National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for garbage bagasse sewerage

  1. Garbage in, power out

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wollard, K.

    1988-06-01

    Faced with the specter of garbage everywhere, communities are turning increasingly to waste-to-energy incineration and encountering unique challenges.

  2. Apparatus for treating garbage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, C.L.; Chen, K.; Hsien, K.

    1994-01-11

    An apparatus for treating garbage is described. The apparatus has a conveyor, a continuous incinerator receiving garbage from the conveyor, a device for cooling ash carried out of the continuous incinerator, a device for filtering the ash, a pipe for inducing exhaust from the continuous incinerator to a water tank for removing particles and water-soluble components from the exhaust. 1 fig.

  3. Vectorized garbage collection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Appel, A.W.; Bendiksen, A.

    1988-01-01

    Garbage collection can be done in vector mode on supercomputers like the Cray-2 and the Cyber 205. Both copying collection and mark-and-sweep can be expressed as breadth-first searches in which the queue can be processed in parallel. The authors have designed a copying garbage collector whose inner loop works entirely in vector mode. The only significant limitation of the algorithm is that if the size of the records is not constant, the implementation becomes much more complicated. The authors give performance measurements of the algorithm as implemented for Lisp CONS cells on the Cyber 205. Vector-mode garbage collection performs up to 9 times faster than scalar-mode collection.

  4. LANL debuts hybrid garbage truck

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    key feature in the stop-and-go life of a garbage truck. Traditional trucks lose that energy as heat during braking. The "Hydraulic Launch Assist" system can generate up to 380...

  5. Bayshore Regional Sewerage Authority (BRSA) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    References "Bayshore Regional Sewerage Authority to Recycle Wastewater using the Wind" Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleBayshoreRegi...

  6. Distributed resource management: garbage collection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bagherzadeh, N.

    1987-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a great interest in designing high-performance distributed symbolic-processing computers. These architectures have special needs for resource management and dynamic reclamation of unused memory cells and objects. The memory management or garbage-collection aspects of these architectures are studied. Also introduced is a synchronous distributed algorithm for garbage collection. A special data structure is defined to handle the distributed nature of the problem. The author formally expresses the algorithm and shows the results of a synchronous garbage-collection simulation and its effect on the interconnection-network message to traffic. He presents an asynchronous distributed garbage collection to handle the resource management for a system that does not require a global synchronization mechanism. The distributed data structure is modified to include the asynchronous aspects of the algorithm. This method is extended to a multiple-mutator scheme, and the problem of having several processors share portion of a cyclical graph is discussed. Two models for the analytical study of the garbage-collection algorithms discussed are provided.

  7. Municipal solid waste (garbage): problems and benefits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stillman, G.I.

    1983-05-01

    The average person in the USA generates from 3 1/2 to 7 lb of garbage/day. The combustible portion of garbage consists primarily of paper products, plastics, textiles, and wood. Problems connected with energy production from municipal solid waste (garbage), and the social, economic, and environmental factors associated with this technology are discussed. The methods for using garbage as a fuel for a combustion process are discussed. One method processes the garbage to produce a fuel that is superior to raw garbage, the other method of using garbage as a fuel is to burn it directly - the mass burning approach. The involvement of the Power Authority of the State of New York in garbage-to-energy technology is discussed.

  8. Improved multiprocessor garbage collection algorithms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newman, I.A.; Stallard, R.P.; Woodward, M.C.

    1983-01-01

    Outlines the results of an investigation of existing multiprocessor garbage collection algorithms and introduces two new algorithms which significantly improve some aspects of the performance of their predecessors. The two algorithms arise from different starting assumptions. One considers the case where the algorithm will terminate successfully whatever list structure is being processed and assumes that the extra data space should be minimised. The other seeks a very fast garbage collection time for list structures that do not contain loops. Results of both theoretical and experimental investigations are given to demonstrate the efficacy of the algorithms. 7 references.

  9. Garbage project on recycling behavior

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGuire, R.H.; Hughes, W.W.; Rathje, W.L.

    1982-02-01

    Results are presented of a study undertaken to determine the factors which are most effective in motivating different socio-economic groups to change their recycling behaviors and participate in recycling programs. Four types of data were collected and analyzed in Tucson: (1) purchase data from local recyclers, (2) traditional interview-survey data on recycling behavior, (3) long-term and short-term household refuse data, and (4) combined interview-garbage data. Findings reveal that disposal patterns for newspapers and aluminum cans are tuse data, and (4) combined interview-garbage data. Findings reveal that disposal patterns for newspapers and aluminum cans are the same across census tracts with significantly different socio-economic characteristics. Further, analysis of interview and garbage data matched by household reaffirm that what people say about recycling and how they dispose of recyclable materials are two different things. Thus, interview reports of newspaper recycling correlate with higher income informants, but their interview reports do not correlate with what is thrown into their garbage cans. Money is concluded to be the most powerful incentive toward recycling.

  10. Garbage to hydrocarbon fuel conversion system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gould, W.A.

    1986-07-15

    A garbage to hydrocarbon fuel conversion system is described which consists of: (a) a source of combustible garbage; (b) means for pulverizing the garbage; (c) a furnace to burn the garbage; (d) means for transporting the pulverized garbage to the furnace which comprises a motor operated worm feed automatic stoker; (e) a steam generating coil inside the furnace which supplies live steam to power a turbine which in turn powers an alternating current generator; and a condenser which returns remaining the steam to a liquid state for re-circulation through the steam generating coils; (f) means for collecting incompletely combusted waste gases from the furnace; precipitating out dust and light oil for re-combustion in the furnace; and, extracting hydrocarbon gas; where in the means for precipitating out dust and light oil for re-combustion in the furnace comprise a cottrell precipitator wherein oil from an external source is mixed with fine dust received from the exhaust port, wherein an electrostatic charge helps to precipitate the dust; a dust and light oil mixer which provides a homogeneous mixture; and, an oil burner mounted to the furnace whose heat output is supplied to the furnace to add energy thereto; and (g) means for burning trapped heavy gases and removing waste ash from the furnace for disposal.

  11. Public attitudes toward garbage disposal. Special report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1990-05-03

    This document is meant to inform the reader about the results of the National Solid Waste Management Association`s opinion research which focused on public attitudes toward recycling, garbage disposal, waste-to-energy, and other waste management concerns. The general public and opinion leaders were asked a wide range of questions about managing our nation`s solid waste and their responses are listed in percentages.

  12. Treating garbage and wastes to obtain methane

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ishida, M.; Haga, R.; Odawara, Y.

    1981-09-08

    The starch-containing garbage is subjected to an alcohol-producing anaerobic fermentation in the slurry state without sterilizing the garbage in the presence of one or more ethanol-producing yeasts which directly converts starch producing anaerobic fermentation in the presence of CH/sub 4/-producing bacteria. Thus, 3 kg slurry of 10% organic concentration was mixed with 0.5 kg seed culture prepared in advance by mix-culturing Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Saccharomyces diasbtitics, and Candia lipolitica at pH 5 and 30 degrees for 3 days. The mixture was charged into a stainless steel container, stirred at 100 rpm, 30 degrees, and pH 5.0 for 3 days, then from the 4th day onward a continual charging was effected at load of 25 g dried organics per day. The neutralized slurry was gasified in a tank at 60 degrees with residence time of 12 days and pH 7.8. A gas containing 75 volume percent CH/sub 4/ was generated at 35 L/kg slurry.

  13. Global garbage collection for distributed heap storage systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ali, K.A.M.; Haridi, S.

    1986-10-01

    The authors present a garbage-collection algorithm, suitable for loosely-coupled multi-processor systems, in which the processing elements (PEs) share only the communication medium. The algorithm is global, i.e., it involves all the PEs in the system. It allows space compaction, and it uses a system-wide marking phase to mark all accessible objects where a combination of parallel breadth-first/depth-first strategies is used for tracing the object-graphs according to a decentralized credit mechanism that regulates the number of garbage collections messages in the system. The credit mechanism is crucial for determining the space requirement of the garbage-collection messages. Also a variation of this algorithm is presented for systems with high locality of reference. It allows each PE to perform first its local garbage collection and only invokes the global garbage collection when the freed space by the local collector is insufficient.

  14. Recycling and computerized garbage tracking cut city's costs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norris, J.L. )

    1994-02-01

    This article describes Athens, Ohio efforts to encourage recycling and minimizing of landfilled garbage by a sliding rate system for garbage collection that accommodates the highly transient nature of this college community. Residential waste going to the landfill has been reduced by as much as 50 percent. Recycling is scheduled the same day as garbage collection. Recycling crews sort all items and package them for sale. Yard wastes are also recycled and are co-mingled with digested municipal sludge generated at the waste-water treatment plant and applied on agricultural fields as a soil conditioner.

  15. Analysis of the Multi-Phase Copying Garbage Collection Algorithm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Podhorszki, Norbert

    2009-01-01

    The multi-phase copying garbage collection was designed to avoid the need for large amount of reserved memory usually required for the copying types of garbage collection algorithms. The collection is performed in multiple phases using the available free memory. This paper proves that the number of phases depends on the size of the reserved memory and the ratio of the garbage and accessible objects. The performance of the implemented algorithm is tested in a fine-grained parallel Prolog system. We find that reserving only 10% of memory for garbage collection is sufficient for good performance in practice. Additionally, an improvement of the generic algorithm specifically for the tested parallel Prolog system is described.

  16. Parallel garbage collection on a virtual memory system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abraham, S.G.; Patel, J.H.

    1987-01-01

    Since most artificial intelligence applications are programmed in list processing languages, it is important to design architectures to support efficient garbage collection. This paper presents an architecture and an associated algorithm for parallel garbage collection on a virtual memory system. All the previously proposed parallel algorithms attempt to collect cells released by the list processor during the garbage collection cycle. We do not attempt to collect such cells. As a consequence, the list processor incurs little overhead in the proposed scheme, since it need not synchronize with the collector. Most parallel algorithms are designed for shared memory machines which have certain implicit synchronization functions on variable access. The proposed algorithm is designed for virtual memory systems where both the list processor and the garbage collector have private memories. The enforcement of coherence between the two private memories can be expensive and is not necessary in our scheme. 15 refs., 3 figs.

  17. Parallel garbage collection without synchronization overhead. Technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patel, J.H.

    1984-08-01

    Incremental garbage-collection schemes incur substantial overhead that is directly translated as reduced execution efficiency for the user. Parallel garbage-collection schemes implemented via time-slicing on a serial processor also incur this overhead, which might even be aggravated due to context switching. It is useful, therefore, to examine the possibility of implementing a parallel garbage-collection algorithm using a separate processor operating asynchronously with the main-list processor. The overhead in such a scheme arises from the synchronization necessary to manage the two processors, maintaining memory consistency. In this paper, the authors present an architecture and supporting parallel garbage-collection algorithms designed for a virtual memory system with separate processors for list processing and for garbage collection. Each processor has its own primary memory; in addition, there is a small common memory which both processors may access. Individual memories swap off a common secondary memory, but no locking mechanism is required. In particular, a page may reside in both memories simultaneously, and indeed may be accessed and modified freely by each processor. A secondary memory controller ensures consistency without necessitating numerous lockouts on the pages.

  18. Apparatus for converting garbage into a fuel gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szloboda, D.T.

    1982-10-05

    Garbage to be converted is fed into the upper end of a vertical chamber. A gas collection chamber is provided around the upper end of the chamber and a blower is used for lowering the pressure in this gas collection chamber. The lower pressure causes a draw within a combustion zone defined at the lower end of the garbage chamber. The draw promotes combustion of garbage in the combustion zone much in the same manner that the draw by a pipe smoker will promote combustion within the bowl of his pipe. The gas collected in the gas chamber is delivered through a water filled cleaner or filter. The gas discharged from the upper end of the filter is ready for use in a power device or a furnace, or it may be collected and compressed or even liquified, into a storage container, for easy mobility and later use.

  19. Garbage as fuel: is it worth the headaches

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reason, J.

    1982-12-01

    The incentive to develop resource recovery is the pressure that municipalities are under to find better ways of getting rid of garbage. Burning not only reduces the volume (by as much as 90%), but it also offers the possibility of the production of energy whose sale can be used to offset the cost of collecting the garbage. Suitable markets for resource-recovery facilities are direct sale of steam to a local industrial plant, district heating, and electric-power generation and sale to an electric utility.

  20. Municipal garbage disposal: A problem we cannot ignore

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    In 1980 the US generated 150 million metric tons of municipal solid waste, and this figure is expected to increase to over 200 million metric tons by 1990. This comment discusses the traditional approaches to waste management, as well as current options available for waste disposal and the federal environmental laws that impinge on these options. Next, the national dimensions of the garbage disposal problem, as epitomized by the garbage barge and the international export of waste generated by this country, are discussed. This Comment concludes with recommendations for a change in public policy to foster recycling, taxing non-biodegradable products, as well as more stringent regulatory controls on solid waste disposal.

  1. Lab employees don't treat their trash like garbage

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lab Employees Don't Treat Their Trash Like Garbage Community Connections: Your link to news and opportunities from Los Alamos National Laboratory Latest Issue:May 2016 all issues All Issues » submit Lab employees don't treat their trash like garbage Last year, the Lab recycled 47 percent of its solid, non-hazardous waste. January 1, 2013 dummy image Read our archives Contacts Editor Linda Anderman Email Community Programs Office Kurt Steinhaus Email The Lab's recycle rate of 47 percent compares

  2. Fast pyrolysis of sweet soghum bagasse in a fluidized bed

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palm, M.; Peacocke, C.; Bridgewater, A.V.; Piskorz, J.; Scott, D.S.

