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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas abatement cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Marginal Abatement Costs and Marginal Welfare Costs for Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reductions: Results from the EPPA Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Marginal abatement cost (MAC) curves, relationships between tons of emissions abated and the CO2 (or GHG) price, have been widely used as pedagogic devices to illustrate simple economic concepts such as the benefits of ...

Morris, Jennifer

2

Tax-versus-trading and efficient revenue recycling as issues for greenhouse gas abatement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tax-versus-trading and efficient revenue recycling as issues for greenhouse gas abatement Final abatement, using the first multi-party model to include both tax-versus-trading under uncertainties of an emissions tax over emissions (permit) trading in handling abatement-cost uncertainties, from that shown

Pezzey, Jack

3

Energy efficiency and the cost of GHG abatement: A comparison of bottom-up and hybrid models for the US  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy efficiency and the cost of GHG abatement: A comparison of bottom-up and hybrid models marginal cost, as well as a smaller contribution from energy efficiency relative to other abatement of energy efficiency potential and green- house gas (GHG) abatement potential that have been highly

4

When Starting with the Most Expensive Option Makes Sense On Marginal Abatement Cost Curves and Optimal Abatement Pathways  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

When Starting with the Most Expensive Option Makes Sense On Marginal Abatement Cost Curves and Optimal Abatement Pathways Adrien Vogt-Schilb a, , Stéphane Hallegatte b aCIRED, Nogent-sur-Marne, France investigates the optimal implementation schedule of the measures listed in a Marginal Abatement Cost Curves

Boyer, Edmond

5

Should marginal abatement costs differ across sectors? The effect of low-carbon capital accumulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Should marginal abatement costs differ across sectors? The effect of low-carbon capital abatement costs, measured as the ratio of investment costs to discounted abatement. The equimarginal to abate. Two apparently opposite views are reconciled. On the one hand, higher efforts are justified

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

6

Marginal abatement cost curves and the optimal timing of mitigation measures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Marginal abatement cost curves and the optimal timing of mitigation measures Adrien Vogt-Schilb 1, Washington D.C., USA Abstract Decision makers facing abatement targets need to decide which abatement mea- sures to implement, and in which order. Measure-explicit marginal abatement cost curves depict the cost

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

7

Long-Term Mitigation Strategies and Marginal Abatement Cost Curves: A Case Study on Brazil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Long-Term Mitigation Strategies and Marginal Abatement Cost Curves: A Case Study on Brazil Adrien abatement targets need to decide which abatement mea- sures to implement, and in which order. This paper investigates the ability of marginal abatement cost (MAC) curves to inform this decision, reanalyzing a MAC

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

8

Taxes Versus Quantities for a Stock Pollutant with Endogenous Abatement Costs and Asymmetric  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Taxes Versus Quantities for a Stock Pollutant with Endogenous Abatement Costs and Asymmetric a (strategic) regulator and (nonstrate- gic) firms have asymmetric information about abatement costs, and all abatement costs. For general functional forms, firms' investment policy is information-constrained efficient

Karp, Larry S.

9

General equilibrium, electricity generation technologies and the cost of carbon abatement: A structural sensitivity analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

General equilibrium, electricity generation technologies and the cost of carbon abatement, and abatement in this sector is a key determinant of economy-wide regulation costs. The complexity. It follows that assessing abatement potentials and price changes in the electricity sector with a partial

10

Greenhouse Gas Abatement with Distributed Generation in California's Commercial Buildings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBL) is working with the California Energy Commission (CEC) to determine the role of distributed generation (DG) in greenhouse gas reductions. The impact of DG on large industrial sites is well known, and mostly, the potentials are already harvested. In contrast, little is known about the impact of DG on commercial buildings with peak electric loads ranging from 100 kW to 5 MW. We examine how DG with combined heat and power (CHP) may be implemented within the context of a cost minimizing microgrid that is able to adopt and operate various smart energy technologies, such as thermal and photovoltaic (PV) on-site generation, heat exchangers, solar thermal collectors, absorption chillers, and storage systems. We use a mixed-integer linear program (MILP) that has the minimization of a site's annual energy costs as objective. Using 138 representative commercial sites in California (CA) with existing tariff rates and technology data, we find the greenhouse gas reduction potential for California's commercial sector. This paper shows results from the ongoing research project and finished work from a two year U.S. Department of Energy research project. To show the impact of the different technologies on CO2 emissions, several sensitivity runs for different climate zones within CA with different technology performance expectations for 2020 were performed. The considered sites can contribute between 1 Mt/a and 1.8 Mt/a to the California Air Resources Board (CARB) goal of 6.7Mt/a CO2 abatement potential in 2020. Also, with lower PV and storage costs as well as consideration of a CO2 pricing scheme, our results indicate that PV and electric storage adoption can compete rather than supplement each other when the tariff structure and costs of electricity supply have been taken into consideration. To satisfy the site's objective of minimizing energy costs, the batteries will be charged also by CHP systems during off-peak and mid-peak hours and not only by PV during sunny on-peak hours.

Stadler, Michael; Marnay, Chris; Cardoso, Goncalo; Megel, Olivier; Siddiqui, Afzal; Lai, Judy

2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

11

Greenhouse Gas Abatement with Distributed Generation in California's Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

utility electricity and natural gas purchases, amortized capital and maintenance costs for distributed generation (

Stadler, Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

General Equilibrium, Electricity Generation Technologies and the Cost of Carbon Abatement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electricity generation is a major contributor to carbon dioxide emissions, and a key determinant of abatement costs. Ex-ante assessments of carbon policies mainly rely on either of two modeling paradigms: (i) partial ...

Lanz, Bruno, 1980-

13

Greenhouse Gas Abatement with Distributed Generation in California's Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

energy efficiency requirements. In this work, we estimate the CO 2 abatement potential in the California commercial sector and report

Stadler, Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

The marginal cost of carbon abatement from planting street trees in New York City  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to offset carbon emissions because the carbon storage attributed to U.S. cities is estimated at 10Analysis The marginal cost of carbon abatement from planting street trees in New York City Kent F Accepted 11 August 2013 Available online xxxx Keywords: Cost-effectiveness Carbon Street trees New York

Fried, Jeremy S.

15

Joint Program Report 164 Appendix B page 1 Appendix B: Comparison of U.S. Marginal Abatement Cost Curves from a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Joint Program Report 164 Appendix B ­ page 1 Appendix B: Comparison of U.S. Marginal Abatement Cost, John Reilly, Henry Jacoby This note provides a short comparison of Marginal Abatement Cost (MAC) curve Joint Program's approach to constructing MACs, which is a relationship between tons of emissions abated

16

Measuring Abatement Potentials When Multiple Change is Present: The Case of Greenhouse Gas Mitigation in U.S. Agriculture and Forestry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Measuring Abatement Potentials When Multiple Change is Present: The Case of Greenhouse Gas;Measuring Abatement Potentials When Multiple Change is Present: The Case of Greenhouse Gas Mitigation in U.S. Agriculture and Forestry Uwe A. Schneider and Bruce A. McCarl Keywords Abatement Function, Agricultural Sector

McCarl, Bruce A.

17

A Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Alternative Ozone Control Strategies: Flexible Nitrogen Oxide (NOx) Abatement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) Abatement from Power Plants in the Eastern United States by Lin Sun B.S. Chemistry, Peking University, China: Flexible Nitrogen Oxide (NOx) Abatement from Power Plants in the Eastern United States by Lin Sun Submitted

18

Greenhouse Gas Abatement with Distributed Generation in California's Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

P.C. (2001), Introduction to Advancd Batteries for Emergingminimizing energy costs, the batteries will be charged alsophotovoltaic (PV) and batteries can supplement each other

Stadler, Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Greenhouse Gas Abatement with Distributed Generation in California's Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

holidays ICE: Internal combustion engine, GT: Gas turbine,indicate that internal combustion engines (ICE) with heatdominance of internal combustion engines with heat exchanger

Stadler, Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

An Electrochemically-mediated Gas Separation Process for Carbon Abatement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This work describes a promising alternative to conventional thermal processes for absorber/desorber processing of for removal of CO[subscript 2] from flue gas streams at fossil fuel fired power plants. Our electrochemica ...

Stern, Michael C.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas abatement cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Final Report on Testing of Off-Gas Treatment Technologies for Abatement of Atmospheric Emissions of Chlorinated Volatile Organic Compounds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to summarize the results of the program for off-gas treatment of atmospheric emissions of chlorinated volatile organic compounds (CVOCs), in particular trichloroethylene (TCE) and perchloroethylene (PCE). This program was funded through the Department of Energy Office of Technology Development`s VOC`s in Non-Arid Soils Integrated Demonstration (VNID). The off-gas treatment program was initiated after testing of in-situ air stripping with horizontal wells was completed (Looney et al., 1991). That successful test expectedly produced atmospheric emissions of CVOCs that were unabated. It was decided after that test that an off-gas treatment is an integral portion of remediation of CVOC contamination in groundwater and soil but also because several technologies were being developed across the United States to mitigate CVOC emissions. A single platform for testing off-gas treatment technologies would facilitate cost effective evaluation of the emerging technologies. Another motivation for the program is that many CVOCs will be regulated under the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 and are already regulated by many state regulatory programs. Additionally, compounds such as TCE and PCE are pervasive subsurface environmental contaminants, and, as a result, a small improvement in terms of abatement efficiency or cost will significantly reduce CVOC discharges to the environment as well as costs to United States government and industry.

Jarosch, T.R.; Haselow, J.S.; Rossabi, J.; Burdick, S.A.; Raymond, R.; Young, J.E.; Lombard, K.H.

1995-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

22

Broadening the Appeal of Marginal Abatement Cost Curves: Capturing Both Carbon Mitigation and Development Benefits of Clean Energy Technologies; Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Low emission development strategies (LEDS) articulate policies and implementation plans that enable countries to advance sustainable, climate-resilient development and private sector growth while significantly reducing the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions traditionally associated with economic growth. In creating a LEDS, policy makers often have access to information on abatement potential and costs for clean energy technologies, but there is a scarcity of economy-wide approaches for evaluating and presenting information on other dimensions of importance to development, such as human welfare, poverty alleviation, and energy security. To address this shortcoming, this paper proposes a new tool for communicating development benefits to policy makers as part of a LEDS process. The purpose of this tool is two-fold: 1. Communicate development benefits associated with each clean energy-related intervention; 2. Facilitate decision-making on which combination of interventions best contributes to development goals. To pilot this tool, the authors created a visual using data on developmental impacts identified through the Technology Needs Assessment (TNA) project in Montenegro. The visual will then be revised to reflect new data established through the TNA that provides information on cost, GHG mitigation, as well as the range and magnitude of developmental impacts.

Cowlin, S.; Cochran, J.; Cox, S.; Davison, C.; van der Gaast, Y.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Indonesia Greenhouse Gas Abatement Cost Curve | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar Power BasicsGermany:Information

24

Cost of Gas Adjustment for Gas Utilities (Maine)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This rule, applicable to gas utilities, establishes rules for calculation of gas cost adjustments, procedures to be followed in establishing gas cost adjustments and refunds, and describes reports...

25

Preliminary Estimates of Combined Heat and Power Greenhouse Gas Abatement Potential for California in 2020  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

equivalent) Other 65 Mt/a Residential CHP 57 Mt/a Applicablefor GHG abatement. Residential CHP has been pursued inobvious challenges, residential scale CHP shows considerable

Firestone, Ryan; Ling, Frank; Marnay, Chris; Hamachi LaCommare, Kristina

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Taxes Versus Quantities for a Stock Pollutant with Endogenous Abatement Costs and Asymmetric Information  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

K t = ?K t?1 + I t . 4. Investment cost C (I t ) = d I t 2 .polluting (B) minus investment cost (C) minus pollution taxnot on the damage or the investment cost function. Under the

Karp, Larry; Zhang, Jiangfeng

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Taxes Versus Quantities for a Stock Pollutant with Endogenous Abatement Costs and Asymmetric Information  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

pollution stocks and environmental damages; there we ignoreabatement costs and environmental damages associated withLearning about Environmental Damage, Jour- nal of

Karp, Larry; Zhang, Jiangfeng

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Preliminary Estimates of Combined Heat and Power Greenhouse Gas Abatement Potential for California in 2020  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MW Reciprocating Engine 3 MW Gas Turbine 1 MW ReciprocatingEngine 5 MW Gas Turbine 3MW Gas Turbine 40 MW Gas Turbine 1 MW Reciprocating Engine

Firestone, Ryan; Ling, Frank; Marnay, Chris; Hamachi LaCommare, Kristina

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Preliminary Estimates of Combined Heat and Power Greenhouse Gas Abatement Potential for California in 2020  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

generation: 50% of electricity from central grid natural gas plantsgeneration: 100% of electricity from central grid natural gas plantselectricity comes from central station natural-gas- fired combined cycle generation, and the other half comes from natural-gas-fired single cycle plants.

Firestone, Ryan; Ling, Frank; Marnay, Chris; Hamachi LaCommare, Kristina

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Emission Abatement System  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Emission abatement system. The system includes a source of emissions and a catalyst for receiving the emissions. Suitable catalysts are absorber catalysts and selective catalytic reduction catalysts. A plasma fuel converter generates a reducing gas from a fuel source and is connected to deliver the reducing gas into contact with the absorber catalyst for regenerating the catalyst. A preferred reducing gas is a hydrogen rich gas and a preferred plasma fuel converter is a plasmatron. It is also preferred that the absorber catalyst be adapted for absorbing NO.sub.x.

Bromberg, Leslie (Sharon, MA); Cohn, Daniel R. (Chestnut Hill, MA); Rabinovich, Alexander (Swampscott, MA)

2003-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

31

Preliminary Estimates of Combined Heat and Power Greenhouse Gas Abatement Potential for California in 2020  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to lower the carbon intensity of the power generationelectricity grid carbon-intensities are considered: importance of grid carbon intensity. Natural-gas-fired CHP

Firestone, Ryan; Ling, Frank; Marnay, Chris; Hamachi LaCommare, Kristina

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Regulation of Stock Externalities with Correlated Abatement Costsw  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Regulation of Stock Externalities with Correlated Abatement Costsw LARRY KARP1;? and JIANGFENG externality. The regulator and firms have asymmetric information about serially correlated abatement costs about abatement costs. Weitzman (1974) showed that there is a simple criterion for ranking the policies

Karp, Larry S.

33

Preliminary Estimates of Combined Heat and Power Greenhouse Gas Abatement Potential for California in 2020  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for out-of-state coal generation, then clearly the GHGElectricity Generation (TWh/a) Natural Gas Coal Natural Gascoal becomes the marginal fuel. Note that the marginal generation

Firestone, Ryan; Ling, Frank; Marnay, Chris; Hamachi LaCommare, Kristina

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Unaccounted-for gas cost allocation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As competitive pressures grow, gas utility managers have stepped up their search for ways to ensure that rates remain competitive. This challenge is particularly acute in the large commercial and industrial market segments, which are most typically [open quotes]at risk.[close quotes] A variety of cost-allocation studies have been undertaken to determine more accurately what costs are associated with serving market segments, and which costs should be recovered from each. Because there are clear winners and losers in this process (at least, it is clear who wins and loses in the short term), these reallocations have been hotly debated and fiercely litigated. Any proposed change in allocation must be supported by either compelling logic or empirical evidence. This article suggests a method of reallocating the costs associated with unaccounted-for (UAF) gas volumes, based on results from two studies of the elements contributing to UAF gas.

Ozenne, D.G. (Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States))

1994-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

35

Direct chlorination process for geothermal power plant off-gas - hydrogen sulfide abatement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Direct Chlorination Process removes hydrogen sulfide from geothermal off-gases by reacting hydrogen sulfide with chlorine in the gas phase. Hydrogen chloride and elemental sulfur are formed by this reaction. The Direct Chlorination Process has been successfully demonstrated by an on-site operation of a pilot plant at the 3 M We HPG-A geothermal power plant in the Puna District on the island of Hawaii. Over 99.5 percent hydrogen sulfide removal was achieved in a single reaction state. Chlorine gas did not escape the pilot plant, even when 90 percent excess chlorine gas was used. A preliminary economic evaluation of the Direct Chlorination Process indicates that it is very competitive with the Stretford Process. Compared to the Stretford Process, the Direct Chlorination Process requires about one-third the initial capital investment and about one-fourth the net daily expenditure.

Sims, A.V.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Restoration Tax Abatement (Louisiana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Restoration Tax Abatement (RTA) Program provides five-year property tax abatement for the expansion, restoration, improvement, and development of existing commercial structures and owner-occupied...

37

Preliminary Estimates of Combined Heat and Power Greenhouse GasAbatement Potential for California in 2020  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this scoping project is to help the California Energy Commission's (CEC) Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program determine where it should make investments in research to support combined heat and power (CHP) deployment. Specifically, this project will: {sm_bullet} Determine what impact CHP might have in reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, {sm_bullet} Determine which CHP strategies might encourage the most attractive early adoption, {sm_bullet} Identify the regulatory and technological barriers to the most attractive CHP strategies, and {sm_bullet} Make recommendations to the PIER program as to research that is needed to support the most attractive CHP strategies.

Firestone, Ryan; Ling, Frank; Marnay, Chris; Hamachi LaCommare,Kristina

2007-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

38

FRASER POLLUTION ABATEMENT OFFICE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;-. FRASER POLLUTION ABATEMENT OFFICE 1992-93 Progress Report By MaggieM. Paquet MAIAPublishingLtd. 302 E. 6th Street NorthVancouver,BC V7L 1P6 For FraserPollutionAbatementOffice EnvironmentCanada 224W abatement. The Fraser Pollution Abatement Office (FPAO) of the Fraser River Action Plan was established

39

Plasma abatement of perfluorocompounds in inductively coupled plasma reactors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Plasma abatement of perfluorocompounds in inductively coupled plasma reactors Xudong ``Peter'' Xu burn-boxes located downstream of the plasma chamber has been proposed as a method for abating PFC emissions with the goals of reducing the cost of PFC abatement and avoiding the NOx formation usually found

Kushner, Mark

40

Regional Analysis of Building Distributed Energy Costs and CO2 Abatement: A U.S. - China Comparison  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The following paper conducts a regional analysis of the U.S. and Chinese buildings? potential for adopting Distributed Energy Resources (DER). The expected economics of DER in 2020-2025 is modeled for a commercial and a multi-family residential building in different climate zones. The optimal building energy economic performance is calculated using the Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER CAM) which minimizes building energy costs for a typical reference year of operation. Several DER such as combined heat and power (CHP) units, photovoltaics, and battery storage are considered. The results indicate DER have economic and environmental competitiveness potential, especially for commercial buildings in hot and cold climates of both countries. In the U.S., the average expected energy cost savings in commercial buildings from DER CAM?s suggested investments is 17percent, while in Chinese buildings is 12percent. The electricity tariffs structure and prices along with the cost of natural gas, represent important factors in determining adoption of DER, more so than climate. High energy pricing spark spreads lead to increased economic attractiveness of DER. The average emissions reduction in commercial buildings is 19percent in the U.S. as a result of significant investments in PV, whereas in China, it is 20percent and driven by investments in CHP. Keywords: Building Modeling and Simulation, Distributed Energy Resources (DER), Energy Efficiency, Combined Heat and Power (CHP), CO2 emissions 1. Introduction The transition from a centralized and fossil-based energy paradigm towards the decentralization of energy supply and distribution has been a major subject of research over the past two decades. Various concerns have brought the traditional model into question; namely its environmental footprint, its structural inflexibility and inefficiency, and more recently, its inability to maintain acceptable reliability of supply. Under such a troubled setting, distributed energy resources (DER) comprising of small, modular, electrical renewable or fossil-based electricity generation units placed at or near the point of energy consumption, has gained much attention as a viable alternative or addition to the current energy system. In 2010, China consumed about 30percent of its primary energy in the buildings sector, leading the country to pay great attention to DER development and its applications in buildings. During the 11th Five Year Plan (FYP), China has implemented 371 renewable energy building demonstration projects, and 210 photovoltaics (PV) building integration projects. At the end of the 12th FYP, China is targeting renewable energy to provide 10percent of total building energy, and to save 30 metric tons of CO2 equivalents (mtce) of energy with building integrated renewables. China is also planning to implement one thousand natural gas-based distributed cogeneration demonstration projects with energy utilization rates over 70percent in the 12th FYP. All these policy targets require significant DER systems development for building applications. China?s fast urbanization makes building energy efficiency a crucial economic issue; however, only limited studies have been done that examine how to design and select suitable building energy technologies in its different regions. In the U.S., buildings consumed 40percent of the total primary energy in 2010 [1] and it is estimated that about 14 billion m2 of floor space of the existing building stock will be remodeled over the next 30 years. Most building?s renovation work has been on building envelope, lighting and HVAC systems. Although interest has emerged, less attention is being paid to DER for buildings. This context has created opportunities for research, development and progressive deployment of DER, due to its potential to combine the production of power and heat (CHP) near the point of consumption and delivering multiple benefits to customers, such as cost

Mendes, Goncalo; Feng, Wei; Stadler, Michael; Steinbach, Jan; Lai, Judy; Zhou, Nan; Marnay, Chris; Ding, Yan; Zhao, Jing; Tian, Zhe; Zhu, Neng

2014-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas abatement cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Regional Analysis of Building Distributed Energy Costs and CO2 Abatement: A U.S. - China Comparison  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

highest investment in CHP and battery storage, with a costelectricity costs in Alaska. All investments in CHP are in

Mendes, Goncalo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Carbon offsets as a cost containment instrument : a case study of reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon offset is one type of flexibility mechanism in greenhouse gas emission trading schemes that helps nations meet their emission commitments at lower costs. Carbon offsets take advantage of lower abatement cost ...

Kim, Jieun, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Asia Least-Cost Greenhouse Gas Abatement Study | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,Ashton-Sandy Spring,

44

E-Print Network 3.0 - abatement bilan international Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

costs... knowledge of firms' abatement costs. Keywords: Compliance, Enforcement, Emissions Trading, Monitoring... the emissions target? The total costs of achieving the target...

45

Motorola's Exhaust Optimization Program: Tracer Gas Application for Gas Panel Enclosures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of as high as 70% of manufacturer's specifications per gas enclosure. This approach leads to energy conservation and infrastructure cost avoidance for new exhaust fans, ductwork, abatement equipment, and make-up air systems....

Myart, H. R.; Camacho, R.

46

Electricity production levelized costs for nuclear, gas and coal  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Levelized costs for nuclear, gas and coal for Electricity, under the Mexican scenario. Javier C. Palacios, Gustavo Alonso, Ramn Ramrez, Armando Gmez, Javier Ortiz, Luis C....

47

What is the best distribution for pollution abatement efforts? Information for optimizing the WFD Programs of measures.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 What is the best distribution for pollution abatement efforts? Information for optimizing the WFD. Nevertheless, it will be possible to relax this standard if it appears that total abatement costs required of the abatement costs and environmental benefits assessment. Concerning the costs, a full discrimination

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

48

Costs Associated With Compressed Natural Gas Vehicle Fueling Infrastructure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is designed to help fleets understand the cost factors associated with fueling infrastructure for compressed natural gas (CNG) vehicles. It provides estimated cost ranges for various sizes and types of CNG fueling stations and an overview of factors that contribute to the total cost of an installed station. The information presented is based on input from professionals in the natural gas industry who design, sell equipment for, and/or own and operate CNG stations.

Smith, M.; Gonzales, J.

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Exercise Session 4 Alessandro Abate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sc4026 Exercise Session 4 Alessandro Abate a.abate@tudelft.nl Solomon Zegeye s Session 4­ sc4026 #12;A. Abate, S.K. Zegeye Controllability and Observability of Feedback Interconnection. The input of the ­ Ac.Yr. 2009/10, 1e Sem. Q1 ­ Exercise Session 4­ sc4026 1 #12;A. Abate, S.K. Zegeye

Abate, Alessandro

50

Exercise Session 5 Alessandro Abate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sc4026 Exercise Session 5 Alessandro Abate a.abate@tudelft.nl Aleksandar Haber a Session 5 ­ sc4026 #12;A. Abate, P. Stano Eigenvalue Assignment via Controllable Canonical Form Consider;A. Abate, P. Stano Observability and Observer Design Consider a process in the state-space form

Abate, Alessandro

51

Exercise Session 7 Alessandro Abate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sc4026 Exercise Session 7 Alessandro Abate a.abate@tudelft.nl Aleksandar Haber a Session 7 ­ sc4026 #12;A. Abate, A. Haber Solution to state space models Find the output response ­ Exercise Session 7 ­ sc4026 1 #12;A. Abate, A. Haber Loss of Observability and/or Controllability Recall

Abate, Alessandro

52

Exercise Session 2 Alessandro Abate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sc4026 Exercise Session 2 Alessandro Abate a.abate@tudelft.nl Aleksandar Haber a ­ Exercise Session 2­ sc4026 #12;A. Abate, A. Haber Basic review of Eigenvalues and Eigenvectors Computation #12;A. Abate, A. Haber Matrix Exponential Compute eAt , through its diagonalization, where: A = 2 4 -2

Abate, Alessandro

53

Exercise Session 5 Alessandro Abate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sc4026 Exercise Session 5 Alessandro Abate a.abate@tudelft.nl Jacopo Antonello j Session 5 ­ sc4026 #12;A. Abate, J. Antonello Eigenvalue Assignment via Controllable Canonical Form ­ sc4026 1 #12;A. Abate, J. Antonello Observability and Observer Design Consider a process in the state

Abate, Alessandro

54

Exercise Session 7 Alessandro Abate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sc4026 Exercise Session 7 Alessandro Abate a.abate@tudelft.nl Pawel Stano p.stano@tudelft.nl Delft 7 ­ sc4026 #12;A. Abate, P. Stano Solution to state space models Find the output response to a step ­ Exercise Session 7 ­ sc4026 1 #12;A. Abate, P. Stano Observer Design for DC Servo Problem 2: Observer

Abate, Alessandro

55

Exercise Session 2 Alessandro Abate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sc4026 Exercise Session 2 Alessandro Abate a.abate@tudelft.nl Pawel Stano p ­ Exercise Session 2 ­ sc4026 #12;A. Abate, P. Stano Review of Eigenvalues and Eigenvectors Computation Find with the aid of MATLAB. ­ Ac.Yr. 2011/12, 1e Sem. Q1 ­ Exercise Session 2 ­ sc4026 1 #12;A. Abate, P. Stano

Abate, Alessandro

56

Exercise Session 4 Alessandro Abate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sc4026 Exercise Session 4 Alessandro Abate a.abate@tudelft.nl Jacopo Antonello j Session 4­ sc4026 #12;A. Abate, J. Antonello Lyapunov Stability Consider the planar system x = Ax = -2 0 0 ­ Exercise Session 4­ sc4026 1 #12;A. Abate, J. Antonello Controllability Show that the property

Abate, Alessandro

57

Exercise Session 6 Alessandro Abate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sc4026 Exercise Session 6 Alessandro Abate a.abate@tudelft.nl Marco Forgione m Session 6 ­ sc4026 #12;A. Abate, M. Forgione Linear Quadratic Regulator, in Theory Consider an object Sem. Q1 ­ Exercise Session 6 ­ sc4026 1 #12;A. Abate, M. Forgione Integral Control Consider the simple

Abate, Alessandro

58

Exercise Session 5 Alessandro Abate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sc4026 Exercise Session 5 Alessandro Abate a.abate@tudelft.nl Aleksandar Haber a Session 5 ­ sc4026 #12;A. Abate, A. Haber State vs Output Feedback Consider the model x = 2 6 6 4 0 1 0 0 ­ Exercise Session 5 ­ sc4026 1 #12;A. Abate, A. Haber Linear Quadratic Regulator, in Theory Consider

Abate, Alessandro

59

Exercise Session 4 Alessandro Abate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sc4026 Exercise Session 4 Alessandro Abate a.abate@tudelft.nl Aleksandar Haber a Session 4­ sc4026 #12;A. Abate, A. Haber Lyapunov Stability Consider the planar system x = Ax = -2 0 0 -2 ­ Exercise Session 4­ sc4026 1 #12;A. Abate, A. Haber Controllability Show that the property

Abate, Alessandro

60

Exercise Session 3 Alessandro Abate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sc4026 Exercise Session 3 Alessandro Abate a.abate@tudelft.nl Marco Forgione m ­ Exercise Session 3 ­ sc4026 #12;A. Abate, M. Forgione Linearization Example In the following diagram, we.Yr. 2012/13, 1e Sem. Q1 ­ Exercise Session 3 ­ sc4026 1 #12;A. Abate, M. Forgione · x, horizontal position

Abate, Alessandro

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas abatement cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Exercise Session 6 Alessandro Abate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sc4026 Exercise Session 6 Alessandro Abate a.abate@tudelft.nl Pawel Stano p.stano@tudelft.nl Delft 6 ­ sc4026 #12;A. Abate, P. Stano Linear Quadratic Regulator, in Theory Consider an object of mass m ­ Exercise Session 6 ­ sc4026 1 #12;A. Abate, P. Stano Integral Control Consider the simple first-order model

Abate, Alessandro

62

Exercise Session 6 Alessandro Abate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sc4026 Exercise Session 6 Alessandro Abate a.abate@tudelft.nl Solomon Zegeye s Session 6­ sc4026 #12;A. Abate, S.K. Zegeye Integral Control Consider the first-order system described. Abate, S.K. Zegeye Observable Canonical Form from polynomials of Transfer Function Consider

Abate, Alessandro

63

Exercise Session 3 Alessandro Abate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sc4026 Exercise Session 3 Alessandro Abate a.abate@tudelft.nl Pawel Stano p ­ Exercise Session 3 ­ sc4026 #12;A. Abate, P. Stano Linearization Example In the following diagram, we have.Yr. 2011/12, 1e Sem. Q1 ­ Exercise Session 3 ­ sc4026 1 #12;A. Abate, P. Stano · x, horizontal position

Abate, Alessandro

64

Exercise Session 7 Alessandro Abate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sc4026 Exercise Session 7 Alessandro Abate a.abate@tudelft.nl Marco Forgione m Session 7 ­ sc4026 #12;A. Abate, M. Forgione Solution to state space models Find the output response ­ Exercise Session 7 ­ sc4026 1 #12;A. Abate, M. Forgione Loss of Observability and/or Controllability Recall

Abate, Alessandro

65

Exercise Session 3 Alessandro Abate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sc4026 Exercise Session 3 Alessandro Abate a.abate@tudelft.nl Aleksandar Haber a ­ Exercise Session 3­ sc4026 #12;A. Abate, A. Haber Linearization Example In the following diagram, we have.Yr. 2010/11, 1e Sem. Q1 ­ Exercise Session 3­ sc4026 1 #12;A. Abate, A. Haber · x, horizontal position

Abate, Alessandro

66

Exercise Session 5 Alessandro Abate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sc4026 Exercise Session 5 Alessandro Abate a.abate@tudelft.nl Pawel Stano p.stano@tudelft.nl Delft 5 ­ sc4026 #12;A. Abate, P. Stano Eigenvalue Assignment via Controllable Canonical Form Consider;A. Abate, P. Stano Observability and Observer Design Consider a process in the state-space form

Abate, Alessandro

67

Exercise Session 3 Alessandro Abate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sc4026 Exercise Session 3 Alessandro Abate a.abate@tudelft.nl Solomon Zegeye s ­ Exercise Session 3­ sc4026 #12;A. Abate, S.K. Zegeye Lyapunov Stability Check Consider the continuous;A. Abate, S.K. Zegeye Lyapunov Stability Study the stability of the system: ¨y + y - y3 3 - y ! = 0

Abate, Alessandro

68

Exercise Session 6 Alessandro Abate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sc4026 Exercise Session 6 Alessandro Abate a.abate@tudelft.nl Aleksandar Haber a Session 6 ­ sc4026 #12;A. Abate, A. Haber Linear Quadratic Regulator, in Theory Consider an object of mass Sem. Q1 ­ Exercise Session 6 ­ sc4026 1 #12;A. Abate, A. Haber Integral Control Consider the simple

Abate, Alessandro

69

Exercise Session 2 Alessandro Abate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sc4026 Exercise Session 2 Alessandro Abate a.abate@tudelft.nl Jacopo Antonello j ­ Exercise Session 2 ­ sc4026 #12;A. Abate, J. Antonello Review of Eigenvalues and Eigenvectors Computation with the aid of MATLAB. ­ Ac.Yr. 2012/13, 1e Sem. Q1 ­ Exercise Session 2 ­ sc4026 1 #12;A. Abate, J. Antonello

Abate, Alessandro

70

Exercise Session 1 Alessandro Abate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sc4026 Exercise Session 1 Alessandro Abate a.abate@tudelft.nl Aleksandar Haber a ­ Exercise Session 1 ­ sc4026 #12;A. Abate, A. Haber 1. Properties of the matrix exponential Show, by using/10, 1e Sem. Q1 ­ Exercise Session 1 ­ sc4026 1 #12;A. Abate, A. Haber 2. Elaboration of the Predator

Abate, Alessandro

71

Exercise Session 4 Alessandro Abate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sc4026 Exercise Session 4 Alessandro Abate a.abate@tudelft.nl Aleksandar Haber a ­ Exercise Session 4­ sc4026 #12;A. Abate, A. Haber Nonlinear System, Linearization, Stability Consider. ­ Ac.Yr. 2010/11, 1e Sem. Q1 ­ Exercise Session 4­ sc4026 1 #12;A. Abate, A. Haber Controllability Show

Abate, Alessandro

72

Exercise Session 2 Alessandro Abate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sc4026 Exercise Session 2 Alessandro Abate a.abate@tudelft.nl Aleksandar Haber a ­ Exercise Session 2 ­ sc4026 #12;A. Abate, A. Haber Properties of the matrix exponential Show, by using/11, 1e Sem. Q1 ­ Exercise Session 2 ­ sc4026 1 #12;A. Abate, A. Haber Review of Eigenvalues

Abate, Alessandro

73

Heterogeneous capital stocks and the optimal timing for CO2 abatement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Heterogeneous capital stocks and the optimal timing for CO2 abatement Mark Jaccard *, Nic Rivers a model and empirically estimated abatement costs. The results suggest that under many different assumptions, an early start at CO2 abatement for long-lived capital stocks would be economically optimal

74

Controlling a Stock Pollutant with Endogenous Abatement Capital and Asymmetric Information  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Controlling a Stock Pollutant with Endogenous Abatement Capital and Asymmetric Information Larry have asymmetric information about abatement costs, and all agents use Markov Per- fect decision rules to represent the problem of controlling greenhouse gasses. The endogeneity of abatement capital favors taxes

Karp, Larry S.

75

Cost Curves for Gas Supply Security: The Case of Bulgaria  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Interconnections: 8.64 7.92 14 - 5 Figure 2. Structure of gas consumption by sector, Bulgaria (2007) Figure 3. Structure of heat generation by fuel type, Bulgaria (2007) Figure 4. Electricity generation mix, Bulgaria (2007) Chemical industry 31... to put the vertical dotted line). The government may want to insure the gas consumption of some specific categories of customers, the interruption of which Cost per unit of peak gas consumption insured (m/mcm/day) Cumulative level of peak gas...

