified with compliance rate of 32%. Plastic CNG Composite Cylinder Process Fitting Internal Plastic Liner External Composite Layer Metal Fitting HDPE Cylinder Liner * HDPE has a high density, great stiffness, good anti-permeability and high melting point, but poor environmental stress cracking Resistance (ESCR). * The defects of cylinder liner quality can be

47

Flammable gas tank safety program: Technical basis for gas analysis and monitoring  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Flammable gases generated in radioactive liquids. Twenty-five high level radioactive liquid waste storage tanks located underground at the Hanford Site are on a Flammable Gas Watch List because they contain waste which tends to retain the gases generated in it until rather large quantities are available for sudden release to the tank head space; if a tank is full it has little dome space, and a flammable concentration of gases could be produced--even if the tank is ventilated. If the waste has no tendency to retain gas generated in it then a continual flammable gas concentration in the tank dome space is established by the gas production rate and the tank ventilation rate (or breathing rate for unventilated tanks); this is also a potential problem for Flammable Gas Watch List tanks, and perhaps other Hanford tanks too. All Flammable Gas Watch List tanks will be fitted with Standard Hydorgen Monitoring Systems so that their behavior can be observed. In some cases, such as tank 241-SY-101, the data gathered from such observations will indicate that tank conditions need to be mitigated so that gas release events are either eliminated or rendered harmless. For example, a mixer pump was installed in tank 241-SY-101; operating the pump stirs the waste, replacing the large gas release events with small releases of gas that are kept below twenty-five percent of the lower flammability limit by the ventilation system. The concentration of hydrogen measured in Hanford waste tanks is greater than that of any other flammable gas. Hydrogen levels measured with a Standard Hydrogen Monitoring System in excess of 0.6 volume percent will cause Westinghouse Hanford Company to consider actions which will decrease the amount of flammable gas in the tank

Sherwood, D.J.

1995-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

48

Development of monitoring and control technology based on trace gas monitoring. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Trace gases are generated by many biological reactions. During anaerobic decomposition, trace levels of hydrogen (H{sub 2}) and carbon monoxide (CO) gases are produced. It was shown previously that these trace gases are intrinsically related to the biochemical reactions occurring and, therefore, offer promise for on-line process monitoring and control. This work was designed to test how effectively hydrogen and CO could be to monitor high-rate anaerobic systems that has significant mass transfer and complex hydraulics. An experimental program was designed to examine the behavior of an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor system under steady state and in response to organic loading perturbations. The responses of trace gases CO and H{sub 2} were tracked using an on-line, real-time gas-monitoring system linked to a computer-controlled data acquisition package. Data on conventional process parameters such as pH, chemical oxygen demand (COD), volatile fatty acids (VFAs) were concurrently collected. Monitoring of conventional process indicators (i.e., pH, VFA, gas production) and trace gas (H{sub 2} and CO) indicators was conducted using a matrix of nine different steady-state OLRs (4-23 kg COD/m{sup 3} -d) and system HRTs (0.5 to 2.5 days) was performed to determine any correlation among the indicators. Of OLR, HRT, and influent COD, only OLR had any significant influence on the process indicators examined. All parameters except methane increased with increases in OLR; methane decreased with increased OLR. The OLR and gas production rate (GP) were observed to be linearly correlated.

Liebowitz, B.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Prediction of light gas composition in coal devolatilization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The chemical percolation devolatilization (CPD) model describes the devolatilization behavior of rapidly heated coal based on the chemical structure of the coal. It predicts the overall char, tar, and light gas yields. This paper presents an improved CPD model with improved capability for predicting light gas composition. This is achieved by incorporating a kinetic model that simulates the release of various light gas species from their respective sources/functional groups in coal. The improved CPD model is validated using experiments with a wire mesh reactor and published experimental observations.13 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

Ravichandra S. Jupudi; Vladimir Zamansky; Thomas H. Fletcher [GE Global Research, Bangalore (India)

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

50

Fuel composition effects on natural gas vehicle emissions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Under a contract from DOE`s National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and support from Brooklyn Union Gas Company (BUG), Northern Illinois Gas Co., the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) evaluated four state-of-the-art, electronic, closed-loop natural gas vehicle (NGV) conversion systems. The systems included an Impco electronic closed-loop system, Mogas electronic closed-loop system, Stewart and Stevenson`s GFI system, and an Automotive Natural Gas Inc. (ANGI) Level 1 electronic closed-loop conversion system. Conversion system evaluation included emission testing per 40 CFR Part 86, and driveability. All testing was performed with a 1993 Chevy Lumina equipped with a 3.1 liter MPFI V6 engine. Each system was emission tested using three different certified compositions of natural gas, representing the 10th, mean and 90th percentile gas compositions distributed in the United States. Emission testing on indolene was performed prior to conversion kit testing to establish a base emission value. Indolene testing was also performed at the end of the project when the vehicle was converted to its OEM configuration to ensure that the vehicle`s emissions were not altered during testing. The results of these tests will be presented.

Blazek, C.F.; Grimes, J.; Freeman, P. [Institute of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Bailey, B.K.; Colucci, C. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

The Role of Isotopes in Monitoring Water Quality Impacts Associated with Shale Gas Drilling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Role of Isotopes in Monitoring Water Quality Impacts Associated with Shale Gas Drilling Methane, including shale gas drilling. Monitoring techniques exist for detecting methane and, in some cases detail within the context of shale gas drilling activities in New York, as well as their uses

Wang, Z. Jane

52

A Robust Infrastructure Design for Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plant Unattended Online Enrichment Monitoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An online enrichment monitor (OLEM) is being developed to continuously measure the relative isotopic composition of UF6 in the unit header pipes of a gas centrifuge enrichment plant (GCEP). From a safeguards perspective, OLEM will provide early detection of a facility being misused for production of highly enriched uranium. OLEM may also reduce the number of samples collected for destructive assay and if coupled with load cell monitoring can provide isotope mass balance verification. The OLEM design includes power and network connections for continuous monitoring of the UF6 enrichment and state of health of the instrument. Monitoring the enrichment on all header pipes at a typical GCEP could require OLEM detectors on each of the product, tails, and feed header pipes. If there are eight process units, up to 24 detectors may be required at a modern GCEP. Distant locations, harsh industrial environments, and safeguards continuity of knowledge requirements all place certain demands on the network robustness and power reliability. This paper describes the infrastructure and architecture of an OLEM system based on OLEM collection nodes on the unit header pipes and power and network support nodes for groupings of the collection nodes. A redundant, self-healing communications network, distributed backup power, and a secure communications methodology. Two candidate technologies being considered for secure communications are the Object Linking and Embedding for Process Control Unified Architecture cross-platform, service-oriented architecture model for process control communications and the emerging IAEA Real-time And INtegrated STream-Oriented Remote Monitoring (RAINSTORM) framework to provide the common secure communication infrastructure for remote, unattended monitoring systems. The proposed infrastructure design offers modular, commercial components, plug-and-play extensibility for GCEP deployments, and is intended to meet the guidelines and requirements for unattended and remotely monitored safeguards systems.

Younkin, James R [ORNL; Rowe, Nathan C [ORNL; Garner, James R [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Variability of Gas Composition and Flux Intensity in Natural Marine Hydrocarbon Seeps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Development and Technology 008 "Variability of gas composition and flux intensity in natural marine hydrocarbon seeps" Jordan

Clark, J F; Schwager, Katherine; Washburn, Libe

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Field testing the Raman gas composition sensor for gas turbine operation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A gas composition sensor based on Raman spectroscopy using reflective metal lined capillary waveguides is tested under field conditions for feed-forward applications in gas turbine control. The capillary waveguide enables effective use of low powered lasers and rapid composition determination, for computation of required parameters to pre-adjust burner control based on incoming fuel. Tests on high pressure fuel streams show sub-second time response and better than one percent accuracy on natural gas fuel mixtures. Fuel composition and Wobbe constant values are provided at one second intervals or faster. The sensor, designed and constructed at NETL, is packaged for Class I Division 2 operations typical of gas turbine environments, and samples gas at up to 800 psig. Simultaneous determination of the hydrocarbons methane, ethane, and propane plus CO, CO2, H2O, H2, N2, and O2 are realized. The capillary waveguide permits use of miniature spectrometers and laser power of less than 100 mW. The capillary dimensions of 1 m length and 300 ?m ID also enable a full sample exchange in 0.4 s or less at 5 psig pressure differential, which allows a fast response to changes in sample composition. Sensor operation under field operation conditions will be reported.

Buric, M.; Chorpening, B.; Mullem, J.; Ranalli, J.; Woodruff, S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Self-tuning method for monitoring the density of a gas vapor component using a tunable laser  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to a vapor density monitor and laser atomic absorption spectroscopy method for highly accurate, continuous monitoring of vapor densities, composition, flow velocity, internal and kinetic temperatures and constituent distributions. The vapor density monitor employs a diode laser, preferably of an external cavity design. By using a diode laser, the vapor density monitor is significantly less expensive and more reliable than prior art vapor density monitoring devices. In addition, the compact size of diode lasers enables the vapor density monitor to be portable. According to the method of the present invention, the density of a component of a gas vapor is calculated by tuning the diode laser to a frequency at which the amount of light absorbed by the component is at a minimum or a maximum within about 50 MHz of that frequency. Laser light from the diode laser is then transmitted at the determined frequency across a predetermined pathlength of the gas vapor. By comparing the amount of light transmitted by the diode laser to the amount of light transmitted after the laser light passes through the gas vapor, the density of the component can be determined using Beer`s law. 6 figs.

Hagans, K.; Berzins, L.; Galkowski, J.; Seng, R.

1996-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

56

Health Monitoring of Ceramic Matrix Composites from Waveform ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Ceramic matrix composites are anticipated for use in the hot section of aircraft ... Ceramic Matrix Composites for Nuclear and Fusion Energy.

57

Real-Time Raman Gas Composition Sensor.pdf  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sensor Sensor Opportunity Technology/Capability Overview Benefits to Partner Development Status Contact The NETL Real-time Raman Gas Composition Analyzer determines the composition of a flowing gaseous sample in real-time and provides the concentration of each gas in that sample. . . . ‡ Testing partners would have the opportunity to evaluate the performance of the prototype system, implement new feed-forward controls, and may help shape the commercial product configuration ‡ This sensor will greatly benefit the power industry, as well as other industries utilizing gaseous input or output streams by enabling smarter control to increase process efficiency and reduce emissions ‡ We are seeking opportunities to field test the prototype instruments in power and industrial applications, as well

58

Melt Infiltrated Ceramic Composites (Hipercomp) for Gas Turbine Engine Applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report covers work performed under the Continuous Fiber Ceramic Composites (CFCC) program by GE Global Research and its partners from 1994 through 2005. The processing of prepreg-derived, melt infiltrated (MI) composite systems based on monofilament and multifilament tow SiC fibers is described. Extensive mechanical and environmental exposure characterizations were performed on these systems, as well as on competing Ceramic Matrix Composite (CMC) systems. Although current monofilament SiC fibers have inherent oxidative stability limitations due to their carbon surface coatings, the MI CMC system based on multifilament tow (Hi-Nicalon ) proved to have excellent mechanical, thermal and time-dependent properties. The materials database generated from the material testing was used to design turbine hot gas path components, namely the shroud and combustor liner, utilizing the CMC materials. The feasibility of using such MI CMC materials in gas turbine engines was demonstrated via combustion rig testing of turbine shrouds and combustor liners, and through field engine tests of shrouds in a 2MW engine for >1000 hours. A unique combustion test facility was also developed that allowed coupons of the CMC materials to be exposed to high-pressure, high-velocity combustion gas environments for times up to {approx}4000 hours.

Gregory Corman; Krishan Luthra

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

59

Acid gas scrubbing by composite solvent-swollen membranes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A composite immobilized liquid membrane suitable for acid gas scrubbing is disclosed. The membrane is a solvent-swollen polymer and a microporous polymeric support, the solvent being selected from a class of highly polar solvents containing at least one atom selected from nitrogen, oxygen, phosphorus and sulfur, and having a boiling point of at least 100 C and a solubility parameter of from about 7.5 to about 13.5 (cal/cm[sup 3]-atm)[sup 1/2]. Such solvents are homogeneously distributed through the solvent-swollen polymer from 20% to 95% by weight. Also disclosed are methods of acid gas scrubbing of high- and low-Btu gas effluents with such solvent-swollen membranes. 3 figs.

Matson, S.L.; Lee, E.K.L.; Friesen, D.T.; Kelly, D.J.

1988-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

60

Acid gas scrubbing by composite solvent-swollen membranes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A composite immobilized liquid membrane suitable for acid gas scrubbing is disclosed. The membrane is a solvent-swollen polymer and a microporous polymeric support, the solvent being selected from a class of highly polar solvents containing at least one atom selected from nitrogen, oxygen, phosphorous and sulfur, and having a boiling point of at least 100.degree. C. and a solubility parameter of from about 7.5 to about 13.5 (cal/cm.sup.3 -atm).sup.1/2. Such solvents are homogeneously distributed through the solvent-swollen polymer from 20% to 95% by weight. Also disclosed are methods of acid gas scrubbing of high- and low-Btu gas effluents with such solvent-swollen membranes.

Matson, Stephen L. (Harvard, MA); Lee, Eric K. L. (Acton, MA); Friesen, Dwayne T. (Bend, OR); Kelly, Donald J. (Bend, OR)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas composition monitor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Results of Vapor Space Monitoring of Flammable Gas Watch List Tanks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents the measurement of headspace gas concentrations and monitoring results from the Hanford tanks that have continuous flammable gas monitoring. The systems used to monitor the tanks are Standard Hydrogen Monitoring Systems. Further characterization of the tank off-gases was done with Gas Characterization systems and vapor grab samples. The background concentrations of all tanks are below the action level of 6250 ppm. Other information which can be derived from the measurements (such as generation rate, released rate, and ventilation rate) is also discussed.

MCCAIN, D.J.

2000-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

62

Results of vapor space monitoring of flammable gas Watch List tanks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents the measurement of headspace gas concentrations and monitoring results from the Hanford tanks that have continuous flammable gas monitoring. The systems used to monitor the tanks are Standard Hydrogen Monitoring Systems. Further characterization of the tank off-gases was done with Gas Characterization Systems and vapor grab samples. The background concentrations of all tanks are below the action level of 6250 ppm. Other information which can be derived from the measurements (such as generation rate, release rate, and ventilation rate) is also discussed.

Wilkins, N.E.

1997-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

63

Towards structural health monitoring in carbon nanotube reinforced composites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An experimental investigation was conducted to understand the non-destructive evaluation (NDE) capabilities of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) of several network architectures towards structural health monitoring (SHM). As ...

Wang, Wennie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Toward a Monitoring and Forecasting System For Atmospheric Composition: The GEMS Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Global and Regional Earth System Monitoring Using Satellite and In Situ Data (GEMS) project is combining the manifold expertise in atmospheric composition research and numerical weather prediction of 32 European institutes to build a ...

A. Hollingsworth; R. J. Engelen; A. Benedetti; A. Dethof; J. Flemming; J. W. Kaiser; J-J. Morcrette; A. J. Simmons; C. Textor; O. Boucher; F. Chevallier; P. Rayner; H. Elbern; H. Eskes; C. Granier; V-H. Peuch; L. Rouil; M. G. Schultz

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

E ects of the Driving Force on the Composition of Natural Gas Hydrates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- ciates to yield natural gas and water. Such hydrate technology has two important characteristics: AmbientE ects of the Driving Force on the Composition of Natural Gas Hydrates Odd I. Levik(1) , Jean for storage and transport of natural gas. Storage of natural gas in the form of hydrate at elevated pressure

Gudmundsson, Jon Steinar

66

Gas turbine combustion modeling for a Parametric Emissions Monitoring System.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Oxides of nitrogen (NOx), carbon monoxide (CO) and other combustion by-products of gas turbines have long been identified as harmful atmospheric pollutants to the environment… (more)

Honegger, Ueli

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

DOE Study Monitors Carbon Dioxide Storage in Norway's Offshore Sleipner Gas  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Study Monitors Carbon Dioxide Storage in Norway's Offshore DOE Study Monitors Carbon Dioxide Storage in Norway's Offshore Sleipner Gas Field DOE Study Monitors Carbon Dioxide Storage in Norway's Offshore Sleipner Gas Field May 21, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, D.C. -- In a newly awarded project, researchers funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) are partnering with European scientists to track injected carbon dioxide (CO2) in the world's first and longest running carbon storage operation located at the Sleipner gas field in the North Sea. The researchers--from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California, San Diego, and the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory (LDEO) in New York--will conduct surveys on the seafloor to monitor injected CO2 in the 1 kilometer-deep reservoir, where more than

68

Monitoring Strain in Engineered Cementitious Composites Using Wireless Sensors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The emergence of new structural materials opens exciting venues for improving the strength and durability of civil structures. Engineered Cementitious Composites (ECC) are a special class of fiber reinforced cementitious composite (FRCC) that combine short polymer fibers with a cement matrix to produce a material, which undergoes strain-induced hardening and is ultra-ductile when loaded in tension. The unique electrical properties of FRCC materials render them a smart material capable of measuring strain and the evolution of structural damage. In particular, the material is piezoresistive with changes in electrical resistance correlated with mechanical strain. In this study, the piezoresistive property of ECC structural specimens are exploited to directly measure levels of tensile strain. To enhance the resistivity properties of the material without disrupting mechanical strength, small volume fractions of short steel or carbon fibers are included within the ECC matrix. Changes in ECC electrical resistance are measured using a two-probe direct-current (DC) resistance test as specimens are monotonically loaded in tension. To collect the resistance measurements of ECC specimens during testing, a low-cost wireless sensing unit is employed. 1

Tsung-chin Hou; Jerome Peter Lynch

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Microemulsion impregnated catalyst composite and use thereof in a synthesis gas conversion process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A catalyst composition for synthesis gas conversion comprising a ruthenium metal component deposited on a support carrier wherein the average metal particle size is less than about 100 A. The method of manufacture of the composition via a reverse micelle impregnation technique and the use of the composition in a Fischer-Tropsch conversion process is also disclosed.

Abrevaya, Hayim (Chicago, IL); Targos, William M. (Palatine, IL)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Microemulsion impregnated catalyst composite and use thereof in a synthesis gas conversion process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A catalyst composition is described for synthesis gas conversion comprising a ruthenium metal component deposited on a support carrier wherein the average metal particle size is less than about 100 A. The method of manufacture of the composition via a reverse micelle impregnation technique and the use of the composition in a Fischer-Tropsch conversion process is also disclosed.

Abrevaya, H.; Targos, W.M.

1987-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

71

Driving force and composition for multicomponent gas hydrate nucleation from supersaturated aqueous solutions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Driving force and composition for multicomponent gas hydrate nucleation from supersaturated aqueous.1063/1.1817999 I. INTRODUCTION Gas hydrate crystallization from mixtures of natural gases and water is of interest for both the prevention of hy- drate formation in natural gas production and for promotion of hydration

Firoozabadi, Abbas

72

Variations in dissolved gas compositions of reservoir fluids from the Coso  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Variations in dissolved gas compositions of reservoir fluids from the Coso Variations in dissolved gas compositions of reservoir fluids from the Coso geothermal field Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Variations in dissolved gas compositions of reservoir fluids from the Coso geothermal field Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Gas concentrations and ratios in 110 analyses of geothermal fluids from 47 wells in the Coso geothermal system illustrate the complexity of this two-phase reservoir in its natural state. Two geographically distinct regions of single-phase (liquid) reservoir are present and possess distinctive gas and liquid compositions. Relationships in soluble and insoluble gases preclude derivation of these waters from a common parent by boiling or condensation alone. These two regions may

73

Application of Condition-Based Monitoring Techniques for Remote Monitoring of a Simulated Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plant  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents research into the adaptation of monitoring techniques from maintainability and reliability (M&R) engineering for remote unattended monitoring of gas centrifuge enrichment plants (GCEPs) for international safeguards. Two categories of techniques are discussed: the sequential probability ratio test (SPRT) for diagnostic monitoring, and sequential Monte Carlo (SMC or, more commonly, particle filtering ) for prognostic monitoring. Development and testing of the application of condition-based monitoring (CBM) techniques was performed on the Oak Ridge Mock Feed and Withdrawal (F&W) facility as a proof of principle. CBM techniques have been extensively developed for M&R assessment of physical processes, such as manufacturing and power plants. These techniques are normally used to locate and diagnose the effects of mechanical degradation of equipment to aid in planning of maintenance and repair cycles. In a safeguards environment, however, the goal is not to identify mechanical deterioration, but to detect and diagnose (and potentially predict) attempts to circumvent normal, declared facility operations, such as through protracted diversion of enriched material. The CBM techniques are first explained from the traditional perspective of maintenance and reliability engineering. The adaptation of CBM techniques to inspector monitoring is then discussed, focusing on the unique challenges of decision-based effects rather than equipment degradation effects. These techniques are then applied to the Oak Ridge Mock F&W facility a water-based physical simulation of a material feed and withdrawal process used at enrichment plants that is used to develop and test online monitoring techniques for fully information-driven safeguards of GCEPs. Advantages and limitations of the CBM approach to online monitoring are discussed, as well as the potential challenges of adapting CBM concepts to safeguards applications.

Hooper, David A [ORNL; Henkel, James J [ORNL; Whitaker, Michael [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Monitoring Results Natural Gas Wells Near Project Rulison  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Natural Gas Wells Near Project Rulison Third Quarter 2013 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Grand Junction, Colorado Date Sampled: June 12, 2013 Background: Project Rulison was the second Plowshare Program test to stimulate natural-gas recovery from deep and low permeability formations. On September 10, 1969, a 40-kiloton-yield nuclear device was detonated 8,426 feet (1.6 miles) below the ground surface in the Williams Fork Formation at what is now the Rulison, Colorado, Site. Following the detonation, a series of production tests were conducted. Afterwards, the site was shut down, then remediated and the emplacement well (R-E) and reentry well (R-Ex) plugged. Purpose: As part of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) mission

75

Effects of natural gas composition on ignition delay under diesel conditions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Effects of variations in natural gas composition on autoignition of natural gas under direct-injection (DI) diesel engine conditions were studied experimentally in a constant-volume combustion vessel and computationally using a chemical kinetic model. Four fuel blends were investigated: pure methane, a capacity weighted mean natural gas, a high ethane content natural gas, and a natural gas with added propane typical of peak shaving conditions. Experimentally measured ignition delays were longest for pure methane and became progressively shorter as ethane and propane concentrations increased. At conditions characteristic of a DI compression ignition natural gas engine at Top Dead Center (CR=23:1, p = 6.8 MPa, T = 1150K), measured ignition delays for the four fuels varied from 1.8 ms for the peak shaving and high ethane gases to 2.7 ms for pure methane. Numerically predicted variations in ignition delay as a function of natural gas composition agreed with these measurements.

Naber, J.D.; Siebers, D.L. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States); Di Julio, S.S. [California State Univ., Northridge, CA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Westbrook, C.K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1993-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

76

Use of high temperature insulation for ceramic matrix composites in gas turbines  

SciTech Connect

A ceramic composition for insulating components, made of ceramic matrix composites, of gas turbines is provided. The composition comprises a plurality of hollow oxide-based spheres of various dimensions, a phosphate binder, and at least one oxide filler powder, whereby the phosphate binder partially fills gaps between the spheres and the filler powders. The spheres are situated in the phosphate binder and the filler powders such that each sphere is in contact with at least one other sphere and the arrangement of spheres is such that the composition is dimensionally stable and chemically stable at a temperature of approximately 1600.degree. C. A stationary vane of a gas turbine comprising the composition of the present invention bonded to the outer surface of the vane is provided. A combustor comprising the composition bonded to the inner surface of the combustor is provided. A transition duct comprising the insulating coating bonded to the inner surface of the transition is provided. Because of abradable properties of the composition, a gas turbine blade tip seal comprising the composition also is provided. The composition is bonded to the inside surface of a shroud so that a blade tip carves grooves in the composition so as to create a customized seal for the turbine blade tip.

Morrison, Jay Alan (Orlando, FL); Merrill, Gary Brian (Pittsburgh, PA); Ludeman, Evan McNeil (New Boston, NH); Lane, Jay Edgar (Murrysville, PA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Titanium composite material for oil and gas industry applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2010. Symposium, Corrosion and Corrosion Protection of Materials in the Oil and Gas Industry.

78

A cost effective trace gas measurement program for long term monitoring of the stratospheric circulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A stratospheric trace gas measurement program using balloon-based sonde and AirCore sampler techniques, is proposed as a way to monitor the strength of the stratospheric mean meridional, or Brewer-Dobson circulation. Modeling work predicts a strengthening ...

Fred L. Moore; Eric A. Ray; Karen H. Rosenlof; James W. Elkins; Pieter Tans; Anna Karion; Colm Sweeney

79

Remote Monitoring of the Structural Health of Hydrokinetic Composite Turbine Blades  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A health monitoring approach is investigated for hydrokinetic turbine blade applications. In-service monitoring is critical due to the difficult environment for blade inspection and the cost of inspection downtime. Composite blade designs have advantages that include long life in marine environments and great control over mechanical properties. Experimental strain characteristics are determined for static loads and free-vibration loads. These experiments are designed to simulate the dynamic characteristics of hydrokinetic turbine blades. Carbon/epoxy symmetric composite laminates are manufactured using an autoclave process. Four-layer composite beams, eight-layer composite beams, and two-dimensional eight-layer composite blades are instrumented for strain. Experimental results for strain measurements from electrical resistance gages are validated with theoretical characteristics obtained from in-house finite-element analysis for all sample cases. These preliminary tests on the composite samples show good correlation between experimental and finite-element strain results. A health monitoring system is proposed in which damage to a composite structure, e.g. delamination and fiber breakage, causes changes in the strain signature behavior. The system is based on embedded strain sensors and embedded motes in which strain information is demodulated for wireless transmission. In-service monitoring is critical due to the difficult environment for blade inspection and the cost of inspection downtime. Composite blade designs provide a medium for embedding sensors into the blades for in-situ health monitoring. The major challenge with in-situ health monitoring is transmission of sensor signals from the remote rotating reference frame of the blade to the system monitoring station. In the presented work, a novel system for relaying in-situ blade health measurements in hydrokinetic systems is described and demonstrated. An ultrasonic communication system is used to transmit sensor data underwater from the rotating frame of the blade to a fixed relay station. Data are then broadcast via radio waves to a remote monitoring station. Results indicate that the assembled system can transmit simulated sensor data with an accuracy of ±5% at a maximum sampling rate of 500 samples/sec. A power investigation of the transmitter within the blade shows that continuous max-sampling operation is only possible for short durations (~days), and is limited due to the capacity of the battery power source. However, intermittent sampling, with long periods between samples, allows for the system to last for very long durations (~years). Finally, because the data transmission system can operate at a high sampling rate for short durations or at a lower sampling rate/higher duty cycle for long durations, it is well-suited for short-term prototype and environmental testing, as well as long-term commercially-deployed hydrokinetic machines.

J.L. Rovey K. Chandrashekhara

2012-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

80

Enabling Technology for Monitoring & Predicting Gas Turbine Health & Performance in IGCC Powerplants  

SciTech Connect

The ''Enabling & Information Technology To Increase RAM for Advanced Powerplants'' program, by DOE request, was re-directed, de-scoped to two tasks, shortened to a 2-year period of performance, and refocused to develop, validate and accelerate the commercial use of enabling materials technologies and sensors for coal/IGCC powerplants. The new program was re-titled ''Enabling Technology for Monitoring & Predicting Gas Turbine Health & Performance in IGCC Powerplants''. This final report summarizes the work accomplished from March 1, 2003 to March 31, 2004 on the four original tasks, and the work accomplished from April 1, 2004 to July 30, 2005 on the two re-directed tasks. The program Tasks are summarized below: Task 1--IGCC Environmental Impact on high Temperature Materials: The first task was refocused to address IGCC environmental impacts on high temperature materials used in gas turbines. This task screened material performance and quantified the effects of high temperature erosion and corrosion of hot gas path materials in coal/IGCC applications. The materials of interest included those in current service as well as advanced, high-performance alloys and coatings. Task 2--Material In-Service Health Monitoring: The second task was reduced in scope to demonstrate new technologies to determine the inservice health of advanced technology coal/IGCC powerplants. The task focused on two critical sensing needs for advanced coal/IGCC gas turbines: (1) Fuel Quality Sensor to rapidly determine the fuel heating value for more precise control of the gas turbine, and detection of fuel impurities that could lead to rapid component degradation. (2) Infra-Red Pyrometer to continuously measure the temperature of gas turbine buckets, nozzles, and combustor hardware. Task 3--Advanced Methods for Combustion Monitoring and Control: The third task was originally to develop and validate advanced monitoring and control methods for coal/IGCC gas turbine combustion systems. This task was refocused to address pre-mixed combustion phenomenon for IGCC applications. The work effort on this task was shifted to another joint GE Energy/DOE-NETL program investigation, High Hydrogen Pre-mixer Designs, as of April 1, 2004. Task 4--Information Technology (IT) Integration: The fourth task was originally to demonstrate Information Technology (IT) tools for advanced technology coal/IGCC powerplant condition assessment and condition based maintenance. The task focused on development of GateCycle. software to model complete-plant IGCC systems, and the Universal On-Site Monitor (UOSM) to collect and integrate data from multiple condition monitoring applications at a power plant. The work on this task was stopped as of April 1, 2004.

Kenneth A. Yackly

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas composition monitor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Enabling Technology for Monitoring & Predicting Gas Turbine Health & Performance in IGCC Powerplants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The ''Enabling & Information Technology To Increase RAM for Advanced Powerplants'' program, by DOE request, was re-directed, de-scoped to two tasks, shortened to a 2-year period of performance, and refocused to develop, validate and accelerate the commercial use of enabling materials technologies and sensors for coal/IGCC powerplants. The new program was re-titled ''Enabling Technology for Monitoring & Predicting Gas Turbine Health & Performance in IGCC Powerplants''. This final report summarizes the work accomplished from March 1, 2003 to March 31, 2004 on the four original tasks, and the work accomplished from April 1, 2004 to July 30, 2005 on the two re-directed tasks. The program Tasks are summarized below: Task 1--IGCC Environmental Impact on high Temperature Materials: The first task was refocused to address IGCC environmental impacts on high temperature materials used in gas turbines. This task screened material performance and quantified the effects of high temperature erosion and corrosion of hot gas path materials in coal/IGCC applications. The materials of interest included those in current service as well as advanced, high-performance alloys and coatings. Task 2--Material In-Service Health Monitoring: The second task was reduced in scope to demonstrate new technologies to determine the inservice health of advanced technology coal/IGCC powerplants. The task focused on two critical sensing needs for advanced coal/IGCC gas turbines: (1) Fuel Quality Sensor to rapidly determine the fuel heating value for more precise control of the gas turbine, and detection of fuel impurities that could lead to rapid component degradation. (2) Infra-Red Pyrometer to continuously measure the temperature of gas turbine buckets, nozzles, and combustor hardware. Task 3--Advanced Methods for Combustion Monitoring and Control: The third task was originally to develop and validate advanced monitoring and control methods for coal/IGCC gas turbine combustion systems. This task was refocused to address pre-mixed combustion phenomenon for IGCC applications. The work effort on this task was shifted to another joint GE Energy/DOE-NETL program investigation, High Hydrogen Pre-mixer Designs, as of April 1, 2004. Task 4--Information Technology (IT) Integration: The fourth task was originally to demonstrate Information Technology (IT) tools for advanced technology coal/IGCC powerplant condition assessment and condition based maintenance. The task focused on development of GateCycle. software to model complete-plant IGCC systems, and the Universal On-Site Monitor (UOSM) to collect and integrate data from multiple condition monitoring applications at a power plant. The work on this task was stopped as of April 1, 2004.

Kenneth A. Yackly

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Gas Bubble Disease Monitoring and Research of Juvenile Salmonids : Annual Report 1996.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document describes the project activities 1996--1997 contract year. This report is composed of three chapters which contain data and analyses of the three main elements of the project: field research to determine the vertical distribution of migrating juvenile salmonids, monitoring of juvenile migrants at dams on the Snake and Columbia rivers, and laboratory experiments to describe the progression of gas bubble disease signs leading to mortality. The major findings described in this report are: A miniature pressure-sensitive radio transmitter was found to be accurate and precise and, after compensation for water temperature, can be used to determine the depth of tagged-fish to within 0.32 m of the true depth (Chapter 1). Preliminary data from very few fish suggest that depth protects migrating juvenile steelhead from total dissolved gas supersaturation (Chapter 1). As in 1995, few fish had any signs of gas bubble disease, but it appeared that prevalence and severity increased as fish migrated downstream and in response to changing gas supersaturation (Chapter 2). It appeared to gas bubble disease was not a threat to migrating juvenile salmonids when total dissolved gas supersaturation was < 120% (Chapter 2). Laboratory studies suggest that external examinations are appropriate for determining the severity of gas bubble disease in juvenile salmonids (Chapter 3). The authors developed a new method for examining gill arches for intravascular bubbles by clamping the ventral aorta to reduce bleeding when arches were removed (Chapter 3). Despite an outbreak of bacterial kidney disease in the experimental fish, the data indicate that gas bubble disease is a progressive trauma that can be monitored (Chapter 3).

Maule, Alec G.; Beeman, John W.; Hans, Karen M.; Mesa, M.G.; Haner, P.; Warren, J.J. [Geological Survey, Cook, WA (United States). Columbia River Research Lab.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Development of a Prototype Optical Hydrogen Gas Sensor Using a Getter-Doped Polymer Transducer for Monitoring Cumulative Exposure: Preliminary Results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A novel prototype optical sensor for monitoring cumulative hydrogen gas exposure was fabricated and evaluated. Chemical-to-optical transduction was accomplished by detecting the intensity of 670 nm laser light transmitted through a hydrogen getter-doped polymer film mounted at the end of an optical fiber; the transmittance of the composite film increased with uptake of hydrogen by the embedded getter. The composite film consisted of the hydrogen getter 1,4-bis(phenylethynyl)benzene, also known as DEB, with carbon-supported palladium catalyst embedded in silicone elastomer. Because the change in transmittance was irreversible and occurred continuously as the getter captured hydrogen, the sensor behaved like a dosimeter, providing a unique indication of the cumulative gas exposure.

Small IV, W; Maitland, D J; Wilson, T S; Bearinger, J P; Letts, S A; Trebes, J E

2008-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

84

NETL: Methane Hydrates - 2012 Ignik Sikumi gas hydrate field...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

fluid, by flowmeters in the Low-flow Gas Measurement Skid. Compositional analysis of methane, nitrogen, carbon dioxide, and tracers pumped during injection are being monitored...

85

Hydrogeochemistry and gas compositions of the Uinta Basin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to geothermal energy extraction and radionu- clide transport as well as conventional and un- conventional oil cracking of bitumen and oil into gas) or from a mix of thermogenic-biogenic sources. Moreover M.S. degree from Louisiana State University (1978) and her Ph.D. from the University of Miami (1983

Zhang, Ye

86

Reactant gas composition for fuel cell potential control  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel cell (10) system in which a nitrogen (N.sub.2) gas is used on the anode section (11) and a nitrogen/oxygen (N.sub.2 /O.sub.2) gaseous mix is used on the cathode section (12) to maintain the cathode at an acceptable voltage potential during adverse conditions occurring particularly during off-power conditions, for example, during power plant shutdown, start-up and hot holds. During power plant shutdown, the cathode section is purged with a gaseous mixture of, for example, one-half percent (0.5%) oxygen (O.sub.2) and ninety-nine and a half percent (99.5%) nitrogen (N.sub.2) supplied from an ejector (21) bleeding in air (24/28) into a high pressure stream (27) of nitrogen (N.sub.2) as the primary or majority gas. Thereafter the fuel gas in the fuel processor (31) and the anode section (11) is purged with nitrogen gas to prevent nickel (Ni) carbonyl from forming from the shift catalyst. A switched dummy electrical load (30) is used to bring the cathode potential down rapidly during the start of the purges. The 0.5%/99.5% O.sub.2 /N.sub.2 mixture maintains the cathode potential between 0.3 and 0.7 volts, and this is sufficient to maintain the cathode potential at 0.3 volts for the case of H.sub.2 diffusing to the cathode through a 2 mil thick electrolyte filled matrix and below 0.8 volts for no diffusion at open circuit conditions. The same high pressure gas source (20) is used via a "T" juncture ("T") to purge the anode section and its associated fuel processor (31).

