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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas capacity increase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

California Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity ...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) California Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun...

2

California Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) California Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

3

Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. . Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity by State, December 31, 1996 (Capacity in Billion Cubic Feet) Table State Interstate Companies Intrastate Companies Independent Companies Total Number of Active Fields Capacity Number of Active Fields Capacity Number of Active Fields Capacity Number of Active Fields Capacity Percent of U.S. Capacity Alabama................. 0 0 1 3 0 0 1 3 0.04 Arkansas ................ 0 0 3 32 0 0 3 32 0.40 California................ 0 0 10 470 0 0 10 470 5.89 Colorado ................ 4 66 5 34 0 0 9 100 1.25 Illinois ..................... 6 259 24 639 0 0 30 898 11.26 Indiana ................... 6 16 22 97 0 0 28 113 1.42 Iowa ....................... 4 270 0 0 0 0 4 270 3.39 Kansas ................... 16 279 2 6 0 0 18 285 3.57 Kentucky ................ 6 167 18 49 0 0 24 216 2.71 Louisiana................ 8 530 4 25 0 0 12 555 6.95 Maryland ................ 1 62

4

Increasing water holding capacity for irrigation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Increasing water holding capacity for irrigation Reseachers recommend solutions for sediment trapping in irrigation system LANL and SNL leveraged technical expertise to determine...

5

Underground Natural Gas Working Storage Capacity - Energy Information  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Underground Natural Gas Working Storage Capacity Underground Natural Gas Working Storage Capacity With Data for November 2012 | Release Date: July 24, 2013 | Next Release Date: Spring 2014 Previous Issues Year: 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 Go Overview Natural gas working storage capacity increased by about 2 percent in the Lower 48 states between November 2011 and November 2012. The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) has two measures of working gas storage capacity, and both increased by similar amounts: Demonstrated maximum volume increased 1.8 percent to 4,265 billion cubic feet (Bcf) Design capacity increased 2.0 percent to 4,575 Bcf Maximum demonstrated working gas volume is an operational measure of the highest level of working gas reported at each storage facility at any time

6

Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant capacity increase options  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Studies are being conducted by the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) Project on ways to increase the waste processing capacity within the current Vitrification Building structural design. The Phase 1 study on remote systems concepts identification and extent of capacity increase was completed. The study concluded that the HWVP capacity could be increased to four times the current capacity with minor design adjustments to the fixed facility design, and the required design changes would not impact the current footprint of the vitrification building. A further increase in production capacity may be achievable but would require some technology development, verification testing, and a more systematic and extensive engineering evaluation. The primary changes included a single advance melter with a higher capacity, new evaporative feed tank, offgas quench collection tank, ejector venturi scrubbers, and additional inner canister closure station,a smear test station, a new close- coupled analytical facility, waste hold capacity of 400,000 gallon, the ability to concentrate out-of-plant HWVP feed to 90 g/L waste oxide concentration, and limited changes to the current base slab construction package.

Larson, D.E.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

,"California Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity",12,"Annual",2013,"6301988" ,"Release...

8

,"New York Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New York Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity",11,"Annual",2013,"6301988" ,"Release...

9

Peak Underground Working Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Definitions Definitions Definitions Since 2006, EIA has reported two measures of aggregate capacity, one based on demonstrated peak working gas storage, the other on working gas design capacity. Demonstrated Peak Working Gas Capacity: This measure sums the highest storage inventory level of working gas observed in each facility over the 5-year range from May 2005 to April 2010, as reported by the operator on the Form EIA-191M, "Monthly Underground Gas Storage Report." This data-driven estimate reflects actual operator experience. However, the timing for peaks for different fields need not coincide. Also, actual available maximum capacity for any storage facility may exceed its reported maximum storage level over the last 5 years, and is virtually certain to do so in the case of newly commissioned or expanded facilities. Therefore, this measure provides a conservative indicator of capacity that may understate the amount that can actually be stored.

10

Increasing the Capacity of Existing Power Lines | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Increasing the Capacity of Existing Power Lines Increasing the Capacity of Existing Power Lines The capacity of the grid has been largely unchanged for decades and needs to expand...

11

Colorado Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Colorado Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun...

12

"Assessment of the Adequacy of Natural Gas Pipeline Capacity...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

"Assessment of the Adequacy of Natural Gas Pipeline Capacity in the Northeast United States" Report Now Available "Assessment of the Adequacy of Natural Gas Pipeline Capacity in...

13

Assessment of the Adequacy of Natural Gas Pipeline Capacity in...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Assessment of the Adequacy of Natural Gas Pipeline Capacity in the Northeast United States - November 2013 Assessment of the Adequacy of Natural Gas Pipeline Capacity in the...

14

Underground Natural Gas Working Storage Capacity - Methodology  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Summary Prices Exploration & Reserves Production Imports/Exports Pipelines Storage Consumption All Natural Gas Data Reports Analysis & Projections Most Requested Consumption Exploration & Reserves Imports/Exports & Pipelines Prices Production Projections Storage All Reports ‹ See All Natural Gas Reports Underground Natural Gas Working Storage Capacity With Data for November 2012 | Release Date: July 24, 2013 | Next Release Date: Spring 2014 Previous Issues Year: 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 Go Methodology Demonstrated Peak Working Gas Capacity Estimates: Estimates are based on aggregation of the noncoincident peak levels of working gas inventories at individual storage fields as reported monthly over a 60-month period ending in November 2012 on Form EIA-191, "Monthly Natural Gas Underground Storage

15

Increasing the Capacity of Existing Power Lines  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

works with Idaho Power engineers to train system operators in the use of weather station data and software tools to generate transmission capacity operat- ing limits. The ability...

16

California Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) California Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

17

Peak Underground Working Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Methodology Methodology Methodology Demonstrated Peak Working Gas Capacity Estimates: Estimates are based on aggregation of the noncoincident peak levels of working gas inventories at individual storage fields as reported monthly over a 60-month period ending in April 2010 on Form EIA-191M, "Monthly Natural Gas Underground Storage Report." The months of measurement for the peak storage volumes by facilities may differ; i.e., the months do not necessarily coincide. As such, the noncoincident peak for any region is at least as big as any monthly volume in the historical record. Data from Form EIA-191M, "Monthly Natural Gas Underground Storage Report," are collected from storage operators on a field-level basis. Operators can report field-level data either on a per reservoir basis or on an aggregated reservoir basis. It is possible that if all operators reported on a per reservoir basis that the demonstrated peak working gas capacity would be larger. Additionally, these data reflect inventory levels as of the last day of the report month, and a facility may have reached a higher inventory on a different day of the report month, which would not be recorded on Form EIA-191M.

18

Natural Gas Productive Capacity for the Lower-48 States  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

for the Lower-48 States for the Lower-48 States 6/4/01 Click here to start Table of Contents Natural Gas Productive Capacity for the Lower-48 States Natural Gas Productive Capacity for the Lower-48 States Natural Gas Productive Capacity for the Lower-48 States - Summary - Natural Gas Productive Capacity for the Lower-48 States - Summary - PPT Slide Natural Gas Productive Capacity for the Lower-48 States - Summary - Natural Gas Productive Capacity for the Lower-48 States - Methodology - Natural Gas Productive Capacity for the Lower-48 States - Methodology - Natural Gas Productive Capacity for the Lower-48 States - Methodology - PPT Slide PPT Slide PPT Slide PPT Slide PPT Slide PPT Slide PPT Slide PPT Slide PPT Slide PPT Slide PPT Slide Other Areas PPT Slide PPT Slide PPT Slide

19

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Pipeline Capacity and Utilization  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Pipeline Utilization & Capacity Pipeline Utilization & Capacity About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 2007/2008 with selected updates Natural Gas Pipeline Capacity & Utilization Overview | Utilization Rates | Integration of Storage | Varying Rates of Utilization | Measures of Utilization Overview of Pipeline Utilization Natural gas pipeline companies prefer to operate their systems as close to full capacity as possible to maximize their revenues. However, the average utilization rate (flow relative to design capacity) of a natural gas pipeline system seldom reaches 100%. Factors that contribute to outages include: Scheduled or unscheduled maintenance Temporary decreases in market demand Weather-related limitations to operations

20

Nitrogen expander cycles for large capacity liquefaction of natural gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermodynamic study is performed on nitrogen expander cycles for large capacity liquefaction of natural gas. In order to substantially increase the capacity, a Brayton refrigeration cycle with nitrogen expander was recently added to the cold end of the reputable propane pre-cooled mixed-refrigerant (C3-MR) process. Similar modifications with a nitrogen expander cycle are extensively investigated on a variety of cycle configurations. The existing and modified cycles are simulated with commercial process software (Aspen HYSYS) based on selected specifications. The results are compared in terms of thermodynamic efficiency, liquefaction capacity, and estimated size of heat exchangers. The combination of C3-MR with partial regeneration and pre-cooling of nitrogen expander cycle is recommended to have a great potential for high efficiency and large capacity.

Chang, Ho-Myung; Park, Jae Hoon; Gwak, Kyung Hyun [Hong Ik University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Seoul, 121-791 (Korea, Republic of); Choe, Kun Hyung [Korea Gas Corporation, Incheon, 406-130 (Korea, Republic of)

2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas capacity increase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Working Gas Capacity Total Number of Existing Fields Period: Monthly Annual Total Working Gas Capacity Total Number of Existing Fields Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History U.S. 9,072,508 9,104,181 9,111,242 9,117,296 9,132,250 9,171,017 1989-2013 Alaska 83,592 83,592 83,592 83,592 83,592 83,592 2013-2013 Lower 48 States 8,988,916 9,020,589 9,027,650 9,033,704 9,048,658 9,087,425 2012-2013 Alabama 35,400 35,400 35,400 35,400 35,400 35,400 2002-2013 Arkansas 21,853 21,853 21,853 21,853 21,853 21,853 2002-2013 California 592,711 592,711 592,711 599,711 599,711 599,711 2002-2013 Colorado 122,086 122,086 122,086 122,086 122,086 122,086 2002-2013

22

Evaluation of capacity release transactions in the natural gas industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The purpose of this thesis is to analyze capacity release transactions in the natural gas industry and to state some preliminary conclusions about how the capacity release market is functioning. Given FERC's attempt to ...

Lautzenhiser, Stephen

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Additions to Capacity on the U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline Network: 2005  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

percent increase in capacity additions (see percent increase in capacity additions (see Box, "Capacity Measures," p. 4). Indeed, less new natural gas pipeline mileage was added in 2005 than in any year during the past decade. 1 Energy Information Administration, Office of Oil and Gas, August 2006 1 In 2005, at least 31 natural gas pipeline projects of varying profiles 2 were completed in the lower 48 States and the Gulf of Mexico (Figure 3, Table 1). Of these, 15 were expansions (increases in capacity) on existing natural gas pipelines while the other 16 were 9 system extensions or laterals associated with existing natural gas pipelines, 5 new natural gas pipeline systems, and 2 oil pipeline conversions. Expenditures for natural gas pipeline development amounted to less than $1.3

24

Natural gas productive capacity for the lower 48 States, 1980 through 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to analyze monthly natural gas wellhead productive capacity in the lower 48 States from 1980 through 1992 and project this capacity from 1993 through 1995. For decades, natural gas supplies and productive capacity have been adequate to meet demand. In the 1970`s the capacity surplus was small because of market structure (split between interstate and intrastate), increasing demand, and insufficient drilling. In the early 1980`s, lower demand, together with increased drilling, led to a large surplus capacity as new productive capacity came on line. After 1986, this large surplus began to decline as demand for gas increased, gas prices fell, and gas well completions dropped sharply. In late December 1989, the decline in this surplus, accompanied by exceptionally high demand and temporary weather-related production losses, led to concerns about the adequacy of monthly productive capacity for natural gas. These concerns should have been moderated by the gas system`s performance during the unusually severe winter weather in March 1993 and January 1994. The declining trend in wellhead productive capacity is expected to be reversed in 1994 if natural gas prices and drilling meet or exceed the base case assumption. This study indicates that in the low, base, and high drilling cases, monthly productive capacity should be able to meet normal production demands through 1995 in the lower 48 States (Figure ES1). Exceptionally high peak-day or peak-week production demand might not be met because of physical limitations such as pipeline capacity. Beyond 1995, as the capacity of currently producing wells declines, a sufficient number of wells and/or imports must be added each year in order to ensure an adequate gas supply.

Not Available

1994-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

25

Microsoft Word - GasCapacityReport3-17.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

for the Lower-48 States Executive Summary This analysis examines the availability of effective productive capacity to meet the projected wellhead demand for natural gas through 2003. Effective productive capacity is defined as the maximum production available from natural gas wells considering limitations of the production, gathering, and transportation systems. Surplus or unutilized capacity is the difference between the effective productive capacity and the actual production. This report contains projections of natural gas effective productive capacity in the Lower-48 States for 2003 and is based on prices and production forecasts in EIA's February 2003 Short Term Energy Outlook (STEO). The analysis projects an average surplus capacity of 5.6 Bcf/d in 2003 under STEO Base

26

,"New York Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"1162014 3:07:28 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: New York Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290NY2"...

27

,"New York Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"1162014 3:07:27 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: New York Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290NY2"...

28

Maryland Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Storage Capacity 64,000 64,000 64,000 64,000 64,000 64,000 1988-2012 Salt Caverns

29

Ohio Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Storage Capacity 572,477 572,477 580,380 580,380 580,380 577,944 1988-2012

30

Texas Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Storage Capacity 690,678 740,477 766,768 783,579 812,394 831,190 1988-2012

31

Kentucky Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Storage Capacity 220,359 220,359 220,368 221,751 221,751 221,751 1988-2012

32

Oregon Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Storage Capacity 29,415 29,415 29,565 29,565 29,565 28,750 1989-2012 Salt Caverns

33

Michigan Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Storage Capacity 1,060,558 1,062,339 1,069,405 1,069,898 1,075,472 1,078,979

34

Tennessee Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Storage Capacity 1,200 1,200 1,200 0 1998-2012 Salt Caverns 0 1999-2012

35

Alabama Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Storage Capacity 19,300 26,900 26,900 32,900 35,400 35,400 1995-2012 Salt Caverns

36

Wyoming Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Storage Capacity 114,067 111,167 111,120 111,120 106,764 124,937 1988-2012

37

Indiana Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Storage Capacity 114,294 114,937 114,274 111,271 111,313 110,749 1988-2012

38

Louisiana Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Storage Capacity 588,711 615,858 651,968 670,880 690,295 699,646 1988-2012

39

Montana Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Storage Capacity 374,201 374,201 376,301 376,301 376,301 376,301 1988-2012

40

Virginia Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Storage Capacity 9,560 6,200 9,500 9,500 9,500 9,500 1998-2012 Salt Caverns

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas capacity increase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Mississippi Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Storage Capacity 166,909 187,251 210,128 235,638 240,241 289,416 1988-2012

42

Pennsylvania Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Storage Capacity 759,365 759,153 776,964 776,822 776,845 774,309 1988-2012

43

On the isobaric specific heat capacity of natural gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A colorimeter equipped with a gas booster in conjunction with a PVT cell was used to measure the heat capacity of natural gas with different amounts of impurities. Based on new experimental and literature data, a general investigation of the isobaric specific heat capacity was carried out using the JarrahianHeidaryan equation of state (JH-EOS). A model was obtained that is valid in wide ranges of pressures (0.140MPa) and temperatures (250414K). The arithmetic average of the models absolute error is acceptable in engineering calculations and has superiority over other methods in its class.

Azad Jarrahian; Hamid Reza Karami; Ehsan Heidaryan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Endogenous production capacity investment in natural gas market equilibrium models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The large-scale natural gas equilibrium model applied in Egging, 2013 combines long-term market equilibria and investments in infrastructure while accounting for market power by certain suppliers. Such models are widely used to simulate market outcomes given different scenarios of demand and supply development, environmental regulations and investment options in natural gas and other resource markets. However, no model has so far combined the logarithmic production cost function commonly used in natural gas models with endogenous investment decisions in production capacity. Given the importance of capacity constraints in the determination of the natural gas supply, this is a serious shortcoming of the current literature. This short note provides a proof that combining endogenous investment decisions and a logarithmic cost function yields a convex minimization problem, paving the way for an important extension of current state-of-the-art equilibrium models.

Daniel Huppmann

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Fact Sheet: Gas Prices and Oil Consumption Would Increase Without...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Gas Prices and Oil Consumption Would Increase Without Biofuels Fact Sheet: Gas Prices and Oil Consumption Would Increase Without Biofuels Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman and...

46

AGA Producing Region Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) AGA Producing Region Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1994 2,026,828 2,068,220 2,068,220 2,068,428 2,068,428 2,068,428 2,074,428 2,082,928 2,082,928 2,082,928 2,082,928 2,082,928 1995 2,082,928 2,096,611 2,096,611 2,096,176 2,096,176 2,096,176 2,090,331 2,090,331 2,090,331 2,090,331 2,090,331 2,090,331 1996 2,095,131 2,106,116 2,110,116 2,108,116 2,110,116 2,127,294 2,126,618 2,134,784 2,140,284 2,140,284 2,144,784 2,144,784 1997 2,143,603 2,149,088 2,170,288 2,170,288 2,170,178 2,170,178 2,189,642 2,194,242 2,194,242 2,194,242 2,194,242 2,194,242 1998 2,194,242 2,194,242 2,194,242 2,194,242 2,194,242 2,205,540 2,205,540 2,205,540 2,205,540 2,205,540 2,205,540 2,197,859

47

AGA Western Consuming Region Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) AGA Western Consuming Region Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1994 1,226,103 1,232,392 1,232,392 1,232,392 1,232,392 1,232,392 1,232,392 1,232,392 1,232,392 1,232,392 1,232,392 1,232,392 1995 1,232,392 1,233,637 1,233,637 1,233,637 1,233,637 1,243,137 1,237,446 1,237,446 1,237,446 1,237,446 1,237,446 1,237,446 1996 1,237,446 1,237,446 1,237,446 1,237,446 1,237,446 1,228,208 1,270,505 1,270,505 1,270,505 1,270,505 1,270,505 1,270,505 1997 1,228,395 1,228,395 1,228,076 1,228,076 1,228,076 1,228,076 1,228,076 1,228,076 1,228,076 1,228,076 1,228,076 1,228,076 1998 1,228,076 1,228,076 1,228,076 1,228,076 1,228,076 1,122,586 1,122,586 1,122,586 1,122,586 1,122,586 1,122,586 1,122,586

48

AGA Eastern Consuming Region Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) AGA Eastern Consuming Region Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1994 4,737,921 4,727,501 4,727,501 4,727,501 4,727,501 4,727,501 4,727,501 4,727,501 4,727,446 4,727,446 4,727,446 4,727,509 1995 4,730,109 4,647,791 4,647,791 4,647,791 4,647,791 4,647,791 4,593,948 4,593,948 4,593,948 4,593,948 4,593,948 4,593,948 1996 4,593,948 4,600,548 4,603,048 4,603,048 4,607,048 4,740,509 4,740,509 4,742,309 4,743,309 4,743,309 4,743,309 4,743,309 1997 4,681,090 4,574,740 4,586,024 4,578,486 4,586,024 4,582,146 4,582,146 4,582,146 4,585,702 4,585,702 4,585,702 4,585,702 1998 4,585,702 4,585,702 4,585,702 4,585,702 4,585,702 4,799,753 4,799,753 4,799,753 4,799,753 4,799,753 4,799,753 4,805,622

49

Optimal transition from coal to gas and renewable power under capacity constraints and adjustment costs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optimal transition from coal to gas and renewable power under capacity constraints and adjustment existing coal power plants to gas and renewable power under a carbon budget. It solves a model of polluting, exhaustible resources with capacity constraints and adjustment costs (to build coal, gas, and renewable power

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

50

Additions to Capacity on the U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline Network: 2007  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Information Administration, Office of Oil and Gas, July 2008 1 U.S. natural gas pipeline construction activity accelerated in 2007 with capacity additions to the grid totaling nearly 14.9 billion cubic feet (Bcf) of daily deliverability (Figure 1). These additions were the largest of any year in the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) 10-year database of pipeline construction activity. The increased level of natural gas pipeline construction activity in 2007 conformed to a growth trend that began slowly in 2005 and intensified in 2006. In 2007, about 1,700 miles of pipeline were installed, which was greater than in any year since 2003 (Figure 2). The expansion cycle for natural gas pipeline construction is occurring at the same time as the development of the

51

Additions to Capacity on the U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline Network: 2007  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Information Administration, Office of Oil and Gas, July 2008 1 U.S. natural gas pipeline construction activity accelerated in 2007 with capacity additions to the grid totaling nearly 14.9 billion cubic feet (Bcf) of daily deliverability (Figure 1). These additions were the largest of any year in the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) 10-year database of pipeline construction activity. The increased level of natural gas pipeline construction activity in 2007 conformed to a growth trend that began slowly in 2005 and intensified in 2006. In 2007, about 1,700 miles of pipeline were installed, which was greater than in any year since 2003 (Figure 2). The expansion cycle for natural gas pipeline construction is occurring at the same time as the development of the

52

Capacity payment impact on gas-fired generation investments under rising renewable feed-in A real options analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract We assess the effect of capacity payments on investments in gas-fired power plants in the presence of different degrees of renewable energy technology (RET) penetration. Low variable cost renewables increasingly make investments in gas-fired generation unprofitable. At the same time, growing feed-in from intermittent \\{RETs\\} amplifies fluctuations in power generation, thus entailing the need for flexible buffer capacitycurrently mostly gas-fired power plants. A real options approach is applied to evaluate investment decisions and timing of a single investor in gas-fired power generation. We investigate the necessity and effectiveness of capacity payments. Our model incorporates multiple uncertainties and assesses the effect of capacity payments under different degrees of RET penetration. In a numerical study, we implement stochastic processes for peak-load electricity prices and natural gas prices. We find that capacity payments are an effective measure to promote new gas-fired generation projects. Especially in times of high renewable feed-in, capacity payments are required to incentivize peak-load investments.

Daniel Hach; Stefan Spinler

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

"Assessment of the Adequacy of Natural Gas Pipeline Capacity in the  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

"Assessment of the Adequacy of Natural Gas Pipeline Capacity in "Assessment of the Adequacy of Natural Gas Pipeline Capacity in the Northeast United States" Report Now Available "Assessment of the Adequacy of Natural Gas Pipeline Capacity in the Northeast United States" Report Now Available November 27, 2013 - 3:13pm Addthis The Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability has released its "Assessment of the Adequacy of Natural Gas Pipeline Capacity in the Northeast United States" report. The report is now available for downloading. In 2005-06, the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE) conducted a study on the adequacy of interstate natural gas pipeline capacity serving the northeastern United States to meet natural gas demand in the event of a pipeline disruption. The study modeled gas demand for

54

SciTech Connect: Possible Pathways for Increasing Natural Gas...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Conference: Possible Pathways for Increasing Natural Gas Use for Transportation (Presentation) Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Possible Pathways for Increasing Natural...

55

EA-1044: Melton Valley Storage Tanks Capacity Increase Project- Oak Ridge  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

44: Melton Valley Storage Tanks Capacity Increase Project- Oak 44: Melton Valley Storage Tanks Capacity Increase Project- Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee EA-1044: Melton Valley Storage Tanks Capacity Increase Project- Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal to construct and maintain additional storage capacity at the U.S. Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, for liquid low-level radioactive waste. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD May 25, 1995 EA-1044: Finding of No Significant Impact Melton Valley Storage Tanks Capacity Increase Project- Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee May 25, 1995 EA-1044: Final Environmental Assessment

56

Storage and capacity rights markets in the natural gas industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This dissertation presents a different approach at looking at market power in capacity rights markets that goes beyond the functional aspects of capacity rights markets as access to transportation services. In particular, ...

Paz-Galindo, Luis A.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Weight Restriction Increase for Natural Gas  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Weight Restriction Weight Restriction Increase for Natural Gas Vehicles to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Weight Restriction Increase for Natural Gas Vehicles on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Weight Restriction Increase for Natural Gas Vehicles on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Weight Restriction Increase for Natural Gas Vehicles on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Weight Restriction Increase for Natural Gas Vehicles on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Weight Restriction Increase for Natural Gas Vehicles on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Weight Restriction Increase for Natural Gas Vehicles on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search

58

Assessment of the Adequacy of Natural Gas Pipeline Capacity in the  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Assessment of the Adequacy of Natural Gas Pipeline Capacity in the Assessment of the Adequacy of Natural Gas Pipeline Capacity in the Northeast United States - November 2013 Assessment of the Adequacy of Natural Gas Pipeline Capacity in the Northeast United States - November 2013 In 2005-06, the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE) conducted a study on the adequacy of interstate natural gas pipeline capacity serving the northeastern United States to meet natural gas demand in the event of a pipeline disruption. The study modeled gas demand for select market areas in the Northeast under a range of different weather conditions. The study then determined how interstate pipeline flow patterns could change in the event of a pipeline disruption to one or more of the pipelines serving the region in order to meet the gas demand. The results

59

Bi-level Optimization for Capacity Planning in Industrial Gas Markets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bi-level Optimization for Capacity Planning in Industrial Gas Markets P. Garcia-Herreros, L. Zhang markets are dynamic: · Suppliers must anticipate demand growth · Most markets are served locally Capacity is incremental( t T, i I ) Demand satisfaction is constraint by capacities( t T, i I ) All markets

Grossmann, Ignacio E.

60

Bi-level Optimization for Capacity Planning in Industrial Gas Markets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bi-level Optimization for Capacity Planning in Industrial Gas Markets P. Garcia-Herreros, E. Arslan are dynamic: · Suppliers must anticipate demand growth · Most markets are served locally Capacity expansion supplier · Set of plants from independent suppliers with limited capacity · Rational markets that select

Grossmann, Ignacio E.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas capacity increase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Laboratory Development of A High Capacity Gas-Fired paper Dryer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Paper drying is the most energy-intensive and temperature-critical aspect of papermaking. It is estimated that about 67% of the total energy required in papermaking is used to dry paper. The conventional drying method uses a series of steam-heated metal cylinders that are required to meet ASME codes for pressure vessels, which limits the steam pressure to about 160 psig. Consequently, the shell temperature and the drying capacity are also limited. Gas Technology Institute together with Boise Paper Solutions, Groupe Laparrier and Verreault (GL&V) USA Inc., Flynn Burner Corporation and with funding support from the U.S. Department of Energy, U.S. natural gas industry, and Gas Research Institute is developing a high efficiency gas-fired paper dryer based on a combination of a ribbon burner and advanced heat transfer enhancement technique. The Gas-Fired Paper Dryer (GFPD) is a high-efficiency alternative to conventional steam-heated drying drums that typically operate at surface temperatures in the 300???????????????ºF range. The new approach was evaluated in laboratory and pilot-scale testing at the Western Michigan University Paper Pilot Plant. Drum surface temperatures of more than 400???????????????ºF were reached with linerboard (basis weight 126 lb/3000 ft2) production and resulted in a 4-5 times increase in drying rate over a conventional steam-heated drying drum. Successful GFPD development and commercialization will provide large energy savings to the paper industry and increase paper production rates from dryer-limited (space- or steam-limited) paper machines by an estimated 10 to 20%, resulting in significant capital costs savings for both retrofits and new capacity.

Yaroslav Chudnovsky; Aleksandr Kozlov; Lester Sherrow

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

62

Final Report: Laboratory Development of a High Capacity Gas-Fired Paper Dryer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Paper drying is the most energy-intensive and temperature-critical aspect of papermaking. It is estimated that about 67% of the total energy required in papermaking is used to dry paper. The conventional drying method uses a series of steam-heated metal cylinders that are required to meet ASME codes for pressure vessels, which limits the steam pressure to about 160 psig. Consequently, the shell temperature and the drying capacity are also limited. Gas Technology Institute together with Boise Paper Solutions, Groupe Laperrier and Verreault (GL&V) USA Inc., Flynn Burner Corporation and with funding support from the U.S. Department of Energy, U.S. natural gas industry, and Gas Research Institute is developing a high efficiency gas-fired paper dryer based on a combination of a ribbon burner and advanced heat transfer enhancement technique. The Gas-Fired Paper Dryer (GFPD) is a high-efficiency alternative to conventional steam-heated drying drums that typically operate at surface temperatures in the 300 deg F range. The new approach was evaluated in laboratory and pilot-scale testing at the Western Michigan University Paper Pilot Plant. Drum surface temperatures of more than 400 deg F were reached with linerboard (basis weight 126 lb/3000 ft2) production and resulted in a 4-5 times increase in drying rate over a conventional steam-heated drying drum. Successful GFPD development and commercialization will provide large energy savings to the paper industry and increase paper production rates from dryer-limited (space- or steam-limited) paper machines by an estimated 10 to 20%, resulting in significant capital costs savings for both retrofits and new capacity.

Yaroslav Chudnovsky; Aleksandr Kozlov; Lester Sherrow

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

63

,"New York Dry Natural Gas Reserves Revision Increases (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New York Dry Natural Gas Reserves Revision Increases (Billion Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2012...

64

Mathematical model and simulation of gas ow through a porous medium in high breaking capacity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mathematical model and simulation of gas #29;ow through a porous medium in high breaking capacity, France. Abstract. A one-dimensional model is introduced to describe the gas #29;ow and the heat transfer model coupled with a porous medium model taking into account the mechanical interaction gas-silica sand

Sart, Remi

65

Achieving increased spent fuel storage capacity at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The HFIR facility was originally designed to store approximately 25 spent cores, sufficient to allow for operational contingencies and for cooling prior to off-site shipment for reprocessing. The original capacity has now been increased to 60 positions, of which 53 are currently filled (September 1994). Additional spent cores are produced at a rate of about 10 or 11 per year. Continued HFIR operation, therefore, depends on a significant near-term expansion of the pool storage capacity, as well as on a future capability of reprocessing or other storage alternatives once the practical capacity of the pool is reached. To store the much larger inventory of spent fuel that may remain on-site under various future scenarios, the pool capacity is being increased in a phased manner through installation of a new multi-tier spent fuel rack design for higher density storage. A total of 143 positions was used for this paper as the maximum practical pool capacity without impacting operations; however, greater ultimate capacities were addressed in the supporting analyses and approval documents. This paper addresses issues related to the pool storage expansion including (1) seismic effects on the three-tier storage arrays, (2) thermal performance of the new arrays, (3) spent fuel cladding corrosion concerns related to the longer period of pool storage, and (4) impacts of increased spent fuel inventory on the pool water quality, water treatment systems, and LLLW volume.