Silve, Florent; Nol, Pierre

76

Tight gas sands study breaks down drilling and completion costs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Given the high cost to drill and complete tight gas sand wells, advances in drilling and completion technology that result in even modest cost savings to the producer have the potential to generate tremendous savings for the natural gas industry. The Gas Research Institute sponsored a study to evaluate drilling and completion costs in selected tight gas sands. The objective of the study was to identify major expenditures associated with tight gas sand development and determine their relative significance. A substantial sample of well cost data was collected for the study. Individual well cost data were collected from nearly 300 wells in three major tight gas sand formations: the Cotton Valley sand in East Texas, the Frontier sand in Wyoming, and the Wilcox sand in South Texas. The data were collected and organized by cost category for each formation. After the information was input into a data base, a simple statistical analysis was performed. The statistical analysis identified data discrepancies that were then resolved, and it helped allow conclusions to be drawn regarding drilling and completion costs in these tight sand formations. Results are presented.

Brunsman, B. (Gas Research Inst., Chicago, IL (United States)); Saunders, B. (S.A. Holditch Associates Inc., College Station, TX (United States))

1994-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

77

Financing of Substitute Natural Gas Costs (Indiana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This statute encourages the development of local coal gasification facilities to produce substitute natural gas, calls on state energy utilities to enter into long-term contracts for the purchase...

78

Flexible NOx Abatement from Power  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Flexible NOx Abatement from Power Plants in the Eastern United States* Lin Sun, Mort Webster, Gary: globalchange@mit.edu Website: http://globalchange.mit.edu/ #12;Flexible NOx Abatement from Power Plants

79

Brownfield Development Tax Abatements (Alabama)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Brownfield Development Tax Abatements gives cities and counties the ability to abate, non-educational city and county sales and use taxes, non-educational state, city and county property taxes ...

80

Exercise Session 1 Alessandro Abate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sc4026 Exercise Session 1 Alessandro Abate a.abate@tudelft.nl Pawel Stano p ­ Exercise Session 1 ­ sc4026 #12;A. Abate, P. Stano State-Space Model Consider the third-order model d3q dt3. Simulate the model with Matlab. ­ Ac.Yr. 2011/12, 1e Sem. Q1 ­ Exercise Session 1 ­ sc4026 1 #12;A. Abate

Abate, Alessandro

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas abatement cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Exercise Session 1 Alessandro Abate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sc4026 Exercise Session 1 Alessandro Abate a.abate@tudelft.nl Jacopo Antonello j ­ Exercise Session 1 ­ sc4026 #12;A. Abate, J. Antonello State-Space Model Consider the third-order model d3q. Simulate the model with Matlab. ­ Ac.Yr. 2012/13, 1e Sem. Q1 ­ Exercise Session 1 ­ sc4026 1 #12;A. Abate

Abate, Alessandro

82

Exercise Session 1 Alessandro Abate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sc4026 Exercise Session 1 Alessandro Abate a.abate@tudelft.nl Aleksandar Haber a Session 1 ­ sc4026 #12;A. Abate, A. Haber State-Space Model Consider the third-order model d3q dt3 + 2 d2q the model with Matlab. ­ Ac.Yr. 2010/11, 1e Sem. Q1 ­ Exercise Session 1 ­ sc4026 1 #12;A. Abate, A. Haber

Abate, Alessandro

83

The Cost of CCS forThe Cost of CCS for Natural GasNatural Gas--Fired Power PlantsFired Power Plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 The Cost of CCS forThe Cost of CCS for Natural GasNatural Gas--Fired Power PlantsFired Power Estimates for Natural GasNatural Gas--Fired Power PlantsFired Power Plants · 2007: Rubin, et al., Energy utilities again looking to natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) plants for new or replacement capacity

84

FRASER POLLUTION ABATEMENT OFFICE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are to build partnerships, clean up pollution, and renew the productivity of the natural environment Environmental Protection Act and the pollution prevention provisions of the Fisheries Act. The pollution clean#12;FRASER POLLUTION ABATEMENT OFFICE PROGRESS REPORT 1994-95 Prepared By Maggie M. Paquet MAIA

85

Emission abatement system utilizing particulate traps  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Emission abatement system. The system includes a source of emissions and a catalyst for receiving the emissions. Suitable catalysts are absorber catalysts and selective catalytic reduction catalysts. A plasma fuel converter generates a reducing gas from a fuel source and is connected to deliver the reducing gas into contact with the absorber catalyst for regenerating the catalyst. A preferred reducing gas is a hydrogen rich gas and a preferred plasma fuel converter is a plasmatron. It is also preferred that the absorber catalyst be adapted for absorbing NO.sub.x.

Bromberg, Leslie (Sharon, MA); Cohn, Daniel R. (Chestnut Hill, MA); Rabinovich, Alexander (Swampscott, MA)

2004-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

86

The Cost of CCS forThe Cost of CCS for Natural GasNatural Gas--Fired Power PlantsFired Power Plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 The Cost of CCS forThe Cost of CCS for Natural GasNatural Gas--Fired Power PlantsFired Power, Pennsylvania Presentation to the Natural Gas CCS Forum Washington, DC November 4, 2011 E.S. Rubin, Carnegie Mellon MotivationMotivation · Electric utilities again looking to natural gas combined cycle (NGCC

87

Cost analysis of NOx control alternatives for stationary gas turbines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of stationary gas turbines for power generation has been growing rapidly with continuing trends predicted well into the future. Factors that are contributing to this growth include advances in turbine technology, operating and siting flexibility and low capital cost. Restructuring of the electric utility industry will provide new opportunities for on-site generation. In a competitive market, it maybe more cost effective to install small distributed generation units (like gas turbines) within the grid rather than constructing large power plants in remote locations with extensive transmission and distribution systems. For the customer, on-site generation will provide added reliability and leverage over the cost of purchased power One of the key issues that is addressed in virtually every gas turbine application is emissions, particularly NO{sub x} emissions. Decades of research and development have significantly reduced the NO{sub x} levels emitted from gas turbines from uncontrolled levels. Emission control technologies are continuing to evolve with older technologies being gradually phased-out while new technologies are being developed and commercialized. The objective of this study is to determine and compare the cost of NO{sub x} control technologies for three size ranges of stationary gas turbines: 5 MW, 25 MW and 150 MW. The purpose of the comparison is to evaluate the cost effectiveness and impact of each control technology as a function of turbine size. The NO{sub x} control technologies evaluated in this study include: Lean premix combustion, also known as dry low NO{sub x} (DLN) combustion; Catalytic combustion; Water/steam injection; Selective catalytic reduction (SCR)--low temperature, conventional, high temperature; and SCONO{sub x}{trademark}.

Bill Major

1999-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

88

An activity-based-parametric hybrid cost model to estimate the unit cost of a novel gas turbine component  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An activity-based-parametric hybrid cost model to estimate the unit cost of a novel gas turbine in gas turbine compressors. However, the model disc (blisk) designs which are used by the aerospace industry in gas turbine compressors. The tool

Sóbester, András

89

Vehicle Investment and Operating Costs and Savings for Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategies  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

To help estimate costs of implementing greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation strategies for vehicles, the table below provides the initial investment, operating costs, and operating savings for each strategy.

90

Bonus Point Exercise 3 Alessandro Abate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sc4026 Bonus Point Exercise 3 Alessandro Abate a.abate@tudelft.nl Solomon Zegeye s Exercise Session 3 ­ sc4026 #12;A. Abate, S.K. Zegeye Observability and Observer Design Consider an LTI

Abate, Alessandro

91

A Low-Cost Natural Gas/Freshwater Aerial Pipeline  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Offered is a new type of low-cost aerial pipeline for delivery of natural gas, an important industrial and residential fuel, and freshwater as well as other payloads over long distances. The offered pipeline dramatically decreases the construction and operation costs and the time necessary for pipeline construction. A dual-use type of freight pipeline can improve an arid rural environment landscape and provide a reliable energy supply for cities. Our aerial pipeline is a large, self-lofting flexible tube disposed at high altitude. Presently, the term "natural gas" lacks a precise technical definition, but the main components of natural gas are methane, which has a specific weight less than air. A lift force of one cubic meter of methane equals approximately 0.5 kg. The lightweight film flexible pipeline can be located in the Earth-atmosphere at high altitude and poses no threat to airplanes or the local environment. The authors also suggest using lift force of this pipeline in tandem with wing devices for cheap shipment of a various payloads (oil, coal and water) over long distances. The article contains a computed macroproject in northwest China for delivery of 24 billion cubic meter of gas and 23 millions tonnes of water annually.

Alexander Bolonkin; Richard Cathcart

2007-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

92

Costs of Crude Oil and Natural Gas Wells Drilled  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"Click worksheet9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,,781 2,328 2,683 2,539PetroleumNatural Gas Usage Form 2003Costs of

93

Costs of Crude Oil and Natural Gas Wells Drilled  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecember 2005 (Thousand9, 2015Year109 AppendixCosts of Crude Oil and Natural Gas

94

Exercise Session 6 (with solutions) Alessandro Abate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sc4026 Exercise Session 6 (with solutions) Alessandro Abate a.abate@tudelft.nl Marco Forgione m Session 6 ­ sc4026 #12;A. Abate, M. Forgione Linear Quadratic Regulator, in Theory Consider an object ­ Ac.Yr. 2012/13, 1e Sem. Q1 ­ Exercise Session 6 ­ sc4026 1 #12;A. Abate, M. Forgione it can be easily

Abate, Alessandro

95

Exercise Session 2 (with solutions) Alessandro Abate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sc4026 Exercise Session 2 (with solutions) Alessandro Abate a.abate@tudelft.nl Pawel Stano p ­ Exercise Session 2 ­ sc4026 #12;A. Abate, P. Stano Review of Eigenvalues and Eigenvectors Computation Find 1 #12;A. Abate, P. Stano The eigenvectors are found as follows: = 3 : (A - 3I)v = 0 -2 -2 2 -1

Abate, Alessandro

96

Exercise Session 7 (with solutions) Alessandro Abate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sc4026 Exercise Session 7 (with solutions) Alessandro Abate a.abate@tudelft.nl Aleksandar Haber a Session 7 ­ sc4026 #12;A. Abate, A. Haber Solution to state space models Find the output response Sem. Q1 ­ Exercise Session 7 ­ sc4026 1 #12;A. Abate, A. Haber The output is Y (t) = CX(t) + DU

Abate, Alessandro

97

Exercise Session 7 (with solutions) Alessandro Abate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sc4026 Exercise Session 7 (with solutions) Alessandro Abate a.abate@tudelft.nl Marco Forgione m Session 7 ­ sc4026 #12;A. Abate, M. Forgione Solution to state space models Find the output response Sem. Q1 ­ Exercise Session 7 ­ sc4026 1 #12;A. Abate, M. Forgione The output is Y (t) = CX(t) + DU

Abate, Alessandro

98

Bonus Point Exercise 1 Alessandro Abate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sc4026 Bonus Point Exercise 1 Alessandro Abate a.abate@tudelft.nl Aleksandar Haber a ­ Exercise Session 1 ­ sc4026 #12;A. Abate, A. Haber Linearization Example In the following diagram, we have.Yr. 2009/10, 1e Sem. Q1 ­ Exercise Session 1 ­ sc4026 1 #12;A. Abate, A. Haber · x, horizontal position

Abate, Alessandro

99

Bonus Point Exercise 2 Alessandro Abate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sc4026 Bonus Point Exercise 2 Alessandro Abate a.abate@tudelft.nl Aleksandar Haber a ­ Exercise Session 2 ­ sc4026 #12;A. Abate, A. Haber Solution to state space models Find the output response Sem. Q1 ­ Exercise Session 2 ­ sc4026 1 #12;A. Abate, A. Haber Equilibria and Phase Portrait Determine

Abate, Alessandro

100

Exercise Session 2 (with solutions) Alessandro Abate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sc4026 Exercise Session 2 (with solutions) Alessandro Abate a.abate@tudelft.nl Jacopo Antonello j ­ Exercise Session 2 ­ sc4026 #12;A. Abate, J. Antonello Review of Eigenvalues and Eigenvectors Computation 1 #12;A. Abate, J. Antonello The eigenvectors are found as follows: = 3 : (A - 3I)v = 0 -2 -2 2

Abate, Alessandro

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas abatement cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Exercise Session 3 (with solutions) Alessandro Abate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sc4026 Exercise Session 3 (with solutions) Alessandro Abate a.abate@tudelft.nl Marco Forgione m ­ Exercise Session 3 ­ sc4026 #12;A. Abate, M. Forgione Linearization Example In the following diagram, we.Yr. 2012/13, 1e Sem. Q1 ­ Exercise Session 3 ­ sc4026 1 #12;A. Abate, M. Forgione · x, horizontal position

Abate, Alessandro

102

Exercise Session 3 (with solutions) Alessandro Abate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sc4026 Exercise Session 3 (with solutions) Alessandro Abate a.abate@tudelft.nl Pawel Stano p ­ Exercise Session 3 ­ sc4026 #12;A. Abate, P. Stano Linearization Example In the following diagram, we have.Yr. 2011/12, 1e Sem. Q1 ­ Exercise Session 3 ­ sc4026 1 #12;A. Abate, P. Stano · x, horizontal position

Abate, Alessandro

103

Exercise Session 5 (with solutions) Alessandro Abate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sc4026 Exercise Session 5 (with solutions) Alessandro Abate a.abate@tudelft.nl Aleksandar Haber a Session 5 ­ sc4026 #12;A. Abate, P. Stano Eigenvalue Assignment via Controllable Canonical Form Consider ­ sc4026 1 #12;A. Abate, P. Stano The state space representation is: x1 x2 x3 x4 = -1 -2 -3

Abate, Alessandro

104

Exercise Session 5 (with solutions) Alessandro Abate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sc4026 Exercise Session 5 (with solutions) Alessandro Abate a.abate@tudelft.nl Jacopo Antonello j Session 5 ­ sc4026 #12;A. Abate, J. Antonello Eigenvalue Assignment via Controllable Canonical Form ­ sc4026 1 #12;A. Abate, J. Antonello The state space representation is: x1 x2 x3 x4 = -1

Abate, Alessandro

105

A Low-Cost, High-Efficiency Periodic Flow Gas Turbine for Distributed Energy Generation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The proposed effort served as a feasibility study for an innovative, low-cost periodic flow gas turbine capable of realizing efficiencies in the 39-48% range.

Dr. Adam London

2008-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

106

Directed Technical Change and the Adoption of CO2 Abatement Technology: The Case of CO2 Capture and Storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper studies the cost effectiveness of combining traditional environmental policy, such as CO2 trading schemes, and technology policy that has aims of reducing the cost and speeding the adoption of CO2 abatement ...

Otto, Vincent M.

107

Gas exchange in terrestrial environments comes at the cost of evaporative water loss from respiratory surfaces.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3477 Gas exchange in terrestrial environments comes at the cost of evaporative water loss from of gas exchange, both within and among species (Lighton, 1998; Shelton and Appel, 2001; Chown, 2002). The classical pattern is that of discontinuous gas exchange, or discontinuous gas-exchange cycles (DGC; Lighton

Franz, Nico M.

108

Brake Defect Causation and Abatement Study (BDCAS)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Brake Defect Causation and Abatement Study (BDCAS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory managed by UT corrective actions and validate true abatement of initial out-of- service causation the FMCSA began the BDCAS

109

Exercise Session 1 (with Solutions) Alessandro Abate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sc4026 Exercise Session 1 (with Solutions) Alessandro Abate a.abate@tudelft.nl Pawel Stano p ­ Exercise Session 1 ­ sc4026 #12;A. Abate, P. Stano State-Space Model Consider the third-order model d3q dt32 + 4x1 = u, y = x1. ­ Ac.Yr. 2011/12, 1e Sem. Q1 ­ Exercise Session 1 ­ sc4026 1 #12;A. Abate, P

Abate, Alessandro

110

Exercise Session 6 (with solutions) Alessandro Abate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sc4026 Exercise Session 6 (with solutions) Alessandro Abate a.abate@tudelft.nl Aleksandar Haber a Session 6 ­ sc4026 #12;A. Abate, A. Haber Linear Quadratic Regulator, in Theory Consider an object of mass ­ Ac.Yr. 2011/12, 1e Sem. Q1 ­ Exercise Session 6 ­ sc4026 1 #12;A. Abate, A. Haber it can be easily

Abate, Alessandro

111

Exercise Session 4 (with solutions) Alessandro Abate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sc4026 Exercise Session 4 (with solutions) Alessandro Abate a.abate@tudelft.nl Aleksandar Haber a Session 4­ sc4026 #12;A. Abate, A. Haber Lyapunov Stability Consider the planar system x = Ax = -2 0 0 -2 = 1 4(x2 1 + x2 2). 2 ­ Ac.Yr. 2011/12, 1e Sem. Q1 ­ Exercise Session 4­ sc4026 1 #12;A. Abate, A

Abate, Alessandro

112

Exercise Session 1 (with Solutions) Alessandro Abate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sc4026 Exercise Session 1 (with Solutions) Alessandro Abate a.abate@tudelft.nl Jacopo Antonello j ­ Exercise Session 1 ­ sc4026 #12;A. Abate, J. Antonello State-Space Model Consider the third-order model d3q2 + 4x1 = u, y = x1. ­ Ac.Yr. 2012/13, 1e Sem. Q1 ­ Exercise Session 1 ­ sc4026 1 #12;A. Abate, J

Abate, Alessandro

113

Exercise Session 4 (with solutions) Alessandro Abate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sc4026 Exercise Session 4 (with solutions) Alessandro Abate a.abate@tudelft.nl Jacopo Antonello j Session 4­ sc4026 #12;A. Abate, J. Antonello Lyapunov Stability Consider the planar system x = Ax = -2 0 0 = 1 4(x2 1 + x2 2). 2 ­ Ac.Yr. 2012/13, 1e Sem. Q1 ­ Exercise Session 4­ sc4026 1 #12;A. Abate, J

Abate, Alessandro

114

Abstract The natural gas price surged in 2004. As a result, the marginal cost of some generators burning gas also rose sharply.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract ­ The natural gas price surged in 2004. As a result, the marginal cost of some generators marginal cost, which is closely related to the natural gas price. Since gas units are usually the marginal the sensitivity of Var benefit with respect to generation cost. The U.S. natural gas industry has been

Tolbert, Leon M.

115

Low-cost multispectral vegetation imaging system for detecting leaking CO2 gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Low-cost multispectral vegetation imaging system for detecting leaking CO2 gas Justin A. Hogan,1 sequestration sites for possible leaks of the CO2 gas from underground reservoirs, a low-cost multispectral are then flagged for closer inspection with in-situ CO2 sensors. The system is entirely self

Shaw, Joseph A.

116

Using Natural Gas Transmission Pipeline Costs to Estimate Hydrogen Pipeline Costs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

future estimates of hydrogen pipelines. Construction Cost (does this mean for hydrogen pipelines? The objective of thisinto the cost of hydrogen pipelines. To this end I will

Parker, Nathan

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Costs and indices for domestic oil and gas field equipment and production operations 1994 through 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents estimated costs and cost indices for domestic oil and natural gas field equipment and production operations for 1994, 1995, 1996, and 1997. The costs of all equipment and services are those in effect during June of each year. The sums (aggregates) of the costs for representative leases by region, depth, and production rate were averaged and indexed. This provides a general measure of the increased or decreased costs from year to year for lease equipment and operations. These general measures do not capture changes in industry-wide costs exactly because of annual variations in the ratio of the total number of oil wells to the total number of gas wells. The detail provided in this report is unavailable elsewhere. The body of this report contains summary tables, and the appendices contain detailed tables. Price changes for oil and gas, changes in taxes on oil and gas revenues, and environmental factors (compliance costs and lease availability) have a significant impact on the number and cost of oil and gas wells drilled. These changes also impact the cost of oil and gas equipment and production operations.

NONE

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Optimal transition from coal to gas and renewable power under capacity constraints and adjustment costs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optimal transition from coal to gas and renewable power under capacity constraints and adjustment existing coal power plants to gas and renewable power under a carbon budget. It solves a model of polluting, exhaustible resources with capacity constraints and adjustment costs (to build coal, gas, and renewable power

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

119

Survey of state regulatory activities on least cost planning for gas utilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Integrated resource planning involves the creation of a process in which supply-side and demand-side options are integrated to create a resource mix that reliably satisfies customers' short-term and long-term energy service needs at the lowest cost. Incorporating the concept of meeting customer energy service needs entails a recognition that customers' costs must be considered along with the utility's costs in the economic analysis of energy options. As applied to gas utilities, an integrated resource plan seeks to balance cost and reliability, and should not be interpreted simply as the search for lowest commodity costs. All state commissions were surveyed to assess the current status of gas planning and demand-side management and to identify significant regulatory issues faced by commissions during the next several years. The survey was to determine the extent to which they have undertaken least-cost planning for gas utilities. The survey included the following topics: (1) status of state PUC least-cost planning regulations and practices for gas utilities; (2) type and scope ofnatural gas DSM programs in effect, includeing fuel substitution; (3) economic tests and analysis methods used to evaluate DSM programs; (4) relationship between prudence reviews of gas utility purchasing practices and integrated resource planning; and (5) key regulatory issues facing gas utilities during the next five years. 34 refs., 6 figs., 10 tabs.

Goldman, C.A. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States) National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners, Washington, DC (United States)); Hopkins, M.E. (Fleming Group, Washington, DC (United States))

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Costs and indices for domestic oil and gas field equipment and production operations 1990 through 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents estimated costs and indice for domestic oil and gas field equipment and production operations for 1990, 1991, 1992, and 1993. The costs of all equipment and serives were those in effect during June of each year. The sums (aggregates) of the costs for representative leases by region, depth, and production rate were averaged and indexed. This provides a general measure of the increased or decreased costs from year to year for lease equipment and operations. These general measures do not capture changes in industry-wide costs exactly because of annual variations in the ratio of oil wells to gas wells. The body of the report contains summary tables, and the appendices contain detailed tables. Price changes for oil and gas, changes in taxes on oil and gas revenues, and environmental factors (costs and lease availability) have significant impact on the number and cost of oil and gas wells drilled. These changes also impact the cost of oil and gas production equipment and operations.

Not Available

1994-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas abatement cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Oil and Gas Lease Equipment and Operating Costs 1994 Through...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

10 producing wells, 11 injection wells and 1 water supply well. Costs for water storage tanks, injection plant, filtering systems, injection lines and drilling water supply wells...

122

FUEL CONSUMPTION AND COST SAVINGS OF CLASS 8 HEAVY-DUTY TRUCKS POWERED BY NATURAL GAS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We compare the fuel consumption and greenhouse gas emissions of natural gas and diesel heavy-duty (HD) class 8 trucks under consistent simulated drive cycle conditions. Our study included both conventional and hybrid HD trucks operating with either natural gas or diesel engines, and we compare the resulting simulated fuel efficiencies, fuel costs, and payback periods. While trucks powered by natural gas engines have lower fuel economy, their CO2 emissions and costs are lower than comparable diesel trucks. Both diesel and natural gas powered hybrid trucks have significantly improved fuel economy, reasonable cost savings and payback time, and lower CO2 emissions under city driving conditions. However, under freeway-dominant driving conditions, the overall benefits of hybridization are considerably less. Based on payback period alone, non-hybrid natural gas trucks appear to be the most economic option for both urban and freeway driving environments.

Gao, Zhiming [ORNL] [ORNL; LaClair, Tim J [ORNL] [ORNL; Daw, C Stuart [ORNL] [ORNL; Smith, David E [ORNL] [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

The Costs of Greenhouse Gas Mitigation with Induced Technological Change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-analysis of the costs of mitigating global GHG emissions over the period to 2100, with and without the effects trading allowances at a regional or global level. It reports a wide range of costs with confusing-analyses done by the World Resources Institute for the US economy, 1997, and the IPCC post-SRES models

Watson, Andrew

124

A royalty pain in the gas: What costs may be properly deducted from a gas royalty interest?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is emphasized that parties contracting for oil and gas leases are always free to allocate the costs of compression, transportation and processing in their agreements, thereby avoiding many potential problems. However, it must be recognized that all too often lease agreements fail to apportion expenses that may be incurred after the discovery of oil or gas. In the likely event that the West Virginia courts are faced with this issue, they would be wise to adopt the implied duty to market theory, thereby, putting the onus on the lessee to either provide up front in the lease for the apportionment of costs after the discovery of the gas, or in those instances where the lease is silent as to who will incur the cost, to place the burden on the lessee to cover those costs. Regarding transportation costs, even in jurisdictions such as Oklahoma, where the lessee is obligated to develop the gas he has found so that it will bring the highest possible market value, the lessee is not required to provide for pipeline facilities beyond the lease premises. Kansas courts have also held that the lessee has a general duty to see that the gas is marketed, but that it is not required to pay the lessor`s share of transportation charges form the well to some distant place. Thus, in West Virginia when a gas lease is silent as what costs a lessee may properly deduct from a lessor`s royalty payment, the lessee should bear the costs under the implied duty to market theory if those costs do not involve enhancing the product or transporting it to some place of sale off the leased premises.

Raynes, R.S. Jr.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Estimate Costs to Implement Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategies for Vehicles and Mobile Equipment  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Once a Federal agency identifies the various strategic opportunities to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions for vehicles and mobile equipment, it is necessary to evaluate the associated costs of adopting each strategy.

126

Estimate Costs to Implement Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategies for Employee Commuting  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

For greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation, once a Federal agency identifies the employee commute alternatives and supporting strategies that will most effectively reduce trips to the worksite, costs of encouraging adoption of those methods can be estimated.

127

ABATEMENT REQUEST FORM \\ \\ Drayton\\ Data\\ Graduate Office\\ Forms\\ F. Assistantship Forms\\ F.4 Abatement Request Form  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ABATEMENT REQUEST FORM (GSO-F4) Rev. 13-14 \\ \\ Drayton\\ Data\\ Graduate Office\\ Forms\\ F. Assistantship Forms\\ F.4 Abatement Request Form 1. CWID Degree or Certificate Program Residency Status 2. Last): Requested Enrollment Hours for Term: Note: The Abatement award is subject to the availability of funds

Kasman, Alex

128

Reduction in Fabrication Costs of Gas Diffusion Layers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ballard Material Products (BMP) performed a pre-design technical and cost analysis of state of the art production technologies feasible for high volume GDL manufacturing. Based upon criteria that also included environmental health and safety, customer quality requirements, and future needs, BMP selected technologies that can be integrated into its current manufacturing process. These selections included Many-At-A-Time (MAAT) coating and continuous mixing technologies, as well as various on-line process control tools. These processes have allowed BMP to produce high performance GDLs at lower cost for near-term markets, as well as to define the inputs needed to develop a conceptual Greenfield facility to meet the cost targets for automotive volumes of 500,000 vehicles per year.

Jason Morgan; Donald Connors; Michael Hickner

2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

129

Passive Catalytic Approach to Low Temperature NOx Emission Abatement...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Catalytic Approach to Low Temperature NOx Emission Abatement Passive Catalytic Approach to Low Temperature NOx Emission Abatement Numerically evaluated and optimized proposed...

130

Probabilistic Bisimulations of Switching and Resetting Diffusions Alessandro Abate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Probabilistic Bisimulations of Switching and Resetting Diffusions Alessandro Abate Delft Center for Systems and Control, TU Delft, The Netherlands a.abate@tudelft.nl Abstract-- This contribution presents

Abate, Alessandro

131

Taxes, Permits, and the Adoption of Abatement Technology under...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Taxes, Permits, and the Adoption of Abatement Technology under Imperfect Compliance Jump to: navigation, search Name Taxes, Permits, and the Adoption of Abatement Technology under...

132

NOx Abatement Research and Development CRADA with Navistar Incorporate...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

NOx Abatement Research and Development CRADA with Navistar Incorporated NOx Abatement Research and Development CRADA with Navistar Incorporated 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and...

133

Costs Associated With Compressed Natural Gas Vehicle Fueling Infrastructure  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageEmerging FuelsRelated4Rogue ValleyValley of the1 S u mCosts

134

A LOW-COST GPR GAS PIPE & LEAK DETECTOR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A light-weight, easy to use ground penetrating radar (GPR) system for tracking metal/non-metal pipes has been developed. A pre-production prototype instrument has been developed whose production cost and ease of use should fit important market niches. It is a portable tool which is swept back and forth like a metal detector and which indicates when it goes over a target (metal, plastic, concrete, etc.) and how deep it is. The innovation of real time target detection frees the user from having to interpret geophysical data and instead presents targets as dots on the screen. Target depth is also interpreted automatically, relieving the user of having to do migration analysis. In this way the user can simply walk around looking for targets and, by ''connecting the dots'' on the GPS screen, locate and follow pipes in real time. This is the first tool known to locate metal and non-metal pipes in real time and map their location. This prototype design is similar to a metal detector one might use at the beach since it involves sliding a lightweight antenna back and forth over the ground surface. The antenna is affixed to the end of an extension that is either clipped to or held by the user. This allows him to walk around in any direction, either looking for or following pipes with the antenna location being constantly recorded by the positioning system. Once a target appears on the screen, the user can locate by swinging the unit to align the cursor over the dot. Leak detection was also a central part of this project, and although much effort was invested into its development, conclusive results are not available at the time of the writing of this document. Details of the efforts that were made as a part of this cooperative agreement are presented.

David Cist; Alan Schutz

2005-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

135

Optimal design and allocation of electrified vehicles and dedicated charging infrastructure for minimum life cycle greenhouse gas emissions and cost  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for minimum life cycle greenhouse gas emissions and cost Elizabeth Traut a,n , Chris Hendrickson b,1 , Erica and dedicated workplace charging infrastructure in the fleet for minimum life cycle cost or GHG emissions over vehicle and battery costs are the major drivers for PHEVs and BEVs to enter and dominate the cost

Michalek, Jeremy J.

136

Property Tax Abatement for Green Buildings  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Nevada provides a property tax abatement for new non-residential and multifamily residential green buildings, and existing buildings or structures which are renovated for use by a manufacturer to...

137

Renewable Energy Generation Zone Property Tax Abatement  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Local areas in Mimssouri can be designated as Renewable Energy Generation Zones and receive property tax abatements as part of the Enhanced Enterprise Zone program. Legislation (H.B. 737) enacted...

138

Renewable Energy Sales and Use Tax Abatement  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

New or expanded businesses in Nevada may apply to the Director of the State Office of Energy for a sales and use tax abatement for qualifying renewable energy technologies. Purchaser is only...

139

Natural Gas Compression Technology Improves Transport and Efficiencies, Lowers Operating Costs  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

An award-winning compressor design that decreases the energy required to compress and transport natural gas, lowers operating costs, improves efficiencies and reduces the environmental footprint of well site operations has been developed by a Massachusetts-based company with support from the U.S. Department of Energy

140

Universal model for water costs of gas exchange by animals and plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

terrestrial animals and plants exchange O2 and CO2 with the atmosphere and thereby incur costs in the currency Hemphill Brown, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM, and approved March 30, 2010 (received for review), the steepness of the gradients for gas and vapor, and the transport mode (convective or diffusive). Model

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas abatement cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Characterization of oil and gas waste disposal practices and assessment of treatment costs. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study examines wastes associated with the onshore exploration and production of crude oil and natural gas in the US. The objective of this study was to update and enhance the current state of knowledge with regard to oil and gas waste quantities, the potential environmental impact of these wastes, potential methods of treatment, and the costs associated with meeting various degrees of treatment. To meet this objective, the study consisted of three tasks: (1) the development of a production Environmental Database (PED) for the purpose of assessing current oil and gas waste volumes by state and for investigating the potential environmental impacts associated with current waste disposal practices on a local scale; (2) the evaluation of available and developing technologies for treating produced water waste streams and the identification of unit process configurations; and (3) the evaluation of the costs associated with various degrees of treatment achievable by different treatment configurations. The evaluation of feasible technologies for the treatment of produced water waste streams was handled in the context of comparing the level of treatment achievable with the associated cost of treatment. Treatment processes were evaluated for the removal of four categories of produced water contaminants: particulate material, volatile organic compounds, adsorbable organic compounds, and dissolved inorganic species. Results showed dissolved inorganic species to be the most costly to remove. The potential cost of treating all 18.3 billion barrels of produced water generated in a year amounts to some 15 billion dollars annually.

Bedient, P.B.

1995-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

142

Equipment Design and Cost Estimation for Small Modular Biomass Systems, Synthesis Gas Cleanup, and Oxygen Separation Equipment; Task 2: Gas Cleanup Design and Cost Estimates -- Wood Feedstock  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of Task 2, Gas Cleanup and Cost Estimates, Nexant investigated the appropriate process scheme for treatment of wood-derived syngas for use in the synthesis of liquid fuels. Two different 2,000 metric tonne per day gasification schemes, a low-pressure, indirect system using the gasifier, and a high-pressure, direct system using gasification technology were evaluated. Initial syngas conditions from each of the gasifiers was provided to the team by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. Nexant was the prime contractor and principal investigator during this task; technical assistance was provided by both GTI and Emery Energy.

Nexant Inc.

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Fuel switch could bring big savings for HECO Liquefied natural gas beats low-sulfur oil in cost and equipment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fuel switch could bring big savings for HECO Liquefied natural gas beats low-sulfur oil in cost gas instead of continuing to burn low-sulfur fuel oil, a report said. Switching to liquefied natural who switch from gasoline-powered vehicles to ones fueled by compressed natural gas could save as much

144

The marginal costs and pricing of gas system upgrades to accommodate new electric generators  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the coming years, competitive forces and restructuring in the electric industry can be expected to increase substantially the demand for gas delivery service to new electric generating units by local distribution companies (LDCs) and pipeline companies across the United States. In meeting this demand, it is important that the prices paid by electric generators for gas delivery service properly reflect the costs of the resources utilized in providing service to them in order that their decisions regarding what to build and where as well as the manner in which their units are dispatched are as efficient as possible from a societal standpoint. This will assure that society`s resources will be neither squandered nor underutilized in providing service to these generators and aid in assuring that, once built, the units are run in an efficient manner. While the most efficient solution to this problem is a secondary market in tradeable pipeline capacity rights, we do not have such a system in place at this time. Further, tradeable rights for LDC capacity may be difficult to establish. An interim solution that will work in the confines of the present system and not create problems for the transition to tradeable rights is required. This purpose of this paper is to set out the important first principals involved in applying marginal costing to the provision of gas delivery service to new electric generating units rather than to present empirical data on the marginal costs of such service. Experience has shown that marginal costs are usually unique to the particular situation being costed.

Ambrose, B.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

145

City of Houston- Property Tax Abatement for Green Buildings  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

In September 2009, Houston enacted Ordinance No. 2009-858, the City of Houston Tax Abatement Program, which establishes a partial tax abatement for commercial buildings that meet LEED standards. A ...

