Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "garbage bagasse sewerage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Sewerage service charges  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Charges? 1945 Municipal Year Book. ? ? ? ? ? . . 30 III* Summary of Texas Cities Having Sewerage Charges and Bases Used for Such Charges, 1945................... ? ? ? ? 31 IV. Summary of Texas Cities Charging Flat Rates and Average Monthly Charges...-liquidating. An increased density of population tends to increase the pollution of the natural streams* The use of these streams by cities as a means of sewage disposal has been tolerated because the dilution has been great enough to prevent nuisances below the point...

Wright, Samuel Robert

2013-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

2

LANL debuts hybrid garbage truck  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hybrid garbage truck LANL debuts hybrid garbage truck The truck employs a system that stores energy from braking and uses that pressure to help the truck accelerate after each...

3

Garbage in, power out  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The growing use of waste-to-energy conversion as a solution to the US national refuse crisis is discussed. The two main technologies for burning waste, refuse-derived fuel and mass burn of unsorted garbage, are described. The environmental impact of ...

K. Wollard

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Bayshore Regional Sewerage Authority (BRSA) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bayshore Regional Sewerage Authority (BRSA) Bayshore Regional Sewerage Authority (BRSA) Jump to: navigation, search Name Bayshore Regional Sewerage Authority (BRSA) Facility Bayshore Regional Sewerage Authority (BRSA) Sector Wind energy Facility Type Community Wind Facility Status Proposed Owner Bayshore Regional Sewerage Authority (BRSA) Developer Bayshore Regional Sewerage Authority (BRSA) Energy Purchaser Bayshore Regional Sewerage Authority (BRSA) Location Union Beach NJ Coordinates 40.4497613°, -74.1764619° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.4497613,"lon":-74.1764619,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

5

Gas, Heat, Water, Sewerage Collection and Disposal, and Street Railway  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Gas, Heat, Water, Sewerage Collection and Disposal, and Street Gas, Heat, Water, Sewerage Collection and Disposal, and Street Railway Companies (South Carolina) Gas, Heat, Water, Sewerage Collection and Disposal, and Street Railway Companies (South Carolina) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Industrial Installer/Contractor Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Program Info State South Carolina Program Type Generating Facility Rate-Making Siting and Permitting Provider South Carolina Public Service Commission This legislation applies to public utilities and entities furnishing natural gas, heat, water, sewerage, and street railway services to the public. The legislation addresses rates and services, exemptions, investigations, and records. Article 4 (58-5-400 et seq.) of this

6

Connectivity-based garbage collection  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We introduce a new family of connectivity-based garbage collectors (Cbgc) that are based on potential object-connectivity properties. The key feature of these collectors is that the placement of objects into partitions is determined by performing ... Keywords: connectivity based garbage collection

Martin Hirzel; Amer Diwan; Matthew Hertz

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

The Measured Cost of Conservative Garbage Collection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

approaches. Techniques for dynamic storage management can be divided into two broad categories: explicit programs to use automatic storage management. Another common approach to automatic The Measured Cost of Conservative Garbage Collection Benjamin Zorn Department of Computer Science

Ramsey, Norman

8

Life Cycle environmental Assessment (LCA) of sanitation systems including sewerage: Case of vertical  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Life Cycle environmental Assessment (LCA) of sanitation systems including sewerage: Case The article presents the application of Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) to a complete sanitation system including the sewer network. It first describes the LCA hypothesis which concerns two types of waste water

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

9

Flash Memory Garbage Collection in Hard Real-Time Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-date behavior and time consuming garbage collection mechanism, NAND-based flash memory is difficult to integrate into hard-real-time embedded systems. In this thesis, I propose a performance model for flash memory garbage collection that can be used...

Lai, Chien-An

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

10

Verification of Parallel Garbage Collection by Abstract Model Checking  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

have a finite state space provided that the abstraction mapping is powerful. M¨uller and Nipkow's work working on abstract model checking. In Section 4, the abstractions we defined on garbage #12; collectionVerification of Parallel Garbage Collection by Abstract Model Checking (Extended Abstract) Masami

Hagiya, Masami

11

Economies of Scale and Scope in Network Industries: Lessons for the UK water and sewerage sectors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

was directly transferred to 12 private firms. The government sold its remaining share of the power generators in the year 2000.4 The 2001 New Electricity Trading Arrangements (NETA) changed the mechanism for electricity trading and the latest major reform... sectors1 Michael G. Pollitt Steven J. Steer ESRC Electricity Policy Research Group University of Cambridge August 2011 Abstract Many studies of the water and sewerage industries place significant importance on the benefits of economies...

Pollitt, Michael G.; Steer, Stephen J.

12

Garbage Collecting the World Wide Web Stephen M. Watt  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Garbage Collecting the World Wide Web Stephen M. Watt Western University London, Ontario, Canada N6A 5B7 Stephen.Watt@uwo.ca Abstract The World Wide Web has grown over the past decade and a half from

Watt, Stephen M.

13

Formal Proof of Abstract Model Checking of Concurrent Garbage Collection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, the correctness of abstraction is not always easy to verify. In our pre- vious work, we applied abstract model with that of proving the concrete system from scratch (not by abstract model checking). In our previous work [6], whichFormal Proof of Abstract Model Checking of Concurrent Garbage Collection Koichi Takahashi Masami

Hagiya, Masami

14

Olive bagasse and nutshell as gamma shielding material  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gamma ray linear attenuation coefficients have been measured experimentally for olive bagasse and nutshell by using narrow beam geometry for Co-60 and the values have been compared with soil. These values have been used calculate mean free path, half value layer and tenth value layer parameters. Besides, effect of multi-layered systems (soil + olive bagasse and soil + nutshell) has been analyzed in terms of half value layer.

?na, Esra; Bayta?, A. Filiz [Energy Institute, Istanbul Technical University, 34469 Istanbul (Turkey)

2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

15

OPPORTUNITIES FOR IMPROVING THE PERFORMANCE AND REDUCING THE COSTS OF BAGASSE-FIRED BOILERS By  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The challenges faced by bagasse boiler designers mean that significant compromise and conservatism are present in the design of most bagasse fired boilers. This paper describes a number of

A. P. Mann; T. F. Dixon; F. Plaza; J. A. Joyce

16

Coordinated garbage collection for raid array of solid state disks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An optimized redundant array of solid state devices may include an array of one or more optimized solid-state devices and a controller coupled to the solid-state devices for managing the solid-state devices. The controller may be configured to globally coordinate the garbage collection activities of each of said optimized solid-state devices, for instance, to minimize the degraded performance time and increase the optimal performance time of the entire array of devices.

Dillow, David A; Ki, Youngjae; Oral, Hakki S; Shipman, Galen M; Wang, Feiyi

2014-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

17

Bagasse-fired steam boiler station for Kenana Sugar in Sudan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The equipment and operation of the bagasse fired steam boiler station of the Kenana Sugar factory in Sudan are described. The station consists of six bagasse-fired, steam boilers with individual capacities of 113 tonnes per hour which provide steam for a 40 MN power station. During the off-season it serves as a regional power station which also operates irrigation facilities to the cane fields. The bagasse handling and feeding system is also described.

Not Available

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Coordinating Garbage Collection for Arrays of Solid-state Drives  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Although solid-state drives (SSDs) offer significant performance improvements over hard disk drives (HDDs) for a number of workloads, they can exhibit substantial variance in request latency and throughput as a result of garbage collection (GC). When GC conflicts with an I/O stream, the stream can make no forward progress until the GC cycle completes. GC cycles are scheduled by logic internal to the SSD based on several factors such as the pattern, frequency, and volume of write requests. When SSDs are used in a RAID with currently available technology, the lack of coordination of the SSD-local GC cycles amplifies this performance variance. We propose a global garbage collection (GGC) mechanism to improve response times and reduce performance variability for a RAID of SSDs. We include a high-level design of SSD-aware RAID controller and GGC-capable SSD devices and algorithms to coordinate the GGC cycles. We develop reactive and proactive GC coordination algorithms and evaluate their I/O performance and block erase counts for various workloads. Our simulations show that GC coordination by a reactive scheme improves average response time and reduces performance variability for a wide variety of enterprise workloads. For bursty, write-dominated workloads, response time was improved by 69% and performance variability was reduced by 71%. We show that a proactive GC coordination algorithm can further improve the I/O response times by up to 9% and the performance variability by up to 15%. We also observe that it could increase the lifetimes of SSDs with some workloads (e.g. Financial) by reducing the number of block erase counts by up to 79% relative to a reactive algorithm for write-dominant enterprise workloads.

Kim, Youngjae [ORNL] [ORNL; Lee, Junghee [ORNL] [ORNL; Oral, H Sarp [ORNL] [ORNL; Dillow, David A [ORNL] [ORNL; Wang, Feiyi [ORNL] [ORNL; Shipman, Galen M [ORNL] [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Author's personal copy Pyrolytic temperatures impact lead sorption mechanisms by bagasse  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Author's personal copy Pyrolytic temperatures impact lead sorption mechanisms by bagasse biochars mechanisms were invested based on isotherm and kinetic models, sorption and desorption, and FITR spectroscopy Lead Bagasse biochar Sorption kinetics Functional groups a b s t r a c t The characteristics

Ma, Lena

20

Garbage, society, and environment in a Mexican municipio: The case of Coxcatln, Puebla, Mexico  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.17 Local recyclables collector pile 136 Figure 3.18 Fierro viejo collector truck 136 Figure 3.19 Small dumpsite in the Barranca Soyolapa 138 Figure 3.20 Larger tiradero clandestino along the highway 139 Figure 3.21 Large burn pit 141 Figure 3.22 Burn pile... Reuse and recycling 135 Dumping and burying 137 Burning 140 Composting, abono, and keeping animals 143 THE GARBAGE MANGAGEMENT TRAJECTORY IN COXCATLN 143 CHAPTER 4: Household garbage management in Coxcatln 148 OBJECTIVES AND METHODS 149 Project...

Hilburn, Andrew Michael

2014-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "garbage bagasse sewerage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Making the right choices for successful bagasse newsprint production: Part 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Successful commercial production of bagasse newsprint of a quality which is acceptable to publishers has been a long time coming - 130 years to be exact. The history of bagasse newsprint, upon which so many organizations and individuals have devoted tremendous amounts of time and effort over these many years, has been strewn with failures. However, as a result of the cautious approach pursued by serious and competent investigators over the past several years, it can be safely proclaimed that successful bagasse newsprint production is now a reality.

Atchison, J.E. (Joseph E. Atchison Consultants, Inc., Larchmont, NY (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Design of a bagasse charcoal briquette-making device for use in Haiti  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Charcoal made from bagasse, the fibrous remains of sugarcane production, has the potential to serve as an alternate cooking fuel in Haiti, where the reliance on wood has led to severe deforestation. Current production ...

Vechakul, Jessica

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Formation of Dioxins from Incineration of Foods Found in Domestic Garbage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Gifu Prefectural Institute for Bio-industrial Technology, 3481-2, Hachiya-cho, Minokamo-shi, Gifu 504-0838, Japan ... There has been great concern about the large amounts of garbage produced by domestic households in the modern world. ...

Takeo Katami; Akio Yasuhara; Takayuki Shibamoto

2004-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

24

Chemical Fixation of Carbon Dioxide Using a Green and Efficient Catalytic System Based on Sugarcane BagasseAn Agricultural Waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Chemical Fixation of Carbon Dioxide Using a Green and Efficient Catalytic System Based on Sugarcane BagasseAn Agricultural Waste ... Wisconsin

Wei Chen; Lin-xin Zhong; Xin-wen Peng; Run-cang Sun; Fa-chuang Lu

2014-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

25

Production of D-lactic acid from sugarcane bagasse using steam-explosion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study investigated the production of D-lactic acid from unutilized sugarcane bagasse using steam explosion pretreatment. The optimal steam pressure for a steaming time of 5 min was determined. By enzymatic saccharification using Meicellase, the highest recovery of glucose from raw bagasse, 73.7%, was obtained at a steam pressure of 20 atm. For residue washed with water after steam explosion, the glucose recovery increased up to 94.9% at a steam pressure of 20 atm. These results showed that washing with water is effective in removing enzymatic reaction inhibitors. After steam pretreatment (steam pressure of 20 atm), D-lactic acid was produced by Lactobacillus delbrueckii NBRC 3534 from the enzymatic hydrolyzate of steam-exploded bagasse and washed residue. The conversion rate of D-lactic acid obtained from the initial glucose concentration was 66.6% for the hydrolyzate derived from steam-exploded bagasse and 90.0% for that derived from the washed residue after steam explosion. These results also demonstrated that the hydrolyzate of steam-exploded bagasse (without washing with water) contains fermentation inhibitors and washing with water can remove them.

Chizuru Sasaki; Ryosuke Okumura; Ai Asakawa; Chikako Asada; Yoshitoshi Nakamura

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Volatile fatty acid fermentation of AFEX-treated newspaper and bagasse by rumen microorganisms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) of cellulolytic bacteria attack the cellulosic materials and hydrolyze them to simple sugars; (ii) the sugars are rapidly fermented largely to VFA's and carbon dioxide, and (iii) methane is formed by slow-growing methanogenic bacteria Anaerobic fermentation..., and on the different acid molar percents. AFEX-treated and non-treated bagasse and newspaper were ground and fermented by a mixed population of rumen microorganisms to produce VFA's and carbon dioxide. The fermentation process was similar to that which occurs...

Blasig, Jorge Dari?o

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Value addition to sugarcane bagasse: Xylan extraction and its process optimization for xylooligosaccharides production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effect of alkali viz., sodium hydroxide and potassium hydroxide, on the recovery of xylan from sugarcane bagasse under two different conditions namely overnight incubation at room temperature and autoclaving was investigated. Conditions for the enzymatic cleavage of the extracted xylan leading to the best yields of xylooligosaccharides was investigated using a fixed substrate concentration (2%, w/v) and varied inputs of other critical factors like pH, temperature, enzyme dose and reaction time. The sugarcane bagasse constituted of 98.990.01% organic matter, 35.670.15% cellulose, 23.220.05% hemicellulose, 6.040.06% lignin and 2.30.01% protein. The highest xylan recovery of 85% was attained using 12% sodium hydroxide combined with steam application. Analyses of the enzymatic hydrolyzate showed the presence of XOS of varying degree of polymerization falling in the range of 23. The maximum conversion to XOS was observed at temperature of 40C, pH of 4 with an enzyme dose of 2.65U and a reaction time of 8h. The response surface analysis predicted ideal condition viz., temperature 40.99C, pH 4.92, enzyme dose 3.13U and reaction time 19.19h for maximizing xylobiose yield, while for maximum xylotriose yields the ideal variables were 40.37C, pH 4.13, enzyme dose 5.89U and an incubation time of 18.14h. The findings established the suitability of sugarcane bagasse as a raw material for extraction of xylan vis a vis its conversion into XOS.

Natasha Jayapal; A.K. Samanta; Atul P. Kolte; S. Senani; Manpal Sridhar; K.P. Suresh; K.T. Sampath

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Preemptible I/O Scheduling of Garbage Collection for Solid State Drives  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Abstract Unlike hard disks, flash devices use out-of-update operations and they require a garbage collection (GC) process to reclaim invalid pages to create free blocks. This GC process is a major cause of performance degradation when running concurrently with other I/O operations as internal bandwidth is consumed to reclaim these invalid pages. The invocation of the GC process is generally governed by a low watermark on free blocks and other internal device metrics that different workloads meet at different intervals. This results in I/O performance that is highly dependent on workload characteristics. In this paper, we examine the GC process and propose a semi-preemptible GC scheme that allows GC processing to be preempted while pending I/O requests in the queue are serviced. Moreover, we further enhance flash performance by pipelining internal GC operations and merge them with pending I/O requests whenever possible. Our experimental evaluation of this semipreemptible GC scheme with realistic workloads demonstrate both improved performance and reduced performance variability. Write-dominant workloads show up to a 66.56% improvement in average response time with a 83.30% reduced variance in response time compared to the non-preemptible GC scheme. In addition, we explore opportunities of a new NAND flash device that supports suspend/resume commands for read, write and erase operations for fully preemptible GC. Our experiments with a fully preemptible GC enabled flash device show that request response time can be improved by up to 14.57% compared to semi-preemptible GC.

Lee, Junghee [ORNL; Kim, Youngjae [ORNL; Shipman, Galen M [ORNL; Oral, H Sarp [ORNL; Kim, Jongman [Georgia Institute of Technology

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

FACTORS AFFECTING THE SAFE AND EFFICIENT OPERATION OF BAGASSE/COAL FIRED WATERTUBE BOILERS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The paper covers various aspects relating to the operation and maintenance of bagasse/coal fired watertube boilers which, if properly implemented, will ensure that the boiler operates safely at optimal performance while maintenance and operating costs are minimised. The current philosophies on instrumentation and controls are discussed. This includes combustion and drum level control loops as well as interlocks and safety devices. Operating problems due to unbalanced steam line pressure drops are covered, and recommendations are given for the design of steam lines. The importance of training courses for operating and maintenance personnel is emphasised, including the day-to-day aspects of proper boiler operation. An overview of present and proposed legal requirements for operating, maintaining and repairing boilers in South Africa is also given.

H Verbanck; K Mcintyre; Q Engelbrecht

30

The Return of the Rest of the Garbage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the lead dancer. Leia had never seen anyone dancing with so much grace and passion, and she was definitely well versed in ballet. She said so to the Irili Praetor during the intermission. "He ::. pleased you," the Praetor nodded. "A very ^ talented...,powerful,seeking plunge. The powershe had felt in him, the sheer masculine force of his personality left her clutching at his muscled back, riding the bruising strength of his intensive thrusts, sinking back into the incredible vortex of unparalleled orgasm. Her...

Multiple Contributors

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

PDMC 2007 Preliminay Version Caching, Hashing, and Garbage Collection for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for symbolic state-space generation is a recent advance in exhaustive verification of complex systems:ciardo@cs.ucr.edu University of California, Riverside, CA 92521 3 Email:radu@nianet.org National Institute of Aerospace in Theoretical Computer Science URL: www.elsevier.nl/locate/entcs #12;Chung, Ciardo, and Siminiceanu of discrete

Ciardo, Gianfranco

32

Is Dilution The Solution To Pollution? Municipal Sewerage Systems In Late Nineteenth Century San Francisco And London  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

wastewater while simultaneously regenerating valuable wetland habitat. Local examples include Ellis Creek Water Recycling

Smith, Brooke Ray

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Extrusion pretreatment of sugarcane bagasse for enzymatic hydrolysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cellulose more susceptible to enzyma- tic hydrolysis have been tested. These methods include both chemical and physical pretreatments which act to separate one or more components of the lignocellulosic complex and/or to increase the surface area... depolymerization of hemicellulose with over 75% of the xylan reported to be solubilized within 3 minutes. The main advantages of steaming are the autocatalytic nature of the process, through release of acetal groups to form organic acids, and the short reaction...

Ocana Camacho, Ronay

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

34

AFEX treatment of coastal bermudagrass, bagasse, and newspaper  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

effect (cellulose decrystallization) and physical effect (increased accessible surface area) dramatically increase the susceptibility of lignocellulose to enzymatic hydrolysis. The purpose of this study is to study AFEX treatment conditions for three.... This violent vaporization disrupts the fibrous structure and increases accessible surface area. The AFEX process involves both chemical effect (cellulose decrystallization) and physical effect (increase in acessible surface area). Treatment conditions...

Jun, Jae-Hoon

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

35

Conversion of sugarcane bagasse to carboxylic acids under thermophilic conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?????????????. 17 1.4 Project description????????????..?... 25 II MATERIALS AND METHODS???????????? 27 2.1 Biomass feedstock??????????????. 27 2.2 Biomass pretreatment????????????? 29 2.3 Fermentation material and methods.... This is followed by introducing promising lignocellulosic biomass feedstocks and challenges in lignocellulosic biomass conversion. Subsequently, it presents the process description and recent advances of the MixAlco process, a novel and promising biomass...

Fu, Zhihong

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

36

Plastic, the Great Pacific Garbage Patch, and International Misfires at a Cure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environmental Implication of Plastic Debris in Marineat 2014. Consumption of plastics by marine animals has beenC. Thompson et al. , Our Plastic Age, 364 PhIL. TRANSAc--

Harse, Grant A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Plastic, the Great Pacific Garbage Patch, and International Misfires at a Cure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the environmental effects of BPA, including "requiringphthalates and bisphenol A ("BPA"), are relevant to thishad detectable levels of BPA in their urine, and that other

Harse, Grant A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Garbage on the wharf : a transfer station for the City of Boston  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Perhaps because they address processes at the expense of space or have many "conditions" limiting architectural design freedom, infrastructure and particularly the infrastructure of waste, are commonly neglected in ...