Cook, D.H.; Chang, S.J.; Dabs, R.D.; Freels, J.D.; Morgan, K.A.; Rothrock, R.B. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Griess, J.C. [Griess (J.C.), Knoxville, TN (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

66

Arkansas Dry Natural Gas Reserves Revision Increases (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Arkansas Dry Natural Gas Reserves Revision Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

67

California Dry Natural Gas Reserves Revision Increases (Billion...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) California Dry Natural Gas Reserves Revision Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

68

Montana Dry Natural Gas Reserves Revision Increases (Billion...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Montana Dry Natural Gas Reserves Revision Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

69

Louisiana Dry Natural Gas Reserves Revision Increases (Billion...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Louisiana Dry Natural Gas Reserves Revision Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

70

Michigan Dry Natural Gas Reserves Revision Increases (Billion...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Michigan Dry Natural Gas Reserves Revision Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

71

Alabama Dry Natural Gas Reserves Revision Increases (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Alabama Dry Natural Gas Reserves Revision Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

72

Mississippi Dry Natural Gas Reserves Revision Increases (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Mississippi Dry Natural Gas Reserves Revision Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

73

Virginia Dry Natural Gas Reserves Revision Increases (Billion...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Virginia Dry Natural Gas Reserves Revision Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

74

Wyoming Dry Natural Gas Reserves Revision Increases (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry Natural Gas Reserves Revision Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

75

Texas Dry Natural Gas Reserves Revision Increases (Billion Cubic...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas Dry Natural Gas Reserves Revision Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

76

Utah Dry Natural Gas Reserves Revision Increases (Billion Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Dry Natural Gas Reserves Revision Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

77

Florida Dry Natural Gas Reserves Revision Increases (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Florida Dry Natural Gas Reserves Revision Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

78

Ohio Dry Natural Gas Reserves Revision Increases (Billion Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Ohio Dry Natural Gas Reserves Revision Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

79

Pennsylvania Dry Natural Gas Reserves Revision Increases (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Pennsylvania Dry Natural Gas Reserves Revision Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

80

Alaska Dry Natural Gas Reserves Revision Increases (Billion Cubic...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Alaska Dry Natural Gas Reserves Revision Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas capacity increase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Kansas Dry Natural Gas Reserves Revision Increases (Billion Cubic...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Kansas Dry Natural Gas Reserves Revision Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

82

Miscellaneous States Shale Gas Proved Reserves Revision Increases...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Miscellaneous States Shale Gas Proved Reserves Revision Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

83

,"U.S. Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1989" 3,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1989" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","ng_stor_cap_dcu_nus_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/ng/ng_stor_cap_dcu_nus_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 7:03:21 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity" "Sourcekey","N5290US2","NGA_EPG0_SACW0_NUS_MMCF","NA1394_NUS_8" "Date","U.S. Total Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)","U.S. Working Natural Gas Total Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)","U.S. Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Count)"

84

Figure A1. Natural gas processing plant capacity in the United States, 2013 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 5 Figure A1. Natural gas processing plant capacity in the United States, 2013 2012 Table A2. Natural gas processing plant capacity, by state, 2013 (million cubic feet per day) Alabama 1,403 Arkansas 24 California 926 Colorado 5,450 Florida 90 Illinois 2,100 Kansas 1,818 Kentucky 240 Louisiana 10,737 Michigan 479 Mississippi 1,123

85

Graphene-on-Diamond Devices with Increased Current-Carrying Capacity: Carbon sp2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Graphene-on-Diamond Devices with Increased Current-Carrying Capacity: Carbon sp2 -on-sp3 Technology Laboratory, Illinois 60439, United States *S Supporting Information ABSTRACT: Graphene demonstrated potential for practical applications owing to its excellent electronic and thermal properties. Typical graphene field

86

Effect of Increased Levels of Liquefied Natural Gas Exports on...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Effect of Increased Levels of Liquefied Natural Gas Exports on U.S. Energy Markets October 2014 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington,...

87

Increase Natural Gas Energy Efficiency | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Groups > Groups > Increase Natural Gas Energy Efficiency Content Group Activity By term Q & A Feeds There are no feeds from external sites for this group. Groups Menu You must...

88

Considerations for increasing unit 1 spent fuel pool capacity at the Laguna Verde station  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To increase the spent fuel storage capacity at the Laguna Verde Station in a safe and economical manner and assure a continuous operation of the first Mexican Nuclear Plant, Comision Federal de Electricidad (CFE), the Nation's Utility, seeked alternatives considering the overall world situation, the safety and licensing aspects, as well as the economics and the extent of the nuclear program of Mexico. This paper describes the alternatives considered, their evaluation and how the decision taken by CFE in this field, provides the Laguna Verde Station with a maximum of 37 years storage capacity plus full core reserve.

Vera, A. (Comision Federal de Electricidad, Veracruz, Ver. (Mexico))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Effect of Increased Natural Gas Exports on Domestic Energy Markets  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report responds to an August 2011 request from the Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy (DOE\\/FE) for an analysis of "the impact of increased domestic natural gas demand, as exports." Appendix A provides a copy of the DOE\\/FE request letter. Specifically, DOE\\/FE asked the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) to assess how specified scenarios of increased natural gas exports could affect domestic energy markets, focusing on consumption, production, and prices.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

U.S. Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Storage Capacity 8,402,216 8,498,535 8,655,740 8,763,798 8,849,125 8,991,335

91

Study on capacity optimization of PEM fuel cell and hydrogen mixing gas-engine compound generator  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Development of a small-scale power source not dependent on commercial power may result in various effects. For example, it may eliminate the need for long distance power-transmission lines, and mean that the amount of green energy development is not restricted to the dynamic characteristics of a commercial power grid. Moreover, the distribution of the independent energy source can be optimized with regionality in mind. This paper examines the independent power supply system relating to hydrogen energy. Generally speaking, the power demand of a house tends to fluctuate considerably over the course of a day. Therefore, when introducing fuel cell cogeneration into an apartment house, etc., low-efficiency operations in a low-load region occur frequently in accordance with load fluctuation. Consequently, the hybrid cogeneration system (HCGS) that uses a solid polymer membrane-type fuel cell (PEM-FC) and a hydrogen mixture gas engine (NEG) together to improve power generation efficiency during partial load of fuel cell cogeneration is proposed. However, since facility costs increase, if the HCGS energy cost is not low compared with the conventional method, it is disadvantageous. Therefore, in this paper, HCGS is introduced into 10 household apartments in Tokyo, and the power generation efficiency, carbon dioxide emissions and optimal capacity of a boiler and heat storage tank are investigated through analysis. Moreover, the system characteristics change significantly based on the capacity of PEM-FC and NEG that compose HCGS. Therefore, in this study, the capacity of PEM-FC and that of NEG are investigated, as well as the power generation efficiency, carbon dioxide emissions and the optimal capacity of a boiler and heat storage tank. Analysis revealed that the annual average power generation efficiency when the capacity of PEM-FC and NEG is 5kW was 27.3%. Meanwhile, the annual average power generation efficiency of HCGS is 1.37 times that of the PEM-FC independent system, and 1.28 times that of the NEG independent system, respectively.

Shinya Obara; Itaru Tanno

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Effect of Increased Natural Gas Exports on Domestic Energy Markets  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Effect of Increased Natural Gas Effect of Increased Natural Gas Exports on Domestic Energy Markets as requested by the Office of Fossil Energy January 2012 This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the U.S. Department of Energy or other Federal agencies. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Effects of Increased Natural Gas Exports on Domestic Energy Markets i Contacts The Office of Energy Analysis prepared this report under the guidance of John Conti, Assistant

93

,"Alaska Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity (MMcf)" Capacity (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Alaska Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","ngm_epg0_sac_sal_mmcfm.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/ngm_epg0_sac_sal_mmcfm.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:57:12 PM"

94

,"Iowa Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity (MMcf)" Capacity (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Iowa Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5290ia2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5290ia2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:10 PM"

95

,"U.S. Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Salt Caverns Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Salt Caverns Capacity (MMcf)" Salt Caverns Capacity (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Salt Caverns Capacity (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","nga_epg0_sacws_nus_mmcfa.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/nga_epg0_sacws_nus_mmcfa.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

96

,"U.S. Natural Gas Number of Underground Storage Acquifers Capacity (Count)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Acquifers Capacity (Count)" Acquifers Capacity (Count)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Natural Gas Number of Underground Storage Acquifers Capacity (Count)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1392_nus_8a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1392_nus_8a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:43:23 PM"

97

,"U.S. Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Acquifers Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Acquifers Capacity (MMcf)" Acquifers Capacity (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Acquifers Capacity (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","nga_epg0_sacwa_nus_mmcfa.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/nga_epg0_sacwa_nus_mmcfa.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

98

,"U.S. Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Depleted Fields Capacity (MMcf)" Depleted Fields Capacity (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","nga_epg0_sacwd_nus_mmcfa.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/nga_epg0_sacwd_nus_mmcfa.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

99

,"U.S. Natural Gas Underground Storage Acquifers Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Acquifers Capacity (MMcf)" Acquifers Capacity (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Natural Gas Underground Storage Acquifers Capacity (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1392_nus_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1392_nus_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:43:23 PM"

100

,"U.S. Working Natural Gas Total Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" Total Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Working Natural Gas Total Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","nga_epg0_sacw0_nus_mmcfa.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/nga_epg0_sacw0_nus_mmcfa.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas capacity increase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Drag reducers, flow improvers, and other magic potions: slick way to increase capacity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

When additional capacity is needed in a given crude oil or products pipeline, the choices are (1) add pumping horsepower at select stations, (2) add pump stations at select locations, (3) add pipeline loops, and (4) use a drag reducer/flow improver. When the need for more capacity is short term, using the slick polymer drag reducing/flow improving chemicals as a fix is likely to prove cheaper and easier. For those operators hampered by waxy or very viscous crudes, other specialty chemicals provide solutions. Availability of specialized chemicals to improve flow conditions in liquids pipelines is increasing. Wax crystal modifier additives are available from several sources. For use with really gunky, almost hard asphalt crudes, an organically-produced emulsion stabilizer has been developed. An in-depth investigation of the products is presented.

Hale, D.

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Colorado Dry Natural Gas Reserves Revision Increases (Billion Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Colorado Dry Natural Gas Reserves Revision Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 116 226 373 1980's 250 131 322 167 160 368 372 340 473 431 1990's 394 719 718 1,000 696 555 802 959 1,898 2,788 2000's 1,825 1,882 2,029 2,114 1,505 2,018 1,178 3,924 3,244 1,601 2010's 2,973 2,509 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Dry Natural Gas Reserves Revision Increases Colorado Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves Revision Increases

103

Oklahoma Dry Natural Gas Reserves Revision Increases (Billion Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Oklahoma Dry Natural Gas Reserves Revision Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 837 962 1,026 1980's 1,293 1,262 2,374 2,189 2,245 2,357 2,158 2,251 2,538 1,984 1990's 1,803 1,710 1,988 1,554 1,580 1,892 1,886 2,396 2,995 3,029 2000's 2,498 1,458 2,159 2,892 2,173 3,064 1,515 2,115 2,786 2,894 2010's 3,224 5,142 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Dry Natural Gas Reserves Revision Increases Oklahoma Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves Revision Increases

104

Improving Gas-Fired Heat Pump Capacity and Performance by Adding a Desiccant Dehumidification Subsystem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

capacity 50%. Increased initial manufacturing costs are estimated at around $500/ton ($142/kW) for volume production. This cost Level is expected to reduce the total initial cost per ton compared to a system without the desiccant subsystem....

Parsons, B. K.; Pesaran, A. A.; Bharathan, D.; Shelpuk, B. C.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Increasing the renewable energy sources absorption capacity of the Macedonian energy system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Macedonian energy sector is the main emitter of greenhouse gases with share of about 70% in the total annual emissions. Also 70%75% of emissions are associated with the electricity generation due to the predominant role of the lignite fuelled power plants. Recently the government has adopted a strategy for the use of renewable energy sources (RES) which identifies a target of 21% of final energy consumption from RES by 2020. In this paper analyses are conducted in order to investigate to which extent and in which way the absorption capacity of the power system for RES electricity can be improved. For this purpose combining various conventional and RES technologies including pump storage hydro power plant and revitalisation of the existing lignite power plants six scenarios for the power system expansion are developed by making use of EnergyPLAN model. Critical excess of electricity analyses are conducted in order to identify the maximal penetration of wind electricity. The results have shown that in the exiting capacities maximal penetration of wind electricity in 2020 is 13% of total electricity consumption. The revitalization of the existing lignite power plants and building of pump storage power plant would increase the wind penetration. Furthermore the developed scenarios are comparatively assessed in terms of the associated greenhouse gases emissions and import of electricity.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

,"U.S. Natural Gas Underground Storage Salt Caverns Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Salt Caverns Capacity (MMcf)" Salt Caverns Capacity (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Natural Gas Underground Storage Salt Caverns Capacity (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1393_nus_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1393_nus_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:43:34 PM"

107

,"U.S. Natural Gas Number of Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Count)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Depleted Fields Capacity (Count)" Depleted Fields Capacity (Count)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Natural Gas Number of Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Count)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1391_nus_8a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1391_nus_8a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:43:06 PM"

108

,"U.S. Natural Gas Number of Underground Storage Salt Caverns Capacity (Count)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Salt Caverns Capacity (Count)" Salt Caverns Capacity (Count)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Natural Gas Number of Underground Storage Salt Caverns Capacity (Count)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1393_nus_8a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1393_nus_8a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:43:34 PM"

109

,"U.S. Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Depleted Fields Capacity (MMcf)" Depleted Fields Capacity (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1391_nus_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1391_nus_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:43:05 PM"

110

,"Tennessee Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","12/2012" Monthly","12/2012" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5290tn2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5290tn2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:23 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Tennessee Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290TN2" "Date","Tennessee Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" 37271,1200 37302,1200 37330,1200 37361,1200

111

,"Texas Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5290tx2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5290tx2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:24 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Texas Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290TX2" "Date","Texas Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" 32324,590248 32689,589780 33054,586502 33419,589018 33785,595229 34150,598782

112

,"Pennsylvania Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5290pa2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5290pa2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:22 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Pennsylvania Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290PA2" "Date","Pennsylvania Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" 32324,805394 32689,805393 33054,640938 33419,640938

113

,"Arkansas Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5290ar2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5290ar2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:08 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Arkansas Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290AR2" "Date","Arkansas Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" 32324,36147 32689,31447 33054,31277 33419,31277 33785,31277 34150,31277

114

,"Colorado Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5290co2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5290co2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:10 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Colorado Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290CO2" "Date","Colorado Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" 37271,100227 37302,100227 37330,100227 37361,100227

115

,"Louisiana Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5290la2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5290la2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:14 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Louisiana Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290LA2" "Date","Louisiana Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" 37271,580037 37302,580037 37330,580037 37361,580037

116

,"Kansas Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5290ks2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5290ks2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:12 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Kansas Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290KS2" "Date","Kansas Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" 32324,334925 32689,334925 33054,301199 33419,301199 33785,290571

117

,"Kentucky Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5290ky2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5290ky2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:13 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Kentucky Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290KY2" "Date","Kentucky Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" 37271,219914 37302,219914 37330,219914 37361,219914

118

,"Ohio Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5290oh2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5290oh2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:21 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Ohio Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290OH2" "Date","Ohio Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" 37271,573784 37302,573784 37330,573784 37361,573784 37391,573784

119

,"Mississippi Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5290ms2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5290ms2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:17 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Mississippi Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290MS2" "Date","Mississippi Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" 37271,134012 37302,134012 37330,134012

120

,"Minnesota Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5290mn2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5290mn2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:15 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Minnesota Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290MN2" "Date","Minnesota Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" 32324,7000 32689,7000 33054,7000 33419,7000 33785,7000 34150,7000

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas capacity increase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

,"Pennsylvania Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5290pa2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5290pa2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:23 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Pennsylvania Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290PA2" "Date","Pennsylvania Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" 37271,713818 37302,713818 37330,713818

122

,"Maryland Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5290md2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5290md2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:14 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Maryland Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290MD2" "Date","Maryland Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" 32324,61978 32689,61978 33054,61978 33419,61978 33785,62400 34150,62400

123

,"Kansas Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5290ks2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5290ks2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:12 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Kansas Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290KS2" "Date","Kansas Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" 37271,301502 37302,301502 37330,301502 37361,301502

124

,"Arkansas Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5290ar2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5290ar2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:08 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Arkansas Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290AR2" "Date","Arkansas Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" 37271,22000 37302,22000 37330,22000 37361,22000

125

,"Montana Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5290mt2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5290mt2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:18 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Montana Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290MT2" "Date","Montana Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" 32324,373963 32689,373960 33054,373960 33419,373960 33785,375010

126

,"Minnesota Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5290mn2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5290mn2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:16 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Minnesota Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290MN2" "Date","Minnesota Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" 37271,7000 37302,7000 37330,7000 37361,7000

127

,"Indiana Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5290in2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5290in2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:11 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Indiana Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290IN2" "Date","Indiana Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" 32324,114603 32689,112045 33054,97332 33419,102246 33785,106176

128

,"Oklahoma Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5290ok2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5290ok2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:21 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Oklahoma Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290OK2" "Date","Oklahoma Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" 32324,377189 32689,364887 33054,362616 33419,362616 33785,359616

129

,"Texas Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5290tx2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5290tx2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:24 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Texas Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290TX2" "Date","Texas Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" 37271,699324 37302,698258 37330,699324 37361,699324

130

,"Oregon Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5290or2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5290or2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:22 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Oregon Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290OR2" "Date","Oregon Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" 37271,17755 37302,21080 37330,21080 37361,21080 37391,21080

131

,"Louisiana Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5290la2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5290la2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:13 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Louisiana Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290LA2" "Date","Louisiana Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" 32324,559019 32689,559019 33054,550823 33419,559823 33785,539200

132

,"Indiana Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5290in2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5290in2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:11 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Indiana Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290IN2" "Date","Indiana Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" 37271,109310 37302,109310 37330,109310 37361,109310

133

,"Alabama Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5290al2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5290al2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:08 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Alabama Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290AL2" "Date","Alabama Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" 37271,5280 37302,5280 37330,5280 37361,5280 37391,5280

134

,"Colorado Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5290co2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5290co2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:09 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Colorado Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290CO2" "Date","Colorado Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" 32324,82662 32689,82662 33054,98999 33419,98999 33785,105790

135

,"Mississippi Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5290ms2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5290ms2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:17 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Mississippi Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290MS2" "Date","Mississippi Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" 32324,108171 32689,108207 33054,108601 33419,114621 33785,114627

136

,"Michigan Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5290mi2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5290mi2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:15 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Michigan Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290MI2" "Date","Michigan Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" 37271,1070717 37302,1070717 37330,1070717 37361,1070717

137

,"Nebraska Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5290ne2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5290ne2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:19 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Nebraska Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290NE2" "Date","Nebraska Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" 37271,39469 37302,39469 37330,39469 37361,39469

138

,"Ohio Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5290oh2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5290oh2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:20 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Ohio Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290OH2" "Date","Ohio Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" 32324,612547 32689,612547 33054,591494 33419,591494 33785,591494 34150,594644

139

,"Alabama Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5290al2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5290al2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:07 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Alabama Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290AL2" "Date","Alabama Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" 34880,2600 35246,3280 35611,3280 35976,3280 36341,3280 36707,3280

140

,"Wyoming Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5290wy2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5290wy2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:28 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Wyoming Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290WY2" "Date","Wyoming Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" 37271,105869 37302,105869 37330,105869 37361,105869

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas capacity increase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

,"Washington Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5290wa2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5290wa2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:26 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Washington Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290WA2" "Date","Washington Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" 32324,36400 32689,36400 33054,32100 33419,34100 33785,34100

142

,"Oregon Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5290or2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5290or2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:22 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Oregon Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290OR2" "Date","Oregon Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" 32689,9791 33054,9791 33419,9791 33785,11445 34150,11445 34515,11622

143

,"California Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5290ca2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5290ca2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:09 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: California Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290CA2" "Date","California Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" 37271,388480 37302,475720 37330,475720 37361,475720

144

,"Utah Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5290ut2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5290ut2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:25 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Utah Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290UT2" "Date","Utah Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" 32324,114980 32689,114980 33054,114980 33419,114980 33785,114980 34150,114980

145

,"Nebraska Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5290ne2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5290ne2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:18 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Nebraska Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290NE2" "Date","Nebraska Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" 32324,88438 32689,88438 33054,143311 33419,93311 33785,93311

146

,"Utah Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5290ut2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5290ut2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:25 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Utah Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290UT2" "Date","Utah Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" 37271,129480 37302,129480 37330,129480 37361,129480 37391,129480

147

,"Michigan Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5290mi2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5290mi2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:15 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Michigan Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290MI2" "Date","Michigan Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" 32324,982362 32689,982362 33054,994542 33419,995181 33785,994281

148

,"Virginia Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5290va2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5290va2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:26 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Virginia Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290VA2" "Date","Virginia Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" 37271,4967 37302,4967 37330,4967 37361,4967 37391,4967

149

,"Wyoming Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5290wy2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5290wy2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:27 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Wyoming Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290WY2" "Date","Wyoming Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" 32324,103831 32689,103830 33054,106130 33419,106130 33785,105668

150

,"Washington Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5290wa2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5290wa2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:26 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Washington Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290WA2" "Date","Washington Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" 37271,37300 37302,37300 37330,37300 37361,37300

151

A fast-time study on increasing the capacity of continuous descent approaches through airborne precision spacing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Due to projectedincrea ses in air traffic, there are several research efforts underway to evaluate ways to safely increase the capacity of the National Airspace System (NAS), improve operational efficiency, andre duce aircraft noise. At NASA Langley...

Weitz, Lesley Anne

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Feedback Can Increase the CapacityCost Function of Discrete Channels with Memory y  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

bound to the capacity­cost func­ tion with feedback (CFB (fi)). The lower bound to CFB (fi) is then shown numerically to exceed the upper bound to CNFB (fi). An upper bound to CFB (fi) is also obtained and feedback capacity­cost functions -- denoted by CNFB (fi) and CFB (fi) respectively -- in order to deter

Alajaji, Fady

153

Gas Turbines Increase the Energy Efficiency of Industrial Processes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

clean fuel gas for the gas turbine is produced by gasification of coal, are presented. Waste heat from the gasifier and the gas turbine exhaust is converted to high pressure steam for steam turbines. Gas turbines may find application in other industrial...

Banchik, I. N.; Bohannan, W. R.; Stork, K.; McGovern, L. J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Multimodal Traffic at Isolated Signalized Intersections: New Management Strategies to Increase Capacity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

passenger car equivalents (pces): buses are counted as 1.7phase; 7 and then combined to obtain a single pce value.estimates of maximum pce counts per cycle (capacities) are

Xuan, Yiguang; Gayah, Vikash; Daganzo, Carlos; Cassidy, Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Possible Pathways for Increasing Natural Gas Use for Transportation...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

emissions reduction. * NG use can provide a pathway for future bio-based fuels (e.g., biogas and gas + biomass-to-liquids GBTL). Natural Gas Use in Transportation Offers...

156

Report: Natural Gas Infrastructure Implications of Increased Demand from the Electric Power Sector  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This report examines the potential infrastructure needs of the U.S. interstate natural gas pipeline transmission system across a range of future natural gas demand scenarios that drive increased electric power sector natural gas use.

157

Optimizing Development Strategies to Increase Reserves in Unconventional Gas Reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

spacing in highly uncertain and risky unconventional gas reservoirs. To achieve the research objectives, an integrated reservoir and decision modeling tool that fully incorporates uncertainty was developed. Monte Carlo simulation was used with a fast...

Turkarslan, Gulcan

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

158

,"U.S. Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

12,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1988" 12,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1988" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","ng_stor_cap_dcu_nus_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/ng/ng_stor_cap_dcu_nus_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 7:03:21 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity" "Sourcekey","N5290US2","NA1393_NUS_2","NA1392_NUS_2","NA1391_NUS_2","NGA_EPG0_SACW0_NUS_MMCF","NGA_EPG0_SACWS_NUS_MMCF","NGA_EPG0_SACWA_NUS_MMCF","NGA_EPG0_SACWD_NUS_MMCF","NA1394_NUS_8","NA1393_NUS_8","NA1392_NUS_8","NA1391_NUS_8"

159

Air Impacts of Increased Natural Gas Acquisition, Processing, and Use: A Critical Review  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Air Impacts of Increased Natural Gas Acquisition, Processing, and Use: A Critical Review to rapid and intensive development of many unconventional natural gas plays (e.g., shale gas, tight sand understanding of local and regional air quality impacts of natural gas extraction, production, and use. Air

Jackson, Robert B.

160

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects 00516 North Dakota Refining Capacity Study  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

North Dakota Refining Capacity Study North Dakota Refining Capacity Study DE-FE0000516 Goal The objective of the North Dakota Refining Capacity study is to assess the feasibility of increasing the oil refinery capacity in North Dakota, and, if possible, determine the scale of such an expansion, the slate of refined product(s) that would produce the most economic benefit, and the preferred ownership model, i.e., private, public or private-public. Performer North Dakota Association of Rural Electric Cooperatives (NDAREC) Corval Group, partnered with Purvin & Gertz and Mustang Engineering Background The genesis of this study came from an April 2008 report issued by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) asserting that North Dakota and Montana have an estimated 3.0 to 4.3 billion barrels of undiscovered, technically recoverable oil in an area known as the Bakken Formation. This assessment shows a 25-fold increase in the amount of recoverable oil compared to the USGS 1995 estimate of 151 million barrels of oil. The Bakken Formation estimate is larger than all other current USGS oil assessments of the lower 48 states and is the largest "continuous" oil accumulation ever assessed by the USGS. The new report points out that the new geologic models applied to the Bakken Formation, advances in drilling and production technologies, and recent oil discoveries have resulted in these substantially larger technically recoverable oil volumes. About 105 million barrels of oil were produced from the Bakken Formation by the end of 2007. In 2008, the formation produced another 27.2 million barrels of oil, which represented 43% of the state’s annual oil production of some 62.3 million barrels. Even though oil prices have dropped significantly in recent months, it appears that oil production from this formation will continue strong for decades to come. Most recently, a major production find has occurred in the Three Forks formation underlying the Bakken. This find is still undergoing significant testing, but early evidence suggests it represents another significant recoverable pool of oil in western North Dakota.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas capacity increase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Geological controls and estimation algorithms of lacustrine shale gas adsorption capacity: A case study of the Triassic strata in the southeastern Ordos Basin, China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract High-pressure methane adsorption experiments on a series of Triassic lacustrine shale moisture-equilibrated samples from the southeastern Ordos Basin, China, were conducted at pressure up to 20MPa, two of which were measured at 30C, 40C, 50C, 60C, and 70C, and seven were performed under reservoir temperature (from 48C to 62C) to investigate the effect of organic matter content, maturity, mineralogical compositions and reservoir conditions (temperature and pressure) on the methane sorption capacity. The total organic carbon contents (TOCs) range from 0.91wt.% to 6.11wt.%. The thermal maturities, as inferred from Rock-Eval Analysis, range from low mature to high mature. The minerals of the shale samples are dominated by clays (3657wt.%) and quartz (1944wt.%). For the entire shale samples the dominant clay minerals are mixed-layer illite/smectite with some illite and no smectite exists, corresponding to a stage of late diagenesis. The studied samples have N2 BET surface areas ranging between 1.47 and 9.21m2/g and pore volumes of 0.0130.034cm3/g. The methane sorption capacities of moisture-equilibrated shale samples show a positive correlation with TOC contents and BET surface areas. No relationship was observed between the clay contents and methane sorption capacities, indicating that clay minerals do not significantly contribute to methane sorption capacity in these organic shales. The Langmuir pressure (PL) increases exponentially with temperature and the Langmuir volume (VL) decreases linearly with temperature. A computational scheme has been developed to calculate the methane sorption capacity of shales as a function of TOC content, temperature and pressure based on Langmuir sorption isotherm function. Using this algorithm methane sorption capacity of organic shales as function of depth can be obtained. Due to the predominating effect of pressure the methane sorption capacity increases with depth initially, through a maximum and then decreases due to the influence of increasing temperature at a greater depth. The maximum gas sorption capacity typically occurs at a depth range between 400 and 900m. With TOC content increasing, the maximum methane sorption capacities of organic shales and the corresponding depths increase.

Wenming Ji; Yan Song; Zhenxue Jiang; Xiangzeng Wang; Yongqiang Bai; Jinyan Xing

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Increased olefins production via recovery of refinery gas hydrocarbons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the process of catalytically cracking heavy petroleum fractions to make gasoline and light fuel oil, by-product waste gases are also generated. The waste gases, normally used as fuel, are themselves rich sources of ethylene, propylene and other light hydrocarbons which can be recovered inexpensively via a cryogenic dephlegmator process. This gas separation technique is exploited in a system, in operation since spring of 1987, which reclaims C/sub 2/+ hydrocarbons from a refinery gas. The reclamation process bolsters production in a nearby ethylene plant. Causing no disruption of ethylene plant operations, the cryogenic hydrocarbon recovery system functions smoothly with existing systems. The dephlegmation unit operation melds distillation and heat transfer processes in a single easily-controlled step which boosts the hydrocarbon purity and recovery above the levels profitably achievable with conventional cryogenic separation techniques. Very attractive operating economics follow from high purity, high recovery, and high energy efficiency. This paper discusses process concepts, economic benefits, plant operation, and early performance results.

Bernhard, D.P.; Rowles, H.C.; Moss, J.A.; Pickering, J.L. Jr.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Easing the natural gas crisis: Reducing natural gas prices through increased deployment of renewable energy and energy efficiency  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Heightened natural gas prices have emerged as a key energy-policy challenge for at least the early part of the 21st century. With the recent run-up in gas prices and the expected continuation of volatile and high prices in the near future, a growing number of voices are calling for increased diversification of energy supplies. Proponents of renewable energy and energy efficiency identify these clean energy sources as an important part of the solution. Increased deployment of renewable energy (RE) and energy efficiency (EE) can hedge natural gas price risk in more than one way, but this paper touches on just one potential benefit: displacement of gas-fired electricity generation, which reduces natural gas demand and thus puts downward pressure on gas prices. Many recent modeling studies of increased RE and EE deployment have demonstrated that this ''secondary'' effect of lowering natural gas prices could be significant; as a result, this effect is increasingly cited as justification for policies promoting RE and EE. This paper summarizes recent studies that have evaluated the gas-price-reduction effect of RE and EE deployment, analyzes the results of these studies in light of economic theory and other research, reviews the reasonableness of the effect as portrayed in modeling studies, and develops a simple tool that can be used to evaluate the impact of RE and EE on gas prices without relying on a complex national energy model. Key findings are summarized.

Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; St. Clair, Matt

2004-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

164

Increase Natural Gas Energy Efficiency - Q & A | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Efficiency - Q & A Home > Increase Natural Gas Energy Efficiency Content Group Activity By term Q & A Feeds No questions have been added to this group yet....

165

Estimation of Molar Heat Capacities in Solution from Gas Chromatographic Data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......the solutions of hydrocarbons--the general...and the molar heat capacity Abstract...Chromatographic Data K roly H berger...measure- ments of heat capacities and...Chem. Eng. Data 20: 24346 (1975...R. Fuchs. Heat capacities of...Enthalpies of combustion of some aliphatic......

Kroly Hberger; Mikls Grgnyi

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Effect of Increased Natural Gas Exports on Domestic Energy Markets  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Appendix B. Summary Tables Table B1. U.S. Annual Average Values from 2015 to 2025 low/ low/ high/ high/ low/ low/ high/ high/ low/ low/ high/ high/ low/ low/ high/ high/ baseline slow rapid slow rapid baseline slow rapid slow rapid baseline slow rapid slow rapid baseline slow rapid slow rapid NATURAL GAS VOLUMES (Tcf) Net Exports (1.90) (0.29) 0.11 0.17 1.74 (1.32) 0.32 0.70 0.79 2.35 (2.72) (1.17) (0.88) (0.73) 0.66 (2.00) (0.38) 0.01 0.07 1.64 gross imports 3.62 3.70 3.70 3.74 3.76 3.19 3.25 3.26 3.27 3.31 4.27 4.42 4.53 4.48 4.68 3.70 3.78 3.79 3.82 3.85

167

Increased stray gas abundance in a subset of drinking water wells near Marcellus shale gas extraction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...2011 ) Natural gas: Should fracking stop? Nature 477 ( 7364 ): 271...13 Boyer EW ( 2012 ) The Impact of Marcellus Gas Drilling on Rural Drinking Water Supplies...the Nicholas School of the Environment and Center on Global Change...derived from depositional environments that ranged from proposed...