    1993-12-31

    Samples of Italian sorghum bagasse were dried and ground and then pyrolyzed in the Waterloo Fast Pyrolysis bench scale reactor unit. Results were typical of agricultural grasses of this kind, and resembled those obtained from similar tests of sugar cane bagasse. A maximum liquid yield (dry feed basis) of 68% by weight of dry feed was achieved, with a corresponding char yield (ash included) of 16%. The high ash content of the bagasse (9.2%) gave a char with a very high ash content ({approx}50%), with calcium as the most abundant cation. Yields of hydroxyacetaldehyde were comparable to those obtained from softwoods. Deionized bagasse gave significant yields of anhydrosugars on pyrolysis. Sorghum bagasse appears to be a suitable feedstock, either for pyrolysis to yield an alternative fuel oil, or after pretreatment and pyrolysis, to yield a solution of fermentable sugars.

  3. Garbage collection for functional languages in a distributed system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eckart, J.D.

    1987-01-01

    Garbage collection is a helpful facility provided by many applicative languages such as Prolog, SISAL, FP, and Lisp. While these, and other, languages provide easy recognition of actions that may be executed in parallel, the garbage-collection algorithms used for single-machine environments become significantly more inefficient in multi-machine environments. Thus, in order to make effective use of these languages, more-efficient algorithms for collecting inter-machine structures is needed. Reference marking is the algorithm developed to meet these needs. It takes advantage of the semantics of applicative languages allowing each parallel action to be responsible for collecting any discarded structures it was responsible for creating. Simulation results comparing the performance of reference marking with other distributed garbage-collection algorithms are given. A variety of problem types and sizes are examined to determine the effects of particular styles of computation on each of the garbage-collection algorithms. The results gathered demonstrate the usefulness of the reference-marking algorithm in both uni- and multi-machine systems.

  4. Life cycle assessment of bagasse waste management options

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kiatkittipong, Worapon; Wongsuchoto, Porntip; Pavasant, Prasert

    2009-05-15

    Bagasse is mostly utilized for steam and power production for domestic sugar mills. There have been a number of alternatives that could well be applied to manage bagasse, such as pulp production, conversion to biogas and electricity production. The selection of proper alternatives depends significantly on the appropriateness of the technology both from the technical and the environmental points of view. This work proposes a simple model based on the application of life cycle assessment (LCA) to evaluate the environmental impacts of various alternatives for dealing with bagasse waste. The environmental aspects of concern included global warming potential, acidification potential, eutrophication potential and photochemical oxidant creation. Four waste management scenarios for bagasse were evaluated: landfilling with utilization of landfill gas, anaerobic digestion with biogas production, incineration for power generation, and pulp production. In landfills, environmental impacts depended significantly on the biogas collection efficiency, whereas incineration of bagasse to electricity in the power plant showed better environmental performance than that of conventional low biogas collection efficiency landfills. Anaerobic digestion of bagasse in a control biogas reactor was superior to the other two energy generation options in all environmental aspects. Although the use of bagasse in pulp mills created relatively high environmental burdens, the results from the LCA revealed that other stages of the life cycle produced relatively small impacts and that this option might be the most environmentally benign alternative.

  5. Non-polluting, energy-efficient garbage disposal method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Breton, J.R.

    1985-01-01

    This study has examined the possibilities of a novel method of handling garbage, namely incinerating it in an enclosed chamber in an atmosphere of pure oxygen. The design has shown itself robust and flexible with abundant latitude for accommodating user's requirements. The concept does not require great size, so that the proposed design might find a ready market for schools, commercial establishments, apartment complexes, etc. Even groups of individual residences might benefit. The system may be configured as an auxiliary source of heat. In this configuration the design offers, in addition to eliminating the garbage problem, the extra advantage of approximately halving heating costs. In another configuration the system may become the source of hydrogen, a high energy fuel with commercial possibilities of its own. The study has only considered design requirements. To proceed further to a useful device, there must follow engineering development and economic feasibility. 3 figs.

  6. Coordinated garbage collection for raid array of solid state disks

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dillow, David A; Ki, Youngjae; Oral, Hakki S; Shipman, Galen M; Wang, Feiyi

    2014-04-29

    An optimized redundant array of solid state devices may include an array of one or more optimized solid-state devices and a controller coupled to the solid-state devices for managing the solid-state devices. The controller may be configured to globally coordinate the garbage collection activities of each of said optimized solid-state devices, for instance, to minimize the degraded performance time and increase the optimal performance time of the entire array of devices.

  7. Olive bagasse and nutshell as gamma shielding material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ?na, Esra; Bayta?, A. Filiz

    2013-12-16

    Gamma ray linear attenuation coefficients have been measured experimentally for olive bagasse and nutshell by using narrow beam geometry for Co-60 and the values have been compared with soil. These values have been used calculate mean free path, half value layer and tenth value layer parameters. Besides, effect of multi-layered systems (soil + olive bagasse and soil + nutshell) has been analyzed in terms of half value layer.

  8. A garbage collection algorithm for shared memory parallel processors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crammond, J. )

    1988-12-01

    This paper describes a technique for adapting the Morris sliding garbage collection algorithm to execute on parallel machines with shared memory. The algorithm is described within the framework of an implementation of the parallel logic language Parlog. However, the algorithm is a general one and can easily be adapted to parallel Prolog systems and to other languages. The performance of the algorithm executing a few simple Parlog benchmarks is analyzed. Finally, it is shown how the technique for parallelizing the sequential algorithm can be adapted for a semi-space copying algorithm.

  9. Conversion of bagasse cellulose into ethanol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cuzens, J.E.

    1997-11-19

    The study conducted by Arkenol was designed to test the conversion of feedstocks such as sugar cane bagasse, sorghum, napier grass and rice straw into fermentable sugars, and then ferment these sugars using natural yeasts and genetically engineered Zymomonis mobilis bacteria (ZM). The study did convert various cellulosic feedstocks into fermentable sugars utilizing the patented Arkenol Concentrated Acid Hydrolysis Process and equipment at the Arkenol Technology Center in Orange, California. The sugars produced using this process were in the concentration range of 12--15%, much higher than the sugar concentrations the genetically engineered ZM bacteria had been developed for. As a result, while the ZM bacteria fermented the produced sugars without initial inhibition, the completion of high sugar concentration fermentations was slower and at lower yield than predicted by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). Natural yeasts performed as expected by Arkenol, similar to the results obtained over the last four years of testing. Overall, at sugar concentrations in the 10--13% range, yeast produced 850090% theoretical ethanol yields and ZM bacteria produced 82--87% theoretical yields in 96 hour fermentations. Additional commercialization work revealed the ability to centrifugally separate and recycle the ZM bacteria after fermentation, slight additional benefits from mixed culture ZM bacteria fermentations, and successful utilization of defined media for ZM bacteria fermentation nutrients in lieu of natural media.

  10. Energy from garbage loses promise as wave of future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-07-01

    A front-page article in The Wall Street Journal (June 16, 1988) reports on the rising troubles of waste-to-energy projects. The garbage crisis has promoted the construction of 73 waste-to-energy plants around the country, with hundreds more planned at a combined cost of more than $18 billion, writes Bill Richards. Critics profess to feel an eerie sense of deja vu in the trend toward burning. In the 1990s, they say, this could become for municipalities what the nuclear plant building binge was to electric utilities in the 1970s. It plunged many into an economic and environmental swamp in which a few are still mired, their huge cost over-runs unrecoverable from customers, their shareholder dividends shrunken or ended.

  11. Garbage collection: an exercise in distributed, fault-tolerant programming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vestal, S.C.

    1987-01-01

    Two garbage-collection algorithms are presented to reclaim unused storage in object-oriented systems implemented on local area networks. The algorithms are fault-tolerant and allowed parallel, incremental collection in an object address space distributed throughout the system. The two approaches allow multiple collectors, so some unused storage can be reclaimed in partitioned networks. The first method makes use of fault-tolerant reference counts together with an algorithm to collect cycles of objects that would otherwise remain unclaimed. The second method adapts a parallel collector so that it can be used to collect subspaces of the entire network address space. Throughout this work concern is with a methodology for developing distributed, parallel, fault-tolerant programs. Also, there is concern with the suitability of object-oriented systems for such applications.

  12. Germany, garbage, and the green dot: Challenging the throwaway society

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fishbein, B.K.

    1994-09-01

    For US policymakers and citizens who are grappling with the question of how to handle this country's mounting municipal garbage and commercial wastes, this report offers a revolutionary approach taken by Germany to promote both recycling and source reduction. The sweeping new German legislation is stimulating industry efforts to reduce packaging and product waste by requiring that the businesses producing packages and products be financially responsible for taking back their used materials and recycling, reusing or disposing of them. This report describes what Germans have done in solid waste policies, the difficulties they are confronting and the impact on wastes to date. It discusses the environmental problems that the US and other industrialized countries face, identifies practical solutions: programs and policies that work to conserve our valuable air, land, water and natural resources and enable us to live and do business less wastefully.

  13. Efficient parallel global garbage collection on massively parallel computers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kamada, Tomio; Matsuoka, Satoshi; Yonezawa, Akinori

    1994-12-31

    On distributed-memory high-performance MPPs where processors are interconnected by an asynchronous network, efficient Garbage Collection (GC) becomes difficult due to inter-node references and references within pending, unprocessed messages. The parallel global GC algorithm (1) takes advantage of reference locality, (2) efficiently traverses references over nodes, (3) admits minimum pause time of ongoing computations, and (4) has been shown to scale up to 1024 node MPPs. The algorithm employs a global weight counting scheme to substantially reduce message traffic. The two methods for confirming the arrival of pending messages are used: one counts numbers of messages and the other uses network `bulldozing.` Performance evaluation in actual implementations on a multicomputer with 32-1024 nodes, Fujitsu AP1000, reveals various favorable properties of the algorithm.

  14. Coordinating Garbage Collection for Arrays of Solid-state Drives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Youngjae; Lee, Junghee; Oral, H Sarp; Dillow, David A; Wang, Feiyi; Shipman, Galen M

    2014-01-01

    Although solid-state drives (SSDs) offer significant performance improvements over hard disk drives (HDDs) for a number of workloads, they can exhibit substantial variance in request latency and throughput as a result of garbage collection (GC). When GC conflicts with an I/O stream, the stream can make no forward progress until the GC cycle completes. GC cycles are scheduled by logic internal to the SSD based on several factors such as the pattern, frequency, and volume of write requests. When SSDs are used in a RAID with currently available technology, the lack of coordination of the SSD-local GC cycles amplifies this performance variance. We propose a global garbage collection (GGC) mechanism to improve response times and reduce performance variability for a RAID of SSDs. We include a high-level design of SSD-aware RAID controller and GGC-capable SSD devices and algorithms to coordinate the GGC cycles. We develop reactive and proactive GC coordination algorithms and evaluate their I/O performance and block erase counts for various workloads. Our simulations show that GC coordination by a reactive scheme improves average response time and reduces performance variability for a wide variety of enterprise workloads. For bursty, write-dominated workloads, response time was improved by 69% and performance variability was reduced by 71%. We show that a proactive GC coordination algorithm can further improve the I/O response times by up to 9% and the performance variability by up to 15%. We also observe that it could increase the lifetimes of SSDs with some workloads (e.g. Financial) by reducing the number of block erase counts by up to 79% relative to a reactive algorithm for write-dominant enterprise workloads.

  15. A Semi-Preemptive Garbage Collector for Solid State Drives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Junghee; Kim, Youngjae; Shipman, Galen M; Oral, H Sarp; Wang, Feiyi; Kim, Jongman

    2011-01-01

    NAND flash memory is a preferred storage media for various platforms ranging from embedded systems to enterprise-scale systems. Flash devices do not have any mechanical moving parts and provide low-latency access. They also require less power compared to rotating media. Unlike hard disks, flash devices use out-of-update operations and they require a garbage collection (GC) process to reclaim invalid pages to create free blocks. This GC process is a major cause of performance degradation when running concurrently with other I/O operations as internal bandwidth is consumed to reclaim these invalid pages. The invocation of the GC process is generally governed by a low watermark on free blocks and other internal device metrics that different workloads meet at different intervals. This results in I/O performance that is highly dependent on workload characteristics. In this paper, we examine the GC process and propose a semi-preemptive GC scheme that can preempt on-going GC processing and service pending I/O requests in the queue. Moreover, we further enhance flash performance by pipelining internal GC operations and merge them with pending I/O requests whenever possible. Our experimental evaluation of this semi-preemptive GC sheme with realistic workloads demonstrate both improved performance and reduced performance variability. Write-dominant workloads show up to a 66.56% improvement in average response time with a 83.30% reduced variance in response time compared to the non-preemptive GC scheme.

  16. Garbage in, garbage out

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mann, C.

    1987-01-01

    Many US cities are using incinerators to replace landfills for municipal waste disposal. The plants burn municipal waste as fuel to generate steam and electricity, while reducing the volume of trash by 60-90%. But, along with electricity the plants are generating concern among environmentalists, who say the ash the plants produce and the emissions from their stacks are serious health hazards. In EPA tests every sample of fly ash showed unacceptable levels of toxic metals such as lead and cadmium. Concentrations of dioxin and furan are also present in fly ash.

  17. Making manufacturers responsible for recycling: Passing the garbage buck

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chilton, K.; Boerner, C.; Ansehl-Fellow, J.