Russell, Phillip Gregory

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Waste Management: Garbage Displacement and the Ethics of Mafia Representation in Matteo Garrones Gomorra  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

By visiting dumps and quarries it is possible to see thestations, decommissioned quarries, deserted farmland. Theis full). In an abandoned quarry Franco sees a prospect:

Bondavalli, Simona

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Sugarcane juice extraction and preservation, and long-term lime pretreatment of bagasse  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

C)................................................................................146 Figure 4.6 Total mass, holocellulose, lignin and ash for treatment without air purging at 23oC. .........................................................................147 Figure 4.7 Total mass, holocellulose, lignin and ash for treatment... without air purging at 30oC. .........................................................................148 Figure 4.8 Total mass, holocellulose, lignin and ash for treatment without air purging at 40o...

Granda Cotlear, Cesar Benigno

2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "garbage bagasse sewerage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Volatile fatty acid fermentation of lime-treated bagasse by rumen microorganisms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

future. From another perspective, since fossil fuels are mined from beneath the earth' s surface, their combustion releases subsurface carbon to accumulate in the atmosphere as carbon dioxide, leading to the global warmings7 ? the so... of the least thermally stable components of the cell wall. 'a Softwood hemicelluloses are rich in mannan polymers with significant quantities of xylans, whereas hardwood hemicelluloses are rich in xylan polymers and contain small amounts of mannan, as 10...

Lee, Chang-Ming

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

42

A comparative analysis of emissions from bagasse charcoal and wood charcoal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Haiti is the poorest country in the Western hemisphere and is in need of cheap cooking fuel source. Currently, lump charcoal, the cooking fuel of Haiti, is made by carbonizing trees in ditches before selling the charcoal ...

Ramrez, Andrs, 1982-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Smoke and toxic species analyses from combustion of guayule bagasse modified fiberboards  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The determination of particle size distribution. 3. The identification of heavy metals in the smoke and ash phases. 4. The identification of other major smoke components. These tests will also be performed on normal, untreated fiberboard samples so... and untreated fiberboards were less than 10 microns in size and were, therefore, respirable to humans. Toxic species identification through the use of the gas chromatograph/mass spectroscopy identified no unusually toxic chemical species within the smoke...

Paris, Lisa Danielle

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Multicomponent Adsorption Study of Metal Ions onto Bagasse Fly Ash Using Taguchi's Design of Experimental Methodology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Department of Chemical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology?Roorkee, Roorkee 247667, India ... Adsorption technologies for metals wastes include activated carbon and ion exchange treatment. ... The concentration of Cd(II), Ni(II), and Zn(II) in the aqueous samples was determined using a flame atomic absorption spectrophotometer (GBC Avanta, Australia) with the detection limit of 0.009, 0.040, and 0.008 mg/L at wavelengths of 228.8, 232, and 213.9 nm, for Cd(II), Ni(II), and Zn(II), respectively, using an air?acetylene flame. ...

Vimal C. Srivastava; Indra D. Mall; Indra M. Mishra

2007-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

45

Ultrasound assisted pretreatment and hydrolysis for the production of ethanol from sugarcane bagasse;.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The steady increase in energy consumption and the depletion of fossil fuels has reawakened the interest in developing alternative energy sources that can compensate the (more)

Velmurugan R

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Effects of physical and chemical pretreatments on the crystallinity of bagasse  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biomass conversion technologies are receiving increasing attention due to global climate change and most recently plans from the President of the United States to reduce fossil fuel consumption. The MixAlco process converts a variety of feedstocks...

Jones, Maxine Janette

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

47

Spitzer should focus on turning garbage into renewable energy By ALYSSAA. LAPPEN and JACK D. LAUBER Eliot Spitzer, listen up.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

virtually eliminated emissions. Such plants have cut dioxins and other toxic emissions by 99 percent or more-to-energy plant emissions, combined, reach only 12 grams of dioxin annually, less than 0.5 percent of all dioxins

Columbia University

48

Side by Side Comparison of Chemical Compounds Generated by Aqueous Pretreatments of Maize Stover, Miscanthus and Sugarcane Bagasse  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Furfural and hydroxymethyl furfural (HMF) are dehydration products of pentose and hexose ... fermentation, but could also serve as industrial platform chemicals [40, 41...] and thus may be problematic or valuable...

Leonardo D. Gmez; Ruben Vanholme; Susannah Bird; Geert Goeminne

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Bagasse as a Fuel for Combined Heat and Power (CHP): An Assessment of Options for Implementation in Iran.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??With over one hundred years of commercial cultivation, sugar cane is one of the most valuable agricultural botanical resources in the World. This position is (more)

Salehi, Farnza Amin

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Influence of Chemical Pretreatment on the Internal Structure and Reactivity of Pyrolysis Chars Produced from Sugar Cane Bagasse  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Marion Carrier , Hein Wjp Neomagus , Johann Grgens , and Johannes H. Knoetze * ... A study of the steam gasification of Eucalyptus chars has been carried out, using Li, Na and K chlorides as catalysts, in order to characterize the gas phase with a view to its energy use, analyzing the influence of steam flow rates, initial mass of char, particle size and temp. ... Energy Conversion and Management (2006), 47 (7-8), 1004-1013 CODEN: ECMADL; ISSN:0196-8904. ...

Marion Carrier; Hein Wjp Neomagus; Johann Grgens; Johannes H. Knoetze

2012-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

51

DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201000181 Synthesis of Furfural from Xylose and Xylan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for utilization of impor- tant biomass feedstocks such as bagasse, corn stover, Miscan- thus, switchgrass

Raines, Ronald T.

52

E-Print Network 3.0 - appendix c- ecotox Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology 18 Life Cycle environmental Assessment (LCA) of sanitation systems including sewerage: Case of vertical Summary: of vertical flow...

53

Rana Novini ATOC 3500 Open-air pits are used to burn garbage and other wastes at bases in Iraq and Afghanistan that lack  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

found in the study: Acetone, Acrolein**, Benzene, Carbon Disulfide, Chlorodifluoromethane, Chloromethane, Toluene Acrolein and Hexachlorobutadiene were occasionally detected far above the MEG ratio--over 1800 percent above the MEG for Acrolein and over 500 percent above the MEG for Hexachlorobutadiene. Plaintiffs

Toohey, Darin W.

54

Sustainable Heat and Electricity from Sugarcane Residues Gasification in Brazil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Sugarcane residues, in the form of bagasse and cane tops and leaves, represent a large renewable biomass energy resource in Brazil. Bagasse is currently used to satisfy the energy needs of the sugar and alcohol i...

Ausilio Bauen

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Selection of Process Pathways for Biorefinery Design Using Optimization Tools: A Colombian Case for Conversion of Sugarcane Bagasse to Ethanol, Poly-3-hydroxybutyrate (PHB), and Energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An optimization procedure is shown in order to select the most promising process pathway for the production of fuel ethanol, poly-3-hydroxybutyrate (PHB), and electricity. ... This method is useful to evaluate potential configurations of biorefineries using simple data for the solution of the optimization/superstructure model. ... (43-48) For this development using binary variables (Xi) and big-M constraints, the problem corresponds to a big-M MIP formulation. ...

Jonathan Moncada; Luis G. Matallana; Carlos A. Cardona

2013-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

56

Chemical and Thermogravimetric Analyses of Raw and Saturated Agave Bagasse Main Fractions with Cd(II), Pb(II), and Zn(II) Ions: Adsorption Mechanisms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Prasher, S. O.; Beaugerard, M.; Hawari, J.; Bera, P.; Patel, R. M.; Kim, S. H.Biosorption of heavy metals by red algae (Palmaria Palmata) Environ. ... Prasher, S. O.; Beaugeard, M.; Hawari, J.; Bera, P.; Patel, R. M.; Kim, S. H. ...

Litza Halla Velazquez-Jimenez; Jose Rene Rangel-Mendez

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Gasification of Fuel Cane Bagasse in a Downdraft Gasifier: Influence of Lignocellulosic Composition and Fuel Particle Size on Syngas Composition and Yield  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The extracted syngas is then flared or fed to a 30 kW internal combustion engine. ... As expected, immediately after the start of combustion, pyrolysis zone temperatures increased by thermal radiation from the oxidation zone; however, a rapid increase in the temperature at the gasifier exit also occurred, and within 10 min of ignition, the syngas temperature at the exit had already reached 309 C and continued to increase. ... The ER is a measure of the ratio of actual air used to the stoichiometric amount of air required for combustion and is, therefore, crucial in the development of syngas quality. ...

Galip Akay; C. Andrea Jordan

2011-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

58

LIFE CYCLE ASSESSMENTS (LCAs) OF PYROLYSIS-BASED GASOLINE AND DIESEL FROM DIFFERENT REGIONAL FEEDSTOCKS: CORN STOVER, SWITCHGRASS, SUGAR CANE BAGASSE, WASTE WOOD, GUINEA GRASS, ALGAE, AND ALBIZIA.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Renewable hydrocarbon biofuels are being investigated as possible alternatives to conventional liquid transportation fossil fuels like gasoline, kerosene (aviation fuel), and diesel. A diverse (more)

Mihalek, Matthew J.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

HEEZEN, B. C., AND C. D. HOLLISTER. 1971. The face of the deep.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

garbage, paper, radioactively contaminated tools and waste; junk, wrecks from peace and war; artillery projectiles; clinkers from coal- burning steamships...

1999-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

60

I No cough, wheeze, chest tightness, or shortness of breath during the day or night  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

thing to do: · Keep food and garbage in closed containers. Never leave food out. · Use poison baits

Baker, Chris I.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "garbage bagasse sewerage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Adaptive reuse and revitalization of water heritage in Nicosia, Cyprus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The bi-communal sewerage system developed for the divided capital of Nicosia, Cyprus has been lauded as a rare example of cooperation between the Turkish Cypriot and Greek Cypriot communities. The story of how the project ...

Lau, Marisa (Marisa May-Lan)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Die Wirkung verschiedener Gewsserschutzmassnahmen auf den Vorfluter  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study discusses the efficiency of some dispositions to be considered for a combined sewerage system. The annual amounts of settleable solids and B.O.D. which may be eliminated have been calculated for var...

W. Munz Eawag

1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Structural development of vortical flows around a square jet in cross-flow  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...1324 Structural development of vortical flows...the structural development of the entire...the structural development of the jet wake...computer hardware technology and computational...sewerage outfalls, gas- turbine cooling, and...

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

E-Print Network 3.0 - analysing bioenergy demand Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

normally derived... of bioenergy resources are fuel wood, bagasse, organic waste, biogas and bioethanol. Bioenergy is the only... action on climate change have all served to...

65

E-Print Network 3.0 - assessing bioenergy options Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

origin, normally derived... of bioenergy resources are fuel wood, bagasse, organic waste, biogas and bioethanol. Bioenergy is the only... action on climate change have all served...

66

E-Print Network 3.0 - automatic wood furnaces Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

bagasse. 3. The total cost of the boiler island including stoker, furnace, boiler, economizer... , feeders and bins for handling bark and wood, while experience in dealing with...

67

Methodological and Practical Considerations for Developing Multiproject Baselines for Electric Power and Cement Industry Projects in Central America  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

energy projects (small hydro and bagasse co-generators) andPCF) in Guatemala for a small hydro project assumes that the

Murtishaw, Scott; Sathaye, Jayant; Galitsky, Christina; Dorion, Kristel

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

C3Bio.org - Tags: C3Bio Group  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Basudeb Saha Direct transformation of cellulose and sugarcane bagasse into 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) was carried out using single or combined metal chloride catalysts in...

69

C3Bio.org - Tags: C3Bio Non-Experiment Resource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Basudeb Saha Direct transformation of cellulose and sugarcane bagasse into 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) was carried out using single or combined metal chloride catalysts in...

70

C3Bio.org - Resources: Presentations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Basudeb Saha Direct transformation of cellulose and sugarcane bagasse into 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) was carried out using single or combined metal chloride catalysts in...

71

What substitutes for oil?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... bagasse, ethyl alcohol, vegetable oils, methane and hydrogen; as well as hydro and nuclear power generation, conservation methods, and solar, wind and tidal energy.

David Spurgeon

1978-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

72

RAPID/Geothermal/Environment | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

the management of solid waste (e.g., garbage), hazardous waste, and underground storage tanks holding petroleum products or certain chemicals. While some states have few additional...

73

Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-13-023.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

amount of waste that may be generated could include uncontaminated garbage such as plastic water bottles or other miscellaneous waste. All waste would be disposed of in...

74

LOS ALAMOS, New Mexico, November 19, 2010- Los Alamos National...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

debuts hybrid garbage truck November 19, 2010 Truck uses hydraulic pressure to improve efficiency by 30 percent LOS ALAMOS, New Mexico, November 19, 2010- Los Alamos National...

75

Integrated Pest Management of Flies in Texas Dairies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This publication identifies and gives management strategies for various species of flies infesting Texas dairies, including houseflies, stable flies, horn flies, garbage flies and blow flies....

Stevenson, Douglas; Cocke, Jesse

2000-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

76

Microsoft Word - Airport_EA_Final.doc  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

garbage, refuse, sludge from a waste treatment plant, water supply treatment plant, or air pollution control facility, and other discarded material, including solid, liquid,...

77

landfill  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

landfill, landfill(ed) site, refuse dump, garbage dump ... depository, trash disposal site (US); sanitary landfill [Landfills may often release a toxic soup of...] ? Abfalldeponie f [Zur Endlagerung ...

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

E-Print Network 3.0 - abacates persia americana Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Task Barnes & Underwood (1959) Example: learn AB paired associates... : window-reason bicycle-garbage ... Then AC paired associates: window-locomotive bicycle-dishtowel 20...

79

Decrypting the Java gene pool  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Pretenuring long-lived and immortal objects into infrequently or never collected regions reduces garbage collection costs significantly. However, extant approaches either require computationally expensive, application-specific, off-line profiling, or ... Keywords: Java, garbage collection, micro-patterns, pretenuring

Sebastien Marion; Richard Jones; Chris Ryder

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Atmos. Chem. Phys., 10, 565584, 2010 www.atmos-chem-phys.net/10/565/2010/  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

waste stream suggests that garbage burning Correspondence to: R. J. Yokelson (bob and Physics Trace gas and particle emissions from domestic and industrial biofuel use and garbage burning- sions of VOC pollutants per mass of fuel burned by about half. We did not detect HCN emissions from

Meskhidze, Nicholas

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "garbage bagasse sewerage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

GREEN GUIDE MAISON AM GROND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. There are some good habits while cooking which can help us to reduce the energy consumption. Some good habits are the problem that the garbage collectors from the City of Luxembourg didn't want to take the garbage which with such implementation. Out team investigated and confirmed that the City of Luxembourg is collecting the organic wastes

van der Torre, Leon

82

OTHER APPROACHES TO MANAGING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

requirements Include minimum separations between wells and conventional/alternative onsite sewage treatment systems Supplement public sanitary sewerage systems primarily in rural areas Legal Approaches ConstructionOTHER APPROACHES TO MANAGING POLLUTANT SOURCES Laws and Land Use [Chapter 10.2] Rules of Thumb Rule

83

Risks and responses to universal drinking water security  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...providers were introduced, with utility pay points closed, saving...LIFELINK system, which uses solar panels to pump groundwater...2004 Water for Asian cities. Utilities performance and civil society...water and sewerage regulation. Utilities Policy 14, 175-184. ( doi...

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Watershed management: Clean water`s next act  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

14 articles related to watershed management comprise this special advertising section of the Association of Metropolitan Sewerage Agencies. Subtopics include water quality, regulations, US Environmental Protection Agency activities, analysis tools, economics, flooding and erosions, and non-point source pollutions. Articles on arid and coastal are included. Several articles describe municipal watershed programs being planned or in place.

Hite, R.W. [Metro Wastewater Reclamation District, Denver, CO (United States)

1996-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

85

Western Michigan University Detail of Budgeted Supply/Equipment Codes by Category (4000-4999)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Light, Power 4224 4192 Utilities-Water 4225 4192 Utilities-Sewerage 4229 4192 Utilities-Oth 4250 4180 Rentals 4190 Travel-Motor Pool Cars 4366 4190 Non-Emp Consulting Travel 4367 4190 Academic Recruitment Travel 4368 4190 Lease Car Charge 4369 4190 On-Campus Conference/Training 4370 4190 Conferences 4371 4190

de Doncker, Elise

86

THE FUNCTION AND FUTURE OF THE TECHNICAL COLLEGE  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...for-estry, agriculture, horticulture and the various subdivisions...and water, of heating, lighting, water supply, sewerage...Forestry, ag-riculture and horticulture were carried on in the belief...marine engineering and one in horticulture. In the fourteen special...

A. H. Chamberlain

1909-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

87

Corporate Overview Founded on Values  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Manufacturing Petroleum Maintenance Pipeline Design Sewer/Wastewater Design Sewerage and Solid Waste Site Assessment and Compliance Wastewater Treatment Plants Water Treatment and Desalination Plants Working participating in EWB-USA trips. To date we have awarded 92 grants totaling US$350,000 Created a CH2M HILL EWB

Subramanian, Venkat

88

Managing R&D Risk in Renewable Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Shell Dips into Algae Biodiesel. Business Week, December 12,sugar cane bagasse biodiesel algae n/a biodiesel wastealgae with a high lipid content that can be used as another source of biodiesel.

Rausser, Gordon C.; Papineau, Maya

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

New and emerging bioenergy technologies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rohstoffe e.V. Germany Consultant Charles Butcher Science Journalist Risø Energy Report 2 #12;1. Preface 3 2 or fisheries. Examples of bioenergy resources are fuel wood, bagasse, organic waste, biogas and bioethanol

90

Ozone treatment of biomass to enhance digestibility  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is very resistant to enzymatic degradation. Lignocellulosic materials require pretreatment to enhance their digestibility. The main objective of this research was to further enhance the digestibility of biomass (bagasse) with ozonation as a follow...

Almendarez, Maria Elena

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Ammonia fiber explosion (AFEX) treatment of grass  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and steam explosion (Playne, 1984), pretreatment of cane bagasse with alkaline hydrogen peroxide (Azzam, 1989), alkali treatment of soybean straw to improve digestibility (Felix, Hill, and Diarra, 14 1990), ammoniation of wheat straw to improve nutritive...

Ashok, Ganesh

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Carbon-Catalyzed Gasification of Organic Feedstocks in Supercritical Water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Feedstocks studied in this paper include glycerol, glucose, cellobiose, whole biomass feedstocks (depithed bagasse liquid extract and sewage sludge), and representative Department of Defense (DoD) wastes (methanol, methyl ethyl ketone, ethylene glycol, acetic acid, and phenol). ...

Xiaodong Xu; Yukihiko Matsumura; Jonny Stenberg; Michael Jerry Antal, Jr.

1996-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

93

E-Print Network 3.0 - areca-a food waste Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

greeted staff and took... the cafeteria to find out if it can be used to generate biogas or for compost. They separated food waste from... other garbage and measured an...

94

Environmental magnetic responses of urbanization processes: evidence from lake sediments in East Lake, Wuhan, China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......garbage, spilled fuel and lubricating oil from vessels are expected to be...from QTPP and coal consumption in Wuhan city (Fig...WISC and the coal consumption in Wuhan, respectively...Coal was the major fuel for power generation......

Tao Yang; Qingsheng Liu; Qingli Zeng; Lungsang Chan

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Using landfill gas for energy: Projects that pay  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pending Environmental Protection Agency regulations will require 500 to 700 landfills to control gas emissions resulting from decomposing garbage. Conversion of landfill gas to energy not only meets regulations, but also creates energy and revenue for local governments.

NONE

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Demaq System Documentation and User Manual Alexander Bohm  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Demaq System Documentation and User Manual Alexander B¨ohm March 8, 2010 #12;Contents 1 4.4.2 Tracking System Activity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 4.4.3 Requesting Garbage

Mannheim, Universität

97

The AllFloridaBeeRemoval.com team consists of three pest control operators, entomologists and beekeep-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

applied a wasp freeze, insulating foam, or similar product and inadvertently heightened the colony alert in strange places, including garbage can lids, tires, and water meter boxes. Pedestal style cable television

Jawitz, James W.

98

(sanitary) landfill  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

(sanitary) landfill, landfill(ed) site, refuse dump, garbage dump...Landfills may often release a toxic soup of...] ? Abfalldeponie f [Zur Endlagerung von Abfallstoffen oder von Industrieprodukten al...