Bushnell, Calvin L. (Glastonbury, CT); Davis, Christopher L. (Tolland, CT)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Gas composition issues and implications for natural gas vehicles and fueling stations. Topical report, October 1993-June 1996  

SciTech Connect

This report provides a general overview of gas composition issues related to compressed natural gas for vehicles, recent research, and practical experience gained in the field. Its purpose is to summarize and communicate information and, where possible, to help fuel providers, original equipment manufacturers, and other members of the industry to formulate appropriate responses to emerging challenges and issues. Three critical topics are covered: compressor oil carryover, moisture content, and elevated levels of higher hydrocarbons. Where appropriate, economic analyses and general guidelines are provided to indicate alternative approaches to fuel issues and relative costs.

Schaedel, S.; Czachorski, M.; Rowley, P.; Richards, M.; Shikari, Y.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Site Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Monitoring Plan - 40 CFR 98  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Monitoring Plan is to meet the monitoring plan requirements of Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations Part 98.3(g)(5). This GHG Monitoring Plan identifies procedures and methodologies used at the Idaho National Laboratory Site (INL Site) to collect data used for GHG emissions calculations and reporting requirements from stationary combustion and other regulated sources in accordance with 40 CFR 98, Subparts A and other applicable subparts. INL Site Contractors determined subpart applicability through the use of a checklist (Appendix A). Each facility/contractor reviews operations to determine which subparts are applicable and the results are compiled to determine which subparts are applicable to the INL Site. This plan is applicable to the 40 CFR 98-regulated activities managed by the INL Site contractors: Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Idaho Cleanup Project (ICP), Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project (AMWTP), and Naval Reactors Facilities (NRF).

Deborah L. Layton; Kimberly Frerichs

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Site Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Monitoring Plan - 40 CFR 98  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Monitoring Plan is to meet the monitoring plan requirements of Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations Part 98.3(g)(5). This GHG Monitoring Plan identifies procedures and methodologies used at the Idaho National Laboratory Site (INL Site) to collect data used for GHG emissions calculations and reporting requirements from stationary combustion and other regulated sources in accordance with 40 CFR 98, Subparts A and other applicable subparts. INL Site Contractors determined subpart applicability through the use of a checklist (Appendix A). Each facility/contractor reviews operations to determine which subparts are applicable and the results are compiled to determine which subparts are applicable to the INL Site. This plan is applicable to the 40 CFR 98-regulated activities managed by the INL Site contractors: Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Idaho Cleanup Project (ICP), Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project (AMWTP), and Naval Reactors Facilities (NRF).

Deborah L. Layton; Kimberly Frerichs

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Preparation and characterization of composite membrane for high temperature gas separation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to develop thin film palladium membranes for separation of hydrogen in high temperature applications. The authors plan to use electroless plating to deposit thin palladium films on microporous ceramic and silver substrates and then characterize the membrane in terms of permeability and selectivity for gas separation. To accomplish the research objective, the project requires three tasks: Development of a process for composite membrane fabrication; Characterization of composite membrane; and Development of theoretical model for hydrogen gas separation. The experimental procedures are described.

Ilias, S.; King, F.G.; Su, N.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

On0Line Fuel Failure Monitor for Fuel Testing and Monitoring of Gas Cooled Very High Temperature Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

IVery High Temperature Reactors (VHTR) utilize the TRISO microsphere as the fundamental fuel unit in the core. The TRISO microsphere (~ 1- mm diameter) is composed of a UO2 kernel surrounded by a porous pyrolytic graphite buffer, an inner pyrolytic graphite layer, a silicon carbide (SiC) coating, and an outer pyrolytic graphite layer. The U-235 enrichment of the fuel is expected to range from 4% – 10% (higher enrichments are also being considered). The layer/coating system that surrounds the UO2 kernel acts as the containment and main barrier against the environmental release of radioactivity. To understand better the behavior of this fuel under in-core conditions (e.g., high temperature, intense fast neutron flux, etc.), the US Department of Energy (DOE) is launching a fuel testing program that will take place at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). During this project North Carolina State University (NCSU) researchers will collaborate with INL staff for establishing an optimized system for fuel monitoring for the ATR tests. In addition, it is expected that the developed system and methods will be of general use for fuel failure monitoring in gas cooled VHTRs.

Ayman I. Hawari; Mohamed A. Bourham

2010-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

92

Variations in dissolved gas compositions of reservoir fluids from the Coso geothermal field  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Gas concentrations and ratios in 110 analyses of geothermal fluids from 47 wells in the Coso geothermal system illustrate the complexity of this two-phase reservoir in its natural state. Two geographically distinct regions of single-phase (liquid) reservoir are present and possess distinctive gas and liquid compositions. Relationships in soluble and insoluble gases preclude derivation of these waters from a common parent by boiling or condensation alone. These two regions may represent two limbs of fluid migration away from an area of two-phase upwelling. During migration, the upwelling fluids mix with chemically evolved waters of moderately dissimilar composition. CO{sub 2} rich fluids found in the limb in the southeastern portion of the Coso field are chemically distinct from liquids in the northern limb of the field. Steam-rich portions of the reservoir also indicate distinctive gas compositions. Steam sampled from wells in the central and southwestern Coso reservoir is unusually enriched in both H{sub 2}S and H{sub 2}. Such a large enrichment in both a soluble and insoluble gas cannot be produced by boiling of any liquid yet observed in single-phase portions of the field. In accord with an upflow-lateral mixing model for the Coso field, at least three end-member thermal fluids having distinct gas and liquid compositions appear to have interacted (through mixing, boiling and steam migration) to produce the observed natural state of the reservoir.

Williams, Alan E.; Copp, John F.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Advanced Sensor Approaches for Monitoring and Control of Gas Turbine Combustors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Seitzman and T. Lieuwen Seitzman and T. Lieuwen SCIES Project 02- 01- SR102 DOE COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT DE-FC26-02NT41431 Tom J. George, Program Manager, DOE/NETL Richard Wenglarz, Manager of Research, SCIES Project Awarded (5/1/2002, 36 Month Duration) $337,501 Total Contract Value ($327,501 DOE) Advanced Sensor Approaches For Monitoring and Control Of Gas Turbine Combustors Georgia Institute of Technology JS/TL 10/19/05 Advanced Sensors 10/19/05 2 Gas Turbine Need * Gas turbines must operate with ultra-low levels of pollutant emissions - Problem: lean, premixed operation causes minimal pollutant generation but introduces combustion problems, such as instabilities and blowoff * Combustor health and performance information needed to optimize engine across competing demands of emissions levels, power output, and

94

Enabling Technology for Monitoring & Predicting Gas Turbine Health & Performance in COAL IGCC Powerplants  

SciTech Connect

The ''Enabling & Information Technology To Increase RAM for Advanced Powerplants'' program, by DOE request, has been re-directed, de-scoped to two tasks, shortened to a 2-year period of performance, and refocused to develop, validate and accelerate the commercial use of enabling materials technologies and sensors for Coal IGCC powerplants. The new program has been re-titled as ''Enabling Technology for Monitoring & Predicting Gas Turbine Health & Performance in IGCC Powerplants'' to better match the new scope. This technical progress report summarizes the work accomplished in the reporting period April 1, 2004 to August 31, 2004 on the revised Re-Directed and De-Scoped program activity. The program Tasks are: Task 1--IGCC Environmental Impact on high Temperature Materials: This first materials task has been refocused to address Coal IGCC environmental impacts on high temperature materials use in gas turbines and remains in the program. This task will screen material performance and quantify the effects of high temperature erosion and corrosion of hot gas path materials in Coal IGCC applications. The materials of interest will include those in current service as well as advanced, high-performance alloys and coatings. Task 2--Material In-Service Health Monitoring: This second task develops and demonstrates new sensor technologies to determine the in-service health of advanced technology Coal IGCC powerplants, and remains in the program with a reduced scope. Its focus is now on only two critical sensor need areas for advanced Coal IGCC gas turbines: (1) Fuel Quality Sensor for detection of fuel impurities that could lead to rapid component degradation, and a Fuel Heating Value Sensor to rapidly determine the fuel heating value for more precise control of the gas turbine, and (2) Infra-Red Pyrometer to continuously measure the temperature of gas turbine buckets, nozzles, and combustor hardware.

Kenneth A. Yackly

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

95

Gas Explosion Tests on East Jordan Iron Works Rectangular Composite Secondary Box Covers for Con Edison  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is an account of continuing research by Con Edison and EPRI to address issues related to manhole events caused by the accumulation of gases in underground structures. It summarizes the results of gas explosion tests performed in June 2008 on rectangular composite vented covers produced by East Jordan Iron Works Company.

2009-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

96

U.S. Natural Gas Liquid Composite Price (Dollars per Million BTU)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Natural Gas Liquid Composite Price (Dollars per Million BTU) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9; 2000's: 12.91: 15.20 ...

97

Development of ceramic composite hot-gas filters  

SciTech Connect

A novel type of hot-gas filter based on a ceramic fiber-reinforced ceramic matrix was developed and extended to fullsize, 60-mm OD by 1.5-meter-long, candle filters. A commercially viable process for producing the filters was developed, and the filters are undergoing testing and demonstration throughout the world for applications in pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) and integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plants. Development activities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and at the 3M Company, and testing at the Westinghouse Science and Technology Center (STC) are presented. Demonstration tests at the Tidd PFBC are underway. Issues identified during the testing and demonstration phases of the development are discussed. Resolution of the issues and the status of commercialization of the filters are described.

Judkins, R.R.; Stinton, D.P. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Smith, R.G.; Fischer, E.M.; Eaton, J.H.; Weaver, B.L.; Kahnke, J.L.; Pysher, D.J. [3M Co., St. Paul, MN (United States)

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Development of ceramic composite hot-gas filters  

SciTech Connect

A novel type of hot-gas filter based on a ceramic fiber-reinforced ceramic matrix was developed and extended to full-size, 60-mm OD by 1.5-m-long, candle filters. A commercially viable process for producing the filters was developed, and the filters are undergoing testing and demonstration throughout the world for applications in pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) and integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plants. Development activities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and at the 3M Company, and testing at the Westinghouse Science and Technology Center (STC) are presented. Demonstration tests at the Tidd PFBC are in progress. Issues identified during the testing and demonstration phases of the development are discussed. Resolution of the issues identified during testing and the status of commercialization of the filters are described.

Judkins, R.R.; Stinton, D.P. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Smith, R.G.; Fischer, E.M.; Eaton, J.H.; Weaver, B.L.; Kahnke, J.L.; Pysher, D.J. [3M Co., St. Paul, MN (United States)

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Advanced Gas Turbine Guidelines: Vibration Monitoring and Analysis: Durability Surveillance at Potomac Electric Power Company's Stat ion H  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The analyses performed by EPRI's Vibration Monitoring and Analysis System (VMAS) represent an important source of steady- state and transient operational data. These advanced gas turbine guidelines discuss state-of-the art vibration analysis methods, monitoring systems, and sensors as well as troubleshooting approaches for engine-related problems.

1999-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

100

Total Dissolved Gas Monitoring in Chum Salmon Spawning Gravels Below Bonneville Dam  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

At the request of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Portland District), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted research to determine whether total dissolved gas concentrations are elevated in chum salmon redds during spring spill operations at Bonneville Dam. The study involved monitoring the total dissolved gas levels at egg pocket depth and in the river at two chum salmon spawning locations downstream from Bonneville Dam. Dissolved atmospheric gas supersaturation generated by spill from Bonneville Dam may diminish survival of chum (Oncorhynchus keta) salmon when sac fry are still present in the gravel downstream from Bonneville Dam. However, no previous work has been conducted to determine whether total dissolved gas (TDG) levels are elevated during spring spill operations within incubation habitats. The guidance used by hydropower system managers to provide protection for pre-emergent chum salmon fry has been to limit TDG to 105% after allowing for depth compensation. A previous literature review completed in early 2006 shows that TDG levels as low as 103% have been documented to cause mortality in sac fry. Our study measured TDG in the incubation environment to evaluate whether these levels were exceeded during spring spill operations. Total dissolved gas levels were measured within chum salmon spawning areas near Ives Island and Multnomah Falls on the Columbia River. Water quality sensors screened at egg pocket depth and to the river were installed at both sites. At each location, we also measured dissolved oxygen, temperature, specific conductance, and water depth to assist with the interpretation of TDG results. Total dissolved gas was depth-compensated to determine when levels were high enough to potentially affect sac fry. This report provides detailed descriptions of the two study sites downstream of Bonneville Dam, as well as the equipment and procedures employed to monitor the TDG levels at the study sites. Results of the monitoring at both sites are then presented in both text and graphics. The findings and recommendations for further research are discussed, followed by a listing of the references cited in the report.

Arntzen, Evan V.; Geist, David R.; Panther, Jennifer L.; Dawley, Earl

2007-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas composition monitor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Microwave plasma monitoring system for the elemental composition analysis of high temperature process streams  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Microwave-induced plasma for continuous, real time trace element monitoring under harsh and variable conditions. The sensor includes a source of high power microwave energy and a shorted waveguide made of a microwave conductive, high temperature capability refractory material communicating with the source of the microwave energy to generate a plasma. The high power waveguide is constructed to be robust in a hot, hostile environment. It includes an aperture for the passage of gases to be analyzed and a spectrometer is connected to receive light from the plasma. Provision is made for real time in situ calibration. The spectrometer disperses the light, which is then analyzed by a computer. The sensor is capable of making continuous, real time quantitative measurements of desired elements, such as the heavy metals lead and mercury. The invention may be incorporated into a high temperature process device and implemented in situ for example, such as with a DC graphite electrode plasma arc furnace. The invention further provides a system for the elemental analysis of process streams by removing particulate and/or droplet samples therefrom and entraining such samples in the gas flow which passes through the plasma flame. Introduction of and entraining samples in the gas flow may be facilitated by a suction pump, regulating gas flow, gravity or combinations thereof.

Woskov, Paul P. (Bedford, MA); Cohn, Daniel R. (Chestnuthill, MA); Titus, Charles H. (Newtown Square, PA); Surma, Jeffrey E. (Kennewick, WA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

The Design and Implementation of Monitoring System for H2S Gas Volume Fraction with Virtual Instrument  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

H2S is a kind of poisonous gas that exist in oil, chemical production process. The detection of H2S plays an important role in mine, oil and gas exploration, production of chemical product, control of atmosphere environment. The monitoring system for ...

Wenlian Li; Chuanqing Liu; Yang Li; Fang Xiao

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Measurement of gas transport through fiber preforms and densified composites for chemical vapor infiltration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gas transport via pressure-driven permeation or via concentration-driven diffusion is a key step in the chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) process. This paper describes methods for the measurement of these properties for CVI preforms and partially infiltrated composites. Results are presented for Nicalon-fiber cloth layup preforms and composites, Nextel-fiber braid preforms and composites, and a Nicalon-fiber three-dimensional (3-D) weave composite. The permeability of Nicalon cloth layup preforms is strongly dependent on the packing density over the range of 29--40 vol% but is only weakly dependent on the orientation of the alternating cloth layers. The permeability of Nextel braid preforms is dependent on the thread count and the weight for cloths with similar construction and packing density. The gas permeability of the finer wave (6.3 tows/cm (16 tows/in.)) is approximately one-half that of the coarser weave (3.5 tows/cm (9 tows/in.)). Results are reported for a small number of infiltrated composites with Nextel fiber reinforcement. Attempts to mount a Nicalon-fiber 3-D weave preform specimen have been unsuccessful. Results for a small number of composite specimens with 3-D weave reinforcement are reported.

Starr, T.L.; Hablutzel, N. [Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (United States). School of Materials Science and Engineering

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Program on Technology Innovation: Wavelength-Multiplexed Diode Laser Absorption Sensors for Rapid Monitoring of Coal-Derived Synthesis Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sensors are needed to monitor gas temperature and synthesis products during coal gasificationin the reactor, at the reactor exit, and along the path to potential use by gas turbines. The harsh operating conditions of coal gasification create a challenging measurement environment. In particular, an optimized gasifier is operated at pressures of 20–40 atm (2027–4053 kPa) with the expectation for operation at even higher pressures. The synthesis gas is also heavily laden with particulate, and the gasifier r...

2012-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

105

GULF OF MEXICO SEAFLOOR STABILITY AND GAS HYDRATE MONITORING STATION PROJECT  

SciTech Connect

The gas hydrates research Consortium (HRC), established and administered at the University if Mississippi's Center for Marine Research and Environmental Technology (CMRET) has been active on many fronts in FY 03. Extension of the original contract through March 2004, has allowed completion of many projects that were incomplete at the end of the original project period due, primarily, to severe weather and difficulties in rescheduling test cruises. The primary objective of the Consortium, to design and emplace a remote sea floor station for the monitoring of gas hydrates in the Gulf of Mexico by the year 2005 remains intact. However, the possibility of levering HRC research off of the Joint Industries Program (JIP) became a possibility that has demanded reevaluation of some of the fundamental assumptions of the station format. These provisions are discussed in Appendix A. Landmark achievements of FY03 include: (1) Continuation of Consortium development with new researchers and additional areas of research contribution being incorporated into the project. During this period, NOAA's National Undersea Research Program's (NURP) National Institute for Undersea Science and Technology (NIUST) became a Consortium funding partner, joining DOE and Minerals Management Service (MMS); (2) Very successful annual and semiannual meetings in Oxford Mississippi in February and September, 2003; (3) Collection of piston cores from MC798 in support of the effort to evaluate the site for possible monitoring station installation; (4) Completion of the site evaluation effort including reports of all localities in the northern Gulf of Mexico where hydrates have been documented or are strongly suspected to exist on the sea floor or in the shallow subsurface; (5) Collection and preliminary evaluation of vent gases and core samples of hydrate from sites in Green Canyon and Mississippi Canyon, northern Gulf of Mexico; (6) Monitoring of gas activity on the sea floor, acoustically and thermally; (7) Design, construction, and successful deployment of an in situ pore-water sampling device; (8) Improvements to the original Raman spectrometer (methane sensor); (9) Laboratory demonstration of the impact of bacterially-produced surfactants' rates of hydrate formation; (10) Construction and sea floor emplacement and testing--with both watergun and ship noise sources--of the prototypal vertical line array (VLA); (11) Initiation of studies of spatial controls on hydrates; (12) Compilation and analyses of seismic data, including mapping of surface anomalies; (13) Additional field verification (bottom samples recovered), in support of the site selection effort; (14) Collection and preliminary analyses of gas hydrates from new sites that exhibit variant structures; (15) Initial shear wave tests carried out in shallow water; (16) Isolation of microbes for potential medicinal products development; (17) Preliminary modeling of occurrences of gas hydrates.

J. Robert Woolsey; Thomas M. McGee; Robin C. Buchannon

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Temporal changes in noble gas compositions within the Aidlinsector ofThe Geysers geothermal system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of nonreactive isotopic tracers coupled to a full thermal-hydrological reservoir simulation allows for an improved method of investigating how reservoir fluids contained within matrix and fractures contribute over time to fluids produced from geothermal systems. A combined field and modeling study has been initiated to evaluate the effects of injection, production, and fracture-matrix interaction on produced noble gas contents and isotopic ratios. Gas samples collected periodically from the Aidlin steam field at The Geysers, California, between 1997 and 2006 have been analyzed for their noble gas compositions, and reveal systematic shifts in abundance and isotopic ratios over time. Because of the low concentrations of helium dissolved in the injection waters, the injectate itself has little impact on the helium isotopic composition of the reservoir fluids over time. However, the injection process may lead to fracturing of reservoir rocks and an increase in diffusion-controlled variations in noble gas compositions, related to gases derived from fluids within the rock matrix.

Dobson, Patrick; Sonnenthal, Eric; Kennedy, Mack; van Soest,Thijs; Lewicki, Jennifer

2006-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

107

Strategies for Detecting Hidden Geothermal Systems by Near-Surface Gas Monitoring  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

''Hidden'' geothermal systems are those systems above which hydrothermal surface features (e.g., hot springs, fumaroles, elevated ground temperatures, hydrothermal alteration) are lacking. Emissions of moderate to low solubility gases (e.g., CO2, CH4, He) may be one of the primary near-surface signals from these systems. Detection of anomalous gas emissions related to hidden geothermal systems may therefore be an important tool to discover new geothermal resources. This study investigates the potential for CO2 detection and monitoring in the subsurface and above ground in the near-surface environment to serve as a tool to discover hidden geothermal systems. We focus the investigation on CO2 due to (1) its abundance in geothermal systems, (2) its moderate solubility in water, and (3) the wide range of technologies available to monitor CO2 in the near-surface environment. However, monitoring in the near-surface environment for CO2 derived from hidden geothermal reservoirs is complicated by the large variation in CO2 fluxes and concentrations arising from natural biological and hydrologic processes. In the near-surface environment, the flow and transport of CO2 at high concentrations will be controlled by its high density, low viscosity, and high solubility in water relative to air. Numerical simulations of CO2 migration show that CO2 concentrations can reach very high levels in the shallow subsurface even for relatively low geothermal source CO2 fluxes. However, once CO2 seeps out of the ground into the atmospheric surface layer, surface winds are effective at dispersing CO2 seepage. In natural ecological systems in the absence of geothermal gas emissions, near-surface CO2 fluxes and concentrations are primarily controlled by CO2 uptake by photosynthesis, production by root respiration, and microbial decomposition of soil/subsoil organic matter, groundwater degassing, and exchange with the atmosphere. Available technologies for monitoring CO2 in the near-surface environment include (1) the infrared gas analyzer (IRGA) for measurement of concentrations at point locations, (2) the accumulation chamber (AC) method for measuring soil CO2 fluxes at point locations, (3) the eddy covariance (EC) method for measuring net CO2 flux over a given area, (4) hyperspectral imaging of vegetative stress resulting from elevated CO2 concentrations, and (5) light detection and ranging (LIDAR) that can measure CO2 concentrations over an integrated path. Technologies currently in developmental stages that have the potential to be used for CO2 monitoring include tunable lasers for long distance integrated concentration measurements and micro-electronic mechanical systems (MEMS) that can make widespread point measurements. To address the challenge of detecting potentially small-magnitude geothermal CO2 emissions within the natural background variability of CO2, we propose an approach that integrates available detection and monitoring methodologies with statistical analysis and modeling strategies. Within the area targeted for geothermal exploration, point measurements of soil CO2 fluxes and concentrations using the AC method and a portable IRGA, respectively, and measurements of net surface flux using EC should be made. Also, the natural spatial and temporal variability of surface CO2 fluxes and subsurface CO2 concentrations should be quantified within a background area with similar geologic, climatic, and ecosystem characteristics to the area targeted for geothermal exploration. Statistical analyses of data collected from both areas should be used to guide sampling strategy, discern spatial patterns that may be indicative of geothermal CO2 emissions, and assess the presence (or absence) of geothermal CO2 within the natural background variability with a desired confidence level. Once measured CO2 concentrations and fluxes have been determined to be of anomalous geothermal origin with high confidence, more expensive vertical subsurface gas sampling and chemical and isotopic analyses can be undertaken. Integrated analysis of all measurements will d

Lewicki, Jennifer L.; Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2004-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

108

Gas Bubble Trauma Monitoring and Research of Juvenile Salmonids, 1994-1995 Progress Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes laboratory and field monitoring studies of gas bubble trauma (GBT) in migrating juvenile salmonids in the Snake and Columbia rivers. The first chapter describes laboratory studies of the progression of GBT signs leading to mortality and the use of the signs for GBT assessment. The progression and severity of GBT signs in juvenile salmonids exposed to different levels of total dissolved gas (TDG) and temperatures was assessed and quantified. Next, the prevalence, severity, and individual variation of GBT signs was evaluated to attempt to relate them to mortality. Finally, methods for gill examination in fish exposed to high TDG were developed and evaluated. Primary findings were: (1) no single sign of GBT was clearly correlated with mortality, but many GBT signs progressively worsened; (2) both prevalence and severity of GBT signs in several tissues is necessary; (3) bubbles in the lateral line were the earliest sign of GBT, showed progressive worsening, and had low individual variation but may develop poorly during chronic exposures; (4) fin bubbles had high prevalence, progressively worsened, and may be a persistent sign of GBT; and (5) gill bubbles appear to be the proximate cause of death but may only be relevant at high TDG levels and are difficult to examine. Chapter Two describes monitoring results of juvenile salmonids for signs of GBT. Emigrating fish were collected and examined for bubbles in fins and lateral lines. Preliminary findings were: (1) few fish had signs of GBT, but prevalence and severity appeared to increase as fish migrated downstream; (2) there was no apparent correlation between GBT signs in the fins, lateral line, or gills; (3) prevalence and severity of GBT was suggestive of long-term, non-lethal exposure to relatively low level gas supersaturated water; and (4) it appeared that GBT was not a threat to migrating juvenile salmonids. 24 refs., 26 figs., 3 tabs.

Hans, Karen M.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

,"U.S. Natural Gas Liquid Composite Price (Dollars per Million Btu)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","8/2013" Monthly","8/2013" ,"Release Date:","10/31/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","11/29/2013" ,"Excel File Name:","ngm_epg0_plc_nus_dmmbtum.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/ngm_epg0_plc_nus_dmmbtum.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/18/2013 12:22:47 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas Liquid Composite Price (Dollars per Million Btu)" "Sourcekey","NGM_EPG0_PLC_NUS_DMMBTU" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas Liquid Composite Price (Dollars per Million Btu)"

110

,"U.S. Natural Gas Liquid Composite Price (Dollars per Million Btu)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","10/31/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","11/29/2013" ,"Excel File Name:","ngm_epg0_plc_nus_dmmbtua.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/ngm_epg0_plc_nus_dmmbtua.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/18/2013 12:22:46 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas Liquid Composite Price (Dollars per Million Btu)" "Sourcekey","NGM_EPG0_PLC_NUS_DMMBTU" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas Liquid Composite Price (Dollars per Million Btu)"

111

Effects of Natural Recharge on Gas Composition in the Larderello - Castelnuovo Area  

SciTech Connect

A study of the temporal behaviour of gas compsition in the Larderello-Castelnuovo area shows that this behaviour varies, depending on whether the wells are affected or not by natural recharge. Where no natural recharge exists, gas composition seems to be governed by chemical equilibria. The recharge water, and the steam it produces, mix with the fluid already existing in the reservoir. At Larderello (far from absorption areas) the gas composition resulting from this mixing does not undergo further changes by chemical reaction. This is due either to a lack of reactivity where there is no liquid phase or to an ineffective fluid-rock interaction. At Castelnuovo (close to absorption areas) the H{sub 2}S and CH{sub 4} contents in the gas have gradually decreased with the increase in recharge effects. The decrease in H{sub 2}S can be attributed to dissolution in liquid water and oxidation. Various hypotheses have been forwarded for the methane. The correlation existing between CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2} concentrations, even when methane decreases in the areas affected by recharge, suggests that CH{sub 4} may be governed by more than just the Fisher-Tropsch reaction.

D'Amore, Franco; Celati, Romano; Calore, Claudio; Bertrami, Rino

1983-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

112

Fission Product Monitoring and Release Data for the Advanced Gas Reactor -1 Experiment  

SciTech Connect

The AGR-1 experiment is a fueled multiple-capsule irradiation experiment that was irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) from December 26, 2006 until November 6, 2009 in support of the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Technology Development Office (TDO) Fuel Development and Qualification program. An important measure of the fuel performance is the quantification of the fission product releases over the duration of the experiment. To provide this data for the inert fission gasses(Kr and Xe), a fission product monitoring system (FPMS) was developed and implemented to monitor the individual capsule effluents for the radioactive species. The FPMS continuously measured the concentrations of various krypton and xenon isotopes in the sweep gas from each AGR-1 capsule to provide an indicator of fuel irradiation performance. Spectrometer systems quantified the concentrations of Kr-85m, Kr-87, Kr-88, Kr-89, Kr-90, Xe-131m, Xe-133, Xe 135, Xe 135m, Xe-137, Xe-138, and Xe-139 accumulated over repeated eight hour counting intervals.-. To determine initial fuel quality and fuel performance, release activity for each isotope of interest was derived from FPMS measurements and paired with a calculation of the corresponding isotopic production or birthrate. The release activities and birthrates were combined to determine Release-to-Birth ratios for the selected nuclides. R/B values provide indicators of initial fuel quality and fuel performance during irradiation. This paper presents a brief summary of the FPMS, the release to birth ratio data for the AGR-1 experiment and preliminary comparisons of AGR-1 experimental fuels data to fission gas release models.

Dawn M. Scates; John B. Walter; Jason M. Harp; Mark W. Drigert; Edward L. Reber

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Design of an Online Fission Gas Monitoring System for Post-irradiation Examination Heating Tests of Coated Fuel Particles for High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new Fission Gas Monitoring System (FGMS) has been designed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for use of monitoring online fission gas-released during fuel heating tests. The FGMS will be used with the Fuel Accident Condition Simulator (FACS) at the Hot Fuels Examination Facility (HFEF) located at the Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) within the INL campus. Preselected Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) TRISO (Tri-isotropic) fuel compacts will undergo testing to assess the fission product retention characteristics under high temperature accident conditions. The FACS furnace will heat the fuel to temperatures up to 2,000şC in a helium atmosphere. Released fission products such as Kr and Xe isotopes will be transported downstream to the FGMS where they will accumulate in cryogenically cooledcollection traps and monitored with High Purity Germanium (HPGe) detectors during the heating process. Special INL developed software will be used to monitor the accumulated fission products and will report data in near real-time. These data will then be reported in a form that can be readily available to the INL reporting database. This paper describes the details of the FGMS design, the control and acqusition software, system calibration, and the expected performance of the FGMS. Preliminary online data may be available for presentation at the High Temperature Reactor (HTR) conference.

Dawn Scates

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

A greenhouse-gas information system monitoring and validating emissions reporting and mitigation  

SciTech Connect

Current GHG-mitigating regimes, whether internationally agreed or self-imposed, rely on the aggregation of self-reported data, with limited checks for consistency and accuracy, for monitoring. As nations commit to more stringent GHG emissions-mitigation actions and as economic rewards or penalties are attached to emission levels, self-reported data will require independent confirmation that they are accurate and reliable, if they are to provide the basis for critical choices and actions that may be required. Supporting emissions-mitigation efforts and agreements, as well as monitoring energy- and fossil-fuel intensive national and global activities would be best achieved by a process of: (1) monitoring of emissions and emission-mitigation actions, based, in part, on, (2) (self-) reporting of pertinent bottom-up inventory data, (3) verification that reported data derive from and are consistent with agreed-upon processes and procedures, and (4) validation that reported emissions and emissions-mitigation action data are correct, based on independent measurements (top-down) derived from a suite of sensors in space, air, land, and, possibly, sea, used to deduce and attribute anthropogenic emissions. These data would be assessed and used to deduce and attribute measured GHG concentrations to anthropogenic emissions, attributed geographically and, to the extent possible, by economic sector. The validation element is needed to provide independent assurance that emissions are in accord with reported values, and should be considered as an important addition to the accepted MRV process, leading to a MRV&V process. This study and report focus on attributes of a greenhouse-gas information system (GHGIS) needed to support MRV&V needs. These needs set the function of such a system apart from scientific/research monitoring of GHGs and carbon-cycle systems, and include (not exclusively): the need for a GHGIS that is operational, as required for decision-support; the need for a system that meets specifications derived from imposed requirements; the need for rigorous calibration, verification, and validation (CV&V) standards, processes, and records for all measurement and modeling/data-inversion data; the need to develop and adopt an uncertainty-quantification (UQ) regimen for all measurement and modeling data; and the requirement that GHGIS products can be subjected to third-party questioning and scientific scrutiny. This report examines and assesses presently available capabilities that could contribute to a future GHGIS. These capabilities include sensors and measurement technologies; data analysis and data uncertainty quantification (UQ) practices and methods; and model-based data-inversion practices, methods, and their associated UQ. The report further examines the need for traceable calibration, verification, and validation processes and attached metadata; differences between present science-/research-oriented needs and those that would be required for an operational GHGIS; the development, operation, and maintenance of a GHGIS missions-operations center (GMOC); and the complex systems engineering and integration that would be required to develop, operate, and evolve a future GHGIS. Present monitoring systems would be heavily relied on in any GHGIS implementation at the outset and would likely continue to provide valuable future contributions to GHGIS. However, present monitoring systems were developed to serve science/research purposes. This study concludes that no component or capability presently available is at the level of technological maturity and readiness required for implementation in an operational GHGIS today. However, purpose-designed and -built components could be developed and implemented in support of a future GHGIS. The study concludes that it is possible to develop and provide a capability-driven prototype GHGIS, as part of a Phase-1 effort, within three years from project-funding start, that would make use of and integrate existing sensing and system capabilities. As part of a Phase-2 effort, a requirem

Jonietz, Karl K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dimotakis, Paul E [JPL/CAL TECH; Roman, Douglas A [LLNL; Walker, Bruce C [SNL

2011-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

115

CO2 Removal from Gas Streams Using a Carbon Fiber Composite Molecular  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A novel adsorbent carbon monolith has been developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The monolith is fabricated from isotropic-pitch-derived carbon fibers and powdered phenolic resin via a slurry molding process. The resultant green-form is dried, cured, and carbonized to convert the phenolic resin to carbon, and then activated to develop a connected network of micropores within the carbon fibers and resin-derived carbon binder. The monolith is also macroporous, exhibiting large (>50 µm) pores between the fibers. The resultant open structure allows the free flow of fluids through the monoliths such that gases can reach the micropores where they may be selectively adsorbed. This novel adsorbent has been named a “carbon fiber composite molecular sieve” (CFCMS). Several separations have been demonstrated such as the separation of hydrogen from experimental gas mixtures containing H2 and H2S or H2 and CO2; the separation of CO2 from CH4; the separation of CO2 from air; and the separation of CO2, CO, H2S, and H2O from a variety of proprietary gas mixtures. The CFCMS is being investigated as a CO2 separation and capture device in carbon mitigation strategies for natural gas processing, fuel cells, and gas turbines. The monolithic material is rigid and strong, resistant to attrition and dusting, and because of its continuous carbon skeletal structure, electrically conductive. An adsorbed gas may be quickly and efficiently desorbed by the passage of an electric current, thereby allowing for a low-energy, electrical-swing separation system. It is possible to regenerate the carbon monoliths in the absence of a temperature increase, potentially reducing swing cycle times and improving separation efficiency. The structure and properties of the adsorbent CFCMS monoliths are reported. Some information on the experimental apparatus is provided. Breakthrough plots and performance data for CO2 separation and capture are presented, and the electrical swing adsorption process is discussed

Roddie R. Judkins; Timothy D. Burchell

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

International Composites Expo ICE-98 Nashville, TN, January 19-21, 1998. Title: Strength, Durability and Health Monitoring of Composites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and utilization of composite overlays on civil infrastructures is also addressed. INTRODUCTION According to the US. The perspective and benefits of the repair, upgrade, retrofit, and rehabilitation of US civil infrastructure using capacity of concrete bridges. FRP repair technology offers a practical way to rehabilitate aging concrete

Giurgiutiu, Victor

117

Gas centrifuge enrichment plants inspection frequency and remote monitoring issues for advanced safeguards implementation  

SciTech Connect

Current safeguards approaches used by the IAEA at gas centrifuge enrichment plants (GCEPs) need enhancement in order to verify declared low enriched uranium (LEU) production, detect undeclared LEU production and detect high enriched uranium (BEU) production with adequate probability using non destructive assay (NDA) techniques. At present inspectors use attended systems, systems needing the presence of an inspector for operation, during inspections to verify the mass and {sup 235}U enrichment of declared cylinders of uranium hexafluoride that are used in the process of enrichment at GCEPs. This paper contains an analysis of how possible improvements in unattended and attended NDA systems including process monitoring and possible on-site destructive analysis (DA) of samples could reduce the uncertainty of the inspector's measurements providing more effective and efficient IAEA GCEPs safeguards. We have also studied a few advanced safeguards systems that could be assembled for unattended operation and the level of performance needed from these systems to provide more effective safeguards. The analysis also considers how short notice random inspections, unannounced inspections (UIs), and the concept of information-driven inspections can affect probability of detection of the diversion of nuclear material when coupled to new GCEPs safeguards regimes augmented with unattended systems. We also explore the effects of system failures and operator tampering on meeting safeguards goals for quantity and timeliness and the measures needed to recover from such failures and anomalies.