    1995-09-01

    During a meeting with the Conference of Mayor and the National Association of Counties in April of 1993, Senator Max Baucus, then-Chairman of the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee, unveiled his solution to America`s {open_quotes}garbage crisis{close_quotes}. Modeled after Germany`s draconian {open_quotes}green dot{close_quotes} recycling program, the Senator`s solution rested on a principle which he called {open_quotes}manufacturers` responsibility for the life-cycle of a product.{close_quotes} {open_quotes}Anyone who sells a product,{close_quotes} Senator Baucus noted, {open_quotes}should also be responsible for the product when it becomes waste{close_quotes}. Other variations on this life-cycle stewardship concept were a central element of Congress`s failed attempts in 1992-1993 to reauthorize the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Likewise, on July 11, 1994 the United States Conference of Mayors` Energy and Environment Committee passed a resolution calling on Congress to study the concept of {open_quotes}shared responsibility for waste reduction{close_quotes}. The committee cited the virtues of Western Europe`s systems of manufacturers` responsibility and claimed that a U.S. version would create jobs, promote new environmental technology and {open_quotes}result in the emergence of entire new industries{close_quotes}. This report describes a recycling program in Germany in which the manaufacturers are responsible for waste collection. The overall waste reduction benefits are described.

  18. Garbage In, Power Out: South Carolina BMW Plant Demonstrates Landfill Gas

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    to Hydrogen Fuel | Department of Energy Garbage In, Power Out: South Carolina BMW Plant Demonstrates Landfill Gas to Hydrogen Fuel Garbage In, Power Out: South Carolina BMW Plant Demonstrates Landfill Gas to Hydrogen Fuel August 25, 2015 - 2:15pm Addthis The plant BMW plant in Greer, South Carolina is home to the world's largest fleet of fuel cell forklifts. | Photo courtesy of BMW Manufacturing. The plant BMW plant in Greer, South Carolina is home to the world's largest fleet of fuel cell

  19. Harmonia: A Globally Coordinated Garbage Collector for Arrays of Solid-state Drives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Youngjae; Oral, H Sarp; Shipman, Galen M; Lee, Junghee; Dillow, David A; Wang, Feiyi

    2011-01-01

    Solid-State Drives (SSDs) offer significant performance improvements over hard disk drives (HDD) on a number of workloads. The frequency of garbage collection (GC) activity is directly correlated with the pattern, frequency, and volume of write requests, and scheduling of GC is controlled by logic internal to the SSD. SSDs can exhibit significant performance degradations when garbage collection (GC) conflicts with an ongoing I/O request stream. When using SSDs in a RAID array, the lack of coordination of the local GC processes amplifies these performance degradations. No RAID controller or SSD available today has the technology to overcome this limitation. This paper presents Harmonia, a Global Garbage Collection (GGC) mechanism to improve response times and reduce performance variability for a RAID array of SSDs. Our proposal includes a high-level design of SSD-aware RAID controller and GGC-capable SSD devices, as well as algorithms to coordinate the global GC cycles. Our simulations show that this design improves response time and reduces performance variability for a wide variety of enterprise workloads. For bursty, write dominant workloads response time was improved by 69% while performance variability was reduced by 71%.

  20. Comparing Coordinated Garbage Collection Algorithms for Arrays of Solid-state Drives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Junghee; Kim, Youngjae; Oral, H Sarp; Shipman, Galen M; Dillow, David A; Wang, Feiyi

    2012-01-01

    Solid-State Drives (SSDs) offer significant performance improvements over hard disk drives (HDD) on a number of workloads. The frequency of garbage collection (GC) activity is directly correlated with the pattern, frequency, and volume of write requests, and scheduling of GC is controlled by logic internal to the SSD. SSDs can exhibit significant performance degradations when garbage collection (GC) conflicts with an ongoing I/O request stream. When using SSDs in a RAID array, the lack of coordination of the local GC processes amplifies these performance degradations. No RAID controller or SSD available today has the technology to overcome this limitation. In our previous work, we presented a Global Garbage Collection (GGC) mechanism to improve response times and reduce performance variability for a RAID array of SSDs. A coordination method is employed so that GCs in the array can run at the same time. The coordination can exhibit substantial performance improvement. In this paper, we explore various GC coordination algorithms. We develop reactive and proactive GC coordination algorithms and evaluate their I/O performance and block erase counts for various workloads. We show that a proactive GC coordination algorithm can improve the I/O response times by up to 9% further and increase the lifetime of SSDs by reducing the number of block erase counts by up to 79% compared to a reactive algorithm.

  1. The possibility of garbage, medical and other toxic waste treatment by plasma chemical method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rutberg, P.G.; Safronov, A.A.; Bratsev, A.N.; Kuznetsov, V.E.

    1998-12-31

    This paper describes the creation of plasma facility for treatment of toxic waste. All industrialized countries are greatly interested in plasma chemical technology application for the destruction of different types of industrial, building, purification works toxic waste and waste of plants for garbage treatment. On the basis of three-phase plasma generators with power 0.1--1 MW intended for work in air a row of pilot facilities were created for carrying out of experiments on destruction of medical waste and fluorine-chlorine containing substances. The obtained results allow to design and create pilot-commercial plants with treatment productivity of 200 t/24 hours.

  2. Plant That Makes Fuel Out Of Garbage and Waste Called A Success

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Plant That Makes Fuel Out Of Garbage and Waste Called A Success For more information contact: e:mail: Public Affairs Golden, Colo., May 5, 1999 — The final report on a demonstration of a technology for turning organic wastes into fuel, energy and other products calls the project a success and concludes there are no major issues standing in the way of the technology being commercialized on a larger scale. The report is on the operation of the high solids anaerobic digester (HSAD) in Stanton,

  3. Municipal garbage/trash as a viable fuel for DHC systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levenhagen, J.I.

    1990-01-01

    This paper will discuss the state of the art of MSW plants and offer an overview of the following topics: The history of MSW in the U.S.; The scope of MSW, with emphasis on composition, energy and content; Types of WTE plants; Problems of emissions; Federal and state regulations; Solutions for emissions problems; Final solutions for municipalities. It should be noted that WTE plants are not the final solution for SMW problems in the U.S. There are other options and solutions to the nationwide garbage problems, which include recycling and composting as well as changing the packaging for industrial and consumer goods. Thus, no single technique is the final and complete solution. A combination of WTE plants, recycling, and composting{emdash}as well as a change in attitude toward packing{emdash}will give the U.S. a more final solution.

  4. Garbage power projects multiply as cities seek ways to get rid of trash economically

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smock, R.

    1984-05-01

    Trash-to-energy projects increased to at least a dozen during 1983 as the refuse-derived fuel (RDF) concept began competing with imported mass-burn technology. Although the trend is encouraging, the potential for power production will be small even if all major cities were to build facilities. The trend is encouraging new suppliers and joint ventures to the market, and the government is asking suppliers to take over the environmental impact analyses and permitting work. No utilities have become owners of garbage-to-energy systems, but many cities are interested in making local efforts. Some utilities are using RDF as a supplemental fuel in boilers designed to burn both coal and RDF. 1 figure.

  5. Analysis of shared data structures for compile-time garbage collection in logic programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mulkers, A.; Bruynooghe, M. . Dept. Computerwetenschappen); Winsborough, W. )

    1990-01-01

    One of the central problems in program analysis for compile-time garbage collection is detecting the sharing of term substructure that can occur during program execution. We present an abstract domain for representing possibly shared structures and an abstract unification operation based on this domain. When supplied to an abstract interpretation framework, this domain induces a powerful analysis of shared structures. We show that the analysis is sound by relating the abstract domain and operation to variants of the concrete domain and operation (substitutions with term unification) that are augmented with information about the term structures shared in actual implementations. We show these instrumented versions of the concrete domain and operation characterize the takes place in standard implementations. 22 refs., 3 figs.

  6. Scaling up logic-based truth maintenance systems via fact garbage collection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Everett, J.O.; Forbus, K.D.

    1996-12-31

    Truth maintenance systems provide caches of beliefs and inferences that support explanations and search. Traditionally, the cost of using a TMS is monotonic growth in the size of this cache. In some applications this cost is too high; for example, intelligent learning environments may require students to explore many alternatives, which leads to unacceptable performance. This paper describes an algorithm for fact garbage collection that retains the explanation-generating capabilities of a TMS while eliminating the increased storage overhead. We describe the application context that motivated this work and the properties of applications that benefit from this technique. We present the algorithm, showing how to balance the tradeoff between maintaining a useful cache and reclaiming storage, and analyze its complexity. We demonstrate that this algorithm can eliminate monotonic storage growth, thus making it more practical to field large-scale TMS-based systems.

  7. Emissions of dioxins and furans from garbage-burning incinerators can be minimized by good combustion practices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-10-01

    The American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) have stated that emissions of dioxin and furan from garbage-burning incinerators can be minimized by good combustion practices. They have found that maintaining the heat of combustion above 815 degrees centigrade and reducing the carbon monoxide level to below 100 ppm will reduce the emissions of furan and dioxin. The combustion research that lead to these conclusions was sponsored by ASME and the New York energy authority

  8. Preemptible I/O Scheduling of Garbage Collection for Solid State Drives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Junghee; Kim, Youngjae; Shipman, Galen M; Oral, H Sarp; Kim, Jongman

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Unlike hard disks, flash devices use out-of-update operations and they require a garbage collection (GC) process to reclaim invalid pages to create free blocks. This GC process is a major cause of performance degradation when running concurrently with other I/O operations as internal bandwidth is consumed to reclaim these invalid pages. The invocation of the GC process is generally governed by a low watermark on free blocks and other internal device metrics that different workloads meet at different intervals. This results in I/O performance that is highly dependent on workload characteristics. In this paper, we examine the GC process and propose a semi-preemptible GC scheme that allows GC processing to be preempted while pending I/O requests in the queue are serviced. Moreover, we further enhance flash performance by pipelining internal GC operations and merge them with pending I/O requests whenever possible. Our experimental evaluation of this semipreemptible GC scheme with realistic workloads demonstrate both improved performance and reduced performance variability. Write-dominant workloads show up to a 66.56% improvement in average response time with a 83.30% reduced variance in response time compared to the non-preemptible GC scheme. In addition, we explore opportunities of a new NAND flash device that supports suspend/resume commands for read, write and erase operations for fully preemptible GC. Our experiments with a fully preemptible GC enabled flash device show that request response time can be improved by up to 14.57% compared to semi-preemptible GC.

  9. Use of Brazilian sugarcane bagasse ash in concrete as sand replacement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sales, Almir; Lima, Sofia Araujo

    2010-06-15

    Sugarcane today plays a major role in the worldwide economy, and Brazil is the leading producer of sugar and alcohol, which are important international commodities. The production process generates bagasse as a waste, which is used as fuel to stoke boilers that produce steam for electricity cogeneration. The final product of this burning is residual sugarcane bagasse ash (SBA), which is normally used as fertilizer in sugarcane plantations. Ash stands out among agroindustrial wastes because it results from energy generating processes. Many types of ash do not have hydraulic or pozzolanic reactivity, but can be used in civil construction as inert materials. The present study used ash collected from four sugar mills in the region of Sao Carlos, SP, Brazil, which is one of the world's largest producers of sugarcane. The ash samples were subjected to chemical characterization, sieve analysis, determination of specific gravity, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and solubilization and leaching tests. Mortars and concretes with SBA as sand replacement were produced and tests were carried out: compressive strength, tensile strength and elastic modulus. The results indicated that the SBA samples presented physical properties similar to those of natural sand. Several heavy metals were found in the SBA samples, indicating the need to restrict its use as a fertilizer. The mortars produced with SBA in place of sand showed better mechanical results than the reference samples. SBA can be used as a partial substitute of sand in concretes made with cement slag-modified Portland cement.

  10. Process for the utilization of household rubbish or garbage and other organic waste products for the production of methane gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunziker, M.; Schildknecht, A.

    1985-04-16

    Non-organic substances are separated from household garbage and the organic substances are fed in proportioned manner into a mixing tank and converted into slurry by adding liquid. The slurry is crushed for homogenization purposes in a crushing means and passed into a closed holding container. It is then fed over a heat exchanger and heated to 55/sup 0/ to 60/sup 0/ C. The slurry passes into a plurality of reaction vessels in which the methane gas and carbon dioxide are produced. In a separating plant, the mixture of gaseous products is broken down into its components and some of the methane gas is recycled by bubbling it through both the holding tank and the reaction tank, the remainder being stored in gasholders. The organic substances are degraded much more rapidly through increasing the degradation temperature and as a result constructional expenditure can be reduced.

  11. From garbage to electricity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nagl, G.

    1997-03-01

    Landfills provide an easy-to-tap source of methane gas to fuel power-generation gas turbines. However, they also produce hydrogen sulfide which when burned in a gas turbine, produces acidic sulfur dioxide that corrodes plant equipment and erodes community support. The Central Sanitary Landfill and Recycling Center in Broward County FL operates the nation`s largest landfill gas to energy plant. After Hurricane Andrew hydrogen sulfide became a big problem. To reduce this and other air pollution problems, the Center installed the LO-CAT II process. This process removes hydrogen sulfide from landfill gas, eliminating oders and cutting corrosion. This article describes process alternatives, the process itself and the success of the project.

  12. The politics of garbage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, H.F. )

    1989-10-01

    This article examines the forces that lead to the success or failure of waste management strategies. The topics discussed include hierarchy logic; disposal strategies; public perceptions, misconceptions, and education; rejection of combustion; siting and not in my back yard; myths versus facts in the battle of public perception; and logic, facts and lessons.

  13. There's gold in garbage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pollock, C. )

    1987-03-01

    We haven't begun to mine wealth in the world's wastes, but still insist on burying it - even while cities are running out of landfill space. Most of the products available to consumers are purchased, consumed and tossed with little regard for their remaining value. The energy, materials, and environmental losses associated with this consumption pattern are staggering. Recycling offers the opportunity to trim waste-disposal needs, simultaneously reducing disposal costs and combating global environmental problems. Recycling metals, paper, glass, plastics, and organic wastes lessens the demand for energy and materials.

  14. Growth and garbage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beaton, K.

    1996-08-01

    Construction and demolition wastes are addressed in this paper. Waste audits are summarized to show average construction waste compositions; 86% to 94% of the construction waste is estimated to be recycable. Potential end-uses for construction wastes are identified. Barriers to recycling construction wastes in Colorado are also identified; they include lack of recycling facilities, additional costs associated with recycling, low landfill tipping fees, and lack of transportation routes to facilities.