Robert B. Jackson; Avner Vengosh; Thomas H. Darrah; Nathaniel R. Warner; Adrian Down; Robert J. Poreda; Stephen G. Osborn; Kaiguang Zhao; Jonathan D. Karr

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Modelling of an integrated gas and electricity network with significant wind capacity.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The large scale integration of wind generation capacity into an electricity network poses technical as well as economic challenges. In this research, three major challenges (more)

Qadrdan, Meysam

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Increased stray gas abundance in a subset of drinking water wells near Marcellus shale gas extraction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...2011 ) Natural gas: Should fracking stop? Nature 477 ( 7364...Formation brine to shallow aquifers in Pennsylvania . Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 109 ( 30...hydraulically fractured shale to aquifers . Ground Water 50...constitute the two primary aquifer li- thologies in northeastern...

Robert B. Jackson; Avner Vengosh; Thomas H. Darrah; Nathaniel R. Warner; Adrian Down; Robert J. Poreda; Stephen G. Osborn; Kaiguang Zhao; Jonathan D. Karr

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Increased stray gas abundance in a subset of drinking water wells near Marcellus shale gas extraction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Pennsylvania, Texas, and North Dakota. In addition to predrilling...Natural gas: Should fracking stop? Nature 477 ( 7364...Middle Devonian of eastern North America . Palaeogeogr Palaeoclimatol...Maryland, New Jersey, North Carolina, Pennsylvania...

Robert B. Jackson; Avner Vengosh; Thomas H. Darrah; Nathaniel R. Warner; Adrian Down; Robert J. Poreda; Stephen G. Osborn; Kaiguang Zhao; Jonathan D. Karr

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Increased stray gas abundance in a subset of drinking water wells near Marcellus shale gas extraction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Kerr RA ( 2010 ) Energy. Natural gas from...1626 . 3 US Energy Information Administration...March 2013 (US Energy Information Administration...Agency, Office of Research and Development, National Risk...isotopes in Icelandic geothermal systems. 1. He-3...

Robert B. Jackson; Avner Vengosh; Thomas H. Darrah; Nathaniel R. Warner; Adrian Down; Robert J. Poreda; Stephen G. Osborn; Kaiguang Zhao; Jonathan D. Karr

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Fact Sheet: Gas Prices and Oil Consumption Would Increase Without Biofuels  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Fact Sheet: Gas Prices and Oil Consumption Would Increase Without Fact Sheet: Gas Prices and Oil Consumption Would Increase Without Biofuels Fact Sheet: Gas Prices and Oil Consumption Would Increase Without Biofuels June 11, 2008 - 1:30pm Addthis Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman and Secretary of Agriculture Edward T. Schafer sent a letter on June 11, 2008 to Senator Jeff Bingaman addressing a number of questions related to biofuels, food, and gasoline and diesel prices. Read the letter. Without Biofuels, Gas Prices Would Increase $.20 to $.35 per Gallon. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) estimates that gasoline prices would be between 20 cents to 35 cents per gallon higher without ethanol1, a first-generation biofuel. For a typical household, that means saving about $150 to $300 per year. For the U.S. overall, this saves gas expenditures of $28 billion to

173

Fact Sheet: Gas Prices and Oil Consumption Would Increase Without Biofuels  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Gas Prices and Oil Consumption Would Increase Without Gas Prices and Oil Consumption Would Increase Without Biofuels Fact Sheet: Gas Prices and Oil Consumption Would Increase Without Biofuels June 11, 2008 - 1:30pm Addthis Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman and Secretary of Agriculture Edward T. Schafer sent a letter on June 11, 2008 to Senator Jeff Bingaman addressing a number of questions related to biofuels, food, and gasoline and diesel prices. Read the letter. Without Biofuels, Gas Prices Would Increase $.20 to $.35 per Gallon. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) estimates that gasoline prices would be between 20 cents to 35 cents per gallon higher without ethanol1, a first-generation biofuel. For a typical household, that means saving about $150 to $300 per year. For the U.S. overall, this saves gas expenditures of $28 billion to

174

The freezing tendency towards 4-coordinated amorphous network causes increase in heat capacity of supercooled Stillinger-Weber silicon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The supercooled liquid silicon, modeled by Stillinger-Weber potential, shows anomalous increase in heat capacity $C_p$, with a maximum $C_p$ value close to 1060 K at zero pressure. We study equilibration and relaxation of the supercooled SW Si, in the temperature range of 1060 K--1070 K at zero pressure. We find that as the relaxation of the metastable supercooled liquid phase initiates, a straight line region (SLR) is formed in cumulative potential energy distributions. The configurational temperature corresponding to the SLR is close to 1060 K, which was earlier identified as the freezing temperature of 4-coordinated amorphous network. The SLR is found to be tangential to the distribution of the metastable liquid phase and thus influences the broadness of the distribution. As the bath temperature is reduced from 1070 K to 1060 K, the effective temperature approaches the bath temperature which results in broadening of the metastable phase distribution. This, in turn, causes an increase in overall fluctuations of potential energy and hence an increase of heat capacity. We also find that during initial stages of relaxation, 4-coordinated atoms form 6-membered rings with a chair--like structure and other structural units that indicate crystallization. Simultaneously a strong correlation is established between the number of chair-shaped 6-membered rings and the number of 4-coordinated atoms in the system. This shows that all properties related to 4-coordinated particles are highly correlated as the SLR is formed in potential energy distributions and this can be interpreted as a consequence of `freezing' of amorphous network formed by 4-coordinated particles.

Pankaj A. Apte; Nandlal Pingua; Arvind Kumar Gautam; Uday Kumar; Soohaeng Yoo Willow; Xiao Cheng Zeng; B. D. Kulkarni

2014-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

175

Localities and their natural gas : stories of problem diffusion, state preemption, and local government capacity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The rapid rise of oil and gas production in the United States poses a new set of policy challenges for local governments. Striving to balance the goals of encouraging economic growth and mitigating its side effects, local ...

Agatstein, Jessica C

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Microsoft Word - Gas Prices and Oil Consumption Would Increase Without Biofuels  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

For Immediate Release For Immediate Release June 11, 2008 202-586-4940 Fact Sheet: Gas Prices and Oil Consumption Would Increase Without Biofuels Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman and Secretary of Agriculture Edward T. Schafer sent a letter on June 11, 2008 to Senator Jeff Bingaman addressing a number of questions related to biofuels, food, and gasoline and diesel prices. The letter is available at http://www.energy.gov Without Biofuels, Gas Prices Would Increase $.20 to $.35 per Gallon. * The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) estimates that gasoline prices would be between 20 cents to 35 cents per gallon higher without ethanol 1 , a first-generation biofuel. * For a typical household, that means saving about $150 to $300 per year. * For the U.S. overall, this saves gas expenditures of $28 billion to $49 billion based on annual

177

Analytical Estimation of CO2 Storage Capacity in Depleted Oil and Gas Reservoirs Based on Thermodynamic State Functions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

dimensions. Vertical discretization of grid size allows to improve aquifer influx modeling......................................... 55 Table 4.2? Reservoir model properties. ................................................................ 58 Table 4... fuel dependency will continue in the near future, increasing the need to develop economic and technologically feasible approaches to reduce and capture and dispose CO2 emissions. Geological storage of CO2 in aquifers and depleted oil and gas...

Valbuena Olivares, Ernesto

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

178

INCREASE  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

The Interdisciplinary Consortium for Research and Educational Access in Science and Engineering (INCREASE), assists minority-serving institutions in gaining access to world-class research facilities.

None

2013-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

179

Simultaneous use of MRM (maximum rectangle method) and optimization methods in determining nominal capacity of gas engines in CCHP (combined cooling, heating and power) systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Energy, economic, and environmental analyses of combined cooling, heating and power (CCHP) systems were performed here to select the nominal capacities of gas engines by combination of optimization algorithm and maximum rectangle method (MRM). The analysis was performed for both priority of providing electricity (PE) and priority of providing heat (PH) operation strategies. Four scenarios (SELL-PE, SELL-PH, No SELL-PE, No SELL-PH) were followed to specify design parameters such as the number and nominal power of prime movers, heating capacities of both backup boiler and energy storage tank, and the cooling capacities of electrical and absorption chillers. By defining an objective function called the Relative Annual Benefit (RAB), Genetic Algorithm optimization method was used for finding the optimal values of design parameters. The optimization results indicated that two gas engines (with nominal powers of 3780 and 3930kW) in SELL-PE scenario, two gas engines (with nominal powers of 5290 and 5300kW) in SELL-PH scenario, one gas engine (with nominal power of 2440kW) in No SELL-PE scenario provided the maximum value of the objective function. Furthermore in No SELL-PE scenario (which had the lowest RAB value in comparison with that for the above mentioned scenarios), thermal energy storage was not required. Due to very low value of RAB, any gas engine in No SELL-PH scenario was not recommended.

Sepehr Sanaye; Navid Khakpaay

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

High Capacity Immobilized Amine Sorbents  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Capacity Immobilized Amine Sorbents Capacity Immobilized Amine Sorbents Opportunity The Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory is seeking licensing partners interested in implementing United States Patent Number 7,288,136 entitled "High Capacity Immobilized Amine Sorbents." Disclosed in this patent is the invention of a method that facilitates the production of low-cost carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) sorbents for use in large-scale gas-solid processes. This method treats an amine to increase the number of secondary amine groups and impregnates the amine in a porous solid support. As a result of this improvement, the method increases CO 2 capture capacity and decreases the cost of using an amine-enriched solid sorbent in CO 2 capture systems. Overview The U.S. Department of Energy has placed a high priority on the separation

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181

Total Working Gas Capacity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Monthly Annual Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History U.S. 4,211,193 4,327,844 4,410,224 4,483,650 4,576,356 2008-2012 Alabama 20,900 20,900 25,150 27,350 27,350 2008-2012 Arkansas 14,500 13,898 13,898 12,036 12,178 2008-2012 California 283,796 296,096 311,096 335,396 349,296 2008-2012 Colorado 42,579 48,129 49,119 48,709 60,582 2008-2012 Illinois 296,318 303,761 303,500 302,385 302,962 2008-2012 Indiana 32,769 32,157 32,982 33,024 33,024 2008-2012 Iowa 87,350 87,414 90,613 91,113 90,313 2008-2012 Kansas 119,260 119,339 123,190 123,225 123,343 2008-2012 Kentucky

182

Total Working Gas Capacity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

12,178 2012-2014 California 374,296 374,296 374,296 374,296 374,296 374,296 2012-2014 Colorado 60,582 60,582 60,582 60,582 60,582 63,774 2012-2014 Illinois 303,312 303,312...

183

lackouts, rising gas prices, changes to the Clean Air Act, proposals to open wilderness and protected offshore areas to gas drilling, and increasing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

B lackouts, rising gas prices, changes to the Clean Air Act, proposals to open wilderness, author Julian Darley takes a hard-hitting look at natural gas as an energy source that rapidly went from nuisance to crutch. Darley outlines the implications of our increased dependence on this energy source

Keeling, Stephen L.

184

Gas Separation by Adsorption in Order to Increase CO2 Conversion to CO via Reverse Water Gas Shift (RWGS) Reaction .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??In this research project, adsorption is considered in conjunction with the reverse water gas shift reaction in order to convert CO2 to CO for synthetic (more)

Abdollahi, Farhang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Feebates, rebates and gas-guzzler taxes: a study of incentives for increased fuel economy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

US fuel economy standards have not been changed significantly in 20 years. Feebates are a market-based alternative in which vehicles with fuel consumption rates above a pivot point are charged fees while vehicles below receive rebates. By choice of pivot points, feebate systems can be made revenue neutral. Feebates have been analyzed before. This study re-examines feebates using recent data, assesses how the undervaluing of fuel economy by consumers might affect their efficacy, tests sensitivity to the cost of fuel economy technology and price elasticities of vehicle demand, and adds assessments of gas-guzzler taxes or rebates alone. A feebate rate of $500 per 0.01 gallon per mile (GPM) produces a 16 percent increase in fuel economy, while a $1000 per 0.01GPM results in a 29 percent increase, even if consumers count only the first 3 years of fuel savings. Unit sales decline by about 0.5 percent but sales revenues increase because the added value of fuel economy technologies outweighs the decrease in sales. In all cases, the vast majority of fuel economy increase is due to adoption of fuel economy technologies rather than shifts in sales.

David L. Greene; Philip D. Patterson; Margaret Singh; Jia Li

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Effects of increasing filing fees for noncompetitive onshore oil and gas leases  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Government Accounting Office (GAO) examined the impact of increasing the fee charged to applicants for noncompetitive onshore oil and gas leases from $25.00 to $75.00. Interior believes the increased filing fee will: (1) reduce casual speculation and multiple filings, thereby reducing fraud potential, development delays caused by assignments, and administrative burden; and (2) generate significant additional revenue. Interior's analysis is, of necessity, based largely on conjecture, but the possibility that the positive results foreseen may not materialize to the degree projected cannot be ruled out. For example, while it is likely that the $75 fee will generate additional revenue over what was obtainable under either the $10 or $25 rate, Interior's projections of at least a million filings annually and $150 million in revenues are far from certain. GAO was also unable in the time available to determine the degree to which the problems the Department desires to overcome exist, or that they will be resolved through a fee increase. Results suggest that: reducing the number of filings is not necessarily the total or only solution to reducing the administrative burden; the casual speculator is not having that great an adverse effect on development, and in fact has certain positive aspects; and the true extent of fraud in the SOG may not be as great as initially supposed. In addition, there are possible adverse effects that may not have been fully considered. For example, the increased filing fee, when coupled with the increased rental, could adversely affect industry's exploration activities, particularly that of the smaller independent. GAO suggests, now that the increase is in effect, that the Interior Department and the Congress closely watch the results, and be prepared to take remedial action if deemed necessary.

Not Available

1982-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

187

High capacity immobilized amine sorbents  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is provided for making low-cost CO.sub.2 sorbents that can be used in large-scale gas-solid processes. The improved method entails treating an amine to increase the number of secondary amine groups and impregnating the amine in a porous solid support. The method increases the CO.sub.2 capture capacity and decreases the cost of utilizing an amine-enriched solid sorbent in CO.sub.2 capture systems.

Gray, McMahan L. (Pittsburgh, PA); Champagne, Kenneth J. (Fredericktown, PA); Soong, Yee (Monroeville, PA); Filburn, Thomas (Granby, CT)

2007-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

188

Feebates, rebates and gas-guzzler taxes: a study of incentives for increased fuel economy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3 3 (2005) 757-775 Feebates, rebates and gas-guzzler taxes: a study of incentives for increased fuel economy $ David L. Greene a, *, Philip D. Patterson b , Margaret Singh c , Jia Li d a Oak Ridge National Laboratory, National Transportation Research Center, 2360 Cherahala Boulevard, Knoxville, TN 37932, USA b Office of Planning, Budget Formulation and Analysis, US Department of Energy, Forestall Building (EE-3B), 1000 Independence Avenue, S.W., Washington, DC 20585, USA c Argonne National Laboratory, 955 L'Enfant Plaza, S.W., Suite 6000, Washington, DC 20024, USA d National Transportation Research Center, The University of Tennessee, 2360 Cherahala Boulevard, Knoxville, TN 37932, USA Abstract US fuel economy standards have not been changed significantly in 20 years. Feebates are a market-based alternative in which vehicles with fuel consumption rates above a ''pivot point''

189

Establishment of an oil and gas database for increased recovery and characterization of oil and gas carbonate reservoir heterogeneity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives of this project are to augment the National Reservoir Database (TORIS database) and to increase our understanding of geologic heterogeneities that affect the recoveries of oil and gas from carbonate reservoirs in the State of Alabama and to identify those resources that are producible at moderate cost. These objectives will be achieved through detailed geological, engineering, and geostatistical characterization of typical Jurassic Smackover Formation hydrocarbon reservoirs in selected productive fields in the State of Alabama. The results of these studies will be used to develop and test mathematical models for prediction of the effects of reservoir heterogeneities in hydrocarbon production. Work to date has focused on the completion of Subtasks 1, 2, and 3. Subtask 1 included the survey and tabulation of available reservoir engineering and geological data relevant to the Smackover reservoir in southwestern Alabama. Subtask 2 comprises the geological and engineering characterization of Smackover reservoir lithofacies. This has been accomplished through detailed examination and analysis of geophysical well logs, core material, well cuttings, and well-test data from wells penetrating Smackover reservoirs in southwestern Alabama. From these data, reservoir heterogeneities, such as lateral and vertical changes in lithology, porosity, permeability, and diagenetic overprint, have been recognized and used to produce maps, cross sections, graphs, and other graphic representations to aid in interpretation of the geologic parameters that affect these reservoirs. Subtask 3 includes the geologic modeling of reservoir heterogeneities for Smackover reservoirs. This research has been based primarily on the evaluation of key geologic and engineering data from selected Smackover fields. 1 fig.

Mancini, E.A.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

A comparative analysis of the technical and economic indicators characterizing independent small-capacity power installations for supplying power to trunk gas lines and gas distribution stations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Results obtained from a feasibility study of different independent sources of energy are presented, using which one can select them on a sound basis for supplying heat and power for trunk gas lines and gas distri...

G. A. Fokin

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

INCREASED FLEXIBILITY OF TURBO-COMPRESSORS IN NATURAL GAS TRANSMISSION THROUGH DIRECT SURGE CONTROL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this Direct Surge Control project was to develop a new internal method to avoid surge of pipeline compressors. This method will safely expand the range and flexibility of compressor operations, while minimizing wasteful recycle flow at the lower end of the operating envelope. The approach is to sense the onset of surge with a probe that directly measures re-circulation at the impeller inlet. The signals from the probe are used by a controller to allow operation at low flow conditions without resorting to a predictive method requiring excessive margin to activate a recycle valve. The sensor developed and demonstrated during this project was a simple, rugged, and sensitive drag probe. Experiments conducted in a laboratory compressor clearly showed the effectiveness of the technique. Subsequent field demonstrations indicated that the increase in range without the need to recycle flow was on the order of 19% to 25%. The cost benefit of applying the direct surge control technology appears to be as much as $120 per hour per compressor for operation without the current level of recycle flow. This could amount to approximately $85 million per year for the U.S. Natural Gas Transmission industry, if direct surge control systems are applied to most pipeline centrifugal compressors.

Robert J. McKee; Shane P. Siebenaler; Danny M. Deffenbaugh

2005-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

192

Air Impacts of Increased Natural Gas Acquisition, Processing, and Use: A Critical Review  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Unconventional oil and natural gas development in general is often referred to as fracking. ... (89) These include Alaska, North Dakota, New Mexico, and West Virginia. ...

Christopher W. Moore; Barbara Zielinska; Gabrielle Ptron; Robert B. Jackson

2014-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

193

World experience with development of combined-cycle and gas turbine technologies and prospects for employing them in the thermal power engineering of Russia using the capacities of the countrys industry producing power machinery and equipment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

World experience gained from using combined-cycle and gas-turbine technologies in power engineering is analyzed. The technical and production capacities of the Russian industry constructing power machinery and...

O. N. Favorskii; V. L. Polishchuk; I. M. Livshits

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Novel Heat Exchanger Increases Cascade Cycle Efficiency for Natural Gas Liquefaction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Liquefaction of natural gas in large scale production facilities has become an accepted, competitive method for supplying fuel to energy-short areas within the past ten years. To reach attractive laid-down cos...

P. S. ONeill; C. F. Gottzmann; J. W. Terbot

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Direct Experimental Evidence for a Negative Heat Capacity in the Liquid-to-Gas Phase Transition in Hydrogen Cluster Ions: Backbending of the Caloric Curve  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

By selecting specific decay reactions in high-energy collisions (60??keV/amu) of hydrogen cluster ions with a helium target (utilizing event-by-event data of a recently developed multicoincidence experiment) and by deriving corresponding temperatures for these microcanonical cluster ensembles (analyzing respective fragment distributions), we are able to construct caloric curves for H3+(H2)m cluster ions (6?m?14). All individual curves and the mean of these curves show a backbending in the plateau region, thus constituting direct evidence for a negative microcanonical heat capacity in the liquid-to-gas transition of these finite systems.

F. Gobet; B. Farizon; M. Farizon; M. J. Gaillard; J. P. Buchet; M. Carr; P. Scheier; T. D. Mrk

2002-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

196

Removing Cross-Border Capacity Bottlenecks in the European Natural Gas MarketA Proposed Merchant-Regulatory Mechanism  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We propose a merchant-regulatory framework to promote investment in the European natural gas network infrastructure based on a price cap over two-part tariffs. As suggested by Vogelsang (J Regul Econ 20:141165,

Anne Neumann; Juan Roselln; Hannes Weigt

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Increasing liquid hydrocarbon recovery from natural gas: Evaluation of the vortex-tube device  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The vortex-tube device provides a useful addition to the range of equipment available to the gas industry. It has been shown that the use of vortex-tube equipment permits improved separation in comparison with a Joule-Thomson system, without entering into the cost and complexity of a true isentropic system such as a turbo-expander unit. The comparative advantage of the vortex tube depends upon the inlet conditions of the gas and the pressure drop that is available. An optimum pressure drop of 25--35% of the inlet gas pressure has been confirmed in practice. Although not yet tested on operating plant, it is expected that a loss of performance of vortex-tube units will occur for inlet liquid-to-gas ratios of greater than 20%. Units with up to 5% liquid at the inlet have been successfully operated showing that a single phase gas at the unit inlet is not essential. It is expected that future application of vortex tube units will be concentrated where performance improvements over Joule-Thomson units, at low capital cost, are required.

Hajdik, B. [CBS Engineering, Houston, TX (United States); Steinle, J. [BEB Erdoel and Erdgas GmbH, Hannover (Germany); Lorey, M. [Filtan Analgenbau GmbH, Langenselbold (Germany); Thomas, K. [Falk and Thomas Engineering GmbH, Wettenberg (Germany)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

198

Improvement of LNG production technology in gas-distribution stations with an increased content of carbon dioxide in supply-line gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The possibility is considered of reducing the weight of absorbent in a carbon dioxide gas cleaning system during liquefied natural gas production in gas-distribution stations (due to use of a pressure drop ... is...

S. P. Gorbachev; S. V. Lyugai

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operable Capacity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

(Barrels per Calendar Day) (Barrels per Calendar Day) Data Series: Total Number of Operable Refineries Number of Operating Refineries Number of Idle Refineries Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operable Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operating Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Idle Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operable Capacity (B/SD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operating Capacity (B/SD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Idle Capacity (B/SD) Vacuum Distillation Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Total Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Delayed Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD Thermal Cracking Fluid Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Visbreaking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Other/Gas Oil Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Cracking Fresh Feed Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Cracking Recycle Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Distillate Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Gas Oil Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Residual Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming Low Pressure Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming High Pressure Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating/Desulfurization Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Naphtha/Reformer Feed Charge Cap (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Gasoline Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Heavy Gas Oil Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Distillate Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Kerosene/Jet Fuel Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Diesel Fuel Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Other Distillate Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Residual/Other Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Residual Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Other Oils Charge Capacity (B/SD) Fuels Solvent Deasphalting Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Total Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Catalytic Cracking Fresh Feed Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Period:

200

Working Gas Capacity of Aquifers  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

96,950 396,092 364,228 363,521 367,108 2008-2012 96,950 396,092 364,228 363,521 367,108 2008-2012 Alabama 0 2012-2012 Arkansas 0 2012-2012 California 0 0 2009-2012 Colorado 0 2012-2012 Illinois 244,900 252,344 216,132 215,017 215,594 2008-2012 Indiana 19,978 19,367 19,437 19,479 19,215 2008-2012 Iowa 87,350 87,414 90,613 91,113 90,313 2008-2012 Kansas 0 2012-2012 Kentucky 6,629 6,629 6,629 6,629 6,629 2008-2012 Louisiana 0 2012-2012 Michigan 0 2012-2012 Minnesota 2,000 2,000 2,000 2,000 2,000 2008-2012 Mississippi 0 2012-2012 Missouri 11,276 3,040 3,656 6,000 6,000 2008-2012 Montana 0 2012-2012 New Mexico 0 2012-2012 New York 0 2012-2012 Ohio 0 2012-2012 Oklahoma 31 2012-2012 Oregon 0 2012-2012 Pennsylvania 942 2012-2012 Tennessee 0 2012-2012 Texas 0 2012-2012 Utah 948 948 939 939 948 2008-2012

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas capacity increase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Natural Gas Aquifers Storage Capacity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,347,516 1,351,832 1,340,633 1,233,017 1,231,897 1,237,269 1,347,516 1,351,832 1,340,633 1,233,017 1,231,897 1,237,269 1999-2012 Alabama 0 1999-2012 Arkansas 0 1999-2012 California 0 0 1999-2012 Colorado 0 1999-2012 Illinois 876,960 874,384 885,848 772,381 777,294 779,862 1999-2012 Indiana 81,490 81,991 81,328 81,268 81,310 80,746 1999-2012 Iowa 278,238 284,747 284,811 288,010 288,210 288,210 1999-2012 Kansas 0 1999-2012 Kentucky 9,567 9,567 9,567 9,567 9,567 9,567 1999-2012 Louisiana 0 1999-2012 Michigan 0 1999-2012 Minnesota 7,000 7,000 7,000 7,000 7,000 7,000 1999-2012 Mississippi 0 1999-2012 Missouri 32,940 32,876 10,889 11,502 13,845 13,845 1999-2012 Montana 0 1999-2012 New Mexico 0 1999-2012 New York 0 1999-2012 Ohio 0 1999-2012 Oklahoma 170 1999-2012 Oregon 0 1999-2012 Pennsylvania

202

Working Gas Capacity of Aquifers  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

96,950 396,092 364,228 363,521 367,108 2008-2012 96,950 396,092 364,228 363,521 367,108 2008-2012 Alabama 0 2012-2012 Arkansas 0 2012-2012 California 0 0 2009-2012 Colorado 0 2012-2012 Illinois 244,900 252,344 216,132 215,017 215,594 2008-2012 Indiana 19,978 19,367 19,437 19,479 19,215 2008-2012 Iowa 87,350 87,414 90,613 91,113 90,313 2008-2012 Kansas 0 2012-2012 Kentucky 6,629 6,629 6,629 6,629 6,629 2008-2012 Louisiana 0 2012-2012 Michigan 0 2012-2012 Minnesota 2,000 2,000 2,000 2,000 2,000 2008-2012 Mississippi 0 2012-2012 Missouri 11,276 3,040 3,656 6,000 6,000 2008-2012 Montana 0 2012-2012 New Mexico 0 2012-2012 New York 0 2012-2012 Ohio 0 2012-2012 Oklahoma 31 2012-2012 Oregon 0 2012-2012 Pennsylvania 942 2012-2012 Tennessee 0 2012-2012 Texas 0 2012-2012 Utah 948 948 939 939 948 2008-2012

203

Nanofluid heat capacities  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Significant increases in the heat capacity of heat transfer fluids are needed not only to reduce the costs of liquid heating and cooling processes but also to bring clean energy producing technologies like concentrating solar power (CSP) to price parity with conventional energy generation. It has been postulated that nanofluids could have higher heat capacities than conventional fluids. In this work nano- and micron-sized particles were added to five base fluids (poly-? olefin mineral oil ethylene glycol a mixture of water and ethylene glycol and calcium nitrate tetrahydrate) and the resulting heat capacities were measured and compared with those of the neat base fluids and the weighted average of the heat capacities of the components. The particles used were inert metals and metal oxides that did not undergo any phase transitions over the temperature range studied. In the nanofluids studied here we found no increase in heat capacity upon the addition of the particles larger than the experimental error.

Anne K. Starace; Judith C. Gomez; Jun Wang; Sulolit Pradhan; Greg C. Glatzmaier

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Establishment of an oil and gas database for increased recovery and characterization of oil and gas carbonate reservoir heterogeneity. [Jurassic Smackover Formation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume contains maps, well logging correlated to porosity and permeability, structural cross section, graph of production history, porosity vs. natural log permeability plot, detailed core log, paragenetic sequence and reservoir characterization sheet of the following fields in southwest Alabama: Appleton oil field; Barnett oil field; Barrytown oil field; Big Escambia Creek gas and condensate field; Blacksher oil field; Broken Leg Creed oil field; Bucatunna Creed oil field; Chappell Hill oil field; Chatom gas and condensate field; Choctaw Ridge oil field; Chunchula gas and condensate field; Cold Creek oil field; Copeland gas and condensate field; Crosbys Creed gas and condensate field; and East Barnett oil field. (AT)

Kopaska-Merkel, D.C.; Moore, H.E. Jr.; Mann, S.D.; Hall, D.R.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Establishment of an oil and gas database for increased recovery and characterization of oil and gas carbonate reservoir heterogeneity. Appendix 1, Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume contains maps, well logging correlated to porosity and permeability, structural cross section, graph of production history, porosity vs. natural log permeability plot, detailed core log, paragenetic sequence and reservoir characterization sheet of the following fields in southwest Alabama: Appleton oil field; Barnett oil field; Barrytown oil field; Big Escambia Creek gas and condensate field; Blacksher oil field; Broken Leg Creed oil field; Bucatunna Creed oil field; Chappell Hill oil field; Chatom gas and condensate field; Choctaw Ridge oil field; Chunchula gas and condensate field; Cold Creek oil field; Copeland gas and condensate field; Crosbys Creed gas and condensate field; and East Barnett oil field. (AT)

Kopaska-Merkel, D.C.; Moore, H.E. Jr.; Mann, S.D.; Hall, D.R.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Fundamentals of Capacity Control  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Whereas capacity planning determines in advance the capacities required to implement a production program, capacity control determines the actual capacities implemented shortly beforehand. The capacity control...

Prof. Dr.-Ing. habil. Hermann Ldding

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE Colloque C7, supplhent au n07, Tome 40, Juillet 1979, page C7-445 TEMPORAL INCREASE OF IONIZATION CURRENT IN NpGAS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, component. rectly f o r the secondary electron emission from the Self-sustaining of current: When the increasing cathode. Current increase was also observedinother current comes near self-sustaining condition i - vation and t h e i r career i n the gas. Self-sustaining cia1 wall of 16 cm in diameter and 12

Boyer, Edmond

208

Driving on the Interior of Campus An increased number of vehicles and small electric/gas carts on campus, both State and private,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Driving on the Interior of Campus An increased number of vehicles and small electric/gas carts on campus, both State and private, have created an increased risk to pedestrians and has damaged walkways Director or the designee. · Private and vendor vehicles are restricted at all times. Vehicles requiring

de Lijser, Peter

209

Electric Capacity | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Capacity Capacity Dataset Summary Description The New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development publishes an annual Energy Outlook, which presents projections of New Zealand's future energy supply, demand, prices and greenhouse gas emissions. The principle aim of these projections is to inform the national energy debate. Included here are the model results for electricity and generation capacity. The spreadsheet provides an interactive tool for selecting which model results to view, and which scenarios to evaluate; full model results for each scenario are also included. Source New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development Date Released Unknown Date Updated December 15th, 2010 (3 years ago) Keywords Electric Capacity Electricity Generation New Zealand projections

210

CHEMISTRY 223: Introductory Physical Chemistry I. Kinetics 1: Gas laws, kinetic theory of collisions. Thermodynamics: Zeroth law of thermodynamics. First law of thermodynamics, heat capacity,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of collisions. Thermodynamics: Zeroth law of thermodynamics. First law of thermodynamics, heat capacity, enthalpy, thermochemistry, bond energies. Second law of thermodynamics; the entropy and free energy functions. Third law of thermodynamics, absolute entropies, free energies, Maxwell relations and chemical

Ronis, David M.

