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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas capacity estimates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Estimates of Peak Underground Working Gas Storage Capacity in the ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Estimates of Peak Underground Working Gas Storage Capacity in the United States, 2009 Update The aggregate peak capacity for U.S. underground natural gas storage is ...

2

Estimate of Maximum Underground Working Gas Storage Capacity in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Estimate of Maximum Underground Working Gas Storage Capacity in the United States: 2007 Update This report provides an update to an estimate for U.S. aggregate ...

3

Estimate of Maximum Underground Working Gas Storage Capacity in the United States: 2007 Update  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report provides an update to an estimate for U.S. aggregate natural gas storage capacity that was released in 2006.

Information Center

2007-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

4

Estimates of Maximum Underground Working Gas Storage Capacity in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

report presents three alternative ... All facilities have a design ... • Some facilities are not operated at design capacity because of operational guidelines ...

5

Estimates of Peak Underground Working Gas Storage Capacity in...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Administration report, The Basics of Underground Storage, http:www.eia.doe.govpuboilgasnaturalgasanalysispublicationsstoragebasicsstoragebasics.html. 2 Working gas is...

6

Estimate of Maximum Underground Working Gas Storage Capacity in the United States  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report examines the aggregate maximum capacity for U.S. natural gas storage. Although the concept of maximum capacityseems quite straightforward, there are numerous issues that preclude the determination of a definitive maximum volume. Thereport presents three alternative estimates for maximum capacity, indicating appropriate caveats for each.

Information Center

2006-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

7

2. Gas Productive Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

2. Gas Productive Capacity Gas Capacity to Meet Lower 48 States Requirements The United States has sufficient dry gas productive capacity at the wellhead to meet ...

8

Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Summary)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Salt Caverns Storage Capacity Aquifers Storage Capacity Depleted Fields Storage Capacity Total Working Gas Capacity Working Gas Capacity of Salt Caverns Working Gas Capacity of...

9

Analytical Estimation of CO2 Storage Capacity in Depleted Oil and Gas Reservoirs Based on Thermodynamic State Functions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Numerical simulation has been used, as common practice, to estimate the CO2 storage capacity of depleted reservoirs. However, this method is time consuming, expensive and requires detailed input data. This investigation proposes an analytical method to estimate the ultimate CO2 storage in depleted oil and gas reservoirs by implementing a volume constrained thermodynamic equation of state (EOS) using the reservoir?s average pressure and fluid composition. This method was implemented in an algorithm which allows fast and accurate estimations of final storage, which can be used to select target storage reservoirs, and design the injection scheme and surface facilities. Impurities such as nitrogen and carbon monoxide, usually contained in power plant flue gases, are considered in the injection stream and can be handled correctly in the proposed algorithm by using their thermodynamic properties into the EOS. Results from analytical method presented excellent agreement with those from reservoir simulation. Ultimate CO2 storage capacity was predicted with an average difference of 1.3%, molar basis, between analytical and numerical methods; average oil, gas, and water saturations were also matched. Additionally, the analytical algorithm performed several orders of magnitude faster than numerical simulation, with an average of 5 seconds per run.

Valbuena Olivares, Ernesto

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Total Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity Working Gas Capacity of Salt Caverns Working Gas Capacity of Aquifers Working Gas Capacity of Depleted Fields Total Number of Existing Fields Number of Existing Salt...

11

Peak Underground Working Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Definitions Definitions Definitions Since 2006, EIA has reported two measures of aggregate capacity, one based on demonstrated peak working gas storage, the other on working gas design capacity. Demonstrated Peak Working Gas Capacity: This measure sums the highest storage inventory level of working gas observed in each facility over the 5-year range from May 2005 to April 2010, as reported by the operator on the Form EIA-191M, "Monthly Underground Gas Storage Report." This data-driven estimate reflects actual operator experience. However, the timing for peaks for different fields need not coincide. Also, actual available maximum capacity for any storage facility may exceed its reported maximum storage level over the last 5 years, and is virtually certain to do so in the case of newly commissioned or expanded facilities. Therefore, this measure provides a conservative indicator of capacity that may understate the amount that can actually be stored.

12

Underground Natural Gas Working Storage Capacity - Methodology  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Summary Prices Exploration & Reserves Production Imports/Exports Pipelines Storage Consumption All Natural Gas Data Reports Analysis & Projections Most Requested Consumption Exploration & Reserves Imports/Exports & Pipelines Prices Production Projections Storage All Reports ‹ See All Natural Gas Reports Underground Natural Gas Working Storage Capacity With Data for November 2012 | Release Date: July 24, 2013 | Next Release Date: Spring 2014 Previous Issues Year: 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 Go Methodology Demonstrated Peak Working Gas Capacity Estimates: Estimates are based on aggregation of the noncoincident peak levels of working gas inventories at individual storage fields as reported monthly over a 60-month period ending in November 2012 on Form EIA-191, "Monthly Natural Gas Underground Storage

13

Natural Gas Productive Capacity for the Lower-48 States  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

An analysis report from the Energy Information Administration which estimates the increases in natural gas productive capacity which should be expected in 2001, given ...

14

California Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) California Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

15

Mississippi Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Mississippi Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

16

Pennsylvania Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Pennsylvania Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

17

Washington Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Washington Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

18

Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. . Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity by State, December 31, 1996 (Capacity in Billion Cubic Feet) Table State Interstate Companies Intrastate Companies Independent Companies Total Number of Active Fields Capacity Number of Active Fields Capacity Number of Active Fields Capacity Number of Active Fields Capacity Percent of U.S. Capacity Alabama................. 0 0 1 3 0 0 1 3 0.04 Arkansas ................ 0 0 3 32 0 0 3 32 0.40 California................ 0 0 10 470 0 0 10 470 5.89 Colorado ................ 4 66 5 34 0 0 9 100 1.25 Illinois ..................... 6 259 24 639 0 0 30 898 11.26 Indiana ................... 6 16 22 97 0 0 28 113 1.42 Iowa ....................... 4 270 0 0 0 0 4 270 3.39 Kansas ................... 16 279 2 6 0 0 18 285 3.57 Kentucky ................ 6 167 18 49 0 0 24 216 2.71 Louisiana................ 8 530 4 25 0 0 12 555 6.95 Maryland ................ 1 62

19

Washington Natural Gas Underground Storage Acquifers Capacity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Acquifers Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Washington Natural Gas Underground Storage Acquifers Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

20

Missouri Natural Gas Underground Storage Acquifers Capacity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Acquifers Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Missouri Natural Gas Underground Storage Acquifers Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas capacity estimates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Minnesota Natural Gas Underground Storage Acquifers Capacity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Acquifers Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Minnesota Natural Gas Underground Storage Acquifers Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

22

Peak Underground Working Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Peak Working Natural Gas Capacity. Data and Analysis from the Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

23

Peak Underground Working Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Methodology Methodology Methodology Demonstrated Peak Working Gas Capacity Estimates: Estimates are based on aggregation of the noncoincident peak levels of working gas inventories at individual storage fields as reported monthly over a 60-month period ending in April 2010 on Form EIA-191M, "Monthly Natural Gas Underground Storage Report." The months of measurement for the peak storage volumes by facilities may differ; i.e., the months do not necessarily coincide. As such, the noncoincident peak for any region is at least as big as any monthly volume in the historical record. Data from Form EIA-191M, "Monthly Natural Gas Underground Storage Report," are collected from storage operators on a field-level basis. Operators can report field-level data either on a per reservoir basis or on an aggregated reservoir basis. It is possible that if all operators reported on a per reservoir basis that the demonstrated peak working gas capacity would be larger. Additionally, these data reflect inventory levels as of the last day of the report month, and a facility may have reached a higher inventory on a different day of the report month, which would not be recorded on Form EIA-191M.

24

End-to-end asymmetric link capacity estimation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Simple and Accurate Capacity Estimation Technique. InGerla. Accuracy of Link Capacity Es- timates using Passiveto-end asymmetric link capacity estimation Ling-Jyh Chen,

Chen, Ling-Jyh; Sun, Tony; Yang, Guang; Sanadidi, Medy Y; Gerla, Mario

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Total Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas Capacity Total Number of Existing Fields Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes...

26

,"Texas Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity",11,"Annual",2011,"6301988" ,"Release...

27

,"Nebraska Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Nebraska Underground Natural Gas...

28

,"Kentucky Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Kentucky Underground Natural Gas...

29

,"Wyoming Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Wyoming Underground Natural Gas...

30

,"Minnesota Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Minnesota Underground Natural Gas...

31

,"Maryland Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Maryland Underground Natural Gas...

32

,"Indiana Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Indiana Underground Natural Gas...

33

,"Michigan Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Michigan Underground Natural Gas...

34

,"Arkansas Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Arkansas Underground Natural Gas...

35

,"Alabama Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Alabama Underground Natural Gas...

36

,"Oregon Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Oregon Underground Natural Gas...

37

,"New York Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New York Underground Natural Gas...

38

,"Missouri Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Missouri Underground Natural Gas...

39

,"Oklahoma Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Oklahoma Underground Natural Gas...

40

,"Kansas Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Kansas Underground Natural Gas...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas capacity estimates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

,"Natural Gas Salt Caverns Storage Capacity "  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Salt Caverns Storage Capacity " ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Natural Gas...

42

,"Montana Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Montana Underground Natural Gas...

43

,"Virginia Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Virginia Underground Natural Gas...

44

,"Colorado Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Colorado Underground Natural Gas...

45

,"Utah Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Utah Underground Natural Gas...

46

,"Tennessee Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Tennessee Underground Natural Gas...

47

,"Louisiana Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Louisiana Underground Natural Gas...

48

,"Ohio Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Ohio Underground Natural Gas...

49

,"Illinois Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Illinois Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","52013" ,"Release...

50

Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields Estimated Production Number of Producing Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil...

51

California Interstate Natural Gas Pipeline Capacity Levels ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

PG&E Gas Transmission - NW Tuscarora Pipeline (Malin OR) 110 Mmcf/d 2,080 Mmcf/d Total Interstate Pipeline Capacity into California 7,435 Mmcf/d Net Natural Gas ...

52

Peak Underground Working Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Note: 1) 'Demonstrated Peak Working Gas Capacity' is the sum of the highest storage inventory level of working gas observed in each facility over the prior 5-year period as...

53

GASCAP: Wellhead Gas Productive Capacity Model documentation, June 1993  

SciTech Connect

The Wellhead Gas Productive Capacity Model (GASCAP) has been developed by EIA to provide a historical analysis of the monthly productive capacity of natural gas at the wellhead and a projection of monthly capacity for 2 years into the future. The impact of drilling, oil and gas price assumptions, and demand on gas productive capacity are examined. Both gas-well gas and oil-well gas are included. Oil-well gas productive capacity is estimated separately and then combined with the gas-well gas productive capacity. This documentation report provides a general overview of the GASCAP Model, describes the underlying data base, provides technical descriptions of the component models, diagrams the system and subsystem flow, describes the equations, and provides definitions and sources of all variables used in the system. This documentation report is provided to enable users of EIA projections generated by GASCAP to understand the underlying procedures used and to replicate the models and solutions. This report should be of particular interest to those in the Congress, Federal and State agencies, industry, and the academic community, who are concerned with the future availability of natural gas.

Not Available

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Property:Number of Plants included in Capacity Estimate | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of Plants included in Capacity Estimate Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Number of Plants included in Capacity Estimate Property Type Number Retrieved from "http:...

55

,"California Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"10312013 6:21:10 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: California Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290CA2"...

56

Texas Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Texas Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Texas Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million...

57

"Assessment of the Adequacy of Natural Gas Pipeline Capacity...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

"Assessment of the Adequacy of Natural Gas Pipeline Capacity in the Northeast United States" Report Now Available "Assessment of the Adequacy of Natural Gas Pipeline Capacity in...

58

Assessment of the Adequacy of Natural Gas Pipeline Capacity in...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Assessment of the Adequacy of Natural Gas Pipeline Capacity in the Northeast United States - November 2013 Assessment of the Adequacy of Natural Gas Pipeline Capacity in the...

59

Lower 48 States Total Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

data. Release Date: 9302013 Next Release Date: 10312013 Referring Pages: Total Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity Lower 48 States Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity...

60

Indiana Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Indiana Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas capacity estimates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Wyoming Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Wyoming Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

62

Louisiana Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Louisiana Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

63

Virginia Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Virginia Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

64

New Mexico Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) New Mexico Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

65

Illinois Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Illinois Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

66

New York Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) New York Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

67

Maryland Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Maryland Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

68

Oklahoma Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Oklahoma Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

69

Alabama Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Alabama Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

70

Kansas Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Kansas Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

71

Utah Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Utah Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

72

Missouri Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Missouri Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

73

Oregon Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Oregon Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

74

Colorado Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Colorado Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

75

Montana Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Montana Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

76

Minnesota Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Minnesota Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

77

Arkansas Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Arkansas Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

78

Iowa Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Iowa Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

79

Nebraska Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Nebraska Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

80

Texas Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Texas Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas capacity estimates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Kentucky Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Kentucky Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

82

Michigan Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Michigan Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

83

Ohio Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Ohio Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

84

Utah Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

124,465 124,465 124,465 124,465 124,465 124,465 2002-2013 Total Working Gas Capacity 54,898 54,898 54,898 54,898 54,898 54,898 2012-2013 Total Number of Existing Fields 3 3 3 3 3...

85

Ohio Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

577,944 577,944 577,944 577,944 577,944 577,944 2002-2013 Total Working Gas Capacity 230,350 228,030 228,030 228,030 228,030 230,828 2012-2013 Total Number of Existing Fields 24 24...

86

Michigan Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1,078,979 1,078,979 1,078,979 1,079,424 1,079,424 1,079,424 2002-2013 Total Working Gas Capacity 673,200 673,200 674,010 674,455 674,455 674,967 2012-2013 Total Number of Existing...

87

Maryland Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

64,000 64,000 64,000 64,000 64,000 64,000 1988-2011 Salt Caverns 0 1999-2011 Depleted Fields 64,000 64,000 64,000 64,000 64,000 64,000 1999-2011 Total Working Gas Capacity 17,300...

88

Pennsylvania Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

774,309 774,309 774,309 774,309 774,309 774,309 2002-2013 Total Working Gas Capacity 434,174 433,084 433,084 433,084 433,084 433,214 2012-2013 Total Number of Existing Fields 51 51...

89

Oregon Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

29,565 29,565 29,565 29,565 29,565 29,565 2002-2013 Total Working Gas Capacity 15,935 15,935 15,935 15,935 15,935 15,935 2012-2013 Total Number of Existing Fields 7 7 7 7 7 7...

90

Colorado Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

122,086 122,086 122,086 122,086 122,086 122,086 2002-2013 Total Working Gas Capacity 60,582 60,582 60,582 60,582 60,582 60,582 2012-2013 Total Number of Existing Fields 10 10 10 10...

91

Iowa Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

288,210 288,210 288,210 288,210 288,210 288,210 2002-2013 Total Working Gas Capacity 90,313 90,313 90,313 90,313 90,313 90,313 2012-2013 Total Number of Existing Fields 4 4 4 4 4 4...

92

Tennessee Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

1,200 1,200 1,200 1,200 0 1998-2011 Salt Caverns 0 1999-2011 Aquifers 0 1999-2011 Depleted Fields 1,200 1,200 1,200 1,200 0 1999-2011 Total Working Gas Capacity 860 860 0 2008-2011...

93

Arkansas Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

21,853 21,853 21,853 21,853 21,853 21,853 2002-2013 Total Working Gas Capacity 12,178 12,178 12,178 12,178 12,178 12,178 2012-2013 Total Number of Existing Fields 2 2 2 2 2 2...

94

Iowa Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

275,200 278,238 284,747 284,811 288,010 288,210 1988-2011 Aquifers 275,200 278,238 284,747 284,811 288,010 288,210 1999-2011 Depleted Fields 0 1999-2011 Total Working Gas Capacity...

95

Washington Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

43,316 39,341 39,287 39,210 41,309 43,673 1988-2011 Aquifers 43,316 39,341 39,287 39,210 41,309 43,673 1999-2011 Depleted Fields 0 1999-2011 Total Working Gas Capacity 23,033...

96

Virginia Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9,500 9,500 9,500 9,500 9,500 9,500 2002-2013 Total Working Gas Capacity 5,400 5,400 5,400 5,400 5,400 5,400 2012-2013 Total Number of Existing Fields 2 2 2 2 2 2...

97

Nebraska Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

39,469 34,850 34,850 34,850 34,850 34,850 1988-2011 Salt Caverns 0 1999-2011 Depleted Fields 39,469 34,850 34,850 34,850 34,850 34,850 1999-2011 Total Working Gas Capacity 13,619...

98

California Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

592,711 592,711 592,711 592,711 592,711 599,711 2002-2013 Total Working Gas Capacity 349,296 349,296 349,296 349,296 349,296 374,296 2012-2013 Total Number of Existing Fields 14 14...

99

Montana Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

376,301 376,301 376,301 376,301 376,301 376,301 2002-2013 Total Working Gas Capacity 197,501 197,501 197,501 197,501 197,501 197,501 2012-2013 Total Number of Existing Fields 5 5 5...

100

Missouri Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

32,505 32,940 32,876 10,889 11,502 13,845 1988-2011 Aquifers 32,505 32,940 32,876 10,889 11,502 13,845 1999-2011 Total Working Gas Capacity 11,276 3,040 3,656 6,000 2008-2011...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas capacity estimates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Maryland Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4,000 64,000 64,000 64,000 64,000 64,000 2002-2013 Total Working Gas Capacity 18,300 18,300 18,300 18,300 18,300 18,300 2012-2013 Total Number of Existing Fields 1 1 1 1 1 1...

102

Missouri Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

13,845 13,845 13,845 13,845 13,845 13,845 2002-2013 Total Working Gas Capacity 6,000 6,000 6,000 6,000 6,000 6...

103

Indiana Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

110,749 110,749 110,749 110,749 110,749 110,749 2002-2013 Total Working Gas Capacity 33,024 33,024 33,024 33,024 33,024 33,024 2012-2013 Total Number of Existing Fields 22 22 22 22...

104

Minnesota Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7,000 7,000 7,000 7,000 7,000 7,000 2002-2013 Total Working Gas Capacity 2,000 2,000 2,000 2,000 2,000 2...

105

West Virginia Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

524,332 524,337 524,337 524,337 524,337 524,337 2002-2013 Total Working Gas Capacity 256,454 257,322 257,319 257,315 257,311 258,072 2012-2013 Total Number of Existing Fields 30 30...

106

Illinois Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

999,931 999,931 999,931 999,931 999,931 1,000,281 2002-2013 Total Working Gas Capacity 302,962 302,962 302,962 302,962 302,962 303,312 2012-2013 Total Number of Existing Fields 28...

107

Oklahoma Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

370,838 370,838 370,838 370,838 370,838 370,838 2002-2013 Total Working Gas Capacity 180,358 180,358 180,358 180,358 180,358 180,358 2012-2013 Total Number of Existing Fields 13 13...

108

New York Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

245,579 245,579 245,779 245,779 245,779 245,779 2002-2013 Total Working Gas Capacity 129,026 129,026 129,221 129,221 129,221 129,551 2012-2013 Total Number of Existing Fields 26 26...

109

Louisiana Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

74,940 674,940 708,440 708,303 715,203 714,443 2002-2013 Total Working Gas Capacity 399,572 399,572 424,021 423,472 428,072 428,482 2012-2013 Total Number of Existing Fields 17 17...

110

Wyoming Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

124,937 124,937 124,937 157,985 157,985 157,985 2002-2013 Total Working Gas Capacity 48,705 48,705 48,705 73,705 73,705 73,705 2012-2013 Total Number of Existing Fields 9 9 9 9 9 9...

111

Kentucky Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

21,723 221,723 221,723 221,723 221,723 221,723 2002-2013 Total Working Gas Capacity 107,600 107,600 107,600 107,600 107,600 107,600 2012-2013 Total Number of Existing Fields 23 23...

112

Dry Gas-Well Capacity per New Gas-Well Completions  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Appendix C Dry Gas-Well Capacity per New Gas-Well Completion Dry gas-well gas productive capacity of about one billion cubic feet per day is added per 1,000 new gas ...

113

Louisiana Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Louisiana Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

114

Washington Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Washington Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

115

Iowa Natural Gas Underground Storage Acquifers Capacity (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Acquifers Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Iowa Natural Gas Underground Storage Acquifers Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

116

Tennessee Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Tennessee Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

117

Maryland Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Maryland Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

118

Tennessee Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Tennessee Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1...

119

Minnesota Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Minnesota Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

120

Nebraska Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Nebraska Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas capacity estimates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

California Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) California Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

122

Arkansas Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Arkansas Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

123

Colorado Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Colorado Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

124

Pennsylvania Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Pennsylvania Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

125

Oklahoma Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Oklahoma Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

126

Oregon Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Oregon Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

127

Ohio Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Ohio Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

128

Montana Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Montana Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

129

Mississippi Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Mississippi Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

130

Natural gas, renewables dominate electric capacity additions in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Of the ten states with the highest levels of capacity additions, most of the new capacity uses natural gas or renewable energy sources.

131

Minnesota Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7,000 7,000 7,000 7,000 7,000 7,000 1988-2011 Aquifers 7,000 7,000 7,000 7,000 7,000 7,000 1999-2011 Total Working Gas Capacity 2,000 2,000 2,000 2,000 2008-2011 Aquifers 2,000...

132

New natural gas pipeline capacity adds service into Florida ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration based on BENTEK Energy, LLC Note: Daily natural gas flow data and daily pipeline capacity derived from Florida's Gas ...

133

U.S. natural gas processing capacity expands rapidly - Today ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... EIA tracks shut-in natural gas processing capacity through the emergency schedule on the survey of natural gas processing plants, Form EIA-757B.

134

Natural Gas Productive Capacity for the Lower-48 States  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

for the Lower-48 States for the Lower-48 States 6/4/01 Click here to start Table of Contents Natural Gas Productive Capacity for the Lower-48 States Natural Gas Productive Capacity for the Lower-48 States Natural Gas Productive Capacity for the Lower-48 States - Summary - Natural Gas Productive Capacity for the Lower-48 States - Summary - PPT Slide Natural Gas Productive Capacity for the Lower-48 States - Summary - Natural Gas Productive Capacity for the Lower-48 States - Methodology - Natural Gas Productive Capacity for the Lower-48 States - Methodology - Natural Gas Productive Capacity for the Lower-48 States - Methodology - PPT Slide PPT Slide PPT Slide PPT Slide PPT Slide PPT Slide PPT Slide PPT Slide PPT Slide PPT Slide PPT Slide Other Areas PPT Slide PPT Slide PPT Slide

135

Estimating Water Needs to Meet 2025 Electricity Generating Capacity...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

demand and capacity forecasts from AEO 2006 with representative water withdrawal and consumption estimates to identify regions where water issues could become acute. Future...

