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1

Multiprocessing compactifying garbage collection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Algorithms for a multiprocessing compactifying garbage collector are presented and discussed. The simple case of two processors, one performing LISP-like list operations and the other performing garbage collection continuously, is thoroughly examined. ... Keywords: LISP, compactification, data structures, free storage, garbage collection, gc processor, list processing, multiprocessing, parallel processing, pointers, reclaimer, relocation, semaphores, storage allocation, storage reclamation, synchronization

Guy L. Steele, Jr.

1975-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Gas, Heat, Water, Sewerage Collection and Disposal, and Street...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Gas, Heat, Water, Sewerage Collection and Disposal, and Street Railway Companies (South Carolina) Gas, Heat, Water, Sewerage Collection and Disposal, and Street Railway Companies...

3

Garbage collection in generic libraries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper demonstrates a unified and garbage-collector independent way to describe the information required for precise collection. Thereby it is possible to construct, a library that can be used with various garbage collectors, without modifying the ...

Gor V. Nishanov; Sibylle Schupp

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Garbage Collecting the World  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Distributed symbolic computations involve the existence of remote references allowing an object, local to a processor, to designate another object located on another processor. To reclaim inaccessible objects is the non trivial task of a distributed Garbage Collector (GC). We present in this paper a new distributed GC algorithm which (i) is faulttolerant, (ii ) is largely independent of how a processor garbage collects its own data space, (iii ) does not need centralized control nor global stop-the-world synchronization, (iv) allows for multiple concurrent active GCs, (v) does not require to migrate objects from processor to processor and (vi) eventually reclaims all inaccessible objects including distributed cycles. These results are mainly obtained through the concept of a group of processors (or processes). Processors of a same group cooperate together to a GC inside this group; this GC is conservative with respect to the outside of the group. A processor contributes to the glob...

Bernard Lang; Christian Queinnec; José Piquer

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Bayshore Regional Sewerage Authority (BRSA) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bayshore Regional Sewerage Authority (BRSA) Bayshore Regional Sewerage Authority (BRSA) Jump to: navigation, search Name Bayshore Regional Sewerage Authority (BRSA) Facility Bayshore Regional Sewerage Authority (BRSA) Sector Wind energy Facility Type Community Wind Facility Status Proposed Owner Bayshore Regional Sewerage Authority (BRSA) Developer Bayshore Regional Sewerage Authority (BRSA) Energy Purchaser Bayshore Regional Sewerage Authority (BRSA) Location Union Beach NJ Coordinates 40.4497613°, -74.1764619° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.4497613,"lon":-74.1764619,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

6

Gas, Heat, Water, Sewerage Collection and Disposal, and Street Railway  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Gas, Heat, Water, Sewerage Collection and Disposal, and Street Gas, Heat, Water, Sewerage Collection and Disposal, and Street Railway Companies (South Carolina) Gas, Heat, Water, Sewerage Collection and Disposal, and Street Railway Companies (South Carolina) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Industrial Installer/Contractor Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Program Info State South Carolina Program Type Generating Facility Rate-Making Siting and Permitting Provider South Carolina Public Service Commission This legislation applies to public utilities and entities furnishing natural gas, heat, water, sewerage, and street railway services to the public. The legislation addresses rates and services, exemptions, investigations, and records. Article 4 (58-5-400 et seq.) of this

7

Using passive object garbage collection algorithms for garbage collection of active objects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the increasing use of active object systems, agents and concurrent object oriented languages like Java, the problem of garbage collection (GC) of unused resources has become more complex. Since active objects are autonomous computational agents, ... Keywords: Java, active objects, actors, agents, garbage collection, program transformation

Abhay Vardhan; Gul Agha

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

A Cyclic Distributed Garbage Collector for Network Objects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. This paper presents an algorithm for distributed garbage collection and outlines its implementation within the Network Objects system. The algorithm is based on a reference listing scheme, which is augmented by partial tracing in order to collect distributed garbage cycles. Processes may be dynamically organised into groups, according to appropriate heuristics, to reclaim distributed garbage cycles. The algorithm places no overhead on local collectors and suspends local mutators only brie y. Partial tracing of the distributed graph involves only objects thought to be part of a garbage cycle: no collaboration with other processes is required. The algorithm o ers considerable exibility, allowing expediency and fault-tolerance to be traded against completeness.

Helena Rodrigues; Richard Jones

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Cork: dynamic memory leak detection for garbage-collected languages  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A memory leak in a garbage-collected program occurs when the program inadvertently maintains references to objects that it no longer needs. Memory leaks cause systematic heap growth, degrading performance and resulting in program crashes after ... Keywords: dynamic, garbage collection, memory leak detection, memory leaks, runtime analysis

Maria Jump; Kathryn S. McKinley

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Tree Rerooting in Distributed Garbage Collection: Implementation and Performance Evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have recently defined a new algorithm for distributed garbage collection based on reference-counting (Luc Moreau, in Proceedings of the Third International Conference of Functional Programming (ICFP'98), Sept. 1998, pp. 204–215; ... Keywords: benchmark, distributed garbage collection, distributed reference counting, performance evaluation

Luc Moreau

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Flash Memory Garbage Collection in Hard Real-Time Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Due to advances in capacity, speed, and economics, NAND-based flash memory technology is increasingly integrated into all types of computing systems, ranging from enterprise servers to embedded devices. However, due to its unpredictable up-date behavior and time consuming garbage collection mechanism, NAND-based flash memory is difficult to integrate into hard-real-time embedded systems. In this thesis, I propose a performance model for flash memory garbage collection that can be used in conjunction with a number of different garbage collection strategies. I describe how to model the cost of reactive (lazy) garbage collection and compare it to that of more proactive schemes. I develop formulas to assess the schedulability of hard real- time periodic task sets under simplified memory consumption models. Results show that I prove the proactive schemes achieve the larger maximum schedulable utilization than the traditional garbage collection mechanism for hard real-time systems in flash memory.

Lai, Chien-An

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Economic feasibility of bagasse charcoal in Haiti  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The economics of implementing bagasse-based charcoal manufacturing in Haiti was investigated. From these main inputs, three different manufacturing economic scenarios were modeled using a simple, dynamic excel spreadsheet. ...

Kamimoto, Lynn K. (Lynn Kam Oi)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Compiler support for garbage collection in a statically typed language  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We consider the problem of supporting compacting garbage collection in the presence of modern compiler optimizations. Since our collector may move any heap object, it must accurately locate, follow, and update all pointers and values derived from pointers. ...

Amer Diwan; Eliot Moss; Richard Hudson

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

CATA: a garbage collection scheme for flash memory file systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The problem of flash memory is that it cannot be overwritten unless erased in advance. In order to avoid having to erase during every update, non-in-place-update schemes have been widely used. In case of non-in-place update mechanism, garbage collection ...

Longzhe Han; Yeonseung Ryu; Keunsoo Yim

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Catalytic gasification of bagasse for the production of methanol  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of the study was to evaluate the technical and economic feasibility of catalytic gasification of bagasse to produce methanol. In previous studies, a catalytic steam gasification process was developed which converted wood to methanol synthesis gas in one step using nickel based catalysts in a fluid-bed gasifier. Tests in a nominal 1 ton/day process development unit (PDU) gasifier with these same catalysts showed bagasse to be a good feedstock for fluid-bed gasifiers, but the catalysts deactivated quite rapidly in the presence of bagasse. Laboratory catalyst screening tests showed K/sub 2/CO/sub 3/ doped on the bagasse to be a promising catalyst for converting bagasse to methanol synthesis gas. PDU tests with 10 wt % K/sub 2/CO/sub 3/ doped on bagasse showed the technical feasibility of this type of catalyst on a larger scale. A high quality synthesis gas was produced and carbon conversion to gas was high. The gasifier was successfully operated without forming agglomerates of catalyst, ash, and char in the gasifier. There was no loss of activity throughout the runs because catalysts is continually added with the bagasse. Laboratory tests showed about 80% of the potassium carbonate could be recovered and recycled with a simple water wash. An economic evaluation of the process for converting bagasse to methanol showed the required selling price of methanol to be significantly higher than the current market price of methanol. Several factors make this current evaluaton using bagasse as a feedstock less favorable: (1) capital costs are higher due to inflation and some extra costs required to use bagasse, (2) smaller plant sizes were considered so economies of scale are lost, and (3) the market price of methanol in the US has fallen 44% in the last six months. 24 refs., 14 figs., 16 tabs.

Baker, E.G.; Brown, M.D.; Robertus, R.J.

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Life cycle assessment of bagasse waste management options  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bagasse is mostly utilized for steam and power production for domestic sugar mills. There have been a number of alternatives that could well be applied to manage bagasse, such as pulp production, conversion to biogas and electricity production. The selection of proper alternatives depends significantly on the appropriateness of the technology both from the technical and the environmental points of view. This work proposes a simple model based on the application of life cycle assessment (LCA) to evaluate the environmental impacts of various alternatives for dealing with bagasse waste. The environmental aspects of concern included global warming potential, acidification potential, eutrophication potential and photochemical oxidant creation. Four waste management scenarios for bagasse were evaluated: landfilling with utilization of landfill gas, anaerobic digestion with biogas production, incineration for power generation, and pulp production. In landfills, environmental impacts depended significantly on the biogas collection efficiency, whereas incineration of bagasse to electricity in the power plant showed better environmental performance than that of conventional low biogas collection efficiency landfills. Anaerobic digestion of bagasse in a control biogas reactor was superior to the other two energy generation options in all environmental aspects. Although the use of bagasse in pulp mills created relatively high environmental burdens, the results from the LCA revealed that other stages of the life cycle produced relatively small impacts and that this option might be the most environmentally benign alternative.

Kiatkittipong, Worapon [Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Industrial Technology, Silpakorn University, Nakhon Pathom 73000 (Thailand); National Center of Excellence for Environmental and Hazardous Waste Management, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand); Wongsuchoto, Porntip [National Center of Excellence for Environmental and Hazardous Waste Management, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand); Pavasant, Prasert [National Center of Excellence for Environmental and Hazardous Waste Management, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand); Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand)], E-mail: prasert.p@chula.ac.th

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

17

Passing the buck in the garbage can model of organizational choice  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We reconstruct Cohen, March and Olsen's Garbage Can model of organizational choice as an agent-based model. In the original model, the members of an organization can postpone decision-making. We add another means for avoiding making decisions, that of ... Keywords: Buck-passing, Garbage can model, Organizational decision making, Postponing decisions

Guido Fioretti; Alessandro Lomi

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Hard Real-Time Garbage Collection for a Java Chip Multi-Processor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

or hard copies of all or part of this work for personal or classroom use is granted without fee provided, these approaches implement substantial parts or all of the garbage collector in hard- ware. In contrast, ourHard Real-Time Garbage Collection for a Java Chip Multi-Processor Wolfgang Puffitsch Institute

19

Hard Real-Time Garbage Collection on Chip Multi-Processors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hard Real-Time Garbage Collection on Chip Multi-Processors DISSERTATION submitted in partial are however not suited for use in hard real-time systems. As a failure in these systems can have catastrophic of the respective system. In the past few years, methods for garbage collection that are suitable for use in hard

20

A study of the scalability of stop-the-world garbage collectors on multicores  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Large-scale multicore architectures create new challenges for garbage collectors (GCs). In particular, throughput-oriented stop-the-world algorithms demonstrate good performance with a small number of cores, but have been shown to degrade badly beyond ... Keywords: garbage collection, multicore, numa

Lokesh Gidra; Gaël Thomas; Julien Sopena; Marc Shapiro

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "garbage bagasse sewerage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Paper pulp from sugar mill bagasse  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is a continuation-in-part of US Serial No. 884,513, abandoned. Neutral sulfite semichemical (NSSC) cooking of depithed bagasse gave pulp with improved physicomechanical properties for use in the production of newsprint paper. Thus, the NSSC cooking at 170-175/sup 0/ gave pulp in 70-75% yield. The NSSC pulp as above was bleached with alkali H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ at 50-70/sup 0/ to give a product with breaking load 8.7 kg, tensile 3.9%, breaking length 7.13 km, absolute tearing strength 135 cmg/cm, absolute bursting strength 3.8 kg/sq. cm and Elrepho brightness 61.

Krueger, H.; Berndt, W.; Schwartzkopff, U.; Reitter, F.J.; Hoepner, T.; Muehlig, H.J.

1981-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

22

Overlooking roots: a framework for making nondeferred reference-counting garbage collection fast  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Numerous optimizations exist for improving the performance of nondeferred reference-counting (RC) garbage collection. Their designs are ad hoc, intended to exploit different count removal opportunities. This paper shows that many of these optimizations ... Keywords: reference counting, static analysis

Pramod G. Joisha

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Garbage collection in the presence of remote objects: an empirical study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most virtual machine implementations employ generational garbage collection to manage dynamically allocated memory. Studies have shown that these generational schemes work efficiently in desktop-like applications where most objects are short-lived. The ...

Witawas Srisa-an; Mulyadi Oey; Sebastian Elbaum

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Contribution of garbage burning to chloride and PM[subscript 2.5] in Mexico City  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The contribution of garbage burning (GB) emissions to chloride and PM[subscript 2.5] in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) has been investigated for the period of 24 to 29 March during the MILAGRO-2006 campaign using ...

Li, G.

25

Conversion of bagasse cellulose into ethanol  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The study conducted by Arkenol was designed to test the conversion of feedstocks such as sugar cane bagasse, sorghum, napier grass and rice straw into fermentable sugars, and then ferment these sugars using natural yeasts and genetically engineered Zymomonis mobilis bacteria (ZM). The study did convert various cellulosic feedstocks into fermentable sugars utilizing the patented Arkenol Concentrated Acid Hydrolysis Process and equipment at the Arkenol Technology Center in Orange, California. The sugars produced using this process were in the concentration range of 12--15%, much higher than the sugar concentrations the genetically engineered ZM bacteria had been developed for. As a result, while the ZM bacteria fermented the produced sugars without initial inhibition, the completion of high sugar concentration fermentations was slower and at lower yield than predicted by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). Natural yeasts performed as expected by Arkenol, similar to the results obtained over the last four years of testing. Overall, at sugar concentrations in the 10--13% range, yeast produced 850090% theoretical ethanol yields and ZM bacteria produced 82--87% theoretical yields in 96 hour fermentations. Additional commercialization work revealed the ability to centrifugally separate and recycle the ZM bacteria after fermentation, slight additional benefits from mixed culture ZM bacteria fermentations, and successful utilization of defined media for ZM bacteria fermentation nutrients in lieu of natural media.

Cuzens, J.E.

1997-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

26

Catalytic steam gasification of bagasse for the production of methanol  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) tested the catalytic gasification of bagasse for the production of methanol synthesis gas. The process uses steam, indirect heat, and a catalyst to produce synthesis gas in one step in fluidized bed gasifier. Both laboratory and process development scale (nominal 1 ton/day) gasifiers were used to test two different catalyst systems: (1) supported nickel catalysts and (2) alkali carbonates doped on the bagasse. This paper presents the results of laboratory and process development unit gasification tests and includes an economic evaluation of the process. 20 references, 6 figures, 9 tables.

Baker, E.G.; Brown, M.D.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

A Semi-Preemptive Garbage Collector for Solid State Drives  

SciTech Connect

NAND flash memory is a preferred storage media for various platforms ranging from embedded systems to enterprise-scale systems. Flash devices do not have any mechanical moving parts and provide low-latency access. They also require less power compared to rotating media. Unlike hard disks, flash devices use out-of-update operations and they require a garbage collection (GC) process to reclaim invalid pages to create free blocks. This GC process is a major cause of performance degradation when running concurrently with other I/O operations as internal bandwidth is consumed to reclaim these invalid pages. The invocation of the GC process is generally governed by a low watermark on free blocks and other internal device metrics that different workloads meet at different intervals. This results in I/O performance that is highly dependent on workload characteristics. In this paper, we examine the GC process and propose a semi-preemptive GC scheme that can preempt on-going GC processing and service pending I/O requests in the queue. Moreover, we further enhance flash performance by pipelining internal GC operations and merge them with pending I/O requests whenever possible. Our experimental evaluation of this semi-preemptive GC sheme with realistic workloads demonstrate both improved performance and reduced performance variability. Write-dominant workloads show up to a 66.56% improvement in average response time with a 83.30% reduced variance in response time compared to the non-preemptive GC scheme.

Lee, Junghee [ORNL; Kim, Youngjae [ORNL; Shipman, Galen M [ORNL; Oral, H Sarp [ORNL; Wang, Feiyi [ORNL; Kim, Jongman [Georgia Institute of Technology

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Conversion of sugarcane bagasse to carboxylic acids under thermophilic conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With the inevitable depletion of the petroleum supply and increasing energy demands in the world, interest has been growing in bioconversion of lignocellulosic biomass (e.g., sugarcane bagasse). Lignocellulosic biomass is an abundant, inexpensive, and renewable resource. Most of current conversion technologies require expensive enzymes and sterility. In contrast, the patented MixAlco process requires no enzymes or sterility, making it attractive to convert lignocellulosic biomass to transportation fuels and valuable chemicals. This study focuses on pretreatment and thermophilic fermentation in the MixAlco process. Ammonium bicarbonate (NH4HCO3) was discovered to be a better pH buffer than previously widely used calcium carbonate (CaCO3) in anaerobic fermentations under thermophilic conditions (55°C). The desired pH should be controlled within 6.5 to 7.5. Over 85% acetate content in the product was found in paper fermentations and bagasse fermentations. Hot-lime-water-treated bagasse countercurrent fermentations buffered by ammonium bicarbonate achieved 50–60% higher total product concentrations than those using calcium carbonate. It was nearly double in paper batch fermentations if the pH was controlled around 7.0. Ammonium bicarbonate is a “weak” methane inhibitor, so a strong methane inhibitor (e.g., iodoform) is still required in ammonium bicarbonate buffered fermentations. Residual calcium salts did not show significant effects on ammonium bicarbonate buffered fermentations. Lake inocula from the Great Salt Lake, Utah, proved to be feasible in ammonium bicarbonate buffered fermentations. Under mesophilic conditions (40°C), the inoculum from the Great Salt Lake increased the total product concentration about 30%, compared to the marine inoculum. No significant fermentation performance difference, however, was found under thermophilic conditions. The Continuum Particle Distribution Model (CPDM) is a powerful tool to predict product concentrations and conversions for long-term countercurrent fermentations, based on batch fermentation data. The experimental acid concentrations and conversions agree well with the CPDM predictions (average absolute error < 15%). Aqueous ammonia treatment proved feasible for bagasse. Air-lime-treated bagasse had the highest acid concentration among the three treated bagasse. Air-lime treatment coupled with ammonium bicarbonate buffered fermentations is preferred for a “crop-tofuel” process. Aqueous ammonia treatment combined with ammonium bicarbonate buffered fermentations is a viable modification of the MixAlco process, if “ammonia recycle” is deployed.

Fu, Zhihong

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Volatile fatty acid fermentation of lime-treated bagasse by rumen microorganisms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis describes the design and operation of a batch, anaerobic, in vitro fermentation of sugarcane bagasse by a mixed culture of ruminal microflora. The bagasse was supplemented with a small amount of alfalfa (0.16 g alfalfa/g bagasse) to provide necessary nutrients. The volatile fatty acid (VFA) product concentrations, yields and proportions of each acid for six different bagasse concentrations (10, 20, 35, 50, 75, and 100 g/L) are reported. Bagasse was treated with calcium hydroxide to increase the digestibility of the cell wall carbohydrates. The treatment conditions were: Ca(OH)2 loading = 10 g/100 g dry bagasse, water loading = 8.5 g/g dry bagasse, temperature 100'C, and treatment time = 1 hour. Compared to untreated bagasse, the lime-treated bagasse gave higher total VFA concentrations, faster rates of acidogenesis, and more stable molar proportions of individual VFA'S. The highest total VFA concentration obtained from lime-treated bagasse was 690 mM (45 g/L). By applying the lime pretreatment, the total VFA concentrations increased over 80% for a 10 g dry bagasse/L loading fermentation (from 4.5g VFA/L to 8.5 g VFAAL) With lime pretreatment, approximately 71 to 96% of the final total VFA yields were accomplished within the initial three days of fermentation, whereas only 52 to 67% were achieved without pretreatment during the same time period. At all solid loadings, the VFA molar compositions resulting from lime-treated bagasse were quite constant: acetate, 64-70%; propionate, 21-28%; butyrate, 6.5-7.6%; and other acids were about 1% each. In this thesis, we examined the effect of higher substrate concentration up to 100 g dry bagasse/L. For untreated bagasse, the VFA yields were fairly constant regardless of substrate concentration (ca. 0.37 g VFA/g dry substrate). However, for lime-treated bagasse, the total VFA yields decreased as the substrate concentrations increased. The best total VFA yield obtained from 10 g/L lime-treated bagasse was 0.63 g VFA/g dry raw substrate (or 0.82 g VFA/g dry ash-free substrate or 0.94 g VFA/g dry ash-free, lignin- free substrate). This is greater than yields previously reported in the literature using lignocellulosic substrates, and hence demonstrates the superiority of this very effective lime pretreatment.

Lee, Chang-Ming

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

A study into the permeability and compressibility of Australian bagasse pulp.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This is an experimental study into the permeability and compressibility properties of bagasse pulp pads. Three experimental rigs were custom-built for this project. The experimental… (more)

Rainey, Thomas James

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Production of compost with bagasse and vinasses for cane crop in Brazil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent laboratory experiments have shown that a mixture of bagasse, animal manure and vinasse can be transformed into compost suitable for agriculture. The factors necessary for good composting are discussed, these include the carbon-nitrogen ratio, moisture, aeration and temperature. A mixture of 300 kg cane bagasse and 38 kg poultry manure moistened with vinasse gave the best results.

Park, Y.K.; Castro Gomez, R.J.H.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Comparing Coordinated Garbage Collection Algorithms for Arrays of Solid-state Drives  

SciTech Connect

Solid-State Drives (SSDs) offer significant performance improvements over hard disk drives (HDD) on a number of workloads. The frequency of garbage collection (GC) activity is directly correlated with the pattern, frequency, and volume of write requests, and scheduling of GC is controlled by logic internal to the SSD. SSDs can exhibit significant performance degradations when garbage collection (GC) conflicts with an ongoing I/O request stream. When using SSDs in a RAID array, the lack of coordination of the local GC processes amplifies these performance degradations. No RAID controller or SSD available today has the technology to overcome this limitation. In our previous work, we presented a Global Garbage Collection (GGC) mechanism to improve response times and reduce performance variability for a RAID array of SSDs. A coordination method is employed so that GCs in the array can run at the same time. The coordination can exhibit substantial performance improvement. In this paper, we explore various GC coordination algorithms. We develop reactive and proactive GC coordination algorithms and evaluate their I/O performance and block erase counts for various workloads. We show that a proactive GC coordination algorithm can improve the I/O response times by up to 9% further and increase the lifetime of SSDs by reducing the number of block erase counts by up to 79% compared to a reactive algorithm.

Lee, Junghee [ORNL; Kim, Youngjae [ORNL; Oral, H Sarp [ORNL; Shipman, Galen M [ORNL; Dillow, David A [ORNL; Wang, Feiyi [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Harmonia: A Globally Coordinated Garbage Collector for Arrays of Solid-state Drives  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solid-State Drives (SSDs) offer significant performance improvements over hard disk drives (HDD) on a number of workloads. The frequency of garbage collection (GC) activity is directly correlated with the pattern, frequency, and volume of write requests, and scheduling of GC is controlled by logic internal to the SSD. SSDs can exhibit significant performance degradations when garbage collection (GC) conflicts with an ongoing I/O request stream. When using SSDs in a RAID array, the lack of coordination of the local GC processes amplifies these performance degradations. No RAID controller or SSD available today has the technology to overcome this limitation. This paper presents Harmonia, a Global Garbage Collection (GGC) mechanism to improve response times and reduce performance variability for a RAID array of SSDs. Our proposal includes a high-level design of SSD-aware RAID controller and GGC-capable SSD devices, as well as algorithms to coordinate the global GC cycles. Our simulations show that this design improves response time and reduces performance variability for a wide variety of enterprise workloads. For bursty, write dominant workloads response time was improved by 69% while performance variability was reduced by 71%.

Kim, Youngjae [ORNL; Oral, H Sarp [ORNL; Shipman, Galen M [ORNL; Lee, Junghee [ORNL; Dillow, David A [ORNL; Wang, Feiyi [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Design of a bagasse charcoal briquette-making device for use in Haiti  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Charcoal made from bagasse, the fibrous remains of sugarcane production, has the potential to serve as an alternate cooking fuel in Haiti, where the reliance on wood has led to severe deforestation. Current production ...

Vechakul, Jessica

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

And then there were none: a stall-free real-time garbage collector for reconfigurable hardware  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Programmers are turning to radical architectures such as reconfigurable hardware (FPGAs) to achieve performance. But such systems, programmed at a very low level in languages with impoverished abstractions, are orders of magnitude more complex to use ... Keywords: block ram, fpga, garbage collection, high level synthesis, real time

David F. Bacon; Perry Cheng; Sunil Shukla

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Real-time garbage collection for flash-memory storage systems of real-time embedded systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flash-memory technology is becoming critical in building embedded systems applications because of its shock-resistant, power economic, and nonvolatile nature. With the recent technology breakthroughs in both capacity and reliability, flash-memory storage ... Keywords: Embedded systems, flash memory, garbage collection, real-time system, storage systems

Li-Pin Chang; Tei-Wei Kuo; Shi-Wu Lo

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Feasibility study for bagasse congeneration in Kenya. Final report. Export trade information  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The study was funded by the U.S. Trade and Development Agency on behalf of Kenya's Ministry of Agriculture. The purpose of the report is to determine the economic, technical, and financial viability of implementing bagasse based cogeneration projects in Kenya. The study is divided into the following sections: (1) Executive Summary, (2) Terms of Reference, (3) Bagasse Fuel for Generation, (4) The Electrical Power Situation in Kenya, (5) Export Electricity Potential from Nyando Sugar Belt, (6) Export Potential from Proposed New Sugar Factories; (7) Financial, (8) Project Financing, (9) Demonstration Project.

Not Available

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Sugarcane juice extraction and preservation, and long-term lime pretreatment of bagasse  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

New technologies, such as an efficient vapor-compression evaporator, a stationary lime kiln (SLK), and the MixAlco process, compelled us to re-evaluate methods for producing sugar from cane. These technologies allow more water and lime to be used, and they add more value to bagasse. Extracting and preserving the sugars, and lime pretreating the bagasse to enhance biodigestibility, all at the same time in a pile, was demonstrated to be unfeasible; therefore, sugar extraction must occur before lime treating the bagasse. Sugar extraction should occur countercurrently by lixiviation, where liquid moves in stages opposite to the soaked bagasse (megasse), which is conveyed by screw-press conveyors that gently squeeze the fiber in each stage, improving extraction. The performance of a pilot-scale screw-press conveyor was tested for dewatering capabilities and power consumption. The unoptimized equipment decreased megasse moisture from 96 to 89%. Simulation of the process suggested that eight stages are necessary to achieve 98% recovery from typical sugarcane. The cumulative power for the screw-press conveyor system was 17.0±2.1 hp?h/ton dry fiber. Thin raw juice preserved with lime for several months showed no sucrose degradation and no quality deterioration, except for reducing sugar destruction. The lime loading needed for 1-year preservation is 0.20 g Ca(OH)2/g sucrose. Shorter times require less lime. After preservation, the juice was carbonated and filtered, and the resulting sludge pelletized. Due to their high organic content, the pellets were too weak for calcination temperatures used in the SLK. The organics must be decreased prior to pelletization and sodium must be supplemented as a binding agent. Long-term lime pretreatment of bagasse showed two delignification phases: bulk (rapid) and residual (slow). These were modeled by two simultaneous first-order reactions. Treatments with air purging and higher temperatures (50 ? 57oC) delignified more effectively, especially during the residual phase, thus yielding higher cellulase-enzyme digestibilities after 2 ? 8 weeks of treatment. At temperatures > 60oC, pure oxygen purging is preferred. Fresh bagasse was of better quality than old bagasse. Treatment with NaOH yielded a larger bulk delignification phase than Ca(OH)2. Long-term lime pulping of bagasse was unsuitable for copy-quality paper, but it was appropriate for strawboard and other filler applications.

Granda Cotlear, Cesar Benigno

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Effects of blending, staging and furnace temperature on co-firing of coal and biomass-bagasse.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This manuscript reports on emissions generated from laboratory-scale batch combustion of a high-volatile content bituminous coal, sugar-cane bagasse, and blends thereof. The average bulk equivalence… (more)

Arvind, Joshi Kulbhushan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

The development of multi-objective optimization model for excess bagasse utilization: A case study for Thailand  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, a multi-objective optimization model is proposed as a tool to assist in deciding for the proper utilization scheme of excess bagasse produced in sugarcane industry. Two major scenarios for excess bagasse utilization are considered in the optimization. The first scenario is the typical situation when excess bagasse is used for the onsite electricity production. In case of the second scenario, excess bagasse is processed for the offsite ethanol production. Then the ethanol is blended with an octane rating of 91 gasoline by a portion of 10% and 90% by volume respectively and the mixture is used as alternative fuel for gasoline vehicles in Thailand. The model proposed in this paper called 'Environmental System Optimization' comprises the life cycle impact assessment of global warming potential (GWP) and the associated cost followed by the multi-objective optimization which facilitates in finding out the optimal proportion of the excess bagasse processed in each scenario. Basic mathematical expressions for indicating the GWP and cost of the entire process of excess bagasse utilization are taken into account in the model formulation and optimization. The outcome of this study is the methodology developed for decision-making concerning the excess bagasse utilization available in Thailand in view of the GWP and economic effects. A demonstration example is presented to illustrate the advantage of the methodology which may be used by the policy maker. The methodology developed is successfully performed to satisfy both environmental and economic objectives over the whole life cycle of the system. It is shown in the demonstration example that the first scenario results in positive GWP while the second scenario results in negative GWP. The combination of these two scenario results in positive or negative GWP depending on the preference of the weighting given to each objective. The results on economics of all scenarios show the satisfied outcomes.