211

Significant Increase in Hydrogen Photoproduction Rates and Yields by Wild-Type Algae is Detected at High Photobioreactor Gas Phase Volume (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This NREL Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technical Highlight describes how hydrogen photoproduction activity in algal cultures can be improved dramatically by increasing the gas-phase to liquid-phase volume ratio of the photobioreactor. NREL, in partnership with subcontractors from the Institute of Basic Biological Problems in Pushchino, Russia, demonstrated that the hydrogen photoproduction rate in algal cultures always decreases exponentially with increasing hydrogen partial pressure above the culture. The inhibitory effect of high hydrogen concentrations in the photobioreactor gas phase on hydrogen photoproduction by algae is significant and comparable to the effect observed with some anaerobic bacteria.

Not Available

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Increasing Gas Prices: Good Economics, but Bad Public Relations Rising gasoline prices captured the attention of the press and politicians in recent months,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Increasing Gas Prices: Good Economics, but Bad Public Relations Rising gasoline prices captured interest during our current gasoline shortage. That is, a higher price rations the product to the best use the supply of gasoline become relatively scarcer? First, the growth of the Chinese and Indian economies

Ahmad, Sajjad

213

Determining the maximal capacity of a combined-cycle plant operating with afterburning of fuel in the gas conduit upstream of the heat-recovery boiler  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effect gained from afterburning of fuel in the gas conduit upstream of the heat-recovery boiler used as part of a PGU-450T combined-cycle plant is considered. The results obtained from ... electric and therma...

V. M. Borovkov; N. M. Osmanova

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Natural Gas Processing Plants in the United States: 2010 Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

This special report presents an analysis of natural gas processing plants This special report presents an analysis of natural gas processing plants in the United States as of 2009 and highlights characteristics of this segment of the industry. The purpose of the paper is to examine the role of natural gas processing plants in the natural gas supply chain and to provide an overview and summary of processing plant characteristics in the United States, such as locations, capacities, and operations. Key Findings There were 493 operational natural gas processing plants in the United States with a combined operating capacity of 77 billion cubic feet (Bcf) per day. Overall, operating capacity increased about 12 percent between 2004 and 2009, not including the processing capacity in Alaska1. At the same time, the number of all processing plants in the lower 48 States decreased

215

electricity generating capacity | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

generating capacity generating capacity Dataset Summary Description The New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development publishes energy data including many datasets related to electricity. Included here are three electricity generating capacity datasets: annual operational electricity generation capacity by plant type (1975 - 2009); estimated generating capacity by fuel type for North Island, South Island and New Zealand (2009); and information on generating plants (plant type, name, owner, commissioned date, and capacity), as of December 2009. Source New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development Date Released Unknown Date Updated July 03rd, 2009 (5 years ago) Keywords biomass coal Electric Capacity electricity generating capacity geothermal Hydro Natural Gas wind Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon Operational Electricity Generation Capacity by Plant Type (xls, 42.5 KiB)

216

Petroleum Gas Oil?Ethanol Blends Used as Feeds: Increased Production of Ethylene and Propylene over Catalytic Steam-Cracking (CSC) Hybrid Catalysts. Different Behavior of Methanol in Blends with Petroleum Gas Oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Petroleum Gas Oil?Ethanol Blends Used as Feeds: Increased Production of Ethylene and Propylene over Catalytic Steam-Cracking (CSC) Hybrid Catalysts. ... Recently developed hybrid catalysts used in the catalytic steam cracking (CSC, formerly called selective deep catalytic cracking or SDCC(1, 2) and also thermal catalytic cracking or TCC(3, 4)) of hydrocarbon heavy feedstocks (naphthas and gas oils) are very efficient in the production of light olefins, particularly ethylene and propylene with a product propylene-to-ethylene ratio close to 1.0. ...

A. Muntasar; R. Le Van Mao; H. T. Yan

2010-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

217

Capacity Markets for Electricity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ternative Approaches for Power Capacity Markets, Papers andprof id=pjoskow. Capacity Markets for Electricity [13]Utility Commission- Capacity Market Questions, available at

Creti, Anna; Fabra, Natalia

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Natural Gas Processing Plants in the United States: 2010 Update / National  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

National Overview National Overview Processing Capacity Processing plants are typically clustered close to major producing areas, with a high number of plants close to the Federal Gulf of Mexico offshore and the Rocky Mountain production areas (Figure 1). In terms of both the number of plants and processing capacity, about half of these plants are concentrated in the States along the Gulf of Mexico. Gulf States have been some of the most prolific natural gas producing areas. U.S. natural gas processing capacity showed a net increase of about 12 percent between 2004 and 2009 (not including the State of Alaska), with the largest increase occurring in Texas, where processing capacity rose by more than 4 Bcf per day. In fact, increases in Texas' processing capacity accounted for 57 percent of the total lower 48 States' capacity increase

219

Integration of a Process Waste Gas into a Site's Energy Concept  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In 1996, the BASF Corporation's Geismar, Louisiana site determined that the increased steam demands of their aggressive investment program would require them to expand their steam generation capacity. The site had operated a gas turbine based...

Peterson, J.

220

FAQs about Storage Capacity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

about Storage Capacity about Storage Capacity How do I determine if my tanks are in operation or idle or non-reportable? Refer to the following flowchart. Should idle capacity be included with working capacity? No, only report working capacity of tanks and caverns in operation, but not for idle tanks and caverns. Should working capacity match net available shell in operation/total net available shell capacity? Working capacity should be less than net available shell capacity because working capacity excludes contingency space and tank bottoms. What is the difference between net available shell capacity in operation and total net available shell capacity? Net available shell capacity in operation excludes capacity of idle tanks and caverns. What do you mean by transshipment tanks?

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas capacity increase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Monitoring Infrastructure Capacity Monitoring Infrastructure Capacity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Levinson, D. (2000) Monitoring Infrastructure Capacity p. 165-181 in Land Market Monitoring for Smart Urban) task. Monitoring infrastructure capacity is at least as complex as monitoring urban land markets Levinson, D. (2000) Monitoring Infrastructure Capacity p. 165-181 in Land Market Monitoring for Smart Urban

Levinson, David M.

222

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Columbia Gas Transmission, LLC on March 16 began planned maintenance on its pipeline in Green County, Pennsylvania. The maintenance will reduce capacity at an interconnect...

223

Development and analytical validation of a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method for the assessment of gastrointestinal permeability and intestinal absorptive capacity in dogs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the characterization and localization of the mucosal lesions.3 Additionally, an important set of biological markers has been validated for the monitoring of IBD activity.4,5 However, these diagnostic techniques do not provide functional information about...-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and cytotoxic drugs have been shown to increase gastrointestinal permeability.64,65 Also, GI permeability tests may also be used to monitor response to therapy. Several studies in humans and dogs have reported the normalization...

Rodriguez Frausto, Heriberto

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

224

Energy Information Administration/Natural Gas Monthly October 2000  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Monthly October 2000 Natural Gas Monthly October 2000 vii Status of Natural Gas Pipeline System Capacity Entering the 2000-2001 Heating Season During the summer and fall of 2000 natural gas prices reached record highs for a nonheating season period. The dramatic rise in prices resulted from an upsurge in natural gas demand, mainly from electric generation needs during a warmer-than-usual spring and summer. The increased demand has occurred while domestic production levels have continued to decrease over the past several years. 1 Low natural gas prices during 1998 and 1999 dampened exploration and development efforts and caused some lower producing wells to be shut in or abandoned. Natural gas pipeline capacity, on the other hand, has grown with end-use demand, and as sources of new supply have developed, new pipelines have been

225

Refinery Capacity Report  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Report --- Full report in PDF (1 MB) XLS --- Refinery Capacity Data by individual refinery as of January 1, 2006 Tables 1 Number and Capacity of Operable Petroleum...

226

Fuel option for gas turbine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Growth in electricity demand is an average of 10% per year. Energy, emission, and economy are importance of critical concerns for generating systems. Therefore, combined cycle power plant is preferred to Electricity Generating Authority of Thailand (EGAT) new power generating capacity. The various option of available fuel for gas turbine are natural gas, liquid fuel and coal fuel. Particularly with the tremendous price increases in imported and domestic fuel supplies, natural gas is an attractive low cost alternative for power generation. EGAT has researched using heavy fuel instead of natural gas since the year 1991. The problems of various corrosion characteristics have been found. In addition, fuel treatment for gas turbine are needed, and along with it, the environmental consideration are options that provide the limitation of environmental regulation.

Tantayakom, S. [Electricity Generating Authority of Thailand, Nonthaburi (Thailand). Chemical and Analysis Dept.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

227

Installed Geothermal Capacity | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Capacity Geothermal Capacity Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Installed Geothermal Capacity International Market Map of U.S. Geothermal Power Plants List of U.S. Geothermal Power Plants Throughout the world geothermal energy is looked at as a potential source of renewable base-load power. As of 2005 there was 8,933 MW of installed power capacity within 24 countries. The International Geothermal Association (IGA) reported 55,709 GWh per year of geothermal electricity. The generation from 2005 to 2010 increased to 67,246 GWh, representing a 20% increase in the 5 year period. The IGA has projected that by 2015 the new installed capacity will reach 18,500 MW, nearly 10,000 MW greater than 2005. [1] Countries with the greatest increase in installed capacity (MW) between

228

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1, 2008 1, 2008 Next Release: September 18, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (Wednesday, September 3, to Wednesday, September 10) Natural gas spot prices increased at most market locations in the Lower 48 States this report week (Wednesday–Wednesday, September 3-10), as the fifth hurricane of the season moving through the Gulf of Mexico has prompted mandatory evacuation orders in some areas as well as evacuation of personnel from offshore platforms. Mandatory evacuation orders in Louisiana have led to the shutdown of at least two processing plants, with a total of 700 million cubic feet (MMcf) per day of processing capacity. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price increased $0.39 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $7.65.

229

Capacity Value of Concentrating Solar Power Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study estimates the capacity value of a concentrating solar power (CSP) plant at a variety of locations within the western United States. This is done by optimizing the operation of the CSP plant and by using the effective load carrying capability (ELCC) metric, which is a standard reliability-based capacity value estimation technique. Although the ELCC metric is the most accurate estimation technique, we show that a simpler capacity-factor-based approximation method can closely estimate the ELCC value. Without storage, the capacity value of CSP plants varies widely depending on the year and solar multiple. The average capacity value of plants evaluated ranged from 45%?90% with a solar multiple range of 1.0-1.5. When introducing thermal energy storage (TES), the capacity value of the CSP plant is more difficult to estimate since one must account for energy in storage. We apply a capacity-factor-based technique under two different market settings: an energy-only market and an energy and capacity market. Our results show that adding TES to a CSP plant can increase its capacity value significantly at all of the locations. Adding a single hour of TES significantly increases the capacity value above the no-TES case, and with four hours of storage or more, the average capacity value at all locations exceeds 90%.

Madaeni, S. H.; Sioshansi, R.; Denholm, P.

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Natural Gas Salt Caverns Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

253,410 341,213 397,560 456,009 512,279 715,821 1999-2012 253,410 341,213 397,560 456,009 512,279 715,821 1999-2012 Alabama 8,300 15,900 15,900 21,900 21,900 21,900 1999-2012 Arkansas 0 1999-2012 California 0 1999-2012 Colorado 0 1999-2012 Illinois 0 1999-2012 Indiana 0 1999-2012 Kansas 931 931 931 931 931 931 1999-2012 Kentucky 0 1999-2012 Louisiana 61,660 88,806 123,341 142,253 161,668 297,020 1999-2012 Maryland 0 1999-2012 Michigan 3,851 3,827 3,821 3,834 3,834 3,834 1999-2012 Mississippi 45,383 62,424 62,301 82,411 90,452 139,627 1999-2012 Montana 0 1999-2012 Nebraska 0 1999-2012 New Mexico 0 1999-2012 New York 2,340 2,340 2,340 2,340 2,340 0 1999-2012 Ohio 0 1999-2012 Oklahoma 0 1999-2012 Oregon 0 1999-2012 Pennsylvania 0 1999-2012 Tennessee 0 1999-2012 Texas 124,686 160,786 182,725 196,140 224,955 246,310 1999-2012

231

West Virginia Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alaska Lower 48 States Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Alaska Lower 48 States Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View

232

Kansas Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alaska Lower 48 States Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Alaska Lower 48 States Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View

233

Montana Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alaska Lower 48 States Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Alaska Lower 48 States Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View

234

Minnesota Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alaska Lower 48 States Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Alaska Lower 48 States Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View

235

Kentucky Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alaska Lower 48 States Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Alaska Lower 48 States Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View

236

Tennessee Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alaska Lower 48 States Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Alaska Lower 48 States Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View

237

Missouri Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alaska Lower 48 States Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Alaska Lower 48 States Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View

238

Oregon Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alaska Lower 48 States Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Alaska Lower 48 States Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View

239

Alabama Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alaska Lower 48 States Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Alaska Lower 48 States Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View

240

Natural Gas Salt Caverns Storage Capacity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

253,410 341,213 397,560 456,009 512,279 715,821 1999-2012 253,410 341,213 397,560 456,009 512,279 715,821 1999-2012 Alabama 8,300 15,900 15,900 21,900 21,900 21,900 1999-2012 Arkansas 0 1999-2012 California 0 1999-2012 Colorado 0 1999-2012 Illinois 0 1999-2012 Indiana 0 1999-2012 Kansas 931 931 931 931 931 931 1999-2012 Kentucky 0 1999-2012 Louisiana 61,660 88,806 123,341 142,253 161,668 297,020 1999-2012 Maryland 0 1999-2012 Michigan 3,851 3,827 3,821 3,834 3,834 3,834 1999-2012 Mississippi 45,383 62,424 62,301 82,411 90,452 139,627 1999-2012 Montana 0 1999-2012 Nebraska 0 1999-2012 New Mexico 0 1999-2012 New York 2,340 2,340 2,340 2,340 2,340 0 1999-2012 Ohio 0 1999-2012 Oklahoma 0 1999-2012 Oregon 0 1999-2012 Pennsylvania 0 1999-2012 Tennessee 0 1999-2012 Texas 124,686 160,786 182,725 196,140 224,955 246,310 1999-2012

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas capacity increase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Pennsylvania Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alaska Lower 48 States Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Alaska Lower 48 States Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View

242

Oklahoma Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alaska Lower 48 States Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Alaska Lower 48 States Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View

243

Natural Gas Depleted Fields Storage Capacity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6,801,291 6,805,490 6,917,547 7,074,773 7,104,948 7,038,245 6,801,291 6,805,490 6,917,547 7,074,773 7,104,948 7,038,245 1999-2012 Alabama 11,000 11,000 11,000 11,000 13,500 13,500 1999-2012 Arkansas 22,000 22,000 21,760 21,760 21,359 21,853 1999-2012 California 487,711 498,705 513,005 542,511 570,511 592,411 1999-2012 Colorado 98,068 95,068 105,768 105,768 105,858 124,253 1999-2012 Illinois 103,731 103,606 103,606 218,106 220,070 220,070 1999-2012 Indiana 32,804 32,946 32,946 30,003 30,003 30,003 1999-2012 Iowa 0 1999-2012 Kansas 287,996 281,291 281,370 283,891 283,800 283,974 1999-2012 Kentucky 210,792 210,792 210,801 212,184 212,184 212,184 1999-2012 Louisiana 527,051 527,051 528,626 528,626 528,626 402,626 1999-2012 Maryland 64,000 64,000 64,000 64,000 64,000 64,000 1999-2012

244

Mississippi Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alaska Lower 48 States Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Alaska Lower 48 States Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View

245

Wyoming Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alaska Lower 48 States Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Alaska Lower 48 States Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View

246

Texas Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alaska Lower 48 States Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Alaska Lower 48 States Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View

247

Louisiana Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alaska Lower 48 States Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Alaska Lower 48 States Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View

248

Ohio Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Lower 48 States Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico...

249

California Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Lower 48 States Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico...

250

Arkansas Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Lower 48 States Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico...

251

Utah Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Lower 48 States Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico...

252

Alaska Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Lower 48 States Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico...

253

Arkansas Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download...

254

California Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download...

255

Kansas Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download...

256

Oklahoma Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download...

257

Alaska Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download...

258

Colorado Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download...

259

Minnesota Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download...

260

Missouri Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas capacity increase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Utah Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download...

262

Indiana Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alaska Lower 48 States Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Alaska Lower 48 States Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View

263

Working Gas Capacity of Salt Caverns  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

230,456 271,785 312,003 351,017 488,268 2008-2012 230,456 271,785 312,003 351,017 488,268 2008-2012 Alabama 11,900 11,900 16,150 16,150 16,150 2008-2012 Arkansas 0 2012-2012 California 0 2012-2012 Colorado 0 2012-2012 Illinois 0 2012-2012 Indiana 0 2012-2012 Kansas 375 375 375 375 375 2008-2012 Kentucky 0 2012-2012 Louisiana 57,630 84,487 100,320 111,849 200,702 2008-2012 Maryland 0 2012-2012 Michigan 2,154 2,150 2,159 2,159 2,159 2008-2012 Mississippi 43,292 43,758 56,928 62,932 100,443 2008-2012 Montana 0 2012-2012 Nebraska 0 2012-2012 New Mexico 0 2012-2012 New York 1,450 1,450 1,450 1,450 0 2008-2012 Ohio 0 2012-2012 Oklahoma 0 2012-2012 Oregon 0 2012-2012 Pennsylvania 0 2012-2012 Tennessee 0 2012-2012 Texas 109,655 123,664 130,621 152,102 164,439 2008-2012 Utah 0 2012-2012 Virginia

264

Working Gas Capacity of Depleted Fields  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,583,786 3,659,968 3,733,993 3,769,113 3,720,980 2008-2012 ,583,786 3,659,968 3,733,993 3,769,113 3,720,980 2008-2012 Alabama 9,000 9,000 9,000 11,200 11,200 2008-2012 Arkansas 14,500 13,898 13,898 12,036 12,178 2008-2012 California 283,796 296,096 311,096 335,396 349,296 2008-2012 Colorado 42,579 48,129 49,119 48,709 60,582 2008-2012 Illinois 51,418 51,418 87,368 87,368 87,368 2008-2012 Indiana 12,791 12,791 13,545 13,545 13,809 2008-2012 Iowa 0 2012-2012 Kansas 118,885 118,964 122,814 122,850 122,968 2008-2012 Kentucky 94,598 96,855 100,971 100,971 100,971 2008-2012 Louisiana 284,544 284,544 284,544 285,779 211,780 2008-2012 Maryland 17,300 18,300 18,300 18,300 18,300 2008-2012 Michigan 660,693 664,486 664,906 670,473 671,041 2008-2012 Mississippi 53,140 65,220 70,320 68,159 68,159 2008-2012

265

Michigan Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alaska Lower 48 States Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Alaska Lower 48 States Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View

266

Maryland Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alaska Lower 48 States Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Alaska Lower 48 States Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View

267

New York Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alaska Lower 48 States Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Alaska Lower 48 States Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View

268

Virginia Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alaska Lower 48 States Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Alaska Lower 48 States Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View

269

EPA-GHG Inventory Capacity Building | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

EPA-GHG Inventory Capacity Building EPA-GHG Inventory Capacity Building Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: US EPA GHG inventory Capacity Building Agency/Company /Organization: United States Environmental Protection Agency Sector: Energy, Land Topics: GHG inventory, Background analysis Resource Type: Training materials, Lessons learned/best practices References: US EPA GHG inventory Capacity Building[1] Logo: US EPA GHG inventory Capacity Building "Developing greenhouse gas inventories is an important first step to managing emissions. U.S. EPA's approach for building capacity to develop GHG inventories is based on the following lessons learned from working alongside developing country experts: Technical expertise for GHG inventories already exists in developing countries.

270

A Significant Increase in Hydrogen Photoproduction Rates and Yields by Wild-Type Algae is Detected at High Photobioreactor Gas Phase Volume (Fact Sheet), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

503 * July 2012 503 * July 2012 Hydrogen photoproduction by 500 mL of sulfur/phosphorus- deprived (-S -P) algal cultures placed in PhBRs with different headspace volumes (165-925 mL). The final percentages of H 2 gas in the gas phase of the PhBRs are indicated in the figure inset; the Y-axis reports actual amounts of H 2 produced. The yield of H 2 gas in the PhBR with a historically small gas phase volume is shown as a dotted line. A Significant Increase in Hydrogen Photoproduction Rates and Yields by Wild-Type Algae is Detected at High Photobioreactor Gas Phase Volume Project: Biological Systems for Hydrogen Photoproduction Team: Maria L. Ghirardi and Michael Seibert, NREL; Sergey N. Kosourov, Khorcheska A. Batyrova, Ekaterina P. Petushkova, and Anatoly A. Tsygankov, IBBP, Russian Academy of Sciences, Russia

271

OpenEI - Electric Capacity  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

New Zealand Energy New Zealand Energy Outlook (2010): Electricity and Generation Capacity http://en.openei.org/datasets/node/357 The New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development publishes an annual Energy Outlook, which presents projections of New Zealand's future energy supply, demand, prices and greenhouse gas emissions. The principle aim of these projections is to inform the national energy debate. Included here are the model results for electricity and generation capacity. The spreadsheet provides an interactive tool for selecting which model results to view, and which scenarios to evaluate; full model results for each scenario are also included.

License

272

Natural gas dehydration by desiccant materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Water vapor in a natural gas stream can result in line plugging due to hydrate formation, reduction of line capacity due to collection of free water in the line, and increased risk of damage to the pipeline due to the corrosive effects of water. Therefore, water vapor must be removed from natural gas to prevent hydrate formation and corrosion from condensed water. Gas dehydration is the process of removing water vapor from a gas stream to lower the temperature at which water will condense from the stream; this temperature is called the dew point of the gas. Molecular sieves are considered as one of the most important materials that are used as desiccant materials in industrial natural gas dehydration. This work shows a study of natural gas dehydration using 3A molecular sieve as a type of solid desiccant materials, the scope of this work was to build up a pilot scale unit for a natural gas dehydration as simulation of actual existing plant for Egyptian Western Desert Gas Company (WDGC). The effect of different operating conditions (water vapor concentration and gas flow rate) on dehydration of natural gas was studied. The experimental setup consists of cylinder filled with 3A molecular sieve to form a fixed bed, then pass through this bed natural gas with different water vapor concentration, The experimental setup is fitted with facilities to control bed pressure, flow rate, measure water vapor concentration and bed temperature, a gas heater was used to activate molecular sieve bed. Increasing water vapor concentration in inlet feed gas leads to a marked decrease in dehydration efficiency. As expected, a higher inlet flow rate of natural gas decrease dehydration efficiency. Increasing feed pressure leads to higher dehydration efficiency.

Hassan A.A. Farag; Mustafa Mohamed Ezzat; Hoda Amer; Adel William Nashed

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

ORISE: Capacity Building  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Capacity Building Capacity Building Because public health agencies must maintain the resources to respond to public health challenges, critical situations and emergencies, the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) helps government agencies and organizations develop a solid infrastructure through capacity building. Capacity building refers to activities that improve an organization's ability to achieve its mission or a person's ability do his or her job more effectively. For organizations, capacity building may relate to almost any aspect of its work-from leadership and administration to program development and implementation. Strengthening an organizational infrastructure can help agencies and community-based organizations more quickly identify targeted audiences for

274

Primer on gas integrated resource planning  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discusses the following topics: gas resource planning: need for IRP; gas integrated resource planning: methods and models; supply and capacity planning for gas utilities; methods for estimating gas avoided costs; economic analysis of gas utility DSM programs: benefit-cost tests; gas DSM technologies and programs; end-use fuel substitution; and financial aspects of gas demand-side management programs.

Goldman, C.; Comnes, G.A.; Busch, J.; Wiel, S. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Capacity mapping for optimum utilization of pulverizers for coal fired boilers - article no. 032201  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Capacity mapping is a process of comparison of standard inputs with actual fired inputs to assess the available standard output capacity of a pulverizer. The base capacity is a function of grindability; fineness requirement may vary depending on the volatile matter (VM) content of the coal and the input coal size. The quantity and the inlet will change depending on the quality of raw coal and output requirement. It should be sufficient to dry pulverized coal (PC). Drying capacity is also limited by utmost PA fan power to supply air. The PA temperature is limited by air preheater (APH) inlet flue gas temperature; an increase in this will result in efficiency loss of the boiler. The higher PA inlet temperature can be attained through the economizer gas bypass, the steam coiled APH, and the partial flue gas recirculation. The PS/coal ratioincreases with a decrease in grindability or pulverizer output and decreases with a decrease in VM. The flammability of mixture has to be monitored on explosion limit. Through calibration, the PA flow and efficiency of conveyance can be verified. The velocities of coal/air mixture to prevent fallout or to avoid erosion in the coal carrier pipe are dependent on the PC particle size distribution. Metal loss of grinding elements inversely depends on the YGP index of coal. Variations of dynamic loading and wearing of grinding elements affect the available milling capacity and percentage rejects. Therefore, capacity mapping in necessary to ensure the available pulverizer capacity to avoid overcapacity or undercapacity running of the pulverizing system, optimizing auxiliary power consumption. This will provide a guideline on the distribution of raw coal feeding in different pulverizers of a boiler to maximize system efficiency and control, resulting in a more cost effective heat rate.

Bhattacharya, C. [National Power Training Institute, Durgapur (India)

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

276

"ALON ISRAEL OIL COMPANY LTD",820,13,"ALON BAKERSFIELD OPERATING INC","West Coast","California","BAKERSFIELD",5,"CAT HYDROCRACKING, GAS OIL","Downstream Charge Capacity, Current Year (barrels per calendar day)",14250  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

CORPORATION","SURVEY","PERIOD","COMPANY_NAME","RDIST_LABEL","STATE_NAME","SITE","PADD","PRODUCT","SUPPLY","QUANTITY" CORPORATION","SURVEY","PERIOD","COMPANY_NAME","RDIST_LABEL","STATE_NAME","SITE","PADD","PRODUCT","SUPPLY","QUANTITY" "ALON ISRAEL OIL COMPANY LTD",820,13,"ALON BAKERSFIELD OPERATING INC","West Coast","California","BAKERSFIELD",5,"CAT HYDROCRACKING, GAS OIL","Downstream Charge Capacity, Current Year (barrels per calendar day)",14250 "ALON ISRAEL OIL COMPANY LTD",820,13,"ALON BAKERSFIELD OPERATING INC","West Coast","California","BAKERSFIELD",5,"CAT HYDROCRACKING, GAS OIL","Downstream Charge Capacity, Current Year (barrels per stream day)",15000

277

EIA - Electricity Generating Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Electricity Generating Capacity Release Date: January 3, 2013 | Next Release: August 2013 Year Existing Units by Energy Source Unit Additions Unit Retirements 2011 XLS XLS XLS 2010...

278

Cascading of Fluctuations in Interdependent Energy Infrastructures: Gas-Grid Coupling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The revolution of hydraulic fracturing has dramatically increased the supply and lowered the cost of natural gas in the United States driving an expansion of natural gas-fired generation capacity in many electrical grids. Unrelated to the natural gas expansion, lower capital costs and renewable portfolio standards are driving an expansion of intermittent renewable generation capacity such as wind and photovoltaic generation. These two changes may potentially combine to create new threats to the reliability of these interdependent energy infrastructures. Natural gas-fired generators are often used to balance the fluctuating output of wind generation. However, the time-varying output of these generators results in time-varying natural gas burn rates that impact the pressure in interstate transmission pipelines. Fluctuating pressure impacts the reliability of natural gas deliveries to those same generators and the safety of pipeline operations. We adopt a partial differential equation model of natural gas pipeli...

Chertkov, Michael; Backhaus, Scott

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Enhanced Efficiency of Internal Combustion Engines By Employing Spinning Gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The efficiency of the internal combustion engine might be enhanced by employing spinning gas. A gas spinning at near sonic velocities has an effectively higher heat capacity, which allows practical fuel cycles, which are far from the Carnot efficiency, to approach more closely the Carnot efficiency. A gain in fuel efficiency of several percent is shown to be theoretically possible for the Otto and Diesel cycles. The use of a flywheel, in principle, could produce even greater increases in the efficiency.

Geyko, Vasily; Fisch, Nathaniel

2014-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

280

Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Building and Operating Electric  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Building and Operating Electric Power Plants in the Upper Colorado-1712 As demand for electricity increases, investments into new generation capacity from renewable,CaliforniaandtherestoftheWestCoastoftheUnited States started to experience severe shortages of electricity. Investments

Kammen, Daniel M.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas capacity increase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Liquid heat capacity lasers  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The heat capacity laser concept is extended to systems in which the heat capacity lasing media is a liquid. The laser active liquid is circulated from a reservoir (where the bulk of the media and hence waste heat resides) through a channel so configured for both optical pumping of the media for gain and for light amplification from the resulting gain.

Comaskey, Brian J. (Walnut Creek, CA); Scheibner, Karl F. (Tracy, CA); Ault, Earl R. (Livermore, CA)

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

capacity | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

capacity capacity Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 9, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts. The data is broken down into power only, combined heat and power, cumulative planned additions, cumulative unplanned conditions, and cumulative retirements and total electric power sector capacity . Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO capacity consumption EIA Electricity generating Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Electricity Generating Capacity- Reference Case (xls, 130.1 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment

283

Natural gas pipeline technology overview.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United States relies on natural gas for one-quarter of its energy needs. In 2001 alone, the nation consumed 21.5 trillion cubic feet of natural gas. A large portion of natural gas pipeline capacity within the United States is directed from major production areas in Texas and Louisiana, Wyoming, and other states to markets in the western, eastern, and midwestern regions of the country. In the past 10 years, increasing levels of gas from Canada have also been brought into these markets (EIA 2007). The United States has several major natural gas production basins and an extensive natural gas pipeline network, with almost 95% of U.S. natural gas imports coming from Canada. At present, the gas pipeline infrastructure is more developed between Canada and the United States than between Mexico and the United States. Gas flows from Canada to the United States through several major pipelines feeding U.S. markets in the Midwest, Northeast, Pacific Northwest, and California. Some key examples are the Alliance Pipeline, the Northern Border Pipeline, the Maritimes & Northeast Pipeline, the TransCanada Pipeline System, and Westcoast Energy pipelines. Major connections join Texas and northeastern Mexico, with additional connections to Arizona and between California and Baja California, Mexico (INGAA 2007). Of the natural gas consumed in the United States, 85% is produced domestically. Figure 1.1-1 shows the complex North American natural gas network. The pipeline transmission system--the 'interstate highway' for natural gas--consists of 180,000 miles of high-strength steel pipe varying in diameter, normally between 30 and 36 inches in diameter. The primary function of the transmission pipeline company is to move huge amounts of natural gas thousands of miles from producing regions to local natural gas utility delivery points. These delivery points, called 'city gate stations', are usually owned by distribution companies, although some are owned by transmission companies. Compressor stations at required distances boost the pressure that is lost through friction as the gas moves through the steel pipes (EPA 2000). The natural gas system is generally described in terms of production, processing and purification, transmission and storage, and distribution (NaturalGas.org 2004b). Figure 1.1-2 shows a schematic of the system through transmission. This report focuses on the transmission pipeline, compressor stations, and city gates.

Folga, S. M.; Decision and Information Sciences

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Ethylene capacity tops 77 million mty  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

World ethylene production capacity is 77.8 million metric tons/year (mty). This total represents an increase of more than 6 million mty, or almost 9%, over last year`s survey. The biggest reason for the large change is more information about plants in the CIS. Also responsible for the increase in capacity is the start-up of several large ethylene plants during the past year. The paper discusses construction of ethylene plants, feedstocks, prices, new capacity, price outlook, and problems in Europe`s ethylene market.

Rhodes, A.K.; Knott, D.