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

PUBLISHED OCCASIONALLY BY THE FRIENDS OF THE BANCROFT LIBRARY UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, BERKELEY, CALIFORNIA 94720  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

pneumonia. He spent much time during his prolonged recuperation looking at photographs andbooks himself a radical for photographing garbage cans, and was commonly criticized. This early work does show

California at Berkeley, University of

100

Role models V.S. Sunder  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

waste matter (such as the wrapper of an ice cream cone or an empty plastic bag which once contained potato chips) out of a car window, and in the extreme case, throwing domestic garbage over the wall

Sunder, V S

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "garbage bagasse sewerage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

The generation of residual biomass during the production of bio-ethanol from sugarcane, its characterization and its use in energy production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Sugarcane bagasse is the residue produced by mills after juice is extracted from sugarcane. Other important solid residues in the sugarcane-to-sugar-and-ethanol production chain are the leaves and tops of the stalks (together referred to as cane trash). Although it represents a significant portion of the energy in sugarcane, cane trash is currently left in the fields. This paper has described and analyzed how residues (bagasse and cane trash) are produced from sugarcane and their use as an energy source in the production of ethanol. Also, it presents a review of the physical properties and characteristics of bagasse and cane trash and estimate their energy potential. Bagasse and cane trash have similar fuel characteristics to other biomasses fuels. Special attention should be given to the characteristics of cane trash ash, which has higher fusibility and alkali levels than bagasse. A flowchart of a typical mill was described and the thermal and mechanical energy consumption at various stages of the production process was determined. Of the energy consumed as work, about 58% is accounted for by milling and juice extraction, and 33% by the generation of electricity for use in the plant. In a typical mill using steam generators operating at average pressure and temperature (22bar, 300360C), about 15% of the bagasse produced is surplus, and an average of 480kg of steam is used per tonne of cane processed. An energy consumption analysis revealed that there was significant scope for reducing the amount of steam needed to operate the turbines in mills because of the low isentropic efficiencies identified. Cane trash, which is not yet used for energy production, also shows great energy potential because it is produced in similar quantities to bagasse, and its calorific value is only slightly lower.

Waldir Antonio Bizzo; Paulo Csar Leno; Danilo Jos Carvalho; Joo Paulo Soto Veiga

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Lab celebrates Earth Day  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Lab celebrates Earth Day Lab celebrates Earth Day Community Connections: Our link to Northern New Mexico Communities Latest Issue:Dec. 2013 - Jan. 2014 All Issues » submit Lab celebrates Earth Day Multiple activities focus on environmental protection. May 1, 2013 A team from Industrial Hygiene and Safety during the Great Garbage Grab A team from Industrial Hygiene and Safety during the Great Garbage Grab. Contact Editor Linda Anderman Email Community Programs Office Kurt Steinhaus Email Great Garbage Grab From April 1 - 12 employees were encouraged to don work gloves and very attractive orange vests to pick up litter around their workplace-both on and off Lab property. This year's winner of the coveted Traveling Trash Trophy (for picking up the most litter) went to the Worker Safety and

103

A Second Generation Biofuel from Cellulosic Agricultural By-product Fermentation Using Clostridium Species for Electricity Generation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The production of second generation biofuel is essential for limiting food versus fuel competition. Butanol is one of the important biofuel for the future. Agricultural by-products namely bagasse and potato peel were hydrolyzed to produce readily fermented sugar for butanol fermentation. The butanol concentration was 1 2g/l. To test the electricity generation, a customized generator was used for butanol combustion. The electricity produced was up to 1300 watts. Further improvements are needed in the hydrolysis method, medium composition, and generator design. This research has demonstrated that bagasse and potato peel are potential feedstock for producing butanol for generating electricity

Yalun Arifin; Ellen Tanudjaja; Arbi Dimyati; Reinhard Pinontoan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Bisolute Sorption and Thermodynamic Behavior of Organic Pollutants to Biomass-derived Biochars at Two Pyrolytic Temperatures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The structural characteristics and isotherms shape of the biochar were more dependent on the pyrolytic temperature than on the biomass feedstocks, which included orange peel, pine needle, and sugar cane bagasse. ... , a garden waste and ubiquitous forest biomass), orange peel (OP, Citrus reticulate, an industrial source of oils, not pre-extracted) and sugar cane bagasse (SB, Saccharum sinense, a byproduct of the sugar cane industry), were selected as biomass feedstocks because they are easily available. ... Low temperature biochars (LTB) at 300 C and high temperature biochars (HTB) at 700 C were produced by pyrolyzing different biomass feedstocks under oxygen-limited conditions as described in previous reports. ...

Zaiming Chen; Baoliang Chen; Dandan Zhou; Wenyuan Chen

2012-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

105

Release of Fuel-Bound Nitrogen during Biomass Gasification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Gasification of four biomass feedstocks (leucaena, sawdust, bagasse, and banagrass) with significantly different fuel-bound nitrogen (FBN) content was investigated to determine the effects of operational parameters and nitrogen content of biomass on the partitioning of FBN among nitrogenous gas species. ... The present study attempts to clarify the effects of gasification conditions and fuel on the release and evolution of biomass FBN through parallel experiments utilizing four different biomass feedstocks having significantly different FBN contents. ... Four types of biomass feedstocks were used in the experimentsleucaena, sawdust, bagasse, and banagrass. ...

Jiachun Zhou; Stephen M. Masutani; Darren M. Ishimura; Scott Q. Turn; Charles M. Kinoshita

2000-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

106

Third World: Science and Technology Contribute Feebly to Development  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Temple, in Studies ofSoil Erosion and Sedi-mentation in Tanzania A. Rapp, L. Berry, P. H. Temple, Eds. (University...break-through in single cell protein, cancer chemother-apy, solar energy, or yet another use for bagasse [the refuse from sugar...

Nicholas Wade

1975-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

107

BIODEGRADATION OF COMPOSITE NONWOVENS MADE OF NATURAL FIBERS AND SYNTHETIC POLYMERS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 BIODEGRADATION OF COMPOSITE NONWOVENS MADE OF NATURAL FIBERS AND SYNTHETIC POLYMERS Ioan I Research Center, New Orleans, LA ABSTRACT Composite nonwovens have been prepared from bagasse and cotton-co-terephthalate) and poly(hydroxy butyrate). Some nonwoven compositions have been treated with flame retardants containing

108

BOILERS, BOILER FUEL AND BOILER EFFICIENCY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper describes the modern boilers in the South African sugar industry. A new equation for the calculation of the net calorific value (NCV) of bagasse is suggested and a distinction is made between boiler design efficiency and boiler operation efficiency. Methods to calculate fuel calorific values and boiler efficiencies from first principles are presented.

A Wienese

109

Ris Energy Report 2 Bioenergy is energy of biological and renewable origin,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2 Risø Energy Report 2 Bioenergy is energy of biological and renewable origin, normally derived of bioenergy resources are fuel wood, bagasse, organic waste, biogas and bioethanol. Bioenergy is the only action on climate change have all served to increase interest in bioenergy. Technological advances

110

Calcium hydroxide pretreatment of biomass  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HYDROXIDE RECOVERY DATA. . . . . . 135 138 142 . . . . . 148 . . . . . 150 . . . . . 153 156 LIST OF TABLES Table Page 1. Methods used for pretreatment of lignocellulosics. . . . . . . . 15 2. Ammoniation conditions used by previous workers...C-pH diagram for a carbonate solution. 32 12. Flow diagram for continuous calcium hydroxide recovery. . . 13. A tree of possible experimental conditions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14. Sugar yields obtained from ammoniated bagasse...

Nagwani, Murlidhar

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Risoe Energy Conference Copenhagen, Denmark  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Zambia Ltd (CEEEZ) Private Bag E721, Lusaka ZAMBIA Tel/Fax: +260 - 1 - 240267 Email: yamba Cane Molasses/Juice Crop Residues (Bagasse) Sugar/Solids Raw Sugar Industrial Uses Steam & Electricity%) Biomass (0%) Other/Nuclear (1.9%) Figure: SAPP Installed Electricity Capacity for 2000 (Total Energy 45 GW

112

Development of Oxidative Lime Pretreatment and Shock Treatment to Produce Highly Digestible Lignocellulose for Biofuel and Ruminant Feed Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

enhanced the 72-h glucan digestibility of several promising biomass feedstocks: bagasse (74.0), corn stover (92.0), poplar wood (94.0), sorghum (71.8), and switchgrass (89.0). Highly digestible lignocellulose can also be used as ruminant animal feed. Shock...

Falls, Matthew David

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

113

Overview of Renewables for Power Rangan Banerjee  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

;Wind Solar Small Hydro Biomass Tidal Energy Wave Energy Ocean Thermal Energy Solar Thermal Solar Gasifier 69 70% 423 Bagasse Cogeneration 379 60% 1992 Small Hydro 1603 50% 7021 Waste to Energy 41 70% 251 Coal Oil Gas Nuclear Biomass PV Hydro-electric Wind CO2 g/kWh 960 -1300 800-860 690-870 460-1230 9

Banerjee, Rangan

114

Renewable Energy in Rangan Banerjee  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;Renewable Energy Options Wind Solar Small Hydro Biomass Tidal Energy Wave Energy Ocean Thermal Power 376 70% 2306 Biomass Gasifier 69 70% 423 Bagasse Cogeneration 540 60% 2838 Small Hydro 1826 50 #12;2005 data : 2006 Update Martinot #12;Source:Martinot(2006) #12;#12;#12;Small Hydro Power

Banerjee, Rangan

115

Resource recovery potential from secondary components of segregated municipal solid wastes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(MSW) such as fruit and vegetable wastes (FVW), leaf litter, paddy straw, cane bagasse, cane trash for decentralized biogas plants to be operated in the vicinity. We characterized the fermen- tation potential of six of the above MSW fractions for their suitability to be converted to biogas and anaerobic compost using

Columbia University

116

Ports for Objects in Concurrent Logic Programs Sverker Janson Johan Montelius Seif Haridi  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ports for Objects in Concurrent Logic Programs Sverker Janson Johan Montelius Seif Haridi Swedish Institute of Computer Sciencey . July 13, 1993 Abstract We introduce ports, an alternative to streams a pragmatic point of view ports provide e cient many-to- one communication, object identity, means for garbage

Janson, Sverker

117

If current capacity were to be expanded so that all of the non-recycled municipal solid waste that is currently sent to U.S. landfills each year could instead be converted to energy, we could generate enough electricity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

so that we could convert our non-recycled waste to alternative energy instead of landfilling it, we-recycled waste into energy instead of landfilling it, we could reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by nearly our roads. The Power of Waste GARBAGE ENERGY REDUCES 123M TONS CO2 = 23M LESS CARS PLASTICS 5.7B

118

Landfills a thing of the past in Germany where advanced waste management By Evridiki Bersi -Kathimerini  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Landfills a thing of the past in Germany where advanced waste management rules By Evridiki Bersi but that day has already come in Germany. On June 1, 2005, Germany imposed a ban on traditional garbage dumps, replacing them with one of the most advanced waste-management systems in the world. In the 1970s, Germany

Columbia University

119

Health Care: What the Poor People Didn't Get from Kentucky Project  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Program" for the poor people of this coal mining county in Appalachian Kentucky...eastern Kentucky and other parts of Appalachia, the poor in Floyd County are afflicted...filled with garbage and sewage. Coal no longer provides jobs for everyone...

Robert J. Bazell

1971-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

120

AAAS (I): Facing the Questions of What It Should Be and Do  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Program" for the poor people of this coal mining county in Appalachian Kentucky...eastern Kentucky and other parts of Appalachia, the poor in Floyd County are afflicted...filled with garbage and sewage. Coal no longer provides jobs for everyone...

Philip M. Boffey

1971-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "garbage bagasse sewerage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

MSU Extension Publication Archive Archive copy of publication, do not use for current recommendations. Up-to-date  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

electricity, telephone, mail delivery, garbage removal, fire and po- lice protection, street lights · streets, dust proper zoning can prevent the intrusion of these things · a location on a secondary street avoid at present, you will probably have to pay part of the cost for their installation well established street

122

Updated 9/23/2010 HOW TO RECYCLE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/Copiers · Garbage · Gas Cylinders · Glass Bottles & Jars · Grease · Halogen Bulbs · Hardbound Books · Hazardous Waste · Helium Tanks · Imaging Units for Printers/Copiers · Incandescent Bulbs · Ink Jet Printer · Newspapers & Newsprint #12;Updated 9/23/2010 · Office Supplies · Oil · Packing Peanuts · Paint · Pallets

Clark, John

123

Proceedings of NAWTEC16 16th Annual North American Waste-to-Energy Conference  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) and over-burdened dumps. Improper disposal of solid wastes over several decades and open burning of garbageProceedings of NAWTEC16 16th Annual North American Waste-to-Energy Conference May 19-21, 2008 is facing a solid waste management crisis. The infrastructure has been unable to keep pace with economic

Columbia University

124

Household Hazardous Waste Household hazardous waste is the discarded, unused, or leftover portion of household products  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be damaged when corrosive chemicals are put down the drain. Burning hazardous wastes simply distributes themHousehold Hazardous Waste Household hazardous waste is the discarded, unused, or leftover portion of household products containing toxic chemicals. These wastes CANNOT be disposed of in regular garbage. Any

de Lijser, Peter

125

Capacity-to-Act in India's Solid Waste Management and Waste-to-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, for example, Oppili, P., "Waste Burning, A Health Hazard at Pallikaranai," The Hindu, Sept. 9, 2003; "MPPCB1 Capacity-to-Act in India's Solid Waste Management and Waste-to- Energy Industries Perinaz Bhada and disposal of garbage, or municipal solid waste, compounded by increasing consumption levels. Another serious

Columbia University

126

Energy Use in the U. S. Food System  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...subsidy for food production could be supplied...energy-intensive food production or famine for...fertilizer to fields. More than...of feedlot operations so that manure...increase feedlot costs, but, as...of natural gas in drying crops...and the production of methane...with coal, oil, garbage-or...

John S. Steinhart; Carol E. Steinhart

1974-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

127

Table of Contents Rural Outreach 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

School of Dentistry/Dental Bites August 2008 Green Advice Many items that can be recycled into the blue in the garbage, says Connie- Marie Sanders, administrative coordinator for pathology and radiology. "There. DS4's Head Into the Community The second batch of fourth-year OHSU dental students opting

Chapman, Michael S.

128

In This Issue  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...garbage, biomass, or coal, and from industrial...oxides, produced by combustion, are usually present...on surfaces of soil, dust, and man-made structures...wadsleyite after a high-pressure laboratory collision...long-duration high-pressure experiments, but the...

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

SEARCH The Oregonian Enter Keyword(s) FIND A BUSINESS Enter Keyword More From The Oregonian | Subscribe To The Oregonian  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the incomplete combustion of oil; gas; garbage; and other organic substances. The findings may be important Laboratory in Richland, Wash. Michael J. Scott, a natural resources economist, and his colleagues at the lab in snowpack for the West Coast, including the Cascades. Losses to Yakima Valley agriculture in the next

McGraw, Kevin J.

130

Beecher, Institute of Public Utilities, MSU [2010] [ 1 ] IPU RESEARCH NOTE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

gas Local phone ALL ITEMS (CPI) Postage Electricity Internet (1997=100) Wireless (1997=100) Interstate: electricity, natural gas, fuel oil, water and sewer, local telephone service, interstate telephone service, wireless phone service, internet service, cable and satellite television, garbage collection, and postage

131

at the Weizmann Institute We are launching a new cardboard recycling e ort  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cardboard Recycling at the Weizmann Institute We are launching a new cardboard recycling e ort and brought to the Weizmann warehouse for reuse. Damaged boxes will be compressed and recycled by the by the recycling company (Kamam). Why do it? Re-using and recycling saves garbage burial space and frees space

Shapiro, Ehud

132

1. Design Review: Proposed construction or improvements on any properties within the Greek Housing Area shall receive prior approval  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Material should be selected for ease of long-term maintenance. 15. Landscape: Each lot should be fully storage use shall be constructed on the lot without prior approval of the Architectural Design Review Disposal: Trash, garbage or other waste shall not be kept except in sanitary containers. 13. Exterior

Almor, Amit

133

The Use of Ion Chromatography in the Evaluation of Densified Refuse-Derived Fuel as a Potential Alternative Fuel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......acceptable potential alternative fuel as far as acid...OH)2 will have car bonated before the...is an attrac tive alternative to garbage treatment...the production of energy. The main challenge...possible future as an alternative fuel source. R...the Association of Energy Engineers in Atlanta......

Jen-Fon Jen; Kenneth E. Daugherty; James G. Tarter

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Inside this issue: March Goes Green 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Inside this issue: March Goes Green 1 Save the Date: Spring Awakening 1 What's in the garbage? 2 Alternative Transportation options 3 Eco apps 3 Guest Speakers: Water First Docu- mentarian and Green Deen Green! March 2011Volume 4, Issue 4 Office of Environmental Sustainability Sustainability Bulletin Adding

Linsley, Braddock K.

135

Storage Systems for Non-volatile Memory Devices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 2. Benefit From Migration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3. Sensitivity Study . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 a. Impact of Migration Threshold Parameter ? . . . 20 b. Impact of Chunk Size . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 4... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65 3. Space Pre-allocation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67 4. Modifications to Kernel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68 5. Garbage Collection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70 6. File System Consistency...

Wu, Xiaojian

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

136

Research Demonstration of a Hardware Reference-Counting Heap  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A hardware self-managing heap memory (RCM) for languages like Lisp, Smalltalk, and Java has been designed, built, tested and benchmarked. On every pointer write from the processor, reference-counting transactions are performed in real time within ... Keywords: Performance, garbage collection, uniprocessor

David S. Wise; Brian Heck; Caleb Hess; Willie Hunt; Eric Ost

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Electronic copy available at: http://ssrn.com/abstract=2014709 Joshua M. Pearce, Sara J. Johnson, and Gabriel B. Grant, "3DMapping Optimization of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the automobile route that uses the least fuel and maintains vehicles at their individual to optimize fleet vehicle routes such as garbage or recycling collection trucks. The secondary benefit of ecological education will also be explored. Fuel used could be converted into monetary units based

Boyer, Edmond

138

There's a Patch in The Ocean [There's a Hole in The Bucket (D/D)] 1. There's a Dpatch in the Gocean,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

There's a Patch in The Ocean [There's a Hole in The Bucket (D/D)] 1. There's a Dpatch it A7to Dwaste. 10. Let's Dclean up that Gtrash patch, Dear Granny, dear Granny, Let's Dclean up that Gtrash patch, Dear Granny, A7that Dpatch. See this link (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great Pacific Garbage

Nightingale, Peter

139

OFFICE OF INTERNATIONAL PROGRAMS 1024 Campus Delivery  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(electric, cable, internet, cell phone, water, garbage, etc). Arrange for your utilities (and cell phone unneeded furniture, personal items (i.e. clothes) or automobile. If you sell your automobile, make sure to transfer the title to the new owner and remember to cancel your automobile insurance. You can donate

140

Fluidised bed co-gasification of coal and olive oil industry wastes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Co-gasification of bagasse wastes mixed with coal is technically feasible, without major installation changes. The effect of experimental conditions on co-gasification process was analysed, to enhance gas production and improve its composition and energetic content. The rise of bagasse content increased tars and gaseous hydrocarbons contents, which can be reduced by increasing gasification temperature and/or air flow rate. The rise of temperature till 890C favoured hydrocarbons further reactions and allowed an increase of 45% in hydrogen release and a decrease in gaseous hydrocarbons of 55%. A reduction of around 30% in gaseous hydrocarbons was also achieved by rising O2/fuel ratio till 0.6g/g daf, which decreased gas heating value, due to nitrogen diluting effect. Though no significant changes in gaseous hydrocarbons composition were obtained, the presence of dolomite in the fluidised bed had the benefit of decreasing tars content and rising gas yield, being the gas richer in hydrogen content.

Rui Neto Andr; Filomena Pinto; Carlos Franco; M. Dias; I. Gulyurtlu; M.A.A. Matos; I. Cabrita

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "garbage bagasse sewerage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Berkeley Lab Recycling Guide Berkeley Lab Recycling Guide The Berkeley Lab supports the philosophy that prevention is superior to remediation. The goal of waste minimization is to incorporate pollution prevention into the decision-making process at every level throughout the Lab. Additionally, where waste generation is unavoidable, the preference is to reuse or recycle. Reduce Source reduction is to garbage what preventive medicine is to health: a means of eliminating a problem before it can happen. Reduce the amount of paper you use. Use electronic transfer of information. Reduce disposal costs: By decreasing office waste you can dramatically lower the costs of garbage pick-up service. Reduce pollution: The manufacturing of new paper products from recycled materials results in a 74 percent reduction in air pollution and

142

Decontamination of Radioactive Cesium Released from Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant - 13277  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Peculiar binding of Cesium to the soil clay minerals remained the major obstacle for the immediate Cs-decontamination of soil and materials containing clay minerals like sludge. Experiments for the removal of Cesium from soil and ash samples from different materials were performed in the lab scale. For soil and sludge ash formed by the incineration of municipal sewage sludge, acid treatment at high temperature is effective while washing with water removed Cesium from ashes of plants or burnable garbage. Though total removal seems a difficult task, water-washing of wood-ash or garbage-ash at 40 deg. C removes >90% radiocesium, while >60% activity can be removed from soil and sludge-ash by acid washing at 95 deg. C. (authors)

Parajuli, Durga; Minami, Kimitaka; Tanaka, Hisashi; Kawamoto, Tohru [Nanosystem Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology - AIST (Japan)] [Nanosystem Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology - AIST (Japan)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Pyrolysis for Biochar Purposes: A Review to Establish Current Knowledge Gaps and Research Needs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Khalil(28) reported very low surface areas for charcoals (from a wide variety of biomass feedstocks) pyrolyzed at temperatures near 550 C. ... Cetin and co-workers(33) reported a slight decrease of the total surface area by increasing pressure during the pyrolysis of several biomass feedstocks (radiata pine, eucalyptus wood, and sugar cane bagasse). ... Table 1 reports several experimental data from the literature for slow pyrolysis of different biomass feedstocks under various operating conditions. ...

