National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for gas cng refueling

  1. LNG to CNG refueling stations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Branson, J.D. [ECOGAS Corp., Austin, TX (United States)

    1995-12-31

    While the fleet operator is concerned about the environment, he or she is going to make the choice based primarily on economics. Which fuel provides the lowest total operating cost? The calculation of this costing must include the price-per-gallon of the fuel delivered, as well as the tangible and intangible components of fuel delivery, such as downtime for vehicles during the refueling process, idle time for drivers during refueling, emissions costings resulting from compressor oil blow-by, inclusion of non-combustible constituents in the CNG, and energy consumption during the refueling process. Also, the upfront capital requirement of similar delivery capabilities must be compared. The use of LNG as the base resource for the delivered CNG, in conjunction with the utilization of a fully temperature-compressed LNG/CNG refueling system, eliminates many of the perceived shortfalls of CNG. An LNG/CNG refueling center designed to match the capabilities of the compressor-based station will have approximately the same initial capital requirement. However, because it derives its CNG sales product from the {minus}260 F LNG base product, thus availing itself of the natural physical properties of the cryogenic product, all other economic elements of the system favor the LNG/CNG product.

  2. Evaluating the Safety of a Natural Gas Home Refueling Appliance (HRA)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2005-04-01

    A fact sheet summarizing the National Renewable Energy Laboratory safety evaluation of Phill, Fuelmaker Corporation's natural gas home refueling appliance, used to fill CNG vehicles at home.

  3. Compressed natural gas (CNG) measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Husain, Z.D.; Goodson, F.D. [Daniel Flow Products, Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

    1995-12-01

    The increased level of environmental awareness has raised concerns about pollution. One area of high attention is the internal combustion engine. The internal combustion engine in and of itself is not a major pollution threat. However, the vast number of motor vehicles in use release large quantities of pollutants. Recent technological advances in ignition and engine controls coupled with unleaded fuels and catalytic converters have reduced vehicular emissions significantly. Alternate fuels have the potential to produce even greater reductions in emissions. The Natural Gas Vehicle (NGV) has been a significant alternative to accomplish the goal of cleaner combustion. Of the many alternative fuels under investigation, compressed natural gas (CNG) has demonstrated the lowest levels of emission. The only vehicle certified by the State of California as an Ultra Low Emission Vehicle (ULEV) was powered by CNG. The California emissions tests of the ULEV-CNG vehicle revealed the following concentrations: Non-Methane Hydrocarbons 0.005 grams/mile Carbon Monoxide 0.300 grams/mile Nitrogen Oxides 0.040 grams/mile. Unfortunately, CNG vehicles will not gain significant popularity until compressed natural gas is readily available in convenient locations in urban areas and in proximity to the Interstate highway system. Approximately 150,000 gasoline filling stations exist in the United States while number of CNG stations is about 1000 and many of those CNG stations are limited to fleet service only. Discussion in this paper concentrates on CNG flow measurement for fuel dispensers. Since the regulatory changes and market demands affect the flow metering and dispenser station design those aspects are discussed. The CNG industry faces a number of challenges.

  4. Orders Granting Natural Gas, LNG & CNG Authorizations Issued...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Orders Granting Natural Gas, LNG & CNG Authorizations Issued in 2014 Orders Granting Natural Gas, LNG & CNG Authorizations Issued in 2014 Order 3378 - Encana Natural Gas Inc. Order...

  5. Research and Development of a PEM Fuel Cell, Hydrogen Reformer, and Vehicle Refueling Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and compressed natural gas (CNG) and pure hydrogen to vehicles, and the co-production of electricity from, and operation of the refueling station. Overall Integration System Configuration NG H2 /CNG RTCRTCRTC Plug Power STORAGE COMPRESSION CNG REFUELING STATION CNG CLV & APCI CLV &CLV & APCIAPCI Figure 1: Overall Integration

  6. 2015 - LNG Export, Compressed Natural Gas (CNG), Re-Exports ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2015 - LNG Export, Compressed Natural Gas (CNG), Re-Exports & Long Term Natural Gas Applications 2015 - LNG Export, Compressed Natural Gas (CNG), Re-Exports & Long Term Natural Gas...

  7. Refueling stations for natural gas vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blazek, C.F.; Kinast, J.A.; Biederman, R.T.; Jasionowski, W.

    1991-01-01

    The unavailability of natural gas vehicle (NGV) refueling stations constitutes one of the major barriers to the wide spread utilization of natural gas in the transportation market. The purpose of this paper is to review and evaluate the current technical and economic status of compressed natural gas vehicle refueling stations and to identify the components or design features that offer the greatest potential for performance improvements and/or cost reductions. Both fast-fill- and slow-fill-type refueling systems will be discussed. 4 refs., 10 figs., 6 tabs.

  8. EA-1976: Emera CNG, LLC Compressed Natural Gas Project, Florida...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Emera's CNG plant facilities to receive, dehydrate, and compress gas to fill pressure vessels with an open International Organization for Standardization (ISO) container frame...

  9. The effects of refueling system operating pressure on LNG and CNG economics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corless, A.J.; Barclay, J.A.

    1996-12-31

    Natural gas (NG) liquefaction and compression are energy intensive processes which make up a significant portion of the overall delivered price of liquefied NG (LNG) and compressed NG (CNG). Increases in system efficiency and/or process changes which reduce the required amount of work will improve the overall economics of NG as a vehicle fuel. This paper describes a method of reducing the delivered cost of LNG by liquefying the gas above ambient pressures. Higher pressure LNG is desirable because OEM NG engine manufacturers would like NG delivered to the engine intake manifold at elevated pressures to avoid compromising engine performance. Producing LNG at higher pressures reduces the amount of work required for liquefaction but it is only practical when the LNG is liquefied on-site. Using a thermo-economic approach, it is shown that NG fuel costs can be reduced by as much as 10% when producing LNG at higher pressures. A reduction in the delivered cost is also demonstrated for CNG produced on-site from high pressure LNG.

  10. Soviets' CNG technology promoted in U. S

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-11-25

    This paper reports on compressed natural gas which continues to be a major player in the push for alternate motor fuels. A CNG program has been under way for 40 years in the U.S.S.R., and Moscow CNG research and development company Gaztop is soliciting U.S. interest in its natural gas fuel systems and vehicle converters. Elsewhere in U.S. CNH action: Pittsburgh has taken delivery of five CNG buses. The first mass produced CNG pickup truck in the U.S. was unveiled this month in Los Angeles. The nation's first public CNG refueling network opened this month in Texas.

  11. Fact #816: February 10, 2014 Natural Gas Refueling Stations Grow...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    6: February 10, 2014 Natural Gas Refueling Stations Grow Over the Last Ten Years Fact 816: February 10, 2014 Natural Gas Refueling Stations Grow Over the Last Ten Years In 2003...

  12. Alternative Fuel Tool Kit Case Study on Compressed Natural Gas (CNG)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 5/2014 Alternative Fuel Tool Kit Case Study on Compressed Natural Gas (CNG): Build retrofit services to its clients. Its fleet consists of the following vehicles: Two 2011 CNG Ford Transit Connects Three 2009 CNG Ford Escapes Two 2012 CNG Ford E-350 Vans Three light-duty diesel vehicles

  13. The CNG process: Acid gas removal with liquid carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Y.C.; Auyang, L.; Brown, W.R.

    1987-01-01

    The CNG acid gas removal process has two unique features: the absorption of sulfur-containing compounds and other trace contaminants with liquid carbon dioxide, and the regeneration of pure liquid carbon dioxide by triple-point crystallization. The process is especially suitable for treating gases which contain large amounts of carbon dioxide and much smaller amounts (relative to carbon dioxide) of hydrogen sulfide. Capital and energy costs are lower than conventional solvent processes. Further, products of the CNG process meet stringent purity specifications without undue cost penalties. A process demonstration unit has been constructed and operated to demonstrate the two key steps of the CNG process. Hydrogen sulfide and carbonyl sulfide removal from gas streams with liquid carbon dioxide absorbent to sub-ppm concentrations has been demonstrated. The production of highly purified liquid carbon dioxide (less than 0.1 ppm total contaminant) by triple-point crystallization also has been demonstrated.

  14. SEP Success Story: City in Colorado Fueling Vehicles with Gas...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    bus is preparing to refuel. The City of Grand Junction built a 5-mile underground pipeline to transport compressed natural gas (CNG) from a local wastewater treatment facility...

  15. Fact #816: February 10, 2014 Natural Gas Refueling Stations Grow Over the Last Ten Years

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In 2003 there were 1,097 natural gas refueling stations nationwide. By 2013, that number increased by about 25% to a total of 1,374 natural gas refueling stations. In 2003, there were six states...

  16. Evaluating metalorganic frameworks for natural gas storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    suited for light-duty passenger vehicles. For instance, compressed natural gas (CNG) requires expensive and cargo space. Even with compression to 250 bar, the energy density of CNG (near 9 MJ LÀ1 ) is only 26% that of gasoline,2a leading to a signicant reduction in the driving range of a vehicle. Moreover, CNG refueling

  17. Technical evaluation and assessment of CNG/LPG bi-fuel and flex-fuel vehicle viability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sinor, J E

    1994-05-01

    This report compares vehicles using compressed natural gas (CNG), liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), and combinations of the two in bi-fuel or flex-fuel configurations. Evidence shows that environmental and energy advantages can be gained by replacing two-fuel CNG/gasoline vehicles with two-fuel or flex-fuel systems to be economically competitive, it is necessary to develop a universal CNG/LPG pressure-regulator-injector and engine control module to switch from one tank to the other. For flex-fuel CNG/LPG designs, appropriate composition sensors, refueling pumps, fuel tanks, and vaporizers are necessary.

  18. BuildSense Compressed natural gas (CNG) bi-fuel conversions for two Ford F-series pickup trucks.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BuildSense Compressed natural gas (CNG) bi-fuel conversions for two Ford F-series pickup trucks $141,279 $35,320 $176,599 City of Charlotte Solid Waste Services Compressed natural gas ( CNG) up fits of Cary. Wake $121,779 $40,799 $162,578 Waste Industries Fifty-two CNG up fits on refuse trucks in Raleigh

  19. Using Gasoline, Diesel, and Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) Vehicles, Characterize the Significance of Lube

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Using Gasoline, Diesel, and Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) Vehicles, Characterize the Significance from natural gas vehicles will help in the development of PM mitigation technologies. This in turn and help bring to market advanced transportation technologies that reduce air pollution and greenhouse gas

  20. Alternative Fuel Vehicles: The Case of Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) Vehicles in California Households

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abbanat, Brian A.

    2001-01-01

    Infrastructure F. Current California CNG Vehicle UseCharacteristics of CNG Vehicles Review of Previous Studies/RP) Studies of AFVs/CNG Vehicles i. British Columbia, Canada

  1. An Overview of Automotive Home and Neighborhood Refueling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Xuping; Ogden, Joan M.; Kurani, Kenneth S.

    2009-01-01

    case of compressed natural gas (CNG) vehicles in Californiacompressed natural gas (CNG) vehicles, battery electricwas a push for the use of CNG vehicles in North America due

  2. CNG: Aiming to be an energy company, not a gas company

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wheatley, R.

    1997-06-30

    Long before regulatory changes in the US paved the way for the union of natural gas and electric utility companies, Consolidated Natural Gas Co. (CNG) embarked on a strategy that would serve the company well in the 1990s. In 1995, CNG began a corporate repositioning to meet mounting competition, switching emphasis from its regulated businesses to the non-regulated side. The goal: to become an energy player, not only in the US but internationally. This paper focuses on the company`s operations, business plans, and management strategies. The paper gives an overview, then discusses production of oil and gas, the growing exploration program and plans for the future.

  3. Technology demonstration of dedicated compressed natural gas (CNG) original equipment manufacturer (OEM) vehicles at Ft. Bliss, Texas. Interim report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alvarez, R.A.; Yost, D.M.

    1995-11-01

    A technology demonstration program of dedicated compressed natural gas (CNG) original equipment manufacturer (OEM) vehicles was conducted at FL Bliss, Texas to demonstrate the use of CNG as an alternative fuel. The demonstration program at FL Bliss was the first Army initiative with CNG-fueled vehicles under the legislated Alternative Motor Fuels Act. This Department of Energy (DOE)-supported fleet demonstration consisted of 48 General Services Administration (GSA)-owned, Army-leased 1992 dedicated CNG General Motors (GM) 3/4-ton pickup trucks and four 1993 gasoline-powered Chevrolet 3/4-ton pickup trucks.

  4. Low Quality Natural Gas Sulfur Removal and Recovery CNG Claus Sulfur Recovery Process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klint, V.W.; Dale, P.R.; Stephenson, C.

    1997-10-01

    Increased use of natural gas (methane) in the domestic energy market will force the development of large non-producing gas reserves now considered to be low quality. Large reserves of low quality natural gas (LQNG) contaminated with hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S), carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and nitrogen (N) are available but not suitable for treatment using current conventional gas treating methods due to economic and environmental constraints. A group of three technologies have been integrated to allow for processing of these LQNG reserves; the Controlled Freeze Zone (CFZ) process for hydrocarbon / acid gas separation; the Triple Point Crystallizer (TPC) process for H{sub 2}S / C0{sub 2} separation and the CNG Claus process for recovery of elemental sulfur from H{sub 2}S. The combined CFZ/TPC/CNG Claus group of processes is one program aimed at developing an alternative gas treating technology which is both economically and environmentally suitable for developing these low quality natural gas reserves. The CFZ/TPC/CNG Claus process is capable of treating low quality natural gas containing >10% C0{sub 2} and measurable levels of H{sub 2}S and N{sub 2} to pipeline specifications. The integrated CFZ / CNG Claus Process or the stand-alone CNG Claus Process has a number of attractive features for treating LQNG. The processes are capable of treating raw gas with a variety of trace contaminant components. The processes can also accommodate large changes in raw gas composition and flow rates. The combined processes are capable of achieving virtually undetectable levels of H{sub 2}S and significantly less than 2% CO in the product methane. The separation processes operate at pressure and deliver a high pressure (ca. 100 psia) acid gas (H{sub 2}S) stream for processing in the CNG Claus unit. This allows for substantial reductions in plant vessel size as compared to conventional Claus / Tail gas treating technologies. A close integration of the components of the CNG Claus process also allow for use of the methane/H{sub 2}S separation unit as a Claus tail gas treating unit by recycling the CNG Claus tail gas stream. This allows for virtually 100 percent sulfur recovery efficiency (virtually zero SO{sub 2} emissions) by recycling the sulfur laden tail gas to extinction. The use of the tail gas recycle scheme also deemphasizes the conventional requirement in Claus units to have high unit conversion efficiency and thereby make the operation much less affected by process upsets and feed gas composition changes. The development of these technologies has been ongoing for many years and both the CFZ and the TPC processes have been demonstrated at large pilot plant scales. On the other hand, prior to this project, the CNG Claus process had not been proven at any scale. Therefore, the primary objective of this portion of the program was to design, build and operate a pilot scale CNG Claus unit and demonstrate the required fundamental reaction chemistry and also demonstrate the viability of a reasonably sized working unit.

  5. Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) Transit Bus Experience Survey: April 2009--April 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, R.; Horne, D. B.

    2010-09-01

    This survey was commissioned by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to collect and analyze experiential data and information from a cross-section of U.S. transit agencies with varying degrees of compressed natural gas (CNG) bus and station experience. This information will be used to assist DOE and NREL in determining areas of success and areas where further technical or other assistance might be required, and to assist them in focusing on areas judged by the CNG transit community as priority items.

  6. After the gas station : redevelopment opportunities from rethinking America's vehicle refueling infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turco, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Gas stations are found throughout the US, but their ubiquity causes them to go largely unnoticed. Because their purpose - refueling vehicles - is so uniform and so integral to the existing automotive transportation system, ...

  7. Ten Years of Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) Operations at SunLine Transit Agency: April 2003--December 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chandler, K.

    2006-01-01

    This report focuses on the lesson learned at the SunLine Transit Agency after it converted in 1994 its entire operating transit bus fleet to compressed natural gas (CNG).

  8. HH22 Reformer, Fuel Cell Power Plant,Reformer, Fuel Cell Power Plant, & Vehicle Refueling System& Vehicle Refueling System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ;2 Nevada Hydrogen Project CNG Storage NG City of Las Vegas NG H2 Storage Backup LH2 H2/CNG Blender H2 Generator AirProducts Fuel CellPlug Power Power H2 H2/CNG CNG #12;3 Goals and Objectives Develop vehicle refueling station to dispense H2/CNG blends, and pure H2 Develop & install H2-fueled stationary 50

  9. Energy Department Authorizes Emera CNG, LLC's Application to...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Authorizes Emera CNG, LLC's Application to Export Compressed Natural Gas Energy Department Authorizes Emera CNG, LLC's Application to Export Compressed Natural Gas October 19, 2015...

  10. Comparative analysis of liquefied natural gas (LNG) and compressed natural gas (CNG) used by transit agencies in Texas. Research report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lede, N.W.

    1997-09-01

    This study is a detailed comparative analysis of liquefied natural gas (LNG) and compressed natural gas (CNG). The study provides data on two alternative fuels used by transit agencies in Texas. First, we examine the `state-of-the- art` in alternative fuels to established a framework for the study. Efforts were made to examine selected characteristics of two types of natural gas demonstrations in terms of the following properties: energy source characteristics, vehicle performance and emissions, operations, maintenance, reliability, safety costs, and fuel availability. Where feasible, two alternative fuels were compared with conventional gasoline and diesel fuel. Environmental considerations relative to fuel distribution and use are analyzed, with a focus on examining flammability an other safety-related issues. The objectives of the study included: (1) assess the state-of-the-art and document relevant findings pertaining to alternative fuels; (2) analyze and synthesize existing databases on two natural gas alternatives: liquefied natural gas (LNG) and compressed natural gas (CNG): and (3) compare two alterative fuels used by transit properties in Texas, and address selected aspects of alternative fuels such as energy source characteristics, vehicle performance and emissions, safety, costs, maintenance and operations, environmental and related issues.

  11. 3 , LNG (Liquefied Natural Gas) -165oC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Deog Ki

    . GTL CNG (Compressed Natural Gas), GTW (Gas to Wire), NGH . CNG () . NGH () . NGH . CNG , ANG (Adsorbed Natural Gas) . . . .ANG CNG . #12;

  12. CNG, Hydrogen, CNG-Hydrogen Blends - Critical Fuel Properties...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CNG, Hydrogen, CNG-Hydrogen Blends - Critical Fuel Properties and Behavior CNG, Hydrogen, CNG-Hydrogen Blends - Critical Fuel Properties and Behavior Presentation given by Jay...

  13. An Overview of Automotive Home and Neighborhood Refueling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Xuping; Ogden, Joan M.; Kurani, Kenneth S.

    2009-01-01

    of using natural gas as a transportation fuel. Although anatural gas (CNG) vehicles in California households. 2001, Institute of Transportation

  14. Barwood CNG Cab Fleet Study: Final Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whalen, P.; Kelly, K.; John, M.

    1999-05-03

    This report describes a fleet study conducted over a 12-month period to evaluate the operation of dedicated compress natural gas (CNG) Ford Crown Victoria sedans in a taxicab fleet. In the study, we assess the performance and reliability of the vehicles and the cost of operating the CNG vehicles compared to gasoline vehicles. The study results reveal that the CNG vehicles operated by this fleet offer both economic and environmental advantages. The total operating costs of the CNG vehicles were about 25% lower than those of the gasoline vehicles. The CNG vehicles performed as well as the gasoline vehicles, and were just as reliable. Barwood representatives and drivers have come to consider the CNG vehicles an asset to their business and to the air quality of the local community.

  15. Successful Adoption of CNG and Energing CNG-Hydrogen Program...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Successful Adoption of CNG and Energing CNG-Hydrogen Program in India Successful Adoption of CNG and Energing CNG-Hydrogen Program in India Presentation given by Narendra Kumar Pal...

  16. Comparison of LNG, CNG, and diesel transit bus economics. Topical report, July 1992-September 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powars, C.A.; Moyer, C.B.; Luscher, D.R.; Lowell, D.D.; Pera, C.J.

    1993-10-20

    The purpose of the report is to compare the expected costs of operating a transit bus fleet on liquefied natural gas (LNG), compressed natural gas (CNG), and diesel fuel. The special report is being published prior to the overall project final report in response to the current high level of interest in LNG transit buses. It focuses exclusively on the economics of LNG buses as compared with CNG and diesel buses. The reader is referred to the anticipated final report, or to a previously published 'White Paper' report (Reference 1), for information regarding LNG vehicle and refueling system technology and/or the economics of other LNG vehicles. The LNG/CNG/diesel transit bus economics comparison is based on total life-cycle costs considering all applicable capital and operating costs. The costs considered are those normally borne by the transit property, i.e., the entity facing the bus purchase decision. These costs account for the portion normally paid by the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) Federal Transit Administration (FTA). Transit property net costs also recognize the sale of emissions reduction credits generated by using natural gas (NG) engines which are certified to levels below standards (particularly for NOX).

  17. Surface acoustic wave sensors/gas chromatography; and Low quality natural gas sulfur removal and recovery CNG Claus sulfur recovery process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klint, B.W.; Dale, P.R.; Stephenson, C.

    1997-12-01

    This topical report consists of the two titled projects. Surface Acoustic Wave/Gas Chromatography (SAW/GC) provides a cost-effective system for collecting real-time field screening data for characterization of vapor streams contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The Model 4100 can be used in a field screening mode to produce chromatograms in 10 seconds. This capability will allow a project manager to make immediate decisions and to avoid the long delays and high costs associated with analysis by off-site analytical laboratories. The Model 4100 is currently under evaluation by the California Environmental Protection Agency Technology Certification Program. Initial certification focuses upon the following organics: cis-dichloroethylene, chloroform, carbon tetrachloride, trichlorethylene, tetrachloroethylene, tetrachloroethane, benzene, ethylbenzene, toluene, and o-xylene. In the second study the CNG Claus process is being evaluated for conversion and recovery of elemental sulfur from hydrogen sulfide, especially found in low quality natural gas. This report describes the design, construction and operation of a pilot scale plant built to demonstrate the technical feasibility of the integrated CNG Claus process.

  18. Alternative Fuel Vehicles: The Case of Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) Vehicles in California Households

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abbanat, Brian A.

    2001-01-01

    of the Canadian Natural Gas Vehicles Survey,” SAE 892067,2000. Gushee, David E, “Natural Gas Vehicles Stall on Way toWelfare Costs of Natural Gas Vehicles,” Resources for the

  19. Safety and Regulatory Structure for CNG, CNG-Hydrogen, Hydrogen...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hydrogen, Hydrogen Vehicles and Fuels in China Safety and Regulatory Structure for CNG, CNG-Hydrogen, Hydrogen Vehicles and Fuels in China Presentation given by Jinyang Zheng of...

  20. Overview of DOE - DOT December 2009 CNG and Hydrogen Fuels Workshop...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    10-11, 2009 Safety and Regulatory Structure for CNG, CNG-Hydrogen Vehicles and Fuels in India Workshop Agenda: Compressed Natural Gas and Hydrogen Fuels, Lesssons Learned for the...

  1. Wentworth Gas Martketing LLC- FE Dkt. No. 14-63-CNG

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Fossil Energy gives notice of receipt of an application filed on May 13, 2014, by Wentworth Gas Marketing LLC. requesting  long-term, multi-contract authorization to export...

  2. 2014 - LNG Export, Compressed Natural Gas (CNG), Re-Exports & Long Term

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p a l De p u t y A s s i sEnergyEnergy The intentNatural Gas

  3. 2015 - LNG Export, Compressed Natural Gas (CNG), Re-Exports & Long Term

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p a l De p u t y A s s iof1 of 8 2 of 8 3 ofRuleWe We We el lc lc

  4. Determining the Volatility of Ultrafine (UF) PM Emissions from CNG Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Determining the Volatility of Ultrafine (UF) PM Emissions from CNG Vehicles Contract#: 500. Limited research has been done to characterize compressed natural gas (CNG) mass emissions and practically no work focused on the determination of the size- segregated volatility of UF particles from CNG engines

  5. Hydrogen Energy Stations: Poly-Production of Electricity, Hydrogen, and Thermal Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lipman, Timothy; Brooks, Cameron

    2006-01-01

    for vehicle refueling and compressed natural gas (CNG)for CNG vehicles, aswell as CNG/hydrogen blends (City of Las Vegas, 2002). Clean

  6. Safety and Regulatory Structure for CNG, CNG-Hydrogen Vehicles...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hydrogen Vehicles and Fuels in India Safety and Regulatory Structure for CNG, CNG-Hydrogen Vehicles and Fuels in India Presentation given by Ambrish Mishra of India's Ministry of...

  7. Hydrogen, CNG, and HCNG Dispenser System – Prototype Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James Francfort

    2005-02-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity is currently testing a prototype gaseous fuel dispenser developed by the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation (ETEC). The dispenser (Figure 1) delivers three types of fuels: 100% hydrogen, 100% compressed natural gas (CNG), and blends of hydrogen and CNG (HCNG) using two independent single nozzles (Figure 2). The nozzle for the 100% hydrogen dispensing is rated at 5,000 psig and used solely for 100% hydrogen fuel. The second nozzle is rated at 3,600 psig and is used for both CNG and HCNG fuels. This nozzle connects to both a CNG supply line and a hydrogen supply line and blends the hydrogen and CNG to supply HCNG levels of 15, 20, 30, and 50% (by volume).

  8. Light Duty Vehicle CNG Tanks

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i nAand DOE Safety StandardsLabor SeptemberofDepartmentDuty Vehicle CNG Tanks

  9. Safety issues relating to the liquefied petroleum gas, compressed natural gas and liquefied natural gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petru, T.D.

    1995-12-31

    The Railroad Commission of Texas, LP-Gas Division, is statutorily responsible for the safety aspects of liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) most commonly known as LP-gas or propane, compressed natural gas (CNG) and liquefied natural gas (LNG). This presentation will address the safety issues relating to their use as alternative fuels. The paper discusses the safety of pressure vessels used for storage of the fuels at refueling facilities and the containers mounted in vehicles. Other topics include the lack of odorants in LNG, the use of protective clothing when handling cryogenic fluids, and where to obtain a copy of the safety regulations for handling these three fuels.

  10. Webinar: Hydrogen Refueling Protocols

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Video recording and text version of the webinar titled, Hydrogen Refueling Protocols, originally presented on February 22, 2013.

  11. Feasibility study of Northeast Thailand Gas Pipeline Project. Final report. Part 2. Compressed natural gas. Export trade information

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-09-01

    The volume is the second part of a three part study submitted to the Petroleum Authority of Thailand. Part II analyzes the potential use of compressed natural gas (CNG) as a transportation fuel for high mileage vehicles traveling the highway system of Thailand. The study provides an initial estimate of buses and trucks that are potential candidates for converting to natural gas vehicles (NGV). CNG technology is briefly reviewed. The types of refueling stations that may be sited along the highway are discussed. The estimated capital investments and typical layouts are presented. The report also discusses the issues involved in implementing a CNG program in Thailand, such as safety, user acceptability and the government's role.

  12. The equinox: Instant electric refueling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Severance, B.

    1989-01-01

    The Equinox electric mini-van design features a battery exchange system which will allow refueling in less time than it takes to fill a gas tank. The design addresses the major pitfalls of electric vehicles today: short range and long charging periods. The article provides background for the project and discusses the design characteristics.

  13. COMPARISON OF CLEAN DIESEL BUSES TO CNG BUSES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lowell, D.; Parsley, W.; Bush,C; Zupo, D.

    2003-08-24

    Using previously published data on regulated and unregulated emissions, this paper will compare the environmental performance of current generation transit buses operated on compressed natural gas (CNG) to current generation transit buses operated on ultra low sulfur diesel fuel (ULSD) and incorporating diesel particulate filters (DPF). Unregulated emissions evaluated include toxic compounds associated with adverse health effects (carbonyl, PAH, NPAH, benzene) as well as PM particle count and size distribution. For all regulated and unregulated emissions, both technologies are shown to be comparable. DPF equipped diesel buses and CNG buses have virtually identical levels of PM mass emissions and particle number emissions. DPF-equipped diesel buses have lower HC and CO emissions and lower emissions of toxic substances such as benzene, carbonyls and PAHs than CNG buses. CNG buses have lower NOx emissions than DPF-equipped buses, though CNG bus NOx emissions are shown to be much more variable. In addition, this paper will compare the capital and operating costs of CNG and DPF-equipped buses. The cost comparison is primarily based on the experience of MTA New York City Transit in operating CNG buses since 1995 and DPF-equipped buses fueled with ULSD since 2001. Published data on the experience of other large transit agencies in operating CNG buses is used to validate the NYCT experience. The incremental cost (compared to ''baseline'' diesel) of operating a typical 200-bus depot is shown to be six times higher for CNG buses than for ''clean diesel'' buses. The contributors to this increased cost for CNG buses are almost equally split between increased capital costs for purchase of buses and installation of fueling infrastructure, and increased operating costs for purchase of fuel, bus maintenance, and fuel station maintenance.

  14. VICE 2.0 Helps Fleets Evaluate CNG Investments (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-03-01

    Vehicle and Infrastructure Cash-Flow Evaluation (VICE) 2.0 online tool estimates financial and emissions benefits of compressed natural gas (CNG) in vehicles.

  15. New York City Transit Hybrid and CNG Transit Buses: Interim Evaluation Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chandler, K.; Eberts, E.; Eudy, L.

    2006-01-01

    This report focuses on the evaluation of compressed natural gas (CNG) and diesel hybrid electric bus propulsion systems in New York City Transit's transit buses.

  16. Compressed natural gas fueled vehicles: The Houston experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-31

    The report describes the experience of the City of Houston in defining the compressed natural gas fueled vehicle research scope and issues. It details the ways in which the project met initial expectations, and how the project scope, focus, and duration were adjusted in response to unanticipated results. It provides examples of real world successes and failures in efforts to commercialize basic research in adapting a proven technology (natural gas) to a noncommercially proven application (vehicles). Phase one of the demonstration study investigates, develops, documents, and disseminates information regarding the economic, operational, and environmental implications of utilizing compressed natural gas (CNG) in various truck fueling applications. The four (4) truck classes investigated are light duty gasoline trucks, medium duty gasoline trucks, medium duty diesel trucks and heavy duty diesel trucks. The project researches aftermarket CNG conversions for the first three vehicle classes and original equipment manufactured (OEM) CNG vehicles for light duty gasoline and heavy duty diesel classes. In phase two of the demonstration project, critical issues are identified and assessed with respect to implementing use of CNG fueled vehicles in a large vehicle fleet. These issues include defining changes in local, state, and industry CNG fueled vehicle related codes and standards; addressing vehicle fuel storage limitations; using standardized vehicle emission testing procedures and results; and resolving CNG refueling infrastructure implementation issues and related cost factors. The report identifies which CNG vehicle fueling options were tried and failed and which were tried and succeeded, with and without modifications. The conclusions include a caution regarding overly optimistic assessments of CNG vehicle technology at the initiation of the project.

  17. L/CNG - Refueling Systems - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACTThousand Cubic Feet)Multimaterial MultiphysicsKwokVehicles and Fuels

  18. Emissions and performance evaluation of a dedicated compressed natural gas saturn

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hodgson, J.W.; Taylor, J.D. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1997-07-01

    The use of compressed natural gas (CNG) as a transportation fuel has been identified as one strategy that can help ameliorate some problems, which include a growing dependence on imported oil (and all its ramifications) and the persistent contributions that mobile sources make to urban air pollution, associated with the use of conventional petroleum fuels. The attributes and limitations of CNG as a fuel for spark-ignition engines have been presented by others. The attributes are associated with its high octane rating, low cost relative to other alternative fuels, its availability, the absence of running and diurnal evaporative emissions, and its demonstrated potential for producing extremely low exhaust emissions-particularly if the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted are expressed in terms of reactivity adjusted non-methane organic gases (RANMOG). The limitations associated with the use of CNG include its limited refueling infrastructure, the cost of refueling facilities, the cost of on-board fuel storage tanks, and its relatively low energy density. Because one impediment to CNG use is the cost associated with producing a CNG-powered vehicle, a study was initiated at the University of Tennessee under sponsorship by the Saturn Corporation to determine how a CNG vehicle (specifically, a 1991 Saturn SL1) could be engineered so it could be produced with a minimal impact on the production of the base vehicle. The present study was undertaken to further investigate the emissions reduction potential of the Saturn CNG vehicle. In the previous study the role of exhaust gas recirculation was not thoroughly investigated. Those involved in the study agreed that the NO{sub x} levels could be brought down well below California ULEV levels without increasing either the non-methane organic gases or the CO levels.