1995-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

285

High sensitive and selective ethylene measurement by using a large-capacity-on-chip preconcentrator device  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Using a large-capacity-on-chip preconcentrator device for selective ethylene measurement leads to some challenges. The dramatic increase of the water influence and the gas chromatography effect of the preconcentrator must be known and compensated before a good measurement with this new device can be performed. Nevertheless, after facing these challenges the small gas chromatograph presented in this paper was for the first time able to detect an ethylene concentration of 170ppbv. Deduced from this measurement a detection limit below 50ppbv can be reached, which is absolutely mandatory for shelf life prediction of climacteric fruits. New stationary phases were tested. The used packed gas chromatography column is now capable of separating vaporized water and ethylene gas from each other, which was a breakthrough in the analysis of ethylene concentrations in ambient air. It can be predicted that the system will be available at a price under 1000.

S. Janssen; T. Tessmann; W. Lang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook EIA Home > Natural Gas > Natural Gas Weekly Update Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook This summary is based on the most recent Short-Term Energy Outlook released May 6, 2002. EIA projects that natural gas wellhead prices will average $2.73 per MMBtu in 2002 compared with about $4.00 per MMBtu last year (Short-Term Energy Outlook, May 2002). This projection reflects the sharp increases in spot and near-term futures prices in recent weeks. Average wellhead prices have risen 38 percent from $2.14 per MMBtu in February to an estimated $2.96 in April. Spot prices at the Henry Hub have increased to an even greater extent, rising more than $1.50 per MMBtu since early February. The upward price trend reflects a number of influences, such as unusual weather patterns that have led to increased gas consumption, and tensions in the Middle East and rising crude oil prices. Other factors contributing to the recent price surge include the strengthening economy, the increased capacity and planned new capacity of gas-burning power plants, and concerns about the decline in gas-directed drilling.

287

WINDExchange: Wind Potential Capacity  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

area with a gross capacity factor1 of 35% and higher, which may be suitable for wind energy development. AWS Truepower LLC produced the wind resource data with a spatial...

288

Panama Canal capacity analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Predicting the transit capacities of the various Panama Canal alternatives required analyzing data on present Canal operations, adapting and extending an existing computer simulation model, performing simulation runs for each of the alternatives, and using the simulation model outputs to develop capacity estimates. These activities are summarized in this paper. A more complete account may be found in the project final report (TAMS 1993). Some of the material in this paper also appeared in a previously published paper (Rosselli, Bronzini, and Weekly 1994).

Bronzini, M.S. [Oak Ridge National Lab., Knoxville, TN (United States). Center for Transportation Analysis

1995-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

289

QER Public Meeting in Denver, CO: Gas-Electricity Interdependencies...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

and General Manager, Brazos Electric Cooperative - Statement Beth Musich, Director Energy Markets and Capacity Products, Southern California Gas Company and San Diego Gas &...

290

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

is National Hurricane Preparedness Week. Natural Gas Transportation Update: Texas Gas Transmission (TGT) announced that the company will reduce capacity through the...

291

Definition: Deferred Distribution Capacity Investments | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Deferred Distribution Capacity Investments Deferred Distribution Capacity Investments Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Deferred Distribution Capacity Investments As with the transmission system, reducing the load and stress on distribution elements increases asset utilization and reduces the potential need for upgrades. Closer monitoring and load management on distribution feeders could potentially extend the time before upgrades or capacity additions are required.[1] Related Terms load, transmission lines, transmission line, sustainability References ↑ SmartGrid.gov 'Description of Benefits' An inl LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. ine Glossary Definition Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Deferred_Distribution_Capacity_Investments&oldid=502613

292

EPA-GHG Inventory Capacity Building | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

EPA-GHG Inventory Capacity Building EPA-GHG Inventory Capacity Building (Redirected from US EPA GHG Inventory Capacity Building) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: US EPA GHG inventory Capacity Building Agency/Company /Organization: United States Environmental Protection Agency Sector: Energy, Land Topics: GHG inventory, Background analysis Resource Type: Training materials, Lessons learned/best practices References: US EPA GHG inventory Capacity Building[1] Logo: US EPA GHG inventory Capacity Building "Developing greenhouse gas inventories is an important first step to managing emissions. U.S. EPA's approach for building capacity to develop GHG inventories is based on the following lessons learned from working alongside developing country experts: Technical expertise for GHG inventories already exists in developing

293

Russias Natural Gas Export Potential up to 2050  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent increases in natural gas reserve estimates and advances in shale gas technology make natural gas a fuel with good prospects to serve a bridge to a low-carbon world. Russia is an important energy supplier as it holds the world largest natural gas reserves and it is the worlds largest exporter of natural gas. Energy was one of the driving forces of Russias recent economic recovery from the economic collapse of 1990s. These prospects have changed drastically with a global recession and the collapse of oil and gas prices from their peaks of 2008. An additional factor is an ongoing surge in a liquefied natural gas (LNG) capacity and a development of Central Asias and the Middle East gas supplies that can compete with Russian gas in its traditional (European) and potential (Asian) markets. To study the long-term prospects for Russian natural gas, we employ the MIT Emissions Prediction and Policy Analysis (EPPA) model, a computable general equilibrium model of the world economy. While we consider the updated reserve estimates for all world regions, in this paper we focus on the results for Russian natural gas trade. The role of natural gas is explored in the context of several policy assumptions: with no greenhouse gas mitigation policy and scenarios of emissions targets in developed countries. Scenarios where Europe takes on an even more restrictive target of 80

Sergey Paltsev; Sergey Paltsev

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Measuring the capacity impacts of demand response  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Critical peak pricing and peak time rebate programs offer benefits by increasing system reliability, and therefore, reducing capacity needs of the electric power system. These benefits, however, decrease substantially as the size of the programs grows relative to the system size. More flexible schemes for deployment of demand response can help address the decreasing returns to scale in capacity value, but more flexible demand response has decreasing returns to scale as well. (author)

Earle, Robert; Kahn, Edward P.; Macan, Edo

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

295

Capacity factors and solar job creation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We discuss two main job creation statistics often used by solar advocates to support increased solar deployment. Whilst overall solar technologies have a tendency to be labor-intensive, we find that the jobs per gigawatt hour statistic is relatively mis-leading as it has a tendency to reward technologies that have a low capacity factor. Ultimately the lower the capacity factor the more amplified the solar job creation number.

Matt Croucher

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

predicted increase in fuel prices include: low levels of spare crude oil capacity, political tensions in parts of the world, recent hurricanes and associated supply disruptions,...

297

Refinery Capacity Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Refinery Capacity Report Refinery Capacity Report June 2013 With Data as of January 1, 2013 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or other Federal agencies. Table 1. Number and Capacity of Operable Petroleum Refineries by PAD District and State as of January 1, 2013

298

Dual capacity reciprocating compressor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A multi-cylinder compressor particularly useful in connection with northern climate heat pumps and in which different capacities are available in accordance with reversing motor rotation is provided with an eccentric cam on a crank pin under a fraction of the connecting rods, and arranged for rotation upon the crank pin between opposite positions 180[degree] apart so that with cam rotation on the crank pin such that the crank throw is at its normal maximum value all pistons pump at full capacity, and with rotation of the crank shaft in the opposite direction the cam moves to a circumferential position on the crank pin such that the overall crank throw is zero. Pistons whose connecting rods ride on a crank pin without a cam pump their normal rate with either crank rotational direction. Thus a small clearance volume is provided for any piston that moves when in either capacity mode of operation. 6 figs.

Wolfe, R.W.

1984-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

299

Dual capacity reciprocating compressor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A multi-cylinder compressor 10 particularly useful in connection with northern climate heat pumps and in which different capacities are available in accordance with reversing motor 16 rotation is provided with an eccentric cam 38 on a crank pin 34 under a fraction of the connecting rods, and arranged for rotation upon the crank pin between opposite positions 180.degree. apart so that with cam rotation on the crank pin such that the crank throw is at its normal maximum value all pistons pump at full capacity, and with rotation of the crank shaft in the opposite direction the cam moves to a circumferential position on the crank pin such that the overall crank throw is zero. Pistons 24 whose connecting rods 30 ride on a crank pin 36 without a cam pump their normal rate with either crank rotational direction. Thus a small clearance volume is provided for any piston that moves when in either capacity mode of operation.

Wolfe, Robert W. (Wilkinsburg, PA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Refinery Capacity Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Refinery Capacity Report Refinery Capacity Report With Data as of January 1, 2013 | Release Date: June 21, 2013 | Next Release Date: June 20, 2014 Previous Issues Year: 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000 1999 1997 1995 1994 Go Data series include fuel, electricity, and steam purchased for consumption at the refinery; refinery receipts of crude oil by method of transportation; and current and projected atmospheric crude oil distillation, downstream charge, and production capacities. Respondents are operators of all operating and idle petroleum refineries (including new refineries under construction) and refineries shut down during the previous year, located in the 50 States, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, Guam, and other U.S. possessions.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas capacity increase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

The role of sustainable agriculture and renewableresource management in reducing greenhousegas emissions and increasing sinks in China and India  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...iii) increasing renewable-energy production from biomass that either substitutes for...the production of renewable energy from biomass. Biomass avoids GHG emissions...fossil fuels substituted by the biomass energy (or woody fuels substituted...

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

EIA - All Natural Gas Analysis  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

All Natural Gas Analysis All Natural Gas Analysis 2010 Peaks, Plans and (Persnickety) Prices This presentation provides information about EIA's estimates of working gas peak storage capacity, and the development of the natural gas storage industry. Natural gas shale and the need for high deliverability storage are identified as key drivers in natural gas storage capacity development. The presentation also provides estimates of planned storage facilities through 2012. Categories: Prices, Storage (Released, 10/28/2010, ppt format) U.S Natural Gas Imports and Exports: 2009 This report provides an overview of U.S. international natural gas trade in 2009. Natural gas import and export data, including liquefied natural gas (LNG) data, are provided through the year 2009 in Tables SR1-SR9. Categories: Imports & Exports/Pipelines (Released, 9/28/2010, Html format)

303

Employee-Driven Initiative Increases Treatment Capacity, Reduces...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

on the Hanford Site," said RL's Hanford Groundwater Remediation Senior Technical Advisor John Morse. "These improvements make us better stewards of our resources as we do...

304

Increasing NOAA's computational capacity to improve global forecast modeling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

competing numerical weather prediction centers such as the European Center for MediumRange Weather Forecasts (ECMWF). For most sensibleweather metrics, we lag 1 to 1.5 days (i.e., they make a 3.5day of NOAA's current investment in weather satellites. Without a modern data assimilation system

Hamill, Tom

305

Question 2: Gas procurement strategy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article is a collection of responses from natural gas distribution company representatives to questions on how the start-up of the natural gas futures market has changed gas procurement strategies, identification of procurement problems related to pipeline capacity, deliverability, or pregranted abandonment of firm transportation, the competition of separate utility subsidiaries with brokers, marketers, and other gas suppliers who sell gas to large-volume industrial or other 'noncore' customers.

Carrigg, J.A.; Crespo, J.R.; Davis, E.B. Jr.; Farman, R.D.; Green, R.C. Jr.; Hale, R.W.; Howard, J.J.; McCormick, W.T. Jr.; Page, T.A.; Ryan, W.F.; Schrader, T.F.; Schuchart, J.A.; Smith, J.F.; Stys, R.D.; Thorpe, J.A.

1990-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

306

Capacity of steganographic channels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An information-theoretic approach is used to determine the amount of information that may be safely transferred over a steganographic channel with a passive adversary. A steganographic channel, or stego-channel is a pair consisting of the channel transition ... Keywords: information spectrum, information theory, steganalysis, steganographic capacity, steganography, stego-channel

Jeremiah J. Harmsen; William A. Pearlman

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Natural Gas Industrial Price  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Electric Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Gas in Underground Storage Base Gas in Underground Storage Working Gas in Underground Storage Underground Storage Injections Underground Storage Withdrawals Underground Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period: Monthly Annual

308

Small gas turbine technology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Small Gas Turbine Technology: Small gas turbine, in the power range up to 500 kW, requires a recuperated thermodynamic cycle to achieve an electrical efficiency of about 30%. This efficiency is the optimum, which is possible for a cycle pressure ratio of about 41. The cycle airflow is function of the power requirement. To increase the efficiency, in view to reduce the CO2 emission, it is mandatory to develop a more efficient thermodynamic cycle. Different thermodynamic cycles were examined and the final choice was made for an Intercooled, Recuperated cycle. The advantage of this cycle, for the same final electrical efficiency of about 35%, is the smaller cycle airflow, which is the most dimensional parameter for the important components as the heat exchanger recuperator and the combustion chamber. In parallel with the thermodynamic cycle it is necessary to develop the High Speed Alternator technology, integrated on the same shaft that the gas turbine rotating components, to achieve the constant efficiency at part loads, from 50% up to 100%, by the capacity to adjust the engine speed at the required load. To satisfy the stringent requirement in pollutant emissions of \\{NOx\\} and CO, the catalytic combustion system is the most efficient and this advance technology has to be proven. The major constraints for the small gas turbine technology development are the production cost and the maintenance cost of the unit. In the power range of 0500 kW the gas turbine technology is in competition with small reciprocating engines, which are produced in large quantity for automotive industry, at a very low production cost.

Andre Romier

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Representation of Solar Capacity Value in the ReEDS Capacity Expansion Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An important issue for electricity system operators is the estimation of renewables' capacity contributions to reliably meeting system demand, or their capacity value. While the capacity value of thermal generation can be estimated easily, assessment of wind and solar requires a more nuanced approach due to the resource variability. Reliability-based methods, particularly assessment of the Effective Load-Carrying Capacity, are considered to be the most robust and widely-accepted techniques for addressing this resource variability. This report compares estimates of solar PV capacity value by the Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) capacity expansion model against two sources. The first comparison is against values published by utilities or other entities for known electrical systems at existing solar penetration levels. The second comparison is against a time-series ELCC simulation tool for high renewable penetration scenarios in the Western Interconnection. Results from the ReEDS model are found to compare well with both comparisons, despite being resolved at a super-hourly temporal resolution. Two results are relevant for other capacity-based models that use a super-hourly resolution to model solar capacity value. First, solar capacity value should not be parameterized as a static value, but must decay with increasing penetration. This is because -- for an afternoon-peaking system -- as solar penetration increases, the system's peak net load shifts to later in the day -- when solar output is lower. Second, long-term planning models should determine system adequacy requirements in each time period in order to approximate LOLP calculations. Within the ReEDS model we resolve these issues by using a capacity value estimate that varies by time-slice. Within each time period the net load and shadow price on ReEDS's planning reserve constraint signals the relative importance of additional firm capacity.

Sigrin, B.; Sullivan, P.; Ibanez, E.; Margolis, R.

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Combined heat and power has the potential to significantly increase energy production efficiency and thus reduce greenhouse gas emissions, however current market penetration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Combined heat and power has the potential to significantly increase energy production efficiency that California will not reach the targets for combined heat and power set for it by the Air Resources Board (ARB of combined heat and power into the new ARB Emissions Cap and Trade scheme. This potential failure would

Kammen, Daniel M.

311

Gas turbine cooling system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A gas turbine engine (10) having a closed-loop cooling circuit (39) for transferring heat from the hot turbine section (16) to the compressed air (24) produced by the compressor section (12). The closed-loop cooling system (39) includes a heat exchanger (40) disposed in the flow path of the compressed air (24) between the outlet of the compressor section (12) and the inlet of the combustor (14). A cooling fluid (50) may be driven by a pump (52) located outside of the engine casing (53) or a pump (54) mounted on the rotor shaft (17). The cooling circuit (39) may include an orifice (60) for causing the cooling fluid (50) to change from a liquid state to a gaseous state, thereby increasing the heat transfer capacity of the cooling circuit (39).

Bancalari, Eduardo E. (Orlando, FL)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Capacity Value of Solar Power  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Evaluating the capacity value of renewable energy sources can pose significant challenges due to their variable and uncertain nature. In this paper the capacity value of solar power is investigated. Solar capacity value metrics and their associated calculation methodologies are reviewed and several solar capacity studies are summarized. The differences between wind and solar power are examined, the economic importance of solar capacity value is discussed and other assessments and recommendations are presented.

Duignan, Roisin; Dent, Chris; Mills, Andrew; Samaan, Nader A.; Milligan, Michael; Keane, Andrew; O'Malley, Mark

2012-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

313

"Primary Energy Source","Natural Gas"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Source","Natural Gas" "Net Summer Capacity (megawatts)",25548,15 "..Electric Utilities",16661,18 "..IPP & CHP",8887,13 "Net Generation (megawatthours)",103407706,15...

314

"Primary Energy Source","Natural Gas"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Source","Natural Gas" "Net Summer Capacity (megawatts)",15404,29 "..Electric Utilities",12691,21 "..IPP & CHP",2713,33 "Net Generation (megawatthours)",54584295,28...

315

"Primary Energy Source","Natural Gas"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Source","Natural Gas" "Net Summer Capacity (megawatts)",10,51 "Electric Utilities",, "IPP & CHP",10,51 "Net Generation (megawatthours)",71787,51 "Electric...

316

"Primary Energy Source","Natural Gas"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Source","Natural Gas" "Net Summer Capacity (megawatts)",4491,43 "..Electric Utilities",19,49 "..IPP & CHP",4472,22 "Net Generation (megawatthours)",14428596,44...

317

Total Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Summary)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Gas Processed NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity...

318

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on June 19) 2, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on June 19) Moderate temperatures across the country except in the Southwest contributed to natural gas spot prices easing 25 to 50 cents per MMBtu since Wednesday, June 4. On the week (Wednesday, June 4-Wednesday, June 11), the Henry Hub spot price dropped 35 cents per MMBtu to $6.06. The NYMEX futures contract for July delivery at the Henry Hub fell about 16 cents per MMBtu to $6.213. Natural gas in storage as of Friday, June 6, increased to 1,324 Bcf, which is 25.2 percent below the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil rose $2.36 per barrel on the week to yesterday's (June 11) closing price of $32.17 per barrel, or $5.55 per MMBtu. Prices: Natural gas spot prices at many market locations in the Lower 48 States have declined for three consecutive trading days from Friday peaks as key market areas in the Midwest and the Eastern seaboard have experienced unseasonably cool weather. Although prices remain elevated, the slackened demand for natural gas for electric generation has contributed to prices generally softening across the board. For the week, the spot price at the Henry Hub dropped about 6 percent to $6.06 per MMBtu, while other pricing points on the Gulf Coast showed slightly greater declines and fell below the $6-mark. The overall easing of prices may reflect also the slightly improving storage picture as injections in 7 of the past 8 weeks have exceeded the 5-year average with a record net addition reported last Thursday. Although the storage refill season started slowly, injections have increased considerably, with at least one major interstate pipeline serving the Northeast, Tennessee Gas Pipeline, announcing restrictions to shippers due to injection nominations exceeding capacity. The spot price at Tennessee Gas Pipeline's Zone 6, which serves major citygates in New York and other Northeastern states, this week fell 47 cents per MMBtu to $6.30. In contrast to the East, prices in the West moved higher early in the week, as maintenance on El Paso Natural Gas in the San Juan Basin restricted deliveries from the region and a heat wave sparked buying at pricing locations in California and New Mexico. The spot price at the Southern California border surged 61 cents per MMBtu on Monday to $5.78, but has since dropped to $5.51, which is a net decline of 51 cents since Wednesday, June 4.

319

Natural Gas - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8, 2013 | Release Date: September 19, 8, 2013 | Release Date: September 19, 2013 | Next Release: September 26, 2013 Previous Issues Week: 12/29/2013 (View Archive) JUMP TO: In The News | Overview | Prices/Demand/Supply | Storage In the News: Marcellus gas pipe capacity seen rising 0.5 Bcf/d by month's end; additional expansions expected this winter Initial service could begin by the end of September for two projects that would increase natural gas takeaway capacity from the Marcellus Shale formation by a combined 0.5 billion cubic feet per day (Bcf/d). These two projects are a 7.9 mile, 0.23 Bcf/d looping pipeline added to Kinder Morgan's Tennessee Gas Pipeline (TGP) (known as the MPP Project's "313 Loop") and a 2.5 mile, 0.22 Bcf/d pipeline connecting NiSource's Columbia Gas Transmission (TCO) pipeline to a 1,329-megawatt gas-fired

320

Refinery Capacity Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 1 Idle Operating Total Stream Day Barrels per Idle Operating Total Calendar Day Barrels per Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Capacity Idle Operating Total Operable Refineries Number of State and PAD District a b b 14 10 4 1,617,500 1,205,000 412,500 1,708,500 1,273,500 435,000 ............................................................................................................................................... PAD District I 1 0 1 182,200 0 182,200 190,200 0 190,200 ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ Delaware......................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas capacity increase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Natural Gas Processing Plants in the United States: 2010 Update / Regional  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Regional Analysis Regional Analysis Rocky Mountain States and California Rocky Mountain States and California The Rocky Mountain States, which include all of the States west of the Great Plains and Texas and those east of California, have seen significant natural gas production increases over the last decade. With the development of new production basins, including the San Juan Basin, Powder River Basin, and Green River Basin, natural gas processing capacity in this region has expanded significantly. In 2009, California and Rocky Mountain States accounted for a total of 16.9 Bcf per day or about 22 percent of total U.S. capacity. Since 2004, only California and New Mexico noted a decrease in overall processing capacity, falling by 17 and 12 percent, respectively. Processing capacity in all of the remaining States (Colorado, Montana, New

322

Increasing Knowledge Increasing Knowledge 29  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

28 Increasing Knowledge Increasing Knowledge 29 Expanding Leadership 36 Building Partnerships 43 the world. The challenges ahead are large, but WSP is preparing to meet them by increasing knowledge, expanding leadership, building partnerships, and seeking solutions. #12;29 Increasing Knowledge Increasing

Fay, Noah

323

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Regional/State Underground Natural Gas  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Regional/State Underground Natural Gas Storage Table Regional/State Underground Natural Gas Storage Table About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 2007/2008 with selected updates Regional Underground Natural Gas Storage, Close of 2007 Depleted-Reservoir Storage Aquifer Storage Salt-Cavern Storage Total Region/ State # of Sites Working Gas Capacity (Bcf) Daily Withdrawal Capability (MMcf) # of Sites Working Gas Capacity (Bcf) Daily Withdrawal Capability (MMcf) # of Sites Working Gas Capacity (Bcf) Daily Withdrawal Capability (MMcf) # of Sites Working Gas Capacity (Bcf) Daily Withdrawal Capability (MMcf) Central Region Colorado 8 42 1,088 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 42 1,088 Iowa 0 0 0 4 77 1,060 0 0 0 4 77 1,060

324

Development of Gas Turbine Combustors for Low BTU Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Large-capacity combined cycles with high-temperature gas turbines burning petroleum fuel or LNG have already ... the other hand, as the power generation technology utilizing coal burning the coal gasification com...

I. Fukue; S. Mandai; M. Inada

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Natural Gas Supply Vulnerability in Europe.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Demand for natural gas has been increasing steadily the past few years. Most European countries depend heavily on natural gas imports due to insufficient gas (more)

Gungor, Bekir

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Deepwater Oil & Gas Resources | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Deepwater Oil & Gas Resources Deepwater Oil & Gas Resources The United States has significant natural gas and oil reserves. But many of these resources are increasingly harder to...

327

Natural Gas - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

‹ back to Natural Gas Weekly Update ‹ back to Natural Gas Weekly Update In the News continued - Natural Gas Year in Review: High natural gas inventory last spring limited injections during the 2012 storage injection season Working natural gas storage inventories entered the injection season on March 31, 2012 at 2,477 billion cubic feet (Bcf), following a winter that had a combination of high natural gas production and low heating degree days. This storage volume was the highest amount recorded for that date since the Natural Gas Monthly storage dataset began in 1976, and meant that only 1,762 Bcf of demonstrated peak storage capacity was available for additional injections, versus a five-year average of 2,354 Bcf. This limited the degree to which inventories could increase from April through

328

Investigation of the carbon dioxide sorption capacity and structural deformation of coal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Due to increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations causing the global energy and environmental crises, geological sequestration of carbon dioxide is now being actively considered as an attractive option to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions. One of the important strategies is to use deep unminable coal seams, for those generally contain significant quantities of coal bed methane that can be recovered by CO2 injection through enhanced coal bed natural gas production, as a method to safely store CO2. It has been well known that the adsorbing CO2 molecules introduce structural deformation, such as distortion, shrinkage, or swelling, of the adsorbent of coal organic matrix. The accurate investigations of CO2 sorption capacity as well as of adsorption behavior need to be performed under the conditions that coals deform. The U.S. Department of Energy-National Energy Technology Laboratory and Regional University Alliance are conducting carbon dioxide sorption isotherm experiments by using manometric analysis method for estimation of CO2 sorption capacity of various coal samples and are constructing a gravimetric apparatus which has a visual window cell. The gravimetric apparatus improves the accuracy of carbon dioxide sorption capacity and provides feasibility for the observation of structural deformation of coal sample while carbon dioxide molecules interact with coal organic matrix. The CO2 sorption isotherm measurements have been conducted for moist and dried samples of the Central Appalachian Basin (Russell County, VA) coal seam, received from the SECARB partnership, at the temperature of 55 C.

Hur, Tae-Bong; Fazio, James; Romanov, Vyacheslav; Harbert, William

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Working and Net Available Shell Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Net Available Shell Storage Capacity by PAD District as of September 30, 2013 Net Available Shell Storage Capacity by PAD District as of September 30, 2013 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity In Operation Idle 1 In Operation Idle 1 In Operation Idle 1 In Operation Idle 1 In Operation Idle 1 In Operation Idle 1 Refineries Crude Oil 17,334 831 21,870 1,721 86,629 3,468 4,655 174 39,839 1,230 170,327 7,424 Fuel Ethanol 174 - 175 1 289 - 134 - 92 - 864 1 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases 2 1,267 23 11,599 382 28,865 78 641 19 2,412 23 44,784 525 Propane/Propylene (dedicated)

330

Working and Net Available Shell Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Storage Capacity by PAD District as of September 30, 2013 Working Storage Capacity by PAD District as of September 30, 2013 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity 1 2 3 4 5 U.S. Total Ending Stocks Utilization Rate 1 Refineries Crude Oil 15,154 17,952 72,858 4,109 35,324 145,397 90,778 62% Fuel Ethanol 151 142 257 114 79 743 482 65% Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases 2 1,149 10,996 24,902 581 2,219 39,847 19,539 49% Propane/Propylene (dedicated) 3 405 3,710 3,886 54 199 8,254 4,104 NA Motor Gasoline (incl. Motor Gasoline Blending Components)

331

Shale Natural Gas Reserves Revision Increases  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6,363 10,661 25,993 2009-2011 6,363 10,661 25,993 2009-2011 Alaska 0 0 0 2009-2011 Lower 48 States 6,363 10,661 25,993 2009-2011 Alabama 0 0 2009-2010 Arkansas 1,585 861 502 2009-2011 California 912 2011-2011 San Joaquin Basin Onshore 912 2011-2011 Colorado 0 1 4 2009-2011 Kentucky 44 3 44 2009-2011 Louisiana 636 1,856 2,002 2009-2011 North 636 1,856 2,002 2009-2011 Michigan 149 165 140 2009-2011 Montana 42 14 14 2009-2011 New Mexico 2 1 83 2009-2011 East 0 1 68 2009-2011 West 2 0 15 2009-2011 North Dakota 119 528 439 2009-2011 Ohio 0 0 2009-2010 Oklahoma 1,373 1,352 3,709 2009-2011 Pennsylvania 299 1,994 5,238 2009-2011 Texas 2,052 3,580 12,185 2009-2011 RRC District 1 1 322 2,141 2009-2011 RRC District 2 Onshore 6 388 2010-2011 RRC District 3 Onshore

332

Dry Natural Gas Reserves Revision Increases  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0,833 32,174 30,674 31,416 40,521 53,601 1977-2011 0,833 32,174 30,674 31,416 40,521 53,601 1977-2011 Federal Offshore U.S. 2,030 1,815 1,699 2,312 2,978 2,467 1990-2011 Pacific (California) 43 49 23 79 23 39 1977-2011 Louisiana & Alabama 1,606 1,430 1,230 1,637 2,617 2,050 1981-2011 Texas 381 336 446 596 338 378 1981-2011 Alaska 2,853 2,147 184 1,868 622 928 1977-2011 Lower 48 States 17,980 30,027 30,490 29,548 39,899 52,673 1977-2011 Alabama 234 163 283 99 206 455 1977-2011 Arkansas 101 321 1,249 1,912 1,072 631 1977-2011 California 156 355 263 259 548 1,486 1977-2011 Coastal Region Onshore 28 32 21 41 38 20 1977-2011 Los Angeles Basin Onshore 7 15 1 35 9 11 1977-2011 San Joaquin Basin Onshore 112 296 239 180 488 1,444 1977-2011 State Offshore

333

Natural Gas Liquids Reserves Revision Increases  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

882 1,232 968 845 1,187 1,192 1979-2008 882 1,232 968 845 1,187 1,192 1979-2008 Federal Offshore U.S. 118 148 114 118 116 85 1981-2008 Pacific (California) 0 0 0 0 0 0 1979-2008 Louisiana & Alabama 89 104 89 99 90 71 1981-2008 Texas 29 44 25 19 26 14 1981-2008 Alaska 0 0 0 0 0 0 1979-2008 Lower 48 States 882 1,232 968 845 1,187 1,192 1979-2008 Alabama 8 4 2 5 2 9 1979-2008 Arkansas 0 0 0 0 0 0 1979-2008 California 12 22 31 8 16 12 1979-2008 Coastal Region Onshore 1 3 2 3 2 1 1979-2008 Los Angeles Basin Onshore 1 0 1 0 1 0 1979-2008 San Joaquin Basin Onshore 10 19 28 5 13 11 1979-2008 State Offshore 0 0 0 0 0 0 1979-2008 Colorado 51 72 55 34 105 93 1979-2008 Florida 0 0 0 0 2 0 1979-2008 Kansas 11 44 12 44 22 19 1979-2008

334

Dry Natural Gas Reserves Revision Increases  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0,833 32,174 30,674 31,416 40,521 53,601 1977-2011 0,833 32,174 30,674 31,416 40,521 53,601 1977-2011 Federal Offshore U.S. 2,030 1,815 1,699 2,312 2,978 2,467 1990-2011 Pacific (California) 43 49 23 79 23 39 1977-2011 Louisiana & Alabama 1,606 1,430 1,230 1,637 2,617 2,050 1981-2011 Texas 381 336 446 596 338 378 1981-2011 Alaska 2,853 2,147 184 1,868 622 928 1977-2011 Lower 48 States 17,980 30,027 30,490 29,548 39,899 52,673 1977-2011 Alabama 234 163 283 99 206 455 1977-2011 Arkansas 101 321 1,249 1,912 1,072 631 1977-2011 California 156 355 263 259 548 1,486 1977-2011 Coastal Region Onshore 28 32 21 41 38 20 1977-2011 Los Angeles Basin Onshore 7 15 1 35 9 11 1977-2011 San Joaquin Basin Onshore 112 296 239 180 488 1,444 1977-2011 State Offshore

335

The Gas/Electric Partnership  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The electric and gas industries are each in the process of restructuring and "converging" toward one mission: providing energy. Use of natural gas in generating electric power and use of electricity in transporting natural gas will increase...

Schmeal, W. R.; Royall, D.; Wrenn, K. F. Jr.

336

Shale Gas R&D  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Natural gas from shales has the potential to significantly increase Americas security of energy supply, reduce greenhouse gas emissions, and lower prices for consumers. Although shale gas has been...