Buddadee, Bancha [National Center of Excellence for Environmental and Hazardous Waste Management, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand)], E-mail: bancha_eng@yahoo.com; Wirojanagud, Wanpen [Research Center of Environmental and Hazardous Substance Management, Department of Environmental Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen 40002 (Thailand)], E-mail: wanpen@kku.ac.th; Watts, Daniel J. [Center for Environmental Engineering and Science, New Jersey Institute of Technology, Newark, New Jersey 07102 (United States)], E-mail: daniel.watts@njit.edu; Pitakaso, Rapeepan [Department of Industrial Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Ubonratchathani University, Ubonratchathani 34190 (Thailand)], E-mail: enrapepi@ubu.ac.th

2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "garbage bagasse sewerage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Environmental Life Cycle Implications of Using Bagasse-Derived Ethanol as a Gasoline Oxygenate in Mumbai (Bombay)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Bagasse is the fibrous residue generated during sugar production and can be a desirable feedstock for fuel ethanol production. About 15%--25% of the bagasse is left after satisfying the mills' energy requirements, and this excess bagasse can be used in a bioconversion process to make ethanol. It is estimated that a 23 million L/yr ({approximately}6 million gal/yr) ethanol facility is feasible by combining excess bagasse from three larger sugar mills in Maharashtra state. The plant could supply about half of the ethanol demand in Mumbai, assuming that all gasoline is sold as an E10 fuel, a blend of 90% gasoline and 10% ethanol by volume. The life cycle assessment (LCA) performed in this study demonstrated the potentially significant benefits of diverting excess bagasse in Maharashtra to ethanol production, as opposed to disposing it by burning. In particular, lower net values for the ethanol production scenario were observed for the following: fossil energy consumption, and emissions of carbon monoxide , hydrocarbons (except methane), SOx, NOx, particulates, carbon dioxide, and methane. The lower greenhouse potential of the ethanol scenario is also important in the context of Clean Development Mechanism and Joint Implementation because India is a developing country.

Kadam, K.

2000-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

42

Effects of physical and chemical pretreatments on the crystallinity of bagasse  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biomass conversion technologies are receiving increasing attention due to global climate change and most recently plans from the President of the United States to reduce fossil fuel consumption. The MixAlco process converts a variety of feedstocks, such as agricultural residues, municipal solid waste, and sewage sludge, into mixed alcohols via microbial fermentation, which can then be used as fuel additives or independently as an alternative fuel. Optimizing the pretreatment step of this process is critical to improving product yields. The process uses lime pretreatment, which can be enhanced using new decrystallization pretreatment methods, namely hydrodynamic cavitation and shock tube pretreatment.Previous studies on biomass decrystallization showed an increase in biomass digestibility when hydrodynamic cavitation was utilized as a pretreatment step. This previous work was expanded by studying both acoustic and hydrodynamic cavitation. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) was used to model the cavitator to improve its efficiency. The crystallinity before and after pretreatment was analyzed. A new laboratory-scale MixAlco lime-pretreatment system was developed to produce greater quantities of lime-pretreated biomass that could be subjected to decrystallization experiments. The length of pretreatment, water loading, and bagasse loadings were varied for the shock tube experiments. After each pretreatment, enzymatic hydrolysis was performed, and the equivalent glucose yield was measured by the DNS (dinitrosalicylic acid) assay. Additionally, mixed-acid fermentation was performed to show the benefits of reduced crystallinity on the MixAlco fermentation. The acoustic and hydrodynamic cavitation pretreatments had a modest effect on crystallinity. In contrast, the shock tube pretreatment shows greater promise as an effective decrystallization pretreatment, even for lime-treated bagasse. Repeated shocks had little effect on digestibility and the crystallinity; however, the water temperature used in shock tube pretreatment played an important role in bagasse digestibility and crystallinity.

Jones, Maxine Janette

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Pyrolysis of sugarcane bagasse and co-pyrolysis with an Argentinean subbituminous coal  

SciTech Connect

Physicochemical properties of the charcoal arising from pyrolysis of sugarcane bagasse at 600{sup o}C and 800{sup o}C were determined to evaluate potentialities for specific end uses. The charcoals were found fairly adequate as solid bio-fuels. Their quality was comparable to charcoals obtained from some other agro-industrial by-products, reportedly proposed as substitutes of wood-based ones. Surface properties of the charcoal generated at the higher temperature indicated that it is reasonably suited for potential use as low-cost rough adsorbent, soil amender, and/or for further upgrading to activated carbon. Moreover, kinetic measurements for pyrolysis of the sugarcane bagasse individually and mixed with an Argentinean subbituminous coal in equal proportions were conducted by thermogravimetry for the range 25 -900{sup o}C. Data modeling accounting for variations in the activation energy with process evolution provided a proper description of pyrolysis and co-pyrolysis over the entire temperature range.

Bonelli, P.R.; Buonomo, E.L.; Cukierman, A.L. [University of Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Use of Brazilian sugarcane bagasse ash in concrete as sand replacement  

SciTech Connect

Sugarcane today plays a major role in the worldwide economy, and Brazil is the leading producer of sugar and alcohol, which are important international commodities. The production process generates bagasse as a waste, which is used as fuel to stoke boilers that produce steam for electricity cogeneration. The final product of this burning is residual sugarcane bagasse ash (SBA), which is normally used as fertilizer in sugarcane plantations. Ash stands out among agroindustrial wastes because it results from energy generating processes. Many types of ash do not have hydraulic or pozzolanic reactivity, but can be used in civil construction as inert materials. The present study used ash collected from four sugar mills in the region of Sao Carlos, SP, Brazil, which is one of the world's largest producers of sugarcane. The ash samples were subjected to chemical characterization, sieve analysis, determination of specific gravity, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and solubilization and leaching tests. Mortars and concretes with SBA as sand replacement were produced and tests were carried out: compressive strength, tensile strength and elastic modulus. The results indicated that the SBA samples presented physical properties similar to those of natural sand. Several heavy metals were found in the SBA samples, indicating the need to restrict its use as a fertilizer. The mortars produced with SBA in place of sand showed better mechanical results than the reference samples. SBA can be used as a partial substitute of sand in concretes made with cement slag-modified Portland cement.

Sales, Almir, E-mail: almir@ufscar.b [Department of Civil Engineering, UFSCar, Via Washington Luis, km 235, Monjolinho, 13565-905 Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil); Lima, Sofia Araujo, E-mail: sofiaalima@yahoo.com.b [Department of Civil Engineering, UFSCar, Via Washington Luis, km 235, Monjolinho, 13565-905 Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil)

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

45

LANL debuts hybrid garbage truck  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environment Feature Stories Public Reading Room: Environmental Documents, Reports LANL Home Phonebook Calendar Video Newsroom News Releases News Releases - 2010 ...

46

Profiles in garbage: Polyethylene terephthalate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) is a plastic resin used primarily to make bottles. Soft drinks -- along with salad dressing, fruit juices, peanut butter, and other household and consumer products -- use PET bottles. PET also is used for film, sheeting for cups and food trays, oven-safe trays, and other uses. PET is a relatively new packaging resin, first commercialized in the early 1970s. Because it is an ``engineered`` resin, PET is more expensive than commodity resins such as high-density polyethylene (HDPE) and, for the same reason, it is usually the highest valued plastic recyclable.

Miller, C. [Environmental Industry Associations, Washington, DC (United States)

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Probabilistic models of maximum precipitation for designing sewerage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pluviographic measurement results from the IMGW Wroc?aw-Strachowice meteorological station from years 1960-2009 constitute the basis for this paper. While conducting the statistical analysis of precipitation occurrence frequency own criterion of ...

Andrzej Kotowski; Bartosz Ka?mierczak

48

Economies of Scale and Scope in Network Industries: Lessons for the UK water and sewerage sectors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

). There is also an issue of definition and measurement of economies of scope. A vehicle factory might be operating at a size that returns the maximum economies of scale for vehicle manufacture; however, the plant could be redefined as a car and van... manufacturing factory. Now it is a multi-product firm. The optimal economies of scale of vehicle manufacture are likely to include benefits derived from economies of scope. These would have previously been included in the measurement of scale economies...

Pollitt, Michael G.; Steer, Stephen J.

49

Lock-Free Garbage Collection for Multiprocessors Maurice P. Herlihy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

). It is easy to examine our code sequences and determine the exact cache consistency re~uirements, so we omit

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

50

A LISP Garbage Collector Algorithm Using Serial Secondary Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents an algorithm for reclaiming unused free storage memory cells in LISP. It depends on availability of a fast secondary storage device, or a large block of available temporary storage. For this price, we ...

Minsky, M.L.

1963-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

51

Municipal solid waste plants convert garbage to electricity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Includes hydropower, solar, wind, geothermal, biomass and ethanol. Nuclear & Uranium. Uranium fuel, nuclear reactors, generation, spent fuel. Total Energy.

52

Lab employees don't treat their trash like garbage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

able to recycle 93 percent of its construction and demolition waste (almost 7,000 tons of debris and scrap materials) and reused more than 5,000 of the 20,188 cubic yards of clean...

53

Mostly-copying garbage collection picks up generations and C  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

research relevant to the design and application of high performance scientific computers. We test our ideas by designing, building, and using real systems. The systems we build are research prototypes; they are not intended to become products. There is a second research laboratory located in Palo Alto, the Systems Research Center (SRC). Other Digital research groups are located in Paris (PRL) and in Cambridge,

Joel F. Bartlett

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

QUANTIFYING AND IMPROVING THE PERFORMANCE OF GARBAGE COLLECTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the ALI and PLASMA research groups over the years, especially Steve Blackburn, Alistair Dundas, Yi (Eric

Hertz, Matthew

55

Coordinated Garbage Collection for RAID Array of Solid State Disks  

... or it can query the disks to determine the best time to start a global collection . Advantages • Solid state disks have no mechanical moving ...

56

Coordinated Garbage Collection for RAID Array of Solid State ...  

... in which collection cycles begin on all disks in the array at a scheduled time, or it can query the disks to determine the best time to start a global ...

57

Bagasse-based cogeneration projects in Kenya. Export trade information  

SciTech Connect

A Definitional Mission team evaluated the prospects of the US Trade and Development Program (TDP) funding a feasibility study that would assist the Government of Kenya in developing power cogeneration plants in three Kenyan sugar factories and possibly two more that are now in the planning stage or construction. The major Kenyan sugar producing region around Kisumu, on Lake Victoria has climatic conditions that permit cane growing operations ideally suitable for cogeneration of power in sugar factories. The total potentially available capacity from the proposed rehabilitation of the three mills will be approximately 25.15 MW, or 5.7 percent of total electricity production.

Kenda, W.; Shrivastava, V.K.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Comparative Study of the Sugarcane Bagasse Fiber/HDPE ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The composite samples obtained by extrusion and injection molding processes were irradiated at 50 and 90 kGy using either a 1.5 MeV electron beam ...

59

Plastic, the Great Pacific Garbage Patch, and International Misfires at a Cure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Elimination of Pollution from Land-Based Sources, requiresprevent and eliminate pollution from land-based sources. 2 1as opposed to land-based sources of pollution. The London

Harse, Grant A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Sparsely faceted arrays : a mechanism supporting the parallel allocation, communication, and garbage collection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conventional parallel computer architectures do not provide support for non-uniformly distributed objects. In this thesis, I introduce sparsely faceted arrays (SFAs), a new low-level mechanism for naming regions of memory, ...

Brown, Jeremy Hanford, 1972-

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "garbage bagasse sewerage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Sparsely Faceted Arrays: A Mechanism Supporting Parallel Allocation, Communication, and Garbage Collection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conventional parallel computer architectures do not provide support for non-uniformly distributed objects. In this thesis, I introduce sparsely faceted arrays (SFAs), a new low-level mechanism for naming regions of memory, ...

Brown, Jeremy Hanford

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

An on-the-fly reference counting garbage collector for Java  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reference counting is not naturally suitable for running on multiprocessors. The update of pointers and reference counts requires atomic and synchronized operations. We present a novel reference counting algorithm suitable for a multiprocessor that does ...

Yossi Levanoni; Erez Petrank

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Waste Management: Garbage Displacement and the Ethics of Mafia Representation in Matteo Garrone’s Gomorra  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

spaces: abandoned gas stations, decommissioned quarries,shot of a still and silent gas station is the set for the

Bondavalli, Simona

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Lazy Garbage Collection of Recovery State for Fault-Tolerant Distributed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-tolerant home-based lazy release consistency (HLRC) distributed shared-memory (DSM) system based on independent

Iftode, Liviu

65

Use of Ash from the Incineration of Urban Garbage into Clayey ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The waste is a type of fly-ash resulting from the incineration of a selected part of urban ... Analysis of Carbon Fiber Recovered from Optimized Processes of ... Clayey Ceramic Incorporated with Powder from the Sintering Plant of a ... Influence of Fly Ash and Fluorgypsum on Hydration Heat and Mortar Strength of Cement.

66

Garbage on the wharf : a transfer station for the City of Boston  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Perhaps because they address processes at the expense of space or have many "conditions" limiting architectural design freedom, infrastructure and particularly the infrastructure of waste, are commonly neglected in ...

Russell, Phillip Gregory

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Gentrified Barrio : gentrification and the Latino community in San Francisco's Mission District  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

stores and better garbage pick-up, residents in vibrantbasic services like garbage pick-up and police presence have

Nyborg, Anne Meredith

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Spitzer should focus on turning garbage into renewable energy By ALYSSAA. LAPPEN and JACK D. LAUBER Eliot Spitzer, listen up.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the Development of Biomass." Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger seeks to boost California's wind, solar and biomass energy. Continuing on New York City's current track, though, will generate incalculable costs. Diesel-term low pollution from transport, millions of gallons of wasted diesel fuel consumption, and increased

Columbia University

69

Trace gas and particle emissions from domestic and industrial biofuel use and garbage burning in central Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In central Mexico during the spring of 2007 we measured the initial emissions of 12 gases and the aerosol speciation for elemental and organic carbon (EC, OC), anhydrosugars, Cl?, NO[subscript 3]?, and 20 metals from 10 ...

Christian, T. J.

70

Conversion of sugarcane bagasse to ethanol by the use of Zymomonas mobilis and Pichia stipitis.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The rapid development of the bioethanol industry globally demonstrates the importance of bioethanol as an alternate energy source to the depleting fossil fuels. To decrease… (more)

Fu, Nan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Design of a crushing and agglomeration process for manufacturing bagasse charcoal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In Haiti, wood and wood charcoal are common fuels for cooking. This practice has contributed to deforestation, leading to erosion and fatal floods. The availability of charcoal made from a different source other than wood, ...

Fan, Victoria Y. (Victoria Yue-May)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

A comparative analysis of emissions from bagasse charcoal and wood charcoal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Haiti is the poorest country in the Western hemisphere and is in need of cheap cooking fuel source. Currently, lump charcoal, the cooking fuel of Haiti, is made by carbonizing trees in ditches before selling the charcoal ...

Ramírez, Andrés, 1982-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

An Information Product Approach For Total Information Awareness  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To fight terrorism successfully, the quality of data must be considered to avoid garbage-in-garbage-out. Research has shown that data quality (DQ) goes beyond ...

Wang, Richard

2003-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

74

False ecologies : : corporate consciousness and localized practices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Revolution, Who Is Going To Pick Up the Garbage On MondayWHO'S GOING TO PICK UP THE GARBAGE ON MONDAY MORNING? 61

White, David P.

75

ENERGY CONSERVATION: POLICY ISSUES AND END-USE SCENARIOS OF SAVINGS POTENTIAL PT.2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ton) Community Unsorted Garbage Pick-Up Costs Somerville (5%garbage processing facility -- with separate collection of the recyclable materials through a community pick-up

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Sweet-Talking the Climate? Evaluating Sugar Mill Cogeneration and Climate Change Financing in India  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2004).   Bagasse  Cogeneration  ??  Global  Review  and ?Promotion  of  biomass  cogeneration  with  power  export WADE  2004.   Bagasse  Cogeneration  –  Global  Review  and 

Ranganathan, Malini; Haya, Barbara; Kirpekar, Sujit

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Commercialization of the Conversion of Bagasse to Ethanol. Summary quarterly report for the period January-September 1999  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

These studies were intended to further refine sugar yield parameters which effect sugar yield such as feedstock particle size, debris, acid soak time, temperature, dewatering, and pretreatment conditions (such as temperature, reaction time, percentage solids concentration, acid concentration), liquid-solids separation, and detoxification parameters (such as time temperature and mixing of detoxification ingredients). Validate and refine parameters, which affect ethanol yield such as detoxification conditions mentioned above, and to fermenter conditions such as temperature, pH adjustment, aeration, nutrients, and charging sequence. Materials of construction will be evaluated also. Evaluate stillage to determine clarification process and suitability for recycle; evaluate lignocellulosic cake for thermal energy recovery to produce heat and electricity for the process; and Support Studies at UF - Toxin Amelioration and Fermentation; TVA work will provide pre-hydroylsates for the evaluation of BCI proprietary methods of toxin amelioration. Pre-hydrolysates from batch studies will allow the determination of the range of allowable hydrolyze conditions that can be used to produce a fermentable sugar stream. This information is essential to guide selection of process parameters for refinement and validation in the continuous pretreatment reactor, and for overall process design. Additional work will be conducted at UFRFI to develop improved strains that are resistant to inhibitors. The authors are quite optimistic about the long-term prospects for this advancement having recently developed strains with a 25%--50% increase in ethanol production. The biocatalyst platform selected originally, genetically engineered Escherichia coli B, has proven to be quite robust and adaptable.

NONE

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Addressing Industrial Control Systems in NISP SP 800-53  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 8 One example is an isolated electrical substation that supplies electric power to water and sewerage pumps 9 . While a prolonged outage of the ...

2007-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

79

A mark-and-sweep collector C++  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Our research is concerned with compiler-independent, tag-free garbage collection for the C++ programming language. We have previously presented a copying collector based on root registration. This paper presents a mark-and-sweep garbage collector that ...

Daniel R. Edelson

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Algorithms for Multivariate Polynomials - CECM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

garbage is created, thus eliminating the need for garbage collection. .... pick small random integers a ? , ..., a? , factor ?f = f( xO, x ? = a ? , ..., x? = a? ) using ... Wang's technique assumes that GCDs exist and are unique (up to multiplication by.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "garbage bagasse sewerage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Mike Rotkin on the Rise and Fall of Community Studies at UCSC, 1969-2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ll come around and pick up your garbage. But you’ve got tokids, and we’ll come pick up your garbage. We’ll do it once,

Rotkin, Mike; Rabkin, Sarah Juniper; Regional History Project, UCSC Library

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Water Conservation Tips When washing dishes by hand, don't let the water run while rinsing. Fill one sink with wash water and the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

when they are full and you could save 1000 gallons a month. Use the garbage disposal sparingly. Compost trimmings and peelings from fruits and vegetables into your yard compost to prevent from using the garbage

83

Today in Energy - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas. Exploration and reserves, storage, imports and exports, production, prices, sales. ... Municipal solid waste plants convert garbage to electricity .

84

A survey of state clean energy fund support for biomass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

burning or heating of waste wood, tires, garbage, generalheating projects in the business sector. These projects are using primarily wood

Fitzgerald, Garrett; Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Carbon Offsetting: An Efficient Way to Reduce Emissions or to Avoid Reducing Emissions? An Investigation and Analysis of Offsetting Design and Practice in India and China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

history of the development of bagasse cogeneration (the generation of electricityhistory of the development of high efficiency bagasse cogeneration (the generation of electricityhistory of the development of a single technology in India – the generation of electricity

Haya, Barbara

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Techno-Economic Analysis of Hydrogen Production by Gasification of Biomass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

was the design and operation of a gasifier processing 100 tons/day of bagasse utilizing the RENUGAS® pro

87

Renewable Energy in Rangan Banerjee  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Power 376 70% 2306 Biomass Gasifier 69 70% 423 Bagasse Cogeneration 540 60% 2838 Small Hydro 1826 50

Banerjee, Rangan

88

New SRMs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... RM 8491 Sugarcane Bagasse Whole Biomass Feedstock New expiration date: 01 June 2020 Technical changes RM 8492 ...

2011-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

89

Report on Customer Service Performance Measures in UK Network SQUEEZING HARD TO IMPROVE QUALITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

....................................................... Page 4 2.0 ELECTRICITY: SUPPLY, DISTRIBUTION & TRANSMISSION DISTRIBUTION ..................................... Page 23 2.3 ELECTRICITY TRANSMISSION ­ The National Grid measures, as imposed by the economic regulators of water and sewerage services, electricity (supply

Feigon, Brooke

90

Swamp rats, fat cats and soggy suburbs : planners and engineers in south east Florida  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

U.S. cities continue to physically expand, supported by and creating demand for water supply, road, sewerage, electricity networks. But the relationship between the professional values, education and practices of city or ...

Phelan, Katherine A., 1971-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Adaptive reuse and revitalization of water heritage in Nicosia, Cyprus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The bi-communal sewerage system developed for the divided capital of Nicosia, Cyprus has been lauded as a rare example of cooperation between the Turkish Cypriot and Greek Cypriot communities. The story of how the project ...

Lau, Marisa (Marisa May-Lan)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

The Sorted City: San Francisco, Hope SF, and the Redevelopment of Public Housing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

courts, piles of garbage, street lights shattered by bulletsto the rest of the city. Street lights work infrequently.such as the Third Street Light Rail, business development

Rongerude, Jane Marie

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

EIA Energy Kids - Covanta Waste-to-Energy Plant  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas; Nuclear; Oil (petroleum) Photovoltaic; Solar Thermal; Transportation; Wind; ... This means that Covanta takes garbage and turns it into electricity. Cool.

94

sage-5.13.beta1 - CECM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Trac #14888: ffelt: fix doctests for 32-bit systems; some clean up; 14888_review. patch · Download: Trac #14888: ffelt: fix garbage collection problem ...

95

Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-13-001.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

trash are removed from the building for pickup and transportation by garbage collection services prior to lease termination. Using, Reusing, and Conserving Natural Resources: DOE...

96

Clean energy funds: An overview of state support for renewable energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

solar space heating, and clean wood stoves - applicationsloans (11 advanced wood heating systems, 2 geothermal heatburning, or heating of waste wood, tires, garbage, general

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Milford, Lew; Stoddard, Michael; Porter, Kevin

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Integrated Pest Management of Flies in Texas Dairies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This publication identifies and gives management strategies for various species of flies infesting Texas dairies, including houseflies, stable flies, horn flies, garbage flies and blow flies.

Stevenson, Douglas; Cocke, Jesse

2000-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

98

Introspective pushdown analysis of higher-order programs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the static analysis of functional programs, pushdown flow analysis and abstract garbage collection skirt just inside the boundaries of soundness and decidability. Alone, each method reduces analysis times and boosts precision by orders of magnitude. ... Keywords: abstract garbage collection, abstract interpretation, abstract machines, cfa2, higher-order languages, program analysis, pushdown analysis, pushdown systems

Christopher Earl; Ilya Sergey; Matthew Might; David Van Horn

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Path specialization: reducing phased execution overheads  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As garbage collected languages become widely used, the quest for reducing collection overheads becomes essential. In this paper, we propose a compiler optimization called path specialization that shrinks the cost of memory barriers for a wide ... Keywords: c#, garbage collection, memory management, read barriers, write barriers

Filip Pizlo; Erez Petrank; Bjarne Steensgaard

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Improving the performance of log-structured file systems with adaptive block rearrangement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Log-Structured File System (LFS) is famous for its optimization for write performance. Because of its append-only nature, garbage collection is needed to reclaim the space occupied by the obsolete data. The cleaning overhead could significantly decrease ... Keywords: data rearrangement, garbage collection, log-structured file system

Mei-Ling Chiang; Jia-Shin Huang

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "garbage bagasse sewerage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

WEEE treatment strategies' evaluation using fuzzy LINMAP method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electrical and electronic equipments (EEE) have already begun to be accumulated at the garbage dumps. This garbage accumulation brings big danger to the environment and human health. That's why one should look for exploring the ways to dispose of these ... Keywords: Fuzzy LINMAP, Multi-attribute group decision making, WEEE treatment strategies

Ilke Bereketli; Mujde Erol Genevois; Y. Esra Albayrak; Melisa Ozyol

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Published by Information Services, University of B.C., 2075 Wesbrook Mail, Vancouver. 6.C: V6T 1W5. 228-3131. J. A. Banham and Judith Walker, editors. VOl. 23, NO. 16.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

into landfill projects,Dr.Cameron says, and extractionof the gas fromold B.C.garbage dumpsmaybecome feasible was a direct result of limited operating grants, nearly stable overall Continuedon p.2 "Title change" Shearer engineering in the Faculty of Applied Science,says garbage dumplandfills generate methane,an inflammable gas

Farrell, Anthony P.

103

Household Hazardous Waste Household hazardous waste is the discarded, unused, or leftover portion of household products  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Household Hazardous Waste Household hazardous waste is the discarded, unused, or leftover portion of household products containing toxic chemicals. These wastes CANNOT be disposed of in regular garbage. Any should be considered hazardous. You cannot treat hazardous wastes like other kinds of garbage

de Lijser, Peter

104

Simulação do processo de produção de etanol a partir do açucar e do bagaço, visando a integração do processo e a maximização da produção de energia e excedentes do bagaço.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The main objective of this dissertation is to present the description and simulation of bioethanol production processes from sugarcane juice and bagasse, considering the evaluation… (more)

Marina Oliveira de Souza Dias

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Microsoft Word - MySAB_Final_EA-12-02-2010.docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and other lignocellulosic sugars derived from biomass agricultural residues such as corn stover and sugarcane bagasse, and forest residues such as wood chips. The base...

106

NREL: Energy Analysis - Biomass Technology Analysis Models and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of more than 150 (as of 1001) samples of potential biofuels feedstocks including corn stover, wheat straw, bagasse, switchgrass and other grasses, and poplars and other...

107

NREL: Biomass Research - Data and Resources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

data on more than 150 analyzed samples of potential biofuels feedstocks, including corn stover, wheat straw, bagasse, switchgrass and other grasses, and poplars and other...

108

India Overview - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

large amount of biomass used for electricity generation comes from bagasse (crushed sugarcane or sorghum stalks), which can be used in ...

109

Characterization of Carbon and Soft Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 15, 2012... (HRTEM), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), and Raman spectroscopy studies. .... Comparative Study of the Sugarcane Bagasse Fiber/HDPE ...

110

Cellulosic biofuels begin to flow but in lower volumes than ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Several companies combined to produce about 20,000 gallons of fuels using cellulosic biomass (e.g., wood waste, sugarcane bagasse) from commercial-scale facilities in ...

111

Process for preparing and using sweet sorghum in a fuel product  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This patent describes a method of storing sweet sorghum preparatory to pelletizing it for use as a combustible fuel product comprising: removing a majority of sugar-containing fluid from the sorghum to leave a residue of ligno-cellulosic bagasse; piling the bagasse on a hard surface; compressing the piled bagasse to form a compacted mass, whereby the compressing frees air trapped within the bagasse to inhibit microbial and fungal oxidative degradation thereof; and storing the compacted mass preparatory to pelletizing the same.

Gunnerman, R.W.; Farone, W.A.

1986-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

112

Methodological and Practical Considerations for Developing Multiproject Baselines for Electric Power and Cement Industry Projects in Central America  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MW of renewable energy projects (small hydro and bagasse co-hydro projects, and some geothermal projects, were registered under the Renewable Energy

Murtishaw, Scott; Sathaye, Jayant; Galitsky, Christina; Dorion, Kristel

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Liveness of Heap Data for Functional Programs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Functional programming languages use garbage collection for heap memory management. Ideally, garbage collectors should reclaim all objects that are dead at the time of garbage collection. An object is dead at an execution instant if it is not used in future. Garbage collectors collect only those dead objects that are not reachable from any program variable. This is because they are not able to distinguish between reachable objects that are dead and reachable objects that are live. In this paper, we describe a static analysis to discover reachable dead objects in programs written in first-order, eager functional programming languages. The results of this technique can be used to make reachable dead objects unreachable, thereby allowing garbage collectors to reclaim more dead objects.

Karkare, Amey; Sanyal, Amitabha

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Microsoft Word - Raccoon_Article_final.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

a good variety of food scraps will act as a magnet for raccoons. To avoid creating a "banquet" area for these animals, all outside garbage receptacles should have fastened tight...

115

CX-008523: Categorical Exclusion Determination  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Non-Hazardous Solid Waste Disposal Contract (Garbage Collection) CX(s) Applied: A1, A8, B1.3 Date: 07/10/2012 Location(s): Oregon Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

116

Mostly-copying reachability-based orthogonal persistence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe how reachability-based orthogonal persistence can be supported even in uncooperative implementations of languages such as C++ and Modula-3, and without modification to the compiler. Our scheme extends Bartlett's mostly-copying garbage collector ...

Antony L. Hosking; Jiawan Chen

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Using landfill gas for energy: Projects that pay  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pending Environmental Protection Agency regulations will require 500 to 700 landfills to control gas emissions resulting from decomposing garbage. Conversion of landfill gas to energy not only meets regulations, but also creates energy and revenue for local governments.

NONE

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

The Wily Coyote  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

also attract coyotes looking for easy prey. 4. Limit disposal of edible garbage in compost piles or other outside areas. Coyotes are opportunistic and will be attracted to such...

119

Region Type Checking for Core-Java  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Region-based memory management offers several important advantages over garbage-collected heap, including real-time performance, better data locality and efficient use of limited memory. The concept of regions was first ...

Chin, Wei Ngan

120

KRT Wire | 07/19/2004 | 'Wonderbug' changes waste into power News | Business | Sports | Entertainment | Living/FYI | Classifieds | Jobs | Cars | Homes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, generate electricity from rust and garbage, and even run a toy car. It's a lot to expect from an invisible | Entertainment | Living/FYI | Classifieds | Jobs | Cars | Homes Register or Log In. Member Benefits News Election

Lovley, Derek

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "garbage bagasse sewerage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

NETL F 451.1/1-1, Categorical Exclusion Designation Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Not Assigned Yet Lee JensenAllied Waste of Albany.. FE NETLSOD FY 2013-FY20175 years Lee Jensen NETL: Albany, Oregon Non-Hazardous Solid Waste Disposal Contract (Garbage...