136

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Pipeline Capacity and Utilization  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Pipeline Utilization & Capacity Pipeline Utilization & Capacity About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 2007/2008 with selected updates Natural Gas Pipeline Capacity & Utilization Overview | Utilization Rates | Integration of Storage | Varying Rates of Utilization | Measures of Utilization Overview of Pipeline Utilization Natural gas pipeline companies prefer to operate their systems as close to full capacity as possible to maximize their revenues. However, the average utilization rate (flow relative to design capacity) of a natural gas pipeline system seldom reaches 100%. Factors that contribute to outages include: Scheduled or unscheduled maintenance Temporary decreases in market demand Weather-related limitations to operations

137

Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Working Gas Capacity Total Number of Existing Fields Period: Monthly Annual Total Working Gas Capacity Total Number of Existing Fields Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History U.S. 9,072,508 9,104,181 9,111,242 9,117,296 9,132,250 9,171,017 1989-2013 Alaska 83,592 83,592 83,592 83,592 83,592 83,592 2013-2013 Lower 48 States 8,988,916 9,020,589 9,027,650 9,033,704 9,048,658 9,087,425 2012-2013 Alabama 35,400 35,400 35,400 35,400 35,400 35,400 2002-2013 Arkansas 21,853 21,853 21,853 21,853 21,853 21,853 2002-2013 California 592,711 592,711 592,711 599,711 599,711 599,711 2002-2013 Colorado 122,086 122,086 122,086 122,086 122,086 122,086 2002-2013

138

Working natural gas storage capacity grows 3% year-over-year ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

EIA estimates that the demonstrated peak working gas capacity for underground storage in the lower 48 states rose 3%, or 136 billion cubic feet (Bcf), to 4,239 Bcf in ...

139

Alaska Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Alaska Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 17,902 17,902 83,592...

140

Evaluation of capacity release transactions in the natural gas industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this thesis is to analyze capacity release transactions in the natural gas industry and to state some preliminary conclusions about how the capacity release market is functioning. Given FERC's attempt to ...

Lautzenhiser, Stephen

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas capacity estimates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Montana Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Montana Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

142

Utah Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Utah Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

143

Virginia Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Virginia Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

144

Kansas Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Kansas Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

145

Alabama Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Alabama Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

146

Michigan Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Michigan Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

147

Maryland Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Maryland Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

148

Arkansas Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Arkansas Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

149

Iowa Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Iowa Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

150

Colorado Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Colorado Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

151

Illinois Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Illinois Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

152

Nebraska Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Nebraska Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

153

U.S. Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Acquifers Capacity...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Acquifers Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) U.S. Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Acquifers Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

154

Texas Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Texas Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

155

Ohio Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Ohio Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

156

Missouri Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Missouri Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

157

Oklahoma Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Oklahoma Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

158

Indiana Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Indiana Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

159

Wyoming Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Wyoming Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

160

Oregon Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Oregon Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas capacity estimates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Kentucky Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Kentucky Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

162

New Mexico Natural Gas Underground Storage Acquifers Capacity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Acquifers Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) New Mexico Natural Gas Underground Storage Acquifers Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

163

New Mexico Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) New Mexico Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

164

New Mexico Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) New Mexico Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

165

Adaptive Online Battery Parameters/SOC/Capacity Co-estimation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Adaptive Online Battery Parameters/SOC/Capacity Co-estimation Habiballah Rahimi-Eichi and Mo parameters to characterize the performance and application of a battery. Although the nominal capacity and even storage ageing of the battery. Following our previous publications in which we developed an online

Chow, Mo-Yuen

166

Underground Natural Gas Working Storage Capacity - Energy Information  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Underground Natural Gas Working Storage Capacity Underground Natural Gas Working Storage Capacity With Data for November 2012 | Release Date: July 24, 2013 | Next Release Date: Spring 2014 Previous Issues Year: 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 Go Overview Natural gas working storage capacity increased by about 2 percent in the Lower 48 states between November 2011 and November 2012. The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) has two measures of working gas storage capacity, and both increased by similar amounts: Demonstrated maximum volume increased 1.8 percent to 4,265 billion cubic feet (Bcf) Design capacity increased 2.0 percent to 4,575 Bcf Maximum demonstrated working gas volume is an operational measure of the highest level of working gas reported at each storage facility at any time

167

A Heat Capacity Estimator for Fourier Path Integral Simulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Previous heat capacity estimators useful in path integral simulations have variances that grow with the number of path variables included. In the present work a new specific heat estimator for Fourier path integral Monte Carlo simulations is derived using methods similar to those used in developing virial energy estimators. The resulting heat capacity estimator has a variance that is roughly independent of the number of Fourier coe#cients (k max ) included, and the asymptotic convergence rate is shown to be proportional to 1/k 2 max when partial averaging is included. Quantum Monte Carlo simulations are presented to test the estimator using two one-dimensional models and for Lennard-Jones representations of Ne 13 . For finite kmax , using numerical methods, the calculated heat capacity is found to diverge at low temperatures for the potential functions studied in this work. Extrapolation methods enable useful results to be determined over a wide temperature range. Typeset using REVT...

J. P. Neirotti; David L. Freeman; J. D. Doll

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases...

169

Underground Natural Gas Working Storage Capacity - Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum & Other Liquids. Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas

170

Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells...

171

Underground Natural Gas Working Storage Capacity - Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... Demonstrated maximum working gas volume is the sum of the highest storage inventory levels of working gas observed in each facility over the previous 5-year ...

172

Natural gas, renewables dominate electric capacity additions ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

These appear in a separate EIA survey collecting data on net metering and distributed generation. More capacity was added in the first half of 2012 than was retired.

173

,"West Virginia Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","West Virginia Underground Natural...

174

,"California Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California Underground Natural...

175

,"Natural Gas Depleted Fields Storage Capacity "  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Depleted Fields Storage Capacity " ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Natural...

176

,"Mississippi Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Mississippi Underground Natural...

177

,"Washington Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Washington Underground Natural...

178

,"New Mexico Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New Mexico Underground Natural...

179

,"Pennsylvania Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Pennsylvania Underground Natural...

180

Natural gas productive capacity for the lower 48 states 1984 through 1996, February 1996  

SciTech Connect

This is the fourth wellhead productive capacity report. The three previous ones were published in 1991, 1993, and 1994. This report should be of particular interest to those in Congress, Federal and State agencies, industry, and the academic community, who are concerned with the future availability of natural gas. The EIA Dallas Field Office has prepared five earlier reports regarding natural gas productive capacity. These reports, Gas Deliverability and Flow Capacity of Surveillance Fields, reported deliverability and capacity data for selected gas fields in major gas producing areas. The data in the reports were based on gas-well back-pressure tests and estimates of gas-in-place for each field or reservoir. These reports use proven well testing theory, most of which has been employed by industry since 1936 when the Bureau of Mines first published Monograph 7. Demand for natural gas in the United States is met by a combination of natural gas production, underground gas storage, imported gas, and supplemental gaseous fuels. Natural gas production requirements in the lower 48 States have been increasing during the last few years while drilling has remained at low levels. This has raised some concern about the adequacy of future gas supplies, especially in periods of peak heating or cooling demand. The purpose of this report is to address these concerns by presenting a 3-year projection of the total productive capacity of natural gas at the wellhead for the lower 48 States. Alaska is excluded because Alaskan gas does not enter the lower-48 States pipeline system. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) generates this 3-year projection based on historical gas-well drilling and production data from State, Federal, and private sources. In addition to conventional gas-well gas, coalbed gas and oil-well gas are also included.

NONE

1996-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas capacity estimates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

A scheme for reducing experimental heat capacity data of gas hydrates  

SciTech Connect

Experimental heat capacity data of simple gas hydrates on xenon, methane, ethane, and propane are reduced by application of classical thermodynamics and the ideal solid solution theory. It is shown that calculated heat capacities of the empty hydrate lattices of the structure 1 and 2 hydrates can be higher or lower than the heat capacity of ice. Similarly, the calculated partial molar heat capacity of the enclathrated gases are higher or lower than the corresponding experimental ideal gas heat capacity. These differences depend on the size of the guest relative to the cavity, the hydrate number, and the temperature. For estimation of the thermodynamic properties of the empty hydrate lattice, further experimental work is recommended. Within the present limitations, a consistent methodology is applied for the prediction of the heat capacity of a natural gas hydrate.

Avlonitis, D. (Aero-engines Factory, Elefsis (Greece). Division of Chemistry)

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Microsoft Word - GasCapacityReport3-17.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

for the Lower-48 States Executive Summary This analysis examines the availability of effective productive capacity to meet the projected wellhead demand for natural gas through 2003. Effective productive capacity is defined as the maximum production available from natural gas wells considering limitations of the production, gathering, and transportation systems. Surplus or unutilized capacity is the difference between the effective productive capacity and the actual production. This report contains projections of natural gas effective productive capacity in the Lower-48 States for 2003 and is based on prices and production forecasts in EIA's February 2003 Short Term Energy Outlook (STEO). The analysis projects an average surplus capacity of 5.6 Bcf/d in 2003 under STEO Base

183

Illinois Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 View History Total Storage Capacity 984,768 980,691...

184

Estimated capacity of U. S. ethanol plants. Staff report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents and explains data on U.S. alcohol fuel production capacity for 1980-83. The major feedstock used is corn because of its availability and the technical ease of conversion to alcohol by means of the well-known fermentation process. The Corn Belt is currently the leading alcohol fuel production region. The estimates of likely, optimistic, and highly optimistic capacity by the end of 1983 are 1.5, 1.7, and 2 billion gallons, respectively. These estimates indicate that the national alcohol fuel production goal of 60,000 barrels per day (920 million gallons per year) by the end of 1982 will not be achieved.

Gill, M.; Dargan, A.D.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Underground Natural Gas Working Storage Capacity - Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... (see Table 1), and why any given week's storage ... Demonstrated maximum working gas volume is the sum of the highest storage inventory levels of ...

186

Peak Underground Working Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Related Links: Storage Basics: ... natural gas consumption declined roughly 2 percent from the previous year a reflection of 2009's mild temperatures and weak ...

187

Natural Gas Data Collection and Estimation  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This presentation to the Oklahoma Independent Petroleum Association gives an overview of the EIA natural gas data collection system, Oklahoma natural gas statistics, recent changes in monthly natural gas production statistics, and the May 2010 short-term natural gas forecast. The presentation focuses on the EIA-914, the "Monthly Natural Gas Production Report," and recent changes to this survey's estimation methodology.

Information Center

2010-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

188

Michigan Natural Gas Underground Storage Salt Caverns Capacity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Michigan Natural Gas Underground Storage Salt Caverns Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9; 1990's:

189

,"U.S. Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

586-8800",,,"9302013 5:36:07 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity" "Sourcekey","N5290US2","NGAEPG0SACW0NUSMMCF","NA1394NUS8"...

190

Natural Gas Productive Capacity for the Lower 48 States  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas Productive Capacity for the Lower-48 States May 2001 Information about this presentation may be obtained from John Wood (john.wood@eia.doe.gov), Gary Long ...

191

,"New Mexico Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"10312013 6:21:22 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: New Mexico Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290NM2" "Date","New...

192

West Virginia Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

513,416 536,702 528,442 531,456 531,480 524,324 1988-2011 Salt Caverns 0 1999-2011 Depleted Fields 513,416 536,702 528,442 531,456 531,480 524,324 1999-2011 Total Working Gas...

193

Alabama Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Storage Capacity 19,300 26,900 26,900 32,900 35,400 35,400 1995-2012 Salt Caverns

194

Wyoming Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Storage Capacity 114,067 111,167 111,120 111,120 106,764 124,937 1988-2012

195

Indiana Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Storage Capacity 114,294 114,937 114,274 111,271 111,313 110,749 1988-2012

196

Louisiana Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Storage Capacity 588,711 615,858 651,968 670,880 690,295 699,646 1988-2012

197

Montana Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Storage Capacity 374,201 374,201 376,301 376,301 376,301 376,301 1988-2012

198

Virginia Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Storage Capacity 9,560 6,200 9,500 9,500 9,500 9,500 1998-2012 Salt Caverns

199

Mississippi Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Storage Capacity 166,909 187,251 210,128 235,638 240,241 289,416 1988-2012

200

Pennsylvania Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Storage Capacity 759,365 759,153 776,964 776,822 776,845 774,309 1988-2012

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas capacity estimates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Maryland Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Storage Capacity 64,000 64,000 64,000 64,000 64,000 64,000 1988-2012 Salt Caverns

202

Ohio Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Storage Capacity 572,477 572,477 580,380 580,380 580,380 577,944 1988-2012

203

Texas Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Storage Capacity 690,678 740,477 766,768 783,579 812,394 831,190 1988-2012

204

Kentucky Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Storage Capacity 220,359 220,359 220,368 221,751 221,751 221,751 1988-2012

205

Oregon Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Storage Capacity 29,415 29,415 29,565 29,565 29,565 28,750 1989-2012 Salt Caverns

206

Michigan Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Storage Capacity 1,060,558 1,062,339 1,069,405 1,069,898 1,075,472 1,078,979

207

Tennessee Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Storage Capacity 1,200 1,200 1,200 0 1998-2012 Salt Caverns 0 1999-2012

208

Huge natural gas reserves central to capacity work, construction plans in Iran  

SciTech Connect

Questions about oil production capacity in Iran tend to mask the country's huge potential as a producer of natural gas. Iran is second only to Russia in gas reserves, which National Iranian Gas Co. estimates at 20.7 trillion cu m. Among hurdles to Iran's making greater use of its rich endowment of natural gas are where and how to sell gas not used inside the country. The marketing logistics problem is common to other Middle East holders of gas reserves and a reason behind the recent proliferation of proposals for pipeline and liquefied natural gas schemes targeting Europe and India. But Iran's challenges are greater than most in the region. Political uncertainties and Islamic rules complicate long-term financing of transportation projects and raise questions about security of supply. As a result, Iran has remained mostly in the background of discussions about international trade of Middle Eastern gas. The country's huge gas reserves, strategic location, and existing transport infrastructure nevertheless give it the potential to be a major gas trader if the other issues can be resolved. The paper discusses oil capacity plans, gas development, gas injection for enhanced oil recovery, proposals for exports of gas, and gas pipeline plans.

Not Available

1994-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

209

,"Pennsylvania Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Pennsylvania Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release...

210

,"Mississippi Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Mississippi Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release...

211

,"Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production "  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production ",52,"Annual",2011,"6301977" ,"Release Date:","81...

212

How EIA Estimates Natural Gas Production  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The Energy Information Administration (EIA) publishes estimates monthly and annually of the production of natural gas in the United States. The estimates are based on data EIA collects from gas producing States and data collected by the U. S. Minerals Management Service (MMS) in the Department of Interior. The States and MMS collect this information from producers of natural gas for various reasons, most often for revenue purposes. Because the information is not sufficiently complete or timely for inclusion in EIA's Natural Gas Monthly (NGM), EIA has developed estimation methodologies to generate monthly production estimates that are described in this document.

Information Center

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Natural gas pipeline capacity additions in 2011 - Today in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The U.S. Energy Information Administration estimates that U.S. natural gas pipeline companies added about 2,400 miles of new pipe to the grid as part ...

214

Charts estimate gas-turbine site performance  

SciTech Connect

Nomographs have been developed to simplify site performance estimates for various types of gas turbine engines used for industrial applications. The nomographs can provide valuable data for engineers to use for an initial appraisal of projects where gas turbines are to be considered. General guidelines for the selection of gas turbines are also discussed. In particular, site conditions that influence the performance of gas turbines are described.

Dharmadhikari, S.

1988-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

215

,"U.S. Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

586-8800",,,"9302013 5:36:07 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity" "Sourcekey","N5290US2","NA1393NUS2","NA1392NUS2","NA1391NUS2","...

216

New Methodology for Natural Gas Production Estimates  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

A new methodology is implemented with the monthly natural gas production estimates from the EIA-914 survey this month. The estimates, to be released April 29, 2010, include revisions for all of 2009. The fundamental changes in the new process include the timeliness of the historical data used for estimation and the frequency of sample updates, both of which are improved.

Information Center

2010-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

217

Shale Natural Gas Estimated Production  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

3+ or Netscape Navigator 3+ Make sure that JavaScript is enabled in your browser Shale Gas (Billion Cubic Feet) Data Series: Proved Reserves as of Dec. 31 Adjustments...

218

Task Force on CO2 Storage Capacity Estimation for the Technical Group (TG) of the Carbon Sequestration Leadership Forum (CSLF)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Force has previously issued a Phase I report (in August 2005) which served to document the nature of the problem such as the relationship between assessment scale and the level of detail and resolution of the storage capacity. This report of the Task Force’s Phase II activities summarizes the Phase I findings and provides suggested methodologies for the estimation of CO2 storage capacity in three types of geologic structures: uneconomic coal beds, oil and gas reservoirs, and deep saline aquifers. Estimation of CO2 Storage Capacity in Geological Media

Stefan Bachu (canada; Didier Bonijoly (france; John Bradshaw (australia; Robert Burruss (usa; Niels Peter Christensen (ec; Sam Holloway (uk

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Adjusted Estimates of Texas Natural Gas Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Energy Information Administration 1 Energy Information Administration Adjusted Estimates of Texas Natural Gas Production Background The Energy Information Administration (EIA) is adjusting its estimates of natural gas production in Texas for 2004 and 2005 to correctly account for carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) production. Normally, EIA would wait until publication of the Natural Gas Annual (NGA) before revising the 2004 data, but the adjustments for CO 2 are large enough to warrant making the changes at this time. Prior to 2005, EIA relied exclusively on the voluntary sharing of production data by state and federal government entities to develop its natural gas production estimates. In 2005, EIA began collecting production data directly from operators on the new EIA-914 production

220

Natural gas storage working capacity grows 2% in 2012 - Today in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

This Week in Petroleum › Weekly Petroleum Status Report › Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report ... This lack of growth in natural gas storage capacity may be partly ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas capacity estimates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Natural gas productive capacity for the lower 48 states 1985 through 1997  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This publication presents information on wellhead productive capacity and a projection of gas production requirements. A history of natural gas production and productive capacity at the wellhead, along with a projection of the same, is illustrated.

NONE

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

New Northeast natural gas pipeline capacity comes on-line - Today ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

natural gas; prices; states; production; crude oil; consumption; international; coal; generation; renewable; ... of capacity from Clarington, Ohio to York County ...

223

'81-'82 peakshaving capacity is gas industry's best ever  

SciTech Connect

During the 1981-82 winter, the US gas industry expected to draw its peakshaving supplies from (1) 58.40 billion CF of underground storage, (2) 5.21 billion CF of propane-air, (3) 8.99 billion CF of LNG, and (4) 0.27 billion CF of other sources. The industry's top peak-day sendout could reach 80-88 billion CF in a single 24-hr period. During 1981, underground-storage capacity continued its rising trend, while LNG-plant deliverability remained static and propane-air plant additions tapered off.

Hale, D.

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Estimates of Renewable Energy Capacity Serving U.S. Green Power...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Estimates of Renewable Energy Capacity Serving U.S. Green Power Markets (as of December 2004) Lori Bird and Blair Swezey National Renewable Energy Laboratory September 2005 This...

225

Estimated 2000 Interregional Pipeline Capacity and 1999 Average Flows  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... the nation's natural gas interstate pipeline infrastructure appears more than adequate to meet the differing regional market demand requirements that are likely ...

226

Estimating Gas Concentration of Coal Mines Based on ISGNN  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Online detecting failure of gas sensors in mine wells is an important problem. A key step for solution of the problem is estimating sample values of detected gas sensor, according to sample values of other gas sensors. We propose a scheme based on ISGNN ... Keywords: Estimating gas concentration, Gas concentration modeling, Generating Neural Networks, ISGNN

Aiguo Li; Lina Song

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

AGA Producing Region Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) AGA Producing Region Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1994 2,026,828 2,068,220 2,068,220 2,068,428 2,068,428 2,068,428 2,074,428 2,082,928 2,082,928 2,082,928 2,082,928 2,082,928 1995 2,082,928 2,096,611 2,096,611 2,096,176 2,096,176 2,096,176 2,090,331 2,090,331 2,090,331 2,090,331 2,090,331 2,090,331 1996 2,095,131 2,106,116 2,110,116 2,108,116 2,110,116 2,127,294 2,126,618 2,134,784 2,140,284 2,140,284 2,144,784 2,144,784 1997 2,143,603 2,149,088 2,170,288 2,170,288 2,170,178 2,170,178 2,189,642 2,194,242 2,194,242 2,194,242 2,194,242 2,194,242 1998 2,194,242 2,194,242 2,194,242 2,194,242 2,194,242 2,205,540 2,205,540 2,205,540 2,205,540 2,205,540 2,205,540 2,197,859

228

AGA Western Consuming Region Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) AGA Western Consuming Region Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1994 1,226,103 1,232,392 1,232,392 1,232,392 1,232,392 1,232,392 1,232,392 1,232,392 1,232,392 1,232,392 1,232,392 1,232,392 1995 1,232,392 1,233,637 1,233,637 1,233,637 1,233,637 1,243,137 1,237,446 1,237,446 1,237,446 1,237,446 1,237,446 1,237,446 1996 1,237,446 1,237,446 1,237,446 1,237,446 1,237,446 1,228,208 1,270,505 1,270,505 1,270,505 1,270,505 1,270,505 1,270,505 1997 1,228,395 1,228,395 1,228,076 1,228,076 1,228,076 1,228,076 1,228,076 1,228,076 1,228,076 1,228,076 1,228,076 1,228,076 1998 1,228,076 1,228,076 1,228,076 1,228,076 1,228,076 1,122,586 1,122,586 1,122,586 1,122,586 1,122,586 1,122,586 1,122,586

229

AGA Eastern Consuming Region Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) AGA Eastern Consuming Region Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1994 4,737,921 4,727,501 4,727,501 4,727,501 4,727,501 4,727,501 4,727,501 4,727,501 4,727,446 4,727,446 4,727,446 4,727,509 1995 4,730,109 4,647,791 4,647,791 4,647,791 4,647,791 4,647,791 4,593,948 4,593,948 4,593,948 4,593,948 4,593,948 4,593,948 1996 4,593,948 4,600,548 4,603,048 4,603,048 4,607,048 4,740,509 4,740,509 4,742,309 4,743,309 4,743,309 4,743,309 4,743,309 1997 4,681,090 4,574,740 4,586,024 4,578,486 4,586,024 4,582,146 4,582,146 4,582,146 4,585,702 4,585,702 4,585,702 4,585,702 1998 4,585,702 4,585,702 4,585,702 4,585,702 4,585,702 4,799,753 4,799,753 4,799,753 4,799,753 4,799,753 4,799,753 4,805,622

230

Information channel capacity in the field theory estimation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The construction of the information capacity for the vector position parameter in the Minkowskian space-time is presented. This lays the statistical foundations of the kinematical term of the Lagrangian of the physical action for many field theory models, derived by the extremal physical information method of Frieden and Soffer.