  15. Garbage in perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alexander, J.H.

    1995-09-01

    This paper reviews the relationship of the volume, costs, and benefits of municipal solid wastes to other elements of our economy and to the public welfare. It is illustrated that mandated recycling is more expensive and less efffective than the public presumes.

  16. Study of lay people's perceptions of appropriate management of gasoline/soil mixtures, hazardous waste mixtures, and trash/garbage mixtures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simon, L.E.

    1988-01-01

    The method used was a researcher-developed questionnaire that was given to San Diego residents who were either Naval Reservists or worked at the corporate headquarters of a fast food chain. The respondents were chosen to yield a cross section of lay people. The forced-choice questionnaire asked identical questions about each of the wastes. The sequence in which each waste appeared was varied in order not to imply a ranking. One-way ANOVA and Bonferroni's Method was used to identify any significant differences. On all eight elements, there was a significant difference between each of the wastes at the p < .05 level. Lay people perceive a significant difference in what constitutes appropriate management of the three waste mixtures. Lay people who participated in the study saw Gasoline/Soil Mixtures as requiring management that was significantly more lenient that what they saw as needed for Hazardous Waste Mixtures and significantly more strict than what they saw as needed for Trash/Garbage Mixtures. The establishment of an intermediate category of solid waste between the existing categories of Hazardous Waste and Non-Hazardous Waste was clearly identified as a possibility by the respondents. If such a category were established it would: (1) clarify and resolve existing contradictions between various regulations; (2) reduce unnecessary filling of scarce hazardous waste disposal capacity; (3) reduce uncertainty, delay and expense to businesses trying to comply with the regulations.

  17. Profiles in garbage: Old newspaper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, C.

    1998-08-01

    Newspapers are printed on newsprint. Newsprint is an uncoated groundwood paper that is made by mechanically grinding wood pulp without first removing lignin and other components of wood pulp. This creates a different product than the chemical pulping process used to make office paper and other grades of paper. Old newspaper (ONP) is the term used for scrap newspapers. More than 64.2 million newspapers are sold every day by the 1,664 daily newspapers in North America. The amount of newspapers generated by increased by 5.2 million tons since 1960, but its market share of solid waste decreased by 27%. Newspaper recycling increased by 4.9 million tons and the recycling rate doubled during that period.

  18. Profiles in garbage: Office paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, C.

    1998-04-01

    The primary markets for recycled office paper are tissue mills, printing and writing paper, and paperboard packaging. Other uses include exports and newsprint. As recently as 1990, more than half of recovered office paper was exported, primarily to paper mills in Pacific Rim countries. This decade has seen an increase in the number of mills using deinked market pulp made from office paper. North American capacity to produce deinked market pulp skyrocketed in the first half of this decade. However, oversupply in the end markets for office paper led to financial problems and shutdown for several of these new mills.

  19. Profiles in garbage glass containers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, C.

    1997-09-01

    Glass containers are made from sand, limestone, soda ash, cullet (crushed bottles), and various additives, including those used to color brown, green, or blue bottles. Sixty percent of the glass used in the US is clear (flint) and one-fourth is brown (amber). Almost half of the green bottles are imported wind and beer bottles. Other glass products include flat glass such as windows; fiberglass insulation; and glassware. These products use different manufacturing processes and different additives than container glass. This profile covers only container glass. Glass bottles are commonly collected in curb-side programs. Losses due to breakage and the abrasiveness of glass during collection and processing offset their low collection and processing costs. Breakage solutions include installation of interior baffles or nets in the collection trucks, special glass-only truck compartments, and limiting the number of times glass is transferred after collection before final processing. Ten states require deposits on glass bottles for beer and soft drinks and related items.

  20. Profiles in garbage: Corrugated boxes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, C.

    1997-12-01

    Corrugated boxes (also known as old corrugated containers, or OCC) are used to ship products to factories, warehouses, retail stores, offices, and homes. The primary market for OCC is the paperboard industry, which uses OCC for corrugated medium, linerboard, recycled paperboard, and other paper products. In addition, 2.6 million tons of OCC were exported in 1996. OCC provided 37% of the scrap paper that was exported in 1996. Some corrugated boxes can be reused before recycling. Corrugated boxes are easily and highly recyclable. Large producers such as grocery store warehouses and factories have recycled their corrugated boxes for some time. If shredded properly, uncoated corrugated boxes are easily compostable.

  1. Profiles in garbage: Steel cans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, C.

    1998-02-01

    Steel mills are the largest market for steel cans. Integrated mills use the basic oxygen process to manufacture tinplate, appliances, car bodies, and steel framing. Electric arc furnaces use 100% scrap to produce steel shapes such as railroad ties and bridge spans. Electric arc furnaces are more geographically diverse and tend to have smaller capacities than basic oxygen furnaces. Detinners remove the tin from steel cans for resale to tin using industries. With less tin use in steel cans, the importance of the detinning market has declined substantially. Foundries use scrap as a raw material in making castings and molds for industrial users.

  2. Profiles in garbage: Polyethylene terephthalate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, C.

    1997-11-01

    Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) is a plastic resin used primarily to make bottles. Soft drinks -- along with salad dressing, fruit juices, peanut butter, and other household and consumer products -- use PET bottles. PET also is used for film, sheeting for cups and food trays, oven-safe trays, and other uses. PET is a relatively new packaging resin, first commercialized in the early 1970s. Because it is an ``engineered`` resin, PET is more expensive than commodity resins such as high-density polyethylene (HDPE) and, for the same reason, it is usually the highest valued plastic recyclable.

  3. Coordinated Garbage Collection for RAID Array of Solid State...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    computer systems. The new technology functions on both servers and mass consumer computers.DescriptionThe ORNL technology uses solid state disks in a coordinated RAID array....

  4. War on waste: Can America win its battle with garbage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blumberg, L.; Gottlieb, R.

    1989-12-01

    This book provides a comprehensive analysis of the solid waste problem and the major alternatives for a solution to the crisis.

  5. Garbage In, Power Out: South Carolina BMW Plant Demonstrates...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    cell forklifts with hydrogen produced on-site from biomethane gas at a nearby landfill. ... Protection One Year Down the Road of Biogas Industry Development DOE Releases 2013 ...

  6. High quality garbage: A neural network plastic sorter in hardware and software

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stanton, S.L.; Alam, M.K.; Hebner, G.A.

    1993-09-01

    In order to produce pure polymer streams from post-consumer waste plastics, a quick, accurate and relatively inexpensive method of sorting needs to be implemented. This technology has been demonstrated by using near-infrared spectroscopy reflectance data and neural network classification techniques. Backpropagation neural network routines have been developed to run real-time sortings in the lab, using a laboratory-grade spectrometer. In addition, a new reflectance spectrometer has been developed which is fast enough for commercial use. Initial training and test sets taken with the laboratory instrument show that a network is capable of learning 100% when classifying 5 groups of plastic (HDPE and LDPE combined), and up to 100% when classifying 6 groups. Initial data sets from the new instrument have classified plastics into all seven groups with varying degrees of success. One of the initial networks has been implemented in hardware, for high speed computations, and thus rapid classification. Two neural accelerator systems have been evaluated, one based on the Intel 8017ONX chip, and another on the AT&T ANNA chip.

  7. Recycling at naval shore installations: One means of curbing the garbage glut. Research report, August 1992-April 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, R.L.

    1993-04-01

    The document provides techniques and strategies to aid Federal recycling program managers. Highlights the major laws and regulations that stimulated recycling within the Department of Defense, discusses several benefits of recycling, and addressees start-up and operating costs associated with a recycling program. Briefly examines the Navy's current recycling efforts at shore activities; and contends that the real breakthrough in effective solid waste management will only come when intense recycling is combined with reducing waste at the source, expanding the use recycled materials, and investing in better research and development.

  8. Commercialization of the Conversion of Bagasse to Ethanol. Summary quarterly report for the period January-September 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2000-02-01

    These studies were intended to further refine sugar yield parameters which effect sugar yield such as feedstock particle size, debris, acid soak time, temperature, dewatering, and pretreatment conditions (such as temperature, reaction time, percentage solids concentration, acid concentration), liquid-solids separation, and detoxification parameters (such as time temperature and mixing of detoxification ingredients). Validate and refine parameters, which affect ethanol yield such as detoxification conditions mentioned above, and to fermenter conditions such as temperature, pH adjustment, aeration, nutrients, and charging sequence. Materials of construction will be evaluated also. Evaluate stillage to determine clarification process and suitability for recycle; evaluate lignocellulosic cake for thermal energy recovery to produce heat and electricity for the process; and Support Studies at UF - Toxin Amelioration and Fermentation; TVA work will provide pre-hydroylsates for the evaluation of BCI proprietary methods of toxin amelioration. Pre-hydrolysates from batch studies will allow the determination of the range of allowable hydrolyze conditions that can be used to produce a fermentable sugar stream. This information is essential to guide selection of process parameters for refinement and validation in the continuous pretreatment reactor, and for overall process design. Additional work will be conducted at UFRFI to develop improved strains that are resistant to inhibitors. The authors are quite optimistic about the long-term prospects for this advancement having recently developed strains with a 25%--50% increase in ethanol production. The biocatalyst platform selected originally, genetically engineered Escherichia coli B, has proven to be quite robust and adaptable.

  9. RAPID/Roadmap/8-UT-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    corporation, water corporation, sewerage corporation, heat corporation, and independent energy producer, where the service is performed for the general public. Public...

  10. City of Shelbyville, Tennessee (Utility Company) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Twitter: @ShelbyvillePwr Facebook: https:www.facebook.compagesShelbyville-Power-Water-Sewerage396497130511649 Outage Hotline: 1-931-684-7171 References: EIA Form EIA-861...

  11. RAPID/Geothermal/Transmission Siting & Interconnection/Montana...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    service; light; power in any form or by any agency; water for business, manufacturing, household use, or sewerage service, whether within the limits of municipalities...

  12. RAPID/Geothermal/Transmission Siting & Interconnection/Nevada...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    gas, coal slurry, light, power in any form or by any agency, water for business, manufacturing, agricultural or household use, or sewerage service, whether or not within the...

  13. Taking out the trash: A no-nonsense guide to recycling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carless, J.

    1992-05-01

    A practical and useful guide to how individuals, businesses, and communities can help alleviate America`s garbage crisis.

  14. Summer food habits of juvenile Arctic foxes in northern Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garrott, R.A.; Eberhardt, L.E.; Hanson, W.C.

    1983-01-01

    The absence of garbage in fox scats collected in the Colville Delta area was expected because garbage was unavailable to these foxes. Foxes from Prudhoe Bay, however, had access to quantities of garbage as a result of petroleum development activities. Most occupied dens in the Prudhoe Bay area were littered with garbage. Telemetry investigations conducted in conjunction with our study of food habits indicated that foxes frequented areas of human activity to solicit handouts and forage garbage disposal sites. The reason for the low occurrence of garbage in Prudhoe Bay scats is undoubtedly related to the lack of undigestible matter in most forms of garbage. The small number of scats that were classified as containing garbage typically contained only packaging materials associated with processed food such as plastic wrap and aluminum foil. The highly digestible nature of most forms of garbage made it impossible to quantify its importance in the diet of foxes. Prudhoe Bay foxes undoubtedly use garbage; however, the diversity and abundance of natural prey in the scat indicates that these foxes only supplement their summer diet with garbage. Dependence on this food resource may increase during the winter when foxes must rely almost exclusively on the fluctuating lemming poulations for sustenance. 11 references, 2 tables.

  15. Title Final Environmental Impact Statement: Tonopah Test Range...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... The second source of contaminated water is produced by stormwater runoff from the apron and runway in Area 10A. Sewaae Collection. Treatment and Disposal i Sewerage systems in ...

  16. Shandong Yucheng Xinyuan Heat Power Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Xinyuan Heat & Power Co Ltd Place: Yucheng, China Zip: 251200 Product: Yucheng-based Bagasse powered project developer. Coordinates: 34.389011, 115.851723 Show Map Loading...

  17. Cosan Bioenergia | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Cosan Bioenergia Jump to: navigation, search Name: Cosan Bioenergia Place: Sao Paulo, Brazil Product: Sao Paulo-based Cosan subsidiary to develop cogeneration plants from bagasse...

  18. Central Energetica do Rio Pardo Ltda CERPA | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    do Rio Pardo Ltda CERPA Jump to: navigation, search Name: Central Energetica do Rio Pardo Ltda (CERPA) Place: Serrana, Sao Paulo, Brazil Zip: 14150000 Product: A bagasse...

  19. Biofuels | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    process requires significant energy input for heat (often unsustainable natural gas fossil fuel, but cellulosic biomass such as bagasse, the waste left after sugar cane is...

  20. LOS ALAMOS, New Mexico, November 19, 2010- Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    debuts hybrid garbage truck November 19, 2010 Truck uses hydraulic pressure to improve efficiency by 30 percent LOS ALAMOS, New Mexico, November 19, 2010- Los Alamos National Laboratory has begun using a diesel-hydraulic hybrid truck for daily garbage pickup, improving fuel efficiency by 30 percent and reducing greenhouse gas emissions by even more. The Peterbilt Model 320 replaces one of the Lab's two garbage trucks. Each truck runs 40 hours per week and racks up tens of thousands of miles

  1. 50-MW trash-to-electricity plant nears completion in Pinellas County, Florida

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-12-01

    A garbage-fueled power plant will begin operating this spring in Pinellas County, Florida. Although the plant will use a mass-burning technique already proven in Europe, it will be the first to generate electricity. Two new technologies are expected to reverse the poor performance of earlier garbage and refuse-derived fuel efforts: new boilers using 100% refuse-derived fuel and the European mass-burning technique, which uses untreated garbage. The institutional arrangements between the builder and operator, UOP, Inc., and Pinellas County reflect the priamry goal of garbage disposal, and will be treated as an expense. (DCK)

  2. Microsoft Word - Chapter 12.doc

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... regulation, solid waste is any garbage; refuse; sludge from a waste treatment plant, water supply treatment plant, or air pollution control facility; and other discarded material. ...