Boyer, Brian David [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Erpenbeck, Heather H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Miller, Karen A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ianakiev, Kiril D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reimold, Benjamin A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ward, Steven L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Howell, John [GLASGOW UNIV.

2010-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

118

A Greenhouse-Gas Information System: Monitoring and Validating Emissions Reporting and Mitigation  

SciTech Connect

This study and report focus on attributes of a greenhouse-gas information system (GHGIS) needed to support MRV&V needs. These needs set the function of such a system apart from scientific/research monitoring of GHGs and carbon-cycle systems, and include (not exclusively): the need for a GHGIS that is operational, as required for decision-support; the need for a system that meets specifications derived from imposed requirements; the need for rigorous calibration, verification, and validation (CV&V) standards, processes, and records for all measurement and modeling/data-inversion data; the need to develop and adopt an uncertainty-quantification (UQ) regimen for all measurement and modeling data; and the requirement that GHGIS products can be subjected to third-party questioning and scientific scrutiny. This report examines and assesses presently available capabilities that could contribute to a future GHGIS. These capabilities include sensors and measurement technologies; data analysis and data uncertainty quantification (UQ) practices and methods; and model-based data-inversion practices, methods, and their associated UQ. The report further examines the need for traceable calibration, verification, and validation processes and attached metadata; differences between present science-/research-oriented needs and those that would be required for an operational GHGIS; the development, operation, and maintenance of a GHGIS missions-operations center (GMOC); and the complex systems engineering and integration that would be required to develop, operate, and evolve a future GHGIS.

Jonietz, Karl K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dimotakis, Paul E. [JPL/CAL Tech; Rotman, Douglas A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; Walker, Bruce C. [Sandia National Laboratory

2011-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

119

FEMO, A FLOW AND ENRICHMENT MONITOR FOR VERIFYING COMPLIANCE WITH INTERNATIONAL SAFEGUARDS REQUIREMENTS AT A GAS CENTRIFUGE ENRICHMENT FACILITY  

SciTech Connect

A number of countries have received construction licenses or are contemplating the construction of large-capacity gas centrifuge enrichment plants (GCEPs). The capability to independently verify nuclear material flows is a key component of international safeguards approaches, and the IAEA does not currently have an approved method to continuously monitor the mass flow of 235U in uranium hexafluoride (UF6) gas streams. Oak Ridge National Laboratory is investigating the development of a flow and enrichment monitor, or FEMO, based on an existing blend-down monitoring system (BDMS). The BDMS was designed to continuously monitor both 235U mass flow and enrichment of UF6 streams at the low pressures similar to those which exists at GCEPs. BDMSs have been installed at three sites-the first unit has operated successfully in an unattended environment for approximately 10 years. To be acceptable to GCEP operators, it is essential that the instrument be installed and maintained without interrupting operations. A means to continuously verify flow as is proposed by FEMO will likely be needed to monitor safeguards at large-capacity plants. This will enable the safeguards effectiveness that currently exists at smaller plants to be maintained at the larger facilities and also has the potential to reduce labor costs associated with inspections at current and future plants. This paper describes the FEMO design requirements, operating capabilities, and development work required before field demonstration.

Gunning, John E [ORNL; Laughter, Mark D [ORNL; March-Leuba, Jose A [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Published in `AI Communications 9 journal', pp1-17. Published by IOS Press (1996) TIGERTM: Knowledge Based Gas Turbine Condition Monitoring  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: Knowledge Based Gas Turbine Condition Monitoring Dr. Robert Milne and Dr. Charlie Nicol Intelligent, 11 Colon, Barcelona, 08222 Terrassa. Spain 1. INTRODUCTION Given the critical nature of gas turbines and increasing the availability of the gas turbine. Routine preventative maintenance techniques have been used

Travé-Massuyès, Louise

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121

Melt Infiltrated Ceramic Matrix Composites for Shrouds and Combustor Liners of Advanced Industrial Gas Turbines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report covers work performed under the Advanced Materials for Advanced Industrial Gas Turbines (AMAIGT) program by GE Global Research and its collaborators from 2000 through 2010. A first stage shroud for a 7FA-class gas turbine engine utilizing HiPerComp{reg_sign}* ceramic matrix composite (CMC) material was developed. The design, fabrication, rig testing and engine testing of this shroud system are described. Through two field engine tests, the latter of which is still in progress at a Jacksonville Electric Authority generating station, the robustness of the CMC material and the shroud system in general were demonstrated, with shrouds having accumulated nearly 7,000 hours of field engine testing at the conclusion of the program. During the latter test the engine performance benefits from utilizing CMC shrouds were verified. Similar development of a CMC combustor liner design for a 7FA-class engine is also described. The feasibility of using the HiPerComp{reg_sign} CMC material for combustor liner applications was demonstrated in a Solar Turbines Ceramic Stationary Gas Turbine (CSGT) engine test where the liner performed without incident for 12,822 hours. The deposition processes for applying environmental barrier coatings to the CMC components were also developed, and the performance of the coatings in the rig and engine tests is described.

Gregory Corman; Krishan Luthra; Jill Jonkowski; Joseph Mavec; Paul Bakke; Debbie Haught; Merrill Smith

2011-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

122

Effect of steam partial pressure on gasification rate and gas composition of product gas from catalytic steam gasification of HyperCoal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

HyperCoal was produced from coal by a solvent extraction method. The effect of the partial pressure of steam on the gasification rate and gas composition at temperatures of 600, 650, 700, and 750{sup o}C was examined. The gasification rate decreased with decreasing steam partial pressure. The reaction order with respect to steam partial pressure was between 0.2 and 0.5. The activation energy for the K{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-catalyzed HyperCoal gasification was independent of the steam partial pressure and was about 108 kJ/mol. The gas composition changed with steam partial pressure and H{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} decreased and CO increased with decreasing steam partial pressure. By changing the partial pressure of the steam, the H{sub 2}/CO ratio of the synthesis gas can be controlled. 18 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

Atul Sharma; Ikuo Saito; Toshimasa Takanohashi [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Ibaraki (Japan). Advanced Fuel Group

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

123

Performance analysis of compositional and modified black-oil models for rich gas condensate reservoirs with vertical and horizontal wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It has been known that volatile oil and gas condensate reservoirs cannot be modeled accurately with conventional black-oil models. One variation to the black-oil approach is the modified black-oil (MBO) model that allows the use of a simple, and less expensive computational algorithm than a fully compositional model that can result in significant timesaving in full field studies. The MBO model was tested against the fully compositional model and performances of both models were compared using various production and injection scenarios for a rich gas condensate reservoir. The software used to perform the compositional and MBO runs were Eclipse 300 and Eclipse 100 versions 2002A. The effects of black-oil PVT table generation methods, uniform composition and compositional gradient with depth, initialization methods, location of the completions, production and injection rates, kv/kh ratios on the performance of the MBO model were investigated. Vertical wells and horizontal wells with different drain hole lengths were used. Contrary to the common belief that oil-gas ratio versus depth initialization gives better representation of original fluids in place, initializations with saturation pressure versus depth gave closer original fluids in place considering the true initial fluids in place are given by the fully compositional model initialized with compositional gradient. Compared to the compositional model, results showed that initially there was a discrepancy in saturation pressures with depth in the MBO model whether it was initialized with solution gas-oil ratio (GOR) and oil-gas ratio (OGR) or dew point pressure versus depth tables. In the MBO model this discrepancy resulted in earlier condensation and lower oil production rates than compositional model at the beginning of the simulation. Unrealistic vaporization in the MBO model was encountered in both natural depletion and cycling cases. Oil saturation profiles illustrated the differences in condensate saturation distribution for the near wellbore area and the entire reservoir even though the production performance of the models was in good agreement. The MBO model representation of compositional phenomena for a gas condensate reservoir proved to be successful in the following cases: full pressure maintenance, reduced vertical communication, vertical well with upper completions, and producer set as a horizontal well.

Izgec, Bulent

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Nondestructive characterization of ceramic composites used as combustor liners in advanced gas turbines  

SciTech Connect

Nondestructive characterization (NDC) methods, which can provide full-field information about components prior to and during use, are critical to the reliable application of continuous fiber ceramic matrix composites in high-firing-temperature (>1,350 C) gas turbines. [For combustor liners, although they are nonmechanical load-bearing components, both thermal characteristics and mechanical integrity are vitally important.] NDC methods being developed to provide necessary information include x-ray computed tomography (mainly for through-wall density and delamination detection), infrared-based thermal diffusivity imaging, and single-wall through-transmission x-ray imaging (mainly for fiber content and alignment detection). Correlation of the data obtained from NDC methods with subscale combustor liner tests have shown positive results at thermal cycling temperatures from 700 C to 1,177 C.

Ellingson, W.A.; Rothermel, S.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Energy Technology Div.; Simpson, J.F. [Solar Turbines, Inc., San Diego, CA (United States)

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

SewerSnort: A drifting sensor for in situ Wastewater Collection System gas monitoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biochemical reactions that occur in sewer pipes produce a considerable amount of hydrogen sulfide gas (H"2S corrosive and poisonous), methane gas (CH"4 explosive and a major climate change contributor), carbon dioxide (CO"2 a major climate change contributor), ... Keywords: Biochemical process, Electrochemical gas sensor, Mobile sensing, Received signal strength indicator based localization, Wastewater Collection System

Jung Soo Lim, Jihyoung Kim, Jonathan Friedman, Uichin Lee, Luiz Vieira, Diego Rosso, Mario Gerla, Mani B. Srivastava

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

CHANGES OF ATMOSPHERIC COMPOSITION AND OPTICAL PROPERTIES OVER BEIJING—2008 Olympic Monitoring Campaign  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Before and during the 2008 Beijing Olympics from June to September, ground-based and satellite monitoring were carried out over Beijing and its vicinity (BIV) in a campaign to quantify the outcomes of various emission control measures. These ...

X. Y. Zhang; Y. Q. Wang; W. L. Lin; Y. M. Zhang; X. C. Zhang; P. Zhao; Y. Q. Yang; J. Z. Wang; Q. Hou; H. Z. Che; J. P. Guo; Y. Li; S. Gong; X. L. Zhang

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Landfill Gas Fueled HCCI Demonstration System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

operations with natural gas: Fuel composition implications,”of Natural gas testing LANDFILL GAS COMPOSITION Tapping into

Blizman, Brandon J.; Makel, Darby B.; Mack, John Hunter; Dibble, Robert W.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Piezoelectric-based in-situ damage detection of composite materials for structural health monitoring systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cost-effective and reliable damage detection is critical for the utilization of composite materials. This thesis presents the conclusions of an analytical and experimental survey of candidate methods for in-situ damage ...

Kessler, Seth Stovack, 1977-

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Industrial Compositional Streamline Simulation for Efficient and Accurate Prediction of Gas Injection and WAG Processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gas-injection processes are widely and increasingly used for enhanced oil recovery (EOR). In the United States, for example, EOR production by gas injection accounts for approximately 45% of total EOR production and has tripled since 1986. The understanding of the multiphase, multicomponent flow taking place in any displacement process is essential for successful design of gas-injection projects. Due to complex reservoir geometry, reservoir fluid properties and phase behavior, the design of accurate and efficient numerical simulations for the multiphase, multicomponent flow governing these processes is nontrivial. In this work, we developed, implemented and tested a streamline based solver for gas injection processes that is computationally very attractive: as compared to traditional Eulerian solvers in use by industry it computes solutions with a computational speed orders of magnitude higher and a comparable accuracy provided that cross-flow effects do not dominate. We contributed to the development of compositional streamline solvers in three significant ways: improvement of the overall framework allowing improved streamline coverage and partial streamline tracing, amongst others; parallelization of the streamline code, which significantly improves wall clock time; and development of new compositional solvers that can be implemented along streamlines as well as in existing Eulerian codes used by industry. We designed several novel ideas in the streamline framework. First, we developed an adaptive streamline coverage algorithm. Adding streamlines locally can reduce computational costs by concentrating computational efforts where needed, and reduce mapping errors. Adapting streamline coverage effectively controls mass balance errors that mostly result from the mapping from streamlines to pressure grid. We also introduced the concept of partial streamlines: streamlines that do not necessarily start and/or end at wells. This allows more efficient coverage and avoids the redundant work generally done in the near-well regions. We improved the accuracy of the streamline simulator with a higher order mapping from pressure grid to streamlines that significantly reduces smoothing errors, and a Kriging algorithm is used to map from the streamlines to the background grid. The higher accuracy of the Kriging mapping means that it is not essential for grid blocks to be crossed by one or more streamlines. The higher accuracy comes at the price of increased computational costs, but allows coarser coverage and so does not generally increase the overall costs of the computations. To reduce errors associated with fixing the pressure field between pressure updates, we developed a higher order global time-stepping method that allows the use of larger global time steps. Third-order ENO schemes are suggested to propagate components along streamlines. Both in the two-phase and three-phase experiments these ENO schemes outperform other (higher order) upwind schemes. Application of the third order ENO scheme leads to overall computational savings because the computational grid used can be coarsened. Grid adaptivity along streamlines is implemented to allow sharp but efficient resolution of solution fronts at reduced computational costs when displacement fronts are sufficiently separated. A correction for Volume Change On Mixing (VCOM) is implemented that is very effective at handling this effect. Finally, a specialized gravity operator splitting method is proposed for use in compositional streamline methods that gives an effective correction of gravity segregation. A significant part of our effort went into the development of a parallelization strategy for streamline solvers on the next generation shared memory machines. We found in this work that the built-in dynamic scheduling strategies of OpenMP lead to parallel efficiencies that are comparable to optimal schedules obtained with customized explicit load balancing strategies as long as the ratio of number of streamlines to number of threads is sufficiently high, which is the case in real-fie

Margot Gerritsen

2008-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

130

Use of Composite Pipe Materials in the Transportation of Natural Gas (INEEL/EXT-02-00992)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

992 992 Use of Composite Pipe Materials in the Transportation of Natural Gas Patrick Laney July 2002 Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Bechtel BWXT Idaho, LLC INEEL/EXT-02-00992 Use of Composite Pipe Materials in the Transportation of Natural Gas Sponsored by Natural Gas Pipeline Infrastructure Reliability Program National Energy Technology Laboratory INEEL Field Work Proposal # 4340-70 Prepared by: Patrick Laney Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Idaho Falls, Idaho With Contributions From: Ian Kopp Kenway Corporation Augusta, Maine July 2002 Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Fossil Energy Technologies Department Idaho Falls, Idaho 83415 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

131

Strategies for Detecting Hidden Geothermal Systems by Near-Surface Gas Monitoring  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Atmospheric dispersion of dense gases, Ann. Rev. Fluidtransport and dispersion capability for dilute gases basedmake a dilute gas assumption. 4.2.4 Dispersion Model For the

Lewicki, Jennifer L.; Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

A genetic fuzzy radial basis function neural network for structural health monitoring of composite laminated beams  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, a new neural network learning procedure, called genetic fuzzy hybrid learning algorithm (GFHLA) is proposed for training the radial basis function neural network (RBFNN). The method combines the genetic algorithm and fuzzy logic to optimize ... Keywords: Fuzzy logic, Genetic algorithm, RBF neural network, Structural health monitoring

Shi-jie Zheng; Zheng-qiang Li; Hong-tao Wang

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Ceramic-zeolite Composite Membranes and Use for Separation of Vapor-gas Mixtures  

Having both high selectivity and high permeability, the zeolite membranes have great potential for highly selective separation of vapor/gas and gas/gas mixtures and for catalytic membrane reactor applications. However, it is very difficult to prepare ...

134

Innovative coke oven gas cleaning system for retrofit applications: Environmental Monitoring Program. Volume 3, Appendix sections 8--14: Baseline Sampling Program report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains no text. It consists entirely of numerical data: Coke oven wastewater treatment performance; Ammonia still effluents to equalization tank; Stack gas analysis of coke oven batteries; CoaL consumption; Coke production; Supplemental OSHA employee exposure monitoring(hydrocarbons,ammonia, hydrogen sulfide); operating data; chemical products and coke oven gas production.

Stuart, L.M.

1994-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

135

Guidelines for Energy Cost Savings Resulting from Tracking and Monitoring Electrical nad Natural Gas Usage, Cost, and Rates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper discusses how improved energy information in schools and hospitals from tracking and monitoring electrical and natural gas usage, cost, and optional rate structures, can reduce energy costs. Recommendations, methods, and guidelines for monitoring and tracking of utilities are provided. These recommendations, methods, and guidelines are the result of on-site work for schools and hospitals . Recently completed energy usage survey and observations of several hospitals in Texas are included. Opportunities exist for schools, hospitals, and other buildings t o achieve significant dollar savings by good utility management. Understanding utility rate structures is essential for minimizing energy costs. The authors' data is for Texas schools and hospitals, but the principles presented apply to other geographic areas.

McClure, J. D.; Estes, M. C.; Estes, J. M.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

TWRS hydrogen mitigation portable standard hydrogen monitoring system platform design and fabrication engineering task plan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The primary function of portable gas monitoring is to quickly determine tank vapor space gas composition and gas release rate, and to detect gas release events. Characterization of the gas composition is needed for safety analysis. The lower flammability limit, as well as the peak burn temperature and pressure, are dependent upon the gas composition. If there is little or no knowledge about the gas composition, safety analysis utilize compositions that yield the worst case in a deflagration or detonation. This conservative approach to unknowns necessitates a significant increase in administrative and engineering costs. Knowledge of the true composition could lead to reductions in the assumptions and therefore contribute to a reduction in controls and work restrictions. Also, knowledge of the actual composition will be required information for the analysis that is needed to remove tanks from the Watch List. Similarly, the rate of generation and release of gases is required information for performing safety analysis, developing controls, designing equipment, and closing safety issues. To determine release rate, both the gas concentrations and the dome space ventilation rates (exhauster flow rate or passive dome/atmosphere exchange rate) are needed. Therefore, to quickly verify waste tank categorization or to provide additional characterization for tanks with installed gas monitoring, a temporary, portable standard hydrogen monitoring system is needed that can be used to measure gas compositions at both high and low sensitivities.

Philipp, B.L.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

FEMP Technology Brief: Boiler Combustion Control and Monitoring System |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Boiler Combustion Control and Monitoring Boiler Combustion Control and Monitoring System FEMP Technology Brief: Boiler Combustion Control and Monitoring System October 7, 2013 - 9:12am Addthis This composite photo shows technicians observing operation at the monitoring station and making subsequent fine adjustments on combustion system controls Technical staff are making boiler adjustments with the control and monitoring system. Photo courtesy of the Department of Defense's Environmental Security Technology Certification Program. Technology Description A novel combustion control system, along with gas sensors, sets the opening of fuel and air inlets based on flue-gas concentrations. Continuous feedback from measurements of oxygen, carbon monoxide, and nitrogen oxide concentrations enable the control system

138

Preparation and characterization of composite membrane for high temperature gas separation. Quarterly technical report, September 1--November 30, 1994  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To develop a new class of permselective inorganic membranes, the authors have identified electroless plating as a potential route to deposit a thin metal film on a porous substrate. Electroless plating is a controlled autocatalytic deposition of continuous film on the surface of a substrate by the interactions of a metal salt and a chemical reducing agent. This method can give thin films of metals, alloys and composites on both conducting and nonconducting surfaces. The objective of this project is to develop thin film palladium membranes for separation of hydrogen in high temperature applications. The authors plan to use electroless plating to deposit thin palladium films on microporous ceramic and silver substrates. They plan to characterize the membrane in terms of permeability and selectivity for gas separation. To accomplish the research objective, the project requires three tasks: Development of a process for composite membrane formation; Characterization of fabricated composite membrane; and Development of theoretical model for hydrogen gas separation. During this quarter, the authors attempted to measure the diffusivity and permeability of hydrogen gas through the palladium composite membrane. While running the diffusion measurements at elevated temperature and pressure, leakage of hydrogen was observed. This is a serious problem and it needs to be resolved. Currently, they are working on this problem. During this quarter, they also designed a diffusion cell to test thin-film palladium membrane in tubular structure. The diffusion cell is being fabricated and assembled by a local machine shop.

Ilias, S.; King, F.G.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

139

Toughened Silcomp composites for gas turbine engine applications. Continuous fiber ceramic composites program: Phase I final report, April 1992--June 1994  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The two main factors driving the development of new industrial gas turbine engine systems are fuel efficiency and reduced emissions. One method of providing improvements in both areas is to reduce the cooling air requirements of the hot gas path components. For this reason ceramic components are becoming increasingly attractive for gas turbine applications because of their greater refractoriness and oxidation resistance. Among the ceramics being considered, continuous fiber ceramic composites (CFCCs) are leading candidates because they combine the high temperature stability of ceramics with the toughness and damage tolerance of composites. The purpose of this program, which is part of DOE`s CFCC initiative, is to evaluate the use of CFCC materials as gas turbine engine components, and to demonstrate the feasibility of producing such components from Toughened Silcomp composites. Toughened silcomp is a CFCC material made by a reactive melt infiltration process, and consists of continuous SiC reinforcing fibers, with an appropriate fiber coating, in a fully dense matrix of SiC and Si. Based on the material physical properties, the material/process improvements realized in Phase 1, and the preliminary design analyses from Task 1, they feel the feasibility of fabricating Toughened Silcomp with the requisite physical and mechanical properties for the intended applications has been demonstrated. Remaining work for Phase 2 is to further improve the system for enhanced oxidation resistance, incorporate additional process controls to enhance the reproducibility of the material, transition the fabrication process to the selected vendors for scale-up, develop a more complete material property data base, including long-term mechanical behavior, and fabricate and test preliminary ``representative part`` specimens.

Corman, G.S.; Luthra, K.L.; Brun, M.K.; Meschter, P.J.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Fabrication of gas turbine water-cooled composite nozzle and bucket hardware employing plasma spray process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In the method for fabrication of water-cooled composite nozzle and bucket hardware for high temperature gas turbines, a high thermal conductivity copper alloy is applied, employing a high velocity/low pressure (HV/LP) plasma arc spraying process, to an assembly comprising a structural framework of copper alloy or a nickel-based super alloy, or combination of the two, and overlying cooling tubes. The copper alloy is plamsa sprayed to a coating thickness sufficient to completely cover the cooling tubes, and to allow for machining back of the copper alloy to create a smooth surface having a thickness of from 0.010 inch (0.254 mm) to 0.150 inch (3.18 mm) or more. The layer of copper applied by the plasma spraying has no continuous porosity, and advantageously may readily be employed to sustain a pressure differential during hot isostatic pressing (HIP) bonding of the overall structure to enhance bonding by solid state diffusion between the component parts of the structure.

Schilke, Peter W. (4 Hempshire Ct., Scotia, NY 12302); Muth, Myron C. (R.D. #3, Western Ave., Amsterdam, NY 12010); Schilling, William F. (301 Garnsey Rd., Rexford, NY 12148); Rairden, III, John R. (6 Coronet Ct., Schenectady, NY 12309)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas composition monitor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

A new chemodynamical tool to study the evolution of galaxies in the local Universe: a quick and accurate numerical technique to compute gas cooling rate for any chemical composition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have developed a quick and accurate numerical tool to compute gas cooling whichever its chemical composition.

Nicolas Champavert; Hervé Wozniak

2007-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

142

From the Lab to the real world : sources of error in UF {sub 6} gas enrichment monitoring  

SciTech Connect

Safeguarding uranium enrichment facilities is a serious concern for the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Safeguards methods have changed over the years, most recently switching to an improved safeguards model that calls for new technologies to help keep up with the increasing size and complexity of today’s gas centrifuge enrichment plants (GCEPs). One of the primary goals of the IAEA is to detect the production of uranium at levels greater than those an enrichment facility may have declared. In order to accomplish this goal, new enrichment monitors need to be as accurate as possible. This dissertation will look at the Advanced Enrichment Monitor (AEM), a new enrichment monitor designed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Specifically explored are various factors that could potentially contribute to errors in a final enrichment determination delivered by the AEM. There are many factors that can cause errors in the determination of uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) gas enrichment, especially during the period when the enrichment is being measured in an operating GCEP. To measure enrichment using the AEM, a passive 186-keV (kiloelectronvolt) measurement is used to determine the {sup 235}U content in the gas, and a transmission measurement or a gas pressure reading is used to determine the total uranium content. A transmission spectrum is generated using an x-ray tube and a “notch” filter. In this dissertation, changes that could occur in the detection efficiency and the transmission errors that could result from variations in pipe-wall thickness will be explored. Additional factors that could contribute to errors in enrichment measurement will also be examined, including changes in the gas pressure, ambient and UF{sub 6} temperature, instrumental errors, and the effects of uranium deposits on the inside of the pipe walls will be considered. The sensitivity of the enrichment calculation to these various parameters will then be evaluated. Previously, UF{sub 6} gas enrichment monitors have required empty pipe measurements to accurately determine the pipe attenuation (the pipe attenuation is typically much larger than the attenuation in the gas). This dissertation reports on a method for determining the thickness of a pipe in a GCEP when obtaining an empty pipe measurement may not be feasible. This dissertation studies each of the components that may add to the final error in the enrichment measurement, and the factors that were taken into account to mitigate these issues are also detailed and tested. The use of an x-ray generator as a transmission source and the attending stability issues are addressed. Both analytical calculations and experimental measurements have been used. For completeness, some real-world analysis results from the URENCO Capenhurst enrichment plant have been included, where the final enrichment error has remained well below 1% for approximately two months.

Lombardi, Marcie L.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Reflection mass spectrometry technique for monitoring and controlling composition during molecular beam epitaxy  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of a method for on-line accurate monitoring and precise control of molecular beam epitaxial growth of Groups III-III-V or Groups III-V-V layers in an advanced semiconductor device incorporates reflection mass spectrometry. The reflection mass spectrometry is responsive to intentional perturbations in molecular fluxes incident on a substrate by accurately measuring the molecular fluxes reflected from the substrate. The reflected flux is extremely sensitive to the state of the growing surface and the measurements obtained enable control of newly forming surfaces that are dynamically changing as a result of growth.

Brennan, T.M.; Hammons, B.E.; Tsao, J.Y.

1990-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

144

Reflection mass spectrometry technique for monitoring and controlling composition during molecular beam epitaxy  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for on-line accurate monitoring and precise control of molecular beam epitaxial growth of Groups III-III-V or Groups III-V-V layers in an advanced semiconductor device incorporates reflection mass spectrometry. The reflection mass spectrometry is responsive to intentional perturbations in molecular fluxes incident on a substrate by accurately measuring the molecular fluxes reflected from the substrate. The reflected flux is extremely sensitive to the state of the growing surface and the measurements obtained enable control of newly forming surfaces that are dynamically changing as a result of growth.

Brennan, Thomas M. (Albuquerque, NM); Hammons, B. Eugene (Tijeras, NM); Tsao, Jeffrey Y. (Albuquerque, NM)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Composites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

"Developing Hybrid Polymer Composites with Embedded Shape-Memory Alloy Wires" (Overview), P. Sittner and R. Stalmans, October 2000, pp. 15-20.

146

Field monitoring and evaluation of a residential gas-engine-driven heat pump: Volume 1, Cooling season  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Federal government is the largest single energy consumer in the United States; consumption approaches 1.5 quads/year of energy (1 quad = 10{sup 15} Btu) at a cost valued at nearly $10 billion annually. The US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) supports efforts to reduce energy use and associated expenses in the Federal sector. One such effort, the New Technology Demonstration Program (NTDP), seeks to evaluate new energy-saving US technologies and secure their more timely adoption by the US government. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL)is one of four DOE national multiprogram laboratories that participate in the NTDP by providing technical expertise and equipment to evaluate new, energy-saving technologies being studied and evaluated under that program. This two-volume report describes a field evaluation that PNL conducted for DOE/FEMP and the US Department of Defense (DoD) Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP) to examine the performance of a candidate energy-saving technology -- a gas-engine-driven heat pump. The unit was installed at a single residence at Fort Sam Houston, a US Army base in San Antonio, Texas, and the performance was monitored under the NTDP. Participating in this effort under a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) were York International, the heat pump manufacturer, Gas Research Institute (GRI), the technology developer; City Public Service of San Antonio, the local utility; American Gas Cooling Center (AGCC); Fort Sam Houston; and PNL.

Miller, J.D.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Implements a gas based on the ideal gas law. It should be noted that this model of gases is niave (from many perspectives). ...

148

Gas Turbine Condition Monitoring and Predictive Maintenance Capability Analysis Between Aviation and Power Generation Industries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study compares and contrasts aviation and power generation condition monitoring and fault diagnosis. The report provides an overview of the technology, process, sensor suite and decision-making processes for both industries. The study highlights the level of decision automation and the structure to automatically initiate a maintenance process in aviation as one of the key differences between the two industries. This automation has important potential cost and operational benefits for the power gener...

2007-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

149

Program on Technology Innovation: Combustion Exhaust Gas Monitoring with Laser Absorption Sensors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In current plant practice, the operator of a coal-fired boiler must typically rely on a limited number of point measurements of exhaust-gas oxygen and nitric oxides (NOX) to support combustion and selective catalytic reduction (SCR) control efforts with the goal of meeting emissions reduction mandates. As a possible alternative, tunable diode laser technology offers the potential for enabling a much richer set of measurements to be obtained using in situ, species-specific laser absorption sensors. This t...

2012-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

150

Interaction of Polyethylene and Tritium Gas as Monitored by Raman Spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect

Irradiation of high-density polyethylene by ~1 atm overpressure of T2 gas at 23+- 2 degrees C has been shown to produce severe damage, about 200 MRad dose, within 6 months. Production rate of H2 gas from irradiation due to polymer incorporation of tritium increased quickly within the first 2 months, after which it slowed considerably. It is proposed that outgassing of H2 acted to inhibit diffusion of solubilized HT or T2 into the bulk, thereby limiting increases in polymer T incorporation and thus damage rate. Damage to the HDPE sample was found to be nonuniform. Laser fluorescence from the sample surface irradiated by the supply of T2 gas was ~10{sup}3-fold greater in the energy deposition layer than the fluroescence from bulk polymer after 2 months. This factor was within an order of magnitude of calculated dosages to surface and bulk. Fluorescence from the bulk, apparently caused by unsaturated polyene groups formed during irradiation, grew in time about proportionally to H2 generation and thus dose. An appreciable concentration of radical or ion-radical polyenes at room temperature could be recombined by bleaching for 15 minutes at ~150 degrees C; these species appeared to reform over night at room temperature.

Gill, J. T.

1985-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

151

The chemical composition of the Orion star forming region: stars, gas and dust  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a summary of main results from the studies performed in the series of papers "The chemical composition of the Orion star forming region". We reinvestigate the chemical composition of B-type stars in the Orion OB1 association by means of state-of-the-art stellar atmosphere codes, atomic models and techniques, and compare the resulting abundances with those obtained from the emission line spectra of the Orion nebula (M42), and recent determinations of the Solar chemical composition.

Simón-Díaz, S; Przybilla, N; Stasi?ska, G

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Variability in natural gas fuel composition and its effects on the performance of catalytic combustion systems. Final report for period September 18, 1998 - September 17, 2000  

SciTech Connect

Natural gas is composed primarily of methane with small amounts of higher hydrocarbons and diluents, which vary by region and over time. Compositions of natural gas from domestic and worldwide sources were surveyed with respect to content of higher hydrocarbons and diluents. The survey showed slight compositional variability between most of the gases, with a small fraction of them containing significantly larger contents of higher hydrocarbons than the mean. As gas-fired turbines will be used for power generation all over the world, they will need to tolerate operation with fuels with a wide variety of compositions, particularly with respect to the concentration of higher hydrocarbons and diluents. Subscale catalytic combustion modules typical of those used in gas turbine power generation with ultra low emissions of pollutants were tested in a subscale test system with natural gas alone and with added known levels of hydrocarbon compounds and diluents. The range of compositions tested contained the range observed in the survey. Test results were used to calculate the effect of composition on catalyst performance. The compositional variability is of little consequence to the catalyst for most of the gases in the survey, including nearly all of the gases delivered in the U.S. To accommodate the remaining gases, the catalyst inlet temperature must be lowered to maintain combustor durability. These results support commercial acceptance of catalytic combustion systems for use in natural gas fired turbines in distributed power generation with ultra low NO{sub x} emissions.

Ginter, David; Simchick, Chuck; Schlatter, Jim

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Monitoring the response of the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere to a greenhouse gas scenario  

SciTech Connect

During the past two years a system has been under development to contribute to this monitoring process by making measurement of the downwelling infrared radiance field at moderate spectral resolution. Sensitivity of the measurements to the presence of cirrus cloudiness, and effective particle size in cirrus clouds has been demonstrated. Sensitivity of the measurements to concentration of C0[sub 2] and to the gross temperature structure of a 2CO[sub 2] atmosphere have been modeled, and measurements have been made at various locations to provide a data base for further system evaluation. A temperature retrieval algorithm has been acquired and examined concerning its potential for monitoring temperature and gaseous concentration profiles. A continue research program is described herein that may be divided into three parts. First, continued system development must be pursued. This includes continued attention to the absolute accuracy of the measurements, and implementation of the Path Characterization Algorithm (retrieval code). Second, the value of long term deployment of the system at a site of considerable elevation is necessary. Third, inclusion of a solar transmission capability at moderate resolution is proposed.

Davis, J.M.; Cox, S.K.

1992-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

154

Prediction of the effects of compositional mixing in a reservoir on conversion to natural gas storage.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The increased interest in the development of new Gas Storage Fields over the lastseveral decades has created some interesting challenges for the industry. Most existinggas… (more)

Brannon, Alan W.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

PALLADIUM/COPPER ALLOY COMPOSITE MEMBRANES FOR HIGH TEMPERATURE HYDROGEN SEPARATION FROM COAL-DERIVED GAS STREAMS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

For hydrogen from coal gasification to be used economically, processing approaches that produce a high purity gas must be developed. Palladium and its alloys, nickel, platinum and the metals in Groups 3 to 5 of the Periodic Table are all permeable to hydrogen. Hydrogen permeable metal membranes made of palladium and its alloys are the most widely studied due to their high hydrogen permeability, chemical compatibility with many hydrocarbon containing gas streams, and infinite hydrogen selectivity. Our Pd composite membranes have demonstrated stable operation at 450 C for over 70 days. Coal derived synthesis gas will contain up to 15000 ppm H{sub 2}S as well as CO, CO{sub 2}, N{sub 2} and other gases. Highly selectivity membranes are necessary to reduce the H{sub 2}S concentration to acceptable levels for solid oxide and other fuel cell systems. Pure Pd-membranes are poisoned by sulfur, and suffer from mechanical problems caused by thermal cycling and hydrogen embrittlement. Recent advances have shown that Pd-Cu composite membranes are not susceptible to the mechanical, embrittlement, and poisoning problems that have prevented widespread industrial use of Pd for high temperature H{sub 2} separation. These membranes consist of a thin ({le} 5 {micro}m) film of metal deposited on the inner surface of a porous metal or ceramic tube. With support from this DOE Grant, we have fabricated thin, high flux Pd-Cu alloy composite membranes using a sequential electroless plating approach. Thin, Pd{sub 60}Cu{sub 40} films exhibit a hydrogen flux more than ten times larger than commercial polymer membranes for H{sub 2} separation, resist poisoning by H{sub 2}S and other sulfur compounds typical of coal gas, and exceed the DOE Fossil Energy target hydrogen flux of 80 ml/cm{sup 2} {center_dot} min = 0.6 mol/m{sup 2} {center_dot} s for a feed pressure of 40 psig. Similar Pd-membranes have been operated at temperatures as high as 750 C. We have developed practical electroless plating procedures for fabrication of thin Pd-Cu composite membranes at any scale.