122

Chapter 8 Findings 8.1 Introduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

transport options including the use of electric vehicles and systems to reduce car usage such as garbage dissatisfied with the long-term suitability of diesel generators to supply the Islands with electricity

123

Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC02-09CH11466. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SARA Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986 SBRSA Stony Brook Regional Sewerage Authority Diego University of Washington at Seattle Cadarache, France selected as the site for ITER On June 28. As shown in Exhibit 2-1, the site is located in Plainsboro Township within Middlesex County (central New

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

124

Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC02-76CH03073. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986 SBRSA Stony Brook Regional Sewerage Authority SDWA Safe THANK YOU TO ALL WHO PARTICIPATED AND WHO REMEMBERED EARTH DAY 2002 Participating Schools Central University of California at San Diego University of Washington at Seattle PPPL's TFTR was kept in a safe

125

PREPARED FOR THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, UNDER CONTRACT DE-AC02-76CH03073  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986 SBRSA Stony Brook Regional Sewerage Authority SDWA Safe University of California at San Diego University of Washington at Seattle PPPL's TFTR was kept in a safe (central New Jersey), which includes the municipalities of Princeton, Kingston, West Windsor, and Cranbury

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

126

Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC02-76CH03073. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SARA Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986 SBRSA Stony Brook Regional Sewerage Authority of California at Los Angeles University of California at San Diego University of Washington at Seattle. As shown in Exhibit 2-1, the site is located in Plainsboro Township within Middlesex County (central New

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

127

ECOSYSTEM COMPONENT CHARACTERIZATION 461 Failing or nearby septic tank systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

or natural environment Leaks from underground storage tanks and pipes are a common source of soil.g., petroleum refineries. Pipes that are plugged or collapsed, as well as leaking storage tanks, may cause: · Sanitary wastewater sources: ­ Raw sanitary wastewater from improper sewerage connections, exfiltration

Pitt, Robert E.

128

Alcotra Bio Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Zip 22290-906 Product Alcotra Bio Energy is a new subsidiary of Alcotra, focusing on production of ethanol and energy from sugarcane bagasse. References Alcotra Bio Energy1...

129

Preliminary assessment of potential CDM early start projects in Brazil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

10 XI. Wind Farms in Northeast$20/tC SMALL HYDRO IN GOIAS WIND FARMS BAGASSE ELECTRICITYFax: +55(71)379 1759 XI. Wind Farms in Northeast Brazil

Meyers, S.; Sathaye, J.; Lehman, B.; Schumacher, K.; van Vliet, O.; Moreira, J.R.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

INDIA.PDF  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

kcalkg (4100 Btulb) - one ton of bagasse is equal to about two barrels of oil on an energy basis. Based on Table 5 data, sugar production in India yields 70-80 million metric...

131

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY DANISCO U.S. INC. (f/k...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the U.S. on substrates other than sugar cane bagasse, such as hardwoods, paper pulp, and corn stover. In exchange for the waiver from the U.S. Competitiveness clause of its...

132

Comparisons of four categories of waste recycling in China's paper industry based on physical input-output life-cycle assessment model  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Using crop straws and wood wastes for paper production should be promoted. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bagasse and textile waste recycling should be properly limited. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Imports of scrap paper should be encouraged. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sensitivity analysis, uncertainties and policy implications are discussed. - Abstract: Waste recycling for paper production is an important component of waste management. This study constructs a physical input-output life-cycle assessment (PIO-LCA) model. The PIO-LCA model is used to investigate environmental impacts of four categories of waste recycling in China's paper industry: crop straws, bagasse, textile wastes and scrap paper. Crop straw recycling and wood utilization for paper production have small total intensity of environmental impacts. Moreover, environmental impacts reduction of crop straw recycling and wood utilization benefits the most from technology development. Thus, using crop straws and wood (including wood wastes) for paper production should be promoted. Technology development has small effects on environmental impacts reduction of bagasse recycling, textile waste recycling and scrap paper recycling. In addition, bagasse recycling and textile waste recycling have big total intensity of environmental impacts. Thus, the development of bagasse recycling and textile waste recycling should be properly limited. Other pathways for reusing bagasse and textile wastes should be explored and evaluated. Moreover, imports of scrap paper should be encouraged to reduce large indirect impacts of scrap paper recycling on domestic environment.

Liang Sai [School of Environment, State Key Joint Laboratory of Environment Simulation and Pollution Control, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Zhang, Tianzhu, E-mail: zhangtz@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn [School of Environment, State Key Joint Laboratory of Environment Simulation and Pollution Control, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Xu Yijian [School of Environment, State Key Joint Laboratory of Environment Simulation and Pollution Control, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); China Academy of Urban Planning and Design, Beijing 100037 (China)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

133

Lab celebrates Earth Day  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lab celebrates Earth Day Lab celebrates Earth Day Community Connections: Our link to Northern New Mexico Communities Latest Issue:Dec. 2013 - Jan. 2014 All Issues » submit Lab celebrates Earth Day Multiple activities focus on environmental protection. May 1, 2013 A team from Industrial Hygiene and Safety during the Great Garbage Grab A team from Industrial Hygiene and Safety during the Great Garbage Grab. Contact Editor Linda Anderman Email Community Programs Office Kurt Steinhaus Email Great Garbage Grab From April 1 - 12 employees were encouraged to don work gloves and very attractive orange vests to pick up litter around their workplace-both on and off Lab property. This year's winner of the coveted Traveling Trash Trophy (for picking up the most litter) went to the Worker Safety and

134

Integrated Waste Management in Sweden Where incineration is not a dirty word  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the opportunity to visit a Swedish waste-to-energy plant in Malmö and was amazed at how clean and technologically on their own or through public or private contractors. Needless to say, there is a strong economic incentive, rather than deal with it later. By mixing economic incentives, such as garbage collection fees, with easy

Columbia University

135

University of Colorado Boulder Colorado Springs Denver Anschutz Medical Campus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chi float is right. 49 #12;so Sp,.ing on the Jerry Emison, senior business student and member of Tri around Queen Jerry include Marsha J ensch, Delta Gamma; Marlene Hopkins, Ddta Gamma; ) err)' Emison Joe Tom Tom Turpin Bob Wallace Jerry Wray Douglas Young #12;Tonsilitis. BETA 68 High-class garbage

Stowell, Michael

136

Dynamic heap type inference for program understanding and debugging  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

C programs can be difficult to debug due to lax type enforcement and low-level access to memory. We present a dynamic analysis for C that checks heap snapshots for consistency with program types. Our approach builds on ideas from physical subtyping and ... Keywords: conservative garbage collection, constraints, debugging tools, dynamic type inference, heap visualization, physical subtyping

Marina Polishchuk; Ben Liblit; Chloë W. Schulze

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

POLY : A new polynomial data structure for Maple - CECM - Simon ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

They fill the simpl table and slow down Maple's garbage collector. 5. Provided no ... So the POLY dag representation can accommodate polynomials in 8 variables up to total degree 127. We chose the .... In order to do this they pick apart each ...

138

POLY : A new polynomial data structure for Maple 17 - CECM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

They fill the simpl table and slow down Maple's garbage collector. 5. Provided no .... In order to do this they pick appart each ... terms, up to 90% of the time is spent converting the POLY dag for the product to the sum-of-products dag, and ...

139

Man-in-the-middle in tunnelled authentication protocols  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

John Ioannidis: I have to interrupt here and be even more offensive than usual. But you are using the worst rackets in industry as a justification for what you're doing. There are all sorts of people just generating garbage protocols, a couple ...

N. Asokan

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

NUMA-aware memory manager with dominant-thread-based copying GC  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We propose a novel online method of identifying the preferred NUMA nodes for objects with negligible overhead during the garbage collection time as well as object allocation time. Since the number of CPUs (or NUMA nodes) is increasing recently, it is ... Keywords: cc-NUMA, java

Takeshi Ogasawara

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "garbage bagasse sewerage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Contact: John F. Kelly  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

@poly.edu Garbage Gas: Polytechnic University Researcher Develops Bioplastic as a Disposable Source of Biodiesel New, have bioengineered a fuel-latent plastic that can be converted into biodiesel. The Defense Advanced synthesis, to develop enzymes that can both synthesize and break the fuel-latent plastic down into biodiesel

Aronov, Boris

142

To appear in Proceedings of the International Conference on Dependable Systems and Networks (DSN-2002), IEEE/IFIP, June 23-26, 2002, Washington, DC.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Subsystem with a Tunable Statistical Profiling Service Andy Franz, Radek Mista, David Bakken, Curtis Dyreson, Murali Medidi2 School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Washington State University PO Box garbage in and produces energy for the time-travelling Delorean car of Doc Brown, the genial but mad

Dyreson, Curtis

143

Colimits for Concurrent Collectors Dusko Pavlovic1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the overall specification in Fig. 1. In this diagram we have added monotone white Mutator monotone white Mut in the previous section we have added the Collector invariant black white = gray = monotone white Mutator Coll information. In the greater part of the paper we work out the example of concurrent garbage collection

144

Live-structure dataflow analysis for Prolog  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For the class of applicative programming languages, efficient methods for reclaiming the memory occupied by released data structures constitute an important aspect of current implementations. The present article addresses the problem of memory reuse ... Keywords: Prolog, abstract interpretation, compile-time garbage collection, liveness, program analysis

Anne Mulkers; William Winsborough; Maurice Bruynooghe

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Tolerating memory leaks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Type safety and garbage collection in managed languages eliminate memory errors such as dangling pointers, double frees, and leaks of unreachable objects. Unfortunately, a program still leaks memory if it maintains references to objects it will never ... Keywords: bug tolerance, managed languages, memory leaks

Michael D. Bond; Kathryn S. McKinley

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

GCspy: an adaptable heap visualisation framework  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

GCspy is an architectural framework for the collection, transmission, storage and replay of memory management behaviour. It makes new contributions to the understanding of the dynamic memory behaviour of programming languages (and especially object-oriented ... Keywords: Java, garbage collection, language implementation, memory management, visualisation of objects

Tony Printezis; Richard Jones

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

DOI: 10.1002/chem.201201123 Synthesis and STM Imaging of Symmetric and Dissymmetric Ethynyl-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- Bridged Dimers of Boron­Subphthalocyanine Bowl-Shaped Nanowheels Henri-Pierre Jacquot de Rouville] which have an inter- esting bowl-shaped structure due to the presence of the tet- rahedral boron. Garbage, Dr. F. Ample, Dr. C. Joachim, Prof. Dr. G. Rapenne NanoSciences Group, CEMES, CNRS UPR 8011 29

Cuniberti, Gianaurelio

148

Capacity-to-Act in India's Solid Waste Management and Waste-to-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Capacity-to-Act in India's Solid Waste Management and Waste-to- Energy Industries Perinaz Bhada and disposal of garbage, or municipal solid waste, compounded by increasing consumption levels. Another serious of converting waste into different forms of energy. The process of using waste as a fuel source and converting

Columbia University

149

THE BURNING ISSUES OF MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE DISPOSAL WHAT WORKS AND WHAT DOESN'T  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 THE BURNING ISSUES OF MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE DISPOSAL ­ WHAT WORKS AND WHAT DOESN'T By: Jack D devil burns and the Lord recycles." Perhaps these negative references to waste burning come from, the Valley of Hinnom south of ancient Jerusalem. This was the site of a foul, smoking, open burning garbage

Columbia University

150

A presentation by: Jaclyn DeCoursey &  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

be used to convert various raw fuel materials besides wood, including municipal garbage and crop wastes 2) Biofuels 3) Biodiesel 4) Gasification #12;By the numbers Over 50% of the world's population to households for space heating. #12;Biofuels Two main types: Ethanol & Biodiesel Biofuel is made from

Bensel, Terrence G.

151

Proceedings of the IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems (IROS 2000), Takamatsu, Japan, Oct. 30 -Nov. 5, 2000. Starting from a user point of view the paper discusses the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

system is re- sponsible for supervising a proper counter-measure. The task constellation running to the operating system; the garbage collector ensures that the unused memory will get automatically reclaimed. 5Proceedings of the IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems (IROS 2000

Arras, Kai O.

152

Eventrons: a safe programming construct for high-frequency hard real-time applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

While real-time garbage collection has achieved worst-case latencies on the order of a millisecond, this technology is approaching its practical limits. For tasks requiring extremely low latency, and especially periodic tasks with frequencies above 1 ... Keywords: allocation, real-time, scheduling

Daniel Spoonhower; Joshua Auerbach; David F. Bacon; Perry Cheng; David Grove

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

IMPROVED BIOREFINERY FOR THE PRODUCTION OF ETHANOL, CHEMICALS, ANIMAL FEED AND BIOMATERIALS FROM SUGAR CANE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Audubon Sugar Institute (ASI) of Louisiana State University’s Agricultural Center (LSU AgCenter) and MBI International (MBI) sought to develop technologies that will lead to the development of a sugar-cane biorefinery, capable of supplying fuel ethanol from bagasse. Technology development focused on the conversion of bagasse, cane-leaf matter (CLM) and molasses into high value-added products that included ethanol, specialty chemicals, biomaterials and animal feed; i.e. a sugar cane-based biorefinery. The key to lignocellulosic biomass utilization is an economically feasible method (pretreatment) for separating the cellulose and the hemicellulose from the physical protection provided by lignin. An effective pretreatment disrupts physical barriers, cellulose crystallinity, and the association of lignin and hemicellulose with cellulose so that hydrolytic enzymes can access the biomass macrostructure (Teymouri et al. 2004, Laureano-Perez, 2005). We chose to focus on alkaline pretreatment methods for, and in particular, the Ammonia Fiber Expansion (AFEX) process owned by MBI. During the first two years of this program a laboratory process was established for the pretreatment of bagasse and CLM using the AFEX process. There was significant improvement of both rate and yield of glucose and xylose upon enzymatic hydrolysis of AFEX-treated bagasse and CLM compared with untreated material. Because of reactor size limitation, several other alkaline pretreatment methods were also co-investigated. They included, dilute ammonia, lime and hydroxy-hypochlorite treatments. Scale-up focused on using a dilute ammonia process as a substitute for AFEX, allowing development at a larger scale. The pretreatment of bagasse by an ammonia process, followed by saccharification and fermentation produced ethanol from bagasse. Simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) allowed two operations in the same vessel. The addition of sugarcane molasses to the hydrolysate/fermentation process yielded improvements beyond what was expected solely from the addition of sugar. In order to expand the economic potential for building a biorefinery, the conversion of enzyme hydrolysates of AFEX-treated bagasse to succinic acid was also investigated. This program established a solid basis for pre-treatment of bagasse in a manner that is feasible for producing ethanol at raw sugar mills.

Dr. Donal F. Day

2009-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

154

The Economics of Ethanol from Sweet Sorghum Using the MixAlco Process  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

source Pump Drain pipe Liner Cover Biomass Gravel Sugar JuiceGrain LeavesBagasse Fermentation Fermentation Co-generation Other uses DDGS Ethanol Ethanol Electricity Heat Sweet Sorghum Pretreatment fermentation Dewater Acid springing Hydrogenation Lime kiln Biomass Lime Calcium carbonate Carboxylate salts

155

Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of bioethanol as an automotive fuel. Conversion of sugar and starch to ethanol has been proven at an industrial be conserved and requires immediate processing. In the case of sweet juice conversion to sugar (options #3 direct sale or convert- ing the sugar to ethanol with conversion of the residual bagasse to ethanol

156

Ris Energy Report 2 Bioenergy is energy of biological and renewable origin,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of bioenergy resources are fuel wood, bagasse, organic waste, biogas and bioethanol. Bioenergy is the only in biomass conversion, combined with signifi- cant changes in energy markets, have stimulated this trend should continue to develop gasification and fuel cell conversion systems based on biomass. Conversion

157

Resource recovery potential from secondary components of segregated municipal solid wastes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for decentralized biogas plants to be operated in the vicinity. We characterized the fermen- tation potential of six differently for each of the feedstocks to obtain a higher gas recovery. Bagasse produced the largest fraction-systems. The existing centralized collection and open landfill systems are gradually becoming expensive and will need

Columbia University

158

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Berkeley Lab Recycling Guide Berkeley Lab Recycling Guide The Berkeley Lab supports the philosophy that prevention is superior to remediation. The goal of waste minimization is to incorporate pollution prevention into the decision-making process at every level throughout the Lab. Additionally, where waste generation is unavoidable, the preference is to reuse or recycle. Reduce Source reduction is to garbage what preventive medicine is to health: a means of eliminating a problem before it can happen. Reduce the amount of paper you use. Use electronic transfer of information. Reduce disposal costs: By decreasing office waste you can dramatically lower the costs of garbage pick-up service. Reduce pollution: The manufacturing of new paper products from recycled materials results in a 74 percent reduction in air pollution and

159

Reclaiming Storage in an Object Oriented Platform Supporting Extended C++ and Objective-C Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes the experience obtained from the conception and implementation of a system for garbage collection in the INESC Comandos platform. The garbage collector is presently being used not only by applications written in C++ but also in ObjectiveC (both with some minor restrictions) since both languages are supported by the platform. In order to reclaim the memory used by objects, two algorithms were implemented: stop and copy with multiple generations and an incremental mark and sweep. The generational copying algorithm reduces drastically the time used to reclaim old objects when compared with a nongenerational version. Besides these two algorithms, another one was developed in order to reclaim nonobject memory (usually strings). This memory can be explicitly created by the programmer or by the Communication Subsystem in order to support distributed invocations. 1 Introduction Comandos [1, 2] is a project within the ESPRIT (European Strategic Program for Research on Inf...

Paulo Ferreira; R. Alves Redol N

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Computer memory management system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A computer memory management system utilizing a memory structure system of "intelligent" pointers in which information related to the use status of the memory structure is designed into the pointer. Through this pointer system, The present invention provides essentially automatic memory management (often referred to as garbage collection) by allowing relationships between objects to have definite memory management behavior by use of coding protocol which describes when relationships should be maintained and when the relationships should be broken. In one aspect, the present invention system allows automatic breaking of strong links to facilitate object garbage collection, coupled with relationship adjectives which define deletion of associated objects. In another aspect, The present invention includes simple-to-use infinite undo/redo functionality in that it has the capability, through a simple function call, to undo all of the changes made to a data model since the previous `valid state` was noted.

Kirk, III, Whitson John (Greenwood, MO)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "garbage bagasse sewerage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Sugar-Based Ethanol Biorefinery: Ethanol, Succinic Acid and By-Product Production  

SciTech Connect

The work conducted in this project is an extension of the developments itemized in DE-FG-36-04GO14236. This program is designed to help the development of a biorefinery based around a raw sugar mill, which in Louisiana is an underutilized asset. Some technical questions were answered regarding the addition of a biomass to ethanol facility to existing sugar mills. The focus of this work is on developing technology to produce ethanol and valuable by-products from bagasse. Three major areas are addressed, feedstock storage, potential by-products and the technology for producing ethanol from dilute ammonia pre-treated bagasse. Sugar mills normally store bagasse in a simple pile. During the off season there is a natural degradation of the bagasse, due to the composting action of microorganisms in the pile. This has serious implications if bagasse must be stored to operate a bagasse/biorefinery for a 300+ day operating cycle. Deterioration of the fermentables in bagasse was found to be 6.5% per month, on pile storage. This indicates that long term storage of adequate amounts of bagasse for year-round operation is probably not feasible. Lignin from pretreatment seemed to offer a potential source of valuable by-products. Although a wide range of phenolic compounds were present in the effluent from dilute ammonia pretreatment, the concentrations of each (except for benzoic acid) were too low to consider for extraction. The cellulosic hydrolysis system was modified to produce commercially recoverable quantities of cellobiose, which has a small but growing market in the food process industries. A spin-off of this led to the production of a specific oligosaccharide which appears to have both medical and commercial implications as a fungal growth inhibitor. An alternate use of sugars produced from biomass hydrolysis would be to produce succinic acid as a chemical feedstock for other conversions. An organism was developed which can do this bioconversion, but the economics of succinic acid production were such that it could not compete with current commercial practice. To allow recovery of commercial amounts of ethanol from bagasse fermentation, research was conducted on high solids loading fermentations (using S. cerevisiae) with commercial cellulase on pretreated material. A combination of SHF/SSF treatment with fed-batch operation allowed fermentation at 30% solids loading. Supplementation of the fermentation with a small amount of black-strap molasses had results beyond expectation. There was an enhancement of conversion as well as production of ethanol levels above 6.0% w/w, which is required both for efficient distillation as well as contaminant repression. The focus of fermentation development was only on converting the cellulose to ethanol, as this yeast is not capable of fermenting both glucose and xylose (from hemicellulose). In anticipation of the future development of such an organism, we screened the commercially available xylanases to find the optimum mix for conversion of both cellulose and hemicellulose. A different mixture than the spezyme/novozyme mix used in our fermentation research was found to be more efficient at converting both cellulose and hemicellulose. Efforts were made to select a mutant of Pichia stipitis for ability to co-ferment glucose and xylose to ethanol. New mutation technology was developed, but an appropriate mutant has not yet been isolated. The ability to convert to stillage from biomass fermentations were determined to be suitable for anaerobic degradation and methane production. An economic model of a current sugar factory was developed in order to provide a baseline for the cost/benefit analysis of adding cellulosic ethanol production.

Donal F. Day

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

162

Municipal solid waste management in Africa: Strategies and livelihoods in Yaounde, Cameroon  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper provides an overview of the state of municipal solid waste (MSW) management in the capital of Cameroon, Yaounde, and suggests some possible solutions for its improvement. The institutional, financial, and physical aspects of MSW management, as well as the livelihoods of the population, were analyzed. Our study revealed that distances and lack of infrastructure have a major impact on waste collection. Garbage bins are systematically mentioned as the primary infrastructure needed by the population in all quarters, whether it be a high or low standard community. The construction of transfer stations and the installation of garbage bins are suggested as a solution to reduce distances between households and garbage bins, thus improving waste collection vehicle accessibility. Transfer stations and garbage bins would enable the official waste collection company to expand its range of services and significantly improve waste collection rates. Several transfer stations have already been set up by non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and community-based organizations (CBOs), but they require technical, institutional and funding support. Research is needed on the quality and safety of community-made compost, as well as on soil fertility in urban and peri-urban areas. Most of the stakeholders, municipalities, the official waste collection company and households acknowledge the need for better monitoring and regulation of MSW management. The urban community of Yaounde also needs to maintain its support of MSW management and promote the sustainability of NGOs and CBOs operating in underserved areas not yet covered by adequate infrastructures. A major opportunity for implementation of such waste policy is the heavily indebted poor countries (HIPC) program dedicated to urban planning and good governance.

Parrot, Laurent [Centre de Cooperation Internationale en Recherche Agronomique pour le Developpement (CIRAD), Montpellier 34398 Cedex 5 (France)], E-mail: laurent.parrot@cirad.fr; Sotamenou, Joel; Dia, Bernadette Kamgnia [University of Yaounde II - Soa, Faculty of Economics and Management, P.O. Box 1365, Yaounde (Cameroon)

2009-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

163

Interactive Numerical Flow Visualization Using Stream Surfaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.1.2 The Interpreter . 2.1.3 The Garbage Collector . 2.1.4 The Foreign Function Interface 2.2 THE OBJECT SYSTEM.3.1 Implementation ...... . 4.3.2 Performance Measurement . 4.4 FURTHER USE OF CELL TAGS . 4.4.1 Valid Cells .. 4 Particle . 5.4.4 Ripping the Surface . . . . . 5.5 HANDLING CURVATURE .... 5.5.1 Measuring Surface

North Carolina at Chapel Hill, University of

164

P/M Stainless Steels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 12   Applications for P/M stainless steels...Seatback tray slides 316L Galley latches 316L Jet fuel refueling impellers 316L Foam generators 316L Agriculture Fungicide spray equipment 316L Appliances Automatic dishwasher components 304L Automatic washer components 304L Garbage disposal components 410L Pot handles 316L Coffee filters 316L-Si...

165

Anaerobic fermentation of rice straw and chicken manure to carboxylic acids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this work, 80% lime-treated rice straw and 20% lime-treated chicken manure were used as substrates in rotary fermentors. Countercurrent fermentation was performed at various volatile solid loading rates (VSLR) and liquid residence times (LRT). The highest acid productivity of 1.69 g/(L�·d) was at a total acid concentration of 32.4 g/L. The highest conversion and yield were 0.692 g VS digested/g VS fed and 0.29 g total acids/g VS fed, respectively. The continuum particle distribution model (CPDM) was used to predict product concentrations at various VSLR and LRT. CPDM predicted the experimental total acid concentration and conversion at an average error of 6.41% and 6.55%, respectively. A fixed-bed fermentation system was designed to perform pretreatment and fermentation in the same unit. High product concentrations (~48 g/L) as well as high conversions (0.741 g VS digested/g VS fed, F4, Train B) were obtained from the same fermentor. CPDM was extended to predict product concentrations in the fixed-bed fermentation system. The model gave a good estimate of the product concentrations and retention time. After biomass fermentation, the residue can be combusted to generate heat. For pretreatment purposes, the use of ash can replace lime. A study was performed using ash as a potential pretreatment agent. Ash from raw poplar wood was effective in pretreating poplar wood; however, ash from bagasse fermentation residues was not useful in pretreating bagasse. Previous modeling studies indicate that a conversion of 95% could be achieved with bagasse using countercurrent fermentation. Because lignin constitutes 13% of the dry weight of bagasse, this means lignin would have to be digested to obtain a conversion of 95%. Experiments on the fermentation of enzymatically liberated lignin from both poplar wood and bagasse do not show that solubilized lignin was fermented to organic acids by using a mixed culture of marine microorganisms. Two buffer systems (ammonium bicarbonate and calcium carbonate) were used to compare product concentrations of carboxylic acid fermentations using office paper and chicken manure. It has been demonstrated that the total product concentration using ammonium bicarbonate is almost double the product concentration using calcium carbonate.

Agbogbo, Frank Kwesi

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

31 - 16040 of 28,905 results. 31 - 16040 of 28,905 results. Rebate Garrison Diversion Conservancy District (North Dakota) The Garrison Conservancy District is a state agency established to provide for land irrigation, to establish and restore depleted lakes and stabilize stream flows, and to make waters available for... http://energy.gov/savings/garrison-diversion-conservancy-district-north-dakota Rebate Gas Storage Act (Illinois) Any corporation which is engaged in or desires to engage in, the distribution, transportation or storage of natural gas or manufactured gas, which gas, in whole or in part, is intended for ultimate... http://energy.gov/savings/gas-storage-act-illinois Rebate Gas, Heat, Water, Sewerage Collection and Disposal, and Street Railway Companies (South Carolina) This legislation applies to public utilities and entities furnishing

167

Data:D3cc486d-f051-4418-a189-7bfeac997a3c | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

86d-f051-4418-a189-7bfeac997a3c 86d-f051-4418-a189-7bfeac997a3c No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Anaheim, California (Utility Company) Effective date: 2011/12/01 End date if known: Rate name: Power-Agriculture- Schedule PA Sector: Commercial Description: Applicability to power service for general agricultural purposes, or for general water or sewerage pumping. Source or reference: http://www.anaheim.net/utilities/ElectricRules/SCHD-PA.pdf Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh):

168

National and Regional Water and Wastewater Rates For Use inCost-Benefit Models and Evaluations of Water Efficiency Programs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Calculating the benefits and costs of water conservation orefficiency programs requires knowing the marginal cost of the water andwastewater saved by those programs. Developing an accurate picture of thepotential cost savings from water conservation requires knowing the costof the last few units of water consumed or wastewater released, becausethose are the units that would be saved by increased water efficiency.This report describes the data we obtained on water and wastewater ratesand costs, data gaps we identified, and other issues related to using thedata to estimate the cost savings that might accrue from waterconservation programs. We identified three water and wastewater ratesources. Of these, we recommend using Raftelis Financial Corporation(RFC) because it: a) has the most comprehensive national coverage; and b)provides greatest detail on rates to calculate marginal rates. The figurebelow shows the regional variation in water rates for a range ofconsumption blocks. Figure 1A Marginal Rates of Water Blocks by Regionfrom RFC 2004Water and wastewater rates are rising faster than the rateof inflation. For example, from 1996 to 2004 the average water rateincreased 39.5 percent, average wastewater rate increased 37.8 percent,the CPI (All Urban) increased 20.1 percent, and the CPI (Water andSewerage Maintenance) increased 31.1 percent. On average, annualincreases were 4.3 percent for water and 4.1 percent for wastewater,compared to 2.3 percent for the All Urban CPI and 3.7 percent for the CPIfor water and sewerage maintenance. If trends in rates for water andwastewater rates continue, water-efficient products will become morevaluable and more cost-effective.

Fisher, Diane C.; Whitehead, Camilla Dunham; Melody, Moya

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

HDR (Hot Dry Rock) technology transfer activities in the Clear Lake Area, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A large Hot Dry Rock resource has been recognized in northern California. It underlies the region extending NE of The Geysers to N of the City of Clearlake. The long-range productive potential is thousands of megawatts. The geothermal resource is heterogeneous. There are two mechanisms of heat flow occurring together. One is fluid transport, up natural zones of permeability, to outflows as surface springs. The other is conductive heat flow through impermeable rock. The temperature isotherms are thought to be nearly level surfaces, for example, the 300{degree}C isotherm is at about 8000 ft depth, with spikes'' or ridges'' occurring around narrow zones of fluid flow. While there is accessible heat at shallow depth in the naturally permeable rocks, the really substantial resource is in the impermeable rock. This is the HDR resource. The potential reservoir rocks are Franciscan greywackes and greenstones. Recorded drilling problems appear to be mainly due to intersection with serpentinites or to the effects of stimulation, so are potentially avoidable. Greywacke is favoured as a reservoir rock, and is expected to fail by brittle fracture. The water shortages in Northern California appear to be surmountable. Leakoff rates are expected to be low. Sewerage water may be available for fill and makeup. There is a possibility of combining HDR heat power production with sewerage disposal. To establish the first HDR producer in Northern California offers challenges in technology transfer. Two significant challenges will be creation of dispersed permeability in a greywacke reservoir, and pressure management in the vicinity of naturally permeable zones. A successful demonstration of HDR production technology will improve the long-term prospects for the geothermal power industry in California. 29 refs., 20 figs., 4 tabs.

Burns, K.; Potter, R.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Solid Waste Program (Alabama) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Program (Alabama) Program (Alabama) Solid Waste Program (Alabama) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Developer General Public/Consumer Industrial Residential Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Alabama Program Type Environmental Regulations This article states the authority of the department, regulations for the control of unauthorized dumping, disposal fees, violations and penalties. Solid waste refers to any garbage, rubbish, construction or demolition debris, ash, or sludge from a waste treatment facility, water supply plant, or air pollution control facility, and any other discarded materials, including solid, liquid, semisolid, or contained gaseous material resulting

171

Data linkage algebra, data linkage dynamics, and priority rewriting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We introduce an algebra of data linkages. Data linkages are intended for modelling the states of computations in which dynamic data structures are involved. We present a simple model of computation in which states of computations are modelled as data linkages and state changes take place by means of certain actions. We describe the state changes and replies that result from performing those actions by means of a term rewriting system with rule priorities. The model in question is an upgrade of molecular dynamics. The upgrading is mainly concerned with the features to deal with values and the features to reclaim garbage.