  3. DOI-BLM-NV-B010-2011-0015-EA | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    matter including, but not limited to: human waste, trash, garbage, vegetation, refuse, oil drums, petroleum products, ashes, and equipment. 9. The Holder shall comply with all...

  4. DOI-BLM-OR-V040-2011-0008-EA | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    The facilities would be maintained by a local contractor. Solid wastes (paper trash and garbage) generated by the operations would be transported offsite to an...

  5. DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2010-0008-EA | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Affected, Present, Potentially Affected, Not Indicated) for this property. proposed Trash and other waste products would be properly managed and Magma would control garbage...

  6. DOI-BLM-ID-220-2009-EA-3709 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Affected, Not Indicated) for this property. imposed All solid wastes (paper trash and garbage) must be contained in a trash cage and hauled away to an approved disposal...

  7. DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2012-0029-EA | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    testing, and construction. These facilities would be maintained by a local contractor; Trash and other waste products would be properly managed, and Ormat would control garbage...

  8. DOI-BLM-NV-W010-2011-0001-EA | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Not Affected, Present, Potentially Affected, Not Indicated) for this property. proposed Trash and other waste products would be properly managed and Ormat would control garbage...

  9. LLNV-WO1000-2009-0002-EA | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    These facilities would be maintained by a local contractor. * Solid wastes (paper trash and garbage) generated by the operations would be transported offsite to an...

  10. DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2011-0516-EA | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Not Affected, Present, Potentially Affected, Not Indicated) for this property. proposed Trash and other waste products would be properly managed, and Ormat would control garbage...

  11. Looking down in the dumps for energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teresi, D.

    1980-01-01

    General review of the mounting garbage in the US and methods used to recycle it into energy are discussed. These methods include drilling garbage landfills for methane at the Palos Verdes site, processing refuse to convert it into electricity at Hempstead and material recovery of iron, steel, aluminum and glass, also at Hempstead.

  12. Microsoft PowerPoint - 7 Paul Black

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Garbage OUT. 4 Performance and Risk Assessment Community of Practice * December 2015 Computers are not Magic "On two occasions I have been asked, "Pray, Mr. Babbage, if you put...

  13. Characterization of household hazardous waste from Marin County, California, and New Orleans, Louisiana

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rathje, W.L.; Wilson, D.C.; Lambou, V.W.; Herndon, R.C.

    1987-09-01

    There is a growing concern that certain constituents of common household products, that are discarded in residential garbage, may be potentially harmful to human health and the environment by adversely affecting the quality of ground and surface water. A survey of hazardous wastes in residential garbage from Marin County, California, and New Orleans, Louisiana, was conducted in order to determine the amount and characteristics of such wastes that are entering municipal landfills. The results of the survey indicate that approximately 642 metric tons of hazardous waste are discarded per year for the New Orleans study area and approximately 259 metric tons are discarded per year for the Marin County study area. Even though the percent of hazardous household waste in the garbage discarded in both study areas was less than 1%, it represents a significant quantity of hazardous waste because of the large volume of garbage involved.

  14. Using landfill gas for energy: Projects that pay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-02-01

    Pending Environmental Protection Agency regulations will require 500 to 700 landfills to control gas emissions resulting from decomposing garbage. Conversion of landfill gas to energy not only meets regulations, but also creates energy and revenue for local governments.

  15. CX-008523: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Non-Hazardous Solid Waste Disposal Contract (Garbage Collection) CX(s) Applied: A1, A8, B1.3 Date: 07/10/2012 Location(s): Oregon Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  16. Protecting the environment into the future

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    favorably with the current national rate of 34 percent. Lab Employees Don't Treat Their Trash Like Garbage Last year, the Lab recycled 47 percent of its solid, non-hazardous waste...

  17. Bioconversion of cellulose into ethanol by Clostridium thermocellum--product inhibition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kundu, S.; Ghose, T.K.; Mukhopadhyay, S.N.

    1983-04-01

    Direct anaerobic bioconversion of cellulosic substances into ethanol by Clostridium thermocellum ATCC 27405 has been carried out at 60/sup 0/C and pH 7.0 (initial for 100 L under continuous sparging of oxygen free nitrogen in a culture vessel. Raw bagasse, mild alkali-treated bagasse, and solka floc were used as substrates. The extent of conversion of raw bagasse (cellulose, 50%; hemicellulose, 25%; lignin, 19%) was observed as 52% (w/w) and 79% (w/w) in the case of mild alkali and steam-treated bagasse (cellulose, 72%; hemicellulose, 11%; lignin, 12%), respectively. Use of bagasse concentration above 10 g/L showed a decreased rate in ethanol production. An inoculum age between 28-30 h and cell mass content of 0.027-0.036 g/L (dry basis) were used. The results obtained with raw and pretreated bagasse have been compared with those of highly pure Solka Floc (hemicellulose, 10%). Studies on the product inhibition indicated a linear fall of the percent of survivors with time. An Arrhenius type correlation between the cell decay rate constant and the product concentration was predicted. Even at low levels, the inhibitory effects of products on cell viability, the specific growth rate, and extracellular enzyme were observed.

  18. RCRA, superfund and EPCRA hotline training module. Introduction to: Solid waste programs updated July 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-07-01

    The module focuses on EPA`s efforts in two areas: municipal and industrial solid waste. The garbage that is managed by the local governments is known as municipal solid waste (MSW). Garbage excluded from hazardous waste regulation but not typically collected by local governments is commonly known as industrial solid waste. This category includes domestic sewage and other wastewater treatment sludge, demolition and construction wastes, agricultural and mining residues, combustion ash, and industrial process wastes.

  19. Lab celebrates Earth Day

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lab celebrates Earth Day Community Connections: Your link to news and opportunities from Los Alamos National Laboratory Latest Issue:May 2016 all issues All Issues » submit Lab celebrates Earth Day Multiple activities focus on environmental protection. May 1, 2013 A team from Industrial Hygiene and Safety during the Great Garbage Grab A team from Industrial Hygiene and Safety during the Great Garbage Grab. Contact Editor Linda Anderman Email Community Programs Office Kurt Steinhaus Email Great

  20. 244E is king pin on Arizona waste-processing operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    A 244E 4-wheel-drive loader, assorted garbage, and a touch of sewage sludge may not sound like a state-of-the-art formula...but it is. The Pinetop-Lakeside Sanitation District has pioneered a way to turn a caldron of municipal waste products into something usable, with the help of a 244E loader equipped with a quick coupler and attachments. The district bring in about 45 cu. yd. (34.4 m[sup 3]) of household garbage daily and converts it into compost at their plant. The 244E runs the entire operation. Two truckloads of garbage a day are dumped onto a tilt floor and loaded by the 244E into a 45-ft.-long (13.7 m) rotating drum. Sewage sludge is pumped from the treatment plant into the slowly rotating drum. Seven days later, the mixture comes out as a soil compost.

  1. Municipal solid waste to electricity recommendations for project in Bangkok, Thailand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-09-01

    Bangkok Metropolitan Administration (BMA) is charged with the responsibility of public cleansing and waste disposal in the metropolitan area. BMA operates 600 trucks which collect the waste twice a day and dump it at its three sites located in the Huai Kwong, Bangkok Noi and Rataburana districts. Presently these trucks collect 3,000 metric tons of garbage per day. At the waste dump sites, which are rapidly overflowing, BMA presently operates four compost plants, three with input capacity of 320 tons per day each and a fourth which uses about 160 tons of garbage per day--thus utilizing about 1,120 tons of garbage per day. Creation of new sites would require going even farther away from the city, resulting in excessive transportation costs.

  2. IMPROVED BIOREFINERY FOR THE PRODUCTION OF ETHANOL, CHEMICALS, ANIMAL FEED AND BIOMATERIALS FROM SUGAR CANE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Donal F. Day

    2009-01-29

    The Audubon Sugar Institute (ASI) of Louisiana State University’s Agricultural Center (LSU AgCenter) and MBI International (MBI) sought to develop technologies that will lead to the development of a sugar-cane biorefinery, capable of supplying fuel ethanol from bagasse. Technology development focused on the conversion of bagasse, cane-leaf matter (CLM) and molasses into high value-added products that included ethanol, specialty chemicals, biomaterials and animal feed; i.e. a sugar cane-based biorefinery. The key to lignocellulosic biomass utilization is an economically feasible method (pretreatment) for separating the cellulose and the hemicellulose from the physical protection provided by lignin. An effective pretreatment disrupts physical barriers, cellulose crystallinity, and the association of lignin and hemicellulose with cellulose so that hydrolytic enzymes can access the biomass macrostructure (Teymouri et al. 2004, Laureano-Perez, 2005). We chose to focus on alkaline pretreatment methods for, and in particular, the Ammonia Fiber Expansion (AFEX) process owned by MBI. During the first two years of this program a laboratory process was established for the pretreatment of bagasse and CLM using the AFEX process. There was significant improvement of both rate and yield of glucose and xylose upon enzymatic hydrolysis of AFEX-treated bagasse and CLM compared with untreated material. Because of reactor size limitation, several other alkaline pretreatment methods were also co-investigated. They included, dilute ammonia, lime and hydroxy-hypochlorite treatments. Scale-up focused on using a dilute ammonia process as a substitute for AFEX, allowing development at a larger scale. The pretreatment of bagasse by an ammonia process, followed by saccharification and fermentation produced ethanol from bagasse. Simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) allowed two operations in the same vessel. The addition of sugarcane molasses to the hydrolysate/fermentation process yielded improvements beyond what was expected solely from the addition of sugar. In order to expand the economic potential for building a biorefinery, the conversion of enzyme hydrolysates of AFEX-treated bagasse to succinic acid was also investigated. This program established a solid basis for pre-treatment of bagasse in a manner that is feasible for producing ethanol at raw sugar mills.

  3. Video Gallery

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Video Gallery Video Gallery Videos reveal insight to our efforts in cleaning the past, protecting the present, and creating a sustainable future. Earth Day Every Day, Los Alamos National Laboratory 3:26 See how LANL workers treat every day as Earth Day Hear from employees regarding their environmental commitment To hear and see how Lab employees help protect the environment at work and home, watch this 3.5 minute video. LANL debuts hybrid garbage truck 1:49 Hybrid Garbage Truck LANL debuts

  4. Plastic Pollution Research and Control Act. House of Representatives, One Hundredth Congress, First Session, October 8, 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    The House report on H.R. 940 recommends passage with amendments to a bill designed to regulate the sea disposal of plastic materials. The bill addresses domestic garbage management and implements an international agreement regulating the disposal of ship garbage disposal. The report includes the amended text of the Act, a summary of the background and legislative history. Title I deals with disposal from ships and the MARPOL Convention; Title II, the problem of plastic driftnet fishing. The report concludes with changes which the bill will impose on existing law, penalties for violations, and legal actions available under the Act.

  5. Method for the manufacturing of fuel briquettes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nielsen, F.S.

    1983-02-08

    A method for manufacturing fuel briquettes from selected components of garbage which are comminuted and combined with coal dust. The mixture of comminuted garbage and coal dust is compressed in a press so as to form a solid body. The proportion of coal dust in the mixture is advantageously adjusted in response to the amount of power which is drawn by a motor which drives the press. In one embodiment, the weight of the coal dust forms at least 20% of the weight of the briquette. The press may be provided with pressing wheels which may be used to comminute the refuse.

  6. Superfund issues facing municipalities. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Superfund, Ocean, and Water Protection of the Committee on Environment and Public Works, United States Senate, One Hundred Second Congress, First Session, July 29, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    Members of Congress, representatives from the Environmental Protection Agency, as well as city officials were among those testifying at a hearing on unfair private party lawsuits against cities and towns. These lawsuits seriously threaten to undermine the Superfund program. This bill focuses on blocking opportunistic and costly lawsuits by large corporate polluters against innocent cities and towns. The problem is caused by cities and towns hauling their garbage to landfills, where industry brings millions of gallons of liquid hazardous waste. These old landfills have now become Superfund sites because industrial hazardous wastes were deliberately disposed with the garbage.

  7. Co-collection: Back to the past

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, C.

    1995-10-01

    In the early `70s, when haulers began collecting newspapers for recycling at the curbside, they collected them at the same time and with the same truck as garbage. A rack underneath the compactor truck or a trailer behind the truck held the newspaper. These early rack and trailer programs had several advantages. Racks and trailers were easy to install and maintain. In addition, they allowed the hauler to combine garbage and recyclables collection. However, both racks and trailers had limited capacity.time-consuming, off-route unloading was common. They were also unsuited for multi-material recycling. As haulers began collecting glass and metals at the curbside, co-collection was displaced by separate collection of recyclables. Today, curbside recycling is firmly established in communities throughout the US. In an attempt to lower costs, haulers are starting to use co-collection trucks to combine recyclables and garbage collection. While co-collection of recyclables and garbage is still uncommon, its advocates argue it is the wave of the future.

  8. Pollution solution. From the Landsat -- a satellite for all seasons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-12-31

    The video shows how Landsat`s remote sensing capabilities can aid in resolving environmental quality problems. The satellite can locate and monitor strip mining operations to facilitate land reclamation programs. The satellite helps solve some meteorological mysteries by taking the path of airborne pollution. It can also monitor the course of industrial wastes and garbage dumped into lakes, rivers, and coastal areas.