146

Equipment Design and Cost Estimation for Small Modular Biomass Systems, Synthesis Gas Cleanup, and Oxygen Separation Equipment; Task 2: Gas Cleanup Design and Cost Estimates -- Black Liquor Gasification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of Task 2, Gas Cleanup and Cost Estimates, Nexant investigated the appropriate process scheme for removal of acid gases from black liquor-derived syngas for use in both power and liquid fuels synthesis. Two 3,200 metric tonne per day gasification schemes, both low-temperature/low-pressure (1100 deg F, 40 psi) and high-temperature/high-pressure (1800 deg F, 500 psi) were used for syngas production. Initial syngas conditions from each of the gasifiers was provided to the team by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and Princeton University. Nexant was the prime contractor and principal investigator during this task; technical assistance was provided by both GTI and Emery Energy.

Nexant Inc.

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Carbon black: A low cost colloidal additive for controlling gas-migration in cement slurries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effect of different additives on the permeability of cement slurries to formation gas has been studied with the aid of a gas flow apparatus. The performance of two commercial additives (polymer latex and silica fume) has been compared to that of a novel additive (carbon black) that has been developed in the authors laboratories with the aim of simplifying the cement slurry composition and reducing field operational costs. Data on the thickening time, fluid loss, rheology and compressive strength are also presented to provide a clear picture of the potential of carbon black as a substitute for silica fume and polymer latex in some field applications. Finally, the paper describes the results of a field application using carbon black as a gas-block additive in the cement slurry.

Calloni, G.; Moroni, N.; Miano, F.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

A note on the Lyapunov Equation Alessandro Abate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A note on the Lyapunov Equation Alessandro Abate a.abate@tudelft.nl Delft Center for Systems and Control, TU Delft October 27, 2011 ­ Ac.Yr. 2011/12, 1e Sem. Q1 ­ Note ­ sc4026 #12;A. Abate Consider/12, 1e Sem. Q1 ­ Note ­ sc4026 1 #12;A. Abate Consider the following operations: AX + XAT = -Q2 AXX-1

Abate, Alessandro

149

A Unified Framework for Numerically Inverting Laplace Joseph Abate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Unified Framework for Numerically Inverting Laplace Transforms Joseph Abate 900 Hammond Road been many applications; e.g., see the survey by Abate et al. (1999) and the textbook treatment by Kao transforms; e.g., see the surveys in Abate and Whitt (1992) and Chapter 19 of Davies (2002), the extensive

Whitt, Ward

150

FRASER POLLUTION ABATEMENT OFFICE PROGRESS REPORT 1995 -1996  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;FRASER POLLUTION ABATEMENT OFFICE PROGRESS REPORT 1995 - 1996 & PROGRESS REPORT 1996 - 1997 DOE FRAP 1997-21 Prepared for: Environment Canada Environmental Protection Fraser Pollution Abatement North by Environment Canada under the Fraser River Action Plan through its Fraser Pollution Abatement Office

151

Selecting the proper fuel gas for cost-effective oxyfuel cutting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The motivating factor behind recent research and development efforts in metal cutting has been the growing need for companies everywhere to embrace emerging technologies if they are to complete in the global economy. To quickly implement these productivity improvements and gain lower bottom line costs for welding and cutting operations, rapid commercialization of these process advancements is needed. Although initially more expensive, additive-enhanced fuel gases may be the most cost-effective choice for certain cutting applications. The cost of additive-enhanced fuel gases can be justified where oxygen pricing is low (such as with bulk oxygen). Propylene exhibited equal cutting speeds to acetylene and improved cutting economy under specific conditions, which involved longer cuts on thicker base materials. With a longer cut distance, the extra time required to reach the kindling temperature (when compared to acetylene) becomes less critical. It is important to note that kindling temperature was reached more rapidly with propylene than it was with propane, but both fuel gases were slower than acetylene. When factors such as these are considered, many applications are found to be more cost effectively performed with the more expensive acetylene or propylene fuel gases. Each individual application must be studied on a singular basis to determine the most cost-effective choice when selecting the fuel gas.

Lyttle, K.A.; Stapon, W.F.G. [Praxair, Inc., Danbury, CT (United States); Guimaraes, A.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Hanford Site Asbestos Abatement Plan. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Site Asbestos Abatement Plan (Plan) lists priorities for asbestos abatement activities to be conducted in Hanford Site facilities. The Plan is based on asbestos assessment information gathered in fiscal year 1989 that evaluated all Hanford Site facilities for the presence and condition of asbestos. Of those facilities evaluated, 414 contain asbestos-containing materials and are classified according to the potential risk of asbestos exposure to building personnel. The Plan requires that asbestos condition update reports be prepared for all affected facilities. The reporting is completed by the asbestos coordinator for each of the 414 affected facilities and transmitted to the Plan manager annually. The Plan manager uses this information to reprioritize future project lists. Currently, five facilities are determined to be Class Al, indicating a high potential for asbestos exposure. Class Al and B1 facilities are the highest priority for asbestos abatement. Abatement of the Class A1 and Bl facilities is scheduled through fiscal year 1997. Removal of asbestos in B1 facilities will reduce the risk for further Class ``A`` conditions to arise.

Mewes, B.S.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

DEVELOPMENT OF A LOW COST INFERENTIAL NATURAL GAS ENERGY FLOW RATE PROTOTYPE RETROFIT MODULE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1998, Southwest Research Institute began a multi-year project to develop a working prototype instrument module for natural gas energy measurement. The module will be used to retrofit a natural gas custody transfer flow meter for energy measurement, at a cost an order of magnitude lower than a gas chromatograph. Development and evaluation of the prototype energy meter in 2002-2003 included: (1) refinement of the algorithm used to infer properties of the natural gas stream, such as heating value; (2) evaluation of potential sensing technologies for nitrogen content, improvements in carbon dioxide measurements, and improvements in ultrasonic measurement technology and signal processing for improved speed of sound measurements; (3) design, fabrication and testing of a new prototype energy meter module incorporating these algorithm and sensor refinements; and (4) laboratory and field performance tests of the original and modified energy meter modules. Field tests of the original energy meter module have provided results in close agreement with an onsite gas chromatograph. The original algorithm has also been tested at a field site as a stand-alone application using measurements from in situ instruments, and has demonstrated its usefulness as a diagnostic tool. The algorithm has been revised to use measurement technologies existing in the module to measure the gas stream at multiple states and infer nitrogen content. The instrumentation module has also been modified to incorporate recent improvements in CO{sub 2} and sound speed sensing technology. Laboratory testing of the upgraded module has identified additional testing needed to attain the target accuracy in sound speed measurements and heating value.

E. Kelner; D. George; T. Morrow; T. Owen; M. Nored; R. Burkey; A. Minachi

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

High Speed, Low Cost Fabrication of Gas Diffusion Electrodes for Membrane Electrode Assemblies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fabrication of membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) depends on creating inks or pastes of catalyst and binder, and applying this suspension to either the membrane (catalyst coated membrane) or gas diffusion media (gas diffusion electrode) and respectively laminating either gas diffusion media or gas diffusion electrodes (GDEs) to the membrane. One barrier to cost effective fabrication for either of these approaches is the development of stable and consistent suspensions. This program investigated the fundamental forces that destabilize the suspensions and developed innovative approaches to create new, highly stable formulations. These more concentrated formulations needed fewer application passes, could be coated over longer and wider substrates, and resulted in significantly lower coating defects. In March of 2012 BASF Fuel Cell released a new high temperature product based on these advances, whereby our customers received higher performing, more uniform MEAs resulting in higher stack build yields. Furthermore, these new materials resulted in an instant increase in capacity due to higher product yields and material throughput. Although not part of the original scope of this program, these new formulations have also led us to materials that demonstrate equivalent performance with 30% less precious metal in the anode. This program has achieved two key milestones in DOEs Manufacturing R&D program: demonstration of processes for direct coating of electrodes and continuous in-line measurement for component fabrication.

DeCastro, Emory S.; Tsou, Yu-Min; Liu, Zhenyu

2013-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

155

Low cost hydrogen/novel membrane technology for hydrogen separation from synthesis gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To make the coal-to-hydrogen route economically attractive, improvements are being sought in each step of the process: coal gasification, water-carbon monoxide shift reaction, and hydrogen separation. This report addresses the use of membranes in the hydrogen separation step. The separation of hydrogen from synthesis gas is a major cost element in the manufacture of hydrogen from coal. Separation by membranes is an attractive, new, and still largely unexplored approach to the problem. Membrane processes are inherently simple and efficient and often have lower capital and operating costs than conventional processes. In this report current ad future trends in hydrogen production and use are first summarized. Methods of producing hydrogen from coal are then discussed, with particular emphasis on the Texaco entrained flow gasifier and on current methods of separating hydrogen from this gas stream. The potential for membrane separations in the process is then examined. In particular, the use of membranes for H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}/CO, and H{sub 2}/N{sub 2} separations is discussed. 43 refs., 14 figs., 6 tabs.

Not Available

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Abating climate change. What will be done and the consequences for investors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is meant for institutional investors. Sections discuss: the science of climate change; global emissions - abatement scenario; coal - the world's dominant fuel for electric generation; CO{sub 2} transport and storage; nuclear energy - the new green solution; renewable energy - harnessing the power of water, wind and sun; regulation; increasing energy efficiency - the lowest cost option; enhancing the efficiency of electric applications; enhancing the efficiency of transportation; macroeconomic implications; and investment implications.

Raskin, A.; Mellquist, N.; Shah, S.; Winton, B.

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

157

Building Commissioning: A Golden Opportunity for Reducing Energy Costs and Greenhouse-gas Emissions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The aim of commissioning new buildings is to ensure that they deliver, if not exceed, the performance and energy savings promised by their design. When applied to existing buildings, commissioning identifies the almost inevitable 'drift' from where things should be and puts the building back on course. In both contexts, commissioning is a systematic, forensic approach to quality assurance, rather than a technology per se. Although commissioning has earned increased recognition in recent years - even a toehold in Wikipedia - it remains an enigmatic practice whose visibility severely lags its potential. Over the past decade, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has built the world's largest compilation and meta-analysis of commissioning experience in commercial buildings. Since our last report (Mills et al. 2004) the database has grown from 224 to 643 buildings (all located in the United States, and spanning 26 states), from 30 to 100 million square feet of floorspace, and from $17 million to $43 million in commissioning expenditures. The recorded cases of new-construction commissioning took place in buildings representing $2.2 billion in total construction costs (up from 1.5 billion). The work of many more commissioning providers (18 versus 37) is represented in this study, as is more evidence of energy and peak-power savings as well as cost-effectiveness. We now translate these impacts into avoided greenhouse gases and provide new indicators of cost-effectiveness. We also draw attention to the specific challenges and opportunities for high-tech facilities such as labs, cleanrooms, data centers, and healthcare facilities. The results are compelling. We developed an array of benchmarks for characterizing project performance and cost-effectiveness. The median normalized cost to deliver commissioning was $0.30/ft2 for existing buildings and $1.16/ft2 for new construction (or 0.4% of the overall construction cost). The commissioning projects for which data are available revealed over 10,000 energy-related problems, resulting in 16% median whole-building energy savings in existing buildings and 13% in new construction, with payback time of 1.1 years and 4.2 years, respectively. In terms of other cost-benefit indicators, median benefit-cost ratios of 4.5 and 1.1, and cash-on-cash returns of 91% and 23% were attained for existing and new buildings, respectively. High-tech buildings were particularly cost-effective, and saved higher amounts of energy due to their energy-intensiveness. Projects with a comprehensive approach to commissioning attained nearly twice the overall median level of savings and five-times the savings of the least-thorough projects. It is noteworthy that virtually all existing building projects were cost-effective by each metric (0.4 years for the upper quartile and 2.4 years for the lower quartile), as were the majority of new-construction projects (1.5 years and 10.8 years, respectively). We also found high cost-effectiveness for each specific measure for which we have data. Contrary to a common perception, cost-effectiveness is often achieved even in smaller buildings. Thanks to energy savings valued more than the cost of the commissioning process, associated reductions in greenhouse gas emissions come at 'negative' cost. In fact, the median cost of conserved carbon is negative - -$110 per tonne for existing buildings and -$25/tonne for new construction - as compared with market prices for carbon trading and offsets in the +$10 to +$30/tonne range. Further enhancing the value of commissioning, its non-energy benefits surpass those of most other energy-management practices. Significant first-cost savings (e.g., through right-sizing of heating and cooling equipment) routinely offset at least a portion of commissioning costs - fully in some cases. When accounting for these benefits, the net median commissioning project cost was reduced by 49% on average, while in many cases they exceeded the direct value of the energy savings. Commissioning also improves worker comfort, mitigates indoor air quality problems

Mills, Evan

2009-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

158

Economic viability of shale gas production in the Marcellus Shale; indicated by production rates, costs and current natural gas prices.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? The U.S. natural gas industry has changed because of the recent ability to produce natural gas from unconventional shale deposits. One of the largest (more)

Duman, Ryan J.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Equipment Design and Cost Estimation for Small Modular Biomass Systems, Synthesis Gas Cleanup, and Oxygen Separation Equipment; Task 1: Cost Estimates of Small Modular Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This deliverable is the Final Report for Task 1, Cost Estimates of Small Modular Systems, as part of NREL Award ACO-5-44027, ''Equipment Design and Cost Estimation for Small Modular Biomass Systems, Synthesis Gas Cleanup and Oxygen Separation Equipment''. Subtask 1.1 looked into processes and technologies that have been commercially built at both large and small scales, with three technologies, Fluidized Catalytic Cracking (FCC) of refinery gas oil, Steam Methane Reforming (SMR) of Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids (NGL) Expanders, chosen for further investigation. These technologies were chosen due to their applicability relative to other technologies being considered by NREL for future commercial applications, such as indirect gasification and fluidized bed tar cracking. Research in this subject is driven by an interest in the impact that scaling has on the cost and major process unit designs for commercial technologies. Conclusions from the evaluations performed could be applied to other technologies being considered for modular or skid-mounted applications.

Nexant Inc.

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Do Americans Consume Too Little Natural Gas? An Empirical Test of Marginal Cost Pricing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Residential Market for Natural Gas, 2008, working paper. [of Electricity and Natural Gas, Journal of IndustrialPrices: Evidence from Natural Gas Distribution Utilities,

Davis, Lucas; Muehlegger, Erich

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas abatement cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Tradeoffs between Costs and Greenhouse Gas Emissions in the Design of Urban Transit Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of veh (kWh/veh-km) Cost per kWh ($/kWh) Operating cost ($/of veh (kWh/veh-km) Cost per kWh ($/kWh) Operating cost ($/

Griswold, Julia Baird

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Chapter 6.15 ABATEMENT OF PUBLIC NUISANCES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 6.15 ABATEMENT OF PUBLIC NUISANCES Sections: 6.15.010 Purpose. 6.15.015 Definitions. 6.15.020 Declaration of nuisances. 6.15.021 Summary Abatement. 6.15.022 Method of giving notice. 6.15.025 Determination of nuisance. 6.15.030 Appeal. 6.15.035 Time limit for compliance. 6.15.040 Abatement by City. 6.15.041 Report

Lyubomirsky, Ilya

163

Tradeoffs between Costs and Greenhouse Gas Emissions in the Design of Urban Transit Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Working Group on Social Cost of Carbon, United StatesSupport Document: Social Cost of Carbon for Regulatory

Griswold, Julia Baird

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Program Review, Workplace Inspections, Hazards Analysis And Abatement  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This document provides guidance information and suggested procedures for performing program review, workplace inspections, hazards analysis, and abatement, successfully at DOE Federal employee worksites.

165

City of Cleveland- Residential Property Tax Abatement for Green Buildings  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The City of Cleveland, in cooperation with the Cuyahoga County Auditor's Office, provides a 100% tax abatement for residential properties built to the Cleveland Green Building Standard. Tax...

166

City of Cincinnati- Property Tax Abatement for Green Buildings  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The City of Cincinnati offers property tax abatements for residential and commercial buildings constructed or renovated to meet LEED certification standards. The original green building tax...

167

NOx Abatement Research and Development CRADA with Navistar Incorporate...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Abatement Research and Development CRADA with Navistar Incorporated (successor to International Truck and Engine Corporation) Josh A. Pihl and Todd J. Toops Oak Ridge National...

168

EMISSION ABATEMENT VERSUS DEVELOPMENT AS STRATEGIES TO REDUCE VULNERABILITY TO CLIMATE CHANGE: AN APPLICATION OF  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EMISSION ABATEMENT VERSUS DEVELOPMENT AS STRATEGIES TO REDUCE VULNERABILITY TO CLIMATE CHANGE development aid is more effective in reducing vulnerability than is emission abatement. The hypothesis, vulnerability, adaptive capacity, development #12;EMISSION ABATEMENT VERSUS DEVELOPMENT AS STRATEGIES TO REDUCE

169

The Effect of Uncertainty on Pollution Abatement Investments: Measuring Hurdle Rates for Swedish Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Effect of Uncertainty on Pollution Abatement Investments: Measuring Hurdle Rates for Swedish Industry Abstract: We estimate hurdle rates for firms' investments in pollution abatement technology, using, oil price uncertainty, abatement investment, sulfur emissions, pulp and paper industry, energy

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

170

A Cost Effective Multi-Spectral Scanner for Natural Gas Detection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to design, fabricate and demonstrate a cost effective, multi-spectral scanner for natural gas leak detection in transmission and distribution pipelines. During the first year of the project, a laboratory version of the multi-spectral scanner was designed, fabricated, and tested at EnUrga Inc. The multi-spectral scanner was also evaluated using a blind Department of Energy study at the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center. The performance of the scanner was inconsistent during the blind study. However, most of the leaks were outside the view of the multi-spectral scanner that was developed during the first year of the project. Therefore, a definite evaluation of the capability of the scanner was not obtained. Despite the results, sufficient number of plumes was detected fully confirming the feasibility of the multi-spectral scanner. During the second year, the optical design of the scanner was changed to improve the sensitivity of the system. Laboratory tests show that the system can reliably detect small leaks (20 SCFH) at 30 to 50 feet. A prototype scanner was built and evaluated during the second year of the project. Only laboratory evaluations were completed during the second year. The laboratory evaluations show the feasibility of using the scanner to determine natural gas pipeline leaks. Further field evaluations and optimization of the scanner are required before commercialization of the scanner can be initiated.

Yudaya Sivathanu; Jongmook Lim; Vinoo Narayanan; Seonghyeon Park

2005-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

171

Marginal Abatement Cost Tool (MACTool) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpIncMAKGalway Bay(HeldManhattan, Kansas:Margaretta High School

172

ECN GHG Marginal Abatement Cost curves (NAMAC) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar Power Basics (The followingDirectLow Carbon Transition Jump to:

173

Offsite commercial disposal of oil and gas exploration and production waste :availability, options, and cost.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A survey conducted in 1995 by the American Petroleum Institute (API) found that the U.S. exploration and production (E&P) segment of the oil and gas industry generated more than 149 million bbl of drilling wastes, almost 18 billion bbl of produced water, and 21 million bbl of associated wastes. The results of that survey, published in 2000, suggested that 3% of drilling wastes, less than 0.5% of produced water, and 15% of associated wastes are sent to offsite commercial facilities for disposal. Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne) collected information on commercial E&P waste disposal companies in different states in 1997. While the information is nearly a decade old, the report has proved useful. In 2005, Argonne began collecting current information to update and expand the data. This report describes the new 2005-2006 database and focuses on the availability of offsite commercial disposal companies, the prevailing disposal methods, and estimated disposal costs. The data were collected in two phases. In the first phase, state oil and gas regulatory officials in 31 states were contacted to determine whether their agency maintained a list of permitted commercial disposal companies dedicated to oil. In the second stage, individual commercial disposal companies were interviewed to determine disposal methods and costs. The availability of offsite commercial disposal companies and facilities falls into three categories. The states with high oil and gas production typically have a dedicated network of offsite commercial disposal companies and facilities in place. In other states, such an infrastructure does not exist and very often, commercial disposal companies focus on produced water services. About half of the states do not have any industry-specific offsite commercial disposal infrastructure. In those states, operators take their wastes to local municipal landfills if permitted or haul the wastes to other states. This report provides state-by-state summaries of the types of offsite commercial disposal facilities that are found in each state. In later sections, data are presented by waste type and then by disposal method.

Puder, M. G.; Veil, J. A.

2006-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

174

E-Print Network 3.0 - abatement jof pollutants Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Health & Safety Summary: prior to any asbestos abatement project start up. The local air pollution control agency for King... asbestos abatement contractor to perform asbestos...

175

Reduction on synthesis gas costs by decrease of steam/carbon and oxygen/carbon ratios in the feedstock  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The costs for syngas production at low steam/carbon and oxygen/carbon ratios have been analyzed for simplified process schemes of the main syngas production technologies (steam-CO{sub 2} reforming, autothermal reforming, and combined reforming) and different synthesis gas compositions. The broad analysis arises from experimental indication on the possibility of preventing carbon formation at low steam/carbon and oxygen/carbon ratios in the feedstock by choosing an appropriate catalyst or by introducing small amounts of sulfur compounds in the reactant feed. The analysis is limited to the synthesis gas production step and does not include its downstream processes. The results indicate that technologies at low steam/carbon and oxygen/carbon ratios would have a significant positive impact on synthesis gas costs.

Basini, L.; Piovesan, L. [Snamprogetti S.p.A. Research Labs., Milano (Italy)] [Snamprogetti S.p.A. Research Labs., Milano (Italy)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Options and costs for offsite disposal of oil and gas exploration and production wastes.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the United States, most of the exploration and production (E&P) wastes generated at onshore oil and gas wells are disposed of or otherwise managed at the well site. Certain types of wastes are not suitable for onsite management, and some well locations in sensitive environments cannot be used for onsite management. In these situations, operators must transport the wastes offsite for disposal. In 1997, Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne) prepared a report that identified offsite commercial disposal facilities in the United States. This information has since become outdated. Over the past year, Argonne has updated the study through contacts with state oil and gas agencies and commercial disposal companies. The new report, including an extensive database for more than 200 disposal facilities, provides an excellent reference for information about commercial disposal operations. This paper describes Argonne's report. The national study provides summaries of the types of offsite commercial disposal facilities found in each state. Data are presented by waste type and by disposal method. The categories of E&P wastes in the database include: contaminated soils, naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM), oil-based muds and cuttings, produced water, tank bottoms, and water-based muds and cuttings. The different waste management or disposal methods in the database involve: bioremediation, burial, salt cavern, discharge, evaporation, injection, land application, recycling, thermal treatment, and treatment. The database includes disposal costs for each facility. In the United States, most of the 18 billion barrels (bbl) of produced water, 149 million bbl of drilling wastes, and 21 million bbl of associated wastes generated at onshore oil and gas wells are disposed of or otherwise managed at the well site. However, under certain conditions, operators will seek offsite management options for these E&P wastes. Commercial disposal facilities are offsite businesses that accept and manage E&P wastes for a fee. Their services include waste management and disposal, transportation, cleaning of vehicles and tanks, disposal of wash water, and, in some cases, laboratory analysis. Commercial disposal facilities offer a suite of waste management methods and technologies.

Puder, M. G.; Veil, J. A.; Environmental Science Division

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Advanced Membrane Filtration Technology for Cost Effective Recovery of Fresh Water from Oil & Gas Produced Brine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Produced water is a major waste generated at the oil and natural gas wells in the state of Texas. This water could be a possible source of new fresh water to meet the growing demands of the state after treatment and purification. Treatment of brine generated in oil fields or produced water with an ultrafiltration membranes were the subject of this thesis. The characterization of ultrafiltration membranes for oil and suspended solids removal of produced water, coupled with the reverse osmosis (RO) desalination of brine were studied on lab size membrane testing equipment and a field size testing unit to test whether a viable membrane system could be used to treat produced water. Oil and suspended solids were evaluated using turbidity and oil in water measurements taken periodically. The research considered the effect of pressure and flow rate on membrane performance of produced water treatment of three commercially available membranes for oily water. The study also analyzed the flux through the membrane and any effect it had on membrane performance. The research showed that an ultrafiltration membrane provided turbidity removal of over 99% and oil removal of 78% for the produced water samples. The results indicated that the ultrafiltration membranes would be asset as one of the first steps in purifying the water. Further results on selected RO membranes showed that salt rejection of greater than 97% could be achieved with satisfactory flux and at reasonable operating cost.

David B. Burnett

2004-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

178

Carbon capture retrofits and the cost of regulatory uncertainty  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Power generation firms confront impending replacement of an aging coal-fired fleet in a business environment characterized by volatile natural gas prices and uncertain carbon regulation. We develop a stochastic dynamic programming model of firm investment decisions that minimizes the expected present value of future power generation costs under uncertain natural gas and carbon prices. We explore the implications of regulatory uncertainty on generation technology choice and the optimal timing of investment, and assess the implications of these choices for regulators. We find that interaction of regulatory uncertainty with irreversible investment always raises the social cost of carbon abatement. Further, the social cost of regulatory uncertainty is strongly dependent on the relative competitiveness of IGCC plants, for which the cost of later carbon capture retrofits is comparatively small, and on the firm's ability to use investments in natural gas generation as a transitional strategy to manage carbon regulation uncertainty. Without highly competitive IGCC or low gas prices, regulatory uncertainty can increase the expected social cost of reducing emissions by 40 to 60%.

Reinelt, P.S.; Keith, D.W. [SUNY College of Fredonia, Fredonia, NY (United States). Dept. of Economics

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

The Effect of Transaction Costs on Greenhouse Gas Emission Mitigation for Agriculture and Forestry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

increasing the bioenergy and afforestation role. Storage costs diminish the bioenergy role and favor forest and sequestration items. The results of this study illustrate that transactions and storage costs are important considerations in policy and market...

Kim, Seong Woo

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

180

Low Cost Chemical Feedstocks Using an Improved and Energy Efficient Natural Gas Liquid (NGL) Removal Process, Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project is to develop a new low-cost and energy efficient Natural Gas Liquid (NGL) recovery process - through a combination of theoretical, bench-scale and pilot-scale testing - so that it could be offered to the natural gas industry for commercialization. The new process, known as the IROA process, is based on U.S. patent No. 6,553,784, which if commercialized, has the potential of achieving substantial energy savings compared to currently used cryogenic technology. When successfully developed, this technology will benefit the petrochemical industry, which uses NGL as feedstocks, and will also benefit other chemical industries that utilize gas-liquid separation and distillation under similar operating conditions. Specific goals and objectives of the overall program include: (i) collecting relevant physical property and Vapor Liquid Equilibrium (VLE) data for the design and evaluation of the new technology, (ii) solving critical R&D issues including the identification of suitable dehydration and NGL absorbing solvents, inhibiting corrosion, and specifying proper packing structure and materials, (iii) designing, construction and operation of bench and pilot-scale units to verify design performance, (iv) computer simulation of the process using commercial software simulation platforms such as Aspen-Plus and HYSYS, and (v) preparation of a commercialization plan and identification of industrial partners that are interested in utilizing the new technology. NGL is a collective term for C2+ hydrocarbons present in the natural gas. Historically, the commercial value of the separated NGL components has been greater than the thermal value of these liquids in the gas. The revenue derived from extracting NGLs is crucial to ensuring the overall profitability of the domestic natural gas production industry and therefore of ensuring a secure and reliable supply in the 48 contiguous states. However, rising natural gas prices have dramatically reduced the economic incentive to extract NGLs from domestically produced natural gas. Successful gas processors will be those who adopt technologies that are less energy intensive, have lower capital and operating costs and offer the flexibility to tailor the plant performance to maximize product revenue as market conditions change, while maintaining overall system efficiency. Presently, cryogenic turbo-expander technology is the dominant NGL recovery process and it is used throughout the world. This process is known to be highly energy intensive, as substantial energy is required to recompress the processed gas back to pipeline pressure. The purpose of this project is to develop a new NGL separation process that is flexible in terms of ethane rejection and can reduce energy consumption by 20-30% from current levels, particularly for ethane recoveries of less than 70%. The new process integrates the dehydration of the raw natural gas stream and the removal of NGLs in such a way that heat recovery is maximized and pressure losses are minimized so that high-value equipment such as the compressor, turbo-expander, and a separate dehydration unit are not required. GTI completed a techno-economic evaluation of the new process based on an Aspen-HYSYS simulation model. The evaluation incorporated purchased equipment cost estimates obtained from equipment suppliers and two different commercial software packages; namely, Aspen-Icarus and Preliminary Design and Quoting Service (PDQ$). For a 100 MMscfd gas processing plant, the annualized capital cost for the new technology was found to be about 10% lower than that of conventional technology for C2 recovery above 70% and about 40% lower than that of conventional technology for C2 recovery below 50%. It was also found that at around 40-50% C2 recovery (which is economically justifiable at the current natural gas prices), the energy cost to recover NGL using the new technology is about 50% of that of conventional cryogenic technology.

Meyer, Howard, S.; Lu, Yingzhong

2012-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas abatement cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Do Americans Consume Too Little Natural Gas? An Empirical Test of Marginal Cost Pricing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

natural gas consumers rises, but tax collection introduces distortions in other parts of the economy.natural gas users, these gains are o?set by tax distortions in other parts of the economy.

Davis, Lucas; Muehlegger, Erich

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Do Americans Consume Too Little Natural Gas? An Empirical Test of Marginal Cost Pricing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

natural gas is used for home heating. Net revenue follows abeing, from heating and cooling our homes and businesses to

Davis, Lucas; Muehlegger, Erich

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Induced technical change and the cost of climate policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper investigates the potential for a carbon tax to induce R&D, and for the consequent induced technical change (ITC) to lower the macroeconomic cost of abating carbon emissions. ITC is modelled within a general ...

Sue Wing, Ian.

184

Short-term CO? abatement in the European power sector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper focuses on the possibilities for short term abatement in response to a CO2 price through fuel switching in the European power sector. The model E-Simulate is used to simulate the electricity generation in Europe ...

Delarue, Erik D.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Design of a Plasma Abatement System for Perfluoronated Compounds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The plasma abatement system co-developed by Rf Environmental, Inc. and Texas A & M University has been effective at destroying the global warming gases CF4 and C4F8. The destruction of greenhouse gases, specifically perfluorocompounds...

Butler, Matthew

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

186

City of Friendswood- Commercial Green Building Tax Abatement  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The City of Friendswood offers a tax abatement for LEED-certified commercial buildings located within the city. Applicants must register their projects with the USGBC before submiting an...

187

Modeling and managing separation for noise abatement arrival procedures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aircraft noise is a significant concern to communities near airports, and therefore a constraint to the growth of aviation. Advanced noise abatement approach and arrival procedures have been shown in previous studies and ...

Ren, Liling

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Property Tax Abatement for Production and Manufacturing Facilities  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

In May 2007, Montana enacted legislation (H.B. 3) that allows a property tax abatement for new renewable energy production facilities, new renewable energy manufacturing facilities, and renewable...

189

The gas turbine-modular helium reactor (GT-MHR), high efficiency, cost competitive, nuclear energy for the next century  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Gas Turbine-Modular Helium Reactor (GT-MHR) is the result of coupling the evolution of a small passively safe reactor with key technology developments in the US during the last decade: large industrial gas turbines, large active magnetic bearings, and compact, highly effective plate-fin heat exchangers. The GT-MHR is the only reactor concept which provides a step increase in economic performance combined with increased safety. This is accomplished through its unique utilization of the Brayton cycle to produce electricity directly with the high temperature helium primary coolant from the reactor directly driving the gas turbine electrical generator. This cannot be accomplished with another reactor concept. It retains the high levels of passive safety and the standardized modular design of the steam cycle MHTGR, while showing promise for a significant reduction in power generating costs by increasing plant net efficiency to a remarkable 47%.

Zgliczynski, J.B.; Silady, F.A.; Neylan, A.J.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Estimate Costs to Implement Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategies for Business Travel  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Once business travel reduction strategies have been identified, a Federal agency may evaluate the cost of implementing those measures and any potential savings from avoided travel.

191

THE CO2 ABATEMENT POTENTIAL OF CALIFORNIA'S MID-SIZED COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) is working with the California Energy Commission (CEC) todetermine the potential role of commercial sector distributed generation (DG) with combined heat and power (CHP) capability deployment in greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) reductions. CHP applications at large industrial sites are well known, and a large share of their potential has already been harvested. In contrast, relatively little attention has been paid to the potential of medium-sized commercial buildings, i.e. ones with peak electric loads ranging from 100 kW to 5 MW. We examine how this sector might implement DG with CHP in cost minimizing microgrids that are able to adopt and operate various energy technologies, such as solar photovoltaics (PV), on-site thermal generation, heat exchangers, solar thermal collectors, absorption chillers, and storage systems. We apply a mixed-integer linear program (MILP) that minimizes a site?s annual energy costs as its objective. Using 138 representative mid-sized commercial sites in California (CA), existing tariffs of three major electricity distribution ultilities, and performance data of available technology in 2020, we find the GHG reduction potential for this CA commercial sector segment, which represents about 35percent of total statewide commercial sector sales. Under the assumptions made, in a reference case, this segment is estimated to be capable of economically installing 1.4 GW of CHP, 35percent of the California Air Resources Board (CARB) statewide 4 GW goal for total incremental CHP deployment by 2020. However, because CARB?s assumed utilization is far higher than is found by the MILP, the adopted CHP only contributes 19percent of the CO2 target. Several sensitivity runs were completed. One applies a simple feed-in tariff similar to net metering, and another includes a generous self-generation incentive program (SGIP) subsidy for fuel cells. The feed-in tariff proves ineffective at stimulating CHP deployment, while the SGIP buy down is more powerful. The attractiveness of CHP varies widely by climate zone and service territory, but in general, hotter inlandareas and San Diego are the more attractive regions because high cooling loads achieve higher equipment utilization. Additionally, large office buildings are surprisingly good hosts for CHP, so large office buildings in San Diego and hotter urban centers emerge as promising target hosts. Overall the effect on CO2 emissions is limited, never exceeding 27 percent of the CARB target. Nonetheless, results suggest that the CO2 emissions abatement potential of CHP in mid-sized CA buildings is significant, and much more promising than is typically assumed.

Stadler, Michael; Marnay, Chris; Cardoso, Goncalo; Lipman, Tim; Megel, Olivier; Ganguly, Srirupa; Siddiqui, Afzal; Lai, Judy

2009-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

192

Tradeoffs between Costs and Greenhouse Gas Emissions in the Design of Urban Transit Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cost of GHG emissions reductions to facilitate comparison with other approaches, such as vehicle replacement or enginecost of GHG emissions reductions to facilitate comparison with other approaches, such as vehicle replacement or engine

Griswold, Julia Baird

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Abatement of Air Pollution: Greenhouse Gas Emissions Offset Projects...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Projects that either capture and destroy landfill methane, avoid sulfur hexafluoride emissions, sequester carbon through afforestation, provide end-use energy efficiency, or avoid...