Joan J. Many

2012-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

144

Eucalyptus plantations for energy production in Hawaii. Technical status report, October 1, 1978-June 30, 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Progress made on accomplishing research objectives is reported. The objectives of this project are: (1) to increase the biomass production of Eucalyptus; (2) to determine the optimum requirements to maximize yield; (3) to assess planting, cultivation, harvesting, and transportation equipment requirements; (4) to determine the optimum mixture of biomass (eucalyptus and bagasse) at the generator for the production of electricity; and (5) to evaluate a complete production/conversion system which utilized optimum management conditions in relationship to costs. (DMC)

Not Available

1980-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

145

Recommendations for Sustaining Sustainability Initiatives in City Government  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Associations GreenPrint Green Buildings/ Governance Other Partnership with Businesses Company Donation GreenPrint Incentives Offered by Companies to Users (e.g., utility companies) Solid Waste Xcel Energy Green Buildings/ Governance Discount... the states energy come from alternative fuels is an example where local utility companies were encouraged to cooperate with Denvers efforts to decrease the Citys overall energy use. Solid waste programs are another area prone to government interest. At its core, garbage...

Boxumm-Debolt, Krystal; Edson, Greg; Holtzman, Karina; Jackson, Melissa; McCurdy, Nancy; Miller, David; Profaizer, Richard; Reinert, Doug; Wilburn, Sonta; Williams, Carla

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

146

AOC shuts down Italian plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

NORTH AMERICAN-based resin supplier AOC has announced that it is discontinuing operations at its facility in Garbag-nate, Italy, after only a few months. It blames significant over-capacity in the European unsaturated polyester resin market, combined with volatile raw material costs, for this move. This is a short news story only. Visit www.reinforcedplastics.com for the latest plastics industry news.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Squatter settlements in Latin America: the basis of social integration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

growth and urban population growth. Such urban structure, explains Germani (1973:34), is associated with an economic structure dependent on international trade. "The primate c1ty often functions as a point of contact between land trans- port (from... loafers, abandoned women and children, thieves, drunks, and prosti- tutes. These marginal elements live in a subhuman condition without piped water, sewage systems, garbage collection, and other basic urban 33 services" (Perlman, 1976:14-15). Squatters...

Sanint, Zaida Castellanos

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

148

Treatment of nitrate-rich water in a baffled membrane bioreactor (BMBR) employing waste derived materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Nitrate removal in submerged membrane bioreactors (MBRs) is limited as intensive aeration (for maintaining adequate dissolved oxygen levels and for membrane scouring) deters the formation of anoxic zones essential for biological denitrification. The present study employs baffled membrane bioreactor (BMBR) to overcome this constraint. Treatment of nitrate rich water (synthetic and real groundwater) was investigated. Sludge separation was achieved using ceramic membrane filters prepared from waste sugarcane bagasse ash. A complex external carbon source (leachate from anaerobic digestion of food waste) was used to maintain an appropriate C/N ratio. Over 90% COD and 95% NO3N reduction was obtained. The bagasse ash filters produced a clear permeate, free of suspended solids. Sludge aggregates were observed in the reactor and were linked to the high extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) content. Lower sludge volume index (40mL/g compared to 150mL/g for seed sludge), higher settling velocity (47m/h compared to 10m/h for seed sludge) and sludge aggregates (0.7mm aggregates compared to <0.2mm for seed sludge) was observed. The results demonstrate the potential of waste-derived materials viz. food waste leachate and bagasse ash filters in water treatment.

Subhankar Basu; Saurabh K. Singh; Prahlad K. Tewari; Vidya S. Batra; Malini Balakrishnan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Comparison among Proposals for Energy Integration of Processes for 1G/2G Ethanol and Bioelectricity Production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Brazil has an important role in the world market of ethanol production and the implementation of technologies of second generation ethanol will intensify its production. In this work Pinch Analysis was used in order to perform energy integration of processes for first and second generation (1G/2G) ethanol and bioelectricity production, using hydrothermal and diluted acid pretreatments of sugarcane bagasse, both including and not including pentoses fermentation step. Processes that include pentoses fermentation step, for both considered pretreatments, have higher ethanol production when compared to the ones that do not make use of hemicellulose fraction of bagasse to produce ethanol, but steam consumption increases in the same order of magnitude of ethanol production. For the four evaluated scenarios the application of energy integration demonstrated a reduction in energy consumption of more than 50% when compared to the corresponding cases without any energy integration and of more than 30% when compared to partially integrated processes, as commonly found in Brazilian industrial plants. Besides the economical advantage, due to the decrease in costs of hot and cold utilities, energy integrated processes increase bagasse availability for production of second generation ethanol.

Cssia M. Oliveira; Antonio J.G. Cruz; Caliane B.B. Costa

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

21 - Milling Control  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary This chapter discusses milling control. Brix graph curves are used to denote and compare mill control efficiency. The degree to which the values obtained in the mills approach the theoretical curve indicates how well each mill is doing its work. To establish these brix curves, the brix of back-roller juice is generally taken. In dry crushing mills, the brix of the feed-roller juice is higher. In wet crushing mills, on the contrary, it is the back-roller juice which has the higher brix. Mill control is based on an equation expressing the fact that the weight of material entering the milling plant is equal to the weight leaving, cane = imbibition water = mixed juice = bagasse. This equation though does not work out strictly correct in practice. The basic equation serves mainly to determine the weight of bagasse, the three other terms being generally weighed or measured. Also, before analysis, the bagasse, in turn, also loses a small fraction of its weight, which is generally negligible. One important method for milling control calculation is using the Hawaiian method.

E. HUGOT

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

31 - 16040 of 28,905 results. 31 - 16040 of 28,905 results. Rebate Garrison Diversion Conservancy District (North Dakota) The Garrison Conservancy District is a state agency established to provide for land irrigation, to establish and restore depleted lakes and stabilize stream flows, and to make waters available for... http://energy.gov/savings/garrison-diversion-conservancy-district-north-dakota Rebate Gas Storage Act (Illinois) Any corporation which is engaged in or desires to engage in, the distribution, transportation or storage of natural gas or manufactured gas, which gas, in whole or in part, is intended for ultimate... http://energy.gov/savings/gas-storage-act-illinois Rebate Gas, Heat, Water, Sewerage Collection and Disposal, and Street Railway Companies (South Carolina) This legislation applies to public utilities and entities furnishing

152

Data:D3cc486d-f051-4418-a189-7bfeac997a3c | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

86d-f051-4418-a189-7bfeac997a3c 86d-f051-4418-a189-7bfeac997a3c No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Anaheim, California (Utility Company) Effective date: 2011/12/01 End date if known: Rate name: Power-Agriculture- Schedule PA Sector: Commercial Description: Applicability to power service for general agricultural purposes, or for general water or sewerage pumping. Source or reference: http://www.anaheim.net/utilities/ElectricRules/SCHD-PA.pdf Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh):

153

BSEL BioProducts, Sciences, and Engineering Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

. . To develop and transform abundant and renewable bioresources through targeted research, development, demonstration and commercialization of bioproducts, bioprocesses and bioenergy supported by a wide variety of public and private partnerships. 2. To provide a quality and rigorous education in the sciences and engineering required to conduct an active program of research, discovery and commercialization while integrating the teaching and research missions. You are here Statement from US Department of Energy Current technology: Starch-based ethanol Biomass: Corn, grain, sugar Technology under implementation: Lignocellulose based ethanol Residues and waste: Corn stover, straw, bagasse, wood, garden refuges etc. Cellulose Hemicellulose

154

Pacific Ethanol, Inc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Verenium Biofuels Corporation Verenium Biofuels Corporation Corporate HQ: Cambridge, Massachusetts Proposed Facility Location: Jennings, Louisiana Description: Operation and maintenance of a demonstration-scale facility in Jennings, Louisiana with some capital additions. CEO or Equivalent: Carlos A. Riva, President, Chief Executive Officer and Director Participants: Only Verenium Biofuels Corporation Production: * Capacity of 1.5 million gallons per year of cellulosic ethanol biofuel Technology and Feedstocks: * Pretreatment, enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulosics and fermentation of sugars into ethanol * sugarcane bagasse, dedicated energy crops, agricultural waste, and wood product residues State of Readiness: * The demonstration facility has been completed and is in the

155

Fuel nitrogen release during black liquor pyrolysis; Part 2: Comparisons between different liquors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This continuation of earlier work reports fuel nitrogen release for black liquors at two temperatures during pyrolysis of single droplets in an oxygen-free environment. Approximately half of the 20--60% fuel nitrogen released was ammonia and half was molecular nitrogen. The total amount of fixed nitrogen released during pyrolysis was almost linearly proportional to the liquor nitrogen content. The yield of fixed nitrogen for birch liquors was significantly higher than for pine liquors, and the yield for bagasse liquor was extremely high.

Aho, K.; Nikkanen, S. (A. Ahlstrom Corp., Varkaus (Finland)); Hupa, M. (Abo Akademi Univ., Turku (Finland). Chemical Engineering Dept.)

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Solid Waste Program (Alabama) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Program (Alabama) Program (Alabama) Solid Waste Program (Alabama) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Developer General Public/Consumer Industrial Residential Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Alabama Program Type Environmental Regulations This article states the authority of the department, regulations for the control of unauthorized dumping, disposal fees, violations and penalties. Solid waste refers to any garbage, rubbish, construction or demolition debris, ash, or sludge from a waste treatment facility, water supply plant, or air pollution control facility, and any other discarded materials, including solid, liquid, semisolid, or contained gaseous material resulting

157

Privacy of encrypted Voice Over Internet Protocol  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for our experiments. For simplicity, all the words are treated separately i.e. there is a silence period after each word in the sentence. Rhyme 1: \\Betty bought some batter butter. But she found the butter bitter. So she bought some better butter to make... the bitter batter better." Rhyme 2: \\Popeye the sailor man, lived in a garbage can, Ate all the worms and spat out the germs; the best a man can." Rhyme 3: \\My older brother is a pest, He loves to sit in the west, He gets no rest, but pins his chest...

Lella, Tuneesh Kumar

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

158

Promotion of Biomass Cogeneration With Power Export in the Indian Sugar  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Promotion of Biomass Cogeneration With Power Export in the Indian Sugar Industry Promotion of Biomass Cogeneration With Power Export in the Indian Sugar Industry India Helping Reduce the Risk of Global Warming Greenhouse Gas Pollution Prevention (GEP) Project in India India is the world’s fifth largest, and second fastest growing, source of greenhouse gas emissions. The GEP Project, conducted under an agreement with USAID-India and NETL, has helped to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from coal- and biomass-fired power plants. The Project has directly contributed to reducing emissions of CO2 by 6 to 10 million tons per year. India is the largest producer of sugar and also contains vast reserves of coal. Under the Project’s Advanced Bagasse Cogeneration Component, cogeneration (production of electricity and steam) using biomass fuels year-round in high efficiency boilers in sugar mills is promoted. Experts feel that, using the concept of sugar mill cogeneration, that as much as 5,000 megawatts of electricity can be generated through efficient combustion of bagasse in Indian sugar mills.

159

Data:6e35dfc9-dcec-49dd-a047-21e7d9e84d81 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

dfc9-dcec-49dd-a047-21e7d9e84d81 dfc9-dcec-49dd-a047-21e7d9e84d81 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Southern California Edison Co Effective date: 2013/04/01 End date if known: Rate name: TOU-PA-3B Sector: Industrial Description: Applicable where SCE determines that 70% or more of the customer's electrical usage is for Agricultural Power Service, general water or sewerage pumping, or for oil pumping by customers with a Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) Code of 1311, and none of any remaining electrical usage is for purposes for which a domestic schedule is applicable. This Schedule is applicable to customers whose Monthly Maximum demand registers, or in the opinion of SCE, is expected to register 200 through 500 kW. The customer whose monthly Maximum Demand, in the opinion of SCE, is expected to exceed 500 kW or has

160

Development of Pressurized Circulating Fluidized Bed Partial Gasification Module (PGM)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Foster Wheeler Power Group, Inc. is working under US Department of Energy contract No. DE-FC26-00NT40972 to develop a partial gasification module (PGM) that represents a critical element of several potential coal-fired Vision 21 plants. When utilized for electrical power generation, these plants will operate with efficiencies greater than 60% and produce near zero emissions of traditional stack gas pollutants. The new process partially gasifies coal at elevated pressure producing a coal-derived syngas and a char residue. The syngas can be used to fuel the most advanced power producing equipment such as solid oxide fuel cells or gas turbines, or processed to produce clean liquid fuels or chemicals for industrial users. The char residue is not wasted; it can also be used to generate electricity by fueling boilers that drive the most advanced ultra-supercritical pressure steam turbines. The amount of syngas and char produced by the PGM can be tailored to fit the production objectives of the overall plant, i.e., power generation, clean liquid fuel production, chemicals production, etc. Hence, PGM is a robust building bock that offers all the advantages of coal gasification but in a more user-friendly form; it is also fuel flexible in that it can use alternative fuels such as biomass, sewerage sludge, etc. This report describes the work performed during the July 1-September 30, 2002 time period.

A. Robertson

2002-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "garbage bagasse sewerage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

DEVELOPMENT OF PRESSURIZED CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED BED PARTIAL GASIFICATION MODULE (PGM)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Foster Wheeler Power Group, Inc. is working under US Department of Energy contract No. DE-FC26-00NT40972 to develop a partial gasification module (PGM) that represents a critical element of several potential coal-fired Vision 21 plants. When utilized for electrical power generation, these plants will operate with efficiencies greater than 60% and produce near zero emissions of traditional stack gas pollutants. The new process partially gasifies coal at elevated pressure producing a coal-derived syngas and a char residue. The syngas can be used to fuel the most advanced power producing equipment such as solid oxide fuel cells or gas turbines, or processed to produce clean liquid fuels or chemicals for industrial users. The char residue is not wasted; it can also be used to generate electricity by fueling boilers that drive the most advanced ultra-supercritical pressure steam turbines. The amount of syngas and char produced by the PGM can be tailored to fit the production objectives of the overall plant, i.e., power generation, clean liquid fuel production, chemicals production, etc. Hence, PGM is a robust building bock that offers all the advantages of coal gasification but in a more user-friendly form; it is also fuel flexible in that it can use alternative fuels such as biomass, sewerage sludge, etc. This report describes the work performed during the October 1--December 31, 2002 time period.

Unknown

2003-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

162

DEVELOPMENT OF PRESSURIZED CIRCULATIONG FLUIDIZED BED PARTIAL GASIFICATION MODULE(PGM)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Foster Wheeler Power Group, Inc. is working under US Department of Energy contract No. DE-FC26-00NT40972 to develop a partial gasification module (PGM) that represents a critical element of several potential coal-fired Vision 21 plants. When utilized for electrical power generation, these plants will operate with efficiencies greater than 60% and produce near zero emissions of traditional stack gas pollutants. The new process partially gasifies coal at elevated pressure producing a coal-derived syngas and a char residue. The syngas can be used to fuel the most advanced power producing equipment such as solid oxide fuel cells or gas turbines, or processed to produce clean liquid fuels or chemicals for industrial users. The char residue is not wasted; it can also be used to generate electricity by fueling boilers that drive the most advanced ultra-supercritical pressure steam turbines. The amount of syngas and char produced by the PGM can be tailored to fit the production objectives of the overall plant, i.e., power generation, clean liquid fuel production, chemicals production, etc. Hence, PGM is a robust building block that offers all the advantages of coal gasification but in a more user-friendly form; it is also fuel flexible in that it can use alternative fuels such as biomass, sewerage sludge, etc. This report describes the work performed during the January 1--March 31, 2003 time period.

Archie Robertson

2003-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

163

DEVELOPMENT OF PRESSURIZED CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED BED PARTIAL GASIFICATION MODULE (PGM)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Foster Wheeler Power Group, Inc. is working under US Department of Energy contract No. DE-FC26-00NT40972 to develop a partial gasification module (PGM) that represents a critical element of several potential coal-fired Vision 21 plants. When utilized for electrical power generation, these plants will operate with efficiencies greater than 60% and produce near zero emissions of traditional stack gas pollutants. The new process partially gasifies coal at elevated pressure producing a coal-derived syngas and a char residue. The syngas can be used to fuel the most advanced power producing equipment such as solid oxide fuel cells or gas turbines, or processed to produce clean liquid fuels or chemicals for industrial users. The char residue is not wasted; it can also be used to generate electricity by fueling boilers that drive the most advanced ultra-supercritical pressure steam turbines. The amount of syngas and char produced by the PGM can be tailored to fit the production objectives of the overall plant, i.e., power generation, clean liquid fuel production, chemicals production, etc. Hence, PGM is a robust building bock that offers all the advantages of coal gasification but in a more user-friendly form; it is also fuel flexible in that it can use alternative fuels such as biomass, sewerage sludge, etc. This report describes the work performed during the April 1--June 30, 2003 time period.

Archie Robertson

2003-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

164

DEVELOPMENT OF PRESSURIZED CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED BED PARTIAL GASIFICATION MODULE (PGM)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Foster Wheeler Power Group, Inc. is working under US Department of Energy contract No. DE-FC26-00NT40972 to develop a partial gasification module (PGM) that represents a critical element of several potential coal-fired Vision 21 plants. When utilized for electrical power generation, these plants will operate with efficiencies greater than 60% and produce near zero emissions of traditional stack gas pollutants. The new process partially gasifies coal at elevated pressure producing a coal-derived syngas and a char residue. The syngas can be used to fuel the most advanced power producing equipment such as solid oxide fuel cells or gas turbines, or processed to produce clean liquid fuels or chemicals for industrial users. The char residue is not wasted; it can also be used to generate electricity by fueling boilers that drive the most advanced ultra-supercritical pressure steam turbines. The amount of syngas and char produced by the PGM can be tailored to fit the production objectives of the overall plant, i.e., power generation, clean liquid fuel production, chemicals production, etc. Hence, PGM is a robust building bock that offers all the advantages of coal gasification but in a more user-friendly form; it is also fuel flexible in that it can use alternative fuels such as biomass, sewerage sludge, etc. This report describes the work performed during the July 1--September 30, 2003 time period.

Archie Robertson

2003-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

165

Development of Pressurized Circulating Fluidized Bed Partial Gasification Module (PGM)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Foster Wheeler Power Group, Inc. is working under US Department of Energy contract No. DE-FC26-00NT40972 to develop a partial gasification module (PGM) that represents a critical element of several potential coal-fired Vision 21 plants. When utilized for electrical power generation, these plants will operate with efficiencies greater than 60% and produce near zero emissions of traditional stack gas pollutants. The new process partially gasifies coal at elevated pressure producing a coal-derived syngas and a char residue. The syngas can be used to fuel the most advanced power producing equipment such as solid oxide fuel cells or gas turbines, or processed to produce clean liquid fuels or chemicals for industrial users. The char residue is not wasted; it can also be used to generate electricity by fueling boilers that drive the most advanced ultra-supercritical pressure steam turbines. The amount of syngas and char produced by the PGM can be tailored to fit the production objectives of the overall plant, i.e., power generation, clean liquid fuel production, chemicals production, etc. Hence, PGM is a robust building bock that offers all the advantages of coal gasification but in a more user-friendly form; it is also fuel flexible in that it can use alternative fuels such as biomass, sewerage sludge, etc. This report describes the work performed during the October 1 - December 31, 2003 time period.

A. Robertson

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

166

DEVELOPMENT OF PRESSURIZED CIRCULATING FLUDIZED BED PARTIAL GASIFICATION MODULE (PGM)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Foster Wheeler Power Group, Inc. is working under US Department of Energy contract No. DE-FC26-00NT40972 to develop a partial gasification module (PGM) that represents a critical element of several potential coal-fired Vision 21 plants. When utilized for electrical power generation, these plants will operate with efficiencies greater than 60% and produce near zero emissions of traditional stack gas pollutants. The new process partially gasifies coal at elevated pressure producing a coal-derived syngas and a char residue. The syngas can be used to fuel the most advanced power producing equipment such as solid oxide fuel cells or gas turbines, or processed to produce clean liquid fuels or chemicals for industrial users. The char residue is not wasted; it can also be used to generate electricity by fueling boilers that drive the most advanced ultra-supercritical pressure steam turbines. The amount of syngas and char produced by the PGM can be tailored to fit the production objectives of the overall plant, i.e., power generation, clean liquid fuel production, chemicals production, etc. Hence, PGM is a robust building bock that offers all the advantages of coal gasification but in a more user-friendly form; it is also fuel flexible in that it can use alternative fuels such as biomass, sewerage sludge, etc. This report describes the work performed during the April 1--June 30, 2002 time period.