337

Capacity of a UMTS system for aeronautical communications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Current Air Traffic Management and Air Traffic Control systems will experience a demand increase in the following years due to the large number of operating aircrafts. As a consequence, new solution must be studied to overcome this capacity limitation ... Keywords: ATC, ATM, ENR, SDR, TMA, UMTS, W-CDMA, air traffic, capacity

Miguel Calvo Ramn; Ramn Martnez Rodrguez-Osorio; Bazil Taha Ahmed; Juan Jos Iglesias Jimnez

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

EIA - Natural Gas Storage Data & Analysis  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Storage Storage Weekly Working Gas in Underground Storage U.S. Natural gas inventories held in underground storage facilities by East, West, and Producing regions (weekly). Underground Storage - All Operators Total storage by base gas and working gas, and storage activity by State (monthly, annual). Underground Storage by Type U.S. storage and storage activity by all operators, salt cavern fields and nonsalt cavern (monthly, annual). Underground Storage Capacity Storage capacity, working gas capacity, and number of active fields for salt caverns, aquifers, and depleted fields by State (monthly, annual). Liquefied Natural Gas Additions to and Withdrawals from Storage By State (annual). Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report Estimates of natural gas in underground storage for the U.S. and three regions of the U.S.

339

First mideast capacity planned  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Kuwait catalyst Co.`s (KCC) plans to build a hydrodesulfurization (HDS) catalysts plant in Kuwait will mark the startup of the first refining catalysts production in the Persian Gulf region. KCC, owned by a conglomerate of Kuwait companies and governmental agencies, has licensed catalyst manufacturing technology from Japan Energy in a deal estimated at more than 7 billion ($62 million). Plant design will be based on technology from Orient Catalyst, Japan Energy`s catalysts division. Construction is expected to begin in January 1997 for production startup by January 1998. A source close to the deal says the new plant will eventually reach a capacity of 5,000 m.t./year of HDS catalysts to supply most of Kuwait`s estimated 3,500-m.t./year demand, driven primarily by Kuwait National Petroleum refineries. KCC also expects to supply demand from other catalyst consumers in the region. Alumina supply will be acquired on the open market. KCC will take all production from the plant and will be responsible for marketing.

Fattah, H.

1996-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

340

Little study sees large growth in Asian natural gas market  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Power capacity additions in Asia will at least triple by 2010, and Arthur D. Little Inc. predicts natural gas can pick up a good 15 percent of that market. The study predicts Asia potentially will need 720 gigawatts of new power generation by 2010, of which 15 percent may be gas-based. This represents a market three times the size of the US market in the same period, and would require more than $1 trillion in investment to finance the power generation projects alone. Six forces are driving new market opportunities for natural gas in Asia, and have set the stage for major investments in Asian gas-based power generation. They are: New technologies; growing environmental pressures; privatization; alternative energy pricing; gas availability; and continued economic growth. Japan, South Korea and Taiwan already have large, well-established markets for both gas and power that provide minimal opportunities for foreign investment. But the rest of Asia - specifically, India, Pakistan, the Philippines, Vietnam, Indonesia, Malaysia, the People's Republic of China, Thailand, Bangladesh and Myanmar - is still relatively undeveloped, the study said, and gas is emerging as an energy import substitute or export earner. The study found those countries will turn increased environmental awareness and concern into legislation as their economic prosperity grows, leading to a higher future value for natural gas relative to other fuels. Stricter emissions standards will favor gas over diesel, fuel oil and coal.

O'Driscoll, M.

1993-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas capacity increase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Adaptive capacity and its assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reviews the concept of adaptive capacity and various approaches to assessing it, particularly with respect to climate variability and change. I find that adaptive capacity is a relatively under-researched topic within the sustainability science and global change communities, particularly since it is uniquely positioned to improve linkages between vulnerability and resilience research. I identify opportunities for advancing the measurement and characterization of adaptive capacity by combining insights from both vulnerability and resilience frameworks, and I suggest several assessment approaches for possible future development that draw from both frameworks and focus on analyzing the governance, institutions, and management that have helped foster adaptive capacity in light of recent climatic events.

Engle, Nathan L.

2011-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

342

Natural Gas Annual 2006  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Released: October 31, 2007 The Natural Gas Annual 2006 Summary Highlights provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2006 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2006. The Natural Gas Annual 2006 Summary Highlights provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2006 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2006. Natural Gas Annual --- Full report in PDF (5 MB) Special Files --- All CSV files contained in a self-extracting executable file. Respondent/Company Level Natural Gas Data Files Annual Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition Company level data (1996 to 2007) as reported on Form EIA-176 are provided in the EIA-176 Query System and selected data files. EIA-191A Field Level Underground Natural Gas Storage Data: Detailed annual data (2006 and 2007) of storage field capacity, field type, and maximum deliverability as of December 31st of the report year, as reported by operators of all U.S. underground natural gas storage fields.

343

Selection and preparation of activated carbon for fuel gas storage  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Increasing the surface acidity of active carbons can lead to an increase in capacity for hydrogen adsorption. Increasing the surface basicity can facilitate methane adsorption. The treatment of carbons is most effective when the carbon source material is selected to have a low ash content i.e., below about 3%, and where the ash consists predominantly of alkali metals alkali earth, with only minimal amounts of transition metals and silicon. The carbon is washed in water or acid and then oxidized, e.g. in a stream of oxygen and an inert gas at an elevated temperature.

Schwarz, James A. (Fayetteville, NY); Noh, Joong S. (Syracuse, NY); Agarwal, Rajiv K. (Las Vegas, NV)

1990-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

344

Multicast Capacity in Mobile Wireless Ad Hoc Network with Infrastructure Support  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Index Terms--Wireless ad hoc network; multicast capacity; mobility; infrastructure; hybrid network that infrastructure can offer a linear capacity increase in hybrid network, when the number of base stations increases the multicast capacity in a static hybrid network with infrastructure support. Establishing the multicast tree with the

Wang, Xinbing

345

An air-cooled pulse tube cryocooler with 50 W cooling capacity at 77 K  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A pulse tube cryocooler with 50 W cooling capacity at 77 K is developed to cool superconducting devices mounted on automobiles. The envisioned cryocooler weight is less than 40 kg and the input electric power is less than 1 kW. To achieve these requirements the working frequency is increased to 75 Hz and the dual-opposed pistons use gas bearings to reduce compressor weight and volume. The heat from the main heat exchanger is rejected by forced convective air instead of water. The compressor and the cold finger are carefully matched to improve the efficiency. The details of these will be presented in this paper. After some adjustment a no load temperature for the pulse tube cryocooler of 40 K was achieved with 1 kW input electric power in surroundings at 298 K. At 77 K the cooling capacity is 50 W. If the main heat exchanger is cooled by water at 293 K the cooling capacity increases to 64 W corresponding to a relative Carnot efficiency of 18%.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Net Withdrawals of Natural Gas from Underground Storage (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Pipeline and Distribution Use Price Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Vehicle Fuel Price Electric Power Price Proved Reserves as of 12/31 Reserves Adjustments Reserves Revision Increases Reserves Revision Decreases Reserves Sales Reserves Acquisitions Reserves Extensions Reserves New Field Discoveries New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields Estimated Production Number of Producing Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production Natural Gas Processed NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Underground Storage Injections Underground Storage Withdrawals Underground Storage Net Withdrawals LNG Storage Additions LNG Storage Withdrawals LNG Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Lease Fuel Plant Fuel Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period: Monthly Annual

347

Natural Gas - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

13, 2013 | Release Date: November 14, 13, 2013 | Release Date: November 14, 2013 | Next Release: November 21, 2013 Previous Issues Week: 12/29/2013 (View Archive) JUMP TO: In The News | Overview | Prices/Demand/Supply | Storage In the News: Gas pipeline expansions reduce Marcellus backup, New York gas prices As reported in October, natural gas pipeline expansions were slated to add nearly 1 billion cubic feet per day (Bcf/d) of capacity to flow gas to markets in New York and New Jersey on November 1. These expansions happened on schedule, increasing access for consumers in the New York City metropolitan area to natural gas produced in the Appalachian Basin's Marcellus Shale play. This has resulted in lower gas prices for New York consumers, and has eased supply backup in the Marcellus Basin.

348

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Largest Natural Gas Pipeline Systems  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Interstate Pipelines Table Interstate Pipelines Table About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 2007/2008 with selected updates Thirty Largest U.S. Interstate Natural Gas Pipeline Systems, 2008 (Ranked by system capacity) Pipeline Name Market Regions Served Primary Supply Regions States in Which Pipeline Operates Transported in 2007 (million dekatherm)1 System Capacity (MMcf/d) 2 System Mileage Columbia Gas Transmission Co. Northeast Southwest, Appalachia DE, PA, MD, KY, NC, NJ, NY, OH, VA, WV 1,849 9,350 10,365 Transcontinental Gas Pipeline Co. Northeast, Southeast Southwest AL, GA, LA, MD, MS, NC, NY, SC, TX, VA, GM 2,670 8,466 10,450 Northern Natural Gas Co. Central, Midwest Southwest IA, IL, KS, NE, NM, OK, SD, TX, WI, GM 1,055 7,442 15,874 Texas Eastern Transmission Corp.

349

Resource planning for gas utilities: Using a model to analyze pivotal issues  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With the advent of wellhead price decontrols that began in the late 1970s and the development of open access pipelines in the 1980s and 90s, gas local distribution companies (LDCs) now have increased responsibility for their gas supplies and face an increasingly complex array of supply and capacity choices. Heretofore this responsibility had been share with the interstate pipelines that provide bundled firm gas supplies. Moreover, gas supply an deliverability (capacity) options have multiplied as the pipeline network becomes increasing interconnected and as new storage projects are developed. There is now a fully-functioning financial market for commodity price hedging instruments and, on interstate Pipelines, secondary market (called capacity release) now exists. As a result of these changes in the natural gas industry, interest in resource planning and computer modeling tools for LDCs is increasing. Although in some ways the planning time horizon has become shorter for the gas LDC, the responsibility conferred to the LDC and complexity of the planning problem has increased. We examine current gas resource planning issues in the wake of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission`s (FERC) Order 636. Our goal is twofold: (1) to illustrate the types of resource planning methods and models used in the industry and (2) to illustrate some of the key tradeoffs among types of resources, reliability, and system costs. To assist us, we utilize a commercially-available dispatch and resource planning model and examine four types of resource planning problems: the evaluation of new storage resources, the evaluation of buyback contracts, the computation of avoided costs, and the optimal tradeoff between reliability and system costs. To make the illustration of methods meaningful yet tractable, we developed a prototype LDC and used it for the majority of our analysis.

Busch, J.F.; Comnes, G.A.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Chapter 10 - Natural Gas Sweetening  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Acid gas constituents present in most natural gas streams are mainly hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and carbon dioxide (CO2). Many gas streams, however, particularly those in a refinery or manufactured gases, may contain mercaptans, carbon sulfide, or carbonyl sulfide. The level of acid gas concentration in the sour gas is an important consideration for selecting the proper sweetening process. Some processes are applicable for removal of large quantities of acid gas, and other processes have the capacity for removing acid gas constituents to ppm range. This chapter covers the minimum process requirements, criteria, and features for accomplishment of process design of gas sweetening units. The basic principles for process design of main equipment, piping, and instrumentation together with guidelines on present developments and process selection in the gas sweetening process are the main objectives throughout this chapter.

Alireza Bahadori

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Limits to the representation capacity of imaging in random media  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The information capacity of an image in the atmosphere, ocean, or biological media does not grow indefinitely with increasing light power but has well defined limits. Here, the exact...

Belmonte, Aniceto

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Creative capacity building in post-conflict Uganda  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Creative Capacity Building (CCB) is a methodology that emphasizes the ability of people living in poverty to create livelihood technologies, i.e., machines and tools that increase income, improve health and safety, decrease ...

Taha, Kofi A. (Kofi Abdul Malik)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Philippines-Strengthening Planning Capacity for Low Carbon Growth in  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Philippines-Strengthening Planning Capacity for Low Carbon Growth in Philippines-Strengthening Planning Capacity for Low Carbon Growth in Developing Asia Jump to: navigation, search Name Philippines-Strengthening Planning Capacity for Low Carbon Growth in Developing Asia Agency/Company /Organization Asian Development Bank Partner Japan, United Kingdom Sector Climate, Energy Focus Area Non-renewable Energy, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Greenhouse Gas, Grid Assessment and Integration, People and Policy, Transportation Topics Baseline projection, GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, Market analysis, Pathways analysis, Policies/deployment programs Program Start 2011 Program End 2013 Country Philippines South-Eastern Asia References Strengthening Planning Capacity for Low Carbon Growth in Developing Asia[1]

354

Strengthening Planning Capacity for Low Carbon Growth in Developing Asia  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Strengthening Planning Capacity for Low Carbon Growth in Developing Asia Strengthening Planning Capacity for Low Carbon Growth in Developing Asia - Thailand Jump to: navigation, search Name Thailand-Strengthening Planning Capacity for Low Carbon Growth in Developing Asia Agency/Company /Organization Asian Development Bank Partner Japan, United Kingdom Sector Climate, Energy Focus Area Non-renewable Energy, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Greenhouse Gas, Grid Assessment and Integration, People and Policy, Transportation Topics Baseline projection, GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, Market analysis, Pathways analysis, Policies/deployment programs Program Start 2011 Program End 2013 Country Thailand South-Eastern Asia References Strengthening Planning Capacity for Low Carbon Growth in Developing Asia[1]

355

Indonesia-Strengthening Planning Capacity for Low Carbon Growth in  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Indonesia-Strengthening Planning Capacity for Low Carbon Growth in Indonesia-Strengthening Planning Capacity for Low Carbon Growth in Developing Asia Jump to: navigation, search Name Indonesia-Strengthening Planning Capacity for Low Carbon Growth in Developing Asia Agency/Company /Organization Asian Development Bank Partner Japan, United Kingdom Sector Climate, Energy Focus Area Non-renewable Energy, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Greenhouse Gas, Grid Assessment and Integration, People and Policy, Transportation Topics Baseline projection, GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, Market analysis, Pathways analysis, Policies/deployment programs Program Start 2011 Program End 2013 Country Indonesia South-Eastern Asia References Strengthening Planning Capacity for Low Carbon Growth in Developing Asia[1]

356

Malaysia-Strengthening Planning Capacity for Low Carbon Growth in  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Malaysia-Strengthening Planning Capacity for Low Carbon Growth in Malaysia-Strengthening Planning Capacity for Low Carbon Growth in Developing Asia Jump to: navigation, search Name Malaysia-Strengthening Planning Capacity for Low Carbon Growth in Developing Asia Agency/Company /Organization Asian Development Bank Partner Japan, United Kingdom Sector Climate, Energy Focus Area Non-renewable Energy, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Greenhouse Gas, Grid Assessment and Integration, People and Policy, Transportation Topics Baseline projection, GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, Market analysis, Pathways analysis, Policies/deployment programs Program Start 2011 Program End 2013 Country Malaysia South-Eastern Asia References Strengthening Planning Capacity for Low Carbon Growth in Developing Asia[1]

357

Natural Gas Annual 2007  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Released: January 28, 2009 The Natural Gas Annual 2007 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2007. Summary data are presented for each State for 2003 to 2007. The Natural Gas Annual 2007 Summary Highlights provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2007 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2007. Natural Gas Annual --- Full report in PDF (5 MB) Special Files --- All CSV files contained in a self-extracting executable file. Respondent/Company Level Natural Gas Data Files Annual Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition Company level data (1996 to 2007) as reported on Form EIA-176 are provided in the EIA-176 Query System and selected data files. EIA-191A Field Level Underground Natural Gas Storage Data: Detailed annual data (2005 to 2007) of storage field capacity, field type, and maximum deliverability as of December 31st of the report year, as reported by operators of all U.S. underground natural gas storage fields.

358

Natural Gas Annual 2009  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 Released: December 28, 2010 The Natural Gas Annual 2009 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2009. Summary data are presented for each State for 2005 to 2009. The Natural Gas Annual 2009 Summary Highlights provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2009 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2009. Natural Gas Annual --- Full report in PDF (5 MB) Special Files --- All CSV files contained in a self-extracting executable file. Respondent/Company Level Natural Gas Data Files Annual Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition Company level data (1996 to 2009) as reported on Form EIA-176 are provided in the EIA-176 Query System and selected data files. EIA-191A Field Level Underground Natural Gas Storage Data: Detailed annual data (2005 to 2009) of storage field capacity, field type, and maximum deliverability as of December 31st of the report year, as reported by operators of all U.S. underground natural gas storage fields.

359

Natural Gas Annual 2008  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Released: March 2, 2010 The Natural Gas Annual 2008 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2008. Summary data are presented for each State for 2004 to 2008. The Natural Gas Annual 2008 Summary Highlights provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2008 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2008. Natural Gas Annual --- Full report in PDF (5 MB) Special Files --- All CSV files contained in a self-extracting executable file. Respondent/Company Level Natural Gas Data Files Annual Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition Company level data (1996 to 2008) as reported on Form EIA-176 are provided in the EIA-176 Query System and selected data files. EIA-191A Field Level Underground Natural Gas Storage Data: Detailed annual data (2005 to 2008) of storage field capacity, field type, and maximum deliverability as of December 31st of the report year, as reported by operators of all U.S. underground natural gas storage fields.

360

Disk Quota Increase Request  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Disk Disk Quota Increase Disk Quota Increase Request NERSC will consider reasonable requests for changes in disk space and inode limits. Please submit a request through the "Request Forms" section at the NERSC help portal. If you select "Hopper scratch directory" from the "File System" menu below, the quota value requested applies to the combined contents of $SCRATCH and $SCRATCH2. Please ask for the least amount of resources you need, since the sum of disk space and inodes allocated to users already exceeds system capacity. In other words, system resources would be exhausted before all users could use their existing quotas. You can find out the current quotas and usage of disk space and inodes for your home and scratch file systems with the myquota command. You can find

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas capacity increase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Natural Gas - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

injections typically continue beyond the end of October storage Natural gas, solar, and wind lead power plant capacity additions in first-half 2014 statescapacity and...

362

Axial bearing with gas lubrication for marine turbines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The possibility of enhancing the carrying capacity of the lubricant layer in bearings with gas lubrication is considered, for marine turbines. The basic design features of the hybrid...

M. V. Gribinichenko; A. V. Kurenskii; N. V. Sinenko

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Advancing Development and Greenhouse Gas Reductions in Vietnams...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Capacity for Low Emission Development Strategies EE energy efficiency FIT feed-in tariff GHG greenhouse gas GIS geographical information system GIZ Deutsche Gesellschaft fr...

364

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

diameter pipeline with the capacity to transport 477 million cubic feet (MMcf) of natural gas per day. Facilities would also include a compressor station, 2 meter stations, 19...

365

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

repairs are completed. During this period capacity will be zero. Cheyenne Plains Gas Pipeline Company announced that repairs have been completed on the compressor at the...

366

COMMUNITY CAPACITY BUILDING THROUGH TECHNOLOGY  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

COMMUNITY CAPACITY BUILDING THROUGH TECHNOLOGY COMMUNITY CAPACITY BUILDING THROUGH TECHNOLOGY Empowering Communities in the Age of E-Government Prepared by Melinda Downing, Environmental Justice Program Manager, U.S. Department of Energy MAR 06 MARCH 2006 Since 1999, the Department of Energy has worked with the National Urban Internet and others to create community capacity through technology.  Empowering Communities in the Age of E-Government Table of Contents Message from the Environmental Justice Program Manager . . . . . . . . 3 Introduction. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Partnerships. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Process Chart: From Agency to Community. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Case Studies. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8

367

Dynamic Long-Term Modelling of Generation Capacity Investment and Capacity Margins  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is the capital expenditure vector for the project with ??x?1i=0 Mxi = 1. For simplicity, the expenditure schedule uses a lagged 3Which in the case of natural gas match quite well with available future prices from ICE Futures Europe (out to 2017) but are arguably... capacity I(t), which is a parallel cascade of the four technology categories. Each single category is defined by a Delay Differential Equation (DDE): dIx dt = ? (?j ,?j)??x ?j?(t? ?j ? ?x)? ? (?j ,?j)??x ?j?(t? ?j ? ?x ? ?x), (1) where ?(t) is the Dirac...

Eager, Dan; Hobbs, Benjamin; Bialek, Janusz

2012-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

368

generation capacity | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

generation capacity generation capacity Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords AEO Electricity electricity market module region generation capacity Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Electricity Generation Capacity by Electricity Market Module Region and Source- Reference Case (xls, 10.6 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 2008-2035 License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL) Comment Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata Average vote Your vote

369

Possible Locations for Gas-Fired Power Generation in Southern Germany  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Gas-fired power generation has not only grown continuously in Europe, ... . Significant transport capacities in a high pressure gas grid are required to guarantee stable generation of gas-fired electricity. The p...

Joachim Mller-Kirchenbauer

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Kansas Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 301,502 301,502 301,502 301,502 301,502 301,502 301,502 301,502 301,502 301,502 301,502 301,502 2003 301,502 301,502 301,502 301,502 301,502 299,474 299,474 299,474 299,474 299,474 299,474 299,474 2004 293,574 293,574 293,574 293,574 293,574 293,574 293,574 293,574 293,574 288,197 288,197 288,197 2005 288,197 288,197 288,197 289,259 289,259 289,259 289,259 289,259 289,259 289,259 289,259 289,259 2006 289,259 289,259 289,259 289,259 289,259 289,259 289,259 289,259 289,259 289,747 289,747 289,747 2007 289,747 289,747 289,747 289,747 289,747 289,747 289,747 289,747 288,383 288,383 288,383 288,383 2008 288,383 288,383 288,383 288,383 288,383 288,383 288,383 288,383 288,383 288,383 288,926 288,926

371

U.S. Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Alaska Lower 48 States Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Alaska Lower 48 States Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View

372

Louisiana Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 580,037 580,037 580,037 580,037 580,037 580,037 580,037 580,037 580,037 580,037 576,841 576,841 2003 576,841 576,841 576,841 576,841 576,841 587,116 563,590 587,116 587,116 587,116 587,116 587,116 2004 592,516 592,516 592,516 592,516 592,516 592,516 592,516 592,516 592,516 591,673 591,673 591,673 2005 591,673 591,673 591,673 591,673 591,673 591,673 591,673 591,673 591,673 591,673 591,673 591,673 2006 591,673 591,673 591,673 591,673 591,673 591,673 591,673 591,673 591,673 593,740 593,740 593,740 2007 593,740 593,740 593,740 593,740 593,740 593,740 593,740 593,740 599,165 599,869 599,869 599,869 2008 599,869 599,869 599,869 599,869 599,869 599,869 599,869 599,869 599,869 606,369 605,361 605,361

373

Oregon Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 17,755 21,080 21,080 21,080 21,080 21,080 21,080 21,080 22,042 22,042 22,042 22,042 2003 22,042 22,042 22,042 22,042 22,042 23,676 23,676 23,676 23,676 23,676 23,676 23,676 2004 23,676 23,676 23,676 23,676 23,676 23,676 23,676 23,676 23,676 23,796 23,796 23,796 2005 24,603 24,603 24,603 24,603 24,603 24,603 24,603 24,603 24,603 24,603 24,603 24,603 2006 24,603 24,603 24,603 24,603 24,603 24,603 24,603 24,603 24,603 24,034 24,034 24,034 2007 24,034 24,034 24,034 24,034 24,034 24,034 24,034 24,034 26,703 26,703 26,703 29,165 2008 22,310 22,310 22,310 22,310 22,310 22,310 22,310 22,310 22,310 22,310 29,415 29,415

374

Virginia Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 4,967 4,967 4,967 4,967 4,967 4,967 4,967 4,967 4,967 4,967 2,992 2,992 2003 2,992 2,992 2,992 2,992 2,992 5,100 5,100 6,344 6,344 6,344 6,344 6,344 2004 6,344 6,344 6,344 6,344 6,344 6,344 6,344 6,344 6,344 8,024 8,024 8,024 2005 8,024 8,024 8,024 8,024 8,024 8,024 8,024 8,024 8,024 8,024 8,024 8,024 2006 8,024 8,024 8,024 8,024 8,024 8,024 8,024 8,024 8,024 9,035 9,035 9,035 2007 9,035 9,035 9,035 9,035 9,035 9,035 9,035 9,035 9,692 9,692 9,692 9,692 2008 9,692 9,692 9,692 6,260 9,677 9,677 9,677 9,677 9,677 9,677 9,677 9,677 2009 9,677 9,677 9,677 9,677 9,677 9,677 9,677 9,677 9,677 9,677 9,677 9,500

375

Maryland Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 62,000 62,000 62,000 62,000 62,000 62,000 62,000 62,000 62,000 62,000 62,000 62,000 2003 62,000 62,000 62,000 62,000 62,000 62,000 62,000 62,000 62,000 62,000 62,000 62,000 2004 62,000 62,000 62,000 62,000 62,000 62,000 62,000 62,000 62,000 62,000 62,000 62,000 2005 62,000 62,000 62,000 62,000 62,000 62,000 62,000 62,000 62,000 62,000 62,000 62,000 2006 62,000 62,000 62,000 62,000 62,000 62,000 62,000 62,000 62,000 62,000 62,000 62,000 2007 62,000 62,000 62,000 62,000 62,000 62,000 62,000 62,000 64,000 64,000 64,000 64,000 2008 64,000 64,000 64,000 64,000 64,000 64,000 64,000 64,000 64,000 64,000 64,000 64,000

376

Utah Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 129,480 129,480 129,480 129,480 129,480 129,480 129,480 129,480 129,480 129,480 129,480 129,480 2003 129,480 129,480 129,480 129,480 129,480 129,480 129,480 129,480 129,480 129,480 129,480 129,480 2004 129,480 129,480 129,480 129,480 129,480 129,480 129,480 129,480 129,480 129,480 129,480 129,480 2005 129,480 129,480 129,480 129,480 129,480 129,480 129,480 129,480 129,480 129,480 129,480 129,480 2006 129,480 129,480 129,480 129,480 129,480 129,480 129,480 129,480 129,480 129,480 129,480 129,480 2007 129,480 129,480 129,480 129,480 129,480 129,480 129,480 129,480 129,480 129,480 129,480 129,480 2008 129,480 129,480 129,480 129,480 129,480 129,480 129,480 129,480 129,480 129,480 129,480 129,480

377

New York Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 175,496 175,496 175,496 175,496 175,496 175,496 175,496 175,496 175,496 175,496 189,267 189,267 2003 189,267 189,267 189,267 189,267 189,267 190,157 190,157 190,157 190,157 190,157 190,157 190,157 2004 190,157 190,157 190,157 190,157 190,157 190,157 190,157 190,157 190,157 203,265 203,265 203,265 2005 203,265 203,265 203,265 203,265 203,265 203,265 203,265 204,265 204,265 204,265 204,265 204,265 2006 204,265 204,265 204,265 204,265 212,165 212,165 212,165 212,165 212,165 212,755 212,755 212,755 2007 212,755 212,755 212,755 212,755 212,755 212,755 212,755 212,755 213,225 213,225 213,225 213,225 2008 213,225 213,225 213,225 213,225 213,225 213,225 213,225 213,225 213,225 213,225 229,013 229,013

378

Washington Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 37,300 37,300 37,300 37,300 37,300 37,300 37,300 37,300 37,300 37,300 37,720 37,720 2003 37,720 37,720 37,720 37,720 37,720 38,969 38,969 38,969 39,628 39,628 39,628 39,628 2004 39,628 39,628 39,628 39,628 39,628 39,628 39,628 39,628 39,628 40,247 40,247 40,247 2005 40,247 40,247 40,247 40,247 40,247 40,247 40,247 40,247 40,247 40,247 40,247 40,247 2006 40,247 40,247 40,247 40,247 40,247 40,247 40,247 40,247 40,247 42,191 42,191 42,191 2007 42,191 42,191 42,191 42,191 42,191 42,191 42,191 42,191 43,316 43,316 43,316 43,316 2008 43,316 43,316 43,316 43,316 43,316 43,316 43,316 43,316 43,316 43,316 39,341 39,341

379

California Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 388,480 475,720 475,720 475,720 475,720 475,720 475,720 475,720 475,720 475,720 474,920 474,920 2003 474,920 474,920 474,920 474,920 474,920 478,995 478,995 478,995 478,995 478,995 478,995 478,995 2004 478,995 478,995 478,995 478,995 478,995 478,995 486,095 446,095 446,095 454,095 454,095 454,095 2005 474,095 474,095 474,095 474,095 474,095 474,095 474,095 474,095 474,095 474,095 474,095 474,095 2006 474,095 474,095 474,095 474,095 474,095 474,095 481,095 481,095 481,095 484,726 484,726 484,726 2007 484,726 484,726 484,726 484,726 484,726 484,726 484,726 484,726 484,711 476,711 476,711 476,711 2008 476,711 476,711 476,711 476,711 476,711 476,711 476,711 476,711 476,711 477,911 488,911 488,911

380

Nebraska Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 39,469 39,469 39,469 39,469 39,469 39,469 39,469 39,469 39,469 39,469 39,469 39,469 2003 39,469 39,469 39,469 39,469 39,469 39,469 39,469 39,469 39,469 39,469 39,469 39,469 2004 39,469 39,469 39,469 39,469 39,469 39,469 39,469 39,469 39,469 39,469 39,469 39,469 2005 39,469 39,469 39,469 39,469 39,469 39,469 39,469 39,469 39,469 39,469 39,469 39,469 2006 39,469 39,469 39,469 39,469 39,469 39,469 39,469 39,469 39,469 39,469 39,469 39,469 2007 39,469 39,469 39,469 39,469 39,469 39,469 39,469 39,469 39,469 39,469 39,469 39,469 2008 39,469 39,469 39,469 39,469 39,469 39,469 39,469 39,469 39,469 39,469 34,850 34,850

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381

Colorado Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 100,227 100,227 100,227 100,227 100,227 100,227 100,227 100,227 100,227 100,227 100,227 100,227 2003 100,227 100,227 100,227 100,227 100,227 101,055 101,055 101,055 101,055 101,055 101,055 101,055 2004 101,055 101,055 101,055 101,055 101,055 101,055 101,055 101,055 101,055 101,055 101,055 101,055 2005 101,055 101,055 101,055 101,055 101,055 101,055 101,055 101,055 101,055 101,055 101,055 101,055 2006 101,055 101,055 101,055 101,055 101,055 101,055 101,055 101,055 101,055 98,068 98,068 98,068 2007 93,474 93,474 93,474 93,474 93,474 93,474 93,474 93,474 98,068 98,068 98,068 98,068 2008 98,068 98,068 98,068 98,068 98,068 98,068 98,068 98,068 98,068 98,068 98,068 98,068

382

Montana Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 371,510 371,510 371,510 371,510 371,510 371,510 371,510 371,510 371,510 371,510 374,125 374,125 2003 374,125 374,125 374,125 374,125 374,125 374,201 374,201 374,201 374,201 374,201 374,201 374,201 2004 374,201 374,201 374,201 374,201 374,201 374,201 374,201 374,201 374,201 374,201 374,201 374,201 2005 374,201 374,201 374,201 374,201 374,201 374,201 374,201 374,201 374,201 374,201 374,201 374,201 2006 374,201 374,201 374,201 374,201 374,201 374,201 374,201 374,201 374,201 374,201 374,201 374,201 2007 374,201 374,201 374,201 374,201 374,201 374,201 374,201 374,201 374,201 374,201 374,201 374,201 2008 374,201 374,201 374,201 374,201 374,201 374,201 374,201 374,201 374,201 374,201 374,201 374,201

383

Alabama Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 5,280 5,280 5,280 5,280 5,280 5,280 5,280 5,280 5,280 5,280 5,280 5,280 2003 5,280 5,280 5,280 5,280 5,280 8,520 8,520 8,520 8,520 8,520 8,520 8,520 2004 8,520 8,520 8,520 8,520 8,520 8,520 8,520 8,520 8,520 11,015 11,015 11,015 2005 11,015 11,015 11,015 11,015 11,015 11,015 11,015 11,015 11,015 11,015 11,015 11,015 2006 11,015 11,015 11,015 11,015 11,015 11,015 11,015 11,015 11,015 11,015 11,015 11,015 2007 11,015 11,015 11,015 11,015 11,015 11,015 11,015 11,015 19,300 19,300 19,300 19,300 2008 19,300 19,300 19,300 19,300 19,300 19,300 19,300 19,300 19,300 19,300 19,300 19,300 2009 19,300 19,300 19,300 19,300 19,300 19,300 19,300 19,300 19,300 19,300 19,300 26,900

384

Ohio Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 573,784 573,784 573,784 573,784 573,784 573,784 573,784 573,784 573,784 573,784 575,959 575,959 2003 575,959 575,959 575,959 575,959 575,959 573,709 573,709 573,709 573,709 573,709 573,709 573,709 2004 573,709 573,709 573,709 573,709 573,709 573,709 573,709 573,709 573,709 572,404 572,404 572,404 2005 572,404 572,404 572,329 572,404 572,404 572,404 572,404 572,404 572,404 572,404 572,404 572,404 2006 572,404 572,404 572,404 572,404 572,404 572,404 572,404 572,404 572,404 572,477 572,477 572,477 2007 572,477 572,477 572,477 572,477 572,477 572,477 572,477 572,477 572,477 572,477 572,477 572,477 2008 572,477 572,477 572,477 572,477 572,477 572,477 572,477 572,477 572,477 572,477 572,477 572,477

385

West Virginia Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 733,126 733,126 733,126 733,126 733,126 733,126 496,796 496,796 496,796 496,796 497,996 497,996 2003 497,996 497,996 497,996 497,996 497,996 509,836 509,836 509,836 509,836 509,758 494,458 494,458 2004 492,025 492,025 492,025 492,025 492,025 492,025 492,025 492,025 492,025 510,827 510,827 510,827 2005 510,827 510,827 510,827 510,827 510,827 510,827 510,827 510,827 510,827 510,827 510,827 510,827 2006 510,827 510,827 510,827 510,827 510,827 510,827 510,827 510,827 510,827 512,377 512,377 512,377 2007 512,377 512,377 541,977 541,977 541,977 541,977 541,977 541,977 543,016 543,016 543,016 543,016 2008 543,016 543,016 543,016 543,016 543,016 543,016 543,016 543,016 543,016 543,016 536,702 536,702

386

Colorado Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 82,662 82,662 1990's 98,999 98,999 105,790 105,790 105,583 108,837 99,599 99,599 99,599 99,599...