J. Douglas Way

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Neural net controlled tag gas sampling system for nuclear reactors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and system for providing a tag gas identifier to a nuclear fuel rod and analyze escaped tag gas to identify a particular failed nuclear fuel rod. The method and system include disposing a unique tag gas composition into a plenum of a nuclear fuel rod, monitoring gamma ray activity, analyzing gamma ray signals to assess whether a nuclear fuel rod has failed and is emitting tag gas, activating a tag gas sampling and analysis system upon sensing tag gas emission from a failed nuclear rod and evaluating the escaped tag gas to identify the particular failed nuclear fuel rod.

Gross, Kenneth C. (Bolingbrook, IL); Laug, Matthew T. (Idaho Fall, ID); Lambert, John D. B. (Wheaton, IL); Herzog, James P. (Downers Grove, IL)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Chemical composition of water and gas from five nearshore subaqueous springs in Clear Lake, northern California  

SciTech Connect

In 1971 The Geysers-Clear Lake area was selected by the US Geological Survey geothermal research program as a region for extensive investigation. Under this program thermal water samples were first collected in December, 1974 during a winter of normal rainfall; the last samples were collected in February, 1977 during a period of drought. The drought exposed many springs which normally are submerged by Clear Lake. It was demonstrated that gas and water samples can be collected from shallow submerged springs relatively simply using a peristaltic, battery powered pump. Qualitatively sulfate, ammonia, chloride and lithium concentrations may be used to estimate the amount of lake water contamination. The gas sampling technique, using an inverted funnel and long tube to the surface only where visibility was greater than 2 to 3 m. Analyses of near surface compared to deeper submerged gas indicates air contamination in the near surface sample. Thus gas samples should be collected deep underwater or as near the spring vent or gas orifice as possible.

Thompson, J.M.; Sims, J.D.; Yadav, S.; Rymer, M.J.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Calculation of geothermal reservoir temperatures and steam fractions from gas compositions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper deals with the chemical equilibria and physical characteristics of the fluid in the reservoir (temperature, steam fraction with respect to total water, gas/steam ratio, redox conditions), which seem to be responsible for the observed concentrations of some reactive species found in the geothermal fluids (CO2, H2, H2S and CH4). Gas geochemistry is of particular interest in vapor-dominated fields where the fluid discharged consists of almost pure steam containing a limited number of volatile chemical species. Considering several geothermal systems, a good correlation has been obtained among the temperatures calculated from the gas geothermometers and the temperatures measured in the reservoir of evaluated by other physical or chemical methods. 24 refs., 5 figs.

D'Amore, F.; Truesdell, A.H.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Rio_Monitoring  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

RioMonitoring Rio Blanco, Colorado, Site Natural Gas Well Monitoring Results Project Rio Blanco Monitoring Results Fourth Quarter 2010 Separated Water at a Natural Gas Plant,...

160

Innovative coke oven gas cleaning system for retrofit applications. Quarterly environmental monitoring report No. 3, January 1, 1991--December 31, 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bethlehem Steel Corporation (BSC), in conjunction with the Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting a Clean Coal Technology (CCT) project at its Sparrows Point, Maryland Coke Oven Plant. This project combines several existing technologies into an integrated system for removing impurities from Coke Oven Gas (COG) to make it an acceptable fuel. DOE is providing cost-sharing under a Cooperative Agreement with BSC. This Cooperative Agreement requires BSC to develop and conduct an Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) for the Clean Coal Technology project and to report the status of the EMP on a quarterly basis. This report is the third quarterly status report of the EMP. It covers the Environmental Monitoring Plan activities for the full year of 1991 from January 1, 1991 through December 31, 1991, including the forth quarter. See Sections 2, 3 and 4 for status reports of the Project Installation and Commissioning, the Environmental Monitoring activities and the Compliance Monitoring results for the period. Section 5 contains a list of Compliance Reports submitted to regulatory agencies during the period. The EMP describes in detail the environmental monitoring activities to be performed during the project execution. The purpose of the EMP is to: (1) document the extent of compliance of monitoring activities, i.e. those monitoring required to meet permit requirements, (2) confirm the specific impacts predicted in the National Environmental Policy Act documentation, and (3) establish an information base for the assessment of the environmental performance of the technology demonstrated by the project.

Not Available

1992-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas composition monitor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

REMORA 3: The first instrumented fuel experiment with on-line gas composition measurement by acoustic sensor  

SciTech Connect

With the aim to improve the knowledge of nuclear fuel behaviour, the development of advanced instrumentation used during in-pile experiments in Material Testing Reactor (MTR) is necessary. To obtain data on high Burn-Up MOX fuel performance under transient operating conditions, especially in order to differentiate between the kinetics of fission gas and helium releases and to acquire data on the degradation of the fuel conductivity, a highly instrumented in-pile experiment called REMORA 3 has been conducted by CEA and IES (Southern Electronic Inst. - CNRS - Montpellier 2 Univ.). A rodlet extracted from a fuel rod base irradiated for five cycles in a French EDF commercial PWR has been re-instrumented with a fuel centerline thermocouple, a pressure transducer and an advanced acoustic sensor. This latter, patented by CEA and IES, is 1 used in addition to pressure measurement to determine the composition of the gases located in the free volume and the molar fractions of fission gas and helium. This instrumented fuel rodlet has been re-irradiated in a specific rig, GRIFFONOS, located in the periphery of the OSIRIS experimental reactor core at CEA Saclay. First of all, an important design stage and test phases have been performed before the irradiation in order to optimize the response and the accuracy of the sensors: - To control the influence of the temperature on the acoustic sensor behaviour, a thermal mock-up has been built. - To determine the temperature of the gas located in the acoustic cavity as a function of the coolant temperature, and the average temperature of the gases located in the rodlet free volume as a function of the linear heat rate, thermal calculations have been achieved. The former temperature is necessary to calculate the molar fractions of the gases and the latter is used to calculate the total amount of released gas from the internal rod pressure measurements. - At the end of the instrumented rod manufacturing, specific internal free volume and pressure measurements have been carried out. Preliminary calculations of the REMORA 3 experiments have been performed from these measurements, with the aim to determine free volume evolution as a function of linear heat rate history. - A tracer gas has been added to the filling gas in order to optimize the accuracy of the helium balance at the time of the post irradiation examination. The two phases of the REMORA 3 irradiation have been achieved at the end of 2010 in the OSIRIS reactor. Slight acoustic signal degradation, observed during the test under high neutron and gamma flux, has led to an efficiency optimization of the signal processing. The instrumentation ran smoothly and allowed to reach all the experimental objectives. After non destructive examination performed in the Osiris reactor pool, typically gamma spectrometry and neutron radiography, the instrumented rod and the device have been disassembled. Then the instrumented rod has been transported to the LECA facility in Cadarache Centre for post irradiation examination. The internal pressure and volume of the rodlet as well as precise gas composition measurements will be known after puncturing step performed in a hot cell of this facility. That will allow us to qualify the in-pile measurements and to finalize the data which will be used for the validation of the fuel behaviour computer codes. (authors)

Lambert, T.; Muller, E.; Federici, E. [CEA - Nuclear Energy Div., DEN - Fuel Research Dept. - Cadarache, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Rosenkrantz, E.; Ferrandis, J. Y. [CNRS - Univ. Montpellier 2, Southern Electronic Inst., UMR 5214, F-34095 Montpellier (France); Tiratay, X.; Silva, V. [CEA, Nuclear Energy Div., DEN, Nuclear Reactors and Facilities Dept., F-91191 Gif Sur Yvette (France); Machard, D. [EDF, SEPTEN, F-69628 Villeurbanne (France); Trillon, G. [AREVA-NP, F-69456 Lyon (France)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Optical gas monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A frequency modulated spectroscopy system, including a photo-detector, a band-pass filter to filter the output of the photo-detector, and a rectifier to demodulate. The band-pass filter has a relatively high Q factor. With the high Q factor band-pass filter and rectifier, a reference sinusoid is not required for demodulation, resulting in phase-insensitive spectroscopy. Other embodiments are described and claimed.

Wu, Sheng (San Gabriel, CA); Deev, Andrei (Pasadena, CA); Palm, Steve L. (Escondido, CA); Tang, Yongchun (Walnut, CA); Goddard, William A. (Pasadena, CA)

2010-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

163

Innovative coke oven gas cleaning system for retrofit applications. Environmental Monitoring program. Volume 1 - sampling progrom report. Baseline Sampling Program report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bethlehem Steel Corporation (BSC), in conjunction with the Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting a Clean Coal Technology (CCT) project at its Sparrows Point, Maryland Coke Oven Plant. This innovative coke oven gas cleaning system combines several existing technologies into an integrated system for removing impurities from Coke Oven Gas (COG) to make it an acceptable fuel. DOE provided cost-sharing under a Cooperative Agreement with BSC. This Cooperative Agreement requires BSC to develop and conduct and Environmental Monitoring Plan for the Clean Coal Technology project and to report the status of the EMP on a quarterly basis. It also requires the preparation of a final report on the results of the Baseline Compliance and Supplemental Sampling Programs that are part of the EMP and which were conducted prior to the startup of the innovative coke oven gas cleaning system. This report is the Baseline Sampling Program report.

Stuart, L.M.

1994-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

164

Full-scale hot cell test of an acoustic sensor dedicated to measurement of the internal gas pressure and composition of a LWR nuclear fuel rod  

SciTech Connect

A full-scale hot cell test of the internal gas pressure and composition measurement by an acoustic sensor was carried on successfully between 2008 and 2010 on irradiated fuel rods in the LECA-STAR facility at Cadarache Centre. The acoustic sensor has been specially designed in order to provide a nondestructive technique to easily carry out the measurement of the internal gas pressure and gas composition of a LWR nuclear fuel rod. This sensor has been achieved in 2007 and is now covered by an international patent. The first positive result, concerning the device behaviour, is that the sensor-operating characteristics have not been altered by a two-year exposure in the hot cell ambient. We performed the gas characterisation contained in irradiated fuel rods. The acoustic method accuracy is now {+-}5 bars on the pressure measurement result and {+-}0.3% on the evaluated gas composition. The results of the acoustic method were compared to puncture results. Another significant conclusion is that the efficiency of the acoustic method is not altered by the irradiation time, and possible modification of the cladding properties. These results make it possible to demonstrate the feasibility of the technique on irradiated fuel rods. The transducer and the associated methodology are now operational. (authors)

Ferrandis, J. Y.; Rosenkrantz, E.; Leveque, G. [CNRS - Univ. Montpellier 2, Southern Electronic Inst., UMR 5214, F-34095 Montpellier (France); Baron, D. [EDF, R and D, F-77250 Moret sur Loing (France); Segura, J. C. [EDF, SEPTEN, F-69628 Villeurbanne (France); Cecilia, G.; Provitina, O. [CEA - Nuclear Energy Direction DEN - Fuel Studies Dept. - Cadarache, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Design and Tests of a New Rest Gas Ionisation Profile Monitor Installed in the SPS as a Prototype for the LHC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Based on the encouraging results obtained with a Rest Gas Ionization Profile Monitor of a first generation, a new monitor was designed and then installed in the SPS at the beginning of 2002. Its design fulfills all the requirements for a future installation in the LHC where four such monitors are foreseen. After the initial tests performed during the run of 2002, a few upgrading steps appeared necessary mainly in order to cope with the nominal LHC beam characteristics. They were implemented during the subsequent winter stop and the operation of the monitor was resumed in 2003 under various conditions of beam, ranging from a LHC pilot bunch up to beams having in the SPS nominal distributions in bunch number, intensity and energy for injection into the LHC. After a description of the monitor design, the measurements performed with the instrument during these last two years are discussed with the difficulties encountered and the corresponding implemented cures. Data acquired in 2003 on the whole spectrum of LHC ...

Fischer, C; Kramer, Daniel; Perret, R; Sillanoli, M; BIW'04

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Preparation and characterization of composite membrane for high temperature gas separation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A new class of perm-selective inorganic membrane was developed by electroless deposition of palladium thin-film on a microporous {alpha}-alumina ceramic substrate ({phi}39 mm x 2 mm thickness, nominal pore size 150 nm and open porosity {approx} 42 %). The new membrane was characterized by Scanning Electron Micrography (SEM), Energy Dispersive X-ray Analysis (EDX) and conducting permeability experiments with hydrogen, helium, argon and carbon dioxide at temperatures from 473 K to 673 K and feed pressures from 136 kPa to 274 kPa. The results indicate that the membrane has both high permeability and selectivity for hydrogen. The hydrogen transport through the Pd-composite membrane closely followed Sievert's law. A theoretical model is presented to describe the performance of a single-stage permeation process. The model uses a unified mathematical formulation and calculation methods for two flow patterns (cocurrent and countercurrent) with two permeable components and a nonpermeable fraction in the feed and a sweep stream in the permeate. The countercurrent flow pattern is always better than the cocurrent flow pattern with respect to stage cut and membrane area. The effect of flow configuration decreases with increasing membrane selectivity or with decreasing permeate/feed ratio.

Ilias, S.; King, F.G.

1998-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

167

Vapor spill pipe monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is a method and apparatus for continually monitoring the composition of liquefied natural gas flowing from a spill pipe during a spill test by continually removing a sample of the LNG by means of a probe, gasifying the LNG in the probe, and sending the vaporized LNG to a remote ir gas detector for analysis. The probe comprises three spaced concentric tubes surrounded by a water jacket which communicates with a flow channel defined between the inner and middle, and middle and outer tubes. The inner tube is connected to a pump for providing suction, and the probe is positioned in the LNG flow below the spill pipe with the tip oriented partly downward so that LNG is continuously drawn into the inner tube through a small orifice. The probe is made of a high thermal conductivity metal. Hot water is flowed through the water jacket and through the flow channel between the three tubes to provide the necessary heat transfer to flash vaporize the LNG passing through the inner channel of the probe. The gasified LNG is transported through a connected hose or tubing extending from the probe to a remote ir sensor which measures the gas composition.

Bianchini, G.M.; McRae, T.G.

1983-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

168

Composition and sources of carbonaceous aerosols at three contrasting sites in Hong Kong  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

detritus, coal combustion, and natural gas combustion. Diesel engine exhaust dominated fine organic carbonComposition and sources of carbonaceous aerosols at three contrasting sites in Hong Kong Mei Zheng monitoring sites located at roadside, urban, and rural areas in Hong Kong are quantified using gas

Zheng, Mei

169

1762 OPTICS LETTERS / Vol. 24, No. 23 / December 1, 1999 Methane concentration and isotopic composition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and in determining water- vapor levels in natural-gas distribution systems. In these experiments a QC laser designed composition measurements with a mid-infrared quantum-cascade laser A. A. Kosterev, R. F. Curl, and F. K spectroscopy is known to be an effective tool for monitoring atmospheric trace-gas species. The demonstrated

170

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Rulison Monitoring  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Rulison Monitoring Rulison Monitoring Rulison, Colorado, Site Natural Gas Well Monitoring Results Monitoring Results for Natural Gas Wells Near Project Rulison Third Quarter 2013 Monitoring Results for Natural Gas Wells Near Project Rulison Second Quarter 2013 Monitoring Results Natural Gas Wells Near Project Rulison Fourth Quarter 2012 and First Quarter 2013 Monitoring Results Natural Gas Wells Near Project Rulison Third Quarter 2012. Monitoring Results for Natural Gas Wells Near Project Rulison (2nd quarter 2012) Monitoring Results for Natural Gas Wells Near Project Rulison (1st quarter 2012) Monitoring Results Natural Gas Wells Near Project Rulison (4th quarter 2011) Project Rulison Monitoring Results for Water Vapor in Gas at the Holmes Mesa Compressor Station, Garfield County, Colorado (3rd quarter

171

Polyvinylpyrrolidone/Multiwall Carbon Nanotube Composite Based 36 deg. YX LiTaO{sub 3} Surface Acoustic Wave For Hydrogen Gas Sensing Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Poly-vinyl-pyrrolidone (PVP)/Multiwall Carbon Nanotubes (MWNTs) based Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) sensors are fabricated and characterized, and their performances towards hydrogen gas are investigated. The PVP/MWNTs fibers composite are prepared by electrospinning of the composite aqueous solution deposited directly onto the active area of SAW transducers. Via scanning electron microscopy (SEM), the morphology of the deposited nanostructure material is observed. From the dynamic response, frequency shifts of 530 Hz (1%H{sub 2}) and 11.322 kHz (0.25%H{sub 2}) are recorded for the sensors contain of 1.525 g and 1.025 g PVP concentrations, respectively.

Chee, Pei Song; Arsat, Rashidah [Faculty of Electrical Eng and Faculty of Education, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia (Malaysia); He Xiuli [State Key laboratory of Transducer Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Arsat, Mahyuddin [Faculty of Education, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia (Malaysia); Wlodarski, Wojtek [School of Electrical and Computer Eng. RMIT University, Melbourne (Australia); Kalantar-zadeh, Kourosh

2011-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

172

Computer systems and software description for Standard-E+ Hydrogen Monitoring System (SHMS-E+)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The primary function of the Standard-E+ Hydrogen Monitoring System (SHMS-E+) is to determine tank vapor space gas composition and gas release rate, and to detect gas release events. Characterization of the gas composition is needed for safety analyses. The lower flammability limit, as well as the peak burn temperature and pressure, are dependent upon the gas composition. If there is little or no knowledge about the gas composition, safety analyses utilize compositions that yield the worst case in a deflagration or detonation. Knowledge of the true composition could lead to reductions in the assumptions and therefore there may be a potential for a reduction in controls and work restrictions. Also, knowledge of the actual composition will be required information for the analysis that is needed to remove tanks from the Watch List. Similarly, the rate of generation and release of gases is required information for performing safety analyses, developing controls, designing equipment, and closing safety issues. This report outlines the computer system design layout description for the Standard-E+ Hydrogen Monitoring System.

Tate, D.D.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Vapor spill monitoring method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Method for continuous sampling of liquified natural gas effluent from a spill pipe, vaporizing the cold liquified natural gas, and feeding the vaporized gas into an infrared detector to measure the gas composition. The apparatus utilizes a probe having an inner channel for receiving samples of liquified natural gas and a surrounding water jacket through which warm water is flowed to flash vaporize the liquified natural gas.

Bianchini, Gregory M. (Livermore, CA); McRae, Thomas G. (Livermore, CA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP), Environmental Protection...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Surface Water Chapter 11 - Potable Water Chapter 12 - Groundwater Monitoring Chapter 13 - Landfill Gas and Leachate Monitoring Appendix A - Acronyms and Technical Terms Appendix B...

175

Tritium monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for continuously monitoring the concentration of tritium in an aqueous stream. The system pumps a sample of the stream to magnesium-filled combustion tube which reduces the sample to extract hydrogen gas. The hydrogen gas is then sent to an isotope separation device where it is separated into two groups of isotopes: a first group of isotopes containing concentrations of deuterium and tritium, and a second group of isotopes having substantially no deuterium and tritium. The first group of isotopes containing concentrations of deuterium and tritium is then passed through a tritium detector that produces an output proportional to the concentration of tritium detected. Preferably, the detection system also includes the necessary automation and data collection equipment and instrumentation for continuously monitoring an aqueous stream.

Chastagner, Philippe (Augusta, GA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Tritium monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system is described for continuously monitoring the concentration of tritium in an aqueous stream. The system pumps a sample of the stream to magnesium-filled combustion tube which reduces the sample to extract hydrogen gas. The hydrogen gas is then sent to an isotope separation device where it is separated into two groups of isotopes: a first group of isotopes containing concentrations of deuterium and tritium, and a second group of isotopes having substantially no deuterium and tritium. The first group of isotopes containing concentrations of deuterium and tritium is then passed through a tritium detector that produces an output proportional to the concentration of tritium detected. Preferably, the detection system also includes the necessary automation and data collection equipment and instrumentation for continuously monitoring an aqueous stream. 1 fig.

Chastagner, P.

1994-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

177

Tritium monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of a system for continuously monitoring the concentration of tritium in an aqueous stream. The system pumps a sample of the stream to magnesium-filled combustion tube which reduces the sample to extract hydrogen gas. The hydrogen gas is then sent to an isotope separation device where it is separated into two groups of isotopes: a first group of isotopes containing concentrations of deuterium and tritium, and a second group of isotopes having substantially no deuterium and tritium. The first group of isotopes containing concentrations of deuterium and tritium is then passed through a tritium detector that produces an output proportional to the concentration of tritium detected. Preferably, the detection system also includes the necessary automation and data collection equipment and instrumentation for continuously monitoring an aqueous stream.

Chastagner, P.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

178

TWRS hydrogen mitigation gas characterization system design and fabrication engineering task plan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The flammable gas watch-list (FGWL) tanks, which have demonstrated a gas release event (GRE) exceeding 0.625% hydrogen by volume will require additional characterization. The purpose of this additional characterization is to accurately measure the flammable and hazardous gas compositions and resulting lower flammability limit (LFL) of the tank vapor space during baseline and GRE emissions. Data from this characterization will help determine methods to resolve the unreviewed safety questions for the FGWL tanks. This document details organization responsibilities and engineering requirements for the design and fabrication of two gas characterization systems used to monitor flammable gas watch-list tanks.

Straalsund, E.K.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Monitored natural attenuation of manufactured gas plant tar mono- and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in ground water: a 14-year field study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Site 24 was the subject of a 14-year (5110-day) study of a ground water plume created by the disposal of manufactured gas plant (MGP) tar into a shallow sandy aquifer approximately 25 years prior to the study. The ground water plume in 1988 extended from a well-defined source area to a distance of approximately 400 m down gradient. A system of monitoring wells was installed along six transects that ran perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the plume centerline. The MGP tar source was removed from the site in 1991 and a 14-year ground water monitored natural attenuation (MNA) study commenced. The program measured the dissolved mono- and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (MAHs and PAHs) periodically over time, which decreased significantly over the 14-year period. Naphthalene decreased to less than 99% of the original dissolved mass, with mass degradation rates of 0.30 per year (half-life 2.3 years). Bulk attenuation rate constants for plume centerline concentrations over time ranged from 0.33 {+-} 0.09 per year (half-life 2.3 {+-} 0.8 years) for toluene and 0.45 {+-} 0.06 per year (half-life 1.6 {+-} 0.2 years) for naphthalene. The hydrogeologic setting at Site 24, having a sandy aquifer, shallow water table, clay confining layer, and aerobic conditions, was ideal for demonstrating MNA. However, these results demonstrate that MNA is a viable remedial strategy for ground water at sites impacted by MAHs and PAHs after the original source is removed, stabilized, or contained.

Neuhauser, E.F.; Ripp, J.A.; Azzolina, N.A.; Madsen, E.L.; Mauro, D.M.; Taylor, T. [Foth Infrastructure & Environment LLC, Green Bay, WI (United States)

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

In situ parametric study of alkali release in pulverized coal combustion: Effects of operating conditions and gas composition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work concerns a parametric study of alkali release in a lab-scale, pulverized coal combustor (drop tube reactor) at atmospheric pressure. Measurements were made at steady reactor conditions using excimer laser fragmentation fluorescence (ELIF) and with direct optical access to the flue gas pipe. In this way, absolute gas-phase alkali species could be determined in situ, continuously, with sub-ppb sensitivity, directly in the flue gas. A hard coal was fired in the range 1000-1300{sup o}C, for residence times in the range 3-5 s and for air numbers {lambda} (air/fuel ratios) from 1.15 to 1.50. In addition, the amount of chlorine, water vapor and sulfur, respectively, was increased in known amounts by controlled dosing of HCl, H{sub 2}O and SO{sub 2} into the combustion gas to determine effects of these components on release or capture of the alkali species. The experimental results are also compared with values calculated using ash/fuel analyses and sequential extraction to obtain a fuller picture of alkali release in pulverized fuel combustion. 27 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

H. Schuermann; P.B. Monkhouse; S. Unterberger; K.R.G. Hein [Universitaet Stuttgart, Stuttgart (Germany). Institut fuer Verfahrenstechnik und Dampfkesselwesen

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas composition monitor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Feasibility of Monitoring Gas Hydrate Production with Geophysical Methods Feasibility of Monitoring Gas Hydrate Production with Geophysical Methods Authors: M.B. Kowalsky...

182

Pore-scale mechanisms of gas flow in tight sand reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

adjacent fractures. Natural gas composition consists mostlyNatural gas is called wet or dry depending on how large is the lique?able portion of gas composition.

Silin, D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Fluid-inclusion gas composition from an active magmatic-hydrothermal system: a case study of The Geysers, California geothermal field  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrothermal alteration and the active vapor-dominated geothermal system at The Geysers, CA are related to a composite hypabyssal granitic pluton emplaced beneath the field 1.1 to 1.2 million years ago. Deep drill holes provide a complete transect across the thermal system and samples of the modem-day steam. The hydrothermal system was liquid-dominated prior to formation of the modem vapor-dominated regime at 0.25 to 0.28 Ma. Maximum temperatures and salinities ranged from 440 C and 44 wt. percent NaCl equivalent in the biotite hornfels adjacent to the pluton to 305 C and 5 wt. percent NaCl equivalent at distances of 1730 m from the intrusive contact. The major, minor, and noble gas compositions of fluid inclusions in the hydrothermally altered rocks were integrated with microthermometric and mineralogic data to determine their sources and the effects of mixing and boiling. Major and minor gaseous species were released from the inclusions by crushing or thermal decrepitation; noble gases were released by crushing. The samples were analyzed by mass spectrometry. The analyses document the presence of magmatic, crustal, and meteoric components in the trapped fluids. Hydrothermal fluids present during the liquid-dominated phase of the system contained gaseous species derived mainly from crustal and magmatic sources. At The Geysers, N-2/Ar ratios greater than 525 and He-3/He-4 ratios of 6-10.7 Ra are diagnostic of a magmatic component. Crustal gas has CO2/CH4 ratios less than 4, N-2/Ar ratios between 45 and 525, and low 3He/4He ratios (0.5 Ra). Meteoric fluids have CO2/CH4 ratios greater than 4 and N2/Ar ratios between 38 (air-saturated water) and 84 (air). However, N-2/Ar ratios between 15 and 110 can result from boiling. Ratios less than 15 reflect the incorporation of N-2 into NH3-bearing clay minerals. In the central Geysers, the incursion of meteoric fluids occurred during the transition from the liquid- to vapor-dominated regime. Variations in the relative CH4, CO2, and H-2 contents of the gas analyses demonstrate that boiling took place under open-system conditions. The gas data indicate that the inclusions have remained closed to the diffusion of He and H-2 since their formation.

Moore, Joseph N.; Norman, David I.; Kennedy, B. Mack.

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Gas tracer composition and method. [Process to determine whether any porous underground methane storage site is in fluid communication with a gas producing well  

SciTech Connect

A process is described for determining whether any porous underground gaseous methane storage sites is in fluid communication with a gas producing well, and if there is fluid communication, determining which site is in the fluid communication comprising injecting a different gaseous tracer mixture into each of the sites at some location in each of the site in an amount such that the presence of the tracer mixture will be detectable in the gaseous methane stored therein, each of the mixture having the properties of (1) not occurring in natural supplies of methane, (2) diffusing through any underground methane storage site in a manner very similar in rate to methane, and (3) being substantially insoluble in petroleum distillates, after a period of time sufficient for each of the tracer mixtures to diffuse through the underground site from its injection location to the well, withdrawing a sample gaseous product from the well, testing the sample gaseous product for the presence of each of the tracer mixtures.

Malcosky, N.D.; Koziar, G.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Data Observations on Double Shell Tank (DST) Flammable Gas Watch List Tank Behavior  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report provides the data from the retained gas sampler, void fraction instrument, ball rheometer, standard hydrogen monitoring system, and other tank data pertinent to gas retention and release behavior in the waste stored in double-shelled Flammable Gas Watch List tanks at Hanford. These include tanks 241-AN-103,241-AN-104, 241-AN-105, 241-AW-101, 241-SY-101, and 241-SY-103. The tanks and the waste they contain are described in terms of fill history and chemistry. The results of mixer pump operation and recent waste transfers and back-dilution in SY-101 are also described. In-situ measurement and monitoring systems are described and the data are summarized under the categories of thermal behavior, waste configuration and properties, gas generation and composition, gas retention and historical gas release behavior.

HEDENGREN, D.C.

2000-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

186

Liquid crystalline composites containing phyllosilicates  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides barrier films having reduced gas permeability for use in packaging and coating applications. The barrier films comprise an anisotropic liquid crystalline composite layer formed from phyllosilicate-polymer compositions. Phyllosilicate-polymer liquid crystalline compositions of the present invention can contain a high percentage of phyllosilicate while remaining transparent. Because of the ordering of the particles in the liquid crystalline composite, barrier films comprising liquid crystalline composites are particularly useful as barriers to gas transport.

Chaiko; David J. (Naperville, IL)

2007-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

187

Protecting against physical resource monitoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper considers the problem of resource monitoring. We consider the scenario where an adversary is physically monitoring on the resource access, such as the electricity line or gas pipeline, of a user in order to learn private information about ... Keywords: differential privacy, resource monitoring, smart grids, smart metering

Gergely Acs; Claude Castelluccia; William Lecat

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Monitor Worldwide  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NRC guidance on the need for integration of performance assessment and data collection NUREG-1573 Monitor Scientific Monitoring Monitoring * Two distinct situations - A proposed...

189

FEMP Technology Brief: Boiler Combustion Control and Monitoring...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Boiler Combustion Control and Monitoring System FEMP Technology Brief: Boiler Combustion Control and Monitoring System October 7, 2013 - 9:12am Addthis This composite photo shows...

190

Composition of carbonaceous smoke particles from prescribed burning of a Canadian boreal forest: 1. Organic aerosol characterization by gas chromatography  

SciTech Connect

In this study we examine the molecular organic constituents (C8 to C40 lipid compounds) collected as smoke particles from a Canadian boreal forest prescribed burn. Of special interest are (1) the molecular identity of polar organic aerosols, and (2) the amount of polar organic matter relative to the total mass of aerosol particulate carbon. Organic extracts of smoke aerosol particles show complex distributions of the lipid compounds when analyzed by capillary gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The molecular constituents present as smoke aerosol are grouped into non-polar (hydrocarbons) and polar {minus}2 oxygen atoms) subtractions. The dominant chemical species found in the boreal forest smoke aerosol are unaltered resin compounds (C20 terpenes) which are abundant in unburned conifer wood, plus thermally altered wood lignins and other polar aromatic hydrocarbons. Our results show that smoke aerosols contain molecular tracers which are related to the biofuel consumed. These smoke tracers can be related structurally back to the consumed softwood and hardwood vegetation. In addition, combustion of boreal forest materials produces smoke aerosol particles that are both oxygen-rich and chemically complex, yielding a carbonaceous aerosol matrix that is enriched in polar substances. As a consequence, emissions of carbonaceous smoke particles from large-scale combustion of boreal forest land may have a disproportionate effect on regional atmospheric chemistry and on cloud microphysical processes.

Mazurek, M.A.; Laterza, C.; Newman, L.; Daum, P. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Cofer, W.R. III; Levine, J.S. [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Hampton, VA (United States). Langley Research Center; Winstead, E.L. [Science Applications International Corporation, Hampton, VA (United States)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Monitoring of tritium  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The fluid from a breeder nuclear reactor, which may be the sodium cooling fluid or the helium reactor-cover-gas, or the helium coolant of a gas-cooled reactor passes over the portion of the enclosure of a gaseous discharge device which is permeable to hydrogen and its isotopes. The tritium diffused into the discharge device is radioactive producing beta rays which ionize the gas (argon) in the discharge device. The tritium is monitored by measuring the ionization current produced when the sodium phase and the gas phase of the hydrogen isotopes within the enclosure are in equilibrium.

Corbett, James A. (Turtle Creek, PA); Meacham, Sterling A. (Greensburg, PA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Innovative coke oven gas cleaning system for retrofit applications. Quarterly environmental monitoring report No. 2, July 1, 1991--September 30, 1991  

SciTech Connect

The EMP consists of a Compliance Monitoring Sampling Program and a Supplemental monitoring Sampling Program. The Compliance Monitoring Sampling Program will be conducted during a summer and a winter Baseline periods during the Pre-Construction/Construction phases of the Project and during a summer and a winter period following the successful Startup and Operational phase of the completed Project. compliance monitoring consist of conducting all the sampling and observation programs associated with existing required Federal, State, and Local Regulations, Permits and Orders. These include air, water, and waste monitoring and OSHA and NESHAP monitoring. The Supplemental Monitoring Program will also be conducted during a summer and a winter Baseline periods during the Pre-Construction/Construction phases of the Demonstration Facility and during a summer and a winter period following the successful startup and Operational phase of the completed Facility. Supplemental Monitoring includes sampling of 27 additional streams that are important to measure operational or environmental performance and impacts of the installation of the new COG treatment facilities.

Not Available

1992-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

193

NATURAL GAS VARIABILITY IN CALIFORNIA: ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS AND DEVICE PERFORMANCE EXPERIMENTAL EVALUATION OF POLLUTANT EMISSIONS FROM RESIDENTIAL APPLIANCES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of variations in natural gas composition and physical 2.1.2. Fuel Gas Compositions Both domestic natural gas and natural gas appliances vary with (are affected by) variability in fuel  composition 

Singer, Brett C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Combustible gas sensor interference test report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Result of Laboratory Interference testing of the Sierra Monitor Corporation Gas Sensor, number model 4101-2, are documented.

Webb, B.J., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

195

Vapor concentration monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for monitoring the concentration of a vapor, such as heavy water, having at least one narrow bandwidth in its absorption spectrum, in a sample gas such as air. The air is drawn into a chamber in which the vapor content is measured by means of its radiation absorption spectrum. High sensitivity is obtained by modulating the wavelength at a relatively high frequency without changing its optical path, while high stability against zero drift is obtained by the low frequency interchange of the sample gas to be monitored and of a reference sample. The variable HDO background due to natural humidity is automatically corrected.

Bayly, John G. (Deep River, CA); Booth, Ronald J. (Deep River, CA)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Gas Generation Testing of Plutonium Dioxide  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrogen and oxygen gas generation rates were measured for purified plutonium oxide (PuO2) powder as a function of water content, specific surface area (SSA), dose rate, and initial fill gas composition. Gas generation rates were found to increase with water content and dose rate and to decrease with specific surface area for given water content. Hydrogen generation rates were similar in air, nitrogen and argon, but oxygen generation rates were greater in nitrogen and argon than in air. The potential for reaching a steady state container pressure for PuO2 of given calcination temperature (i.e., SSA) and water content was evaluated by adding hydrogen to some test vessels and monitoring the effect on container pressure over time

Duffey, J.M.

2002-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

197

Validation of the Greenhouse Gas Balance of the Netherlands. Observational constraints on CO2, CH4 and N2O from atmospheric monitoring station Lutjewad.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In this PhD thesis a method is described to determine the atmospheric greenhouse gas emissions for a large area using in-situ measurements. The method was… (more)

Laan, Sander van der

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Monitoring gas retention and slurry transport during the transfer of waste from Tank 241-C-106 to Tank 241-AY-102  

SciTech Connect

The retained gas volume can be estimated by several methods. All of these methods have significant uncertainties, but together they form a preponderance of evidence that describes the gas retention behavior of the tank. The methods are (1) an increase in nonconvective layer thickness; (2) a waste surface level rise (surface level effect [SLE] model); (3) the barometric pressure effect (BPE model); (4) direct void measurement; and (5) the consequences of the transfer process. The nonconvective layer thickness can be determined with sufficient accuracy to describe the overall waste configuration by means of temperature profiles or densitometer indications. However, the presence of a nonconvective layer does not necessarily indicate significant gas retention, and small changes in layer thickness that could quantify gas retention cannot be detected reliably with the methods available. The primary value of this measurement is in establishing the actual {open_quotes}fluffing factor{close_quotes} for thermal calculations. Surface level rise is not a useful measure of gas retention in Tank 241-C-106 (C-106) since the waste level fluctuates with regular makeup water additions. In Tank 241-AY-102 (AY-102) with the existing ventilation system it should be possible to determine the gas retention rate within 30-60% uncertainty from the surface level rise, should a significant rise be observed. The planned ventilation system upgrades in AY- 102 will greatly reduce the exhaust flow and the headspace humidity, and the evaporation rate should be significantly lower when transfers begin. This could reduce the uncertainty in gas retention rate estimates to around {+-} 10%.