  19. Assessment of gas engine drives for CNG compressors at NGV fueling stations. Final technical report, June 1993-April 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keder, J.; Darrow, K.G.

    1995-06-01

    This report assesses the technical and economic issues associated with the use of gas engine drives for gas compressors at natural gas vehicle (NGV) fueling stations. The use of gas engine drives and electric motor drives is compared for typical time fill, fast fill, and combined fill applications. NGV fueling station equipment is described with an emphasis on gas engine and electric motor drives, their installation, operation, and maintenance. The economic benefits of gas engine drives and electric motor drives are compared using sensitivity and operating cost analyses. A perspective of the current market for gas engine drives is also presented, as well as several case histories.

  20. CNG transit fueling station handbook. Final report, October 1993-June 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, R.R.; Pennington, M.D.

    1997-02-01

    This manual has been complied for use by a Transit Authority Engineer or an Engineering Company who is involved in the design of Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) fueling facilities. It is intended to provide a convenient and comprehensive reference document, to supplement but not replace codes and other reference documents. It is also intended to be used as a basis for the design of a broad range of CNG fueling facilities. The scope is limited to straight CNG and hence Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) or LNG vaporization to CNG has not been addressed. Similarly, this document does not deal with the facility modifications which may be required to park, service, or fuel CNG buses indoors. Additional information on actual gas fueling is available from the Gas Research Institute.

  1. Comparison of CNG and LNG technologies for transportation applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sinor, J.E. Consultants, Inc., Niwot, CO )

    1992-01-01

    This report provides a head-to-head comparison of compressed natural gas (CNG) and liquefied natural gas (LNG) supplied to heavy-duty vehicles. The comparison includes an assessment of the overall efficiency of the fuel delivery system, the cost of the fuel supply system, the efficiency of use in heavy-duty vehicles, and the environmental impact of each technology. The report concludes that there are applications in which CNG will have the advantage, and applications in which LNG will be preferred.

  2. Inspection of compressed natural gas cylinders on school buses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is sponsoring compressed natural gas (CNF)-powered school bus demonstrations in various locations around the country. Early in 1994, two non-DOE-sponsored CNG pickup trucks equipped with composite-reinforced-aluminum fuel cylinders experienced cylinder ruptures during refueling. As reported by the Gas Research Institute (GRI): ...analysis of the cylinder ruptures on the pickup trucks revealed that they were due to acid-induced stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of the overwrap. The overwrap that GRI refers to is a resin-impregnated fiber that is wrapped around the outside of the gas cylinder for added strength. Because ensuring the safety of the CNG vehicles it sponsors is of paramount concern to DOE, the Department, through the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), conducted inspections of DOE-sponsored vehicles nationwide. The work had three objectives: inspection, documentation, and education. First, inspectors visited sites where CNG-powered school buses sponsored by DOE are based, and inspected the CNG cylinders for damage. Second, information learned during the inspections was collected for DOE. Third, the inspections found that the education and awareness of site personnel, in terms of cylinder damage detection, needed to be increased.

  3. Ambient temperature and driving cycle effects on CNG motor vehicle emission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gabele, P.; Krapp, K.T.; Ray, W.D.; Snow, R.; Crews, W.; Perry, N.; Lanning, J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes an emissions study of two vans powered by compressed natural gas (CNG). One van was relatively new, while the other had been driven more than 120,000 mi. The purpose of the study was to obtain emissions information which could be used to predict the impact of CNG use on ambient air quality and air toxic concentrations, and to develop a better understanding of the effect of ambient temperature variations on CNG emissions. Using four different driving cycles, emission tests were carried out at 20{degree}F, 75{degree}F, and 105{degree}F. Test results agree with previous findings that document low emissions of nonmethane hydrocarbons from CNG vehicles. Results also confirm the expectation that CNG emissions are not significantly affected by ambient temperature variations, although an increase in formaldehyde emission was noted for the 20{degree}F cold-start tests.

  4. Effect of CNG start - gasoline run on emissions from a 3/4 ton pick-up truck

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Springer, K.J.; Smith, L.R.; Dickinson, A.G.

    1994-10-01

    This paper describes experiments to determine the effect on exhaust emissions of starting on compressed natural gas (CNG) and then switching to gasoline once the catalyst reaches operating temperature. Carbon monoxide, oxides of nitrogen, and detailed exhaust hydrocarbon speciation data were obtained for dedicated CNG, then unleaded gasoline, and finally CNG start - gasoline run using the Federal Test Procedure at 24{degree}C and at -7{degree}C. The results was a reductiopn in emissions from the gasoline baseline, especially at -7{degree}C. It was estimated that CNG start - gasoline run resulted in a 71 percent reduction in potential ozone formation per mile. 3 refs., 6 figs., 11 tabs.

  5. The Importance of Interregional Refueling Availability to the Purchase Decision

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicholas, Michael A

    2009-01-01

    surveys about refueling availability No experience using aof Interregional Refueling Availability to the Purchasewith refueling availability (pretest only) ? Respondents

  6. Safety Evaluation of the FuelMaker Home Refueling Concept: Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waterland, L. R.; Powars, C.; Stickles, P.

    2005-02-01

    Report summarizes results of a National Renewable Energy Laboratory safety evaluation of the FuelMaker natural gas vehicle home refueling appliance (HRA, aka Phill).

  7. Qualitative Risk Assessment For An LNG Refueling Station And Review Of Relevant Safety Issues, Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siu, Nathan; Herring, J Stephen; Cadwallader, Lee; Reece, Wendy; Byers, James

    2014-06-25

    This report is a qualitative assessment of the public and worker risk involved with the operation of liquefied natural gas vehicle refueling facility.

  8. In-Use Performance Comparison of Hybrid Electric, CNG, and Diesel Buses at New York City Transit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnitt, R. A.

    2008-06-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) evaluated the performance of diesel, compressed natural gas (CNG), and hybrid electric (equipped with BAE Systems? HybriDrive propulsion system) transit buses at New York City Transit (NYCT). CNG, Gen I and Gen II hybrid electric propulsion systems were compared on fuel economy, maintenance and operating costs per mile, and reliability.

  9. Rapidly refuelable fuel cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Joy, Richard W. (Santa Clara, CA)

    1985-01-01

    A rapidly refuelable dual cell of an electrochemical type wherein a single anode cooperates with two cathodes and wherein the anode has a fixed position and the cathodes are urged toward opposite faces of the anodes at constant and uniform force. The associated cathodes are automatically retractable to permit the consumed anode remains to be removed from the housing and a new anode inserted between the two cathodes.

  10. Rapidly refuelable fuel cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Joy, R.W.

    1982-09-20

    A rapidly refuelable dual cell of an electrochemical type is described wherein a single anode cooperates with two cathodes and wherein the anode has a fixed position and the cathodes are urged toward opposite faces of the anodes at constant and uniform force. The associated cathodes are automatically retractable to permit the consumed anode remains to be removed from the housing and a new anode inserted between the two cathodes.

  11. Vehicle Modeling and Verification of CNG-Powered Transit Buses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hedrick, J. K.; Ni, A.

    2004-01-01

    Modeling and Verification of CNG-Powered Transit BusesModeling and Verification of CNG-Powered Transit Buses.Modeling and Veri?cation of CNG-Powered Transit Buses J.K.

  12. Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Dodge Ram Wagon Van - Hydrogen/CNG Operations Summary - January 2003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karner, D.; Francfort, J.E.

    2003-01-16

    Over the past two years, Arizona Public Service, a subsidiary of Pinnacle West Capital Corporation, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity, tested four gaseous fuel vehicles as part of its alternative fueled vehicle fleet. One vehicle, a Dodge Ram Wagon Van, operated initially using compressed natural gas (CNG) and later a blend of CNG and hydrogen. Of the other three vehicles, one was fueled with pure hydrogen and two were fueled with a blend of CNG and hydrogen. The three blended-fuel vehicles were originally equipped with either factory CNG engines or factory gasoline engines that were converted to run CNG fuel. The vehicles were variously modified to operate on blended fuel and were tested using 15 to 50% blends of hydrogen (by volume). The pure-hydrogen-fueled vehicle was converted from gasoline fuel to operate on 100% hydrogen. All vehicles were fueled from the Arizona Public Service's Fuel Pilot Plant, which was developed to dispense gaseous fuels, including CNG, blends of CNG and hydrogen, and pure hydrogen with up to 99.9999% purity. The primary objective of the test was to evaluate the safety and reliability of operating vehicles on hydrogen and blended hydrogen fuel, and the interface between the vehicles and the hydrogen fueling infrastructure. A secondary objective was to quantify vehicle emissions, cost, and performance. Over a total of 40,000 fleet test miles, no safety issues were found. Also, significant reductions in emissions were achieved by adding hydrogen to the fuel. This report presents results of 22,816 miles of testing for the Dodge Ram Wagon Van, operating on CNG fuel, and a blended fuel of 15% hydrogen-85% CNG.

  13. Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Dodge Ram Wagon Van -- Hydrogen/CNG Operations Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Don Karner; Francfort, James Edward

    2003-01-01

    Over the past two years, Arizona Public Service, a subsidiary of Pinnacle West Capital Corporation, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity, tested four gaseous fuel vehicles as part of its alternative fueled vehicle fleet. One vehicle, a Dodge Ram Wagon Van, operated initially using compressed natural gas (CNG) and later a blend of CNG and hydrogen. Of the other three vehicles, one was fueled with pure hydrogen and two were fueled with a blend of CNG and hydrogen. The three blended-fuel vehicles were originally equipped with either factory CNG engines or factory gasoline engines that were converted to run CNG fuel. The vehicles were variously modified to operate on blended fuel and were tested using 15 to 50% blends of hydrogen (by volume). The pure-hydrogen-fueled vehicle was converted from gasoline fuel to operate on 100% hydrogen. All vehicles were fueled from the Arizona Public Service’s Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant, which was developed to dispense gaseous fuels, including CNG, blends of CNG and hydrogen, and pure hydrogen with up to 99.9999% purity. The primary objective of the test was to evaluate the safety and reliability of operating vehicles on hydrogen and blended hydrogen fuel, and the interface between the vehicles and the hydrogen fueling infrastructure. A secondary objective was to quantify vehicle emissions, cost, and performance. Over a total of 40,000 fleet test miles, no safety issues were found. Also, significant reductions in emissions were achieved by adding hydrogen to the fuel. This report presents results of 22,816 miles of testing for the Dodge Ram Wagon Van, operating on CNG fuel, and a blended fuel of 15% hydrogen–85% CNG.

  14. Refueling Infrastructure for Alternative Fuel Vehicles: Lessons...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Refueling Infrastructure for Alternative Fuel Vehicles: Lessons Learned for Hydrogen Refueling Infrastructure for Alternative Fuel Vehicles: Lessons Learned for Hydrogen On April...

  15. Hydrogen Refueling Station Costs in Shanghai

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weinert, Jonathan X.; Shaojun, Liu; Ogden, Joan M; Jianxin, Ma

    2006-01-01

    04 Hydrogen Refueling Station Costs in Shanghai Jonathan X.Hydrogen Refueling Station Costs in Shanghai Jonathan X.voltage connections) Capital costs for this equipment must

  16. Reactor refueling containment system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gillett, James E. (Greensburg, PA); Meuschke, Robert E. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1995-01-01

    A method of refueling a nuclear reactor whereby the drive mechanism is disengaged and removed by activating a jacking mechanism that raises the closure head. The area between the barrier plate and closure head is exhausted through the closure head penetrations. The closure head, upper drive mechanism, and bellows seal are lifted away and transported to a safe area. The barrier plate acts as the primary boundary and each drive and control rod penetration has an elastomer seal preventing excessive tritium gases from escaping. The individual instrumentation plugs are disengaged allowing the corresponding fuel assembly to be sealed and replaced.

  17. Reactor refueling containment system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gillett, J.E.; Meuschke, R.E.

    1995-05-02

    A method of refueling a nuclear reactor is disclosed whereby the drive mechanism is disengaged and removed by activating a jacking mechanism that raises the closure head. The area between the barrier plate and closure head is exhausted through the closure head penetrations. The closure head, upper drive mechanism, and bellows seal are lifted away and transported to a safe area. The barrier plate acts as the primary boundary and each drive and control rod penetration has an elastomer seal preventing excessive tritium gases from escaping. The individual instrumentation plugs are disengaged allowing the corresponding fuel assembly to be sealed and replaced. 2 figs.

  18. CNG and Diesel Transite Bus Emissions in Review | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CNG and Diesel Transite Bus Emissions in Review CNG and Diesel Transite Bus Emissions in Review 2003 DEER Conference Presentation: California Environmental Protection Agency, Air...

  19. SEP Success Story: Louisiana Company Makes Switch to CNG, Helps...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    heavy duty CNG fueling station officially opened on Earth Day. | Photo courtesy of Ivan Smith Furniture Shreveport, Louisiana's first public heavy duty CNG fueling station...

  20. Louisiana Company Makes Switch to CNG, Helps Transform Local...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    heavy duty CNG fueling station officially opened on Earth Day. | Photo courtesy of Ivan Smith Furniture Shreveport, Louisiana's first public heavy duty CNG fueling station...

  1. SEP Success Story: Louisiana Company Makes Switch to CNG, Helps...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SEP Success Story: Louisiana Company Makes Switch to CNG, Helps Transform Local Fuel Supplies SEP Success Story: Louisiana Company Makes Switch to CNG, Helps Transform Local Fuel...

  2. California Policy Stimulates Carbon Negative CNG for Heavy Duty...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Policy Stimulates Carbon Negative CNG for Heavy Duty Trucks California Policy Stimulates Carbon Negative CNG for Heavy Duty Trucks Describes system for fueling truck fleet with...

  3. Dispersion of CNG following a high-pressure release. Final report, February 1995-March 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaumer, R.L.; Raj, P.K.

    1996-05-01

    The research described in the report was designed to evaluate the adequacy of the current convention concerning safeguards against CNG-related fires in transit buildings where CNG powered buses are fueled, stored, or maintained. The convention embraces the belief that precautions need to be taken only at or near the ceiling of the buildings. It is based on the premise that, since CNG is primarily methane and methane is approximately one-half the density of air at ambient temperature and pressure, any natural gas released would immediately rise to the ceiling as a buoyant plume. The experiments described here tested theoretical predictions that challenge this premise. During the tests, infrared imaging was used to track the movement of CNG following release from a high-pressure source close to the floor.

  4. U.S. Department of Energy FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Program Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity, Hydrogen/CNG Blended Fuels Performance Testing in a Ford F-150

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James E. Francfort

    2003-11-01

    Federal regulation requires energy companies and government entities to utilize alternative fuels in their vehicle fleets. To meet this need, several automobile manufacturers are producing compressed natural gas (CNG)-fueled vehicles. In addition, several converters are modifying gasoline-fueled vehicles to operate on both gasoline and CNG (Bifuel). Because of the availability of CNG vehicles, many energy company and government fleets have adopted CNG as their principle alternative fuel for transportation. Meanwhile, recent research has shown that blending hydrogen with CNG (HCNG) can reduce emissions from CNG vehicles. However, blending hydrogen with CNG (and performing no other vehicle modifications) reduces engine power output, due to the lower volumetric energy density of hydrogen in relation to CNG. Arizona Public Service (APS) and the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (DOE AVTA) identified the need to determine the magnitude of these effects and their impact on the viability of using HCNG in existing CNG vehicles. To quantify the effects of using various blended fuels, a work plan was designed to test the acceleration, range, and exhaust emissions of a Ford F-150 pickup truck operating on 100% CNG and blends of 15 and 30% HCNG. This report presents the results of this testing conducted during May and June 2003 by Electric Transportation Applications (Task 4.10, DOE AVTA Cooperative Agreement DEFC36- 00ID-13859).

  5. Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Low-Percentage Hydrogen/CNG Blend, Ford F-150 -- Operating Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karner, D.; Francfort, James Edward

    2003-01-01

    Over the past two years, Arizona Public Service, a subsidiary of Pinnacle West Capital Corporation, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity, tested four gaseous fuel vehicles as part of its alternative fueled vehicle fleet. One vehicle operated initially using compressed natural gas (CNG) and later a blend of CNG and hydrogen. Of the other three vehicles, one was fueled with pure hydrogen and two were fueled with a blend of CNG and hydrogen. The three blended-fuel vehicles were originally equipped with either factory CNG engines or factory gasoline engines that were converted to run CNG fuel. The vehicles were variously modified to operate on blended fuel and were tested using 15 to 50% blends of hydrogen (by volume). The pure-hydrogen-fueled vehicle was converted from gasoline fuel to operate on 100% hydrogen. All vehicles were fueled from the Arizona Public Service’s Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant, which was developed to dispense gaseous fuels, including CNG, blends of CNG and hydrogen, and pure hydrogen with up to 99.9999% purity The primary objective of the test was to evaluate the safety and reliability of operating vehicles on hydrogen and blended hydrogen fuel, and the interface between the vehicles and the hydrogen fueling infrastructure. A secondary objective was to quantify vehicle emissions, cost, and performance. Over a total of 40,000 fleet test miles, no safety issues were found. Also, significant reductions in emissions were achieved by adding hydrogen to the fuel. This report presents results of 16,942 miles of testing for one of the blended fuel vehicles, a Ford F-150 pickup truck, operating on up to 30% hydrogen/70% CNG fuel.

  6. Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: High-Percentage Hydrogen/CNG Blend, Ford F-150 -- Operating Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Don Karner; Francfort, James Edward

    2003-01-01

    Over the past two years, Arizona Public Service, a subsidiary of Pinnacle West Capital Corporation, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity, tested four gaseous fuel vehicles as part of its alternative fueled vehicle fleet. One vehicle operated initially using compressed natural gas (CNG) and later a blend of CNG and hydrogen. Of the other three vehicles, one was fueled with pure hydrogen and two were fueled with a blend of CNG and hydrogen. The three blended-fuel vehicles were originally equipped with either factory CNG engines or factory gasoline engines that were converted to run CNG fuel. The vehicles were variously modified to operate on blended fuel and were tested using 15 to 50% blends of hydrogen (by volume). The pure-hydrogen-fueled vehicle was converted from gasoline fuel to operate on 100% hydrogen. All vehicles were fueled from the Arizona Public Service’s Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant, which was developed to dispense gaseous fuels, including CNG, blends of CNG and hydrogen, and pure hydrogen with up to 99.9999% purity. The primary objective of the test was to evaluate the safety and reliability of operating vehicles on hydrogen and blended hydrogen fuel, and the interface between the vehicles and the hydrogen fueling infrastructure. A secondary objective was to quantify vehicle emissions, cost, and performance. Over a total of 40,000 fleet test miles, no safety issues were found. Also, significant reductions in emissions were achieved by adding hydrogen to the fuel. This report presents the results of 4,695 miles of testing for one of the blended fuel vehicles, a Ford F-150 pickup truck, operating on up to 50% hydrogen–50% CNG fuel.

  7. SuperShuttle CNG Fleet Start-Up Experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leslie Eudy.

    1999-05-18

    The Gas Research Institute (GRI) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), along with several industry partners, are collaborating with SuperShuttle of Denver, Colorado, to evaluate natural gas vans added to the SuperShuttle fleet in 1999. Brand new (1999 model year) dedicated and bi-fuel compressed natural gas (CNG) vans manufactured by Ford Motor Company will be operated side-by-side with several similar gasoline vehicles in normal revenue service. Once the study is complete, DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory will analyze and compile the results for release.

  8. Optimization of a CNG series hybrid concept vehicle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aceves, S.M.; Smith, J.R.; Perkins, L.J.; Haney, S.W.; Flowers, D.L.

    1995-09-22

    Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) has favorable characteristics as a vehicular fuel, in terms of fuel economy as well as emissions. Using CNG as a fuel in a series hybrid vehicle has the potential of resulting in very high fuel economy (between 26 and 30 km/liter, 60 to 70 mpg) and very low emissions (substantially lower than Federal Tier II or CARB ULEV). This paper uses a vehicle evaluation code and an optimizer to find a set of vehicle parameters that result in optimum vehicle fuel economy. The vehicle evaluation code used in this analysis estimates vehicle power performance, including engine efficiency and power, generator efficiency, energy storage device efficiency and state-of-charge, and motor and transmission efficiencies. Eight vehicle parameters are selected as free variables for the optimization. The optimum vehicle must also meet two perfect requirements: accelerate to 97 km/h in less than 10 s, and climb an infinitely long hill with a 6% slope at 97 km/h with a 272 kg (600 lb.) payload. The optimizer used in this work was originally developed in the magnetic fusion energy program, and has been used to optimize complex systems, such as magnetic and inertial fusion devices, neutron sources, and mil guns. The optimizer consists of two parts: an optimization package for minimizing non-linear functions of many variables subject to several non-linear equality and/or inequality constraints and a programmable shell that allows interactive configuration and execution of the optimizer. The results of the analysis indicate that the CNG series hybrid vehicle has a high efficiency and low emissions. These results emphasize the advantages of CNG as a near-term alternative fuel for vehicles.

  9. Hydrogen effects on materials for CNG/H2 blends.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farese, David (Air Products, USA); Keller, Jay O.; Somerday, Brian P.

    2010-09-01

    No concerns for Hydrogen-Enriched Compressed Natural gas (HCNG) in steel storage tanks if material strength is < 950 MPa. Recommend evaluating H{sub 2}-assisted fatigue cracking in higher strength steels at H{sub 2} partial pressure in blend. Limited fatigue testing on higher strength steel cylinders in H{sub 2} shows promising results. Impurities in Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) (e.g., CO) may provide extrinsic mechanism for mitigating H{sub 2}-assisted fatigue cracking in steel tanks.

  10. Comparison of CNG and LNG technologies for transportation applications. Final subcontract report, June 1991--December 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sinor, J.E.

    1992-01-01

    This report provides a head-to-head comparison of compressed natural gas (CNG) and liquefied natural gas (LNG) supplied to heavy-duty vehicles. The comparison includes an assessment of the overall efficiency of the fuel delivery system, the cost of the fuel supply system, the efficiency of use in heavy-duty vehicles, and the environmental impact of each technology. The report concludes that there are applications in which CNG will have the advantage, and applications in which LNG will be preferred.

  11. CNG fueling stations: The dispenser and control benefits of a systems design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, C.D.

    1995-12-31

    A CNG station is composed of many varied pieces of equipment. It is the combined functionality and compatibility of this equipment that distinguishes a CNG fueling system from a CNG fueling station. Components include: dryer, compressor, driver, cooler, blow-down system, priority/sequencing/bypass system; storage; dispenser; and controls. Whether its a system or a station, the objective is the same: to disperse the proper amount of clean dry compressed natural gas into a vehicle quickly. This objective is sometimes overshadowed by the focus on the compressor. It is big, tangible and usually costs the most. The compressor, however is only responsible for compressing the gas, not dispensing it into the vehicle. While there are many different types of compressors on the market, some of which are very good, this paper focuses on the system design and control and its specific effects on the dispensing system.

  12. Refueling Infrastructure for Alternative Fuel Vehicles: Lessons...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    California fry.pdf More Documents & Publications HYDROGEN TO THE HIGHWAYS NREL Alt Fuel Lessons Learned: Hydrogen Infrastructure Safety Analysis of Type 4 Tanks in CNG Vehicles...

  13. Method and system for vehicle refueling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Surnilla, Gopichandra; Leone, Thomas G; Prasad, Krishnaswamy Venkatesh; Agarwal, Apoorv; Hinds, Brett Stanley

    2014-06-10

    Methods and systems are provided for facilitating refueling operations in vehicles operating with multiple fuels. A vehicle operator may be assisted in refueling the multiple fuel tanks of the vehicle by being provided one or more refueling profiles that take into account the vehicle's future trip plans, the predicted environmental conditions along a planned route, and the operator's preferences.

  14. Method and system for vehicle refueling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Surnilla, Gopichandra; Leone, Thomas G; Prasad, Krishnaswamy Venkatesh; Argarwal, Apoorv; Hinds, Brett Stanley

    2012-11-20

    Methods and systems are provided for facilitating refueling operations in vehicles operating with multiple fuels. A vehicle operator may be assisted in refueling the multiple fuel tanks of the vehicle by being provided one or more refueling profiles that take into account the vehicle's future trip plans, the predicted environmental conditions along a planned route, and the operator's preferences.

  15. A comparative life cycle assessment of diesel and compressed natural gas powered refuse collection vehicles in a Canadian city

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedersen, Tom

    and CNG RCVs. c A 24% reduction of GHG emissions (CO2-equivalent) may be realized by switching from diesel to CNG. c CNG RCVs are estimated to be cost effective and may lead to reduced fuel costs. a r t i c l e i 2012 Keywords: Life cycle assessment (LCA) Compressed natural gas (CNG) Refuse collection vehicle (RCV

  16. Transit Users Group Supports Transit Agencies with Natural Gas Buses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2002-04-01

    Fact sheet describes the benefits of the Transit Users Group, which supports transit groups with compressed natural gas (CNG) buses.

  17. Development and Demonstration of Hydrogen and Compressed Natural Gas (H/CNG) Blend Transit Buses: October 15, 2002--September 30, 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Del Toro, A.; Frailey, M.; Lynch, F.; Munshi, S.; Wayne, S.

    2005-11-01

    The report covers literature and laboratory analyses to identify modification requirements of a Cummins Westport B Gas Plus engine for transit buses using a hydrogen/compressed natural fuel blend.

  18. Effect of CNG start-gasoline run on emissions from a 3/4 ton pick-up truck

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Springer, K.J.; Smith, L.R.; Dickinson, A.G.

    1994-10-01

    This paper describes experiments to determine the effect on exhaust emissions of starting on compressed natural gas (CNG) and then switching to gasoline once the catalyst reaches operating temperature. Carbon monoxide, oxides of nitrogen, and detailed exhaust hydrocarbon speciation data were obtained for dedicated CNG, then unleaded gasoline, and finally CNG start-gasoline run using the Federal Test Procedure at 24{degree}C and at -7{degree}C. The result was a reduction in emissions from the gasoline baseline, especially at -7{degree}C. It was estimated that CNG start - gasoline run resulted in a 71 percent reduction in potential ozone formation per mile. 3 refs., 6 figs., 11 tabs.

  19. Development of the Ford QVM CNG bi-fuel 4.9L F-Series pickup truck

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lapetz, J.; McCarthy, D.; Greenfield, N. [Ford Motor Co., Dearborn, MI (United States)] [and others

    1996-09-01

    A bi-fuel (Compressed Natural Gas [CNG] and gasoline) pickup truck has been developed using the Ford Alternative Fuel Qualified Vehicle Modifier (QVM) process. The base vehicle`s 4.9L engine has been specially modified for improved durability on gaseous fuels. The base vehicle`s configuration has been designed for conversion to bi-fuel CNG operation. A complete CNG fuel system has been designed and qualified, including fuel tanks, fuel system, and electrical interface. The completed vehicle has been safety and emission certified, demonstrating CARB Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) emissions in MY95. This paper details the design objectives, development process, CNG components, and integration of the two fuel systems.

  20. CNG 213 Data Structures 2012-2013 Spring Semester

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Can, Tolga

    CNG 213 Data Structures 2012-2013 Spring Semester Syllabus Course Info Catalog Description and searching. Credits 3(0)-3 (ECTS credits: 6.0) Category Content Departmental Prerequisites CNG 140 Lecture

  1. Clean Cities Launches Improved Tool to Help Fleets Evaluate CNG...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Clean Cities Launches Improved Tool to Help Fleets Evaluate CNG Investments Clean Cities Launches Improved Tool to Help Fleets Evaluate CNG Investments January 21, 2014 - 12:00am...

  2. CNG 477 Introduction to Computer Graphics Computer Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Can, Tolga

    CNG 477 Introduction to Computer Graphics Computer Engineering METU-NCC Spring 2013-2014 Syllabus. Introduction to illumination models and surface rendering. Course Objectives: CNG 477 Introduction to Computer

  3. NGV fueling station technology program: CNG dispenser development goals. Interim report, February-June 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Svedeman, S.J.; Buckingham, J.C.; Behring, K.A.; McKee, R.J.

    1994-09-01

    The objective of the project is to investigate improvements to the CNG dispensers used at fueling stations. CNG dispensers perform similar functions to gasoline dispensers in that they control the fuel flow, measure the amount of fuel dispensed into the vehicle, and compute the sale amount. The specific areas where improvements are required include: reducing the dispenser cost, improving the dispensed gas flow measurement accuracy, reducing the time required to fill the vehicle, and increasing the level of fill provided by the dispenser control system.

  4. Natural Gas Fuel Basics | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    must be stored onboard a vehicle in either a compressed gaseous (compressed natural gas, CNG) or liquefied (liquefied natural gas, LNG) state. Compressed Natural Gas To provide...

  5. CNG 140 C Programming 2012-2013 Fall Semester

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Can, Tolga

    CNG 140 C Programming 2012-2013 Fall Semester Syllabus Course Info Catalog Description Advanced Assistant Uur Dönmez, office and e-mail to be announced #12;Course Conduct CNG 140 is a non. This is not so for CNG 140. Though the intersection of the Text book and Lecture content is non empty, it is also

  6. UPS CNG Truck Fleet Start Up Experience: Alternative Fuel Truck Evaluation Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walkowicz, K.

    2001-08-14

    UPS operates 140 Freightliner Custom Chassis compressed natural gas (CNG)-powered vehicles with Cummins B5.9G engines. Fifteen are participating in the Alternative Fuel Truck Evaluation Project being funded by DOE's Office of Transportation Technologies and the Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies.

  7. Climate and Transportation Solutions: Findings from the 2009 Asilomar Conference on Transportation and Energy Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sperling, Daniel; Cannon, James S.

    2010-01-01

    Engine Vehicles Natural Gas Vehicles Plug-in and Batterygas (CNG) use in natural gas vehicles (NGVs) and hydrogenalso introduced natural gas vehicles, but the refueling

  8. Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: High-Percentage Hydrogen/CNG Blend Ford F-150 Operating Summary - January 2003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karner, D.; Francfort, J.E.

    2003-01-22

    Over the past two years, Arizona Public Service, a subsidiary of Pinnacle West Capital Corporation, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity, tested four gaseous fuel vehicles as part of its alternative fueled vehicle fleet. One vehicle operated initially using compressed natural gas (CNG) and later a blend of CNG and hydrogen. Of the other three vehicles, one was fueled with pure hydrogen and two were fueled with a blend of CNG and hydrogen. The three blended-fuel vehicles were originally equipped with either factory CNG engines or factory gasoline engines that were converted to run CNG fuel. The vehicles were variously modified to operate on blended fuel and were tested using 15 to 50% blends of hydrogen (by volume). The pure-hydrogen-fueled vehicle was converted from gasoline fuel to operate on 100% hydrogen. All vehicles were fueled from the Arizona Public Service's Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant, which was developed to dispense gaseous fuels, including CNG, blends of CNG and hydrogen, and pure hydrogen with up to 99.9999% purity. The primary objective of the test was to evaluate the safety and reliability of operating vehicles on hydrogen and blended fuel, and the interface between the vehicles and the hydrogen fueling infrastructure. A secondary objective was to quantify vehicle emissions, cost, and performance. Over a total of 40,000 fleet test miles, no safety issues were found. Also, significant reductions in emissions were achieved by adding hydrogen to the fuel. This report presents the results of 4,695 miles of testing for one of the blended fuel vehicles, a Ford F-150 pickup truck, operating on up to 50% hydrogen-50% CNG fuel.

  9. Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Low-Percentage Hydrogen/CNG Blend Ford F-150 Operating Summary - January 2003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karner, D.; Francfort, J.E.

    2003-01-22

    Over the past two years, Arizona Public Service, a subsidiary of Pinnacle West Capital Corporation, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity, tested four gaseous fuel vehicles as part of its alternative fueled vehicle fleet. One vehicle operated initially using compressed natural gas (CNG) and later a blend of CNG and hydrogen. Of the other three vehicles, one was fueled with pure hydrogen and two were fueled with a blend of CNG and hydrogen. The three blended-fuel vehicles were originally equipped with either factory CNG engines or factory gasoline engines that were converted to run CNG fuel. The vehicles were variously modified to operate on blended fuel and were tested using 15 to 50% blends of hydrogen (by volume). The pure-hydrogen-fueled vehicle was converted from gasoline fuel to operate on 100% hydrogen. All vehicles were fueled from the Arizona Public Service's Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant, which was developed to dispense gaseous fuels, including CNG, blends of CNG and hydrogen, and pure hydrogen with up to 99.9999% purity. The primary objective of the test was to evaluate the safety and reliability of operating vehicles on hydrogen and blended hydrogen fuel, and the interface between the vehicles and the hydrogen fueling infrastructure. A secondary objective was to quantify vehicle emissions, cost, and performance. Over a total of 40,000 fleet test miles, no safety issues were found. Also, significant reductions in emissions were achieved by adding hydrogen to the fuel. This report presents results of 16,942 miles of testing for one of the blended fuel vehicles, a Ford F-150 pickup truck, operating on up to 30% hydrogen/70% CNG fuel.