Bergstra, J A

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Municipal waste processing apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to apparatus for processing municipal waste, and more particularly to vibrating mesh screen conveyor systems for removing grit, glass, and other noncombustible materials from dry municipal waste. Municipal waste must be properly processed and disposed of so that it does not create health risks to the community. Generally, municipal waste, which may be collected in garbage trucks, dumpsters, or the like, is deposited in processing areas such as landfills. Land and environmental controls imposed on landfill operators by governmental bodies have increased in recent years, however, making landfill disposal of solid waste materials more expensive. 6 figs.

Mayberry, J.L.

1988-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

173

Leak Pruning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Managed languages improve programmer productivity with type safety and garbage collection, which eliminate memory errors such as dangling pointers, double frees, and buffer overflows. However, programs may still leak memory if programmers forget to eliminate the last reference to an object that will not be used again. Leaks slow programs by increasing collector workload and frequency. Growing leaks crash programs. Instead of crashing, leak pruning extends program availability by predicting and reclaiming leaked objects at run time. Whereas garbage collection over-approximates live objects using reachability, leak pruning predicts dead objects and reclaims them based on how stale they are and the size of stale data structures. Leak pruning preserves semantics because it waits for heap exhaustion before reclaiming objects and then poisons references to objects it reclaims. If the program later tries to access these objects, the virtual machine (VM) throws an internal error. We implement leak pruning in a Java VM, show its overhead is low, and evaluate it on 10 leaking programs. Leak pruning does not help two programs, executes four substantial programs 1.6-35X longer, and executes four programs, including two leaks in Eclipse, for at least 24 hours. In the worst case, leak pruning defers fatal errors. In the best case, programs with unbounded memory requirements execute indefinitely and correctly in bounded memory with consistent throughput.

Michael D. Bond; Kathryn S. McKinley

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Title Evaluation of Inventions- Reducing Time in a DEAR Process Authors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Legislative changes in the U.S. and more recently Germany, require universities and research institutes to act as entrepreneurs, something that is not necessarily in their nature. Therefore, a number of Technology Transfer Organizations or Evaluation Agencies have been established to handle the evaluation, patenting and commercialization of inventions. The process of evaluating inventions, in this thesis termed DEAR, poses two major challenges for evaluation agencies: (1) the process must be aimed at keeping the inventions that will generate revenues and filtering out those that will not; and (2) the time spent on evaluation should be kept to a minimum, but must never be reduced below the point where potential commercial successes will be lost. The purpose of this thesis is to benchmark the practices of evaluation agencies in order to establish whether time can be reduced in any part of the DEAR process and if so where. We find that there are aspects in almost every stage of the DEAR process that could be made more effective. For instance, it may be worthwhile for the German agencies to reflect on the fact that their U.S. counterparts generally seem to rely on the scientific information given in the disclosure. Also, even though valuation of inventions often becomes a case of “Garbage In – Garbage Out”, such valuation may be worthwhile for younger agencies since it may signal that the DEAR process is conducted in a thorough and accurate manner.

Stefan Kristoffersson; Mathias Jonsson Division; Stefan Kristoffersson; Mathias Jonsson

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Pacific Ethanol, Inc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Verenium Biofuels Corporation Verenium Biofuels Corporation Corporate HQ: Cambridge, Massachusetts Proposed Facility Location: Jennings, Louisiana Description: Operation and maintenance of a demonstration-scale facility in Jennings, Louisiana with some capital additions. CEO or Equivalent: Carlos A. Riva, President, Chief Executive Officer and Director Participants: Only Verenium Biofuels Corporation Production: * Capacity of 1.5 million gallons per year of cellulosic ethanol biofuel Technology and Feedstocks: * Pretreatment, enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulosics and fermentation of sugars into ethanol * sugarcane bagasse, dedicated energy crops, agricultural waste, and wood product residues State of Readiness: * The demonstration facility has been completed and is in the

176

BSEL BioProducts, Sciences, and Engineering Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

. . To develop and transform abundant and renewable bioresources through targeted research, development, demonstration and commercialization of bioproducts, bioprocesses and bioenergy supported by a wide variety of public and private partnerships. 2. To provide a quality and rigorous education in the sciences and engineering required to conduct an active program of research, discovery and commercialization while integrating the teaching and research missions. You are here Statement from US Department of Energy Current technology: Starch-based ethanol Biomass: Corn, grain, sugar Technology under implementation: Lignocellulose based ethanol Residues and waste: Corn stover, straw, bagasse, wood, garden refuges etc. Cellulose Hemicellulose

177

Compilation of air pollutant emission factors. Volume 1. Stationary point and area sources. Supplement E  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the Supplement to the Fourth Edition of AP-42 Volume I, new or revised emissions data are presented for Anthracite Coal Combustion; Natural Gas Combustion; Liquified Petroleum Gas Combustion; Wood Waste Combustion In Boilers; Bagasse Combustion In Sugar Mills; Residential Fireplaces; Residential Wood Stoves; Waste Oil Combustion; Automobile Body Incineration; Conical Burners; Open Burning; Stationary Gas Turbines for Electricity Generation; Heavy Duty Natural Gas Fired Pipeline Compressor Engines; Gasoline and Diesel Industrial Engines; Large Stationary Diesel and All Stationary Dual Fuel Engines; Soap and Detergents; and Storage of Organic Liquids.

Not Available

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Promotion of Biomass Cogeneration With Power Export in the Indian Sugar  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Promotion of Biomass Cogeneration With Power Export in the Indian Sugar Industry Promotion of Biomass Cogeneration With Power Export in the Indian Sugar Industry India Helping Reduce the Risk of Global Warming Greenhouse Gas Pollution Prevention (GEP) Project in India India is the worldÂ’s fifth largest, and second fastest growing, source of greenhouse gas emissions. The GEP Project, conducted under an agreement with USAID-India and NETL, has helped to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from coal- and biomass-fired power plants. The Project has directly contributed to reducing emissions of CO2 by 6 to 10 million tons per year. India is the largest producer of sugar and also contains vast reserves of coal. Under the ProjectÂ’s Advanced Bagasse Cogeneration Component, cogeneration (production of electricity and steam) using biomass fuels year-round in high efficiency boilers in sugar mills is promoted. Experts feel that, using the concept of sugar mill cogeneration, that as much as 5,000 megawatts of electricity can be generated through efficient combustion of bagasse in Indian sugar mills.

179

Demonstration plant for pressurized gasification of biomass feedstocks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A project to design, construct, and operate a pressurized biomass gasification plant in Hawaii will begin in 1991. Negotiations are underway with the United States Department of Energy (DOE) which is co-funding the project with the state of Hawaii and industry. The gasifier is a scale-up of the pressurized fluidized-bed RENUGAS process developed by the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT). The project team consists of Pacific International Center for High Technology Research (PICHTR), Hawaii Natural Energy Institute (HNEI) of the University of Hawaii, Hawaiian Commercial and Sugar Company (HC S), The Ralph M. Parsons Company, and IGT. The gasifier will be designed for 70 tons per day of sugarcane fiber (bagasse) and will be located at the Paia factory of HC S on the island of Maui. In addition to bagasse, other feedstocks such as wood, biomass wastes, and refuse-derived-fuel may be evaluated. The demonstration plant will ultimately supply part of the process energy needs for the sugar factory. The operation and testing phase will provide process information for both air- and oxygen-blown gasification, and at both low and high pressures. The process will be evaluated for both fuel gas and synthesis gas production, and for electrical power production with advanced power generation schemes. 6 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

Trenka, A.R. (Pacific International Center for High Technology Research, Honolulu, HI (United States)); Kinoshita, C.M.; Takahashi, P.K.; Phillips, V.D. (Hawaii Natural Energy Inst., Honolulu, HI (United States)); Caldwell, C. (Parsons (Ralph M.) Co., Pasadena, CA (United States)); Kwok, R. (Hawaiian Commercial and Sugar Co., HI (United States)); Onischak, M.; Babu, S.P. (Institute of Gas Technology

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Preliminary assessment of off-season fuels for electricity generation at Indian sugar mills  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report on off-season fuels is part of a preliminary feasibility assessment to retrofit Indian sugar mills to cogenerate heat and power with sales of excess electricity to the local grid. To justify the high capital costs of retrofitting existing facilities, sugar mill operators must attempt to maximize the amount of power they sell to the local grid. This fact means that sugar mills must operate and sell power well-beyond the milling season, which typically lasts about 200 days. The purpose of this report is to assess and determine whether low cost and reliable sources of off-season fuels can be secured for two sugar mills (Simbhaoli and Daurala) within their respective sugar growing districts, located in western Uttar Pradesh. Off-season fuels under consideration include excess bagasse that is stored for off-season use, agricultural field residues (e.g., wheat straw), forest residues (e.g., bark and small limbs), and dedicated energy crops (short-rotation woody crops and herbaceous energy crops). Results of the pre-feasibility indicate that bagasse and some agricultural residues are available in sufficient quantity and may be available at reasonable cost.

Perlack, R.D. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Ranney, J.W. [Joint Inst. for Energy and Environment, Knoxville, TN (United States)

1995-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "garbage bagasse sewerage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Have You Ever Tried Composting? | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ever Tried Composting? Ever Tried Composting? Have You Ever Tried Composting? January 20, 2012 - 10:07am Addthis This week, Erin talked about how she's helping her parents (and learning from them) as they maintain an outdoor compost pile. By composting, you can nourish your garden for very little cost while keeping organic garbage out of sewer systems and city dumps. Compost materials range from food scraps to worms, and you can keep your compost in an open pile outdoors or in a specialized container. Of course, composting isn't just for homes - you can also participate in composting at the office. Whether at work or at home, indoors or outdoors, worms or food scraps: Have you ever tried composting? Why or why not? E-mail your responses to the Energy Saver team at consumer.webmaster@nrel.gov.

182

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.5 Residential Construction and Housing Market  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

7 7 Materials Used in the Construction of a 2,272 Square-Foot Single-Family Home 13,837 board-feet of lumber 12 interior doors 13,118 square feet of sheathing 6 closet doors 19 tons of concrete 2 garage doors 3,206 square feet of exterior siding material 1 fireplace 3,103 square feet of roofing material 3 toilets, 2 bathtubs, 1 shower stall 3,061 square feet of insulation 3 bathroom sinks 6,050 square feet of interior wall material 15 kitchen cabinets, 5 other cabinets 2,335 square feet of interior ceiling material 1 kitchen sink 226 linear feet of ducting 1 range, 1 refrigerator, 1 dishwasher, 1 garbage disposal, 1 range hood 19 windows 1 washer, 1 dryer 4 exterior doors (3 hinged, 1 sliding) 1 heating and cooling system 2,269 square feet of flooring material Source(s):

183

Western Lake Superior Sanitary District (Minnesota) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Western Lake Superior Sanitary District (Minnesota) Western Lake Superior Sanitary District (Minnesota) Western Lake Superior Sanitary District (Minnesota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Siting and Permitting A sanitary board is established to deal with long-term serious problems relating to water pollution and solid waste disposal in the area. The district can set regulations regarding garbage management and recycling,

184

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

31 - 16140 of 28,905 results. 31 - 16140 of 28,905 results. Rebate Western Lake Superior Sanitary District (Minnesota) A sanitary board is established to deal with long-term serious problems relating to water pollution and solid waste disposal in the area. The district can set regulations regarding garbage... http://energy.gov/savings/western-lake-superior-sanitary-district-minnesota Rebate Wetland Preservation Areas (Minnesota) A wetland owner can apply to the host county for designation of a wetland preservation area. Once designated, the area remains designated until the owner initiates expiration, except where a state... http://energy.gov/savings/wetland-preservation-areas-minnesota Rebate White Bear Lake Conservation District (Minnesota) This statute establishes the White Bear Lake Conservation District, which

185

Environment, Health and Safety (EH&S): Biosafety Manual: 7.0 Standards,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7.0 Standards, Policies, References, and Resources 7.0 Standards, Policies, References, and Resources 7.1 Standards 7 CFR 331 and 9 CFR 121, Possession, Use, and Transfer of Biological Agents and Toxins, U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) 7 CFR 330, Plant Pest Regulations; General; Plant Pests; Soil, Stone, and Quarry Products; Garbage. Importation of Plant Pests, USDA/APHIS 9 CFR Parts 92, 94, 95 96, 122 and 130 (note especially Part 122, Organisms and Vectors). Importation of Etiologic Agents of Livestock, Poultry, and Other Animal Diseases; USDA/APHIS 10 CFR 851, Worker Safety and Health Program, Department of Energy (DOE) 29 CFR 1904.8, Recording criteria for needle stick and sharps injuries, Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA)

186

Drosophila  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Drosophila Drosophila Nature Bulletin No. 576 October 17, 1959 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Daniel Ryan, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist DROSOPHILA: THE FRUIT FLY Have you noticed any tiny flies in your kitchen or around the fruit bowl? They are so small that they come through ordinary screens into homes, stores and restaurants. From midsummer until the killing frosts of autumn, swarms of them cluster wherever ripe or fermenting fruit is exposed -- outdoor markets, tomato canneries, garbage cans, melon patches, vineyards, and apple, pear or peach orchards. At this season, hordes of them are found around cider mills where they breed in the cakes of pressed apple pulp or pomace. A few adults and young survive the winter in basement drains and other protected places with food and warmth.

187

Recycle plastics into feedstocks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thermal cracking of mixed-plastics wastes with a fluidized-bed reactor can be a viable and cost-effective means to meet mandatory recycling laws. Strict worldwide environmental statutes require the hydrocarbon processing industry (HPI) to develop and implement product applications and technologies that reuse post-consumer mixed-plastics waste. Recycling or reuse of plastics waste has a broad definition. Recycling entails more than mechanical regranulation and remelting of polymers for film and molding applications. A European consortium of academia and refiners have investigated if it is possible and profitable to thermally crack plastics into feedstocks for refining and petrochemical applications. Development and demonstration of pyrolysis methods show promising possibilities of converting landfill garbage into valuable feedstocks such as ethylene, propylene, BTX, etc. Fluidized-bed reactor technologies offer HPI operators a possible avenue to meet recycling laws, conserve raw materials and yield a profit. The paper describes thermal cracking for feedstocks and pyrolysis of polyolefins.

Kastner, H.; Kaminsky, W. [Univ. of Hamburg (Germany)

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determinations By Date | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

11, 2012 11, 2012 CX-009078: Categorical Exclusion Determination Dismantle and removal (D&R) of Domestic Water (DW) & Process Water (PWS) heater tanks CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 07/11/2012 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office July 10, 2012 CX-008811: Categorical Exclusion Determination Utility Energy Service Contract Closed Loop Centrifugal Chiller at the Central Chilled Water Facility CX(s) Applied: B1.5, B2.1 Date: 07/10/2012 Location(s): New York Offices(s): Brookhaven Site Office July 10, 2012 CX-008523: Categorical Exclusion Determination Non-Hazardous Solid Waste Disposal Contract (Garbage Collection) CX(s) Applied: A1, A8, B1.3 Date: 07/10/2012 Location(s): Oregon Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory July 10, 2012

189

CX-003105: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

05: Categorical Exclusion Determination 05: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-003105: Categorical Exclusion Determination Solar Compactor Energy Efficiency CX(s) Applied: A9, B5.1 Date: 07/15/2010 Location(s): Boston, Massachusetts Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office The City of Boston proposes to use federal funding to replace existing street corner trash receptacles with new solar powered compacting receptacles. This change will increase the amount of garbage held in the bins before scheduled pickups and reduce the number of trips to empty them by 5 fold. Bill Belly Solar Compactors are already in existence around the city. This upscale of the scale of the project will prove that the bins are a cost effective and energy saving method. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD

190

Illinois Turning Landfill Trash into Future Cash | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Turning Landfill Trash into Future Cash Turning Landfill Trash into Future Cash Illinois Turning Landfill Trash into Future Cash September 28, 2010 - 5:35pm Addthis Illinois Turning Landfill Trash into Future Cash Andy Oare Andy Oare Former New Media Strategist, Office of Public Affairs Will County, Illinois officials yesterday formally broke ground on a new $7 million project (that includes $1 million of Energy Efficiency Conservation Block Grant funds) to turn methane gas from the Prairie View Landfill into electricity in a partnership with Waste Management. Will County will receive revenue from the sale of the gas created from decomposing garbage which will be harnessed and converted to generate 4.8 megawatts of green electrical power and used to power up to 8,000 homes. The future revenue generated from the sale of the gas and the sale of the

191

Powered by NERSC, A Database of Billions of Genes and Counting!  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Powered by NERSC, a Powered by NERSC, a Database of Billions of Genes and Counting! Powered by NERSC, a Database of Billions of Genes and Counting! With More than a Billion Microbial genes, IMG/M Breaks a Record January 26, 2012 | Tags: Joint Genome Institute Linda Vu, lvu@lbl.gov, +1 510 495 2402 IMG/M team celebrates the recording of 1 billionth gene. Microbes are microscopic organisms that live in every nook and cranny of our planet. Without them, plants wouldn't grow, garbage wouldn't decay, humans wouldn't digest food, and there would literally be no life on Earth, or at least as we know it. By examining the genetic makeup of these "bugs," scientists hope to understand how they work, and how they can be used to solve a variety of important problems like identifying new

192

Protecting the environment into the future  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Protecting the Environment Into the Future Protecting the Environment Into the Future Community Connections: Our link to Northern New Mexico Communities Latest Issue:Dec. 2013 - Jan. 2014 All Issues » submit Protecting the environment into the future Last year, the Lab recycled 47 percent of its solid, non-hazardous waste by placing it in the recycling containers. February 1, 2013 dummy image Read our archives. Contacts Editor Linda Anderman Email Community Programs Office Kurt Steinhaus Email The Lab's recycle rate of 47 percent compares favorably with the current national rate of 34 percent. Lab Employees Don't Treat Their Trash Like Garbage Last year, the Lab recycled 47 percent of its solid, non-hazardous waste (which translates to about 1,275 metric tons of paper, cardboard, plastic bottles, and aluminum cans) by placing it in the recycling containers that

193

Microsoft Word - DOE-ID_INL-13-010.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0 0 SECTION A. Project Title: North Boulevard Annex Lease Termination SECTION B. Project Description: The proposed activity would terminate the current lease of the North Boulevard Annex (IF-613) at 2095 North Boulevard in Idaho Falls, ID on or about July 31, 2013 for cost savings and footprint reduction purposes. A facility walkthrough by BEA personnel will occur prior to the lease termination to ensure the facility is ready for turnover back to the owner. Approximate cost associated with these activities is estimated at $2,000.00. SECTION C. Environmental Aspects or Potential Sources of Impact: Generating and Managing Waste: Various quantities of industrial waste (non-hazardous, non-radioactive) such as office trash are removed from the building for pickup and transportation by garbage collection services prior to lease termination.

194

Pumpkin Patterns  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) like this are simply a Compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) like this are simply a curly version of the long tube fluorescent lights you might see in your school, office or garage, and use less electricity than traditional incandescents. An ENERGY STAR-qualified CFL uses about 1/4th the energy and lasts 10 times longer than an incandescent bulb that puts out the same amount of light. Biomass is material made from plants and animals, and contains stored energy from the sun. This renewable energy source can be made from wood, crops, manure and even garbage. Using biomass for energy can cut back on waste and greenhouse gas emissions. Just like a windmill, wind turbines like this one use blades to collect the wind's kinetic energy. The wind flows over the blades, which causes them to turn. The blades are

195

Reducing Waste and Saving Energy with Composting | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reducing Waste and Saving Energy with Composting Reducing Waste and Saving Energy with Composting Reducing Waste and Saving Energy with Composting January 16, 2012 - 9:29am Addthis Erin R. Pierce Erin R. Pierce Digital Communications Specialist, Office of Public Affairs "Hey, don't throw that away!" This a phrase I heard quite often when I visited my parents over the holidays. What were they referring to? All the banana and carrot peelings I would discard, nonchalantly into the garbage bin. My father, an avid gardener for as long as I can remember, has taken-up composting again, this time with renewed fervor and an ever watchful eye. The result of my compost-conscious parent's hard work? A humungous nutrient-rich compost pile, perfect for all their summer outdoor gardening projects.In addition to the usual suspects of compost (coffee grinds, apple

196

Questions and Answers - Which jobs use electromagnets?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

does adding coils to anelectromagnet make it stronger? does adding coils to an<br>electromagnet make it stronger? Previous Question (Why does adding coils to an electromagnet make it stronger?) Questions and Answers Main Index Next Question (Why is a non-permanent, but long lasting, magnet called a permanent magnet?) Why is a non-permanent, but long lasting,magnet called a permanent magnet? Which jobs use electromagnets? In today's world almost all jobs other than a goat herder use some type of electromagnet. They are everywhere. Electric motors are a type of electromagnet. Cars have dozens of electromagnets that move things or generate electricity. There are all sorts of interesting applications for larger electromagnets. The most obvious and biggest example is electricity. There are some interesting applications like dumping shredded garbage

197

Renewable Natural Gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Natural Gas Natural Gas JOHN DAVIS: The use of clean, domestic natural gas as highway fuel in place of imported oil is growing in popularity with fleets and trucking companies. While natural gas from underground deposits is arguably a limited resource, there is a renewable, eco-friendly resource that we have right here in the U.S.A. And we're here now to give you the straight poop! Every family, farm animal and food processing plant in America produces organic waste that creates a mix of methane, CO2 and other elements called bio gas when it decomposes. Rotten vegetables, moldy bread, last night's leftovers --- they all break down when our garbage gets to the land fill. Incredibly, for

198

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

51 - 25560 of 28,904 results. 51 - 25560 of 28,904 results. Article Illinois Turning Landfill Trash into Future Cash Will County, Illinois officials yesterday formally broke ground on a new $7 million project (that includes $1 million of Energy Efficiency Conservation Block Grant funds) to turn methane gas from the Prairie View Landfill into electricity in a partnership with Waste Management. Will County will receive revenue from the sale of the gas created from decomposing garbage which will be harnessed and converted to generate 4.8 megawatts of green electrical power and used to power up to 8,000 homes. The future revenue generated from the sale of the gas and the sale of the electricity could reach $1 million annually. http://energy.gov/articles/illinois-turning-landfill-trash-future-cash

199

Moss Animals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Moss Animals Moss Animals Nature Bulletin No. 138 January 17, 1948 Forest Preserve District of Cook County William N. Erickson, President Roberts Mann, Supt. of Conservation MOSS ANIMALS Last summer, several visitors in the forest preserves were puzzled by finding masses of jelly-like substance stuck to sunken sticks in certain ponds and lakes. These masses were usually round or egg-shaped, ranging in size from that of a tennis ball to that of a football. On the outside they were covered by a grayish scum with faint lines in a coarse design. Inside there was apparently nothing but a clear colorless jelly that quivered and shook like a well-chilled gelatin dessert. One man guessed that it was some sort of garbage; another, reasonably, that it was some strange plant growth.

200

Purify: Fast detection of memory leaks and access errors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes Purifyru, a software testing and quality assurance Ool that detects memory leaks and access erors. Purify inserts additional checking instructions directly into the object code produced by existing compilers. These instructions check every memory read and write performed by the program-under-test and detect several types of access errors, such as reading uninitialized memory or witing to freed memory. Purify inserts checking logic into all of the code in a program, including third-party and vendor object-code libraries, and verifies system call interfaces. In addition, Purify tracks memory usage and identifies individual memory leals using a novel adaptation of garbage collection techniques. Purify produce standard executable files compatible with existing debuggers, and currently runs on Sun Microsystems ' SPARC family of workstations. Purify's neafly-comprehensive memory access checking slows the target program down typically by less than a facor of three and has resulted in significantly more reliable software for several development goups. L.

Reed Hastings; Bob Joyce

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "garbage bagasse sewerage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Health assessment for Pratt and Whitney Aircraft, Palm Beach County, Florida, Region 4. CERCLIS No. FLD001447952. Preliminary report  

SciTech Connect

The Pratt and Whitney Government Engine Business Division has been in operation as a division of the United Technologies Corporation (UTC) plant since 1958. In the past, materials disposed of in the landfill/incineration trenches at the plant included construction debris, discarded equipment, unknown solid waste from Air Force Plant Number 74, solvents and solvent sludges, asbestos, fuels, paints, pesticide and herbicide container residues, benzonitrite and solvent-contaminated soils, mercury (from bulbs and thermometers), discarded equipment from metal finishing operations, commercial and laboratory chemicals, garbage, and sewage sludge. Based on available information, the site is considered to be of potential public health concern because of the risk to human health caused by the possibility of exposure to hazardous substances via chemicals in the groundwater and air (wind-blown) and possibly through ingestion of contaminated wildlife.

1989-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

202

Homeless and homebased lazy release consistency protocols on distributed shared memory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes the comparison between homeless and home-based Lazy Release Consistency (LRC) protocols which are used to implement Distributed Shared Memory (DSM) in cluster computing. We present a performance evaluation of parallel applications running on homeless and home-based LRC protocols. We compared the performance between Tread-Marks, which uses homeless LRC protocol, and our home-based DSM system. We found that the home-based DSM system has shown better scalability than TreadMarks in parallel applications we tested. This poor scalability in the homeless protocol is caused by a hot spot and garbage collection, but we have shown that these factors do not affect the scalability of the home-based protocol.

Byung-hyun Yu; Zhiyi Huang; Stephen Cranefield; Martin Purvis

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Energy conservation: policy issues and end-use scenarios of savings potential. Part 2. Tradeoffs of municipal solid-waste-processing alternatives  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this report is to assess the comparative performance and advantages of the various garbage-processing or disposal (landfill) techniques, and to address the issue of large-scale recycling of waste material. Five general methods are discussed: close-in landfill, remote landfill, refuse-derived solid fuel (RDSF), pyrolysis, and incineration. The major issue at this time concerning municipal solid waste disposal is whether to continue with landfill as the primary method or to use some combination of source separation, resource recovery, and energy generation. The constraints surrounding this issue are capital and labor costs, technical feasibility, environmental impacts--especially air pollution--marketability of the derived energy and recycled resources, and public cooperation. (MCW)

Codina, R.; Langlois, C.

1978-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Data:6e35dfc9-dcec-49dd-a047-21e7d9e84d81 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

dfc9-dcec-49dd-a047-21e7d9e84d81 dfc9-dcec-49dd-a047-21e7d9e84d81 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Southern California Edison Co Effective date: 2013/04/01 End date if known: Rate name: TOU-PA-3B Sector: Industrial Description: Applicable where SCE determines that 70% or more of the customer's electrical usage is for Agricultural Power Service, general water or sewerage pumping, or for oil pumping by customers with a Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) Code of 1311, and none of any remaining electrical usage is for purposes for which a domestic schedule is applicable. This Schedule is applicable to customers whose Monthly Maximum demand registers, or in the opinion of SCE, is expected to register 200 through 500 kW. The customer whose monthly Maximum Demand, in the opinion of SCE, is expected to exceed 500 kW or has

205

Assessment of Radioactive Liquid Effluents Release at IPEN-CNEN/SP  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A continuous effluent monitoring program has been established at IPEN's plant in order to allow an environmental impact assessment due to radioactive liquid effluent discharge to sanitary system. Representative samples of radioactive liquid effluents are analyzed by using high resolution gamma spectroscopy and instrumental neutron activation analysis, facing to Brazilian radioprotection regulatory rules. The results are consolidating yearly in the Institute source-term. In this paper, results of the source-term are presented, concerning to years 2004, 2005 and 2006. The total activity discharged was 8.5xl0{sup 8} Bq, 5.7x10{sup 8} Bq and 2.7xl0{sup 8} Bq, respectively. As the release is strongly dependent on the total amount of the effluent and on the dilution factor, special attention is needed in order to obtain the correct value of that last one. The estimated inside plant dilution factor, considering the recent facilities and the reshaping of the sewerage system was 80, 180 and 130, for period of 2004, 2005 and 2006 discharged liquid radioactive effluent.

Bessa Nisti, Marcelo; Godoy dos Santos, Adir Janete [Insituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes, 2242-Cidade Universitaria-Zip Code 05508-000 Sao Paulo-SP (Brazil)

2008-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

206

DEVELOPMENT OF PRESSURIZED CIRCULATING FLUDIZED BED PARTIAL GASIFICATION MODULE (PGM)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Foster Wheeler Power Group, Inc. is working under US Department of Energy contract No. DE-FC26-00NT40972 to develop a partial gasification module (PGM) that represents a critical element of several potential coal-fired Vision 21 plants. When utilized for electrical power generation, these plants will operate with efficiencies greater than 60% and produce near zero emissions of traditional stack gas pollutants. The new process partially gasifies coal at elevated pressure producing a coal-derived syngas and a char residue. The syngas can be used to fuel the most advanced power producing equipment such as solid oxide fuel cells or gas turbines, or processed to produce clean liquid fuels or chemicals for industrial users. The char residue is not wasted; it can also be used to generate electricity by fueling boilers that drive the most advanced ultra-supercritical pressure steam turbines. The amount of syngas and char produced by the PGM can be tailored to fit the production objectives of the overall plant, i.e., power generation, clean liquid fuel production, chemicals production, etc. Hence, PGM is a robust building bock that offers all the advantages of coal gasification but in a more user-friendly form; it is also fuel flexible in that it can use alternative fuels such as biomass, sewerage sludge, etc. This report describes the work performed during the April 1--June 30, 2002 time period.

Archie Robertson

2002-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

207

DEVELOPMENT OF PRESSURIZED CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED BED PARTIAL GASIFICATION MODULE (PGM)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Foster Wheeler Power Group, Inc. is working under US Department of Energy contract No. DE-FC26-00NT40972 to develop a partial gasification module (PGM) that represents a critical element of several potential coal-fired Vision 21 plants. When utilized for electrical power generation, these plants will operate with efficiencies greater than 60% and produce near zero emissions of traditional stack gas pollutants. The new process partially gasifies coal at elevated pressure producing a coal-derived syngas and a char residue. The syngas can be used to fuel the most advanced power producing equipment such as solid oxide fuel cells or gas turbines, or processed to produce clean liquid fuels or chemicals for industrial users. The char residue is not wasted; it can also be used to generate electricity by fueling boilers that drive the most advanced ultra-supercritical pressure steam turbines. The amount of syngas and char produced by the PGM can be tailored to fit the production objectives of the overall plant, i.e., power generation, clean liquid fuel production, chemicals production, etc. Hence, PGM is a robust building bock that offers all the advantages of coal gasification but in a more user-friendly form; it is also fuel flexible in that it can use alternative fuels such as biomass, sewerage sludge, etc. This report describes the work performed during the October 1--December 31, 2002 time period.