Archie Robertson

2002-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

167

Why sequence Actinotalea fermentans?  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Actinotalea fermentans? Actinotalea fermentans? Actinotalea fermentans is a bacterium isolated from a landfill and grows best in moderate temperature, where it ferments cellulose to acetate and ethanol aerobically. This organism was previously considered as a potential way to convert cellulose to ethanol for use as a fuel, but the fermentation reaction always led to reduced yields, reducing the bacterium's usefulness. Recently, scientists have engineered synthetic co-cultures of A. fermentans with yeast to produce useful chemicals and fuels directly from cellulose or agricultural feedstocks such as corn stover, switchgrass, poplar and sugarcane bagasse. This technique will allow A. fermentans to be used to convert cellulose to ethanol while allowing researchers to avoid the same

168

Brazil-World Bank Climate Projects | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Brazil-World Bank Climate Projects Brazil-World Bank Climate Projects Agency/Company /Organization World Bank Sector Energy, Land Focus Area Energy Efficiency, Renewable Energy, Transportation Topics Finance, Background analysis Website http://web.worldbank.org/exter Country Brazil UN Region Latin America and the Caribbean References World Bank Project Database-Brazil[1] Contents 1 World Bank Active Climate Projects in Brazil 1.1 Sao Paulo Metro Line 5 Project 1.2 BR-GEF Sustainable Transport and Air Quality Project (STAQ) 1.3 First Programmatic Development Policy Loan for Sustainable Environmental Management 1.4 BR Nova Gerar Carbon Finance and Solid Waste Management Project II 1.5 BR Lages Woodwaste Cogeneration 1.6 PCF Sugar Bagasse Cogeneration Project 1.7 Nova Gerar Landfill Rio de Janeiro

169

Feedstocks (Poster), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Feedstocks Feedstocks Customized milling and continuous handling of a wide variety of feedstocks Integrated Biorefi nery Research Facility | NREL * Golden, Colorado | December 2011 | NREL/PO-5100-53598 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Offi ce of Energy Effi ciency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Photo by Warren Gretz, NREL/PIX 10446 Photo by Warren Gretz, NREL/PIX 00459 Photo by Warren Gretz, NREL/PIX 05754 Feedstock handling capabilities * We have experience working with: - Perennials - switchgrass, sorghum, and others - Crop residue - corn stover, bagasse, wheat straw - Forestry biomass - hickory, poplar, oak * Our mill takes dry material from large super sacks and mills the feedstock to a variety of sizes

170

 

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Small-Scale Biorefineries Project Overview Small-Scale Biorefineries Project Overview July, 14 2008 Final Two Selections for up to $40 million - Announced July 14, 2008 for up to $40 million Applicant Total Cost DOE Share Cost Share Annual Production capacity Project Location Feedstock Technology Verenium $91,347,330 TBD* TBD* 1,500,000 Jennings, LA bagasse, energy crops, ag waste, & wood residues Biochemical Flambeau LLC $84,000,000 $30,000,000 64.4% 6,000,000 Park Falls, WI Forest residues GTL (FT) *Based on negotiations. Round two selections - Announced April 18, 2008 for up to $114 million ICM $86,030,900 $30,000,000 65% 1,500,000 St. Joseph, MO Switchgrass, Forage sorghum, stover Biochemical Lignol Innovations $88,015,481 $30,000,000 66% 2,500,000 Commerce City, CO Woody Biomass -

171

Combined Dilute Acid and Solvent Based Pretreatment of Agricultural Wastes for Efficient Lignocellulosic Fractionation and Biofuels Production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A true biorefinery for processing lignocellulosic biomass should achieve maximum utilization of all major constituents (cellulose, hemicellulose, & lignin) within the feedstock. In this work a combined pretreatment process of dilute acid (DA) and N-methyl morpholine N-oxide (NMMO) is described that allows for both fractionation and subsequent complete hydrolysis of the feedstocks (corn stover and sugarcane bagasse). During this multi-step processing, the dilute acid pretreatment solubilizes the majority (>90%) of the hemicellulosic fraction, while the NMMO treatment yields a cellulosic fraction that is completely digestible within 48 hours at low enzyme loadings. With both the cellulosic and hemicellulosic fractions being converted into separate, dissolved sugar fractions, the remaining portion is nearly pure lignin. When used independently, DA and NMMO pretreatments are only able to achieve ~80% and ~45% cellulosic conversion, respectively. Mass balance calculations along with experimental results are used to illustrate the feasibility of separation and recycling of NMMO.

Brodeur, G.; Ramakrishnan, S.; Wilson, C.; Telotte, J.; Collier, J.; Stickel, J.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Waste heat recovery systems in the sugar industry: An Indian perspective  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article identifies the key role of the sugar industry in the rural development of developing countries. The Indian sugar industry, already second largest among the country`s processing industries, shows even greater potential, according to the Plan Documents (shown in a table). The potential of waste heat in sugar processing plants, which produce white crystal sugar using the double sulphitation clarification process, is estimated at 5757.9 KJ/kg of sugar. Efficient waste heat recovery (WHR) systems could help arrest the trend of increasing production costs. This would help the sugar industry not only in India, but in many other countries as well. The innovative methods suggested and discussed briefly in this article include dehydration of prepared cane, bagasse drying, and juice heating using waste heat. These methods can reduce the cost of energy in sugar production by at least 10% and improve efficiency and productivity.

Madnaik, S.D.; Jadhav, M.G. [Walchand Inst. of Tech., Maharashtra (India)

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Jennings Demonstration PLant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Verenium operated a demonstration plant with a capacity to produce 1.4 million gallons of cellulosic ethanol from agricultural resiues for about two years. During this time, the plant was able to evaluate the technical issues in producing ethanol from three different cellulosic feedstocks, sugar cane bagasse, energy cane, and sorghum. The project was intended to develop a better understanding of the operating parameters that would inform a commercial sized operation. Issues related to feedstock variability, use of hydrolytic enzymes, and the viability of fermentative organisms were evaluated. Considerable success was achieved with pretreatment processes and use of enzymes but challenges were encountered with feedstock variability and fermentation systems. Limited amounts of cellulosic ethanol were produced.

Russ Heissner

2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

174

Increasing Efficiency of Fuel Ethanol Production from Lignocellulosic Biomass by Process Integration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

(8-10) To our knowledge, the thermal integration of ethanol fermentation and thermochemical conversion of its residues has only been investigated for ethanol production from sugar cane and power cogeneration from the by-produced bagasse with an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) instead of a conventional single cycle. ... Considering the energetic value of the byproducts in Table 2 and the important heat requirement for distillation and rectification of the raw product to fuel quality of Figure 2(c), this section compares different alternatives for integrating the fuel production and the energy and exergy recovery processes. ... biofuels as well as to indicate the emerging challenges and opportunities of the application of process integration on such processes towards innovative and sustainable solns. ...

Martin Gassner; Franois Marchal

2013-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

175

An energy atlas of five Central American countries. Un atlas energetico de cinco paises Centroamericanos  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In a series of maps and figures, this atlas summarizes what is known about the energy resources and how these resources and oil imports supply the energy needs of five Central American countries: Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras, Costa Rica, and Panama. The main exploited energy resources are firewood, hydroelectric energy, bagasse from sugar cane residues, and geothermal energy. Limited oil exploration in the region has uncovered modest oil resources only in Guatemala. Peat and small coal deposits are also known to exist but are not presently being exploited. After the description of energy resources, this atlas describes energy supply and demand patterns in each country. It concludes with a description of socioeconomic data that strongly affect energy demand. 4 refs.

Trocki, L.; Newman, C.K.; Gurule, F.; Aragon, P.C.; Peck, C.

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Energy balance, forecasting of bioelectricity generation and greenhouse gas emission balance in the ethanol production at sugarcane mills in the state of Mato Grosso do Sul  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The aim of this paper is to present aspects about the energy balance of sugarcane crops and its carbon dioxide emissions. We calculate energy used in agricultural, industrial and distribution sectors by five sugarcane mills of Mato Grosso do Sul and we compare the yield with its energy delivery. The energy balance obtained, with an average 6.8, shows that is advantageous to produce ethanol in the lands of that Brazilian state. We have prepared a forecasting of electricity production from bagasse taking into account two types of technology. Finally, we present the potential value of CO2 emitted by the five mills to evaluate greenhouse gas emissions of the ethanol production valor chain.

Mirko V. Turdera

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Renewable Energy Pipeline Development Terms of Reference | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Renewable Energy Pipeline Development Terms of Reference Renewable Energy Pipeline Development Terms of Reference Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Renewable Energy Pipeline Development Terms of Reference Agency/Company /Organization: World Bank Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Biomass, Hydro, Solar, Wind Topics: Implementation Website: web.worldbank.org/WBSITE/EXTERNAL/TOPICS/EXTENERGY2/EXTRENENERGYTK/0,, References: Renewable Energy Pipeline Development Terms of Reference[1] Resources Preparation of Mini-hydro Private Power Projects Off-Grid Village Hydro Subproject Preparation Off-Grid Subprojects Pipeline Development Development of Wind Farm Projects - Local Consultants Bagasse/Rice Husk Co-generation Project Preparation Biomass Cogeneration Projects Preparation Design of a PV Pilot Concession

178

Protecting the environment into the future  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Protecting the Environment Into the Future Protecting the Environment Into the Future Community Connections: Our link to Northern New Mexico Communities Latest Issue:Dec. 2013 - Jan. 2014 All Issues » submit Protecting the environment into the future Last year, the Lab recycled 47 percent of its solid, non-hazardous waste by placing it in the recycling containers. February 1, 2013 dummy image Read our archives. Contacts Editor Linda Anderman Email Community Programs Office Kurt Steinhaus Email The Lab's recycle rate of 47 percent compares favorably with the current national rate of 34 percent. Lab Employees Don't Treat Their Trash Like Garbage Last year, the Lab recycled 47 percent of its solid, non-hazardous waste (which translates to about 1,275 metric tons of paper, cardboard, plastic bottles, and aluminum cans) by placing it in the recycling containers that

179

Microsoft Word - DOE-ID_INL-13-010.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

0 0 SECTION A. Project Title: North Boulevard Annex Lease Termination SECTION B. Project Description: The proposed activity would terminate the current lease of the North Boulevard Annex (IF-613) at 2095 North Boulevard in Idaho Falls, ID on or about July 31, 2013 for cost savings and footprint reduction purposes. A facility walkthrough by BEA personnel will occur prior to the lease termination to ensure the facility is ready for turnover back to the owner. Approximate cost associated with these activities is estimated at $2,000.00. SECTION C. Environmental Aspects or Potential Sources of Impact: Generating and Managing Waste: Various quantities of industrial waste (non-hazardous, non-radioactive) such as office trash are removed from the building for pickup and transportation by garbage collection services prior to lease termination.

180

Pumpkin Patterns  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) like this are simply a Compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) like this are simply a curly version of the long tube fluorescent lights you might see in your school, office or garage, and use less electricity than traditional incandescents. An ENERGY STAR-qualified CFL uses about 1/4th the energy and lasts 10 times longer than an incandescent bulb that puts out the same amount of light. Biomass is material made from plants and animals, and contains stored energy from the sun. This renewable energy source can be made from wood, crops, manure and even garbage. Using biomass for energy can cut back on waste and greenhouse gas emissions. Just like a windmill, wind turbines like this one use blades to collect the wind's kinetic energy. The wind flows over the blades, which causes them to turn. The blades are

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "garbage bagasse sewerage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Reducing Waste and Saving Energy with Composting | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Reducing Waste and Saving Energy with Composting Reducing Waste and Saving Energy with Composting Reducing Waste and Saving Energy with Composting January 16, 2012 - 9:29am Addthis Erin R. Pierce Erin R. Pierce Digital Communications Specialist, Office of Public Affairs "Hey, don't throw that away!" This a phrase I heard quite often when I visited my parents over the holidays. What were they referring to? All the banana and carrot peelings I would discard, nonchalantly into the garbage bin. My father, an avid gardener for as long as I can remember, has taken-up composting again, this time with renewed fervor and an ever watchful eye. The result of my compost-conscious parent's hard work? A humungous nutrient-rich compost pile, perfect for all their summer outdoor gardening projects.In addition to the usual suspects of compost (coffee grinds, apple

182

Questions and Answers - Which jobs use electromagnets?  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

does adding coils to anelectromagnet make it stronger? does adding coils to an<br>electromagnet make it stronger? Previous Question (Why does adding coils to an electromagnet make it stronger?) Questions and Answers Main Index Next Question (Why is a non-permanent, but long lasting, magnet called a permanent magnet?) Why is a non-permanent, but long lasting,magnet called a permanent magnet? Which jobs use electromagnets? In today's world almost all jobs other than a goat herder use some type of electromagnet. They are everywhere. Electric motors are a type of electromagnet. Cars have dozens of electromagnets that move things or generate electricity. There are all sorts of interesting applications for larger electromagnets. The most obvious and biggest example is electricity. There are some interesting applications like dumping shredded garbage

183

Renewable Natural Gas  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Natural Gas Natural Gas JOHN DAVIS: The use of clean, domestic natural gas as highway fuel in place of imported oil is growing in popularity with fleets and trucking companies. While natural gas from underground deposits is arguably a limited resource, there is a renewable, eco-friendly resource that we have right here in the U.S.A. And we're here now to give you the straight poop! Every family, farm animal and food processing plant in America produces organic waste that creates a mix of methane, CO2 and other elements called bio gas when it decomposes. Rotten vegetables, moldy bread, last night's leftovers --- they all break down when our garbage gets to the land fill. Incredibly, for

184

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

51 - 25560 of 28,904 results. 51 - 25560 of 28,904 results. Article Illinois Turning Landfill Trash into Future Cash Will County, Illinois officials yesterday formally broke ground on a new $7 million project (that includes $1 million of Energy Efficiency Conservation Block Grant funds) to turn methane gas from the Prairie View Landfill into electricity in a partnership with Waste Management. Will County will receive revenue from the sale of the gas created from decomposing garbage which will be harnessed and converted to generate 4.8 megawatts of green electrical power and used to power up to 8,000 homes. The future revenue generated from the sale of the gas and the sale of the electricity could reach $1 million annually. http://energy.gov/articles/illinois-turning-landfill-trash-future-cash

185

Moss Animals  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Moss Animals Moss Animals Nature Bulletin No. 138 January 17, 1948 Forest Preserve District of Cook County William N. Erickson, President Roberts Mann, Supt. of Conservation MOSS ANIMALS Last summer, several visitors in the forest preserves were puzzled by finding masses of jelly-like substance stuck to sunken sticks in certain ponds and lakes. These masses were usually round or egg-shaped, ranging in size from that of a tennis ball to that of a football. On the outside they were covered by a grayish scum with faint lines in a coarse design. Inside there was apparently nothing but a clear colorless jelly that quivered and shook like a well-chilled gelatin dessert. One man guessed that it was some sort of garbage; another, reasonably, that it was some strange plant growth.

186

Have You Ever Tried Composting? | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Ever Tried Composting? Ever Tried Composting? Have You Ever Tried Composting? January 20, 2012 - 10:07am Addthis This week, Erin talked about how she's helping her parents (and learning from them) as they maintain an outdoor compost pile. By composting, you can nourish your garden for very little cost while keeping organic garbage out of sewer systems and city dumps. Compost materials range from food scraps to worms, and you can keep your compost in an open pile outdoors or in a specialized container. Of course, composting isn't just for homes - you can also participate in composting at the office. Whether at work or at home, indoors or outdoors, worms or food scraps: Have you ever tried composting? Why or why not? E-mail your responses to the Energy Saver team at consumer.webmaster@nrel.gov.

187

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.5 Residential Construction and Housing Market  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

7 7 Materials Used in the Construction of a 2,272 Square-Foot Single-Family Home 13,837 board-feet of lumber 12 interior doors 13,118 square feet of sheathing 6 closet doors 19 tons of concrete 2 garage doors 3,206 square feet of exterior siding material 1 fireplace 3,103 square feet of roofing material 3 toilets, 2 bathtubs, 1 shower stall 3,061 square feet of insulation 3 bathroom sinks 6,050 square feet of interior wall material 15 kitchen cabinets, 5 other cabinets 2,335 square feet of interior ceiling material 1 kitchen sink 226 linear feet of ducting 1 range, 1 refrigerator, 1 dishwasher, 1 garbage disposal, 1 range hood 19 windows 1 washer, 1 dryer 4 exterior doors (3 hinged, 1 sliding) 1 heating and cooling system 2,269 square feet of flooring material Source(s):

188

Western Lake Superior Sanitary District (Minnesota) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Western Lake Superior Sanitary District (Minnesota) Western Lake Superior Sanitary District (Minnesota) Western Lake Superior Sanitary District (Minnesota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Siting and Permitting A sanitary board is established to deal with long-term serious problems relating to water pollution and solid waste disposal in the area. The district can set regulations regarding garbage management and recycling,

189

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

31 - 16140 of 28,905 results. 31 - 16140 of 28,905 results. Rebate Western Lake Superior Sanitary District (Minnesota) A sanitary board is established to deal with long-term serious problems relating to water pollution and solid waste disposal in the area. The district can set regulations regarding garbage... http://energy.gov/savings/western-lake-superior-sanitary-district-minnesota Rebate Wetland Preservation Areas (Minnesota) A wetland owner can apply to the host county for designation of a wetland preservation area. Once designated, the area remains designated until the owner initiates expiration, except where a state... http://energy.gov/savings/wetland-preservation-areas-minnesota Rebate White Bear Lake Conservation District (Minnesota) This statute establishes the White Bear Lake Conservation District, which

190

Environment, Health and Safety (EH&S): Biosafety Manual: 7.0 Standards,  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

7.0 Standards, Policies, References, and Resources 7.0 Standards, Policies, References, and Resources 7.1 Standards 7 CFR 331 and 9 CFR 121, Possession, Use, and Transfer of Biological Agents and Toxins, U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) 7 CFR 330, Plant Pest Regulations; General; Plant Pests; Soil, Stone, and Quarry Products; Garbage. Importation of Plant Pests, USDA/APHIS 9 CFR Parts 92, 94, 95 96, 122 and 130 (note especially Part 122, Organisms and Vectors). Importation of Etiologic Agents of Livestock, Poultry, and Other Animal Diseases; USDA/APHIS 10 CFR 851, Worker Safety and Health Program, Department of Energy (DOE) 29 CFR 1904.8, Recording criteria for needle stick and sharps injuries, Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA)

191

Drosophila  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Drosophila Drosophila Nature Bulletin No. 576 October 17, 1959 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Daniel Ryan, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist DROSOPHILA: THE FRUIT FLY Have you noticed any tiny flies in your kitchen or around the fruit bowl? They are so small that they come through ordinary screens into homes, stores and restaurants. From midsummer until the killing frosts of autumn, swarms of them cluster wherever ripe or fermenting fruit is exposed -- outdoor markets, tomato canneries, garbage cans, melon patches, vineyards, and apple, pear or peach orchards. At this season, hordes of them are found around cider mills where they breed in the cakes of pressed apple pulp or pomace. A few adults and young survive the winter in basement drains and other protected places with food and warmth.

192

Health assessment for Pratt and Whitney Aircraft, Palm Beach County, Florida, Region 4. CERCLIS No. FLD001447952. Preliminary report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Pratt and Whitney Government Engine Business Division has been in operation as a division of the United Technologies Corporation (UTC) plant since 1958. In the past, materials disposed of in the landfill/incineration trenches at the plant included construction debris, discarded equipment, unknown solid waste from Air Force Plant Number 74, solvents and solvent sludges, asbestos, fuels, paints, pesticide and herbicide container residues, benzonitrite and solvent-contaminated soils, mercury (from bulbs and thermometers), discarded equipment from metal finishing operations, commercial and laboratory chemicals, garbage, and sewage sludge. Based on available information, the site is considered to be of potential public health concern because of the risk to human health caused by the possibility of exposure to hazardous substances via chemicals in the groundwater and air (wind-blown) and possibly through ingestion of contaminated wildlife.

Not Available

1989-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

193

Municipal solid waste energy conversion study on Guam and American Samoa  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the Pacific Islands of Guam and Tutuila in American Samoa, conversion of municipal solid waste to useable energy forms - principally electricity but possibly steam - may hold promise for reducing economic dependence on imported petroleum. A secondary benefit may be derived from reduction of solid waste landfill requirements. At the preliminary planning stage, waste-to-energy facilities producing electricity appear technically and environmentally feasible. Economically, the projects appear marginal but could be viable under specific conditions related to capital costs, revenue from garbage collection and revenue from the sale of the energy generated. Grant funding for the projects would considerably enhance the economic viability of the proposed facilities. The projects appear sufficiently viable to proceed to the detailed planning stage. Such projects are not viable for the islands now emerging from the US Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands.