J. S?adkowski; J. Syska

2012-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

231

Utah Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Estimated...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Estimated Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Estimated Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade...

232

Estimates of emergency operating capacity in US manufacturing and nonmanufacturing industries - Volume 1: Concepts and Methodology  

SciTech Connect

Development of integrated mobilization preparedness policies requires planning estimates of available productive capacity during national emergency conditions. Such estimates must be developed in a manner to allow evaluation of current trends in capacity and the consideration of uncertainties in various data inputs and in engineering assumptions. This study developed estimates of emergency operating capacity (EOC) for 446 manufacturing industries at the 4-digit Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) level of aggregation and for 24 key nonmanufacturing sectors. This volume lays out the general concepts and methods used to develop the emergency operating estimates. The historical analysis of capacity extends from 1974 through 1986. Some nonmanufacturing industries are included. In addition to mining and utilities, key industries in transportation, communication, and services were analyzed. Physical capacity and efficiency of production were measured. 3 refs., 2 figs., 12 tabs. (JF)

Belzer, D.B. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA)); Serot, D.E. (D/E/S Research, Richland, WA (USA)); Kellogg, M.A. (ERCE, Inc., Portland, OR (USA))

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

"Assessment of the Adequacy of Natural Gas Pipeline Capacity in the  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

"Assessment of the Adequacy of Natural Gas Pipeline Capacity in "Assessment of the Adequacy of Natural Gas Pipeline Capacity in the Northeast United States" Report Now Available "Assessment of the Adequacy of Natural Gas Pipeline Capacity in the Northeast United States" Report Now Available November 27, 2013 - 3:13pm Addthis The Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability has released its "Assessment of the Adequacy of Natural Gas Pipeline Capacity in the Northeast United States" report. The report is now available for downloading. In 2005-06, the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE) conducted a study on the adequacy of interstate natural gas pipeline capacity serving the northeastern United States to meet natural gas demand in the event of a pipeline disruption. The study modeled gas demand for

234

Methodologies for estimating one-time hazardous waste generation for capacity generation for capacity assurance planning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains descriptions of methodologies to be used to estimate the one-time generation of hazardous waste associated with five different types of remediation programs: Superfund sites, RCRA Corrective Actions, Federal Facilities, Underground Storage Tanks, and State and Private Programs. Estimates of the amount of hazardous wastes generated from these sources to be shipped off-site to commercial hazardous waste treatment and disposal facilities will be made on a state by state basis for the years 1993, 1999, and 2013. In most cases, estimates will be made for the intervening years, also.

Tonn, B.; Hwang, Ho-Ling; Elliot, S. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Peretz, J.; Bohm, R.; Hendrucko, B. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Storage and capacity rights markets in the natural gas industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation presents a different approach at looking at market power in capacity rights markets that goes beyond the functional aspects of capacity rights markets as access to transportation services. In particular, ...

Paz-Galindo, Luis A.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Improving Gas-Fired Heat Pump Capacity and Performance by Adding a Desiccant Dehumidification Subsystem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper examines the merits of coupling a desiccant dehumidification subsystem to a gas-engine- driven vapor compression air conditioner. A system is identified that uses a rotary, silica gel, parallel-plate dehumidifier. Dehumidifier data and analysis are based on recent tests. The dehumidification subsystem processes the fresh air portion and handles the latent portion of the load. Adding the desiccant subsystem increases the gas-based coefficient of performance 40% and increases the cooling capacity 50%. Increased initial manufacturing costs are estimated at around $500/ton ($142/kW) for volume production. This cost Level is expected to reduce the total initial cost per ton compared to a system without the desiccant subsystem.

Parsons, B. K.; Pesaran, A. A.; Bharathan, D.; Shelpuk, B. C.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Natural Gas Productive Capacity for the Lower-48 States 1985...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Administration, Office of Oil and Gas; and IHS Energy. Well Completions Forecast: Energy Information Administration, Office of Oil and Gas, Drilling Rig Model; and Model...

238

Additions to Capacity on the U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline Network: 2005  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

percent increase in capacity additions (see percent increase in capacity additions (see Box, "Capacity Measures," p. 4). Indeed, less new natural gas pipeline mileage was added in 2005 than in any year during the past decade. 1 Energy Information Administration, Office of Oil and Gas, August 2006 1 In 2005, at least 31 natural gas pipeline projects of varying profiles 2 were completed in the lower 48 States and the Gulf of Mexico (Figure 3, Table 1). Of these, 15 were expansions (increases in capacity) on existing natural gas pipelines while the other 16 were 9 system extensions or laterals associated with existing natural gas pipelines, 5 new natural gas pipeline systems, and 2 oil pipeline conversions. Expenditures for natural gas pipeline development amounted to less than $1.3

239

Assessment of the Adequacy of Natural Gas Pipeline Capacity in the  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Assessment of the Adequacy of Natural Gas Pipeline Capacity in the Assessment of the Adequacy of Natural Gas Pipeline Capacity in the Northeast United States - November 2013 Assessment of the Adequacy of Natural Gas Pipeline Capacity in the Northeast United States - November 2013 In 2005-06, the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE) conducted a study on the adequacy of interstate natural gas pipeline capacity serving the northeastern United States to meet natural gas demand in the event of a pipeline disruption. The study modeled gas demand for select market areas in the Northeast under a range of different weather conditions. The study then determined how interstate pipeline flow patterns could change in the event of a pipeline disruption to one or more of the pipelines serving the region in order to meet the gas demand. The results

240

Heat capacity of a two-component superfluid Fermi gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate mean-field effects in two- component trapped Fermi gases in the superfluid phase, in the vicinity of s-wave Feshbach resonances. Within the resonance superfluidity approach (Holland et al., 2001) we calculate the ground state energy and the heat capacity as function of temperature. Heat capacity is analyzed for different trap aspect ratios. We find that trap anisotropy is an important factor in determining both the value of heat capacity near the transition temperature and the transition temperature itself.

Alexander V. Avdeenkov

2003-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas capacity estimates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Natural gas productive capacity for the lower 48 States, 1980 through 1995  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to analyze monthly natural gas wellhead productive capacity in the lower 48 States from 1980 through 1992 and project this capacity from 1993 through 1995. For decades, natural gas supplies and productive capacity have been adequate to meet demand. In the 1970`s the capacity surplus was small because of market structure (split between interstate and intrastate), increasing demand, and insufficient drilling. In the early 1980`s, lower demand, together with increased drilling, led to a large surplus capacity as new productive capacity came on line. After 1986, this large surplus began to decline as demand for gas increased, gas prices fell, and gas well completions dropped sharply. In late December 1989, the decline in this surplus, accompanied by exceptionally high demand and temporary weather-related production losses, led to concerns about the adequacy of monthly productive capacity for natural gas. These concerns should have been moderated by the gas system`s performance during the unusually severe winter weather in March 1993 and January 1994. The declining trend in wellhead productive capacity is expected to be reversed in 1994 if natural gas prices and drilling meet or exceed the base case assumption. This study indicates that in the low, base, and high drilling cases, monthly productive capacity should be able to meet normal production demands through 1995 in the lower 48 States (Figure ES1). Exceptionally high peak-day or peak-week production demand might not be met because of physical limitations such as pipeline capacity. Beyond 1995, as the capacity of currently producing wells declines, a sufficient number of wells and/or imports must be added each year in order to ensure an adequate gas supply.

Not Available

1994-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

242

Statistical estimation of multiple faults in aircraft gas turbine engines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

415 Statistical estimation of multiple faults in aircraft gas turbine engines S Sarkar, C Rao of multiple faults in aircraft gas-turbine engines, based on a statistical pattern recognition tool called commercial aircraft engine. Keywords: aircraft propulsion, gas turbine engines, multiple fault estimation

Ray, Asok

243

New natural gas pipeline capacity adds service into Florida ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The lack of natural gas storage in Florida, as well as limited areas of gas production, makes the State dependent on two main supply pipelines for most of its natural ...

244

Communication Capacity Requirement for Reliable and Secure State Estimation in Smart Grid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Communication Capacity Requirement for Reliable and Secure State Estimation in Smart Grid Husheng, Cookeville, TN Abstract-- Secure system state estimation is an important issue in smart grid to assure the information the- oretic perspective. The smart grid is modeled as a linear dynamic system. Then, the channel

Qiu, Robert Caiming

245

Estimating the Capacity Value of Concentrating Solar Power Plants: A Case Study of the Southwestern United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We estimate the capacity value of concentrating solar power (CSP) plants without thermal energy storage in the southwestern U.S. Our results show that CSP plants have capacity values that are between 45% and 95% of maximum capacity, depending on their location and configuration. We also examine the sensitivity of the capacity value of CSP to a number of factors and show that capacity factor-based methods can provide reasonable approximations of reliability-based estimates.

Madaeni, S. H.; Sioshansi, R.; Denholm, P.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

,"Montana Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Montana Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release...

247

,"Arkansas Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Arkansas Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release...

248

,"Wyoming Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Wyoming Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release...

249

,"Alabama Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Alabama Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release...

250

,"Oklahoma Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Oklahoma Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release...

251

,"Alaska Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Alaska Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release...

252

,"Texas Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release...

253

,"Kansas Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Kansas Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release...

254

,"Michigan Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Michigan Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release...

255

,"Kentucky Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Kentucky Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release...

256

,"Utah Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Utah Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release...

257

,"Florida Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Florida Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release...

258

,"Virginia Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Virginia Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release...

259

,"Louisiana Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Louisiana Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release...

260

,"Colorado Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Colorado Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas capacity estimates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

,"California Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release...

262

,"Ohio Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Ohio Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release...

263

The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: Measurement and Estimation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

a quantitative and qualitative estimation of uncertainty associated with a GHG inventory. Overview The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Uncertainty Tool is designed to facilitate a...

264

,"Estimated Production of Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Estimated Production of Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation " ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Lates...

265

,"New Mexico Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New Mexico Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2011...

266

Trends in natural gas storage capacity utilization vary by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-191, Monthly Underground Gas Storage Report and Short-Term Energy Outlook Note: Dashed lines indicate ...

267

U.S. Natural Gas Total Underground Storage Capacity (Million ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Home > Natural Gas > Navigator Energy Glossary: View History: Annual : Download Data (XLS File) ... Contact Us · Feedback · Privacy/Security · Careers · About EIA.

268

Utah Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Reserves Estimated...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

269

California Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) California Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

270

Ohio Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Ohio Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

271

U.S. Natural Gas Plant Liquids Reserves, Estimated Production...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Liquids Reserves, Estimated Production (Million Barrels) U.S. Natural Gas Plant Liquids Reserves, Estimated Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

272

Florida Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Florida Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

273

Mississippi Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Mississippi Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

274

Louisiana Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Louisiana Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

275

Kentucky Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Kentucky Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

276

Alaska Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Alaska Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

277

Utah Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

278

Michigan Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Michigan Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

279

Virginia Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Virginia Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

280

Kansas Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Kansas Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas capacity estimates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Montana Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Montana Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

282

Pennsylvania Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Pennsylvania Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

283

Alabama Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Alabama Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

284

Colorado Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Colorado Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

285

New Mexico - West Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) New Mexico - West Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

286

Texas Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

287

,"U.S. Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1989" 3,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1989" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","ng_stor_cap_dcu_nus_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/ng/ng_stor_cap_dcu_nus_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 7:03:21 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity" "Sourcekey","N5290US2","NGA_EPG0_SACW0_NUS_MMCF","NA1394_NUS_8" "Date","U.S. Total Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)","U.S. Working Natural Gas Total Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)","U.S. Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Count)"

288

U.S. Total Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Total Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec; 1989: 8,119,368: 8,119,368: 8,119,368 ...

289

Figure A1. Natural gas processing plant capacity in the United States, 2013 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 5 Figure A1. Natural gas processing plant capacity in the United States, 2013 2012 Table A2. Natural gas processing plant capacity, by state, 2013 (million cubic feet per day) Alabama 1,403 Arkansas 24 California 926 Colorado 5,450 Florida 90 Illinois 2,100 Kansas 1,818 Kentucky 240 Louisiana 10,737 Michigan 479 Mississippi 1,123

290

Estimating Major and Minor Natural Fracture Patterns in Gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Estimating Major and Minor Natural Fracture Patterns in Gas Shales Using Production Data Razi Identification of infill drilling locations has been challenging with mixed results in gas shales. Natural fractures are the main source of permeability in gas shales. Natural fracture patterns in shale has a random

Mohaghegh, Shahab

291

title Estimating Policy Driven Greenhouse Gas Emissions Trajectories  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Estimating Policy Driven Greenhouse Gas Emissions Trajectories Estimating Policy Driven Greenhouse Gas Emissions Trajectories in California The California Greenhouse Gas Inventory Spreadsheet GHGIS Model year month institution Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory address Berkeley abstract p A California Greenhouse Gas Inventory Spreadsheet GHGIS model was developed to explore the impact of combinations of state policies on state greenhouse gas GHG and regional criteria pollutant emissions The model included representations of all GHGemitting sectors of the California economy including those outside the energy sector such as high global warming potential gases waste treatment agriculture and forestry in varying degrees of detail and was carefully calibrated using available data and projections from multiple state agencies and

292

Inlet Air Chillers for Gas Turbine Capacity Enhancement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides information and analysis to help power generation engineers assess the cost-effectiveness of using inlet air chillers to increase the net output capacity of combustion turbine and combined cycle generating units. It also provides an analysis of integrating the storage of chilled water or ice with the inlet air cooling system as a means of energy storage. This report provides new and updated information and analysis, building on information from previous Electric Power Research ...

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Theoretical Estimates of HVAC Duct Channel Capacity for High-Speed Internet Access  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Theoretical Estimates of HVAC Duct Channel Capacity for High-Speed Internet Access Ariton E. Xhafa-conditioning (HVAC) ducts based on multi-carrier transmission that uses M-QAM mod- ulation and measured channel- flections in HVAC ducts). Our work also shows that data rates in excess of 300 Mbps are possible over

Stancil, Daniel D.

294

The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: Measurement and Estimation of  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: Measurement and Estimation of The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: Measurement and Estimation of Uncertainty of GHG Emissions Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: Measurement and Estimation of Uncertainty of GHG Emissions Agency/Company /Organization: World Resources Institute, World Business Council for Sustainable Development Sector: Energy, Climate Focus Area: Greenhouse Gas Phase: Determine Baseline, Evaluate Effectiveness and Revise as Needed Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Spreadsheet Website: www.ghgprotocol.org/calculation-tools/all-tools Cost: Free References: GHG Uncertainty Guide[1] The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Uncertainty Tool is designed to facilitate a quantitative and qualitative estimation of uncertainty associated with a

295

Estimate and Analyze Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategy Implementation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Estimate and Analyze Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategy Estimate and Analyze Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategy Implementation Costs Estimate and Analyze Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategy Implementation Costs October 7, 2013 - 10:18am Addthis Analyzing the cost of implementing each greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation measure provides an important basis for prioritizing different emission reduction strategies. While actual costs should be used when available, this guidance provides cost estimates or considerations for the major emission reduction measures to help agencies estimate costs without perfect information. Cost criteria the agency may consider when prioritizing strategies include: Lifecycle cost Payback Cost effectiveness ($ invested per MTCO2e, metric tonne carbon dioxide equivalent avoided). Implementation costs should be analyzed for each emissions source:

296

U.S. Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Storage Capacity 8,402,216 8,498,535 8,655,740 8,763,798 8,849,125 8,991,335

297

Estimate Greenhouse Gas Emissions by Building Type | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Estimate Greenhouse Gas Emissions by Building Type Estimate Greenhouse Gas Emissions by Building Type Estimate Greenhouse Gas Emissions by Building Type October 7, 2013 - 10:51am Addthis YOU ARE HERE Step 2 Starting with the programs contributing the greatest proportion of building greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, the agency should next determine which building types operated by those programs use the most energy (Figure 1). Energy intensity is evaluated instead of emissions in this approach because programs may not have access to emissions data by building type. Figure 1 - An image of an organizational-type chart. A rectangle labeled 'Program 1' has lines pointing to three other rectangles below it labeled 'Building Type 1,' 'Building Type 2,' and 'Building Type 3.' Next to the building types it says, 'Step 2. Estimate emissions by building type.

298

Methodology for EIA Weekly Underground Natural Gas Storage Estimates  

Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (EIA)

Methodology for EIA Weekly Underground Natural Gas Storage Estimates Methodology for EIA Weekly Underground Natural Gas Storage Estimates Latest Update: November 25, 2008 This report consists of the following sections: Survey and Survey Processing - a description of the survey and an overview of the program Sampling - a description of the selection process used to identify companies in the survey Estimation - how the regional estimates are prepared from the collected data Computing the 5-year Averages, Maxima, Minima, and Year-Ago Values for the Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report - the method used to prepare weekly data to compute the 5-year averages, maxima, minima, and year-ago values for the weekly report Derivation of the Weekly Historical Estimates Database - a description of the process used to generate the historical database for the

299

Estimates of emergency operating capacity in U.S. manufacturing industries: 1994--2005  

SciTech Connect

To develop integrated policies for mobilization preparedness, planners require estimates and projections of available productive capacity during national emergency conditions. This report develops projections of national emergency operating capacity (EOC) for 458 US manufacturing industries at the 4-digit Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) level. These measures are intended for use in planning models that are designed to predict the demands for detailed industry sectors that would occur under conditions such as a military mobilization or a major national disaster. This report is part of an ongoing series of studies prepared by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to support mobilization planning studies of the Federal Emergency Planning Agency/US Department of Defense (FEMA/DOD). Earlier sets of EOC estimates were developed in 1985 and 1991. This study presents estimates of EOC through 2005. As in the 1991 study, projections of capacity were based upon extrapolations of equipment capital stocks. The methodology uses time series regression models based on industry data to obtain a response function of industry capital stock to levels of industrial output. The distributed lag coefficients of these response function are then used with projected outputs to extrapolate the 1994 level of EOC. Projections of industrial outputs were taken from the intermediate-term forecast of the US economy prepared by INFORUM (Interindustry Forecasting Model, University of Maryland) in the spring of 1996.

Belzer, D.B.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

What is the total working gas capacity in underground natural gas ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum & Other Liquids. Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas capacity estimates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Outlook for Regional Generation Capacity Balances: Report Series on Natural Gas and Power Reliability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The United States is in the midst of a power plant expansion boom, achieving record additions of natural gas-fired combustion turbines and combined-cycle units over the past two years, with 68,000 MW already added since 1998 and 17,000 MW more slated for completion by the end of 2001. This report provides a region-by-region accounting of how this new capacity -- plus hundreds of megawatts of possible additional natural gas and coal capacity -- may change reserve margins and result in many other impacts a...

2002-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

302

,"U.S. Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Depleted Fields Capacity (MMcf)" Depleted Fields Capacity (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","nga_epg0_sacwd_nus_mmcfa.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/nga_epg0_sacwd_nus_mmcfa.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

303

,"U.S. Natural Gas Underground Storage Acquifers Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Acquifers Capacity (MMcf)" Acquifers Capacity (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Natural Gas Underground Storage Acquifers Capacity (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1392_nus_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1392_nus_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:43:23 PM"

304

,"U.S. Working Natural Gas Total Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" Total Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Working Natural Gas Total Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","nga_epg0_sacw0_nus_mmcfa.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/nga_epg0_sacw0_nus_mmcfa.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

305

,"Alaska Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity (MMcf)" Capacity (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Alaska Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","ngm_epg0_sac_sal_mmcfm.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/ngm_epg0_sac_sal_mmcfm.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:57:12 PM"

306

,"Iowa Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity (MMcf)" Capacity (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Iowa Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5290ia2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5290ia2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:10 PM"

307

,"U.S. Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Salt Caverns Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Salt Caverns Capacity (MMcf)" Salt Caverns Capacity (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Salt Caverns Capacity (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","nga_epg0_sacws_nus_mmcfa.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/nga_epg0_sacws_nus_mmcfa.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

308

,"U.S. Natural Gas Number of Underground Storage Acquifers Capacity (Count)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Acquifers Capacity (Count)" Acquifers Capacity (Count)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Natural Gas Number of Underground Storage Acquifers Capacity (Count)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1392_nus_8a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1392_nus_8a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:43:23 PM"

309

,"U.S. Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Acquifers Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Acquifers Capacity (MMcf)" Acquifers Capacity (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Acquifers Capacity (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","nga_epg0_sacwa_nus_mmcfa.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/nga_epg0_sacwa_nus_mmcfa.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

310

STABILIZATION OF GAS LIFTED WELLS BASED ON STATE ESTIMATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

STABILIZATION OF GAS LIFTED WELLS BASED ON STATE ESTIMATION Gisle Otto Eikrem Lars Imsland Bjarne well. Two different controllers are investigated, PI control using the estimated downhole pressure in the well, and nonlinear model based control of the total mass in the system. Both control structures rely

Foss, Bjarne A.