  9. Opportunity fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lutwen, R.C.

    1994-12-31

    Opportunity fuels - fuels that can be converted to other forms of energy at lower cost than standard fossil fuels - are discussed in outline form. The type and source of fuels, types of fuels, combustability, methods of combustion, refinery wastes, petroleum coke, garbage fuels, wood wastes, tires, and economics are discussed.

  10. Sugar-Based Ethanol Biorefinery: Ethanol, Succinic Acid and By-Product Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donal F. Day

    2009-03-31

    The work conducted in this project is an extension of the developments itemized in DE-FG-36-04GO14236. This program is designed to help the development of a biorefinery based around a raw sugar mill, which in Louisiana is an underutilized asset. Some technical questions were answered regarding the addition of a biomass to ethanol facility to existing sugar mills. The focus of this work is on developing technology to produce ethanol and valuable by-products from bagasse. Three major areas are addressed, feedstock storage, potential by-products and the technology for producing ethanol from dilute ammonia pre-treated bagasse. Sugar mills normally store bagasse in a simple pile. During the off season there is a natural degradation of the bagasse, due to the composting action of microorganisms in the pile. This has serious implications if bagasse must be stored to operate a bagasse/biorefinery for a 300+ day operating cycle. Deterioration of the fermentables in bagasse was found to be 6.5% per month, on pile storage. This indicates that long term storage of adequate amounts of bagasse for year-round operation is probably not feasible. Lignin from pretreatment seemed to offer a potential source of valuable by-products. Although a wide range of phenolic compounds were present in the effluent from dilute ammonia pretreatment, the concentrations of each (except for benzoic acid) were too low to consider for extraction. The cellulosic hydrolysis system was modified to produce commercially recoverable quantities of cellobiose, which has a small but growing market in the food process industries. A spin-off of this led to the production of a specific oligosaccharide which appears to have both medical and commercial implications as a fungal growth inhibitor. An alternate use of sugars produced from biomass hydrolysis would be to produce succinic acid as a chemical feedstock for other conversions. An organism was developed which can do this bioconversion, but the economics of succinic acid production were such that it could not compete with current commercial practice. To allow recovery of commercial amounts of ethanol from bagasse fermentation, research was conducted on high solids loading fermentations (using S. cerevisiae) with commercial cellulase on pretreated material. A combination of SHF/SSF treatment with fed-batch operation allowed fermentation at 30% solids loading. Supplementation of the fermentation with a small amount of black-strap molasses had results beyond expectation. There was an enhancement of conversion as well as production of ethanol levels above 6.0% w/w, which is required both for efficient distillation as well as contaminant repression. The focus of fermentation development was only on converting the cellulose to ethanol, as this yeast is not capable of fermenting both glucose and xylose (from hemicellulose). In anticipation of the future development of such an organism, we screened the commercially available xylanases to find the optimum mix for conversion of both cellulose and hemicellulose. A different mixture than the spezyme/novozyme mix used in our fermentation research was found to be more efficient at converting both cellulose and hemicellulose. Efforts were made to select a mutant of Pichia stipitis for ability to co-ferment glucose and xylose to ethanol. New mutation technology was developed, but an appropriate mutant has not yet been isolated. The ability to convert to stillage from biomass fermentations were determined to be suitable for anaerobic degradation and methane production. An economic model of a current sugar factory was developed in order to provide a baseline for the cost/benefit analysis of adding cellulosic ethanol production.

  11. New developments in capital cost estimating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stutz, R.A.; Zocher, M.A.

    1988-01-01

    The new developments in cost engineering revolve around the ability to capture information that in the past could not be automated. The purpose of automation is not to eliminate the expert cost engineer. The goal is to use available technology to have more information available to the professionals in the cost engineering field. In that sense, the demand for expertise increases in order to produce the highest quality estimate and project possible from all levels of cost engineers. We cannot overemphasize the importance of using a good source of expert information in building these types of programs. ''Garbage in, garbage out'' still applies in this form of programming. Expert systems technology will become commonplace in many vertical markets; it is important to undersand what can and cannot be accomplished in our field, and where this technology will lead us in the future.

  12. Slowing the waste behemoth: Source reduction is overshadowed by recycling's success

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fishbein, B.; Saphire, D.

    1992-08-01

    The article describes the benefits from source reduction as the major and most cost effective way to solve the garbage issue that is overwhelming the United States. Recycling has emerged as the solution to the garbage crisis, however there is a growing recognition that it is not a panacea. Although source reduction is recognized as the best answer, there is a big information gap. Industry has been exploring opportunities for source reduction initiatives that will improve operating efficiency, cut costs and reduce the amount of waste. Several examples of source reduction in the business and industrial sector are cited, including substituting reusable blankets for shipping furniture rather than using cardboard containers; promotion of double-sided copying to reduce paper usage; and refilling beer bottles. Others, such as public composting programs and government source reduction programs that work are discussed.

  13. Is recycling worth the trouble

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boltz, C.M.

    1995-03-01

    A panel of waste industry experts met recently at a Washington, DC, conference to discuss and debate the costs, benefits, and economics of recycling solid waste. The nearly unanimous conclusion from some of the speakers--that recycling, as it is implemented today, has costs that far outweigh its benefits--is evidence of a growing backlash among solid waste officials against a recycling movement they feel has been grossly over-inflated by environmental groups as a solution to a non-existent problem known as the garbage crisis. The public should not place such a strong emphasis on recycling as a cure-all for environmental problems, according to the panel of four waste management policy analysts at The State of Garbage'' session held in mid-January at the 1995 US/Canadian Federation Solid Waste Management Conference. Moreover, some panel members said, recycling should take place only if it makes economic sense.

  14. Allocation without locking

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Appel, A.W.

    1988-01-01

    In a programming environment with both concurrency and automatic garbage collection, the allocation and initialization of a new record is a sensitive matter: if it is interrupted halfway through, the allocating process may be in a state that the garbage collector can't understand. In particular, the collector won't know which words of the new record have been initialized and which are meaningless (and unsafe to transverse). For this reason, parallel implementations usually use a locking or semaphore mechanism to ensure that allocation is an atomic operation. The locking significantly adds to the cost of allocation. This paper shows that allocation can run extremely quickly even in a multi-thread environment: open-coded, without locking.

  15. Computer memory management system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kirk, III, Whitson John

    2002-01-01

    A computer memory management system utilizing a memory structure system of "intelligent" pointers in which information related to the use status of the memory structure is designed into the pointer. Through this pointer system, The present invention provides essentially automatic memory management (often referred to as garbage collection) by allowing relationships between objects to have definite memory management behavior by use of coding protocol which describes when relationships should be maintained and when the relationships should be broken. In one aspect, the present invention system allows automatic breaking of strong links to facilitate object garbage collection, coupled with relationship adjectives which define deletion of associated objects. In another aspect, The present invention includes simple-to-use infinite undo/redo functionality in that it has the capability, through a simple function call, to undo all of the changes made to a data model since the previous `valid state` was noted.

  16. Decontamination of Radioactive Cesium Released from Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant - 13277

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parajuli, Durga; Minami, Kimitaka; Tanaka, Hisashi; Kawamoto, Tohru

    2013-07-01

    Peculiar binding of Cesium to the soil clay minerals remained the major obstacle for the immediate Cs-decontamination of soil and materials containing clay minerals like sludge. Experiments for the removal of Cesium from soil and ash samples from different materials were performed in the lab scale. For soil and sludge ash formed by the incineration of municipal sewage sludge, acid treatment at high temperature is effective while washing with water removed Cesium from ashes of plants or burnable garbage. Though total removal seems a difficult task, water-washing of wood-ash or garbage-ash at 40 deg. C removes >90% radiocesium, while >60% activity can be removed from soil and sludge-ash by acid washing at 95 deg. C. (authors)

  17. Environmental protection in China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russell, M. Univ. of Knoxville, TN )

    1990-01-01

    Environmental conditions in China are dramatically worse than those in the USA, but the Chinese are acting with commendable vigor in attempting to contain and ultimately reverse the damage. The Chinese have air, water and soil contamination, along with garbage and trash problems. They are also experiencing deforestation, desertification, soil erosion, destruction of wildlife habitat and wetlands, and the depletion of ground water. Attempts are being made to reduce the pollutants being produced, but economic factors weigh heavily against cleaning up current pollution.

  18. Eirich technology for the preparation of ashes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eirich, G.

    1994-12-31

    The paper describes a mixer manufactured by Maschinenfabrik Gustav Eirich that can be used in the agglomeration of power plant ashes and residues. No matter whether the power plant burns coal, fuel oil, wood, peat, or garbage or whether the power plant plans to dispose or utilize the residue, most flowsheets will contain an agglomeration step. The paper describes some of the uses to which this mixer can be put.

  19. E-Alerts: Environmental pollution and control (solid waste pollution and control). E-mail newsletter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-04-01

    The paper discusses pollution by solid wastes including garbage, scrap, junked automobiles, spoil, sludge, containers; Disposal methods such as composts or land application, injection wells, incineration, sanitary landfills; Mining wastes; Processing for separation and materials recovery; Solid waste utilization; Recycling; Biological and ecological effects; Superfund (Records of Decision, etc.); SITE technology; Laws, legislation, and regulations; Public administration; Economics; Land use. The discussion includes disposal of concentrated or pure liquids such as brines, oils, chemicals, and hazardous materials.

  20. Prosperity without pollution: The prevention strategy for industry and consumers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirschhorn, J.S.; Oldenburg, K.U.

    1991-12-31

    ;Contents: Pollution prevention pays for everyone; What pollution prevention is-What waste recycling and other strategies are not; Achieving succcess by overcoming obstacles; Data tells the story-too much waste; The ozone groan-do we still have time; Harm to the farm and home from chemical pesticides; Changing consumption-reducing garbage; Household toxic products-thinking more and buying less; and No time to waste.

  1. Municipal solid waste management in Africa: Strategies and livelihoods in Yaounde, Cameroon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parrot, Laurent Sotamenou, Joel; Dia, Bernadette Kamgnia

    2009-02-15

    This paper provides an overview of the state of municipal solid waste (MSW) management in the capital of Cameroon, Yaounde, and suggests some possible solutions for its improvement. The institutional, financial, and physical aspects of MSW management, as well as the livelihoods of the population, were analyzed. Our study revealed that distances and lack of infrastructure have a major impact on waste collection. Garbage bins are systematically mentioned as the primary infrastructure needed by the population in all quarters, whether it be a high or low standard community. The construction of transfer stations and the installation of garbage bins are suggested as a solution to reduce distances between households and garbage bins, thus improving waste collection vehicle accessibility. Transfer stations and garbage bins would enable the official waste collection company to expand its range of services and significantly improve waste collection rates. Several transfer stations have already been set up by non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and community-based organizations (CBOs), but they require technical, institutional and funding support. Research is needed on the quality and safety of community-made compost, as well as on soil fertility in urban and peri-urban areas. Most of the stakeholders, municipalities, the official waste collection company and households acknowledge the need for better monitoring and regulation of MSW management. The urban community of Yaounde also needs to maintain its support of MSW management and promote the sustainability of NGOs and CBOs operating in underserved areas not yet covered by adequate infrastructures. A major opportunity for implementation of such waste policy is the heavily indebted poor countries (HIPC) program dedicated to urban planning and good governance.

  2. Multithreaded processor architecture for parallel symbolic computation. Technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fujita, T.

    1987-09-01

    This paper describes the Multilisp Architecture for Symbolic Applications (MASA), which is a multithreaded processor architecture for parallel symbolic computation with various features intended for effective Multilisp program execution. The principal mechanisms exploited for this processor are multiple contexts, interleaved pipeline execution from separate instruction streams, and synchronization based on a bit in each memory cell. The tagged architecture approach is taken for Lisp program execution, and trap conditions are provided for future object manipulation and garbage collection.

  3. Mid-Connecticut MRF offers integrated approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thoresen, C.

    1993-11-01

    Mandatory recycling hit Connecticut in 1987, with a goal set at recycling 25% of the state's municipal solid waste. Once municipalities, haulers, and commercial operators were required to separate recyclables from garbage, no project moved forward to take the materials. CRRA already had 44 municipalities using its Mid-Connecticut waste-to-energy facility. The quickest way to accommodate these towns was to move aggressively forward to develop a Mid-Connecticut materials recycling facility and bring the recyclables in.

  4. New study projects burgeoning market

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-10-01

    At the end of 1987, seventy waste-to-energy plants were in operation. As cities and towns respond to the growing garbage crisis, a noted market research firm predicts that waste-to-energy plants will be increasingly viewed as an economical solution. domestic sales of waste-to-energy capital equipment and services, they content, will total $25.5 billion between 1988 and 2005.

  5. The early days of incineration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valenti, M.

    1995-05-01

    Landfills reaching capacity, beaches fouled with trash, neighborhood residents protesting waste disposal sites in their backyards, and municipalities forced to recycle. Sound familiar? These issues might have been taken from today`s headlines, but they were also problems facing mechanical engineers a century ago. Conditions such as these were what led engineers to design the first incinerators for reducing the volume of municipal garbage, as well as for producing heat and electricity. The paper discusses these early days.

  6. 2005 Update for Implementing Best Available Technology per DOE Order 5400.5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    INL

    2006-09-01

    The report addresses Best Available Technology per DOE Order 5400.5 in relation to wastewater discharges to the soil. In accordance with Contract Data Requirements List F.19, this report addresses the Best Available Technology requirements per Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.5, "Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment", as they apply to radiological discharges to the soil for Calendar Year 2005. The report includes review of discharges for both, Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC and CH2M WG Idaho, LLC. The Best Available Technology selection process is applicable to wastewater discharges containing process derived radionuclides to surface waters, sanitary sewerages greater than five times the Derived Concentration Guideline (found in DOE Order 5400.5), and to the soil. Wastewater at the Idaho National Laboratory Site is not discharged to surface water (Big Lost River and Birch Creek) nor is it discharged to sanitary sewerages at activity levels greater than five times a Derived Concentration Guideline. Therefore, this report focuses on radiological discharges to the soil.