  10. Method and apparatus for dispensing compressed natural gas and liquified natural gas to natural gas powered vehicles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bingham, Dennis A.; Clark, Michael L.; Wilding, Bruce M.; Palmer, Gary L.

    2005-05-31

    A fueling facility and method for dispensing liquid natural gas (LNG), compressed natural gas (CNG) or both on-demand. The fueling facility may include a source of LNG, such as cryogenic storage vessel. A low volume high pressure pump is coupled to the source of LNG to produce a stream of pressurized LNG. The stream of pressurized LNG may be selectively directed through an LNG flow path or to a CNG flow path which includes a vaporizer configured to produce CNG from the pressurized LNG. A portion of the CNG may be drawn from the CNG flow path and introduced into the CNG flow path to control the temperature of LNG flowing therethrough. Similarly, a portion of the LNG may be drawn from the LNG flow path and introduced into the CNG flow path to control the temperature of CNG flowing therethrough.

  11. Low-cost, low-weight CNG cylinder development. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richards, Mark E.; Melford, K.; Wong, J.; Gambone, L.

    1999-09-01

    This program was established to develop and commercialize new high-strength steel-lined, composite hoop-wrapped compressed natural gas (CNG) cylinders for vehicular applications. As much as 70% of the cost of natural gas vehicles can be related to on-board natural gas storage costs. The cost and weight targets for this program represent significant savings in each characteristic when compared to comparable containers available at the initiation of the program. The program objectives were to optimize specific weight and cost goals, yielding CNG cylinders with dimensions that should, allowing for minor modifications, satisfy several vehicle market segments. The optimization process encompassed material, design, and process improvement. In optimizing the CNG cylinder design, due consideration was given to safety aspects relative to national, international, and vehicle manufacturer cylinder standards and requirements. The report details the design and development effort, encompassing plant modifications, material selection, design issues, tooling development, prototype development, and prototype testing. Extenuating circumstances prevented the immediate commercialization of the cylinder designs, though significant progress was made towards improving the cost and performance of CNG cylinders. A new low-cost fiber was successfully employed while the weight target was met and the cost target was missed by less than seven percent.

  12. Refueling Stations | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onRAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/Colorado <RAPID/Geothermal/WaterEnergyRedfield1989) Jump to:|Open EnergyRefueling

  13. NGV fleet fueling station business plan: A public, private and utility partnership to identify economical business options for implementation of CNG fueling infrastructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    The City of Long Beach recently incorporated an additional 61 natural gas vehicles (NGV) within its own fleet, bringing the City`s current NGV fleet to 171 NGVs. During January 1992, the City opened its first public access compressed natural gas (CNG) fueling station (86 CFM). This action served as the City`s first step toward developing the required CNG infrastructure to accommodate its growing NGV fleet, as well as those of participating commercial and private fleet owners. The City of Long Beach is committed to promoting NGVs within its own fleet, as well as encouraging NGV use by commercial and private fleet owners and resolving market development barriers. The NGV Business Plan provides recommendations for priority locations, station size and design, capital investment, partnership and pricing options. The NGV Business Plan also includes an econometric model to calculate CNG infrastructure cost recovery options, based on CNG market research within the City of Long Beach and Southern California area. Furthermore, the NGV Business Plan provides the City with a guide regarding CNG infrastructure investment, partnerships and private fueling programs. Although the NGV Business Plan was developed to address the prevailing CNG-related issues affecting the City of Long Beach, the methodology used within the NGV Business Plan and, more significantly, the accompanying econometric model will assist local governments, nation-wide, in the successful implementation of similar CNG infrastructures required for effective market penetration of NGVs.

  14. Evaluating P2P Live Streaming Systems: the CNG Case Shakeel Ahmad1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evaluating P2P Live Streaming Systems: the CNG Case Shakeel Ahmad1 Christos Bouras2 Eliya Buyukkaya Network Game (CNG) project as an ex- ample to illustrate them. The evaluation of the P2P sys- tem consists streaming systems and use the CNG project as an example to illustrate them. The CNG project (http://www.cng

  15. Refueling Infrastructure for Alternative Fuel Vehicles: Lessons...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Proceedings from the DOE sponsored Refueling Infrastructure for Alternative Fuel Vehicles: Lessons Learned for Hydrogen workshop to understand how lessons from past experiences can...

  16. CNG Cylinder Safety - Education, Outreach, and Next Steps (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, M.; Schroeder, A.

    2014-01-01

    Mr. Schroeder discussed the work that NREL is performing for the U.S. Department of Transportation on compressed natural gas cylinder end-of-life requirements. CNG vehicles are different from most other vehicles in that the CNG fuel storage cylinders have a pre-determined lifetime that may be shorter than the expected life of the vehicle. The end-of-life date for a cylinder is based on construction and test protocols, and is specific to the construction and material of each cylinder. The end-of-life date is important because it provides a safe margin of error against catastrophic cylinder failure or rupture. The end-of-life dates range from 15 to 25 years from the date of manufacture. NREL worked to develop outreach materials to increase awareness of cylinder end-of-life dates, has provided technical support for individual efforts related to cylinder safety and removal, and also worked with CVEF to document best practices for cylinder removal or inspection after an accident. Mr. Smith discussed the engagement of the DOE Clean Fleets Partners, which were surveyed to identify best practices on managing cylinder inventories and approached to provide initial data on cylinder age in a fleet environment. Both DOE and NREL will continue to engage these fleets and other stakeholders to determine how to best address this issue moving forward.

  17. Planning and Installation Guide: North Carolina Compressed Natural Gas Fueling Stations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Introduction Are you considering installing a compressed natural gas (CNG) fueling station for your fleet of important items to consider when planning for a CNG station. Natural gas infrastructure, which is commonly - Others interested in installing a natural gas fueling station CNG fueling station under construction

  18. Corn Ethanol: The Surprisingly Effective Route for Natural Gas Consumption in the Transportation Sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szybist, James P.; Curran, Scott

    2015-05-01

    Proven reserves and production of natural gas (NG) in the United States have increased dramatically in the last decade, due largely to the commercialization of hydraulic fracturing. This has led to a plentiful supply of NG, resulting in a significantly lower cost on a gallon of gasoline-equivalent (GGE) basis. Additionally, NG is a domestic, non-petroleum source of energy that is less carbon-intensive than coal or petroleum products, and thus can lead to lower greenhouse gas emissions. Because of these factors, there is a desire to increase the use of NG in the transportation sector in the United States (U.S.). However, using NG directly in the transportation sector requires that several non-trivial challenges be overcome. One of these issues is the fueling infrastructure. There are currently only 1,375 NG fueling stations in the U.S. compared to 152,995 fueling stations for gasoline in 2014. Additionally, there are very few light-duty vehicles that can consume this fuel directly as dedicated or bi-fuel options. For example, in model year 2013Honda was the only OEM to offer a dedicated CNG sedan while a number of others offered CNG options as a preparation package for LD trucks and vans. In total, there were a total of 11 vehicle models in 2013 that could be purchased that could use natural gas directly. There are additional potential issues associated with NG vehicles as well. Compared to commercial refueling stations, the at-home refueling time for NG vehicles is substantial – a result of the small compressors used for home refilling. Additionally, the methane emissions from both refueling (leakage) and from tailpipe emissions (slip) from these vehicles can add to their GHG footprint, and while these emissions are not currently regulated it could be a barrier in the future, especially in scenarios with broad scale adoption of CNG vehicles. However, NG consumption already plays a large role in other sectors of the economy, including some that are important to the transportation sector. Examples include steam reforming of natural gas to provide hydrogen for hydrotreating unit operations within the refinery and production of urea for use as a reductant for diesel after treatment in selective catalytic reduction (SCR). This discussion focuses on the consumption of natural gas in the production pathway of conventional ethanol (non-cellulosic) from corn through fermentation. Though it is clear that NG would also play a significant role in the cellulosic production pathways, those cases are not considered in this analysis.

  19. Core refueling subsystem design description. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, J.K.; Harvey, E.C.

    1987-07-01

    The Core Refueling Subsystem of the Fuel Handling and Storage System provides the mechanisms and tools necessary for the removal and replacement of the hexagonal elements which comprise the reactor core. The Core Refueling Subsystem is not "safety-related." The Core Refueling Subsystem equipment is used to prepare the plant for element removal and replacement, install the machines which handle the elements, maintain control of air inleakage and radiation release, transport the elements between the core and storage, and control the automatic and manual operations of the machines. Much of the element handling is performed inside the vessel, and the entire exchange of elements between storage and core is performed with the elements in a helium atmosphere. The core refueling operations are conducted with the reactor module shutdown and the primary coolant pressure slightly subatmospheric. The subsystem is capable of accomplishing the refueling in a reliable manner commensurate with the plant availability requirements.

  20. Comparison of Clean Diesel Buses to CNG Buses | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Comparison of Clean Diesel Buses to CNG Buses 2003 DEER Conference Presentation: New York City Transit Department of Buses deer2003lowell.pdf More Documents & Publications...

  1. Louisiana Company Makes Switch to CNG, Helps Transform Local...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Louisiana's first public heavy duty CNG fueling station officially opened on Earth Day. | Photo courtesy of Ivan Smith Furniture Shreveport, Louisiana's first public...

  2. Comparative Study on Exhaust Emissions from Diesel- and CNG-Powered...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Study on Exhaust Emissions from Diesel- and CNG-Powered Urban Buses Comparative Study on Exhaust Emissions from Diesel- and CNG-Powered Urban Buses 2003 DEER Conference...

  3. Dodge B2500 dedicated CNG van

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eudy, L.

    2000-04-19

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is promoting the use of alternative fuels and alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs). To support this activity, DOE has directed the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to conduct projects to evaluate the performance and acceptability of light-duty AFVs. The authors tested a 1999 B2500 dedicated CNG Ram Wagon with a 5.2L V8 engine. The vehicle was run through a series of tests explained briefly in this fact sheet.

  4. Fracture mechanics analysis of NGV fuel cylinders. Part 1. Steel cylinders. Topical report, August 1989-February 1993. [NGV (Natural Gas Vehicles)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Connolly, M.P.; Hudak, S.J.; Roy, S.

    1993-02-01

    Compressed natural gas (CNG) cylinders for natural gas vehicles (NGVs) are subject to a combination of pressure cycles, associated with periodic refueling, and a potentially corrosive CNG environment. Under these conditions it has been shown that the life of the cylinder is governed by the corrosion-fatigue crack growth of internal flaws such as voids, pits or folds that may be present after manufacture. For NGV applications, these cylinders are required to operate for at least 15 years and the report, through a detailed fracture mechanics analysis, describes approaches to achieving the desired life. The analysis shows that a 15 year cylinder life can be obtained by using quality control to ensure that no initial defects greater than 0.045 in. X 0.090 in. exist after manufacture. Alternatively, gas drying can be used at the distribution stations to reduce the detrimental effects of the remaining CNG impurities, and thereby, produce long cylinder lives. The analysis also considers the role of in-service inspection/retest and shows that in-service NDE has little advantage, either technically or economically, for ensuring the fitness-for-service of steel NGV cylinders. The analysis also shows that hydrostatic testing of cylinders, either at manufacture or in service, is ineffective for detecting fatigue cracks and therefore should not be implemented as part of a fitness-for-service plan for NGV fuel cylinders. The issue of cylinder geometry was also considered and the analysis shows that improperly designed flat-bottomed CNG cylinders can result in premature fatigue failures originating at the inner wall in the transition region between the cylinder end and sidewall.

  5. Economic Implications of Natural Gas Vehicle Technology in U.S. Private Automobile Transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for the US and other major countries and regions. To do so, I add a dedicated compressed natural gas (CNG goods over time, given specification of resource availabilities. With the CNG vehicle specification I am able to evaluate the effect of the CNG option on transportation emissions, oil imports, natural gas use

  6. Hydrogen Refueling Station Costs in Shanghai

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weinert, Jonathan X.; Shaojun, Liu; Ogden, J; Jianxin, Ma

    2006-01-01

    Well-to-wheels analysis of hydrogen based fuel-cell vehicleJP, et al. Distributed Hydrogen Fueling Systems Analysis,”Year 2006 UCD—ITS—RR—06—04 Hydrogen Refueling Station Costs

  7. Identifying Options for Deep Reductions in Greenhouse Gas Emissions from California Transportation: Meeting an 80% Reduction Goal in 2050

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Christopher; McCollum, David L; McCarthy, Ryan; Leighty, Wayne

    2008-01-01

    vehicles used liquefied natural gas, liquefied petroleum1,793 -100 to -84% Other Fuels Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG)Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) Liquefied Petroleum Gases (LPG)

  8. CEC-500-2010-FS-XXX Natural Gas Engine and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The project goal is to develop, integrate, and demonstrate three compressed natural gas (CNG) engines, which. to develop and optimize a sparkignited CNG Powered Refuse Truck Photo Credit: Cummings Westport, Inc. 11.9 liter CNG engine suitable for refuse and other vocational Class 8 applications. The engine

  9. Renewable Fuels and Lubricants (ReFUEL) Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2004-08-01

    Fact sheet describing NREL's Renewable Fuels and Lubricants Laboratory (ReFUEL). ReFUEL is a world-class research and testing facility dedicated to future fuels and advanced heavy-duty vehicle research, located in Denver, Colorado.

  10. Alternative fuel information: Facts about CNG and LPG conversion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O`Connor, K.

    1994-06-01

    As new environmental and energy related laws begin to take effect, increasing numbers of alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs) will be required in federal, state, municipal, and private fleets across the country. The National Energy Policy Act of 1992 and the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990, along with several new state and local laws, will require fleet managers to either purchase original equipment manufacturer (OEM) vehicles, which are produced by automakers, or convert existing vehicles to run on alternative fuels. Because there is a limited availability and selection of OEM vehicles, conversions are seen as a transition to the time when automakers will produce more AFVs for public sale. A converted vehicle is any vehicle that originally was designed to operate on gasoline, and has been altered to run on an alternative fuel such as compressed natural gas (CNG) or propane (liquefied petroleum gas -- LPG), the two most common types of fuel conversions. In the United States, more than 25,000 vehicles already have been converted to COG, and 300,000 have been converted to LPG.

  11. Development of a simple 5-15 litre per hour LNG refueling system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corless, A.J.; Sarangi, S.; Hall, J.L.; Barclay, J.A.

    1994-12-31

    A variable capacity, small-scale liquefied natural gas (LNG) refueling system has been designed, built, and tested at the Cryofuel Systems` Laboratory, University of Victoria, Canada. The system, designed to continuously liquefy between 5 and 15 litres of NG, utilizes liquid nitrogen (LN{sub 2}) as its cold source and contains most of the components found in a typical commercial refueling system; i.e. purification system, liquefier, LNG storage, automatic control and monitoring system. This paper describes the design of the system as well as the results of a set of LNG production trials. The performance of the system exceeded expected LNG production rates, but at levels of efficiency somewhat less than predicted. Cryofuel Systems expects to use this system to implement an LNG vehicle demonstration program and to gain experience in the integration of LNG refueling systems which exploit advanced liquefaction technology such as magnetic refrigeration.

  12. Refueling machine with relative positioning capability

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Challberg, Roy Clifford (Livermore, CA); Jones, Cecil Roy (Saratoga, CA)

    1998-01-01

    A refueling machine having relative positioning capability for refueling a nuclear reactor. The refueling machine includes a pair of articulated arms mounted on a refueling bridge. Each arm supports a respective telescoping mast. Each telescoping mast is designed to flex laterally in response to application of a lateral thrust on the end of the mast. A pendant mounted on the end of the mast carries an air-actuated grapple, television cameras, ultrasonic transducers and waterjet thrusters. The ultrasonic transducers are used to detect the gross position of the grapple relative to the bail of a nuclear fuel assembly in the fuel core. The television cameras acquire an image of the bail which is compared to a pre-stored image in computer memory. The pendant can be rotated until the television image and the pre-stored image match within a predetermined tolerance. Similarly, the waterjet thrusters can be used to apply lateral thrust to the end of the flexible mast to place the grapple in a fine position relative to the bail as a function of the discrepancy between the television and pre-stored images.

  13. Refueling machine with relative positioning capability

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Challberg, R.C.; Jones, C.R.

    1998-12-15

    A refueling machine is disclosed having relative positioning capability for refueling a nuclear reactor. The refueling machine includes a pair of articulated arms mounted on a refueling bridge. Each arm supports a respective telescoping mast. Each telescoping mast is designed to flex laterally in response to application of a lateral thrust on the end of the mast. A pendant mounted on the end of the mast carries an air-actuated grapple, television cameras, ultrasonic transducers and waterjet thrusters. The ultrasonic transducers are used to detect the gross position of the grapple relative to the bail of a nuclear fuel assembly in the fuel core. The television cameras acquire an image of the bail which is compared to a pre-stored image in computer memory. The pendant can be rotated until the television image and the pre-stored image match within a predetermined tolerance. Similarly, the waterjet thrusters can be used to apply lateral thrust to the end of the flexible mast to place the grapple in a fine position relative to the bail as a function of the discrepancy between the television and pre-stored images. 11 figs.

  14. CNG and Diesel Transit Bus Emissions in Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ayala, A. (a); Kado, N. (a,b); Okamoto, R. (a); Gebel, M. (a) Rieger, P. (a); Kobayashi, R. (b); Kuzmicky, P. (b)

    2003-08-24

    Over the past three years, the California Air Resources Board (CARB), in collaboration with the University of California and other entities, has investigated the tailpipe emissions from three different latemodel, in-use heavy-duty transit buses in five different configurations. The study has focused on the measurement of regulated emissions (NOX, HC, CO, total PM), other gaseous emissions (CO2, NO2, CH4, NMHC), a number of pollutants of toxic risk significance (aromatics, carbonyls, PAHs, elements), composition (elemental and organic carbon), and the physical characterization (size-segregated number count and mass) of the particles in the exhaust aerosol. Emission samples are also tested in a modified Ames assay. The impact of oxidation catalyst control for both diesel and compressed natural gas (CNG) buses and a passive diesel particulate filter (DPF) were evaluated over multiple driving cycles (idle, 55 mph cruise, CBD, UDDS, NYBC) using a chassis dynamometer. For brevity, only CBD results are discussed in this paper and particle sizing results are omitted. The database of results is large and some findings have been reported already at various forums including last year's DEER conference. The goal of this paper is to offer an overview of the lessons learned and attempt to draw overall conclusions and interpretations based on key findings to date.

  15. ARB's Study of Emissions from Diesel and CNG Heavy-duty Transit...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ARB's Study of Emissions from Diesel and CNG Heavy-duty Transit Buses ARB's Study of Emissions from Diesel and CNG Heavy-duty Transit Buses 2002 DEER Conference Presentation:...

  16. CNG Exports by Truck out of the U.S. Form | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p a l DeInsulation at04-86)ContractorsCNG Exports by Truck out of the

  17. CNG in OKC: Improving Efficiency at the Pump and on the Road | Department

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p a l DeInsulation at04-86)ContractorsCNG Exports by Truck out of theof

  18. Costs Associated With Compressed Natural Gas Vehicle Fueling Infrastructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, M.; Gonzales, J.

    2014-09-01

    This document is designed to help fleets understand the cost factors associated with fueling infrastructure for compressed natural gas (CNG) vehicles. It provides estimated cost ranges for various sizes and types of CNG fueling stations and an overview of factors that contribute to the total cost of an installed station. The information presented is based on input from professionals in the natural gas industry who design, sell equipment for, and/or own and operate CNG stations.

  19. Low-Cost Methane Liquefaction Plant and Vehicle Refueling Station

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B. Wilding; D. Bramwell

    1999-01-01

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is currently negotiating a collaborative effort with Pacific Gas and Electric (PG&E) that will advance the use of liquefied natural gas (LNG) as a vehicle fuel. We plan to develop and demonstrate a small-scale methane liquefaction plant (production of 5,000 to 10,000 gallons per day) and a low-cost ($150,000) LNG refueling station to supply fuel to LNG-powered transit buses and other heavy-duty vehicles. INEEL will perform the research and development work. PG&E will deploy the new facilities commercially in two demonstration projects, one in northern California, and one in southern California.

  20. Compressed natural gas vehicles motoring towards a green Beijing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Ming; Kraft-Oliver, T. [International Institute for Energy Conservation (IIEC) - Asia, Bangkok (Thailand); Guo Xiao Yan [China North Vehicle Research Institute (CNVRI), Beijing (China)

    1996-12-31

    This paper first describes the state-of-the-art of compressed natural gas (CNG) technologies and evaluates the market prospects for CNG vehicles in Beijing. An analysis of the natural gas resource supply for fleet vehicles follows. The costs and benefits of establishing natural gas filling stations and promoting the development of vehicle technology are evaluated. The quantity of GHG reduction is calculated. The objective of the paper is to provide information of transfer niche of CNG vehicle and equipment production in Beijing. This paper argues that the development of CNG vehicles is a cost-effective strategy for mitigating both air pollution and GHG.

  1. New York City Transit Hybrid and CNG Transit Buses: Final Evaluation Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnitt, R.; Chandler, K.

    2006-11-01

    This report describes the evaluation results for new Orion VII buses at NYCT with CNG propulsion and new hybrid propulsion.

  2. AHTR Refueling Systems and Process Description

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Varma, V.K.; Holcomb, D.E.; Bradley, E.C.; Zaharia, N.M.; Cooper, E.J.

    2012-07-15

    The Advanced High-Temperature Reactor (AHTR) is a design concept for a central station-type [1500 MW(e)] Fluoride salt–cooled High-temperature Reactor (FHR) that is currently undergoing development by Oak Ridge National Laboratory for the US. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy’s Advanced Reactor Concepts program. FHRs, by definition, feature low-pressure liquid fluoride salt cooling, coated-particle fuel, a high-temperature power cycle, and fully passive decay heat rejection. The overall goal of the AHTR development program is to demonstrate the technical feasibility of FHRs as low-cost, large-size power producers while maintaining full passive safety. The AHTR is approaching a preconceptual level of maturity. An initial integrated layout of its major systems, structures, and components (SSCs), and an initial, high-level sequence of operations necessary for constructing and operating the plant is nearing completion. An overview of the current status of the AHTR concept has been recently published [1], and a report providing a more detailed overview of the AHTR structures and mechanical systems is currently in preparation. This report documents the refueling components and processes envisioned at this early development phase. The report is limited to the refueling aspects of the AHTR and does not include overall reactor or power plant design information. The report, however, does include a description of the materials envisioned for the various components and the instrumentation necessary to control the refueling process. The report begins with an overview of the refueling strategy. Next a mechanical description of the AHTR fuel assemblies and core is provided. The reactor vessel upper assemblies are then described. Following this the refueling path structures and the refueling mechanisms and components are described. The sequence of operations necessary to fuel and defuel the reactor is then discussed. The report concludes with a discussion of the levels of maturity of the various SSCs to provide guidance for future technology developments. The conceptual design information presented in this report is very preliminary in nature. Significant uncertainty remains about several aspects of the process and even the radiation and mechanical performance of plate-type coated-particle fuel.

  3. AHTR Refueling Systems and Process Description

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Varma, Venugopal Koikal; Holcomb, David Eugene; Bradley, Eric Craig; Zaharia, Nathaniel M; Cooper, Eliott J

    2012-07-01

    The Advanced High-Temperature Reactor (AHTR) is a design concept for a central station-type [1500 MW(e)] Fluoride salt-cooled High-temperature Reactor (FHR) that is currently undergoing development by Oak Ridge National Laboratory for the US. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy's Advanced Reactor Concepts program. FHRs, by definition, feature low-pressure liquid fluoride salt cooling, coated-particle fuel, a high-temperature power cycle, and fully passive decay heat rejection. The overall goal of the AHTR development program is to demonstrate the technical feasibility of FHRs as low-cost, large-size power producers while maintaining full passive safety. The AHTR is approaching a preconceptual level of maturity. An initial integrated layout of its major systems, structures, and components (SSCs), and an initial, high-level sequence of operations necessary for constructing and operating the plant is nearing completion. An overview of the current status of the AHTR concept has been recently published and a report providing a more detailed overview of the AHTR structures and mechanical systems is currently in preparation. This report documents the refueling components and processes envisioned at this early development phase. The report is limited to the refueling aspects of the AHTR and does not include overall reactor or power plant design information. The report, however, does include a description of the materials envisioned for the various components and the instrumentation necessary to control the refueling process. The report begins with an overview of the refueling strategy. Next a mechanical description of the AHTR fuel assemblies and core is provided. The reactor vessel upper assemblies are then described. Following this the refueling path structures and the refueling mechanisms and components are described. The sequence of operations necessary to fuel and defuel the reactor is then discussed. The report concludes with a discussion of the levels of maturity of the various SSCs to provide guidance for future technology developments. The conceptual design information presented in this report is very preliminary in nature. Significant uncertainty remains about several aspects of the process and even the radiation and mechanical performance of plate-type coated-particle fuel.

  4. PCH 6934/CNG 6933/GEO 6119 Page 1 of 3 Spring 2009 Sustainability Concepts and Methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Amy L.

    PCH 6934/CNG 6933/GEO 6119 Page 1 of 3 Spring 2009 Syllabus Sustainability Concepts and Methods: Mercury in Guyana PHC 6934 (ref# 18035) / CNG 6933(ref# 12678) / GEO 6119 (ref # 18740) Spring 2009 Course. Reply times may vary up to several days. #12;PCH 6934/CNG 6933/GEO 6119 Page 2 of 3 Spring 2009 Course

  5. PCH 6934/CNG 6933/GEO 6119 Page 1 of 5 Spring 2008 Sustainability Concepts and Methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Amy L.

    PCH 6934/CNG 6933/GEO 6119 Page 1 of 5 Spring 2008 Syllabus Sustainability Concepts and Methods: Mercury in Tampa Bay PHC 6934 (ref# 15933) / CNG 6933(ref# 11277) / Geog 6119 (ref # 18993) Spring 2008 vary up to several days. #12;PCH 6934/CNG 6933/GEO 6119 Page 2 of 5 Spring 2008 Course Outline

  6. Malm Hydrogen and CNG/Hydrogen filling station and Hythane bus project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malmö Hydrogen and CNG/Hydrogen filling station and Hythane bus project Bengt Ridell Carl Bro and the Municipality of Malmö started a long- term co-operation regarding conversion from diesel to CNG on the city busses. Now in the region Skåne more than 330 buses, 80 trucks and about 1000 cars are running on CNG

  7. CNG 477 Introduction to Computer Graphics 2012-2013 Fall Semester

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Can, Tolga

    CNG 477 Introduction to Computer Graphics 2012-2013 Fall Semester Syllabus Course Info Catalog. Credits 3 Category Content Technical Elective Prerequisites CNG 213 Lecture Time and Place Friday 08 Conduct CNG 140 is an upper level technical elective course for the Computer Engineering undergraduate

  8. CNG buses fire safety: learnings from recent accidents in France and Germany

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    CNG buses fire safety: learnings from recent accidents in France and Germany Lionel PERRETTE Saarland Holding, Sulzbach Saar/ Germany ABSTRACT The use of CNG in bus and private vehicles is growing steadily. Recent fire accidents involving CNG buses have shown that tanks may explode though compliant

  9. Fault Tolerant SAMI for Vision-Based Probe and Drogue Autonomous Aerial Refueling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valasek, John

    to the future deployment of unmanned aerial vehicles is reliable autonomous in-flight aerial refueling.1,2 Two for practical autonomous aerial refuel- ing. The refueling scenario of an unmanned tanker aircraft refueling. 2 provides an overview of the various challenges involved in aerial refueling for unmanned aerial

  10. Cost-effectiveness analysis of TXDOT CNG fleet conversion. Volume 2. Interim research report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Euritt, M.A.; Taylor, D.B.; Mahmassani, H.

    1992-08-01

    Increased emphasis on energy efficiency and air quality has resulted in a number of state and federal initiatives examining the use of alternative fuels for motor vehicles. Texas' program for alternate fuels includes compressed natural gas (CNG). Based on an analysis of 30-year life-cycle costs, development of a natural gas vehicle (NGV) program for the Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT) would cost about $47 million (in 1991 dollars). These costs include savings from lower priced natural gas, infrastructure costs for a fast-fueling station, vehicle costs, and operating costs. The 30-year life-cycle costs translate into an average annual vehicle cost increase of $596, or about 4.9 cents more per vehicle mile of travel. Based on the cost-effectiveness analysis and assumptions, there are currently no TxDOT stations suitable for conversion to compressed natural gas.

  11. Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority: Compressed Natural Gas Transit Bus Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chandler, K.; Eberts, E.; Melendez, M.

    2006-04-01

    Evaluates compressed natural gas (CNG) powered transit buses at Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority (WMATA), providing a comparison between them and standard diesel transit buses.

  12. An Overview of Automotive Home and Neighborhood Refueling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Xuping; Ogden, Joan M.; Kurani, Kenneth S.

    2009-01-01

    Battery, Hybrid and Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle SymposiumC.A.R.B. , Battery Electric Vehicles Refueling, Energy UsePlug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle Charging Infrastructure

  13. Lessons and Challenges for Early Hydrogen Refueling Infrastructure...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Alternative Fuel Vehicles: Lessons Learned for Hydrogen Conference, April 2-3, 2008, Sacramento, California lessonsmelainafinal.pdf More Documents & Publications Refueling...

  14. H2 Refuel H-Prize Safety Guidance Webinar

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Access the recording and download the presentation slides from the Fuel Cell Technologies Office webinar "H2 Refuel H-Prize Safety Guidance" held on August 6, 2015.

  15. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Refuel Colorado...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Refuel Colorado Presentation given by Colorado Energy Office at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation...

  16. Cost-effectiveness analysis of TXDOT CNG fleet conversion. Volume 1. Interim research report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Euritt, M.A.; Taylor, D.B.; Mahmassani, H.

    1992-08-01

    Increased emphasis on energy efficiency and air quality has resulted in a number of state and federal initiatives examining the use of alternative fuels for motor vehicles. Texas' program for alternate fuels includes compressed natural gas (CNG). Based on analysis of 30-year life-cycle costs, development of a natural gas vehicle (NGV) program for the Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT) would cost about $47 million (in 1991 dollars). These costs include savings from lower-priced natural gas, infrastructure costs for a fast-fueling station, vehicle costs, and operating costs. The 30-year life-cycle costs translate into an average annual vehicle cost increase of $596, or about 4.9

  17. Turn of the century refueling: A review of innovations in early gasoline refueling methods and analogies for hydrogen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melaina, Marc W

    2007-01-01

    NJ. Koenig, R. , 1984. Gasoline alley: service stations area parametric analysis of US gasoline station networks. Inof innovations in early gasoline refueling methods and

  18. Combined cooling and purification system for nuclear reactor spent fuel pit, refueling cavity, and refueling water storage tank

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Corletti, Michael M. (New Kensington, PA); Lau, Louis K. (Monroeville, PA); Schulz, Terry L. (Murrysville Boro, PA)

    1993-01-01

    The spent fuel pit of a pressured water reactor (PWR) nuclear power plant has sufficient coolant capacity that a safety rated cooling system is not required. A non-safety rated combined cooling and purification system with redundant branches selectively provides simultaneously cooling and purification for the spent fuel pit, the refueling cavity, and the refueling water storage tank, and transfers coolant from the refueling water storage tank to the refueling cavity without it passing through the reactor core. Skimmers on the suction piping of the combined cooling and purification system eliminate the need for separate skimmer circuits with dedicated pumps.

  19. Combined cooling and purification system for nuclear reactor spent fuel pit, refueling cavity, and refueling water storage tank

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Corletti, M.M.; Lau, L.K.; Schulz, T.L.

    1993-12-14

    The spent fuel pit of a pressured water reactor (PWR) nuclear power plant has sufficient coolant capacity that a safety rated cooling system is not required. A non-safety rated combined cooling and purification system with redundant branches selectively provides simultaneously cooling and purification for the spent fuel pit, the refueling cavity, and the refueling water storage tank, and transfers coolant from the refueling water storage tank to the refueling cavity without it passing through the reactor core. Skimmers on the suction piping of the combined cooling and purification system eliminate the need for separate skimmer circuits with dedicated pumps. 1 figures.