Stewart, C.W.; Erian, F.F.; Meyer, P.A. [and others

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Monitoring informs management  

SciTech Connect

Improved regional monitoring and reporting of greenhouse-gas emissions depends on accurate estimates of emissions from different land-use regimes. An analysis suggests that measuring emissions per crop yield may be an optimum metric for refining land-management decisions.

West, Tristram O.

2011-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

200

Landfill Gas Fueled HCCI Demonstration System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Journal of Engineering for Gas Turbines and Power, 121:569-operations with natural gas: Fuel composition implications,”USA ICEF2006-1578 LANDFILL GAS FUELED HCCI DEMONSTRATION

Blizman, Brandon J.; Makel, Darby B.; Mack, John Hunter; Dibble, Robert W.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas composition monitor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Radiogenic gas accumulation in TRU waste storage drums  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A field experiment was conducted over a four-year time span to determine the effect of high-activity transuranic (TRU) waste on the atmosphere within TRU waste storage drums typical of those generated in Savannah River Plant operation. Routine gas composition analyses showed that a significant amount of hydrogen can accumulate in drums that contain high alpha activity, and that flammable gas mixtures could form in such drums in spite of the radiolytic consumption of oxygen. According to this study, gas pressure accumulation does not pose a threat to the integrity of the TRU waste containers that are now being stored at the Savannah River Plant. Therefore, the 20-year storage criterion is still viable. However, the continued avoidance of a perfectly gas-tight drum seal (e.g., epoxy, metal welding) is recommended. The test drums will continue to be monitored.

Ryan, J.P.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Development of Nano-crystalline Doped-Ceramic Enabled Fiber Sensors for High Temperature In-Situ Monitoring of Fossil Fuel Gases  

SciTech Connect

This is a final technical report for the first project year from July 1, 2005 to Jan 31, 2012 for DoE/NETL funded project â??DE-FC26-05NT42439: Development of Nanocrystalline Doped-Ceramic Enabled Fiber Sensors for High Temperature In-Situ Monitoring of Fossil Fuel Gases.â?ť This report summarizes the technical progresses and achievements towards the development of novel nanocrystalline doped ceramic material-enabled optical fiber sensors for in situ and real time monitoring the gas composition of flue or hot gas streams involved in fossil-fuel based power generation and hydrogen production.

Hai Xiao; Junhang Dong; Jerry Lin; Van Romero

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

203

Innovative coke oven gas cleaning system for retrofit applications. Quarterly environmental monitoring report No. 1, January 1, 1991--June 30, 1991  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The coke plant at the Sparrows Point Plant consist of three coke oven batteries and two coal chemical plants. The by-product coke oven gas (COG) consists primarily of hydrogen, methane, carbon monoxide, nitrogen and contaminants consisting of tars, light oils (benzene, toluene, and xylene) hydrogen sulfide, ammonia, water vapor and other hydrocarbons. This raw coke oven gas needs to be cleaned of most of its contaminants before it can be used as a fuel at other operations at the Sparrows Point Plant. In response to environmental concerns, BSC decided to replace much of the existing coke oven gas treatment facilities in the two coal chemical Plants (A and B) with a group of technologies consisting of: Secondary Cooling of the Coke oven Gas; Hydrogen Sulfide Removal; Ammonia Removal; Deacification of Acid Gases Removed; Ammonia Distillation and Destruction; and, Sulfur Recovery. This combination of technologies will replace the existing ammonia removal system, the final coolers, hydrogen sulfide removal system and the sulfur recovery system. The existing wastewater treatment, tar recovery and one of the three light oil recovery systems will continue to be used to support the new innovative combination of COG treatment technologies.

Not Available

1992-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

204

Measurements and monitoring of the hydrogen and deuterium contents in the plasma of the L-2M stellarator  

SciTech Connect

The program of experiments on ITER includes a sequential change of the plasma isotopic composition from pure hydrogen plasma in the initial stage of research to deuterium and, then, deuterium-tritium plasma with a gradual increase in the tritium content. In this context, the influence of the plasma isotopic composition on the processes of plasma heating and confinement are being actively studied on the existing tokamaks and stellarators. The plasma isotopic composition also depends on the composition of the gas desorbed from the vacuum chamber wall in the course of recycling. Therefore, the rate of change of the plasma isotopic composition after altering the injected gas also depends on the rate of change of the isotopic composition of the gas absorbed in the wall. These effects were studied in the experiments carried out on the L-2M stellarator in which the working gas was changed from hydrogen to deuterium. Spectral measurements of the intensity ratio between the H{sub {alpha}} and D{sub {alpha}} lines made it possible to monitor the isotopic composition of the plasma in the course of cleaning of the chamber wall from earlier absorbed hydrogen and its replacement with deuterium. After returning to hydrogen, the rate of cleaning of the wall from deuterium was also determined. The results of these experiments show that the plasma isotopic composition varies exponentially with the number N of shots after transition to another isotope, {approx}exp(-N/47). Hence, the isotopic composition can be changed almost completely over 2 to 3 working days. This allows one to study the influence of the plasma isotopic composition on plasma confinement during the same experimental session.

Voronov, G. S.; Berezhetskii, M. S. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Prokhorov General Physics Institute (Russian Federation)

2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

205

Carbon Storage Monitoring, Verification and Accounting Research |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Monitoring, Verification and Accounting Research Monitoring, Verification and Accounting Research Carbon Storage Monitoring, Verification and Accounting Research Reliable and cost-effective monitoring, verification and accounting (MVA) techniques are an important part of making geologic sequestration a safe, effective, and acceptable method for greenhouse gas control. MVA of geologic storage sites is expected to serve several purposes, including addressing safety and environmental concerns; inventory verification; project and national accounting of greenhouse gas emissions reductions at geologic storage sites; and evaluating potential regional, national, and international greenhouse gas reduction goals. The goal of our program area is to develop and demonstrate a broad portfolio of technologies, applications, and accounting requirements that

206

Acidic gas capture by diamines  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Compositions and methods related to the removal of acidic gas. In particular, the present disclosure relates to a composition and method for the removal of acidic gas from a gas mixture using a solvent comprising a diamine (e.g., piperazine) and carbon dioxide. One example of a method may involve a method for removing acidic gas comprising contacting a gas mixture having an acidic gas with a solvent, wherein the solvent comprises piperazine in an amount of from about 4 to about 20 moles/kg of water, and carbon dioxide in an amount of from about 0.3 to about 0.9 moles per mole of piperazine.

Rochelle, Gary (Austin, TX); Hilliard, Marcus (Missouri City, TX)

2011-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

207

RADIATION MONITORING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Monitoring for Radiation Protection of Workers" in ICRPNo. 9, in "Advances in Radiation Protection and Dosimetry inDosimetry f o r Stray Radiation Monitoring on the CERN S i t

Thomas, R.H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Monitoring the response of the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere to a greenhouse gas scenario. Final progress report, May 1, 1990--December 15, 1992  

SciTech Connect

During the past two years a system has been under development to contribute to this monitoring process by making measurement of the downwelling infrared radiance field at moderate spectral resolution. Sensitivity of the measurements to the presence of cirrus cloudiness, and effective particle size in cirrus clouds has been demonstrated. Sensitivity of the measurements to concentration of C0{sub 2} and to the gross temperature structure of a 2CO{sub 2} atmosphere have been modeled, and measurements have been made at various locations to provide a data base for further system evaluation. A temperature retrieval algorithm has been acquired and examined concerning its potential for monitoring temperature and gaseous concentration profiles. A continue research program is described herein that may be divided into three parts. First, continued system development must be pursued. This includes continued attention to the absolute accuracy of the measurements, and implementation of the Path Characterization Algorithm (retrieval code). Second, the value of long term deployment of the system at a site of considerable elevation is necessary. Third, inclusion of a solar transmission capability at moderate resolution is proposed.

Davis, J.M.; Cox, S.K.

1992-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

209

Composition and quantities of retained gas measured in Hanford waste tanks 241-U-103, S-106, BY-101, and BY-109  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report provides the results obtained for the single-shell tanks (SSTs) sampled with the Retained Gas Sampler (RGS) during 1997: Tanks 241-U-103, 241-S-106, 241-BY-101, and 241-BY-109. The RGS is a modified version of the core sampler used at Hanford. It is designed specifically to be used in concert with the gas extraction equipment in the hot cell to capture and extrude a gas-containing waste sample in a hermetically sealed system. The four tanks represent several different types of flammable gas SSTs. Tank U-103 is on the Flammable Gas Watch List (FGWL) and is one of the highest-priority group of SSTs that show evidence of significant gas retention. Tank S-106, though not a FGWL tank, has a uniquely high barometric pressure response and continuing rapid surface level rise, indicating a large and increasing volume of retained gas. Tanks BY-101 and BY-109 are not on the FGWL but were chosen to test the effect of recent salt-well pumping on gas retention. Section 2 of this report provides an overview of the process by which retained gases in the Hanford tanks are sampled and analyzed. A detailed description of the procedure used to reduce and analyze the data is provided in Section 3. Tank-by-tank results are covered in Section 4 (with the data presented in the order in which the tanks were sampled), and an RGS system performance overview is given in Section 5. Section 6 presents conclusions from these analyses and recommendations for further research. The cited references are listed in Section 7. Appendix A describes the procedures used to extract gas and ammonia from the samples, Appendix B contains detailed laboratory data from each of the tanks, and Appendix C gives field sampling data.

Mahoney, L.A.; Antoniak, Z.I.; Bates, J.M.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Solvent Formulation for CO2 Separation from Flue Gas Streams  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

gas characteristics (composition, pressure, temperature, etc.) and the treated gas specifications (i.e. the process requirements). These two elements provide a preliminary...

211

Natural Gas Futures Prices (NYMEX) - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The natural gas liquids (NGL) composite price is derived from daily Bloomberg spot price data for natural gas liquids at Mont Belvieu, Texas, ...

212

Multizone infiltration monitoring system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A multizone infiltration monitoring system (MIMS) using a single tracer gas has been developed. MIMS measures zonal infiltration and exfiltration as well as interzonal air movement rates. The system has been used at the 4-zone test house at the SERI interim field site, and this paper presents preliminary results. The present system can determine zonal infiltration rates, and the results show significant differences in infiltration rates for the various zones.

Wortman, D.N.; Burch, J.; Judkoff, R.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Controls on Gas Hydrate Formation and Dissociation  

SciTech Connect

The main objectives of the project were to monitor, characterize, and quantify in situ the rates of formation and dissociation of methane hydrates at and near the seafloor in the northern Gulf of Mexico, with a focus on the Bush Hill seafloor hydrate mound; to record the linkages between physical and chemical parameters of the deposits over the course of one year, by emphasizing the response of the hydrate mound to temperature and chemical perturbations; and to document the seafloor and water column environmental impacts of hydrate formation and dissociation. For these, monitoring the dynamics of gas hydrate formation and dissociation was required. The objectives were achieved by an integrated field and laboratory scientific study, particularly by monitoring in situ formation and dissociation of the outcropping gas hydrate mound and of the associated gas-rich sediments. In addition to monitoring with the MOSQUITOs, fluid flow rates and temperature, continuously sampling in situ pore fluids for the chemistry, and imaging the hydrate mound, pore fluids from cores, peepers and gas hydrate samples from the mound were as well sampled and analyzed for chemical and isotopic compositions. In order to determine the impact of gas hydrate dissociation and/or methane venting across the seafloor on the ocean and atmosphere, the overlying seawater was sampled and thoroughly analyzed chemically and for methane C isotope ratios. At Bush hill the pore fluid chemistry varies significantly over short distances as well as within some of the specific sites monitored for 440 days, and gas venting is primarily focused. The pore fluid chemistry in the tub-warm and mussel shell fields clearly documented active gas hydrate and authigenic carbonate formation during the monitoring period. The advecting fluid is depleted in sulfate, Ca Mg, and Sr and is rich in methane; at the main vent sites the fluid is methane supersaturated, thus bubble plumes form. The subsurface hydrology exhibits both up-flow and down-flow of fluid at rates that range between 0.5 to 214 cm/yr and 2-162 cm/yr, respectively. The fluid flow system at the mound and background sites are coupled having opposite polarities that oscillate episodically between 14 days to {approx}4 months. Stability calculations suggest that despite bottom water temperature fluctuations, of up to {approx}3 C, the Bush Hill gas hydrate mound is presently stable, as also corroborated by the time-lapse video camera images that did not detect change in the gas hydrate mound. As long as methane (and other hydrocarbon) continues advecting at the observed rates the mound would remain stable. The {_}{sup 13}C-DIC data suggest that crude oil instead of methane serves as the primary electron-donor and metabolic substrate for anaerobic sulfate reduction. The oil-dominated environment at Bush Hill shields some of the methane bubbles from being oxidized both anaerobically in the sediment and aerobically in the water column. Consequently, the methane flux across the seafloor is higher at Bush hill than at non-oil rich seafloor gas hydrate regions, such as at Hydrate Ridge, Cascadia. The methane flux across the ocean/atmosphere interface is as well higher. Modeling the methane flux across this interface at three bubble plumes provides values that range from 180-2000 {_}mol/m{sup 2} day; extrapolating it over the Gulf of Mexico basin utilizing satellite data is in progress.

Miriam Kastner; Ian MacDonald

2006-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

214

Testing Ceramic Matrix Composites – Challenges, Pitfalls ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advanced Environmental Barrier Coatings for Gas Turbine Applications · Ceramic Matrix Composites for Nuclear and Fusion Energy · Crack Propagation in SiC ...

215

Reflred - Monitor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... power bumps due to weather conditions affecting the electrical supply), so use with caution. Be careful when mixing monitor and time data in the ...

216

NIST Fluid Metrology Calibration Services - Natural Gas Flow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... control, meaning the turbine meters as well as all other auxiliary measurements (eg, temperature, pressure, frequency, gas composition) are ...

2013-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

217

Ammonia Monitor Lab Test Verification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The increasing use of post combustion NOx control systems such as Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) and Selective Non-Catalytic Reduction (SNCR) has heightened the need for reliable continuous monitoring of ammonia slip. This report describes laboratory tests conducted to assess the ability of the Norsk Elektro Optik's (NEO) LaserGas II tunable diode laser monitor to measure ammonia under highly controlled conditions over a typical range of process conditions.

2007-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

218

PEM fuel cell monitoring system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Method and apparatus are disclosed for monitoring the performance of H{sub 2}--O{sub 2} PEM fuel cells. Outputs from a cell/stack voltage monitor and a cathode exhaust gas H{sub 2} sensor are corrected for stack operating conditions, and then compared to predetermined levels of acceptability. If certain unacceptable conditions coexist, an operator is alerted and/or corrective measures are automatically undertaken. 2 figs.

Meltser, M.A.; Grot, S.A.

1998-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

219

PEM fuel cell monitoring system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Method and apparatus for monitoring the performance of H.sub.2 --O.sub.2 PEM fuel cells. Outputs from a cell/stack voltage monitor and a cathode exhaust gas H.sub.2 sensor are corrected for stack operating conditions, and then compared to predetermined levels of acceptability. If certain unacceptable conditions coexist, an operator is alerted and/or corrective measures are automatically undertaken.

Meltser, Mark Alexander (Pittsford, NY); Grot, Stephen Andreas (West Henrietta, NY)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Microsoft Word - RBL-RUL_Gas-Plant  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Page 1 Project Rulison Monitoring Results For Separated Water at a Natural Gas Plant, Parachute, Colorado U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Grand Junction,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas composition monitor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Standard-C hydrogen monitoring system. Acceptance test report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Project W-369, Watch List Tank Hydrogen Monitors, installed a Standard-C Hydrogen Monitoring System (SHMS) on Flammable Gas Watch List waste tank 104-AN. This document is the acceptance test report for the acceptance testing of the SHMS.

Lott, D.T.

1995-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

222

Wyoming mineral development monitoring system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The monitoring system covers, or will cover, all segments of the mineral industry except oil and gas exploration under one of eight main sections: coal uranium, bentonite, power plants, refineries, gas plants, synthetic fuels, trona, and others. Projects are grouped alphabetically by county and indexed by county, commodity, and company. Index maps all the location of projects within the state. A notebook format allows easy updating of information on ownership, production, numbers of employees, contracts, etc.

Not Available

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Influence of gas feed composition and pressure on the catalytic conversion of CO{sub 2} to hydrocarbons using a traditional cobalt-based Fischer-Tropsch catalyst  

SciTech Connect

The hydrogenation of CO{sub 2} using a traditional Fischer-Tropsch Co-Pt/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst for the production of valuable hydrocarbon materials is investigated. The ability to direct product distribution was measured as a function of different feed gas ratios of H{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} (3:1, 2:1, and 1:1) as well as operating pressures (ranging from 450 to 150 psig). As the feed gas ratio was changed from 3:1 to 2:1 and 1:1, the production distribution shifted from methane toward higher chain hydrocarbons. This change in feed gas ratio is believed to lower the methanation ability of Co in favor of chain growth, with possibly two different active sites for methane and C2-C4 products. Furthermore, with decreasing pressure, the methane conversion drops slightly in favor of C{sub 2}-C{sub 4} paraffins. Even though under certain reaction conditions product distribution can be shifted slightly away from the formation of methane, the catalyst studied behaves like a methanation catalyst in the hydrogenation of CO{sub 2}. 36 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

Robert W. Dorner; Dennis R. Hardy; Frederick W. Williams; Burtron H. Davis; Heather D. Willauer [Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC (United States). Navy Technology Center for Safety and Survivability Branch

2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

224

NETL: News Release - DOE Technology Monitors CO2 Injection in...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3, 2008 DOE Technology Monitors CO2 Injection in Australian Gas Field CSLF Project Demonstrates Unique Carbon Sequestration Technologies WASHINGTON, D.C. - Australia has launched...

225

HIGHLIGHTS Fossil Energy Techline, "DOE Technology Monitors CO  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HIGHLIGHTS Fossil Energy Techline, "DOE Technology Monitors CO 2 Injection in Australian Gas Field." On April 2, Australia launched the Otway Basin Pilot Project - the first carbon...

226

Advanced optical sensor for monitoring and control of multiple...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced optical sensor for monitoring and control of multiple gas and turbine-blade properties University of Wisconsin - Madison Department of Mechanical Engineering Principal...

227

UNFCCC-Consolidated baseline and monitoring methodology for landfill...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Facebook icon Twitter icon UNFCCC-Consolidated baseline and monitoring methodology for landfill gas project activities Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name:...

228

Gas Chromatography Laboratory Proficiency Testing Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lab Proficiency Testing provider for Gas Chromatography to determine Fatty Acid Composition and Iodine Value using AOCS methods Ce 1-62 and Cd 1c-85. Gas Chromatography Laboratory Proficiency Testing Program Laboratory Proficiency Program (LPP) aocs appl

229

Weld Monitor  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Monitoring of Laser Beam Welding Monitoring of Laser Beam Welding Using Infrared Weld Emissions P. G. Sanders, J. S. Keske, G. Kornecki, and K. H. Leong Technology Development Division Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, IL 60439 USA The submitted manuscript has been authorized by a contractor of the U. S. Government under contract No. W-31-109-ENG-38. Accordingly, the U. S. Government retains a non-exclusive, royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published form of this contribution, or allow others to do so, for U. S. Government purposes. Abstract A non-obtrusive, pre-aligned, solid-state device has been developed to monitor the primary infrared emissions during laser welding. The weld monitor output is a 100-1000 mV signal that depends on the beam power and weld characteristics. The DC level of this signal is related to weld

230

Microfabricated fuel heating value monitoring device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A microfabricated fuel heating value monitoring device comprises a microfabricated gas chromatography column in combination with a catalytic microcalorimeter. The microcalorimeter can comprise a reference thermal conductivity sensor to provide diagnostics and surety. Using microfabrication techniques, the device can be manufactured in production quantities at a low per-unit cost. The microfabricated fuel heating value monitoring device enables continuous calorimetric determination of the heating value of natural gas with a 1 minute analysis time and 1.5 minute cycle time using air as a carrier gas. This device has applications in remote natural gas mining stations, pipeline switching and metering stations, turbine generators, and other industrial user sites. For gas pipelines, the device can improve gas quality during transfer and blending, and provide accurate financial accounting. For industrial end users, the device can provide continuous feedback of physical gas properties to improve combustion efficiency during use.

Robinson, Alex L. (Albuquerque, NM); Manginell, Ronald P. (Albuquerque, NM); Moorman, Matthew W. (Albuquerque, NM)

2010-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

231

Gas Atomization of Amorphous Aluminum: Part I. Thermal Behavior Calculations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

which are summarized below: 1. Gas composition is moree?ective than gas pressure on in?uencing cooling rate for app. 210–11. 37. J.E.A. John: Gas Dynamics, Allyn and Bacon,

Zheng, Baolong; Lin, Yaojun; Zhou, Yizhang; Lavernia, Enrique J.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Hydrogeochemistry & Gas Chemistry of Uinta Basin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

://www.britannica.com/ Natural gas is a fast growing component of world energy. #12;Types of Natural Gas http://pubs.usgs.gov/dds/dds-069/dds-069-b/REPORTS/Chapter_1.pdf BCG #12;Origins of Natural Gas Shurr & Ridgley (2002) #12;Impact Dominion wells with gas composition #12;Groundwater Dynamics · Shallow (normal P) · Intermediate (Over

Zhang, Ye

233

NETL: Ambient Monitoring - Steubenville Comprehensive Air Monitoring  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Steubenville Comprehensive Air Monitoring Project (SCAMP) Steubenville Comprehensive Air Monitoring Project (SCAMP) The National Ambient Air Quality Standards for airborne fine particles (PM2.5) are based on the mass of PM2.5 measured at outdoor monitoring stations; however, most people spend the majority of their time indoors. In order to fully understand the relationship between ambient PM2.5 and human health effects, it is important to define how ambient PM2.5 concentrations and compositions compare to those actually breathed by humans during normal daily activities. The objective of SCAMP is to measure the concentrations of PM2.5 and other potential air pollutants at ambient monitoring stations in and around Steubenville, OH, and relate them to the pollutant concentrations in air that is actually breathed by people living in the area. Steubenville was chosen by DOE for this study because of the ability to integrate its results with those of the UORVP, and also because Steubenville was one of the six cities where correlations between ambient PM2.5 mass and adverse health effects had been noted. These correlations had been cited by EPA as one of the primary justifications for its 1997 ambient PM2.5 standards. Complete characterization of the relationships between ambient PM2.5 and human exposure, including the chemical components of PM2.5 at various locations, will provide a comprehensive database for use in subsequent epidemiological studies, long-range transport studies, and State Implementation Program development. CONSOL Energy is the primary performer of SCAMP, and will provide the necessary coordination and data integration between the various components of the study.

234

Gas Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Sampling Gas Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Gas Sampling Details Activities (7) Areas (7) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Field Sampling Parent Exploration Technique: Field Sampling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: High flux can be indicative of conduits for fluid flow. Hydrological: Gas composition and source of fluids. Thermal: Anomalous flux is associated with active hydrothermal activity. Distinguish magmatic/mantle heat inputs. Can be used to estimate reservoir fluid temperatures. Dictionary.png Gas Sampling: Gas sampling is done to characterize the chemical, thermal, and hydrological properties of a surface or subsurface hydrothermal system.

235

Benchmark Monitoring: Retired Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Completed Batch Jobs Completed Parallel Jobs Usage Reports Hopper Benchmark Monitoring Edison Benchmark Monitoring Carver Benchmark Monitoring Benchmark Monitoring: Retired Systems...

236

Radiolytic gas generation in plutonium contaminated waste materials  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Many plutonium contaminated waste materials decompose into gaseous products because of exposure to alpha radiation. The gases generated (usually hydrogen) over long-storage periods may create hazardous conditions. To determine the extent of such hazards, knowing the gas generation yields is necessary. These yields were measured by contacting some common Rocky Flats Plant waste materials with plutonium and monitoring the enclosed atmospheres for extensive periods of time. The materials were Plexiglas, polyvinyl chloride, glove-box gloves, machining oil, carbon tetrachloride, chlorothene VG solvent, Kimwipes (dry and wet), polyethylene, Dowex-1 resin, and surgeon's gloves. Both /sup 239/Pu oxide and /sup 238/Pu oxide were used as radiation sources. The gas analyses were made by mass spectrometry and the results obtained were the total gas generation, the hydrogen generation, the oxygen consumption rate, and the gas composition over the entire storage period. Hydrogen was the major gas produced in most of the materials. The total gas yields varied from 0.71 to 16 cm/sup 3/ (standard temperature pressure) per day per curie of plutonium. The oxygen consumption rates varied from 0.0088 to 0.070 millimoles per day per gram of plutonium oxide-239 and from 0.0014 to 0.0051 millimoles per day per milligram /sup 238/Pu.

Kazanjian, A.R.

1976-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

237

PDSF Monitoring  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PDSF Monitoring PDSF Monitoring The plot below is a measure of the read and write rates a single user would experience via the PDSF batch system. Jobs are submitted sequentially every hour to the debug queue. If a jobs doesn't finish in 8 minutes, it is killed and a -1 rate is written out. The read rates are calculated by copying a directory containing 2 files totaling 274 MB from the eliza directories to the $TMPDIR on the node running the job. The write rates are calculated by untarring a tarball on the eliza directories. The write rates are typically around a factor of two slower than the read rates, because the data still has to travel to the compute node and then back to the eliza for writing. The I/O rates are taken from the ganglia monitoring and serve as a measure of the amount of

238

Impacts of Imported Liquefied Natural Gas on Residential Appliance Components: Literature Review  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

significantly with natural gas composition. Most generally,natural gas and several LNGs evaluated the impact of gas compositioncomposition (also referred to as “gas quality”) 3 , with the natural

Lekov, Alex

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Method and apparatus for monitoring mercury emissions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A mercury monitoring device that continuously monitors the total mercury concentration in a gas. The device uses the same chamber for converting speciated mercury into elemental mercury and for measurement of the mercury in the chamber by radiation absorption techniques. The interior of the chamber is resistant to the absorption of speciated and elemental mercury at the operating temperature of the chamber. 15 figs.

Durham, M.D.; Schlager, R.J.; Sappey, A.D.; Sagan, F.J.; Marmaro, R.W.; Wilson, K.G.

1997-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

240

Method and apparatus for monitoring mercury emissions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A mercury monitoring device that continuously monitors the total mercury concentration in a gas. The device uses the same chamber for converting speciated mercury into elemental mercury and for measurement of the mercury in the chamber by radiation absorption techniques. The interior of the chamber is resistant to the absorption of speciated and elemental mercury at the operating temperature of the chamber.

Durham, Michael D. (Castle Rock, CO); Schlager, Richard J. (Aurora, CO); Sappey, Andrew D. (Golden, CO); Sagan, Francis J. (Lakewood, CO); Marmaro, Roger W. (Littleton, CO); Wilson, Kevin G. (Littleton, CO)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas composition monitor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

WEMOS Gas-in-Oil Monitor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Initial work on Taguchi-type metal oxide semiconductor (MOS) sensors indicated that they were sensitive to several of the gases produced by the overheated cellulosic insulation and mineral oil found in transformers, and that their output drifted in time. Modification of the sensors with postmanufacturing surface active treatments achieved improved but not completely satisfactory stability.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Monitor 1979  

SciTech Connect

The status, improvements, and accomplishments of the Monitor remote-handling system previously reported are updated. It also outlines the goals for the future to improve the efficiency and speed of remote-maintenance operations at the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF).

Grisham, D.L.; Ekberg, E.L.; Lambert, J.E.; Meyer, R.E.; Stroik, P.J.; Wickham, M.D.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Monitoring well  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A monitoring well including a conduit defining a passageway, the conduit having a proximal and opposite, distal end; a coupler connected in fluid flowing relationship with the passageway; and a porous housing borne by the coupler and connected in fluid flowing relation thereto.

Hubbell, Joel M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Sisson, James B. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Monitoring well  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A monitoring well is described which includes: a conduit defining a passageway, the conduit having a proximal and opposite, distal end; a coupler connected in fluid flowing relationship with the passageway; and a porous housing borne by the coupler and connected in fluid flowing relation thereto. 8 figs.

Hubbell, J.M.; Sisson, J.B.

1999-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

245

Wind Turbine Manufacturing Process Monitoring  

SciTech Connect

To develop a practical inline inspection that could be used in combination with automated composite material placement equipment to economically manufacture high performance and reliable carbon composite wind turbine blade spar caps. The approach technical feasibility and cost benefit will be assessed to provide a solid basis for further development and implementation in the wind turbine industry. The program is focused on the following technology development: (1) Develop in-line monitoring methods, using optical metrology and ultrasound inspection, and perform a demonstration in the lab. This includes development of the approach and performing appropriate demonstration in the lab; (2) Develop methods to predict composite strength reduction due to defects; and (3) Develop process models to predict defects from leading indicators found in the uncured composites.

Waseem Faidi; Chris Nafis; Shatil Sinha; Chandra Yerramalli; Anthony Waas; Suresh Advani; John Gangloff; Pavel Simacek

2012-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

246

Lightweight Composite Materials for Fire Control and Prevention in ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Trelleborg Offshore is exploring the potential uses of current offshore composite foams ... Structural Health Monitoring of Wind Turbine Blades.

247

Definition: Line Transformer Monitors | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Transformer Monitors Transformer Monitors Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Line Transformer Monitors Transformer Monitoring System can monitor different aspects of transformers, including oil levels and multiple temperatures within the transformer. This allows for analysis of the health of either individual key power transformers or multiple power transformers networked in the system. For example, the transformer monitors provide transformer oil dissolved gas analysis (DGA), oil temperature, ambient temperature, and moisture in oil measurements. These measurements are made in relation to transformer load.[1] Related Terms transformer, system, transformer References ↑ https://www.smartgrid.gov/category/technology/line_transformer_monitors [[Cat LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like.

248

Flashback Detection Sensor for Hydrogen Augmented Natural Gas Combustion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The use of hydrogen augmented fuel is being investigated by various researchers as a method to extend the lean operating limit, and potentially reduce thermal NOx formation in natural gas fired lean premixed (LPM) combustion systems. The resulting increase in flame speed during hydrogen augmentation, however, increases the propensity for flashback in LPM systems. Real-time in-situ monitoring of flashback is important for the development of control strategies for use of hydrogen augmented fuel in state-of-the-art combustion systems, and for the development of advanced hydrogen combustion systems. The National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and Woodward Industrial Controls are developing a combustion control and diagnostics sensor (CCADS), which has already been demonstrated as a useful sensor for in-situ monitoring of natural gas combustion, including detection of important combustion events such as flashback and lean blowoff. Since CCADS is a flame ionization sensor technique, the low ion concentration produced in pure hydrogen combustion raises concerns of whether CCADS can be used to monitor flashback in hydrogen augmented combustion. This paper discusses CCADS tests conducted at 0.2-0.6 MPa (2-6 atm), demonstrating flashback detection with fuel compositions up to 80% hydrogen (by volume) mixed with natural gas. NETL’s Simulation Validation (SimVal) combustor offers full optical access to pressurized combustion during these tests. The CCADS data and high-speed video show the reaction zone moves upstream into the nozzle as the hydrogen fuel concentration increases, as is expected with the increased flame speed of the mixture. The CCADS data and video also demonstrate the opportunity for using CCADS to provide the necessary in-situ monitor to control flashback and lean blowoff in hydrogen augmented combustion applications.

Thornton, J.D.; Chorpening, B.T.; Sidwell, T.; Strakey, P.A.; Huckaby, E.D.; Benson, K.J. (Woodward)

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Shape stability in composites  

SciTech Connect

Work was undertaken to investigate shape instabilities in anisotropic laminted composites. Both theoretical and experimental studies were carried out. The experimental segments made use of carbon fiber/epoxy composites, and investigated the effects of both temperature and moisture. Long-term cyclic environmental conditioning was performed to check the reproducibility of the shape instabilities and to monitor laminate degradation. Curvatures of classical asymmetric laminates were used to aid in evaluating the internal stress of the laminates throughout the test. Safe operating conditions were determined within the time/temperature/moisture domain. This information was subsequently used to predict the long-term reproducibility of the shape instabilities. A model was derived, based on a closed-form analytical technique, which allows the prediction of the degree of shape instability and warpage in a composite semi-cylindrical shell of unsymmetric geometry.

Radford, D.W.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Avoiding Carbon Bed Hot Spots in Thermal Process Off-Gas Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mercury has had various uses in nuclear fuel reprocessing and other nuclear processes, and so is often present in radioactive and mixed (radioactive and hazardous) wastes. Test programs performed in recent years have shown that mercury in off-gas streams from processes that treat radioactive wastes can be controlled using fixed beds of activated sulfur-impregnated carbon, to levels low enough to comply with air emission regulations such as the Hazardous Waste Combustor (HWC) Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) standards. Carbon bed hot spots or fires have occurred several times during these tests, and also during a remediation of tanks that contained mixed waste. Hot spots occur when localized areas in a carbon bed become heated to temperatures where oxidation occurs. This heating typically occurs due to heat of absoption of gas species onto the carbon, but it can also be caused through external means such as external heaters used to heat the carbon bed vessel. Hot spots, if not promptly mitigated, can grow into bed fires. Carbon bed hot spots and fires must be avoided in processes that treat radioactive and mixed waste. Hot spots are detected by (a) monitoring in-bed and bed outlet gas temperatures, and (b) more important, monitoring of bed outlet gas CO concentrations. Hot spots are mitigated by (a) designing for appropriate in-bed gas velocity, for avoiding gas flow maldistribution, and for sufficient but not excessive bed depth, (b) appropriate monitoring and control of gas and bed temperatures and compositions, and (c) prompt implementation of corrective actions if bed hot spots are detected. Corrective actions must be implemented quickly if bed hot spots are detected, using a graded approach and sequence starting with corrective actions that are simple, quick, cause the least impact to the process, and are easiest to recover from.

Nick Soelberg; Joe Enneking

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

SRNL - Natural Attenuation Monitor  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Natural Attenuation Monitor covers Natural Attenuation Monitor Published by the US DOE Monitored Natural Attenuation and Enhanced Attenuation for Chlorinated Solvents Technology...

252

Solid state electrochemical composite  

SciTech Connect

Provided is a composite electrochemical device fabricated from highly electronically conductive materials such as metals, metal alloys, or electronically conductive ceramics. The electronic conductivity of the electrode substrate is maximized. The invention allows for an electrode with high electronic conductivity and sufficient catalytic activity to achieve high power density in ionic (electrochemical) devices such as fuel cells and electrolytic gas separation systems including oxygen generation system.

Visco, Steven J. (Berkeley, CA); Jacobson, Craig P. (Moraga, CA); DeJonghe, Lutgard C. (Lafayette, CA)

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

253

Benzene Monitor System report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two systems for monitoring benzene in aqueous streams have been designed and assembled by the Savannah River Technology Center, Analytical Development Section (ADS). These systems were used at TNX to support sampling studies of the full-scale {open_quotes}SRAT/SME/PR{close_quotes} and to provide real-time measurements of benzene in Precipitate Hydrolysis Aqueous (PHA) simulant. This report describes the two ADS Benzene Monitor System (BMS) configurations, provides data on system operation, and reviews the results of scoping tests conducted at TNX. These scoping tests will allow comparison with other benzene measurement options being considered for use in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) laboratory. A report detailing the preferred BMS configuration statistical performance during recent tests has been issued under separate title: Statistical Analyses of the At-line Benzene Monitor Study, SCS-ASG-92-066. The current BMS design, called the At-line Benzene Monitor (ALBM), allows remote measurement of benzene in PHA solutions. The authors have demonstrated the ability to calibrate and operate this system using peanut vials from a standard Hydragard{trademark} sampler. The equipment and materials used to construct the ALBM are similar to those already used in other applications by the DWPF lab. The precision of this system ({+-}0.5% Relative Standard Deviation (RSD) at 1 sigma) is better than the purge & trap-gas chromatograpy reference method currently in use. Both BMSs provide a direct measurement of the benzene that can be purged from a solution with no sample pretreatment. Each analysis requires about five minutes per sample, and the system operation requires no special skills or training. The analyzer`s computer software can be tailored to provide desired outputs. Use of this system produces no waste stream other than the samples themselves (i.e. no organic extractants).