311

Revision Policy for EIA Weekly Underground Natural Gas Storage Estimates  

Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (EIA)

September 23, 2013 September 23, 2013 This report consists of the following sections: General EIA Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report Revisions Policy - a description of how revisions to the Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report estimates may occur EIA Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report Policy to Allow Unscheduled Release of revisions - a description of the policy that will be implemented in the event of an out-of-cycle release Revisions to the Historical Database - a description of how revisions will be noted in the Historical database The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) is announcing changes Revisions may be presented for the most recent estimates of working gas in storage under a number of circumstances that occur after release of the estimates. These include: I. A respondent revises previously submitted data (respondents are

312

Revision Policy for EIA Weekly Underground Natural Gas Storage Estimates  

Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (EIA)

April 26, 2005 April 26, 2005 This report consists of the following sections: General EIA Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report Revisions Policy - a description of how revisions to the Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report estimates may occur EIA Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report Policy to Allow Unscheduled Release of revisions - a description of the policy that will be implemented in the event of an out-of-cycle release Revisions to the Historical Database - a description of how revisions will be noted in the Historical database Revisions may be presented for the most recent estimates of working gas in storage under a number of circumstances that occur after release of the estimates. These include: I. A respondent revises previously submitted data (respondents are requested to submit revisions if the change is greater than 500 million

313

Methodology for estimating volumes of flared and vented natural gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The common perception in the United States that natural gas produced with oil is a valuable commodity probably dates from the 1940's. Before that time, most operators regarded natural gas associated with or dissolved in oil as a nuisance. Indeed, most associated/dissolved natural gas produced in the United States before World War II probably was flared or vented to the atmosphere. This situation has changed in the United States, where flaring and venting have decreased dramatically in recent years, in part because of environmental concerns, but also because of the changing view of the value of natural gas. The idea that gas is a nuisance is beginning to change almost everywhere, as markets for gas have developed in Europe, Japan, and elsewhere, and as operators have increasingly utilized or reinjected associated-dissolved gas in their oil-production activities. Nevertheless, in some areas natural gas continues to be flared or vented to the atmosphere. Gas flares in Russia, the Niger Delta, and the Middle East are some of the brightest lights on the nighttime Earth. As we increasingly consider the global availability and utility of natural gas, and the environmental impacts of the consumption of carbon-based fuels, it is important to know how much gas has been flared or vented, how much gas is currently being flared or vented, and the distribution of flaring or venting through time. Unfortunately, estimates of the volumes of flared and vented gas are generally not available. Despite the inconsistency and inavailability of data, the extrapolation method outlined provides a reliable technique for estimating amounts of natural gas flared and vented through time. 36 refs., 7 figs., 6 tabs.

Klett, T.R.; Gautier, D.L. (Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Estimating Policy-Driven Greenhouse Gas Emissions Trajectories in  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Estimating Policy-Driven Greenhouse Gas Emissions Trajectories in Estimating Policy-Driven Greenhouse Gas Emissions Trajectories in California: The California Greenhouse Gas Inventory Spreadsheet (GHGIS) Model Jeffery Greenblatt November 2013 For decades, California has used groundbreaking tools to collect and analyze emissions data from a variety of sources to establish a scientific basis for policy making. As its scope has expanded to include greenhouse gas (GHG) reductions, it has sought out similar tools to use to achieve the goals of legislation such as the Global Warming Solutions Act of 2006 (AB 32). To support this effort, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory developed a California Greenhouse Gas Inventory Spreadsheet (GHGIS) model funded by the California Air Resources Board (ARB), to explore the impact of combinations

315

Status of Natural Gas Pipeline System Capacity Entering the 2000-2001 Heating Season  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This special report looks at the capabilities of the national natural gas pipeline network in 2000 and provides an assessment of the current levels of available capacity to transport supplies from production areas to markets throughout the United States during the upcoming heating season. It also examines how completion of currently planned expansion projects and proposed new pipelines would affect the network.

Information Center

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Estimate Greenhouse Gas Reduction Potential and Cost-Effectiveness of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Greenhouse Gas Reduction Potential and Cost-Effectiveness Greenhouse Gas Reduction Potential and Cost-Effectiveness of Strategies for Vehicles and Mobile Equipment Estimate Greenhouse Gas Reduction Potential and Cost-Effectiveness of Strategies for Vehicles and Mobile Equipment October 7, 2013 - 11:58am Addthis YOU ARE HERE: Step 3 After identifying petroleum reduction strategies, a Federal agency should estimate the greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction potential and cost effectiveness of these strategies for vehicles and mobile equipment. The table below provides steps for identifying optimal vehicle acquisition strategies. Table 1. Framework for Identifying Optimal Vehicle Acquisition Strategies Step Summary Purpose PLAN and COLLECT 1 Determine vehicle acquisition requirements Establish a structured Vehicle Allocation Matrix (VAM) to determine the numbers and types of vehicles required to accomplish your fleet's mission

317

Estimate Costs to Implement Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategies Using  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Costs to Implement Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategies Costs to Implement Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategies Using Renewable Energy in Buildings Estimate Costs to Implement Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategies Using Renewable Energy in Buildings October 7, 2013 - 11:25am Addthis After determining the best greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction strategies using renewable energy, a Federal agency should estimate the cost of implementing them in a building or buildings. There are several cost factors that need to be considered when developing a renewable energy project. Capital costs, fixed and variable operations and maintenance (O&M) costs and in the case of biomass and waste-to-energy projects, fuel costs all contribute to the total cost of operating a renewable energy system. The levelized system cost takes into account these

318

(ANTI)PETER Principle - Discrete (INVERSE) Logistic Equation with Imprecisely Estimated and Stimulated Carrying Capacity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this work we consider the Peter principle and anti-Peter principle as the discrete logistic and discrete inverse logistic equation. Especially we discuss imprecisely estimated (by hierarchical control mechanism) carrying capacity, i.e. boundary (in)competence level of a hierarchy member. It implies that Peter principle holds two sub-principles. In the first one objective boundary competence level is increased for estimation error. In the second one objective boundary competence level is decreased for estimation error. Similarly, anti-Peter principle holds two sub-principles too. All this implies that paradoxical situations that follow from Peter and anti-Peter principle can be simply removed by decrease of the error of hierarchical (social) control. Also we discuss cases by Peter principle when error of the boundary competence level by estimation grows up. (Then, in fact, there is no estimation error but stimulation of the boundary level by control mechanism.) By first Peter sub-principle it implies anarchy in the social structure or, correspondingly, cancer in the biology and medicine, schizophrenia in the psychology and inflation in the economy. By second Peter sub-principle it implies a totalitary social structure (dictature or caste regime) or multiplex sclerosis and other autoimmune diseases in biology and medicine, servile mentality or low value complex in psychology and depression by hyperactive political influences in economy. Finally, monotonus changes of the stimulated part of boundary level cause corresponding phase transitions discussed on the example of the introspection in the psychology.

V. Pankovic; M. Krmar; R. Glavatovic

2009-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

319

Estimation of the social costs of natural gas  

SciTech Connect

This study determines the extent to which it is possible to develop monetary estimates of the marginal social cost of fuels, using natural gas to test a methodology that could be applied to other fuels. This requires review of previous estimates of both market and nonmarket costs to the extent that such are available. For some components of social cost, calculation of estimates from secondary data is required. The feasibility of using these estimates to develop marginal social-cost estimates for the country and for states or regions must then be evaluated. In order to develop estimates of marginal social cost for use in determining minimum life-cycle costs of building space conditioning, economic theory is used to develop a conceptual model of the market cost of fuel extraction and conversion. Then, estimation methodologies for each component of nonmarket costs are examined to assess the applicability and validity of each methodology. On the basis of this analysis, empirical estimates of both market and nonmarket components of social cost are aggregated to calculate a social-cost estimate for natural gas. 38 references.

Nieves, L.A.; Lemon, J.R.

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

The 1-vertex transfer matrix and accurate estimation of channel capacity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The notion of a 1-vertex transfer matrix for multi-dimensional codes is introduced. It is shown that the capacity of such codes, or the topological entropy, can be expressed as the limit of the logarithm of spectral radii of 1-vertex transfer matrices. Storage and computations using the 1-vertex transfer matrix are much smaller than storage and computations needed for the standard transfer matrix. The method is applied to estimate the first 15 digits of the entropy of the 2-dimensional (0,1) run length limited channel. In order to compare the computational cost of the new method with the standard transfer matrix and have rigorous bounds to compare the estimates with a large scale computation of eigenvalues for the (0,1) run length limited channel in 2 and 3 dimensions have been carried out. This in turn leads to improvements on the best previous lower and upper bounds for that channel.

Shmuel Friedland; Per Hakan Lundow; Klas Markstrom

2006-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas capacity estimates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

New Mexico Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) New Mexico Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 1,127 1,099 1,149 1980's 1,064 1,086 942 799 856 843 628 728 731 760 1990's 887 1,013 1,143 1,337 1,362 1,397 1,423 1,547 1,449 1,539 2000's 1,508 1,536 1,524 1,415 1,527 1,493 1,426 1,349 1,349 1,350 2010's 1,220 1,170 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production New Mexico Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves Dry Natural Gas Estimated Production

322

Natural gas repowering creates new capacity and efficiency options for utilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Repowering of aging electrical generation units in the U.S. is becoming increasingly accepted as a key technology for meeting future electrical demands. Repowering of steam electric generating capacity can be broadly defined as the replacement of existing equipment with new, more efficient systems that also offer lower emissions and substantially increased capacity. The feasibility of repowering units has been largely established. The basic equipment needed for gas-based repowering, including state-of-the-art gas turbines and heat recovery steam generators, are considered established and mature technologies by the utility industry. Nevertheless, important questions exist about the future of the repowering market. GRI had addressed these issues through three different projects in the last year: A technology-based, bottom-up study of repowering issues and markets; A top-down, capacity growth/demographic study of repowering markets; and A workshop with gas equipment and electric utility representative to discuss the future of gas repowering. These studies are summarized.

NONE

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

An Expert System to Estimate the Capacity of Harvesting Energy from Biogas and its Capacity in TRNC  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In TRNC, the electricity is been obtained from fuel oil, which is most expensive production in the world. The aim of this research is to produce electricity from biogas to reduce the cost of electricity in TRNC. Our researches proved that the potential ... Keywords: Expert system, Biogas, Capacity determination

Hasan H. Onder

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Additions to Capacity on the U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline Network: 2007  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Information Administration, Office of Oil and Gas, July 2008 1 U.S. natural gas pipeline construction activity accelerated in 2007 with capacity additions to the grid totaling nearly 14.9 billion cubic feet (Bcf) of daily deliverability (Figure 1). These additions were the largest of any year in the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) 10-year database of pipeline construction activity. The increased level of natural gas pipeline construction activity in 2007 conformed to a growth trend that began slowly in 2005 and intensified in 2006. In 2007, about 1,700 miles of pipeline were installed, which was greater than in any year since 2003 (Figure 2). The expansion cycle for natural gas pipeline construction is occurring at the same time as the development of the

325

Additions to Capacity on the U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline Network: 2007  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Information Administration, Office of Oil and Gas, July 2008 1 U.S. natural gas pipeline construction activity accelerated in 2007 with capacity additions to the grid totaling nearly 14.9 billion cubic feet (Bcf) of daily deliverability (Figure 1). These additions were the largest of any year in the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) 10-year database of pipeline construction activity. The increased level of natural gas pipeline construction activity in 2007 conformed to a growth trend that began slowly in 2005 and intensified in 2006. In 2007, about 1,700 miles of pipeline were installed, which was greater than in any year since 2003 (Figure 2). The expansion cycle for natural gas pipeline construction is occurring at the same time as the development of the

326

,"California Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5290ca2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5290ca2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:09 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: California Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290CA2" "Date","California Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" 37271,388480 37302,475720 37330,475720 37361,475720

327

,"Utah Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5290ut2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5290ut2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:25 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Utah Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290UT2" "Date","Utah Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" 32324,114980 32689,114980 33054,114980 33419,114980 33785,114980 34150,114980

328

,"Nebraska Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5290ne2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5290ne2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:18 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Nebraska Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290NE2" "Date","Nebraska Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" 32324,88438 32689,88438 33054,143311 33419,93311 33785,93311

329

,"Utah Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5290ut2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5290ut2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:25 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Utah Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290UT2" "Date","Utah Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" 37271,129480 37302,129480 37330,129480 37361,129480 37391,129480

330

,"Michigan Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5290mi2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5290mi2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:15 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Michigan Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290MI2" "Date","Michigan Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" 32324,982362 32689,982362 33054,994542 33419,995181 33785,994281

331

,"Virginia Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5290va2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5290va2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:26 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Virginia Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290VA2" "Date","Virginia Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" 37271,4967 37302,4967 37330,4967 37361,4967 37391,4967

332

,"Wyoming Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5290wy2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5290wy2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:27 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Wyoming Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290WY2" "Date","Wyoming Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" 32324,103831 32689,103830 33054,106130 33419,106130 33785,105668

333

,"Washington Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5290wa2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5290wa2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:26 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Washington Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290WA2" "Date","Washington Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" 37271,37300 37302,37300 37330,37300 37361,37300

334

,"Tennessee Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","12/2012" Monthly","12/2012" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5290tn2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5290tn2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:23 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Tennessee Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290TN2" "Date","Tennessee Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" 37271,1200 37302,1200 37330,1200 37361,1200

335

,"Texas Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5290tx2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5290tx2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:24 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Texas Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290TX2" "Date","Texas Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" 32324,590248 32689,589780 33054,586502 33419,589018 33785,595229 34150,598782

336

,"Pennsylvania Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5290pa2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5290pa2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:22 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Pennsylvania Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290PA2" "Date","Pennsylvania Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" 32324,805394 32689,805393 33054,640938 33419,640938

337

,"Arkansas Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5290ar2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5290ar2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:08 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Arkansas Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290AR2" "Date","Arkansas Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" 32324,36147 32689,31447 33054,31277 33419,31277 33785,31277 34150,31277

338

,"Colorado Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5290co2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5290co2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:10 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Colorado Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290CO2" "Date","Colorado Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" 37271,100227 37302,100227 37330,100227 37361,100227

339

,"Louisiana Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5290la2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5290la2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:14 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Louisiana Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290LA2" "Date","Louisiana Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" 37271,580037 37302,580037 37330,580037 37361,580037

340

,"Kansas Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5290ks2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5290ks2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:12 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Kansas Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290KS2" "Date","Kansas Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" 32324,334925 32689,334925 33054,301199 33419,301199 33785,290571

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas capacity estimates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

,"Kentucky Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5290ky2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5290ky2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:13 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Kentucky Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290KY2" "Date","Kentucky Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" 37271,219914 37302,219914 37330,219914 37361,219914

342

,"Ohio Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5290oh2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5290oh2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:21 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Ohio Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290OH2" "Date","Ohio Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" 37271,573784 37302,573784 37330,573784 37361,573784 37391,573784

343

,"Mississippi Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5290ms2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5290ms2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:17 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Mississippi Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290MS2" "Date","Mississippi Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" 37271,134012 37302,134012 37330,134012

344

,"Minnesota Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5290mn2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5290mn2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:15 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Minnesota Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290MN2" "Date","Minnesota Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" 32324,7000 32689,7000 33054,7000 33419,7000 33785,7000 34150,7000

345

,"Pennsylvania Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5290pa2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5290pa2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:23 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Pennsylvania Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290PA2" "Date","Pennsylvania Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" 37271,713818 37302,713818 37330,713818

346

,"Maryland Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5290md2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5290md2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:14 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Maryland Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290MD2" "Date","Maryland Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" 32324,61978 32689,61978 33054,61978 33419,61978 33785,62400 34150,62400

347

,"Kansas Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5290ks2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5290ks2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:12 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Kansas Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290KS2" "Date","Kansas Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" 37271,301502 37302,301502 37330,301502 37361,301502

348

,"Arkansas Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5290ar2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5290ar2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:08 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Arkansas Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290AR2" "Date","Arkansas Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" 37271,22000 37302,22000 37330,22000 37361,22000

349

,"Montana Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5290mt2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5290mt2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:18 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Montana Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290MT2" "Date","Montana Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" 32324,373963 32689,373960 33054,373960 33419,373960 33785,375010

350

,"Minnesota Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5290mn2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5290mn2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:16 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Minnesota Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290MN2" "Date","Minnesota Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" 37271,7000 37302,7000 37330,7000 37361,7000

351

,"Indiana Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5290in2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5290in2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:11 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Indiana Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290IN2" "Date","Indiana Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" 32324,114603 32689,112045 33054,97332 33419,102246 33785,106176

352

,"Oklahoma Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5290ok2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5290ok2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:21 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Oklahoma Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290OK2" "Date","Oklahoma Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" 32324,377189 32689,364887 33054,362616 33419,362616 33785,359616

353

,"Texas Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5290tx2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5290tx2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:24 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Texas Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290TX2" "Date","Texas Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" 37271,699324 37302,698258 37330,699324 37361,699324

354

,"Oregon Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5290or2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5290or2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:22 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Oregon Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290OR2" "Date","Oregon Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" 37271,17755 37302,21080 37330,21080 37361,21080 37391,21080

355

,"Louisiana Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5290la2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5290la2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:13 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Louisiana Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290LA2" "Date","Louisiana Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" 32324,559019 32689,559019 33054,550823 33419,559823 33785,539200

356

,"Indiana Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5290in2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5290in2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:11 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Indiana Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290IN2" "Date","Indiana Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" 37271,109310 37302,109310 37330,109310 37361,109310

357

,"Alabama Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5290al2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5290al2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:08 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Alabama Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290AL2" "Date","Alabama Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" 37271,5280 37302,5280 37330,5280 37361,5280 37391,5280

358

,"Colorado Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5290co2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5290co2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:09 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Colorado Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290CO2" "Date","Colorado Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" 32324,82662 32689,82662 33054,98999 33419,98999 33785,105790

359

,"Mississippi Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5290ms2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5290ms2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:17 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Mississippi Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290MS2" "Date","Mississippi Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" 32324,108171 32689,108207 33054,108601 33419,114621 33785,114627

360

,"Michigan Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5290mi2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5290mi2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:15 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Michigan Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290MI2" "Date","Michigan Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" 37271,1070717 37302,1070717 37330,1070717 37361,1070717

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas capacity estimates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

,"Nebraska Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5290ne2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5290ne2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:19 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Nebraska Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290NE2" "Date","Nebraska Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" 37271,39469 37302,39469 37330,39469 37361,39469

362

,"Ohio Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5290oh2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5290oh2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:20 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Ohio Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290OH2" "Date","Ohio Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" 32324,612547 32689,612547 33054,591494 33419,591494 33785,591494 34150,594644

363

,"Alabama Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5290al2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5290al2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:07 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Alabama Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290AL2" "Date","Alabama Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" 34880,2600 35246,3280 35611,3280 35976,3280 36341,3280 36707,3280

364

,"Wyoming Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5290wy2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5290wy2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:28 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Wyoming Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290WY2" "Date","Wyoming Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" 37271,105869 37302,105869 37330,105869 37361,105869

365

,"Washington Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5290wa2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5290wa2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:26 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Washington Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290WA2" "Date","Washington Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" 32324,36400 32689,36400 33054,32100 33419,34100 33785,34100

366

,"Oregon Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5290or2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5290or2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:22 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Oregon Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290OR2" "Date","Oregon Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" 32689,9791 33054,9791 33419,9791 33785,11445 34150,11445 34515,11622

367

,"U.S. Natural Gas Underground Storage Salt Caverns Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Salt Caverns Capacity (MMcf)" Salt Caverns Capacity (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Natural Gas Underground Storage Salt Caverns Capacity (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1393_nus_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1393_nus_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:43:34 PM"

368

,"U.S. Natural Gas Number of Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Count)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Depleted Fields Capacity (Count)" Depleted Fields Capacity (Count)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Natural Gas Number of Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Count)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1391_nus_8a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1391_nus_8a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:43:06 PM"

369

,"U.S. Natural Gas Number of Underground Storage Salt Caverns Capacity (Count)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Salt Caverns Capacity (Count)" Salt Caverns Capacity (Count)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Natural Gas Number of Underground Storage Salt Caverns Capacity (Count)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1393_nus_8a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1393_nus_8a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:43:34 PM"

370

,"U.S. Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Depleted Fields Capacity (MMcf)" Depleted Fields Capacity (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1391_nus_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1391_nus_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:43:05 PM"

371

A Computational Approach to the Real Option Management of Network Contracts for Natural Gas Pipeline Transport Capacity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Commodity merchants use real option models to manage their operations. A central element of such a model is its underlying operating policy. We focus on network contracts for the transport capacity of natural gas pipelines, specific energy conversion ... Keywords: Monte Carlo simulation, capacity valuation, commodity and energy conversion assets, energy-related operations, heuristics, math programming, natural gas pipelines, operations management practice, operations management/finance interface, petroleum/natural gas industries, real options, sensitivities, spread options

Nicola Secomandi; Mulan X. Wang

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Systems, methods and computer readable media for estimating capacity loss in rechargeable electrochemical cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system includes an electrochemical cell, monitoring hardware, and a computing system. The monitoring hardware periodically samples charge characteristics of the electrochemical cell. The computing system periodically determines cell information from the charge characteristics of the electrochemical cell. The computing system also periodically adds a first degradation characteristic from the cell information to a first sigmoid expression, periodically adds a second degradation characteristic from the cell information to a second sigmoid expression and combines the first sigmoid expression and the second sigmoid expression to develop or augment a multiple sigmoid model (MSM) of the electrochemical cell. The MSM may be used to estimate a capacity loss of the electrochemical cell at a desired point in time and analyze other characteristics of the electrochemical cell. The first and second degradation characteristics may be loss of active host sites and loss of free lithium for Li-ion cells.

Gering, Kevin L.

2013-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

373

Oklahoma Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Oklahoma Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 1,691 1,667 1,592 1980's 1,526 1,700 1,636 1,544 1,778 1,686 1,658 1,813 1,896 1,983 1990's 2,058 1,983 1,895 1,770 1,721 1,562 1,580 1,555 1,544 1,308 2000's 1,473 1,481 1,518 1,554 1,563 1,587 1,601 1,659 1,775 1,790 2010's 1,703 1,697 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production Oklahoma Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves

374

Estimate Impact of Strategies on Greenhouse Gas Emissions | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Impact of Strategies on Greenhouse Gas Emissions Impact of Strategies on Greenhouse Gas Emissions Estimate Impact of Strategies on Greenhouse Gas Emissions October 7, 2013 - 1:35pm Addthis YOU ARE HERE Step 3 To estimate the GHG impact of a business travel reduction program, a Federal agency or program should quantify the number of trips that could be avoided each year. If an agency has a large proportion of international travel, the agency may estimate changes in domestic and international trips separately because the associated savings in miles can be very different. General Services Administration Resources to Support GHG Mitigation Planning TravelTrax provides agencies with several tools that can help plan for reductions in business travel. This includes a tool to help estimate the impact of videoconferencing and a tool that can help conference and event planners to identify event locations that consider where attendees are coming from in order to reduce air travel GHGs. These tools are embedded in the GSA Travel MIS database, thus enabling agencies to link their actual travel to different planning scenarios and evaluate options.