194

Greenhouse Gas Abatement with Distributed Generation in California's Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and not only by PV / solar thermal systems. To satisfy theheat exchangers, solar thermal collectors, absorptionphotovoltaics and solar thermal collectors; electrical

Stadler, Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Greenhouse Gas Abatement with Distributed Generation in California's Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modeling with Combined Heat and Power Applications,Committee, Combined Heat and Power Workshop, CaliforniaJuly 23, 2009 Combined Heat and Power Installation

Stadler, Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Greenhouse Gas Abatement with Distributed Generation in California's Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and may also be charged by CHP systems during off-peak andDarrow, K et al. (2009), CHP Market Assessment, Integratedwith combined heat and power (CHP) may be implemented within

Stadler, Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Greenhouse Gas Abatement with Distributed Generation in California's Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2020 S00 S/t of carbon mpared to CHP, PV a n d solar t h e rm a l as options in DE R-CAM only CHP as optioninDER-CAM CHP Capacity: 2.25 GW CHP Electricity: 10.05 TWh

Marnay, Chris

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Abatement of Air Pollution: Greenhouse Gas Emissions Offset Projects  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists' ResearchThe Office of FossilMembershipoftheManagementHasdecDioxidePlants

199

Greenhouse Gas Abatement with Distributed Generation in California's Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORYErnest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is an

Marnay, Chris

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

The competition between coal and natural gas : the importance of sunk costs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper explores the seeming paradox between the predominant choice of natural gas for capacity additions to generate electricity in the United States and the continuing large share of coal in meeting incremental ...

Ellerman, A. Denny

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas abatement cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Flue gas desulfurization : cost and functional analysis of large-scale and proven plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Flue Gas Desulfurization is a method of controlling the emission of sulfurs, which causes the acid rain. The following study is based on 26 utilities which burn coal, have a generating capacity of at least 50 Megawatts ...

Tilly, Jean

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Oil and natural gas reserve prices, 1982-2002 : implications for depletion and investment cost  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A time series is estimated of in-ground prices - as distinct from wellhead prices ? of US oil and natural gas reserves for the period 1982-2002, using market purchase and sale transaction information. The prices are a ...

Adelman, Morris Albert

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Environmental benefits and cost savings through market-based instruments : an application using state-level data from India  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper develops a methodology for estimating potential cost savings from the use of market-based instruments (MBIs) when local emissions and abatement cost data are not available. The paper provides estimates of the ...

Gupta, Shreekant

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Realistic costs of carbon capture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There is a growing interest in carbon capture and storage (CCS) as a means of reducing carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. However there are substantial uncertainties about the costs of CCS. Costs for pre-combustion capture with compression (i.e. excluding costs of transport and storage and any revenue from EOR associated with storage) are examined in this discussion paper for First-of-a-Kind (FOAK) plant and for more mature technologies, or Nth-of-a-Kind plant (NOAK). For FOAK plant using solid fuels the levelised cost of electricity on a 2008 basis is approximately 10 cents/kWh higher with capture than for conventional plants (with a range of 8-12 cents/kWh). Costs of abatement are found typically to be approximately US$150/tCO2 avoided (with a range of US$120-180/tCO2 avoided). For NOAK plants the additional cost of electricity with capture is approximately 2-5 cents/kWh, with costs of the range of US$35-70/tCO2 avoided. Costs of abatement with carbon capture for other fuels and technologies are also estimated for NOAK plants. The costs of abatement are calculated with reference to conventional SCPC plant for both emissions and costs of electricity. Estimates for both FOAK and NOAK are mainly based on cost data from 2008, which was at the end of a period of sustained escalation in the costs of power generation plant and other large capital projects. There are now indications of costs falling from these levels. This may reduce the costs of abatement and costs presented here may be 'peak of the market' estimates. If general cost levels return, for example, to those prevailing in 2005 to 2006 (by which time significant cost escalation had already occurred from previous levels), then costs of capture and compression for FOAK plants are expected to be US$110/tCO2 avoided (with a range of US$90-135/tCO2 avoided). For NOAK plants costs are expected to be US$25-50/tCO2. Based on these considerations a likely representative range of costs of abatement from CCS excluding transport and storage costs appears to be US$100-150/tCO2 for first-of-a-kind plants and perhaps US$30-50/tCO2 for nth-of-a-kind plants.The estimates for FOAK and NOAK costs appear to be broadly consistent in the light of estimates of the potential for cost reductions with increased experience. Cost reductions are expected from increasing scale, learning on individual components, and technological innovation including improved plant integration. Innovation and integration can both lower costs and increase net output with a given cost base. These factors are expected to reduce abatement costs by approximately 65% by 2030. The range of estimated costs for NOAK plants is within the range of plausible future carbon prices, implying that mature technology would be competitive with conventional fossil fuel plants at prevailing carbon prices.

Al Juaied, Mohammed (Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (US). Belfer Center for Science and International Affiaris); Whitmore, Adam (Hydrogen Energy International Ltd., Weybridge (GB))

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

The cost of agriculturally based greenhouse gas offsets in the Texas High Plains  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as shown in equation (2), (2) ) NR is the net revenue ($ per acre), TR is the total revenue ($ per acre), TVC is the total variable cost ($ per acre), and TFC is the total fixed cost ($ per acre). 21 3.1.2 Calculation of Breakeven Carbon Price (BCP...) The Breakeven Carbon price (BCP) is calculated according to equation (3). (3) BCPQGHGPDC =?? )( or (4) BCPQGHGQGHG NR base base = ? ? ) The GHG quantity in the denominator of equation (3) is the amount of net GHGE stored or emitted by each alternative...

Chandrasena, Rajapakshage Inoka Ilmi

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

206

COST EFFECTIVE REGULATORY APPROACHES TO ENHANCE DOMESTIC OIL & GAS PRODUCTION AND ENSURE THE PROTECTION OF THE ENVIRONMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Environmental Information Management Suite/Risk Based Data Management System (EIMS/RBDMS) and Cost Effective Regulatory Approach (CERA) programs continue to be successful. All oil and gas state regulatory programs participate in these efforts. Significant accomplishments include: streamline regulatory approaches, enhancing environmental protection, and making oil and gas data available via the Internet. Oil and gas companies worldwide now have access to data on state web sites. This reduces the cost of exploration and enables companies to develop properties in areas that would have been cost prohibited for exploration. Early in project, GWPC and State Oil and Gas agencies developed the EIMS and CERA strategic plan to prioritize long term development and implementation. The planning process identifies electronic commerce and coal bed methane as high priorities. The group has involved strategic partners in industry and government to develop a common data exchange process. Technical assistance to Alaska continues to improve their program management capabilities. New initiatives in Alaska include the development of an electronic permit tracking system. This system allows managers to expedite the permitting process. Nationwide, the RBDMS system is largely completed with 22 states and one Indian Nation now using this nationally accepted data management system. Additional remaining tasks include routine maintenance and the installation of the program upon request for the remaining oil and gas states. The GWPC in working with the BLM and MMS to develop an XML schema to facilitate electronic permitting and reporting (Appendix A, B, and C). This is a significant effort and, in years to come, will increase access to federal lands by reducing regulatory barriers. The new initiatives are coal bed methane and e-commerce. The e-commerce program will provide industry and BLM/MMS access to the millions of data points housed in the RBDMS system. E-commerce will streamline regulatory approaches and allow small operators to produce energy from areas that have become sub-economic for the major producers. The GWPC is working with states to develop a coal bed methane program, which will both manage the data and develop a public education program on the benefits of produced water. The CERA program benefits all oil and gas states by reducing the cost of regulatory compliance, increasing environmental protection, and providing industry and regulatory agencies a discussion forum. Activities included many small and large group forum settings for discussions of technical and policy issues as well as the ongoing State Class II UIC peer review effort. The accomplishments detailed in this report will be the basis for the next initiative which is RBDMS On-Line. RBDMS On-Line will combine data mining, electronic permitting and electronic reporting with .net technology. Industry, BLM, GWPC and all Oil and Gas states are partnering this effort.

Ben Grunewald; Paul Jehn; Tom Gillespie; Ben Binder

2004-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

207

APPLICATION OF A HYBRID MODEL TO EXPLORE ENERGY EMISSIONS ABATEMENT POLICIES IN CHINA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

APPLICATION OF A HYBRID MODEL TO EXPLORE ENERGY EMISSIONS ABATEMENT POLICIES IN CHINA by Jianjun Tu: Application of a Hybrid Model to Explore Energy Emissions Abatement Policies in China Project No. 360

208

Atmospheric Environment 38 (2004) 14251436 A development of ozone abatement strategies for the Grenoble  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Atmospheric Environment 38 (2004) 1425­1436 A development of ozone abatement strategies are generated in the Grenoble plume. For developing ozone abatement strategies it is important to know whether

209

Effect of BaO Morphology on NOx Abatement: NO Interaction with...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

BaO Morphology on NOx Abatement: NO Interaction with Unsupported and O-Supported BaO. Effect of BaO Morphology on NOx Abatement: NO Interaction with Unsupported and O-Supported...

210

Harris County- Green Building Tax Abatement for New Commercial Construction (Texas)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

In 2008, the Harris County Commissioners Court adopted guidelines for partial tax abatements for new construction of commercial LEED-certified buildings. The tax abatement was renewed in 2009, and...

211

Decision matrix for liquid loading in gas wells for cost/benefit analyses of lifting options  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

rotation using an electric motor at the surface. Fig. 2.9 PCP system (Schlumberger, 2007). Applications PCP can be applied to the wells producing sand-laden heavy oil and bitumen, high water-cut wells, and in the gas wells that require...

Park, Han-Young

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

212

Equipment Design and Cost Estimation for Small Modular Biomass Systems, Synthesis Gas Cleanup, and Oxygen Separation Equipment; Task 2.3: Sulfur Primer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This deliverable is Subtask 2.3 of Task 2, Gas Cleanup Design and Cost Estimates, of NREL Award ACO-5-44027, ''Equipment Design and Cost Estimation for Small Modular Biomass Systems, Synthesis Gas Cleanup and Oxygen Separation Equipment''. Subtask 2.3 builds upon the sulfur removal information first presented in Subtask 2.1, Gas Cleanup Technologies for Biomass Gasification by adding additional information on the commercial applications, manufacturers, environmental footprint, and technical specifications for sulfur removal technologies. The data was obtained from Nexant's experience, input from GTI and other vendors, past and current facility data, and existing literature.

Nexant Inc.

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Low cost hydrogen/novel membrane technology for hydrogen separation from synthesis gas. Task 1, Literature survey  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To make the coal-to-hydrogen route economically attractive, improvements are being sought in each step of the process: coal gasification, water-carbon monoxide shift reaction, and hydrogen separation. This report addresses the use of membranes in the hydrogen separation step. The separation of hydrogen from synthesis gas is a major cost element in the manufacture of hydrogen from coal. Separation by membranes is an attractive, new, and still largely unexplored approach to the problem. Membrane processes are inherently simple and efficient and often have lower capital and operating costs than conventional processes. In this report current ad future trends in hydrogen production and use are first summarized. Methods of producing hydrogen from coal are then discussed, with particular emphasis on the Texaco entrained flow gasifier and on current methods of separating hydrogen from this gas stream. The potential for membrane separations in the process is then examined. In particular, the use of membranes for H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}/CO, and H{sub 2}/N{sub 2} separations is discussed. 43 refs., 14 figs., 6 tabs.

Not Available

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Updated cost estimates of meeting geothermal hydrogen sulfide emission regulations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A means of estimating the cost of hydrogen sulfide (H/sub 2/S) emission control was investigated. This study was designed to derive H/sub 2/S emission abatement cost functions and illustrate the cost of H/sub 2/S emission abatement at a hydrothermal site. Four tasks were undertaken: document the release of H/sub 2/S associated with geothermal development; review H/sub 2/S environmental standards; develop functional relationships that may be used to estimate the most cose-effective available H/sub 2/S abatement process; and use the cost functions to generate abatement cost estimates for a specific site. The conclusions and recommendations derived from the research are presented. The definition of the term impacts as used in this research is discussed and current estimates of the highest expected H/sub 2/S concentrations of in geothermal reservoirs are provided. Regulations governing H/sub 2/S emissions are reviewed and a review of H/sub 2/S control technology and a summary of the control cost functions are included. A case study is presented to illustrate H/sub 2/S abatement costs at the Baca KGRA in New Mexico.

Wells, K.D.; Currie, J.W.; Weakley, S.A.; Ballinger, M.Y.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

On the Infinite Horizon Constrained Switched LQR Problem Maximilian Balandat, Wei Zhang, Alessandro Abate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abate Abstract-- This paper studies the Discrete-Time Switched LQR problem over an infinite time horizon weizhang@eecs.berkeley.edu A. Abate is with the Delft Center for Systems and Control, Technische Universiteit Delft, Delft, The Netherlands a.abate@tudelft.nl Mixed Integer Quadratic Program (MIQP) and solved

Zhang, Wei

216

Highway Traffic Noise Analysis and Abatement Guidelines The purpose of this project is to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Highway Traffic Noise Analysis and Abatement Guidelines The purpose of this project is to: (1 AND ABATEMENT GUIDELINE. HDOT's 1997 noise policy has to be reviewed and updated in order to allow for relief or Federal-Aid highway projects to construct traffic noise abatement measures on existing highways

Prevedouros, Panos D.

217

Formal Poincare-Dulac renormalization for holomorphic germs Marco Abate1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Formal Poincar´e-Dulac renormalization for holomorphic germs Marco Abate1 , Jasmin Raissy2 1 Dipartimento di Matematica, Universit`a di Pisa, Largo Pontecorvo 5, 56127 Pisa, Italy. E-mail: abate and Continuous Dynamical Systems - Series A 33, 5 (2013) 1773-1807" #12;2 Marco Abate and Jasmin Raissy the set

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

218

Use of Simulation To Optimize NOx Abatement by Absorption and Selective Catalytic Reduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Use of Simulation To Optimize NOx Abatement by Absorption and Selective Catalytic Reduction Andrew This paper describes the development of an ASPEN PLUS simulation model for a commercial NOx abatement system nitric acid production and the abatement of NOx- laden effluent streams for environmental protection.1

Liu, Y. A.

219

Review of H2S Abatement in Geothermal Plants and Laboratory Scale Design of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Review of H2S Abatement in Geothermal Plants and Laboratory Scale Design of Tray Plate Distillation Engineering ­ ISE December 2013 #12;ii Review of H2S Abatement Methods in Geothermal Plants and Laboratory for decreasing these emissions through abatement systems or even potentially using these gases to generate value

Karlsson, Brynjar

220

FLIGHTLESS GIANT CANADA GOOSE DEPREDATION ABATEMENT AND DIGESTIBILITY OF SELECTED CROPS IN SOUTH DAKOTA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FLIGHTLESS GIANT CANADA GOOSE DEPREDATION ABATEMENT AND DIGESTIBILITY OF SELECTED CROPS IN SOUTH DEPREDATION ABATEMENT AND DIGESTIBILITY OF SELECTED CROPS IN SOUTH DAKOTA This thesis is approved DEPREDATION ABATEMENT AND DIGESTIBILITY OF SELECTED CROPS IN SOUTH DAKOTA Christopher J. Flann 1999 v Crop

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas abatement cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Basins of attraction in quadratic dynamical systems with a Jordan fixed point Marco Abate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Basins of attraction in quadratic dynamical systems with a Jordan fixed point Marco Abate Fax: +39/06/7259­4699 e­mail: abate@mat.uniroma2.it Abstract In this note we study the dynamics to the exceptional divisor and thus it can be projected down #12; 2 Marco Abate producing a parabolic curve

Roma Tor Vergata, Università di

222

The Effects of CO2 Abatement Policies on Power System Expansion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Effects of CO2 Abatement Policies on Power System Expansion by Conrad Fox B.Sc.E., Queens means, without the permission of the author. #12;ii The Effects of CO2 Abatement Policies on Power abatement policies. The model proposes a novel approach for incorporating investment in non- #12;iv

Victoria, University of

223

HumanWildlife Interactions 5(2):315320, Fall 2011 Canada goose crop damage abatement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Human­Wildlife Interactions 5(2):315­320, Fall 2011 Canada goose crop damage abatement in South% in 2006 and 80% in 2007, but the timing was important. Fields where abatement practices were applied early in the growing season had less damage than fields where they were applied later. Abatement practices that were

224

The Cost of Improving Gas Supply Security in the Baltic States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to replace a failed compressor station on a transmission pipeline; 12 most disruptions caused by pipeline failures could be repaired in a week or less. A failure of the Latvian underground storage could potentially disrupt supply to Estonia and Latvia... it is important to note that both types of disruptions have the same practical consequences. For example in the Baltic States, an accidental pipeline explosion or compressor failure would interrupt gas supply to district heating plants, just as a voluntary...

Noel, Pierre; Findlater, Sachi; Chyong, Chi Kong

2012-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

225

Non-nuclear submarine tankers could cost-effectively move Arctic oil and gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Before the advent of nuclear propulsion for U.S. Navy submarines, fuel cells were considered to be the next logical step forward from battery powered submarines which required recharging. But with the launching of the USS Nautilus (SSN-571) in 1954, the development of fuel-cell propulsion was sidelined by the naval community. Nearly 30 years later fuel-cell propulsion on board submarines is actually more cost-effective than the use of nuclear propulsion. In the Artic Ocean, the use of the submarine tanker has long been considered commercially appropriate because of the presence of the polar ice cap, which inhibits surface ship transport. The technical difficulty and high operating cost of Arctic icebreaking tankers are strong arguments in favor of the cheaper, more efficient submarine tanker. Transiting under the polar ice cap, the submarine tanker is not an ''Arctic'' system, but merely a submerged system. It is a system usable in any ocean around the globe where sufficient depth exists (about 65% of the global surface). Ice breakers are another story; their design only makes them useful for transit through heavy sea ice in coastal environments. Used anywhere else, such as in the open ocean or at the Arctic ice cap, they are not a cost-effective means of transport. Arctic sea ice conditions require the Arctic peculiar icebreaking tanker system to do the job the hard way-on the surface. But on the other hand, Arctic sea ice conditions are neatly set aside by the submarine tanker, which does it the energy-efficient, elegant way submerged. The submarine tanker is less expensive to build, far less expensive to operate, and does not need to be nuclear propelled.

Kumm, W.H.

1984-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

226

Low-Cost Gas Heat Pump For Building Space Heating | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in3.pdfEnergy Health andofIanJenniferLeslieEnergy LoanOfficialLow-Cost Direct

227

Oil and Gas Lease Equipment and Operating Costs 1994 Through 2009  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecember 2005 (Thousand9,0,InformationU.S. Crude Oil3113315,0,482272Oil and GasOil

228

Advanced Membrane Filtration Technology for Cost Effective Recovery of Fresh Water from Oil & Gas Produced Brine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study is developing a comprehensive study of what is involved in the desalination of oil field produced brine and the technical developments and regulatory changes needed to make the concept a commercial reality. It was originally based on ''conventional'' produced water treatment and reviewed (1) the basics of produced water management, (2) the potential for desalination of produced brine in order to make the resource more useful and available in areas of limited fresh water availability, and (3) the potential beneficial uses of produced water for other than oil production operations. Since we have begun however, a new area of interest has appeared that of brine water treatment at the well site. Details are discussed in this technical progress report. One way to reduce the impact of O&G operations is to treat produced brine by desalination. The main body of the report contains information showing where oil field brine is produced, its composition, and the volume available for treatment and desalination. This collection of information all relates to what the oil and gas industry refers to as ''produced water management''. It is a critical issue for the industry as produced water accounts for more than 80% of all the byproducts produced in oil and gas exploration and production. The expense of handling unwanted waste fluids draws scarce capital away for the development of new petroleum resources, decreases the economic lifetimes of existing oil and gas reservoirs, and makes environmental compliance more expensive to achieve. More than 200 million barrels of produced water are generated worldwide each day; this adds up to more than 75 billion barrels per year. For the United States, the American Petroleum Institute estimated about 18 billion barrels per year were generated from onshore wells in 1995, and similar volumes are generated today. Offshore wells in the United States generate several hundred million barrels of produced water per year. Internationally, three barrels of water are produced for each barrel of oil. Production in the United States is more mature; the US average is about 7 barrels of water per barrel of oil. Closer to home, in Texas the Permian Basin produces more than 9 barrels of water per barrel of oil and represents more than 400 million gallons of water per day processed and re-injected.

David B. Burnett

2005-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

229

Catalysts For Lean Burn Engine Exhaust Abatement  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention provides a process for catalytically reducing nitrogen oxides in an exhaust gas stream containing nitrogen oxides and a reductant material by contacting the gas stream under conditions effective to catalytically reduce the nitrogen oxides with a catalyst comprising a aluminum-silicate type material and a minor amount of a metal, the catalyst characterized as having sufficient catalytic activity so as to reduce the nitrogen oxides by at least 60 percent under temperatures within the range of from about 200.degree. C. to about 400.degree. C.

Ott, Kevin C. (Los Alamos, NM); Clark, Noline C. (Jemez Springs, NM); Paffett, Mark T. (Los Alamos, NM)

2004-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

230

Catalysts for lean burn engine exhaust abatement  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention provides a process for catalytically reducing nitrogen oxides in an exhaust gas stream containing nitrogen oxides and a reductant material by contacting the gas stream under conditions effective to catalytically reduce the nitrogen oxides with a catalyst comprising a aluminum-silicate type material and a minor amount of a metal, the catalyst characterized as having sufficient catalytic activity so as to reduce the nitrogen oxides by at least 60 percent under temperatures within the range of from about 200.degree. C. to about 400.degree. C.

Ott, Kevin C. (Los Alamos, NM); Clark, Noline C. (Jemez Springs, NM); Paffett, Mark T. (Los Alamos, NM)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Gas Saturation and Sensitivity Analysis Using CRiSP 1 Gas Saturation and Sensitivity Analysis Using CRiSP  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gas Saturation and Sensitivity Analysis Using CRiSP 1 Gas Saturation and Sensitivity Analysis Using of Engineers began the Gas Abatement Study in order to address the problem of gas and its effects on the Snake and Columbia Rivers. One important question is how much gas reductions caused by structural changes at a few

Washington at Seattle, University of

232

Electrically Driven Technologies for Radioactive Aerosol Abatement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this research project was to develop an improved understanding of how electriexecy driven processes, including electrocoalescence, acoustic agglomeration, and electric filtration, may be employed to efficiently treat problems caused by the formation of aerosols during DOE waste treatment operations. The production of aerosols during treatment and retrieval operations in radioactive waste tanks and during thermal treatment operations such as calcination presents a significant problem of cost, worker exposure, potential for release, and increased waste volume.

David W. DePaoli; Ofodike A. Ezekoye; Costas Tsouris; Valmor F. de Almeida

2003-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

233

The Allocative Cost of Price Ceilings: Lessons to be Learned from the U.S. Residential Market for Natural Gas, Unpublished paper  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Following a Supreme Court decision in 1954, natural gas markets in the U.S. were subject to 35 years of intensive federal regulation. Several studies have measured the deadweight loss from the price ceilings that were imposed during this period. This paper concentrates on an additional component of welfare loss that is rarely discussed. In particular, when there is excess demand for a good such as natural gas for which secondary markets do not exist, an additional welfare loss occurs when the good is not allocated to the buyers who value it the most. We quantify the overall size of this allocative cost, its evolution during the post-war period, and its geographical distribution across states, and we highlight implications of our analysis for the regulation of other markets. Using a household-level, discrete-continuous model of natural gas demand we estimate that the allocative cost averaged $8.1 billion annually in the U.S. residential market for natural gas during 1950-2000, effectively doubling previous estimates of the total welfare losses from natural gas regulation. We find that these allocative costs were borne disproportionately by households in the Northeast, Midwest, and South Atlantic states.

Lucas W. Davis; Lutz Kilian; Jel D; Comments William; James Adams; James R. Hines

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

E-Print Network 3.0 - aircraft noise abatement Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and the Eco-Industry Bernard Sinclair-Desgagn Summary: . Abstract: This paper re-examines environmental regulation, under the assumption that pollution abatement... a specific...

235

When to Pollute, When to Abate? Intertemporal Permit Use in the Los Angeles NOx Market  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

such as overlapping cycles of permits, can increase theproblems of bankable permits. References Carlson, Dale A.to Abate? Intertemporal Permit Use in the Los Angeles NO x

Holland, Stephen P.; MOORE, MICHAEL R

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

E-Print Network 3.0 - air pollution abatement Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: air pollution abatement Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON Hazardous...

237

E-Print Network 3.0 - abate comparativo na Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Centre de mathmatiques Collection: Mathematics 15 Analysis of Post-Kyoto CO2 Emissions Trading Using Marginal Abatement Curves A. Denny Ellerman and Annelne Decaux Summary:...

238

E-Print Network 3.0 - al larvicida abate Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology 54 Analysis of Post-Kyoto CO2 Emissions Trading Using Marginal Abatement Curves A. Denny Ellerman and Annelne Decaux Summary:...

239

E-Print Network 3.0 - abatement le captage Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Centre de mathmatiques Collection: Mathematics 53 Analysis of Post-Kyoto CO2 Emissions Trading Using Marginal Abatement Curves A. Denny Ellerman and Annelne Decaux Summary:...

240

''When Cost Measures Contradict''  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

When regulators put forward new economic or regulatory policies, there is a need to compare the costs and benefits of these new policies to existing policies and other alternatives to determine which policy is most cost-effective. For command and control policies, it is quite difficult to compute costs, but for more market-based policies, economists have had a great deal of success employing general equilibrium models to assess a policy's costs. Not all cost measures, however, arrive at the same ranking. Furthermore, cost measures can produce contradictory results for a specific policy. These problems make it difficult for a policy-maker to determine the best policy. For a cost measures to be of value, one would like to be confident of two things. First one wants to be sure whether the policy is a winner or loser. Second, one wants to be confident that a measure produces the correct policy ranking. That is, one wants to have confidence in a policy measure's ability to correctly rank policies from most beneficial to most harmful. This paper analyzes empirically these two properties of different costs measures as they pertain to assessing the costs of the carbon abatement policies, especially the Kyoto Protocol, under alternative assumptions about implementation.

Montgomery, W. D.; Smith, A. E.; Biggar, S. L.; Bernstein, P. M.

2003-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas abatement cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Comparative analysis of the production costs and life-cycle GHG emissions of FT liquid fuels from coal and natural gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Liquid transportation fuels derived from coal and natural gas could help the United States reduce its dependence on petroleum. The fuels could be produced domestically or imported from fossil fuel-rich countries. The goal of this paper is to determine the life-cycle GHG emissions of coal- and natural gas-based Fischer-Tropsch (FT) liquids, as well as to compare production costs. The results show that the use of coal- or natural gas-based FT liquids will likely lead to significant increases in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions compared to petroleum-based fuels. In a best-case scenario, coal- or natural gas-based FT-liquids have emissions only comparable to petroleum-based fuels. In addition, the economic advantages of gas-to-liquid (GTL) fuels are not obvious: there is a narrow range of petroleum and natural gas prices at which GTL fuels would be competitive with petroleum-based fuels. CTL fuels are generally cheaper than petroleum-based fuels. However, recent reports suggest there is uncertainty about the availability of economically viable coal resources in the United States. If the U.S. has a goal of increasing its energy security, and at the same time significantly reducing its GHG emissions, neither CTL nor GTL consumption seem a reasonable path to follow. 28 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

Paulina Jaramillo; W. Michael Griffin; H. Scott Matthews [Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA (USA). Civil and Environmental Engineering Department

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

242

Use of vegetation for abatement of road traffic noise in a 1:10 scale street model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Use of vegetation for abatement of road traffic noise in a 1:10 scale street model J.Y. Jeona , H was constructed to evaluate the noise abatement by use of vegetation as sustainable means. The model materials

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

243

Baiting system for selective abatement of undesirable J.L. Williams, R.G. Danka T.E. Rinderer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Short note Baiting system for selective abatement of undesirable honey bees J.L. Williams, R abatement program because it is effective, relatively safe, and, due to a limited, managed exposure time

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

244

Impact of Environmental Compliance Costs on U.S. Refining Profitability 1995-2001  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report assesses the effects of pollution abatement requirements on the financial performance of U.S. petroleum refining and marketing operations during the 1995 to 2001 period. This study is a follow-up to the October 1997 publication entitled The Impact of Environmental Compliance Costs on U.S. Refining Profitability, that focused on the financial impacts of U.S. refining pollution abatement investment requirements in the 1988 to1995 period.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

SC4250: Probabilistic Models in the Life Sciences Instructor: A. Abate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SC4250: Probabilistic Models in the Life Sciences Instructor: A. Abate Q4, S2, AC 2011-12 1 Contact · Office: room 8C-4-24 · Phone: +31-15-27-85606 · Email: a dot abate at tudelft dot nl 2 General

Abate, Alessandro

246

The Julia-Wolff-Caratheodory theorem(s) by Marco Abate1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Julia-Wolff-Carath´eodory theorem(s) by Marco Abate1 and Roberto Tauraso2 1 Dipartimento di expressed in terms of the Kobayashi metric and distance. #12;2 Marco Abate1 and Roberto Tauraso2 Actually

Tauraso, Roberto

247

THE CO2 ABATEMENT POTENTIAL OF CALIFORNIA'S MID-SIZED COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

utility electricity and natural gas purchases, plus amortized capital and maintenance costs for any distributed generation (distributed generation (DG) or combined heat and power (CHP), and all energy needs to be purchased from the utility.

Stadler, Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Development of standardized air-blown coal gasifier/gas turbine concepts for future electric power systems. Volume 5, Appendix D: Cost support information: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The cost estimate provided for the DOE sponsored study of Air Blown Coal Gasification was developed from vendor quotes obtained directly for the equipment needed in the 50 MW, 100 MW, and 200 MW sized plants and from quotes from other jobs that have been referenced to apply to the particular cycle. Quotes were generally obtained for the 100 MW cycle and a scale up/down factor was used to generate the cost estimates for the 200 MW and 50 MW cycles, respectively. Information from GTPro (property of Thermoflow, Inc.) was used to estimate the cost of the 200 MW and 50 MW gas turbine, HRSG, and steam turbines. To available the use of GTPro`s estimated values for this equipment, a comparison was made between the quotes obtained for the 100 MW cycle (ABB GT 11N combustion turbine and a HSRG) against the estimated values by GTPro.

Sadowski, R.S.; Brown, M.J.; Harriz, J.T.; Ostrowski, E.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Electronic copy available at: http://ssrn.com/abstract=1558744 The optimal portfolio of emissions abatement and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

abatement and low-carbon R&D depends on the expected availability of negative emission technologies Derek M optimal portfolio of emissions abatement and low-carbon R&D depends on the expected availability. We model the optimal selection of a dynamic portfolio of abatement, research and development (R

Kammen, Daniel M.

250

Electronic copy available at: http://ssrn.com/abstract=1558744 The Role of Abatement, Technology Policies, and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electronic copy available at: http://ssrn.com/abstract=1558744 The Role of Abatement, Technology role of abatement, technology policies, and negative emission strategies in achieving climate goals on abatement and on public funding of research and development (R&D). An analytic model shows that improving

Kammen, Daniel M.

251

Development of Low-Cost Austenitic Stainless Gas-Turbine and Diesel Engine Components with Enhanced High-Temperature Reliability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In July of 1999, a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) was undertaken between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Solar Turbines, Inc. and Caterpillar, Inc. (Caterpillar Technical Center) to evaluate commercial cast stainless steels for gas turbine engine and diesel engine exhaust component applications relative to the materials currently being used. If appropriate, the goal was to develop cast stainless steels with improved performance and reliability rather than switch to more costly cast Ni-based superalloys for upgraded performance. The gas-turbine components considered for the Mercury-50 engine were the combustor housing and end-cover, and the center-frame hot-plate, both made from commercial CF8C cast austenitic stainless steel (Fe-l9Cr-12Ni-Nb,C), which is generally limited to use at below 650 C. The advanced diesel engine components considered for truck applications (C10, C12, 3300 and 3400) were the exhaust manifold and turbocharger housing made from commercial high SiMo ductile cast iron with uses limited to 700-750 C or below. Shortly after the start of the CRADA, the turbine materials emphasis changed to wrought 347H stainless steel (hot-plate) and after some initial baseline tensile and creep testing, it was confirmed that this material was typical of those comprising the abundant database; and by 2000, the emphasis of the CRADA was primarily on diesel engine materials. For the diesel applications, commercial SiMo cast iron and standard cast CN12 austenitic stainless steel (Fe-25Cr-13Ni-Nb,C,N,S) baseline materials were obtained commercially. Tensile and creep testing from room temperature to 900 C showed the CN12 austenitic stainless steel to have far superior strength compared to SiMo cast iron above 550 C, together with outstanding oxidation resistance. However, aging at 850 C reduced room-temperature ductility of the standard CN12, and creep-rupture resistance at 850 C was less than expected, which triggered a focused laboratory-scale alloy development effort on modified cast austenitic stainless steels at ORNL. Isothermal fatigue testing at 700 C also showed that standard CN12 was far superior to SiMo cast iron, but somewhat less than the desired behavior. During the first year, 3 new modified CF8C heats and 8 new modified CN12 heats were made, based on compositional changes specifically designed to change the nature, dispersion and stability of the as-cast and high-temperature aging-induced microstructures that consisted of carbides and other precipitate phases. Screening of the alloys at room-temperature and at 850 C (tensile and creep-rupture) showed -a ten-fold increase in rupture life of the best modified CN12 relative to the baseline material, better room-temperature ductility after aging, caused by less precipitation in the as-cast material and much less aging-induced precipitation. The best new modified CF8C steel showed strength at tensile and creep-rupture strength comparable to standard CN12 steel at 850 C, due to a unique and very stable microstructure. The CRADA was scheduled to end in July 2001, but was extended twice until July 2002. Based on the very positive results on the newly developed modified CF8C and CN12 cast austenitic stainless steels, a new CRADA with Caterpillar has been set up to commercially scale-up, test and evaluate, and make trial components from the new steels.

Maziasz, P.J.; Swindeman, R.W.; Browning, P.F. (Solar Turbines, Inc.); Frary, M.E. (Caterpillar, Inc.); Pollard, M.J.; Siebenaler, C.W.; McGreevy, T.E.

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Gas Generation Equations for CRiSP 1.6 April 21, 1998 1 Gas Generation Equations for CRiSP 1.6  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gas Generation Equations for CRiSP 1.6 April 21, 1998 1 Gas Generation Equations for CRiSP 1.6 Theory For CRiSP.1.6 new equations have been implemented for gas production from spill. As a part of the US Army Corps' Gas Abatement study, Waterways Experiment Station (WES) has developed these new

Washington at Seattle, University of

253

Cost-Benefit Analysis of Flexibility Retrofits for Coal and Gas-Fueled Power Plants: August 2012 - December 2013  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High penetrations of wind and solar power plants can induce on/off cycling and ramping of fossil-fueled generators. This can lead to wear-and-tear costs and changes in emissions for fossil-fueled generators. Phase 2 of the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study (WWSIS-2) determined these costs and emissions and simulated grid operations to investigate the full impact of wind and solar on the fossil-fueled fleet. This report studies the costs and benefits of retrofitting existing units for improved operational flexibility (i.e., capability to turndown lower, start and stop faster, and ramp faster between load set-points).