  7. Batteries called primary source of lead, cadmium in municipal waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-04-01

    The US Environmental Protection Agency reports that lead-acid batteries, such as those used in automobiles, and rechargeable nickel-cadmium batteries used in consumer electronics equipment, are the primary sources of lead and cadmium in municipal trash and garbage. A report prepared for EPA analyzed existing data from 1970 to 1986 and made projections to the year 2000. Lead-acid batteries continue to constitute a major source of lead in garbage even though 80 percent of them are now recycled. As a result, EPA is calling for additional recycling of batteries. This study is an important step in implementing EPA's strategy for helping states and cities achieve the national goal of recycling and reducing 25 percent of all municipal garbage by 1992. The findings on batteries are the result of a study conducted for EPA because of concern over the levels of lead and cadmium found n ash (residue) from municipal waste incinerators. Lead and cadmium are two metals of particular concern in the solid waste stream. The metals can contaminate soil and groundwater when landfilled. They also may be found in some incinerator emissions.

  8. Feasibility of automatic storage reclamation with concurrent program execution in a LISP environment. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cassidy, K.G.

    1985-12-01

    Storage reclamation is the process of reclaiming discarded information and returning the memory space occupied by that discarded information to an available area or list in memory that is available to be utilized by programmers. This increased interest in storage reclamation is a result of the increasing use of list-processing environments. A list-processing environment is a system in which the language manipulates data structures called lists. In classical LISP implementations, program execution/computation continues until there is no more memory available (i.e., the free list of available cells has become exhausted). When this happens, user program(s) HALT and then storage reclamation, in the form of garbage collection, takes over. This halting of programs in the midst of their computation is not only frustrating to programmers and researchers but can also be of crucial importance in other applications. This thesis investigates the feasibility of allowing concurrent program execution with garbage collection. LISP has been selected because it has been estimated that typical LISP programs take 10%-30% of their processing time to perform garbage collection.

  9. Okeelanta Cogeneration Project: Electricity and steam from sugar cane

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schaberg, D.

    1994-12-31

    The Okeelanta Cogeneration Project is a Bagasse- and wood chip-fired cogeneration project with a net electrical output of approximately 70MW, located at the Okeelanta Corporation`s sugar mill in South Bay, Florida. The Project is comprised of three stoker type boilers each capable of producing 440,000 lbs/hr of steam at 1455 psia, 955F, and a single extraction/condensing steam turbine with a gross output of 75 MW. The electrical output will be sold to Florida Power and Light under the terms of an executed power purchase agreement and delivered at 138kV.

  10. National and Regional Water and Wastewater Rates For Use inCost-Benefit Models and Evaluations of Water Efficiency Programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisher, Diane C.; Whitehead, Camilla Dunham; Melody, Moya

    2006-09-01

    Calculating the benefits and costs of water conservation orefficiency programs requires knowing the marginal cost of the water andwastewater saved by those programs. Developing an accurate picture of thepotential cost savings from water conservation requires knowing the costof the last few units of water consumed or wastewater released, becausethose are the units that would be saved by increased water efficiency.This report describes the data we obtained on water and wastewater ratesand costs, data gaps we identified, and other issues related to using thedata to estimate the cost savings that might accrue from waterconservation programs. We identified three water and wastewater ratesources. Of these, we recommend using Raftelis Financial Corporation(RFC) because it: a) has the most comprehensive national coverage; and b)provides greatest detail on rates to calculate marginal rates. The figurebelow shows the regional variation in water rates for a range ofconsumption blocks. Figure 1A Marginal Rates of Water Blocks by Regionfrom RFC 2004Water and wastewater rates are rising faster than the rateof inflation. For example, from 1996 to 2004 the average water rateincreased 39.5 percent, average wastewater rate increased 37.8 percent,the CPI (All Urban) increased 20.1 percent, and the CPI (Water andSewerage Maintenance) increased 31.1 percent. On average, annualincreases were 4.3 percent for water and 4.1 percent for wastewater,compared to 2.3 percent for the All Urban CPI and 3.7 percent for the CPIfor water and sewerage maintenance. If trends in rates for water andwastewater rates continue, water-efficient products will become morevaluable and more cost-effective.

  11. H. R. 2670: A bill to amend the Solid Waste Disposal Act to regulate ash from municipal solid waste incinerators as a hazardous waste, introduced in the US House of Representatives, One Hundred Second Congress, First Session, June 18, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    This bill was introduced into the US House of Representatives on June 18, 1991 to amend the Solid Waste disposal Act to regulate ash from municipal solid waste incinerators as a hazardous waste. When garbage is burned, toxic materials are concentrated in the ash. If the ash is disposed of in a landfill, these toxic materials can contaminate the ground water or surface water by leaching toxic materials from the ash. In addition, disposing of contaminated ash improperly can pose a health hazard. New authority is provided for regulating incinerator ash as a hazardous waste.

  12. Solid-waste contracting: Questions and answers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-05-01

    The increasing complexity of local government responsibilities is nowhere better illustrated than in solid waste management. In the past, when the adverse effects of waste disposal were less recognized, garbage was simply taken to local public dumps, or burned in backyard barrels or apartment building incinerators. Local governments must modernize their solid waste programs and operate within growing federal and state regulations. The changing regulatory environment of solid waste management presents a golden opportunity to contract with the private sector if interest of the community can be protected.

  13. Policies for green design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fullerton, D.; Wu, W.

    1998-09-01

    A simple general equilibrium model is used to analyze disposal-content fees, subsidies for recyclable designs, unit-pricing of household disposal, deposit-refund systems, and manufacturer take-back requirements. Firms use primary and recycled inputs to produce output that has two attributes: packaging per unit output, and recyclability. If households pay the social cost of disposal, then they send the right signals to producers to reduce packaging and to design products that can more easily be recycled. If garbage is collected for free, then socially optimum attributes can still be achieved by a tax on producers` use of packaging and subsidy to recyclable designs.

  14. Geohazards: Natural and man-made

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCall, G.J.H.; Laming, D.J.C.; Scott, S.C.

    1992-01-01

    This book of conference presentations from a meeting of the Geological Society of London in 1989 includes 20 papers grouped in 5 sections. Sections include the following: volcanos; earthquakes; landslides; quiet hazards such as sea-level changes and loss of soils or biodiversity; discussion of the question of what can be done to reduce such disasters. Interaction of man's activities to initiate disasters, to increase the scope of disasters and/or to mitigate them is included in a number of papers. In the fourth section a final paper provides a summary of the food-soil, energy-climate, waste-garbage, and water-contamination interactions.

  15. LANFILGAS(sm) process. Technology spotlight report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-08-01

    The United States is facing a garbage crisis. Several areas of the country have already run out of landfill space, and recent studies indicate that many other areas will be experiencing the same problem with the next ten years. Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) has patented an advanced biogasification technology called LANFILGAS that accelerates the stabilization of landfills through anaerobic composting and recovers the methane gas for its energy value. Anaerobic composting, or digestion, is a natural process that takes place in every landfill. It is generally uncontrolled, however, and can take up to 30 years to stabilize a landfill.

  16. Opportunity fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lutwen, R.C.

    1996-12-31

    The paper consists of viewgraphs from a conference presentation. A comparison is made of opportunity fuels, defined as fuels that can be converted to other forms of energy at lower cost than standard fossil fuels. Types of fuels for which some limited technical data is provided include petroleum coke, garbage, wood waste, and tires. Power plant economics and pollution concerns are listed for each fuel, and compared to coal and natural gas power plant costs. A detailed cost breakdown for different plant types is provided for use in base fuel pricing.

  17. Superfund at work: Hazardous waste cleanup efforts nationwide, Spring 1993 (Powersville site profile, Peach County, Georgia)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) encountered much more than a municipal landfill at the Powersville site in Peach County, Georgia. Contamination from improperly dumped hazardous wastes and pesticides tainted an old quarry used for household garbage. Chemicals migrating into area ground water threatened local drinking water supplies. To address these issues, EPA's Superfund program designed a cleanup strategy that included: negotiating with the county and chemical companies to contain the hazardous wastes on site underneath a protective cover; investigating reports of drinking water contamination and extending municipal water lines to affected residents; and conducting a tailored community relations program to inform and educate residents about the site.

  18. NREL: Transportation Research - Miami-Dade County Hydraulic Hybrid Refuse

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Truck Testing Miami-Dade County Hydraulic Hybrid Refuse Truck Testing Photo of garbage truck with view of lake and city in background. As part of its overall strategy to reduce emissions and fuel use, Miami-Dade County currently operates 35 hydraulic hybrid refuse vehicles, with 29 more on order. Photo courtesy of Parker Hannifin NREL is evaluating the in-service performance of 10 next-generation (model year 2015) hydraulic hybrid refuse vehicles (HHVs), 8 previous-generation (model year

  19. Powered by NERSC, a Database of Billions of Genes and Counting!

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Powered by NERSC, a Database of Billions of Genes and Counting! Powered by NERSC, a Database of Billions of Genes and Counting! With More than a Billion Microbial genes, IMG/M Breaks a Record January 26, 2012 Linda Vu, lvu@lbl.gov, +1 510 495 2402 IMG/M team celebrates the recording of 1 billionth gene. Microbes are microscopic organisms that live in every nook and cranny of our planet. Without them, plants wouldn't grow, garbage wouldn't decay, humans wouldn't digest food, and there would

  20. They`re up! They`re down! They`re waste-to-energy plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Varrasi, J.

    1996-03-01

    Burning garbage - either just to get rid of it, or to recover its latent energy as heat or electricity - has never been a sweet-sounding or -smelling idea. Long before the first boiler and turbine/generator were integrated with a trash incinerator - turning it into a waste-to-energy (WTE) plant - public concern about the air pollution produced by burning municipal solid waste (MSW) began placing an upper bound on the growth of the WTE industry, as it continues to do today. This paper describes some statistics, benefits and problems related to WTE plants.

  1. Illinois Turning Landfill Trash into Future Cash

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Will County, Illinois officials yesterday formally broke ground on a new $7 million project (that includes $1 million of Energy Efficiency Conservation Block Grant funds) to turn methane gas from the Prairie View Landfill into electricity in a partnership with Waste Management. Will County will receive revenue from the sale of the gas created from decomposing garbage which will be harnessed and converted to generate 4.8 megawatts of green electrical power and used to power up to 8,000 homes. The future revenue generated from the sale of the gas and the sale of the electricity could reach $1 million annually.

  2. Municipal waste processing apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mayberry, J.L.

    1988-04-13

    This invention relates to apparatus for processing municipal waste, and more particularly to vibrating mesh screen conveyor systems for removing grit, glass, and other noncombustible materials from dry municipal waste. Municipal waste must be properly processed and disposed of so that it does not create health risks to the community. Generally, municipal waste, which may be collected in garbage trucks, dumpsters, or the like, is deposited in processing areas such as landfills. Land and environmental controls imposed on landfill operators by governmental bodies have increased in recent years, however, making landfill disposal of solid waste materials more expensive. 6 figs.

  3. An overview of agriforestry waste production and use in Louisiana

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kleit, S.; Hoop, C.F. de; Chang, S.J.

    1994-12-31

    Agriculture and forestry are the second largest employers in the state of Louisiana. Natural by-products of these industries are biomass waste in the form of bark, wood chips, sawdust, cotton gin trash, rice hulls and sugar bagasse. Disposing of these wastes poses problems for the air and water. One popular waste management solution is to use them for fuel. To measure the potential for using biomass waste for fuel and other uses, a study was conducted of sugar cane processors, cotton ginners, rice processors and the primary and secondary wood processors in Louisiana. The study revealed that while some firms use waste for their own boilers, or sell it to others for fuel, there is still unused waste. There are many reasons for this including the cost of competing energy sources, lack of marketing innovation and the economies of scale. The study`s mission includes identifying new areas for utilizing waste. To facilitate these innovations, and bridge buyers with sellers of biomass waste, a geographic information system (GIS) was developed to map all sites claiming to produce and/or consume wood waste, as well as processors of cotton gin trash, rice hulls and sugar bagasse. These data are layered with timber supply data from the U.S. Forest Service.

  4. Liquid products from the continuous flash pyrolysis of biomass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott, D.S.; Piskorz, J.; Radlein, D.

    1985-01-01

    A bench-scale continuous flash pyrolysis unit using a fluidized bed at atmospheric pressure has been employed to investigate conditions for maximum organic liquid yields from various biomass materials. Liquid yields for poplar-aspen were reported previously, and this work describes results for the flash pyrolysis of maple, poplar bark, bagasse, peat, wheat straw, corn stover, and a crude commercial cellulose. Organic liquid yields of 60-70% mf can be obtained from hardwoods and bagasse, and 40-50% from agricultural residues. Peat and bark with lower cellulose content give lower yields. The effects of the addition of lime and of a nickel catalyst to the fluid bed are reported also. A rough correlation exists between has content and maximum organic liquid yield, but the liquid yield correlates better with the alpha-cellulose content of the biomass. General relationships valid over all reaction conditions appear to exist among the ratios of final decomposition products also, and this correlation is demonstrated for the yields of methane and carbon monoxide.

  5. Reducing plastic contamination of the marine environment under MARPOL Annex V: A model for recreational harbors and ports

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mudar, M.J.