375

Estimating Externalities of Natural Gas Fuel Cycles, Report 4  

SciTech Connect

This report describes methods for estimating the external costs (and possibly benefits) to human health and the environment that result from natural gas fuel cycles. Although the concept of externalities is far from simple or precise, it generally refers to effects on individuals' well being, that result from a production or market activity in which the individuals do not participate, or are not fully compensated. In the past two years, the methodological approach that this report describes has quickly become a worldwide standard for estimating externalities of fuel cycles. The approach is generally applicable to any fuel cycle in which a resource, such as coal, hydro, or biomass, is used to generate electric power. This particular report focuses on the production activities, pollution, and impacts when natural gas is used to generate electric power. In the 1990s, natural gas technologies have become, in many countries, the least expensive to build and operate. The scope of this report is on how to estimate the value of externalities--where value is defined as individuals' willingness to pay for beneficial effects, or to avoid undesirable ones. This report is about the methodologies to estimate these externalities, not about how to internalize them through regulations or other public policies. Notwithstanding this limit in scope, consideration of externalities can not be done without considering regulatory, insurance, and other considerations because these institutional factors affect whether costs (and benefits) are in fact external, or whether they are already somehow internalized within the electric power market. Although this report considers such factors to some extent, much analysis yet remains to assess the extent to which estimated costs are indeed external. This report is one of a series of reports on estimating the externalities of fuel cycles. The other reports are on the coal, oil, biomass, hydro, and nuclear fuel cycles, and on general methodology.

Barnthouse, L.W.; Cada, G.F.; Cheng, M.-D.; Easterly, C.E.; Kroodsma, R.L.; Lee, R.; Shriner, D.S.; Tolbert, V.R.; Turner, R.S.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Estimate Costs to Implement Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategies for  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Buildings Buildings Estimate Costs to Implement Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategies for Buildings October 7, 2013 - 11:09am Addthis YOU ARE HERE Step 4 When estimating the cost of implementing the greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation strategies, Federal agencies should consider the life-cycle costs and savings of the efforts. The major cost elements associated with developing and implementing a project are identified in Table 1. Table 1. Major Costs for Project Development and Implementation Cost Element Description Variables Project planning costs Preparatory work by building owners and design team. Benchmarking activities. Building audits. Developing statements of work for subcontractors. Selecting contractors. Integrated design process (for major renovations). Type of project; previous team experience; local markets; number of stakeholders

377

Estimate Costs to Implement Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategies for  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Employee Commuting Employee Commuting Estimate Costs to Implement Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategies for Employee Commuting October 7, 2013 - 2:27pm Addthis YOU ARE HERE Step 4 For greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation, once a Federal agency identifies the employee commute alternatives and supporting strategies that will most effectively reduce trips to the worksite, costs of encouraging adoption of those methods can be estimated. The annual costs of commute trip reduction programs can vary greatly by worksite. This section outlines types of costs that might be incurred by an agency as well as savings and other benefits of commute trip reduction to an agency, its employees, and the communities surrounding its major worksites. It includes: Employer costs and benefits Employee costs and benefits

378

Direct experimental evidence for a negative heat capacity in the liquid-to-gas like phase transitionin hydrogen cluster ions backbending of the caloric curve  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Direct experimental evidence for a negative heat capacity in the liquid-to-gas like phase transitionin hydrogen cluster ions

Gobet, F; Farizon, M; Gaillard, M J; Buchet, J P; Carré, M; Schreier, P; Märk, T D

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Parameter Estimation and Capacity Fade Analysis of Lithium-Ion Batteries Using Reformulated Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many researchers have worked to develop methods to analyze and characterize capacity fade in lithium-ion batteries. As a complement to approaches to mathematically model capacity fade that require detailed understanding ...

Braatz, Richard D.

380

Estimating Policy-Driven Greenhouse Gas Emissions Trajectories in  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Estimating Policy-Driven Greenhouse Gas Emissions Trajectories in Estimating Policy-Driven Greenhouse Gas Emissions Trajectories in California: The California Greenhouse Gas Inventory Spreadsheet (GHGIS) Model Title Estimating Policy-Driven Greenhouse Gas Emissions Trajectories in California: The California Greenhouse Gas Inventory Spreadsheet (GHGIS) Model Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-6541E Year of Publication 2013 Authors Greenblatt, J. Date Published 10/2013 Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory City Berkeley Abstract A California Greenhouse Gas Inventory Spreadsheet (GHGIS) model was developed to explore the impact of combinations of state policies on state greenhouse gas (GHG) and regional criteria pollutant emissions. The model included representations of all GHGemitting sectors of the California economy (including those outside the energy sector, such as high global warming potential gases, waste treatment, agriculture and forestry) in varying degrees of detail, and was carefully calibrated using available data and projections from multiple state agencies and other sources. Starting from basic drivers such as population, numbers of households, gross state product, numbers of vehicles, etc., the model calculated energy demands by type (various types of liquid and gaseous hydrocarbon fuels, electricity and hydrogen), and finally calculated emissions of GHGs and three criteria pollutants: reactive organic gases (ROG), nitrogen oxides (NOx), and fine (2.5 μm) particulate matter (PM2.5). Calculations were generally statewide, but in some sectors, criteria pollutants were also calculated for two regional air basins: the South Coast Air Basin (SCAB) and the San Joaquin Valley (SJV). Three scenarios were developed that attempt to model: (1) all committed policies, (2) additional, uncommitted policy targets and (3) potential technology and market futures. Each scenario received extensive input from state energy planning agencies, in particular the California Air Resources Board. Results indicate that all three scenarios are able to meet the 2020 statewide GHG targets, and by 2030, statewide GHG emissions range from between 208 and 396 MtCO2/yr. However, none of the scenarios are able to meet the 2050 GHG target of 85 MtCO2/yr, with emissions ranging from 188 to 444 MtCO2/yr, so additional policies will need to be developed for California to meet this stringent future target. A full sensitivity study of major scenario assumptions was also performed. In terms of criteria pollutants, targets were less well-defined, but while all three scenarios were able to make significant reductions in ROG, NOx and PM2.5 both statewide and in the two regional air basins, they may nonetheless fall short of what will be required by future federal standards. Specifically, in Scenario 1, regional NOx emissions are approximately three times the estimated targets for both 2023 and 2032, and in Scenarios 2 and 3, NOx emissions are approximately twice the estimated targets. Further work is required in this area, including detailed regional air quality modeling, in order to determine likely pathways for attaining these stringent targets.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas capacity estimates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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381

Estimate Costs to Implement Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategies for  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Vehicles and Mobile Equipment Vehicles and Mobile Equipment Estimate Costs to Implement Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategies for Vehicles and Mobile Equipment October 7, 2013 - 1:13pm Addthis YOU ARE HERE: Step 4 Once a Federal agency identifies the various strategic opportunities to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions for vehicles and mobile equipment, it is necessary to evaluate the associated costs of adopting each strategy. The costs to reduce GHG emissions can vary greatly from cost-free behavior modification to the high-cost of purchasing zero-emission battery electric vehicles and associated fueling infrastructure. This section provides an overview of the costs and savings to consider when planning for mobile source emissions reductions, including efforts to: Reduce vehicle miles traveled

382

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects 00516 North Dakota Refining Capacity Study  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

North Dakota Refining Capacity Study North Dakota Refining Capacity Study DE-FE0000516 Goal The objective of the North Dakota Refining Capacity study is to assess the feasibility of increasing the oil refinery capacity in North Dakota, and, if possible, determine the scale of such an expansion, the slate of refined product(s) that would produce the most economic benefit, and the preferred ownership model, i.e., private, public or private-public. Performer North Dakota Association of Rural Electric Cooperatives (NDAREC) Corval Group, partnered with Purvin & Gertz and Mustang Engineering Background The genesis of this study came from an April 2008 report issued by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) asserting that North Dakota and Montana have an estimated 3.0 to 4.3 billion barrels of undiscovered, technically recoverable oil in an area known as the Bakken Formation. This assessment shows a 25-fold increase in the amount of recoverable oil compared to the USGS 1995 estimate of 151 million barrels of oil. The Bakken Formation estimate is larger than all other current USGS oil assessments of the lower 48 states and is the largest "continuous" oil accumulation ever assessed by the USGS. The new report points out that the new geologic models applied to the Bakken Formation, advances in drilling and production technologies, and recent oil discoveries have resulted in these substantially larger technically recoverable oil volumes. About 105 million barrels of oil were produced from the Bakken Formation by the end of 2007. In 2008, the formation produced another 27.2 million barrels of oil, which represented 43% of the stateÂ’s annual oil production of some 62.3 million barrels. Even though oil prices have dropped significantly in recent months, it appears that oil production from this formation will continue strong for decades to come. Most recently, a major production find has occurred in the Three Forks formation underlying the Bakken. This find is still undergoing significant testing, but early evidence suggests it represents another significant recoverable pool of oil in western North Dakota.

383

Estimation of Gas Leak Rates Through Very Small Orifices  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Estimation of Gas Leak Rates Estimation of Gas Leak Rates Through Very Small Orifices and Channels by Herbert J. Bomelburg February 1977 Prepared for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission -..- Pacific Northwest Laboratories Th% report was preparrd is an accceullt r.84 work spoi.wr~d by the Un~ted States Governmect. Kettker t > ~ United States nor the L'nited states 'rl:clczr 1tcgl;l;:cry Cornmiszion. :or ally c! their e m p i o y e ~ , nor any of chcrr contractors, subcontraao~r, a . tlveir rrn~invct?t-, r.~aies any H r r l a tty, cxpreji o r implied, or ?.;+~nics any !egA liability or rcrpocsibility for iirc accuracy. zcm:lc.~cn~ss 01 ~rscf.~!ccss -,f an). i?fzrxat-on, 3Poar.i:b4. prodiict cr I.m)cess disclosed, or repreen:.; :hi.: i;s i43? wott:rl n.;\ irlfringe pr ivzrc:i*l u w x o :ig.~ts.

384

Direct estimation of gas reserves using production data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis presents the development of a semi-analytical technique that can be used to estimate the gas-in-place for volumetric gas reservoirs. This new methodology utilizes plotting functions, plots, extrapolations, etc. - where all analyses are based on the following governing identity. The 'governing identity' is derived and validated by others for pi less than 6000 psia. We have reproduced the derivation of this result and we provide validation using numberical simulation for cases where pi greater than 6000 psia. The relevance of this work is straightforward using a simple governing relation, we provide a series of plotting functions which can be used to extrapolate or interpret an estimate of gas-in-place using only production data (qg and Gp). The proposed methodology does not require a prior knowledge of formation and or fluid compressibility data, nor does it require average reservoir pressure. In fact, no formation or fluid properties are directly required for this analysis and interpretation approach. The new methodology is validated demonstrated using results from numerical simulation (i.e., cases where we know the exact answer), as well as for a number of field cases. Perhaps the most valuable component of this work is our development of a "spreadsheet" approach in which we perform multiple analyses interpretations simultaneously using MS Excel. This allows us to visualize all data plots simultaneously - and to "link" the analyses to a common set of parameters. While this "simultaneous" analysis approach may seem rudimentary (or even obvious), it provides the critical (and necessary) "visualization" that makes the technique functional. The base relation (given above) renders different behavior for different plotting functions, and we must have a "linkage" that forces all analyses to "connect" to one another. The proposed multiplot spreadsheet approach provides just such a connection.

Buba, Ibrahim Muhammad

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

,"U.S. Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

12,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1988" 12,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1988" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","ng_stor_cap_dcu_nus_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/ng/ng_stor_cap_dcu_nus_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 7:03:21 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity" "Sourcekey","N5290US2","NA1393_NUS_2","NA1392_NUS_2","NA1391_NUS_2","NGA_EPG0_SACW0_NUS_MMCF","NGA_EPG0_SACWS_NUS_MMCF","NGA_EPG0_SACWA_NUS_MMCF","NGA_EPG0_SACWD_NUS_MMCF","NA1394_NUS_8","NA1393_NUS_8","NA1392_NUS_8","NA1391_NUS_8"

386

Estimate Costs to Implement Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategies for  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Business Travel Business Travel Estimate Costs to Implement Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategies for Business Travel October 7, 2013 - 1:37pm Addthis YOU ARE HERE Step 4 Once business travel reduction strategies have been identified, a Federal agency may evaluate the cost of implementing those measures and any potential savings from avoided travel. The annual costs associated with reducing business travel may vary greatly by agency, program, and site depending on the current level of video conferencing and desktop collaboration solutions that are available between the organization's major travel destinations. This will be largely driven by whether the agency has to install or upgrade equipment or just make them more accessible and familiar to users. Strategies focused on policy and

387

Estimated Maximum Gas Retention from Uniformly Dispersed Bubbles in K Basin Sludge Stored in Large-Diameter Containers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This letter report addresses the KE Basin sludge that will be retrieved and stored in large-diameter containers (LDCs.) A fraction of the hydrogen gas bubbles generated from the corrosion of uranium metal and oxides may be retained within the sludge matrix. Those entrapped bubbles will expand the sludge bed volume and, therefore, will affect how much sludge can be loaded into a container. The entrapped gas bubbles will also impact the overall thermal conductivity and heat capacity of the sludge bed. The evaluation summarized here was performed to estimate the maximum gas holdup (volume fraction gas) that could occur sludge stored in large-diameter containers, assuming uniform gas generation (i.e., uniform distribution of metallic uranium particles). This report represents an evaluation of the retention of uniformly distributed bubbles and an estimate of the maximum gas fraction that might be retained in K Basin LDCs based on existing literature data on bubble retention and Basin sludge characterization data. Existing data show that the maximum gas fraction varies, depending on physical properties and the configuration of the material or waste.

Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Terrones, Guillermo

2002-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

388

Preliminary estimates of electrical generating capacity of slim holes--a theoretical approach  

SciTech Connect

The feasibility of using small geothermal generators (< 1 MWe) for off-grid electrical power in remote areas or for rural electrification in developing nations would be enhanced if drilling costs could be reduced. This paper examines the electrical generating capacity of fluids which can be produced from typical slim holes (six-inch diameter or less), both by binary techniques (with downhole pumps) and, for hotter reservoir fluids, by conventional spontaneous-discharge flash-steam methods. Depending mainly on reservoir temperature, electrical capacities from a few hundred kilowatts to over one megawatt per slim hole appear to be possible.

Pritchett, John W.

1995-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

389

Direct measurements improve estimates of dairy greenhouse-gas emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

small quantity of Greenhouse gases measured enteric nitrousSC, Pain BF. 1994. Greenhouse gas emissions from intensiveE, Brose G. 2001. Greenhouse gas emissions from animal house

Mitloehner, Frank M; Sun, Huawei; Karlik, John F

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Regulation and Political Costs in the Oil and Gas Industry: An Investigation of Discretion in Reporting Earnings and Oil and Gas Reserves Estimates.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study investigates the use of discretion by oil and gas companies in reporting financial performance and oil and gas reserve estimates during times of… (more)

Kurdi, Ammr

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Negative heat capacity in the critical region of nuclear fragmentation: an experimental evidence of the liquid-gas phase transition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An experimental indication of negative heat capacity in excited nuclear systems is inferred from the event by event study of energy fluctuations in $Au$ quasi-projectile sources formed in $Au+Au$ collisions at 35 A.MeV. The excited source configuration is reconstructed through a calorimetric analysis of its de-excitation products. Fragment partitions show signs of a critical behavior at about 5 A.MeV excitation energy. In the same energy range the heat capacity shows a negative branch providing a direct evidence of a first order liquid gas phase transition.

M. D'Agostino; F. Gulminelli; Ph. Chomaz; M. Bruno; F. Cannata; R. Bougault; N. Colonna; F. Gramegna; I. Iori; N. Le Neindre; G. V. Margagliotti; P. F. Mastinu; P. M. Milazzo; A. Moroni; G. Vannini

1999-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

392

Estimating Water Needs to Meet 2025 Electricity Generating Capacity Forecasts by NERC Region  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NETL-2006/1235 NETL-2006/1235 August 2006 Revised April 8, 2008 Estimating Freshwater Needs to Meet Future Thermoelectric Generation Requirements Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement,

393

Primer on gas integrated resource planning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report discusses the following topics: gas resource planning: need for IRP; gas integrated resource planning: methods and models; supply and capacity planning for gas utilities; methods for estimating gas avoided costs; economic analysis of gas utility DSM programs: benefit-cost tests; gas DSM technologies and programs; end-use fuel substitution; and financial aspects of gas demand-side management programs.

Goldman, C.; Comnes, G.A.; Busch, J.; Wiel, S. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

New Northeast natural gas pipeline capacity comes on-line - Today ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Solar › Energy in Brief ... Ohio to York County, Pennsylvania. 300 Line Expansion Project, operated by Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company, began service on Nov 1, 2011.

395

Major Changes in Natural Gas Pipeline Transportation Capacity, 1998-2008  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This presentation graphically illustrates the areas of major growth on the national natural gas pipeline transmission network between 1998 and the end of 2008.

Information Center

2008-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

396

Working natural gas storage capacity grows 3% year-over-year | U.S ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

tags: natural gas storage. Email Updates. RSS Feeds. Facebook. Twitter. YouTube. Add us to your site. Have a question, comment, or suggestion for a future article?

397

Economic Modeling of Mid-Term Gas Demand and Electric Generation Capacity Trends  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. power sector natural gas use over the next 10 to 20 years is a topic of significant uncertainty and debate. The industry expects the power sector to be the principal source of growth in national gas demand in the short run; and the manner in which it drives demand and affects the market over the "mid term," to 2020-2030, is an important consideration for planners in both the electric and gas industries. With abundant, relatively low-priced supplies, gas-fired generation can be a strong competito...

2009-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

398

Estimating household fuel oil/kerosine, natural gas, and LPG prices by census region  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this research is to estimate individual fuel prices within the residential sector. The data from four US Department of Energy, Energy Information Administration, residential energy consumption surveys were used to estimate the models. For a number of important fuel types - fuel oil, natural gas, and liquefied petroleum gas - the estimation presents a problem because these fuels are not used by all households. Estimates obtained by using only data in which observed fuel prices are present would be biased. A correction for this self-selection bias is needed for estimating prices of these fuels. A literature search identified no past studies on application of the selectivity model for estimating prices of residential fuel oil/kerosine, natural gas, and liquefied petroleum gas. This report describes selectivity models that utilize the Dubin/McFadden correction method for estimating prices of residential fuel oil/kerosine, natural gas, and liquefied petroleum gas in the Northeast, Midwest, South, and West census regions. Statistically significant explanatory variables are identified and discussed in each of the models. This new application of the selectivity model should be of interest to energy policy makers, researchers, and academicians.

Poyer, D.A.; Teotia, A.P.S.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Guidelines for Induced Flue Gas Recirculation: Volume 1: Reducing Air/Gas System Resistance and Enhancing Fan Capacity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document guides users through a logical sequence, or "road map," of activities and decisions for optimizing solutions for fans, ducts, and related equipment in fossil plant combustion air and gas systems.

1999-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

400

A Bootstrap Approach to Computing Uncertainty in Inferred Oil and Gas Reserve Estimates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study develops confidence intervals for estimates of inferred oil and gas reserves based on bootstrap procedures. Inferred reserves are expected additions to proved reserves in previously discovered conventional oil and gas fields. Estimates of inferred reserves accounted for 65% of the total oil and 34% of the total gas assessed in the U.S. Geological Survey's 1995 National Assessment of oil and gas in US onshore and State offshore areas. When the same computational methods used in the 1995 Assessment are applied to more recent data, the 80-year (from 1997 through 2076) inferred reserve estimates for pre-1997 discoveries located in the lower 48 onshore and state offshore areas amounted to a total of 39.7 billion barrels of oil (BBO) and 293 trillion cubic feet (TCF) of gas. The 90% confidence interval about the oil estimate derived from the bootstrap approach is 22.4 BBO to 69.5 BBO. The comparable 90% confidence interval for the inferred gas reserve estimate is 217 TCF to 413 TCF. The 90% confidence interval describes the uncertainty that should be attached to the estimates. It also provides a basis for developing scenarios to explore the implications for energy policy analysis.

Attanasi, Emil D. [US Geological Survey MS 956 (United States)], E-mail: attanasi@usgs.gov; Coburn, Timothy C. [Abilene Christian University, Department of Management Science (United States)

2004-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas capacity estimates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

electricity generating capacity | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

generating capacity generating capacity Dataset Summary Description The New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development publishes energy data including many datasets related to electricity. Included here are three electricity generating capacity datasets: annual operational electricity generation capacity by plant type (1975 - 2009); estimated generating capacity by fuel type for North Island, South Island and New Zealand (2009); and information on generating plants (plant type, name, owner, commissioned date, and capacity), as of December 2009. Source New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development Date Released Unknown Date Updated July 03rd, 2009 (5 years ago) Keywords biomass coal Electric Capacity electricity generating capacity geothermal Hydro Natural Gas wind Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon Operational Electricity Generation Capacity by Plant Type (xls, 42.5 KiB)

402

MIE 1.0 - Gas Turbine Maintenance Interval Estimator , Version 1.0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The EPRI Gas Turbine Maintenance Interval Estimator Version 1.0 (MIE 1.0) is a spreadsheet application that predicts the remaining hot section life of a General Electric heavy-duty gas turbine using General Electric's standard algorithms described in GER-3620K.

2007-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

403

Comparison of Natural Gas Storage Estimates from the EIA and AGA  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The Energy Information Administration (EIA) has been publishing monthly storage information for years. In order to address the need for more timely information, in 1994 the American Gas Association (AGA) began publishing weekly storage levels. Both the EIA and the AGA series provide estimates of the total working gas in storage, but use significantly different methodologies.

Information Center

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Estimating Policy-Driven Greenhouse Gas Emissions Trajectories in California: The California Greenhouse Gas Inventory Spreadsheet (GHGIS) Model  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Estimating Policy-Driven Greenhouse Estimating Policy-Driven Greenhouse Gas Emissions Trajectories in California: The California Greenhouse Gas Inventory Spreadsheet (GHGIS) Model Jeffery B. Greenblatt Energy Analysis and Environmental Impacts Department Environmental Energy Technologies Division Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Berkeley, CA 94720 November 2013 This work was supported by the Research Division, California Air Resources Board under ARB Agreement No. 12-329. LBNL-6451E DISCLAIMER This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor The Regents of the University of California, nor any of

405

Gas Turbine and Combined-Cycle Capacity Enhancement: Second Interim Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project helps resource planners find more cost-effective ways to add capacity to already-installed peakers, than the purchase, permitting, and siting of new units. The project focuses on techniques whose incremental costs are far below the cost of installing new generation.

1995-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

406

Localities and their natural gas : stories of problem diffusion, state preemption, and local government capacity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The rapid rise of oil and gas production in the United States poses a new set of policy challenges for local governments. Striving to balance the goals of encouraging economic growth and mitigating its side effects, local ...