  20. Refueling Availability for Alternative Fuel Vehicle Markets: Sufficient Urban Station Coverage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melaina, Marc W; Bremson, Joel

    2008-01-01

    the importance of fuel availability to choice of alternativeof adequate refueling availability for AFVs. Referenceslocate/enpol Refueling availability for alternative fuel

  1. The role of natural gas as a vehicle transportation fuel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murphy, Paul Jarod

    2010-01-01

    This thesis analyzes pathways to directly use natural gas, as compressed natural gas (CNG) or liquefied natural gas (LNG), in the transportation sector. The thesis focuses on identifying opportunities to reduce market ...

  2. Qualitative Risk Assessment for an LNG Refueling Station and Review of Relevant Safety Issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siu, N.; Herring, J.S.; Cadwallader, L.; Reece, W.; Byers, J.

    1998-02-01

    This report is a qualitative assessment of the public and worker risk involved with the operation of a liquefied natural gas (LNG) vehicle refueling facility. This study includes facility maintenance and operations, tank truck deliveries, and end-use vehicle fueling; it does not treat the risks of LNG vehicles on roadways. Accident initiating events are identified by using a Master Logic Diagram, a Failure Modes and Effects Analysis, and historical operating experiences. The event trees were drawn to depict possible sequences of mitigating events following the initiating events. The phenomenology of LNG and other vehicle fuels is discussed to characterize the hazard posed by LNG usage. Based on the risk modeling and analysis, recommendations are given to improve the safety of LNG refueling stations in the areas of procedures and training, station design, and the dissemination of ``best practice`` information throughout the LNG community.

  3. An empirical analysis on the adoption of alternative fuel vehicles:The case of natural gas vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yeh, Sonia

    2007-01-01

    579–594. IANGV, 1997. Natural Gas Vehicle Industry Positionmarket penetration of natural gas vehicles in Switzerland.of NGVs versus number of natural gas refueling stations in

  4. H2 Refuel H-Prize Technical Data Collection Requirements

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Access the recording and download the presentation slides from the Fuel Cell Technologies Office webinar "H2 Refuel H-Prize Technical Data Collection Requirements Webinar Slides" held on May 14, 2015.

  5. Webinar: H2 Refuel H-Prize Safety Guidance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Fuel Cell Technologies Office will present a live webinar entitled "H2 Refuel H-Prize Safety Guidance" on Thursday, August 6, from 1 to 2 p.m. Eastern Daylight Time.

  6. Low-quality natural gas sulfur removal/recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Damon, D.A. [CNG Research Co., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Siwajek, L.A. [Acrion Technologies, Inc., Cleveland, OH (United States); Klint, B.W. [BOVAR Inc., AB (Canada). Western Research

    1993-12-31

    Low quality natural gas processing with the integrated CFZ/CNG Claus process is feasible for low quality natural gas containing 10% or more of CO{sub 2}, and any amount of H{sub 2}S. The CNG Claus process requires a minimum CO{sub 2} partial pressure in the feed gas of about 100 psia (15% CO{sub 2} for a 700 psia feed gas) and also can handle any amount of H{sub 2}S. The process is well suited for handling a variety of trace contaminants usually associated with low quality natural gas and Claus sulfur recovery. The integrated process can produce high pressure carbon dioxide at purities required by end use markets, including food grade CO{sub 2}. The ability to economically co-produce high pressure CO{sub 2} as a commodity with significant revenue potential frees process economic viability from total reliance on pipeline gas, and extends the range of process applicability to low quality gases with relatively low methane content. Gases with high acid gas content and high CO{sub 2} to H{sub 2}S ratios can be economically processed by the CFZ/CNG Claus and CNG Claus processes. The large energy requirements for regeneration make chemical solvent processing prohibitive. The cost of Selexol physical solvent processing of the LaBarge gas is significantly greater than the CNG/CNG Claus and CNG Claus processes.

  7. Hazard analysis of compressed natural gas fueling systems and fueling procedures used at retail gasoline service stations. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-04-28

    An evaluation of the hazards associated with operations of a typical compressed natural gas (CNG) fueling station is presented. The evaluation includes identification of a typical CNG fueling system; a comparison of the typical system with ANSI/NFPA (American National Standards Institute/National Fire Protection Association) Standard 52, Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) Vehicular Fuel System, requirements; a review of CNG industry safety experience as identified in current literature; hazard identification of potential internal (CNG system-specific causes) and external (interface of co-located causes) events leading to potential accidents; and an analysis of potential accident scenarios as determined from the hazard evaluation. The study considers CNG dispensing equipment and associated equipment, including the compressor station, storate vessels, and fill pressure sensing system.

  8. CNG a Natural for Tulsa Public Schools

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2004-04-01

    This 2-page Clean Cities fact sheet describes the use of natural gas power for Tulsa Public Schools' fleet of buses and cars. It includes information on the history of the program, along with contact information for the local Clean Cities Coordinator and Tulsa Public Schools.

  9. Ad-hoc Authorship Attribution Competition, part of ALLC/ACH 2004 CNG Method with Weighted Voting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keselj, Vlado

    Ad-hoc Authorship Attribution Competition, part of ALLC/ACH 2004 CNG Method with Weighted Voting Vlado Keselj and Nick Cercone ({vlado,nick}cs.dal.ca) CNG Method for Authorship Attribution. The Common N-Grams (CNG) classification method for authorship attribution (AATT) was described in [2

  10. Ad-hoc Authorship Attribution Competition, part of ALLC/ACH 2004 CNG Method with Weighted Voting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keselj, Vlado

    Ad-hoc Authorship Attribution Competition, part of ALLC/ACH 2004 CNG Method with Weighted Voting Vlado Ke#20;selj and Nick Cercone (fvlado,nickg@cs.dal.ca) CNG Method for Authorship Attribution. The Common N-Grams (CNG) classi#12;cation method for authorship attribution (AATT) was described in [2

  11. EA-1976: Emera CNG, LLC Compressed Natural Gas Project, Florida |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based|Department of Energy 8:Final EnvironmentalFinalDraftFinding of

  12. Evaluation of aftermarket CNG conversion kits in light-duty vehicle applications. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blazek, C.F.; Rowley, P.F.; Grimes, J.W.

    1995-07-01

    The Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) was contracted by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to evaluate three compressed natural gas (CNG) conversion systems using a 1993 Chevrolet Lumina baseline vehicle. A fourth conversion system was added to the test matrix through funding support from Brooklyn Union. The objective of this project was to measure the Federal Test Procedure (FTP) emissions and fuel economy of the different conversion systems, and to compare the performance to gasoline-fueled operation and each other. Different natural gas compositions were selected to represent the 10th percentile, mean, and 90th percentile compositions distributed in the Continental United States. Testing with these different compositions demonstrated the systems` ability to accommodate the spectrum of gas found in the United States. Each compressed natural gas conversion system was installed and adjusted according to the manufacturer`s instructions. In addition to the FTP testing, an evaluation of the comparative installation times and derivability tests (based on AGA and CRC guidelines) were conducted on each system.

  13. Minimizing or eliminating refueling of nuclear reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doncals, Richard A. (Washington, PA); Paik, Nam-Chin (Pittsburgh, PA); Andre, Sandra V. (Hempfield Township, Westmoreland County, PA); Porter, Charles A. (Rostraver Township, Westmoreland County, PA); Rathbun, Roy W. (Greensburg, PA); Schwallie, Ambrose L. (Greensburg, PA); Petras, Diane S. (Penn Township, Westmoreland County, PA)

    1989-01-01

    Demand for refueling of a liquid metal fast nuclear reactor having a life of 30 years is eliminated or reduced to intervals of at least 10 years by operating the reactor at a low linear-power density, typically 2.5 kw/ft of fuel rod, rather than 7.5 or 15 kw/ft, which is the prior art practice. So that power of the same magnitude as for prior art reactors is produced, the volume of the core is increased. In addition, the height of the core and it diameter are dimensioned so that the ratio of the height to the diameter approximates 1 to the extent practicable considering the requirement of control and that the pressure drop in the coolant shall not be excessive. The surface area of a cylinder of given volume is a minimum if the ratio of the height to the diameter is 1. By minimizing the surface area, the leakage of neutrons is reduced. By reducing the linear-power density, increasing core volume, reducing fissile enrichment and optimizing core geometry, internal-core breeding of fissionable fuel is substantially enhanced. As a result, core operational life, limited by control worth requirements and fuel burnup capability, is extended up to 30 years of continuous power operation.

  14. Alternative Fuels Data Center: CNG Fleets Aid in Superstorm Recovery

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O O D S TA I NLoans TheCounty Schools BiodieselCNG Fleets

  15. Alternative Fuels Data Center: CNG Powers Law Enforcement in Arkansas

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageBlender Pump Dispensers to someone by E-mail ShareNorthCNG

  16. AVTA: 2012 CNG Honda Civic Testing Results

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Vehicle Technologies Office's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity carries out testing on a wide range of advanced vehicles and technologies on dynamometers, closed test tracks, and on-the-road. These results provide benchmark data that researchers can use to develop technology models and guide future research and development. The following reports describe results of testing done on a 2012 Compressed Natural Gas Honda Civic GX. Baseline and other data collected at Idaho National Laboratory is in the attached documents. Baseline data collected at Argonne National Laboratory is available in summary and CSV form on the Argonne Downloadable Dynometer Database site (http://www.anl.gov/energy-systems/group/downloadable-dynamometer-databas...). Taken together, these reports give an overall view of how this vehicle functions under extensive testing.

  17. Hydrogen-Enhanced Natural Gas Vehicle Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hyde, Dan; Collier, Kirk

    2009-01-22

    The project objective is to demonstrate the viability of HCNG fuel (30 to 50% hydrogen by volume and the remainder natural gas) to reduce emissions from light-duty on-road vehicles with no loss in performance or efficiency. The City of Las Vegas has an interest in alternative fuels and already has an existing hydrogen refueling station. Collier Technologies Inc (CT) supplied the latest design retrofit kits capable of converting nine compressed natural gas (CNG) fueled, light-duty vehicles powered by the Ford 5.4L Triton engine. CT installed the kits on the first two vehicles in Las Vegas, trained personnel at the City of Las Vegas (the City) to perform the additional seven retrofits, and developed materials for allowing other entities to perform these retrofits as well. These vehicles were used in normal service by the City while driver impressions, reliability, fuel efficiency and emissions were documented for a minimum of one year after conversion. This project has shown the efficacy of operating vehicles originally designed to operate on compressed natural gas with HCNG fuel incorporating large quantities of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR). There were no safety issues experienced with these vehicles. The only maintenance issue in the project was some rough idling due to problems with the EGR valve and piping parts. Once the rough idling was corrected no further maintenance issues with these vehicles were experienced. Fuel economy data showed no significant changes after conversion even with the added power provided by the superchargers that were part of the conversions. Driver feedback for the conversions was very favorable. The additional power provided by the HCNG vehicles was greatly appreciated, especially in traffic. The drivability of the HCNG vehicles was considered to be superior by the drivers. Most of the converted vehicles showed zero oxides of nitrogen throughout the life of the project using the State of Nevada emissions station.

  18. SuperShuttle CNG Fleet Evaluation--Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eudy, L.

    2000-12-07

    The mission of the US Department of Energy's Office of Transportation Technologies is to promote the development and deployment of transportation technologies that reduce US dependence on foreign oil, while helping to improve the nation's air quality and promoting US competitiveness. In support of this mission, DOE has directed the National Renewable Energy Laboratory to conduct projects to evaluate the performance and acceptability of alternative fuel vehicles. NREL has undertaken several fleet study projects, which seek to provide objective real-world fleet experiences with AFVs. For this type of study we collect, analyze, and report on operational, cost, emissions, and performance data from AFVs being driven in a fleet application. The primary purpose of such studies is to make real-world information on AFVs available to fleet managers and other potential AFV purchasers. For this project, data was collected from 13 passenger vans operating in the Boulder/Denver, Colorado area. The study vehicles were all 1999 Ford E-350 passenger vans based at SuperShuttle's Boulder location. Five of the vans were dedicated CNG, five were bi-fuel CNG/gasoline, and three were standard gasoline vans that were used for comparison.

  19. Fact #832: August 4, 2014 Over Half of the Refueling Stations...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2: August 4, 2014 Over Half of the Refueling Stations in the U.S. and Canada Sell Diesel Fuel Fact 832: August 4, 2014 Over Half of the Refueling Stations in the U.S. and Canada...

  20. H2 Refuel H-Prize Safety Guidance | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Safety Guidance H2 Refuel H-Prize Safety Guidance August 6, 2015 1:00PM to 2:00PM EDT The Fuel Cell Technologies Office will present a live webinar entitled "H2 Refuel H-Prize...

  1. UPS CNG Truck Fleet Final Results: Alternative Fuel Truck Evaluation Project (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2002-08-01

    This report provides transportation professionals with quantitative, unbiased information on the cost, maintenance, operational and emissions characteristics of CNG as one alternative to conventional diesel fuel for heavy-duty trucking applications.

  2. Efficiency Improvement Opportunities for Light-Duty Natural-Gas-Fueled Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Staunton, R.H.; Thomas, J.F.

    1998-12-01

    The purpose of this report is to evaluate and make recommendations concerning technologies that promise to improve the efilciency of compressed natural gas (CNG) light-duty vehicles. Technical targets for CNG automotive technology given in the March 1998 OffIce of Advanced Automotive Technologies research and development plan were used as guidance for this effort. The technical target that necessitates this current study is to validate technologies that enable CNG light vehicles to have at least 10% greater - fuel economy (on a miles per gallon equivalent basis) than equivalent gasoline vehicles by 2006. Other tar- gets important to natural gas (NG) automotive technology and this study are to: (1) increase CNG vehicle range to 380 miles, (2) reduce the incremental vehicle cost (CNG vs gasoline) to $1500, and (3) meet the California ultra low-emission vehicle (ULEV) and Federal Tier 2 emission standards expected to be in effect in 2004.

  3. Business Case for Compressed Natural Gas in Municipal Fleets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, C.

    2010-06-01

    This report describes how NREL used the CNG Vehicle and Infrastructure Cash-Flow Evaluation (VICE) model to establish guidance for fleets making decisions about using compressed natural gas.

  4. At-Home Natural Gas Refueling | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News Publications TraditionalWithAntiferromagneticInexpensive 2-Nek5000 | ArgonneDepartment

  5. Compressed gas manifold

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hildebrand, Richard J. (Edgemere, MD); Wozniak, John J. (Columbia, MD)

    2001-01-01

    A compressed gas storage cell interconnecting manifold including a thermally activated pressure relief device, a manual safety shut-off valve, and a port for connecting the compressed gas storage cells to a motor vehicle power source and to a refueling adapter. The manifold is mechanically and pneumatically connected to a compressed gas storage cell by a bolt including a gas passage therein.

  6. cleanenergyfuels.com Natural Gas Solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    1 cleanenergyfuels.com Natural Gas Solutions for Transportation December 7, 2012 #12 Gas As a Transportation Fuel About Clean Energy Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) Port Trucking LNG Station;2 cleanenergyfuels.com Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) Taxis Airport Vehicles Transit Buses Leading Provider of Natural

  7. Analysis of the University of Texas at Austin compressed natural gas demonstration bus. Interim research report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, C.M.; Matthews, R.; Euritt, M.

    1994-06-01

    A demonstration compressed natural gas (CNG) bus has been operating on The University of Texas at Austin shuttle system since 1992. This CNG vehicle, provided by the Blue Bird Company, was an opportunity for the University to evaluate the effectiveness of a CNG bus for shuttle operations. Three basic operating comparisons were made: (1) fuel consumption, (2) tire wear, and (3) vehicle performance. The bus was equipped with a data logger, which was downloaded regularly, for trip reports. Tire wear was monitored regularly, and performance tests were conducted at the Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Center. Overall, the data suggest that fuel costs for the CNG bus are comparable to those for University diesel buses. This is a result of the lower fuel price for natural gas. Actual natural gas fuel consumption was higher for the CNG buses than for the diesel buses. Due to weight differences, tire wear was much less on the CNG buses. Finally, after installation of a closed-loop system, the CNG bus out-performed the diesel bus on acceleration, grade climbing ability, and speed.

  8. Renewable Fuels and Lubricants (ReFUEL) Laboratory (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-03-01

    This fact sheet describes the Renewable Fuels and Lubricants (ReFUEL) Laboratory at the U.S. Department of Energy National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is a state-of-the-art research and testing facility for advanced fuels and vehicles. Research and development aims to improve vehicle efficiency and overcome barriers to the increased use of renewable diesel and other nonpetroleum-based fuels, such as biodiesel and synthetic diesel derived from biomass. The ReFUEL Laboratory features a chassis dynamometer for vehicle performance and emissions research, two engine dynamometer test cells for advanced fuels research, and precise emissions analysis equipment. As a complement to these capabilities, detailed studies of fuel properties, with a focus on ignition quality, are performed at NREL's Fuel Chemistry Laboratory.

  9. i hc K thut Texas l trng i hc cng c cng nhn trn ton quc chuyn o to cc sinh vin hng u trong bi cnh a vn ha v cnh tranh ton cu. Theo Tp ch Wall Street,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rock, Chris

    1.500$ TNG CNG 32.884$ Hc cao hc: Hc phí và l phí 14.653$ Chi phí sinh hot 9.750$ Bo him sc khe 1.500$ TNG CNG 24.571$ i hc K thut Texas Vn phòng ng ký nhp hc

  10. Determination of combustion products from alternative fuels - part 1. LPG and CNG combustion products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitney, K.A.; Bailey, B.K.

    1994-10-01

    This paper describes efforts underway to identify volatile organic exhaust species generated by a light-duty vehicle operating over the Federal Test Procedure (FTP) on CNG and LPG, and to compare them to exhaust constituents generated from the same vehicle operating on a fuel blended to meet California Phase 2 specifications. The exhaust species from this vehicle were identified and quantified for fuel/air equivalence ratios of 0.8, 1.0, and 1.2, nominally, and were analyzed with and without the vehicle`s catalytic converter in place to determine the influence of the vehicle`s catalyst on species formation. Speciation data showed greater than 87 percent of all LPG and greater than 95 percent of all CNG hydrocarbon exhaust constituents to be composed of C{sub 1} to C{sub 3} compounds. In addition, toxic emissions from the combustion of CNG and LPG were as low as 10 percent of those generated by combustion of gasoline. A comparison of ozone forming potential of the three fuels was made based on the Maximum Incremental Reactivity scale used by the California Air Resources Board. Post-catalyst results from stoichiometric operation indicated that LPG and CNG produced 63 percent and 88 percent less potential ozone than reformulated gasoline, respectively. On average over all equivalence ratios, CNG and LPG exhaust constituents were approximately 65 percent less reactive than those from reformulated gasoline. 4 refs., 3 figs., 14 tabs.

  11. LIQUID NATURAL GAS (LNG): AN ALTERNATIVE FUEL FROM LANDFILL GAS (LFG) AND WASTEWATER DIGESTER GAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    VANDOR,D.

    1999-03-01

    This Research and Development Subcontract sought to find economic, technical and policy links between methane recovery at landfill and wastewater treatment sites in New York and Maryland, and ways to use that methane as an alternative fuel--compressed natural gas (CNG) or liquid natural gas (LNG) -- in centrally fueled Alternative Fueled Vehicles (AFVs).

  12. Research and Development of a PEM Fuel Cell, Hydrogen Reformer, and Vehicle Refueling Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edward F. Kiczek

    2007-08-31

    Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. has teamed with Plug Power, Inc. of Latham, NY, and the City of Las Vegas, NV, to develop, design, procure, install and operate an on-site hydrogen generation system, an alternative vehicle refueling system, and a stationary hydrogen fuel cell power plant, located in Las Vegas. The facility will become the benchmark for validating new natural gas-based hydrogen systems, PEM fuel cell power generation systems, and numerous new technologies for the safe and reliable delivery of hydrogen as a fuel to vehicles. Most important, this facility will serve as a demonstration of hydrogen as a safe and clean energy alternative. Las Vegas provides an excellent real-world performance and durability testing environment.

  13. Insights from Hydrogen Refueling Station Manufacturing Competitiveness Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mayyas, Ahmad

    2015-12-18

    In work for the Clean Energy Manufacturing Analysis Center (CEMAC), NREL is currently collaborating with Great Lakes Wind Network in conducting a comprehensive hydrogen refueling stations manufacturing competitiveness and supply chain analyses. In this project, CEMAC will be looking at several metrics that will facilitate understanding of the interactions between and within the HRS supply chain, such metrics include innovation potential, intellectual properties, learning curves, related industries and clustering, existing supply chains, ease of doing business, and regulations and safety. This presentation to Fuel Cell Seminar and Energy Exposition 2015 highlights initial findings from CEMAC's analysis.

  14. List of Refueling Stations Incentives | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource History ViewInformationWindsCompressedList of Refueling Stations Incentives

  15. Interested in Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies? Help Shape the H2 Refuel H-Prize Competition

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Find out how you can help improve the H-Prize H2 Refuel competition, which involves designing a small-scale hydrogen refueler system for homes, community centers, or businesses.

  16. Loi hnh trng: a ngnh, trng cng lp, i hc l trung tm nghin cu.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickman, Mark

    100 hc bng dành cho sinh viên quc t và Chính ph New Zealand cng cho thêm nhiu hc bng khác na. · Các

  17. Fire Protection Engineering Design Brief Template. Hydrogen Refueling Station.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaFleur, Angela Christine; Muna, Alice Baca; Groth, Katrina M.

    2015-08-01

    Building a hydrogen infrastructure system is critical to supporting the development of alternate- fuel vehicles. This report provides a methodology for implementing a performance-based design of an outdoor hydrogen refueling station that does not meet specific prescriptive requirements in NFPA 2, The Hydrogen Technologies Code . Performance-based designs are a code-compliant alternative to meeting prescriptive requirements. Compliance is demonstrated by comparing a prescriptive-based fueling station design with a performance-based design approach using Quantitative Risk Assessment (QRA) methods and hydrogen risk assessment tools. This template utilizes the Sandia-developed QRA tool, Hydrogen Risk Analysis Models (HyRAM), which combines reduced-order deterministic models that characterize hydrogen release and flame behavior with probabilistic risk models to quantify risk values. Each project is unique and this template is not intended to account for site-specific characteristics. Instead, example content and a methodology are provided for a representative hydrogen refueling site which can be built upon for new hydrogen applications.

  18. 2014- LNG Export, Compressed Natural Gas (CNG), Re-Exports & Long Term Natural Gas Applications

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Please note: To view the complete docket listing, please click the 'Docket Index' link pertaining to a particular docket. Docket Indexes and Service Lists that are not listed can be obtained by...

  19. Business Case for CNG in Municipal Fleets (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, C.

    2010-07-27

    Presentation about compressed natural gas in municipal fleets, assessing investment profitability, the VICE model, base-case scenarios, and pressing questions for fleet owners.

  20. CS 601/IITB Uncapacitated Facility Location Abhiram Ranade Input: n n matrix D giving distances between n points C = fc1; : : : ; cng. The

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ranade, Abhiram G.

    between n points C = fc1; : : : ; cng. The distances form a metric, i.e. dii = 0, dij = dji, dij dik + dkj

  1. Refueling Infrastructure for Alternative Fuel Vehicles: Lessons Learned for Hydrogen; Workshop Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melaina, M. W.; McQueen, S.; Brinch, J.

    2008-07-01

    DOE sponsored the Refueling Infrastructure for Alternative Fuel Vehicles: Lessons Learned for Hydrogen workshop to understand how lessons from past experiences can inform future efforts to commercialize hydrogen vehicles. This report contains the proceedings from the workshop.

  2. NREL's ReFUEL Laboratory: Center for Transportation Technologies and Systems (CTTS) Fact Sheet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2002-09-01

    CTTS fact sheet describing NREL's new Renewable Fuels and Lubricants (ReFUEL) Research Laboratory, which will be used to facilitate increased renewable diesel use in heavy-duty vehicles.

  3. H2 Refuel H-Prize Overview and Q&A | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    1 to 2 p.m. Eastern Daylight Time. Learn all about the 1 million H2 Refuel 2014-2016 H-Prize competition, which challenges America's innovators to deploy an on-site hydrogen...

  4. H2 Refuel H-Prize Overview and Q&A

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Access the recording and download the presentation slides from the Fuel Cell Technologies Office webinar "H2 Refuel H-Prize Overview and Q&A" held on June 25, 2015.

  5. H2 Refuel H-Prize Updates and Q&A Webinar

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Access the recording and download the presentation slides from the Fuel Cell Technologies Office webinar "H2 Refuel H-Prize Updates and Q&A" held on September 22, 2015.

  6. Reminder: Webinar May 14: H2 Refuel H-Prize Technical Data Collection Requirements

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energy Department will present a live webinar entitled “H2 Refuel H-Prize Technical Data Collection Requirements” on Thursday, May 14, at 1 p.m. Eastern Daylight Time. This webinar will go over the technical testing specifications and testing plans that are now available for the Fuel Cell Technologies Office's $1 million H2 Refuel H-Prize competition, as well as answer questions.

  7. An Overview of Automotive Home and Neighborhood Refueling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Xuping; Ogden, Joan M.; Kurani, Kenneth S.

    2009-01-01

    IANGV, International Association for Natural Gas Vehicles.Natural Gas Vehicle Statistics. http:// www.iangv.org/tools-for compressed natural gas vehicles, battery electric

  8. Fermi 2: Independent safety assessment of refueling outage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arora, H.O. [Detroit Edison, MI (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Industry experience and studies conducted by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) have shown that plants are susceptible to a variety of events that can challenge safety during shutdowns. While these events have neither posed nor indicated an undue risk to public health and safety, they do serve to underscore the importance of effective outage planning and control. The NUMARC 91-06 guidelines suggest that proper planning and execution of outage activities can reduce the likelihood and consequences of events, which ultimately enhances safety during shutdown. The Fermi 2, Independent Safety Engineering Group (ISEG) is charged with the independent safety review of the refueling outage plan and its implementation. The ISEG is responsible for performing a detailed and critical review of proposed outage plan prior to the start of the outage, maintaining surveillance of the adequacy and consistency of the {open_quotes}defense-in-depth{close_quotes} provided during the outage, reviewing the outage plan changes for potential vulnerabilities that could affect safety functions, and investigating selected events that emerge during the course of the outage.

  9. Pellet refuelling of particle loss due to ELM mitigation with RMPs in the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak at low collisionality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valovi?, M; Kirk, A; Suttrop, W; Cavedon, M; Fischer, L R; Garzotti, L; Guimarais, L; Kocsis, G; Cseh, G; Pl?ckl, B; Szepesi, T; Thornton, A; Mlynek, A; Tardini, G; Viezzer, E; Scannell, R; Wolfrum, E

    2015-01-01

    The complete refuelling of the plasma density loss (pump-out) caused by mitigation of Edge Localised Modes (ELMs) is demonstrated on the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak. The plasma is refuelled by injection of frozen deuterium pellets and ELMs are mitigated by external resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs). In this experiment relevant dimensionless parameters, such as relative pellet size, relative RMP amplitude and pedestal collisionality are kept at the ITER like values. Refuelling of density pump out requires a factor of two increase of nominal fuelling rate. Energy confinement and pedestal temperatures are not restored to pre-RMP values by pellet refuelling.

  10. Alternative Fuels Data Center: CNG Vehicle Fueling Animation

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Digg Find More places to shareNatural Gas Printable

  11. Natural Gas Utilities Options Analysis for the Hydrogen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    stations · Alt fuel stations (CNG, LNG, E-85, biodiesel) · H2, CNG, LNG storage #12;5 Future Concerns

  12. Energy Department Authorizes Emera CNG, LLC's Application to Export

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy A plug-inPPL EnergyPlus,DepartmentFederalJuly 8,toDepartmentExport Liquefied

  13. Alternative Fuels Data Center: CNG Vehicle Fueling Animation Text Version

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Digg FindPortsas a VehicleNatural Gas Printable Version

  14. Fact #832: August 4, 2014 Over Half of the Refueling Stations in the U.S. and Canada Sell Diesel Fuel

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A 2014 survey of over 110,000 refueling stations in the U.S. and Canada shows that over half of all refueling stations sell diesel fuel. The survey results are shown for five different regions of...

  15. REFUEL: an EU road map for biofuels , E. Deurwaarder and S. Lensink, ECN policy Studies, the Netherlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    REFUEL: an EU road map for biofuels M. Londo1 , E. Deurwaarder and S. Lensink, ECN policy Studies), Poland K. Könighofer, Joanneum Research, Austria Abstract A successful mid-term development of biofuels calls for a robust road map. REFUEL assesses inter alia least-cost biofuel chain options, their benefits

  16. Nuclear Safety Risk Management in Refueling Outage of Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meijing Wu; Guozhang Shen [Qinshan Nuclear power company (China)

    2006-07-01

    The NPP is used to planning maintenance, in-service inspection, surveillance test, fuel handling and design modification in the refueling outage; the operator response capability will be reduced plus some of the plant systems out of service or loss of power at this time. Based on 8 times refueling outage experiences of the Qinshan NPP, this article provide some good practice and lesson learned for the nuclear safety risk management focus at four safety function areas of Residual Heat Removal Capability, Inventory Control, Power availability and Reactivity control. (authors)

  17. Balanced Transport and Sustainable Urbanism: Enhancing Mobility and Accessibility through Institutional, Demand Management, and Land-Use Initiatives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cervero, Robert

    2006-01-01

    compressed natural gas (CNG) buses found in cities likesustainable technologies. CNG conversions means many urban

  18. Low pressure storage of natural gas on activated carbon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wegrzyn, J.; Wiesmann, H.; Lee, T.

    1992-12-31

    The introduction of natural gas to the transportation energy sector offers the possibility of displacing imported oil with an indigenous fuel. The barrier to the acceptance of natural gas vehicles (NGV) is the limited driving range due to the technical difficulties of on-board storage of a gaseous fuel. In spite of this barrier, compressed natural gas (CNG) vehicles are today being successfully introduced into the market place. The purpose of this work is to demonstrate an adsorbent natural gas (ANG) storage system as a viable alternative to CNG storage. It can be argued that low pressure ANG has reached near parity with CNG, since the storage capacity of CNG (2400 psi) is rated at 190 V/V, while low pressure ANG (500 psi) has reached storage capacities of 180 V/V in the laboratory. A program, which extends laboratory results to a full-scale vehicle test, is necessary before ANG technology will receive widespread acceptance. The objective of this program is to field test a 150 V/V ANG vehicle in FY 1994. As a start towards this goal, carbon adsorbents have been screened by Brookhaven for their potential use in a natural gas storage system. This paper reports on one such carbon, trade name Maxsorb, manufactured by Kansai Coke under an Amoco license.

  19. Low pressure storage of natural gas on activated carbon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wegrzyn, J.; Wiesmann, H.; Lee, T.

    1992-01-01

    The introduction of natural gas to the transportation energy sector offers the possibility of displacing imported oil with an indigenous fuel. The barrier to the acceptance of natural gas vehicles (NGV) is the limited driving range due to the technical difficulties of on-board storage of a gaseous fuel. In spite of this barrier, compressed natural gas (CNG) vehicles are today being successfully introduced into the market place. The purpose of this work is to demonstrate an adsorbent natural gas (ANG) storage system as a viable alternative to CNG storage. It can be argued that low pressure ANG has reached near parity with CNG, since the storage capacity of CNG (2400 psi) is rated at 190 V/V, while low pressure ANG (500 psi) has reached storage capacities of 180 V/V in the laboratory. A program, which extends laboratory results to a full-scale vehicle test, is necessary before ANG technology will receive widespread acceptance. The objective of this program is to field test a 150 V/V ANG vehicle in FY 1994. As a start towards this goal, carbon adsorbents have been screened by Brookhaven for their potential use in a natural gas storage system. This paper reports on one such carbon, trade name Maxsorb, manufactured by Kansai Coke under an Amoco license.

  20. Converting landfill gas to vehicle fuel: The results of over 30 months of operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wheless, E.; Cosulich, J.; Wang, A.