Venkataraman, S.; Jordan, G.; O'Connor, M.; Kumar, N.; Lefton, S.; Lew, D.; Brinkman, G.; Palchak, D.; Cochran, J.

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Uncertainty Quantification and Calibration in Well Construction Cost Estimates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EXCEPT tubulars -Intercoms -Forklift (if kept on location) -Packer & retrievable bridge plug - PVT?s monitoring equipment -Circulating pump (for reserve pit) -Pick up lay down machines -All casing crews...) -Thread man to witness torque make up on tubular goods Environmental & Safety -Trash trailer & cost to dispose of contents -Chemical toilets -Lining, fencing, filling in reserve pits -Sound abatement...

Valdes Machado, Alejandro

2013-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

255

Plant power : the cost of using biomass for power generation and potential for decreased greenhouse gas emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

To date, biomass has not been a large source of power generation in the United States, despite the potential for greenhouse gas (GHG) benefits from displacing coal with carbon neutral biomass. In this thesis, the fuel cycle ...

Cuellar, Amanda Dulcinea

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Cost and Performance Baseline for Fossil Energy Plants Volume 2: Coal to Synthetic Natural Gas and Ammonia  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phases on &gamma;-Al2O3. |ID#: 19834 Title:Cost Study Manual Cost

257

Cost and Performance Baseline for Fossil Energy Plants; Volume 3c: Natural Gas Combined Cycle at Elevation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phases on &gamma;-Al2O3. |ID#: 19834 Title:Cost Study Manual Cost

258

Cost-Benefit Analysis of Flexibility Retrofits for Coal and Gas Fueled Power Plants: August 2012 - December 2013  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phases on &gamma;-Al2O3. |ID#: 19834 Title:CostCost-Benefit Analysis

259

CO2 Abatement in the UK Power Sector: Evidence from the EU ETS Trial Period  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper provides an empirical assessment of CO2 emissions abatement in the UK power sector during the trial period of the EU ETS. Using an econometrically estimated model of fuel switching, it separates the impacts of ...

Ellerman, A. Denny

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

CO? abatement by multi-fueled electric utilities: an analysis based on Japanese data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Multi-fueled electric utilities are commonly seen as offering relatively greater opportunities for reasonably priced carbon abatement through changes in the dispatch of generating units from capacity using high emission ...

Ellerman, A. Denny.; Tsukada, Natsuki.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas abatement cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Large-Scale Renewable Energy Producers Property Tax Abatement (Nevada State Office of Energy)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

New or expanded businesses in Nevada may apply to the Director of the State Office of Energy for a property tax abatement of up to 55% for up to 20 years for real and personal property used to...

262

New York City- Property Tax Abatement for Photovoltaic (PV) Equipment Expenditures  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

In August 2008 the State of New York enacted legislation allowing a property tax abatement for photovoltaic (PV) system expenditures made on buildings located in cities with a population of 1...

263

Analysis of post-Kyoto CO? emissions trading using marginal abatement curves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Marginal abatement curves (MACs) are often used heuristically to demonstrate the advantages of emissions trading. In this paper, the authors derive MACs from EPPA, the MIT Joint Program's computable general equilibrium ...

Ellerman, A. Denny.; Decaux, Annelne.

264

E-Print Network 3.0 - abatement program bmap Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change Summary: of Post-Kyoto CO2 Emissions Trading Using Marginal Abatement Curves, MIT Joint Program on the Science... MIT Joint...

265

E-Print Network 3.0 - abatement program plan Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change Summary: of Post-Kyoto CO2 Emissions Trading Using Marginal Abatement Curves, MIT Joint Program on the Science... MIT Joint...

266

Design of aircraft noise abatement approach procedures for near-term implementation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Advanced aircraft noise abatement approach procedures -- characterized by decelerating, continuous descent approaches using idle thrust, and enabled by flight guidance technologies such as GPS and FMS -- have been shown ...

Ho, Nhut Tan, 1974-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Assessment of costs and benefits of flexible and alternative fuel use in the US transportation sector. Technical report twelve: Economic analysis of alternative uses for Alaskan North Slope natural gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of the Altemative Fuels Assessment, the Department of Energy (DOE) is studying the use of derivatives of natural gas, including compressed natural gas and methanol, as altemative transportation fuels. A critical part of this effort is determining potential sources of natural gas and the economics of those sources. Previous studies in this series characterized the economics of unutilized gas within the lower 48 United States, comparing its value for methanol production against its value as a pipelined fuel (US Department of Energy 1991), and analyzed the costs of developing undeveloped nonassociated gas reserves in several countries (US Department of Energy 1992c). This report extends those analyses to include Alaskan North Slope natural gas that either is not being produced or is being reinjected. The report includes the following: A description of discovered and potential (undiscovered) quantities of natural gas on the Alaskan North Slope. A discussion of proposed altemative uses for Alaskan North Slope natural gas. A comparison of the economics of the proposed alternative uses for Alaskan North Slope natural gas. The purpose of this report is to illustrate the costs of transporting Alaskan North Slope gas to markets in the lower 48 States as pipeline gas, liquefied natural gas (LNG), or methanol. It is not intended to recommend one alternative over another or to evaluate the relative economics or timing of using North Slope gas in new tertiary oil recovery projects. The information is supplied in sufficient detail to allow incorporation of relevant economic relationships (for example, wellhead gas prices and transportation costs) into the Altemative Fuels Trade Model, the analytical framework DOE is using to evaluate various policy options.

Not Available

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

COMPUTATIONAL OPTIMIZATION OF GAS COMPRESSOR ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Feb 26, 2015 ... When considering cost-optimal operation of gas transport net- works ..... The four most frequently used drive types are gas turbines, gas driven.

2015-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

269

Organic sponges for cost-effective CVOC abatement. Final report, September 1992--April 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Air contaminated with CVOCs (chlorinated volatile organic compounds) arise from air stripping of ground water or from soil and dual phase vapor extraction. A research program was undertaken to develop sorbents better than activated carbon for remediation. Two such sorbents were found: Dow`s XUS polymer and Rohm and Haas` Ambersorb 563 (carbonaceous). Opportunities exist to further develop sorption and biodegradation technologies.

Flanagan, W.P.; Grade, M.M.; Horney, D.P.; Mackenzie, P.D.; Salvo, J.J.; Sivavec, T.M.; Stephens, M.L.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Low Carbon Growth: a Potential Path for Mexico - GHG Abatement Cost Curve |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 - 429Lacey,(Monaster AndLittletown,LongweiLoveland, Colorado: EnergyLovingLow

271

Low Carbon Growth: a Potential Path for Mexico - GHG Abatement Cost Curve |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpInc Place:KeystoneSolarListLiveFuelsLoup City High

272

DOE Honors WIPP Representative for Cutting Travel Costs, Greenhouse...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

DOE Honors WIPP Representative for Cutting Travel Costs, Greenhouse Gas Emissions DOE Honors WIPP Representative for Cutting Travel Costs, Greenhouse Gas Emissions June 29, 2012 -...

273

New Process for Producing Styrene Cuts Costs, Saves Energy, and...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Process for Producing Styrene Cuts Costs, Saves Energy, and Reduces Greenhouse Gas Emissions New Process for Producing Styrene Cuts Costs, Saves Energy, and Reduces Greenhouse Gas...

274

Characterization of oil and gas waste disposal practices and assessment of treatment costs. Technical progress report, January 1, 1994--March 31, 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report covers work completed during the sixth quarter for the project. The project consists of three tasks: the first relates to developing a database of waste volumes and disposal methods used by the industry; the second and third tasks are aimed at investigating technologies that could be used for the treatment of produced waters and developing cost estimates for those technologies. The remainder of this report describes progress related to the three tasks in the project. Overall, construction of the Production Environmental Database (PED) is ongoing. While much of the data has been collected and entered into the database, a few data categories are still missing, for example, soils and geology and geohydrology. Work is currently under way to collect these data. In addition, a detailed data analysis has begun in order to develop relationships between oil and gas activities and environmental characteristics. In terms of the treatment of produced water, much of the work in the past quarter was focused on analyzing the costs associated with the treatment and disposal of waste residuals such as sludges.

Bedient, P.B.

1994-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

275

EMSP Final Report: Electrically Driven Technologies for Radioactive Aerosol Abatement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this research project was to develop an improved understanding of how electrically driven processes, including electrocoalescence, acoustic agglomeration, and electric filtration, may be employed to efficiently treat problems caused by the formation of aerosols during DOE waste treatment operations. The production of aerosols during treatment and retrieval operations in radioactive waste tanks and during thermal treatment operations such as calcination presents a significant problem of cost, worker exposure, potential for release, and increased waste volume. There was anecdotal evidence in the literature that acoustic agglomeration and electrical coalescence could be used together to change the size distribution of aerosol particles in such a way as to promote easier filtration and less frequent maintenance of filtration systems. As such, those electrically driven technologies could potentially be used as remote technologies for improved treatment; however, existing theoretical models are not suitable for prediction and design. To investigate the physics of such systems, and also to prototype a system for such processes, a collaborative project was undertaken between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the University of Texas at Austin (UT). ORNL was responsible for the larger-scale prototyping portion of the project, while UT was primarily responsible for the detailed physics in smaller scale unit reactors. It was found that both electrical coalescence and acoustic agglomeration do in fact increase the rate of aggregation of aerosols. Electrical coalescence requires significantly less input power than acoustic agglomeration, but it is much less effective in its ability to aggregate/coalesce aerosols. The larger-scale prototype showed qualitatively similar results as the unit reactor tests, but presented more difficulty in interpretation of the results because of the complex multi-physics coupling that necessarily occur in all larger-scale system tests. An additional finding from this work is that low-amplitude oscillation may provide an alternative, non-invasive, non-contact means of controlling settling and/or suspension of solids. Further investigation would be necessary to evaluate its utility for radioactive waste treatment applications. This project did not uncover a new technology for radioactive waste treatment. While it may be possible that an efficient electrically driven technology for aerosol treatment could be developed, it appears that other technologies, such as steel and ceramic HEPA filters, can suitably solve this problem. If further studies are to be undertaken, additional fundamental experimentation and modeling is necessary to fully capture the physics; in addition, larger-scale tests are needed to demonstrate the treatment of flowing gas streams through the coupling of acoustic agglomeration with electrocoalescence.

DePaoli, D.W.

2003-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

276

Implementing a Time-and Location-Differentiated Cap-and-Trade Program: Flexible Nitrogen Oxide Abatement from Power Plants in the Eastern United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abatement from Power Plants in the Eastern United States by Katherine C. Martin B.A., Physics Reed College Oxide Abatement from Power Plants in the Eastern United States by Katherine C. Martin Submitted

de Weck, Olivier L.

277

Keynote paper at the International Workshop on TMDL Monitoring and Abatement Program presented at Konkuk University, Seoul (Korea0 on May 16, 2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Keynote paper at the International Workshop on TMDL Monitoring and Abatement Program presented at Konkuk University, Seoul (Korea0 on May 16, 2008 DIFFUSE POLLUTION MONITORING AND ABATEMENT IN THE FUTURE

Sridhar, Srinivas

278

Using Ex Post Data to Estimate the Hurdle Rate of Abatement Investments -An Application to the Swedish Pulp and Paper Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using Ex Post Data to Estimate the Hurdle Rate of Abatement Investments - An Application to Estimate the Hurdle Rate of Abatement Investments - An Application to the Swedish Pulp and Paper Industry in pollution abatement technology, using ex post data. The method is based on a structural option value model

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

279

Sustainable gasificationbiochar systems? A case-study of rice-husk gasification in Cambodia, Part II: Field trial results, carbon abatement,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

II: Field trial results, carbon abatement, economic assessment and conclusions Simon Shackley a trials using the RHC, and provide an estimate of the carbon abatement and economic evaluation). The carbon abatement from the RHC addition is approximately 0.42 t CO2 t?1 rice husk; including energy

Haszeldine, Stuart

280

Startup Costs  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This chapter discusses startup costs for construction and environmental projects, and estimating guidance for startup costs.

1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas abatement cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Low-Cost, Fiber-Optic Hydrogen Gas Detector Using Guided-Wave, Surface-Plasmon Resonance in Chemochromic Thin Films  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Low-cost, hydrogen-gas-leak detectors are needed for many hydrogen applications, such as hydrogen-fueled vehicles where several detectors may be required in different locations on each vehicle. A fiber-optic leak detector could be inherently safer than conventional detectors, because it would remove all detector electronics from the vicinity of potential leaks. It would also provide freedom from electromagnetic interference, a serious problem in fuel-cell-powered electric vehicles. This paper describes the design of a fiber-optic, surface-plasmon-resonance hydrogen detector, and efforts to make it more sensitive, selective, and durable. Chemochromic materials, such as tungsten oxide and certain Lanthanide hydrides, can reversibly react with hydrogen in air while exhibiting significant changes in their optical properties. Thin films of these materials applied to a sensor at the end of an optical fiber have been used to detect low concentrations of hydrogen gas in air. The coatings include a thin silver layer in which the surface plasmon is generated, a thin film of the chemochromic material, and a catalytic layer of palladium that facilitates the reaction with hydrogen. The film thickness is chosen to produce a guided-surface plasmon wave along the interface between the silver and the chemochromic material. A dichroic beam-splitter separates the reflected spectrum into a portion near the resonance and a portion away from the resonance, and directs these two portions to two separate photodiodes. The electronic ratio of these two signals cancels most of the fiber transmission noise and provides a stable hydrogen signal.

Benson, D. K.; Tracy, C. E.; Lee, S-H. (National Renewable Energy Laboratory); Hishmeh, G. A.; Haberman, D. P. (DCH Technologies, Valencia, CA); Ciszek, P. A. (Evergreen Solar, Waltham, MA)

1998-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

282

Characterization of oil and gas waste disposal practices and assessment of treatment costs. Yearly report, July 1, 1992--June 30, 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The project consists of 3 tasks: (1) Developing a Production Environmental Database (PED) with the purpose of investigating the current industry waste storage and disposal practices by different regions, states and types of waste and investigating the environmental impacts associated with these practices; (2) Evaluating the suitability of available and developing technologies for treating produced water and identifying applicable unit process configurations; and (3) Evaluating the costs associated with various degrees of treatment achievable by different configurations. Records of wells drilled during the years 1986 through 1991 were compiled from industry reports. Overall, drilling has decreased from an average of 60,000 wells/yr for the period 1981 through 1985 to 20,000/yr during 1986 through 1991. A produced water database was developed from data and information provided by the various state and federal agencies. Currently, the database has information on the production of oil, gas and brines from 24 states. The data from the produced water database indicate that for the most part, Class II Injection seemed to be the common disposal method. Other methods included evaporation, surface disposal via NPDES permit, road spreading, hauling out-of-state, and annular disposal. A survey of oil and gas operators has been developed, reviewed and edited. The survey is divided-by topic into three sections. (1) drilling wastes; (2) associated wastes; and (3) produced water. The objective of the survey is to develop more current information on the waste volumes and disposal methods used during 1986 through 1991. The possible treatment scenarios for produced water have been identified. Organic and inorganic contaminant removal, liquid/solid separation and liquid/emulsified oil separation have been identified as the main objectives of the treatment of produced water.

Bedient, P.B.

1993-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

283

Control Systems Design, SC4026 SC4026 Fall 2009, dr. A. Abate, DCSC, TU Delft  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and the steam engine. The centrifugal governor on the left consists of a set of flyballs that spread apart as the speed of the engine increases. The steam engine on the right uses a centrifugal governor (above engineering: a few examples SC4026 Fall 2009, dr. A. Abate, DCSC, TU Delft 1 #12;The concept of feedback

Abate, Alessandro

284

PROCESS DESIGN AND CONTROL Market-Based Pollution Abatement Strategies: Risk Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

market-based pollution abatement instruments in the technology selection decision of a firm is developed://www.epa.gov/airmarkets/) launched by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Title IV of the Clean Air Act set a goal in 1995 and affected 110 coal-burning electric utility plants located in 21 eastern and midwestern states

Maranas, Costas

285

To identify tickborne viruses circulating in Kenya and the surrounding region, we conducted surveillance at abat-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

To identify tickborne viruses circulating in Kenya and the surrounding region, we conducted surveillance at abat- toirs in Nairobi, Kenya. Species of ticks collected included Rhipicephalus pulchellus (56 the abundance of tick- borne arboviruses in Kenya and the surrounding region, we collected and tested ticks

Wang, David

286

USA oilgas production cost : recent changes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

During 1984-1989, oil development investment cost in the USA fell, but only because of lower activity. The whole cost curve shifted unfavorably (leftward). In contrast, natural gas cost substantially decreased, the curve ...

Adelman, Morris Albert

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Primer on gas integrated resource planning  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discusses the following topics: gas resource planning: need for IRP; gas integrated resource planning: methods and models; supply and capacity planning for gas utilities; methods for estimating gas avoided costs; economic analysis of gas utility DSM programs: benefit-cost tests; gas DSM technologies and programs; end-use fuel substitution; and financial aspects of gas demand-side management programs.

Goldman, C.; Comnes, G.A.; Busch, J.; Wiel, S. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Preliminary Estimates of Combined Heat and Power Greenhouse Gas Abatement Potential for California in 2020  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GHG preferable to grid power only when the waste heat can bethe grid electricity it displaces when the waste heat from

Firestone, Ryan; Ling, Frank; Marnay, Chris; Hamachi LaCommare, Kristina

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Preliminary Estimates of Combined Heat and Power Greenhouse Gas Abatement Potential for California in 2020  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

limits potential use of waste heat for space conditioning.the attractive uses for waste heat in many circumstancesprovide electricity and use the waste heat for cleaning, the

Firestone, Ryan; Ling, Frank; Marnay, Chris; Hamachi LaCommare, Kristina

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Operating Costs Estimates Cost Indices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to update costs of specific equipment, raw material or labor or CAPEX and OPEX of entire plants Cost Indices

Boisvert, Jeff

291

Methods of communicating activities in pollution abatement by five hundred major industrial corporations in the United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

METHODS OF COMMUNICATING ACTIVITIES IN POLLUTION ABATEMENT BY FIVE HUNDRED MAJOR INDUSTRIAL CORPORATIONS IN THE UNITED STATES A Thesis by CHRISTINE ANN OUINN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1973 Major Subject: Educational Administration (Public Relations) METHODS OF COMMUNICATING ACTIVITIES IN POLLUTION ABATEMENT BY FIVE HUNDRED MAJOR INDUSTRIAL CORPORATIONS IN THE UNITED STATES A...

Quinn, Christine Ann

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Multimedia-based decision support system for hazards recognition and abatement  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system for monitoring a site includes a portable data collection module used in the field to collect site specific data, and a processor module located at a central location. The data collection module displays choices of categories of findings, and then specific findings within each category. A selected specific finding is then displayed in report form with a citation to the specific code or statutory requirement, as well as a recommended course of action and an abatement date.

Czachowski, John B. (Knoxville, TN); Zoldak, John T. (Alexandria, VA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Co-benefits of mitigating global greenhouse gas emissions for future air quality and human health  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions also influences air quality. We simulate the co-benefits of global GHG reductions on air quality and human health via two mechanisms: a) reducing co-emitted air pollutants, and b) slowing climate change and its effect on air quality. Relative to a reference scenario, global GHG mitigation in the RCP4.5 scenario avoids 0.50.2, 1.30.6, and 2.21.6 million premature deaths in 2030, 2050, and 2100, from changes in fine particulate matter and ozone. Global average marginal co-benefits of avoided mortality are $40-400 (ton CO2)-1, exceeding marginal abatement costs in 2030 and 2050, and within the low range of costs in 2100. East Asian co-benefits are 10-80 times the marginal cost in 2030. These results indicate that transitioning to a low-carbon future might be justified by air quality and health co-benefits.

West, Jason; Smith, Steven J.; Silva, Raquel; Naik, Vaishali; Zhang, Yuqiang; Adelman, Zacariah; Fry, Meridith M.; Anenberg, Susan C.; Horowitz, L.; Lamarque, Jean-Francois

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Transportation Energy Futures Series: Alternative Fuel Infrastructure Expansion: Costs, Resources, Production Capacity, and Retail Availability for Low-Carbon Scenarios  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Achieving the Department of Energy target of an 80% reduction in greenhouse gas emissions by 2050 depends on transportation-related strategies combining technology innovation, market adoption, and changes in consumer behavior. This study examines expanding low-carbon transportation fuel infrastructure to achieve deep GHG emissions reductions, with an emphasis on fuel production facilities and retail components serving light-duty vehicles. Three distinct low-carbon fuel supply scenarios are examined: Portfolio: Successful deployment of a range of advanced vehicle and fuel technologies; Combustion: Market dominance by hybridized internal combustion engine vehicles fueled by advanced biofuels and natural gas; Electrification: Market dominance by electric drive vehicles in the LDV sector, including battery electric, plug-in hybrid, and fuel cell vehicles, that are fueled by low-carbon electricity and hydrogen. A range of possible low-carbon fuel demand outcomes are explored in terms of the scale and scope of infrastructure expansion requirements and evaluated based on fuel costs, energy resource utilization, fuel production infrastructure expansion, and retail infrastructure expansion for LDVs. This is one of a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency project initiated to pinpoint underexplored transportation-related strategies for abating GHGs and reducing petroleum dependence.

Melaina, M. W.; Heath, G.; Sandor, D.; Steward, D.; Vimmerstedt, L.; Warner, E.; Webster, K. W.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Energy Department Invests to Drive Down Costs of Carbon Capture...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Invests to Drive Down Costs of Carbon Capture, Support Reductions in Greenhouse Gas Pollution Energy Department Invests to Drive Down Costs of Carbon Capture, Support Reductions...

296

Cost-Competitive Advanced Thermoelectric Generators for Direct...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

vehicles by 5% using advanced low cost TE technology: - Low cost materials, modules, heat exchangers, power conditioning, and vehicle integration for exhaust gas waste heat...

297

Development of Cost-Competitive Advanced Thermoelectric Generators...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

vehicles by 5% using advanced low cost TE technology: - Low cost materials, modules, heat exchangers, power conditioning, and vehicle integration for exhaust gas waste heat...

298

Cost Estimator  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A successful candidate in this position will serve as a senior cost and schedule estimator who is responsible for preparing life-cycle cost and schedule estimates and analyses associated with the...

299

Operating Costs  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This chapter is focused on capital costs for conventional construction and environmental restoration and waste management projects and examines operating cost estimates to verify that all elements of the project have been considered and properly estimated.

1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

300

LIFE Cost of Electricity, Capital and Operating Costs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Successful commercialization of fusion energy requires economic viability as well as technical and scientific feasibility. To assess economic viability, we have conducted a pre-conceptual level evaluation of LIFE economics. Unit costs are estimated from a combination of bottom-up costs estimates, working with representative vendors, and scaled results from previous studies of fission and fusion plants. An integrated process model of a LIFE power plant was developed to integrate and optimize unit costs and calculate top level metrics such as cost of electricity and power plant capital cost. The scope of this activity was the entire power plant site. Separately, a development program to deliver the required specialized equipment has been assembled. Results show that LIFE power plant cost of electricity and plant capital cost compare favorably to estimates for new-build LWR's, coal and gas - particularly if indicative costs of carbon capture and sequestration are accounted for.

Anklam, T

2011-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas abatement cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

This report was funded by Environment Canada under the Fraser K.wer Acnon rum tnrougn m Fraser Pollution Abatement Office. The views expressed herein are though of the authors and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the Fraser K.wer Acnon rum tnrougn m Fraser Pollution Abatement Office. The views expressed herein are though this report should be forwarded to: Fraser Pollution Abatement Office Environment Canada 224 W. Esplanade IN THE FRASER RIVER BASIN VOLUME #1 DOE FRAP 1994-9 Prepared for: ENVIRONMENT CANADA Pollution Abatement Branch

302

8:30 -8:45 | Introductions and Overview of SSPEED Center Abatement Concepts Phil Bedient and Jim Blackburn will give an overview of the proposed solutions for the Houston region  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

8:30 - 8:45 | Introductions and Overview of SSPEED Center Abatement Concepts Phil Bedient and Jim.S. Army Corps of Engineers Surge Abatement and Damage Minimization: The Galveston District vs. National Pardue, Session Chair) Dedicated more generally to coastal surge abatement with discussions of issues

303

Abatement of Xenon and Iodine Emissions from Medical Isotope Production Facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The capability of the International Monitoring System (IMS) to detect xenon from underground nuclear explosions is dependent on the radioactive xenon background. Adding to the background, medical isotope production (MIP) by fission releases several important xenon isotopes including xenon-133 and iodine-133 that decays to xenon-133. The amount of xenon released from these facilities may be equivalent to or exceed that released from an underground nuclear explosion. Thus the release of gaseous fission products within days of irradiation makes it difficult to distinguish MIP emissions from a nuclear explosion. In addition, recent shortages in molybdenum-99 have created interest and investment opportunities to design and build new MIP facilities in the United States and throughout the world. Due to the potential increase in the number of MIP facilities, a discussion of abatement technologies provides insight into how the problem of emission control from MIP facilities can be tackled. A review of practices is provided to delineate methods useful for abatement of medical isotopes.

Doll, Charles G. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Sorensen, Christina M. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Bowyer, Ted W. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Friese, Judah I. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hayes, James C. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hoffman, Emma L. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Menai (Australia); Kephart, Rosara F. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Regional Analysis of Building Distributed Energy Costs and CO2 Abatement: A U.S. - China Comparison  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cold climate zone) buildings use least energy compared to other cold regions, mainly because of its high altitude and ample solar

Mendes, Goncalo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Regional Analysis of Building Distributed Energy Costs and CO2 Abatement: A U.S. - China Comparison  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fired district residential heating makes CHP systems notmakes CHP generally not attractive in Chinese residentialResidential flat tariffs generally configure non- attractive circumstances for adoption of CHP and

Mendes, Goncalo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Regional Analysis of Building Distributed Energy Costs and CO2 Abatement: A U.S. - China Comparison  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Portugal Fraunhofer Institute for Systems and Innovationc Fraunhofer Institute for Systems and Innovation Research

Mendes, Goncalo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Regional Analysis of Building Distributed Energy Costs and CO2 Abatement: A U.S. - China Comparison  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fraunhofer Institute for Systems and Innovation Researchc Fraunhofer Institute for Systems and Innovation Research

Mendes, Goncalo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Regional Analysis of Building Distributed Energy Costs and CO2 Abatement: A U.S. - China Comparison  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

commercial and residential prototype buildings was simulated in EnergyPlus [15]. The commercial and residential energy usage

Mendes, Goncalo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Regional Analysis of Building Distributed Energy Costs and CO2 Abatement: A U.S. - China Comparison  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, Building Technologies Program, Building America Best Practices

Mendes, Goncalo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Cost-Effective Industrial Boiler Plant Efficiency Advancements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Natural gas and electricity are expensive to the extent that annual fuel and power costs can approach the initial cost of an industrial boiler plant. Within this context, this paper examines several cost-effective efficiency advancements that were...

Fiorino, D. P.

311

A Top-down and Bottom-up look at Emissions Abatement in Germany in response to the EU ETS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper uses top-down trend analysis and a bottom-up power sector model to define upper and lower boundaries on abatement in Germany in the first phase of the EU Emissions Trading Scheme (2005-2007). Long-term trend ...

Feilhauer, Stephan M. (Stephan Marvin)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Analysis of Post-Kyoto CO2 Emissions Trading Using Marginal Abatement Curves A. Denny Ellerman and Annelne Decaux  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Analysis of Post-Kyoto CO2 Emissions Trading Using Marginal Abatement Curves A. Denny Ellerman the advantages of emissions trading. In this paper, the authors derive MACs from EPPA, the MIT Joint Program the benefits of emissions trading in achieving the emission reduction targets implied by the Kyoto Protocol

313

Valve for gas centrifuges  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention is pneumatically operated valve assembly for simulatenously (1) closing gas-transfer lines connected to a gas centrifuge or the like and (2) establishing a recycle path between two on the lines so closed. The value assembly is especially designed to be compact, fast-acting, reliable, and comparatively inexpensive. It provides large reductions in capital costs for gas-centrifuge cascades.

Hahs, C.A.; Rurbage, C.H.

1982-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

314

Cost and Performance Comparison Baseline for Fossil Energy Plants, Volume 3 Executive Summary: Low Rank Coal and Natural Gas to Electricity  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phases on &gamma;-Al2O3. |ID#: 19834 Title:Cost Study Manual

315

RECOVERY OF FISH COMMUNITIES IN A WARMWATER STREAM FOLLOWING POLLUTION ABATEMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The long-term recovery process for fish communities in a warm water stream in East Tennessee was studied using quantitative measurements over 20 years. The stream receives effluents from a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facility, but since 1985 these effluents have been greatly reduced, eliminated, or diluted as part of a substantial long-term pollution abatement program. The resulting changes in water quantity and quality led to a recovery of the fish communities, evidenced by significant changes in species richness, abundance (density and biomass), and community composition (e.g., number of fish species sensitive to stress). The fish community changes occurred over a spatial gradient (downstream from the headwater release zone nearest the DOE facility) and temporally, at multiple sampling locations in the stream. Changes in measured parameters were associated with specific remedial actions and the intervening steps within the recovery process are discussed with regard to changes in treatment processes.

Ryon, Michael G [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

''Measuring the Costs of Climate Change Policies''  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Studies of the costs of climate change policies have utilized a variety of measures or metrics for summarizing costs. The leading economic models have utilized GNP, GDP, the ''area under a marginal cost curve,'' the discounted present value of consumption, and a welfare measure taken directly from the utility function of the model's representative agent (the ''Equivalent Variation''). Even when calculated using a single model, these metrics do not necessarily give similar magnitudes of costs or even rank policies consistently. This paper discusses in non-technical terms the economic concepts lying behind each concept, the theoretical basis for expecting each measure to provide a consistent ranking of policies, and the reasons why different measures provide different rankings. It identifies a method of calculating the ''Equivalent Variation'' as theoretically superior to the other cost metrics in ranking policies. When regulators put forward new economic or regulatory policies, there is a need to compare the costs and benefits of these new policies to existing policies and other alternatives to determine which policy is most cost-effective. For command and control policies, it is quite difficult to compute costs, but for more market-based policies, economists have had a great deal of success employing general equilibrium models to assess a policy's costs. Not all cost measures, however, arrive at the same ranking. Furthermore, cost measures can produce contradictory results for a specific policy. These problems make it difficult for a policy-maker to determine the best policy. For a cost measures to be of value, one would like to be confident of two things. First one wants to be sure whether the policy is a winner or loser. Second, one wants to be confident that a measure produces the correct policy ranking. That is, one wants to have confidence in a policy measure's ability to correctly rank policies from most beneficial to most harmful. This paper analyzes empirically these two properties of different costs measures as they pertain to assessing the costs of the carbon abatement policies, especially the Kyoto Protocol, under alternative assumptions about implementation.

Montgomery, W. D.; Smith, A. E.; Biggar, S. L.; Bernstein, P.M.

2003-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

317

HTGR Cost Model Users' Manual  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The High Temperature Gas-Cooler Reactor (HTGR) Cost Model was developed at the Idaho National Laboratory for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project. The HTGR Cost Model calculates an estimate of the capital costs, annual operating and maintenance costs, and decommissioning costs for a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor. The user can generate these costs for multiple reactor outlet temperatures; with and without power cycles, including either a Brayton or Rankine cycle; for the demonstration plant, first of a kind, or nth of a kind project phases; for a single or four-pack configuration; and for a reactor size of 350 or 600 MWt. This users manual contains the mathematical models and operating instructions for the HTGR Cost Model. Instructions, screenshots, and examples are provided to guide the user through the HTGR Cost Model. This model was design for users who are familiar with the HTGR design and Excel. Modification of the HTGR Cost Model should only be performed by users familiar with Excel and Visual Basic.

A.M. Gandrik

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Options in ISEEM Global Energy Model: 2010-2050 Scenario Analysis for Least-Cost Carbon Reduction in Iron and Steel Sector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of the modeling work carried out in this project was to quantify long-term scenarios for the future emission reduction potentials in the iron and steel sector. The main focus of the project is to examine the impacts of carbon reduction options in the U.S. iron and steel sector under a set of selected scenarios. In order to advance the understanding of carbon emission reduction potential on the national and global scales, and to evaluate the regional impacts of potential U.S. mitigation strategies (e.g., commodity and carbon trading), we also included and examined the carbon reduction scenarios in Chinas and Indias iron and steel sectors in this project. For this purpose, a new bottom-up energy modeling framework, the Industrial Sector Energy Efficiency Modeling (ISEEM), (Karali et al. 2012) was used to provide detailed annual projections starting from 2010 through 2050. We used the ISEEM modeling framework to carry out detailed analysis, on a country-by-country basis, for the U.S., Chinas, and Indias iron and steel sectors. The ISEEM model applicable to iron and steel section, called ISEEM-IS, is developed to estimate and evaluate carbon emissions scenarios under several alternative mitigation options - including policies (e.g., carbon caps), commodity trading, and carbon trading. The projections will help us to better understand emission reduction potentials with technological and economic implications. The database for input of ISEEM-IS model consists of data and information compiled from various resources such as World Steel Association (WSA), the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), China Steel Year Books, India Bureau of Mines (IBM), Energy Information Administration (EIA), and recent LBNL studies on bottom-up techno-economic analysis of energy efficiency measures in the iron and steel sector of the U.S., China, and India, including long-term steel production in China. In the ISEEM-IS model, production technology and manufacturing details are represented, in addition to the extensive data compiled from recent studies on bottom-up representation of efficiency measures for the sector. We also defined various mitigation scenarios including long-term production trends to project country-specific production, energy use, trading, carbon emissions, and costs of mitigation. Such analyses can provide useful information to assist policy-makers when considering and shaping future emissions mitigation strategies and policies. The technical objective is to analyze the costs of production and CO{sub 2} emission reduction in the U.S, China, and Indias iron and steel sectors under different emission reduction scenarios, using the ISEEM-IS as a cost optimization model. The scenarios included in this project correspond to various CO{sub 2} emission reduction targets for the iron and steel sector under different strategies such as simple CO{sub 2} emission caps (e.g., specific reduction goals), emission reduction via commodity trading, and emission reduction via carbon trading.

Karali, Nihan; Xu, Tengfang; Sathaye, Jayant

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Berkshire Gas- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Berkshire Gas offers all commercial customers various energy efficiency rebates. Berkshire Gas will pay residential customers that use gas to heat their homes 75% of the installed cost (up to $2...