Agatstein, Jessica C

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

TY RPRT T1 Estimating Policy Driven Greenhouse Gas Emissions Trajectories in  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Estimating Policy Driven Greenhouse Gas Emissions Trajectories in Estimating Policy Driven Greenhouse Gas Emissions Trajectories in California The California Greenhouse Gas Inventory Spreadsheet GHGIS Model A1 J Greenblatt AB p A California Greenhouse Gas Inventory Spreadsheet GHGIS model was developed to explore the impact of combinations of state policies on state greenhouse gas GHG and regional criteria pollutant emissions The model included representations of all GHGemitting sectors of the California economy including those outside the energy sector such as high global warming potential gases waste treatment agriculture and forestry in varying degrees of detail and was carefully calibrated using available data and projections from multiple state agencies and other sources Starting from basic drivers such as population numbers

408

Estimating the greenhouse gas benefits of forestry projects: A Costa Rican Case Study  

SciTech Connect

If the Clean Development Mechanism proposed under the Kyoto Protocol is to serve as an effective means for combating global climate change, it will depend upon reliable estimates of greenhouse gas benefits. This paper sketches the theoretical basis for estimating the greenhouse gas benefits of forestry projects and suggests lessons learned based on a case study of Costa Rica's Protected Areas Project, which is a 500,000 hectare effort to reduce deforestation and enhance reforestation. The Protected Areas Project in many senses advances the state of the art for Clean Development Mechanism-type forestry projects, as does the third-party verification work of SGS International Certification Services on the project. Nonetheless, sensitivity analysis shows that carbon benefit estimates for the project vary widely based on the imputed deforestation rate in the baseline scenario, e.g. the deforestation rate expected if the project were not implemented. This, along with a newly available national dataset that confirms other research showing a slower rate of deforestation in Costa Rica, suggests that the use of the 1979--1992 forest cover data originally as the basis for estimating carbon savings should be reconsidered. When the newly available data is substituted, carbon savings amount to 8.9 Mt (million tones) of carbon, down from the original estimate of 15.7 Mt. The primary general conclusion is that project developers should give more attention to the forecasting land use and land cover change scenarios underlying estimates of greenhouse gas benefits.

Busch, Christopher; Sathaye, Jayant; Sanchez Azofeifa, G. Arturo

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Comparative Evaluation of Two Methods to Estimate Natural Gas Production in Texas  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report describes an evaluation conducted by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) in August 2003 of two methods that estimate natural gas production in Texas. The first method (parametric method) was used by EIA from February through August 2003 and the second method (multinomial method) replaced it starting in September 2003, based on the results of this evaluation.

Information Center

2003-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

410

Estimating retained gas volumes in the Hanford tanks using waste level measurements  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford site is home to 177 large, underground nuclear waste storage tanks. Safety and environmental concerns surround these tanks and their contents. One such concern is the propensity for the waste in these tanks to generate and trap flammable gases. This report focuses on understanding and improving the quality of retained gas volume estimates derived from tank waste level measurements. While direct measurements of gas volume are available for a small number of the Hanford tanks, the increasingly wide availability of tank waste level measurements provides an opportunity for less expensive (than direct gas volume measurement) assessment of gas hazard for the Hanford tanks. Retained gas in the tank waste is inferred from level measurements -- either long-term increase in the tank waste level, or fluctuations in tank waste level with atmospheric pressure changes. This report concentrates on the latter phenomena. As atmospheric pressure increases, the pressure on the gas in the tank waste increases, resulting in a level decrease (as long as the tank waste is {open_quotes}soft{close_quotes} enough). Tanks with waste levels exhibiting fluctuations inversely correlated with atmospheric pressure fluctuations were catalogued in an earlier study. Additionally, models incorporating ideal-gas law behavior and waste material properties have been proposed. These models explicitly relate the retained gas volume in the tank with the magnitude of the waste level fluctuations, dL/dP. This report describes how these models compare with the tank waste level measurements.

Whitney, P.D.; Chen, G.; Gauglitz, P.A.; Meyer, P.A.; Miller, N.E.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Equipment Design and Cost Estimation for Small Modular Biomass Systems, Synthesis Gas Cleanup, and Oxygen Separation Equipment; Task 2: Gas Cleanup Design and Cost Estimates -- Wood Feedstock  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As part of Task 2, Gas Cleanup and Cost Estimates, Nexant investigated the appropriate process scheme for treatment of wood-derived syngas for use in the synthesis of liquid fuels. Two different 2,000 metric tonne per day gasification schemes, a low-pressure, indirect system using the gasifier, and a high-pressure, direct system using gasification technology were evaluated. Initial syngas conditions from each of the gasifiers was provided to the team by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. Nexant was the prime contractor and principal investigator during this task; technical assistance was provided by both GTI and Emery Energy.

Nexant Inc.

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Application of the Continuous EUR Method to Estimate Reserves in Unconventional Gas Reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reserves estimation in unconventional (low/ultra-low permeability) reservoirs has become a topic of increased interest as more of these resources are being developed, especially in North America. The estimation of reserves in unconventional reservoirs is challenging due to the long transient flow period exhibited by the production data. The use of conventional methods (i.e., Arps' decline curves) to estimate reserves is often times inaccurate and leads to the overestimation of reserves because these models are only (theoretically) applicable for the boundary-dominated flow regime. The premise of this work is to present and demonstrate a methodology which continuously estimates the ultimate recovery during the producing life of a well in order to generate a time-dependent profile of the estimated ultimate recovery (EUR). The "objective" is to estimate the final EUR value(s) from several complimentary analyses. In this work we present the "Continuous EUR Method" to estimate reserves for unconventional gas reservoirs using a rate-time analysis approach. This work offers a coherent process to reduce the uncertainty in reserves estimation for unconventional gas reservoirs by quantifying "upper" and "lower" limits of EUR prior to the onset of boundary-dominated flow. We propose the use of traditional and new rate-time relations to establish the "upper" limit for EUR. We clearly demonstrate that rate-time relations which better represent the transient and transitional flow regimes (in particular the power law exponential rate decline relation) often lead to a more accurate "upper" limit for reserves estimates — earlier in the producing life of a well (as compared to conventional ("Arps") relations). Furthermore, we propose a straight line extrapolation technique to offer a conservative estimate of maximum produced gas which we use as the "lower" limit for EUR. The EUR values estimated using this technique continually increase with time, eventually reaching a maximum value. We successfully demonstrate the methodology by applying the approach to 43 field examples producing from 7 different tight sandstone and shale gas reservoirs. We show that the difference between the "upper" and "lower" limit of reserves decreases with time and converges to the "true" value of reserves during the latter producing life of a well.

Currie, Stephanie M.

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Steady-state model for estimating gas production from underground coal gasification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A pseudo-one-dimensional channel model has been developed to estimate gas production from underground coal gasification. The model incorporates a zero-dimensional steady-state cavity growth submodel and models mass transfer from the bulk gas to the coal wall using a correlation for natural convection. Simulations with the model reveal that the gas calorific value is sensitive to coal reactivity and the exposed reactive surface area per unit volume in the channel. A comparison of model results with several small-scale field trials conducted at Centralia in the U.S.A. show that the model can make good predictions of the gas production and composition under a range of different operating conditions, including operation with air and steam/oxygen mixtures. Further work is required to determine whether the model formulation is also suitable for simulating large-scale underground coal gasification field trials.

Greg Perkins; Veena Sahajwalla [University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW (Australia). School of Materials Science and Engineering

2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

414

Baseline estimate of the retained gas volume in Tank 241-C-106  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of a study of the retained gas volume in Hanford Tank 241-C-106 (C-106) using the barometric pressure effect method. This estimate is required to establish the baseline conditions for sluicing the waste from C-106 into AY-102, scheduled to begin in the fall of 1998. The barometric pressure effect model is described, and the data reduction and detrending techniques are detailed. Based on the response of the waste level to the larger barometric pressure swings that occurred between October 27, 1997, and March 4, 1998, the best estimate and conservative (99% confidence) retained gas volumes in C-106 are 24 scm (840 scf) and 50 scm (1,770 scf), respectively. This is equivalent to average void fractions of 0.025 and 0.053, respectively.

Stewart, C.W.; Chen, G.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

A METHOD FOR ESTIMATING GAS PRESSURE IN 3013 CONTAINERS USING AN ISP DATABASE QUERY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's Integrated Surveillance Program (ISP) is responsible for the storage and surveillance of plutonium-bearing material. During storage, plutonium-bearing material has the potential to generate hydrogen gas from the radiolysis of adsorbed water. The generation of hydrogen gas is a safety concern, especially when a container is breached within a glove box during destructive evaluation. To address this issue, the DOE established a standard (DOE, 2004) that sets the criteria for the stabilization and packaging of material for up to 50 years. The DOE has now packaged most of its excess plutonium for long-term storage in compliance with this standard. As part of this process, it is desirable to know within reasonable certainty the total maximum pressure of hydrogen and other gases within the 3013 container if safety issues and compliance with the DOE standards are to be attained. The principal goal of this investigation is to document the method and query used to estimate total (i.e. hydrogen and other gases) gas pressure within a 3013 container based on the material properties and estimated moisture content contained in the ISP database. Initial attempts to estimate hydrogen gas pressure in 3013 containers was based on G-values (hydrogen gas generation per energy input) derived from small scale samples. These maximum G-values were used to calculate worst case pressures based on container material weight, assay, wattage, moisture content, container age, and container volume. This paper documents a revised hydrogen pressure calculation that incorporates new surveillance results and includes a component for gases other than hydrogen. The calculation is produced by executing a query of the ISP database. An example of manual mathematical computations from the pressure equation is compared and evaluated with results from the query. Based on the destructive evaluation of 17 containers, the estimated mean absolute pressure was significantly higher (P.10) between the mean pressures from DR and the calculation. The mean predicted absolute pressure was consistently higher than GEST by an average difference of 57 kPa (8 psi). The mean difference between the estimated pressure and digital radiography was 11 kPa (2 psi). Based on the initial results of destructive evaluation, the pressure query was found to provide a reasonably conservative estimate of the total pressure in 3013 containers whose material contained minimal moisture content.

Friday, G; L. G. Peppers, L; D. K. Veirs, D

2008-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

416

A METHOD FOR ESTIMATING GAS PRESSURE IN 3013 CONTAINERS USING AN ISP DATABASE QUERY  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's Integrated Surveillance Program (ISP) is responsible for the storage and surveillance of plutonium-bearing material. During storage, plutonium-bearing material has the potential to generate hydrogen gas from the radiolysis of adsorbed water. The generation of hydrogen gas is a safety concern, especially when a container is breached within a glove box during destructive evaluation. To address this issue, the DOE established a standard (DOE, 2004) that sets the criteria for the stabilization and packaging of material for up to 50 years. The DOE has now packaged most of its excess plutonium for long-term storage in compliance with this standard. As part of this process, it is desirable to know within reasonable certainty the total maximum pressure of hydrogen and other gases within the 3013 container if safety issues and compliance with the DOE standards are to be attained. The principal goal of this investigation is to document the method and query used to estimate total (i.e. hydrogen and other gases) gas pressure within a 3013 container based on the material properties and estimated moisture content contained in the ISP database. Initial attempts to estimate hydrogen gas pressure in 3013 containers was based on G-values (hydrogen gas generation per energy input) derived from small scale samples. These maximum G-values were used to calculate worst case pressures based on container material weight, assay, wattage, moisture content, container age, and container volume. This paper documents a revised hydrogen pressure calculation that incorporates new surveillance results and includes a component for gases other than hydrogen. The calculation is produced by executing a query of the ISP database. An example of manual mathematical computations from the pressure equation is compared and evaluated with results from the query. Based on the destructive evaluation of 17 containers, the estimated mean absolute pressure was significantly higher (P<.01) than the mean GEST pressure. There was no significant difference (P>.10) between the mean pressures from DR and the calculation. The mean predicted absolute pressure was consistently higher than GEST by an average difference of 57 kPa (8 psi). The mean difference between the estimated pressure and digital radiography was 11 kPa (2 psi). Based on the initial results of destructive evaluation, the pressure query was found to provide a reasonably conservative estimate of the total pressure in 3013 containers whose material contained minimal moisture content.

Friday, G; L. G. Peppers, L; D. K. Veirs, D

2008-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

417

Total Working Gas Capacity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Monthly Annual Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History U.S. 4,211,193 4,327,844 4,410,224 4,483,650 4,576,356 2008-2012 Alabama 20,900 20,900 25,150 27,350 27,350 2008-2012 Arkansas 14,500 13,898 13,898 12,036 12,178 2008-2012 California 283,796 296,096 311,096 335,396 349,296 2008-2012 Colorado 42,579 48,129 49,119 48,709 60,582 2008-2012 Illinois 296,318 303,761 303,500 302,385 302,962 2008-2012 Indiana 32,769 32,157 32,982 33,024 33,024 2008-2012 Iowa 87,350 87,414 90,613 91,113 90,313 2008-2012 Kansas 119,260 119,339 123,190 123,225 123,343 2008-2012 Kentucky

418

Equipment Design and Cost Estimation for Small Modular Biomass Systems, Synthesis Gas Cleanup, and Oxygen Separation Equipment; Task 2: Gas Cleanup Design and Cost Estimates -- Black Liquor Gasification  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As part of Task 2, Gas Cleanup and Cost Estimates, Nexant investigated the appropriate process scheme for removal of acid gases from black liquor-derived syngas for use in both power and liquid fuels synthesis. Two 3,200 metric tonne per day gasification schemes, both low-temperature/low-pressure (1100 deg F, 40 psi) and high-temperature/high-pressure (1800 deg F, 500 psi) were used for syngas production. Initial syngas conditions from each of the gasifiers was provided to the team by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and Princeton University. Nexant was the prime contractor and principal investigator during this task; technical assistance was provided by both GTI and Emery Energy.

Nexant Inc.

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Meta-Analysis of Estimates of Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Concentrating Solar Power: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In reviewing life cycle assessment (LCA) literature of utility-scale CSP systems, this analysis focuses on clarifying central tendency and reducing variability in estimates of life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions through a meta-analytical process called harmonization. From 125 references reviewed, 10 produced 36 independent GHG emission estimates passing screens for quality and relevance: 19 for parabolic trough technology and 17 for power tower technology. The interquartile range (IQR) of published GHG emission estimates was 83 and 20 g CO2eq/kWh for trough and tower, respectively, with medians of 26 and 38 g CO2eq/kWh. Two levels of harmonization were applied. Light harmonization reduced variability in published estimates by using consistent values for key parameters pertaining to plant design and performance. Compared to the published estimates, IQR was reduced by 69% and median increased by 76% for troughs. IQR was reduced by 26% for towers, and median was reduced by 34%. A second level of harmonization was applied to five well-documented trough LC GHG emission estimates, harmonizing to consistent values for GHG emissions embodied in materials and from construction activities. As a result, their median was further reduced by 5%, while the range increased by 6%. In sum, harmonization clarified previous results.

Heath, G. A.; Burkhardt, J. J.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Nonlinear Bayesian Algorithms for Gas Plume Detection and Estimation from Hyper-spectral Thermal Image Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a nonlinear Bayesian regression algorithm for the purpose of detecting and estimating gas plume content from hyper-spectral data. Remote sensing data, by its very nature, is collected under less controlled conditions than laboratory data. As a result, the physics-based model that is used to describe the relationship between the observed remotesensing spectra, and the terrestrial (or atmospheric) parameters that we desire to estimate, is typically littered with many unknown "nuisance" parameters (parameters that we are not interested in estimating, but also appear in the model). Bayesian methods are well-suited for this context as they automatically incorporate the uncertainties associated with all nuisance parameters into the error estimates of the parameters of interest. The nonlinear Bayesian regression methodology is illustrated on realistic simulated data from a three-layer model for longwave infrared (LWIR) measurements from a passive instrument. This shows that this approach should permit more accurate estimation as well as a more reasonable description of estimate uncertainty.

Heasler, Patrick G.; Posse, Christian; Hylden, Jeff L.; Anderson, Kevin K.

2007-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas capacity estimates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Natural gas fired electric generating technology: A key to the adequacy of electric generating capacity in North American Electric Reliability Councils. Topical report, May 1991  

SciTech Connect

Development and implementation of an enhanced modeling system for electricity market analysis is explained. The relevant geographic areas that must be used for accurate supply and demand modeling and analysis are defined. There is no national market for electricity in the United States. Surplus hydroelectric capacity from the Pacific Northwest cannot be made available in Florida. Any model of U.S. electricity consumer and producer interaction that does not differentiate by region would produce misleading results. The expected natural gas-dominated capacity expansion phase in electricity markets is described.

Makovick, L.

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Preliminary Estimates of Combined Heat and Power Greenhouse Gas Abatement Potential for California in 2020  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MW Reciprocating Engine 3 MW Gas Turbine 1 MW ReciprocatingEngine 5 MW Gas Turbine 3MW Gas Turbine 40 MW Gas Turbine 1 MW Reciprocating Engine

Firestone, Ryan; Ling, Frank; Marnay, Chris; Hamachi LaCommare, Kristina

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

EIA - All Natural Gas Analysis  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

All Natural Gas Analysis All Natural Gas Analysis 2010 Peaks, Plans and (Persnickety) Prices This presentation provides information about EIA's estimates of working gas peak storage capacity, and the development of the natural gas storage industry. Natural gas shale and the need for high deliverability storage are identified as key drivers in natural gas storage capacity development. The presentation also provides estimates of planned storage facilities through 2012. Categories: Prices, Storage (Released, 10/28/2010, ppt format) U.S Natural Gas Imports and Exports: 2009 This report provides an overview of U.S. international natural gas trade in 2009. Natural gas import and export data, including liquefied natural gas (LNG) data, are provided through the year 2009 in Tables SR1-SR9. Categories: Imports & Exports/Pipelines (Released, 9/28/2010, Html format)

424

Solid oxide fuel cell/gas turbine power plant cycles and performance estimates  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

SOFC pressurization enhances SOFC efficiency and power performance. It enables the direct integration of the SOFC and gas turbine technologies which can form the basis for very efficient combined- cycle power plants. PSOFC/GT cogeneration systems, producing steam and/or hot water in addition to electric power, can be designed to achieve high fuel effectiveness values. A wide range of steam pressures and temperatures are possible owing to system component arrangement flexibility. It is anticipated that Westinghouse will offer small PSOFC/GT power plants for sale early in the next decade. These plants will have capacities less than 10 MW net ac, and they will operate with efficiencies in the 60-65% (net ac/LHV) range.

Lundberg, W.L.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

425

Power Plant Profitability and Investment in the Central United States: Impact of New Gas Capacity on Generation and Repowering Economics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the past 12 months, announcements of capacity additions by 2005 in the midwest have jumped from 20,000 to 60,000 MW. This report examines how just a portion of this capacity, if built, could affect the profitability of new and existing power plants.

2000-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

426

Preliminary Estimates of Combined Heat and Power Greenhouse Gas Abatement Potential for California in 2020  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the standard efficiency natural gas power plant case, highand imports Natural gas plants providing power to Californianatural gas and petroleum products as well as the remote power plant

Firestone, Ryan; Ling, Frank; Marnay, Chris; Hamachi LaCommare, Kristina

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

LP-gas sales gain in estimated 4%; severe winter to boost 1977 sales  

SciTech Connect

The National LP-Gas Association reports that sales of LP-gas rose 4.0% in 1976 to an estimated 15.81 billion gal. Residential and commercial sales accounted for 7.13 billion gal, a 1.6% increase; sales to the chemical industry 4.41 billion, 5.6% more; the engine-fuel market 1.17 billion, up 0.5%; and utility sales 0.45 billion, a 12.0% rise. Industrial sales declined 1.3% to 1.07 billion gal in 1976. The ''other'' category, including agricultural uses and feedstock for the manufacture of synthetic gas, jumped 16.8% to 1.60 billion gal. U.S. production of LPG declined 0.4% to 18.02 billion gal, while imports rose 12.3% to 1.94 billion gal. The difference between production and sales is accounted for by the use of LPG in gasoline blending, inventory additions, and exports.

Hartzell, J.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Estimating the benefits of greenhouse gas emission reduction from agricultural policy reform  

SciTech Connect

Land use and agricultural activities contribute directly to the increased concentrations of atmospheric greenhouse gases. Economic support in industrialized countries generally increases agriculture's contribution to global greenhouse gas concentrations through fluxes associated with land use change and other sources. Changes in economic support offers opportunities to reduce net emissions, through this so far has gone unaccounted. Estimates are presented here of emissions of methane from livestock in the UK and show that, in monetary terms, when compared to the costs of reducing support, greenhouse gases are a significant factor. As signatory parties to the Climate Change Convection are required to stabilize emissions of all greenhouse gases, options for reduction of emissions of methane and other trace gases from the agricultural sector should form part of these strategies.

Adger, W.N. (Univ. of East Anglia, Norwich (United Kingdom). Centre for Social and Economic Research on the Global Environment); Moran, D.C. (Univ. College, London (United Kingdom). Centre for Social and Economic Research on the Global Environment)

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Using Natural Gas Transmission Pipeline Costs to Estimate Hydrogen Pipeline Costs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the construction costs of natural gas, oil, and petroleumR. “Current pipeline costs. ” Oil & Gas Journal; Nov 21,cost projections for over 20,000 miles of natural gas, oil, and

Parker, Nathan

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Using Natural Gas Transmission Pipeline Costs to Estimate Hydrogen Pipeline Costs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Adjustments in 1991. ” Oil & Gas Journal; Nov 23, 1992; 90,begin 1993 on upbeat. ” Oil & Gas Journal; Nov 22, 1993; 91,Current pipeline costs. ” Oil & Gas Journal; Nov 21, 1994;

Parker, Nathan

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Preliminary Estimates of Combined Heat and Power Greenhouse Gas Abatement Potential for California in 2020  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in-state and imports Natural gas plants providing power toand Imports 20% RPS 2010, 33% RPS 2020 California Electricity Generation (TWh/a) Natural Gas

Firestone, Ryan; Ling, Frank; Marnay, Chris; Hamachi LaCommare, Kristina

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Preliminary Estimates of Combined Heat and Power Greenhouse Gas Abatement Potential for California in 2020  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

natural-gas- fired combined cycle generation, and the othernatural-gas-fired combined cycle plants. This assumptionplants were efficient combined cycle plants. The four

Firestone, Ryan; Ling, Frank; Marnay, Chris; Hamachi LaCommare, Kristina

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

ESTIMATION OF RADIOLYTIC GAS GENERATION RATE FOR CYLINDRICAL RADIOACTIVE WASTE PACKAGES - APPLICATION TO SPENT ION EXCHANGE RESIN CONTAINERS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Radioactive waste packages containing water and/or organic substances have the potential to radiolytically generate hydrogen and other combustible gases. Typically, the radiolytic gas generation rate is estimated from the energy deposition rate and the radiolytic gas yield. Estimation of the energy deposition rate must take into account the contributions from all radionuclides. While the contributions from non-gamma emitting radionuclides are relatively easy to estimate, an average geometry factor must be computed to determine the contribution from gamma emitters. Hitherto, no satisfactory method existed for estimating the geometry factors for a cylindrical package. In the present study, a formulation was developed taking into account the effect of photon buildup. A prototype code, called PC-CAGE, was developed to numerically solve the integrals involved. Based on the selected dimensions for a cylinder, the specified waste material, the photon energy of interest and a value for either the absorption or attenuation coefficient, the code outputs values for point and average geometry factors. These can then be used to estimate the internal dose rate to the material in the cylinder and hence to calculate the radiolytic gas generation rate. Besides the ability to estimate the rates of radiolytic gas generation, PC-CAGE can also estimate the dose received by the container material. This is based on values for the point geometry factors at the surface of the cylinder. PC-CAGE was used to calculate geometry factors for a number of cylindrical geometries. Estimates for the absorbed dose rate in container material were also obtained. The results for Ontario Power Generation's 3 m3 resin containers indicate that about 80% of the source gamma energy is deposited internally. In general, the fraction of gamma energy deposited internally depends on the dimensions of the cylinder, the material within it and the photon energy; the fraction deposited increases with increasing dimensions of the cylinder and decreases with increasing photon energy.