Livingston, R.R.

1992-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

254

Short-range wireless sensor networks for high density seismic monitoring  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

new oil and gas reservoir. The envisioned production peak of current oil and gas reservoirs is pushing for sub-surface diagnostic (for small earthquake monitoring) and exploration (for new oil and gas Receivers time Delivery time Source Receivers Shot Gas/Oil/Water Gas/Oil/Water Dip-slip fault Active seismic

Spagnolini, Umberto

255

Kinetic Model of Gas Bubble Dissolution in Groundwater and Its  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

appear to be more important for the composition of the gas excess than the differences between molecular in both natural and technical gas exchange processes. In chemical engineering systems, the dissolution that the composition of the excess gas does not correspond to atmospheric air (8). Excess air and its fractionation

Aeschbach-Hertig, Werner

256

A multi-scale approach to statistical and model-based structural health monitoring with application to embedded sensing for wind energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in a composite wind turbine rotor blade," Structural Healthdetection in composite wind turbine blades," Journal offor structural monitoring of wind turbine rotor blades," in

Taylor, Stuart Glynn

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Surface Gas Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Surface Gas Sampling Surface Gas Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Surface Gas Sampling Details Activities (12) Areas (10) Regions (1) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Field Sampling Parent Exploration Technique: Gas Sampling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Gas composition and source of fluids. Thermal: Distinguish magmatic/mantle heat inputs. Can be used to estimate reservoir fluid temperatures. Dictionary.png Surface Gas Sampling: Gas sampling is done to characterize the chemical, thermal, or hydrological properties of a surface or subsurface hydrothermal system. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Introduction

258

Design and construction of a thermophotovoltaic generator using turbine combustion gas  

SciTech Connect

This US Naval Academy project involves the development of a prototype thermophotovoltaic (TPV) generator that uses a General Electric T-58 helicopter gas turbine as the heat source. The goals of this project were to demonstrate the viability of using TPV and external combustion gases to generate electricity, and develop a system which could also be used for materials testing. The generator was modularly designed so that different materials could be tested at a later date. The combustion gas was tapped from the T-58`s combustor through one of the two igniter ports and extracted through a silicon carbide matrix ceramic composite tube into a similarly constructed ceramic composite radiant emitter. The ceramic radiant emitters is heated by the combustion gas via convection, and then serves the TPV generator by radiating the heat outwards where it can be absorbed by thermophotovoltaic cells and converted directly into electricity. The gas turbine and generator module are monitored by a data acquisition system that performs both data collection and control functions. This paper details the design of the TPV generator. It also gives results of initial tests with the gas turbine.

Erickson, T.A.; Lindler, K.W.; Harper, M.J. [Naval Academy, Annapolis, MD (United States). Dept. of Naval Architecture, Ocean, and Marine Engineering

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Fiber Reinforced Composite Pipeline - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

End Date: October 1, 2016 Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Fiber Reinforced Composite Pipeline (FRP) Successfully adapt spoolable FRP currently used in * the oil and natural gas...

260

Affordable Metal-Matrix Composites for High Performance Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Effect of Pulse Parameters on the Molten Pool Behavior of SiCp/6061. Composite in Impulsed Laser .... Liquid Metal – Molten Salt, 233. Molten Salt – Gas, 233.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas composition monitor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Microsensors for Continuous Emission Monitoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Continuous emission monitors have evolved during the last fifteen years to include smaller and more compact units. The trend in miniaturizing detectors, as well as all electronic components, is the focus of this report. Micro- sensors, miniature spectrometers, and nano-sized sensors are only a few of the developments that are currently being incorporated into gas sensing instruments by industrial laboratories, research institutes and universities. This report focuses on the use of miniaturized sensors an...

2006-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

262

Ruslands Gas.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This paper is about Russian natural gas and the possibility for Russia to use its reserves of natural gas politically towards the European Union to… (more)

Elkjćr, Jonas Bondegaard

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

A Geochemical Approach for Monitoring a CO2 Pilot Site: Rousse, France.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

field CO2 storage pilot (Rousse, France). In this pilot, CO2 is produced by oxycombustion from natural. The bulk gas compositions of the Rousse natural gas are comparable to the Lacq fuel gas with methane and ­25. The Rousse natural gas and the Lacq fuel gas are both characterized by a high He enrichment

264

Audible radiation monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention consists of a method and apparatus for monitoring ionizing radiation comprising radiation detectors in electrical connection with an isotopic analyzer and a device for producing chords to which each isotope is mapped so that the device produces a unique chord for each isotope. Preferably the chords are pleasing to the ear, except for chords representing unexpected isotopes, and are louder or softer depending on the level of radioactivity produced by each isotope, and musical instrument voices may be simulated in producing the chords as an aid to distinguishing similar-sounding chords. Because of the representation by chords, information regarding the level and composition of the radiation in an area can be conveyed to workers in that area more effectively and yet without distracting them.

Odell, D.M.C.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

265

Continuous Fiber Ceramic Composites (CFCC)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes work to develop CFCC's for various applications in the Industries of the Future (IOF) and power generation areas. Performance requirements range from relatively modest for hot gas filters to severe for turbine combustor liners and infrared burners. The McDermott Technology Inc. (MTI) CFCC program focused on oxide/oxide composite systems because they are known to be stable in the application environments of interest. The work is broadly focused on dense and porous composite systems depending on the specific application. Dense composites were targeted at corrosion resistant components, molten aluminum handling components and gas turbine combustor liners. The development work on dense composites led to significant advances in fiber coatings for oxide fibers and matrix densification. Additionally, a one-step fabrication process was developed to produce low cost composite components. The program also supported key developments in advanced oxide fibers that resulted in an improved version of Nextel 610 fiber (commercially available as Nextel 650) and significant progress in the development of a YAG/alumina fiber. Porous composite development focused on the vacuum winding process used to produce hot gas filters and infrared burner components.

R. A. Wagner

2002-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

266

Definition: Equipment Condition Monitor | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Condition Monitor Condition Monitor Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Equipment Condition Monitor A monitoring device that automatically measures and communicates equipment characteristics that are related to the "health" and maintenance of the equipment. These characteristics can include, but are not limited to temperature, dissolved gas, and loading. These devices can automatically generate alarm signals if conditions exceed preset thresholds.[1] Related Terms sustainability References ↑ https://www.smartgrid.gov/category/technology/equipment_condition_monitor [[C LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. ategory: Smart Grid Definitions|Template:BASEPAGENAME]] Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Equipment_Condition_Monitor&oldid=502601"

267

System and apparatus for monitoring or controlling secondary battery operation  

SciTech Connect

The terminal current of a main secondary battery is continuously monitored throughout charging and discharging by a system having a monitor cell, such as a metal gas battery, and having circuitry for conforming monitor cell terminal current in sense, and proportionally in magnitude, to the main battery terminal current. Apparatus responsive to the monitor cell state of charge may provide sensible output indication of main battery state of charge or control charging/discharging of the main battery.

Klein, M.G.

1980-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

268

Detecting of Coal Gas Weak Signals Using Lyapunov Exponent under Strong Noise Background  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In coal gas monitoring system, the early detecting of gas concentration is key technique for preventing the gas explosion because the coal gas signals are very weak under strong noise background in mining digging laneway. In this paper, the coal gas ... Keywords: Coal gas, weak signals, coal mine underground, Lyapunov exponent, Duffing chaotic oscillator

Ma Xian-Min

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Microwave Plasma Monitoring System For Real-Time Elemental Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Microwave Plasma Monitoring System For Real-Time Elemental Analysis Microwave Plasma Monitoring System For Real-Time Elemental Analysis Microwave Plasma Monitoring System For Real-Time Elemental Analysis The invention apparatus can also be used to monitor for the presence of halogens, sulfur and silicon. Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email Microwave Plasma Monitoring System For Real-Time Elemental Analysis There has been invented a process for analyzing ambient air in a microwave induced plasma without use of an additional carrier gas. There has also been invented an apparatus for analyzing ambient air, other sample gas, or nebulized and desolvated liquids wherein a novel arrangement of plasma gas and sample gas conduits is used to enhance dependability of the plasma. This apparatus embodiment of the invention has a concentric arrangement of

270

MOISTURE MONITOR TESTING AND CALIBRATION  

SciTech Connect

ABS>Electrolytic moisture monitors which continuously analyze the moisture content of gases are commercially available. After a period of operation, these instruments may give erroneous readings, frequently because of damage to the electrolytic cell. A gas with a known and reproducible moisture content within the operating range would be useful for making operational response tests on these monltors and for checking their calibration. A paired- hydrate system of a chemical compound exhibits a water vapor pressure that is constant at a constant temperature. ff an unreactive gas is allowed to equilibrate with a paired-hydrate system, the moisture content of the gas is determined by the vapor pressure of the hydrate pair, the total pressure, and the temperature. Hydrated magnesium perchlorate was prepared which contained between four and six moles of water per mole of perchlorate. This material was pulverized lightly then packed into a stainless steel column and 100 cc/minute of air at atmospheric pressure was passed through the bed. The exit air from the column was analyzed with a moisture monitor. A gas residence time of two minutes in the column was found to be sufficient for establishing moisture equilibrium in the exit flow. The moisture content of the exit air was found to vary from 34 to 70 ppm by volume as the temperature of the paired-hydrate system varied from 20 to 28 un. Concent 85% C. Other paired-hydrate systems can extend this range to higher moisture levels. (auth)

Montgomery, C.D.; Googin, J.M.; Phillips, L.R.

1963-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

271

Relative chemical composition of selected synthetic crudes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A knowledge of the composition of synthetic crudes can provide an important input into the assessment of occupational exposure monitoring requirements for the coal conversion and oil shale industries. This paper summarizes comparative compositional studies of coal- and shale-derived crude oils with petroleum crude oils as a reference point.

Griest, W.H.; Guerin, M.R.; Clark, B.R.; Ho, C.; Rubin, I.B.; Jones, A.R.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Gas hydrate reservoir characteristics and economics  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of the DOE-funded USGS Gas Hydrate Program is to assess the production characteristics and economic potential of gas hydrates in northern Alaska. The objectives of this project for FY-1992 will include the following: (1) Utilize industry seismic data to assess the distribution of gas hydrates within the nearshore Alaskan continental shelf between Harrison Bay and Prudhoe Bay; (2) Further characterize and quantify the well-log characteristics of gas hydrates; and (3) Establish gas monitoring stations over the Eileen fault zone in northern Alaska, which will be used to measure gas flux from destabilized hydrates.

Collett, T.S.; Bird, K.J.; Burruss, R.C.; Lee, Myung W.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Gas hydrate reservoir characteristics and economics  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of the DOE-funded USGS Gas Hydrate Program is to assess the production characteristics and economic potential of gas hydrates in northern Alaska. The objectives of this project for FY-1992 will include the following: (1) Utilize industry seismic data to assess the distribution of gas hydrates within the nearshore Alaskan continental shelf between Harrison Bay and Prudhoe Bay; (2) Further characterize and quantify the well-log characteristics of gas hydrates; and (3) Establish gas monitoring stations over the Eileen fault zone in northern Alaska, which will be used to measure gas flux from destabilized hydrates.

Collett, T.S.; Bird, K.J.; Burruss, R.C.; Lee, Myung W.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Composite Membranes for Coal Gas Reforming  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

steps 8-10; melting and rolling alloy foils, cleaning, deposition of Pd, and welding into a tubular shape. High purity (99.9%) powders were mixed and electron beam (e-...

275

Electrical condition monitoring method for polymers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrical condition monitoring method utilizes measurement of electrical resistivity of an age sensor made of a conductive matrix or composite disposed in a polymeric structure such as an electrical cable. The conductive matrix comprises a base polymer and conductive filler. The method includes communicating the resistivity to a measuring instrument and correlating resistivity of the conductive matrix of the polymeric structure with resistivity of an accelerated-aged conductive composite.

Watkins, Jr., Kenneth S. (Dahlonega, GA); Morris, Shelby J. (Hampton, VA); Masakowski, Daniel D. (Worcester, MA); Wong, Ching Ping (Duluth, GA); Luo, Shijian (Boise, ID)

2008-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

276

In-situ continuous water monitoring system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An in-situ continuous liquid monitoring system for continuously analyzing volatile components contained in a water source comprises: a carrier gas supply, an extraction container and a mass spectrometer. The carrier gas supply continuously supplies the carrier gas to the extraction container and is mixed with a water sample that is continuously drawn into the extraction container by the flow of carrier gas into the liquid directing device. The carrier gas continuously extracts the volatile components out of the water sample. The water sample is returned to the water source after the volatile components are extracted from it. The extracted volatile components and the carrier gas are delivered continuously to the mass spectrometer and the volatile components are continuously analyzed by the mass spectrometer.

Thompson, Cyril V. (Knoxville, TN); Wise, Marcus B. (Kingston, TN)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Electrode compositions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrode composition is described for use as an electrode in a non-aqueous battery system. The electrode composition contains an electrically active powder in a solid polymer and, as a dispersant, a C{sub 8}-C{sub 15} alkyl capped oligomer of a hexanoic acid that is electrochemically inert at 2.5--4.5 volts.

Block, J.; Fan, X.

1998-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

278

Electrode compositions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrode composition for use as an electrode in a non-aqueous battery system. The electrode composition contains an electrically active powder in a solid polymer and, as a dispersant, a C.sub.8 -C.sub.15 alkyl capped oligomer of a hexanoic acid that is electrochemically inert at 2.5-4.5 volts.

Block, Jacob (Rockville, MD); Fan, Xiyun (Orange, TX)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Exhaust gas provides alternative gas source for cyclic EOR  

SciTech Connect

Injected exhaust gas from a natural gas or propane engine enhanced oil recovery from several Nebraska and Kansas wells. The gas, containing nitrogen and carbon dioxide, is processed through a catalytic converted and neutralized as necessary before being injected in a cyclic (huff and puff) operation. The process equipment is skid or trailer mounted. The engine in these units drives the gas-injection compressor. The gas after passing through the converter and neutralizers is approximately 13% CO[sub 2] and 87% N[sub 2]. The pH is above 6.0 and dew point is near 0 F at atmospheric pressure. Water content is 0.0078 gal/Mscf. This composition is less corrosive than pure CO[sub 2] and reduces oil viscosity by 30% at 1,500 psi. The nitrogen supplies reservoir energy and occupies pore space. The paper describes gas permeability, applications, and field examples.

Stoeppelwerth, G.P.

1993-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

280

Freeze drying for gas chromatography stationary phase deposition  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present disclosure relates to methods for deposition of gas chromatography (GC) stationary phases into chromatography columns, for example gas chromatography columns. A chromatographic medium is dissolved or suspended in a solvent to form a composition. The composition may be inserted into a chromatographic column. Alternatively, portions of the chromatographic column may be exposed or filled with the composition. The composition is permitted to solidify, and at least a portion of the solvent is removed by vacuum sublimation.

Sylwester, Alan P. (Livermore, CA)

2007-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas composition monitor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Microsoft Word - 41232_SWPC_On-line TBC Monitor_Factsheet_Rev01...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A. Objectives: The objective of this proposed work is to design build and install a gas turbine blade and vane thermal barrier coating (TBC) monitor that will monitor, in...

282

Regenerable activated bauxite adsorbent alkali monitor probe  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to a regenerable activated bauxite adsorber alkali monitor probe for field applications to provide reliable measurement of alkali-vapor 5 concentration in combustion gas with special emphasis on pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) off-gas. More particularly, the invention relates to the development of a easily regenerable bauxite adsorbent for use in a method to accurately determine the alkali-vapor content of PFBC 10 exhaust gases.

Lee, S.H.D.

1991-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

283

Regenerable activated bauxite adsorbent alkali monitor probe  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A regenerable activated bauxite adsorber alkali monitor probe for field applications to provide reliable measurement of alkali-vapor concentration in combustion gas with special emphasis on pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) off-gas. More particularly, the invention relates to the development of a easily regenerable bauxite adsorbent for use in a method to accurately determine the alkali-vapor content of PFBC exhaust gases. 6 figs.

Lee, S.H.D.

1992-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

284

Microsoft Word - RBL-RUL_Gas-Plant  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Page 1 Project Rio Blanco Monitoring Results For Separated Water at a Natural Gas Plant, Parachute, Colorado U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Grand Junction,...

285

Composite hydrogen separation element and module  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

There are disclosed improvements in multicomponent composite metal membranes useful for the separation of hydrogen, the improvements comprising the provision of at least one common-axis hole through all components of the composite membrane and the provision of a gas-tight seal around the periphery of the hole or holes through a coating metal layer of the membrane. 11 figs.

Edlund, D.J.; Newbold, D.D.; Frost, C.B.

1997-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

286

Composite hydrogen separation element and module  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

There are disclosed improvements in multicomponent composite metal membranes useful for the separation of hydrogen, the improvements comprising the provision of at least one common-axis hole through all components of the composite membrane and the provision of a gas-tight seal around the periphery of the hole or holes through a coating metal layer of the membrane.

Edlund, David J. (Redmond, OR); Newbold, David D. (Bend, OR); Frost, Chester B. (Bend, OR)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Solar composition from the Genesis Discovery Mission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solar composition from the Genesis Discovery Mission D. S. Burnett1 and Genesis Science Team2: the isoto- pic compositions of O, N, and noble gases differ in the Sun from other inner solar system objects in the noble gas data from solar wind implanted in lunar soils. (ii) The most advanced analytical instruments

288

Combustion Gas Sensing of CO and NO  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Modern laser absorption sensing schemes have successfully monitored important trace gases in atmospheric research and hold promise for gas monitoring in the power industry. Commercial sensors using near-infrared telecommunications lasers are emerging; however, these near-infrared devices are not sensitive enough to detect small concentrations of carbon monoxide (CO) and nitric oxide (NO) in the large background of flue gas moisture (H2O) and carbon dioxide. In working toward continuous spatially resolved...

2009-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

289

Cinematic color: from your monitor to the big screen  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Color affects many areas of the computer-graphics pipeline, From texture painting to lighting, rendering, compositing, image display, and the theater, handling color is a tricky problem. Tired of getting your images right on the monitor only to have ...

Jeremy Selan

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Gas purification  

SciTech Connect

Natural gas having a high carbon dioxide content is contacted with sea water in an absorber at or near the bottom of the ocean to produce a purified natural gas.

Cook, C.F.; Hays, G.E.

1982-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

291

Natural Gas  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas. Under the baseline winter weather scenario, EIA expects end-of-October working gas inventories will total 3,830 billion cubic feet (Bcf) and end March ...

292

INSTRUMENTATION FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING R. D. McLaughlin, M. S. Hunt, D. L.ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING R. D. McLaughlin, M. S. Hunt, D. L.

McLaughlin, R.D.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Gas Week  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Presented by: Guy F. Caruso, EIA AdministratorPresented to: Gas WeekHouston, TexasSeptember 24, 2003

Information Center

2003-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

294

NETL: News Release - DOE Study Monitors Carbon Dioxide Storage...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1, 2009 DOE Study Monitors Carbon Dioxide Storage in Norway's Offshore Sleipner Gas Field U.S. World-Acclaimed Marine Institutes Partner with Europeans in North Sea Washington,...

295

NETL: News Release - Underground Monitoring of Carbon Storage...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions." Innovative real-time monitoring of the CO2 injection is being led by the Gulf Coast Carbon Center at the Bureau of Economic...

296

NETL: Gasification Systems - Real Time Flame Monitoring of Gasifier...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Real Time Flame Monitoring of Gasifier Burner and Injectors Project No.: DE-FC26-02NT41585 Gas Technology Institute is developing a reliable, practical, and cost effective means to...

297

Hydride compositions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A composition for use in storing hydrogen, and a method for making the composition. The composition comprises a mixture of two or more hydrides, each hydride having a different series of hydrogen sorption isotherms that contribute to the overall isotherms of the mixture. The hydrides are chosen so that the isotherms of the mixture have regions wherein the hydrogen equilibrium pressure increases with increasing hydrogen, preferably linearly. The isotherms of the mixture can be adjusted by selecting hydrides with different isotherms and by varying the amounts of the individual hydrides, or both. Preferably, the mixture is made up of hydrides that have isotherms with substantially flat plateaus and in nearly equimolar amounts. The composition is activated by degassing, exposing to hydrogen and then heating at a temperature below the softening temperature of any of the. constituents so that their chemical and structural integrity is preserved. When the composition is used to store hydrogen, its hydrogen content can be found simply by measuring P.sub.H.sbsb.2 and determining H/M from the isothermic function of the composition.

Lee, Myung W. (North Augusta, SC)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Hydride compositions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed are a composition for use in storing hydrogen and a method for making the composition. The composition comprises a mixture of two or more hydrides, each hydride having a different series of hydrogen sorption isotherms that contribute to the overall isotherms of the mixture. The hydrides are chosen so that the isotherms of the mixture have regions wherein the H equilibrium pressure increases with increasing hydrogen, preferably linearly. The isotherms of the mixture can be adjusted by selecting hydrides with different isotherms and by varying the amounts of the individual hydrides, or both. Preferably, the mixture is made up of hydrides that have isotherms with substantially flat plateaus and in nearly equimolar amounts. The composition is activated by degassing, exposing to H, and then heating below the softening temperature of any of the constituents. When the composition is used to store hydrogen, its hydrogen content can be found simply by measuring P{sub H}{sub 2} and determining H/M from the isothermic function of the composition.

Lee, Myung, W.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Flammable gas interlock spoolpiece flow response test plan and procedure  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this test plan and procedure is to test the Whittaker electrochemical cell and the Sierra Monitor Corp. flammable gas monitors in a simulated field flow configuration. The sensors are used on the Rotary Mode Core Sampling (RMCS) Flammable Gas Interlock (FGI), to detect flammable gases, including hydrogen and teminate the core sampling activity at a predetermined concentration level.

Schneider, T.C., Fluor Daniel Hanford

1997-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

300

Electronic fuel control system for gas turbine  

SciTech Connect

A method is described for monitoring gas turbine operating temperatures and rotational velocity for producing one of a group of fuel control signals for controlling the fuel input rate to the gas turbine. The method consists of: monitoring turbine inlet temperatures through respective sensors for the gas turbine, averaging the turbine inlet temperatures to produce an average turbine inlet temperature signal, monitoring a gas generator inlet temperature sensor of the gas turbine for producing a gas generator inlet temperature signal, generating a speed signal proportional to the rotational velocity of the gas turbine, combining the gas generator inlet temperature signal with the speed signal to produce a first function signal, applying the first function signal to a stored data set to produce a second function signal, the stored data set related to performance characteristics of the gas turbine, and comparing the turbine inlet temperature signal to the second function signal to produce a difference signal therefrom, the difference signal serving as a fuel control signal for the gas turbine.

Nick, C.F.

1986-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas composition monitor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Tennessee Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Tennessee Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

302

Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

303

Arkansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Arkansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

304

Oklahoma Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Oklahoma Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

305

Louisiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Louisiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

306

Maryland Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Maryland Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

307

Kentucky Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Kentucky Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

308

Pennsylvania Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Pennsylvania Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

309

Michigan Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Michigan Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

310

Colorado Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Colorado Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

311

Continuous Emission Monitoring System Procurement Specification Guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current regulatory requirements mandate the use of continuous emissions monitoring systems (CEMS) on many new gas turbine power generation units. Retrofit CEMS for older units may also be needed. These guidelines provide a detailed methodology for specifying CEMS for purchase and installation.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

In-line beam current monitor  

SciTech Connect

An intense relativistic electron beam current monitor for a gas neutralized beam transport line includes a first foil for conducting plasma current to the wall where it is measured as it traverses an inductive loop formed by a cavity in the wall. An insulator foil separates the first foil from a second conducting foil which returns the current to the plasma environment.

Ekdahl, Jr., Carl A. (Albuquerque, NM); Frost, Charles A. (Albuquerque, NM)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Development of Deepwater Riser Monitoring Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In recent years, the exploration activity of oil and gas industry in ultra deepwater is numerous. The main offshore industries around the world are busy building drilling systems for deeper and deeper water, progressively using all kinds of new technologies. ... Keywords: Riser, Monitoring, Acoustic

Dai Wei; Bai Yong

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Higher modulus compositions incorporating particulate rubber  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Rubber particles, to be used as fillers or extenders for various composite polymer systems, are chlorinated by a gas-solid phase reaction with a chlorine-containing gas. A composite polymer containing the chlorinated rubber fillers or extenders exhibits a higher flexural modulus than if prepared using an unchlorinated rubber filler or extender. Chlorination of the rubber particles is carried out by contacting the finely divided rubber particles with a chlorine-containing gas comprising at least about 5 volume percent chlorine. Advantageously, the chlorine can be diluted with air, nitrogen or other essentially inert gases and may contain minor amounts of fluorine. Improved performance is obtained with nitrogen dilution of the chlorine gas over air dilution. Improved polymer composite systems having higher flexural modulus result from the use of the chlorinated rubber particles as fillers instead of unchlorinated rubber particles.

Bauman, Bernard D. (Emmaus, PA); Williams, Mark A. (Souderton, PA); Bagheri, Reza (Bethlehem, PA)

1997-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

315

Higher modulus compositions incorporating particulate rubber  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Rubber particles, to be used as fillers or extenders for various composite polymer systems, are chlorinated by a gas-solid phase reaction with a chlorine-containing gas. A composite polymer containing the chlorinated rubber fillers or extenders exhibits a higher flexural modulus than if prepared using an unchlorinated rubber filler or extender. Chlorination of the rubber particles is carried out by contacting the finely divided rubber particles with a chlorine-containing gas comprising at least about 5 volume percent chlorine. Advantageously, the chlorine can be diluted with air, nitrogen or other essentially inert gases and may contain minor amounts of fluorine. Improved performance is obtained with nitrogen dilution of the chlorine gas over air dilution. Improved polymer composite systems having higher flexural modulus result from the use of the chlorinated rubber particles as fillers instead of unchlorinated rubber particles. 2 figures.

McInnis, E.L.; Scharff, R.P.; Bauman, B.D.; Williams, M.A.

1995-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

316

Higher modulus compositions incorporating particulate rubber  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Rubber particles, to be used as fillers or extenders for various composite polymer systems, are chlorinated by a gas-solid phase reaction with a chlorine-containing gas. A composite polymer containing the chlorinated rubber fillers or extenders exhibits a higher flexural modulus than if prepared using an unchlorinated rubber filler or extender. Chlorination of the rubber particles is carried out by contacting the finely divided rubber particles with a chlorine-containing gas comprising at least about 5 volume percent chlorine. Advantageously, the chlorine can be diluted with air, nitrogen or other essentially inert gases and may contain minor amounts of fluorine. Improved performance is obtained with nitrogen dilution of the chlorine gas over air dilution. Improved polymer composite systems having higher flexural modulus result from the use of the chlorinated rubber particles as fillers instead of unchlorinated rubber particles. 2 figs.

Bauman, B.D.; Williams, M.A.; Bagheri, R.

1997-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

317

Higher modulus compositions incorporating particulate rubber  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Rubber particles, to be used as fillers or extenders for various composite polymer systems, are chlorinated by a gas-solid phase reaction with a chlorine-containing gas. A composite polymer containing the chlorinated rubber fillers or extenders exhibits a higher flexural modulus than if prepared using an unchlorinated rubber filler or extender. Chlorination of the rubber particles is carried out by contacting the finely divided rubber particles with a chlorine-containing gas comprising at least about 5 volume percent chlorine. Advantageously, the chlorine can be diluted with air, nitrogen or other essentially inert gases and may contain minor amounts of fluorine. Improved performance is obtained with nitrogen dilution of the chlorine gas over air dilution. Improved polymer composite systems having higher flexural modulus result from the use of the chlorinated rubber particles as fillers instead of unchlorinated rubber particles.

McInnis, Edwin L. (Allentown, PA); Bauman, Bernard D. (Emmaus, PA); Williams, Mark A. (Souderton, PA)

1996-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

318

Higher modulus compositions incorporating particulate rubber  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Rubber particles, to be used as fillers or extenders for various composite polymer systems, are chlorinated by a gas-solid phase reaction with a chlorine-containing gas. A composite polymer containing the chlorinated rubber fillers or extenders exhibits a higher flexural modulus than if prepared using an unchlorinated rubber filler or extender. Chlorination of the rubber particles is carried out by contacting the finely divided rubber particles with a chlorine-containing gas comprising at least about 5 volume percent chlorine. Advantageously, the chlorine can be diluted with air, nitrogen or other essentially inert gases and may contain minor amounts of fluorine. Improved performance is obtained with nitrogen dilution of the chlorine gas over air dilution. Improved polymer composite systems having higher flexural modulus result from the use of the chlorinated rubber particles as fillers instead of unchlorinated rubber particles. 2 figs.

McInnis, E.L.; Bauman, B.D.; Williams, M.A.

1996-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

319

Higher modulus compositions incorporating particulate rubber  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Rubber particles, to be used as fillers or extenders for various composite polymer systems, are chlorinated by a gas-solid phase reaction with a chlorine-containing gas. A composite polymer containing the chlorinated rubber fillers or extenders exhibits a higher flexural modulus than if prepared using an unchlorinated rubber filler or extender. Chlorination of the rubber particles is carried out by contacting the finely divided rubber particles with a chlorine-containing gas comprising at least about 5 volume percent chlorine. Advantageously, the chlorine can be diluted with air, nitrogen or other essentially inert gases and may contain minor amounts of fluorine. Improved performance is obtained with nitrogen dilution of the chlorine gas over air dilution. Improved polymer composite systems having higher flexural modulus result from the use of the chlorinated rubber particles as fillers instead of unchlorinated rubber particles.

McInnis, Edwin L. (Allentown, PA); Scharff, Robert P. (Louisville, KY); Bauman, Bernard D. (Emmaus, PA); Williams, Mark A. (Souderton, PA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Carbon Sequestration Monitoring Activities  

SciTech Connect

In its 'Carbon Sequestration Technology Roadmap and Program Plan 2007' the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)'s Office of Fossil Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) identified as a major objective extended field tests to fully characterize potential carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) storage sites and to demonstrate the long-term storage of sequestered carbon (p. 5). Among the challenges in this area are 'improved understanding of CO{sub 2} flow and trapping within the reservoir and the development and deployment of technologies such as simulation models and monitoring systems' (p. 20). The University of Wyoming (UW), following consultations with the NETL, the Wyoming State Geological Survey, and the Governor's office, identified potential for geologic sequestration of impure carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) in deep reservoirs of the Moxa Arch. The Moxa Arch is a 120-mile long north-south trending anticline plunging beneath the Wyoming Thrust Belt on the north and bounded on the south by the Uinta Mountains. Several oil and gas fields along the Moxa Arch contain accumulations of natural CO{sub 2}. The largest of these is the La Barge Platform, which encompasses approximately 800 square miles. Several formations may be suitable for storage of impure CO{sub 2} gas, foremost among them the Madison Limestone, Bighorn Dolomite, and Nugget Sandstone. This project responded to the challenges described above by preparing a geological site characterization study on the Moxa Arch. The project included four priority research areas: (A) geological characterization of geologic structure of the Arch, the fault, and fracture patterns of the target formations and caprocks, (B) experimental characterization of carbon dioxide-brine-rock reactions that may occur, (C) optimization of geophysical and numerical models necessary for measurement, monitoring and verification (MMV), and (D) a preliminary performance assessment. Research work to accomplish these goals was coordinated by one administrative task under the direction of Dr. Carol Frost, Professor of Geology and Geophysics (Task 1.0), and one task devoted to designing and creating an interdisciplinary, project-specific carbon cyberinfrastructure to support collaborative carbon dioxide sequestration research among University of Wyoming scientists and their collaborators, performed by Jeff Hammerlinck, Director of the Wyoming Geographic Information Science Center at the University of Wyoming (Task 1.5). The results of these tasks are presented in the Introduction and in Chapter 1, respectively.

Carol Frost

2010-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas composition monitor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Forest Monitoring for Action (FORMA) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Forest Monitoring for Action (FORMA) Forest Monitoring for Action (FORMA) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Forest Monitoring for Action (FORMA) Agency/Company /Organization: Center for Global Development Sector: Land, Climate Focus Area: Forestry Topics: GHG inventory, Resource assessment Resource Type: Maps Website: www.cgdev.org/section/initiatives/_active/forestmonitoringforactionfor Cost: Free Forest Monitoring for Action (FORMA) Screenshot References: FORMA[1] "Forest Monitoring for Action (FORMA) uses freely available satellite data to generate rapidly updated online maps of tropical forest clearing, providing useful information for local and national forest conservation programs, as well as international efforts to curb greenhouse gas emissions by paying to keep forests intact."

322

Method for detecting gas turbine engine flashback  

SciTech Connect

A method for monitoring and controlling a gas turbine, comprises predicting frequencies of combustion dynamics in a combustor using operating conditions of a gas turbine, receiving a signal from a sensor that is indicative of combustion dynamics in the combustor, and detecting a flashback if a frequency of the received signal does not correspond to the predicted frequencies.

Singh, Kapil Kumar; Varatharajan, Balachandar; Kraemer, Gilbert Otto; Yilmaz, Ertan; Lacy, Benjamin Paul

2012-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

323

Proceedings: EPRI Manufactured Gas Plants 2003 Forum  

SciTech Connect

The EPRI Manufactured Gas Plants 2003 Forum covered a range of topics related to remediation and management of former manufactured gas plant (MGP) sites, with emphasis on technological advances and current issues associated with site cleanup. In specific, the forum covered MGP coal-tar delineation, soil and groundwater remediation technologies, improvements in air monitoring, and ecological risk characterization/risk management tools.

None

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

COAL CLEANING BY GAS AGGLOMERATION  

SciTech Connect

The agglomeration of ultrafine-size coal particles in an aqueous suspension by means of microscopic gas bubbles was demonstrated in numerous experiments with a scale model mixing system. Coal samples from both the Pittsburgh No. 8 Seam and the Upper Freeport Seam were used for these experiments. A small amount of i-octane was added to facilitate the process. Microscopic gas bubbles were generated by saturating the water used for suspending coal particles with gas under pressure and then reducing the pressure. Microagglomerates were produced which appeared to consist of gas bubbles encapsulated in coal particles. Since dilute particle suspensions were employed, it was possible to monitor the progress of agglomeration by observing changes in turbidity. By such means it became apparent that the rate of agglomeration depends on the concentration of microscopic gas bubbles and to a lesser extent on the concentration of i-octane. Similar results were obtained with both Pittsburgh No. 8 coal and Upper Freeport coal.

MEIYU SHEN; ROYCE ABBOTT; T.D. WHEELOCK

1998-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

325

Modern Performance Monitoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Today's diverse and decentralized computer world demands new thinking about performance monitoring and analysis.