320

SOLAR HEATING OF TANK BOTTOMS Application of Solar Heating to Asphaltic and Parrafinic Oils Reducing Fuel Costs and Greenhouse Gases Due to Use of Natural Gas and Propane  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The sale of crude oil requires that the crude meet product specifications for BS&W, temperature, pour point and API gravity. The physical characteristics of the crude such as pour point and viscosity effect the efficient loading, transport, and unloading of the crude oil. In many cases, the crude oil has either a very high paraffin content or asphalt content which will require either hot oiling or the addition of diluents to the crude oil to reduce the viscosity and the pour point of the oil allowing the crude oil to be readily loaded on to the transport. Marginal wells are significantly impacted by the cost of preheating the oil to an appropriate temperature to allow for ease of transport. Highly paraffinic and asphaltic oils exist throughout the D-J basin and generally require pretreatment during cold months prior to sales. The current study addresses the use of solar energy to heat tank bottoms and improves the overall efficiency and operational reliability of stripper wells.

Eugene A. Fritzler

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas abatement cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT IN KAZAKHASTAN: USING OIL AND GAS PRODUCTION BY-PRODUCT SULFUR FOR COST-EFFECTIVE SECONDARY END-USE PRODUCTS.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Republic of Kazakhstan is continuing to develop its extensive petroleum reserves in the Tengiz region of the northeastern part of the Caspian Sea. Large quantities of by-product sulfur are being produced as a result of the removal of hydrogen sulfide from the oil and gas produced in the region. Lack of local markets and economic considerations limit the traditional outlets for by-product sulfur and the buildup of excess sulfur is a becoming a potential economic and environmental liability. Thus, new applications for re-use of by-product sulfur that will benefit regional economies including construction, paving and waste treatment are being developed. One promising application involves the cleanup and treatment of mercury at a Kazakhstan chemical plant. During 19 years of operation at the Pavlodar Khimprom chlor-alkali production facility, over 900 tons of mercury was lost to the soil surrounding and beneath the buildings. The Institute of Metallurgy and Ore Benefication (Almaty) is leading a team to develop and demonstrate a vacuum-assisted thermal process to extract the mercury from the soil and concentrate it as pure, elemental mercury, which will then be treated using the Sulfur Polymer Stabilization/Solidification (SPSS) process. The use of locally produced sulfur will recycle a low-value industrial by-product to treat hazardous waste and render it safe for return to the environment, thereby helping to solve two problems at once. SPSS chemically stabilizes mercury to mercuric sulfide, which has a low vapor pressure and low solubility, and then physically encapsulates the material in a durable, monolithic solid sulfur polymer matrix. Thus, mercury is placed in a solid form very much like stable cinnabar, the form in which it is found in nature. Previous research and development has shown that the process can successfully encapsulate up to 33 wt% mercury in the solid form, while still meeting very strict regulatory standards for leachable mercury (0.025 mg/l in the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure). The research and development to deploy Kazakhstan recycled sulfur for secondary applications described in this paper is being conducted with support from the International Science and Technology Center (ISTC) and the U.S. Department of Energy Initiatives for Proliferation Prevention (DOE IPP).

KALB, P.D.; VAGIN, S.; BEALL, P.W.; LEVINTOV, B.L.

2004-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

322

Amores de Abat-jour: A cena teatral brasileira e a escrita de mulheres nos anos vinte  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FALL 2001 75 Amores de Abat-jour: a cena teatral brasileira e a escrita de mulheres nos anos vinte Ktia da Costa Bezerra Nas ltimas dcadas, muitos pesquisadores tm se dedicado a um verdadeiro trabalho de escavao arqueolgica na busca por... vozes silenciadas. Para tanto, eles tm procurado desencavar de arquivos e acervos empoeirados nomes e obras esquecidos pela historiografa oficial. Um projeto de resgate queja comea a surtir efeito dado o nmero crescente de antologias e ensaios...

Costa Bezerra, Ká tia da

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Types of Costs Types of Cost Estimates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Types of Costs Types of Cost Estimates Methods to estimate capital costs MIN E 408: Mining% accuracy. 2-5% of pre-production capital Types of Cost Estimates #12;3. Definitive Based on definitive-even $ Production Level Fixed Cost Break-even $ Production Level Cost-Revenue Relationships Capital Costs (or

Boisvert, Jeff

324

Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant biological monitoring and abatement program (BMAP) plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The proposed Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) for East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, as described, will be conducted for the duration of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit issued for the Y-12 Plant on April 28, 1995, and which became effective July 1, 1995. The basic approach to biological monitoring used in this program was developed by the staff in the Environmental Sciences Division at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory at the request of Y-12 Plant personnel. The proposed BMAP plan is based on results of biological monitoring conducted since 1985. Details of the specific procedures used in the current routine monitoring program are provided, but experimental designs for future studies are described in less detail. The overall strategy used in developing this plan was, and continues to be, to use the results obtained from each task to define the scope of future monitoring efforts. Such efforts may require more intensive sampling than initially proposed in some areas or a reduction in sampling intensity in others. By using the results of previous monitoring efforts to define the current program and to guide them in the development of future studies, an effective integrated monitoring program has been developed to assess the impacts of the Y-12 Plant operation on the biota of EFPC and to document the ecological effects of remedial actions.

Adams, S.M.; Brandt, C.C.; Cicerone, D.S. [and others

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Monitoring Fish Contaminant Responses to Abatement Actions: Factors that Affect Recovery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Monitoring of contaminant accumulation in fish has been conducted in East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee since 1985. Bioaccumulation trends are examined over a twenty year period coinciding with major pollution abatement actions by a Department of Energy facility at the stream s headwaters. Although EFPC is enriched in many contaminants relative to other local streams, only polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and mercury (Hg) were found to accumulate in the edible portions of fish to levels of human health concern. Mercury concentrations in redbreast sunfish were found to vary with season of collection, sex and size of individual fish. Over the course of the monitoring, waterborne Hg concentrations were reduced[80%; however, this did not translate into a comparable decrease in Hg bioaccumulation at most sites. Mercury bioaccumulation in fish did respond to decreased inputs in the industrialized headwater reach, but paradoxically increased in the lowermost reach of EFPC. As a result, the downstream pattern of Hg concentration in fish changed from one resembling dilution of a headwater point source in the 1980s to a uniform distribution in the 2000s. The reason for this remains unknown, but is hypothesized to involve changes in the chemical form and reactivity of waterborne Hg associated with the removal of residual chlorine and the addition of suspended particulates to the streamflow. PCB concentrations in fish varied greatly from year-to-year, but always exhibited a pronounced downstream decrease, and appeared to respond to management practices that limited episodic inputs from legacy sources within the facility.

Southworth, George R [ORNL; Peterson, Mark J [ORNL; Roy, W Kelly [ORNL; Mathews, Teresa J [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Additional Resources for Estimating Building Energy and Cost Savings to Reduce Greenhouse Gases  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

For evaluating greenhouse gas reduction strategies and estimating costs, the following information resources can help Federal agencies estimate energy and cost savings potential by building type.

327

Types of Costs Types of Cost Estimates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

05-1 Types of Costs Types of Cost Estimates Methods to estimate capital costs MIN E 408-Revenue Relationships Capital Costs (or first cost or capital investment): Expenditures made to acquire or develop capital assets Three main classes of capital costs: 1. Depreciable Investment: Investment allocated

Boisvert, Jeff

328

Valve for gas centrifuges  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention is a pneumatically operated valve assembly for simultaneously (1) closing gas-transfer lines connected to a gas centrifuge or the like and (2) establishing a recycle path between two of the lines so closed. The valve assembly is especially designed to be compact, fast-acting, reliable, and comparatively inexpensive. It provides large reductions in capital costs for gas-centrifuge cascades.

Hahs, Charles A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Burbage, Charles H. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Natural Gas Regulation- Delaware Public Service Commission (Delaware)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Delaware Public Service Commission regulates only the distribution of natural gas to Delaware consumers. The delivery and administrative costs associated with natural gas distribution are...

330

Mid-South Metallurgical Makes Electrical and Natural Gas System...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Mid-South Metallurgical Makes Electrical and Natural Gas System Upgrades to Reduce Energy Use and Achieve Cost Savings Mid-South Metallurgical Makes Electrical and Natural Gas...

331

Estimating Specialty Costs  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Specialty costs are those nonstandard, unusual costs that are not typically estimated. Costs for research and development (R&D) projects involving new technologies, costs associated with future regulations, and specialty equipment costs are examples of specialty costs. This chapter discusses those factors that are significant contributors to project specialty costs and methods of estimating costs for specialty projects.

1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

332

OAK RIDGE Y-12 PLANT BIOLOGICAL MONITORING AND ABATEMENT PROGRAM (BMAP) PLAN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The proposed Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) for East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, as described, will be conducted for the duration of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit issued for the Y-12 Plant on April 28, 1995, and which became effective July 1, 1995. The basic approach to biological monitoring used in this program was developed by the staff in the Environmental Sciences Division at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory at the request of Y- 12 Plant personnel. The proposed BMAP plan is based on results of biological monitoring conducted since 1985. Details of the specific procedures used in the current routine monitoring program are provided but experimental designs for future studies are described in less detail. The overall strategy used in developing this plan was, and continues to be, to use the results obtained from each task to define the scope of future monitoring efforts. Such efforts may require more intensive sampling than initially proposed in some areas (e.g., additional toxicity testing if initial results indicate low survival or reproduction) or a reduction in sampling intensity in others (e.g., reduction in the number of sampling sites when no impact is observed). By using the results of previous monitoring efforts to define the current program and to guide us in the development of future studies, an effective integrated monitoring program has been developed to assess the impacts of the Y-12 Plant operation on the biota of EFPC and to document the ecological effects of remedial actions.

ADAMS, S.M.; BRANDT, C.C.; CHRISTENSEN, S.W.; CICERONE, D.S.; GREELEY, M.S.JR; HILL, W.R.; HUSTON, M.S.; KSZOS, L.A.; MCCARTHY, J.F.; PETERSON, M.J.; RYON, M.G.; SMITH, J.G.; SOUTHWORTH, G.R.; STEWART, A.J.

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The revised Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) for East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, as described, will be conducted as required by the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit issued for the Y-12 Plant on April 28, 1995 and became effective July 1, 1995. The basic approach to biological monitoring used in this program was developed by the staff in the Environmental Science Division (ESD) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) at the request of the Y-12 Plant. The revision to the BMAP plan is based on results of biological monitoring conducted during the period of 1985 to present. Details of the specific procedures used in the current routine monitoring program are provided; experimental designs for future studies are described in less detail. The overall strategy used in developing this plan was, and continues to be, to use the results obtained from each task to define the scope of future monitoring efforts. Such efforts may require more intensive sampling than initially proposed in some areas (e.g., additional bioaccumulation monitoring if results indicate unexpectedly high PCBs or Hg) or a reduction in sampling intensity in others (e.g., reduction in the number of sampling sites when no impact is still observed). The program scope will be re-evaluated annually. By using the results of previous monitoring efforts to define the current program and to guide us in the development of future studies, an effective integrated monitoring program has been developed to assess the impacts of Y-12 Plant operations (past and present) on the biota of EFPC and to document the ecological effects of remedial actions.

Adams, S.M.; Brandt, C.C.; Christensen, S.W.; Greeley, M.S.JR.; Hill, W.R.; Peterson, M.J.; Ryon, M.G.; Smith, J.G.; Southworth, G.R.; Stewart, A.J.

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Capturing Waste Gas: Saves Energy, Lower Costs  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in Review: Top FiveDepartment of EnergyLANDSCAPEDepartment ofDepartment of

335

Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trends: 2006  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cost ($/MWh) Regulation Load Following Unit Commitment Gas31 Regulation and load-following impacts are generally found

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

NREL and Industry Advance Low-Cost Solar Water Heating R&D (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

NREL and Rhotech develop cost-effective solar water heating prototype to rival natural gas water heater market.

Not Available

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

THE CO2 ABATEMENT POTENTIAL OF CALIFORNIA'S MID-SIZED COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

heat exchanger internal combustion engine Los Angeleschiller. ICE: Internal combustion engine, GT: Gas turbine,indicate that internal combustion engines (ICEs) with heat

Stadler, Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Simulation of the GHG Abatement Potentials in the U.S. Building Sector by 2050  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and gas filled cavities. Dynamic (Electrochromic) Windows The dynamic electrochromic option allows for active controlPerformance Dynamic Electrochromic Windows Combined Windows

Stadler, Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Employee Replacement Costs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Employee Replacement Costs Arindrajit Dube, Eric Freeman andproperties of employee replacement costs, using a panel2008. We establish that replacement costs are sub- stantial

Dube, Arindrajit; Freeman, Eric; Reich, Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Computational Optimization of Gas Compressor Stations: MINLP ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Feb 26, 2015 ... Abstract: When considering cost-optimal operation of gas transport networks, compressor stations play the most important role. Proper...

Daniel Rose

2015-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas abatement cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

An integrated assessment of air pollutant abatement opportunities in a computable general equilibrium framework  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Air pollution and anthropogenic greenhouse gas emission reduction policies are desirable to reduce smog, tropospheric concentrations of ozone precursors, acid rain, and other adverse effects on human health, the environment, ...

Waugh, C. (Caleb Joseph)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

GROUP 1 GROUP 2 GROUP 3 GROUP 4 GROUP 5 GROUP 6 ANDERSON, JENNIFER AYENI, MARY ABATE BESSOMO, ANNA BARRETT, CIAN ADAMS, NICOLE BARTON, MICHAEL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GROUP 1 GROUP 2 GROUP 3 GROUP 4 GROUP 5 GROUP 6 ANDERSON, JENNIFER AYENI, MARY ABATE BESSOMO, ANNA ANDERSON FITZSIMONS, DENISEBINCHY, SUSAN CARLEY, JESSE CONWAY, AILBHE BROOKE, HENRY CONLAN, DEIRDRE, CAOIMHE HESKIN, CLODAGH MC GOVERN, MARIE-CLAIREMURRAY, AINE GROGAN, CLARE GERARD, ALLISON MC QUAID, RACHEL

O'Mahony, Donal E.

343

Y-12 National Security Complex Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program 2007 Calendar Yeare Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit issued for the Oak Ridge Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12 Complex) which became effective May 1, 2006, continued a requirement for a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP). The BMAP was originally developed in 1985 to demonstrate that the effluent limitations established for the Y-12 Complex protected the classified uses of the receiving stream (East Fork Poplar Creek: EFPC), in particular, the growth and propagation of aquatic life (Loar et al. 1989). The objectives of the current BMAP are similar, specifically to assess stream ecological conditions relative to regulatory limits and criteria, to assess ecological impacts as well as recovery in response to Y-12 operations, and to investigate the causes of continuing impacts. The BMAP consists of three tasks that reflect complementary approaches to evaluating the effects of the Y-12 Complex discharges on the biotic integrity of EFPC. These tasks include: (1) bioaccumulation monitoring, (2) benthic macroinvertebrate community monitoring, and (3) fish community monitoring. As required by the NPDES permit, the BMAP benthic macroinvertebrate community monitoring task includes studies to annually evaluate the receiving stream's biological integrity in comparison to TN Water Quality Criteria. BMAP monitoring is currently being conducted at five primary EFPC sites, although sites may be excluded or added depending upon the specific objectives of the various tasks. Criteria used in selecting the sites include: (1) location of sampling sites used in other studies, (2) known or suspected sources of downstream impacts, (3) proximity to U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) boundaries, (4) appropriate habitat distribution, and (5) access. The primary sampling sites include upper EFPC at kilometers (EFKs) 24.4 and 23.4 [upstream and downstream of Lake Reality (LR) respectively]; EFK 18.7 (also EFK 18.2 and 19), located off the ORR and below an area of intensive commercial and light industrial development; EFK 13.8, located upstream from the Oak Ridge Wastewater Treatment Facility (ORWTF); and EFK 6.3 located approximately 1.4 km below the ORR boundary (Fig. 1.1). Actual sampling locations on EFPC may differ slightly by task according to specific requirements of the task. Brushy Fork (BF) at kilometer (BFK) 7.6 and Hinds Creek at kilometer (HCK) 20.6 are the most commonly used reference sites for the Y-12 BMAP. Additional sites off the ORR are also occasionally used for reference, including Beaver Creek, Bull Run, Cox Creek, and Paint Rock Creek (Fig. 1.2). Summaries of the sampling designs for the three primary tasks of the Y-12 Complex BMAP for EFPC are presented in Tables 1.1-1.3. This report covers the 2007 study period, although data collected outside this time period are included as appropriate. To address the biological monitoring requirements for Bear Creek and McCoy Branch, CERCLA-funded data is summarized in Appendix A (for Bear Creek) and Appendix B (for McCoy Branch). Data for these two watersheds is provided herein to address Section IX of the NPDES Permit for Y-12, where 'Results of these CERCLA programs can be used to meet the biological monitoring requirements of this permit'. For potential comparison with instream biological measures, a summary of the toxicity testing results for Y-12 outfalls into upper EFPC is provided in Appendix C (these results have been previously reported).

Peterson, M.J.; Greeley, M. S. Jr.; Morris, G. W.; Roy, W. K.; Ryan, M. G.; Smith, J. G.; Southworth, G. R.

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Electricity Plant Cost Uncertainties (released in AEO2009)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Construction costs for new power plants have increased at an extraordinary rate over the past several years. One study, published in mid-2008, reported that construction costs had more than doubled since 2000, with most of the increase occurring since 2005. Construction costs have increased for plants of all types, including coal, nuclear, natural gas, and wind.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Building Distributed Energy Performance Optimization for China a Regional Analysis of Building Energy Costs and CO2 Emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

solar radiation, electricity tariff, technology costs, andrequirements, usage patterns, tariffs, and incentives. Toassessment Electricity tariff Natural gas tariff Technology

Feng, Wei

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Cost Model and Cost Estimating Software  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This chapter discusses a formalized methodology is basically a cost model, which forms the basis for estimating software.

1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

347

Costing of Joining Methods -Arc Welding Costs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Costing of Joining Methods - Arc Welding Costs ver. 1 ME 6222: Manufacturing Processes and Systems.S. Colton © GIT 2009 5 #12;LaborLabor Di t ti f ldi· Direct time of welding ­ time to produce a length of weld ­ labor rate ­ multiplication gives labor cost per length · Set-up time, etc. · Personal time

Colton, Jonathan S.

348

Natural gas liquids remain strong petrochemical feedstock  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The supply of petrochemical feedstocks in the USA are discussed. The US petrochemical network starts with three main sources, i.e., olefins, aromatics, and natural gas. Petrochemical technology has been pushed to lower costs and improve yields in the face of a determined market drive from new petrochemical producing regions with vast supplies of low-cost gas liquids.

Greek, B.F.

1984-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

349

Activity Based Costing  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Activity Based Costing (ABC) is method for developing cost estimates in which the project is subdivided into discrete, quantifiable activities or a work unit. This chapter outlines the Activity Based Costing method and discusses applicable uses of ABC.

1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

350

GTL technologies focus on lowering costs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Difficulties in the development of major natural-gas production projects and the limitations imposed by saturated markets for LNG or pipeline gas have focused attention on alternative gas utilization approaches. At the same time, technology improvements have transformed the Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) conversion of natural gas-to-liquid (GTL) hydrocarbons from a technically interesting but uneconomic option into an option worthy of serious consideration. This two-part series reviews GTL technology developments which have led to today`s situation (Part 1) and examines the economics of GTL conversion (Part 2). The economic viability of GTL projects mainly depends on feed-gas pricing, investment costs, and the potential to produce liquids with natural-gas production.

Corke, M.J. [Purvin and Gertz Inc., London (United Kingdom)

1998-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

351

Evaluation of air pollution abatement systems for multiple-hearth sewage sludge incinerators  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Capital and annual costs were calculated for the application of six different air-pollution-control system options to municipal sewage-sludge incinerators that were using multiple-hearth furnaces. The systems involved three principal types of air-pollution equipment - wet scrubbers, fabric filters, and electrostatic precipitators - applied to three different plant sizes (plants incinerating 36, 72, and 300 tons of dry sludge per day in one, two, and eight multiple-hearth furnaces, respectively). The six options were: (1) venturi/tray scrubber with a 40-inch pressure drop, (2) fabric filter system operating at 500 deg and equipped with an upstream temperature control, (3) fabric filter system operating at 500 deg and equipped with a heat exchanger and a scrubber for SO/sub 2/ reduction, (4) electrostatic precipitator (ESP) with upstream limited temperature and humidity control, (5) same as Option 4 but with an additional downstream wet scrubber for SO/sub 2/ reduction, and (6) ESP with upstream temperature control and an SO/sub 2/ scrubber. Technical feasibility studies indicated that all three types of controls could achieve a total particulate removal efficiency of 99 percent. The venturi/tray scrubber option entailed the lowest capital cost, but annual operating costs were highest because of the high pressure drops and increased energy use.

Annamraju, G.; Gerstle, R.W.; Shah, Y.M.; Arora, M.L.

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Yes, you can control lost and unaccounted-for gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1982, lost and unaccounted-for gas cost the US gas industry $1.983 billion, based on a gas worth of $5.00/1000 CF. A survey of key gas operators across the country produced a list of 23 suggestions for reducing gas losses in the areas of leakage control, measurement practices, accounting accuracy, and theft prevention.

Hale, D.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Cost Effectiveness Analysis for Conservation Investments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of investment capital as the principal reason for the abundance of cost effective The Alliance to Save Energy is a nonprofit conservation projects awaiting funding. In coalition of business, labor, government, many firms the in-practice "hurdle rates... considered. Assume, for example, that natural gas prices are expected to escalate and oil prices are expected to remain constant. If these assumptions are not reflected in the quantitative assessment of IRR, the relatively greater attractiveness of gas...

Reid, M. W.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

INDEPENDENT COST REVIEW (ICR) and INDEPENDENT COST ESTIMATE ...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

INDEPENDENT COST REVIEW (ICR) and INDEPENDENT COST ESTIMATE (ICE) Standard Operating Procedures INDEPENDENT COST REVIEW (ICR) and INDEPENDENT COST ESTIMATE (ICE) Standard Operating...

355

Contracting with reading costs and renegotiation costs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OF CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO Contracting with Reading Costs andrents, and the competitive contracting process. Journal ofReiche. Foundation of incomplete contracting in a model of

Brennan, James R.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

A cost-effectiveness analysis of alternative ozone control strategies : flexible nitrogen oxide (NOx) abatement from power plants in the eastern United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ozone formation is a complex, non-linear process that depends on the atmospheric concentrations of its precursors, nitrogen oxide (NOx) and Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC), as well as on temperature and the available ...

Sun, Lin, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Systems Engineering Cost Estimation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on project, human capital impact. 7 How to estimate Cost? Difficult to know what we are building early on1 Systems Engineering Lecture 3 Cost Estimation Dr. Joanna Bryson Dr. Leon Watts University of Bath: Contrast approaches for estimating software project cost, and identify the main sources of cost

Bryson, Joanna J.

358

Life Cycle Cost Estimate  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Life-cycle costs (LCCs) are all the anticipated costs associated with a project or program alternative throughout its life. This includes costs from pre-operations through operations or to the end of the alternative.This chapter discusses life cycle costs and the role they play in planning.

1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

359

Cost Estimation Package  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This chapter focuses on the components (or elements) of the cost estimation package and their documentation.

1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

360

EPA Natural Gas STAR Program Accomplishments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Established in 1993, the Natural Gas STAR program is a partnership between the U.S. EPA and the oil and natural gas industry designed to cost-effectively reduce methane emissions from voluntary activities undertaken at oil and natural gas operations both

unknown authors

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas abatement cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

OOTW COST TOOLS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document reports the results of a study of cost tools to support the analysis of Operations Other Than War (OOTW). It recommends the continued development of the Department of Defense (DoD) Contingency Operational Support Tool (COST) as the basic cost analysis tool for 00TWS. It also recommends modifications to be included in future versions of COST and the development of an 00TW mission planning tool to supply valid input for costing.

HARTLEY, D.S.III; PACKARD, S.L.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Technology and economics of gas utilization: Methanol  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The paper reviews the current and emerging technology for the conversion of natural gas into methanol and assesses its impact on the production economics. Technologies of potential use for offshore developments of large gas reserves or associated gas are discussed. New technologies for the production of methanol synthesis-gas, such as autothermal reforming and GHR technology, are described and the economic advantages over conventional steam reforming are quantified. New methanol synthesis technology, such as slurry phase reactors, are outlined but appear to offer little advantage over conventional technology for offshore gas utilization. The purification of methanol for fuel and chemical grade product is outlined and the cost of transport presented. The data presented gives an overview of the production costs for production of methanol from large gas reserves (> 1Tcf, 25--35PJ/a) and smaller scale reserves (10--20MMscfd, 4--10PJ/a). The variation of the production cost of methanol with gas price indicates that the gas price is the principal economic consideration. However, adoption of new technology will improve production economics by an amount equivalent to an incremental gas cost of about $0.5/GJ. For gas reserves of low development cost, the adoption of new technology is not a prerequisite to economic viability.

Seddon, D.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

363

Hydrogen refueling station costs in Shanghai  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Elec Del Cali: Del Investment Cost Delivery Cost OperatingCost Feedstock Cost Investment Cost Delivery Cost Operatingcosts Annualized investment cost, 1000$/yr Total annualized

Weinert, Jonathan X.; Shaojun, Liu; Ogden, Joan M; Jianxin, Ma

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Technology Adoption and Regulatory Regimes: Gas Turbines Electricity Generators from 1980 to 2001  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Clean Air Amendments helped lower the cost of natural gas turbines vis-a-vis coal based technologies.

Ishii, Jun

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

First report on the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program for East Fork Poplar Creek  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As stipulated in the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit issued to the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant on May 24, 1985, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed for the receiving stream, East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC). The objectives of the BMAP are (1) to demonstrate that the current effluent limitations established for the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant protect the uses of EFPC (e.g., the growth and propagation of fish and aquatic life), as designated by the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) [formerly the Tennessee Department of Health and Environment (TDHE)], and (2) to document the ecological effects resulting from implementation of a water pollution control program that includes construction of several large wastewater treatment facilities. The BMAP consists of four major tasks: (1) ambient toxicity testing, (2) bioaccumulation studies, (3) biological indicator studies, and (4) ecological surveys of stream communities, including periphyton (attached algae), benthic macroinvertebrates, and fish. This document, the first in a series of reports on the results of the Y-12 Plant BMAP, describes studies that were conducted from May 1985 through September 1986.

Loar, J.M.; Adams, S.M.; Allison, L.J.; Boston, H.L.; Huston, M.A.; McCarthy, J.F.; Smith, J.G.; Southworth, G.R.; Stewart, A.J. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Black, M.C. (Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK (United States)); Gatz, A.J. Jr. (Ohio Wesleyan Univ., Delaware, OH (United States)); Hinzman, R.L. (Oak Ridge Research Inst., TN (United States)); Jimenez, B.D. (Puerto Rico Univ.,

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Second report on the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program for East Fork Poplar Creek  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As stipulated in the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NDPES) permit issued to the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant on May 24, 1986, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed for the receiving stream, East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC). The objectives of BMAP are (1) to demonstrate that the current effluent limitations established for the Y-12 Plant protect the classified uses of EFPC (e.g., the growth and propagation of fish and aquatic life), as designated by the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) and (2) to document the ecological effects resulting from implementation of a Water Pollution Control Program that includes construction of several large wastewater treatment facilities. BMAP consists of four major tasks: (1) ambient toxicity testing; (2) bioaccumulation studies; (3) biological indicator studies; and (4) ecological surveys of stream communities, including periphyton (attached algae), benthic (bottom-dwelling) macroinvertebrates, and fish. This document, the second in a series of reports on the results of the Y-12 Plant BMAP, describes studies that were conducted between July 1986 and July 1988, although additional data collected outside this time period are included, as appropriate.

Hinzman, R.L. [ed.; Adams, S.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Black, M.C. [Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK (United States)] [and others

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Total Cost Per MwH for all common large scale power generation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

or ash heap, the cost of the gas out of the stack, toxificaiton of the lakes and streams, plant decommision costs. For nuclear yiou are talking about managing the waste in...

368

Regulatory Control of Vehicle and Power Plant Emissions: How Effective and at What Cost?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Passenger vehicles and power plants are major sources of greenhouse gas emissions. While economic analyses generally indicate that a broader market-based approach to greenhouse gas reduction would be less costly and more ...

Paltsev, S.

369

E-Print Network 3.0 - adoption analysis cost-effectiveness Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

p. 1 10 Cost-Effectiveness of Greenhouse Gas Emission ... Source: Kammen, Daniel M. - Renewable and Appropriate Energy Laboratory, University of California at Berkeley...

370

Do Gasoline Prices Resond Asymmetrically to Cost Shocks? The Confounding Effect of Edgeworth Cycles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Atkinson, B . (2006) "Retail Gasoline Price Cycles: Evidenceof Adjustment of U K Retail Gasoline Prices to Cost Changes"1993) "Gas Wars: Retail Gasoline Price Fluctuations", of and

Noel, Michael

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Gas Storage Technology Consortium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of April 1, 2005 through June 30, 2005. During this time period efforts were directed toward (1) GSTC administration changes, (2) participating in the American Gas Association Operations Conference and Biennial Exhibition, (3) issuing a Request for Proposals (RFP) for proposal solicitation for funding, and (4) organizing the proposal selection meeting.

Joel Morrison

2005-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

372

Direct/Indirect Costs  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This chapter provides recommended categories for direct and indirect elements developed by the Committee for Cost Methods Development (CCMD) and describes various estimating techniques for direct and indirect costs.

1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

373

Suggestions for the Road to Copenhagen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

abatement cost and environmental damage are uncorrelated,of abatement costs and environmental damage. The results areabatement costs and environmental damages makes it dif?cult

Karp, Larry; Zhao, Jinhua

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Environmental Cost Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environmental Cost Analysis David Edge Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission 131 ESL-IE-00-04-21 Proceedings from the Twenty-second National Industrial Energy Technology Conference, Houston, TX, April 5-6, 2000 Tuas Natural... Resource Conservation CorDDliuion Environmental Cost Analysis Presented By David Edge Determine the Costs c> Input co Output c> Hidden c> Capital (non recurring) Envirormenlal Cost Analy.;is "There has to be a measurable result...

Edge, D.

375

Revisiting the Long-Term Hedge Value of Wind Power in an Era of Low Natural Gas Prices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nexus of Natural Gas and Renewable Energy. The Electricity2007. Can Deployment of Renewable Energy Put DownwardDetermining the Real Cost: Why Renewable Power is More Cost-

Bolinger, Mark

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

International Trade in Natural Gas: Golden Age of LNG?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The introduction of liquefied natural gas (LNG) as an option for international trade has created a market for natural gas where global prices may eventually be differentiated by the transportation costs between world ...

Du, Y.

377

Power Plant Cycling Costs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides a detailed review of the most up to date data available on power plant cycling costs. The primary objective of this report is to increase awareness of power plant cycling cost, the use of these costs in renewable integration studies and to stimulate debate between policymakers, system dispatchers, plant personnel and power utilities.

Kumar, N.; Besuner, P.; Lefton, S.; Agan, D.; Hilleman, D.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

acid gas removal: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

cost. In mixed matrix membrane (MMM) superior gas separation properties of inorganic membranes and economical processes ability of polymeric membranes are exploited by combining...

379

Natural Gas Choice and Competition Act in 1999 (Pennsylvania)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This act aims to regulate the distribution system for natural gas by utility companies in terms of contracts, costs, tariff structures and competition. These regulations include minimum standards...

380

Electric Power Costs in Texas in 1985 and 1990  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

since utilities in Texas will be using a mix of fuels. This paper analyzes the cost of generating electricity from nuclear power, out-of-state coal, in-state lignite, fuel oil, natural gas, geothermal, and solar power. These costs are then used...

Gordon, J. B.; White, D. M.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas abatement cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Cost effective lighting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Long-life replacement lamps for the incandescent lamp have been evaluated with regard to their cost effectiveness. The replacements include the use of energy buttons that extend lamp life as well as an adaptive fluorescent circline lamp that will fit into existing incandescent lamp sockets. The initial, operating, and replacement costs for one million lumen-hours are determined for each lamp system. We find the most important lighting cost component is the operating cost. Using lamps that are less efficient or devices that cause lamps to operate less efficiently are not cost-effective. The adaptive fluorescent circline lamp, even at an initial cost of $15.00, is the most cost effective source of illumination compared to the incandescent lamp and lamp systems examined. 3 refs., 6 tabs.

Morse, O.; Verderber, R.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Gas Storage Technology Consortium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is crucial in meeting the needs of these new markets. To address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created - the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance the operational flexibility and deliverability of the nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost-effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of January1, 2007 through March 31, 2007. Key activities during this time period included: {lg_bullet} Drafting and distributing the 2007 RFP; {lg_bullet} Identifying and securing a meeting site for the GSTC 2007 Spring Proposal Meeting; {lg_bullet} Scheduling and participating in two (2) project mentoring conference calls; {lg_bullet} Conducting elections for four Executive Council seats; {lg_bullet} Collecting and compiling the 2005 GSTC Final Project Reports; and {lg_bullet} Outreach and communications.

Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

383

Gas Storage Technology Consortium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission & distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of April 1 to June 30, 2006. Key activities during this time period include: (1) Develop and process subcontract agreements for the eight projects selected for cofunding at the February 2006 GSTC Meeting; (2) Compiling and distributing the three 2004 project final reports to the GSTC Full members; (3) Develop template, compile listserv, and draft first GSTC Insider online newsletter; (4) Continue membership recruitment; (5) Identify projects and finalize agenda for the fall GSTC/AGA Underground Storage Committee Technology Transfer Workshop in San Francisco, CA; and (6) Identify projects and prepare draft agenda for the fall GSTC Technology Transfer Workshop in Pittsburgh, PA.

Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

2006-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

384

Gas Storage Technology Consortium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is crucial in meeting the needs of these new markets. To address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance the operational flexibility and deliverability of the nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost-effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of April 1, 2007 through June 30, 2007. Key activities during this time period included: (1) Organizing and hosting the 2007 GSTC Spring Meeting; (2) Identifying the 2007 GSTC projects, issuing award or declination letters, and begin drafting subcontracts; (3) 2007 project mentoring teams identified; (4) New NETL Project Manager; (5) Preliminary planning for the 2007 GSTC Fall Meeting; (6) Collecting and compiling the 2005 GSTC project final reports; and (7) Outreach and communications.

Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

385

Gas Storage Technology Consortium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of January 1, 2006 through March 31, 2006. Activities during this time period were: (1) Organize and host the 2006 Spring Meeting in San Diego, CA on February 21-22, 2006; (2) Award 8 projects for co-funding by GSTC for 2006; (3) New members recruitment; and (4) Improving communications.

Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

2006-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

386

Hydrogen Refueling Station Costs in Shanghai  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Costs Annualized Investment Cost, 1000$/yr Total AnnualizedH2 Fueling Stations Investment Cost Cost ($/yr) OperatingH2 Fueling Stations Investment Cost Cost ($/kg) Operating

Weinert, Jonathan X.; Shaojun, Liu; Ogden, J; Jianxin, Ma

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Liquefied Natural Gas for Trucks and Buses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Liquefied natural gas (LNG) is being developed as a heavy vehicle fuel. The reason for developing LNG is to reduce our dependency on imported oil by eliminating technical and costs barriers associated with its usage. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has a program, currently in its third year, to develop and advance cost-effective technologies for operating and refueling natural gas-fueled heavy vehicles (Class 7-8 trucks). The objectives of the DOE Natural Gas Vehicle Systems Program are to achieve market penetration by reducing vehicle conversion and fuel costs, to increase consumer acceptance by improving the reliability and efficiency, and to improve air quality by reducing tailpipe emissions. One way to reduce fuel costs is to develop new supplies of cheap natural gas. Significant progress is being made towards developing more energy-efficient, low-cost, small-scale natural gas liquefiers for exploiting alternative sources of natural gas such as from landfill and remote gas sites. In particular, the DOE program provides funds for research and development in the areas of; natural gas clean up, LNG production, advanced vehicle onboard storage tanks, improved fuel delivery systems and LNG market strategies. In general, the program seeks to integrate the individual components being developed into complete systems, and then demonstrate the technology to establish technical and economic feasibility. The paper also reviews the importance of cryogenics in designing LNG fuel delivery systems.

James Wegrzyn; Michael Gurevich

2000-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

388

Development of an efficient, low cost, small-scale natural gas fuel reformer for residential scale electric power generation. Final report for the period October 1, 1998 - December 31, 1999  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the final report, we present results from a technical and economic assessment of residential scale PEM fuel cell power systems. The objectives of our study are to conceptually design an inexpensive, small-scale PEMFC-based stationary power system that converts natural gas to both electricity and heat, and then to analyze the prospective performance and economics of various system configurations. We developed computer models for residential scale PEMFC cogeneration systems to compare various system designs (e.g., steam reforming vs. partial oxidation, compressed vs. atmospheric pressure, etc.) and determine the most technically and economically attractive system configurations at various scales (e.g., single family, residential, multi-dwelling, neighborhood).

Kreutz, Thomas G.; Ogden, Joan M.

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Hybrid Membranes for Light Gas Separations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Membrane separations provide a potentially attractive technology over conventional processes due to their advantages, such as low capital cost and energy consumption. The goal of this thesis is to design hybrid membranes that facilitate specific gas...

Liu, Ting

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

390

The impact of instrument choice on investment in abatement technologies: a case study of tax versus trade incentives for CCS and Biomass for electricity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

www.eprg.group.cam.ac.uk E P R G W O R K IN G P A P E R Abstract The impact of instrument choice on investment in abatement technologies: a case study of tax versus trade incentives for CCS and Biomass for electricity EPRG... for electricity and coal with carbon capture and storage. For both technologies we find that cap-and-trade schemes generate greater mean returns to such an investment than taxes, but with a wider distribution. We find that introducing price floors increase...

Laing, T; Grubb, Michael

391

Cost analysis guidelines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The first phase of the Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Management Program (Program)--management strategy selection--consists of several program elements: Technology Assessment, Engineering Analysis, Cost Analysis, and preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). Cost Analysis will estimate the life-cycle costs associated with each of the long-term management strategy alternatives for depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF6). The scope of Cost Analysis will include all major expenditures, from the planning and design stages through decontamination and decommissioning. The costs will be estimated at a scoping or preconceptual design level and are intended to assist decision makers in comparing alternatives for further consideration. They will not be absolute costs or bid-document costs. The purpose of the Cost Analysis Guidelines is to establish a consistent approach to analyzing of cost alternatives for managing Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) stocks of depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF6). The component modules that make up the DUF6 management program differ substantially in operational maintenance, process-options, requirements for R and D, equipment, facilities, regulatory compliance, (O and M), and operations risk. To facilitate a consistent and equitable comparison of costs, the guidelines offer common definitions, assumptions or basis, and limitations integrated with a standard approach to the analysis. Further, the goal is to evaluate total net life-cycle costs and display them in a way that gives DOE the capability to evaluate a variety of overall DUF6 management strategies, including commercial potential. The cost estimates reflect the preconceptual level of the designs. They will be appropriate for distinguishing among management strategies.

Strait, R.S.

1996-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

392

Pension costs and liabilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be to charge the cost over the current and subsequent years on the assumption that the cost, even though measured by past services, is incurred in contemplation of present and future 1 services. 1'he development of accounting thought concerning retire...? present liabilities are under- stated and owner's equity is overstated by a corresponding amount. It seems, however, that charging retained earnings with the past service cost does not, represent the true picture. Pension payments based solely on past...

Courtney, Harley Macon

1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

LMFBR fuel component costs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A significant portion of the cost of fabricating LMFBR fuels is in the non-fuel components such as fuel pin cladding, fuel assembly ducts and end fittings. The contribution of these to fuel fabrication costs, based on FFTF experience and extrapolated to large LMFBR fuel loadings, is discussed. The extrapolation considers the expected effects of LMFBR development programs in progress on non-fuel component costs.

Epperson, E.M.; Borisch, R.R.; Rice, L.H.

1981-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

394

Hydrogen and Infrastructure Costs  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

FUEL CELL TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM Hydrogen and Infrastructure Costs Hydrogen Infrastructure Market Readiness Workshop Washington D.C. February 17, 2011 Fred Joseck U.S. Department of...

395

Target Cost Management Strategy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Target cost management (TCM) is an innovation of Japanese management accounting system and by common sense has been considered with great interest by practitioners. Nowadays, TCM related

Okano, Hiroshi

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Avoidable waste management costs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the activity based costing method used to acquire variable (volume dependent or avoidable) waste management cost data for routine operations at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. Waste volumes from environmental restoration, facility stabilization activities, and legacy waste were specifically excluded from this effort. A core team consisting of Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, and Oak Ridge Reservation developed and piloted the methodology, which can be used to determine avoidable waste management costs. The method developed to gather information was based on activity based costing, which is a common industrial engineering technique. Sites submitted separate flow diagrams that showed the progression of work from activity to activity for each waste type or treatability group. Each activity on a flow diagram was described in a narrative, which detailed the scope of the activity. Labor and material costs based on a unit quantity of waste being processed were then summed to generate a total cost for that flow diagram. Cross-complex values were calculated by determining a weighted average for each waste type or treatability group based on the volume generated. This study will provide DOE and contractors with a better understanding of waste management processes and their associated costs. Other potential benefits include providing cost data for sites to perform consistent cost/benefit analysis of waste minimization and pollution prevention (WMIN/PP) options identified during pollution prevention opportunity assessments and providing a means for prioritizing and allocating limited resources for WMIN/PP.

Hsu, K.; Burns, M.; Priebe, S.; Robinson, P.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Apportioning Climate Change Costs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Apportioning Climate Change Costs Daniel A. Farber* I. II.ON CLIMATE CHANGE FOUR QUESTIONS ABOUTof how to respond to climate change. Most public attention

Farber, Daniel A.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Assessment of hot gas contaminant control  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this work is to gather data and information to assist DOE in responding to the NRC recommendation on hot gas cleanup by performing a comprehensive assessment of hot gas cleanup systems for advanced coal-based Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) and Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC) including the status of development of the components of the hot gas cleanup systems, and the probable cost and performance impacts. The scope and time frame of information gathering is generally responsive to the boundaries set by the National Research council (NRC), but includes a broad range of interests and programs which cover hot gas cleanup through the year 2010. As the status of hot gas cleanup is continually changing, additional current data and information are being obtained for this effort from this 1996 METC Contractors` Review Meeting as well as from the 1996 Pittsburgh Coal Conference, and the University of Karlsruhe Symposium. The technical approach to completing this work consists of: (1) Determination of the status of hot gas cleanup technologies-- particulate collection systems, hot gas desulfurization systems, and trace contaminant removal systems; (2) Determination of hot gas cleanup systems cost and performance sensitivities. Analysis of conceptual IGCC and PFBC plant designs with hot gas cleanup have been performed. The impact of variations in hot gas cleanup technologies on cost and performance was evaluated using parametric analysis of the baseline plant designs and performance sensitivity.

Rutkowski, M.D.; Klett, M.G.; Zaharchuk, R.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

400

CAPITAL FOR ENERGY AND INTER-FUEL ELASTICITIES OF SUBSTITUTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: ESTIMATING THE COST OF GREENHOUSE GAS REDUCTION Prepared for: Natural Resources Canada Prepared by for comparing greenhouse gas abatement policies are computer models of the Canadian economy. A key element in the case of switching from oil to natural gas and natural gas to electricity. It was also found that all

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas abatement cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

An Examination of Avoided Costs in Utah  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

existing avoided cost methodology and established thefor certain avoided cost methodologies or avoided cost inpu

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Decommissioning Unit Cost Data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Rocky Flats Closure Site (Site) is in the process of stabilizing residual nuclear materials, decommissioning nuclear facilities, and remediating environmental media. A number of contaminated facilities have been decommissioned, including one building, Building 779, that contained gloveboxes used for plutonium process development but did little actual plutonium processing. The actual costs incurred to decommission this facility formed much of the basis or standards used to estimate the decommissioning of the remaining plutonium-processing buildings. Recent decommissioning activities in the first actual production facility, Building 771, implemented a number of process and procedural improvements. These include methods for handling plutonium contaminated equipment, including size reduction, decontamination, and waste packaging, as well as management improvements to streamline planning and work control. These improvements resulted in a safer working environment and reduced project cost, as demonstrated in the overall project efficiency. The topic of this paper is the analysis of how this improved efficiency is reflected in recent unit costs for activities specific to the decommissioning of plutonium facilities. This analysis will allow the Site to quantify the impacts on future Rocky Flats decommissioning activities, and to develop data for planning and cost estimating the decommissioning of future facilities. The paper discusses the methods used to collect and arrange the project data from the individual work areas within Building 771. Regression and data correlation techniques were used to quantify values for different types of decommissioning activities. The discussion includes the approach to identify and allocate overall project support, waste management, and Site support costs based on the overall Site and project costs to provide a ''burdened'' unit cost. The paper ultimately provides a unit cost basis that can be used to support cost estimates for decommissioning at other facilities with similar equipment and labor costs. It also provides techniques for extracting information from limited data using extrapolation and interpolation techniques.

Sanford, P. C.; Stevens, J. L.; Brandt, R.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

403

Transmission line capital costs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The displacement or deferral of conventional AC transmission line installation is a key benefit associated with several technologies being developed with the support of the U.S. Department of Energy`s Office of Energy Management (OEM). Previous benefits assessments conducted within OEM have been based on significantly different assumptions for the average cost per mile of AC transmission line. In response to this uncertainty, an investigation of transmission line capital cost data was initiated. The objective of this study was to develop a database for preparing preliminary estimates of transmission line costs. An extensive search of potential data sources identified databases maintained by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Western Area Power Administration (WAPA) as superior sources of transmission line cost data. The BPA and WAPA data were adjusted to a common basis and combined together. The composite database covers voltage levels from 13.8 to 765 W, with cost estimates for a given voltage level varying depending on conductor size, tower material type, tower frame type, and number of circuits. Reported transmission line costs vary significantly, even for a given voltage level. This can usually be explained by variation in the design factors noted above and variation in environmental and land (right-of-way) costs, which are extremely site-specific. Cost estimates prepared from the composite database were compared to cost data collected by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) for investor-owned utilities from across the United States. The comparison was hampered because the only design specifications included with the FERC data were voltage level and line length. Working within this limitation, the FERC data were not found to differ significantly from the composite database. Therefore, the composite database was judged to be a reasonable proxy for estimating national average costs.

Hughes, K.R.; Brown, D.R.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Fuel option for gas turbine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Growth in electricity demand is an average of 10% per year. Energy, emission, and economy are importance of critical concerns for generating systems. Therefore, combined cycle power plant is preferred to Electricity Generating Authority of Thailand (EGAT) new power generating capacity. The various option of available fuel for gas turbine are natural gas, liquid fuel and coal fuel. Particularly with the tremendous price increases in imported and domestic fuel supplies, natural gas is an attractive low cost alternative for power generation. EGAT has researched using heavy fuel instead of natural gas since the year 1991. The problems of various corrosion characteristics have been found. In addition, fuel treatment for gas turbine are needed, and along with it, the environmental consideration are options that provide the limitation of environmental regulation.

Tantayakom, S. [Electricity Generating Authority of Thailand, Nonthaburi (Thailand). Chemical and Analysis Dept.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

405

Development of a Compressed Hydrogen Gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Kpsi "Saran Wrap" Tank Energy Density for Hydrogen Storage Systems " Advance the development of a cost · Satisfying hydrogen gas permeation requirements · Increasing energy density efficiency · Developing cost · Design » T700 carbon fiber overwrap with high interspersed winding pattern with design FOS of 2.45 » NGV

406

How regulators should use natural gas price forecasts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Natural gas prices are critical to a range of regulatory decisions covering both electric and gas utilities. Natural gas prices are often a crucial variable in electric generation capacity planning and in the benefit-cost relationship for energy-efficiency programs. High natural gas prices can make coal generation the most economical new source, while low prices can make natural gas generation the most economical. (author)

Costello, Ken

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

407

Abatement of 3-methylbutanal and trimethylamine with combined plasma1 and photocatalysisin a continuous planar reactor2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

titanium dioxide (TiO2) and the gas phase [9, 40, 42, 43]. The catalyst47 is activated by photons provided[5], combustion [6], adsorption [7], absorption and44 photocatalysis [3, 8,14, 39, 40, 42

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

408

Gas Storage Technology Consortium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The EMS Energy Institute at The Pennsylvania State University (Penn State) has managed the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC) since its inception in 2003. The GSTC infrastructure provided a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance the operational flexibility and deliverability of the nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost-effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. The GSTC received base funding from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Oil & Natural Gas Supply Program. The GSTC base funds were highly leveraged with industry funding for individual projects. Since its inception, the GSTC has engaged 67 members. The GSTC membership base was diverse, coming from 19 states, the District of Columbia, and Canada. The membership was comprised of natural gas storage field operators, service companies, industry consultants, industry trade organizations, and academia. The GSTC organized and hosted a total of 18 meetings since 2003. Of these, 8 meetings were held to review, discuss, and select proposals submitted for funding consideration. The GSTC reviewed a total of 75 proposals and committed co-funding to support 31 industry-driven projects. The GSTC committed co-funding to 41.3% of the proposals that it received and reviewed. The 31 projects had a total project value of $6,203,071 of which the GSTC committed $3,205,978 in co-funding. The committed GSTC project funding represented an average program cost share of 51.7%. Project applicants provided an average program cost share of 48.3%. In addition to the GSTC co-funding, the consortium provided the domestic natural gas storage industry with a technology transfer and outreach infrastructure. The technology transfer and outreach were conducted by having project mentoring teams and a GSTC website, and by working closely with the Pipeline Research Council International (PRCI) to jointly host technology transfer meetings and occasional field excursions. A total of 15 technology transfer/strategic planning workshops were held.

Joel Morrison; Elizabeth Wood; Barbara Robuck

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

409

Natural gas 1995: Issues and trends  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Natural Gas 1995: Issues and Trends addresses current issues affecting the natural gas industry and markets. Highlights of recent trends include: Natural gas wellhead prices generally declined throughout 1994 and for 1995 averages 22% below the year-earlier level; Seasonal patterns of natural gas production and wellhead prices have been significantly reduced during the past three year; Natural gas production rose 15% from 1985 through 1994, reaching 18.8 trillion cubic feet; Increasing amounts of natural gas have been imported; Since 1985, lower costs of producing and transporting natural gas have benefitted consumers; Consumers may see additional benefits as States examine regulatory changes aimed at increasing efficiency; and, The electric industry is being restructured in a fashion similar to the recent restructuring of the natural gas industry.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

9-26 QER Report: Energy Transmission, Storage, and Distribution...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

synthesis of marginal abatement cost-curve analysis for methane emissions, which involves examining the relative cost effectiveness of different methane abatement strategies...

411

Gas Storage Technology Consortium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created-the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of July 1, 2006 to September 30, 2006. Key activities during this time period include: {lg_bullet} Subaward contracts for all 2006 GSTC projects completed; {lg_bullet} Implement a formal project mentoring process by a mentor team; {lg_bullet} Upcoming Technology Transfer meetings: {sm_bullet} Finalize agenda for the American Gas Association Fall Underground Storage Committee/GSTC Technology Transfer Meeting in San Francisco, CA. on October 4, 2006; {sm_bullet} Identify projects and finalize agenda for the Fall GSTC Technology Transfer Meeting, Pittsburgh, PA on November 8, 2006; {lg_bullet} Draft and compile an electronic newsletter, the GSTC Insider; and {lg_bullet} New members update.

Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

412

GAS STORAGE TECHNOLOGY CONSORTIUM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. To accomplish this objective, the project is divided into three phases that are managed and directed by the GSTC Coordinator. Base funding for the consortium is provided by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). In addition, funding is anticipated from the Gas Technology Institute (GTI). The first phase, Phase 1A, was initiated on September 30, 2003, and is scheduled for completion on March 31, 2004. Phase 1A of the project includes the creation of the GSTC structure, development of constitution (by-laws) for the consortium, and development and refinement of a technical approach (work plan) for deliverability enhancement and reservoir management. This report deals with the second 3-months of the project and encompasses the period December 31, 2003, through March 31, 2003. During this 3-month, the dialogue of individuals representing the storage industry, universities and the Department of energy was continued and resulted in a constitution for the operation of the consortium and a draft of the initial Request for Proposals (RFP).

Robert W. Watson

2004-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

413

GAS STORAGE TECHNOLOGY CONSORTIUM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. To accomplish this objective, the project is divided into three phases that are managed and directed by the GSTC Coordinator. Base funding for the consortium is provided by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). In addition, funding is anticipated from the Gas Technology Institute (GTI). The first phase, Phase 1A, was initiated on September 30, 2003, and was completed on March 31, 2004. Phase 1A of the project included the creation of the GSTC structure, development and refinement of a technical approach (work plan) for deliverability enhancement and reservoir management. This report deals with Phase 1B and encompasses the period April 1, 2004, through June 30, 2004. During this 3-month period, a Request for Proposals (RFP) was made. A total of 17 proposals were submitted to the GSTC. A proposal selection meeting was held June 9-10, 2004 in Morgantown, West Virginia. Of the 17 proposals, 6 were selected for funding.

Robert W. Watson

2004-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

414

Cost of Adding E85 Fueling Capability to Existing Gasoline Stations: NREL Survey and Literature Search (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fact sheet provides framework for gas station owners to access what a reasonable cost would be to install E85 infrastructure.

Not Available

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Assessment of costs and benefits of flexible and alternative fuel use in the US transportation sector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of this report is to provide estimates of volumes and development costs of known nonassociated gas reserves in selected, potentially important supplier nations, using a standard set of costing algorithms and conventions. Estimates of undeveloped nonassociated gas reserves and the cost of drilling development wells, production equipment, gas processing facilities, and pipeline construction are made at the individual field level. A discounted cash-flow model of production, investment, and expenses is used to estimate the present value cost of developing each field on a per-thousand-cubic-foot (Mcf) basis. These gas resource cost estimates for individual accumulations (that is, fields or groups of fields) then were aggregated into country-specific price-quantity curves. These curves represent the cost of developing and transporting natural gas to an export point suitable for tanker shipments or to a junction with a transmission line. The additional costs of LNG or methanol conversion are not included. A brief summary of the cost of conversion to methanol and transportation to the United States is contained in Appendix D: Implications of Gas Development Costs for Methanol Conversion.

none,

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Power Plant Cycling Costs  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

(say, a trip) and such factors are not fully captured in this dataset. 9. Older combined cycle units were a step change in lower operating costs due to cycling...

417

Estimating Renewable Energy Costs  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Some renewable energy measures, such as daylighting, passive solar heating, and cooling load avoidance, do not add much to the cost of a building. However, renewable energy technologies typically...

418

Cost Estimating Guide  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Guide provides uniform guidance and best practices that describe the methods and procedures that could be used in all programs and projects at DOE for preparing cost estimates. No cancellations.

2011-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

419

Investments of uncertain cost  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I study irreversible investment decisions when projects take time to complete, and are subject to two types of uncertainty over the cost of completion. The first is technical uncertainty, i.e., uncertainty over the amount ...

Pindyck, Robert S.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Assessment of coal gasification/hot gas cleanup based advanced gas turbine systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The major objectives of the joint SCS/DOE study of air-blown gasification power plants with hot gas cleanup are to: (1) Evaluate various power plant configurations to determine if an air-blown gasification-based power plant with hot gas cleanup can compete against pulverized coal with flue gas desulfurization for baseload expansion at Georgia Power Company's Plant Wansley; (2) determine if air-blown gasification with hot gas cleanup is more cost effective than oxygen-blown IGCC with cold gas cleanup; (3) perform Second-Law/Thermoeconomic Analysis of air-blown IGCC with hot gas cleanup and oxygen-blown IGCC with cold gas cleanup; (4) compare cost, performance, and reliability of IGCC based on industrial gas turbines and ISTIG power island configurations based on aeroderivative gas turbines; (5) compare cost, performance, and reliability of large (400 MW) and small (100 to 200 MW) gasification power plants; and (6) compare cost, performance, and reliability of air-blown gasification power plants using fluidized-bed gasifiers to air-blown IGCC using transport gasification and pressurized combustion.

Not Available

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas abatement cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Standard costs for labor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STANDARD COSTS FOR LABOR A Thesis By MD. NURUL ABSAR KHAN Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texms in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION... January 1960 Ma/or Sub)acts Accounting STANOAHD COSTS FOR LABOR ND, NURUL ABSAR KHAN Approved as t style and content bys Chairman of Committee Head of Hepartment January 1960 The author acknowledges his indebtedness to Mr. T. M. Leland, Mr. T. D...

Khan, Mohammed Nurul Absar

1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Low cost fuel cell diffusion layer configured for optimized anode water management  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A fuel cell comprises a cathode gas diffusion layer, a cathode catalyst layer, an anode gas diffusion layer, an anode catalyst layer and an electrolyte. The diffusion resistance of the anode gas diffusion layer when operated with anode fuel is higher than the diffusion resistance of the cathode gas diffusion layer. The anode gas diffusion layer may comprise filler particles having in-plane platelet geometries and be made of lower cost materials and manufacturing processes than currently available commercial carbon fiber substrates. The diffusion resistance difference between the anode gas diffusion layer and the cathode gas diffusion layer may allow for passive water balance control.

Owejan, Jon P; Nicotera, Paul D; Mench, Matthew M; Evans, Robert E

2013-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

423

GASIFICATION PLANT COST AND PERFORMANCE OPTIMIZATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this series of design and estimating efforts was to start from the as-built design and actual operating data from the DOE sponsored Wabash River Coal Gasification Repowering Project and to develop optimized designs for several coal and petroleum coke IGCC power and coproduction projects. First, the team developed a design for a grass-roots plant equivalent to the Wabash River Coal Gasification Repowering Project to provide a starting point and a detailed mid-year 2000 cost estimate based on the actual as-built plant design and subsequent modifications (Subtask 1.1). This unoptimized plant has a thermal efficiency of 38.3% (HHV) and a mid-year 2000 EPC cost of 1,681 $/kW. This design was enlarged and modified to become a Petroleum Coke IGCC Coproduction Plant (Subtask 1.2) that produces hydrogen, industrial grade steam, and fuel gas for an adjacent Gulf Coast petroleum refinery in addition to export power. A structured Value Improving Practices (VIP) approach was applied to reduce costs and improve performance. The base case (Subtask 1.3) Optimized Petroleum Coke IGCC Coproduction Plant increased the power output by 16% and reduced the plant cost by 23%. The study looked at several options for gasifier sparing to enhance availability. Subtask 1.9 produced a detailed report on this availability analyses study. The Subtask 1.3 Next Plant, which retains the preferred spare gasification train approach, only reduced the cost by about 21%, but it has the highest availability (94.6%) and produces power at 30 $/MW-hr (at a 12% ROI). Thus, such a coke-fueled IGCC coproduction plant could fill a near term niche market. In all cases, the emissions performance of these plants is superior to the Wabash River project. Subtasks 1.5A and B developed designs for single-train coal and coke-fueled power plants. This side-by-side comparison of these plants, which contain the Subtask 1.3 VIP enhancements, showed their similarity both in design and cost (1,318 $/kW for the coal plant and 1,260 $/kW for the coke plant). Therefore, in the near term, a coke IGCC power plant could penetrate the market and provide a foundation for future coal-fueled facilities. Subtask 1.6 generated a design, cost estimate and economics for a multiple train coal-fueled IGCC powerplant, also based on the Subtaks 1.3 cases. The Subtask 1.6 four gasification train plant has a thermal efficiency of 40.6% (HHV) and cost 1,066 $/kW. The single-train advanced Subtask 1.4 plant, which uses an advanced ''G/H-class'' combustion turbine, can have a thermal efficiency of 45.4% (HHV) and a plant cost of 1,096 $/kW. Multi-train plants will further reduce the cost. Again, all these plants have superior emissions performance. Subtask 1.7 developed an optimized design for a coal to hydrogen plant. At current natural gas prices, this facility is not competitive with hydrogen produced from natural gas. The preferred scenario is to coproduce hydrogen in a plant similar to Subtask 1.3, as described above. Subtask 1.8 evaluated the potential merits of warm gas cleanup technology. This study showed that selective catalytic oxidation of hydrogen sulfide (SCOHS) is promising. As gasification technology matures, SCOHS and other improvements identified in this study will lead to further cost reductions and efficiency improvements.

Samuel S. Tam

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Saving Money with Air and Gas Leak Surveys  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

uncorrected air leaks and gas leaks cost your businesses time and money as well as being environmentally unfriendly. ? Air Leak Surveys ? Nitrogen Leak Surveys ? Gas Leak Survey (H2, O2, Natural Gas) ? Steam Leak Surveys ? Steam Trap Surveys ? Safe... costly problems ? Are caused by dozens, perhaps hundreds of hard to pinpoint outflows which are caused by vibrations and a corrosive atmosphere. ?We can find your leaks in areas that that would be unnoticed and undetected to the human ear ? Details...

Woodruff, D.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Low Cost Hydrogen Production Platform  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A technology and design evaluation was carried out for the development of a turnkey hydrogen production system in the range of 2.4 - 12 kg/h of hydrogen. The design is based on existing SMR technology and existing chemical processes and technologies to meet the design objectives. Consequently, the system design consists of a steam methane reformer, PSA system for hydrogen purification, natural gas compression, steam generation and all components and heat exchangers required for the production of hydrogen. The focus of the program is on packaging, system integration and an overall step change in the cost of capital required for the production of hydrogen at small scale. To assist in this effort, subcontractors were brought in to evaluate the design concepts and to assist in meeting the overall goals of the program. Praxair supplied the overall system and process design and the subcontractors were used to evaluate the components and system from a manufacturing and overall design optimization viewpoint. Design for manufacturing and assembly (DFMA) techniques, computer models and laboratory/full-scale testing of components were utilized to optimize the design during all phases of the design development. Early in the program evaluation, a review of existing Praxair hydrogen facilities showed that over 50% of the installed cost of a SMR based hydrogen plant is associated with the high temperature components (reformer, shift, steam generation, and various high temperature heat exchange). The main effort of the initial phase of the program was to develop an integrated high temperature component for these related functions. Initially, six independent concepts were developed and the processes were modeled to determine overall feasibility. The six concepts were eventually narrowed down to the highest potential concept. A US patent was awarded in February 2009 for the Praxair integrated high temperature component design. A risk analysis of the high temperature component was conducted to identify any potential design deficiency related to the concept. The analysis showed that no fundamental design flaw existed with the concept, but additional simulations and prototypes would be required to verify the design prior to fabricating a production unit. These identified risks were addressed in detail during Phase II of the development program. Along with the models of the high temperature components, a detailed process and 3D design model of the remainder of system, including PSA, compression, controls, water treatment and instrumentation was developed and evaluated. Also, in Phase II of the program, laboratory/fullscale testing of the high temperature components was completed and stable operation/control of the system was verified. The overall design specifications and test results were then used to develop accurate hydrogen costs for the optimized system. Praxair continued development and testing of the system beyond the Phase II funding provided by the DOE through the end of 2008. This additional testing is not documented in this report, but did provide significant additional data for development of a prototype system as detailed in the Phase III proposal. The estimated hydrogen product costs were developed (2007 basis) for the 4.8 kg/h system at production rates of 1, 5, 10, 100 and 1,000 units built per year. With the low cost SMR approach, the product hydrogen costs for the 4.8 kg/h units at 50 units produced per year were approximately $3.02 per kg. With increasing the volume production to 1,000 units per year, the hydrogen costs are reduced by about 12% to $2.67 per kg. The cost reduction of only 12% is a result of significant design and fabrication efficiencies being realized in all levels of production runs through utilizing the DFMA principles. A simplified and easily manufactured design does not require large production volumes to show significant cost benefits. These costs represent a significant improvement and a new benchmark in the cost to produce small volume on-site hydrogen using existing process technologies. The cost mo

Timothy M. Aaron, Jerome T. Jankowiak

2009-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

426

GAS STORAGE TECHNOLOGY CONSORTIUM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. To accomplish this objective, the project is divided into three phases that are managed and directed by the GSTC Coordinator. The first phase, Phase 1A, was initiated on September 30, 2003, and was completed on March 31, 2004. Phase 1A of the project included the creation of the GSTC structure, development and refinement of a technical approach (work plan) for deliverability enhancement and reservoir management. This report deals with Phase 1B and encompasses the period July 1, 2004, through September 30, 2004. During this time period there were three main activities. First was the ongoing negotiations of the four sub-awards working toward signed contracts with the various organizations involved. Second, an Executive Council meeting was held at Penn State September 9, 2004. And third, the GSTC participated in the SPE Eastern Regional Meeting in Charleston, West Virginia, on September 16th and 17th. We hosted a display booth with the Stripper Well Consortium.

Robert W. Watson

2004-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

427

Roadway Improvement Project Cost Allocation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Roadway Improvement Project Cost Allocation CTS 21st Annual Transportation Research Conference costs #12;Potential Applications · Roadway Project Feasibility Studies ­ Identified potential roadway infrastructure improvement ­ Documentation of estimated project costs ­ Determine property assessments

Minnesota, University of

428

Sunk Costs and Competitive Bidding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SUNK COSTS AND COMPETITIVE BIDDING Kenneth R. FrenchRevised: November 1982 SUNK COSTS AND COMPETITIVE BIDDINGl the winning bid be? I f sunk costs do not matter, I f the

French, Kenneth R.; McCormick, Robert E.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Mandatory Photovoltaic System Cost Analysis  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Arizona Corporation Commission requires electric utilities to conduct a cost/benefit analysis to compare the cost of line extension with the cost of installing a stand-alone photovoltaic (PV)...

430

Factors Impacting Decommissioning Costs - 13576  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) studied United States experience with decommissioning cost estimates and the factors that impact the actual cost of decommissioning projects. This study gathered available estimated and actual decommissioning costs from eight nuclear power plants in the United States to understand the major components of decommissioning costs. Major costs categories for decommissioning a nuclear power plant are removal costs, radioactive waste costs, staffing costs, and other costs. The technical factors that impact the costs were analyzed based on the plants' decommissioning experiences. Detailed cost breakdowns by major projects and other cost categories from actual power plant decommissioning experiences will be presented. Such information will be useful in planning future decommissioning and designing new plants. (authors)

Kim, Karen; McGrath, Richard [Electric Power Research Institute, 3420 Hillview Ave., Palo Alto, California (United States)] [Electric Power Research Institute, 3420 Hillview Ave., Palo Alto, California (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Gas Balancing Rules Must Take into account the Trade-off between Offering Pipeline Transport and Pipeline Flexibility in Liberalized Gas Markets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper analyses the value and cost of line-pack flexibility in liberalized gas markets through the examination of the techno-economic characteristics of gas transport pipelines and the trade-offs between the different ...

Keyaerts, Nico

432

Method and apparatus for manufacturing gas tags  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

For use in the manufacture of gas tags employed in a gas tagging failure detection system for a nuclear reactor, a plurality of commercial feed gases each having a respective noble gas isotopic composition are blended under computer control to provide various tag gas mixtures having selected isotopic ratios which are optimized for specified defined conditions such as cost. Using a new approach employing a discrete variable structure rather than the known continuous-variable optimization problem, the computer controlled gas tag manufacturing process employs an analytical formalism from condensed matter physics known as stochastic relaxation, which is a special case of simulated annealing, for input feed gas selection. For a tag blending process involving M tag isotopes with N distinct feed gas mixtures commercially available from an enriched gas supplier, the manufacturing process calculates the cost difference between multiple combinations and specifies gas mixtures which approach the optimum defined conditions. The manufacturing process is then used to control tag blending apparatus incorporating tag gas canisters connected by stainless-steel tubing with computer controlled valves, with the canisters automatically filled with metered quantities of the required feed gases.

Gross, Kenny C. (Bolingbrook, IL); Laug, Matthew T. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Method and apparatus for manufacturing gas tags  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

For use in the manufacture of gas tags employed in a gas tagging failure detection system for a nuclear reactor, a plurality of commercial feed gases each having a respective noble gas isotopic composition are blended under computer control to provide various tag gas mixtures having selected isotopic ratios which are optimized for specified defined conditions such as cost. Using a new approach employing a discrete variable structure rather than the known continuous-variable optimization problem, the computer controlled gas tag manufacturing process employs an analytical formalism from condensed matter physics known as stochastic relaxation, which is a special case of simulated annealing, for input feed gas selection. For a tag blending process involving M tag isotopes with N distinct feed gas mixtures commercially available from an enriched gas supplier, the manufacturing process calculates the cost difference between multiple combinations and specifies gas mixtures which approach the optimum defined conditions. The manufacturing process is then used to control tag blending apparatus incorporating tag gas canisters connected by stainless-steel tubing with computer controlled valves, with the canisters automatically filled with metered quantities of the required feed gases. 4 figs.

Gross, K.C.; Laug, M.T.

1996-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

434

Fourth report on the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program for White Oak Creek Watershed and the Clinch River  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In response to a condition of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit issued to Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) on April 1, 1986, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed for White Oak Creek (WOC) and selected tributaries. BMAP currently consists of six major tasks that address both radiological and nonradiological contaminants in the aquatic and terrestrial environs on-site and the aquatic environs off-site. These tasks are (1) toxicity monitoring, (2) bioaccumulation monitoring of nonradiological contaminants in aquatic biota, (3) biological indicator studies, (4) instream ecological monitoring, (5) assessment of contaminants in the terrestrial environment, and (6) radioecology of WOC and White Oak Lake. The ecological characterization of the WOC watershed will provide baseline data that can be used to document the ecological effects of the water pollution control program and the remedial action program. The long-term nature of BMAP ensures that the effectiveness of remedial measures will be properly evaluated.