Not Available

1984-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

194

Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determinations By Date | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

11, 2012 11, 2012 CX-009078: Categorical Exclusion Determination Dismantle and removal (D&R) of Domestic Water (DW) & Process Water (PWS) heater tanks CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 07/11/2012 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office July 10, 2012 CX-008811: Categorical Exclusion Determination Utility Energy Service Contract Closed Loop Centrifugal Chiller at the Central Chilled Water Facility CX(s) Applied: B1.5, B2.1 Date: 07/10/2012 Location(s): New York Offices(s): Brookhaven Site Office July 10, 2012 CX-008523: Categorical Exclusion Determination Non-Hazardous Solid Waste Disposal Contract (Garbage Collection) CX(s) Applied: A1, A8, B1.3 Date: 07/10/2012 Location(s): Oregon Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory July 10, 2012

195

CX-003105: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

05: Categorical Exclusion Determination 05: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-003105: Categorical Exclusion Determination Solar Compactor Energy Efficiency CX(s) Applied: A9, B5.1 Date: 07/15/2010 Location(s): Boston, Massachusetts Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office The City of Boston proposes to use federal funding to replace existing street corner trash receptacles with new solar powered compacting receptacles. This change will increase the amount of garbage held in the bins before scheduled pickups and reduce the number of trips to empty them by 5 fold. Bill Belly Solar Compactors are already in existence around the city. This upscale of the scale of the project will prove that the bins are a cost effective and energy saving method. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD

196

Illinois Turning Landfill Trash into Future Cash | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Turning Landfill Trash into Future Cash Turning Landfill Trash into Future Cash Illinois Turning Landfill Trash into Future Cash September 28, 2010 - 5:35pm Addthis Illinois Turning Landfill Trash into Future Cash Andy Oare Andy Oare Former New Media Strategist, Office of Public Affairs Will County, Illinois officials yesterday formally broke ground on a new $7 million project (that includes $1 million of Energy Efficiency Conservation Block Grant funds) to turn methane gas from the Prairie View Landfill into electricity in a partnership with Waste Management. Will County will receive revenue from the sale of the gas created from decomposing garbage which will be harnessed and converted to generate 4.8 megawatts of green electrical power and used to power up to 8,000 homes. The future revenue generated from the sale of the gas and the sale of the

197

Powered by NERSC, A Database of Billions of Genes and Counting!  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Powered by NERSC, a Powered by NERSC, a Database of Billions of Genes and Counting! Powered by NERSC, a Database of Billions of Genes and Counting! With More than a Billion Microbial genes, IMG/M Breaks a Record January 26, 2012 | Tags: Joint Genome Institute Linda Vu, lvu@lbl.gov, +1 510 495 2402 IMG/M team celebrates the recording of 1 billionth gene. Microbes are microscopic organisms that live in every nook and cranny of our planet. Without them, plants wouldn't grow, garbage wouldn't decay, humans wouldn't digest food, and there would literally be no life on Earth, or at least as we know it. By examining the genetic makeup of these "bugs," scientists hope to understand how they work, and how they can be used to solve a variety of important problems like identifying new

198

Application of holographic neural networks for flue gas emissions prediction in the Burnaby incinerator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article describes the development of a parametric prediction system (PPS) for various emission species at the Burnaby incinerator. The continuous emissions monitoring system at the Burnaby incinerator is shared between three boilers and therefore actual results are only available 5 minutes out of every 15 minutes. The PPS was developed to fill in data for the 10 minutes when the Continuous Emission Monitor (CEM) is measuring the other boilers. It bases its prediction on the last few actual readings taken and parametrically predicts CO, SO2 and NOx. The Burnaby Incinerator is located in the commercial/industrial area of South Burnaby, British Columbia. It consists of three separate lines, each burning ten tonnes of garbage per hour and producing about three tonnes of steam for every tonne of garbage burned. The air pollution control system first cools the combustion products with water injection and then scrubs them with very fine hydrated lime. Carbon is added to the lime to enhance the scrubbing of the combustion products. The CEM monitors the levels of oxygen, carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, sulphur dioxide and opacity. In 1996, an expert system was installed on one of boilers at the Burnaby Incinerator plant to determine if it could improve the plant=s operations and reduce overall emission. As part of the expert system, the PPS was developed. Holographic Neural Technology (HNeT), developed by AND Corporation of Toronto, Ontario, is a novel neural network technology using complex numbers in its architecture. Compared to the traditional neural networks, HNeT has some significant advantage. It is more resilient against converging on local minima; is faster training and executing; less prone to over fitting; and, in most cases, has significantly lower error. Selection of independent variabs, training set preparation, testing neural nets and other related issue will be discussed.

Zheng, L.; Dockrill, P.; Clements, B. [Natural Resources Canada, Nepean, Ontario (Canada). CANMET Energy Technology Centre

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

199

DEVELOPMENT OF PRESSURIZED CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED BED PARTIAL GASIFICATION MODULE (PGM)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Foster Wheeler Power Group, Inc. is working under US Department of Energy Contract No. DE-FC26-00NT40972 to develop a partial gasification module (PGM) that represents a critical element of several potential coal-fired Vision 21 plants. When utilized for electrical power generation, these plants will operate with efficiencies greater than 60% and produce near zero emissions of traditional stack gas pollutants. The new process partially gasifies coal at elevated pressure producing a coal-derived syngas and a char residue. The syngas can be used to fuel the most advanced power producing equipment such as solid oxide fuel cells or gas turbines, or processed to produce clean liquid fuels or chemicals for industrial users. The char residue is not wasted; it can also be used to generate electricity by fueling boilers that drive the most advanced ultra-supercritical pressure steam turbines. The amount of syngas and char produced by the PGM can be tailored to fit the production objectives of the overall plant, i.e., power generation, clean liquid fuel production, chemicals production, etc. Hence, PGM is a robust building bock that offers all the advantages of coal gasification but in a more user-friendly form; it is also fuel flexible in that it can use alternative fuels such as biomass, sewerage sludge, etc. Under this contract a series of pilot plant tests are being conducted to ascertain PGM performance with a variety of fuels. The performance and economics of a PGM based plant designed for the co-production of hydrogen and electricity will also be determined. This report describes the work performed during the April-June 30, 2004 time period.

Archie Robertson

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

OPERATING EXPERIENCE ON SINGLE AND THREE PASS BOILERS IN THE CANE SUGAR INDUSTRY WITH PARTICULAR REFERENCE TO EROSION AND DRUM WATER LEVEL STABILITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Two boiler designs have recently emerged to suit the present requirements of the cane sugar industry, viz the single pass panel wall unit and the three pass, bottom supported boiler with an open pitch furnace tube construction. The former is less susceptible to erosion compared with the original concept of the three pass boiler. It is believed that the three pass unit in its present form as installed at Tongaat will be effective in reducing erosion in the tube bank. The effect of fuel properties on the performance of boiler plant is considered and it is shown that efficient operation, in addition to improving the utilisation of bagasse, can result in a significant reduction in tube erosion. A relationship is presented for determining dust loadings as a function of the grate heat release rate and the fuel ash content at the furnace and main bank exits. Circulation studies undertaken on both boiler types are presented indicating very similar circulation rates. Shrink and swell characteristics and hence the drum level stability can be related to the volume of water contained in the system and the water plan area in the drum at the steam- water interface. Finally the mechanical design features of the two boiler designs are compared to provide an insight into the design philosophies relating to the two units.

N. Magasiner; D. P. Naude; P. J. Mcintyre

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "garbage bagasse sewerage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Greenhouse gasses emissions and energy balances of a non-vertically integrated sugar and ethanol supply chain: A case study in Argentina  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In order to address society's concerns regarding the sustainability of sugar and ethanol production and use, this paper calculates the energy and greenhouse gasses (GHG) emissions' balances of a non-vertically integrated sugarcane industry in Tucumn-Argentina. The essential operations involved in the sugar/ethanol production cycle were taken into account. Results show that this industry generated an energy balance of 3.4:1. GHG emissions during sugarcane production were 1824 and 2231kg CO2eq. ha?1 year?1 for low and middle to high farms' technological levels, respectively. The mill process emitted 1187kg CO2eq. ha?1 year?1. The main factors influencing these balances were gas-oil and nitrogen fertilizers used in the agricultural stage, natural gas consumed by the sugar mill, and sugarcane burning (only for GHG balance). The impact of ethanol use in reducing GHG emissions under the current production scheme (6.8Mgha?1 of sugar+380.9kgha?1 of ethanol), in final blends of 95% gasoline and 5% ethanol in vehicles, is negligible. A sensitivity analysis indicates that switching to 100% bagasse used as fuel in mill's boilers, ethanol being produced directly from sugarcane juice, and a final blend of 90% gasoline and 10% ethanol, an amount of 1746kg CO2eq. ha?1 year?1 of GHG emissions could be avoided.

Martn M. Acreche; Alejandro H. Valeiro

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Engineered plant biomass feedstock particles  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A new class of plant biomass feedstock particles characterized by consistent piece size and shape uniformity, high skeletal surface area, and good flow properties. The particles of plant biomass material having fibers aligned in a grain are characterized by a length dimension (L) aligned substantially parallel to the grain and defining a substantially uniform distance along the grain, a width dimension (W) normal to L and aligned cross grain, and a height dimension (H) normal to W and L. In particular, the L.times.H dimensions define a pair of substantially parallel side surfaces characterized by substantially intact longitudinally arrayed fibers, the W.times.H dimensions define a pair of substantially parallel end surfaces characterized by crosscut fibers and end checking between fibers, and the L.times.W dimensions define a pair of substantially parallel top and bottom surfaces. The L.times.W surfaces of particles with L/H dimension ratios of 4:1 or less are further elaborated by surface checking between longitudinally arrayed fibers. The length dimension L is preferably aligned within 30.degree. parallel to the grain, and more preferably within 10.degree. parallel to the grain. The plant biomass material is preferably selected from among wood, agricultural crop residues, plantation grasses, hemp, bagasse, and bamboo.

Dooley, James H. (Federal Way, WA); Lanning, David N. (Federal Way, WA); Broderick, Thomas F. (Lake Forest Park, WA)

2012-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

203

Engineered plant biomass feedstock particles  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A novel class of flowable biomass feedstock particles with unusually large surface areas that can be manufactured in remarkably uniform sizes using low-energy comminution techniques. The feedstock particles are roughly parallelepiped in shape and characterized by a length dimension (L) aligned substantially with the grain direction and defining a substantially uniform distance along the grain, a width dimension (W) normal to L and aligned cross grain, and a height dimension (H) normal to W and L. The particles exhibit a disrupted grain structure with prominent end and surface checks that greatly enhances their skeletal surface area as compared to their envelope surface area. The L.times.H dimensions define a pair of substantially parallel side surfaces characterized by substantially intact longitudinally arrayed fibers. The W.times.H dimensions define a pair of substantially parallel end surfaces characterized by crosscut fibers and end checking between fibers. The L.times.W dimensions define a pair of substantially parallel top surfaces characterized by some surface checking between longitudinally arrayed fibers. At least 80% of the particles pass through a 1/4 inch screen having a 6.3 mm nominal sieve opening but are retained by a No. 10 screen having a 2 mm nominal sieve opening. The feedstock particles are manufactured from a variety of plant biomass materials including wood, crop residues, plantation grasses, hemp, bagasse, and bamboo.

Dooley, James H. (Federal Way, WA); Lanning, David N. (Federal Way, WA); Broderick, Thomas F. (Lake Forest Park, WA)

2011-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

204

Engineered plant biomass feedstock particles  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A novel class of flowable biomass feedstock particles with unusually large surface areas that can be manufactured in remarkably uniform sizes using low-energy comminution techniques. The feedstock particles are roughly parallelepiped in shape and characterized by a length dimension (L) aligned substantially with the grain direction and defining a substantially uniform distance along the grain, a width dimension (W) normal to L and aligned cross grain, and a height dimension (H) normal to W and L. The particles exhibit a disrupted grain structure with prominent end and surface checks that greatly enhances their skeletal surface area as compared to their envelope surface area. The L.times.H dimensions define a pair of substantially parallel side surfaces characterized by substantially intact longitudinally arrayed fibers. The W.times.H dimensions define a pair of substantially parallel end surfaces characterized by crosscut fibers and end checking between fibers. The L.times.W dimensions define a pair of substantially parallel top surfaces characterized by some surface checking between longitudinally arrayed fibers. The feedstock particles are manufactured from a variety of plant biomass materials including wood, crop residues, plantation grasses, hemp, bagasse, and bamboo.

Dooley, James H. (Federal Way, WA); Lanning, David N. (Federal Way, WA); Broderick, Thomas F. (Lake Forest Park, WA)

2011-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

205

Gasification improvement of a poor quality solid recovered fuel (SRF). Effect of using natural minerals and biomass wastes blends  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The need to produce energy from poor quality carbonaceous materials has increased, in order to reduce European dependency on imported fuels, diversify the use of new and alternative fuels and to guarantee secure energy production routes. The valorisation of a poor quality solid residual fuel (SRF), with high content of ash and volatile matter, through its conversion into fuel gas was studied. The rise of gasification temperature and equivalent ratio (ER) led to higher gas yields and to lower undesirable gaseous components, though higher ER values led to a gas with lower energetic content. To reduce the negative effect of SRF unfavourable characteristics and to diversify the feedstocks used, SRF blended with three different types of biomass wastes: forestry pine, almond shells and olive bagasse was co-gasified. The use of biomass wastes tested was valuable for SRF gasification, as there was an increase in the overall reactivity and in H2 production and a reduction of about 55% in tar released, without great changes in gas yield and in its HHV. The use of natural minerals mixed with silica sand was also studied with the aim of improving SRF gasification performance and fuel gas quality. The best results were obtained in presence of dolomite, as the lowest tar and H2S contents were obtained, while an increase in gas yield was observed. Co-gasification of this poor quality SRF blended with biomass wastes in presence of dolomite increased gas yield by 25% while tar contents decreased by 55%.

Filomena Pinto; Rui Neto Andr; Carlos Carolino; Miguel Miranda; Pedro Abelha; Daniel Direito; Nikos Perdikaris; Ioannis Boukis

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Pahoa geothermal industrial park. Engineering and economic analysis for direct applications of geothermal energy in an industrial park at Pahoa, Hawaii  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This engineering and economic study evaluated the potential for developing a geothermal industrial park in the Puna District near Pahoa on the Island of Hawaii. Direct heat industrial applications were analyzed from a marketing, engineering, economic, environmental, and sociological standpoint to determine the most viable industries for the park. An extensive literature search produced 31 existing processes currently using geothermal heat. An additional list was compiled indicating industrial processes that require heat that could be provided by geothermal energy. From this information, 17 possible processes were selected for consideration. Careful scrutiny and analysis of these 17 processes revealed three that justified detailed economic workups. The three processes chosen for detailed analysis were: an ethanol plant using bagasse and wood as feedstock; a cattle feed mill using sugar cane leaf trash as feedstock; and a papaya processing facility providing both fresh and processed fruit. In addition, a research facility to assess and develop other processes was treated as a concept. Consideration was given to the impediments to development, the engineering process requirements and the governmental support for each process. The study describes the geothermal well site chosen, the pipeline to transmit the hydrothermal fluid, and the infrastructure required for the industrial park. A conceptual development plan for the ethanol plant, the feedmill and the papaya processing facility was prepared. The study concluded that a direct heat industrial park in Pahoa, Hawaii, involves considerable risks.

Moreau, J.W.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Combustion of single biomass particles in air and in oxy-fuel conditions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The combustion behaviors of four different pulverized biomasses were evaluated in the laboratory. Single particles of sugarcane bagasse, pine sawdust, torrefied pine sawdust and olive residue were burned in a drop-tube furnace, set at 1400K, in both air and O2/CO2 atmospheres containing 21, 30, 35, and 50% oxygen mole fractions. High-speed and high-resolution images of single particles were recorded cinematographically and temperaturetime histories were obtained pyrometrically. Combustion of these particles took place in two phases. Initially, volatiles evolved and burned in spherical envelope flames of low-luminosity; then, upon extinction of these flames, char residues ignited and burned in brief periods of time. This behavior was shared by all four biomasses of this study, and only small differences among them were evident based on their origin, type and pre-treatment. Volatile flames of biomass particles were much less sooty than those of previously burned coal particles of analogous size and char combustion durations were briefer. Replacing the background N2 gas with CO2, i.e., changing from air to an oxy-fuel atmosphere, at 21% O2 impaired the intensity of combustion; reduced the combustion temperatures and lengthened the burnout times of the biomass particles. Increasing the oxygen mole fraction in CO2 to 2835% restored the combustion intensity of the single biomass particles to that in air.

Juan Riaza; Reza Khatami; Yiannis A. Levendis; Luca lvarez; Mara V. Gil; Covadonga Pevida; Fernando Rubiera; Jos J. Pis

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Data:5b74d5b1-6111-4038-b0dd-5f1c6de76b9c | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

d5b1-6111-4038-b0dd-5f1c6de76b9c d5b1-6111-4038-b0dd-5f1c6de76b9c No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Delaware Electric Cooperative Effective date: 2011/05/18 End date if known: Rate name: Home Surge Protection Program--Schedule HSPP Sector: Residential Description: Available to those Members desiring surge protection for home appliances, which include but are not limited to, washers, dryers, electric ranges (stoves), refrigerators, freezers, heating/air conditioning units, garbage disposals and dish washers and sensitive electronic equipment, which include but are not limited to, computers, VCR's, televisions, entertainment centers, telephones, microwave ovens, CD players, garage door openers, radio alarm clocks and telephone answering machines.

209

Dog germs  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Dog germs Dog germs Name: Charles Cole Age: N/A Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: Is a dog's mouth cleaner than a human's? Replies: Charles, Indeed, I have heard that this is true, but I don't have any scientific report handy which confirms it. What I have heard in the past is that, on occasion, if someone is accidentally bitten by a person, the bite is considered quite serious. If a study ever were done, I'm sure the actual 'cleanliness' of a human versus canine mouth would have to be compared based on a variety of normal foodstuffs consumed by each group (in the humans case, maybe hot dogs, cereal, soda, roast beef, etc) and the canines (dog food, garbage cans, various animal remnants found in the neighborhood). I'm sure you can see that there would certainly be occasions where the human's mouth would register as cleaner just because of what had been eaten earlier. Another house-kept dog, fed only purchased dog food and kept 'squeaky-clean' might register cleaner than perhaps a person with poor mouth hygiene. Since we humans regularly do floss and brush, and gargle, I am sure many of us do our best to try to 'keep up with Fido'. :)

210

Clean Streams  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Clean Streams Clean Streams Nature Bulletin No. 538-A October 5, 1974 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation CLEAN STREAMS Each year in mid-May is Clean Streams Week in Cook County by proclamation of the president of the county board and the Board of Forest Preserve Commissioners, and in all of Illinois by proclamation of the Governor. Its purpose is to focus the attention of everyone, young and old, upon the disgraceful conditions in our streams, formerly clean and beautiful, which have been made foul and unsightly by pollution with sewage and by the dumping of garbage and junk into them. Some of us remember when fish such as northern pike, black bass, sunfish, bluegills, crappies and channel catfish were plentiful in the rivers and creeks of Cook County. Now the desirable kinds of fish have largely disappeared and many portions are so polluted that even carp cannot exist. Swimming, once popular in the DesPlaines River, Salt Creek and other streams, has long been prohibited by the State Board of Health. In some streams the stench and appearance of the water is so repulsive that no one enjoys picnicking or resting in the shade along their banks.

211

Waste-to-energy plants face costly emissions-control upgrades  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One treatment method of municipal solid waste, incineration, has fallen in and out of public favor. In the 1970s, emerging consciousness of the threat to groundwater posed by leaking landfills made incineration an attractive option. Prompted by disrupted energy supplies and steeply rising prices, more than 100 municipalities began to generate electricity from the heat produced by burning trash. In the 1990s, the pendulum of public enthusiasm has swung away from incineration. Energy prices have declined dramatically, and safety and siting concerns complicate new projects. A recent Supreme Court decision ruled that municipal incinerator ash must be tested as hazardous waste and disposed accordingly if levels of such pollutants as cadmium and lead exceed Resource Conservation and Recovery Act limits. So-called flow control regulations, which allowed municipalities to apportion garbage disposal to ensure steady supplies to incinerators, also have been struck down. EPA is tackling the issue of air emissions from waste-to-energy and non-energy-producing municipal waste combustors. Emissions guidelines for MWCs and new-source performance standards for new units, proposed Sept. 20 under Sec. 129 of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990, are the culmination of a stalled and litigated initiative dating back to the CAA Amendments of 1977.