Husain, A.; Lewis, Brent J.

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

434

Equipment Design and Cost Estimation for Small Modular Biomass Systems, Synthesis Gas Cleanup, and Oxygen Separation Equipment; Task 1: Cost Estimates of Small Modular Systems  

SciTech Connect

This deliverable is the Final Report for Task 1, Cost Estimates of Small Modular Systems, as part of NREL Award ACO-5-44027, ''Equipment Design and Cost Estimation for Small Modular Biomass Systems, Synthesis Gas Cleanup and Oxygen Separation Equipment''. Subtask 1.1 looked into processes and technologies that have been commercially built at both large and small scales, with three technologies, Fluidized Catalytic Cracking (FCC) of refinery gas oil, Steam Methane Reforming (SMR) of Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids (NGL) Expanders, chosen for further investigation. These technologies were chosen due to their applicability relative to other technologies being considered by NREL for future commercial applications, such as indirect gasification and fluidized bed tar cracking. Research in this subject is driven by an interest in the impact that scaling has on the cost and major process unit designs for commercial technologies. Conclusions from the evaluations performed could be applied to other technologies being considered for modular or skid-mounted applications.

Nexant Inc.

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Outlook for Capacity Retirements Following U.S. Boom in New Supplies: Report Series on Natural Gas and Power Reliability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

While entrepreneurial exuberance for power plant development has evaporated in the face of market saturation, depressed power prices, and tightening credit, the legacy of the power plant building boom is record additions of gas-fired turbines and combined cycle units between 1998 and 2007. These are contributing to a wave of fossil plant retirements, projected for the first time in this report. The combination of recent cancellations and impending retirements reduces the outlook for overbuilding, yet res...

2003-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

436

EIA Crude Oil Distillation Capacity (Table 36)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

(Important Note on Sources of Crude Oil Distillation Capacity Estimates) Table 3.6 World Crude Oil Distillation Capacity, January 1, 1970 - January 1, 2009

437

Estimation of methane flux offshore SW Taiwan and the influence of tectonics on gas hydrate accumulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

­510 INTRODUCTION Gas hydrates are naturally occurring solids, nonstoichio- metric clathrates, stable at relatively and in sedimentary strata of continen- tal deep sea areas and are typically composed of natural gas, mainly methane have suggested that methane concentra- tions play an important role in gas hydrate investigations. Very

Lin, Andrew Tien-Shun

438

Preliminary Estimates of Combined Heat and Power Greenhouse Gas Abatement Potential for California in 2020  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the importance of grid carbon intensity. Natural-gas-fired CHP is GHG preferable to grid power only when supply projection, in-state and imports Natural gas plants providing power to California are a mix ....................................................................................................................... 12 Table 7. 2020 forecasts of California electricity and natural gas prices

439

This latest issues of the Ntrual Gas Montly (March 2004) contains estimates  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Data for 2003 Natural Gas Data for 2003 Preliminary data for 2003 indicate that natural gas total supply and demand were down in 2003 by almost 5 percent compared to 2002. Dry natural gas production in 2003 was 19,068 billion cubic feet (Bcf) compared with 18,964 Bcf in 2002. The increase in the production level reflects the increased drilling for natural gas. However, although natural gas well completions increased by 26 percent in 2003 compared with the previous year, dry natural gas production increased by only 0.5 percent. Net imports went down in 2003 continuing the downward trend of 2002, which was the first decline since 1986. Total net imports were lower in each month of 2003 compared with 2002. Net imports in 2003 were 3,236 Bcf which is a decline of 263 Bcf from 2002 levels. Total pipeline imports

440

EIA - Natural Gas Storage Data & Analysis  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Storage Storage Weekly Working Gas in Underground Storage U.S. Natural gas inventories held in underground storage facilities by East, West, and Producing regions (weekly). Underground Storage - All Operators Total storage by base gas and working gas, and storage activity by State (monthly, annual). Underground Storage by Type U.S. storage and storage activity by all operators, salt cavern fields and nonsalt cavern (monthly, annual). Underground Storage Capacity Storage capacity, working gas capacity, and number of active fields for salt caverns, aquifers, and depleted fields by State (monthly, annual). Liquefied Natural Gas Additions to and Withdrawals from Storage By State (annual). Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report Estimates of natural gas in underground storage for the U.S. and three regions of the U.S.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas capacity estimates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects - Estimate Gas-Hydrate...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to overcome compression and friction at grain contacts, a fracture will form. In a multiphase environment, due to surface tension effects, the gas pressure will not...

442

Preliminary Estimates of Combined Heat and Power Greenhouse Gas Abatement Potential for California in 2020  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

renewables, including hydroelectric. For this analysis, itin 2010 and 33% in 2020. Hydroelectric generation follows aGas Cogeneration Hydroelectric New Renewables Existing

Firestone, Ryan; Ling, Frank; Marnay, Chris; Hamachi LaCommare, Kristina

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

EIA - Analysis of Natural Gas Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Prices Prices 2010 Peaks, Plans and (Persnickety) Prices This presentation provides information about EIA's estimates of working gas peak storage capacity, and the development of the natural gas storage industry. Natural gas shale and the need for high deliverability storage are identified as key drivers in natural gas storage capacity development. The presentation also provides estimates of planned storage facilities through 2012. Categories: Prices, Storage (Released, 10/28/2010, ppt format) Natural Gas Year-In-Review 2009 This is a special report that provides an overview of the natural gas industry and markets in 2009 with special focus on the first complete set of supply and disposition data for 2009 from the Energy Information Administration. Topics discussed include natural gas end-use consumption trends, offshore and onshore production, imports and exports of pipeline and liquefied natural gas, and above-average storage inventories. Categories: Prices, Production, Consumption, Imports/Exports & Pipelines, Storage (Released, 7/9/2010, Html format)

444

Using Natural Gas Transmission Pipeline Costs to Estimate Hydrogen Pipeline Costs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Warren R. “U.S. interstate pipelines begin 1993 on upbeat. ”66. ? True, Warren R. “Current pipeline costs. ” Oil & GasWarren R. “U.S. interstate pipelines ran more efficiently in

Parker, Nathan

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Kalman-filtered compressive sensing for high resolution estimation of anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions from sparse measurements.  

SciTech Connect

The estimation of fossil-fuel CO2 emissions (ffCO2) from limited ground-based and satellite measurements of CO2 concentrations will form a key component of the monitoring of treaties aimed at the abatement of greenhouse gas emissions. The limited nature of the measured data leads to a severely-underdetermined estimation problem. If the estimation is performed at fine spatial resolutions, it can also be computationally expensive. In order to enable such estimations, advances are needed in the spatial representation of ffCO2 emissions, scalable inversion algorithms and the identification of observables to measure. To that end, we investigate parsimonious spatial parameterizations of ffCO2 emissions which can be used in atmospheric inversions. We devise and test three random field models, based on wavelets, Gaussian kernels and covariance structures derived from easily-observed proxies of human activity. In doing so, we constructed a novel inversion algorithm, based on compressive sensing and sparse reconstruction, to perform the estimation. We also address scalable ensemble Kalman filters as an inversion mechanism and quantify the impact of Gaussian assumptions inherent in them. We find that the assumption does not impact the estimates of mean ffCO2 source strengths appreciably, but a comparison with Markov chain Monte Carlo estimates show significant differences in the variance of the source strengths. Finally, we study if the very different spatial natures of biogenic and ffCO2 emissions can be used to estimate them, in a disaggregated fashion, solely from CO2 concentration measurements, without extra information from products of incomplete combustion e.g., CO. We find that this is possible during the winter months, though the errors can be as large as 50%.

Ray, Jaideep; Lee, Jina; Lefantzi, Sophia; Yadav, Vineet [Carnegie Institution for Science, Stanford, CA; Michalak, Anna M. [Carnegie Institution for Science, Stanford, CA; van Bloemen Waanders, Bart Gustaaf [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque NM; McKenna, Sean Andrew [IBM Research, Mulhuddart, Dublin, Ireland

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects - Estimate Gas-Hydrate  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electrical Resistivity Investigation of Gas Hydrate Distribution in Mississippi Canyon Block 118, Gulf of Mexico Last Reviewed 6/14/2013 Electrical Resistivity Investigation of Gas Hydrate Distribution in Mississippi Canyon Block 118, Gulf of Mexico Last Reviewed 6/14/2013 DE-FC26-06NT42959 Goal The goal of this project is to evaluate the direct-current electrical resistivity (DCR) method for remotely detecting and characterizing the concentration of gas hydrates in the deep marine environment. This will be accomplished by adapting existing DCR instrumentation for use on the sea floor in the deep marine environment and testing the new instrumentation at Mississippi Canyon Block 118. Performer Baylor University, Waco, TX 76798 Collaborators Advanced Geosciences Inc., Austin, TX 78726 Specialty Devices Inc., Wylie, TX 75098 Background Marine occurrences of methane hydrates are known to form in two distinct

447

Working Gas Capacity of Aquifers  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

96,950 396,092 364,228 363,521 367,108 2008-2012 96,950 396,092 364,228 363,521 367,108 2008-2012 Alabama 0 2012-2012 Arkansas 0 2012-2012 California 0 0 2009-2012 Colorado 0 2012-2012 Illinois 244,900 252,344 216,132 215,017 215,594 2008-2012 Indiana 19,978 19,367 19,437 19,479 19,215 2008-2012 Iowa 87,350 87,414 90,613 91,113 90,313 2008-2012 Kansas 0 2012-2012 Kentucky 6,629 6,629 6,629 6,629 6,629 2008-2012 Louisiana 0 2012-2012 Michigan 0 2012-2012 Minnesota 2,000 2,000 2,000 2,000 2,000 2008-2012 Mississippi 0 2012-2012 Missouri 11,276 3,040 3,656 6,000 6,000 2008-2012 Montana 0 2012-2012 New Mexico 0 2012-2012 New York 0 2012-2012 Ohio 0 2012-2012 Oklahoma 31 2012-2012 Oregon 0 2012-2012 Pennsylvania 942 2012-2012 Tennessee 0 2012-2012 Texas 0 2012-2012 Utah 948 948 939 939 948 2008-2012

448

Working Gas Capacity of Aquifers  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

96,950 396,092 364,228 363,521 367,108 2008-2012 96,950 396,092 364,228 363,521 367,108 2008-2012 Alabama 0 2012-2012 Arkansas 0 2012-2012 California 0 0 2009-2012 Colorado 0 2012-2012 Illinois 244,900 252,344 216,132 215,017 215,594 2008-2012 Indiana 19,978 19,367 19,437 19,479 19,215 2008-2012 Iowa 87,350 87,414 90,613 91,113 90,313 2008-2012 Kansas 0 2012-2012 Kentucky 6,629 6,629 6,629 6,629 6,629 2008-2012 Louisiana 0 2012-2012 Michigan 0 2012-2012 Minnesota 2,000 2,000 2,000 2,000 2,000 2008-2012 Mississippi 0 2012-2012 Missouri 11,276 3,040 3,656 6,000 6,000 2008-2012 Montana 0 2012-2012 New Mexico 0 2012-2012 New York 0 2012-2012 Ohio 0 2012-2012 Oklahoma 31 2012-2012 Oregon 0 2012-2012 Pennsylvania 942 2012-2012 Tennessee 0 2012-2012 Texas 0 2012-2012 Utah 948 948 939 939 948 2008-2012

449

Natural Gas Aquifers Storage Capacity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,347,516 1,351,832 1,340,633 1,233,017 1,231,897 1,237,269 1,347,516 1,351,832 1,340,633 1,233,017 1,231,897 1,237,269 1999-2012 Alabama 0 1999-2012 Arkansas 0 1999-2012 California 0 0 1999-2012 Colorado 0 1999-2012 Illinois 876,960 874,384 885,848 772,381 777,294 779,862 1999-2012 Indiana 81,490 81,991 81,328 81,268 81,310 80,746 1999-2012 Iowa 278,238 284,747 284,811 288,010 288,210 288,210 1999-2012 Kansas 0 1999-2012 Kentucky 9,567 9,567 9,567 9,567 9,567 9,567 1999-2012 Louisiana 0 1999-2012 Michigan 0 1999-2012 Minnesota 7,000 7,000 7,000 7,000 7,000 7,000 1999-2012 Mississippi 0 1999-2012 Missouri 32,940 32,876 10,889 11,502 13,845 13,845 1999-2012 Montana 0 1999-2012 New Mexico 0 1999-2012 New York 0 1999-2012 Ohio 0 1999-2012 Oklahoma 170 1999-2012 Oregon 0 1999-2012 Pennsylvania

450

Development of a Gas–Liquid Equilibrator for Estimating CO2 Flux at the Ocean Surface  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A system for measuring partial pressure of CO2 in seawater (pCO2) has been developed as a part of a missing-sink elucidation study. The most important part of this system is the multistage bubbling gas–liquid equilibrator. This equilibrator has ...

Hiroyuki Katayama; Takashi Karasudani; Koji Ishii; Kenji Marubayashi; Hiromasa Ueda

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operable Capacity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

(Barrels per Calendar Day) (Barrels per Calendar Day) Data Series: Total Number of Operable Refineries Number of Operating Refineries Number of Idle Refineries Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operable Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operating Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Idle Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operable Capacity (B/SD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operating Capacity (B/SD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Idle Capacity (B/SD) Vacuum Distillation Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Total Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Delayed Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD Thermal Cracking Fluid Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Visbreaking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Other/Gas Oil Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Cracking Fresh Feed Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Cracking Recycle Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Distillate Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Gas Oil Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Residual Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming Low Pressure Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming High Pressure Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating/Desulfurization Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Naphtha/Reformer Feed Charge Cap (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Gasoline Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Heavy Gas Oil Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Distillate Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Kerosene/Jet Fuel Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Diesel Fuel Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Other Distillate Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Residual/Other Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Residual Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Other Oils Charge Capacity (B/SD) Fuels Solvent Deasphalting Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Total Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Catalytic Cracking Fresh Feed Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Period:

452

Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Implements a gas based on the ideal gas law. It should be noted that this model of gases is niave (from many perspectives). ...

453

Using Decline Curve Analysis, Volumetric Analysis, and Bayesian Methodology to Quantify Uncertainty in Shale Gas Reserve Estimates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Probabilistic decline curve analysis (PDCA) methods have been developed to quantify uncertainty in production forecasts and reserves estimates. However, the application of PDCA in shale gas reservoirs is relatively new. Limited work has been done on the performance of PDCA methods when the available production data are limited. In addition, PDCA methods have often been coupled with Arp’s equations, which might not be the optimum decline curve analysis model (DCA) to use, as new DCA models for shale reservoirs have been developed. Also, decline curve methods are based on production data only and do not by themselves incorporate other types of information, such as volumetric data. My research objective was to integrate volumetric information with PDCA methods and DCA models to reliably quantify the uncertainty in production forecasts from hydraulically fractured horizontal shale gas wells, regardless of the stage of depletion. In this work, hindcasts of multiple DCA models coupled to different probabilistic methods were performed to determine the reliability of the probabilistic DCA methods. In a hindcast, only a portion of the historical data is matched; predictions are made for the remainder of the historical period and compared to the actual historical production. Most of the DCA models were well calibrated visually when used with an appropriate probabilistic method, regardless of the amount of production data available to match. Volumetric assessments, used as prior information, were incorporated to further enhance the calibration of production forecasts and reserves estimates when using the Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) as the PDCA method and the logistic growth DCA model. The proposed combination of the MCMC PDCA method, the logistic growth DCA model, and use of volumetric data provides an integrated procedure to reliably quantify the uncertainty in production forecasts and reserves estimates in shale gas reservoirs. Reliable quantification of uncertainty should yield more reliable expected values of reserves estimates, as well as more reliable assessment of upside and downside potential. This can be particularly valuable early in the development of a play, because decisions regarding continued development are based to a large degree on production forecasts and reserves estimates for early wells in the play.

Gonzalez Jimenez, Raul 1988-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Development and analytical validation of a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method for the assessment of gastrointestinal permeability and intestinal absorptive capacity in dogs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Assessment of gastrointestinal permeability in vivo is considered a suitable method for the evaluation of gastrointestinal mucosal integrity. Probes commonly used include lactulose (L) and rhamnose (R) for the assessment of intestinal permeability, xylose (X) and 3-O-methylglucose (M) for the evaluation of intestinal absorptive capacity, and sucrose (S) for the assessment of gastric permeability. Traditionally, various methods have been used to quantify these markers in the urine after orogastric administration. However, urine collection is difficult and uncomfortable. A protocol based on the analysis of blood samples would be easier to perform. Thus, the aim of the first part of this project was to develop and validate a new gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method for the quantification of five sugar probes in canine serum. The method was sensitive, accurate, precise, and reproducible for the simultaneous quantification of 5 sugar probes in serum. The aim of the second part of this project was to assess the kinetic profiles of these 5 sugar probes in serum after orogastric administration in dogs and to determine the optimal time point for sample collection. Dogs received a solution containing L (10 g/L), R (10 g/L), X (10 g/L), M (5 g/L), and S (40 g/L) by orogastric intubation. Baseline blood samples were collected. Subsequent timed blood samples were taken for a 24 hours period. Significant changes in serum concentrations of all 5 sugars were detected after administration of the test dose (p<0.0001 for all 5 probes). Serum concentrations of L and R were significantly different from baseline concentrations from 90 to 240 and from 60 to 300 min post dosing respectively, and those of X, M, and S were significantly different from 30 to 240 min after dosing (p<0.05 for all 5 probes). Variations of the mean sugar concentrations of all dogs at 90, 120, and 180 minutes were analyzed using a Kruskal-Wallis test. Based on the results, only two blood samples, one taken at baseline and a second sample obtained between 90 and 180 after dosing, appear to be sufficient for assessment of intestinal permeability and mucosal absorptive capacity using these sugar probes.

Rodriguez Frausto, Heriberto

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Working crude oil storage capacity at Cushing, Oklahoma rises ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Greenhouse gas data, ... as reported in EIA's recently released report on Working and Net Available Shell Storage Capacity. Utilization of working storage capacity ...

456

Design of experiment and Montecarlo simulation as support for gas turbine power plant availabilty estimation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Maintenance is an important aspect in order to guarantee the efficiency of industrial facilities. For power plants the high availability ratios can be obtained only with preventive maintenance but the result costs increases rapidly. In order to reduce ... Keywords: design of experiment, fuzzy logic, model estimation, montecarlo simulation, reliability

Enrico Briano; Claudia Caballini; Pietro Giribone; Roberto Revetria

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Equipment Design and Cost Estimation for Small Modular Biomass Systems, Synthesis Gas Cleanup, and Oxygen Separation Equipment; Task 2.3: Sulfur Primer  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This deliverable is Subtask 2.3 of Task 2, Gas Cleanup Design and Cost Estimates, of NREL Award ACO-5-44027, ''Equipment Design and Cost Estimation for Small Modular Biomass Systems, Synthesis Gas Cleanup and Oxygen Separation Equipment''. Subtask 2.3 builds upon the sulfur removal information first presented in Subtask 2.1, Gas Cleanup Technologies for Biomass Gasification by adding additional information on the commercial applications, manufacturers, environmental footprint, and technical specifications for sulfur removal technologies. The data was obtained from Nexant's experience, input from GTI and other vendors, past and current facility data, and existing literature.

Nexant Inc.