Loar, J.M. [ed.] [ed.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Second report on the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program for White Oak Creek Watershed and the Clinch River  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As a condition of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit issued to Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) on April 1, 1986, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed for White Oak Creek (WOC); selected tributaries of WOC, including Fifth Creek, First Creek, Melton Branch, and Northwest Tributary; and the Clinch River. BMAP consists of seven major tasks that address both radiological and nonradiological contaminants in the aquatic and terrestrial environs on-site and the aquatic environs off-site. These tasks are (1) toxicity monitoring; (2) bioaccumulation monitoring of nonradiological contaminants in aquatic biota; (3) biological indicator studies; (4) instream ecological monitoring; (5) assessment of contaminants in the terrestrial environment; (6) radioecology of WOC and White Oak Lake (WOL); and (7) contaminant transport, distribution, and fate in the WOC embayment-Clinch River-Watts Bar Reservoir system. This document, the second of a series of annual reports, described the results of BMAP studies conducted in 1987.

Loar, J.M. [ed.] [ed.; Adams, S.M.; Bailey, R.D.; Blaylock, B.G.; Boston, H.L.; Cox, D.K.; Huston, M.A.; Kimmel, B.L.; Loar, J.M.; Olsen, C.R.; Ryon, M.G.; Shugart, L.R.; Smith, J.G.; Southworth, G.R.; Stewart, A.J.; Walton, B.T.; Talmage, S.S.; Murphy, J.B.; Valentine, C.K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Appellanis, S.M.; Jimenez, B.D. [Puerto Rico Univ., San Juan (Puerto Rico)] [Puerto Rico Univ., San Juan (Puerto Rico); Huq, M.V. [Connecticut Dept. of Environmental Protection, Hamden, CT (United States)] [Connecticut Dept. of Environmental Protection, Hamden, CT (United States); Meyers-Schone, L.J. [Frankfurter, Gross-Gerau (Germany)] [Frankfurter, Gross-Gerau (Germany); Mohrbacher, D.A. [Automated Sciences Group, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)] [Automated Sciences Group, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Olsen, C.R. [USDOE Office of Energy Research, Washington, DC (United States). Environmental Sciences Div.] [USDOE Office of Energy Research, Washington, DC (United States). Environmental Sciences Div.; Stout, J.G. [Cincinnati Univ., OH (United States)] [Cincinnati Univ., OH (United States)

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

QGESS: Capital Cost Scaling Methodology  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

(costs and values of inputs, outputs, and processes, including capital and operating costs) and performance (mass conversion, energy efficiency, and, generally speaking,...

437

Low Cost, Durable Seal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Seal durability is critical to achieving the 2010 DOE operational life goals for both stationary and transportation PEM fuel cell stacks. The seal material must be chemically and mechanically stable in an environment consisting of aggressive operating temperatures, humidified gases, and acidic membranes. The seal must also be producible at low cost. Currentlyused seal materials do not meet all these requirements. This project developed and demonstrated a high consistency hydrocarbon rubber seal material that was able to meet the DOE technical and cost targets. Significant emphasis was placed on characterization of the material and full scale molding demonstrations.

Roberts, George; Parsons, Jason; Friedman, Jake

2010-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

438

Cost Type Examples Salary costs for staff working  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Equipment access charges Service contracts, running costs, materials and consumables and staff time

Rambaut, Andrew

439

Evaluation of Reformer Produced Synthesis Gas for Emissions Reductions in Natural Gas Reciprocating Engines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Rolls-Royce Fuel Cell Systems (US) Inc. (RRFCS) has developed a system that produces synthesis gas from air and natural gas. A near-term application being considered for this technology is synthesis gas injection into reciprocating engines for reducing NO{sub x} emissions. A proof of concept study using bottled synthesis gas and a two-stroke reciprocating engine showed that injecting small amounts of high-flammable content synthesis gas significantly improved combustion stability and enabled leaner engine operation resulting in over 44% reduction in NO{sub x} emissions. The actual NO{sub x} reduction that could be achieved in the field is expected to be engine specific, and in many cases may be even greater. RRFCS demonstrated that its synthesis gas generator could produce synthesis gas with the flammable content that was successfully used in the engine testing. An economic analysis of the synthesis gas approach estimates that its initial capital cost and yearly operating cost are less than half that of a competing NO{sub x} reduction technology, Selective Catalytic Reduction. The next step in developing the technology is an integrated test of the synthesis gas generator with an engine to obtain reliability data for system components and to confirm operating cost. RRFCS is actively pursuing opportunities to perform the integrated test. A successful integrated test would demonstrate the technology as a low-cost option to reduce NO{sub x} emissions from approximately 6,000 existing two-stroke, natural gas-fired reciprocating engines used on natural gas pipelines in North America. NO{sub x} emissions reduction made possible at a reasonable price by this synthesis gas technology, if implemented on 25% of these engines, would be on the order of 25,000 tons/year.

Mark Scotto

2010-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

440

Evaluation of Reformer Produced Synthesis Gas for Emissions Reductions in Natural Gas Reciprocating Engines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Rolls-Royce Fuel Cell Systems (US) Inc. (RRFCS) has developed a system that produces synthesis gas from air and natural gas. A near-term application being considered for this technology is synthesis gas injection into reciprocating engines for reducing NOx emissions. A proof of concept study using bottled synthesis gas and a two-stroke reciprocating engine showed that injecting small amounts of highflammables content synthesis gas significantly improved combustion stability and enabled leaner engine operation resulting in over 44% reduction in NOx emissions. The actual NOx reduction that could be achieved in the field is expected to be engine specific, and in many cases may be even greater. RRFCS demonstrated that its synthesis gas generator could produce synthesis gas with the flammables content that was successfully used in the engine testing. An economic analysis of the synthesis gas approach estimates that its initial capital cost and yearly operating cost are less than half that of a competing NOx reduction technology, Selective Catalytic Reduction. The next step in developing the technology is an integrated test of the synthesis gas generator with an engine to obtain reliability data for system components and to confirm operating cost. RRFCS is actively pursuing opportunities to perform the integrated test. A successful integrated test would demonstrate the technology as a low-cost option to reduce NOx emissions from approximately 6,000 existing two-stroke, natural gas-fired reciprocating engines used on natural gas pipelines in North America. NOx emissions reduction made possible at a reasonable price by this synthesis gas technology, if implemented on 25% of these engines, would be on the order of 25,000 tons/year.

Mark V. Scotto; Mark A. Perna

2010-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas abatement cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Design of a diesel exhaust-gas purification system for inert-gas drilling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To combat the serious oxygen corrosion of drill pipe when a low density drilling fluid (air or mist) is used in geothermal drilling, a system has been designed that produces an inert gas (essentially nitrogen) to be substituted for air. The system fits on three flatbed trailers, is roadable and produces 2000 scfm of gas. The projected cost for gas is slightly less than $2.00 per thousand standard cubic feet.

Caskey, B.C.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Conversion economics for Alaska North Slope natural gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For the Prudhoe Bay field, this preliminary analysis provides an indication that major gas sales using a gas pipeline/LNG plant scenario, such as Trans Alaska Gas System, or a gas-to-liquids process with the cost parameters assumed, are essentially equivalent and would be viable and profitable to industry and beneficial to the state of Alaska and the federal government. The cases are compared for the Reference oil price case. The reserves would be 12.7 BBO for the base case without major gas sales, 12.3 BBO and 20 Tcf gas for the major gas sales case, and 14.3 BBO for the gas-to-liquids conversion cases. Use of different parameters will significantly alter these results; e.g., the low oil price case would result in the base case for Prudhoe Bay field becoming uneconomic in 2002 with the operating costs and investments as currently estimated.

Thomas, C.P.; Robertson, E.P.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Heliostat cost reduction study.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Power towers are capable of producing solar-generated electricity and hydrogen on a large scale. Heliostats are the most important cost element of a solar power tower plant. Since they constitute {approx} 50% of the capital cost of the plant it is important to reduce heliostat cost as much as possible to improve the economic performance of power towers. In this study we evaluate current heliostat technology and estimate a price of $126/m{sup 2} given year-2006 materials and labor costs for a deployment of {approx}600 MW of power towers per year. This 2006 price yields electricity at $0.067/kWh and hydrogen at $3.20/kg. We propose research and development that should ultimately lead to a price as low as $90/m{sup 2}, which equates to $0.056/kWh and $2.75/kg H{sup 2}. Approximately 30 heliostat and manufacturing experts from the United States, Europe, and Australia contributed to the content of this report during two separate workshops conducted at the National Solar Thermal Test Facility.

Jones, Scott A.; Lumia, Ronald. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Davenport, Roger (Science Applications International Corporation, San Diego, CA); Thomas, Robert C. (Advanced Thermal Systems, Centennial, CO); Gorman, David (Advanced Thermal Systems, Larkspur, CO); Kolb, Gregory J.; Donnelly, Matthew W.

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Hay Harvesting Costs $$$$$ in Texas.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hay is an important crop in Ta 1 Harvesting costs constitute the major5 pense of hay production in many M Mg and Wayne D . Taylor INTRODUCTION .................................................... 2 Fixed Costs or Ownership Costs... ............................................. 10 Totarl Cost .............................................................. 10 HAY HARVESTING ALTERNATIVES COMPARED ...................... 11 HOW TO MAKE WISE DECISIONS CONCERNING INVESTMENTS IN MACHINERY...

Long, James T.; Taylor, Wayne D.

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

COMPARATIVE COSTS OF CALIFORNIA CENTRAL STATION ELECTRICITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION COMPARATIVE COSTS OF CALIFORNIA CENTRAL STATION ELECTRICITY GENERATION .............................................................................13 Definition of Levelized Cost ........................................................................................................13 Levelized Cost Components

446

COMPARATIVE COSTS OF CALIFORNIA CENTRAL STATION ELECTRICITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION COMPARATIVE COSTS OF CALIFORNIA CENTRAL STATION ELECTRICITY GENERATION............................................................ 3 Definition of Levelized Cost.................................................................................... 3 Levelized Cost Categories

Laughlin, Robert B.

447

Thermal and Economic Analyses of Energy Saving by Enclosing Gas Turbine Combustor Section  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) thermography inspection indicated a high-temperature area (500~560F) at the combustor section of the GE Frame 5 gas turbine of Dynegy Gas Processing Plant at Venice, Louisiana. To improve the thermal efficiency and reduce energy cost, thermal... within the natural gas industry, the Venice plant is seeking various means to reduce cost. As part of the project to improve the energy efficiency of the plant and thus reduce energy costs, Dynegy contracted the Energy Conversion & Conservation...

Li, X.; Wang, T.; Day, B.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Cost Analysis of NOx Control Alternatives for Stationary Gas...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

for Combined Heat and Power in the Industrial Sector, January 2000 Review of CHP Technologies, October 1999 Fuel-Flexible, Low-Emissions Catalytic Combustor for Opportunity Fuels...

449

Cost Analysis of NOx Control Alternatives for Stationary Gas Turbines,  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartmentTieCelebrate EarthEnergyDistrict EnergyCensus,Core5intoNovember 1999

450

Low-Cost Gas Heat Pump for Building Space Heating  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensionalthe10IO1OP001Long-Term StorageDepartmentSystem for

451

Favorable Supplies, Costs, Environmental Profile for Natural Gas Revealed  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing ZirconiaPolicy andExsolutionFES6FYRANDOMOverview The652 PleaseHydrocarbonsin New

452

Natural Gas Vehicle Cost Calculator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's HeatMexico: EnergyMithunCenter Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Natural

453

DOE Honors WIPP Representative for Cutting Travel Costs, Greenhouse Gas  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergy Cooperation |South42.2Consolidated Edison5 byElectricRegistration2.4HQ FEmissions |

454

DOE Honors WIPP Representative for Cutting Travel Costs, Greenhouse Gas  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergy Cooperation |South42.2Consolidated Edison5 byElectricRegistration2.4HQ FEmissions |Emissions

455

Hydrogen Leak Detection - Low-Cost Distributed Gas Sensors | Department  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in3.pdfEnergy Health andof Energy Embrittlement Fundamentals,Slides |Infrastructureof

456

Capturing Waste Gas: Saves Energy, Lower Costs - Case Study, 2013 |  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergy Cooperation |South42.2 (AprilBiden2 CategoricalApproach for Energy 07-21-2014

457

Reduction in Fabrication Costs of Gas Diffusion Layers | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists' Research | DepartmentDepartmentHatch,DepartmentDeliveryMay 1,HereWrap

458

Electricity production levelized costs for nuclear, gas and coal  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinan antagonist Journal Article: Crystal structureComposite--FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE AprilGrowthERDAEffects

459

Hydrogen leak detection - low cost distributed gas sensors  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensionalthe U.S. Department of Energy and the Federalas ain the Heavy

460

Reduction in Fabrication Costs of Gas Diffusion Layers  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department ofT ib l L dDepartmentnews-flashes Office ofofDepartment of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas abatement cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Cost Estimating, Analysis, and Standardization  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To establish policy and responsibilities for: (a) developing and reviewing project cost estimates; (b) preparing independent cost estimates and analysis; (c) standardizing cost estimating procedures; and (d) improving overall cost estimating and analytical techniques, cost data bases, cost and economic escalation models, and cost estimating systems. Cancels DOE O 5700.2B, dated 8-5-1983; DOE O 5700.8, dated 5-27-1981; and HQ 1130.1A, dated 12-30-1981. Canceled by DOE O 5700.2D, dated 6-12-1992

1984-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

462

Process Parameters and Energy Use of Gas and Electric Ovens in Industrial Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for industrial applications where electric ovens have predominant use. Tests were performed to obtain the process efficiency and examine cost savings potential in converting electric ovens to natural gas. Preliminary results show that, for the plat studied, cost...

Kosanovic, D.; Ambs, L.

463

Analysis of natural gas supply strategies at Fort Drum  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This analysis investigates strategies for Fort Drum to acquire a reliable natural gas supply while reducing its gas supply costs. The purpose of this study is to recommend an optimal supply mix based on the life-cycle costs of each strategy analyzed. In particular, this study is intended to provide initial guidance as to whether or not the building and operating of a propane-air mixing station is a feasible alternative to the current gas acquisition strategy. The analysis proceeded by defining the components of supply (gas purchase, gas transport, supplemental fuel supply); identifying alternative options for each supply component; constructing gas supply strategies from different combinations of the options available for each supply component and calculating the life-cycle costs of each supply strategy under a set of different scenarios reflecting the uncertainty of future events.

Stucky, D.J.; Shankle, S.A.; Anderson, D.M.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Interdependency of electricity and natural gas markets in the United States : a dynamic computational model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Due to high storage costs and limited storage availability, natural gas is generally used as a just-in- time resource that needs to be delivered as it is consumed. With the shale gas revolution, coal retirements and ...

Jenkins, Sandra Elizabeth

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Blending Hydrogen into Natural Gas Pipeline Networks: A Review of Key Issues  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This study assesses the potential to deliver hydrogen through the existing natural gas pipeline network as a hydrogen and natural gas mixture to defray the cost of building dedicated hydrogen pipeline

466

About the SimCCS model A cost surface, i.e. a raster grid of the cost to lay a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; · An "offshore scenario" exports CO2 towards the North sea through Normandy and toward an hypothetical storageA B C About the SimCCS model A cost surface, i.e. a raster grid of the cost to lay a pipeline across each grid cell, was estimated using geographical datasets including protected areas, existing gas

Boyer, Edmond

467

Comparative Assessment of Coal-and Natural Gas-fired Power Plants under a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Comparative Assessment of Coal- and Natural Gas-fired Power Plants under a CO2 Emission Performance standard (EPS) for pulverized coal (PC) and natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) power plants; · Evaluate% · Natural Gas-fired Power Plant: Adv. 7F Gas Turbine Capacity Factor 75% · Cost Basis: 2007$, constant 7

468

Blending Hydrogen into Natural Gas Pipeline Networks: A Review of Key Issues  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United States has 11 distinct natural gas pipeline corridors: five originate in the Southwest, four deliver natural gas from Canada, and two extend from the Rocky Mountain region. This study assesses the potential to deliver hydrogen through the existing natural gas pipeline network as a hydrogen and natural gas mixture to defray the cost of building dedicated hydrogen pipelines.

Melaina, M. W.; Antonia, O.; Penev, M.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

WHAT IS A NETWORK? (Gas and Electricity) A complex, interconnected group or  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WHAT IS A NETWORK? (Gas and Electricity) A complex, interconnected group or system Electricity and Gas: A system used to distribute electricity and gas around the world/certain area, by compromising to minimise costs and generate the most electricity and gas as possible, which maximises profits

Wright, Francis

470

Geothermal probabilistic cost study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A tool is presented to quantify the risks of geothermal projects, the Geothermal Probabilistic Cost Model (GPCM). The GPCM model is used to evaluate a geothermal reservoir for a binary-cycle electric plant at Heber, California. Three institutional aspects of the geothermal risk which can shift the risk among different agents are analyzed. The leasing of geothermal land, contracting between the producer and the user of the geothermal heat, and insurance against faulty performance are examined. (MHR)

Orren, L.H.; Ziman, G.M.; Jones, S.C.; Lee, T.K.; Noll, R.; Wilde, L.; Sadanand, V.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Unaccounted-for gas project. Data bases. Volume 5. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The study identifies, explains, and quantifies unaccounted-for (UAF) gas volumes resulting from operating Pacific Gas and Electric (PG E) Co.'s gas transmission and distribution systems during 1987. The results demonstrate that the UAF volumes are reasonable for determining the indirectly billed gas requirements component of the gas cost and for operating the PG E gas system. Gas leakage is a small percentage of UAF. Summaries of studies on gas leakage, gas theft, measurement inaccuracies, and accounting methodologies are presented along with recommendations for further work which could reduce or more accurately measure UAF.

Cowgill, R.; Waller, R.L.; Grinstead, J.R.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

LOW COST, HIGH EFFICIENCY REVERSIBLE FUEL CELL SYSTEMS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

common hydrocarbon fuels (e.g., natural gas, propane, and bio-derived fuel) as well as hydrogenLOW COST, HIGH EFFICIENCY REVERSIBLE FUEL CELL SYSTEMS Dr. Christopher E. Milliken, Materials Group Boulevard Cleveland, Ohio 44108 216-541-1000 Abstract Fuel cell technologies are described in the 2001 DOE

473

Energy Use and Costs in Texas Schools and Hospitals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

performance indices among the participating institutions. For participating elementary schools, the annual electrical energy use/area ranged from 5.52 to 16.84 kwh/ft^2, the gas use from 9,363 to 66,639 Btu/ft^2, the electrical cost/area from 0.29 to 0.98 $/ft...

Dunn, J. R.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

The Potential for Low-Cost Concentrating Solar Power Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Concern over the possibility of global climate change as a result of anthropogenic greenhouse gas buildup in the atmosphere is resulting in increased interest in renewable energy technologies. The World Bank recently sponsored a study to determine whether solar thermal power plants can achieve cost parity with conventional power plants. The paper reviews the conclusions of that study.

Price, H. W. (National Renewable Energy Laboratory); Carpenter, S. (Enermodal Engineering Limited)

1999-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

475

Reducing Life Cycle Cost By Energy Saving in Pump Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

% by the available NPSH. The system should provide the highest NPSHA that is cost effective. Losses in the pump suction line are therefore even more wasteful of energy than those on the discharge ? Suction pipes should avoid restrictions which can cause gas...

Bower, J. R.

476

Gas sensor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A gas sensor is described which incorporates a sensor stack comprising a first film layer of a ferromagnetic material, a spacer layer, and a second film layer of the ferromagnetic material. The first film layer is fabricated so that it exhibits a dependence of its magnetic anisotropy direction on the presence of a gas, That is, the orientation of the easy axis of magnetization will flip from out-of-plane to in-plane when the gas to be detected is present in sufficient concentration. By monitoring the change in resistance of the sensor stack when the orientation of the first layer's magnetization changes, and correlating that change with temperature one can determine both the identity and relative concentration of the detected gas. In one embodiment the stack sensor comprises a top ferromagnetic layer two mono layers thick of cobalt deposited upon a spacer layer of ruthenium, which in turn has a second layer of cobalt disposed on its other side, this second cobalt layer in contact with a programmable heater chip.

Schmid, Andreas K.; Mascaraque, Arantzazu; Santos, Benito; de la Figuera, Juan

2014-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

477

Lifecycle Cost and GHG Implications of a Hydrogen Energy Storage Scenario (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Overview of life cycle cost and green house gas implications of a hydrogen energy storage scenario presented at the National Hydrogen Association Conference & Expo, Long Beach, CA, May 3-6, 2010

Steward, D. M.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Oil and gas journal databook, 1987 edition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This book is an annual compendium of surveys and special reports reviewed by experts. The 1987 edition opens with a forward by Gene Kinney, co-publisher of the Oil and Gas Journal and includes the OGJ 400 Report, Crude Oil Assays, Worldwide Petrochemical Survey, the Midyear Forecast and Reviews, the Worldwide Gas Processing Report, the Ethylene Report, Sulfur Survey, the International Refining, Catalyst Compilation, Annual Refining Survey, Worldwide Construction Report, Pipeline Economics Report, Worldwide Production and Refining Report, the Morgan Pipeline Cost Index for Oil and Gas, the Nelson Cost Index, the Hughes Rig Count, the Smith Rig Count, the OGJ Production Report, the API Refinery Report, API Crude and Product Stocks, APU Imports of Crude and Products, and the complete Oil and Gas Journal 1986 Index of articles.

Not Available

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

NATURAL GAS MARKET ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION NATURAL GAS MARKET ASSESSMENT PRELIMINARY RESULTS In Support.................................................................................... 6 Chapter 2: Natural Gas Demand.................................................................................................. 10 Chapter 3: Natural Gas Supply

480

INDEPENDENT COST REVIEW (ICR)  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNG | Department ofHTS Cable ProjectsHistoryia/802871 IA Blog|INDEPENDENT COST

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas abatement cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

ASSESSING CLIMATE CHANGE MITIGATION WITH A HYBRID ENERGY-ECONOMY APPROACH FOR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for enhanced oil recovery in depleted oil wells. A comparison of marginal abatement costs reveals somewhat

482

User cost in oil production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The assumption of an initial fixed mineral stock is superfluous and wrong. User cost (resource rent) in mineral production is the present value of expected increases in development cost. It can be measured as the difference ...

Adelman, Morris Albert

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

NATURAL GAS RESOURCES IN DEEP SEDIMENTARY BASINS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

From a geological perspective, deep natural gas resources are generally defined as resources occurring in reservoirs at or below 15,000 feet, whereas ultra-deep gas occurs below 25,000 feet. From an operational point of view, ''deep'' is often thought of in a relative sense based on the geologic and engineering knowledge of gas (and oil) resources in a particular area. Deep gas can be found in either conventionally-trapped or unconventional basin-center accumulations that are essentially large single fields having spatial dimensions often exceeding those of conventional fields. Exploration for deep conventional and unconventional basin-center natural gas resources deserves special attention because these resources are widespread and occur in diverse geologic environments. In 1995, the U.S. Geological Survey estimated that 939 TCF of technically recoverable natural gas remained to be discovered or was part of reserve appreciation from known fields in the onshore areas and State waters of the United. Of this USGS resource, nearly 114 trillion cubic feet (Tcf) of technically-recoverable gas remains to be discovered from deep sedimentary basins. Worldwide estimates of deep gas are also high. The U.S. Geological Survey World Petroleum Assessment 2000 Project recently estimated a world mean undiscovered conventional gas resource outside the U.S. of 844 Tcf below 4.5 km (about 15,000 feet). Less is known about the origins of deep gas than about the origins of gas at shallower depths because fewer wells have been drilled into the deeper portions of many basins. Some of the many factors contributing to the origin of deep gas include the thermal stability of methane, the role of water and non-hydrocarbon gases in natural gas generation, porosity loss with increasing thermal maturity, the kinetics of deep gas generation, thermal cracking of oil to gas, and source rock potential based on thermal maturity and kerogen type. Recent experimental simulations using laboratory pyrolysis methods have provided much information on the origins of deep gas. Technologic problems are one of the greatest challenges to deep drilling. Problems associated with overcoming hostile drilling environments (e.g. high temperatures and pressures, and acid gases such as CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S) for successful well completion, present the greatest obstacles to drilling, evaluating, and developing deep gas fields. Even though the overall success ratio for deep wells is about 50 percent, a lack of geological and geophysical information such as reservoir quality, trap development, and gas composition continues to be a major barrier to deep gas exploration. Results of recent finding-cost studies by depth interval for the onshore U.S. indicate that, on average, deep wells cost nearly 10 times more to drill than shallow wells, but well costs and gas recoveries vary widely among different gas plays in different basins. Based on an analysis of natural gas assessments, many topical areas hold significant promise for future exploration and development. One such area involves re-evaluating and assessing hypothetical unconventional basin-center gas plays. Poorly-understood basin-center gas plays could contain significant deep undiscovered technically-recoverable gas resources.

Thaddeus S. Dyman; Troy Cook; Robert A. Crovelli; Allison A. Henry; Timothy C. Hester; Ronald C. Johnson; Michael D. Lewan; Vito F. Nuccio; James W. Schmoker; Dennis B. Riggin; Christopher J. Schenk

2002-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

484

Comparative Analysis of the Production Costs and Life-Cycle GHG Emissions of FT-Liquid Fuels from Coal and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Coal and Natural Gas Figure S1 shows a graphical description of the life cycle of coal-to-liquids (CTL) and gas-to-liquids (GTL). Figure S1: Life Cycle of Coal-Based and Natural Gas-Based Fischer-Tropsch LiquidComparative Analysis of the Production Costs and Life- Cycle GHG Emissions of FT-Liquid Fuels from

Jaramillo, Paulina

485

Missouri Gas Energy (MGE)- Home Performance with ENERGY STAR  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Missouri Gas Energy (MGE) offers rebates to its residential customers towards the cost of an ENERGY STAR Home Energy Assessment and a portion of the installed efficiency improvements. Home...

486

Gas Analysis Of Geothermal Fluid Inclusions- A New Technology...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

inclusion gas analysis of drill chip cuttings in a similar fashion as used in the petroleum industry. Thus the results of this project may lower exploration costs both in the...

487

Wind Integration Cost and Cost-Causation: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The question of wind integration cost has received much attention in the past several years. The methodological challenges to calculating integration costs are discussed in this paper. There are other sources of integration cost unrelated to wind energy. A performance-based approach would be technology neutral, and would provide price signals for all technology types. However, it is difficult to correctly formulate such an approach. Determining what is and is not an integration cost is challenging. Another problem is the allocation of system costs to one source. Because of significant nonlinearities, this can prove to be impossible to determine in an accurate and objective way.

Milligan, M.; Kirby, B.; Holttinen, H.; Kiviluoma, J.; Estanqueiro, A.; Martin-Martinez, S.; Gomez-Lazaro, E.; Peneda, I.; Smith, C.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Check Estimates and Independent Costs  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Check estimates and independent cost estimates (ICEs) are tools that can be used to validate a cost estimate. Estimate validation entails an objective review of the estimate to ensure that estimate criteria and requirements have been met and well documented, defensible estimate has been developed. This chapter describes check estimates and their procedures and various types of independent cost estimates.

1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

489

Cost Effectiveness NW Energy Coalition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Action 8 Cost Effectiveness Manual Kim Drury NW Energy Coalition Context · Inconsistent understanding of cost effectiveness contributed to under performing conservation E.g: individual measures vs Action Plan for Energy Efficiency published a comprehensive guide on cost effectiveness: best practices

490

Developing a gas purchasing strategy using a linear model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper outlines the process of developing a gas purchasing strategy with the use of a linear programming model. The linear model is used to determine the least cost approach regarding the acquisition of natural gas which has a considerable impact on the company`s financial performance. The author discusses the importance of optimizing gas costs from an end-user`s perspective. The Midland Cogeneration Venture (MCV) is the country`s largest cogeneration facility. The Facility has been certified by FERC (Federal Energy Regulatory Commission) as a Q.F. (Qualifying Facility) under PURPA (Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978). Unlike utilities, who have the ability to pass costs through to customers, MCV`s revenues are based on long-term contracts with its utility and industrial customers. Therefore, MCV cannot pass costs through to its customers. As such, effectively managing costs is vital to the success of the company.

Alst, K.M. Van [Midland Cogeneration Venture Limited Partnership, Midland, MI (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

491

User's manual for the INDCEPT code for estimating industrial steam boiler plant capital investment costs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The INDCEPT computer code package was developed to provide conceptual capital investment cost estimates for single- and multiple-unit industrial steam boiler plants. Cost estimates can be made as a function of boiler type, size, location, and date of initial operation. The output includes a detailed breakdown of the estimate into direct and indirect costs. Boiler plant cost models are provided to reflect various types and sources of coal and alternate means of sulfur and particulate removal. Cost models are also included for low-Btu and medium-Btu gas produced in coal gasification plants.

Bowers, H I; Fuller, L C; Hudson, II, C R

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

Assessment of costs and benefits of flexible and alternative fuel use in the US transportation sector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Alternative Motor Fuels Act of 1988 (Public Law 100-494), Section 400EE, states that the Secretary of Energy ...shall study methanol plants, including the costs and practicability of such plants that are (A) capable of utilizing current domestic supplies of unutilized natural gas; (B) relocatable; or (C) suitable for natural gas to methanol conversion by natural gas distribution companies...'' The purpose of this report is to characterize unutilized gas within the lower 48 states and to perform an economic analysis of methanol plants required by the act. The approach with regard to unutilized lower 48 gas is to (1) compare the costs of converting such gas to methanol against the expected price of gasoline over the next 20 years, and (2) compare the economics of converting such gas to methanol against the economics of using the gas as a pipeline-transported fuel. This study concludes that remote gas and low-Btu gas generally cannot be converted to methanol at costs near the expected competitive value of gasoline because of the poor economies of scale of small methanol plants.

Not Available

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

Alternative formulations of regenerable flue gas cleanup catalysts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The major source of man-made SO{sub 2} in the atmosphere is the burning of coal for electric power generation. Coal-fired utility plants are also large sources of NO{sub x} pollution. Regenerable flue gas desulfurization/NO{sub x} abatement catalysts provide one mechanism of simultaneously removing SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} species from flue gases released into the atmosphere. The purpose of this project is to examine routes of optimizing the adsorption efficiency, the adsorption capacity, and the ease of regeneration of regenerable flue gas cleanup catalysts. We are investigating two different mechanisms for accomplishing this goal. The first involves the use of different alkali and alkaline earth metals as promoters for the alumina sorbents to increase the surface basicity of the sorbent and thus adjust the number and distribution of adsorption sites. The second involves investigation of non-aqueous impregnation, as opposed to aqueous impregnation, as a method to obtain an evenly dispersed monolayer of the promoter on the surface.

Mitchell, M.B.; White, M.G.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

Georgia Tech Dangerous Gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Georgia Tech Dangerous Gas Safety Program March 2011 #12;Georgia Tech Dangerous Gas Safety.......................................................................................................... 5 6. DANGEROUS GAS USAGE REQUIREMENTS................................................. 7 6.1. RESTRICTED PURCHASE/ACQUISITION RULES: ................................................ 7 7. FLAMMABLE GAS

Sherrill, David

495

Energy Policy 34 (2006) 32183232 Beyond the learning curve: factors influencing cost reductions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Policy 34 (2006) 32183232 Beyond the learning curve: factors influencing cost reductions-reducing improvements in low-carbon energy systems are important sources of uncertainty in future levels of greenhouse-gas emissions. Models that assess the costs of climate change mitigation policy, and energy policy in general

Kammen, Daniel M.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

COST SHARING Cost sharing is the portion of total project costs of a sponsored agreement that is not bourn by  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 COST SHARING Cost sharing is the portion of total project costs of a sponsored agreement. There are primarily three types of cost sharing that may occur on sponsored projects: Mandatory cost sharing. For example, the National Science Foundation requires mandatory cost sharing for some of its projects. COST

Cui, Yan

497

Combustion modeling in advanced gas turbine systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Goal of DOE`s Advanced Turbine Systems program is to develop and commercialize ultra-high efficiency, environmentally superior, cost competitive gas turbine systems for base-load applications in utility, independent power producer, and industrial markets. Primary objective of the program here is to develop a comprehensive combustion model for advanced gas turbine combustion systems using natural gas (coal gasification or biomass fuels). The efforts included code evaluation (PCGC-3), coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy, laser Doppler anemometry, and laser-induced fluorescence.

Smoot, L.D.; Hedman, P.O.; Fletcher, T.H.; Brewster, B.S.; Kramer, S.K. [Brigham Young Univ., Provo, UT (United States). Advanced Combustion Engineering Research Center

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

498

Steam driven centrifugal pump for low cost boiler feed service  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article describes a steam driven centrifugal pump for boiler feed-water and other high pressure water applications, which was awarded Top Honors in the special pumps category of the 1982 Chemical processing Vaaler competition, because the simple design with turbine, pump and controls combined in an integral unit provides high operating efficiency and reliable performance with minimal maintenance. Single source responsibility for all components when the pump may have to be serviced is another advantage. These features meet the requirements for boiler feed pumps that are critical to maintaining a consistent steam supply in a process plant where downtime can be extremely expensive. The annual cost to operate the pump for 8000 hours is about $100,000, if electricity costs 5 cents/kwh. These pumps can be run for about $30,000 on steam, if natural gas costs $4.00/mcf. Cost savings are $70,000 annually.

Not Available

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

499

Emissions Scenarios, Costs, and Implementation Considerations of REDD Programs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Greenhouse gas emissions from the forestry sector are estimated to be 8.4 GtCO2-eq./year or about 17percent of the global emissions. We estimate that the cost forreducing deforestation is low in Africa and several times higher in Latin America and Southeast Asia. These cost estimates are sensitive to the uncertainties of how muchunsustainable high-revenue logging occurs, little understood transaction and program implementation costs, and barriers to implementation including governance issues. Due to lack of capacity in the affected countries, achieving reduction or avoidance of carbon emissions will require extensive REDD-plus programs. Preliminary REDD-plus Readiness cost estimates and program descriptions for Indonesia, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ghana, Guyana and Mexico show that roughly one-third of potential REDD-plus mitigation benefits might come from avoided deforestation and the rest from avoided forest degradation and other REDD-plus activities.

Sathaye, Jayant; Andrasko, Ken; Chan, Peter

2011-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

500

Annual Running Cost  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energyh Inut: 4,500,000 tons of coal 19 tons enriche'd Uranium tewn _____________ _ 350,000 barrels of oil 250,000 ltons of coal Pollution: ( 9,400,000 tons of carbon * 6 tons of spent fuel none operation)I eraion) dioxide e Emissions of highly radioactive * 270,000 tons of scrubber gases (400,000 Curies of Kr-85, sludge and ash for disposal 18,000 Curies of tritium) * 800,000 tons of Uranium ore 12,000 tons of sulfur tailings dioxide, nitrous oxides and * 37 tons of depleted Uranium mercury * 500,000 tons of greenhouse gas * 100 trillion BTU's of heat 0 100 trillion BTU's of heat Water required: 10 billion galons 13 billion jgalions none 0.5%).

unknown authors