    1996-11-01

    The Sanitation Districts of Los Angeles County (Districts) have successfully converted landfill gas to vehicle fuel for over 30 months with the Clean Fuels facility (Clean Fuels). The station has a design capacity equivalent to 1,000 gallons of gasoline per day. The Districts utilize the compressed landfill gas (CLG) produced at the station to run a fleet of 13 vehicles, ranging from passenger vans to large on-road tractors. This paper presents information on the operation, maintenance, theory, and economics of converting landfill gas to vehicle fuel. The compressed natural gas (CNG) industry is expanding rapidly. The US Department of Energy projects the number of natural gas vehicles (NGVs) to grow from 66,000 in 1995 to 85,000 in 1996. A variety of CNG-powered refuse collection vehicles are now available from original equipment manufacturers (OEMs). Many industry pundits predict that refuse trucks will be the next major vehicle group after transit buses to convert to CNG. CNG provides the benefit of lower emissions than diesel and gasoline, with typical fuel costs of only 70 to 80 percent of the price of gasoline at retail pumps. The primary economic advantage of CNG over conventional fuels is its tax rate, which can be lower by about $0.30 per gallon of diesel equivalent. The CNG market may offer the landfill gas industry the same opportunity the electrical generation market offered in the 1980s. The Clean Fuels facility is located within the Districts` Puente Hills Landfill complex. Puente Hills is a very large landfill with over 70 million tons of refuse in place. The current fill rate is approximately 10,000 tons per day. The landfill gas flow rate is approximately 27,000 standard cubic feet per minute (scfm) at 42 percent methane.

  1. Comparative emissions from natural gas and diesel buses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, N.N.; Gadapati, C.J.; Lyons, D.W.; Wang, W.; Gautam, M.; Bata, R.M. [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States); Kelly, K.; White, C.L. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Data has been gathered using the West Virginia University Heavy Duty Transportable Emissions Laboratories from buses operating on diesel and a variety of alternate fuels in the field. Emissions data are acquired from buses using the Central Business District cycle reported in SAE Standard J1376; this cycle has 14 ramps with 20 mph (32.2 km/h) peaks, separated by idle periods. During the three years of testing, a significant fraction of emissions data was acquired from buses with Cummins L-10 engines designed to operate on either CNG or diesel. The CNG lean burn engines were spark ignited and throttled. Early CNG engines, which were pre-certification demonstration models, have provided the bulk of the data, but data from 9 buses with more advanced technology were also available. It has been found that carbon monoxide (CO) levels from early Cummins L-10 CNG powered buses varied greatly from bus to bus, with the higher values ascribed to either faulty catalytic converters or a rich idle situation, while the later model CNG L-10 engines offered CO levels considerably lower than those typical of diesel engines. The NO{sub x} emissions were on par with those from diesel L-10 buses. Those natural gas buses with engines adjusted correctly for air-fuel ratio, returned very low emissions data. CNG bus hydrocarbon emissions are not readily compared with diesel engine levels since only the non-methane organic gases (NMOG) are of interest. Data show that NMOG levels are low for the CNG buses. Significant reduction was observed in the particulate matter emitted by the CNG powered buses compared to the diesel buses, in most cases the quantity captured was vanishingly small. Major conclusions are that engine maintenance is crucial if emissions are to remain at design levels and that the later generation CNG engines show marked improvement over the earlier models. One may project for the long term that closed loop stoichiometry control is desirable even in lean burn applications.

  2. Compressed Natural Gas (Rev 09/14) DRAFT Page 1 of 14 Examination Procedure Outline (EPO) for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EPO No. 28 Compressed Natural Gas (Rev 09/14) DRAFT Page 1 of 14 Examination Procedure Outline (EPO) for Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) Retail Motor-Fuel Dispensers It is recommended that this outline be followed as minimum criteria for examining retail motor-fuel dispensers used to measure compressed natural gas. Non

  3. RIS0-M-2294 HANDLING OF DEUTERIUM PELLETS FOR PLASMA REFUELLING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RIS0-M-2294 HANDLING OF DEUTERIUM PELLETS FOR PLASMA REFUELLING P.s. Jensen and V. Andersen Association Euratom - Ris0 National Laboratory Abstract. The use of a guide tube technique to inject pellets in pellet-plasma experiments guide tube on the mass and (v ~ 150 m/s) is negligible. jectories

  4. Estimation algorithm for autonomous aerial refueling using a vision based relative navigation system 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowers, Roshawn Elizabeth

    2005-11-01

    . This thesis develops a Kalman filter to be used in combination with the VisNav sensor to improve the quality of the relative navigation solution during autonomous probe and drogue refueling. The performance of the Kalman filter is examined in a closed...

  5. Natural gas/diesel conversions - the outlook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fiore, V.B.; Joyce, T.J.

    1986-01-01

    High conversion costs and technical inadequacies of available equipment have limited diesel to compressed natural gas (CNG) conversions, a process which can use either fumigation, pilot oil injection, or spark-ignition for vehicle ignition. An overview of Gas Research Institute conversion research projects includes a summary of major problems associated with performance, cost, and reliability of the systems. A summary table identifies projects by organization and location, then provides project objectives, funding, future plans, and comments where the information is available.

  6. Alternative Fuel Vehicles: The Case of Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) Vehicles in California Households

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abbanat, Brian A.

    2001-01-01

    Nataliya, “Costs of Oil Dependence: A 2000 Update,” OakCEC, 2000). California oil refineries have been operating at

  7. Alternative Fuel Vehicles: The Case of Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) Vehicles in California Households

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abbanat, Brian A.

    2001-01-01

    gasoline supply, which is controlled by a few companies,gasoline version of the vehicle. They trusted the company

  8. 2015 - LNG Export, Compressed Natural Gas (CNG), Re-Exports & Long Term

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Financing ToolInternationalReportOffice | DepartmentVery Large Air-CooledProducts;3 , I S S

  9. Turn of the century refueling: A review of innovations in early gasoline refueling methods and analogies for hydrogen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melaina, Marc W

    2007-01-01

    to choice of alternative fuels and vehicles. Energy StudiesEnergy Policy Act of 1992: Limited Progress in Acquiring Alternative Fuel Vehiclesalternative vehicle fuel: lessons learned from natural gas for vehicles. Energy

  10. Behavioral Response to Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles and Refueling: A Comparative Analysis of Short- and Long-Term Exposure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Elliot; Shaheen, Susan; Lipman, Timothy; Lidicker, Jeffery

    2008-01-01

    on the attitude towards hydrogen fuel cell buses in the CUTEDriver Preferences for Fuel Cell Taxis. Energy Policy, vol.RESPONSE TO HYDROGEN FUEL CELL VEHICLES AND REFUELING: A

  11. Exhaust emission and fuel consumption of CNG/diesel fueled city buses calculated using a sample driving cycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ergeneman, M.; Sorusbay, C.; Goektan, A.G. [Technical Univ. of Istanbul (Turkey). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1999-04-01

    In this study the reduction of pollutant emissions from city buses converted to dual fuel operation was investigated. Exhaust emission and fuel consumption maps were obtained under laboratory conditions for an engine converted to CNG/diesel fuel operation. These values are then used in the simulation model to predict the total exhaust emission and fuel consumption on a driving cycle evaluated from actual recordings. Calculations showed a significant decrease in particulate matter (PM) emissions as expected, while the total CO emissions minor changes have been observed. For dual fuel operation NO{sub x} emissions were kept at the same level as in pure diesel operation with retarded pilot injection. Fuel cost calculations showed a decrease up to 30% with current prices of diesel fuel and CNG.

  12. The 14C(n,g) cross section between 10 keV and 1 MeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Reifarth; M. Heil; C. Forssen; U. Besserer; A. Couture; S. Dababneh; L. Doerr; J. Goerres; R. C. Haight; F. Kaeppeler; A. Mengoni; S. O'Brien; N. Patronis; R. Plag; R. S. Rundberg; M. Wiescher; J. B. Wilhelmy

    2009-10-01

    The neutron capture cross section of 14C is of relevance for several nucleosynthesis scenarios such as inhomogeneous Big Bang models, neutron induced CNO cycles, and neutrino driven wind models for the r process. The 14C(n,g) reaction is also important for the validation of the Coulomb dissociation method, where the (n,g) cross section can be indirectly obtained via the time-reversed process. So far, the example of 14C is the only case with neutrons where both, direct measurement and indirect Coulomb dissociation, have been applied. Unfortunately, the interpretation is obscured by discrepancies between several experiments and theory. Therefore, we report on new direct measurements of the 14C(n,g) reaction with neutron energies ranging from 20 to 800 keV.

  13. Density Functional Theory for High-Throughput Screening of Chemicals and Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fu, Jia

    2015-01-01

    the compressed natural gas (CNG) at the same temperature andcompressed natural gas tank (CNG). According to this table,Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) 136 , involve either cryogenic

  14. Interim qualitative risk assessment for an LNG refueling station and review of relevant safety issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siu, N.; Herring, S.; Cadwallader, L.; Reece, W.; Byers, J.

    1997-07-01

    This report is a qualitative assessment of the public and worker risk involved with the operation of a liquefied natural (LNG) vehicle refueling facility. This study includes facility maintenance and operations, tanker truck delivers and end-use vehicle fueling; it does not treat the risks of LNG vehicles on roadways. Accident initiating events are identified by using a Master Logic Diagram, a Failure Modes and Effects analysis and historical operating experiences. The event trees were drawn to depict possible sequences of mitigating events following the initiating events. The phenomenology of LNG and other vehicle fuels is discussed to characterize the hazard posed by LNG usage. Based on the risk modeling and analysis, recommendations are given to improve the safety of LNG refueling stations in the areas of procedures and training, station design, and the dissemination of best practice information throughout the LNG community.

  15. Webinar May 14: H2 Refuel H-Prize Technical Data Collection Requirements

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The technical testing specifications are now available for the Energy Department's Fuel Cell Technologies Office's $1 million H2 Refuel H-Prize competition, a two-year competition administered by the Hydrogen Education Foundation that challenges America's engineers and entrepreneurs to develop systems for small-scale hydrogen fueling. The Energy Department will present a webinar on May 14, 2015, at 1 p.m. Eastern Daylight Time to go over the specifications and testing plans and answer questions.

  16. Webinar: H2 Refuel H-Prize Technical Data Collection Requirements

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energy Department will present a webinar on May 14, 2015, at 1 p.m. Eastern Daylight Time about the technical testing specifications for the Energy Department's Fuel Cell Technologies Office's $1 million H2 Refuel H-Prize competition, a two-year competition administered by the Hydrogen Education Foundation that challenges America's engineers and entrepreneurs to develop affordable systems for small-scale hydrogen fueling.

  17. Energy Department Launches H2 Refuel H-Prize Competition for Small-Scale

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12, 2015 Infographic courtesy ofDepartment ofDepartment ofHydrogen Refueling

  18. Refueling Behavior of Flexible Fuel Vehicle Drivers in the Federal Fleet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daley, R.; Nangle, J.; Boeckman, G.; Miller, M.

    2014-05-01

    Federal fleets are a frequent subject of legislative and executive efforts to lead a national transition to alternative fuels and advanced vehicle technologies. Section 701 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 requires that all dual-fueled alternative fuel vehicles in the federal fleet be operated on alternative fuel 100% of the time when they have access to it. However, in Fiscal Year (FY) 2012, drivers of federal flex fuel vehicles (FFV) leased through the General Services Administration refueled with E85 24% of the time when it was available--falling well short of the mandate. The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory completed a 2-year Laboratory Directed Research and Development project to identify the factors that influence the refueling behavior of federal FFV drivers. The project began with two primary hypotheses. First, information scarcity increases the tendency to miss opportunities to purchase E85. Second, even with perfect information, there are limits to how far drivers will go out of their way to purchase E85. This paper discusses the results of the project, which included a June 2012 survey of federal fleet drivers and an empirical analysis of actual refueling behavior from FY 2009 to 2012. This research will aid in the design and implementation of intervention programs aimed at increasing alternative fuel use and reducing petroleum consumption.

  19. November 10, 2004: First hydrogen refueling station opens in Washington,

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy AEnergy Managing853926 News enDepartment of Energy InDC. | Department of

  20. Alternative Transportation Refueling Infrastructure in the U.S. 2014:

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p a l De p u t y AEfficiency Rebate

  1. Fact #832: August 4, 2014 Over Half of the Refueling Stations in the U.S. and Canada Sell Diesel Fuel- Dataset

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Excel file with dataset for Fact #832: Over Half of the Refueling Stations in the U.S. and Canada Sell Diesel Fuel

  2. Transportation and its Infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01

    2007). Natural Gas (CNG / LNG / GTL) Natural gas, which iscompressed (CNG) or liquefied (LNG) form Chapter 5 Transportthe hydrogen section. CNG and LNG combustion characteristics

  3. Natural Gas Vehicle Cylinder Safety, Training and Inspection Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hank Seiff

    2008-12-31

    Under the auspices of the National Energy Technology Laboratory and the US Department of Energy, the Clean Vehicle Education Foundation conducted a three-year program to increase the understanding of the safe and proper use and maintenance of vehicular compressed natural gas (CNG) fuel systems. High-pressure fuel systems require periodic inspection and maintenance to insure safe and proper operation. The project addressed the needs of CNG fuel containers (cylinders) and associated high-pressure fuel system components related to existing law, codes and standards (C&S), available training and inspection programs, and assured coordination among vehicle users, public safety officials, fueling station operators and training providers. The program included a public and industry awareness campaign, establishment and administration of a cylinder inspector certification training scholarship program, evaluation of current safety training and testing practices, monitoring and investigation of CNG vehicle incidents, evaluation of a cylinder recertification program and the migration of CNG vehicle safety knowledge to the nascent hydrogen vehicle community.

  4. ARPA-E: Creating Practical, Affordable Natural Gas Storage Solutions

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Boysen, Dane; Loukus, Josh; Hansen, Rita

    2014-03-13

    Allowing people to refuel natural gas vehicles at home could revolutionize the way we power our cars and trucks. Currently, our nation faces two challenges in enabling natural gas for transportation. The first is improving the way gas tanks are built for natural gas vehicles; they need to be conformable, allowing them to fit tightly into the vehicle. The second challenge is improving the way those tanks are refueled while maintaining cost-effectiveness, safety, and reliability. This video highlights two ARPA-E project teams with innovative solutions to these challenges. REL is addressing the first challenge by developing a low-cost, conformable natural gas tank with an interconnected core structure. Oregon State University and OnBoard Dynamics are addressing the second challenge by developing a self-refueling natural gas vehicle that integrates a compressor into its engine-using one of the engine's cylinders to compress gas eliminates the need for an expensive at-home refueling system. These two distinct technologies from ARPA-E's MOVE program illustrate how the Agency takes a multi-pronged approach to problem solving and innovation.

  5. ARPA-E: Creating Practical, Affordable Natural Gas Storage Solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boysen, Dane; Loukus, Josh; Hansen, Rita

    2014-02-24

    Allowing people to refuel natural gas vehicles at home could revolutionize the way we power our cars and trucks. Currently, our nation faces two challenges in enabling natural gas for transportation. The first is improving the way gas tanks are built for natural gas vehicles; they need to be conformable, allowing them to fit tightly into the vehicle. The second challenge is improving the way those tanks are refueled while maintaining cost-effectiveness, safety, and reliability. This video highlights two ARPA-E project teams with innovative solutions to these challenges. REL is addressing the first challenge by developing a low-cost, conformable natural gas tank with an interconnected core structure. Oregon State University and OnBoard Dynamics are addressing the second challenge by developing a self-refueling natural gas vehicle that integrates a compressor into its engine-using one of the engine's cylinders to compress gas eliminates the need for an expensive at-home refueling system. These two distinct technologies from ARPA-E's MOVE program illustrate how the Agency takes a multi-pronged approach to problem solving and innovation.

  6. Community Energy: Analysis of Hydrogen Distributed Energy Systems with Photovoltaics for Load Leveling and Vehicle Refueling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steward, D.; Zuboy, J.

    2014-10-01

    Energy storage could complement PV electricity generation at the community level. Because PV generation is intermittent, strategies must be implemented to integrate it into the electricity system. Hydrogen and fuel cell technologies offer possible PV integration strategies, including the community-level approaches analyzed in this report: (1) using hydrogen production, storage, and reconversion to electricity to level PV generation and grid loads (reconversion scenario); (2) using hydrogen production and storage to capture peak PV generation and refuel hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEVs) (hydrogen fueling scenario); and (3) a comparison scenario using a battery system to store electricity for EV nighttime charging (electric charging scenario).

  7. H2 Refuel H-Prize Guideline Update | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,ExecutiveFinancing Programs | DepartmentINDUSTRIALH-Tank FarmH2 Refuel H-Prize

  8. Webinar August 6: H2 Refuel H-Prize Safety Guidance | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematics And Statistics » USAJobs SearchAMERICA'S FUTURE.Projects atWe Want It&Web6: H2 Refuel H-Prize

  9. COMPARATIVE STUDY ON EXHAUST EMISSIONS FROM DIESEL- AND CNG-POWERED URBAN BUSES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    COROLLER, P; PLASSAT, G

    2003-08-24

    Couple years ago, ADEME engaged programs dedicated to the urban buses exhaust emissions studies. The measures associated with the reduction of atmospheric and noise pollution has particular importance in the sector of urban buses. In many cases, they illustrate the city's environmental image and contribute to reinforcing the attractiveness of public transport. France's fleet in service, presently put at about 14,000 units, consumes about 2 per cent of the total energy of city transport. It causes about 2 per cent of the HC emissions and from 4 to 6 per cent of the NOx emissions and particles. These vehicles typically have a long life span (about 15 years) and are relatively expensive to buy, about 150.000 euros per unit. Several technical solutions were evaluated to quantify, on a real condition cycle for buses, on one hand pollutants emissions, fuel consumption and on the other hand reliability, cost in real existing fleet. This paper presents main preliminary results on urban buses exhaust emission on two different cases: - existing Diesel buses, with fuel modifications (Diesel with low sulphur content), Diesel with water emulsion and bio-Diesel (30% oil ester in standard Diesel fuel); renovating CNG powered Euro II buses fleet, over representative driving cycles, set up by ADEME and partners. On these cycles, pollutants (regulated and unregulated) were measured as well as fuel consumption, at the beginning of a program and one year after to quantify reliability and increase/decrease of pollutants emissions. At the same time, some after-treatment technologies were tested under real conditions and several vehicles. Information such as fuel consumption, lubricant analysis, problem on the technology were following during a one year program. On the overall level, it is the combination of various action, pollution-reduction and renewal that will make it possible to meet the technological challenge of reducing emissions and fuel consumption by urban bus networks.

  10. Natural Gas as a Pathway to Alternative Low Carbon Fuels: Infrastructure Issues and Barriers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 CrudeOilProduction(thousandbarrels) NaturalGasProduction(MMcf) U.S $/gigajoule Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration #12;Emissions Advantage? · Natural gas is promoted at current relative prices 3 #12;Refueling infrastructure requirements are costly Natural gas as an emerging

  11. Development of a Liquid to Compressed Natural Gas (LCNG) Fueling Station. Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, J. A.

    1999-06-30

    The program objective was the development of equipment and processes to produce compressed natural gas (CNG) from liquified natural gas (LNG) for heavy duty vehicular applications. The interest for this technology is a result of the increased use of alternative fuels for the reduction of emissions and dependency of foreign energy. Technology of the type developed under this program is critical for establishing natural gas as an economical alternative fuel.

  12. Workshop Notes from ""Compressed Natural Gas and Hydrogen Fuels...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Hydrogen Fuels Workshop Safety and Regulatory Structure for CNG, CNG-Hydrogen Vehicles and Fuels in India International Hydrogen Fuel and Pressure Vessel Forum 2010 Proceedings...

  13. Status and Prospects of the Global Automotive Fuel Cell Industry and Plans for Deployment of Fuel Cell Vehicles and Hydrogen Refueling Infrastructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greene, David L; Duleep, Gopal

    2013-06-01

    Automobile manufacturers leading the development of mass-market fuel cell vehicles (FCVs) were interviewed in Japan, Korea, Germany and the United States. There is general agreement that the performance of FCVs with respect to durability, cold start, packaging, acceleration, refueling time and range has progressed to the point where vehicles that could be brought to market in 2015 will satisfy customer expectations. However, cost and the lack of refueling infrastructure remain significant barriers. Costs have been dramatically reduced over the past decade, yet are still about twice what appears to be needed for sustainable market success. While all four countries have plans for the early deployment of hydrogen refueling infrastructure, the roles of government, industry and the public in creating a viable hydrogen refueling infrastructure remain unresolved. The existence of an adequate refueling infrastructure and supporting government policies are likely to be the critical factors that determine when and where hydrogen FCVs are brought to market.

  14. On-Road Development of John Deere 6081 Natural Gas Engine: Final Technical Report, July 1999 - January 2001

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCaw, D. L.; Horrell, W. A. (Deere and Company)

    2001-09-24

    Report that discusses John Deere's field development of a heavy-duty natural gas engine. As part of the field development project, Waste Management of Orange County, California refitted four existing trash packers with John Deere's prototype spark ignited 280-hp 8.1 L CNG engines. This report describes the project and also contains information about engine performance, emissions, and driveability.

  15. Environmental implications of alternative-fueled automobiles: Air quality and greenhouse gas tradeoffs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MaClean, H.L.; Lave, L.B.

    2000-01-15

    The authors analyze alternative fuel-powerstrain options for internal combustion engine automobiles. Fuel/engine efficiency, energy use, pollutant discharges, and greenhouse gas emissions are estimated for spark and compression ignited, direct injected (DI), and indirect injected (II) engines fueled by conventional and reformulated gasoline, reformulated diesel, compressed natural gas (CNG), and alcohols. Since comparisons of fuels and technologies in dissimilar vehicles are misleading, the authors hold emissions level, range, vehicle size class, and style constant. At present, CNG vehicles have the best exhaust emissions performance while DI diesels have the worst. Compared to a conventional gasoline fueled II automobile, greenhouse gases could be reduced by 40% by a DI CNG automobile and by 25% by a DI diesel. Gasoline- and diesel-fueled automobiles are able to attain long ranges with little weight or fuel economy penalty. CNG vehicles have the highest penalty for increasing range, due to their heavy fuel storage systems, but are the most attractive for a 160-km range. DI engines, particularly diesels, may not be able to meet strict emissions standards, at least not without lowering efficiency.

  16. CNG-Hybrid: A Practical Path to "Net Zero Emissions" in Commuter...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    by conversion to natural gas, using waste heat recovery, and employing intercooled gas turbine engines. p-06cook.pdf More Documents & Publications Clean Air Act General...

  17. Life-Cycle Water Impacts of U.S. Transportation Fuels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scown, Corinne Donahue

    2010-01-01

    compressed natural gas (CNG) and electricity also maintain asuch as electricity, CNG, and hydrogen require completelyThe remaining fuels are CNG and electricity, both of which

  18. Societal lifetime cost of hydrogen fuel cell vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Yongling; Ogden, J; Delucchi, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Compressed Natural Gas (CNG), synthetic diesel, methanol,FCX Fuels Gasoline, Diesel, CNG, FT diesel, methanol, H2,H2, electricity Gasoline, diesel, CNG, biogas, LPG, ethanol,

  19. Emissions Benefits From Renewable Fuels and Other Alternatives for Heavy-Duty Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hajbabaei, Maryam

    2013-01-01

    and Greenhouse Gas Emissions from CNG Transit Buses EquippedOxidation Catalyst Effect on CNG Transit Bus Emissions. SAEOxidation Catalyst Effect on CNG Transit Bus Emissions. SAE

  20. Building Out Alternative Fuel Retail Infrastructure: Government Fleet Spillovers in E85

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corts, Kenneth S.

    2009-01-01

    with compressed natural gas (CNG). Vehicles that are capablecapable of burning pure CNG as well. Thus, some hydrogenof Energy, there were 778 CNG stations nationwide at the end

  1. ENGLISH l TuanVietNam.Net l VieTimes l Lm bo cng VietNamNet l Tr c Tuy n l Th H CNTT -Vi n thng

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lummaa, Virpi

    25%, ng th i c h i l y ch ng cng gi m i 15%... ó là k t qu nghiên c u c a các nhà khoa h c thu c Tr v i nh ng bé gái sinh ôi cùng v i m t bé gái khác (song sinh n ). ng th i, nh ng bé gái ó cng có c h tr ng thành. Bà cho bi t vi c phi nhi m v i testosterone m c cao trong t cung cng có th làm tng nguy

  2. Reducing Duration of Refueling Outage by Optimizing Core Design and Shuffling Sequence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wakker, P.H.; Verhagen, F.C.M.; Bloois, J.T. van; Sutton, W.R. III

    2005-07-15

    Reducing the duration of refueling outage is possible by optimizing the core design and the shuffling sequence. For both options software tools have been developed that have been applied to the three most recent cycles of the Borssele plant in the Netherlands. Applicability of the shuffling sequence optimization to boiling water reactors has been demonstrated by a comparison to a recent shuffle plan used in the Hatch plant located in the United States. Their uses have shown that both core design and shuffling sequence optimization can be exploited to reduce the time needed for reloading a core with an in-core shuffling scheme. Ex-core shuffling schemes for pressurized water reactors can still have substantial benefit from a core design using a minimized number of insert shuffles.

  3. Evaluating the Safety of a Natural Gas Home Refueling Appliance (HRA); Natural Gas Infrastructure Evaluation (Fact Sheet)

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageBlender PumpVehiclesThe Heat Is and infrastructure R&D

  4. Bus Rapid Transit (BRT): An Efficient and Competitive Mode of Public Transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cervero, Robert

    2013-01-01

    cities  run  on   CNG.    Because  natural  gas  burns  Chinese  cities  also  run   CNG   buses.    LNG  is  used  

  5. NGV stations based on mobile tube trailers: An economic analysis. Final report, June 1994-January 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keder, J.; Darrow, K.

    1995-01-01

    This report assesses the technical and economic issues associated with the use of mobile tube trailers for Natural Gas Vehicle (NGV) refueling stations. Specifically, this report examines the mobile tube trailer concept developed by Pacific Cryongenics, Inc. and Pacific Gas and Electric. Mobile tube trailers are filled with compressed natural gas (CNG) at an underutilized compressor station and transported to satellite station locations. NGVs are filled at the satellite stations usig compressed gas from the tube trailer. Results of the economic analysis show that, under various operating conditions, the mobile tube trailer concept provides a cost effective alternative to NGV refueling stations with permanent compressors. In addition, the tube trailers were found to provide a substantial load for undertutilized compressor stations, resulting in reduced CNG costs at existing stations.

  6. Hydrogen Vehicle and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    & Publications HYDROGEN TO THE HIGHWAYS Refueling Infrastructure for Alternative Fuel Vehicles: Lessons Learned for Hydrogen Safety Analysis of Type 4 Tanks in CNG Vehicles...

  7. Refueling Availability for Alternative Fuel Vehicle Markets: Sufficient Urban Station Coverage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melaina, Marc W; Bremson, Joel

    2008-01-01

    vehicles: the case of natural gas vehicles. Energy Policywith compressed natural gas vehicles in New Zealand andin California and natural gas vehicles in New Zealand (

  8. Clean Cities Launches Improved Tool to Help Fleets Evaluate CNG Investments

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The popular VICE Model is newly updated to allow fleets greater flexibility in determining payback periods for natural gas vehicles and fueling infrastructure.

  9. Development of Larger Diameter High Pressure CNG Cylinder Manufactured by Piercing and Drawing for Natural Gas Vehicle

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    These slides were presented at the International Hydrogen Fuel and Pressure Vessel Forum on September 27 – 29, 2010, in Beijing, China.

  10. Risk associated with the use of barriers in hydrogen refueling stations.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaChance, Jeffrey L.; Phillips, Jesse; Houf, William G.

    2010-03-01

    Separation distances are used in hydrogen refueling stations to protect people, structures, and equipment from the consequences of accidental hydrogen releases. Specifically, hydrogen jet flames resulting from ignition of unintended releases can be extensive in length and pose significant radiation and impingement hazards. Depending on the leak diameter and source pressure, the resulting separation distances can be unacceptably large. One possible mitigation strategy to reduce exposure to hydrogen flames is to incorporate barriers around hydrogen storage, process piping, and delivery equipment. The effectiveness of barrier walls to reduce hazards at hydrogen facilities has been previously evaluated using experimental and modeling information developed at Sandia National Laboratories. The effect of barriers on the risk from different types of hazards including direct flame contact, radiation heat fluxes, and overpressures associated with delayed hydrogen ignition has subsequently been evaluated and used to identify potential reductions in separation distances in hydrogen facilities. Both the frequency and consequences used in this risk assessment and the risk results are described. The results of the barrier risk analysis can also be used to help establish risk-informed barrier design requirements for use in hydrogen codes and standards.

  11. An empirical analysis on the adoption of alternative fuel vehicles:The case of natural gas vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yeh, Sonia

    2007-01-01

    Kathuria, V. , 2004. Impact of CNG on vehicular pollution inin Delhi: before and after CNG as fuel. EnvironmentalS.A.K. , 2004. Development of CNG infrastructure in India

  12. Experimental studies on a natural gas vehicle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ishii, Mitsunori; Ishizawa, Shizuo; Inada, Eiji; Idoguchi, Ryuichi; Sekiba, Toru

    1994-10-01

    This paper presents the results of several studies conducted on a natural gas vehicle. In one study of engine-out emissions performance, the exhaust emissions of the CNG engine were lower than those of the base gasoline engine. In another study of the conversion characteristics of three-way catalysts, it was found that the conversion efficiency of total hydrocarbons (THCs) was much lower in the lean-mixture region for the NGV. The reduced efficiency was traced to lower conversion and poor reactivity of low-end hydrocarbons and to a higher concentration of H2O. 12 refs., 20 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Compressed gas fuel storage system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wozniak, John J. (Columbia, MD); Tiller, Dale B. (Lincoln, NE); Wienhold, Paul D. (Baltimore, MD); Hildebrand, Richard J. (Edgemere, MD)

    2001-01-01

    A compressed gas vehicle fuel storage system comprised of a plurality of compressed gas pressure cells supported by shock-absorbing foam positioned within a shape-conforming container. The container is dimensioned relative to the compressed gas pressure cells whereby a radial air gap surrounds each compressed gas pressure cell. The radial air gap allows pressure-induced expansion of the pressure cells without resulting in the application of pressure to adjacent pressure cells or physical pressure to the container. The pressure cells are interconnected by a gas control assembly including a thermally activated pressure relief device, a manual safety shut-off valve, and means for connecting the fuel storage system to a vehicle power source and a refueling adapter. The gas control assembly is enclosed by a protective cover attached to the container. The system is attached to the vehicle with straps to enable the chassis to deform as intended in a high-speed collision.

  14. Defect Analysis of Vehicle Compressed Natural Gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cylinder, translated and presented by J. P. Hsu, PhD, Smart Chemistry #12;Reason for Defect Analysis of CNG Composite Cylinder · Safety Issue - Four explosion accidents of auto used CNG composite material cylinders resulting huge personnel and vehicles loss. · Low Compliance Rate ­ Inspect 12119 Auto used CNG composite

  15. NGV cylinder workshop 2. Final report, March 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biederman, R.; Blazek, C.

    1993-06-01

    The report provides an overview of the objectives, conclusions and recommendations discussed during the GRI-sponsored workshop. The workshop brought together a number of industry groups - vehicle OEMS, cylinder manufacturers, compressor and refueling station manufacturers, natural gas distribution companies, and industry advisory personnel. The workshop focused on issues relating to on-board vehicle fuel storage pressure, cylinder standardization, R D needs identification, and prospects for formation of a consortium for CNG fuel storage.

  16. Webinar June 25: H2 Refuel H-Prize Overview and Q&A | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematics And Statistics » USAJobs SearchAMERICA'S FUTURE.Projects atWe Want It&Web6: H2 Refuel

  17. Performance, Efficiency, and Emissions Characterization of Reciprocating Internal Combustion Engines Fueled with Hydrogen/Natural Gas Blends

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirby S. Chapman; Amar Patil

    2007-06-30

    Hydrogen is an attractive fuel source not only because it is abundant and renewable but also because it produces almost zero regulated emissions. Internal combustion engines fueled by compressed natural gas (CNG) are operated throughout a variety of industries in a number of mobile and stationary applications. While CNG engines offer many advantages over conventional gasoline and diesel combustion engines, CNG engine performance can be substantially improved in the lean operating region. Lean operation has a number of benefits, the most notable of which is reduced emissions. However, the extremely low flame propagation velocities of CNG greatly restrict the lean operating limits of CNG engines. Hydrogen, however, has a high flame speed and a wide operating limit that extends into the lean region. The addition of hydrogen to a CNG engine makes it a viable and economical method to significantly extend the lean operating limit and thereby improve performance and reduce emissions. Drawbacks of hydrogen as a fuel source, however, include lower power density due to a lower heating value per unit volume as compared to CNG, and susceptibility to pre-ignition and engine knock due to wide flammability limits and low minimum ignition energy. Combining hydrogen with CNG, however, overcomes the drawbacks inherent in each fuel type. Objectives of the current study were to evaluate the feasibility of using blends of hydrogen and natural gas as a fuel for conventional natural gas engines. The experiment and data analysis included evaluation of engine performance, efficiency, and emissions along with detailed in-cylinder measurements of key physical parameters. This provided a detailed knowledge base of the impact of using hydrogen/natural gas blends. A four-stroke, 4.2 L, V-6 naturally aspirated natural gas engine coupled to an eddy current dynamometer was used to measure the impact of hydrogen/natural gas blends on performance, thermodynamic efficiency and exhaust gas emissions in a reciprocating four stroke cycle engine. The test matrix varied engine load and air-to-fuel ratio at throttle openings of 50% and 100% at equivalence ratios of 1.00 and 0.90 for hydrogen percentages of 10%, 20% and 30% by volume. In addition, tests were performed at 100% throttle opening, with an equivalence ratio of 0.98 and a hydrogen blend of 20% to further investigate CO emission variations. Data analysis indicated that the use of hydrogen/natural gas fuel blend penalizes the engine operation with a 1.5 to 2.0% decrease in torque, but provided up to a 36% reduction in CO, a 30% reduction in NOX, and a 5% increase in brake thermal efficiency. These results concur with previous results published in the open literature. Further reduction in emissions can be obtained by retarding the ignition timing.