387

U.S. Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Lower 48 States Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico...

388

The Capacity of States to Govern Shale Gas Development Risks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Seismic equipment deployed near disposal wells could detect potential induced earthquake activity, and monitors placed at various points could pick up indications of soil erosion. ... Department of the Interior, Fish & Wildlife Service,50 C.F.R. Part 17, Docket No. FWS-R5-ES-2012-0045, Endangered andThreatened Wildlife and Plants; Endangered Species Status for DiamondDarter, Final Rule, July 26, ( 2013. ...

Hannah J. Wiseman

2014-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

389

Arkansas Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year-8 Year-9 1980's 36,147 31,447 1990's 31,277 31,277 31,277 31,277 31,277 38,347 31,871 31,871 24,190 24,190 2000's 22,000 22,000 22,000 22,000 22,000 22,000 22,000 22,000...

390

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline System - Western Region  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Western Region Western Region About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 2007/2008 with selected updates Natural Gas Pipelines in the Western Region Overview | Transportation South | Transportation North | Regional Pipeline Companies & Links Overview Ten interstate and nine intrastate natural gas pipeline companies provide transportation services to and within the Western Region (Arizona, California, Idaho, Nevada, Oregon, and Washington), the fewest number serving any region (see Table below). Slightly more than half the capacity entering the region is on natural gas pipeline systems that carry natural gas from the Rocky Mountain area and the Permian and San Juan basins. These latter systems enter the region at the New Mexico-Arizona and Nevada-Utah State lines. The rest of the capacity arrives on natural gas pipelines that access Canadian natural gas at the Idaho and Washington State border crossings with British Columbia, Canada.

391

EIA - Analysis of Natural Gas Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Prices Prices 2010 Peaks, Plans and (Persnickety) Prices This presentation provides information about EIA's estimates of working gas peak storage capacity, and the development of the natural gas storage industry. Natural gas shale and the need for high deliverability storage are identified as key drivers in natural gas storage capacity development. The presentation also provides estimates of planned storage facilities through 2012. Categories: Prices, Storage (Released, 10/28/2010, ppt format) Natural Gas Year-In-Review 2009 This is a special report that provides an overview of the natural gas industry and markets in 2009 with special focus on the first complete set of supply and disposition data for 2009 from the Energy Information Administration. Topics discussed include natural gas end-use consumption trends, offshore and onshore production, imports and exports of pipeline and liquefied natural gas, and above-average storage inventories. Categories: Prices, Production, Consumption, Imports/Exports & Pipelines, Storage (Released, 7/9/2010, Html format)

392

Natural Gas - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

January 8, 2014 | Release Date: January 9, January 8, 2014 | Release Date: January 9, 2014 | Next Release: January 16, 2014 Previous Issues Week: 01/19/2014 (View Archive) JUMP TO: In The News | Overview | Prices/Demand/Supply | Storage In the News: Power sector response to high natural gas prices varies by region Day-ahead spot prices for natural gas and electric generation rose this week in both the Midwest and eastern United States, as the polar vortex brought cold temperatures to those parts of the country. While cold temperatures affected all of these regions, both gas and power prices increased more in New England, New York and the Mid-Atlantic than they did in the Midwest. Gas-fired power plants in the East had to compete for an increasingly limited amount of available pipeline capacity from a system that was

393

NATURAL GAS: Diversity for Profit  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

NATURAL GAS: Diversity for Profit ... "The current and future natural gas shortage may be a blessing in disguise. ... Getting involved will mean increased profitability by becoming an integrated total energy company and not just a marketer of natural gas, was the repeated message of the Institute of Gas Technology. ...

1969-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Impact of Interruptible Natural Gas Service A Snapshot of California Natural Gas Market: Status and Outlook EIA's Testimony on Natural Gas Supply and Demand Residential Natural Gas Price Brochure Status of Natural Gas Pipeline System Capacity Previous Issues of Natural Gas Weekly Update Natural Gas Homepage Overview Net additions to storage during the fourth week of April were estimated to have been over 100 Bcf-a record high level for the first month of the refill season. Compared to last year when only 36 Bcf or 1.2 Bcf per day were added to stocks in April, this year the industry appears to be taking advantage of the reduction in demand that typically occurs in April, the first shoulder month of the year, and the recent price declines. After beginning the week down, spot prices at the Henry Hub trended down most days last week to end trading on Friday at $4.49 per MMBtu-the lowest price since early November. On the NYMEX futures market, the near-month (June) contract also moved down most days and ended last week at $4.490-down $0.377 from the previous Friday. Some-early summer high temperatures last week in the Northeast and winter-like weather in the Rockies (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation from Normal Temperatures Map) appear to have had little impact on the natural gas markets as prices declined most days at most major locations.

395

Economic Dispatch of Electric Generation Capacity | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Economic Dispatch of Electric Generation Capacity Economic Dispatch of Electric Generation Capacity A report to congress and the states pursuant to sections 1234 and 1832 of the...

396

production capacity | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

production capacity production capacity Dataset Summary Description No description given. Source Oak Ridge National Laboratory Date Released November 30th, 2009 (4 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords biodiesel ethanol location production capacity transportation Data application/zip icon Biorefineries.zip (zip, 7 MiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below Comment Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata Average vote Your vote Usefulness of the dataset Average vote Your vote Ease of access Average vote Your vote Overall rating Average vote Your vote Comments Login or register to post comments If you rate this dataset, your published comment will include your rating.

397

installed capacity | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

installed capacity installed capacity Dataset Summary Description Estimates for each of the 50 states and the entire United States show Source Wind Powering America Date Released February 04th, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated April 13th, 2011 (3 years ago) Keywords annual generation installed capacity usa wind Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon Wind potential data (xls, 102.4 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below Comment Work of the U.S. Federal Government. Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata Average vote Your vote Usefulness of the dataset Average vote Your vote Ease of access Average vote Your vote Overall rating Average vote Your vote Comments

398

Hybrid Zero-capacity Channels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

There are only two known kinds of zero-capacity channels. The first kind produces entangled states that have positive partial transpose, and the second one - states that are cloneable. We consider the family of 'hybrid' quantum channels, which lies in the intersection of the above classes of channels and investigate its properties. It gives rise to the first explicit examples of the channels, which create bound entangled states that have the property of being cloneable to the arbitrary finite number of parties. Hybrid channels provide the first example of highly cloneable binding entanglement channels, for which known superactivation protocols must fail - superactivation is the effect where two channels each with zero quantum capacity having positive capacity when used together. We give two methods to construct a hybrid channel from any binding entanglement channel. We also find the low-dimensional counterparts of hybrid states - bipartite qubit states which are extendible and possess two-way key.

Sergii Strelchuk; Jonathan Oppenheim

2012-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

399

Building Regulatory Capacity for Change  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Regulatory Capacity for Regulatory Capacity for Change PRESENTED BY Sarah Spencer-Workman, LEED AP July 27, 2011 "How to identify and review laws relevant to buildings and find places and opportunities that can accept changes that would support building energy objectives" Presentation Highlights Rulemaking Community and Stakeholder Identification To Support Code Changes Engagement: Building Capacity for Change Pay It Forward RULEMAKING : Plan Development and Research of Laws Relevant to Buildings How is it conducted? 'Landscape' Review Key words or phrases to look for Identify "home rule" jurisdictions Update and review cycle built in 'Landscape' Review:

400

"Primary Energy Source","Natural Gas"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas" "Net Summer Capacity (megawatts)",15404,29 "..Electric Utilities",12691,21 "..IPP & CHP",2713,33 "Net Generation (megawatthours)",54584295,28 "..Electric Utilities",41844010,2...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas capacity increase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

"Primary Energy Source","Natural Gas"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Source","Natural Gas" "Net Summer Capacity (megawatts)",2119,48 "Electric Utilities",1946,39 "IPP & CHP",172,50 "Net Generation (megawatthours)",6946419,49 "Electric...

402

"Primary Energy Source","Natural Gas"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Source","Natural Gas" "Net Summer Capacity (megawatts)",23485,17 "Electric Utilities",17148,17 "IPP & CHP",6337,17 "Net Generation (megawatthours)",77896588,19 "Electric...

403

"Primary Energy Source","Natural Gas"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Source","Natural Gas" "Net Summer Capacity (megawatts)",14321,31 "Electric Utilities",991,42 "IPP & CHP",13330,7 "Net Generation (megawatthours)",36198121,36 "Electric...

404

"Primary Energy Source","Natural Gas"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Source","Natural Gas" "Net Summer Capacity (megawatts)",38488,7 "Electric Utilities",29293,3 "IPP & CHP",9195,10 "Net Generation (megawatthours)",122306364,9 "Electric...

405

"Primary Energy Source","Natural Gas"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Source","Natural Gas" "Net Summer Capacity (megawatts)",1781,49 "Electric Utilities",8,50 "IPP & CHP",1773,38 "Net Generation (megawatthours)",8309036,48 "Electric...

406

"Primary Energy Source","Natural Gas"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Source","Natural Gas" "Net Summer Capacity (megawatts)",32547,9 "Electric Utilities",23615,7 "IPP & CHP",8933,11 "Net Generation (megawatthours)",152878688,6 "Electric...

407

"Primary Energy Source","Natural Gas"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Source","Natural Gas" "Net Summer Capacity (megawatts)",39520,6 "Electric Utilities",10739,26 "IPP & CHP",28781,5 "Net Generation (megawatthours)",135768251,7 "Electric...

408

"Primary Energy Source","Natural Gas"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Source","Natural Gas" "Net Summer Capacity (megawatts)",10476,34 "Electric Utilities",7807,30 "IPP & CHP",2669,34 "Net Generation (megawatthours)",35173263,39 "Electric...

409

"Primary Energy Source","Natural Gas"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Source","Natural Gas" "Net Summer Capacity (megawatts)",59139,3 "Electric Utilities",51373,1 "IPP & CHP",7766,15 "Net Generation (megawatthours)",221096136,3 "Electric...

410

"Primary Energy Source","Natural Gas"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Source","Natural Gas" "Net Summer Capacity (megawatts)",71329,2 "Electric Utilities",30294,2 "IPP & CHP",41035,3 "Net Generation (megawatthours)",199518567,4 "Electric...

411

"Primary Energy Source","Natural Gas"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Source","Natural Gas" "Net Summer Capacity (megawatts)",3357,46 "Electric Utilities",98,47 "IPP & CHP",3259,29 "Net Generation (megawatthours)",8633694,47 "Electric...

412

"Primary Energy Source","Natural Gas"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Source","Natural Gas" "Net Summer Capacity (megawatts)",109568,1 "Electric Utilities",28463,4 "IPP & CHP",81106,1 "Net Generation (megawatthours)",429812510,1 "Electric...

413

Capacity analysis, cycle time optimization, and supply chain strategy in multi-product biopharmaceutical manufacturing operations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Application of system optimization theory, supply chain principles, and capacity modeling are increasingly valuable tools for use in pharmaceutical manufacturing facilities. The dynamics of the pharmaceutical industry - ...

Fetcho-Phillips, Kacey L. (Kacey Lynn)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Natural Gas Combined Cycle Power Plant Integrated to Capture Plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Natural Gas Combined Cycle Power Plant Integrated to Capture Plant ... A natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) power plant with capacity of about 430 MW integrated to a chemical solvent absorber/stripping capture plant is investigated. ... The natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) is an advanced power generation technology that improves the fuel efficiency of natural gas. ...

Mehdi Karimi; Magne Hillestad; Hallvard F. Svendsen

2012-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

415

Oil Production Capacity Expansion Costs for the Persian Gulf  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

TR/0606 TR/0606 Distribution Category UC-950 Oil Production Capacity Expansion Costs For The Persian Gulf January 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Oil and Gas U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Energy Information Administration Oil Production Capacity Expansion Costs for the Persian Gulf iii Preface Oil Production Capacity Expansion Costs for the Persian Gulf provides estimates of development and operating costs for various size fields in countries surrounding the Persian

416

EIS-0164: Pacific Gas Transmission/Pacific Gas and Electric and Altamont Natural Gas Pipeline Project  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) has prepared the PGT/PG&E and Altamont Natural Gas Pipeline Projects Environmental Impact Statement to satisfy the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act. This project addresses the need to expand the capacity of the pipeline transmission system to better transfer Canadian natural gas to Southern California and the Pacific Northwest. The U.S. Department of Energy cooperated in the preparation of this statement because Section 19(c) of the Natural Gas Act applies to the Departments action of authorizing import/export of natural gas, and adopted this statement by the spring of 1992. "

417

Optimization of offshore natural gas field development.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? In this thesis the target is to find the optimal development solution of an offshore natural gas field. Natural gas is increasing in importance (more)

Johansen, Gaute Rannem

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Oil and Gas Research| GE Global Research  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Oil & Gas We're balancing the increasing demand for finite resources with technology that ensures access to energy for generations to come. Home > Innovation > Oil & Gas Innovation...

419

CAPACITY DECISIONS WITH DEMAND FLUCTUATIONS AND CARBON LEAKAGE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

For carbon-intensive, internationally-traded industrial goods, a unilat- eral increase in the domestic CO2 be partly oset by the increase of emissions in the rest of the world. The literature on carbon leakage hasCAPACITY DECISIONS WITH DEMAND FLUCTUATIONS AND CARBON LEAKAGE Guy MEUNIER Jean-Pierre PONSSARD

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

420

Table 11.6 Installed Nameplate Capacity of Fossil-Fuel Steam-Electric Generators With Environmental Equipment, 1985-2010 (Megawatts)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Installed Nameplate Capacity of Fossil-Fuel Steam-Electric Generators With Environmental Equipment," Installed Nameplate Capacity of Fossil-Fuel Steam-Electric Generators With Environmental Equipment," " 1985-2010 (Megawatts)" "Year","Coal",,,,"Petroleum and Natural Gas",,,,"Total 1" ,,,"Flue Gas","Total 2",,,"Flue Gas","Total 2",,,"Flue Gas","Total 2" ,"Particulate","Cooling","Desulfurization",,"Particulate","Cooling","Desulfurization",,"Particulate","Cooling","Desulfurization" ,"Collectors","Towers","(Scrubbers)",,"Collectors","Towers","(Scrubbers)",,"Collectors","Towers","(Scrubbers)"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas capacity increase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Restoration islands supplied by gas turbines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The paper describes how gas turbine based plants (open cycle and combined cycle) can be profitably used in power system restoration for supplying restoration areas. In recent times, in fact, several gas turbine sections entered the power system due to the improved efficiency of gas turbines and to the development of high efficiency combined-cycle plants. These units can be easily improved to provide black-start capability and can therefore largely increase the black-start capacity of the entire system. Restoration islands to be used for minimizing the time to supply critical areas, such as urban and industrial zones, can support the usual restoration paths designed to provide cranking power to large steam units. The paper presents the defining criteria for the procedures to be followed during restoration. An example referred to as an urban area is reported with simulation results. The Italian System Operator recently carried out some tests on an open cycle gas turbine aimed at checking the island operation of the unit. Some results are described.

S. Barsali; D. Poli; A. Pratic; R. Salvati; M. Sforna; R. Zaottini

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Number of Producing Gas Wells (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count) Count) Data Series: Wellhead Price Imports Price Price of Imports by Pipeline Price of LNG Imports Exports Price Price of Exports by Pipeline Price of LNG Exports Pipeline and Distribution Use Price Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Vehicle Fuel Price Electric Power Price Proved Reserves as of 12/31 Reserves Adjustments Reserves Revision Increases Reserves Revision Decreases Reserves Sales Reserves Acquisitions Reserves Extensions Reserves New Field Discoveries New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields Estimated Production Number of Producing Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production Natural Gas Processed NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Underground Storage Injections Underground Storage Withdrawals Underground Storage Net Withdrawals LNG Storage Additions LNG Storage Withdrawals LNG Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Lease Fuel Plant Fuel Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period:

423

Pipeline Politics: Natural Gas in Eurasia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

European Union energy policy to increase influence in energy markets, push for increased gas storage across Europe to provide temporary relief against gas disruptions, and explore increased US and European cooperation with Russia on energy market access....

Landrum, William W.; Llewellyn, Benjamin B.; Limesand, Craig M.; Miller, Dante J.; Morris, James P.; Nowell, Kathleen S.; Sherman, Charlotte L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Landfill Gas | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Landfill Gas Landfill Gas Dataset Summary Description The UK Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC) publishes annual renewable energy generation and capacity by region (9 regions in England, plus Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland). Data available 2003 to 2009. Data is included in the DECC Energy Trends: September 2010 Report (available: http://www.decc.gov.uk/assets/decc/Statistics/publications/trends/558-tr...) Source UK Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC) Date Released September 30th, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords Energy Generation Hydro Landfill Gas Other Biofuels Renewable Energy Consumption Sewage Gas wind Data application/zip icon 2 Excel files, 1 for generation, 1 for capacity (zip, 24.9 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed

425

Capacity Allocation with Competitive Retailers Masabumi Furuhata  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to uncertainty of market demands, costly capacity construction and time consuming capacity expansion. This makes the market to be unstable and malfunc- tioning. Such a problem is known as the capacity allocation investigate the properties of capacity allocation mechanisms for the markets where a sin- gle supplier

Zhang, Dongmo

426

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Impact of Interruptible Natural Gas Service A Snapshot of California Natural Gas Market: Status and Outlook EIA's Testimony on Natural Gas Supply and Demand Residential Natural Gas Price Brochure Status of Natural Gas Pipeline System Capacity Previous Issues of Natural Gas Weekly Update Natural Gas Homepage Overview: Monday, June 04, 2001 Stock builds slowed from their recent pace, even though spot prices continued their downward trend to end the week at the Henry Hub at $3.71 per MMBtu, which is a Friday-to-Friday decline of $0.14 per MMBtu. The NYMEX contract price for June delivery at the Henry Hub settled Tuesday at $3.738, the lowest close-out of a near month contract since the May 2000 contract. The July contract price was $3.930 per MMBtu on Friday, $0.103 lower than a week earlier. Mild weather in the Northeast and Midwest continued to suppress prices on the Eastern Seaboard, while a short burst of warm temperatures in southern California early in the week had the opposite effect on prices in that region. (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation from Normal Temperatures Map) Net injections to storage for the week ended Friday, May 25 were 99 Bcf, breaking a 4-week string of 100-plus net injections.

427

EIA - AEO2010 - Natural Gas Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas Demand Gas Demand Annual Energy Outlook 2010 with Projections to 2035 Natural Gas Demand Figure 68. Regional growth in nonhydroelectric renewable electricity capacity including end-use capacity, 2008-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 69. Annual average lower 48 wellhead and Henry Hub spot market prices for natural gas, 1990-2035. Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 70. Ratio of low-sulfur light crude oil price to Henry Hub natural gas price on an energy equivalent basis, 1990-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 71. Annual average lower 48 wellhead prices for natural gas in three technology cases, 1990-2035. Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 72. Annual average lower 48 wellhead prices for natural gas in three oil price cases, 1990-2035

428

Optimization of condensing gas drive  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- cal, undersaturated reservoir with gas being injected into the crest and oil being produced from the base of the structure. Fractional oil re- covery at gas breakthrough proved to be less sensitive to changes in oil withdrawal rates as the gas... injection pressure was increased. The validity of the model was established by accurately simulating several low pressure gas drives conducted in the laboratory. Oil recoveries at gas breakthrough using the model compared closely with those recoveries...

Lofton, Larry Keith

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

429

Natural Gas | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Natural Gas Natural Gas Many heavy-duty fleets depend on diesel fuel. But an increasing number of trucking companies are transitioning their vehicles to run on liquefied natural...

430

OpenEI Community - natural gas+ condensing flue gas heat recovery+ water  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Increase Natural Gas Increase Natural Gas Energy Efficiency http://en.openei.org/community/group/increase-natural-gas-energy-efficiency Description: Increased natural gas energy efficiency = Reduced utility bills = Profit In 2011 the EIA reports that commercial buildings, industry and the power plants consumed approx. 17.5 Trillion cu.ft. of natural gas.How much of that energy was wasted, blown up chimneys across the country as HOT exhaust into the atmosphere? 40% ~ 60% ? At what temperature?increase-natural-gas-energy-efficiency" target="_blank">read more natural gas+ condensing flue gas heat

431

A high capacity microplate rack  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A microplate rack has been designed for use with in vitro biological assays. The microplate rack can hold up to 15, 96-well ... gas diffusion) surrounding microplates arranged in the rack are more uniform than wh...

Glynn T. Faircloth; David Newman; Michael Young

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Hydrogen storage capacity in single-walled carbon nanotubes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Molecular-dynamics simulations were used to investigate the storage capacity of hydrogen in single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and the strain of nanotube under the interactions between the stored hydrogen molecules and the SWNT. The storage capacities inside SWNTs increase with the increase of tube diameters. For a SWNT with diameter less than 20 , the storage capacity depends strongly on the helicity of a the SWNT. The maximal radial strain of SWNT is in the range of 11%18%, and depends on the helicity of the SWNT. The maximal strain of armchair SWNTs is less than that of zigzag SWNTs. The tensile strengths of SWNTs decrease with increasing diameters, and approach that of graphite (20 GPa) for larger-diameter tubes.

Yuchen Ma; Yueyuan Xia; Mingwen Zhao; Minju Ying

2002-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

433

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1, 2008 1, 2008 Next Release: September 18, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (Wednesday, September 3, to Wednesday, September 10) Natural gas spot prices increased at most market locations in the Lower 48 States this report week (Wednesday–Wednesday, September 3-10), as the fifth hurricane of the season moving through the Gulf of Mexico has prompted mandatory evacuation orders in some areas as well as evacuation of personnel from offshore platforms. Mandatory evacuation orders in Louisiana have led to the shutdown of at least two processing plants, with a total of 700 million cubic feet (MMcf) per day of processing capacity. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price increased $0.39 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $7.65.

434

Microsoft Word - gas price fact sheet.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

the prices seem to have spiked recently, the issues leading to the increase have been the prices seem to have spiked recently, the issues leading to the increase have been decades in the making. Our nation's refining capacity has been stagnant for thirty years, we have limited our options to increase domestic supply, and we depend more and more on foreign sources of oil that are becoming increasingly scarce because of rising demand in other countries like China and India. ♦ The energy bill just signed by the president last summer has helped us start to turn the corner and lead us in the right direction. The energy bill supports development of more oil and gas reserves here at home and in addition, and will help us develop new technologies to fuel our transportation needs like hydrogen fuel cell cars. ♦ In the coming months, we may continue to see high prices due to increased demand as the

435

Natural Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

30 May 1974 research-article Natural Gas C. P. Coppack This paper reviews the world's existing natural gas reserves and future expectations, together with natural gas consumption in 1972, by main geographic...

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

The gas surge  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...S. SHALE GAS PRODUCTION SINCE 2007 40...TOTAL U.S. PRODUCTION 47PERCENT INCREASE IN U.S. ELECTRICITY GENERATED USING...dusty gas drilling site in southwestern Kansas to try an experiment...40% of U.S. production, up from less...

David Malakoff

2014-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

437

Optimizing program increases field's profits  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

By combining benefits of several techniques to increase production and cut drilling and completion costs, Royal Oil and Gas Corp. has increased profitability on it leases in the AWP (Olmos) field, and made the operations economical in the 1988 price environment. The optimization program has included modifying fracture treatments, refracturing older wells, infill drilling, and down sizing of tubulars. Royal has also participated in consortium efforts to increase AWP (Olmos) production through analysis using a borehole televiewer, microfracturing, and history matching. Study of reservoir changes since the beginning of production has led Royal to alter its fracture stimulation designs to reduce treatment sizes that can further increase savings.

Huebinger, T.; Webster, D.; Chrisholm, P.; Venditto, J.; Hunt, J.

1988-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

438

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Benefits  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Benefits Benefits to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Benefits on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Benefits on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Benefits on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Benefits on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Benefits on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Benefits on AddThis.com... More in this section... Natural Gas Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Laws & Incentives Natural Gas Benefits and Considerations Compressed and liquefied natural gas are clean, domestically produced alternative fuels. Using these fuels in natural gas vehicles increases

439

What is a gas hub? Putting European gas hubs in perspective:.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Gas hubs have emerged in Europe after the liberalisation of the gas market and they are increasingly becoming more important. But the questions rises of (more)

Nederveen, M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3, 2008 3, 2008 Next Release: October 30, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the week ending Wednesday, October 22) Natural gas spot prices in the Lower 48 States this report week increased as a result of cold weather in some major gas consuming areas of the country, several ongoing pipeline maintenance projects, and the continuing production shut-ins in the Gulf of Mexico region. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the near-month contract (November 2008) increased on the week to $6.777 per million British thermal units (MMBtu) as of yesterday (October 22). The net weekly increase occurred during a week in which the price increased in three trading sessions. As of Friday, October 17, working gas in underground storage totaled

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas capacity increase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Experiments and thermal modeling on hybrid energy supply system of gas engine heat pumps and organic Rankine cycle  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper presents a hybrid energy supply system, which is composed of two subsystems (gas engine-driven heat pump system (GEHP) and organic Rankine cycle system (ORC)) and three major thermodynamic cycles (the vapor compression refrigeration cycle, the internal combustion gas engine cycle and ORC). In order to convert the low-grade gas engine waste heat into high-grade electricity, the ORC system is built up using R245fa, \\{R152a\\} and R123 as working fluids, and the ORC thermal model is also developed. Meanwhile, experiments of \\{GHEPs\\} in cooling mode are conducted, and several factors which influence the cooling performance are also discussed. The results indicate that the cooling capacity, gas engine energy consumption, gas engine waste heat increase with increasing of gas engine speed and decrease with decreasing of evaporator water inlet temperature. The waste heat recovered from gas engine is more than 55% of gas engine energy consumption. F6urthermore, R123 in ORC system yields the highest thermal and exergy efficiency of 11.84% and 54.24%, respectively. Although, thermal and exergy efficiency of \\{R245fa\\} is 11.42% and 52.25% lower than that of R123, its environmental performance exhibits favorable utilization for ORC using gas engine waste heat as low-grade heat source.

Huanwei Liu; Qiushu Zhou; Haibo Zhao; Peifeng Wang

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Multiple volume compressor for hot gas engine  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A multiple volume compressor for use in a hot gas (Stirling) engine having a plurality of different volume chambers arranged to pump down the engine when decreased power is called for and return the working gas to a storage tank or reservoir. A valve actuated bypass loop is placed over each chamber which can be opened to return gas discharged from the chamber back to the inlet thereto. By selectively actuating the bypass valves, a number of different compressor capacities can be attained without changing compressor speed whereby the capacity of the compressor can be matched to the power available from the engine which is used to drive the compressor.

Stotts, Robert E. (Clifton Park, NY)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 2, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, July 29, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, July 21, 2010) Natural gas prices rose across market locations in the lower 48 States during the report week. The Henry Hub natural gas spot price rose 31 cents, or 7 percent, during the week, averaging $4.70 per million Btu (MMBtu) yesterday, July 21. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the August 2010 natural gas futures contract for delivery at the Henry Hub rose about 21 cents, or 5 percent, ending the report week at $4.513 per MMBtu. Working natural gas in storage increased to 2,891 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, July 16, according to EIA’s Weekly Natural Gas Storage

444

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 1, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, April 28, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, April 20, 2011) Natural gas prices rose at most market locations during the week, as consumption increased. The Henry Hub spot price increased 19 cents from $4.14 per million Btu (MMBtu) on Wednesday, April 13 to $4.33 per MMBtu on Wednesday, April 20. Futures prices behaved similar to spot prices; at the New York Mercantile Exchange, the price of the near-month natural gas contract (May 2011) rose from $4.141 per MMBtu to $4.310 per MMBtu. Working natural gas in storage rose to 1,654 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, April 15, according to EIA’s Weekly Natural Gas

445

How regulators should use natural gas price forecasts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Natural gas prices are critical to a range of regulatory decisions covering both electric and gas utilities. Natural gas prices are often a crucial variable in electric generation capacity planning and in the benefit-cost relationship for energy-efficiency programs. High natural gas prices can make coal generation the most economical new source, while low prices can make natural gas generation the most economical. (author)

Costello, Ken

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

446

[working paper] Regional Economic Capacity, Economic Shocks,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 [working paper] Regional Economic Capacity, Economic Shocks, and Economic that makes them more likely to resist economic shocks or to recover quickly from of resilience capacity developed by Foster (2012) is related to economic resilience

Sekhon, Jasjeet S.

447

Fair capacity sharing of multiple aperiodic servers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

For handling multiple aperiodic tasks with different temporal requirements, multiple aperiodic servers are used. Since capacity is partitioned statically among the multiple servers, they suffer from heavy capacity exhaustions. Bernat and Burns...