Unknown

2003-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

208

Development of Pressurized Circulating Fluidized Bed Partial Gasification Module (PGM)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Foster Wheeler Power Group, Inc. is working under US Department of Energy contract No. DE-FC26-00NT40972 to develop a partial gasification module (PGM) that represents a critical element of several potential coal-fired Vision 21 plants. When utilized for electrical power generation, these plants will operate with efficiencies greater than 60% and produce near zero emissions of traditional stack gas pollutants. The new process partially gasifies coal at elevated pressure producing a coal-derived syngas and a char residue. The syngas can be used to fuel the most advanced power producing equipment such as solid oxide fuel cells or gas turbines, or processed to produce clean liquid fuels or chemicals for industrial users. The char residue is not wasted; it can also be used to generate electricity by fueling boilers that drive the most advanced ultra-supercritical pressure steam turbines. The amount of syngas and char produced by the PGM can be tailored to fit the production objectives of the overall plant, i.e., power generation, clean liquid fuel production, chemicals production, etc. Hence, PGM is a robust building bock that offers all the advantages of coal gasification but in a more user-friendly form; it is also fuel flexible in that it can use alternative fuels such as biomass, sewerage sludge, etc. This report describes the work performed during the October 1 - December 31, 2003 time period.

A. Robertson

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

209

Development of Pressurized Circulating Fluidized Bed Partial Gasification Module (PGM)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Foster Wheeler Power Group, Inc. is working under US Department of Energy contract No. DE-FC26-00NT40972 to develop a partial gasification module (PGM) that represents a critical element of several potential coal-fired Vision 21 plants. When utilized for electrical power generation, these plants will operate with efficiencies greater than 60% and produce near zero emissions of traditional stack gas pollutants. The new process partially gasifies coal at elevated pressure producing a coal-derived syngas and a char residue. The syngas can be used to fuel the most advanced power producing equipment such as solid oxide fuel cells or gas turbines, or processed to produce clean liquid fuels or chemicals for industrial users. The char residue is not wasted; it can also be used to generate electricity by fueling boilers that drive the most advanced ultra-supercritical pressure steam turbines. The amount of syngas and char produced by the PGM can be tailored to fit the production objectives of the overall plant, i.e., power generation, clean liquid fuel production, chemicals production, etc. Hence, PGM is a robust building bock that offers all the advantages of coal gasification but in a more user-friendly form; it is also fuel flexible in that it can use alternative fuels such as biomass, sewerage sludge, etc. This report describes the work performed during the July 1-September 30, 2002 time period.

A. Robertson

2002-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

210

DEVELOPMENT OF PRESSURIZED CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED BED PARTIAL GASIFICATION MODULE (PGM)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Foster Wheeler Power Group, Inc. is working under US Department of Energy contract No. DE-FC26-00NT40972 to develop a partial gasification module (PGM) that represents a critical element of several potential coal-fired Vision 21 plants. When utilized for electrical power generation, these plants will operate with efficiencies greater than 60% and produce near zero emissions of traditional stack gas pollutants. The new process partially gasifies coal at elevated pressure producing a coal-derived syngas and a char residue. The syngas can be used to fuel the most advanced power producing equipment such as solid oxide fuel cells or gas turbines, or processed to produce clean liquid fuels or chemicals for industrial users. The char residue is not wasted; it can also be used to generate electricity by fueling boilers that drive the most advanced ultra-supercritical pressure steam turbines. The amount of syngas and char produced by the PGM can be tailored to fit the production objectives of the overall plant, i.e., power generation, clean liquid fuel production, chemicals production, etc. Hence, PGM is a robust building bock that offers all the advantages of coal gasification but in a more user-friendly form; it is also fuel flexible in that it can use alternative fuels such as biomass, sewerage sludge, etc. This report describes the work performed during the April 1--June 30, 2003 time period.

Archie Robertson

2003-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

211

DEVELOPMENT OF PRESSURIZED CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED BED PARTIAL GASIFICATION MODULE (PGM)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Foster Wheeler Power Group, Inc. is working under US Department of Energy contract No. DE-FC26-00NT40972 to develop a partial gasification module (PGM) that represents a critical element of several potential coal-fired Vision 21 plants. When utilized for electrical power generation, these plants will operate with efficiencies greater than 60% and produce near zero emissions of traditional stack gas pollutants. The new process partially gasifies coal at elevated pressure producing a coal-derived syngas and a char residue. The syngas can be used to fuel the most advanced power producing equipment such as solid oxide fuel cells or gas turbines, or processed to produce clean liquid fuels or chemicals for industrial users. The char residue is not wasted; it can also be used to generate electricity by fueling boilers that drive the most advanced ultra-supercritical pressure steam turbines. The amount of syngas and char produced by the PGM can be tailored to fit the production objectives of the overall plant, i.e., power generation, clean liquid fuel production, chemicals production, etc. Hence, PGM is a robust building bock that offers all the advantages of coal gasification but in a more user-friendly form; it is also fuel flexible in that it can use alternative fuels such as biomass, sewerage sludge, etc. This report describes the work performed during the July 1--September 30, 2003 time period.

Archie Robertson

2003-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

212

DEVELOPMENT OF PRESSURIZED CIRCULATIONG FLUIDIZED BED PARTIAL GASIFICATION MODULE(PGM)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Foster Wheeler Power Group, Inc. is working under US Department of Energy contract No. DE-FC26-00NT40972 to develop a partial gasification module (PGM) that represents a critical element of several potential coal-fired Vision 21 plants. When utilized for electrical power generation, these plants will operate with efficiencies greater than 60% and produce near zero emissions of traditional stack gas pollutants. The new process partially gasifies coal at elevated pressure producing a coal-derived syngas and a char residue. The syngas can be used to fuel the most advanced power producing equipment such as solid oxide fuel cells or gas turbines, or processed to produce clean liquid fuels or chemicals for industrial users. The char residue is not wasted; it can also be used to generate electricity by fueling boilers that drive the most advanced ultra-supercritical pressure steam turbines. The amount of syngas and char produced by the PGM can be tailored to fit the production objectives of the overall plant, i.e., power generation, clean liquid fuel production, chemicals production, etc. Hence, PGM is a robust building block that offers all the advantages of coal gasification but in a more user-friendly form; it is also fuel flexible in that it can use alternative fuels such as biomass, sewerage sludge, etc. This report describes the work performed during the January 1--March 31, 2003 time period.

Archie Robertson

2003-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

213

A Temporal Locality-Aware Page-Mapped Flash Translation Layer  

SciTech Connect

The poor performance of random writes has been a cause of major concern which needs to be addressed to better utilize the potential of flash in enterprise-scale environments. We examine one of the important causes of this poor performance: the design of the flash translation layer (FTL) which performs the virtual-to-physical address translations and hides the erase-before-write characteristics of flash. We propose a complete paradigm shift in the design of the core FTL engine from the existing techniques with our Demand-Based Flash Translation Layer (DFTL) which selectively caches page- level address mappings. Our experimental evaluation using FlashSim with realistic enterprise-scale workloads endorses the utility of DFTL in enterprise-scale storage systems by demonstrating: 1) improved performance, 2) reduced garbage collection overhead and 3) better overload behavior compared with hybrid FTL schemes which are the most popular implementation methods. For example, a predominantly random-write dominant I/O trace from an OLTP application running at a large financial institution shows a 78% improvement in average response time (due to a 3-fold reduction in operations of the garbage collector), compared with the hybrid FTL scheme. Even for the well-known read-dominant TPC-H benchmark, for which DFTL introduces additional overheads, we improve system response time by 56%. Moreover, interestingly, when write-back cache on DFTL-based SSD is enabled, DFTL even outperforms the page-based FTL scheme, improving their response time by 72% in Financial trace.

Kim, Youngjae [ORNL] [ORNL; Gupta, Aayush [IBM Corporation, Almaden Research Center] [IBM Corporation, Almaden Research Center; Urgaonkar, Bhuvan [Pennsylvania State University] [Pennsylvania State University

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Feedstocks (Poster), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Feedstocks Feedstocks Customized milling and continuous handling of a wide variety of feedstocks Integrated Biorefi nery Research Facility | NREL * Golden, Colorado | December 2011 | NREL/PO-5100-53598 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Offi ce of Energy Effi ciency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Photo by Warren Gretz, NREL/PIX 10446 Photo by Warren Gretz, NREL/PIX 00459 Photo by Warren Gretz, NREL/PIX 05754 Feedstock handling capabilities * We have experience working with: - Perennials - switchgrass, sorghum, and others - Crop residue - corn stover, bagasse, wheat straw - Forestry biomass - hickory, poplar, oak * Our mill takes dry material from large super sacks and mills the feedstock to a variety of sizes

215

 

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Small-Scale Biorefineries Project Overview Small-Scale Biorefineries Project Overview July, 14 2008 Final Two Selections for up to $40 million - Announced July 14, 2008 for up to $40 million Applicant Total Cost DOE Share Cost Share Annual Production capacity Project Location Feedstock Technology Verenium $91,347,330 TBD* TBD* 1,500,000 Jennings, LA bagasse, energy crops, ag waste, & wood residues Biochemical Flambeau LLC $84,000,000 $30,000,000 64.4% 6,000,000 Park Falls, WI Forest residues GTL (FT) *Based on negotiations. Round two selections - Announced April 18, 2008 for up to $114 million ICM $86,030,900 $30,000,000 65% 1,500,000 St. Joseph, MO Switchgrass, Forage sorghum, stover Biochemical Lignol Innovations $88,015,481 $30,000,000 66% 2,500,000 Commerce City, CO Woody Biomass -

216

Renewable Energy Pipeline Development Terms of Reference | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Renewable Energy Pipeline Development Terms of Reference Renewable Energy Pipeline Development Terms of Reference Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Renewable Energy Pipeline Development Terms of Reference Agency/Company /Organization: World Bank Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Biomass, Hydro, Solar, Wind Topics: Implementation Website: web.worldbank.org/WBSITE/EXTERNAL/TOPICS/EXTENERGY2/EXTRENENERGYTK/0,, References: Renewable Energy Pipeline Development Terms of Reference[1] Resources Preparation of Mini-hydro Private Power Projects Off-Grid Village Hydro Subproject Preparation Off-Grid Subprojects Pipeline Development Development of Wind Farm Projects - Local Consultants Bagasse/Rice Husk Co-generation Project Preparation Biomass Cogeneration Projects Preparation Design of a PV Pilot Concession

217

Why sequence Actinotalea fermentans?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Actinotalea fermentans? Actinotalea fermentans? Actinotalea fermentans is a bacterium isolated from a landfill and grows best in moderate temperature, where it ferments cellulose to acetate and ethanol aerobically. This organism was previously considered as a potential way to convert cellulose to ethanol for use as a fuel, but the fermentation reaction always led to reduced yields, reducing the bacterium's usefulness. Recently, scientists have engineered synthetic co-cultures of A. fermentans with yeast to produce useful chemicals and fuels directly from cellulose or agricultural feedstocks such as corn stover, switchgrass, poplar and sugarcane bagasse. This technique will allow A. fermentans to be used to convert cellulose to ethanol while allowing researchers to avoid the same

218

Brazil-World Bank Climate Projects | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Brazil-World Bank Climate Projects Brazil-World Bank Climate Projects Agency/Company /Organization World Bank Sector Energy, Land Focus Area Energy Efficiency, Renewable Energy, Transportation Topics Finance, Background analysis Website http://web.worldbank.org/exter Country Brazil UN Region Latin America and the Caribbean References World Bank Project Database-Brazil[1] Contents 1 World Bank Active Climate Projects in Brazil 1.1 Sao Paulo Metro Line 5 Project 1.2 BR-GEF Sustainable Transport and Air Quality Project (STAQ) 1.3 First Programmatic Development Policy Loan for Sustainable Environmental Management 1.4 BR Nova Gerar Carbon Finance and Solid Waste Management Project II 1.5 BR Lages Woodwaste Cogeneration 1.6 PCF Sugar Bagasse Cogeneration Project 1.7 Nova Gerar Landfill Rio de Janeiro

219

Degradation of cellulosic biomass and its subsequent utilization for the production of chemical feedstocks. Progress report, September 1-November 30, 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Studies on the accumulation of glucose during the fermentation of cellulose by Clostridium thermocellum are discussed. Production of ethanol and its relationship to growth rate in C. thermocellum is reported. Different biomasses were tested for ethanol yields. These included exploded poplar, sugar cane, bagasse, corn cobs, sweet gum, rice straw, and wheat straw. Thermophilic bacteria were tested to determine relationship of temperature to yield of ethanol. A preliminary report on isolating plaque forming emits derived from C. thermocellum is presented as well as the utilization of carbohydrates in nutrition. A cellulose enzyme is being purified from C. thermocellum. The production of chemical feedstocks by fermentation is reported. Acrylic acid, acetone/butanol, and acetic acid, produced by C. propionicum, C. acetobutylicum, and C. thermoaceticum, are discussed. (DC)

Wang, D.I.; Cooney, C.L.; Demain, A.L.; Gomez, R.F.; Sinskey, A.J.

1978-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

An energy atlas of five Central American countries. Un atlas energetico de cinco paises Centroamericanos  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In a series of maps and figures, this atlas summarizes what is known about the energy resources and how these resources and oil imports supply the energy needs of five Central American countries: Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras, Costa Rica, and Panama. The main exploited energy resources are firewood, hydroelectric energy, bagasse from sugar cane residues, and geothermal energy. Limited oil exploration in the region has uncovered modest oil resources only in Guatemala. Peat and small coal deposits are also known to exist but are not presently being exploited. After the description of energy resources, this atlas describes energy supply and demand patterns in each country. It concludes with a description of socioeconomic data that strongly affect energy demand. 4 refs.

Trocki, L.; Newman, C.K.; Gurule, F.; Aragon, P.C.; Peck, C.

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "garbage bagasse sewerage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Combined Dilute Acid and Solvent Based Pretreatment of Agricultural Wastes for Efficient Lignocellulosic Fractionation and Biofuels Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A true biorefinery for processing lignocellulosic biomass should achieve maximum utilization of all major constituents (cellulose, hemicellulose, & lignin) within the feedstock. In this work a combined pretreatment process of dilute acid (DA) and N-methyl morpholine N-oxide (NMMO) is described that allows for both fractionation and subsequent complete hydrolysis of the feedstocks (corn stover and sugarcane bagasse). During this multi-step processing, the dilute acid pretreatment solubilizes the majority (>90%) of the hemicellulosic fraction, while the NMMO treatment yields a cellulosic fraction that is completely digestible within 48 hours at low enzyme loadings. With both the cellulosic and hemicellulosic fractions being converted into separate, dissolved sugar fractions, the remaining portion is nearly pure lignin. When used independently, DA and NMMO pretreatments are only able to achieve ~80% and ~45% cellulosic conversion, respectively. Mass balance calculations along with experimental results are used to illustrate the feasibility of separation and recycling of NMMO.

Brodeur, G.; Ramakrishnan, S.; Wilson, C.; Telotte, J.; Collier, J.; Stickel, J.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Integrated Biorefinery Project: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-10-390  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Amyris-NREL CRADA is a sub-project of Amyris?s DOE-funded pilot-scale Integrated Biorefinery (IBR). The primary product of the Amyris IBR is Amyris Renewable Diesel. Secondary products will include lubricants, polymers and other petro-chemical substitutes. Amyris and its project partners will execute on a rapid project to integrate and leverage their collective expertise to enable the conversion of high-impact biomass feedstocks to these advanced, infrastructure-compatible products. The scope of the Amyris-NREL CRADA includes the laboratory development and pilot scale-up of bagasse pretreatment and enzymatic saccharification conditions by NREL for subsequent conversion of lignocellulosic sugar streams to Amyris Diesel and chemical products by Amyris. The CRADA scope also includes a techno-economic analysis of the overall production process of Amyris products from high-impact biomass feedstocks.

Chapeaux, A.; Schell, D.

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Jennings Demonstration PLant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Verenium operated a demonstration plant with a capacity to produce 1.4 million gallons of cellulosic ethanol from agricultural resiues for about two years. During this time, the plant was able to evaluate the technical issues in producing ethanol from three different cellulosic feedstocks, sugar cane bagasse, energy cane, and sorghum. The project was intended to develop a better understanding of the operating parameters that would inform a commercial sized operation. Issues related to feedstock variability, use of hydrolytic enzymes, and the viability of fermentative organisms were evaluated. Considerable success was achieved with pretreatment processes and use of enzymes but challenges were encountered with feedstock variability and fermentation systems. Limited amounts of cellulosic ethanol were produced.

Russ Heissner

2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

224

Developing alternative feedstocks for fuel alcohol  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper briefly reviews recent research to examine the viability of energy sorghum as a feedstock for producing fuel alcohol. Energy sorghum is the name given to any sweet sorghum shown to be feasible for producing fuel alcohol. Energy sorghum can grow on a variety of soils, in 90 day cycles, with up to three crops a year. Crop rotation is rarely needed; most of the nitrogen and potassium returns to the soil. Harmon Engineering and Testing initiated an inhouse program to research sweet sorghum development. Equipment specifications and preliminary results are given. An ''energy farm'' process is explained step by step. Stalk juice, grain, and stalk fiber yields are listed. The use of bagasse and carbon dioxide is also considered.

Verma, V.K.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

DEVELOPMENT OF PRESSURIZED CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED BED PARTIAL GASIFICATION MODULE (PGM)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Foster Wheeler Power Group, Inc. is working under US Department of Energy Contract No. DE-FC26-00NT40972 to develop a partial gasification module (PGM) that represents a critical element of several potential coal-fired Vision 21 plants. When utilized for electrical power generation, these plants will operate with efficiencies greater than 60% and produce near zero emissions of traditional stack gas pollutants. The new process partially gasifies coal at elevated pressure producing a coal-derived syngas and a char residue. The syngas can be used to fuel the most advanced power producing equipment such as solid oxide fuel cells or gas turbines, or processed to produce clean liquid fuels or chemicals for industrial users. The char residue is not wasted; it can also be used to generate electricity by fueling boilers that drive the most advanced ultra-supercritical pressure steam turbines. The amount of syngas and char produced by the PGM can be tailored to fit the production objectives of the overall plant, i.e., power generation, clean liquid fuel production, chemicals production, etc. Hence, PGM is a robust building bock that offers all the advantages of coal gasification but in a more user-friendly form; it is also fuel flexible in that it can use alternative fuels such as biomass, sewerage sludge, etc. Under this contract a series of pilot plant tests are being conducted to ascertain PGM performance with a variety of fuels. The performance and economics of a PGM based plant designed for the co-production of hydrogen and electricity will also be determined. This report describes the work performed during the April-June 30, 2004 time period.

Archie Robertson

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Methods of reducing liquid effluent from the OSU TRIGA MKII Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 1991, the OSU Radiation Center implemented a program to minimize the liquid effluent generated by the reactor facility. The goal of program is to become a 'zero' release facility with regards to routine liquid discharges. Only two liquid waste streams exist for the OSU reactor facility: discharges resulting from changing resin in the deminerializer and decontamination of equipment, primarily sample loading tubes. This paper describes a system which allows remote resin exchange to performed with the collection of all flush water. This water is then recycled for use as makeup for the primary water system. The service life of the resin is maximized by using a steam distillation unit as the source of makeup water to the deminerializer system instead of water coming directly from the City of Corvallis water supply. The second source of liquid waste water comes from the decontamination of the plastic loading tubes used to encapsulate samples. This process originally involved placing the tubes in a dishwasher and sending the discharge to a hold up tank. If the radionuclide concentrations in the tank were below the maximum permissible concentrations of 10CFR20 then it was released to the sanitary sewerage. This process was replaced in 1991 with a system which involved manual washing and rinsing of the tubes with the liquids being absorbed for disposal as solid waste. This paper will also describe the system which is being built to replace this process. It will use the dishwasher unit again but the liquid discharge will collected for absorption and disposal as solid waste. (author)

Higginbotham, J.F.; Dodd, B.; Pratt, D.S.; Smith, S.; Anderson, T.V. [OSU Radiation Center, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331-5903 (United States)

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Clean Streams  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Clean Streams Clean Streams Nature Bulletin No. 538-A October 5, 1974 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation CLEAN STREAMS Each year in mid-May is Clean Streams Week in Cook County by proclamation of the president of the county board and the Board of Forest Preserve Commissioners, and in all of Illinois by proclamation of the Governor. Its purpose is to focus the attention of everyone, young and old, upon the disgraceful conditions in our streams, formerly clean and beautiful, which have been made foul and unsightly by pollution with sewage and by the dumping of garbage and junk into them. Some of us remember when fish such as northern pike, black bass, sunfish, bluegills, crappies and channel catfish were plentiful in the rivers and creeks of Cook County. Now the desirable kinds of fish have largely disappeared and many portions are so polluted that even carp cannot exist. Swimming, once popular in the DesPlaines River, Salt Creek and other streams, has long been prohibited by the State Board of Health. In some streams the stench and appearance of the water is so repulsive that no one enjoys picnicking or resting in the shade along their banks.

228

Data:5b74d5b1-6111-4038-b0dd-5f1c6de76b9c | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

d5b1-6111-4038-b0dd-5f1c6de76b9c d5b1-6111-4038-b0dd-5f1c6de76b9c No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Delaware Electric Cooperative Effective date: 2011/05/18 End date if known: Rate name: Home Surge Protection Program--Schedule HSPP Sector: Residential Description: Available to those Members desiring surge protection for home appliances, which include but are not limited to, washers, dryers, electric ranges (stoves), refrigerators, freezers, heating/air conditioning units, garbage disposals and dish washers and sensitive electronic equipment, which include but are not limited to, computers, VCR's, televisions, entertainment centers, telephones, microwave ovens, CD players, garage door openers, radio alarm clocks and telephone answering machines.

229

Dog germs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dog germs Dog germs Name: Charles Cole Age: N/A Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: Is a dog's mouth cleaner than a human's? Replies: Charles, Indeed, I have heard that this is true, but I don't have any scientific report handy which confirms it. What I have heard in the past is that, on occasion, if someone is accidentally bitten by a person, the bite is considered quite serious. If a study ever were done, I'm sure the actual 'cleanliness' of a human versus canine mouth would have to be compared based on a variety of normal foodstuffs consumed by each group (in the humans case, maybe hot dogs, cereal, soda, roast beef, etc) and the canines (dog food, garbage cans, various animal remnants found in the neighborhood). I'm sure you can see that there would certainly be occasions where the human's mouth would register as cleaner just because of what had been eaten earlier. Another house-kept dog, fed only purchased dog food and kept 'squeaky-clean' might register cleaner than perhaps a person with poor mouth hygiene. Since we humans regularly do floss and brush, and gargle, I am sure many of us do our best to try to 'keep up with Fido'. :)

230

Replacement of petroleum based hydraulic fluids with a soybean-based alternative  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Despite the best preventative measures, ruptured hoses, spills and leaks occur with use of all hydraulic equipment. Although these releases do not usually produce a RCRA regulated waste, they are often a reportable occurrence. Clean-up and subsequent administrative procedure involves additional costs, labor and work delays. Concerns over these releases, especially related to Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) vehicles hauling waste on public roads prompted Fleet Services (FS) to seek an alternative to the standard petroleum based hydraulic fluid. Since 1996 SNL has participated in a pilot program with the University of Iowa (UNI) and selected vehicle manufacturers, notably John Deere, to field test hydraulic fluid produced from soybean oil in twenty of its vehicles. The vehicles included loaders, graders, sweepers, forklifts and garbage trucks. Research was conducted for several years at UNI to modify and market soybean oils for industrial uses. Soybean oil ranks first in worldwide production of vegetable oils (29%), and represents a tremendous renewable resource. Initial tests with soybean oil showed excellent lubrication and wear protection properties. Lack of oxidative stability and polymerization of the oil were concerns. These concerns were being addressed through genetic alteration, chemical modification and use of various additives, and the improved lubricant is in the field testing stage.

Rose, B.; Rivera, P.

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

BEST: Bilingual environmental science training, Grades 3--4  

SciTech Connect

This booklet is one of a series of bilingual guides to environmental-science learning activities for students to do at home. Lesson objectives, materials required, procedure, vocabulary, and subjects integrated into the lesson are described in English for each lesson. A bilingual glossary, alphabetized by English entries, with Spanish equivalents and definitions in both English and Spanish, follows the lesson descriptions, and is itself followed by a bibliography of English-language references with annotations in English. This booklet includes descriptions of ten lessons that cover the following topics: the identification of primary and secondary colors in the environment; recognizing the basic food tastes; the variety of colors that can be made by crushing plant parts; the variety of animal life present in common soil; animal tracks; evidence of plant and animal life in the local environment; recycling, reducing, and composting as alternative means of garbage disposal; waste associated with packaging; paper- recycling principles; and how organic waste can be composted into usable soil. 2 figs.

NONE

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Urban Waste Conversion Systems. IGT Project 61030 final report, October 1, 1978-March 31, 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to assess the market potential of the various systems available, or under development, for converting urban wastes into synthetic gas or liquids. The primary data base for this assessment is a survey which IGT has sent out to experts in this field. The experts were asked to evaluate various conversion systems by assigning point totals to an evaluation matrix. They were also asked to summarize their work in urban waste conversion, to list critical paths which represent obstacles to be surmounted by R and D, and to assess the effect of those obstacles on the market potential of that process. Critical areas for R and D work focus on materials handling and separation techniques, and protection of equipment from abrasive, caustic, or corrosive chemicals in the wastes. Also, prohibitive capital and operating costs in some existing systems must be cited, since investor confidence is eroded by evidence of such experiences. Downtime has been excessive with many systems, stemming from feed problems brought on by the heterogeneous nature of the feedstock. Systems using homogeneous feeds have shown considerably less problems. Perhaps a critical area from a social impact point of view is, can garbage separation be instituted for the home, factory, etc. If so, the chances for waste converison systems to overcome technical problems on the front end are greatly improved, and so is the potential for market penetration.

Cowen, D.S.; Daniels, E.J.; Novil, M.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Electrolytic production of hydrogen. [from carbonaceous materials  

SciTech Connect

A cyclic electrolytic process is claimed for the manufacture of hydrogen from carbonaceous material such as coal, agricultural wastes and garbage to produce commercial hydrogen. An alakli metal sulfate is reduced to an alkali metal sulfide by reaction of the sulfate and carbonaceous fuel at an elevated temperature. The sulfide and impurities derived from the fuel are digested with an aqueous solution to dissolve the sulfide and separate out the impurities. The solution of the alkali sulfide is added to electrolytic cells in which an electric current is utilized to generate hydrogen at the cathode while oxidizing the sulfide substantially to sulfate at the anode. The cell electrolyte temperature is greater than 150/sup 0/C and less than 350/sup 0/C. Under these conditions the polarization problem encountered in hydrogen/oxygen cells is substantially avoided. The alkali sulfate is then separated from the electrolyte stream exiting from the electrolytic cells, reduced again by burning with fuel and recycled to the electrolytic cell.

Spitzer, R.

1978-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

234

An evaluation of Java's I/O capabilities for high-performance computing.  

SciTech Connect

Java is quickly becoming the preferred language for writing distributed applications because of its inherent support for programming on distributed platforms. In particular, Java provides compile-time and run-time security, automatic garbage collection, inherent support for multithreading, support for persistent objects and object migration, and portability. Given these significant advantages of Java, there is a growing interest in using Java for high-performance computing applications. To be successful in the high-performance computing domain, however, Java must have the capability to efficiently handle the significant I/O requirements commonly found in high-performance computing applications. While there has been significant research in high-performance I/O using languages such as C, C++, and Fortran, there has been relatively little research into the I/O capabilities of Java. In this paper, we evaluate the I/O capabilities of Java for high-performance computing. We examine several approaches that attempt to provide high-performance I/O--many of which are not obvious at first glance--and investigate their performance in both parallel and multithreaded environments. We also provide suggestions for expanding the I/O capabilities of Java to better support the needs of high-performance computing applications.

Dickens, P. M.; Thakur, R.

2000-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

235

BEST: Bilingual environmental science training: Grades 5--6  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This booklet is one of a series of bilingual guides to environmental-science learning activities for students to do at home. Lesson objectives, materials required, procedure, vocabulary, and subjects integrated into the lesson are described in English. A bilingual glossary, alphabetized by English entries, with Spanish equivalents and definitions in both English and Spanish, follows the lesson descriptions, and is itself followed by a bibliography of English-language references. This booklet includes descriptions of ten lessons that cover the following topics: safe and unsafe conditions for chemical combinations; growth rates and environmental needs of plants; photosynthesis and effects of ozone-layer depletion; the circulatory system, the importance of exercise to the heart, and selected circulatory diseases; the nervous system; specific nutritional values of the different food groups; significance of including, reducing, or eliminating certain foods for a healthy diet; effects of some common chemicals on plant growth and animal life; plants` and animals` natural habitats; and dangers of non-biodegradable garbage.

NONE

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

The Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 1988, the Alternative Motor Fuels Act (AMFA) became Public Law 100-494. The AMFA encourages the production and use of motor vehicles designed to operate on alternative fuels. The alternative fuels specified in the law are methanol, ethanol, and natural gas. The Department of Energy (DOE), along with several other federal, state, and local agencies, has undertaken numerous activities aimed at fulfilling the AMFA directives. Among these activities is the establishment of the Alternative Fuels Data Center (AFDC), operated and managed by the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI) in Golden Colorado. The AMFA targets activities for three vehicle types using alternative fuels: (1) light-duty vehicles such as automobiles, mini-vans, and light-duty; (2) heavy-duty vehicles such as tractor trailers and garbage trucks; and (3) urban transit buses. The primary purpose of the AFDC is to gather and analyze information on the fuel consumption, emissions, operation, and durability of these vehicles types. The AFDC staff work with an Oracle Relational Database Management System and statistical software to provide information to users.