  18. EECBG Success Story: CNG in OKC: Improving Efficiency at the Pump and on

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy A plug-inPPL EnergyPlus, LLC to5USC787 TITLE 12--BANKS AND BANKING CITE:Bluesthe

  19. In the Face of Hurricane Sandy, CNG Vehicles Shuttle People to Safety |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy A plug-inPPLforLDRD Report11,SecurityHome .EnergyEnvironmental,yourDepartment of

  20. Louisiana Company Makes Switch to CNG, Helps Transform Local Fuel Supplies

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy A plug-inPPLforLDRDEnergyTurbineProcesses toDepartmentSpurred by aPhase|

  1. CNG and Fleets: Building Your Business Case (Fact Sheet), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageBlender PumpVehiclesThe Heat Is onis aTechnicalNatural gas

  2. Miscibility, solubility and retrograde prediction of methane in liquids. Liquid storage of natural gas (LSNG) for vehicle fuel. Annual report, July 15, 1992-July 15, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mansoori, G.A.

    1994-07-01

    The primary focus of this project is to investigate the concept of liquid storage of natural gas (LSNG) for potential natural gas vehicle (NGV) application. The research work consists of developing accurate techniques for modeling of interfacial properties, miscibility and solubility of methane in liquids. By implementing this project it will be possible: To use natural gas as the fuel for internal combustion engines; To increase the gas tank capacity about 200% more over the compressed natural gas (CNG) scheme; To increase the octane-number of low quality liquid fuels through blending them with natural gas.

  3. An Assessment of the Near-Term Costs of Hydrogen Refueling Stations and Station Components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lipman, T E; Weinert, Jonathan X.

    2006-01-01

    connections) Installation Costs: 1. Engineering and Designstation works properly) 6. Contingency Operating Costs: 1.Feedstock Costs (natural gas, electricity) 2. Equipment

  4. Tailoring Topology Optimization to Composite Pressure Vessel Design with Simultaneous

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paulino, Glaucio H.

    $160/ship Comparison of CNG and LNG (Liquefied Natural Gas) Introduction ­ CNG Pressure Vessels MM;Introduction ­ CNG Pressure Vessels Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) Pressure Vessels CNG Cargo Containment System upon the number of ships used for the transport of the gas. MMscf/d - million standard cubic feet per

  5. Refueling Availability for Alternative Fuel Vehicle Markets: Sufficient Urban Station Coverage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melaina, Marc W; Bremson, Joel

    2008-01-01

    to choice of alternative fuels and vehicles. Energy Studiesalternative fuel vehicles: the case of natural gas vehicles. EnergyEnergy Policy Act of 1992: Limited Progress in Acquiring Alternative Fuel Vehicles

  6. Clean air program: Design guidelines for bus transit systems using liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) as an alternative fuel. Final report, July 1995-April 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raj, P.K.; Hathaway, W.T.; Kangas, R.

    1996-09-01

    The Federal Transit Administration (FTA) has initiated the development of `Design Guidelines for Bus Transit Systems Using Alternative Fuels.` This report provides design guidelines for the safe uses of Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG). It forms a part of the series of individual monographs being published by the FTA on (the guidelines for the safe use of) Compressed Natural Gas (CNG), Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG), Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG) and alcohol fuels (Methanol and Ethanol). Each report in this series describes for the subject fuel the important fuel properties, guidelines for the design and operation of bus fueling, storage and maintenance facilities, issues on personnel training and emergency preparedness.

  7. Eliminating the effects of greenhouse gases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Straitz, J.F. III [NAO Inc., Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    1996-11-01

    From 1993 to 1997, more than $600 million will be invested in about 190 new landfill gas energy projects, 75% of which will generate 400 megawatts of electric power. Most of the others will pump methane (CH{sub 4}) directly into natural gas transmission lines or be used to power steam generators. U.S. landfills now produce about 40 million tons of landfill gas per year, and half that tonnage is CH{sub 4}, an alternate fuel. By the year 2000, 90% of all federal and state fleet vehicles must be powered by alternate fuels. Twenty-million tons of CH{sub 4}, converted to compressed natural gas (CNG) at municipal and private landfill refueling stations, could power 8 million natural gas vehicles (NGV). In addition to conserving 8 billion gallons of gasoline per year that would help to reduce this nation`s trade unbalance, the clean-burning CNG would also reduce airborne pollutants.

  8. Analysis of Cost-Effective Off-Board Hydrogen Storage and Refueling Stations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ted Barnes; William Liss

    2008-11-14

    This report highlights design and component selection considerations for compressed gas hydrogen fueling stations operating at 5000 psig or 350 bar. The primary focus is on options for compression and storage – in terms of practical equipment options as well as various system configurations and how they influence delivery performance and station economics.

  9. Transportation and its Infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01

    York City Transit Hybrid and CNG Buses: Interim EvaluationECMT, 2007). Natural Gas (CNG / LNG / GTL) Natural gas,It may be stored in compressed (CNG) or liquefied (LNG) form

  10. Lifecycle Analyses of Biofuels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delucchi, Mark

    2006-01-01

    sulfur) ICEV, natural gas (CNG) ICEV, LPG (P95/BU5) ICEV,Methanol Ethanol Methane (CNG, LNG) Propane (LPG) Hydrogen (M85 (wood) Natural gas CNG (wood) Note: percentage changes

  11. Alternative Fuel Tool Kit How to Implement: Compressed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to Compressed Natural Gas (CNG ..............................................................................................................9 North Carolina CNG Case Study of Energy under Award Number DE-EE0006083. #12;2 6/2014 Introduction to Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) What

  12. Cryogenic Pressure Vessels for H2 Vehicles Rapidly Refueled by LH2 pump to 700 bar

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based| Department of Energy Whole-Home Gas8of EnergyHydrogen

  13. Natural gas vehicle fueling station dispenser meter evaluations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rowley, P.F.; Kriha, K.; Blazek, C.F. [Inst. of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) has constructed a multi-purpose meter evaluation facility capable of testing metering technologies for high flow rate and high pressure NGV dispenser applications. The objective of IGT`s meter evaluation program, sponsored by IGT`s Sustaining Membership Program and the Gas Research Institute, is to assist the industry in evaluating the performance and accuracy of currently available flowmeters that are being used or could be applied to CNG gas dispensing. These meters are tested at various flow rates and pressures to determine their performance under NGV fueling station operating conditions and to identify the performance characteristics and limitations for each meter. The metering technologies which are being evaluated under this program include Coriolis meter, sonic nozzle meter, and turbine meter designs.

  14. Overview of Indian Hydrogen Program and Key Safety Issues of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    & Publications Successful Adoption of CNG and Energing CNG-Hydrogen Program in India Workshop Notes from ""Compressed Natural Gas and Hydrogen Fuels: Lessons Learned for...

  15. California Energy Commission STAFF REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) "Ontario 76 CNG Infrastructure Installation project changed from a CNG station to a liquefied natural gas (LNG) station, and the project proposer

  16. Unburned lubricant produces 60%90% of organic carbon emissions.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , diesel, and compressed natural gas (CNG)-powered vehicles · New and aged lubricants representative fuel, biodiesel, and CNG The study confirmed that normally functioning emission control systems

  17. Reducing Greenhouse Emissions and Fuel Consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaheen, Susan; Lipman, Timothy

    2007-01-01

    Compressed natural gas (CNG) vehicles offer similar emissionsimilar GHG emission levels as CNG vehicles and diesel vehi­BRT buses . The 40-foot CNG buses used in a BRT system

  18. The Rapid Rise of Middle-Class Vehicle Ownership in Mumbai

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shirgaokar, Manish

    2012-01-01

    used Compressed Natural Gas (CNG); in the Thane region, 69%in Greater Mumbai 89% used CNG, 5% used petrol, 3% used35% used diesel, 12% used CNG and 1% used LPG. In the bus

  19. Demonstration of Automated Heavy-Duty Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01

    by compressed natural gas (CNG) in spark-ignition engines,buses are powered by a CNG spark-ignition engine, providedno matter whether it is a CNG or a diesel engine [4, 5].

  20. Results of the 2008-09 Campus Travel Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lovejoy, Kristin; Handy, Susan L; Contreras, Cliff

    2009-01-01

    on compressed natural gas (CNG) rather than diesel fuel forconsumed 235,300 gallons of CNG and 17,600 gallons of dieselper gallon of diesel and CNG, respectively, 10 then Unitrans

  1. BurbankBus' clean fuel fleet now includes a zero-emission hydrogen-fueled bus. BurbankBus, which provides transit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bus fixed-route fleet consists of 17 compressed natural gas (CNG) buses. This fleet has been running on 100% CNG for about two years. The city's trash trucks are also run on CNG, and its light- duty vehicle

  2. Alternative fueled vehicle fleet safety experience. Summary report. Report for September 1994-March 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morris, J.B.

    1995-03-01

    The study was initiated to gather information on the safety performance of alternative fueled vehicles from fleet operators experienced in the day to day operation of these vehicles. Eight fleets and one compressed natural gas (CNG) vehicle converter were visited during the course of the study. The types of fleets visited consisted of these with vehicles fueled with CNG, liquefied natural gas (LNG), liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), and electric vehicles (EVs). Three CNG fleets, two LNG fleets, one EV fleet, and two LPG fleets were visitied in addition to one CNG converter. Items discussed with the fleet operators included fuel system performance in the crash environment as well as safety related problems encountered during the refueling operation and when maintaining the vehicles. The fleets visited have experienced no accidents where the fuel system has been jeopardized and no injury to personnel that can be attributed to the alternative fuel system. However, the accident experience of the fleets visited is very limited. Many of the problems with alternative fueled vehicles experienced in the past have been corrected by advances in the state of the art and improvements in system components. Improvements continue to be made.

  3. Alternative fueled vehicle fleet safety experience. Final report, September 1994-March 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morris, J.B.

    1995-03-01

    The study was initiated to gather information on the safety performance of alternative fueled vehicles from fleet operators experienced in the day to day operation of these vehicles. Eight fleets and one compressed natural gas (CNG) vehicle converter were visitied during the course of the study. The types of fleets visited consisted of these with vehicles fueled with CNG, liquefied natural gas (LNG), liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), and electric vehicles (EVs). Three CNG fleets, two LNG fleets, one EV fleet, and two LPG fleets were visitied in addition to one CNG converter. Items discussed with the fleet operators included fuel system performance in the crash environment as well as safety related problems encountered during the refueling operation and when maintaining the vehicles. The fleets visited have experienced no accidents where the fuel system has been jeopardized and no injury to personnel that can be attributed to the alternative fuel system. However, the accident experience of the fleets visited is very limited. Many of the problems with alternative fueled vehicles experienced in the past have been corrected by advances in the state of the art and improvements in system components. Improvements continue to be made.

  4. Utilities building NGV infrastructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-04-01

    Gas utilities across the US are aggressively pursuing the natural gas vehicle market by putting in place the infrastructure needed to ensure the growth of the important market. The first annual P and GJ NGV Marketing Survey has revealed many utilities plant to build and continue building NGV fueling facilities. The NGV industry in the US is confronting a classic chicken-or-egg quandary. Fleet operators and individual drivers are naturally unwilling to commit to a natural gas vehicle fuel until sufficient fueling facilities are in place, yet service station operators are reluctant to add NGV refueling capacity until enough CNG vehicles are on the road to create demand. The future of the NGV market is bright, but continued research and product improvements by suppliers as well as LDCs is needed if the potential is to be fulfilled. Advances in refueling facilities must continue if the market is to develop.

  5. Development and Demonstration of Hydrogen and Compressed Natural Gas (H/CNG) Blend Transit Buses: October 15, 2002-September 30, 2004

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageBlender PumpVehiclesThe Heat Is onis3 Annual41Development

  6. Gaseous fueled vehicles: A role for natural gas and hydrogen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blazek, C.F.; Jasionowski, W.J.

    1991-01-01

    The commercialization of gaseous hydrogen fueled vehicles requires both the development of hydrogen fueled vehicles and the establishment of a hydrogen fueling infrastructure. These requirements create a classic chicken and egg scenario in that manufacturers will not build and consumers will not buy vehicles without an adequate refueling infrastructure and potential refueling station operators will not invest the needed capital without an adequate market to serve. One solution to this dilemma is to create a bridging strategy whereby hydrogen is introduced gradually via another carrier. The only contending alternative fuel that can act as a bridge to hydrogen fueled vehicles is natural gas. To explore this possibility, IGT is conducting emission tests on its dedicated natural gas vehicle (NGV) test platform to determine what, if any, effects small quantities of hydrogen have on emissions and performance. Furthermore, IGT is actively developing an adsorbent based low-pressure natural gas storage system for NGV applications. This system has also shown promise as a storage media for hydrogen. A discussion of our research results in this area will be presented. Finally, a review of IGT's testing facility will be presented to indicate our capabilities in conducted natural gas/hydrogen vehicle (NGHV) research. 3 refs., 10 figs.

  7. Rapidly refuelable fuel cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Joy, Richard W. (Santa Clara, CA)

    1983-01-01

    This invention is directed to a metal-air fuel cell where the consumable metal anode is movably positioned in the cell and an expandable enclosure, or bladder, is used to press the anode into contact with separating spacers between the cell electrodes. The bladder may be depressurized to allow replacement of the anode when consumed.

  8. Evaluation of aftermarket fuel delivery systems for natural gas and LPG vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Willson, B.

    1992-09-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the effectiveness of aftermarket fuel delivery systems for vehicles fueled by compressed natural gas (CNG) and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG). Most of the CNG and LPG vehicles studied were converted to the alternative fuel after purchase. There are wide variations in the quality of the conversion hardware and the installation. This leads to questions about the overall quality of the converted vehicles, in terms of emissions, safety, and performance. There is a considerable body of emissions data for converted light-duty vehicles, and a smaller amount for medium- and heavy-duty vehicles. However, very few of these data involve real world conditions, and there is growing concern about in-use emissions. This report also attempts to assess factors that could allow in-use emissions to vary from the ``best-case`` results normally reported. The study also addresses issues of fuel supply, fuel composition, performance, safety, and warranty waivers. The report is based on an extensive literature and product survey and on the author`s experience with fuel delivery systems for light-duty vehicles.

  9. Evaluation of aftermarket fuel delivery systems for natural gas and LPG vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Willson, B. )

    1992-09-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the effectiveness of aftermarket fuel delivery systems for vehicles fueled by compressed natural gas (CNG) and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG). Most of the CNG and LPG vehicles studied were converted to the alternative fuel after purchase. There are wide variations in the quality of the conversion hardware and the installation. This leads to questions about the overall quality of the converted vehicles, in terms of emissions, safety, and performance. There is a considerable body of emissions data for converted light-duty vehicles, and a smaller amount for medium- and heavy-duty vehicles. However, very few of these data involve real world conditions, and there is growing concern about in-use emissions. This report also attempts to assess factors that could allow in-use emissions to vary from the best-case'' results normally reported. The study also addresses issues of fuel supply, fuel composition, performance, safety, and warranty waivers. The report is based on an extensive literature and product survey and on the author's experience with fuel delivery systems for light-duty vehicles.

  10. Liquefied Natural Gas for Trucks and Buses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James Wegrzyn; Michael Gurevich

    2000-06-19

    Liquefied natural gas (LNG) is being developed as a heavy vehicle fuel. The reason for developing LNG is to reduce our dependency on imported oil by eliminating technical and costs barriers associated with its usage. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has a program, currently in its third year, to develop and advance cost-effective technologies for operating and refueling natural gas-fueled heavy vehicles (Class 7-8 trucks). The objectives of the DOE Natural Gas Vehicle Systems Program are to achieve market penetration by reducing vehicle conversion and fuel costs, to increase consumer acceptance by improving the reliability and efficiency, and to improve air quality by reducing tailpipe emissions. One way to reduce fuel costs is to develop new supplies of cheap natural gas. Significant progress is being made towards developing more energy-efficient, low-cost, small-scale natural gas liquefiers for exploiting alternative sources of natural gas such as from landfill and remote gas sites. In particular, the DOE program provides funds for research and development in the areas of; natural gas clean up, LNG production, advanced vehicle onboard storage tanks, improved fuel delivery systems and LNG market strategies. In general, the program seeks to integrate the individual components being developed into complete systems, and then demonstrate the technology to establish technical and economic feasibility. The paper also reviews the importance of cryogenics in designing LNG fuel delivery systems.

  11. The DOE/NREL Next Generation Natural Gas Vehicle Program - An Overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kevin Walkowicz; Denny Stephens; Kevin Stork

    2001-05-14

    This paper summarizes the Next Generation Natural Gas Vehicle (NG-NGV) Program that is led by the U.S. Department Of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies (OHVT) through the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). The goal of this program is to develop and implement one Class 3-6 compressed natural gas (CNG) prototype vehicle and one Class 7-8 liquefied natural gas (LNG) prototype vehicle in the 2004 to 2007 timeframe. OHVT intends for these vehicles to have 0.5 g/bhp-hr or lower emissions of oxides of nitrogen (NOx) by 2004 and 0.2 g/bhp-hr or lower NOx by 2007. These vehicles will also have particulate matter (PM) emissions of 0.01 g/bhp-hr or lower by 2004. In addition to ambitious emissions goals, these vehicles will target life-cycle economics that are compatible with their conventionally fueled counterparts.

  12. Well-to-Wheels analysis of landfill gas-based pathways and their addition to the GREET model.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mintz, M.; Han, J.; Wang, M.; Saricks, C.; Energy Systems

    2010-06-30

    Today, approximately 300 million standard cubic ft/day (mmscfd) of natural gas and 1600 MW of electricity are produced from the decomposition of organic waste at 519 U.S. landfills (EPA 2010a). Since landfill gas (LFG) is a renewable resource, this energy is considered renewable. When used as a vehicle fuel, compressed natural gas (CNG) produced from LFG consumes up to 185,000 Btu of fossil fuel and generates from 1.5 to 18.4 kg of carbon dioxide-equivalent (CO{sub 2}e) emissions per million Btu of fuel on a 'well-to-wheel' (WTW) basis. This compares with approximately 1.1 million Btu and 78.2 kg of CO{sub 2}e per million Btu for CNG from fossil natural gas and 1.2 million Btu and 97.5 kg of CO{sub 2}e per million Btu for petroleum gasoline. Because of the additional energy required for liquefaction, LFG-based liquefied natural gas (LNG) requires more fossil fuel (222,000-227,000 Btu/million Btu WTW) and generates more GHG emissions (approximately 22 kg CO{sub 2}e /MM Btu WTW) if grid electricity is used for the liquefaction process. However, if some of the LFG is used to generate electricity for gas cleanup and liquefaction (or compression, in the case of CNG), vehicle fuel produced from LFG can have no fossil fuel input and only minimal GHG emissions (1.5-7.7 kg CO{sub 2}e /MM Btu) on a WTW basis. Thus, LFG-based natural gas can be one of the lowest GHG-emitting fuels for light- or heavy-duty vehicles. This report discusses the size and scope of biomethane resources from landfills and the pathways by which those resources can be turned into and utilized as vehicle fuel. It includes characterizations of the LFG stream and the processes used to convert low-Btu LFG into high-Btu renewable natural gas (RNG); documents the conversion efficiencies and losses of those processes, the choice of processes modeled in GREET, and other assumptions used to construct GREET pathways; and presents GREET results by pathway stage. GREET estimates of well-to-pump (WTP), pump-to-wheel (PTW), and WTW energy, fossil fuel, and GHG emissions for each LFG-based pathway are then summarized and compared with similar estimates for fossil natural gas and petroleum pathways.

  13. Automobility in India: A Study of Car Acquisition and Ownership Trends in the City of Surat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banerjee, Ipsita

    2011-01-01

    fuels, namely gasoline, diesel, liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), compact natural gas (CNG), and electricity, are the representative prices

  14. Light Duty Vehicle CNG Tanks

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy, US DOE dane.boysen@doe.gov Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composite Manufacturing Workshop Advanced Manufacturing Office, EERE, US DOE...

  15. Using LNG to meet the challenge of gas composition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pehrson, N.C. [Minnegasco, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Currently NGV fuel providers are taking actions in response to customer concerns regarding moisture and oil in compressed natural gas (CNG) fuel. Dryers are being installed and oil coalescing or non-lubricated compression equipment is being evaluated in order to minimize problems. Some utilities actively pursuing the NGV market utilize propane-air peak shaving plants to meet cold weather distribution systems demands. The effects of adding these heavier hydrocarbons have not yet appeared to result in major NGV engine problems. However, commercialization of new engine technologies will result in engines that are more fuel sensitive. As the market matures and engine tolerances narrow, increasingly stringent fuel quality standards will be developed and enforced. The Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Partnership has a proposed plan for its Fuel Composition Project which tentatively targets establishing an enforcement mechanisms for meeting gas composition standards in all fifty states as early as December 1996. Propane-air peak shaving utilities need to evaluate how they will address NGV gas quality requirements or risk serious engine problems and customer dissatisfaction. LNG may be a viable solution to meeting gas composition requirements.

  16. Denver SuperShuttle CNG Fleet Evaluation; Evaluacion de la flotilla de GNC de la empresa SuperShuttle de Denver

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaRocque, T.

    2001-10-01

    A description of a joint effort between Denver SuperShuttle, the Gas Research Institute (GRI) and DOE that evaluated two types of bi-fuel and compressed natural gas.

  17. International Hydrogen Fuel and Pressure Vessel Forum 2010 Beijing, China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    challenges in harmonizing test protocols and requirements for compressed natural gas (CNG), hydrogen, and CNG-up on technical topics and issues identified during a previous international workshop on hydrogen and CNG fuels information and data on testing and certification of storage tanks for compressed hydrogen, CNG, and HCNG

  18. Feasibility study for lowering the minimum gas pressure in solution-mined caverns based on geomechanical analyses of creep-induced damage and healing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ratigan, J.L.; Nieland, J.D.; Devries, K.L.

    1998-12-31

    Geomechanical analyses were made to determine the minimum gas pressure allowable based on an existing stress-based criterion (Damage Potential) and an advanced constitutive model (MDCF model) capable of quantifying the level of damage and healing in rock salt. The MDCF model is a constitutive model developed for the WIPP to provide a continuum description of the dislocation and damage deformation of salt. The purpose of this study was to determine if the MDCF model is applicable for evaluating the minimum gas pressure of CNG storage caverns. Specifically, it was to be determined if this model would predict that the minimum gas pressure in the caverns could be lowered without compromising the stability of the cavern. Additionally, the healing behavior of the salt was analyzed to determine if complete healing of the damaged rock zone would occur during the period the cavern was at maximum gas pressure. Significant findings of this study are reported.

  19. Insurance issues and natural gas vehicles. Final report, January 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Squadron, W.F.; Ward, C.O.; Brown, M.H.

    1992-01-01

    GRI has been funding research on natural gas vehicle (NGV) technology since 1986. To support the activity, GRI is evaluating a number of NGV issues including fuel storage, tank inspection, system safety, refueling, U.S. auto and truck use characteristics, and the fleet vehicle infrastructure. In addition, insurance and leasing companies will require new regulations and policies to address clean-fueled vehicle fleets' emergence into the marketplace. These policies may influence and partially determine the structure of the alternatively fueled vehicle industry, and the requirements, if any, imposed upon vehicle technologies. The report asseses the insurance and leasing industries' infrastructure/institutional barriers as they relate to the introduction of natural gas fueled vehicle fleets.

  20. Compressed natural gas and liquefied petroleum gas conversions: The National Renewable Energy Laboratory`s experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Motta, R.C.; Kelly, K.J.; Warnock, W.W.

    1996-04-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) contracted with conversion companies in six states to convert approximately 900 light-duty Federal fleet vehicles to operate on compressed natural gas (CNG) or liquefied petroleum gas (LPG). The contracts were initiated in order to help the Federal government meet the vehicle acquisition requirements of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPACT) during a period of limited original equipment manufacturer (OEM) model availability. Approximately 90% of all conversions were performed on compact of full-size vans and pickups, and 90% of the conversions were to bi-fuel operation. With a positive response from the fleet managers, this program helped the Federal government meet the vehicle acquisition requirements of EPACT for fiscal years 1993 and 1994, despite limited OEM model availability. The conversions also helped to establish the infrastructure needed to support further growth in the use of alternative fuel vehicles. In conclusion, the program has been successful in helping the Federal government meet the vehicle acquisition requirements of EPACT, establishing infrastructure, increasing the displacement of imported oil, and evaluating the emissions performance of converted vehicles. With the relatively widespread availability of OEM vehicles in the 1996 model year, the program is now being phased out.

  1. Hydrogen and Hydrogen/Natural Gas Station and Vehicle Operations - 2006 Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Francfort; Donald Karner; Roberta Brayer

    2006-09-01

    This report is a summary of the operations and testing of internal combustion engine vehicles that were fueled with 100% hydrogen and various blends of hydrogen and compressed natural gas (HCNG). It summarizes the operations of the Arizona Public Service Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant, which produces, compresses, and dispenses hydrogen fuel. Other testing activities, such as the destructive testing of a CNG storage cylinder that was used for HCNG storage, are also discussed. This report highlights some of the latest technology developments in the use of 100% hydrogen fuels in internal combustion engine vehicles. Reports are referenced and WWW locations noted as a guide for the reader that desires more detailed information. These activities are conducted by Arizona Public Service, Electric Transportation Applications, the Idaho National Laboratory, and the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity.

  2. Final report for the Advanced Natural Gas Vehicle Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Wozniak

    1999-02-16

    The project objective was to develop the technologies necessary to prototype a dedicated compressed natural gas (CNG) powered, mid-size automobile with operational capabilities comparable to gasoline automobiles. A system approach was used to design and develop the engine, gas storage system and vehicle packaging. The 2.4-liter DOHC engine was optimized for natural gas operation with high-compression pistons, hardened exhaust valves, a methane-specific catalytic converter and multi-point gaseous injection. The chassis was repackaging to increase space for fuel storage with a custom-designed, cast-aluminum, semi-trailing arm rear suspension system, a revised flat trunk sheet-metal floorpan and by equipping the car with run-flat tires. An Integrated Storage system (ISS) was developed using all-composite, small-diameter cylinders encapsulated within a high-strength fiberglass shell with impact-absorbing foam. The prototypes achieved the target goals of a city/highway driving range of 300 miles, ample trunk capacity, gasoline vehicle performance and ultra low exhaust emissions.

  3. Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Grand Gulf, Unit 1. Volume 5: Analysis of core damage frequency from seismic events for plant operational state 5 during a refueling outage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Budnitz, R.J. [Future Resources Associates, Inc., Berkeley, CA (United States); Davis, P.R. [PRD Consulting (United States); Ravindra, M.K.; Tong, W.H. [EQE International, Inc., Irvine, CA (United States)

    1994-08-01

    In 1989 the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) initiated an extensive program to examine carefully the potential risks during low-power and shutdown operations. The program included two parallel projects, one at Sandia National Laboratories studying a boiling water reactor (Grand Gulf), and the other at Brookhaven National Laboratory studying a pressurized water reactor (Surry Unit 1). Both the Sandia and Brookhaven projects have examined only accidents initiated by internal plant faults---so-called ``internal initiators.`` This project, which has explored the likelihood of seismic-initiated core damage accidents during refueling outage conditions, is complementary to the internal-initiator analyses at Brookhaven and Sandia. This report covers the seismic analysis at Grand Gulf. All of the many systems modeling assumptions, component non-seismic failure rates, and human effort rates that were used in the internal-initiator study at Grand Gulf have been adopted here, so that the results of the study can be as comparable as possible. Both the Sandia study and this study examine only one shutdown plant operating state (POS) at Grand Gulf, namely POS 5 representing cold shutdown during a refueling outage. This analysis has been limited to work analogous to a level-1 seismic PRA, in which estimates have been developed for the core-damage frequency from seismic events during POS 5. The results of the analysis are that the core-damage frequency for earthquake-initiated accidents during refueling outages in POS 5 is found to be quite low in absolute terms, less than 10{sup {minus}7}/year.

  4. Lifecycle Analyses of Biofuels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delucchi, Mark

    2006-01-01

    natural gas (CNG) ICEV, LPG (P95/BU5) ICEV, ethanol (corn)Petroleum, Natural Gas, LPG, and Other Fuels for HighwayMethane (CNG, LNG) Propane (LPG) Hydrogen (CH2) (LH2)

  5. Natural Gas as a Fuel Option for Heavy Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James E. Wegrzyn; Wai Lin Litzke; Michael Gurevich

    1999-04-26

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies (OHVT) is promoting the use of natural gas as a fuel option in the transportation energy sector through its natural gas vehicle program [1]. The goal of this program is to eliminate the technical and cost barriers associated with displacing imported petroleum. This is achieved by supporting research and development in technologies that reduce manufacturing costs, reduce emissions, and improve vehicle performance and consumer acceptance for natural gas fueled vehicles. In collaboration with Brookhaven National Laboratory, projects are currently being pursued in (1) liquefied natural gas production from unconventional sources, (2) onboard natural gas storage (adsorbent, compressed, and liquefied), (3) natural gas delivery systems for both onboard the vehicle and the refueling station, and (4) regional and enduse strategies. This paper will provide an overview of these projects highlighting their achievements and current status. In addition, it will discuss how the individual technologies developed are being integrated into an overall program strategic plan.

  6. Overview of the Safety Issues Associated with the Compressed Natural Gas Fuel System and Electric Drive System in a Heavy Hybrid Electric Vehicle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, S.C.

    2002-11-14

    This report evaluates the hazards that are unique to a compressed-natural-gas (CNG)-fueled heavy hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) design compared with a conventional heavy vehicle. The unique design features of the heavy HEV are the CNG fuel system for the internal-combustion engine (ICE) and the electric drive system. This report addresses safety issues with the CNG fuel system and the electric drive system. Vehicles on U. S. highways have been propelled by ICEs for several decades. Heavy-duty vehicles have typically been fueled by diesel fuel, and light-duty vehicles have been fueled by gasoline. The hazards and risks posed by ICE vehicles are well understood and have been generally accepted by the public. The economy, durability, and safety of ICE vehicles have established a standard for other types of vehicles. Heavy-duty (i.e., heavy) HEVs have recently been introduced to U. S. roadways, and the hazards posed by these heavy HEVs can be compared with the hazards posed by ICE vehicles. The benefits of heavy HEV technology are based on their potential for reduced fuel consumption and lower exhaust emissions, while the disadvantages are the higher acquisition cost and the expected higher maintenance costs (i.e., battery packs). The heavy HEV is more suited for an urban drive cycle with stop-and-go driving conditions than for steady expressway speeds. With increasing highway congestion and the resulting increased idle time, the fuel consumption advantage for heavy HEVs (compared with conventional heavy vehicles) is enhanced by the HEVs' ability to shut down. Any increase in fuel cost obviously improves the economics of a heavy HEV. The propulsion system for a heavy HEV is more complex than the propulsion system for a conventional heavy vehicle. The heavy HEV evaluated in this study has in effect two propulsion systems: an ICE fueled by CNG and an electric drive system with additional complexity and failure modes. This additional equipment will result in a less reliable vehicle with a lower availability than a conventional heavy vehicle. Experience with heavy HEVs to date supports this observation. The key safety concern for the electric drive system is the higher voltages and currents that are required in the electric drive system. Faults that could expose personnel to these electric hazards must be considered, addressed, and minimized. The key issue for the CNG-fueled ICE is containment of the high-pressure natural gas. Events that can result in a release of natural gas with the possibility of subsequent ignition are of concern. These safety issues are discussed. The heavy HEV has the potential to have a safety record that is comparable to that of the conventional vehicle, but adequate attention to detail will be required.