McIlvaine, R.W.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Engineering/design of a co-generation waste-to-energy facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Five hundred fifteen thousand tons of Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) is being generated every day in America. At present 68% of this trash is dumped into landfill operations. As the amount of garbage is increasing daily, the amount of land reserved for landfills is diminishing rapidly. With the sentiment of the public that you produce it, you keep it, the import-export of waste between the counties and states for the landfills, no longer appears to be feasible, especially when combined with expensive disposal costs. One method of reducing the quantity of waste sent to landfills is through the use of waste-to-energy facilities - the technology of resource recovery - the technology of today INCINERATION. All cogeneration projects are not alike. This paper examines several aspects of the electrical system of a particular municipal solid waste-to-energy project at Charleston, S.C. which includes plant auxiliary loads as well as a utility interconnection through a step-up transformer.

Bajaj, K.S.; Virgilio, R.J. (Foster Wheeler USA Corp., Clinton, NJ (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Mining the earth  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Substances extracted from the earth - stone, iron, bronze - have been so critical to human development that historians name the ages of our past after them. But while scholars have carefully tracked human use of minerals, they have never accounted for the vast environmental damage incurred in mineral production. Few people would guess that a copper mining operation has removed a piece of Utah seven times the weight of all the material dug for the Panama Canal. Few would dream that mines and smelters take up to a tenth of all the energy used each year, or that the waste left by mining measures in the billions of tons - dwarfing the world's total accumulation of more familiar kinds of waste, such as municipal garbage. Indeed, more material is now stripped from the earth by mining than by all the natural erosion of the earth's rivers. The effects of mining operations on the environment are discussed under the following topics: minerals in the global economy, laying waste, at what cost cleaning up, and dipping out. It is concluded that in the long run, the most effective strategy for minimizing new damage is not merely to make mineral extraction cleaner, but to reduce the rich nations needs for virgin (non-recycled) minerals.

Young, J.E.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

BEST: Bilingual environmental science training: Grades 5--6  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This booklet is one of a series of bilingual guides to environmental-science learning activities for students to do at home. Lesson objectives, materials required, procedure, vocabulary, and subjects integrated into the lesson are described in English. A bilingual glossary, alphabetized by English entries, with Spanish equivalents and definitions in both English and Spanish, follows the lesson descriptions, and is itself followed by a bibliography of English-language references. This booklet includes descriptions of ten lessons that cover the following topics: safe and unsafe conditions for chemical combinations; growth rates and environmental needs of plants; photosynthesis and effects of ozone-layer depletion; the circulatory system, the importance of exercise to the heart, and selected circulatory diseases; the nervous system; specific nutritional values of the different food groups; significance of including, reducing, or eliminating certain foods for a healthy diet; effects of some common chemicals on plant growth and animal life; plants` and animals` natural habitats; and dangers of non-biodegradable garbage.

NONE

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Riocell nurtures environmental accomplishments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Environmental concerns have very much influenced operations at Riocell's pulp and paper mill in Guaiba, Brazil. Celso Foelkel, environmental and technical director, refers to it as a minimal environmental impact mill that's moving toward becoming a zero impact mill. In many cases, Riocell has developed simple methods to reduce or recycle 99.7% of the 15,000 tons/month of solid residue it generates. It uses composted mill waste to renourish the soil of its plantations, though most of the organic fertilizer produced is sold to local farmers for agricultural use. About half of the solid residue is converted to agricultural use, especially as organic fertilizers. Sawdust is used as fuel or as bedding for poultry. Another 40% goes to industrial uses such as cement manufacturing. The rest is used as fill for the recovery of mined areas. Event the garbage from the mill is sorted and 85% is recycled. A new concern for the Riocell mill is a move toward placing taxes on the use of natural resources such as water. That's prompted the mill to look into going a step beyond tertiary treatment. The Clean-Rio process makes use of sand-bed filtration and reverse osmosis. Settling with activated carbon might also work well.

Meadows, D.G.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Development of Foster Wheeler's Vision 21 Partial Gasification Module  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) has awarded Foster Wheeler Development Corporation a contract to develop a partial gasification module (PGM) that represents a critical element of several potential coal-fired Vision 21 plants. When utilized for electrical power generation, these plants will operate with efficiencies greater than 60% while producing near zero emissions of traditional stack gas pollutants. The new process partially gasifies coal at elevated pressure producing a coal derived syngas and a char residue. The syngas can be used to fuel the most advanced power producing equipment such as solid oxide fuel cells or gas turbines or processed to produce clean liquid fuels or chemicals for industrial users. The char residue is not wasted; it can also be used to generate electricity by fueling boilers that drive the most advanced ultra-supercritical pressure steam turbines. The unique aspect of the process is that it utilizes a pressurized circulating fluidized bed partial gasifier and does not attempt to consume the coal in a single step. To convert all the coal to syngas in a single step requires extremely high temperatures ({approx} 2500 to 2800F) that melt and vaporize the coal and essentially drive all coal ash contaminants into the syngas. Since these contaminants can be corrosive to power generating equipment, the syngas must be cooled to near room temperature to enable a series of chemical processes to clean the syngas. Foster Wheeler's process operates at much lower temperatures that control/minimize the release of contaminants; this eliminates/minimizes the need for the expensive, complicated syngas heat exchangers and chemical cleanup systems typical of high temperature gasification. By performing the gasification in a circulating bed, a significant amount of syngas can still be produced despite the reduced temperature and the circulating bed allows easy scale up to large size plants. Rather than air, it can also operate with oxygen to facilitate sequestration of stack gas carbon dioxide gases for a 100% reduction in greenhouse gas emissions. The amount of syngas and char produced by the PGM can be tailored to fit the production objectives of the overall plant, i.e., power generation, clean liquid fuel production, chemicals production, etc. Hence, PGM is a robust building block that offers all the advantages of coal gasification but in a more user friendly form; it is also fuel flexible in that it can use alternative fuels such as biomass, sewerage sludge, etc. This paper describes the test program and pilot plant that will be used to develop the PGM.

Robertson, A.

2001-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

217

Learning from the Brazilian biofuel experience  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the article `The ethanol program in Brazil' [1] Jos Goldemberg summarizes the key features of Brazil's sugarcane ethanol programthe most successful biofuel program in the world so far. In fact, as of 2005, Brazil was the world's largest producer of fuel ethanol. In addition to providing 40% of its gasoline market with ethanol, Brazil exports a significant amount of ethanol to Europe, Japan, and the United States. The success of the program is attributed to a variety of factors, including supportive governmental policies and favorable natural conditions (such as a tropical climate with abundant rainfall and high temperatures). As the article points out, in the early stages of the Brazilian ethanol program, the Brazilian government provided loans to sugarcane growers and ethanol producers (in most cases, they are the same people) to encourage sugarcane and ethanol production. Thereafter, ethanol prices were regulated to ensure that producers can economically sustain production and consumers can benefit from using ethanol. Over time, Brazil was able to achieve a price for ethanol that is lower than that for gasoline, on the basis of energy content. This lower cost is largely driving the widespread use of ethanol instead of gasoline by consumers in Brazil. In the United States, if owners of E85 flexible-fuel vehicles (FFVs) are expected to use E85 instead of gasoline in their FFVs, E85 will have to be priced competitively against gasoline on an energy-content basis. Compared with corn-based or sugar beet-based ethanol, Brazil's sugarcane-based ethanol yields considerably more favorable results in terms of energy balance and reductions in greenhouse gas emissions. These results are primarily due to (i) the dramatic increase of sugarcane yield in Brazil in the past 25 years and (ii) the use of bagasse instead of fossil fuels in ethanol plants to provide the heat needed for ethanol plant operations and to generate electricity for export to electric grids. Advancements in technology associated with both sugarcane farming and ethanol production have definitely played an important role in yielding the significant benefits associated with sugarcane ethanol. The United States produced about 4 billion gallons of ethanol from corn in 2005. Production was expected to increase to about 5 billion gallons by 2006. Corn-based ethanol achieves moderate reductions in greenhouse gas emissions. In the long run, the great potential of fuel ethanol lies in its production from cellulosic biomass, which is abundant in many regions of the world and can yield much greater reductions in greenhouse gas emissions and energy benefits. Figure 1 presents reductions in greenhouse emissions of several ethanol production pathways that were evaluated at the Argonne National Laboratory. Bagasse, a cellulosic biomass type already available in sugarcane ethanol plants, will certainly offer an opportunity for economically co-producing cellulosic ethanol and sugarcane ethanol in existing sugarcane ethanol plants. Figure 1. Greenhouse gas emissions per million Btu of gasoline and ethanol produced and used. Despite the encouraging progress of Brazil's ethanol program some issues will still need to be addressed. Figure 4 of [1] shows a significant drop in ethanol production in the 2000/2001 season. A steady supply of ethanol will be a key factor for the success of a fuel ethanol program. Consumers are not going to tolerate fluctuations in ethanol production. Instead, they will turn to conventional fuels for fueling their FFVs as a result of supply fluctuations, which can be detrimental to the success of the ethanol program. In addition to this, other environmental effects of biofuels in general, and sugarcane ethanol in particular, need to be assessed. Some have debated and speculated that Brazil's sugarcane ethanol program has caused (i) soil erosion and biodiversity problems by converting rainforests into sugarcane plantations and (ii) local air pollution problems as a result of burning in plantations before harvest. Also, as interest in biofuels heightens

Michael Wang

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Solar production of intermediate temperature process heat. Phase I design. Final report. [For sugarcane processing plant in Hawaii  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is the final effort in the Phase I design of a solar industrial process heat system for the Hilo Coast Processing Company (HCPC) in Pepeekeo, Hawaii. The facility is used to wash, grind and extract sugar from the locally grown sugarcane and it operates 24 hours a day, 305 days per year. The major steam requirements in the industrial process are for the prime movers (mill turbines) in the milling process and heat for evaporating water from the extracted juices. Bagasse (the fibrous residue of milled sugarcane) supplied 84% of the fuel requirement for steam generation in 1979, while 65,000 barrels of No. 6 industrial fuel oil made up the remaining 16%. These fuels are burned in the power plant complex which produces 825/sup 0/F, 1,250 psi superheated steam to power a turbogenerator set which, in addition to serving the factory, generates from 7 to 16 megawatts of electricity that is exported to the local utility company. Extracted steam from the turbo-generator set supplies the plant's process steam needs. The system consists of 42,420 ft./sup 2/ of parabolic trough, single axis tracking, concentrating solar collectors. The collectors will be oriented in a North-South configuration and will track East-West. A heat transfer fluid (Gulf Synfluid 4cs) will be circulated in a closed loop fashion through the solar collectors and a series of heat exchangers. The inlet and outlet fluid temperatures for the collectors are 370/sup 0/F and 450/sup 0/F respectively. It is estimated that the net useable energy delivered to the industrial process will be 7.2 x 10/sup 9/ Btu's per year. With an HCPC boiler efficiency of 78% and 6.2 x 10/sup 6/ Btu's per barrel of oil, the solar energy system will displace 1489 barrels of oil per year. (WHK)

None

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Economic and GHG emissions analyses for sugarcane ethanol in Brazil: Looking forward  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract There have been many efforts to improve sugarcane cultivation and conversion technologies in the ethanol industry. In this study, an economic assessment and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions analysis are performed on ethanol produced conventionally from sugarcane sugar and on an emerging process where the sugarcane bagasse is additionally used to produce ethanol. The combined conventional plus lignocellulosic ethanol pathway is found to be less economically favorable than the conventional ethanol pathway unless a series of technical challenges associated with cost reductions in lignocellulosic ethanol production are overcome, reaching a production cost at 0.31 $/L. This is expected to be achieved in a prospective 2020 scenario. GHG emissions savings against gasoline for both the conventional ethanol and the conventional plus lignocellulosic ethanol pathways are confirmed and found to increase with technological developments projected to occur over time. However, the absolute numbers are highly sensitive to the way of claiming credits from surplus electricity co-generated in the mill. These are 86%, 110% and 150% for the conventional ethanol in the 2020 scenario when the surplus electricity is assumed to replace the average electricity, the combined-sources based electricity and the marginal electricity, respectively. For the conventional plus lignocellulosic ethanol pathway, they are 80%, 85% and 95% respectively in the 2020 scenario. Finally, a series of sensitivity analyses found the comparison in the GHG emissions between the two production pathways is not sensitive to changes in the sugarcane yield or the emissions factor for the enzymes used in the lignocellulosic ethanol process. However, the plant size is an influential factor on both the ethanol production cost (a lowest MESP of 0.26 $/L at the scale of 4 MM tonnecane/yr) and the GHG emission factors, partially because of the important role that transport of feedstock biomass (sugarcane and trash) plays in both elements.

Lei Wang; Raul Quiceno; Catherine Price; Rick Malpas; Jeremy Woods

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Blending high sulfer coal with refuse derived fuel to make SO{sub 2} compliant slurry fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The need for a better method of disposing of the international community`s garbage hardly needs emphasizing. In 1993, the United States alone generated approximately 207 million ton per year of Municipal Solid Waste (MSW), with 62% landfilled, 220/6 recycled, and 16% combusted for energy recovery. Despite strenuous efforts to make these disposal methods meet present needs, the cost of disposal is rising dramatically. Concurrently, the Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) of 1990 have severely restricted the SO{sub 2} emissions from coal fired boilers. Medium and high sulfur coals will not comply with the Phase II CAAA regulation limit of 1.2 lb SO{sub 2}/MM Btu, without advanced coal cleaning technologies or flue gas desulfurization, including the majority of the North Dakota lignite reserves. Utility power plants have attempted to burn refuse derived fuel (RDF), a heterogeneous solid fuel produced from MSW, with coal in utility scale boilers (generally referred to as co-firing). Co-firing of RDF with coal has been attempted in sixteen different boilers, five commercially. While lower SO{sub 2} emissions provided the impetus, co-firing RDF with coal suffered from several disadvantages including increased solids handling, increased excess air requirements, higher HCI, CO, NO{sub x} and chlorinated organic emissions, increased slag formation in the boiler, and higher fly ash resistivity. Currently, only two of the sixteen boilers are still regularly used to co-fire RDF. The overall objective of this research program was to assess the feasibility of blending RDF with lignite coal to form SO{sub 2} Compliant slurry fuels using EnerTech`s SlurryCarb{trademark} process. In particular, the objective was to overcome the difficulties of conventional co-firing. Blended slurry fuels were produced with the Energy & Environmental Research Center`s (EERC) bench-scale autoclave and were combusted in a pressurized fluidized-bed reactor (PFBR).

Klosky, M. [EnerTech Environmental, Inc., Atlanta, GA (United States); Anderson, C. [Energy & Environmental Research Center, Grand Forks, ND (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "garbage bagasse sewerage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Waste-to-energy in the United States: Socioeconomic factors and the decision-making process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Municipal solid waste (MSW) combustion with energy recovery, commonly called waste-to-energy (WTE), was adopted by many US communities during the 1980s to manage their growing quantities of MSW. Although less than one percent of all US MSW was burned to retrieve its heat energy in 1970, WTE grew to account for 16 percent of MSW in 1990, and many experts forecasted that WTE would be used to manage as much as half of all garbage by the turn of the century. However, the growth of WTE has been reduced in recent years by project cancellations. This study takes an in-depth look at the socioeconomic factors that have played a role in the decisions of communities that have considered WTE as a component of their solid waste management strategies. More specifically, a three-pronged approach is adopted to investigate (1) the relationships between a municipality`s decision to consider and accept/reject WTE and key socioeconomic parameters, (2) the potential impacts of recent changes in financial markets on the viability of WTE, and (3) the WTE decision-making process and the socioeconomic parameters that are most important in the municipality`s decision. The first two objectives are met by the collection and analysis of aggregate data on all US WTE initiatives during the 1982 to 1990 time frame. The latter objective is met by way of four in-depth case studies -- two directed at communities that have accepted WTE and two that have cancelled WTE projects.

Curlee, T.R.; Schexnayder, S.M.; Vogt, D.P.; Wolfe, A.K.; Kelsay, M.P.; Feldman, D.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Dust Bowl migration as an analog for possible global warming-induced migration from Mexico  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As a result of increases in CO{sub 2} and other radiatively important trace gases, scientists have predicted increases in mean worldwide temperatures of 2--5 degrees C over the next 50 to 100 years. Such temperature increases may result in climate modifications that would in turn be associated with increases in drought and desertification and could even change the patterns of the monsoons and tropical rains, which are important to agriculture throughout the world. They predicted that the rise in sea level caused by melting and thermal expansion of glaciers and polar icecaps could flood large population centers, destroying habitation and displacing populations. This will result in approximately 50 million ``environmental refugees`` worldwide, triple the number of today. The expected shifts in precipitation are also likely to result in (1) increased runoff contaminated with pesticides, salts, garbage, sewage, and eroded soil, and (2) drought also leading to increased soil erosion and salinization, as well as depletion of limited water resources. The total impact of global warming on agriculture and human habitation could considerably slow the economic development of some nations and would particularly affect agricultural production. Loss of homes, the inability to raise food, an increased prevalence of disease and worsened economic conditions may drive people to leave their homelands, seeking entry into countries which have more resources and greater resistance to the economic consequences of climatic change. This report looks at the possible environmental impacts and economic impacts of the greenhouse effect on Mexico while using the American Dust Bowl event as an analog.

Turner, M.H.; Longstreth, J.D.; Johnson, A.K.; Rosenberg, N.J.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

DEVELOPMENT OF PRESSURIZED CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED BED PARTIAL GASIFICATION MODULE (PGM)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Foster Wheeler Development Corporation is working under DOE contract No. DE-FC26-00NT40972 to develop a partial gasification module (PGM) that represents a critical element of several potential coal-fired Vision 21 plants. When utilized for electrical power generation, these plants will operate with efficiencies greater than 60% while producing near zero emissions of traditional stack gas pollutants. The new process partially gasifies coal at elevated pressure producing a coal-derived syngas and a char residue. The syngas can be used to fuel the most advanced power producing equipment such as solid oxide fuel cells or gas turbines or processed to produce clean liquid fuels or chemicals for industrial users. The char residue is not wasted; it can also be used to generate electricity by fueling boilers that drive the most advanced ultra-supercritical pressure steam turbines. The unique aspect of the process is that it utilizes a pressurized circulating fluidized bed partial gasifier and does not attempt to consume the coal in a single step. To convert all the coal to syngas in a single step requires extremely high temperatures ({approx}2500 to 2800F) that melt and vaporize the coal and essentially drive all coal ash contaminants into the syngas. Since these contaminants can be corrosive to power generating equipment, the syngas must be cooled to near room temperature to enable a series of chemical processes to clean the syngas. Foster Wheeler's process operates at much lower temperatures that control/minimize the release of contaminants; this eliminates/minimizes the need for the expensive, complicated syngas heat exchangers and chemical cleanup systems typical of high temperature gasification. By performing the gasification in a circulating bed, a significant amount of syngas can still be produced despite the reduced temperature and the circulating bed allows easy scale up to large size plants. Rather than air, it can also operate with oxygen to facilitate sequestration of stack gas carbon dioxide gases for a 100% reduction in greenhouse gas emissions. The amount of syngas and char produced by the PGM can be tailored to fit the production objectives of the overall plant, i.e., power generation, clean liquid fuel production, chemicals production, etc. Hence, PGM is a robust building block that offers all the advantages of coal gasification but in a more user friendly form; it is also fuel flexible in that it can use alternative fuels such as biomass, sewerage sludge, etc. The PGM consists of a pressurized circulating fluidized bed (PCFB) reactor together with a recycle cyclone and a particulate removing barrier filter. Coal, air, steam, and possibly sand are fed to the bottom of the PCFB reactor and establish a relatively dense bed of coal/char in the bottom section. As these constituents react, a hot syngas is produced which conveys the solids residue vertically up through the reactor and into the recycle cyclone. Solids elutriated from the dense bed and contained in the syngas are collected in the cyclone and drain via a dipleg back to the dense bed at the bottom of the PCFB reactor. This recycle loop of hot solids acts as a thermal flywheel and promotes efficient solid-gas chemical reaction.

Unknown

2001-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

224

Agro-industry sugarcane residues disposal: The trends of their conversion into energy carriers in Cuba  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The goal of the present work was to carry out a review of the disposal practices for the agro-industrys sugarcane residue and the trends of energy use in Cuba. The lack of an alternative energy carrier to electricity with storage capability for use in off-season has to date been an unsolvable question. The improvement of cogeneration capacity via implementation of CEST or BIG/GTCC and the barriers for their implementation, the introduction of a medium size (3ton/h) fast pyrolysis module (FPM3) as a solution for off-season energy demand in the agro-industry, and an assessment of the energy required to do so, were also analyzed. Bio-oil production from bagasse and sugarcane agriculture residues (SCAR) and their particularities at the sugar mill are treated. The influence of sugar facility production process configuration is analyzed. The fast pyrolysis products and the trends of their end uses in Cuba are presented. The production cost of a ton of Bio-oil for FPM3 conditions was calculated at 155USD/ton and the payback time as a function of selling price between 160 and 110USD/ton was estimated to be from 1.5 to 4 years. The economic feasibility of the FPM3 was estimated, comparing the added values for three scenarios: 1st case, currently-used sugar production, 16.5USD/ton of cane; 2nd case, factoring in the cogeneration improvement, 27USD/ton of cane; and 3rd case, with cogeneration improvement and Bio-oil production, 40USD/ton of cane. The energy use of SCAR and the introduction of FPM3 in the sugar mill are promising improvements that could result in a potential surplus of 80kWhe/ton of cane in-season, or 6נ106ton of Bio-oil (LHV=15MJ/kg) for use off-season in a milling season of 4 million tons of raw sugar.