Not Available

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Investigations of Biomass Pretreatment and Submerged Fixed-bed Fermentation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To improve the MixAlco process and biomass pretreatment, five studies were conducted. Three studies related to fermentation, whereas the other two investigated the effectiveness of shock tube pretreatment (STP) coupled with oxidative lime pretreatment (OLP). In the first study, the constant-selectivity assumption used in the continuum particle distribution model (CPDM) was determined to be invalid. During a 32-day batch fermentation, selectivity increased from 0.10 to 0.40 g acid/g non-acid volatile solid (NAVS) digested. Future revisions to CPDM should incorporate a non-constant selectivity term. In the second study, a revised procedure was developed to provide a more accurate determination of moisture content. Conventional drying at 105 degrees C allowed product acids to vaporize with water, which introduced errors. Using the revised procedure, calcium hydroxide or sodium hydroxide was added to samples at a concentration of 0.01 g base/g sample, which retained acids in the sample. The mass of additional retained material closely matched that of the additional retained acid. Three related studies involving biomass pretreatment were performed. In the first, recommended parameters for pretreating sugarcane bagasse with OLP and STP were determined. Recommended OLP parameters were 130 degrees C, 6.9-bar O2, and 2-h duration. The effects of solids concentration, liquid fill volume, particle size, type of shotgun shell, number of shocks, and pretreatment order were investigated. Liquid fill volume, particle size, type of shotgun shell, and pretreatment order were significant variables, whereas solids concentration and number of shocks were not. Recommended OLP parameters were used as a basis for an additional experiment. To simulate industrial-scale pile fermentation, fixed-bed batch fermentation of OLP + STP sugarcane bagasse was performed in 1-L PVC fermentors. Rubber mulch was used as a structural support material to prevent filter plugging, which had been reported in previous work. After 42 d, acid concentration reached 8 g/L with yield approximately 0.1 g acid/g NAVS fed. Poor fermentation performance was caused by short solid-liquid contact time and poor pH control. A third biomass pretreatment experiment investigated the potential of pretreated corn stover as a potential ruminant feed. Five samples (raw, OLP, STP, OLP + STP, and STP + OLP) were analyzed for composition and in vitro digestibility. STP followed by OLP increased neutral detergent fiber (NDF) digestibility from 49.3 to 79.0 g NDF digested/100 g NDF fed. On an organic matter basis, STP + OLP corn stover plus water-soluble extractives had a total digestible nutrients (TDN) of 74.9, nearly reaching corn grain at 88.1.

Meysing, Daniel

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Effects of Feedstocks and Inoculum Sources on Mixed-Acid and Hydrogen Fermentations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With increasing energy demand, decreasing oil supply, and continuously accumulating waste in landfills, the interest in converting lignocellulosic biomass to liquid fuels has grown. The MixAlco™ process requires no exogenous enzymes, no sterility, can be adapted to any biodegradable feedstock, and converts lignocellulosic biomass into valuable chemicals and transportation fuels. This work focuses on the effects different feedstocks and inocula have on mixed-acid/hydrogen fermentations. When volatile solids (VS) are digested, mixed-acid fermentations produce hydrogen gas as a secondary byproduct. Hydrogen is only produced when there is an excess of NADH within the cell and when the energy selectivity (gamma) of the system has not been met. Continuous fermentations of paper produced 16.7 g carboxylic acid/L and 15.7 mL H2/g VS digested. Continuous fermentations of pretreated bagasse produced 17.1 g carboxylic acid/L and 41.1 mL H2/g VS digested. Both fermentations produced a fraction of the theoretical amount of hydrogen. The paper fermentation had a hydrogen percent yield of 6.9 percent, whereas the bagasse fermentation had a hydrogen percent yield of 22.6 percent. Hydrogen production was capped at this level because gamma had been met for these systems. The Bioscreening Project, a joint project between three departments, sought to improve the MixAlco™ process by finding natural cultures containing high biomass converters and high acid producers. A total of 505 inoculum samples were collected from 19 sites and screened using paper and yeast extract fermentations. The best converters were analyzed with Continuum Particle Distribution Modeling (CPDM). Nine inocula were run in paper and yeast extract countercurrent fermentations in which the overall performance varied less than 13 percent. Comparisons between six countercurrent train cultures showed an average culture similarity of 0.40 (Yue-Clayton similarity). With the dissimilar microbial cultures and the very similar fermentation performance, the performance of the MixAlco™ process depends on fermentation conditions, not on the microorganisms. Batch fermentations of office paper wastes, pineapple residue, Aloe vera rinds, wood molasses, sugar molasses, extracted algae, non-extracted algae, crude glycerol, obtained from the biodiesel process, and pretreated water hyacinths produced sufficient carboxylic acids and had sufficiently high conversions to be viable substrates for the MixAlco™ process.

Forrest, Andrea Kelly

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Carbon-catalyzed gasification of organic feedstocks in supercritical water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Spruce wood charcoal, macadamia shell charcoal, coal activated carbon, and coconut shell activated carbon catalyze the gasification of organic compounds in supercritical water. Feedstocks studied in this paper include glycerol, glucose, cellobiose, whole biomass feedstocks (depithed bagasse liquid extract and sewage sludge), and representative Department of Defense (DoD) wastes (methanol, methyl ethyl ketone, ethylene glycol, acetic acid, and phenol). The effects of temperature, pressure, reactant concentration, weight hourly space velocity, and the type of catalyst on the gasification of glucose are reported. Complete conversion of glucose (22% by weight in water) to a hydrogen-rich synthesis gas was realized at a weight hourly space velocity (WHSV) of 22.2 h{sup {minus}1} in supercritical water at 600 C, 34.5 MPa. Complete conversions of the whole biomass feeds were also achieved at the same temperature and pressure. The destruction efficiencies for the representative DoD wastes were also high. Deactivation of the carbon catalyst was observed after 4 h of operation without swirl in the entrance region of the reactor, but the carbon gasification efficiency remained near 100% for more than 6 h when a swirl generator was employed in the entrance of the reactor.

Xu, X.; Matsumura, Y.; Stenberg, J.; Antal, M.J. Jr. [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States). Hawaii Natural Energy Inst.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Electricity generation potential of Thai sugar mills  

SciTech Connect

At present, the total installed electricity generating capacity of Thailand is 7500 MW. Because this level of investment will take an unacceptable large part of total foreign borrowing, the government plans to encourage participation of the private sector in electricity generation. Among the various technology options for power production, cogeneration appears to be the most promising technology due to its very high effectiveness of fuel utilization. Therefore, in the first phase of private power generation, the Thai government is encouraging cogeneration systems. This paper discusses sugar mills, where expertise and equipment for electricity generation already exist, appear to be in a particularly advantageous position to participate in the private power generation program. At present, there are 46 sugar mills in Thailand with a total capacity of 338,000 tons of cane per day. The fiber part delivered from the milling of sugarcane, bagasse, is normally used to produce steam for the process heat and electricity generation. The investment and operating costs for each of these alternatives have been evaluated. The internal rate of return is used to indicate the benefit of each alternative.

Therdyothin, A.; Bhattacharaya, S.C.; Chirarattananon, S. (Asian Inst. of Tech., Bangkok (Thailand))

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "garbage bagasse sewerage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Continuous fermentation of food scraps with constant pH control to produce carboxylic acids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Global energy demands combined with environmental restrictions are fueling a move to alternative energy sources. Biofuels are formed from biomass; the MixAlco process is one such method. In this work, food scraps are explored as a potential feedstock to the MixAlco process. Batch fermentation with various temperatures, buffers, and pH control methods elucidated the behavior of food scraps during fermentation. The pH and reactor configuration were limiting factors when maximizing production. A fermentor was developed and tested with constant pH control. This resulted in elevated concentration (100 g/L) and selectivity (82%) of desired products. The fermentation resulted in elevated concentrations, but low conversion of solids. The undigested material may serve as a nutrient source for fermenting lignocellulosic feedstocks. Combining various nutrient sources with lignocellulose, such as bagasse, resulted in additional production and further conversion. Multiple nutrient sources were tested resulting in total acid concentration ranging from 20.2 to 34.5 g/L.

Coleman Jr., Stanley Albert

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Pahoa geothermal industrial park. Engineering and economic analysis for direct applications of geothermal energy in an industrial park at Pahoa, Hawaii  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This engineering and economic study evaluated the potential for developing a geothermal industrial park in the Puna District near Pahoa on the Island of Hawaii. Direct heat industrial applications were analyzed from a marketing, engineering, economic, environmental, and sociological standpoint to determine the most viable industries for the park. An extensive literature search produced 31 existing processes currently using geothermal heat. An additional list was compiled indicating industrial processes that require heat that could be provided by geothermal energy. From this information, 17 possible processes were selected for consideration. Careful scrutiny and analysis of these 17 processes revealed three that justified detailed economic workups. The three processes chosen for detailed analysis were: an ethanol plant using bagasse and wood as feedstock; a cattle feed mill using sugar cane leaf trash as feedstock; and a papaya processing facility providing both fresh and processed fruit. In addition, a research facility to assess and develop other processes was treated as a concept. Consideration was given to the impediments to development, the engineering process requirements and the governmental support for each process. The study describes the geothermal well site chosen, the pipeline to transmit the hydrothermal fluid, and the infrastructure required for the industrial park. A conceptual development plan for the ethanol plant, the feedmill and the papaya processing facility was prepared. The study concluded that a direct heat industrial park in Pahoa, Hawaii, involves considerable risks.

Moreau, J.W.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Engineering and economic analysis for the utilization of geothermal fluids in a cane sugar processing plant. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility of geothermal resource utilization at the Puna Sugar Company cane sugar processing plant, located in Keaau, Hawaii. A proposed well site area was selected based on data from surface exploratory surveys. The liquid dominated well flow enters a binary thermal arrangement, which results in an acceptable quality steam for process use. Hydrogen sulfide in the well gases is incinerated, leaving sulfur dioxide in the waste gases. The sulfur dioxide in turn is recovered and used in the cane juice processing at the sugar factory. The clean geothermal steam from the binary system can be used directly for process requirements. It replaces steam generated by the firing of the waste fibrous product from cane sugar processing. The waste product, called bagasse, has a number of alternative uses, but an evaluation clearly indicated it should continue to be employed for steam generation. This steam, no longer required for process demands, can be directed to increased electric power generation. Revenues gained by the sale of this power to the utility, in addition to other savings developed through the utilization of geothermal energy, can offset the costs associated with hydrothermal utilization.

Humme, J.T.; Tanaka, M.T.; Yokota, M.H.; Furumoto, A.S.

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Costs of Harvesting, Storing in a Large Pile, and Transporting Corn Stover in a Wet Form  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Corn stover is potentially an attractive biomass resource, but must be stored if used to supply a biorefinery year-round. Based on experience with successfully storing water-saturated large piles of bagasse for the pulping industry, Atchison and Hettenhaus (2003) proposed that such a system can also be applied to corn stover. Regardless of the technical feasibility of this system, in this article we estimate the cost of harvesting corn stover in a single pass with corn grain, delivering the chopped biomass to a storage pile, storing the stover in a wet form in a large pile at 75% moisture in a 211,700-dry Mg facility within a radius of 24 km from the field, and transporting the stover 64 km to a biorefinery. Field-ground corn stover can be delivered to a biorefinery by rail for $55 to $61/dry Mg. Truck transport is more expensive, $71 to $77/dry Mg. To achieve a minimum cost in the system proposed by Atchison and Hettenhaus, it is necessary to field densify stover to 74 dry kg/m3, without losing combine field efficiency, have a large storage pile to spread fixed costs of storage over enough biomass, and use rail transportation. Compared to storage in an on-farm bunker silo at $60/dry Mg, there are limited circumstances in which large pile storage has a cost advantage.

Turhollow Jr, Anthony F [ORNL; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

ENVIRONMENTAL LAW IN BRAZIL- ANALYSIS OF ENVIRONMENTAL LICENSING OF WIND POWER PLANTS IN PERMANENT PRESERVATION AREAS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Brazilian electric energy matrix is mostly renewable. According to the Generation Information Base (BIG) of the Brazilian Electricity Regulatory Agency (ANEEL), hydroelectricity is responsible for 67.31 % of the country's energy. The additional generation comes mostly from fossil fuels, which’s use is questioned when it comes to environmental quality and climate change. Despite its abundance, hydroelectric power generation has physical, socioeconomic and environmental limitations. Thus, it is essential to develop alternative technologies, providing security in the supply of electric energy and the maintenance of a clean matrix. Among the alternative technologies available, wind power is the one that has been gaining prominence, domestically and internationally speaking. In the last auction of renewable sources held in August 2010 in Brazil, the energy produced by the plants of sugarcane bagasse (biomass) was traded at an average of R $ 144.20 MWh; wind energy, which was the cheapest, was traded at R $ 130.86, and the energy from small hydropower plants (PCH), at R $ 141.93 MWh. The wind power plants accounted for 70 % of the auction, which resulted in a plan for increasing its installed capacity by fivefold, by the year 2013. Brazil has great potential to be explored (estimated 143,000 MW), yet despite being appealing, wind energy still

Cristiano Abijaode Amaral; Adriana Coli Pedreira

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Engineered plant biomass feedstock particles  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A new class of plant biomass feedstock particles characterized by consistent piece size and shape uniformity, high skeletal surface area, and good flow properties. The particles of plant biomass material having fibers aligned in a grain are characterized by a length dimension (L) aligned substantially parallel to the grain and defining a substantially uniform distance along the grain, a width dimension (W) normal to L and aligned cross grain, and a height dimension (H) normal to W and L. In particular, the L.times.H dimensions define a pair of substantially parallel side surfaces characterized by substantially intact longitudinally arrayed fibers, the W.times.H dimensions define a pair of substantially parallel end surfaces characterized by crosscut fibers and end checking between fibers, and the L.times.W dimensions define a pair of substantially parallel top and bottom surfaces. The L.times.W surfaces of particles with L/H dimension ratios of 4:1 or less are further elaborated by surface checking between longitudinally arrayed fibers. The length dimension L is preferably aligned within 30.degree. parallel to the grain, and more preferably within 10.degree. parallel to the grain. The plant biomass material is preferably selected from among wood, agricultural crop residues, plantation grasses, hemp, bagasse, and bamboo.

Dooley, James H. (Federal Way, WA); Lanning, David N. (Federal Way, WA); Broderick, Thomas F. (Lake Forest Park, WA)

2012-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

247

Potential of biomass residue availability; The case of Thailand  

SciTech Connect

An acute shortage of fuel wood and charcoal prevails in many developing countries. A logical approach to the problem places emphasis on the development of alternative energy sources, including use of biomass residues. An assessment of the potential of biomass residues for energy and other uses calls for an estimation of their annual production. Also, because the residues are normally bulky they should be utilized near their place of origin whenever possible to avoid high transportation costs. Thus knowledge of the total national generation of residues per year does not provide enough information for planning residue utilization. This article illustrates a method of residue estimation that takes the case of Thailand as an example. It presents the annual generation of nine agricultural resides (paddy husk, paddy straw, bagasse, cotton stalk, corn cob, groundnut shell, cassava stalk and coconut husk and shell) and one forestry residue (sawdust) in different agroeconomic zones and regions of Thailand. The methodology used for the investigation of crop-to-residue ratios is outlined. The annual generation figures for the different residues along with observations about their traditional uses are presented.

Bhattacharya, S.C.; Shrestha, R.M.; Ngamkajornvivat, S. (Energy Technology Div., Asian Institute of Technology, Bangkok 10501 (TH))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Victorias energy efficiency and cogeneration project. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes a two-phase energy project currently contemplated for joint implementation at the Victorias Milling Company, a large sugar mill and refinery on the island of Negros in the Visayas region of the Philippines. The Energy Efficiency (EE) phase is expected to reduce of eliminate VMC`s fossil fuel consumption, which will have a direct and substantial impact on carbon emissions. Phase I is an EE project which involves the installation of equipment to reduce steam and electricity demand in the factories. Phase II, will involve retrofitting and increasing the capacity of the steam and power generation systems, and selling power to the grid. By increasing efficiency and output, the cogeneration project will allow the factory to use only bagasse sugar cane fiber waste as fuel for energy needs. The cogeneration project will also eliminate VMC`s electricity purchases and supply additional power for the island, which will offset generation capacity expansion on the island and the Visayas region.

NONE

1998-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

249

Catalyst and feedstock effects in the thermochemical conversion of biomass to liquid transportation fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The thermochemical conversion of biomass feedstocks to liquid transportation fuels can be accomplished by three processes, namely gasification, high-pressure liquefaction, and pyrolysis. In this study, the pyrolysis option is selected which is followed by the catalytic upgrading of pyrolysis vapors to aromatic and olefinic hydrocarbons (PYROCAT process). The aromatics constitute a high-octane gasoline blend, while the olefins can be utilized as feedstocks for various chemicals. The PYROCAT process has been studied in a laboratory-scale fixed-bed catalytic reactor. Consecutive biomass samples were pyrolyzed rapidly in steam at 550{degree}C and atmospheric pressure, and then the pyrolysis vapors were passed over a zeolite catalyst. The catalytic upgrading products were monitored in real-time using molecular-beam mass-spectrometry (MBMS). The yields of major products were estimated from mass-spectral data. Several zeolite catalysts were screened in the upgrading process and promising catalysts with high yields were identified. Feedstocks studied included: the woody biomass species aspen (Populus tremuloides), basswood (Tilia americana), and willow (Salix alba); the three isolated components of wood lignin, xylan and cellulose; and the herbaceous species bagasse (Saccharum spp. hybrid), wheat straw (Triticum aestivum), and Sericea lespedeza (Lespedeza cuneata). 17 refs.

Rejai, B.; Agblevor, F.A.; Evans, R.J.; Wang, D.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Engineered plant biomass feedstock particles  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A novel class of flowable biomass feedstock particles with unusually large surface areas that can be manufactured in remarkably uniform sizes using low-energy comminution techniques. The feedstock particles are roughly parallelepiped in shape and characterized by a length dimension (L) aligned substantially with the grain direction and defining a substantially uniform distance along the grain, a width dimension (W) normal to L and aligned cross grain, and a height dimension (H) normal to W and L. The particles exhibit a disrupted grain structure with prominent end and surface checks that greatly enhances their skeletal surface area as compared to their envelope surface area. The L.times.H dimensions define a pair of substantially parallel side surfaces characterized by substantially intact longitudinally arrayed fibers. The W.times.H dimensions define a pair of substantially parallel end surfaces characterized by crosscut fibers and end checking between fibers. The L.times.W dimensions define a pair of substantially parallel top surfaces characterized by some surface checking between longitudinally arrayed fibers. The feedstock particles are manufactured from a variety of plant biomass materials including wood, crop residues, plantation grasses, hemp, bagasse, and bamboo.

Dooley, James H. (Federal Way, WA); Lanning, David N. (Federal Way, WA); Broderick, Thomas F. (Lake Forest Park, WA)

2011-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

251

Engineered plant biomass feedstock particles  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A novel class of flowable biomass feedstock particles with unusually large surface areas that can be manufactured in remarkably uniform sizes using low-energy comminution techniques. The feedstock particles are roughly parallelepiped in shape and characterized by a length dimension (L) aligned substantially with the grain direction and defining a substantially uniform distance along the grain, a width dimension (W) normal to L and aligned cross grain, and a height dimension (H) normal to W and L. The particles exhibit a disrupted grain structure with prominent end and surface checks that greatly enhances their skeletal surface area as compared to their envelope surface area. The L.times.H dimensions define a pair of substantially parallel side surfaces characterized by substantially intact longitudinally arrayed fibers. The W.times.H dimensions define a pair of substantially parallel end surfaces characterized by crosscut fibers and end checking between fibers. The L.times.W dimensions define a pair of substantially parallel top surfaces characterized by some surface checking between longitudinally arrayed fibers. At least 80% of the particles pass through a 1/4 inch screen having a 6.3 mm nominal sieve opening but are retained by a No. 10 screen having a 2 mm nominal sieve opening. The feedstock particles are manufactured from a variety of plant biomass materials including wood, crop residues, plantation grasses, hemp, bagasse, and bamboo.

Dooley, James H. (Federal Way, WA); Lanning, David N. (Federal Way, WA); Broderick, Thomas F. (Lake Forest Park, WA)

2011-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

252

Development of Foster Wheeler's Vision 21 Partial Gasification Module  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) has awarded Foster Wheeler Development Corporation a contract to develop a partial gasification module (PGM) that represents a critical element of several potential coal-fired Vision 21 plants. When utilized for electrical power generation, these plants will operate with efficiencies greater than 60% while producing near zero emissions of traditional stack gas pollutants. The new process partially gasifies coal at elevated pressure producing a coal derived syngas and a char residue. The syngas can be used to fuel the most advanced power producing equipment such as solid oxide fuel cells or gas turbines or processed to produce clean liquid fuels or chemicals for industrial users. The char residue is not wasted; it can also be used to generate electricity by fueling boilers that drive the most advanced ultra-supercritical pressure steam turbines. The unique aspect of the process is that it utilizes a pressurized circulating fluidized bed partial gasifier and does not attempt to consume the coal in a single step. To convert all the coal to syngas in a single step requires extremely high temperatures ({approx} 2500 to 2800F) that melt and vaporize the coal and essentially drive all coal ash contaminants into the syngas. Since these contaminants can be corrosive to power generating equipment, the syngas must be cooled to near room temperature to enable a series of chemical processes to clean the syngas. Foster Wheeler's process operates at much lower temperatures that control/minimize the release of contaminants; this eliminates/minimizes the need for the expensive, complicated syngas heat exchangers and chemical cleanup systems typical of high temperature gasification. By performing the gasification in a circulating bed, a significant amount of syngas can still be produced despite the reduced temperature and the circulating bed allows easy scale up to large size plants. Rather than air, it can also operate with oxygen to facilitate sequestration of stack gas carbon dioxide gases for a 100% reduction in greenhouse gas emissions. The amount of syngas and char produced by the PGM can be tailored to fit the production objectives of the overall plant, i.e., power generation, clean liquid fuel production, chemicals production, etc. Hence, PGM is a robust building block that offers all the advantages of coal gasification but in a more user friendly form; it is also fuel flexible in that it can use alternative fuels such as biomass, sewerage sludge, etc. This paper describes the test program and pilot plant that will be used to develop the PGM.

Robertson, A.

2001-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

253

Municipal solid waste management in India: From waste disposal to recovery of resources?  

SciTech Connect

Unlike that of western countries, the solid waste of Asian cities is often comprised of 70-80% organic matter, dirt and dust. Composting is considered to be the best option to deal with the waste generated. Composting helps reduce the waste transported to and disposed of in landfills. During the course of the research, the author learned that several developing countries established large-scale composting plants that eventually failed for various reasons. The main flaw that led to the unsuccessful establishment of the plants was the lack of application of simple scientific methods to select the material to be composted. Landfills have also been widely unsuccessful in countries like India because the landfill sites have a very limited time frame of usage. The population of the developing countries is another factor that detrimentally impacts the function of landfill sites. As the population keeps increasing, the garbage quantity also increases, which, in turn, exhausts the landfill sites. Landfills are also becoming increasingly expensive because of the rising costs of construction and operation. Incineration, which can greatly reduce the amount of incoming municipal solid waste, is the second most common method for disposal in developed countries. However, incinerator ash may contain hazardous materials including heavy metals and organic compounds such as dioxins, etc. Recycling plays a large role in solid waste management, especially in cities in developing countries. None of the three methods mentioned here are free from problems. The aim of this study is thus to compare the three methods, keeping in mind the costs that would be incurred by the respective governments, and identify the most economical and best option possible to combat the waste disposal problem.

Narayana, Tapan [Hidayatullah National Law University, HNLU Bhawan, Civil Lines, Raipur 492001, Chhattisgarh (India)], E-mail: tapan.narayana@gmail.com

2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

254

HybridStore: A Cost-Efficient, High-Performance Storage System Combining SSDs and HDDs  

SciTech Connect

Unlike the use of DRAM for caching or buffering, certain idiosyncrasies of NAND Flash-based solid-state drives (SSDs) make their integration into existing systems non-trivial. Flash memory suffers from limits on its reliability, is an order of magnitude more expensive than the magnetic hard disk drives (HDDs), and can sometimes be as slow as the HDD (due to excessive garbage collection (GC) induced by high intensity of random writes). Given these trade-offs between HDDs and SSDs in terms of cost, performance, and lifetime, the current consensus among several storage experts is to view SSDs not as a replacement for HDD but rather as a complementary device within the high-performance storage hierarchy. We design and evaluate such a hybrid system called HybridStore to provide: (a) HybridPlan: improved capacity planning technique to administrators with the overall goal of operating within cost-budgets and (b) HybridDyn: improved performance/lifetime guarantees during episodes of deviations from expected workloads through two novel mechanisms: write-regulation and fragmentation busting. As an illustrative example of HybridStore s ef cacy, HybridPlan is able to nd the most cost-effective storage con guration for a large scale workload of Microsoft Research and suggest one MLC SSD with ten 7.2K RPM HDDs instead of fourteen 7.2K RPM HDDs only. HybridDyn is able to reduce the average response time for an enterprise scale random-write dominant workload by about 71% as compared to a HDD-based system.

Kim, Youngjae [ORNL; Gupta, Aayush [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA; Urgaonkar, Bhuvan [Pennsylvania State University; Piotr, Berman [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA; Sivasubramaniam, Anand [Pennsylvania State University

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

1994 Washington State directory of Biomass Energy Facilities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is the fourth edition of the Washington Directory of Biomass Energy Facilities, the first edition was published in 1987. The purpose of this directory is to provide a listing of and basic information about known biomass producers and users within the state to help demonstrate the importance of biomass energy in fueling our state`s energy needs. In 1992 (latest statistical year), estimates show that the industrial sector in Washington consumed nearly 128 trillion Btu of electricity, nearly 49.5 trillion Btu of petroleum, over 82.2 trillion Btu of natural gas, and over 4.2 trillion Btu of coal. Facilities listed in this directory generated approximately 114 trillion Btu of biomass energy - 93 trillion were consumed from waste wood and spent chemicals. In the total industrial energy picture, wood residues and chemical cooking liquors placed second only to electricity. This directory is divided into four main sections biogas production, biomass combustion, ethanol production, and solid fuel processing facilities. Each section contains maps and tables summarizing the information for each type of biomass. Provided in the back of the directory for reference are a conversion table, a table of abbreviations, a glossary, and an index. Chapter 1 deals with biogas production from both landfills and sewage treatment plants in the state. Biogas produced from garbage and sewage can be scrubbed and used to generate electricity. At the present time, biogas collected at landfills is being flared on-site, however four landfills are investigating the feasibility of gas recovery for energy. Landfill biogas accounted for approximately 6 percent of the total biomass reported. Sewage treatment biogas accounted for 0.6 percent. Biogas generated from sewage treatment plants is primarily used for space and process heat, only one facility presently scrubs and sells methane. Together, landfill and sewage treatment plant biogas represented over 6.6 percent of the total biomass reported.

Deshaye, J.A.; Kerstetter, J.D.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Radium-226 and calcium uptake by crops grown in mixtures of sand and cay tailings from phosphate mining  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radium-226 is a naturally occurring radionuclide found in reclaimed clay and sand tailing from phosphate mining. Field studies were conducted to investigate the effects of sand/clay ratio (SCR), Ca supplement and organic amendments on the {sup 226}Ra concentration in turnip, banana pepper, cabbage, yellow squash, mustard, and alfalfa. For vegetables, treatment effects included SCR (2:1, 4:1, 6:1, and 8:1), phosphogypsum (PG) 0,22, and 134 Mg ha{sup {minus}1}, and peat 0,100, and 200 Mg ha{sup {minus}1}. For alfalfa grown in a 1:1 SCR mixture, treatments included organic amendments (control, peat, sewage slude, sawdust, composted sewage sludge, composted garbage and humate) applied at 44.8 Mg ha{sup {minus}1} (2.2 Mg ha{sup {minus}1} for humate). Plant {sup 226}Ra concentration tended to be higher in the 4:1 than in the 2:1 SCR mix but this depended on the crop an d the season. Organic amendments and PG had no effect (p<0.05) on the {sup 226}Ra concentration in vegetables and alfalfa. Mean {sup 226}Ra concentration in plant tissues ranged from 3.4 Bq kg{sup {minus}1} in banana pepper fruit to 31.1 Bq kg{sup {minus}1}. A quadratic relationship based on 631 observations was observed between {sup 226}Ra and Ca concentration in plant tissues. The {sup 226}Ra/Ca ratio in plant tissues ranged from 0.85 to 2.13 kBq {sup 226}Ra kg{sup {minus}1} Ca and decreased with increasing plant {sup 226}Ra. Results indicated that wide differences in plant {sup 226}Ca concentration were related more to differences in plant Ca levels than to soil factors. 21 refs., 1 fig., 6 tabs.

Million, J.B. [Univ. of Hawaii, Hilo, HI (United States); Sartain, J.B. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Gonzalez, R.X.; Carrier, W.D. III [Bromwell & Carrier, Lakeland, FL (United States)

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Dust Bowl migration as an analog for possible global warming-induced migration from Mexico  

SciTech Connect

As a result of increases in CO{sub 2} and other radiatively important trace gases, scientists have predicted increases in mean worldwide temperatures of 2--5 degrees C over the next 50 to 100 years. Such temperature increases may result in climate modifications that would in turn be associated with increases in drought and desertification and could even change the patterns of the monsoons and tropical rains, which are important to agriculture throughout the world. They predicted that the rise in sea level caused by melting and thermal expansion of glaciers and polar icecaps could flood large population centers, destroying habitation and displacing populations. This will result in approximately 50 million ``environmental refugees`` worldwide, triple the number of today. The expected shifts in precipitation are also likely to result in (1) increased runoff contaminated with pesticides, salts, garbage, sewage, and eroded soil, and (2) drought also leading to increased soil erosion and salinization, as well as depletion of limited water resources. The total impact of global warming on agriculture and human habitation could considerably slow the economic development of some nations and would particularly affect agricultural production. Loss of homes, the inability to raise food, an increased prevalence of disease and worsened economic conditions may drive people to leave their homelands, seeking entry into countries which have more resources and greater resistance to the economic consequences of climatic change. This report looks at the possible environmental impacts and economic impacts of the greenhouse effect on Mexico while using the American Dust Bowl event as an analog.