  7. Transportation Energy Futures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeLuchi, Mark A.

    1989-01-01

    tanks for compressed natural gas (CNG)storage, additional fuel lines for the gaseous fuel, and a gaseous fuel mixer

  8. City in Colorado Fueling Vehicles with Gas Produced from Wastewater...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    from Wastewater Treatment Facility April 29, 2015 - 6:05pm Addthis Grand Junction's CNG station fuels the city's fleets and county buses and is available to fuel public...

  9. Triangle Alternative Transportation Fuels First Responder Training Workshop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    fueling sites. Vehicles deployed include compressed natural gas (CNG), propane (LPG), hybrid electric includes biodiesel, E85, CNG, LPG, and electric charging. As part of this project, the North Carolina Solar) Vehicle Technology Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) Vehicle Technology Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) Vehicle

  10. Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Grand Gulf, Unit 1: Analysis of core damage frequency from internal events for Plant Operational State 5 during a refueling outage. Volume 2, Part 3: Internal Events Appendices I and J

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yakle, J. [Science Applications International Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Darby, J. [Science and Engineering Associates, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Whitehead, D.; Staple, B. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1994-06-01

    This report provides supporting documentation for various tasks associated with the performance of the probablistic risk assessment for Plant Operational State 5 during a refueling outage at Grand Gulf, Unit 1 as documented in Volume 2, Part 1 of NUREG/CR-6143.

  11. China's Energy and Carbon Emissions Outlook to 2050

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Nan

    2011-01-01

    Diesel CNG Gasoline Hybrid LPG Gasoline Ethanol DieselCNG Gasoline Hybrid LPG Electric Figure 23 Car Saturation byGasoline Heavy Oil Jet Kerosene LPG Natural Gas CIS Diesel

  12. California Energy Commission STAFF REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the revised NOPA was posted, a project has changed its location for a compressed natural gas (CNG) fueling station. The original project proposed to install the CNG fueling station at 20041 SW Birch Street

  13. May 1965, first store opened in Eau Claire Currently over 400 locations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    content is 600:1 of Natural Gas at atmospheric pressure. CNG > Compressed Natural Gas > Stored at 3600 fuel cost over CNG may be higher LNG Advantages > Fewer tanks / less space requirements > Greater fuel density > Lower weight storage #12; CNG Disadvantages > Size of tanks > Possible weight disadvantages

  14. Reducing Greenhouse Emissions and Fuel Consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaheen, Susan; Lipman, Timothy

    2007-01-01

    CNGV: compressed natural gas vehicle Dl CI DV: direct-Compressed natural gas (CNG) vehicles offer similar emissionvehicle ICE : internal combustion engine NG : natural gas

  15. Optimizing U.S. Mitigation Strategies for the Light-Duty Transportation Sector: What We Learn from a Bottom-Up Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yeh, Sonia; Farrell, Alexander E.; Plevin, Richard J; Sanstad, Alan; Weyant, John

    2008-01-01

    vehicles: The case of natural gas vehicles. Energy PolicyCNG: dedicated natural gas vehicles; LPG: liquefiedvehicles using low- GHG fuels such as compressed natural gas,

  16. Well-to-wheels Analysis of Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Hydrogen Produced with Nuclear Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Ye; Wang, Michael Q.; Vyas, Anant D.; Wade, David C.; Taiwo, Temitope A.

    2004-07-01

    A fuel-cycle model-called the Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy use in Transportation (GREET) model-has been developed at Argonne National Laboratory to evaluate well-to-wheels (WTW) energy and emission impacts of motor vehicle technologies fueled with various transportation fuels. The GREET model contains various hydrogen (H{sub 2}) production pathways for fuel-cell vehicles (FCVs) applications. In this effort, the GREET model was expanded to include four nuclear H{sub 2} production pathways: (1) H{sub 2} production at refueling stations via electrolysis using Light Water Reactor (LWR)-generated electricity; (2) H{sub 2} production in central plants via thermo-chemical water cracking using steam from High Temperature Gas cooled Reactor (HTGR); (3) H{sub 2} production in central plants via high-temperature electrolysis using HTGR-generated electricity and steam; and (4) H{sub 2} production at refueling stations via electrolysis using HTGR-generated electricity The WTW analysis of these four options include these stages: uranium ore mining and milling; uranium ore transportation; uranium conversion; uranium enrichment; uranium fuel fabrication; uranium fuel transportation; electricity or H{sub 2} production in nuclear power plants; H{sub 2} transportation; H{sub 2} compression; and H{sub 2} FCVs operation. Due to large differences in electricity requirements for uranium fuel enrichment between gas diffusion and centrifuge technologies, two scenarios were designed for uranium enrichment: (1) 55% of fuel enriched through gaseous diffusion technology and 45% through centrifuge technology (the current technology split for U.S. civilian nuclear power plants); and (2) 100% fuel enrichment using the centrifuge technology (a future trend). Our well-to-pump (WTP) results show that significant reductions in fossil energy use and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions are achieved by nuclear-based H{sub 2} compared to natural gas-based H{sub 2} production via steam methane reforming for a unit of H{sub 2} delivered at refueling stations. In particular, 73-98% of GHG emissions and 81- 99% of fossil energy use are reduced by nuclear-based H{sub 2} relative to natural gas-based H{sub 2}, depending on the uranium enrichment technology and type of nuclear reactor used. When H{sub 2} is applied to FCVs, the WTW results also show large benefit in reducing fossil energy use and GHG emissions. (authors)

  17. Gram-scale, high-yield synthesis of a robust metalorganic framework for storing methane and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with compressed natural gas tanks (CNG) used in vehicles today, when the latter are pressurized to 248 bar (3600% of the deliverable capacity of a CNG tank that starts at 248 bar. (For crystalline granules or powders, particle-pressure CNG.) This material was synthesized in high yield on a gram-scale in a single- batch synthesis

  18. HybriDrive Propulsion System Cleaner, smarter power for transit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    24% · CNG ICE is 22% · Fuel Cell with H2 from electrolysis has efficiency at 6%-11% Inverter Compressed Natural Gas Vehicle ICE CNG Mech Trans 30% * 85% = 26%R-15 Emissions Road transport: 0.9 Pipeline Metrics ** Bus Only, Not including H2/CNG fueling or battery charging infrastructure, or battery

  19. STATE OF CALIFORNIA NATURAL RESOURCES AGENCY EDMUND G. BROWN JR., Governor CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2 - Notice of Proposed Awards August 16, 2012 Fuel Category: Natural Gas for School CNG Station, LNG or L/CNG Statio Fleets, n Round 2 Proposed Awards: $900,000 Proposal Number Applicant Project Title Ynez Chumash CNG Fueling Station Project $300,000 $300,000 85.7% Awardee 52 Tulare County Compo Biomass

  20. This article was downloaded by: [Cornell University] On: 30 March 2012, At: 11:57

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    limits and PDF calculations of piloted, turbulent flames of compressed natural gas (CNG) partially-premixed with either pure oxygen, or with varying levels of O2/N2. Stability limits are presented for flames of CNG fuel pre- mixed with up to 20% oxygen as well as CNG­O2­N2 fuel where the O2 content is varied from 8

  1. STATE OF CALIFORNIA NATURAL RESOURCES AGENCY ARNOLD SCHWARZENEGGER, Governor CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    when a public access CNG fueling is included AND · Provide a corrected Incentives table (see next page with aboveground storage tanks; and up to $100,000 per station with underground storage tanks Natural Gas CNG to an additional $150,000 to establish a public access CNG with LNG station Biomass- based Diesel Fuel Terminal

  2. Power flattening on modified CANDLE small long life gas-cooled fast reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Monado, Fiber; Su'ud, Zaki; Waris, Abdul; Basar, Khairul; Ariani, Menik; Sekimoto, Hiroshi

    2014-09-30

    Gas-cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) is one of the candidates of next generation Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) that expected to be operated commercially after 2030. In this research conceptual design study of long life 350 MWt GFR with natural uranium metallic fuel as fuel cycle input has been performed. Modified CANDLE burn-up strategy with first and second regions located near the last region (type B) has been applied. This reactor can be operated for 10 years without refuelling and fuel shuffling. Power peaking reduction is conducted by arranging the core radial direction into three regions with respectively uses fuel volume fraction 62.5%, 64% and 67.5%. The average power density in the modified core is about 82 Watt/cc and the power peaking factor decreased from 4.03 to 3.43.

  3. Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Grand Gulf, Unit 1. Volume 2, Part 1C: Analysis of core damage frequency from internal events for plant operational State 5 during a refueling outage, Main report (Sections 11--14)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitehead, D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Darby, J. [Science and Engineering Associates, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Yakle, J. [Science Applications International Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [and others

    1994-06-01

    This document contains the accident sequence analysis of internally initiated events for Grand Gulf, Unit 1 as it operates in the Low Power and Shutdown Plant Operational State 5 during a refueling outage. The report documents the methodology used during the analysis, describes the results from the application of the methodology, and compares the results with the results from two full power analyses performed on Grand Gulf.

  4. Gas Mask 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2011-09-05

    The gas industry fostered more efficient energy utilization long before the idea of energy conservation became fashionable. It became apparent in the late '60's that misguided Federal Legislation was discouraging necessary search for new gas...

  5. Gas separating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gollan, Arye Z.

    1990-12-25

    Feed gas is directed tangentially along the non-skin surface of gas separation membrane modules comprising a cylindrical bundle of parallel contiguous hollow fibers supported to allow feed gas to flow from an inlet at one end of a cylindrical housing through the bores of the bundled fibers to an outlet at the other end while a component of the feed gas permeates through the fibers, each having the skin side on the outside, through a permeate outlet in the cylindrical casing.

  6. Gas separating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gollan, Arye (Newton, MA)

    1988-01-01

    Feed gas is directed tangentially along the non-skin surface of gas separation membrane modules comprising a cylindrical bundle of parallel contiguous hollow fibers supported to allow feed gas to flow from an inlet at one end of a cylindrical housing through the bores of the bundled fibers to an outlet at the other end while a component of the feed gas permeates through the fibers, each having the skin side on the outside, through a permeate outlet in the cylindrical casing.

  7. DOE Announces Over $8 Million to Increase Use and Availability...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    biodiesel blends. Two projects are focused on infrastructure for compressed natural gas (CNG) and liquefied natural gas (LNG). Successful implementation of the planned...

  8. T

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    has created favorable market conditions for investment in compressed natural gas (CNG) and liquefied natural gas (LNG) vehicles. Government subsidies or grants have enabled...

  9. Barwood CNG Cab Fleet Study: Final Results

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageBlender PumpVehiclesThe Heat Is on

  10. UPS CNG Truck Fleet Final Report

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageBlender PumpVehiclesThe HeatClean Cities Technical4® ® ®

  11. 1 University of California, Davis, Oct 1, 2015 Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas (GHG)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    32 32 37 23 43 44 48 44 45 43 47 48 45 48 48 Conv. diesel HEV Conventional diesel CNG LNG central CI LNG distributed CI LNG central SI F-T diesel w/ CCS LNG distributed SI Oil sand diesel F-T diesel w;10 University of California, Davis, Oct 1, 2015 LNG/CNG vs. Diesel (MHDVs) 80% 90% 100% 110% 120% 0% 1% 2% 3% 4

  12. Gas separating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gollan, A.Z.

    1990-12-25

    Feed gas is directed tangentially along the non-skin surface of gas separation membrane modules comprising a cylindrical bundle of parallel contiguous hollow fibers supported to allow feed gas to flow from an inlet at one end of a cylindrical housing through the bores of the bundled fibers to an outlet at the other end while a component of the feed gas permeates through the fibers, each having the skin side on the outside, through a permeate outlet in the cylindrical casing. 3 figs.

  13. Gas separating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gollan, A.

    1988-03-29

    Feed gas is directed tangentially along the non-skin surface of gas separation membrane modules comprising a cylindrical bundle of parallel contiguous hollow fibers supported to allow feed gas to flow from an inlet at one end of a cylindrical housing through the bores of the bundled fibers to an outlet at the other end while a component of the feed gas permeates through the fibers, each having the skin side on the outside, through a permeate outlet in the cylindrical casing. 3 figs.

  14. Improving combustion stability in a bi-fuel engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-06-01

    This article describes how a new strategy for ignition timing control can reduce NOx emissions from engines using CNG and gasoline. Until a proper fueling infrastructure is established, a certain fraction of vehicles powered by compressed natural gas (CNG) must have bi-fuel capability. A bi-fuel engine, enjoying the longer range of gasoline and the cleaner emissions of CNG, can overcome the problem of having few CNG fueling stations. However, bi-fuel engines must be optimized to run on both fuels since low CNG volumetric efficiency causes power losses compared to gasoline.

  15. DOE/BNL Liquid Natural Gas Heavy Vehicle Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James E. Wegrzyn; Wai-Lin Litzke; Michael Gurevich

    1998-08-11

    As a means of lowering greenhouse gas emissions, increasing economic growth, and reducing the dependency on imported oil, the Department of Energy and Brookhaven National Laboratory (DOE/ BNL) is promoting the substitution of liquefied natural gas (LNG) in heavy-vehicles that are currently being fueled by diesel. Heavy vehicles are defined as Class 7 and 8 trucks (> 118,000 pounds GVVV), and transit buses that have a fuel usage greater than 10,000 gallons per year and driving range of more than 300 miles. The key in making LNG market-competitive with all types of diesel fuels is in improving energy efficiency and reducing costs of LNG technologies through systems integration. This paper integrates together the three LNG technologies of: (1) production from landfills and remote well sites; (2) cryogenic fuel delivery systems; and (3) state-of-the-art storage tank and refueling facilities, with market end-use strategies. The program's goal is to develop these technologies and strategies under a ''green'' and ''clean'' strategy. This ''green'' approach reduces the net contribution of global warming gases by reducing levels of methane and carbon dioxide released by heavy vehicles usage to below recoverable amounts of natural gas from landfills and other natural resources. Clean technology refers to efficient use of energy with low environmental emissions. The objective of the program is to promote fuel competition by having LNG priced between $0.40 - $0.50 per gallon with a combined production, fuel delivery and engine systems efficiency approaching 45%. This can make LNG a viable alternative to diesel.

  16. Vehicle Technologies Office: AVTA- Compressed Natural Gas Vehicles

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) uses standard procedures and test specifications to test and collect data from vehicles on dynamometers, closed test tracks, and on-the-road. Data on the 2012 Honda Civic CNG is available in downloadable form.

  17. Gas hydrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-04-01

    There is a definite need for the US government to provide leadership for research in gas hydrates and to coordinate its activities with academia, industry, private groups, federal agencies, and their foreign counterparts. In response to this need, the DOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center implemented a gas hydrates R and D program. Understanding the resource will be achieved through: assessment of current technology; characterization of gas hydrate geology and reservoir engineering; and development of diagnostic tools and methods. Research to date has focused on geology. As work progressed, areas where gas hydrates are likely to occur were identified, and specific high potential areas were targeted for future detailed investigation. Initial research activities involved the development of the Geologic Analysis System (GAS); which will provide, through approximately 30 software packages, the capability to manipulate and correlate several types of geologic and petroleum data into maps, graphics, and reports. Preliminary mapping of hydrate prospects for the Alaskan North Slope is underway. Geological research includes physical system characterization which focuses on creating synthetic methane hydrates and developing synthetic hydrate cores using tetrahydrofuran, consolidated rock cores, frost base mixtures, water/ice base mixtures, and water base mixtures. Laboratory work produced measurements of the sonic velocity and electrical resistivity of these synthetic hydrates. During 1983, a sample from a natural hydrate core recovered from the Pacific coast of Guatemala was tested for these properties by METC. More recently, a natural hydrate sample from the Gulf of Mexico was also acquired and testing of this sample is currently underway. In addition to the development of GAS, modeling and systems analysis work focused on the development of conceptual gas hydrate production models. 16 figs., 6 tabs.

  18. 1. Report No. 2. Government Accession No. SWUTC/94/60059-1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the lower fuel price for natural gas. Actual natural gas fuel consumption was higher for the CNG buses than OF THE UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT AUSTIN COMPRESSED NATURAL GAS DEMONSTRATION BUS 7. Author{s) Cheng-Ming Wu, Ron compressed natural gas (CNG) bus has been operating on The University of Texas at Austin shuttle system since

  19. What Can China Do? China's Best Alternative Outcome for Energy Efficiency and CO2 Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Fridley, David

    2010-01-01

    Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG). 32 Consequently, CNG heavy-Electric Taxi Gasoline LPG Motorcycle Figure 34 Passengercars while the fuel economy of LPG taxis improve at a slower

  20. Lung Toxicity and Mutagenicity of Emissions From Heavy-Duty Compressed...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Lung Toxicity and Mutagenicity of Emissions From Heavy-Duty Compressed Natural Gas (CNG)-Powered Vehicles Lung Toxicity and Mutagenicity of Emissions From Heavy-Duty Compressed...

  1. Components Responsible for the Health Effects of Inhaled Engine...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Lung Toxicity and Mutagenicity of Emissions From Heavy-Duty Compressed Natural Gas (CNG)-Powered Vehicles Assessment of Health Hazards of Repeated Inhalation of Diesel...

  2. NOTICE OF AVAILABILITY

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the potential environmental impacts associated with the: Emera Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) Facility Port of Palm Beach, Florida DOEEA 1976D DOE's National Energy Technology...

  3. SEP Success Story: State Energy Program Helping Arkansans Convert...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    to purchase andor convert their Arkansas-licensed vehicles to compressed natural gas (CNG). | All Rights Reserved. The Arkansas Energy Office recently launched a Compressed...

  4. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) School Bus Matching Grants Noble Energy is partnering with the Regional Air Quality Council (RAQC) to match grants to qualified Colorado school...

  5. IACM Institute Overview

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Turbine Blades * Compressed Gas Storage (CNG, Hydrogen) Five Year Technical Goals * 25% lower CFRP cost * 50% reduction in CFRP embodied energy * 80% composite recyclability into...

  6. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) Fueling Infrastructure Inspection The Oklahoma Department of Labor may access and inspect any equipment, practices, or methods used in association with...

  7. EA-1976D: Draft Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    EA-1976D: Draft Environmental Assessment EA-1976D: Draft Environmental Assessment Emera CNG, LLC Compressed Natural Gas Project, Florida DOE's National Energy Technology Laboratory...

  8. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) Project Loans The Louisiana Department of Natural Resources (DNR) administers a revolving loan program to encourage the development, implementation,...

  9. DOE Announces Webinars on Alternative Fuel Online Tools and Resources...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Office The Energy Department presented a live webcast titled "Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) Infrastructure Overview" on Tuesday, September 16. The webcast presents an overview of...

  10. Comparative Toxicity of Combined Particle and Semi-Volatile Organic...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Components Responsible for the Health Effects of Inhaled Engine Emissions Lung Toxicity and Mutagenicity of Emissions From Heavy-Duty Compressed Natural Gas (CNG)-Powered Vehicles...

  11. Safety and Regulatory Structure for CNG, CNG-Hydrogen Vehicles and Fuels in

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy BillsNo. 195 -RobSSL IN PRACTICERENEWABLEExample Safety

  12. Safety and Regulatory Structure for CNG, CNG-Hydrogen, Hydrogen Vehicles

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy BillsNo. 195 -RobSSL IN PRACTICERENEWABLEExample Safetyand Fuels in China |

  13. CNG, Hydrogen, CNG-Hydrogen Blends - Critical Fuel Properties and Behavior

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based Fuels| Department ofBusinessCEA - ExternalCESPOMERCNG Exports by Truck|

  14. Successful Adoption of CNG and Energing CNG-Hydrogen Program in India |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergyPlan | Department of Energy 1Department ofLithiumSuccesses of

  15. SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS FOR EMERA CNG LLC, DK. NO. 13-157-CNG - ORDER 3447

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterestedReplacement-2-AA-1 SECTION J APPENDIX A ADVANCE- FE DKT.3365NO. 3600 (FTA)

  16. Gas Drill 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2011-09-05

    .C. Wang, B.T. Lovell, Program, Summary Report TE4258-5-84, J. McCrank, "Topping of a Combined Gas DOE/ET/11292, Oct. 1984. and Steam Turbine Powerplant using a TAM Combustor," Thermo Electron [4J Final Report: "Thermionic Energy Report No. 4258... for each Btu fired in the burners has been cal culated with the process gas temperature as a variable. It was shown [2 ] that the maximum thermionic power produced is 18 kW per million Btu fired per hour. All com bustors are similar but progressively...

  17. Gas sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schmid, Andreas K.; Mascaraque, Arantzazu; Santos, Benito; de la Figuera, Juan

    2014-09-09

    A gas sensor is described which incorporates a sensor stack comprising a first film layer of a ferromagnetic material, a spacer layer, and a second film layer of the ferromagnetic material. The first film layer is fabricated so that it exhibits a dependence of its magnetic anisotropy direction on the presence of a gas, That is, the orientation of the easy axis of magnetization will flip from out-of-plane to in-plane when the gas to be detected is present in sufficient concentration. By monitoring the change in resistance of the sensor stack when the orientation of the first layer's magnetization changes, and correlating that change with temperature one can determine both the identity and relative concentration of the detected gas. In one embodiment the stack sensor comprises a top ferromagnetic layer two mono layers thick of cobalt deposited upon a spacer layer of ruthenium, which in turn has a second layer of cobalt disposed on its other side, this second cobalt layer in contact with a programmable heater chip.

  18. A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California, Part 1: Technical Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farrell, Alexander E.; Sperling, Dan

    2007-01-01

    CNG) Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) Dimethyl Ether (DME)Diesel Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG) Compressed Natural Gas(and liquefied gas. There are over 125,000 natural gas

  19. A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California Part 1: Technical Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01

    CNG) Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) Dimethyl Ether (DME)Diesel Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG) Compressed Natural Gas(and liquefied gas. There are over 125,000 natural gas

  20. FARM of the FUTURE AUTOMATED REFUELING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nourbakhsh, Illah

    to minimize waste and runoff. Assists in precision pest management Farm robots can be key components manageable. Enables plant-level management Life cycle monitoring also allows farm robots to customize. This maximizes the quality (and selling price) of farm produce. In the fully-automated Farm of the Future

  1. Hydrogen refueling station costs in Shanghai

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weinert, Jonathan X.; Shaojun, Liu; Ogden, Joan M; Jianxin, Ma

    2007-01-01

    station and equipment costs Capital equipment costs Non-a function of capital cost and is therefore represented intechnology and therefore capital cost and maintenance cost

  2. Hydrogen refueling station costs in Shanghai

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weinert, Jonathan X.; Shaojun, Liu; Ogden, Joan M; Jianxin, Ma

    2007-01-01

    storing and transporting hydrogen. Golden, CO: NREL; 1998. [V. Survey of the economics of hydrogen technologies. Golden,liquid or gaseous form. Hydrogen can be produced from a va-

  3. Hydrogen refueling station costs in Shanghai

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weinert, Jonathan X.; Shaojun, Liu; Ogden, Joan M; Jianxin, Ma

    2007-01-01

    Chemicals, Inc. , Stuart Energy, H2Gen). All cost data areJournal of Hydrogen Energy 32 (2007) 4089 – 4100 2.4.1.Journal of Hydrogen Energy 32 (2007) 4089 – 4100 Annualized

  4. Hydrogen Refueling Station Costs in Shanghai

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weinert, Jonathan X.; Shaojun, Liu; Ogden, J; Jianxin, Ma

    2006-01-01

    production equipment (e.g. electrolyzer, steam reformer) (iffeedstock costs differences. Electrolyzer stations yield theuses an alkaline electrolyzer powered by grid electricity to

  5. Hydrogen refueling station costs in Shanghai

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weinert, Jonathan X.; Shaojun, Liu; Ogden, Joan M; Jianxin, Ma

    2007-01-01

    production equipment (e.g. electrolyzer, steam reformer) (iffeedstock costs differences. Electrolyzer stations yield theuses an alkaline electrolyzer powered by grid electricity to

  6. Hydrogen Refueling Station Costs in Shanghai

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weinert, Jonathan X.; Shaojun, Liu; Ogden, J; Jianxin, Ma

    2006-01-01

    high-pressure stationary hydrogen storage tanks. The storage10] reviewed the hydrogen storage and the delivery cost forwhich applies to hydrogen storage vessels and compressors.

  7. Hydrogen refueling station costs in Shanghai

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weinert, Jonathan X.; Shaojun, Liu; Ogden, Joan M; Jianxin, Ma

    2007-01-01

    N I [10] reviewed the hydrogen storage and the delivery costwhich applies to hydrogen storage vessels and compressors.high-pressure gaseous hydrogen storage contain- ers, and a

  8. Hydrogen Refueling Station Costs in Shanghai

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weinert, Jonathan X.; Shaojun, Liu; Ogden, Joan M; Jianxin, Ma

    2006-01-01

    10] reviewed the hydrogen storage and the delivery cost forwhich applies to hydrogen storage vessels and compressors.high-pressure gaseous hydrogen storage containers, and a

  9. Alternative Transportation Refueling Infrastructure in the U...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    barrier to the success of alternative motor fuels. A transition from fossil petroleum to alternative, low-carbon transportation fuels appears to be necessary to mitigate the...

  10. Hydrogen refueling station costs in Shanghai

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weinert, Jonathan X.; Shaojun, Liu; Ogden, Joan M; Jianxin, Ma

    2007-01-01

    Kingdom; 2004. [8] Amos W. Costs of storing and transportingcon- nections). Capital costs for this equipment must bein an analysis of station costs. Total station construction

  11. ReFuel America | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS Report UrlNM-b < RAPID‎Wind FarmReFuel America Jump to:

  12. Prof. Dr.-Ing. Heinz Pitsch Templergraben 64

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peters, Norbert

    (CNG) engines with direct injection systems are a promising tech- nology for future internal combustion engines, especially as the emission norms become stricter. However, the direct injection of CNG or any and Characterization of Hollow Cone Gas Jet with Application to Gas Injection Systems Abstract Compressed Natural Gas

  13. NATURAL GAS MARKET ASSESSMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION NATURAL GAS MARKET ASSESSMENT PRELIMINARY RESULTS In Support.................................................................................... 6 Chapter 2: Natural Gas Demand.................................................................................................. 10 Chapter 3: Natural Gas Supply

  14. Natural Gas Applications

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Gas Applications. If you need assistance viewing this page, please call (202) 586-8800. Energy Information Administration Home Page Home > Natural Gas > Natural Gas Applications...

  15. ,"Natural Gas Consumption",,,"Natural Gas Expenditures"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Census Division, 1999" ,"Natural Gas Consumption",,,"Natural Gas Expenditures" ,"per Building (thousand cubic feet)","per Square Foot (cubic feet)","per Worker (thousand cubic...

  16. New Natural Gas Storage and Transportation Capabilities Utilizing Rapid Methane Hydrate Formation Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, T.D.; Taylor, C.E.; Bernardo, M.

    2010-01-01

    Natural gas (methane as the major component) is a vital fossil fuel for the United States and around the world. One of the problems with some of this natural gas is that it is in remote areas where there is little or no local use for the gas. Nearly 50 percent worldwide natural gas reserves of ~6,254.4 trillion ft3 (tcf) is considered as stranded gas, with 36 percent or ~86 tcf of the U.S natural gas reserves totaling ~239 tcf, as stranded gas [1] [2]. The worldwide total does not include the new estimates by U.S. Geological Survey of 1,669 tcf of natural gas north of the Arctic Circle, [3] and the U.S. ~200,000 tcf of natural gas or methane hydrates, most of which are stranded gas reserves. Domestically and globally there is a need for newer and more economic storage, transportation and processing capabilities to deliver the natural gas to markets. In order to bring this resource to market, one of several expensive methods must be used: 1. Construction and operation of a natural gas pipeline 2. Construction of a storage and compression facility to compress the natural gas (CNG) at 3,000 to 3,600 psi, increasing its energy density to a point where it is more economical to ship, or 3. Construction of a cryogenic liquefaction facility to produce LNG, (requiring cryogenic temperatures at <-161 °C) and construction of a cryogenic receiving port. Each of these options for the transport requires large capital investment along with elaborate safety systems. The Department of Energy's Office of Research and Development Laboratories at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is investigating new and novel approaches for rapid and continuous formation and production of synthetic NGHs. These synthetic hydrates can store up to 164 times their volume in gas while being maintained at 1 atmosphere and between -10 to -20°C for several weeks. Owing to these properties, new process for the economic storage and transportation of these synthetic hydrates could be envisioned for stranded gas reserves. The recent experiments and their results from the testing within NETL's 15-Liter Hydrate Cell Facility exhibit promising results. Introduction of water at the desired temperature and pressure through an NETL designed nozzle into a temperature controlled methane environment within the 15-Liter Hydrate Cell allowed for instantaneous formation of methane hydrates. The instantaneous and continuous hydrate formation process was repeated over several days while varying the flow rate of water, its' temperature, and the overall temperature of the methane environment. These results clearly indicated that hydrates formed immediately after the methane and water left the nozzle at temperatures above the freezing point of water throughout the range of operating conditions. [1] Oil and Gas Journal Vol. 160.48, Dec 22, 2008. [2] http://www.eia.doe.gov/oiaf/servicerpt/natgas/chapter3.html and http://www.eia.doe.gov/oiaf/servicerpt/natgas/pdf/tbl7.pdf [3] U.S. Geological Survey, “Circum-Arctic Resource Appraisal: Estimates of Undiscovered Oil and Gas North of the Arctic Circle,” May 2008.

  17. Natural Gas

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963Residential2, 2014ProvedYear Jan Feb MarNGPL Production,Energy Office

  18. Georgia Tech Dangerous Gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Mo

    1 Georgia Tech Dangerous Gas Safety Program March 2011 #12;Georgia Tech Dangerous Gas Safety.......................................................................................................... 5 6. DANGEROUS GAS USAGE REQUIREMENTS................................................. 7 6.1. RESTRICTED PURCHASE/ACQUISITION RULES: ................................................ 7 7. FLAMMABLE GAS

  19. Natural Gas Basics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NREL Clean Cities

    2010-04-01

    Fact sheet answers questions about natural gas production and use in transportation. Natural gas vehicles are also described.

  20. Carbon sequestration in natural gas reservoirs: Enhanced gas recovery and natural gas storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, Curtis M.

    2003-01-01

    cushion gas for natural gas storage, Energy and Fuels, 17(RECOVERY AND NATURAL GAS STORAGE Curtis M. Oldenburg Eartheffective cushion gas for gas storage reservoirs. Thus at

  1. Atmos. Chem. Phys., 13, 53375350, 2013 www.atmos-chem-phys.net/13/5337/2013/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    and CNG buses °A. M. Hallquist1, M. Jerksj¨o1, H. Fallgren1, J. Westerlund2, and °A. Sj¨odin1 1IVL Swedish emissions from 28 individual diesel-fuelled and 7 com- pressed natural gas (CNG)-fuelled buses, selected the road vehicle emission model HBEFA3.1. The buses studied were diesel- fuelled Euro III­V and CNG

  2. Fuel gas conditioning process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A. (Union City, CA)

    2000-01-01

    A process for conditioning natural gas containing C.sub.3+ hydrocarbons and/or acid gas, so that it can be used as combustion fuel to run gas-powered equipment, including compressors, in the gas field or the gas processing plant. Compared with prior art processes, the invention creates lesser quantities of low-pressure gas per unit volume of fuel gas produced. Optionally, the process can also produce an NGL product.

  3. Pennsylvania's Natural Gas Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Dongwon

    1 Pennsylvania's Natural Gas Future Penn State Natural Gas Utilization Workshop Bradley Hall sales to commercial and industrial customers ­ Natural gas, power, oil · Power generation ­ FossilMMBtuEquivalent Wellhead Gas Price, $/MMBtu Monthly US Spot Oil Price, $/MMBtu* U.S. Crude Oil vs. Natural Gas Prices, 2005

  4. Supervisory Natural Gas Analyst

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energys Office of Fossil Energy, Office of Oil and Natural Gas, Office of Oil and Gas Global Security and Supply (FE) is responsible for regulating natural gas imports and exports...

  5. Industrial Gas Turbines

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A gas turbine is a heat engine that uses high-temperature, high-pressure gas as the working fluid. Part of the heat supplied by the gas is converted directly into mechanical work. High-temperature,...

  6. Future of Natural Gas

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    of Natural Gas Bill Eisele, CEM SC Electric & Gas Co Hosted by: FEDERAL UTILITY PARTNERSHIP WORKING GROUP SEMINAR November 5-6, 2014 Cape Canaveral. Florida Agenda * Gas Facts *...