Mark Purdy

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Natural gas hydrates - issues for gas production and geomechanical stability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural gas hydrates are solid crystalline substances found in the subsurface. Since gas hydrates are stable at low temperatures and moderate pressures, gas hydrates are found either near the surface in arctic regions or in deep water marine environments where the ambient seafloor temperature is less than 10°C. This work addresses the important issue of geomechanical stability in hydrate bearing sediments during different perturbations. I analyzed extensive data collected from the literature on the types of sediments where hydrates have been found during various offshore expeditions. To better understand the hydrate bearing sediments in offshore environments, I divided these data into different sections. The data included water depths, pore water salinity, gas compositions, geothermal gradients, and sedimentary properties such as sediment type, sediment mineralogy, and sediment physical properties. I used the database to determine the types of sediments that should be evaluated in laboratory tests at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The TOUGH+Hydrate reservoir simulator was used to simulate the gas production behavior from hydrate bearing sediments. To address some important gas production issues from gas hydrates, I first simulated the production performance from the Messsoyakha Gas Field in Siberia. The field has been described as a free gas reservoir overlain by a gas hydrate layer and underlain by an aquifer of unknown strength. From a parametric study conducted to delineate important parameters that affect gas production at the Messoyakha, I found effective gas permeability in the hydrate layer, the location of perforations and the gas hydrate saturation to be important parameters for gas production at the Messoyakha. Second, I simulated the gas production using a hydraulic fracture in hydrate bearing sediments. The simulation results showed that the hydraulic fracture gets plugged by the formation of secondary hydrates during gas production. I used the coupled fluid flow and geomechanical model "TOUGH+Hydrate- FLAC3D" to model geomechanical performance during gas production from hydrates in an offshore hydrate deposit. I modeled geomechanical failures associated with gas production using a horizontal well and a vertical well for two different types of sediments, sand and clay. The simulation results showed that the sediment and failures can be a serious issue during the gas production from weaker sediments such as clays.

Grover, Tarun

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

NETL: Gasification Systems - Gas Separation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Separation Separation Ion-Transport Membrane Oxygen Separation Modules Ion-Transport Membrane Oxygen Separation Modules Gas separation unit operations represent major cost elements in gasification plants. The gas separation technology being supported in the DOE program promises significant reduction in cost of electricity, improved thermal efficiency, and superior environmental performance. Gasification-based energy conversion systems rely on two gas separation processes: (1) separation of oxygen from air for feed to oxygen-blown gasifiers; and (2) post-gasification separation of hydrogen from carbon dioxide following (or along with) the shifting of gas composition when carbon dioxide capture is required or hydrogen is the desired product. Research efforts include development of advanced gas separation

328

Biological conversion of synthesis gas. [Quarterly] project status report, July 1, 1992--September 30, 1992  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The anaerobic, photosynthetic bacterium Chlorobium thiosulfatophilum is able to convert H{sub 2}S and COS in synthesis gas to elemental sulfur. The bacterium grows on CO{sub 2} as its carbon source at 30{degrees}C. In the absence of sulfide, the formed elemental sulfur is converted to sulfate. Thus, bioreactor designs must incorporate sulfur removal as an integral part of the bioprocess. In this initial study, C. thiosulfatophilum was used to convert H{sub 2}S to elemental sulfur in a continuous stirred tank reactor with continuous gas and liquid feed. Sulfur removal was not part of this initial system design, but will be an added feature in future work. The gas used in this study contained 2.52 percent H{sub 2}S, 10.00 percent CO{sub 2}, 14.99 percent CH{sub 4} and 72.49 percent He. The liquid flow rate to the 1380 mL reactor volume ranged from 10.8--23.6 mL/min and was a variable in the study. The initial gas flow rate was 11.6 standard mL/min, although it was also changed twice during the study. The temperature was maintained at 31{degrees}C and the agitation rate was held at 200 rpm in the Bioflo reactor. Cell density was monitored by the chlorophyl method and gas composition was monitored by gas-solid chromatography. Light at 2200 lux was supplied using two 40W tungsten light bulbs on the outside of the glass reactor vessel.

Not Available

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Tritium Room Air Monitor Operating Experience Review  

SciTech Connect

Monitoring the breathing air in tritium facility rooms for airborne tritium is a radiological safety requirement and a best practice for personnel safety. Besides audible alarms for room evacuation, these monitors often send signals for process shutdown, ventilation isolation, and cleanup system actuation to mitigate releases and prevent tritium spread to the environment. Therefore, these monitors are important not only to personnel safety but also to public safety and environmental protection. This paper presents an operating experience review of tritium monitor performance on demand during small (1 mCi to 1 Ci) operational releases, and intentional airborne inroom tritium release tests. The tritium tests provide monitor operation data to allow calculation of a statistical estimate for the reliability of monitors annunciating in actual tritium gas airborne release situations. The data show a failure to operate rate of 3.5E-06/monitor-hr with an upper bound of 4.7E-06, a failure to alarm on demand rate of 1.4E-02/demand with an upper bound of 4.4E-02, and a spurious alarm rate of 0.1 to 0.2/monitor-yr.

L. C. Cadwallader; B. J. Denny

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Flammable gas project topical report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The flammable gas safety issue was recognized in 1990 with the declaration of an unreviewed safety question (USQ) by the U. S. Department of Energy as a result of the behavior of the Hanford Site high-level waste tank 241-SY-101. This tank exhibited episodic releases of flammable gas that on a couple of occasions exceeded the lower flammability limit of hydrogen in air. Over the past six years there has been a considerable amount of knowledge gained about the chemical and physical processes that govern the behavior of tank 241-SY-1 01 and other tanks associated with the flammable gas safety issue. This report was prepared to provide an overview of that knowledge and to provide a description of the key information still needed to resolve the issue. Items covered by this report include summaries of the understanding of gas generation, retention and release mechanisms, the composition and flammability behavior of the gas mixture, the amounts of stored gas, and estimated gas release fractions for spontaneous releases. `Me report also discusses methods being developed for evaluating the 177 tanks at the Hanford Site and the problems associated with these methods. Means for measuring the gases emitted from the waste are described along with laboratory experiments designed to gain more information regarding rates of generation, species of gases emitted and modes of gas storage and release. Finally, the process for closing the USQ is outlined as are the information requirements to understand and resolve the flammable gas issue.

Johnson, G.D.

1997-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

331

In-Situ X-Ray Studies of Ceramic Matrix Composites and Their ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

K. K. Chawla's Seminal Contributions to the Field of Metal Matrix Composites · Structural Health Monitoring of Wind Turbine Blades · Studies of Nanocrystalline  ...

332

Lubricant compositions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The invention provides a lubricant additive having improved antioxidant and antiwear properties made by (1) reacting an alkenylsuccinic anhydride (Asa) with an aminopolyhydroxy compound and (2) reacting the product thus obtained with a phosphorus trihalide and a polyhydroxyaromatic compound. The invention also provides a lubricant composition containing the additive.

Frangatos, G.

1980-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

333

Lubricant compositions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The invention provides a lubricant additive and a lubricant composition having improved demulsifying and anti-wear properties resulting from the addition thereto of such additive, which is made by reacting a partially esterified multifunctional alcohol with a phosphorus oxyhalide or a trihydrocarbyl phosphate.

Frangatos, G.

1980-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

334

Natural Gas  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Energy Department supports research and policy options to ensure environmentally sustainable domestic and global supplies of oil and natural gas.

335

Gas separating  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Feed gas is directed tangentially along the non-skin surface of gas separation membrane modules comprising a cylindrical bundle of parallel contiguous hollow fibers supported to allow feed gas to flow from an inlet at one end of a cylindrical housing through the bores of the bundled fibers to an outlet at the other end while a component of the feed gas permeates through the fibers, each having the skin side on the outside, through a permeate outlet in the cylindrical casing. 3 figs.

Gollan, A.

1988-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

336

Missouri Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Missouri Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6

337

Survey Focal design issues affecting the deployment of wireless sensor networks for pipeline monitoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wireless sensor networks (WSNs) are a target technology for oil and gas pipeline monitoring because they offer benefits of low cost, ease of deployment and ability to cater for data acquisition at great spatial and temporal scales. In order for WSN to ... Keywords: Energy harvesting, Localization, Network reliability, Oil and gas pipeline monitoring, Power efficiency, Sensing modality, Wireless sensor networks

Gbenga Owojaiye; Yichuang Sun

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Automated gas chromatography  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus and process for the continuous, near real-time monitoring of low-level concentrations of organic compounds in a liquid, and, more particularly, a water stream. A small liquid volume of flow from a liquid process stream containing organic compounds is diverted by an automated process to a heated vaporization capillary where the liquid volume is vaporized to a gas that flows to an automated gas chromatograph separation column to chromatographically separate the organic compounds. Organic compounds are detected and the information transmitted to a control system for use in process control. Concentrations of organic compounds less than one part per million are detected in less than one minute. 7 figs.

Mowry, C.D.; Blair, D.S.; Rodacy, P.J.; Reber, S.D.

1999-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

339

Effects of Propane/Natural Gas Blended Fuels on Gas Turbine Pollutant Emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

U.S. natural gas composition is expected to be more variable in the future. Liquefied natural gas (LNG) imports to the U.S. are expected to grow significantly over the next 10-15 years. Unconventional gas supplies, like coal-bed methane, are also expected to grow. As a result of these anticipated changes, the composition of fuel sources may vary significantly from existing domestic natural gas supplies. To allow the greatest use of gas supplies, end-use equipment should be able to accommodate the widest possible gas composition. For this reason, the effect of gas composition on combustion behavior is of interest. This paper will examine the effects of fuel variability on pollutant emissions for premixed gas turbine conditions. The experimental data presented in this paper have been collected from a pressurized single injector combustion test rig at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The tests are conducted at 7.5 atm with a 589K air preheat. A propane blending facility is used to vary the Wobbe Index of the site natural gas. The results indicate that propane addition of about five (vol.) percent does not lead to a significant change in the observed NOx emissions. These results vary from data reported in the literature for some engine applications and potential reasons for these differences are discussed.

D. Straub; D. Ferguson; K. Casleton; G. Richards

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Standard hydrogen monitoring system (SHMS) engineering task plan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document details the responsibilities and requirements for the design, technical documents, fabrication, testing, and installation of the SHMS-E and SHMS-E+ continuous gas monitors. The SHMS-E is identical in function to a SHMS-B but has the interface to accommodate an analytical module containing a gas chromatograph and a B and K photo acoustic gas monitor. Temporary addition of the analytical module adds the ``+`` to the SHMS-E designation. The analytical module is temporary in all installations.

Tate, D.D.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas composition monitor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Study of gas evolution during oil shale pyrolysis by TQMS (triple quadrupole mass spectrometer)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Real-time gas evolution during pyrolysis of two Green River Formation (Colorado) oil shales, one eastern US Devonian shale, and two Chinese shales was monitored using a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer (TQMS). We calculated kinetic parameters for hydrocarbon generation. For water, carbon oxides, and sulfur gases, we compared evolution profiles and identified the organicinorganic precursors of each species. We also monitored nitrogen- and sulfur-containing naphtha components. Hydrocarbon gas profiles, except for CH/sub 4/, are similar for all shales, and their rates of evolution reach a maximum at around the temperatures of maximum oil evolutions. The evolution profiles for H/sub 2/, CH/sub 2/, CO, and CO/sub 2/, at high temperatures are affected by the amount of char remaining in shale, carbonate minerals, and the water-gas shift reaction. The water profile, in general, consists of waters from surface dehydration, kerogen pyrolysis, and mineral dehydration. Mineral dehydration was the dominant water source for all shales, but the temperature ranges for the major water peak varied because of widely different mineral composition. Chinese shales evolved much more water than U.S. shales. Major differences between shales were seen in the sulfur gases. 17 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

Oh, M.S.; Coburn, T.T.; Crawford, R.W.; Burnham, A.K.

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

AUTOMATED PROCESS MONITORING: APPLYING PROVEN AUTOMATION TECHNIQUES TO INTERNATIONAL SAFEGUARDS NEEDS  

SciTech Connect

Identification and quantification of specific alpha- and beta-emitting radionuclides in complex liquid matrices is highly challenging, and is typically accomplished through laborious wet chemical sample preparation and separations followed by analysis using a variety of detection methodologies (e.g., liquid scintillation, gas proportional counting, alpha energy analysis, mass spectrometry). Analytical results may take days or weeks to report. Chains of custody and sample security measures may also complicate or slow the analytical process. When an industrial process-scale plant requires the monitoring of specific radionuclides as an indication of the composition of its feed stream or of plant performance, radiochemical measurements must be fast, accurate, and reliable. Scientists at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory have assembled a fully automated prototype Process Monitor instrument capable of a variety of tasks: automated sampling directly from a feed stream, sample digestion / analyte redox adjustment, chemical separations, radiochemical detection and data analysis / reporting. The system is compact, its components are fluidically inter-linked, and analytical results could be immediately transmitted to on- or off-site locations. The development of a rapid radiochemical Process Monitor for 99Tc in Hanford tank waste processing streams, capable of performing several measurements per hour, will be discussed in detail. More recently, the automated platform was modified to perform measurements of 90Sr in Hanford tank waste stimulant. The system exemplifies how automation could be integrated into reprocessing facilities to support international nuclear safeguards needs.

O'Hara, Matthew J.; Durst, Philip C.; Grate, Jay W.; Devol, Timothy A.; Egorov, Oleg; Clements, John P.

2008-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

343

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

,366 ,366 95,493 1.08 0 0.00 1 0.03 29,406 0.56 1,206 0.04 20,328 0.64 146,434 0.73 - Natural Gas 1996 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: South Carolina South Carolina 88. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas South Carolina, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ...........................................

344

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0,216 0,216 50,022 0.56 135 0.00 49 1.67 85,533 1.63 8,455 0.31 45,842 1.45 189,901 0.95 - Natural Gas 1996 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: M a r y l a n d Maryland 68. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Maryland, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 9 7 7 7 8 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 33 28 26 22 135 From Oil Wells ...........................................

345

Corrosion monitoring apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A corrosion monitoring device in an aqueous system which includes a formed crevice and monitoring the corrosion of the surfaces forming the crevice by the use of an a-c electrical signal.

Isaacs, Hugh S. (Shoreham, NY); Weeks, John R. (Stony Brook, NY)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Portal radiation monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A portal radiation monitor combines 0.1% FAR with high sensitivity to special nuclear material. The monitor utilizes pulse shape discrimination, dynamic compression of the photomultiplier output and scintillators sized to maintain efficiency over the entire portal area.

Kruse, Lyle W. (Albuquerque, NM)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

EVAPORATION OF CAI LIQUIDS INTO SOLAR GAS. A. V. , L. Grossman1,2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EVAPORATION OF CAI LIQUIDS INTO SOLAR GAS. A. V. Fedkin1 , L. Grossman1,2 and S. B. Simon1 , 1-like liquids evaporating into more general gas compositions. In this work, we assume that a CAI precursor liquid is immersed in a gas whose composition is solar except for the amounts of CMAS components which

Grossman, Lawrence

348

Electrical condition monitoring method for polymers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrical condition monitoring method utilizes measurement of electrical resistivity of a conductive composite degradation sensor to monitor environmentally induced degradation of a polymeric product such as insulated wire and cable. The degradation sensor comprises a polymeric matrix and conductive filler. The polymeric matrix may be a polymer used in the product, or it may be a polymer with degradation properties similar to that of a polymer used in the product. The method comprises a means for communicating the resistivity to a measuring instrument and a means to correlate resistivity of the degradation sensor with environmentally induced degradation of the product.

Watkins, Jr. Kenneth S. (Dahlonega, GA); Morris, Shelby J. (Hampton, VA); Masakowski, Daniel D. (Worcester, MA); Wong, Ching Ping (Duluth, GA); Luo, Shijian (Boise, ID)

2010-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

349

Microsoft Word - 49047_ANL_NDE for Ceramic Composites.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of oxide-based ceramic composite materials in advanced , low-emission, high efficiency gas turbines. Components made from oxide-based composites will be studied with and without...

350

Microsoft Word - 49037_Composite Optics_NDE Tech_Factsheet_Rev01...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of oxide-based ceramic composite materials in advanced , low-emission, high efficiency gas turbines. Components made from oxide-based composites will be studied with and without...

351

THE RHIC HYDROGEN JET LUMINESCENCE MONITOR.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A hydrogen jet polarimeter was developed for the RHIC accelerator to improve the process of measuring polarization. Particle beams intersecting with gas molecules can produce light by the process known as luminescence. This light can then be focused, collected, and processed giving important information such as size, position, emittance, motion, and other parameters. The RHIC hydrogen jet polarimeter was modified in 2005 with specialized optics, vacuum windows, light transport, and a new camera system making it possible to monitor the luminescence produced by polarized protons intersecting the hydrogen beam. This paper describes the configuration and preliminary measurements taken using the RHIC hydrogen jet polarimeter as a luminescence monitor.

RUSSO,T.; BELLAVIA, S.; GASSNER, D.; THIEBERGER, P.; TRBOJEVIC, D.; TSANG, T.

2007-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

352

Spirometer techniques for measuring molar composition in argon carbon dioxide mixtures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper examines a new technique for measuring gas composition through the use of a spirometer. A spirometer is high precision pressure transducer which measures the speed of sound in a gas through the emission and ...

Chonde, Daniel Burje

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Single chamber fuel cells: Flow geometry, rate and composition considerations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Four different single chamber fuel cell designs were compared using propane-air gas mixtures. Gas flow around the electrodes has a significant influence on the open circuit voltage and the power density of the cell. The strong influence of flow geometry is likely due to its effect on gas composition, particularly on the oxygen chemical potential at the two electrodes as a result of gas mixing. The chamber design which exposes the cathode first to the inlet gas was found to yield the best performance at lower flow rates, while the open tube design with the electrodes equally exposed to the inlet gas worked best at higher flow rates.

Stefan, Ionel C.; Jacobson, Craig P.; Visco, Steven J.; De Jonghe, Lutgard C.

2003-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

354

Seismic Imaging and Monitoring  

SciTech Connect

I give an overview of LANL's capability in seismic imaging and monitoring. I present some seismic imaging and monitoring results, including imaging of complex structures, subsalt imaging of Gulf of Mexico, fault/fracture zone imaging for geothermal exploration at the Jemez pueblo, time-lapse imaging of a walkway vertical seismic profiling data for monitoring CO{sub 2} inject at SACROC, and microseismic event locations for monitoring CO{sub 2} injection at Aneth. These examples demonstrate LANL's high-resolution and high-fidelity seismic imaging and monitoring capabilities.

Huang, Lianjie [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

355

Seismic Imaging and Monitoring  

SciTech Connect

I give an overview of LANL's capability in seismic imaging and monitoring. I present some seismic imaging and monitoring results, including imaging of complex structures, subsalt imaging of Gulf of Mexico, fault/fracture zone imaging for geothermal exploration at the Jemez pueblo, time-lapse imaging of a walkway vertical seismic profiling data for monitoring CO{sub 2} inject at SACROC, and microseismic event locations for monitoring CO{sub 2} injection at Aneth. These examples demonstrate LANL's high-resolution and high-fidelity seismic imaging and monitoring capabilities.

Huang, Lianjie [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

356

In-Situ Neutron Diffraction Study of Porous NiO-YSZ Composite ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, In-Situ Neutron Diffraction Study of Porous NiO-YSZ Composite ... Gas Turbines of the Future: Hydrogen and Oxy-Combustion Environments.

357

Thermal barrier and overlay coating systems comprising composite metal/metal oxide bond coating layers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention generally describes multilayer coating systems comprising a composite metal/metal oxide bond coat layer. The coating systems may be used in gas turbines.

Goedjen, John G. (Oviedo, FL); Sabol, Stephen M. (Orlando, FL); Sloan, Kelly M. (Longwood, FL); Vance, Steven J. (Orlando, FL)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Novel Composite Materials Demonstrate Ultra-sensitivity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2, Issue 25 2, Issue 25 Novel Composite Materials Demonstrate Ultra-sensitivity Gold nanowires on graphite templates used in gas sensing application page 2 Coronary Stent Wins Technology Transfer Award page 4 University of Oregon Team Wins Competition for Commercializing NETL Technology page 5 the ENERGY lab NATIONAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY 2 Novel Composite Materials Demonstrate Ultra-sensitivity-Gold nanowires on graphite templates used in gas sensing applications ____________________2 Coronary Stent Wins Technology Transfer Award ________4 University of Oregon Team Wins Competition for Commercializing NETL Technology __________________5 NETL & WVU Researchers Design New Catalysts for CO 2 Management ___________________________________6 Structurally Dynamic MOF Sorbent Selectively Adsorbs

359

Environmental Monitoring Plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Environmental Monitoring Plan was written to fulfill the requirements of Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1 and DOE Environmental Regulatory Guide DOE/EH 0173T. This Plan documents the background, organizational structure, and methods used for effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance at Sandia National Laboratories/California. The design, rationale, and historical results of the environmental monitoring system are discussed in detail. Throughout the Plan, recommendations for improvements to the monitoring system are made. This revision to the Environmental Monitoring Plan was written to document the changes made to the Monitoring Program during 1992. Some of the data (most notably the statistical analyses of past monitoring data) has not been changed.

Holland, R.C. [Science Applications International Corp., San Diego, CA (United States)

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

21,547 21,547 4,916 0.06 0 0.00 0 0.00 7,012 0.13 3 0.00 7,099 0.22 19,031 0.10 N e w H a m p s h i r e New Hampshire 77. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New Hampshire, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas composition monitor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

139,881 139,881 26,979 0.30 463 0.00 115 3.92 27,709 0.53 19,248 0.70 28,987 0.92 103,037 0.52 A r i z o n a Arizona 50. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Arizona, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 6 6 6 7 7 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 721 508 711 470 417 From Oil Wells ........................................... 72 110 48 88 47 Total.............................................................. 794 618 759 558 464 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease

362

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Middle Middle Atlantic Middle Atlantic 37. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Middle Atlantic, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,857 1,981 2,042 1,679 1,928 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 36,906 36,857 26,180 37,159 38,000 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 161,372 152,717 140,444 128,677 152,494 From Oil Wells ........................................... 824 610 539 723 641 Total.............................................................. 162,196 153,327 140,982 129,400 153,134 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

363

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

386,690 386,690 102,471 1.16 0 0.00 43 1.47 142,319 2.72 5,301 0.19 98,537 3.12 348,671 1.74 M i n n e s o t a Minnesota 71. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Minnesota, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

364

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,108,583 1,108,583 322,275 3.63 298 0.00 32 1.09 538,749 10.28 25,863 0.95 218,054 6.90 1,104,972 5.52 I l l i n o i s Illinois 61. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Illinois, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 382 385 390 372 370 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 337 330 323 325 289 From Oil Wells ........................................... 10 10 10 10 9 Total.............................................................. 347 340 333 335 298 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ...............

365

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

286,485 286,485 71,533 0.81 25 0.00 31 1.06 137,225 2.62 5,223 0.19 72,802 2.31 286,814 1.43 M i s s o u r i Missouri 73. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Missouri, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 5 8 12 15 24 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 27 14 8 16 25 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 27 14 8 16 25 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

366

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

411,951 411,951 100,015 1.13 0 0.00 5 0.17 114,365 2.18 45,037 1.65 96,187 3.05 355,609 1.78 Massachusetts Massachusetts 69. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Massachusetts, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

367

Natural gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

www.eia.gov Over time the electricity mix gradually shifts to lower-carbon options, led by growth in natural gas and renewable generation U.S. electricity net generation trillion kilowatthours 6

Adam Sieminski Administrator; Adam Sieminski Usnic; Adam Sieminski Usnic

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

226,798 226,798 104,124 1.17 0 0.00 0 0.00 58,812 1.12 2,381 0.09 40,467 1.28 205,783 1.03 North Carolina North Carolina 81. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas North Carolina, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

369

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

68,747 68,747 34,577 0.39 0 0.00 34 1.16 14,941 0.29 0 0.00 11,506 0.36 61,058 0.31 I d a h o Idaho 60. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Idaho, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation.......................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented

370

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 0 0.00 0 0.00 0 0.00 540 0.01 0 0.00 2,132 0.07 2,672 0.01 H a w a i i Hawaii 59. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Hawaii, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation.......................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared

371

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

483,052 483,052 136,722 1.54 6,006 0.03 88 3.00 16,293 0.31 283,557 10.38 41,810 1.32 478,471 2.39 F l o r i d a Florida 57. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Florida, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 47 50 98 92 96 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 7,584 8,011 8,468 7,133 6,706 Total.............................................................. 7,584 8,011 8,468 7,133 6,706 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ...............

372

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

291,898 291,898 113,995 1.29 0 0.00 4 0.14 88,078 1.68 3,491 0.13 54,571 1.73 260,140 1.30 I o w a Iowa 63. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Iowa, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation.......................... 0 0 0

373

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Vehicle Fuel: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: New England New England 36. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New England, 1992-1996 Table 691,089 167,354 1.89 0 0.00 40 1.36 187,469 3.58 80,592 2.95 160,761 5.09 596,215 2.98 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................

374

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

29,693 29,693 0 0.00 0 0.00 6 0.20 17,290 0.33 0 0.00 16,347 0.52 33,644 0.17 District of Columbia District of Columbia 56. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas District of Columbia, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

375

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

42,980 42,980 14,164 0.16 0 0.00 1 0.03 9,791 0.19 23,370 0.86 6,694 0.21 54,020 0.27 D e l a w a r e Delaware 55. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Delaware, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

376

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-49,536 -49,536 7,911 0.09 49,674 0.25 15 0.51 12,591 0.24 3 0.00 12,150 0.38 32,670 0.16 North Dakota North Dakota 82. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas North Dakota, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 496 525 507 463 462 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 104 101 104 99 108 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 12,461 18,892 19,592 16,914 16,810 From Oil Wells ........................................... 47,518 46,059 43,640 39,760 38,906 Total.............................................................. 59,979 64,951 63,232 56,674 55,716 Repressuring ................................................

377

Novel high explosive compositions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This is a technique of preparing explosive compositions by the in-situ reaction of polynitroaliphatic compounds with one or more carboranes or carborane derivatives. One or more polynitroaliphatic reactants are combined with one or more carborane reactants in a suitable container and mixed to a homogeneous reaction mixture using a stream of inert gas or conventional mixing means. Ordinarily the container is a fissure, crack, or crevice in which the explosive is to be implanted. The ratio of reactants will determine not only the stoichiometry of the system, but will effect the quality and quantity of combustion products, the explosive force obtained as well as the impact sensitivity. The test values can shift with even relatively slight changes or modifications in the reaction conditions. Eighteen illustrative examples accompany the disclosure. (46 claims)

Perry, D.D.; Fein, M.M.; Schoenfelder, C.W.

1968-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

378

Continuous Emissions Monitoring System Monitoring Plan for the Y-12 Steam Plant  

SciTech Connect

The Oak Ridge Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12), managed by BWXT, is submitting this Continuous Emissions Monitoring System (CEMS) Monitoring Plan in conformance with the requirements of Title 40 of the U.S. Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 75. The state of Tennessee identified the Y-12 Steam Plant in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, as a non-electrical generation unit (EGU) nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) budget source as a result of the NO{sub x} State Implementation Plan (SIP) under the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) Rule 1200-3-27. Following this introduction, the monitoring plan contains the following sections: CEMS details, NO{sub x} emissions, and quality assurance (QA)/quality control (QC). The following information is included in the attachments: fuel and flue gas diagram, system layout, data flow diagrams, Electronic Monitoring Plan printouts, vendor information on coal and natural gas feed systems, and the Certification Test Protocol. The Y-12 Steam Plant consists of four Wickes boilers. Each is rated at a maximum heat input capacity of 296.8 MMBtu/hour or 250,000 lb/hour of 250-psig steam. Although pulverized coal is the principal fuel, each of the units can fire natural gas or a combination of coal and gas. Each unit is equipped with a Joy Manufacturing Company reverse air baghouse to control particulate emissions. Flue gases travel out of the baghouse, through an induced draft fan, then to one of two stacks. Boilers 1 and 2 exhaust through Stack 1. Boilers 3 and 4 exhaust through Stack 2. A dedicated CEMS will be installed in the ductwork of each boiler, downstream of the baghouse. The CEMS will be designed, built, installed, and started up by URS Group, Inc. (URS). Data acquisition and handling will be accomplished using a data acquisition and handling system (DAHS) designed, built, and programmed by Environmental Systems Corporation (ESC). The installed CEMS will continuously monitor NO{sub x}, flue gas flowrate, and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). The CEMS will be utilized to report emissions from each unit for each ozone season starting May 1, 2003. Each boiler has independent coal and natural gas metering systems. Coal is fed to each boiler by belt-type coal feeders. Each boiler has two dedicated coal feeders. Natural gas may be burned along with coal for flame stability. The boilers may also be fired on natural gas alone. Orifice meters measure the natural gas flow to each boiler.

None

2003-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

379

DIGESTER GAS - FUEL CELL - PROJECT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

GEW has been operating the first fuel cell in Europe producing heat and electricity from digester gas in an environmentally friendly way. The first 9,000 hours in operation were successfully concluded in August 2001. The fuel cell powered by digester gas was one of the 25 registered ''Worldwide projects'' which NRW presented at the EXPO 2000. In addition to this, it is a key project of the NRW State Initiative on Future Energies. All of the activities planned for the first year of operation were successfully completed: installing and putting the plant into operation, the transition to permanent operation as well as extended monitoring till May 2001.

Dr.-Eng. Dirk Adolph; Dipl.-Eng. Thomas Saure

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

AIR QUALITY IMPACTS OF LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS IN THE SOUTH COAST AIR BASIN OF CALIFORNIA  

SciTech Connect

The effects of liquefied natural gas (LNG) on pollutant emission inventories and air quality in the South Coast Air Basin of California were evaluated using recent LNG emission measurements by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the Southern California Gas Company (SoCalGas), and with a state-of-the-art air quality model. Pollutant emissions can be affected by LNG owing to differences in composition and physical properties, including the Wobbe index, a measure of energy delivery rate. This analysis uses LNG distribution scenarios developed by modeling Southern California gas flows, including supplies from the LNG receiving terminal in Baja California, Mexico. Based on these scenarios, the projected penetratino of LNG in the South Coast Air Basin is expected to be limited. In addition, the increased Wobbe index of delivered gas (resulting from mixtures of LNG and conventional gas supplies) is expected to cause increases smaller than 0.05 percent in overall (area-wide) emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx). BAsed on the photochemical state of the South Coast Air Basin, any increase in NOx is expected to cause an increase in the highest local ozone concentrations, and this is reflected in model results. However, the magnitude of the increase is well below the generally accepted accuracy of the model and would not be discernible with the existing monitoring network. Modeling of hypothetical scenarios indicates that discernible changes to ambient ozone and particulate matter concentrations would occur only at LNG distribution rates that are not achievable with current or planned infrastructure and with Wobbe index vlaues that exceed current gas quality tariffs. Results of these hypothetical scenarios are presented for consideration of any proposed substantial expansion of LNG supply infrastructure in Southern California.

Carerras-Sospedra, Marc; Brouwer, Jack; Dabdub, Donald; Lunden, Melissa; Singer, Brett

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas composition monitor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Packed-Bed Reactor Study of NETL Sample 196c for the Removal of Carbon Dioxide from Simulated Flue Gas Mixture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An amine-based solid sorbent process to remove CO2 from flue gas has been investigated. The sorbent consists of polyethylenimine (PEI) immobilized onto silica (SiO2) support. Experiments were conducted in a packed-bed reactor and exit gas composition was monitored using mass spectrometry. The effects of feed gas composition (CO2 and H2O), temperature, and simulated steam regeneration were examined for both the silica support as well as the PEI-based sorbent. The artifact of the empty reactor was also quantified. Sorbent CO2 capacity loading was compared to thermogravimetric (TGA) results to further characterize adsorption isotherms and better define CO2 working capacity. Sorbent stability was monitored by periodically repeating baseline conditions throughout the parametric testing and replacing with fresh sorbent as needed. The concept of the Basic Immobilized Amine Sorbent (BIAS) Process using this sorbent within a system where sorbent continuously flows between the absorber and regenerator was introduced. The basic tenet is to manipulate or control the level of moisture on the sorbent as it travels around the sorbent circulation path between absorption and regeneration stages to minimize its effect on regeneration heat duty.

Hoffman, James S.; Hammache, Sonia; Gray, McMahan L.; Fauth Daniel J.; Pennline, Henry W.

2012-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

382

monitoring talk 2.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gas hydrate formation Wettability Pore Pressure or Insitu temperature - leakagesweep - pressure drop - permeability - permeability - permeability - formation integrity - cap...

383

Engineering Task Plan for Standard Hydrogen Monitoring System Operation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Tanks that are known or suspected to retain and occasionally release flammable gases are equipped with Standard Hydrogen Monitoring System (SHMS) cabinets. These cabinets contain Whittaker{trademark} electrochemical cells and may also have a gas chromatograph (GC) and/or a Bruel and Kjaer infrared photo-acoustic multi-gas monitor (B&K). The GC and B&K will be referred to collectively as ''analytical instruments'' in this document. Using these instruments, a tank can be monitored for hydrogen, helium, ammonia, methane, and nitrous oxide. Air from the tank vent header (for actively ventilated tanks) or dome space (for passively ventilated tanks) is drawn continuously through the monitoring instruments via a sample pump. This monitoring is performed to track the gas release behavior of selected waste storage tanks and to help identify any potentially serious gas release behavior. Vapor grab samples may be obtained from the SHMS as well and analyzed with a mass spectrometer to obtain concentration data about hydrogen and other gases. This document describes the requirements for the operation, maintenance, calibration, and data collection for the Standard Hydrogen Monitoring System. Additionally, this document defines who is responsible for the various tasks.

MCCAIN, D.J.

1999-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

384

Method and apparatus for monitoring aircraft components  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Operability of aircraft mechanical components is monitored by analyzing the voltage output of an electrical generator of the aircraft. Alternative generators, for a turbine-driven rotor aircraft, include the gas producer turbine tachometer generator, the power turbine tachometer generator, and the aircraft systems power producing starter/generator. Changes in the peak amplitudes of the fundamental frequency and its harmonics are correlated to changes in condition of the mechanical components. 14 figs.

Dickens, L.M.; Haynes, H.D.; Ayers, C.W.

1996-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

385

Method and apparatus for monitoring aircraft components  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Operability of aircraft mechanical components is monitored by analyzing the voltage output of an electrical generator of the aircraft. Alternative generators, for a turbine-driven rotor aircraft, include the gas producer turbine tachometer generator, the power turbine tachometer generator, and the aircraft systems power producing starter/generator. Changes in the peak amplitudes of the fundamental frequency and its harmonics are correlated to changes in condition of the mechanical components.

Dickens, Larry M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Haynes, Howard D. (Knoxville, TN); Ayers, Curtis W. (Clinton, TN)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Condensing Hybrid Water Heater Monitoring Field Evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper summarizes the Mascot home, an abandoned property that was extensively renovated. Several efficiency upgrades were integrated into this home, of particular interest, a unique water heater (a Navien CR240-A). Field monitoring was performed to determine the in-use efficiency of the hybrid condensing water heater. The results were compared to the unit's rated efficiency. This unit is Energy Star qualified and one of the most efficient gas water heaters currently available on the market.

Maguire, J.; Earle, L.; Booten, C.; Hancock, C. E.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Comprehensive air monitoring plan: general monitoring report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Recommendations are provided for general monitoring of hydrogen sulfide (H/sub 2/S) in ambient air in parts of Colusa, Lake, Mendocino, Napa, and Sonoma counties potentially impacted by emissions from geothermal development projects in the Geysers-Calistoga Known Geothermal Resource Area. Recommendations for types, placement, performance guidelines, and criteria and procedure for triggering establishment and termination of CAMP monitoring equipment were determined after examination of four factors: population location; emission sources; meteorological considerations; and data needs of permitting agencies and applicants. Three alternate financial plans were developed. Locations and equipment for immediate installation are recommended for: two air quality stations in communities where the State ambient air quality standard for H/sub 2/S has been exceeded; three air quality trend stations to monitor progress in reduction of H/sub 2/S emissions; two meteorological observation stations to monitor synoptic wind flow over the area; and one acoustic radar and one rawinsonde station to monitor air inversions which limit the depth of the mixing layer.

Not Available

1980-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

388

Composite Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 8   Properties of composites for electrical make-break contacts...272 (d) 31 (c) 39.5 (d) â?¦ â?¦ C,A Wall switches, thermostat controls Silver-nickel 99.7Ag-0.3Ni â?¦ 10.49 â?¦ 100 53 HR15T (c) 79 HR15T (d) â?¦ â?¦ â?¦ â?¦ T â?¦ 95Ag-5Ni PSR 10.41 9.80â??10.41 80â??95 32 HRF (c) 84 HRF (d) 165 (c) 24 (c) â?¦ â?¦ C,A,S Appliance switches 90Ag-10Ni PSR 10.31 9.70â??10.32 75â??90 35 HRF (c) 89 HRF (d)...