Turner, M.H.; Longstreth, J.D.; Johnson, A.K.; Rosenberg, N.J.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Petroleum Coke: A Viable Fuel for Cogeneration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Petroleum coke is a by-product of the coking process which upgrades (converts) low-valued residual oils into higher-valued transportation, heating and industrial fuels. Pace forecasts that by the year 2000 petroleum coke production will increase from 36 million to 47 million short tons/year. Because the crude pool will continue to become more sour and refiners treat the coker as the "garbage can" the quality of the petroleum cokes will generally degrade- contain higher sulfur and trace metal levels. The U.S. produces nearly 70% of the total and is expected to maintain this share. Domestic markets consumed less than half of the U.S. production; 80% of the high sulfur fuel grade production from the Gulf coast is exported to Japan or Europe. Increasing environmental concerns could disrupt historic markets and threaten coker operations. This would create opportunities for alternate end-uses such as cogeneration projects. The Pace Consultants Inc. continuously monitors and reports on the petroleum coke industry-production and markets-in its multi-client publication The Pace Petroleum Coke Ouarterly. The information presented in this paper is based on this involvement and Pace's experience in single and multi client consulting activities related to the petroleum refining and petroleum coke industries. The purpose is to provide a review of the existing world petroleum coke industry with particular emphasis on the U.S. production and markets. Forecasted production levels and critical factors which could alter the historic market disposition of petroleum coke are addressed.

Dymond, R. E.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

An analysis of producing ethanol and electric power from woody residues and agricultural crops in East Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The increasing U.S. dependence on imported oil; the contribution of fossil fuels to the greenhouse gas emissions and the climate change issue; the current level of energy prices and other environmental concerns have increased world interest in renewable energy sources. Biomass is a large, diverse, readily exploitable resource. This dissertation examines the biomass potential in Eastern Texas by examining a 44 county region. This examination considers the potential establishment of a 100-megawatt (MW) power plant and a 20 million gallon per year (MMGY) ethanol plant using lignocellulosic biomass. The biomass sources considered are switchgrass, sugarcane bagasse, and logging residues. In the case of electricity generation, co-firing scenarios are also investigated. The research analyzes the key indicators involved with economic costs and benefits, environmental and social impacts. The bioenergy production possibilities considered here were biofeedstock supported electric power and cellulosic ethanol production. The results were integrated into a comprehensive set of information that addresses the effects of biomass energy development in the region. The analysis indicates that none of the counties in East Texas have sufficient biomass to individually sustain either a 100% biomass fired power plant or the cellulosic ethanol plant. Such plants would only be feasible at the regional level. Co-firing biomass with coal, however, does provide a most attractive alternative for the study region. The results indicate further that basing the decision solely on economics of feedstock availability and costs would suggest that bioenergy, as a renewable energy, is not a viable energy alternative. Accounting for some environmental and social benefits accruing to the region from bioenergy production together with the feedstock economics, however, suggests that government subsidies, up to the amount of accruing benefits, could make the bioenergies an attractive business opportunity for local farmers and investors.

Ismayilova, Rubaba Mammad

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Catalytic gasification studies in a pressurized fluid-bed unit  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of the project is to evaluate the technical and economic feasibility of producing specific gas products via the catalytic gasification of biomass. This report presents the results of research conducted from October 1980 to November 1982. In the laboratory scale studis, active catalysts were developed for generation of synthesis gases from wood by steam gasification. A trimetallic catalyst, Ni-Co-Mo on silica-alumina doped with 2 wt % Na, was found to retain activity indefinitely for generation of a methanol synthesis gas from wood at 1380/sup 0/F (750/sup 0/C) and 1 atm (100 kPa) absolute pressure. Catalysts for generation of a methane-rich gas were deactivated rapidly and could not be regenerated as required for economic application. Sodium carbonate and potassium carbonate were effective as catalysts for conversion of wood to synthesis gases and methane-rich gas and should be economically viable. Catalytic gasification conditions were found to be suitable for processing of alternative feedstocks: bagasse, alfalfa, rice hulls, and almond hulls. The PDU was operated successfully at absolute pressures of up to 10 atm (1000 kPa) and temperatures of up to 1380/sup 0/F (750/sup 0/C). Yields of synthesis gases at elevated pressure were greater than those used for previous economic evaluations. A trimetallic catalyst, Ni-Cu-Mo on silica-alumina, did not display a long life as did the doped trimetallic catalyst used in laboratory studies. A computer program for a Radio Shack TRS-80 Model I microcomputer was developed to evaluate rapidly the economics of producing either methane or methanol from wood. The program is based on economic evaluations reported in previous studies. Improved yields from the PDU studies were found to result in a reduction of about 9 cents/gal in methanol cost.

Mudge, L.K.; Baker, E.G.; Mitchell, D.H.; Robertus, R.J.; Brown, M.D.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "garbage bagasse sewerage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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261

Catalysis in biomass gasification  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of these studies is to evaluate the technical and economic feasibility of producing specific gas products by catalytic gasification of biomass. Catalyst performance is a key factor in the feasibility of catalytic gasification processes. The results of studies designed to gain a fundamental understanding of catalytic mechanisms and causes of deactivation, and discussion of the state-of-the-art of related catalytic processes are presented. Experiments with primary and secondary catalysts were conducted in a 5-cm-diameter, continuous-wood-feed, fixed-catalyst-bed reactor. The primary catalysts used in the experiments were alkali carbonates mixed with the biomass feed; the secondary catalysts included nickel or other transition metals on supports such as alumina, silica, or silica-alumina. The primary catalysts were found to influence wood pyrolysis as well as the char/steam reaction. Secondary catalysts were used in a fixed-bed configuration to direct gas phase reactions. Results of the performance of these catalysts are presented. Secondary catalysts were found to be highly effective for conversion of biomass to specific gas products: synthesis gases and methane-rich gas. With an active catalyst, equilibrium gas composition are obtained, and all liquid pyrolysis products are converted to gases. The major cause of catalyst deactivation was carbon deposition, or coking. Loss of surface area by sintering was also inportant. Catalyst deactivation by sulfur poisoning was observed when bagasse was used as the feedstock for catalytic gasification. Mechanisms of catalyst activity and deactivation are discussed. Model compounds (methane, ethylene, and phenol) were used to determine coking behavior of catalysts. Carbon deposition is more prevalent with ethylene and phenol than with methane. Catalyst formulations that are resistant to carbon deposition are presented. 60 references, 10 figures, 21 tables.

Baker, E.G.; Mudge, L.K.

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Biofuel Feedstock Assessment For Selected Countries  

SciTech Connect

Findings from biofuel feedstock production assessments and projections of future supply are presented and discussed. The report aims to improve capabilities to assess the degree to which imported biofuel could contribute to meeting future U.S. targets to reduce dependence on imported oil. The study scope was focused to meet time and resource requirements. A screening process identified Argentina, Brazil, Canada, China, Colombia, India, Mexico, and the Caribbean Basin Initiative (CBI) region for initial analysis, given their likely role in future feedstock supply relevant to U.S. markets. Supply curves for selected feedstocks in these countries are projected for 2012, 2017 and 2027. The supply functions, along with calculations to reflect estimated supplies available for export and/or biofuel production, were provided to DOE for use in a broader energy market allocation study. Potential cellulosic supplies from crop and forestry residues and perennials were also estimated for 2017 and 2027. The analysis identified capacity to potentially double or triple feedstock production by 2017 in some cases. A majority of supply growth is derived from increasing the area cultivated (especially sugarcane in Brazil). This is supplemented by improving yields and farming practices. Most future supplies of corn and wheat are projected to be allocated to food and feed. Larger shares of future supplies of sugarcane, soybean and palm oil production will be available for export or biofuel. National policies are catalyzing investments in biofuel industries to meet targets for fuel blending that generally fall in the 5-10% range. Social and environmental concerns associated with rapid expansion of feedstock production are considered. If the 2017 projected feedstock supply calculated as 'available' for export or biofuel were converted to fuel, it would represent the equivalent of about 38 billion gallons of gasoline. Sugarcane and bagasse dominate the available supply, representing 64% of the total. Among the nations studied, Brazil is the source of about two-thirds of available supplies, followed distantly by Argentina (12%), India and the CBI region.

Kline, Keith L [ORNL; Oladosu, Gbadebo A [ORNL; Wolfe, Amy K [ORNL; Perlack, Robert D [ORNL; Dale, Virginia H [ORNL

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Biofuel Feedstock Assessment for Selected Countries  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Findings from biofuel feedstock production assessments and projections of future supply are presented and discussed. The report aims to improve capabilities to assess the degree to which imported biofuel could contribute to meeting future U.S. targets to reduce dependence on imported oil. The study scope was focused to meet time and resource requirements. A screening process identified Argentina, Brazil, Canada, China, Colombia, India, Mexico, and the Caribbean Basin Initiative (CBI) region for initial analysis, given their likely role in future feedstock supply relevant to U.S. markets. Supply curves for selected feedstocks in these countries are projected for 2012, 2017 and 2027. The supply functions, along with calculations to reflect estimated supplies available for export and/or biofuel production, were provided to DOE for use in a broader energy market allocation study. Potential cellulosic supplies from crop and forestry residues and perennials were also estimated for 2017 and 2027. The analysis identified capacity to potentially double or triple feedstock production by 2017 in some cases. A majority of supply growth is derived from increasing the area cultivated (especially sugarcane in Brazil). This is supplemented by improving yields and farming practices. Most future supplies of corn and wheat are projected to be allocated to food and feed. Larger shares of future supplies of sugarcane, soybean and palm oil production will be available for export or biofuel. National policies are catalyzing investments in biofuel industries to meet targets for fuel blending that generally fall in the 5-10% range. Social and environmental concerns associated with rapid expansion of feedstock production are considered. If the 2017 projected feedstock supply calculated as ‘available’ for export or biofuel were converted to fuel, it would represent the equivalent of about 38 billion gallons of gasoline. Sugarcane and bagasse dominate the available supply, representing 64% of the total. Among the nations studied, Brazil is the source of about two-thirds of available supplies, followed distantly by Argentina (12%), India and the CBI region.

Kline, K.L.; Oladosu, G.A.; Wolfe, A.K.; Perlack, R.D.; Dale, V.H.

2008-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

264

DEVELOPMENT OF PRESSURIZED CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED BED PARTIAL GASIFICATION MODULE (PGM)  

SciTech Connect

Foster Wheeler Development Corporation is working under DOE contract No. DE-FC26-00NT40972 to develop a partial gasification module (PGM) that represents a critical element of several potential coal-fired Vision 21 plants. When utilized for electrical power generation, these plants will operate with efficiencies greater than 60% while producing near zero emissions of traditional stack gas pollutants. The new process partially gasifies coal at elevated pressure producing a coal-derived syngas and a char residue. The syngas can be used to fuel the most advanced power producing equipment such as solid oxide fuel cells or gas turbines or processed to produce clean liquid fuels or chemicals for industrial users. The char residue is not wasted; it can also be used to generate electricity by fueling boilers that drive the most advanced ultra-supercritical pressure steam turbines. The unique aspect of the process is that it utilizes a pressurized circulating fluidized bed partial gasifier and does not attempt to consume the coal in a single step. To convert all the coal to syngas in a single step requires extremely high temperatures ({approx}2500 to 2800F) that melt and vaporize the coal and essentially drive all coal ash contaminants into the syngas. Since these contaminants can be corrosive to power generating equipment, the syngas must be cooled to near room temperature to enable a series of chemical processes to clean the syngas. Foster Wheeler's process operates at much lower temperatures that control/minimize the release of contaminants; this eliminates/minimizes the need for the expensive, complicated syngas heat exchangers and chemical cleanup systems typical of high temperature gasification. By performing the gasification in a circulating bed, a significant amount of syngas can still be produced despite the reduced temperature and the circulating bed allows easy scale up to large size plants. Rather than air, it can also operate with oxygen to facilitate sequestration of stack gas carbon dioxide gases for a 100% reduction in greenhouse gas emissions. The amount of syngas and char produced by the PGM can be tailored to fit the production objectives of the overall plant, i.e., power generation, clean liquid fuel production, chemicals production, etc. Hence, PGM is a robust building block that offers all the advantages of coal gasification but in a more user friendly form; it is also fuel flexible in that it can use alternative fuels such as biomass, sewerage sludge, etc. The PGM consists of a pressurized circulating fluidized bed (PCFB) reactor together with a recycle cyclone and a particulate removing barrier filter. Coal, air, steam, and possibly sand are fed to the bottom of the PCFB reactor and establish a relatively dense bed of coal/char in the bottom section. As these constituents react, a hot syngas is produced which conveys the solids residue vertically up through the reactor and into the recycle cyclone. Solids elutriated from the dense bed and contained in the syngas are collected in the cyclone and drain via a dipleg back to the dense bed at the bottom of the PCFB reactor. This recycle loop of hot solids acts as a thermal flywheel and promotes efficient solid-gas chemical reaction.

Unknown

2001-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

265

Data:3805ae9e-aff3-4262-9dcb-448410ce66a1 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ae9e-aff3-4262-9dcb-448410ce66a1 ae9e-aff3-4262-9dcb-448410ce66a1 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Kenergy Corp Effective date: 2011/09/01 End date if known: Rate name: Renewable Resource Energy Service Rider - Schedule 33 Sector: Industrial Description: APPLICABLE In all territory served. AVAILABILITY OF SERVICE Renewable Resource Energy service is available in accordance with the terms of this tariff rider to any customer purchasing retail electric service under a rate schedule listed on Sheet No. 23A of this rider subject to Kenergy's general rules and regulations on file with the Public Service Comrnission of Kentucky. For purposes of this renewable resource energy service tariff rider, (i) the term "Renewable Resource Energy" means electric energy produced from solar, wind, ocean, geothermal energy, biomass, or landfill gas, and (ii) the term "biomass" means any organic material that is available on a renewable or recurring basis, including dedicated energy crops, trees grown for energy production, wood waste and wood residues, plants (including aquatic plants, grasses, and agricultural crops), residues, fibers, animal wastes and other organic waste materials (but not including unsegregated municipal solid waste (garbage)), and fats and oils. CONDITIONS OF SERVICE (1) Renewable Resource Energy service availability is contingent upon the availability from ' Kenergy's wholesale power supplier of a wholesale supply of Renewable Resource Energy in the quantity and at the quality requested by a customer. (2) Subject to the other requirements of this tariff rider, Kenergy will make Renewable Resource Energy service available to a customer if the customer signs a Renewable Resource Energy service contract in the form attached to this tariff rider agreeing to purchase a specified number of 100 KWH blocks of Renewable Resource Energy per month for a period of not less than one year, and that contract is accepted by Kenergy's wholesale power supplier. Kenergy will have the right, but not the obligation, to terminate a Renewable Resource Energy service contract at the request of the customer before the end of the contract term.

266

Data:4658ce36-6ae9-4812-abc1-e340fd31ffd2 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ce36-6ae9-4812-abc1-e340fd31ffd2 ce36-6ae9-4812-abc1-e340fd31ffd2 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Kenergy Corp Effective date: 2011/09/01 End date if known: Rate name: Renewable Resource Energy Service Rider - Schedule 5 Sector: Industrial Description: APPLICABLE In all territory served. AVAILABILITY OF SERVICE Renewable Resource Energy service is available in accordance with the terms of this tariff rider to any customer purchasing retail electric service under a rate schedule listed on Sheet No. 23A of this rider subject to Kenergy's general rules and regulations on file with the Public Service Comrnission of Kentucky. For purposes of this renewable resource energy service tariff rider, (i) the term "Renewable Resource Energy" means electric energy produced from solar, wind, ocean, geothermal energy, biomass, or landfill gas, and (ii) the term "biomass" means any organic material that is available on a renewable or recurring basis, including dedicated energy crops, trees grown for energy production, wood waste and wood residues, plants (including aquatic plants, grasses, and agricultural crops), residues, fibers, animal wastes and other organic waste materials (but not including unsegregated municipal solid waste (garbage)), and fats and oils. CONDITIONS OF SERVICE (1) Renewable Resource Energy service availability is contingent upon the availability from ' Kenergy's wholesale power supplier of a wholesale supply of Renewable Resource Energy in the quantity and at the quality requested by a customer. (2) Subject to the other requirements of this tariff rider, Kenergy will make Renewable Resource Energy service available to a customer if the customer signs a Renewable Resource Energy service contract in the form attached to this tariff rider agreeing to purchase a specified number of 100 KWH blocks of Renewable Resource Energy per month for a period of not less than one year, and that contract is accepted by Kenergy's wholesale power supplier. Kenergy will have the right, but not the obligation, to terminate a Renewable Resource Energy service contract at the request of the customer before the end of the contract term.

267

Data:83df7de7-3769-409a-a8cf-9ddb4751dbc2 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

df7de7-3769-409a-a8cf-9ddb4751dbc2 df7de7-3769-409a-a8cf-9ddb4751dbc2 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Kenergy Corp Effective date: 2011/09/01 End date if known: Rate name: Renewable Resource Energy Service Rider - Schedule 7 Sector: Industrial Description: APPLICABLE In all territory served. AVAILABILITY OF SERVICE Renewable Resource Energy service is available in accordance with the terms of this tariff rider to any customer purchasing retail electric service under a rate schedule listed on Sheet No. 23A of this rider subject to Kenergy's general rules and regulations on file with the Public Service Comrnission of Kentucky. For purposes of this renewable resource energy service tariff rider, (i) the term "Renewable Resource Energy" means electric energy produced from solar, wind, ocean, geothermal energy, biomass, or landfill gas, and (ii) the term "biomass" means any organic material that is available on a renewable or recurring basis, including dedicated energy crops, trees grown for energy production, wood waste and wood residues, plants (including aquatic plants, grasses, and agricultural crops), residues, fibers, animal wastes and other organic waste materials (but not including unsegregated municipal solid waste (garbage)), and fats and oils. CONDITIONS OF SERVICE (1) Renewable Resource Energy service availability is contingent upon the availability from ' Kenergy's wholesale power supplier of a wholesale supply of Renewable Resource Energy in the quantity and at the quality requested by a customer. (2) Subject to the other requirements of this tariff rider, Kenergy will make Renewable Resource Energy service available to a customer if the customer signs a Renewable Resource Energy service contract in the form attached to this tariff rider agreeing to purchase a specified number of 100 KWH blocks of Renewable Resource Energy per month for a period of not less than one year, and that contract is accepted by Kenergy's wholesale power supplier. Kenergy will have the right, but not the obligation, to terminate a Renewable Resource Energy service contract at the request of the customer before the end of the contract term.

268

Data:Ee7e9519-592a-48d9-8608-c4836519c318 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

e9519-592a-48d9-8608-c4836519c318 e9519-592a-48d9-8608-c4836519c318 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Kenergy Corp Effective date: 2011/09/01 End date if known: Rate name: Renewable Resource Energy Service Rider - Schedule 16 Sector: Commercial Description: APPLICABLE In all territory served. AVAILABILITY OF SERVICE Renewable Resource Energy service is available in accordance with the terms of this tariff rider to any customer purchasing retail electric service under a rate schedule listed on Sheet No. 23A of this rider subject to Kenergy's general rules and regulations on file with the Public Service Comrnission of Kentucky. For purposes of this renewable resource energy service tariff rider, (i) the term "Renewable Resource Energy" means electric energy produced from solar, wind, ocean, geothermal energy, biomass, or landfill gas, and (ii) the term "biomass" means any organic material that is available on a renewable or recurring basis, including dedicated energy crops, trees grown for energy production, wood waste and wood residues, plants (including aquatic plants, grasses, and agricultural crops), residues, fibers, animal wastes and other organic waste materials (but not including unsegregated municipal solid waste (garbage)), and fats and oils. CONDITIONS OF SERVICE (1) Renewable Resource Energy service availability is contingent upon the availability from ' Kenergy's wholesale power supplier of a wholesale supply of Renewable Resource Energy in the quantity and at the quality requested by a customer. (2) Subject to the other requirements of this tariff rider, Kenergy will make Renewable Resource Energy service available to a customer if the customer signs a Renewable Resource Energy service contract in the form attached to this tariff rider agreeing to purchase a specified number of 100 KWH blocks of Renewable Resource Energy per month for a period of not less than one year, and that contract is accepted by Kenergy's wholesale power supplier. Kenergy will have the right, but not the obligation, to terminate a Renewable Resource Energy service contract at the request of the customer before the end of the contract term.

269

Data:9ec9ecbe-c744-441b-867b-6aada38b1fc6 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ecbe-c744-441b-867b-6aada38b1fc6 ecbe-c744-441b-867b-6aada38b1fc6 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Kenergy Corp Effective date: 2011/09/01 End date if known: Rate name: Renewable Resource Energy Service Rider - Schedule 3 Sector: Commercial Description: APPLICABLE In all territory served. AVAILABILITY OF SERVICE Renewable Resource Energy service is available in accordance with the terms of this tariff rider to any customer purchasing retail electric service under a rate schedule listed on Sheet No. 23A of this rider subject to Kenergy's general rules and regulations on file with the Public Service Comrnission of Kentucky. For purposes of this renewable resource energy service tariff rider, (i) the term "Renewable Resource Energy" means electric energy produced from solar, wind, ocean, geothermal energy, biomass, or landfill gas, and (ii) the term "biomass" means any organic material that is available on a renewable or recurring basis, including dedicated energy crops, trees grown for energy production, wood waste and wood residues, plants (including aquatic plants, grasses, and agricultural crops), residues, fibers, animal wastes and other organic waste materials (but not including unsegregated municipal solid waste (garbage)), and fats and oils. CONDITIONS OF SERVICE (1) Renewable Resource Energy service availability is contingent upon the availability from ' Kenergy's wholesale power supplier of a wholesale supply of Renewable Resource Energy in the quantity and at the quality requested by a customer. (2) Subject to the other requirements of this tariff rider, Kenergy will make Renewable Resource Energy service available to a customer if the customer signs a Renewable Resource Energy service contract in the form attached to this tariff rider agreeing to purchase a specified number of 100 KWH blocks of Renewable Resource Energy per month for a period of not less than one year, and that contract is accepted by Kenergy's wholesale power supplier. Kenergy will have the right, but not the obligation, to terminate a Renewable Resource Energy service contract at the request of the customer before the end of the contract term.

270

Data:9382e2fc-dac2-462e-ba98-fdcb96c634f0 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

e2fc-dac2-462e-ba98-fdcb96c634f0 e2fc-dac2-462e-ba98-fdcb96c634f0 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Kenergy Corp Effective date: 2011/09/01 End date if known: Rate name: Renewable Resource Energy Service Rider - Schedule 1 Sector: Residential Description: APPLICABLE In all territory served. AVAILABILITY OF SERVICE Renewable Resource Energy service is available in accordance with the terms of this tariff rider to any customer purchasing retail electric service under a rate schedule listed on Sheet No. 23A of this rider subject to Kenergy's general rules and regulations on file with the Public Service Comrnission of Kentucky. For purposes of this renewable resource energy service tariff rider, (i) the term "Renewable Resource Energy" means electric energy produced from solar, wind, ocean, geothermal energy, biomass, or landfill gas, and (ii) the term "biomass" means any organic material that is available on a renewable or recurring basis, including dedicated energy crops, trees grown for energy production, wood waste and wood residues, plants (including aquatic plants, grasses, and agricultural crops), residues, fibers, animal wastes and other organic waste materials (but not including unsegregated municipal solid waste (garbage)), and fats and oils. CONDITIONS OF SERVICE (1) Renewable Resource Energy service availability is contingent upon the availability from ' Kenergy's wholesale power supplier of a wholesale supply of Renewable Resource Energy in the quantity and at the quality requested by a customer. (2) Subject to the other requirements of this tariff rider, Kenergy will make Renewable Resource Energy service available to a customer if the customer signs a Renewable Resource Energy service contract in the form attached to this tariff rider agreeing to purchase a specified number of 100 KWH blocks of Renewable Resource Energy per month for a period of not less than one year, and that contract is accepted by Kenergy's wholesale power supplier. Kenergy will have the right, but not the obligation, to terminate a Renewable Resource Energy service contract at the request of the customer before the end of the contract term.

271

Data:F358e502-527d-49b0-b8e7-16ce8282b8fb | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

8e502-527d-49b0-b8e7-16ce8282b8fb 8e502-527d-49b0-b8e7-16ce8282b8fb No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Kenergy Corp Effective date: 2011/09/01 End date if known: Rate name: Renewable Resource Energy Service Rider - Schedule 32 Sector: Description: APPLICABLE In all territory served. AVAILABILITY OF SERVICE Renewable Resource Energy service is available in accordance with the terms of this tariff rider to any customer purchasing retail electric service under a rate schedule listed on Sheet No. 23A of this rider subject to Kenergy's general rules and regulations on file with the Public Service Comrnission of Kentucky. For purposes of this renewable resource energy service tariff rider, (i) the term "Renewable Resource Energy" means electric energy produced from solar, wind, ocean, geothermal energy, biomass, or landfill gas, and (ii) the term "biomass" means any organic material that is available on a renewable or recurring basis, including dedicated energy crops, trees grown for energy production, wood waste and wood residues, plants (including aquatic plants, grasses, and agricultural crops), residues, fibers, animal wastes and other organic waste materials (but not including unsegregated municipal solid waste (garbage)), and fats and oils. CONDITIONS OF SERVICE (1) Renewable Resource Energy service availability is contingent upon the availability from ' Kenergy's wholesale power supplier of a wholesale supply of Renewable Resource Energy in the quantity and at the quality requested by a customer. (2) Subject to the other requirements of this tariff rider, Kenergy will make Renewable Resource Energy service available to a customer if the customer signs a Renewable Resource Energy service contract in the form attached to this tariff rider agreeing to purchase a specified number of 100 KWH blocks of Renewable Resource Energy per month for a period of not less than one year, and that contract is accepted by Kenergy's wholesale power supplier. Kenergy will have the right, but not the obligation, to terminate a Renewable Resource Energy service contract at the request of the customer before the end of the contract term.

272

Data:51ac99ac-313f-4582-9db8-7bc4524fc9e9 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ac-313f-4582-9db8-7bc4524fc9e9 ac-313f-4582-9db8-7bc4524fc9e9 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Kenergy Corp Effective date: 2011/09/01 End date if known: Rate name: Renewable Resource Energy Service Rider - Schedule 41 Sector: Industrial Description: APPLICABLE In all territory served. AVAILABILITY OF SERVICE Renewable Resource Energy service is available in accordance with the terms of this tariff rider to any customer purchasing retail electric service under a rate schedule listed on Sheet No. 23A of this rider subject to Kenergy's general rules and regulations on file with the Public Service Comrnission of Kentucky. For purposes of this renewable resource energy service tariff rider, (i) the term "Renewable Resource Energy" means electric energy produced from solar, wind, ocean, geothermal energy, biomass, or landfill gas, and (ii) the term "biomass" means any organic material that is available on a renewable or recurring basis, including dedicated energy crops, trees grown for energy production, wood waste and wood residues, plants (including aquatic plants, grasses, and agricultural crops), residues, fibers, animal wastes and other organic waste materials (but not including unsegregated municipal solid waste (garbage)), and fats and oils. CONDITIONS OF SERVICE (1) Renewable Resource Energy service availability is contingent upon the availability from ' Kenergy's wholesale power supplier of a wholesale supply of Renewable Resource Energy in the quantity and at the quality requested by a customer. (2) Subject to the other requirements of this tariff rider, Kenergy will make Renewable Resource Energy service available to a customer if the customer signs a Renewable Resource Energy service contract in the form attached to this tariff rider agreeing to purchase a specified number of 100 KWH blocks of Renewable Resource Energy per month for a period of not less than one year, and that contract is accepted by Kenergy's wholesale power supplier. Kenergy will have the right, but not the obligation, to terminate a Renewable Resource Energy service contract at the request of the customer before the end of the contract term.

273

Environmental Impacts of Tourism in Khao Yai National Park, Thailand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Knowledge of visitor impacts is critical for sustainable tourism management in national parks. The focus of past tourism impact research on national parks is either on bio-physical impacts (conducted as recreation ecology research) or on social impacts (human dimensions, including environmental perception and crowding). Research integrating these two dimensions has been rarely conducted. This research aims to fill this gap through the integrative approach that attempts to understand current biophysical impacts of visitor activities in a national park, and it examines how visitors perceive these impacts. The primary objectives of this dissertation are 1) to provide a synthesis of existing of bio-physical impacts of visitor activities in the Khao Yai National Park (KYNP) and 2) to examine visitors’ perception of those impacts. Also, the factors affecting visitors’ perception are analyzed. Both qualitative and quantitative methods were used in this study. Previous impact studies conducted in KYNP were reviewed. A visitor survey was conducted between December 2008 and February 2009. The questionnaires were distributed to 628 domestic and 40 international visitors. The 38 KYNP official interviews were completed. Based on previous impact research in KYNP, the most common bio-physical impacts include soil compaction, removal of humus layer, erosion, plant damage, soil and root exposure, water quality deterioration, disturbance and feeding wildlife. Other environmental impacts include noise pollution and garbage accumulation. The results indicate that more than 30 percent of visitors do not recognize the negative results of their activities. With the exception of vegetation and water impacts, overall, visitors perceive the impacts as less severe than the actual impacts. Environmental impacts are rated differently by the KYNP officials, domestic, and international visitors. Also, significant differences were found among birders, hikers, and campers. The key factors influencing impact perceptions include income level, education level, residential location, park visitation experience, length of stay in KYNP, recreation activity, frequency of activity, group type, and group size. It is suggested that both the quality and the quantity of visitor impact research are needed to construct the body of knowledge of impacts in KYNP. A long-term impact monitoring is required to sustain the ecological integrity in KYNP.

Phumsathan, Sangsan

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Combined Grinding and Drying of Biomass in One Operation Phase I  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

First American Scientific Corporation (FASC) has developed a unique and innovative grinder/dryer called KDS Micronex. The KS (Kinetic Disintegration System) combines two operations of grinding and drying into a single operation which reduces dependence on external heat input. The machine captures the heat of comminution and combines it will centrifugal forces to expedite moisture extraction from wet biomass. Because it uses mechanical forces rather than providing direct heat to perform the drying operation, it is a simpler machine and uses less energy than conventional grinding and drying operations which occur as two separate steps. The entire compact unit can be transported on a flatbed trailer to the site where biomass is available. Hence, the KDS Micronex is a technology that enables inexpensive pretreatment of waste materials and biomass. A well prepared biomass can be used as feed, fuel or fertilizer instead of being discarded. Electricity and chemical feedstock produced from such biomass would displace the use of fossil fuels and no net greenhouse gas emissions would result from such bio-based operations. Organic fertilizers resulting from the KS Micronex grinding/drying process will be pathogen-free unlike raw animal manures. The feasibility tests on KS during Phase I showed that a prototype machine can be developed, field tested and the technology demonstrated for commercial applications. The present KDS machine can remove up to 400 kg/h of water from a wet feed material. Since biomass processors demand a finished product that is only 10% moist and most raw materials like corn stover, bagasse, layer manure, cow dung, and waste wood have moisture contents of the order of 50%, this water removal rate translates to a production rate of roughly half a ton per hour. this is too small for most processors who are unwilling to acquire multiple machines because of the added complexity to the feed and product removal systems. The economics suffer due to small production rates, because the labor costs are a much larger fraction of the production cost. The goal for further research and development work is to scale up the KDS technology incorporating findings from Phase I into a machine that has superior performance characteristics.