W. Alonso Pippo; P. Garzone; G. Cornacchia

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Combined Grinding and Drying of Biomass in One Operation Phase I  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

First American Scientific Corporation (FASC) has developed a unique and innovative grinder/dryer called KDS Micronex. The KS (Kinetic Disintegration System) combines two operations of grinding and drying into a single operation which reduces dependence on external heat input. The machine captures the heat of comminution and combines it will centrifugal forces to expedite moisture extraction from wet biomass. Because it uses mechanical forces rather than providing direct heat to perform the drying operation, it is a simpler machine and uses less energy than conventional grinding and drying operations which occur as two separate steps. The entire compact unit can be transported on a flatbed trailer to the site where biomass is available. Hence, the KDS Micronex is a technology that enables inexpensive pretreatment of waste materials and biomass. A well prepared biomass can be used as feed, fuel or fertilizer instead of being discarded. Electricity and chemical feedstock produced from such biomass would displace the use of fossil fuels and no net greenhouse gas emissions would result from such bio-based operations. Organic fertilizers resulting from the KS Micronex grinding/drying process will be pathogen-free unlike raw animal manures. The feasibility tests on KS during Phase I showed that a prototype machine can be developed, field tested and the technology demonstrated for commercial applications. The present KDS machine can remove up to 400 kg/h of water from a wet feed material. Since biomass processors demand a finished product that is only 10% moist and most raw materials like corn stover, bagasse, layer manure, cow dung, and waste wood have moisture contents of the order of 50%, this water removal rate translates to a production rate of roughly half a ton per hour. this is too small for most processors who are unwilling to acquire multiple machines because of the added complexity to the feed and product removal systems. The economics suffer due to small production rates, because the labor costs are a much larger fraction of the production cost. The goal for further research and development work is to scale up the KDS technology incorporating findings from Phase I into a machine that has superior performance characteristics.

Sokhansanj, S.

2008-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

226

Data:83df7de7-3769-409a-a8cf-9ddb4751dbc2 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

df7de7-3769-409a-a8cf-9ddb4751dbc2 df7de7-3769-409a-a8cf-9ddb4751dbc2 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Kenergy Corp Effective date: 2011/09/01 End date if known: Rate name: Renewable Resource Energy Service Rider - Schedule 7 Sector: Industrial Description: APPLICABLE In all territory served. AVAILABILITY OF SERVICE Renewable Resource Energy service is available in accordance with the terms of this tariff rider to any customer purchasing retail electric service under a rate schedule listed on Sheet No. 23A of this rider subject to Kenergy's general rules and regulations on file with the Public Service Comrnission of Kentucky. For purposes of this renewable resource energy service tariff rider, (i) the term "Renewable Resource Energy" means electric energy produced from solar, wind, ocean, geothermal energy, biomass, or landfill gas, and (ii) the term "biomass" means any organic material that is available on a renewable or recurring basis, including dedicated energy crops, trees grown for energy production, wood waste and wood residues, plants (including aquatic plants, grasses, and agricultural crops), residues, fibers, animal wastes and other organic waste materials (but not including unsegregated municipal solid waste (garbage)), and fats and oils. CONDITIONS OF SERVICE (1) Renewable Resource Energy service availability is contingent upon the availability from ' Kenergy's wholesale power supplier of a wholesale supply of Renewable Resource Energy in the quantity and at the quality requested by a customer. (2) Subject to the other requirements of this tariff rider, Kenergy will make Renewable Resource Energy service available to a customer if the customer signs a Renewable Resource Energy service contract in the form attached to this tariff rider agreeing to purchase a specified number of 100 KWH blocks of Renewable Resource Energy per month for a period of not less than one year, and that contract is accepted by Kenergy's wholesale power supplier. Kenergy will have the right, but not the obligation, to terminate a Renewable Resource Energy service contract at the request of the customer before the end of the contract term.

227

Data:Ee7e9519-592a-48d9-8608-c4836519c318 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

e9519-592a-48d9-8608-c4836519c318 e9519-592a-48d9-8608-c4836519c318 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Kenergy Corp Effective date: 2011/09/01 End date if known: Rate name: Renewable Resource Energy Service Rider - Schedule 16 Sector: Commercial Description: APPLICABLE In all territory served. AVAILABILITY OF SERVICE Renewable Resource Energy service is available in accordance with the terms of this tariff rider to any customer purchasing retail electric service under a rate schedule listed on Sheet No. 23A of this rider subject to Kenergy's general rules and regulations on file with the Public Service Comrnission of Kentucky. For purposes of this renewable resource energy service tariff rider, (i) the term "Renewable Resource Energy" means electric energy produced from solar, wind, ocean, geothermal energy, biomass, or landfill gas, and (ii) the term "biomass" means any organic material that is available on a renewable or recurring basis, including dedicated energy crops, trees grown for energy production, wood waste and wood residues, plants (including aquatic plants, grasses, and agricultural crops), residues, fibers, animal wastes and other organic waste materials (but not including unsegregated municipal solid waste (garbage)), and fats and oils. CONDITIONS OF SERVICE (1) Renewable Resource Energy service availability is contingent upon the availability from ' Kenergy's wholesale power supplier of a wholesale supply of Renewable Resource Energy in the quantity and at the quality requested by a customer. (2) Subject to the other requirements of this tariff rider, Kenergy will make Renewable Resource Energy service available to a customer if the customer signs a Renewable Resource Energy service contract in the form attached to this tariff rider agreeing to purchase a specified number of 100 KWH blocks of Renewable Resource Energy per month for a period of not less than one year, and that contract is accepted by Kenergy's wholesale power supplier. Kenergy will have the right, but not the obligation, to terminate a Renewable Resource Energy service contract at the request of the customer before the end of the contract term.

228

Data:9ec9ecbe-c744-441b-867b-6aada38b1fc6 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ecbe-c744-441b-867b-6aada38b1fc6 ecbe-c744-441b-867b-6aada38b1fc6 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Kenergy Corp Effective date: 2011/09/01 End date if known: Rate name: Renewable Resource Energy Service Rider - Schedule 3 Sector: Commercial Description: APPLICABLE In all territory served. AVAILABILITY OF SERVICE Renewable Resource Energy service is available in accordance with the terms of this tariff rider to any customer purchasing retail electric service under a rate schedule listed on Sheet No. 23A of this rider subject to Kenergy's general rules and regulations on file with the Public Service Comrnission of Kentucky. For purposes of this renewable resource energy service tariff rider, (i) the term "Renewable Resource Energy" means electric energy produced from solar, wind, ocean, geothermal energy, biomass, or landfill gas, and (ii) the term "biomass" means any organic material that is available on a renewable or recurring basis, including dedicated energy crops, trees grown for energy production, wood waste and wood residues, plants (including aquatic plants, grasses, and agricultural crops), residues, fibers, animal wastes and other organic waste materials (but not including unsegregated municipal solid waste (garbage)), and fats and oils. CONDITIONS OF SERVICE (1) Renewable Resource Energy service availability is contingent upon the availability from ' Kenergy's wholesale power supplier of a wholesale supply of Renewable Resource Energy in the quantity and at the quality requested by a customer. (2) Subject to the other requirements of this tariff rider, Kenergy will make Renewable Resource Energy service available to a customer if the customer signs a Renewable Resource Energy service contract in the form attached to this tariff rider agreeing to purchase a specified number of 100 KWH blocks of Renewable Resource Energy per month for a period of not less than one year, and that contract is accepted by Kenergy's wholesale power supplier. Kenergy will have the right, but not the obligation, to terminate a Renewable Resource Energy service contract at the request of the customer before the end of the contract term.

229

Data:9382e2fc-dac2-462e-ba98-fdcb96c634f0 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

e2fc-dac2-462e-ba98-fdcb96c634f0 e2fc-dac2-462e-ba98-fdcb96c634f0 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Kenergy Corp Effective date: 2011/09/01 End date if known: Rate name: Renewable Resource Energy Service Rider - Schedule 1 Sector: Residential Description: APPLICABLE In all territory served. AVAILABILITY OF SERVICE Renewable Resource Energy service is available in accordance with the terms of this tariff rider to any customer purchasing retail electric service under a rate schedule listed on Sheet No. 23A of this rider subject to Kenergy's general rules and regulations on file with the Public Service Comrnission of Kentucky. For purposes of this renewable resource energy service tariff rider, (i) the term "Renewable Resource Energy" means electric energy produced from solar, wind, ocean, geothermal energy, biomass, or landfill gas, and (ii) the term "biomass" means any organic material that is available on a renewable or recurring basis, including dedicated energy crops, trees grown for energy production, wood waste and wood residues, plants (including aquatic plants, grasses, and agricultural crops), residues, fibers, animal wastes and other organic waste materials (but not including unsegregated municipal solid waste (garbage)), and fats and oils. CONDITIONS OF SERVICE (1) Renewable Resource Energy service availability is contingent upon the availability from ' Kenergy's wholesale power supplier of a wholesale supply of Renewable Resource Energy in the quantity and at the quality requested by a customer. (2) Subject to the other requirements of this tariff rider, Kenergy will make Renewable Resource Energy service available to a customer if the customer signs a Renewable Resource Energy service contract in the form attached to this tariff rider agreeing to purchase a specified number of 100 KWH blocks of Renewable Resource Energy per month for a period of not less than one year, and that contract is accepted by Kenergy's wholesale power supplier. Kenergy will have the right, but not the obligation, to terminate a Renewable Resource Energy service contract at the request of the customer before the end of the contract term.

230

Data:F358e502-527d-49b0-b8e7-16ce8282b8fb | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

8e502-527d-49b0-b8e7-16ce8282b8fb 8e502-527d-49b0-b8e7-16ce8282b8fb No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Kenergy Corp Effective date: 2011/09/01 End date if known: Rate name: Renewable Resource Energy Service Rider - Schedule 32 Sector: Description: APPLICABLE In all territory served. AVAILABILITY OF SERVICE Renewable Resource Energy service is available in accordance with the terms of this tariff rider to any customer purchasing retail electric service under a rate schedule listed on Sheet No. 23A of this rider subject to Kenergy's general rules and regulations on file with the Public Service Comrnission of Kentucky. For purposes of this renewable resource energy service tariff rider, (i) the term "Renewable Resource Energy" means electric energy produced from solar, wind, ocean, geothermal energy, biomass, or landfill gas, and (ii) the term "biomass" means any organic material that is available on a renewable or recurring basis, including dedicated energy crops, trees grown for energy production, wood waste and wood residues, plants (including aquatic plants, grasses, and agricultural crops), residues, fibers, animal wastes and other organic waste materials (but not including unsegregated municipal solid waste (garbage)), and fats and oils. CONDITIONS OF SERVICE (1) Renewable Resource Energy service availability is contingent upon the availability from ' Kenergy's wholesale power supplier of a wholesale supply of Renewable Resource Energy in the quantity and at the quality requested by a customer. (2) Subject to the other requirements of this tariff rider, Kenergy will make Renewable Resource Energy service available to a customer if the customer signs a Renewable Resource Energy service contract in the form attached to this tariff rider agreeing to purchase a specified number of 100 KWH blocks of Renewable Resource Energy per month for a period of not less than one year, and that contract is accepted by Kenergy's wholesale power supplier. Kenergy will have the right, but not the obligation, to terminate a Renewable Resource Energy service contract at the request of the customer before the end of the contract term.

231

Data:51ac99ac-313f-4582-9db8-7bc4524fc9e9 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ac-313f-4582-9db8-7bc4524fc9e9 ac-313f-4582-9db8-7bc4524fc9e9 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Kenergy Corp Effective date: 2011/09/01 End date if known: Rate name: Renewable Resource Energy Service Rider - Schedule 41 Sector: Industrial Description: APPLICABLE In all territory served. AVAILABILITY OF SERVICE Renewable Resource Energy service is available in accordance with the terms of this tariff rider to any customer purchasing retail electric service under a rate schedule listed on Sheet No. 23A of this rider subject to Kenergy's general rules and regulations on file with the Public Service Comrnission of Kentucky. For purposes of this renewable resource energy service tariff rider, (i) the term "Renewable Resource Energy" means electric energy produced from solar, wind, ocean, geothermal energy, biomass, or landfill gas, and (ii) the term "biomass" means any organic material that is available on a renewable or recurring basis, including dedicated energy crops, trees grown for energy production, wood waste and wood residues, plants (including aquatic plants, grasses, and agricultural crops), residues, fibers, animal wastes and other organic waste materials (but not including unsegregated municipal solid waste (garbage)), and fats and oils. CONDITIONS OF SERVICE (1) Renewable Resource Energy service availability is contingent upon the availability from ' Kenergy's wholesale power supplier of a wholesale supply of Renewable Resource Energy in the quantity and at the quality requested by a customer. (2) Subject to the other requirements of this tariff rider, Kenergy will make Renewable Resource Energy service available to a customer if the customer signs a Renewable Resource Energy service contract in the form attached to this tariff rider agreeing to purchase a specified number of 100 KWH blocks of Renewable Resource Energy per month for a period of not less than one year, and that contract is accepted by Kenergy's wholesale power supplier. Kenergy will have the right, but not the obligation, to terminate a Renewable Resource Energy service contract at the request of the customer before the end of the contract term.

232

Data:3805ae9e-aff3-4262-9dcb-448410ce66a1 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ae9e-aff3-4262-9dcb-448410ce66a1 ae9e-aff3-4262-9dcb-448410ce66a1 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Kenergy Corp Effective date: 2011/09/01 End date if known: Rate name: Renewable Resource Energy Service Rider - Schedule 33 Sector: Industrial Description: APPLICABLE In all territory served. AVAILABILITY OF SERVICE Renewable Resource Energy service is available in accordance with the terms of this tariff rider to any customer purchasing retail electric service under a rate schedule listed on Sheet No. 23A of this rider subject to Kenergy's general rules and regulations on file with the Public Service Comrnission of Kentucky. For purposes of this renewable resource energy service tariff rider, (i) the term "Renewable Resource Energy" means electric energy produced from solar, wind, ocean, geothermal energy, biomass, or landfill gas, and (ii) the term "biomass" means any organic material that is available on a renewable or recurring basis, including dedicated energy crops, trees grown for energy production, wood waste and wood residues, plants (including aquatic plants, grasses, and agricultural crops), residues, fibers, animal wastes and other organic waste materials (but not including unsegregated municipal solid waste (garbage)), and fats and oils. CONDITIONS OF SERVICE (1) Renewable Resource Energy service availability is contingent upon the availability from ' Kenergy's wholesale power supplier of a wholesale supply of Renewable Resource Energy in the quantity and at the quality requested by a customer. (2) Subject to the other requirements of this tariff rider, Kenergy will make Renewable Resource Energy service available to a customer if the customer signs a Renewable Resource Energy service contract in the form attached to this tariff rider agreeing to purchase a specified number of 100 KWH blocks of Renewable Resource Energy per month for a period of not less than one year, and that contract is accepted by Kenergy's wholesale power supplier. Kenergy will have the right, but not the obligation, to terminate a Renewable Resource Energy service contract at the request of the customer before the end of the contract term.

233

Data:4658ce36-6ae9-4812-abc1-e340fd31ffd2 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ce36-6ae9-4812-abc1-e340fd31ffd2 ce36-6ae9-4812-abc1-e340fd31ffd2 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Kenergy Corp Effective date: 2011/09/01 End date if known: Rate name: Renewable Resource Energy Service Rider - Schedule 5 Sector: Industrial Description: APPLICABLE In all territory served. AVAILABILITY OF SERVICE Renewable Resource Energy service is available in accordance with the terms of this tariff rider to any customer purchasing retail electric service under a rate schedule listed on Sheet No. 23A of this rider subject to Kenergy's general rules and regulations on file with the Public Service Comrnission of Kentucky. For purposes of this renewable resource energy service tariff rider, (i) the term "Renewable Resource Energy" means electric energy produced from solar, wind, ocean, geothermal energy, biomass, or landfill gas, and (ii) the term "biomass" means any organic material that is available on a renewable or recurring basis, including dedicated energy crops, trees grown for energy production, wood waste and wood residues, plants (including aquatic plants, grasses, and agricultural crops), residues, fibers, animal wastes and other organic waste materials (but not including unsegregated municipal solid waste (garbage)), and fats and oils. CONDITIONS OF SERVICE (1) Renewable Resource Energy service availability is contingent upon the availability from ' Kenergy's wholesale power supplier of a wholesale supply of Renewable Resource Energy in the quantity and at the quality requested by a customer. (2) Subject to the other requirements of this tariff rider, Kenergy will make Renewable Resource Energy service available to a customer if the customer signs a Renewable Resource Energy service contract in the form attached to this tariff rider agreeing to purchase a specified number of 100 KWH blocks of Renewable Resource Energy per month for a period of not less than one year, and that contract is accepted by Kenergy's wholesale power supplier. Kenergy will have the right, but not the obligation, to terminate a Renewable Resource Energy service contract at the request of the customer before the end of the contract term.

234

Determination of saccharides and ethanol from biomass conversion using Raman spectroscopy: Effects of pretreatment and enzyme composition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This dissertation focuses on the development of facile and rapid quantitative Raman spectroscopy measurements for the determination of conversion products in producing bioethanol from corn stover. Raman spectroscopy was chosen to determine glucose, xylose and ethanol in complex hydrolysis and fermentation matrices. Chapter 1 describes the motives and main goals of this work, and includes an introduction to biomass, commonly used pretreatment methods, hydrolysis and fermentation reactions. The principles of Raman spectroscopy, its advantages and applications related to biomass analysis are also illustrated. Chapter 2 and 3 comprise two published or submitted manuscripts, and the thesis concludes with an appendix. In Chapter 2, a Raman spectroscopic protocol is described to study the efficiency of enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose by measuring the main product in hydrolysate, glucose. Two commonly utilized pretreatment methods were investigated in order to understand their effect on glucose measurements by Raman spectroscopy. Second, a similar method was set up to determine the concentration of ethanol in fermentation broth. Both of these measurements are challenged by the presence of complex matrices. In Chapter 3, a quantitative comparison of pretreatment protocols and the effect of enzyme composition are studied using systematic methods. A multipeak fitting algorithm was developed to analyze spectra of hydrolysate containing two analytes: glucose and xylose. Chapter 4 concludes with a future perspective of this research area. An appendix describes a convenient, rapid spectrophotometric method developed to measure cadmium in water. This method requires relatively low cost instrumentation and can be used in microgravity, such as space shuttles or the International Space Station. This work was performed under the supervision of Professor Marc Porter while at Iowa State University. Research related to producing biofuel from bio-renewable resources, especially bioethanol from biomass, has grown significantly in the past decade due to the high demand and rising costs of fossil fuels. More than 3 percent of the energy consumption in the U.S. is derived from renewable biomass, mostly through industrial heat and steam production by the pulp and paper industry, and electricity generation from municipal solid waste (MSW) and forest industry residues. The utilization of food-based biomass to make fuels has been widely criticized because it may increase food shortages throughout the world and raise the cost of food. Thus, nonfood-based and plentiful lignocellulosic feedstocks, such as corn stover, perennial grass, bagasse, sorghum, wheat/rice straw, herbaceous and woody crops, have great potential to be new bio-renewable sources for energy production. Given that many varieties of biomass are available, there is need for a rapid, simple, high-throughput method to screen the conversion of many plant varieties. The most suitable species for each geographic region must be determined, as well as the optimal stage of harvest, impacts of environmental conditions (temperature, soil, pH, etc.). Various genetically modified plants should be studied in order to establish the desired biomass in bioethanol production. The main screening challenge, however, is the complexity of plant cell wall structures that make reliable and sensitive analysis difficult. To date, one of the most popular methods to produce lignocellulosic ethanol is to perform enzymatic hydrolysis followed by fermentation of the hydrolysate with yeast. There are several vital needs related to the field of chemistry that have been suggested as primary research foci needed to effectively improve lignocellulosic ethanol production. These topics include overcoming the recalcitrance of cellulosic biomass, the pervasiveness of pretreatment, advanced biological processing and better feedstocks. In this thesis, a novel approach using Raman spectroscopy has been developed to address important issues related to bioethanol generation, which will aid the research aimed to solve the topics m

Shih, Chien-Ju

2010-05-16T23:59:59.000Z