389

Composite Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 2   Properties of composites for electrical make-break contacts...HRF (c) 214 (c) 31 (c) â?¦ â?¦ C, A Wall switches, thermostat controls 81 HRF (d) 272 (d) 39.5 (d) â?¦ â?¦ Silver-nickel 99.7Ag-0.3Ni â?¦ 10.49 â?¦ 100 53 HR15T (c) â?¦ â?¦ â?¦ â?¦ T â?¦ 79 HR15T (d) â?¦ â?¦ â?¦ â?¦ 95Ag-5Ni PSR 10.41 9.80â??10.41 80â??95 32 HRF (c) 165 (c) 24 (c) â?¦ â?¦ C, A, S Appliance switches 84 HRF (d) â?¦ â?¦ â?¦ â?¦...

390

An automated neutron monitor maintenance system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Neutron detectors are commonly used by the nuclear materials processing industry to monitor fissile materials in process vessels and tanks. The proper functioning of these neutron monitors must be periodically evaluated. We have developed and placed in routine use a PC-based multichannel analyzer (MCA) system for on-line BF3 and He-3 gas-filled detector function testing. The automated system: 1) acquires spectral data from the monitor system, 2) analyzes the spectrum to determine the detector`s functionality, 3) makes suggestions for maintenance or repair, as required, and 4) saves the spectrum and results to disk for review. The operator interface has been designed to be user-friendly and to minimize the training requirements of the user. The system may also be easily customized for various applications

Moore, F.S.; Griffin, J.C.; Odell, D.M.C.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Continuous Emissions Monitoring Guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since the 2002 update of this manual, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has been extremely active in its efforts to expand continuous emissions monitoring (CEM) requirements through a variety of regulatory instruments. Additional monitoring requirements have resulted from EPA's Clean Air Interstate Rule and Cross-State Air Pollution Rule. EPA attempted to impose mercury (Hg) monitoring requirements in its now-vacated Clean Air Mercury Rule. Most recently, EPA has proposed mercury, particulate mat...

2011-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

392

Edison Benchmark Monitoring  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Edison Benchmark Monitoring Benchmark Results Select Benchmark CAM GAMESS GTC IMPACT-T MAESTRO MILC PARATEC Submit Last edited: 2013-06-25 22:45:11...

393

Gas Delivered  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. Average . Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers, 1980-1996 Figure 1980 1982 1984 1986 1988 1990 1992 1994 1996 0 2 4 6 8 10 0 40 80 120 160 200 240 280 320 Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet Dollars per Thousand Cubic Meters Nominal Dollars Constant Dollars Sources: Nominal dollars: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition." Constant dollars: Prices were converted to 1995 dollars using the chain-type price indexes for Gross Domestic Product (1992 = 1.0) as published by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Economic Analysis. Residential: Prices in this publication for the residential sector cover nearly all of the volumes of gas delivered. Commercial and Industrial: Prices for the commercial and industrial sectors are often associated with

394

GAS TURBINES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the age of volatile and ever increasing natural gas fuel prices, strict new emission regulations and technological advancements, modern IGCC plants are the answer to growing market demands for efficient and environmentally friendly power generation. IGCC technology allows the use of low cost opportunity fuels, such as coal, of which there is a more than a 200-year supply in the U.S., and refinery residues, such as petroleum coke and residual oil. Future IGCC plants are expected to be more efficient and have a potential to be a lower cost solution to future CO2 and mercury regulations compared to the direct coal fired steam plants. Siemens has more than 300,000 hours of successful IGCC plant operational experience on a variety of heavy duty gas turbine models in Europe and the U.S. The gas turbines involved range from SGT5-2000E to SGT6-3000E (former designations are shown on Table 1). Future IGCC applications will extend this experience to the SGT5-4000F and SGT6-4000F/5000F/6000G gas turbines. In the currently operating Siemens ’ 60 Hz fleet, the SGT6-5000F gas turbine has the most operating engines and the most cumulative operating hours. Over the years, advancements have increased its performance and decreased its emissions and life cycle costs without impacting reliability. Development has been initiated to verify its readiness for future IGCC application including syngas combustion system testing. Similar efforts are planned for the SGT6-6000G and SGT5-4000F/SGT6-4000F models. This paper discusses the extensive development programs that have been carried out to demonstrate that target emissions and engine operability can be achieved on syngas operation in advanced F-class 50 Hz and 60 Hz gas turbine based IGCC applications.

Power For L; Satish Gadde; Jianfan Wu; Anil Gulati; Gerry Mcquiggan; Berthold Koestlin; Bernd Prade

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Gas laser  

SciTech Connect

According to the invention, the gas laser comprises a housing which accommodates two electrodes. One of the electrodes is sectional and has a ballast resistor connected to each section. One of the electrodes is so secured in the housing that it is possible to vary the spacing between the electrodes in the direction of the flow of a gas mixture passed through an active zone between the electrodes where the laser effect is produced. The invention provides for a maximum efficiency of the laser under different operating conditions.

Kosyrev, F. K.; Leonov, A. P.; Pekh, A. K.; Timofeev, V. A.

1980-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

396

Nebraska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Nebraska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9; 1980's: 15:

397

Mississippi Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Mississippi Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9; 1980's:

398

Microsoft Word - Acoustic Sensor for Pipeline Monitoring_Revised.do  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LA-UR-05-6025 LA-UR-05-6025 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Title: Acoustic Sensor for Pipeline Monitoring: Technology Report Author(s): Dipen N. Sinha Submitted to: Gas Technology Management Division Strategic Center for Natural Gas and Oil National Energy Technology Laboratory 2 Acoustic Sensor for Pipeline Monitoring: Technology Report Dipen Sinha Los Alamos National Laboratory July 20, 2005 Executive Summary This report presents detailed information on the effort to develop acoustic sensing technologies for natural gas pipe line monitoring. It starts with a historical evolution of the project and ends with the current status. The various technical accomplishments during this effort are pointed out. The latest technique involves the use of Lamb wave propagation in the wall of a pipe generated in a stand-off manner for defect detection. The report presents

399

Gas characterization system operation, maintenance, and calibration plan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document details the responsibilities and requirements for operation, maintenance, and calibration of the Gas Characterization Systems (GCS) analytical instrumentation. It further, defines the division of responsibility between the Characterization Monitoring Development organization and Tank Farms Operations.

Tate, D.D.

1996-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

400

Carbon Dioxide Storage: Geological Security and Environmental Issues – Case Study on the Sleipner Gas Field in Norway Summary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) is one option for mitigatining atmospheric emissions of carbon dioxide and thereby contributes in actions for stabilization of atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations. Carbon dioxide storage in geological formations has been in practice since early 1970s. Information and experience gained from the injection and/or storage of CO2 from a large number of existing enhanced oil recovery (EOR) projects indicate that it is feasible to safely store CO2 in geological formations as a CO2 mitigation option. Industrial analogues, including underground natural gas storage projects around the world and acid gas injection projects, provide additional indications that CO2 can be safely injected and stored at well-characterized and properly managed sites. Geological storage of CO 2 is in practice today beneath the North Sea, where nearly 1 MtCO2 has been successfully injected annually in the Utsira formation at the Sleipner Gas Field since 1996. The site is well characterized and the CO 2 injection process was monitored using seismic methods and this provided insights into the geometrical distribution of the injected CO 2. The injected CO2 will potentially be trapped geochemically pressure build up as a result of CO2 injection is unlikely to occur. Solubility and density dependence of CO2-water composition will become the controlling fluid parameters at Sleipner. The solubility trapping has the effect of eliminating the buoyant forces that drive CO2 upwards, and through time it can lead to mineral trapping, which is the most permanent and secure form of geological storage. Overall, the study at the Sleipner area demonstrates the geological security of carbon dioxide storage. The monitoring tools strengthen the verification of safe injection of CO2 in the Utsira formation. This proves that CO2 capture and storage is technically feasible and can be an effective method for greenhouse mitigation provided the site is well characterized and monitored properly. 1

Semere Solomon; The Bellona Foundation

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas composition monitor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Recycling of Thermoset-Matrix Composites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 1   Thermoset composites recycling processes...Ref 14 ) Polyurethane foams, ASR Gas, oil, solid waste Hydrolysis ( Ref 10 , 11 ) Foams, RIM resin, and elastomers Monomers of the input material Fluidized bed combustion ( Ref 14 ) RIM Energy recovery, solid and gaseous wastes Rotary kiln combustion ( Ref 13 ) RIM Energy recovery, solid and gaseous...

402

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,554,530 1,554,530 311,229 3.51 3,094,431 15.67 442 15.08 299,923 5.72 105,479 3.86 210,381 6.66 927,454 4.64 Mountain Mountain 43. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Mountain, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 38,711 38,987 37,366 39,275 38,944 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 30,965 34,975 38,539 38,775 41,236 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 2,352,729 2,723,393 3,046,159 3,131,205 3,166,689 From Oil Wells ........................................... 677,771 535,884 472,397 503,986 505,903 Total.............................................................. 3,030,499 3,259,277 3,518,556

403

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,592,465 1,592,465 716,648 8.08 239,415 1.21 182 6.21 457,792 8.73 334,123 12.23 320,153 10.14 1,828,898 9.14 South Atlantic South Atlantic 40. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas South Atlantic, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 3,307 3,811 4,496 4,427 4,729 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 39,412 35,149 41,307 37,822 36,827 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 206,766 208,892 234,058 236,072 233,409 From Oil Wells ........................................... 7,584 8,011 8,468 7,133 6,706 Total.............................................................. 214,349 216,903 242,526 243,204 240,115

404

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,999,161 1,999,161 895,529 10.10 287,933 1.46 1,402 47.82 569,235 10.86 338,640 12.39 308,804 9.78 2,113,610 10.57 Pacific Contiguous Pacific Contiguous 44. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Pacific Contiguous, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 3,896 3,781 3,572 3,508 2,082 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 1,142 1,110 1,280 1,014 996 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 156,635 124,207 117,725 96,329 88,173 From Oil Wells ........................................... 294,800 285,162 282,227 289,430 313,581 Total.............................................................. 451,435 409,370

405

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-122,394 -122,394 49,997 0.56 178,984 0.91 5 0.17 37,390 0.71 205 0.01 28,025 0.89 115,622 0.58 West Virginia West Virginia 96. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas West Virginia, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 2,356 2,439 2,565 2,499 2,703 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 38,250 33,716 39,830 36,144 35,148 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... E 182,000 171,024 183,773 186,231 178,984 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. E 182,000 171,024 183,773 186,231 178,984 Repressuring ................................................

406

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

134,294 32,451 0.37 0 0.00 32 1.09 43,764 0.83 10,456 0.38 39,786 1.26 126,488 0.63 C o n n e c t i c u t Connecticut 54. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Connecticut, 1992-1996...

407

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

73,669 73,669 141,300 1.59 221,822 1.12 3 0.10 46,289 0.88 33,988 1.24 31,006 0.98 252,585 1.26 A r k a n s a s Arkansas 51. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Arkansas, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,750 1,552 1,607 1,563 1,470 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 3,500 3,500 3,500 3,988 4,020 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 171,543 166,273 161,967 161,390 182,895 From Oil Wells ........................................... 39,364 38,279 33,446 33,979 41,551 Total.............................................................. 210,906 204,552 195,413 195,369 224,446 Repressuring ................................................

408

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-1,080,240 -1,080,240 201,024 2.27 1,734,887 8.78 133 4.54 76,629 1.46 136,436 4.99 46,152 1.46 460,373 2.30 O k l a h o m a Oklahoma 84. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Oklahoma, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 13,926 13,289 13,487 13,438 13,074 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 28,902 29,118 29,121 29,733 29,733 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 1,674,405 1,732,997 1,626,858 1,521,857 1,467,695 From Oil Wells ........................................... 342,950 316,945 308,006 289,877 267,192 Total.............................................................. 2,017,356 2,049,942 1,934,864

409

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7,038,115 7,038,115 3,528,911 39.78 13,646,477 69.09 183 6.24 408,861 7.80 1,461,718 53.49 281,452 8.91 5,681,125 28.40 West South Central West South Central 42. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas West South Central, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 87,198 84,777 88,034 88,734 62,357 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 92,212 95,288 94,233 102,525 102,864 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 11,599,913 11,749,649 11,959,444 11,824,788 12,116,665 From Oil Wells ........................................... 2,313,831 2,368,395 2,308,634 2,217,752 2,151,247 Total..............................................................

410

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

77,379 77,379 94,481 1.07 81,435 0.41 8 0.27 70,232 1.34 1,836 0.07 40,972 1.30 207,529 1.04 K e n t u c k y Kentucky 65. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Kentucky, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,084 1,003 969 1,044 983 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 12,483 12,836 13,036 13,311 13,501 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 79,690 86,966 73,081 74,754 81,435 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 79,690 86,966 73,081 74,754 81,435 Repressuring ................................................

411

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-67,648 -67,648 75,616 0.85 480,828 2.43 0 0.00 16,720 0.32 31,767 1.16 29,447 0.93 153,549 0.77 Pacific Noncontiguous Pacific Noncontiguous 45. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Pacific Noncontiguous, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 9,638 9,907 9,733 9,497 9,294 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 112 113 104 100 102 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 198,603 190,139 180,639 179,470 183,747 From Oil Wells ........................................... 2,427,110 2,588,202 2,905,261 3,190,433 3,189,837 Total.............................................................. 2,625,713 2,778,341

412

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-310,913 -310,913 110,294 1.24 712,796 3.61 2 0.07 85,376 1.63 22,607 0.83 57,229 1.81 275,508 1.38 K a n s a s Kansas 64. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Kansas, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 9,681 9,348 9,156 8,571 7,694 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 18,400 19,472 19,365 22,020 21,388 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 580,572 605,578 628,900 636,582 629,755 From Oil Wells ........................................... 79,169 82,579 85,759 86,807 85,876 Total.............................................................. 659,741 688,157 714,659 723,389 715,631 Repressuring ................................................

413

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

819,046 819,046 347,043 3.91 245,740 1.24 40 1.36 399,522 7.62 32,559 1.19 201,390 6.38 980,555 4.90 M i c h i g a n Michigan 70. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Michigan, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,223 1,160 1,323 1,294 2,061 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 3,257 5,500 6,000 5,258 5,826 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 120,287 126,179 136,989 146,320 201,123 From Oil Wells ........................................... 80,192 84,119 91,332 97,547 50,281 Total.............................................................. 200,479 210,299 228,321 243,867 251,404 Repressuring ................................................

414

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

W W y o m i n g -775,410 50,253 0.57 666,036 3.37 14 0.48 13,534 0.26 87 0.00 9,721 0.31 73,609 0.37 Wyoming 98. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Wyoming, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 10,826 10,933 10,879 12,166 12,320 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 3,111 3,615 3,942 4,196 4,510 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 751,693 880,596 949,343 988,671 981,115 From Oil Wells ........................................... 285,125 142,006 121,519 111,442 109,434 Total.............................................................. 1,036,817 1,022,602 1,070,862 1,100,113 1,090,549 Repressuring

415

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-67,648 -67,648 75,616 0.85 480,828 2.43 0 0.00 16,179 0.31 31,767 1.16 27,315 0.86 150,877 0.75 A l a s k a Alaska 49. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Alaska, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 9,638 9,907 9,733 9,497 9,294 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 112 113 104 100 102 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 198,603 190,139 180,639 179,470 183,747 From Oil Wells ........................................... 2,427,110 2,588,202 2,905,261 3,190,433 3,189,837 Total.............................................................. 2,625,713 2,778,341 3,085,900 3,369,904 3,373,584 Repressuring

416

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

628,189 628,189 449,511 5.07 765,699 3.88 100 3.41 528,662 10.09 39,700 1.45 347,721 11.01 1,365,694 6.83 West North Central West North Central 39. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas West North Central, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 10,177 9,873 9,663 9,034 8,156 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 18,569 19,687 19,623 22,277 21,669 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 594,551 626,728 651,594 655,917 648,822 From Oil Wells ........................................... 133,335 135,565 136,468 134,776 133,390 Total.............................................................. 727,886 762,293

417

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,048,760 1,048,760 322,661 3.64 18,131 0.09 54 1.84 403,264 7.69 142,688 5.22 253,075 8.01 1,121,742 5.61 N e w Y o r k New York 80. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New York, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 329 264 242 197 232 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 5,906 5,757 5,884 6,134 6,208 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 22,697 20,587 19,937 17,677 17,494 From Oil Wells ........................................... 824 610 539 723 641 Total.............................................................. 23,521 21,197 20,476 18,400 18,134 Repressuring ................................................

418

Natural Gas  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

3.91 119,251 0.60 229 7.81 374,824 7.15 2,867 0.10 189,966 6.01 915,035 4.57 O h i o Ohio 83. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Ohio, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996...

419

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0.00 53 1.81 147,893 2.82 7,303 0.27 93,816 2.97 398,581 1.99 W i s c o n s i n Wisconsin 97. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Wisconsin, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994...

420

Gas Prices  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Prices Gasoline Prices for U.S. Cities Click on the map to view gas prices for cities in your state. AK VT ME NH NH MA MA RI CT CT DC NJ DE DE NY WV VA NC SC FL GA AL MS TN KY IN...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas composition monitor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Natural Gas  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

10,799 1,953 0.02 0 0.00 0 0.00 2,523 0.05 24 0.00 2,825 0.09 7,325 0.04 V e r m o n t Vermont 93. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Vermont, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995...

422

Natural Gas  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

845,998 243,499 2.75 135,000 0.68 35 1.19 278,606 5.32 7,239 0.26 154,642 4.90 684,022 3.42 P e n n s y l v a n i a Pennsylvania 86. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas...

423

Measurement of gas transport properties for chemical vapor infiltration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) process for fabricating ceramic matrix composites (CMCs), transport of gas phase reactant into the fiber preform is a critical step. The transport can be driven by pressure or by concentration. This report describes methods for measuring this for CVI preforms and partially infiltrated composites. Results are presented for Nicalon fiber cloth layup preforms and composites, Nextel fiber braid preforms and composites, and a Nicalon fiber 3-D weave composite. The results are consistent with a percolating network model for gas transport in CVI preforms and composites. This model predicts inherent variability in local pore characteristics and transport properties, and therefore, in local densification during processing; this may lead to production of gastight composites.

Starr, T.L.; Hablutzel, N. [Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (United States). School of Materials Science and Engineering

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Simple beam profile monitor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An inexpensive beam profile monitor is based on the well proven rotating wire method. The monitor can display beam position and shape in real time for particle beams of most energies and beam currents up to 200{mu}A. Beam shape, position cross-section and other parameters are displayed on a computer screen.

Gelbart, W.; Johnson, R. R.; Abeysekera, B. [ASD Inc. Garden Bay, BC (Canada); Best Theratronics Ltd Ottawa Ontario (Canada); PharmaSpect Ltd., Burnaby BC (Canada)

2012-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

425

Composition and Biodegradation of a Synthetic Oil Spilled on the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

characteristics. Composition and natural attenuation of the spilled aviation diesel fuel are discussed in JaraulaComposition and Biodegradation of a Synthetic Oil Spilled on the Perennial Ice Cover of LakeAeroshell500.Molecularcompositionsoftheoilswereanalyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and compared

Priscu, John C.

426

Method of making a modified ceramic-ceramic composite  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides a method of making a shaped ceramic-ceramic composite articles, such as gas-fired radiant heat burner tubes, heat exchangers, flame dispersers, and other furnace elements, having a formed-on ceramic-ceramic composite thereon.

Weaver, Billy L. (Eagan, MN); McLaughlin, Jerry C. (Oak Ridge, TN); Stinton, David P. (Knoxville, TN)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Monitoring Jobs on Hopper  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Monitoring Jobs Monitoring Jobs Monitoring Jobs Monitoring Edison Batch Jobs The batch system provides the command to monotor your jobs. We are listing the commands commonly used to submit and monitor the jobs. For more informaiton please refer to the man pages of these commands. Job Commands Command Description qsub batch_script Submits batch script to the queue. The output of qsub will be a jobid qdel jobid Deletes a job from the queue qhold jobid Puts a job on hold in the queue. qrls jobid Releases a job from hold. qalter [options] jobid Change attributes of submitted job. (See below.) qmove new_queue jobid Move job to new queue. Remember, the new queue must be one of the submission queues (premium, regular, or low) qstat -a Lists jobs in submission order (more useful than qstat without options) Also takes -u and -f [jobid]> options

428

Operational Area Monitoring Plan  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

' ' SECTION 11.7B Operational Area Monitoring Plan for the Long -Term H yd rol og ical M o n i to ri ng - Program Off The Nevada Test Site S . C. Black Reynolds Electrical & Engineering, Co. and W. G. Phillips, G. G. Martin, D. J. Chaloud, C. A. Fontana, and 0. G. Easterly Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory U. S. Environmental Protection Agency October 23, 1991 FOREWORD This is one of a series of Operational Area Monitoring Plans that comprise the overall Environmental Monitoring Plan for the DOE Field Office, Nevada (DOEINV) nuclear and non- nuclear testing activities associated with the Nevada Test Site (NTS). These Operational Area Monitoring Plans are prepared by various DOE support contractors, NTS user organizations, and federal or state agencies supporting DOE NTS operations. These plans and the parent

429

PROTECTIVE CLOTHING MONITORING SYSTEM  

SciTech Connect

An automatic conveyor-type laundry monitoring system, whlch monitors laboratory coats and coveralls for both alpha and beta-gamma contamination, was developed and installed at the Hanford Laundry Facility to improve monitoring efficiency and control. The instrument employs eight alpha and seven beta-gamma scintillation large-area detectors, a garment conveyor, solid state circuitry, and appropriate signaling devices. Oarments are manually placed on hangers which are then placed onto an automatic loading mechanism. Each garment is conveyed past detectors where it is monitored for beta-gamma and alpha contamination. Contaminated garments are rejected and dropped into a special contniner if spot contamination exceeds 1000 disintegrations per minute (dis/min) of alpha or 5000 dis/min of mixed fission products. The garments which are not rejected pass through for folding and distribution. The system, which requires only one attendant, can effectively monitor 500 garments per standard shift. System operation was fully successful for ten months. (auth)

Rankin, M.O.; Spear, W.G.

1963-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

monitor.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

* Prolific oil & gas producing basins * Has numerous large power plants, oil refineries which produces more than 5 million MT of fossil fuel related CO2 emissions each year...

431

Engineering task plan for standard hydrogen monitoring system operation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Tanks that are known or suspected to retain and occasionally release flammable gases are equipped with Standard Hydrogen Monitoring System (SHMS) cabinets. These cabinets contain Whittaker{trademark} electrochemical cells and may also have a gas chromatograph (GC) and/or a Bruel and Kjaer infrared photo-acoustic multi-gas monitor (B and K). The GC and B and K will be referred to collectively as ''analytical instruments'' in this document. Using these instruments, a tank can be monitored for hydrogen, ammonia, methane, and nitrous oxide. Air from the tank vent header (for actively ventilated tanks) or dome space (for passively ventilated tanks) is drawn continuously through the monitoring instruments via a sample pump. This monitoring is performed to track the gas release behavior of selected waste storage tanks and to help identify any potentially serious gas release behavior. Vapor grab samples are obtained from the SHMS as well and are analyzed with a mass spectrometer to obtain concentration data about hydrogen and other gases.

MCCAIN, D.J.

1999-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

432

Real Time Flame Monitoring of Gasifier Burner and Injectors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Real Time Flame Monitoring of Gasifier Real Time Flame Monitoring of Gasifier Burner and Injectors Background The Gasification Technologies Program at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) supports research and development (R&D) in the area of gasification-a process whereby carbon-based materials (feedstocks) such as coal are converted into synthesis gas (syngas), which is separated into hydrogen (H 2 ) and carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) gas streams in a combustion turbine-generator as a way to generate clean electricity while

433

Carbon sequestration in natural gas reservoirs: Enhanced gas recovery and natural gas storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by numerical simulation below. pipeline gas shalecushion gas sand shale CH4 working gas CH4 working gas sand

Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

NETL: Novel Inorganic/Polymer Composite Membranes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Novel Inorganic/Polymer Composite Membranes Novel Inorganic/Polymer Composite Membranes Project No.: DE-FE0007632 Ohio State University is developing a cost-effective design and manufacturing process for new membrane modules that capture carbon dioxide (CO2) from flue gas. The membranes consist of a thin, selective inorganic layer, embedded in a polymer structure so that it can be made in a continuous manufacturing process. They will be incorporated in spiral-wound modules for bench-scale tests using coal-fired flue gas. Preliminary cost calculations show that a single-stage membrane process is economically unfavorable, primarily because of the low concentration of CO2 (~14 percent) in the flue gas stream. A two-stage process is more economical, but requires plant operation with a CO2-enriched recycle stream.

435

Unconventional Natural Gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Natural Gas Unconventional Natural Gas Los Alamos scientists are committed to the efficient and environmentally-safe development of major U.S. natural gas and oil resources....

436

Underground Natural Gas Storage  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Underground Natural Gas Storage. Measured By. Disseminated Through. Monthly Survey of Storage Field Operators -- asking injections, withdrawals, base gas, working gas.

437

,"Texas Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Texas Natural Gas Imports Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Price of Texas Natural Gas Exports...

438

,"Mississippi Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Mississippi Natural Gas Imports Price All Countries (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Mississippi Natural Gas...

439

,"Montana Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Montana Natural Gas Imports Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Price of Montana Natural Gas Exports...

440

,"Michigan Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Michigan Natural Gas Imports Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Price of Michigan Natural Gas Exports...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas composition monitor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

2. Gas Productive Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

2. Gas Productive Capacity Gas Capacity to Meet Lower 48 States Requirements The United States has sufficient dry gas productive capacity at the wellhead to meet ...

442

Optimizing password composition policies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A password composition policy restricts the space of allowable passwords to eliminate weak passwords that are vulnerable to statistical guessing attacks. Usability studies have demonstrated that existing password composition policies can sometimes result ... Keywords: computational complexity, password composition policy, sampling

Jeremiah Blocki, Saranga Komanduri, Ariel Procaccia, Or Sheffet

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

RtS>-l-2437 Utilization of the Isotoplc Composition of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RtS«>-l»-2437 3*- if, -. Utilization of the Isotoplc Composition of Xe and Kr in Fission Gas 4* #12;RIS�-M-2437 UTILIZATION OF THE ISOTOPIC COMPOSITION OF Xe AND Kr IN FISSION GAS RELEASE Computerized Man- Machine Communication, Hotel Alexandra, Loen, May 23rd-28th, 1983 ISBN 87-550-1018-0 ISSN

444

Shale gas is natural gas trapped inside  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Shale gas is natural gas trapped inside formations of shale - fine grained sedimentary rocks that can be rich sources of petroleum and natural gas. Just a few years ago, much of...

445

Liquid absorbent solutions for separating nitrogen from natural gas  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Nitrogen-absorbing and -desorbing compositions, novel ligands and transition metal complexes, and methods of using the same, which are useful for the selective separation of nitrogen from other gases, especially natural gas.

Friesen, Dwayne T. (Bend, OR); Babcock, Walter C. (Bend, OR); Edlund, David J. (Redmond, OR); Lyon, David K. (Bend, OR); Miller, Warren K. (Bend, OR)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

analysis of the composition of volatile hydrocarbons, including methane, ethane, and propane and fixed natural gases (i.e., O2, CO2, and N2+Ar) from headspace void gas and gases...

447

Modelling the natural gas consumption in a changing environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A composite function was used successfully for modelling the Natural Gas (NG) consumption in 16 European energy markets. Background of the model is a logistic function where the upper limit is also a logistic function of time, with secondary parameters ...

F. A. Batzias; N. P. Nikolaou; A. S. Kakos; I. Michailides

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Review Functional hemodynamic monitoring  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hemodynamic monitoring is a central component of intensive care. Patterns of hemodynamic variables often suggest cardiogenic, hypovolemic, obstructive, or distributive (septic) etiologies to cardiovascular insufficiency, thus defining the specific treatments required. Monitoring increases in invasiveness, as required, as the risk for cardiovascular instability-induced morbidity increases because of the need to define more accurately the diagnosis and monitor the response to therapy. Monitoring is also context specific: requirements during cardiac surgery will be different from those in the intensive care unit or emergency department. Solitary hemodynamic values are useful as threshold monitors (e.g. hypotension is always pathological, central venous pressure is only elevated in disease). Some hemodynamic values can only be interpreted relative to metabolic demand, whereas others have multiple meanings. Functional hemodynamic monitoring implies a therapeutic application, independent of diagnosis such as a therapeutic trial of fluid challenge to assess preload responsiveness. Newer methods for assessing preload responsiveness include monitoring changes in central venous pressure during spontaneous inspiration, and variations in arterial pulse pressure, systolic pressure, and aortic flow variation in response to vena caval collapse during positive pressure ventilation or passive leg raising. Defining preload responsiveness using these functional measures, coupled to treatment protocols, can improve outcome from critical illness. Potentially, as these and newer, less invasive hemodynamic measures are validated, they could be incorporated into such protocolized care in a costeffective manner.

Michael R Pinsky; Didier Payen

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Composite of refractory material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A composite refractory material composition comprises a boron carbide matrix and minor constituents of yttrium-boron-oxygen-carbon phases uniformly distributed throughout the boron carbide matrix.

Holcombe, Cressie E. (Knoxville, TN); Morrow, Marvin S. (Kingston, TN)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Composite of refractory material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A composite refractory material composition comprises a boron carbide matrix and minor constituents of yttrium-boron-oxygen-carbon phases uniformly distributed throughout the boron carbide matrix.

Holcombe, C.E.; Morrow, M.S.

1994-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

451

Adaptive simulation of gas turbine performance  

SciTech Connect

A method is presented allowing the simulation of gas turbine performance with the possibility of adapting to engine particularities. Measurements along the gas path are used, in order to adapt a given performance model by appropriate modification of the component maps. The proposed method can provide accurate simulation for engines of the same type, differing due to manufacturing or assembly tolerances. It doesn't require accurate component maps, as they are derived during the adaptation process. It also can be used for health monitoring purposes, introducing thus a novel approach for component condition assessment. The effectiveness of the proposed method is demonstrated by application to an industrial gas turbine.

Stamatis, A.; Mathioudakis, K.; Papailiou, K.D. (Ethnikon Metsovion Polytechneion, Athens (Greece))

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

GAS SEAL  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A seal is described for a cover closing an opening in the top of a pressure vessel that may house a nuclear reactor. The seal comprises a U-shaped trough formed on the pressure vessel around the opening therein, a mass of metal in the trough, and an edge flange on the cover extending loosely into the trough and dipping into the metal mass. The lower portion of the metal mass is kept melted, and the upper portion, solid. The solid pontion of the metal mass prevents pressure surges in the vessel from expelling the liquid portion of the metal mass from the trough; the liquld portion, thus held in place by the solid portion, does not allow gas to go through, and so gas cannot escape through shrinkage holes in the solid portion.

Monson, H.; Hutter, E.

1961-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

453

Environmental Monitoring Plan  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the environmental monitoring plan (EMP) is to promote the early identification of, and response to, potential adverse environmental impacts associated with DOE operations. Environmental monitoring supports the Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) to detect, characterize, and respond to releases from DOE activities; assess impacts; estimate dispersal patterns in the environment; characterize the pathways of exposure to members of the public; characterize the exposures and doses to individuals and to the population; and to evaluate the potential impacts to the biota in the vicinity of the DOE activity. In addition, the EMP addresses the analytical work supporting environmental monitoring to ensure the following: (1) A consistent system for collecting, assessing, and documenting environmental data of known and documented quality; (2) A validated and consistent approach for sampling and analysis of radionuclide samples to ensure laboratory data meets program-specific needs and requirements within the framework of a performance-based approach for analytical laboratory work; and (3) An integrated sampling approach to avoid duplicative data collection. Until recently, environmental monitoring at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) was required by DOE Order 5400.1, which was canceled in January 2003. LLNL is in the process of adopting the ISO 14001 Environmental Management Systems standard, which contains requirements to perform and document environmental monitoring. The ISO 14001 standard is not as prescriptive as DOE Order 5400.1, which expressly required an EMP. LLNL will continue to prepare the EMP because it provides an organizational framework for ensuring that the work is conducted appropriately. The environmental monitoring addressed by the plan includes preoperational characterization and assessment, and effluent and surveillance monitoring. Additional environmental monitoring is conducted at LLNL as part of the compliance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA, also known as Superfund). This EMP does not address the technical requirements for such monitoring.

Althouse, P E; Bertoldo, N A; Bowen, B M; Brown, R A; Campbell, C G; Christofferson, E; Gallegos, G M; Grayson, A R; Jones, H E; Larson, J M; Laycak, D; Mathews, S; Peterson, S R; Revelli, M J; Rueppel, D; Williams, R A; Wilson, K; Woods, N

2005-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

454

MCO Monitoring activity description  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Spent Nuclear Fuel remaining from Hanford's N-Reactor operations in the 1970s has been stored under water in the K-Reactor Basins. This fuel will be repackaged, dried and stored in a new facility in the 200E Area. The safety basis for this process of retrieval, drying, and interim storage of the spent fuel has been established. The monitoring of MCOS in dry storage is a currently identified issue in the SNF Project. This plan outlines the key elements of the proposed monitoring activity. Other fuel stored in the K-Reactor Basins, including SPR fuel, will have other monitoring considerations and is not addressed by this activity description.

SEXTON, R.A.

1998-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

455

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ... 152 170 165 195 224 Production (million cubic feet)...

456

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ... 280 300 225 240 251 Production (million cubic feet)...

457

Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production (Volumes in Million Cubic Feet) Data Series: ... coalbed production data are included in Gas Well totals.

458

Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Withdrawals from Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells Repressuring Vented and Flared...

459

Method and apparatus for manufacturing gas tags  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

For use in the manufacture of gas tags employed in a gas tagging failure detection system for a nuclear reactor, a plurality of commercial feed gases each having a respective noble gas isotopic composition are blended under computer control to provide various tag gas mixtures having selected isotopic ratios which are optimized for specified defined conditions such as cost. Using a new approach employing a discrete variable structure rather than the known continuous-variable optimization problem, the computer controlled gas tag manufacturing process employs an analytical formalism from condensed matter physics known as stochastic relaxation, which is a special case of simulated annealing, for input feed gas selection. For a tag blending process involving M tag isotopes with N distinct feed gas mixtures commercially available from an enriched gas supplier, the manufacturing process calculates the cost difference between multiple combinations and specifies gas mixtures which approach the optimum defined conditions. The manufacturing process is then used to control tag blending apparatus incorporating tag gas canisters connected by stainless-steel tubing with computer controlled valves, with the canisters automatically filled with metered quantities of the required feed gases.

Gross, Kenny C. (Bolingbrook, IL); Laug, Matthew T. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Method and apparatus for manufacturing gas tags  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

For use in the manufacture of gas tags employed in a gas tagging failure detection system for a nuclear reactor, a plurality of commercial feed gases each having a respective noble gas isotopic composition are blended under computer control to provide various tag gas mixtures having selected isotopic ratios which are optimized for specified defined conditions such as cost. Using a new approach employing a discrete variable structure rather than the known continuous-variable optimization problem, the computer controlled gas tag manufacturing process employs an analytical formalism from condensed matter physics known as stochastic relaxation, which is a special case of simulated annealing, for input feed gas selection. For a tag blending process involving M tag isotopes with N distinct feed gas mixtures commercially available from an enriched gas supplier, the manufacturing process calculates the cost difference between multiple combinations and specifies gas mixtures which approach the optimum defined conditions. The manufacturing process is then used to control tag blending apparatus incorporating tag gas canisters connected by stainless-steel tubing with computer controlled valves, with the canisters automatically filled with metered quantities of the required feed gases. 4 figs.

Gross, K.C.; Laug, M.T.

1996-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

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