Melapudi, Vinod Reddy

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Seismic waves increase permeability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

interest to hydrologists and oil reservoir engineers as theygeothermal, natural gas and oil reservoirs 18 . Third, the

Elkhoury, Jean E.; Brodsky, Emily E.; Agnew, Duncan C.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Design of Refractory Linings for Balanced Energy Efficiency, Uptime, and Capacity in Lime Kilns  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The rotary kilns used by the pulp and paper industry to regenerate lime in the Kraft process are very energy intensive. Throughout the 90 s, in response to increasing fuel prices, the industry used back up insulation in conjunction with the high alumina brick used to line the burning zones of their kilns. While this improved energy efficiency, the practice of installing insulating brick behind the working lining increased the inner wall temperatures. In the worst case, due to the increased temperatures, rapid brick failures occurred causing unscheduled outages and expensive repairs. Despite these issues, for the most part, the industry continued to use insulating refractory linings in that the energy savings were large enough to offset any increase in the cost of maintaining the refractory lining. Due to the dramatic decline in the price of natural gas in some areas combined with mounting pressures to increasing production of existing assets, over the last decade, many mills are focusing more on increasing the uptime of their kilns as opposed to energy savings. To this end, a growing number of mills are using basic (magnesia based) brick instead of high alumina brick to line the burning zone of the kiln since the lime mud does not react with these bricks at the operating temperatures of the burning zone of the kiln. In the extreme case, a few mills have chosen to install basic brick in the front end of the kiln running a length equivalent to 10 diameters. While the use of basic brick can increase the uptime of the kiln and reduce the cost to maintain the refractory lining, it does dramatically increase the heat losses resulting from the increased operating temperatures of the shell. Also, over long periods of time operating at these high temperatures, damage can occur in the shell. There are tradeoffs between energy efficiency, capacity and uptime. When fuel prices are very high, it makes sense to insulate the lining. When fuel prices are lower, trading some thermal efficiency for increased uptime and capacity seems reasonable. This paper considers a number of refractory linings in an effort to develop optimized operating strategies that balance these factors. In addition to considering a range of refractory materials, the paper examines other factors such as the chain area, discharge dams and other operating variables that impact the service life of the refractory lining. The paper provides recommendations that will help mill personnel develop a strategy to select a refractory lining that is optimized for their specific situation.

Gorog, John Peter [ORNL; Hemrick, James Gordon [ORNL; Walker, Harold [Refratechnik North America, Inc.; Leary, William R [ORNL; Ellis, Murray [Australian Paper, Co.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Base Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Electric Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Gas in Underground Storage Base Gas in Underground Storage Working Gas in Underground Storage Underground Storage Injections Underground Storage Withdrawals Underground Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period:

451

CAPACITY DECISIONS WITH DEMAND FLUCTUATIONS AND CARBON LEAKAGE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Palaiseau, France April 2013 Abstract For carbon-intensive, internationally-traded industrial goods, a uni be partly oset by the increase of emissions in the rest of the world. The literature on carbon leakage hasCAPACITY DECISIONS WITH DEMAND FLUCTUATIONS AND CARBON LEAKAGE Guy MEUNIER Jean-Pierre PONSSARD

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

452

Can Science and Technology Capacity be Measured?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The ability of a nation to participate in the global knowledge economy depends to some extent on its capacities in science and technology. In an effort to assess the capacity of different countries in science and technology, this article updates a classification scheme developed by RAND to measure science and technology capacity for 150 countries of the world.

Wagner, Caroline S; Dutta, Arindum

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Internal Markets for Supply Chain Capacity Allocation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Internal Markets for Supply Chain Capacity Allocation David McAdams and Thomas W. Malone Sloan David McAdams & Thomas Malone #12;Internal Markets for Supply Chain Capacity Allocation David Mc ("internal markets") to help allocate manufacturing capacity and determine the prices, delivery dates

454

ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Devonian gas shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky. In the shale, natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces. This is analogous to methane storage in coal beds, where CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. Drill cuttings from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library were sampled to determine CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} adsorption isotherms. Sidewall core samples were acquired to investigate CO{sub 2} displacement of methane. An elemental capture spectroscopy log was acquired to investigate possible correlations between adsorption capacity and mineralogy. Average random vitrinite reflectance data range from 0.78 to 1.59 (upper oil to wet gas and condensate hydrocarbon maturity range). Total organic content determined from acid-washed samples ranges from 0.69 to 14 percent. CO{sub 2} adsorption capacities at 400 psi range from a low of 14 scf/ton in less organic-rich zones to more than 136 scf/ton. There is a direct correlation between measured total organic carbon content and the adsorptive capacity of the shale; CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity increases with increasing organic carbon content. Initial estimates based on these data indicate a sequestration capacity of 5.3 billion tons of CO{sub 2} in the Lower Huron Member of the Ohio Shale of eastern Kentucky and as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker parts of the Devonian shales in Kentucky. Should the black shales of Kentucky prove to be a viable geologic sink for CO{sub 2}, their extensive occurrence in Paleozoic basins across North America would make them an attractive regional target for economic CO{sub 2} storage and enhanced natural gas production.

Brandon C. Nuttall

2005-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

455

ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Devonian gas shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky. In the shale, natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces. This is analogous to methane storage in coal beds, where CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. Drill cuttings from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library were sampled to determine CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} adsorption isotherms. Sidewall core samples were acquired to investigate CO{sub 2} displacement of methane. An elemental capture spectroscopy log was acquired to investigate possible correlations between adsorption capacity and mineralogy. Average random vitrinite reflectance data range from 0.78 to 1.59 (upper oil to wet gas and condensate hydrocarbon maturity range). Total organic content determined from acid-washed samples ranges from 0.69 to 14 percent. CO{sub 2} adsorption capacities at 400 psi range from a low of 14 scf/ton in less organic-rich zones to more than 136 scf/ton. There is a direct correlation between measured total organic carbon content and the adsorptive capacity of the shale; CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity increases with increasing organic carbon content. Initial estimates based on these data indicate a sequestration capacity of 5.3 billion tons of CO{sub 2} in the Lower Huron Member of the Ohio Shale of eastern Kentucky and as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker parts of the Devonian shales in Kentucky. Should the black shales of Kentucky prove to be a viable geologic sink for CO{sub 2}, their extensive occurrence in Paleozoic basins across North America would make them an attractive regional target for economic CO{sub 2} storage and enhanced natural gas production.

Brandon C. Nuttall

2005-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

456

ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Devonian gas shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky. In the shale, natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces. This is analogous to methane storage in coal beds, where CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. Drill cuttings from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library were sampled to determine CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} adsorption isotherms. Sidewall core samples were acquired to investigate CO{sub 2} displacement of methane. An elemental capture spectroscopy log was acquired to investigate possible correlations between adsorption capacity and mineralogy. Average random vitrinite reflectance data range from 0.78 to 1.59 (upper oil to wet gas and condensate hydrocarbon maturity range). Total organic content determined from acid-washed samples ranges from 0.69 to 14 percent. CO{sub 2} adsorption capacities at 400 psi range from a low of 14 scf/ton in less organic-rich zones to more than 136 scf/ton. There is a direct correlation between measured total organic carbon content and the adsorptive capacity of the shale; CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity increases with increasing organic carbon content. Initial estimates based on these data indicate a sequestration capacity of 5.3 billion tons of CO{sub 2} in the Lower Huron Member of the Ohio Shale of eastern Kentucky and as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker parts of the Devonian shales in Kentucky. Should the black shales of Kentucky prove to be a viable geologic sink for CO{sub 2}, their extensive occurrence in Paleozoic basins across North America would make them an attractive regional target for economic CO{sub 2} storage and enhanced natural gas production.

Brandon C. Nuttall

2005-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

457

Life cycle greenhouse gas footprint of shale gas: a probabilistic approach  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

With the increase in natural gas (NG) production in recent years, primarily from shale gas, some sources, including the US Environmental ... the data from the Montney and Horn River shale gas basins in the Northe...

Anjuman Shahriar; Rehan Sadiq

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6, 2009 6, 2009 Next Release: July 23, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, July 15, 2009) Natural gas spot prices rose during the week in all trading locations. Price increases ranged between 6 cents and 48 cents per million Btu (MMBtu), with the biggest increases occurring in the Rocky Mountain region. During the report week, the spot price at the Henry Hub increased 15 cents or 5 percent to $3.37 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the natural gas near-month contract (August 2009) decreased 7 cents to $3.283 per MMBtu from $3.353 the previous week. During its tenure as the near-month contract, the August 2009 contract has lost 66 cents. As of Friday, July 10, 2009, working gas in storage rose to 2,886

459

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. 0, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: September 17, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, September 9, 2009) Natural gas prices posted significant increases at all market locations since last Wednesday, September 2. The Henry Hub spot price increased 47 cents from the previous Wednesday's price of $2.25 per MMBtu. However, intraweek trading was volatile, with natural gas prices falling below $2 per million Btu (MMBtu) at the Henry Hub on Friday, September 4 and rising to $2.72 per MMBtu yesterday. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the near-month natural gas contract for delivery in October 2009 rose by 11.4 cents to $2.829 per MMBtu, an increase of about 4 percent from the previous

460

Argentina-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Argentina-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Argentina-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Jump to: navigation, search Name Argentina-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Agency/Company /Organization The European Union (EU), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU), Australian Department of Climate Change and Energy Efficiency (DCCEE), Australian Agency for International Development (AusAID) Partner Secretariat of Environment and Sustainable Development (SESD), Secretariat of Industry Sector Climate, Energy Focus Area Renewable Energy, Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Greenhouse Gas, Industry, - Industrial Processes

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas capacity increase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

EC/UNDP Climate Change Capacity Building Program | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

EC/UNDP Climate Change Capacity Building Program EC/UNDP Climate Change Capacity Building Program Jump to: navigation, search Name UNDP/EC Climate Change Capacity Building Program Agency/Company /Organization The European Union (EU), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) Partner Multiple Ministries Sector Climate Focus Area Renewable Energy, Agriculture, Biomass, Buildings, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Geothermal, Greenhouse Gas, Industry, Land Use, Offsets and Certificates, People and Policy, Solar, Transportation, Water Power, Wind Topics Background analysis, Baseline projection, Co-benefits assessment, - Energy Access, - Environmental and Biodiversity, GHG inventory, Implementation, -Roadmap, -TNA, Policies/deployment programs, Resource assessment Website http://www.lowemissiondevelopm

462

Costa Rica-EU-UNDP Climate Change Capacity Building Program | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Costa Rica-EU-UNDP Climate Change Capacity Building Program Costa Rica-EU-UNDP Climate Change Capacity Building Program Jump to: navigation, search Name Costa Rica-EU-UNDP Climate Change Capacity Building Program Agency/Company /Organization The European Union (EU), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) Partner Multiple Ministries Sector Climate, Energy Focus Area Renewable Energy, Agriculture, Biomass, Buildings, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Geothermal, Greenhouse Gas, Industry, Land Use, Offsets and Certificates, People and Policy, Solar, Transportation, Water Power, Wind Topics Background analysis, Baseline projection, Co-benefits assessment, - Energy Access, - Environmental and Biodiversity, GHG inventory, Implementation, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -NAMA, -Roadmap, -TNA, Policies/deployment programs, Resource assessment

463

DOE Transmission Capacity Report | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Transmission Capacity Report Transmission Capacity Report DOE Transmission Capacity Report DOE Transmission Capacity Report: Transmission lines, substations, circuit breakers, capacitors, and other equipment provide more than just a highway to deliver energy and power from generating units to distribution systems. Transmission systems both complement and substitute for generation. Transmission generally enhances reliability; lowers the cost of electricity delivered to consumers; limits the ability of generators to exercise market power; and provides flexibility to protect against uncertainties about future fuel prices, load growth, generator construction, and other factors affecting the electric system. DOE Transmission Capacity Report More Documents & Publications Report to Congress:Impacts of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's

464

Optimization of the gas production rate by marginal cost analysis: Influence of the sales gas pressure, gas price and duration of gas sales contract  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The development of a gas field requires accurate planning, but the gas production rate is one of the main challenges in determining the feasibility of a gas project. An optimum gas production rate is determined not only by the gas reserve and reservoir characteristics but also by the consumer's requirements of the sales gas pressure, duration of the gas sales contract and gas price. This paper presents a gas production optimization model based on the marginal cost approach to maximize economic profit using a case study in the Donggi gas field. The results reveal that increasing the sales gas pressure and gas price raises the optimum gas production rate and increases the maximum profit; meanwhile, increasing the duration of a gas sales contract will reduce the optimum gas production rate and reduce or increase the maximum profit depending on the gas reserve and reservoir characteristics. This work clearly shows the relationship between the user's requirements and optimum gas production rate, which is an important piece of information for negotiating the gas price and planning production.

Suprapto Soemardan; Widodo Wahyu Purwanto; Arsegianto

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Optimal Residential Solar Photovoltaic Capacity in Grid Connected Applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Microgeneration using solar photovoltaic systems is becoming increasingly popular in residential households as such systems allow households to use a renewable energy source, while also reducing their reliance on the electricity grid, to fulfill their electricity demand. In this study, we explore the attractiveness of PV microgeneration systems of different capacities in the absence of incentives and net metering options and under both flat and variable tariff scenarious. Smaller systems that are below 1 kW in capacity are more attractive under such conditions, however, at current cost levels, they still remain economically unattractive. The cost levels which allow for these PV systems to be economically viable are also determined.

Shisheng Huang; Jingjie Xiao; Joseph F. Pekny; Gintaras V. Reklaitis

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Repair Capacity for UV LightInduced DNA Damage Associated with Risk of Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer and Tumor Progression  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...reactivation|DNA repair capacity|epidemiology|skin...increasing levels of solar UV radiation (2-4...studying the DNA repair capacity (DRC) as a marker for...keratosis with cumulative solar ultraviolet exposure...influence the DNA repair capacity of normal and skin cancer-affected...

Li-E Wang; Chunying Li; Sara S. Strom; Leonard H. Goldberg; Abenaa Brewster; Zhaozheng Guo; Yawei Qiao; Gary L. Clayman; J. Jack Lee; Adel K. El-Naggar; Victor G. Prieto; Madeleine Duvic; Scott M. Lippman; Randal S. Weber; Margaret L. Kripke; and Qingyi Wei

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Carbon Dioxide Capture from Flue Gas Using Dry, Regenerable Sorbents  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes research conducted between July 1, 2006 and September 30, 2006 on the use of dry regenerable sorbents for removal of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) from coal combustion flue gas. Modifications to the integrated absorber/ sorbent regenerator/ sorbent cooler system were made to improve sorbent flow consistency and measurement reliability. Operation of the screw conveyor regenerator to achieve a sorbent temperature of at least 120 C at the regenerator outlet is necessary for satisfactory carbon dioxide capture efficiencies in succeeding absorption cycles. Carbon dioxide capture economics in new power plants can be improved by incorporating increased capacity boilers, efficient flue gas desulfurization systems and provisions for withdrawal of sorbent regeneration steam in the design.

David A. Green; Thomas O. Nelson; Brian S. Turk; Paul D. Box Raghubir P. Gupta

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

468

Liquefied Natural Gas | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Liquefied Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Natural gas plays a vital role in the U.S. energy supply and in achieving the nation's economic and environmental goals. One of several supply options involves increasing imports of liquefied natural gas (LNG) to ensure that American consumers have adequate supplies of natural gas for the future. Natural gas consumption in the United States is expected to increase slightly from about 24.3 trillion cubic feet (Tcf) in 2011 to 26.6 Tcf by 2035. Currently, most of the demand for natural gas in the United States is met with domestic production and imports via pipeline from Canada. A small percentage of gas supplies are imported and received as liquefied natural gas. A significant portion of the world's natural gas resources are

469

Property:InstalledCapacity | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

InstalledCapacity InstalledCapacity Jump to: navigation, search Property Name InstalledCapacity Property Type Quantity Description Installed Capacity (MW) or also known as Total Generator Nameplate Capacity (Rated Power) Use this property to express potential electric energy generation, such as Nameplate Capacity. The default unit is megawatts (MW). For spatial capacity, use property Volume. Acceptable units (and their conversions) are: 1 MW,MWe,megawatt,Megawatt,MegaWatt,MEGAWATT,megawatts,Megawatt,MegaWatts,MEGAWATT,MEGAWATTS 1000 kW,kWe,KW,kilowatt,KiloWatt,KILOWATT,kilowatts,KiloWatts,KILOWATT,KILOWATTS 1000000 W,We,watt,watts,Watt,Watts,WATT,WATTS 1000000000 mW,milliwatt,milliwatts,MILLIWATT,MILLIWATTS 0.001 GW,gigawatt,gigawatts,Gigawatt,Gigawatts,GigaWatt,GigaWatts,GIGAWATT,GIGAWATTS

470

Gas Storage Technology Consortium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is crucial in meeting the needs of these new markets. To address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created - the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance the operational flexibility and deliverability of the nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost-effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of January1, 2007 through March 31, 2007. Key activities during this time period included: {lg_bullet} Drafting and distributing the 2007 RFP; {lg_bullet} Identifying and securing a meeting site for the GSTC 2007 Spring Proposal Meeting; {lg_bullet} Scheduling and participating in two (2) project mentoring conference calls; {lg_bullet} Conducting elections for four Executive Council seats; {lg_bullet} Collecting and compiling the 2005 GSTC Final Project Reports; and {lg_bullet} Outreach and communications.

Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

471

Gas Storage Technology Consortium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is crucial in meeting the needs of these new markets. To address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance the operational flexibility and deliverability of the nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost-effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of April 1, 2007 through June 30, 2007. Key activities during this time period included: (1) Organizing and hosting the 2007 GSTC Spring Meeting; (2) Identifying the 2007 GSTC projects, issuing award or declination letters, and begin drafting subcontracts; (3) 2007 project mentoring teams identified; (4) New NETL Project Manager; (5) Preliminary planning for the 2007 GSTC Fall Meeting; (6) Collecting and compiling the 2005 GSTC project final reports; and (7) Outreach and communications.

Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

472

Home insulation may increase radiation hazard  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... pose a potential health hazard, by increasing exposure to low levels of the radioactive gas radon. ... .Radon-222 is produced as part of the decay chain of uranium-238. Both the ...

David Dickson

1978-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

473

Gas Turbines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

When the gas turbine generator was introduced to the power generation ... fossil-fueled power plant. Twenty years later, gas turbines were established as an important means of ... on utility systems. By the early...

Jeffrey M. Smith

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Strengthening Planning Capacity for Low Carbon Growth in Developing Asia |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

for Low Carbon Growth in Developing Asia for Low Carbon Growth in Developing Asia Jump to: navigation, search Name Strengthening Planning Capacity for Low Carbon Growth in Developing Asia Agency/Company /Organization Asian Development Bank Partner Japan, United Kingdom Sector Climate, Energy Focus Area Non-renewable Energy, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Greenhouse Gas, Grid Assessment and Integration, People and Policy, Transportation Topics Baseline projection, GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, Market analysis, Pathways analysis, Policies/deployment programs Program Start 2011 Program End 2013 Country Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, Thailand, Vietnam South-Eastern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, South-Eastern Asia

475

Building Capacity for Innovative Policy NAMAs | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Policy NAMAs Policy NAMAs Jump to: navigation, search Name Building Capacity for Innovative Policy NAMAs Agency/Company /Organization International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) Partner Norwegian Agency for Development Cooperation (NORAD) Sector Climate, Energy, Land Focus Area Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Buildings, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Greenhouse Gas, Industry, Land Use, Transportation Topics Adaptation, Background analysis, Baseline projection, GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, Pathways analysis Program Start 2010 Program End 2013 Country Trinidad and Tobago Caribbean References International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD)[1] This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. References ↑ "International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD)"

476

Flooding Capacity in Packed Towers:? Database, Correlations, and Analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To provide more insight into the exact influence of operating variables on flooding, several ANN simulations were performed by attributing different values for one studied variable while all of the others were held constant. ... The gas superficial velocity at flooding for the CMR simulation is greater by 1 m/s across the whole liquid velocity range. ... Because of the broadness and diversity of the databases, the proposed correlation has the capability of simulating the flooding capacity in randomly dumped packed beds for any purposes such as absorption and distillation. ...

Simon Pich; Faal Larachi; Bernard P. A. Grandjean

2000-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

477

Gas Turbines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... the time to separate out the essentials and the irrelevancies in a text-book. The gas ...gasturbine ...

H. CONSTANT

1950-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

478

Pennsylvania and West Virginia show largest increases in natural...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Pennsylvania and West Virginia show largest increases in natural gas proved reserves U.S. natural gas proved reserves have hit an all-time high...with Pennsylvania and West...

479

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. 4, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: October 1, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, September 23, 2009) Natural gas prices posted across-the-board increases at both the spot and futures markets since last Wednesday. Spot prices rose at almost all market locations in the lower 48 States, with increases ranging between 2 and 23 cents per million Btu (MMBtu). The price at the Henry Hub spot market rose to $3.43 per MMBtu, increasing by 15 cents or about 5 percent. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the natural gas futures contract for October delivery increased by 10 cents to $3.860 per MMBtu. The November contract also posted gains this week, albeit much smaller at 4

480

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 to Wednesday, December 12) 5 to Wednesday, December 12) Released: December 13 Next release: December 20, 2007 · Natural gas spot and futures prices increased this report week (Wednesday to Wednesday, December 5-12), as cooler temperatures in much of the country increased demand for space heating. On the week the Henry Hub spot price increased $0.18 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $7.22. · At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), prices for futures contracts also registered significant increases. The futures contract for January delivery rose about 22 cents per MMBtu on the week to $7.408. · Working gas in storage is well above the 5-year average for this time year, indicating a healthy supply picture as the winter heating season progress. As of Friday, December 7, working gas in storage was 3,294 Bcf, which is 8.5 percent above the 5-year (2002-2006) average.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas capacity increase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 9, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, December 16, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, December 8, 2010) In response to cold weather across much of the United States, natural gas spot prices increased across the board this report week (December 1 – December 8). Though most increases were less than 50 cents per million Btu (MMBtu), prices at a number of trading points (notably in the Northeast and Florida) increased by several dollars. The Henry Hub spot price rose 25 cents, from $4.21 per MMBtu to $4.46 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the natural gas near-month contract (January 2011) also increased, rising from $4.269 per MMBtu on December 1 to $4.606 per MMBtu on December 8.

482

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5, 2008 5, 2008 Next Release: May 22, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview Natural gas spot prices increased in a majority of regions of the Lower 48 States this report week (Wednesday–Wednesday, May 7-14).The Henry Hub spot price increased $0.43 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $11.51, the highest average price recorded at the Henry Hub in more than 2 years. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), prices also continued on an upward trend that has resulted in weekly price increases in 6 of the last 7 report weeks. The futures contract for June delivery increased 27.1 cents per MMBtu on the week to approximately $11.60. During the week ending Friday, May 9, estimated net injections of natural gas into underground storage totaled the largest volume to date

483

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6, 2009 6, 2009 Next Release: August 13, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, August 5, 2009) Natural gas prices posted increases at both the spot and futures markets since last Wednesday, with price increases at the spot market ranging between 12 and 43 cents per million Btu (MMBtu). During the report week, the price at the Henry Hub spot market rose to $3.61 per MMBtu, increasing by 20 cents or 5.9 percent. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the natural gas futures contract for September delivery increased by 49 cents to $4.042 per MMBtu. The September futures contract closed above $4.00 per MMBtu for the first time since June 19 on Monday, reaching $4.031 per MMBtu. The near-month

484

TABLE 1. Nuclear Reactor, State, Type, Net Capacity, Generation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

TABLE 1. Nuclear Reactor, State, Type, Net Capacity, Generation, and Capacity Factor " "PlantReactor Name","Generator ID","State","Type","2009 Summer Capacity"," 2010 Annual...

485

Design and Evaluation of Novel High Capacity Cathode Materials...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

High Capacity Cathodes Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Design and Evaluation of High Capacity Cathodes Design and Evaluation of Novel High Capacity Cathode Materials...

486

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Natural Gas Imports/Exports Pipelines  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Pipelines Pipelines About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 2007/2008 with selected updates Natural Gas Import/Export Pipelines As of the close of 2008 the United States has 58 locations where natural gas can be exported or imported. 24 locations are for imports only 18 locations are for exports only 13 locations are for both imports and exports 8 locations are liquefied natural gas (LNG) import facilities Imported natural gas in 2007 represented almost 16 percent of the gas consumed in the United States annually, compared with 11 percent just 12 years ago. Forty-eight natural gas pipelines, representing approximately 28 billion cubic feet (Bcf) per day of capacity, import and export natural gas between the United States and Canada or Mexico.

487

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

What Consumers Should Know What Consumers Should Know An Assessment of Prices of Natural Gas Futures Contracts As A Predictor of Realized Spot Prices at the Henry Hub Overview of U.S. Legislation and Regulations Affecting Offshore Natural Gas and Oil Activity Changes in U.S. Natural Gas Transportation Infrastructure in 2004 Major Legislative and Regulatory Actions (1935 - 2004) U.S. Natural Gas Imports and Exports: Issues and Trends 2003 U.S. LNG Markets and Uses: June 2004 Natural Gas Restructuring Previous Issues of Natural Gas Weekly Update Natural Gas Homepage EIA's Natural Gas Division Survey Form Comments Overview: Thursday, December 1, 2005 (next release 2:00 p.m. on December 8) Colder-than-normal temperatures contributed to widespread price increases in natural gas spot markets since Wednesday, November 23 as heating demand increased. For the week (Wednesday to Wednesday), the spot price at the Henry Hub gained 59 cents per MMBtu, or about 5 percent, to trade at $11.73 per MMBtu yesterday (November 30). Similarly, at the NYMEX, the price for the futures contract for January delivery at the Henry Hub gained 54 cents since last Wednesday to close yesterday at $12.587 per MMBtu. Natural gas in storage as of Friday, November 25, decreased to 3,225 Bcf, which is 6.3 percent above the 5 year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil dropped $1.02 per barrel, or about 2 percent, since last Wednesday to trade yesterday at $57.33 per barrel or $9.88 per MMBtu.

488

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 9, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, June 16, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, June 8, 2011) Natural gas prices rose on the week across the board, with somewhat moderate increases in most areas and steep increases in the Northeast United States. The Henry Hub spot price rose 20 cents on the week from $4.63 per million Btu (MMBtu) last Wednesday, June 1, to $4.83 per MMBtu yesterday. At the New York Mercantile Exchange, the price of the near-month (July 2011) contract rose about 5 percent, from $4.692 last Wednesday to $4.847 yesterday. Working natural gas in storage rose to 2,187 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, June 3, according to EIA’s Weekly Natural Gas Storage

489

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 1, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, July 28, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, July 20, 2011) Responding to extremely hot weather this week, natural gas prices moved up at market locations across the lower 48 States. The spot price at the Henry Hub increased 21 cents from $4.43 per million Btu (MMBtu) last Wednesday, July 13, to $4.64 per MMBtu yesterday, July 20. At the New York Mercantile Exchange, the price of the near-month futures contract (August 2011) increased from $4.403 per MMBtu to $4.500 per MMBtu. Working natural gas in storage rose to 2,671 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, July 15, according to EIA’s Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (WNGSR). The natural gas rotary rig count, as reported by Baker Hughes

490

Rover Traverse Science for Increased Mission Science Return  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

rate than downlink capacity is increasing. As this trend continues, the quantity of data that can be returned to Earth per meter traversed is reduced. The capacity of the rover to collect data, however importance to NASA's program of exploring the Solar System, and Mars in particular, is the development

491

Definition: Deferred Generation Capacity Investments | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Generation Capacity Investments Generation Capacity Investments Utilities and grid operators ensure that generation capacity can serve the maximum amount of load that planning and operations forecasts indicate. The trouble is, this capacity is only required for very short periods each year, when demand peaks. Reducing peak demand and flattening the load curve should reduce the generation capacity required to service load and lead to cheaper electricity for customers.[1] Related Terms load, electricity generation, peak demand, smart grid References ↑ SmartGrid.gov 'Description of Benefits' An inl LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. ine Glossary Definition Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Deferred_Generation_Capacity_Investments&oldid=50257

492

Property:PlannedCapacity | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

PlannedCapacity PlannedCapacity Jump to: navigation, search Property Name PlannedCapacity Property Type Quantity Description The total planned capacity for a given area, region or project. Use this property to express potential electric energy generation, such as Nameplate Capacity. The default unit is megawatts (MW). For spatial capacity, use property Volume. Acceptable units (and their conversions) are: 1 MW,MWe,megawatt,Megawatt,MegaWatt,MEGAWATT,megawatts,Megawatt,MegaWatts,MEGAWATT,MEGAWATTS 1000 kW,kWe,KW,kilowatt,KiloWatt,KILOWATT,kilowatts,KiloWatts,KILOWATT,KILOWATTS 1000000 W,We,watt,watts,Watt,Watts,WATT,WATTS 1000000000 mW,milliwatt,milliwatts,MILLIWATT,MILLIWATTS 0.001 GW,gigawatt,gigawatts,Gigawatt,Gigawatts,GigaWatt,GigaWatts,GIGAWATT,GIGAWATTS 0.000001 TW,terawatt,terawatts,Terawatt,Terawatts,TeraWatt,TeraWatts,TERAWATT,TERAWATTS

493

Property:MeanCapacity | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MeanCapacity MeanCapacity Jump to: navigation, search Property Name MeanCapacity Property Type Quantity Description Mean capacity potential at location based on the USGS 2008 Geothermal Resource Assessment if the United States Use this property to express potential electric energy generation, such as Nameplate Capacity. The default unit is megawatts (MW). For spatial capacity, use property Volume. Acceptable units (and their conversions) are: 1 MW,MWe,megawatt,Megawatt,MegaWatt,MEGAWATT,megawatts,Megawatt,MegaWatts,MEGAWATT,MEGAWATTS 1000 kW,kWe,KW,kilowatt,KiloWatt,KILOWATT,kilowatts,KiloWatts,KILOWATT,KILOWATTS 1000000 W,We,watt,watts,Watt,Watts,WATT,WATTS 1000000000 mW,milliwatt,milliwatts,MILLIWATT,MILLIWATTS 0.001 GW,gigawatt,gigawatts,Gigawatt,Gigawatts,GigaWatt,GigaWatts,GIGAWATT,GIGAWATTS

494

Working and Net Available Shell Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working and Net Available Shell Storage Capacity Working and Net Available Shell Storage Capacity With Data for September 2013 | Release Date: November 27, 2013 | Next Release Date: May 29, 2013 Previous Issues Year: September 2013 March 2013 September 2012 March 2012 September 2011 March 2011 September 2010 Go Containing storage capacity data for crude oil, petroleum products, and selected biofuels. The report includes tables detailing working and net available shell storage capacity by type of facility, product, and Petroleum Administration for Defense District (PAD District). Net available shell storage capacity is broken down further to show the percent for exclusive use by facility operators and the percent leased to others. Crude oil storage capacity data are also provided for Cushing, Oklahoma, an

495

Definition: Nameplate Capacity | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Nameplate Capacity Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Nameplate Capacity The maximum amount of electric energy that a generator can produce under specific conditions, as rated by the manufacturer. Generator nameplate capacity is expressed in some multiple of watts such as megawatts (MW), as indicated on a nameplate that is physically attached to the generator.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Also Known As Capacity Related Terms electricity generation, power References ↑ http://www.nrc.gov/reading-rm/basic-ref/glossary/generator-nameplate-capacity.html Retr LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. ieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Nameplate_Capacity&oldid=480378"

496

Colorado Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Colorado Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

497

California Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) California Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

498

Louisiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Louisiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

499

Michigan Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Michigan Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

500

Oklahoma Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Oklahoma Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...