  7. Gas Kick Mechanistic Model 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zubairy, Raheel

    2014-04-18

    Gas kicks occur during drilling when the formation pressure is greater than the wellbore pressure causing influx of gas into the wellbore. Uncontrolled gas kicks could result in blowout of the rig causing major financial ...

  8. Key China Energy Statistics 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levine, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Heating Supply Coal Washing Coking Petroleum Refineries GasHeating Supply Coal Washing Coking Petroleum Refineries GasRefueling in China Coal Washing Coking Petroleum Refineries

  9. Technological advancements in NGV station design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ledbetter, G.S.; Grimmer, J.E.; Ketcham, E.T.

    1995-12-31

    Hurricane Compressors` SPRINT System (patent pending) is designed to increase the rate of flow from compressed natural gas (CNG) fuel stations and provide greater utilization of stored CNG than is available from traditional compressor stations. Using a novel method of adapting compressor operation to changes in CNG storage system pressures, this advanced technology provides an alternative mechanism for fuel delivery when demand for fuel is high. Transfer of CNG may be made at higher rates of flow than would be possible either from a pressure depleted storage system or directly from the compressor.

  10. ,"Total Natural Gas Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas Consumption (billion cubic feet)",,,,,"Natural Gas Energy Intensity (cubic feetsquare foot)" ,"Total ","Space Heating","Water Heating","Cook- ing","Other","Total ","Space...

  11. Natural gas dehydration apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wijmans, Johannes G; Ng, Alvin; Mairal, Anurag P

    2006-11-07

    A process and corresponding apparatus for dehydrating gas, especially natural gas. The process includes an absorption step and a membrane pervaporation step to regenerate the liquid sorbent.

  12. Analysis of Class 8 Hybrid-Electric Truck Technologies Using Diesel, LNG, Electricity, and Hydrogen, as the Fuel for Various Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Hengbing

    2013-01-01

    Lower Heating Value Liquefied Natural Gas Powertrain Systemsoptions included liquefied natural gas (LNG) used in SI andliquefied from pressure drop between CNG transmission lines and distribution lines ‡ Natural gas

  13. A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California, Part 1: Technical Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farrell, Alexander E.; Sperling, Dan

    2007-01-01

    Dimethyl Ether (DME), CH3OCH3, is another fuel that can beFuel Gasoline Diesel Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG) Compressed Natural Gas(CNG) Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) Dimethyl Ether (DME)

  14. A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California Part 1: Technical Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01

    Dimethyl Ether (DME), CH3OCH3, is another fuel that can beFuel Gasoline Diesel Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG) Compressed Natural Gas(CNG) Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) Dimethyl Ether (DME)

  15. Advanced Liquid Natural Gas Onboard Storage System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greg Harper; Charles Powars

    2003-10-31

    Cummins Westport Incorporated (CWI) has designed and developed a liquefied natural gas (LNG) vehicle fuel system that includes a reciprocating pump with the cold end submerged in LNG contained in a vacuum-jacketed tank. This system was tested and analyzed under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Advanced LNG Onboard Storage System (ALOSS) program. The pumped LNG fuel system developed by CWI and tested under the ALOSS program is a high-pressure system designed for application on Class 8 trucks powered by CWI's ISX G engine, which employs high-pressure direct injection (HPDI) technology. A general ALOSS program objective was to demonstrate the feasibility and advantages of a pumped LNG fuel system relative to on-vehicle fuel systems that require the LNG to be ''conditioned'' to saturation pressures that exceeds the engine fuel pressure requirements. These advantages include the capability to store more fuel mass in given-size vehicle and station tanks, and simpler lower-cost LNG refueling stations that do not require conditioning equipment. Pumped LNG vehicle fuel systems are an alternative to conditioned LNG systems for spark-ignition natural gas and port-injection dual-fuel engines (which typically require about 100 psi), and they are required for HPDI engines (which require over 3,000 psi). The ALOSS program demonstrated the feasibility of a pumped LNG vehicle fuel system and the advantages of this design relative to systems that require conditioning the LNG to a saturation pressure exceeding the engine fuel pressure requirement. LNG tanks mounted on test carts and the CWI engineering truck were repeatedly filled with LNG saturated at 20 to 30 psig. More fuel mass was stored in the vehicle tanks as well as the station tank, and no conditioning equipment was required at the fueling station. The ALOSS program also demonstrated the general viability and specific performance of the CWI pumped LNG fuel system design. The system tested as part of this program is designed to be used on Class 8 trucks with CWI ISX G HPDI engines. Extensive test cart and engineering truck tests of the pump demonstrated good durability and the high-pressure performance needed for HPDI application. The LNG tanks manufactured by Taylor-Wharton passed SAE J2343 Recommended Practice drop tests and accelerated road-load vibration tests. NER and hold-time tests produced highly consistent results. Additional tests confirmed the design adequacy of the liquid level sensor, vaporizer, ullage volume, and other fuel system components. While the testing work performed under this program focused on a high-pressure pumped LNG fuel system design, the results also validate the feasibility of a low-pressure pumped fuel system. A low-pressure pumped fuel system could incorporate various design refinements including a simpler and lighter-weight pump, which would decrease costs somewhat relative to a high-pressure system.

  16. Carbon sequestration in natural gas reservoirs: Enhanced gas recovery and natural gas storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, Curtis M.

    2003-01-01

    Hydrogen production from natural gas, sequestration ofunderground storage of natural gas, Jour. Petrol. Tech. 943,dioxide as cushion gas for natural gas storage, Energy and

  17. Noble gas magnetic resonator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Walker, Thad Gilbert; Lancor, Brian Robert; Wyllie, Robert

    2014-04-15

    Precise measurements of a precessional rate of noble gas in a magnetic field is obtained by constraining the time averaged direction of the spins of a stimulating alkali gas to lie in a plane transverse to the magnetic field. In this way, the magnetic field of the alkali gas does not provide a net contribution to the precessional rate of the noble gas.

  18. OIL & GAS INSTITUTE Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strathclyde, University of

    OIL & GAS INSTITUTE CONTENTS Introduction Asset Integrity Underpinning Capabilities 2 4 4 6 8 9 10 COMPETITIVENESS UNIVERSITY of STRATHCLYDE OIL & GAS INSTITUTE OIL & GAS EXPERTISE AND PARTNERSHIPS #12;1 The launch of the Strathclyde Oil & Gas Institute represents an important step forward for the University

  19. E.O.13514 Federal Leadership in Environmental, Energy, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utility of Top 15 Buildings Status Quo Renovation Relocation LCCLA = CElec (1+d)t t=0 N + CNG (1+d)t t=0 cash flow to present value CElec =Annual Electricity Cost CNG =Annual Natural Gas Cost CWater =Annual

  20. Historical Natural Gas Annual

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    State, 1980-1998 PDF 12 Supplemental Gas Supplies by State, 1980-1998 PDF 13 Natural Gas Production, Transmission, and Consumption by State, 1967-1998 PDF 14 Consumption of...

  1. Historical Natural Gas Annual

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    State, 1980-1997 PDF 12 Supplemental Gas Supplies by State, 1980-1997 PDF 13 Natural Gas Production, Transmission, and Consumption by State, 1967-1997 PDF 14 Consumption of...

  2. Historical Natural Gas Annual

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    State, 1980-1996 PDF 12 Supplemental Gas Supplies by State, 1980-1996 PDF 13 Natural Gas Production, Transmission, and Consumption by State, 1967-1996 PDF 14 Consumption of...

  3. Microminiature gas chromatograph

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yu, C.M.

    1996-12-10

    A microminiature gas chromatograph ({mu}GC) comprising a least one silicon wafer, a gas injector, a column, and a detector. The gas injector has a normally closed valve for introducing a mobile phase including a sample gas in a carrier gas. The valve is fully disposed in the silicon wafer(s). The column is a microcapillary in silicon crystal with a stationary phase and is mechanically connected to receive the mobile phase from the gas injector for the molecular separation of compounds in the sample gas. The detector is mechanically connected to the column for the analysis of the separated compounds of sample gas with electronic means, e.g., ion cell, field emitter and PIN diode. 7 figs.

  4. EIA - Natural Gas Publications

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    these data from 2005 to 2009 are presented for each State. (12282010) U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Proved Reserves: 2009 National and State...

  5. Recirculating rotary gas compressor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weinbrecht, John F. (601 Oakwood Loop, NE., Albuquerque, NM 87123)

    1992-01-01

    A positive displacement, recirculating Roots-type rotary gas compressor which operates on the basis of flow work compression. The compressor includes a pair of large diameter recirculation conduits (24 and 26) which return compressed discharge gas to the compressor housing (14), where it is mixed with low pressure inlet gas, thereby minimizing adiabatic heating of the gas. The compressor includes a pair of involutely lobed impellers (10 and 12) and an associated port configuration which together result in uninterrupted flow of recirculation gas. The large diameter recirculation conduits equalize gas flow velocities within the compressor and minimize gas flow losses. The compressor is particularly suited to applications requiring sustained operation at higher gas compression ratios than have previously been feasible with rotary pumps, and is particularly applicable to refrigeration or other applications requiring condensation of a vapor.

  6. Recirculating rotary gas compressor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weinbrecht, J.F.

    1992-02-25

    A positive displacement, recirculating Roots-type rotary gas compressor is described which operates on the basis of flow work compression. The compressor includes a pair of large diameter recirculation conduits which return compressed discharge gas to the compressor housing, where it is mixed with low pressure inlet gas, thereby minimizing adiabatic heating of the gas. The compressor includes a pair of involutely lobed impellers and an associated port configuration which together result in uninterrupted flow of recirculation gas. The large diameter recirculation conduits equalize gas flow velocities within the compressor and minimize gas flow losses. The compressor is particularly suited to applications requiring sustained operation at higher gas compression ratios than have previously been feasible with rotary pumps, and is particularly applicable to refrigeration or other applications requiring condensation of a vapor. 12 figs.

  7. Natural gas annual 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-09-01

    This document provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience. The 1996 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas from it`s production to it`s end use.

  8. Natural gas annual 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-11-01

    The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. The 1995 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production to its end use. This is followed by tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1991 to 1995 for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level.

  9. Residual gas analysis device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thornberg, Steven M. (Peralta, NM)

    2012-07-31

    A system is provided for testing the hermeticity of a package, such as a microelectromechanical systems package containing a sealed gas volume, with a sampling device that has the capability to isolate the package and breach the gas seal connected to a pulse valve that can controllably transmit small volumes down to 2 nanoliters to a gas chamber for analysis using gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy diagnostics.

  10. Natural gas annual 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-11-17

    The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. The 1994 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production to its end use. This is followed by tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1990 to 1994 for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level.

  11. Natural gas industry directory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-11-01

    This directory has information on the following: associations and organizations; exploration and production; gas compression; gas processors; gathering and transmission companies; liquefied natural gas; local distribution companies; marketing firms; regulatory agencies; service companies; suppliers and manufacturers; and regional buyer`s guide.

  12. Gas Chromatography -Mass Spectrometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nizkorodov, Sergey

    GCMS - 1 Gas Chromatography - Mass Spectrometry GC-MS ANALYSIS OF ETHANOL AND BENZENE IN GASOLINE Last updated: June 17, 2014 #12;GCMS - 2 Gas Chromatography - Mass Spectrometry GC-MS ANALYSIS). The goal of this experiment is to separate the components in a sample of gasoline using Gas Chromatography

  13. Valve for gas centrifuges

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hahs, C.A.; Rurbage, C.H.

    1982-03-17

    The invention is pneumatically operated valve assembly for simulatenously (1) closing gas-transfer lines connected to a gas centrifuge or the like and (2) establishing a recycle path between two on the lines so closed. The value assembly is especially designed to be compact, fast-acting, reliable, and comparatively inexpensive. It provides large reductions in capital costs for gas-centrifuge cascades.

  14. Static gas expansion cooler

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Guzek, J.C.; Lujan, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    Disclosed is a cooler for television cameras and other temperature sensitive equipment. The cooler uses compressed gas ehich is accelerated to a high velocity by passing it through flow passageways having nozzle portions which expand the gas. This acceleration and expansion causes the gas to undergo a decrease in temperature thereby cooling the cooler body and adjacent temperature sensitive equipment.

  15. Renewable Natural Gas (Biomethane)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    to Landfill Owner $6.18 Total Cost Per MMBtu #12;Index Price of Natural Gas NYMEX Natural Gas Futures PricesRenewable Natural Gas (Biomethane) #12;Critical Barriers Impeding RNG as a Transportation Fuel-developer of largest RNG production project in U.S. at McCommas Bluff Landfill in Dallas, Texas · Chairman and co

  16. Transportation and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutsey, Nicholas P.; Sperling, Dan

    2008-01-01

    Summary of transportation greenhouse gas mitigation optionsof alternative fuels. Low greenhouse gas fuels Mixing ofMAC) refrigerant replacement. Greenhouse gas budgets for

  17. Transportation and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutsey, Nicholas P.; Sperling, Dan

    2008-01-01

    natural gas and liquefied petroleum gas have continued to make small contributions to transportation,transportation actions include electric power sector actions, eg coal to natural gas

  18. Summary of Swedish Experiences on CNG and "Clean" Diesel Buses...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications A Comparison of Two Gasoline and Two Diesel Cars with Varying Emission Control Technologies Diesel Health Impacts & Recent Comparisons...

  19. Safety Analysis of Type 4 Tanks in CNG Vehicles

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These slides were presented at the International Hydrogen Fuel and Pressure Vessel Forum on September 27 – 29, 2010, in Beijing, China.

  20. Safety and Regulatory Structure for CNG/Hydrogen Vehicles and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CNGHydrogen Vehicles and Fuels in the United States Safety and Regulatory Structure for CNGHydrogen Vehicles and Fuels in the United States Presentation given by Barbara...

  1. California Policy Stimulates Carbon Negative CNG for Heavy Duty Trucks

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Describes system for fueling truck fleet with biomethane generated from anaerobic digestion of organic waste it collects

  2. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Atlanta Airport Converts Shuttles to CNG

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O O D S TA I NLoans The Oregon DepartmentAtlanta Airport

  3. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Leadership in CNG Propels Paper Transport

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O O D S TA I NLoansAFDCHydrogeninReduce OperatingtoInc.

  4. California: SQAMD Replaces Drayage Trucks with CNG | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsofProgram:Y-12Power,5 BUDGETU S DEPARTMENTJune 18, 2012ofAward |

  5. Alternative Fuels Data Center: West Virginia CNG Corridor Now Open

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News Publications TraditionalWith PropaneNaturalTest Your AlternativeAbout PrintableWest

  6. Alternative Carriers For Remote Renewable Energy Sources Using Existing Cng

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAand DaltonSolarOpen5All HomeAlphakat GmbHNepal: Applications

  7. Comparison of Clean Diesel Buses to CNG Buses

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield MunicipalTechnical Report: Achievements ofCOMPOSITION OF VAPORS FROMSciDACReport) |Transverse

  8. Order 3727: EMERA CNG, LLC | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterested Parties -DepartmentAvailableHighOffice| DepartmentWebinarOrder 3690:

  9. Alternative Fuels Data Center: CNG Fuel System and Cylinder Maintenance

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Digg FindPortsas a Vehicle

  10. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Filling CNG Fuel Tanks

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Digg FindPortsas aEthanol Benefits

  11. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Smithtown Selects CNG to Cut Refuse

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onPropane Rolls on as Reliable

  12. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Indianapolis CNG Fueling Station Attracts

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageBlender Pump DispensersEmerging Fuels PrintableLocal

  13. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Kentucky Trucking Company Adds CNG Vehicles

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageBlender Pump DispensersEmerging Fuels PrintableLocalto Its

  14. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Triangle Clean Cities Resource Gives CNG

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageBlender PumpVehiclesThe Heat Is on in St. Louis Buses

  15. Comparison of CNG and LNG Technologies for Transportation Applications

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageBlender PumpVehiclesThe Heat Is onis3 Annual41 Spring2 P

  16. Natural gas leak mapper

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reichardt, Thomas A. (Livermore, CA); Luong, Amy Khai (Dublin, CA); Kulp, Thomas J. (Livermore, CA); Devdas, Sanjay (Albany, CA)

    2008-05-20

    A system is described that is suitable for use in determining the location of leaks of gases having a background concentration. The system is a point-wise backscatter absorption gas measurement system that measures absorption and distance to each point of an image. The absorption measurement provides an indication of the total amount of a gas of interest, and the distance provides an estimate of the background concentration of gas. The distance is measured from the time-of-flight of laser pulse that is generated along with the absorption measurement light. The measurements are formated into an image of the presence of gas in excess of the background. Alternatively, an image of the scene is superimosed on the image of the gas to aid in locating leaks. By further modeling excess gas as a plume having a known concentration profile, the present system provides an estimate of the maximum concentration of the gas of interest.

  17. Flue gas desulfurization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Im, K.H.; Ahluwalia, R.K.

    1984-05-01

    The invention involves a combustion process in which combustion gas containing sulfur oxide is directed past a series of heat exchangers to a stack and in which a sodium compound is added to the combustion gas in a temparature zone of above about 1400 K to form Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/. Preferably, the temperature is above about 1800 K and the sodium compound is present as a vapor to provide a gas-gas reaction to form Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ as a liquid. Since liquid Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ may cause fouling of heat exchanger surfaces downstream from the combustion zone, the process advantageously includes the step of injecting a cooling gas downstream of the injection of the sodium compound yet upstream of one or more heat exchangers to cool the combustion gas to below about 1150 K and form solid Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/. The cooling gas is preferably a portion of the combustion gas downstream which may be recycled for cooling. It is further advantageous to utilize an electrostatic precipitator downstream of the heat exchangers to recover the Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/. It is also advantageous in the process to remove a portion of the combustion gas cleaned in the electrostatic precipitator and recycle that portion upstream to use as the cooling gas. 3 figures.

  18. Integrated Projects | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    demand is high and to refuel vehicles. The advantages of producing both hydrogen and electricity in Power Parks include: providing access to better natural gas rates because...

  19. Gas shielding apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brandt, D.

    1984-06-05

    An apparatus for preventing oxidation by uniformly distributing inert shielding gas over the weld area of workpieces such as pipes being welded together. The apparatus comprises a chamber and a gas introduction element. The chamber has an annular top wall, an annular bottom wall, an inner side wall and an outer side wall connecting the top and bottom walls. One side wall is a screen and the other has a portion defining an orifice. The gas introduction element has a portion which encloses the orifice and can be one or more pipes. The gas introduction element is in fluid communication with the chamber and introduces inert shielding gas into the chamber. The inert gas leaves the chamber through the screen side wall and is dispersed evenly over the weld area.

  20. Gas shielding apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brandt, D.

    1985-12-31

    An apparatus is disclosed for preventing oxidation by uniformly distributing inert shielding gas over the weld area of workpieces such as pipes being welded together. The apparatus comprises a chamber and a gas introduction element. The chamber has an annular top wall, an annular bottom wall, an inner side wall and an outer side wall connecting the top and bottom walls. One side wall is a screen and the other has a portion defining an orifice. The gas introduction element has a portion which encloses the orifice and can be one or more pipes. The gas introduction element is in fluid communication with the chamber and introduces inert shielding gas into the chamber. The inert gas leaves the chamber through the screen side wall and is dispersed evenly over the weld area. 3 figs.

  1. Gas shielding apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brandt, Daniel (Los Alamos, NM)

    1985-01-01

    An apparatus for preventing oxidation by uniformly distributing inert shielding gas over the weld area of workpieces such as pipes being welded together. The apparatus comprises a chamber and a gas introduction element. The chamber has an annular top wall, an annular bottom wall, an inner side wall and an outer side wall connecting the top and bottom walls. One side wall is a screen and the other has a portion defining an orifice. The gas introduction element has a portion which encloses the orifice and can be one or more pipes. The gas introduction element is in fluid communication with the chamber and introduces inert shielding gas into the chamber. The inert gas leaves the chamber through the screen side wall and is dispersed evenly over the weld area.

  2. Thermodynamics of Chaplygin gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yun Soo Myung

    2011-05-11

    We clarify thermodynamics of the Chaplygin gas by introducing the integrability condition. All thermal quantities are derived as functions of either volume or temperature. Importantly, we find a new general equation of state, describing the Chaplygin gas completely. We confirm that the Chaplygin gas could show a unified picture of dark matter and energy which cools down through the universe expansion without any critical point (phase transition).

  3. Pulsed gas laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, Louis W. (Madison, WI); Fitzsimmons, William A. (Madison, WI)

    1978-01-01

    A pulsed gas laser is constituted by Blumlein circuits wherein space metal plates function both as capacitors and transmission lines coupling high frequency oscillations to a gas filled laser tube. The tube itself is formed by spaced metal side walls which function as connections to the electrodes to provide for a high frequency, high voltage discharge in the tube to cause the gas to lase. Also shown is a spark gap switch having structural features permitting a long life.

  4. Valve for gas centrifuges

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hahs, Charles A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Burbage, Charles H. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1984-01-01

    The invention is a pneumatically operated valve assembly for simultaneously (1) closing gas-transfer lines connected to a gas centrifuge or the like and (2) establishing a recycle path between two of the lines so closed. The valve assembly is especially designed to be compact, fast-acting, reliable, and comparatively inexpensive. It provides large reductions in capital costs for gas-centrifuge cascades.

  5. Carbon sequestration in natural gas reservoirs: Enhanced gas recovery and natural gas storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, Curtis M.

    2003-01-01

    gas reservoirs for carbon sequestration and enhanced gasproduction and carbon sequestration, Society of Petroleumfeasibiilty of carbon sequestration with enhanced gas

  6. Compressed Gas Cylinder Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of pressure from a compressed gas cylinder and pose a serious threat to life and property. To minimize risk cylinders to and from a designated work are

  7. Gas venting system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Khan, Amjad; Dreier, Ken Wayne; Moulthrop, Lawrence Clinton; White, Erik James

    2010-06-29

    A system to vent a moist gas stream is disclosed. The system includes an enclosure and an electrochemical cell disposed within the enclosure, the electrochemical cell productive of the moist gas stream. A first vent is in fluid communication with the electrochemical cell for venting the moist gas stream to an exterior of the enclosure, and a second vent is in fluid communication with an interior of the enclosure and in thermal communication with the first vent for discharging heated air to the exterior of the enclosure. At least a portion of the discharging heated air is for preventing freezing of the moist gas stream within the first vent.

  8. String Gas Baryogenesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. L. Alberghi

    2010-02-19

    We describe a possible realization of the spontaneous baryogenesis mechanism in the context of extra-dimensional string cosmology and specifically in the string gas scenario.

  9. Natural gas annual 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-10-01

    The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. The 1997 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production to its end use. This is followed by tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1993 to 1997 for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level. 27 figs., 109 tabs.

  10. Reversible Acid Gas Capture

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Dave Heldebrant

    2012-12-31

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory scientist David Heldebrant demonstrates how a new process called reversible acid gas capture works to pull carbon dioxide out of power plant emissions.

  11. Home Safety: Radon Gas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaw, Bryan W.; Denny, Monica L.

    1999-11-12

    Every home should be tested for radon, an invisible, odorless, radioactive gas that occurs naturally. This publication explains the health risks, testing methods, and mitigation and reduction techniques....

  12. Shale Gas Production

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes 2009 2010 2011 2012...

  13. Gas pump with movable gas pumping panels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Osher, John E. (Alamo, CA)

    1984-01-01

    Apparatus for pumping gas continuously a plurality of articulated panels of getter material, each of which absorbs gases on one side while another of its sides is simultaneously reactivated in a zone isolated by the panels themselves from a working space being pumped.

  14. Oil and Gas Exploration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tingley, Joseph V.

    , oil and gas, and geothermal activities and accomplishments in Nevada: production statistics Products 23. Sloan dolomite quarry 24. Weiser gypsum quarry Oil Fields 1. Blackburn field 2. North WillowMetals Industrial Minerals Oil and Gas Geothermal Exploration Development Mining Processing Nevada

  15. GAS EXPLORATION Winter 2006 GasTIPS 5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubin, Yoram

    GAS EXPLORATION Winter 2006 · GasTIPS 5 T he prediction of reservoir parameters such as gas or oil, but is particularly challenging in the case of gas exploration. Current seismic imaging technol- ogy cannot accurately discriminate between economic and non-eco- nomic concentrations of gas. This is primarily because

  16. Shale gas production: potential versus actual greenhouse gas emissions*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shale gas production: potential versus actual greenhouse gas emissions* Francis O Environ. Res. Lett. 7 (2012) 044030 (6pp) doi:10.1088/1748-9326/7/4/044030 Shale gas production: potential gas (GHG) emissions from shale gas production and use are controversial. Here we assess the level

  17. Thermoacoustic natural gas liquefier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swift, G.; Gardner, D.; Hayden, M.; Radebaugh, R.; Wollan, J.

    1996-07-01

    This is the final report of a two-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This project sought to develop a natural-gas-powered natural-gas liquefier that has absolutely no moving parts and requires no electrical power. It should have high efficiency, remarkable reliability, and low cost. The thermoacoustic natural-gas liquefier (TANGL) is based on our recent invention of the first no-moving-parts cryogenic refrigerator. In short, our invention uses acoustic phenomena to produce refrigeration from heat, with no moving parts. The required apparatus comprises nothing more than heat exchangers and pipes, made of common materials, without exacting tolerances. Its initial experimental success in a small size lead us to propose a more ambitious application: large-energy liquefaction of natural gas, using combustion of natural gas as the energy source. TANGL was designed to be maintenance-free, inexpensive, portable, and environmentally benign.

  18. Cryogenic treatment of gas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bravo, Jose Luis (Houston, TX); Harvey, III, Albert Destrehan (Kingwood, TX); Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX)

    2012-04-03

    Systems and methods of treating a gas stream are described. A method of treating a gas stream includes cryogenically separating a first gas stream to form a second gas stream and a third stream. The third stream is cryogenically contacted with a carbon dioxide stream to form a fourth and fifth stream. A majority of the second gas stream includes methane and/or molecular hydrogen. A majority of the third stream includes one or more carbon oxides, hydrocarbons having a carbon number of at least 2, one or more sulfur compounds, or mixtures thereof. A majority of the fourth stream includes one or more of the carbon oxides and hydrocarbons having a carbon number of at least 2. A majority of the fifth stream includes hydrocarbons having a carbon number of at least 3 and one or more of the sulfur compounds.

  19. Supersonic gas compressor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lawlor, Shawn P. (Bellevue, WA); Novaresi, Mark A. (San Diego, CA); Cornelius, Charles C. (Kirkland, WA)

    2007-11-13

    A gas compressor based on the use of a driven rotor having a compression ramp traveling at a local supersonic inlet velocity (based on the combination of inlet gas velocity and tangential speed of the ramp) which compresses inlet gas against a stationary sidewall. In using this method to compress inlet gas, the supersonic compressor efficiently achieves high compression ratios while utilizing a compact, stabilized gasdynamic flow path. Operated at supersonic speeds, the inlet stabilizes an oblique/normal shock system in the gasdyanamic flow path formed between the rim of the rotor, the strakes, and a stationary external housing. Part load efficiency is enhanced by the use of a pre-swirl compressor, and using a bypass stream to bleed a portion of the intermediate pressure gas after passing through the pre-swirl compressor back to the inlet of the pre-swirl compressor. Inlet guide vanes to the compression ramp enhance overall efficiency.

  20. Alternative Fuel Vehicle Forecasts Final report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ....................................................................................................................................36 Commercial CNG and LNG Vehicles

  1. Natural Gas Prices Forecast Comparison--AEO vs. Natural Gas Markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wong-Parodi, Gabrielle; Lekov, Alex; Dale, Larry

    2005-01-01

    Natural Gas Prices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Natural Gas Prices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .versus AEO and Henry Hub Natural Gas Prices . . . . . .

  2. Shale gas production: potential versus actual greenhouse gas emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O’Sullivan, Francis Martin

    Estimates of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from shale gas production and use are controversial. Here we assess the level of GHG emissions from shale gas well hydraulic fracturing operations in the United States during ...

  3. Baltimore Gas & Electric Company (Gas)- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Baltimore Gas & Electric Company (BGE) offers Natural Gas Connection program to residential customers to switch from electric to natural gas for heat. The program waives connection charge (...

  4. EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Natural Gas Supply Basins...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    with selected updates U.S. Natural Gas Supply Basins Relative to Major Natural Gas Pipeline Transportation Corridors, 2008 U.S. Natural Gas Transporation Corridors out of Major...

  5. Intermountain Gas Company (IGC)- Gas Heating Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Intermountain Gas Company's (IGC) Gas Heating Rebate Program offers customers a $200 per unit rebate when they convert to a high efficiency natural gas furnace that replaces a heating system...

  6. Gas only nozzle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bechtel, William Theodore (15 Olde Coach Rd., Scotia, NY 12302); Fitts, David Orus (286 Sweetman Rd., Ballston Spa, NY 12020); DeLeonardo, Guy Wayne (60 St. Stephens La., Glenville, NY 12302)

    2002-01-01

    A diffusion flame nozzle gas tip is provided to convert a dual fuel nozzle to a gas only nozzle. The nozzle tip diverts compressor discharge air from the passage feeding the diffusion nozzle air swirl vanes to a region vacated by removal of the dual fuel components, so that the diverted compressor discharge air can flow to and through effusion holes in the end cap plate of the nozzle tip. In a preferred embodiment, the nozzle gas tip defines a cavity for receiving the compressor discharge air from a peripheral passage of the nozzle for flow through the effusion openings defined in the end cap plate.

  7. Oregon Natural Gas Summary

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3+Elements) Gas and Gas4.00 4.92 1979-2010

  8. Oil and gas outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry Natural GasNatural GasEIARegionalMethodologyNorth093 *Oil andOil and

  9. ,"Federal Offshore California Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Federal Offshore California Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release...

  10. ,"New Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (MMcf...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release...

  11. Oil and Gas CDT Using noble gas isotopes to develop a mechanistic understanding of shale gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henderson, Gideon

    Oil and Gas CDT Using noble gas isotopes to develop a mechanistic understanding of shale gas relevance to the oil and gas industry: 10 weeks in Year 1 and 5 weeks each in Years 2 and 3. Instructors will be both from expert academics from across the CDT and also experienced oil and gas industry professionals

  12. What is shale gas? | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    What is shale gas? What is shale gas? What is shale gas? More Documents & Publications Natural Gas from Shale: Questions and Answers Shale Gas Glossary Natural Gas Study Guide -...

  13. EIA - Natural Gas Publications & Analysis

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Publications & Analysis Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report Estimates of natural gas in underground storage for the U.S. and three regions of the U.S. Natural Gas Weekly Update...

  14. The Gas/Electric Partnership 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmeal, W. R.; Royall, D.; Wrenn, K. F. Jr.

    1997-01-01

    The electric and gas industries are each in the process of restructuring and "converging" toward one mission: providing energy. Use of natural gas in generating electric power and use of electricity in transporting natural gas will increase...

  15. Gas Water Heater Energy Losses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biermayer, Peter

    2012-01-01

    forty gallon residential gas-fired storage water heater wasthat could replace a gas-fired storage water heater with adefined a baseline gas-fired storage water heater that meets

  16. Fluid Inclusion Gas Analysis

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Dilley, Lorie

    Fluid inclusion gas analysis for wells in various geothermal areas. Analyses used in developing fluid inclusion stratigraphy for wells and defining fluids across the geothermal fields. Each sample has mass spectrum counts for 180 chemical species.

  17. Natural Gas Regulations (Kentucky)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Kentucky Administrative Regulation title 805 promulgates the rules and regulations pertaining to natural gas production in Kentucky. In addition to KAR title 405, chapter 30, which pertains to any...

  18. Gas Separation Using Membranes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koros, W. J.; Paul, D. R.

    1984-01-01

    Commercial membrane-based gas separator systems based upon high-flux, asymmetric polysulfone hollow fibers were first introduced in 1977 by Monsanto. These systems were packaged in compact modules containing large amounts of permeation surface area...

  19. Gas Turbine Emissions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frederick, J. D.

    1990-01-01

    Historically, preliminary design information regarding gas turbine emissions has been unreliable, particularly for facilities using steam injection and other forms of Best Available Control Technology (BACT). This was probably attributed to the lack...

  20. Gas-separation process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Toy, Lora G. (San Francisco, CA); Pinnau, Ingo (Palo Alto, CA); Baker, Richard W. (Palo Alto, CA)

    1994-01-01

    A process for separating condensable organic components from gas streams. The process makes use of a membrane made from a polymer material that is glassy and that has an unusually high free volume within the polymer material.