Sokhansanj, S.

2008-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

275

Development of Oxidative Lime Pretreatment and Shock Treatment to Produce Highly Digestible Lignocellulose for Biofuel and Ruminant Feed Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

At present, the United States generates biofuels (ethanol) from corn grain. Unfortunately, low crop yields and limited growth regions result in limited availability. Furthermore, the use of staple food crops for ethanol production has generated a highly controversial food vs. fuel debate. Because of its high abundance and relatively low cost, lignocellulosic biomass is a promising alternative feedstock for biofuel production; however, structural features of lignocellulose limit accessibility of enzymes or microorganisms. These structural barriers include high lignin content, acetyl groups on hemicellulose, high cellulose crystallinity, cellulose degree of polymerization, and small pore volume. To overcome these barriers, a variety of pretreatment processes (chemical and mechanical) have been developed. Oxidative-lime pretreatment (OLP) is highly effective at reducing lignin content and removing acetyl groups from hemicellulose. Combining OLP with a mechanical treatment process greatly enhances the enzymatic digestibility of lignocellulose. Recommended OLP conditions were determined for Dacotah (120 °C, 6.89-bar O2, 240 min) and Alamo (110 °C, 6-89-bar O2, 240 min) switchgrass. Using recommended conditions, 72-h glucan digestibilities (g glucan hydrolyzed/100 g glucan in raw biomass; 15 filter paper units/g raw glucan) of 85.2 and 88.5 were achieved for Dacotah and Alamo, respectively. Adding ball milling to OLP further enhanced glucan digestibility to 91.1 (Dacotah) and 90.0 (Alamo). In previous studies, shock treatment achieved promising results, but was often inconsistent. This work refined shock treatment with a focus on using consistent procedures and performance analysis. The combination of OLP and shock treatment enhanced the 72-h glucan digestibility of several promising biomass feedstocks: bagasse (74.0), corn stover (92.0), poplar wood (94.0), sorghum (71.8), and switchgrass (89.0). Highly digestible lignocellulose can also be used as ruminant animal feed. Shock treatment plus OLP increased the total digestible nutrients (TDNN; g nutrients digested/100 g organic matter) of corn stover from 51.9 (untreated) to 72.6. Adding in pre-washed corn stover solubles to produce a combined feed (17.8 percent corn stover solubles and 82.2 percent shock OLP corn stover) increased TDNN to 74.9. Mixing in enough solubilized protein to match the crude protein content of corn grain further improved TDNN to 75.5, only 12.6 less than corn grain.

Falls, Matthew David

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Biofuel Production Initiative at Claflin University Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

For US transportation fuel independence or reduced dependence on foreign oil, the Federal Government has mandated that the country produce 36 billion gallons (bg) of renewable transportation fuel per year for its transportation fuel supply by 2022. This can be achieved only if development of efficient technology for second generation biofuel from ligno-cellulosic sources is feasible. To be successful in this area, development of a widely available, renewable, cost-effective ligno-cellulosic biomass feedstock that can be easily and efficiently converted biochemically by bacteria or other fast-growing organisms is required. Moreover, if the biofuel type is butanol, then the existing infrastructure to deliver fuel to the customer can be used without additional costs and retrofits. The Claflin Biofuel Initiative project is focused on helping the US meet the above-mentioned targets. With support from this grant, Claflin University (CU) scientists have created over 50 new strains of microorganisms that are producing butanol from complex carbohydrates and cellulosic compounds. Laboratory analysis shows that a number of these strains are producing higher percentages of butanol than other methods currently in use. All of these recombinant bacterial strains are producing relatively high concentrations of acetone and numerous other byproducts as well. Therefore, we are carrying out intense mutations in the selected strains to reduce undesirable byproducts and increase the desired butanol production to further maximize the yield of butanol. We are testing the proof of concept of producing pre-industrial large scale biobutanol production by utilizing modifications of currently commercially available fermentation technology and instrumentation. We have already developed an initial process flow diagram (PFD) and selected a site for a biobutanol pilot scale facility in Orangeburg, SC. With the recent success in engineering new strains of various biofuel producing bacteria at CU, it will soon be possible to provide other technical information for the development of process flow diagrams (PFD’s) and piping and instrumentation diagrams (P&ID’s). This information can be used for the equipment layout and general arrangement drawings for the proposed process and eventual plant. An efficient bio-butanol pilot plant to convert ligno-cellulosic biomass feedstock from bagasse and wood chips will create significant number of green jobs for the Orangeburg, SC community that will be environmentally-friendly and generate much-needed income for farmers in the area.

Chowdhury, Kamal

2011-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

277

Sugar-Based Ethanol Biorefinery: Ethanol, Succinic Acid and By-Product Production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Lignin from pretreatment seemed to offer a potential source of valuable by-products. Although a wide range of phenolic compounds were present in the effluent from dilute ammonia pretreatment, the concentrations of each (except for benzoic acid) were too low to consider for extraction. The cellulosic hydrolysis system was modified to produce commercially recoverable quantities of cellobiose, which has a small but growing market in the food process industries. A spin-off of this led to the production of a specific oligosaccharide which appears to have both medical and commercial implications as a fungal growth inhibitor. An alternate use of sugars produced from biomass hydrolysis would be to produce succinic acid as a chemical feedstock for other conversions. An organism was developed which can do this bioconversion, but the economics of succinic acid production were such that it could not compete with current commercial practice. To allow recovery of commercial amounts of ethanol from bagasse fermentation, research was conducted on high solids loading fermentations (using S. cerevisiae) with commercial cellulase on pretreated material. A combination of SHF/SSF treatment with fed-batch operation allowed fermentation at 30% solids loading. Supplementation of the fermentation with a small amount of black-strap molasses had results beyond expectation. There was an enhancement of conversion as well as production of ethanol levels above 6.0% w/w, which is required both for efficient distillation as well as contaminant repression. The focus of fermentation development was only on converting the cellulose to ethanol, as this yeast is not capable of fermenting both glucose and xylose (from hemicellulose). In anticipation of the future development of such an organism, we screened the commercially available xylanases to find the optimum mix for conversion of both cellulose and hemicellulose. A different mixture than the spezyme/novozyme mix used in our fermentation research was found to be more efficient at converting both cellulose and hemicellulose. Efforts were made to select a mutant of Pichia stipitis for ability to co-ferment glucose and xylose to ethanol. New mutation technology was developed, but an appropriate mutant has not yet been isolated. The ability to convert to stillage from biomass fermentations were determined to be suitable for anaerobic degradation and methane production. An economic model of a current sugar factory was developed in order to provide a baseline for the cost/benefit analysis of adding cellulosic ethanol production.

Donal F. Day

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

278

Biofuel Feedstock Assessment For Selected Countries  

SciTech Connect

Findings from biofuel feedstock production assessments and projections of future supply are presented and discussed. The report aims to improve capabilities to assess the degree to which imported biofuel could contribute to meeting future U.S. targets to reduce dependence on imported oil. The study scope was focused to meet time and resource requirements. A screening process identified Argentina, Brazil, Canada, China, Colombia, India, Mexico, and the Caribbean Basin Initiative (CBI) region for initial analysis, given their likely role in future feedstock supply relevant to U.S. markets. Supply curves for selected feedstocks in these countries are projected for 2012, 2017 and 2027. The supply functions, along with calculations to reflect estimated supplies available for export and/or biofuel production, were provided to DOE for use in a broader energy market allocation study. Potential cellulosic supplies from crop and forestry residues and perennials were also estimated for 2017 and 2027. The analysis identified capacity to potentially double or triple feedstock production by 2017 in some cases. A majority of supply growth is derived from increasing the area cultivated (especially sugarcane in Brazil). This is supplemented by improving yields and farming practices. Most future supplies of corn and wheat are projected to be allocated to food and feed. Larger shares of future supplies of sugarcane, soybean and palm oil production will be available for export or biofuel. National policies are catalyzing investments in biofuel industries to meet targets for fuel blending that generally fall in the 5-10% range. Social and environmental concerns associated with rapid expansion of feedstock production are considered. If the 2017 projected feedstock supply calculated as 'available' for export or biofuel were converted to fuel, it would represent the equivalent of about 38 billion gallons of gasoline. Sugarcane and bagasse dominate the available supply, representing 64% of the total. Among the nations studied, Brazil is the source of about two-thirds of available supplies, followed distantly by Argentina (12%), India and the CBI region.

Kline, Keith L [ORNL; Oladosu, Gbadebo A [ORNL; Wolfe, Amy K [ORNL; Perlack, Robert D [ORNL; Dale, Virginia H [ORNL

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Fundamental study of structural features affecting enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lignocellulose is a promising and valuable alternative energy source. Native lignocellulosic biomass has limited accessibility to cellulase enzyme due to structural features; therefore, pretreatment is an essential prerequisite to make biomass accessible and reactive by altering its structural features. The effects of substrate concentration, addition of cellobiase, enzyme loading, and structural features on biomass digestibility were explored. The addition of supplemental cellobiase to the enzyme complex greatly increased the initial rate and ultimate extent of biomass hydrolysis by converting the strong inhibitor, cellobiose, to glucose. A low substrate concentration (10 g/L) was employed to prevent end-product inhibition by cellobiose and glucose. The rate and extent of biomass hydrolysis significantly depend on enzyme loading and structural features resulting from pretreatment, thus the hydrolysis and pretreatment processes are intimately coupled because of structural features. Model lignocelluloses with various structural features were hydrolyzed with a variety of cellulase loadings for 1, 6, and 72 h. Glucan, xylan, and total sugar conversions at 1, 6, and 72 h were linearly proportional to the logarithm of cellulase loadings from approximately 10% to 90% conversion, indicating that the simplified HCH-1 model is valid for predicting lignocellulose digestibility. Carbohydrate conversions at a given time versus the natural logarithm of cellulase loadings were plotted to obtain the slopes and intercepts which were correlated to structural features (lignin content, acetyl content, cellulose crystallinity, and carbohydrate content) by both parametric and nonparametric regression models. The predictive ability of the models was evaluated by a variety of biomass (corn stover, bagasse, and rice straw) treated with lime, dilute acid, ammonia fiber explosion (AFEX), and aqueous ammonia. The measured slopes, intercepts, and carbohydrate conversions at 1, 6, and 72 h were compared to the values predicted by the parametric and nonparametric models. The smaller mean square error (MSE) in the parametric models indicates more satisfactorily predictive ability than the nonparametric models. The agreement between the measured and predicted values shows that lignin content, acetyl content, and cellulose crystallinity are key factors that determine biomass digestibility, and that biomass digestibility can be predicted over a wide range of cellulase loadings using the simplified HCH-1 model.

Zhu, Li

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

GTI  

SciTech Connect

Biomass represents a large potential feedstock resource for environmentally clean processes that produce power or chemicals. It lends itself to both biological and thermal conversion processes and both options are currently being explored. Hydrogen can be produced in a variety of ways. The majority of the hydrogen produced in this country is produced through natural gas reforming and is used as chemical feedstock in refinery operations. In this report we will examine the production of hydrogen by gasification of biomass. Biomass is defined as organic matter that is available on a renewable basis through natural processes or as a by-product of processes that use renewable resources. The majority of biomass is used in combustion processes, in mills that use the renewable resources, to produce electricity for end-use product generation. This report will explore the use of hydrogen as a fuel derived from gasification of three candidate biomass feedstocks: bagasse, switchgrass, and a nutshell mix that consists of 40% almond nutshell, 40% almond prunings, and 20% walnut shell. In this report, an assessment of the technical and economic potential of producing hydrogen from biomass gasification is analyzed. The resource base was assessed to determine a process scale from feedstock costs and availability. Solids handling systems were researched. A GTI proprietary gasifier model was used in combination with a Hysys. design and simulation program to determine the amount of hydrogen that can be produced from each candidate biomass feed. Cost estimations were developed and government programs and incentives were analyzed. Finally, the barriers to the production and commercialization of hydrogen from biomass were determined. The end-use of the hydrogen produced from this system is small PEM fuel cells for automobiles. Pyrolysis of biomass was also considered. Pyrolysis is a reaction in which biomass or coal is partially vaporized by heating. Gasification is a more general term, and includes heating as well as the injection of other ''ingredients'' such as oxygen and water. Pyrolysis alone is a useful first step in creating vapors from coal or biomass that can then be processed in subsequent steps to make liquid fuels. Such products are not the objective of this project. Therefore pyrolysis was not included in the process design or in the economic analysis. High-pressure, fluidized bed gasification is best known to GTI through 30 years of experience. Entrained flow, in contrast to fluidized bed, is a gasification technology applied at much larger unit sizes than employed here. Coal gasification and residual oil gasifiers in refineries are the places where such designs have found application, at sizes on the order of 5 to 10 times larger than what has been determined for this study. Atmospheric pressure gasification is also not discussed. Atmospheric gasification has been the choice of all power system pilot plants built for biomass to date, except for the Varnamo plant in Sweden, which used the Ahlstrom (now Foster Wheeler) pressurized gasifier. However, for fuel production, the disadvantage of the large volumetric flows at low pressure leads to the pressurized gasifier being more economical.

GTI

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "garbage bagasse sewerage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Techno Economic Analysis of Hydrogen Production by gasification of biomass  

SciTech Connect

Biomass represents a large potential feedstock resource for environmentally clean processes that produce power or chemicals. It lends itself to both biological and thermal conversion processes and both options are currently being explored. Hydrogen can be produced in a variety of ways. The majority of the hydrogen produced in this country is produced through natural gas reforming and is used as chemical feedstock in refinery operations. In this report we will examine the production of hydrogen by gasification of biomass. Biomass is defined as organic matter that is available on a renewable basis through natural processes or as a by-product of processes that use renewable resources. The majority of biomass is used in combustion processes, in mills that use the renewable resources, to produce electricity for end-use product generation. This report will explore the use of hydrogen as a fuel derived from gasification of three candidate biomass feedstocks: bagasse, switchgrass, and a nutshell mix that consists of 40% almond nutshell, 40% almond prunings, and 20% walnut shell. In this report, an assessment of the technical and economic potential of producing hydrogen from biomass gasification is analyzed. The resource base was assessed to determine a process scale from feedstock costs and availability. Solids handling systems were researched. A GTI proprietary gasifier model was used in combination with a Hysys(reg. sign) design and simulation program to determine the amount of hydrogen that can be produced from each candidate biomass feed. Cost estimations were developed and government programs and incentives were analyzed. Finally, the barriers to the production and commercialization of hydrogen from biomass were determined. The end-use of the hydrogen produced from this system is small PEM fuel cells for automobiles. Pyrolysis of biomass was also considered. Pyrolysis is a reaction in which biomass or coal is partially vaporized by heating. Gasification is a more general term, and includes heating as well as the injection of other ''ingredients'' such as oxygen and water. Pyrolysis alone is a useful first step in creating vapors from coal or biomass that can then be processed in subsequent steps to make liquid fuels. Such products are not the objective of this project. Therefore pyrolysis was not included in the process design or in the economic analysis. High-pressure, fluidized bed gasification is best known to GTI through 30 years of experience. Entrained flow, in contrast to fluidized bed, is a gasification technology applied at much larger unit sizes than employed here. Coal gasification and residual oil gasifiers in refineries are the places where such designs have found application, at sizes on the order of 5 to 10 times larger than what has been determined for this study. Atmospheric pressure gasification is also not discussed. Atmospheric gasification has been the choice of all power system pilot plants built for biomass to date, except for the Varnamo plant in Sweden, which used the Ahlstrom (now Foster Wheeler) pressurized gasifier. However, for fuel production, the disadvantage of the large volumetric flows at low pressure leads to the pressurized gasifier being more economical.

Francis Lau

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Techno Economic Analysis of Hydrogen Production by gasification of biomass  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Biomass represents a large potential feedstock resource for environmentally clean processes that produce power or chemicals. It lends itself to both biological and thermal conversion processes and both options are currently being explored. Hydrogen can be produced in a variety of ways. The majority of the hydrogen produced in this country is produced through natural gas reforming and is used as chemical feedstock in refinery operations. In this report we will examine the production of hydrogen by gasification of biomass. Biomass is defined as organic matter that is available on a renewable basis through natural processes or as a by-product of processes that use renewable resources. The majority of biomass is used in combustion processes, in mills that use the renewable resources, to produce electricity for end-use product generation. This report will explore the use of hydrogen as a fuel derived from gasification of three candidate biomass feedstocks: bagasse, switchgrass, and a nutshell mix that consists of 40% almond nutshell, 40% almond prunings, and 20% walnut shell. In this report, an assessment of the technical and economic potential of producing hydrogen from biomass gasification is analyzed. The resource base was assessed to determine a process scale from feedstock costs and availability. Solids handling systems were researched. A GTI proprietary gasifier model was used in combination with a Hysys(reg. sign) design and simulation program to determine the amount of hydrogen that can be produced from each candidate biomass feed. Cost estimations were developed and government programs and incentives were analyzed. Finally, the barriers to the production and commercialization of hydrogen from biomass were determined. The end-use of the hydrogen produced from this system is small PEM fuel cells for automobiles. Pyrolysis of biomass was also considered. Pyrolysis is a reaction in which biomass or coal is partially vaporized by heating. Gasification is a more general term, and includes heating as well as the injection of other ''ingredients'' such as oxygen and water. Pyrolysis alone is a useful first step in creating vapors from coal or biomass that can then be processed in subsequent steps to make liquid fuels. Such products are not the objective of this project. Therefore pyrolysis was not included in the process design or in the economic analysis. High-pressure, fluidized bed gasification is best known to GTI through 30 years of experience. Entrained flow, in contrast to fluidized bed, is a gasification technology applied at much larger unit sizes than employed here. Coal gasification and residual oil gasifiers in refineries are the places where such designs have found application, at sizes on the order of 5 to 10 times larger than what has been determined for this study. Atmospheric pressure gasification is also not discussed. Atmospheric gasification has been the choice of all power system pilot plants built for biomass to date, except for the Varnamo plant in Sweden, which used the Ahlstrom (now Foster Wheeler) pressurized gasifier. However, for fuel production, the disadvantage of the large volumetric flows at low pressure leads to the pressurized gasifier being more economical.

Francis Lau

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Final Technical Report: Hawaii Hydrogen Center for Development and Deployment of Distributed Energy Systems  

SciTech Connect

Hydrogen power park experiments in Hawai‘i produced real-world data on the performance of commercialized electrochemical components and power systems integrating renewable and hydrogen technologies. By analyzing the different losses associated with the various equipment items involved, this work identifies the different improvements necessary to increase the viability of these technologies for commercial deployment. The stand-alone power system installed at Kahua Ranch on the Big Island of Hawaii required the development of the necessary tools to connect, manage and monitor such a system. It also helped the electrolyzer supplier to adapt its unit to the stand-alone power system application. Hydrogen fuel purity assessments conducted at the Hawai‘i Natural Energy Institute (HNEI) fuel cell test facility yielded additional knowledge regarding fuel cell performance degradation due to exposure to several different fuel contaminants. In addition, a novel fitting strategy was developed to permit accurate separation of the degradation of fuel cell performance due to fuel impurities from other losses. A specific standard MEA and a standard flow field were selected for use in future small-scale fuel cell experiments. Renewable hydrogen production research was conducted using photoelectrochemical (PEC) devices, hydrogen production from biomass, and biohydrogen analysis. PEC device activities explored novel configurations of ‘traditional’ photovoltaic materials for application in high-efficiency photoelectrolysis for solar hydrogen production. The model systems investigated involved combinations of copper-indium-gallium-diselenide (CIGS) and hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H). A key result of this work was the establishment of a robust “three-stage” fabrication process at HNEI for high-efficiency CIGS thin film solar cells. The other key accomplishment was the development of models, designs and prototypes of novel ‘four-terminal’ devices integrating high-efficiency CIGS and a-Si:H with operating features compatible with high-efficiency photoelectrochemical (PEC) water-splitting. The objective of one activity under the hydrogen production from biomass task was to conduct parametric testing of the Pearson gasifier and to determine the effects of gasifier operating conditions on the gas yields and quality. The hydrogen yield from this gasifier was evaluated in a parametric test series over a range of residence times from 0.8 to 2.2 seconds. H2 concentrations as high as 55% (volume) were measured in the product gas at the longer residence times and this corresponds to a hydrogen yield of 90 kg per tonne of bagasse without gas upgrading. The objective of another activity was to develop hot gas clean-up capabilities for the HNEI gasifier test facility to support hydrogen-from-biomass research. The product gas stream at the outlet of the hot gas filter was characterized for concentrations of permanent gas species and contaminants. Biomass feedstock processing activity included a preliminary investigation into methods for processing sugar cane trash at the Puunene Sugar Factory on the island of Maui, Hawaii. The objective of the investigation was to explore treatment methods that would enable the successful use of cane trash as fuel for the production of hydrogen via gasification. Analyses were completed for the technical and economic feasibility of producing biofuel from photosynthetic marine microbes on a commercial scale. Results included estimates for total costs, energy efficiency, and return on investment. The biohydrogen team undertook a comprehensive review of the field and came to what is considered a realistic conclusion. To summarize, continued research is recommended in the fundamentals of the science related to genetic engineering and specific topics to cover knowledge gaps. In the meantime, the team also advocates continued development of related processes which can be linked to pollution control and other real world applications. The extra revenues hydrogen can provide to these multi-product systems can

Rocheleau, Richard E.

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

284

GTI  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Biomass represents a large potential feedstock resource for environmentally clean processes that produce power or chemicals. It lends itself to both biological and thermal conversion processes and both options are currently being explored. Hydrogen can be produced in a variety of ways. The majority of the hydrogen produced in this country is produced through natural gas reforming and is used as chemical feedstock in refinery operations. In this report we will examine the production of hydrogen by gasification of biomass. Biomass is defined as organic matter that is available on a renewable basis through natural processes or as a by-product of processes that use renewable resources. The majority of biomass is used in combustion processes, in mills that use the renewable resources, to produce electricity for end-use product generation. This report will explore the use of hydrogen as a fuel derived from gasification of three candidate biomass feedstocks: bagasse, switchgrass, and a nutshell mix that consists of 40% almond nutshell, 40% almond prunings, and 20% walnut shell. In this report, an assessment of the technical and economic potential of producing hydrogen from biomass gasification is analyzed. The resource base was assessed to determine a process scale from feedstock costs and availability. Solids handling systems were researched. A GTI proprietary gasifier model was used in combination with a Hysys. design and simulation program to determine the amount of hydrogen that can be produced from each candidate biomass feed. Cost estimations were developed and government programs and incentives were analyzed. Finally, the barriers to the production and commercialization of hydrogen from biomass were determined. The end-use of the hydrogen produced from this system is small PEM fuel cells for automobiles. Pyrolysis of biomass was also considered. Pyrolysis is a reaction in which biomass or coal is partially vaporized by heating. Gasification is a more general term, and includes heating as well as the injection of other ''ingredients'' such as oxygen and water. Pyrolysis alone is a useful first step in creating vapors from coal or biomass that can then be processed in subsequent steps to make liquid fuels. Such products are not the objective of this project. Therefore pyrolysis was not included in the process design or in the economic analysis. High-pressure, fluidized bed gasification is best known to GTI through 30 years of experience. Entrained flow, in contrast to fluidized bed, is a gasification technology applied at much larger unit sizes than employed here. Coal gasification and residual oil gasifiers in refineries are the places where such designs have found application, at sizes on the order of 5 to 10 times larger than what has been determined for this study. Atmospheric pressure gasification is also not discussed. Atmospheric gasification has been the choice of all power system pilot plants built for biomass to date, except for the Varnamo plant in Sweden, which used the Ahlstrom (now Foster Wheeler) pressurized gasifier. However, for fuel production, the disadvantage of the large volumetric flows at low pressure leads to the pressurized gasifier being more economical.

GTI

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Determination of saccharides and ethanol from biomass conversion using Raman spectroscopy: Effects of pretreatment and enzyme composition  

SciTech Connect

This dissertation focuses on the development of facile and rapid quantitative Raman spectroscopy measurements for the determination of conversion products in producing bioethanol from corn stover. Raman spectroscopy was chosen to determine glucose, xylose and ethanol in complex hydrolysis and fermentation matrices. Chapter 1 describes the motives and main goals of this work, and includes an introduction to biomass, commonly used pretreatment methods, hydrolysis and fermentation reactions. The principles of Raman spectroscopy, its advantages and applications related to biomass analysis are also illustrated. Chapter 2 and 3 comprise two published or submitted manuscripts, and the thesis concludes with an appendix. In Chapter 2, a Raman spectroscopic protocol is described to study the efficiency of enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose by measuring the main product in hydrolysate, glucose. Two commonly utilized pretreatment methods were investigated in order to understand their effect on glucose measurements by Raman spectroscopy. Second, a similar method was set up to determine the concentration of ethanol in fermentation broth. Both of these measurements are challenged by the presence of complex matrices. In Chapter 3, a quantitative comparison of pretreatment protocols and the effect of enzyme composition are studied using systematic methods. A multipeak fitting algorithm was developed to analyze spectra of hydrolysate containing two analytes: glucose and xylose. Chapter 4 concludes with a future perspective of this research area. An appendix describes a convenient, rapid spectrophotometric method developed to measure cadmium in water. This method requires relatively low cost instrumentation and can be used in microgravity, such as space shuttles or the International Space Station. This work was performed under the supervision of Professor Marc Porter while at Iowa State University. Research related to producing biofuel from bio-renewable resources, especially bioethanol from biomass, has grown significantly in the past decade due to the high demand and rising costs of fossil fuels. More than 3 percent of the energy consumption in the U.S. is derived from renewable biomass, mostly through industrial heat and steam production by the pulp and paper industry, and electricity generation from municipal solid waste (MSW) and forest industry residues. The utilization of food-based biomass to make fuels has been widely criticized because it may increase food shortages throughout the world and raise the cost of food. Thus, nonfood-based and plentiful lignocellulosic feedstocks, such as corn stover, perennial grass, bagasse, sorghum, wheat/rice straw, herbaceous and woody crops, have great potential to be new bio-renewable sources for energy production. Given that many varieties of biomass are available, there is need for a rapid, simple, high-throughput method to screen the conversion of many plant varieties. The most suitable species for each geographic region must be determined, as well as the optimal stage of harvest, impacts of environmental conditions (temperature, soil, pH, etc.). Various genetically modified plants should be studied in order to establish the desired biomass in bioethanol production. The main screening challenge, however, is the complexity of plant cell wall structures that make reliable and sensitive analysis difficult. To date, one of the most popular methods to produce lignocellulosic ethanol is to perform enzymatic hydrolysis followed by fermentation of the hydrolysate with yeast. There are several vital needs related to the field of chemistry that have been suggested as primary research foci needed to effectively improve lignocellulosic ethanol production. These topics include overcoming the recalcitrance of cellulosic biomass, the pervasiveness of pretreatment, advanced biological processing and better feedstocks. In this thesis, a novel approach using Raman spectroscopy has been developed to address important issues related to bioethanol generation, which will aid the research aimed to solve the topics m

Shih, Chien-Ju

2010-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

286

Final Technical Report: Hawaii Hydrogen Center for Development and Deployment of Distributed Energy Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hydrogen power park experiments in Hawai‘i produced real-world data on the performance of commercialized electrochemical components and power systems integrating renewable and hydrogen technologies. By analyzing the different losses associated with the various equipment items involved, this work identifies the different improvements necessary to increase the viability of these technologies for commercial deployment. The stand-alone power system installed at Kahua Ranch on the Big Island of Hawaii required the development of the necessary tools to connect, manage and monitor such a system. It also helped the electrolyzer supplier to adapt its unit to the stand-alone power system application. Hydrogen fuel purity assessments conducted at the Hawai‘i Natural Energy Institute (HNEI) fuel cell test facility yielded additional knowledge regarding fuel cell performance degradation due to exposure to several different fuel contaminants. In addition, a novel fitting strategy was developed to permit accurate separation of the degradation of fuel cell performance due to fuel impurities from other losses. A specific standard MEA and a standard flow field were selected for use in future small-scale fuel cell experiments. Renewable hydrogen production research was conducted using photoelectrochemical (PEC) devices, hydrogen production from biomass, and biohydrogen analysis. PEC device activities explored novel configurations of ‘traditional’ photovoltaic materials for application in high-efficiency photoelectrolysis for solar hydrogen production. The model systems investigated involved combinations of copper-indium-gallium-diselenide (CIGS) and hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H). A key result of this work was the establishment of a robust “three-stage” fabrication process at HNEI for high-efficiency CIGS thin film solar cells. The other key accomplishment was the development of models, designs and prototypes of novel ‘four-terminal’ devices integrating high-efficiency CIGS and a-Si:H with operating features compatible with high-efficiency photoelectrochemical (PEC) water-splitting. The objective of one activity under the hydrogen production from biomass task was to conduct parametric testing of the Pearson gasifier and to determine the effects of gasifier operating conditions on the gas yields and quality. The hydrogen yield from this gasifier was evaluated in a parametric test series over a range of residence times from 0.8 to 2.2 seconds. H2 concentrations as high as 55% (volume) were measured in the product gas at the longer residence times and this corresponds to a hydrogen yield of 90 kg per tonne of bagasse without gas upgrading. The objective of another activity was to develop hot gas clean-up capabilities for the HNEI gasifier test facility to support hydrogen-from-biomass research. The product gas stream at the outlet of the hot gas filter was characterized for concentrations of permanent gas species and contaminants. Biomass feedstock processing activity included a preliminary investigation into methods for processing sugar cane trash at the Puunene Sugar Factory on the island of Maui, Hawaii. The objective of the investigation was to explore treatment methods that would enable the successful use of cane trash as fuel for the production of hydrogen via gasification. Analyses were completed for the technical and economic feasibility of producing biofuel from photosynthetic marine microbes on a commercial scale. Results included estimates for total costs, energy efficiency, and return on investment. The biohydrogen team undertook a comprehensive review of the field and came to what is considered a realistic conclusion. To summarize, continued research is recommended in the fundamentals of the science related to genetic engineering and specific topics to cover knowledge gaps. In the meantime, the team also advocates continued development of related processes which can be linked to pollution control and other real world applications. The extra revenues hydrogen can provide to these multi-product systems can

Rocheleau, Richard E.

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z