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

GENERATING CAPACITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Evidence from the U.S. and some other countries indicates that organized wholesale markets for electrical energy and operating reserves do not provide adequate incentives to stimulate the proper quantity or mix of generating capacity consistent with mandatory reliability criteria. A large part of the problem can be associated with the failure of wholesale spot market prices for energy and operating reserves to rise to high enough levels during periods when generating capacity is fully utilized. Reforms to wholesale energy markets, the introduction of well-design forward capacity markets, and symmetrical treatment of demand response and generating capacity resources to respond to market and institutional imperfections are discussed. This policy reform program is compatible with improving the efficiency of spot wholesale electricity markets, the continued evolution of competitive retail markets, and restores incentives for efficient investment in generating capacity consistent with operating reliability criteria applied by system operators. It also responds to investment disincentives that have been associated with volatility in wholesale energy prices, limited hedging opportunities and to concerns about regulatory opportunism. 1

Paul L. Joskow; Paul L. Joskow; Paul L. Joskow

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Flammable Gas Release Estimates for Modified Sluicing Retrieval of Waste from Selected Hanford Single-Shell Tanks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The high-level radioactive wastes in many single-shell tanks (SSTs) at the Hanford Site are to be retrieved by a modified sluicing method that uses water jets to dissolve the water-soluble waste and mobilize the water-insoluble waste. Retrieval operations will liberate any waste gases trapped in the wetted solid waste matrix, and these gases will be released into the tank headspaces. Because the trapped gases include the flammable species hydrogen, methane, and ammonia, a concern exists that a flammable mixture could be formed in the tank headspaces. This report combines conservative retained gas inventory estimates and tank data with anticipated waste retrieval rates to estimate the potential headspace flammability of selected SSTs during modified sluicing waste retrieval operations. Considered here are nine of the 12 tanks from the 241-S tank farm (241-S-107, 241-S-111, and 241-S 112 are not considered) and Tank 241-U-107. This report is intended to support the specification of process controls that ensure flammable conditions do not develop in the tank headspaces. Consequently, the physical scenarios considered, the models developed to estimate retained gas releases and the tank headspace compositions under these scenarios, and the model input data are intended to conservatively assess the potential to reach headspace flammability. The analyses are intended to address worst-case conditions and establish reasonable upper bounds on the achievable flammability of the tank headspaces. Flammable retained gas inventories, for example, are based on the 95th percentile developed by Barker and Hedengren (2003), giving 95% confidence that actual inventories are smaller than those used in the calculations. Gas releases and headspace flammability were evaluated for three general scenarios: a very aggressive dissolution and erosion of saltcake waste by water jets impinging on the waste surface, the drainage of interstitial liquids from saltcake during a shutdown of the retrieval process, and the dissolution of saltcake by unsaturated liquids during a shutdown of the retrieval process. The simple model of waste retrieval using the modified sluicing approach indicated that the flammable gas headspace concentrations can rapidly approach the action level of 25% of the lower flammability limit (LFL) when the tank is passively ventilated. While it is not necessary to use the portable exhauster to maintain the headspace hydrogen concentration below this action level, retrieval rates would probably be limited by the slow removal of flammable gases by passive ventilation. It was determined that using a portable exhauster anywhere in the assumed operating range of 270 to 475 cfm would prevent the headspaces from reaching the 25% of LFL action level even if the water jets are very effective at eroding the saltcake. Specific guidelines are developed to ensure that, in the event of a catastrophic loss of the retrieval pump and portable exhauster, headspace flammability will not reach the LFL. This report is Revision 1 of PNNL-14271. This revision expands the analysis of interstitial liquid drainage-induced gas releases to address a general retrieval scenario (the previous version of this report assumed a center-out retrieval approach and conditions). Tank waste conditions (waste volumes, interstitial liquid levels, temperatures, retained gas void fractions, etc.) have also been updated from the previous version.

Huckaby, James L.; Wells, Beric E.

2004-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

460

Preliminary Estimates of Combined Heat and Power Greenhouse GasAbatement Potential for California in 2020  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this scoping project is to help the California Energy Commission's (CEC) Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program determine where it should make investments in research to support combined heat and power (CHP) deployment. Specifically, this project will: {sm_bullet} Determine what impact CHP might have in reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, {sm_bullet} Determine which CHP strategies might encourage the most attractive early adoption, {sm_bullet} Identify the regulatory and technological barriers to the most attractive CHP strategies, and {sm_bullet} Make recommendations to the PIER program as to research that is needed to support the most attractive CHP strategies.

Firestone, Ryan; Ling, Frank; Marnay, Chris; Hamachi LaCommare,Kristina

2007-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas capacity estimates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

How to estimate worth of minor value oil, gas producing properties at public auction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the divestiture of minor value working and royalty interests (worth less than $20,000) in producing oil and gas properties through the transaction medium of no-minimum, English open outcry public auctions. Specifically, the paper seeks to answer the question, What can the seller expect to receive for his minor value properties at a public auction, knowing only how he values those properties to himself To answer this question, a mathematical model that predicts the seller's expected present worth (EPW) as a function of the seller's Securities and Exchange Commission-case book value (X{sub s}), and the winning bid value (X{sub B}) is derived from classical auction theory.

Randall, B.L. (Unit Corp., Tulsa, OK (US))

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

462

Estimation of Critical Flow Velocity for Collapse of Gas Test Loop Booster Fuel Assembly  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents calculations performed to determine the critical flow velocity for plate collapse due to static instability for the Gas Test Loop booster fuel assembly. Long, slender plates arranged in a parallel configuration can experience static divergence and collapse at sufficiently high coolant flow rates. Such collapse was exhibited by the Oak Ridge High Flux Reactor in the 1940s and the Engineering Test Reactor at the Idaho National Laboratory in the 1950s. Theoretical formulas outlined by Miller, based upon wide-beam theory and Bernoulli’s equation, were used for the analysis. Calculations based upon Miller’s theory show that the actual coolant flow velocity is only 6% of the predicted critical flow velocity. Since there is a considerable margin between the theoretically predicted plate collapse velocity and the design velocity, the phenomena of plate collapse due to static instability is unlikely.

Guillen; Mark J. Russell

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

U.S. Refinery Catalytic Hydrocracking, Gas Oil Downstream Charge ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Cat. Hydro-Cracking Gas Oil Downstream Charge Capacity ; Cat. Hydro-Cracking Gas Oil Downstream Charge Capacity ; U.S. Downstream Charge Capacity of Operable ...

464

Electric Capacity | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Capacity Capacity Dataset Summary Description The New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development publishes an annual Energy Outlook, which presents projections of New Zealand's future energy supply, demand, prices and greenhouse gas emissions. The principle aim of these projections is to inform the national energy debate. Included here are the model results for electricity and generation capacity. The spreadsheet provides an interactive tool for selecting which model results to view, and which scenarios to evaluate; full model results for each scenario are also included. Source New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development Date Released Unknown Date Updated December 15th, 2010 (3 years ago) Keywords Electric Capacity Electricity Generation New Zealand projections

465

Estimating the potential of controlled plug-in hybrid electric vehicle charging to reduce operational and capacity expansion costs for electric  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Estimating the potential of controlled plug-in hybrid electric vehicle charging to reduce quantify the benefits of controlled charging of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles. Costs are determined expansion Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles Controlled charging Wind power integration a b s t r a c

McGaughey, Alan

466

Recent mix of electric generating capacity additions more diverse ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural gas combined-cycle plants accounted for about 68% of the total natural gas-fired capacity added between 1999 and 2010.

467

Figure 29. Power sector electricity generation capacity by fuel in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Power sector electricity generation capacity by fuel in five cases, 2011 ... Natural gas combined cycle Natural gas combustion turbine Nuclear Renewable/other Reference

468

Estimates of global, regional, and national annual CO{sub 2} emissions from fossil-fuel burning, hydraulic cement production, and gas flaring: 1950--1992  

SciTech Connect

This document describes the compilation, content, and format of the most comprehensive C0{sub 2}-emissions database currently available. The database includes global, regional, and national annual estimates of C0{sub 2} emissions resulting from fossil-fuel burning, cement manufacturing, and gas flaring in oil fields for 1950--92 as well as the energy production, consumption, and trade data used for these estimates. The methods of Marland and Rotty (1983) are used to calculate these emission estimates. For the first time, the methods and data used to calculate CO, emissions from gas flaring are presented. This C0{sub 2}-emissions database is useful for carbon-cycle research, provides estimates of the rate at which fossil-fuel combustion has released C0{sub 2} to the atmosphere, and offers baseline estimates for those countries compiling 1990 C0{sub 2}-emissions inventories.

Boden, T.A.; Marland, G. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Andres, R.J. [University of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK (United States). Inst. of Northern Engineering

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Evaluation of Simplified Methods for Estimating Shear Capacity Using JNES/NUPEC Low-Rise Concrete Shear Wall Cyclic Test Data.  

SciTech Connect

The simplified methods in current codes for determining the shear capacity of reinforced concrete shear walls had mostly been validated using the test results of single-element shear walls. Recently available JNES/NUPEC test data of reinforced concrete shear walls under multi-directional cyclic loadings provided a unique opportunity to investigate the adequacy of the simplified methods for use in situations with strong interaction effects. A total of 11 test specimens with aspect ratios between 0.47 and 0.87 have been used in the assessment. Two simplified methods from the ACI 349-01 standard [1] and one from the ASCE 43-05 standard [2] have been evaluated. This paper also presents the development of an adjustment factor to consider the aspect ratio and the development of two approaches to consider interaction effects for one of the simplified methods. It concludes with the insights on the applicability of the code methods when interaction effects exist.

Nie,J.; Braverman, J.; Hofmayer, C.; Ali, S.

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Generalized Natural Gas...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas based on data through 20072008 with selected updates Generalized Natural Gas Pipeline Capacity Design Schematic Generalized Natural Gas Pipeline Capcity Design Schematic...

471

Recent mix of electric generating capacity additions more diverse ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

tags: natural gas generation capacity electricity. Email Updates. RSS Feeds. Facebook. Twitter. YouTube. Add us to your site.

472

Flammable Gas Release Estimates for Modified Sluicing Retrieval of Waste from Selected Hanford Single-Shell Tanks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The high-level radioactive wastes in many single-shell tanks (SSTs) at the Hanford Site are to be retrieved by a modified sluicing method. Retrieval operations will hydraulically erode and dissolve the saltcake waste, and the resulting brine will then be pumped to a double-shell tank (DST). Waste gases residing in the solid waste matrix will be released into the tank headspace when the matrix is eroded or dissolved. These retained waste gases include the flammable species hydrogen, methane, and ammonia, and there is a concern that these flammable gases could produce a flammable mixture in the tank headspaces during the retrieval operations. This report combines conservative retained gas inventory estimates and tank data with anticipated waste retrieval rates to estimate the potential headspace flammability of selected SSTs during waste retrieval operations. The SSTs considered here are ten of the twelve 241-S farm tanks (tanks 241-S-107 and 241-S-111 are excluded from consideration here) and tank 241-U-107 (U-107).

Huckaby, James L.; Wells, Beric E.

2003-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

473

Oklahoma Refinery Catalytic Hydrotreating, Heavy Gas Oil ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Cat. Hydro. Heavy Gas Oil Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD)y ; Oklahoma Downstream Charge Capacity of Operable Petroleum Refineries ...

474

Mississippi Refinery Catalytic Hydrotreating, Heavy Gas Oil ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Cat. Hydro. Heavy Gas Oil Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD)y ; Mississippi Downstream Charge Capacity of Operable Petroleum Refineries ...

475

Oil Production Capacity Expansion Costs for the Persian Gulf  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

TR/0606 TR/0606 Distribution Category UC-950 Oil Production Capacity Expansion Costs For The Persian Gulf January 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Oil and Gas U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Energy Information Administration Oil Production Capacity Expansion Costs for the Persian Gulf iii Preface Oil Production Capacity Expansion Costs for the Persian Gulf provides estimates of development and operating costs for various size fields in countries surrounding the Persian

476

Natural Gas Exports (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Estimates for Canadian pipeline volumes are derived from the Office of Fossil Energy, Natural Gas Imports and Exports, and EIA estimates of dry natural gas imports.

477

Capacity Value of Concentrating Solar Power Plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study estimates the capacity value of a concentrating solar power (CSP) plant at a variety of locations within the western United States. This is done by optimizing the operation of the CSP plant and by using the effective load carrying capability (ELCC) metric, which is a standard reliability-based capacity value estimation technique. Although the ELCC metric is the most accurate estimation technique, we show that a simpler capacity-factor-based approximation method can closely estimate the ELCC value. Without storage, the capacity value of CSP plants varies widely depending on the year and solar multiple. The average capacity value of plants evaluated ranged from 45%?90% with a solar multiple range of 1.0-1.5. When introducing thermal energy storage (TES), the capacity value of the CSP plant is more difficult to estimate since one must account for energy in storage. We apply a capacity-factor-based technique under two different market settings: an energy-only market and an energy and capacity market. Our results show that adding TES to a CSP plant can increase its capacity value significantly at all of the locations. Adding a single hour of TES significantly increases the capacity value above the no-TES case, and with four hours of storage or more, the average capacity value at all locations exceeds 90%.

Madaeni, S. H.; Sioshansi, R.; Denholm, P.

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Capacity of shrinking condensers in the plane  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show that the capacity of a class of plane condensers is comparable to the capacity of corresponding "dyadic condensers". As an application, we show that for plane condensers in that class the capacity blows up as the distance between the plates shrinks, but there can be no asymptotic estimate of the blow-up.

Arcozzi, N

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Capacity Markets for Electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ternative Approaches for Power Capacity Markets”, Papers andand Steven Stoft, “Installed Capacity and Price Caps: Oil onElectricity Markets Have a Capacity requirement? If So, How

Creti, Anna; Fabra, Natalia

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Equipment Design and Cost Estimation for Small Modular Biomass Systems, Synthesis Gas Cleanup, and Oxygen Separation Equipment; Task 9: Mixed Alcohols From Syngas -- State of Technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This deliverable is for Task 9, Mixed Alcohols from Syngas: State of Technology, as part of National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Award ACO-5-44027, ''Equipment Design and Cost Estimation for Small Modular Biomass Systems, Synthesis Gas Cleanup and Oxygen Separation Equipment''. Task 9 supplements the work previously done by NREL in the mixed alcohols section of the 2003 technical report Preliminary Screening--Technical and Economic Assessment of Synthesis Gas to Fuels and Chemicals with Emphasis on the Potential for Biomass-Derived Syngas.

Nexant Inc.

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas capacity estimates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

U.S. Virgin Islands Refinery Catalytic Hydrocracking/Gas Oil ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Cat. Hydro-Cracking Gas Oil Downstream Charge Capacity ; Cat. Hydro-Cracking Gas Oil Downstream Charge Capacity ; Virgin Islands Downstream Charge Capacity of ...

482

Deterministic and stochastic analyses to quantify the reliability of uncertainty estimates in production decline modeling of shale gas reservoirs.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Decline curve analysis seeks to predict the future performance of oil and gas wells by fitting a mathematical function to historical production data and extrapolating… (more)

Johanson, Brent L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

High Capacity Immobilized Amine Sorbents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Capacity Immobilized Amine Sorbents Capacity Immobilized Amine Sorbents Opportunity The Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory is seeking licensing partners interested in implementing United States Patent Number 7,288,136 entitled "High Capacity Immobilized Amine Sorbents." Disclosed in this patent is the invention of a method that facilitates the production of low-cost carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) sorbents for use in large-scale gas-solid processes. This method treats an amine to increase the number of secondary amine groups and impregnates the amine in a porous solid support. As a result of this improvement, the method increases CO 2 capture capacity and decreases the cost of using an amine-enriched solid sorbent in CO 2 capture systems. Overview The U.S. Department of Energy has placed a high priority on the separation

484

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Impact of Interruptible Natural Gas Service A Snapshot of California Natural Gas Market: Status and Outlook EIA's Testimony on Natural Gas Supply and Demand Residential Natural Gas Price Brochure Status of Natural Gas Pipeline System Capacity Previous Issues of Natural Gas Weekly Update Natural Gas Homepage Overview Net additions to storage during the fourth week of April were estimated to have been over 100 Bcf-a record high level for the first month of the refill season. Compared to last year when only 36 Bcf or 1.2 Bcf per day were added to stocks in April, this year the industry appears to be taking advantage of the reduction in demand that typically occurs in April, the first shoulder month of the year, and the recent price declines. After beginning the week down, spot prices at the Henry Hub trended down most days last week to end trading on Friday at $4.49 per MMBtu-the lowest price since early November. On the NYMEX futures market, the near-month (June) contract also moved down most days and ended last week at $4.490-down $0.377 from the previous Friday. Some-early summer high temperatures last week in the Northeast and winter-like weather in the Rockies (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation from Normal Temperatures Map) appear to have had little impact on the natural gas markets as prices declined most days at most major locations.

485

FAQs about Storage Capacity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

about Storage Capacity about Storage Capacity How do I determine if my tanks are in operation or idle or non-reportable? Refer to the following flowchart. Should idle capacity be included with working capacity? No, only report working capacity of tanks and caverns in operation, but not for idle tanks and caverns. Should working capacity match net available shell in operation/total net available shell capacity? Working capacity should be less than net available shell capacity because working capacity excludes contingency space and tank bottoms. What is the difference between net available shell capacity in operation and total net available shell capacity? Net available shell capacity in operation excludes capacity of idle tanks and caverns. What do you mean by transshipment tanks?

486

ESTIMATING RISK TO CALIFORNIA ENERGY INFRASTRUCTURE FROM PROJECTED CLIMATE CHANGE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TABLES Table 1. Key Assumptions for Natural Gas Power Plantat California Natural Gas Power Plants Between Currenta decrease in natural gas power plant generating capacity of

Sathaye, Jayant

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

ESTIMATING RISK TO CALIFORNIA ENERGY INFRASTRUCTURE FROM PROJECTED CLIMATE CHANGE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TABLES Table 1. Key Assumptions for Natural Gas Power PlantCalifornia Natural Gas Power Plants Between Current Perioda decrease in natural gas power plant generating capacity of

Sathaye, Jayant

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

California Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) California Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic...

489

New Mexico Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) New Mexico Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet)...

490

Comparison of Productive Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Appendix B Comparison of Productive Capacity Comparisons of base case productive capacities for this and all previous studies were made (Figure B1).

491

Tables - Refinery Capacity Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Tables: 1: Number and Capacity of Operable Petroleum Refineries by PAD District and State as of January 1, 2009: PDF: 2: Production Capacity of Operable ...

492

Summary of Industry Surveys on Future Capacity Commitments  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration Natural Gas 1996: Issues and Trends 141 Appendix C Summary of Industry Surveys on Future Capacity Commitments Table C1.

493

State estimation of an acid gas removal (AGR) plant as part of an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plant with CO2 capture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An accurate estimation of process state variables not only can increase the effectiveness and reliability of process measurement technology, but can also enhance plant efficiency, improve control system performance, and increase plant availability. Future integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants with CO2 capture will have to satisfy stricter operational and environmental constraints. To operate the IGCC plant without violating stringent environmental emission standards requires accurate estimation of the relevant process state variables, outputs, and disturbances. Unfortunately, a number of these process variables cannot be measured at all, while some of them can be measured, but with low precision, low reliability, or low signal-to-noise ratio. As a result, accurate estimation of the process variables is of great importance to avoid the inherent difficulties associated with the inaccuracy of the data. Motivated by this, the current paper focuses on the state estimation of an acid gas removal (AGR) process as part of an IGCC plant with CO2 capture. This process has extensive heat and mass integration and therefore is very suitable for testing the efficiency of the designed estimators in the presence of complex interactions between process variables. The traditional Kalman filter (KF) (Kalman, 1960) algorithm has been used as a state estimator which resembles that of a predictor-corrector algorithm for solving numerical problems. In traditional KF implementation, good guesses for the process noise covariance matrix (Q) and the measurement noise covariance matrix (R) are required to obtain satisfactory filter performance. However, in the real world, these matrices are unknown and it is difficult to generate good guesses for them. In this paper, use of an adaptive KF will be presented that adapts Q and R at every time step of the algorithm. Results show that very accurate estimations of the desired process states, outputs or disturbances can be achieved by using the adaptive KF.

Paul, P.; Bhattacharyya, D.; Turton, R.; Zitney, S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

High capacity immobilized amine sorbents  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is provided for making low-cost CO.sub.2 sorbents that can be used in large-scale gas-solid processes. The improved method entails treating an amine to increase the number of secondary amine groups and impregnating the amine in a porous solid support. The method increases the CO.sub.2 capture capacity and decreases the cost of utilizing an amine-enriched solid sorbent in CO.sub.2 capture systems.

Gray, McMahan L. (Pittsburgh, PA); Champagne, Kenneth J. (Fredericktown, PA); Soong, Yee (Monroeville, PA); Filburn, Thomas (Granby, CT)

2007-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

495

Design and Cost Estimating Procedures for SCR and SNCR Retrofits on Gas- and Oil-Fired Boilers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Utility companies have been reevaluating the feasibility of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) and selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR) retrofits in order to meet increasingly stringent nitrogen oxides (NOx) emission limits. This report describes two EPRI-developed models for helping utility companies screen the cost effectiveness of SCR and SNCR technologies for application at specific gas- and oil-fired boiler sites.

2002-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

496

Deliverability on the interstate natural gas pipeline system  

SciTech Connect

Deliverability on the Interstate Natural Gas Pipeline System examines the capability of the national pipeline grid to transport natural gas to various US markets. The report quantifies the capacity levels and utilization rates of major interstate pipeline companies in 1996 and the changes since 1990, as well as changes in markets and end-use consumption patterns. It also discusses the effects of proposed capacity expansions on capacity levels. The report consists of five chapters, several appendices, and a glossary. Chapter 1 discusses some of the operational and regulatory features of the US interstate pipeline system and how they affect overall system design, system utilization, and capacity expansions. Chapter 2 looks at how the exploration, development, and production of natural gas within North America is linked to the national pipeline grid. Chapter 3 examines the capability of the interstate natural gas pipeline network to link production areas to market areas, on the basis of capacity and usage levels along 10 corridors. The chapter also examines capacity expansions that have occurred since 1990 along each corridor and the potential impact of proposed new capacity. Chapter 4 discusses the last step in the transportation chain, that is, deliverability to the ultimate end user. Flow patterns into and out of each market region are discussed, as well as the movement of natural gas between States in each region. Chapter 5 examines how shippers reserve interstate pipeline capacity in the current transportation marketplace and how pipeline companies are handling the secondary market for short-term unused capacity. Four appendices provide supporting data and additional detail on the methodology used to estimate capacity. 32 figs., 15 tabs.

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

installed capacity | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

installed capacity installed capacity Dataset Summary Description Estimates for each of the 50 states and the entire United States show Source Wind Powering America Date Released February 04th, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated April 13th, 2011 (3 years ago) Keywords annual generation installed capacity usa wind Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon Wind potential data (xls, 102.4 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below Comment Work of the U.S. Federal Government. Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata Average vote Your vote Usefulness of the dataset Average vote Your vote Ease of access Average vote Your vote Overall rating Average vote Your vote Comments

498

Natural Gas Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas Production. Measured By. Disseminated Through. Survey of Producing States and Mineral Management Service “Evolving Estimate” in Natural Gas Monthly.

499

Pennsylvania Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Pennsylvania Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1...

500

Network Routing Capacity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We define the routing capacity of a network to be the supremum of all possible fractional message throughputs achievable by routing. We prove that the routing capacity of every network is achievable and rational, we present an algorithm for its computation, and we prove that every non-negative rational number is the routing capacity of some network. We also determine the routing capacity for various example networks. Finally, we discuss the extension of routing capacity to fractional coding solutions and show that the coding capacity of a network is independent of the alphabet used.

Jillian Cannons; Randall Dougherty; Christopher Freiling; Kenneth Zeger

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z