    1991-01-01

    A case study was conducted during Summer, 1990, at the Nantucket Boat Basin, Massachusetts. The purpose of the study was to (1) determine the types and quantities of wastes generated by recreational boaters, particularly plastics and garbage regulated by MARPOL Annex V, (2) develop a model to assist recreational boating facilities to comply with the law and (3) reduce the impact of plastic contamination on the marine environment. An international law which came to force in December, 1988, MARPOL Annex V prohibits the disposal of plastics into the sea and stipulates ocean zones where garbage and other wastes may be disposed. A per capita rate of waste generation by recreational boaters was determined, which will enable recreational harbors and ports to estimate the waste management capacity necessary to meet the requirements of Annex V. In addition to determining the wastestream from the recreational boaters, boaters were surveyed to collect data about pertinent topics including awareness of MARPOL, waste types generated aboard vessels, waste management methods, and how marinas could assist boaters in meeting their waste management needs. As a result of the Boat Basin study, a planning model was developed to assist other recreational harbors and ports to meet the requirements of MARPOL Annex V. Major elements of the model include (1) information Transfer, (2) Waste Management Methods, and (3) the Role of Related Factors such as marina type, and waste characterization and quantification.

  6. Prognostic Analysis of the Tactical Quiet Generator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hively, Lee M

    2008-09-01

    The U.S. Army needs prognostic analysis of mission-critical equipment to enable condition-based maintenance before failure. ORNL has developed and patented prognostic technology that quantifies condition change from noisy, multi-channel, time-serial data. This report describes an initial application of ORNL's prognostic technology to the Army's Tactical Quiet Generator (TQG), which is designed to operate continuously at 10 kW. Less-than-full power operation causes unburned fuel to accumulate on internal components, thereby degrading operation and eventually leading to failure. The first objective of this work was identification of easily-acquired, process-indicative data. Two types of appropriate data were identified, namely output-electrical current and voltage, plus tri-axial acceleration (vibration). The second objective of this work was data quality analysis to avoid the garbage-in-garbage-out syndrome. Quality analysis identified more than 10% of the current data as having consecutive values that are constant, or that saturate at an extreme value. Consequently, the electrical data were not analyzed further. The third objective was condition-change analysis to indicate operational stress under non-ideal operation and machine degradation in proportion to the operational stress. Application of ORNL's novel phase-space dissimilarity measures to the vibration power quantified the rising operational stress in direct proportion to the less-than-full-load power. We conclude that ORNL's technology is an excellent candidate to meet the U.S. Army's need for equipment prognostication.

  7. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 5): Fort Wayne Reduction, Fort Wayne, Indiana (first remedial action) August 1988. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-08-28

    The 35-acre Fort Wayne site (FW) is a former municipal landfill/waste disposal facility located along the Maumee River just east of the city of Fort Wayne, Allen County, Indiana. Two onsite areas are designated as wetlands. In addition, the site lies within a 100-year flood plain. The site accepted residential and industrial wastes from 1967 to 1976. From May 1967 to August 1970, FW was issued a county permit for public disposal of garbage and rubbish. Wastes were incinerated and the residual ash disposed of onsite. In 1970, FW changed its name to National Recycling Corporation. All solid waste was to be processed through the plant. It was torn down in 1985. Inspection reports indicated that deposited refuse included: industrial and liquid wastes, municipal wastes, garbage, paper, and wood. The site consists of two characteristically different areas reflecting its historical use: the eastern half of the site was used as the municipal/general refuse landfill (approximately 15 acres), and the western half of the site (approximately 5 acres) was used for disposal of industrial wastes, building debris, barrels of unidentified wastes, and residual ash from earlier incineration operations. Presently, soil and ground water are contaminated with 43 chemicals of concern including: metals, organics, PCBs, PAHs, phenols, and VOCs. The selected remedial action for the site is included.

  8. Efficiently evaluate complex pressure relief systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, R.K.; Walker, A.G.

    1997-01-01

    This article will present the steps necessary to perform a comprehensive analysis of complex pressure relief systems. The goal is not to discuss detailed calculations for proper valve sizing and selection, but rather to analyze and verify existing system configurations. Sizing and selection have been covered in detail by the American Petroleum Institute (API) RP 520, API RP 521, various AIChE Design Institute for Emergency Relief Systems (DIERS) publications, and other sources. In their work with industry, the authors have noticed a tendency for some engineers to proceed with detailed calculations without first preparing an overall strategy and implementation plan to make sure that the calculations yield the desired results. They have seen detailed pressure relief system analyses costing hundreds of thousands of dollars which, for any number of reasons, are incorrect. The old adage GIGO (garbage in/garbage out) certainly applies to pressure relief system analysis. They will address the thought processes and actions necessary to correctly and efficiently evaluate complex pressure relief systems.

  9. Energy from waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klass, D.L.; Sen, C.T.

    1987-07-01

    Each day, U.S. cities must dispose of more than 450,000 tons of municipal solid waste (MSW). (See box for definitions of this and other terms.) Historically, it has been reported that 95% of this MSW has been buried in garbage dumps and landfills, but this method is becoming unacceptable as space becomes scarcer and much more costly. According to an estimate by Combustion Engineering Co., a quarter of U.S. cities will run out of landfill space in the next five years, and 80% of them over the next decade. The vast majority of these cities have yet to identify new landfill sites. Meanwhile, the cost of landfilling in some urban areas has risen from nearly /sup ll/ton in 1970 to /50/ton or more and is projected to go even higher. Collection and transportation charges add even more to the cost of disposal. The recent news story of a garbage-laden barge from Long Island sailing national and international waterways in desperate search of a disposal site is a dramatic example of this problem.

  10. Chemical reformer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, D.L.

    1987-01-13

    This patent describes the process of producing liquid oils from organic waste materials, which comprises: mixing an oil-based carrier with organic waste material selected from the group consisting of organic garbage, raw sewage, sewage sludge and waste paper. The waste material contains at least about 10 weight percent water. The amount of oil-based carrier present is sufficient to permit the mixture to be a more readily flowable material that the corresponding waste material free of oil carrier. The flowable material is pyrolyzed at elevated temperature and pressure to produce the liquid oils. 17. The process of producing liquid oils from organic waste materials selected from the group consisting of organic garbage, raw sewage, sewage sludge, and waste paper, which comprises: mixing an oil-based carrier with organic waste material, the waste material containing at least about 10 weight percent water, the amount of oil-based carrier present being sufficient to permit the mixture to be more readily flowable material than the corresponding waste material free of oil carrier, pyrolysing the flowable material at a temperature of 700/sup 0/ to 950/sup 0/F. and a pressure of 700 to 2,500 p.s.i. to produce the liquid oils, and thereafter passing the heated, substantially continuous stream through heat exchange means to recover heat and to transfer it to an upstream portion of the substantially continuous stream.

  11. Integrated Biorefinery Project: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-10-390

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chapeaux, A.; Schell, D.

    2013-06-01

    The Amyris-NREL CRADA is a sub-project of Amyris?s DOE-funded pilot-scale Integrated Biorefinery (IBR). The primary product of the Amyris IBR is Amyris Renewable Diesel. Secondary products will include lubricants, polymers and other petro-chemical substitutes. Amyris and its project partners will execute on a rapid project to integrate and leverage their collective expertise to enable the conversion of high-impact biomass feedstocks to these advanced, infrastructure-compatible products. The scope of the Amyris-NREL CRADA includes the laboratory development and pilot scale-up of bagasse pretreatment and enzymatic saccharification conditions by NREL for subsequent conversion of lignocellulosic sugar streams to Amyris Diesel and chemical products by Amyris. The CRADA scope also includes a techno-economic analysis of the overall production process of Amyris products from high-impact biomass feedstocks.

  12. An energy atlas of five Central American countries. Un atlas energetico de cinco paises Centroamericanos

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trocki, L.; Newman, C.K.; Gurule, F.; Aragon, P.C.; Peck, C.

    1988-08-01

    In a series of maps and figures, this atlas summarizes what is known about the energy resources and how these resources and oil imports supply the energy needs of five Central American countries: Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras, Costa Rica, and Panama. The main exploited energy resources are firewood, hydroelectric energy, bagasse from sugar cane residues, and geothermal energy. Limited oil exploration in the region has uncovered modest oil resources only in Guatemala. Peat and small coal deposits are also known to exist but are not presently being exploited. After the description of energy resources, this atlas describes energy supply and demand patterns in each country. It concludes with a description of socioeconomic data that strongly affect energy demand. 4 refs.

  13. Jennings Demonstration PLant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russ Heissner

    2010-08-31

    Verenium operated a demonstration plant with a capacity to produce 1.4 million gallons of cellulosic ethanol from agricultural resiues for about two years. During this time, the plant was able to evaluate the technical issues in producing ethanol from three different cellulosic feedstocks, sugar cane bagasse, energy cane, and sorghum. The project was intended to develop a better understanding of the operating parameters that would inform a commercial sized operation. Issues related to feedstock variability, use of hydrolytic enzymes, and the viability of fermentative organisms were evaluated. Considerable success was achieved with pretreatment processes and use of enzymes but challenges were encountered with feedstock variability and fermentation systems. Limited amounts of cellulosic ethanol were produced.

  14. Case studies in alternative landfill design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barbagallo, J.C.; Druback, G.W.

    1995-12-31

    In the past, landfills or {open_quotes}dumps{close_quotes} were not highly regulated and typically did not require a detailed engineering design. However, landfills are no longer just holes in the ground, and landfill closures entail more than just spreading some dirt on top of piles of garbage. Today landfill design is a highly regulated, complex design effort that integrates soils and geosynthetics into systems aimed at providing long-term protection for the environment and surrounding communities. Integrating these complex design systems into the available landscape and exising landfill configuration often requires the designer go beyond the {open_quotes}typical{close_quotes} landfill and landfill closure design to satisfy regulations and provide cost-effective solutions.

  15. Aggresome-like structure induced by isothiocyanates is novel proteasome-dependent degradation machinery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mi, Lixin; Gan, Nanqin; Chung, Fung-Lung

    2009-10-16

    Unwanted or misfolded proteins are either refolded by chaperones or degraded by the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS). When UPS is impaired, misfolded proteins form aggregates, which are transported along microtubules by motor protein dynein towards the juxta-nuclear microtubule-organizing center to form aggresome, a single cellular garbage disposal complex. Because aggresome formation results from proteasome failure, aggresome components are degraded through the autophagy/lysosome pathway. Here we report that small molecule isothiocyanates (ITCs) can induce formation of aggresome-like structure (ALS) through covalent modification of cytoplasmic {alpha}- and {beta}-tubulin. The formation of ALS is related to neither proteasome inhibition nor oxidative stress. ITC-induced ALS is a proteasome-dependent assembly for emergent removal of misfolded proteins, suggesting that the cell may have a previously unknown strategy to cope with misfolded proteins.

  16. A simulator designated to the help sizing of waste incineration plant with energy valorization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lemoult, B.

    1998-07-01

    The integrated waste treatment (sorting, recycling, composting, incineration, tip) concept is increasing. In this concept, incineration remains the last way of destruction before tipping of refuse. With the aim to improve thermal and economic efficiencies of this kind of treatment, thermal and/or electrical energy are produced in incineration plants. If environmental rules lead to a steady increase of such plants, a lot of data have to be evaluated to find the best size, especially under economic aspects, for a given project. The author presents the specification of the software ARTEMIS, which helps a project manager to find the optimal size of a plant, to quantify the effect of various technical options, and to compare some operating management. Garbage deposit (quantity and quality), energy valorization (electricity price, thermal needs), machines (furnace, high and low pressure turbines, heat exchanger, auxiliary boiler) are taken into account. Energy and economic annual balance are also calculated with a hourly simulation step.

  17. Composting: Dirty riches. [Composting organic wastes from the municiple solid waste stream

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sachs, A.

    1993-08-01

    Up to three-quarters of municiple solid waste (MSW) is organic, readily biodegradable material, such as food, leaves, and paper. If this waste were allowed to root properly, the solid waste crisis would be less serious. However, rotting isn't easy in a tightly packed mountain of garbage at a typical landfill. The last few years have at least established composing as a rising green industry, especially in the most populous regions of the developed world. However, the variety of composting programs is too inefficient to divert any more than a tiny fraction of the compostable waste stream away from landfills and incinerators. This article discusses the problems of mixed municiple solid wastes and composting organic wastes, and possible solutions.

  18. Waste-to-energy: Benefits beyond waste disposal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Charles, M.A.; Kiser, J.V.L. )

    1995-01-01

    More than 125 waste-to-energy plants operate in North America, providing dependable waste disposal for thousands of communities. But the benefits of waste-to-energy plants go beyond getting rid of the garbage. Here's a look at some of the economic, environmental, and societal benefits that waste-to-energy projects have brought to their communities. The reasons vary considerably as to why communities have selected waste-to-energy as a part of their waste management systems. Common on the lists in many communities are a variety of benefits beyond dependable waste disposal. A look at experiences in four communities reveals environmental, economic, energy, and societal benefits that the projects provide to the communities they serve.

  19. Who owns the recyclables

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parker, B.

    1994-05-01

    On March 31, the California Supreme Court decided the much awaited Rancho Mirage'' case (Waste Management of the Desert, Inc., and the City of Rancho Mirage v. Palm Springs Recycling Center, Inc.), and held that the California Integrated Waste Management Act of 1989 does not allow an exclusive franchise for the collection of recyclables not discarded by their owner.'' This ends a three-year slugfest between secondary materials processors in the state and municipalities and their franchised garbage haulers who also collect and process recyclables as part of their exclusive arrangement. Central to this nationally-watched litigation is a most fundamental question in waste management: at what point in time do articles in the solid waste stream become actual or potentially valuable secondary materials

  20. Ridge station eases Florida's waste-disposal problems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swanekamp, R.

    1994-10-01

    Two results of Florida's continuing population growth are (1) a critical need for electricity, and (2) a solid-waste disposal crisis. During a recent winter cold snap, electric demand in one service territory surged 25% over generating capacity and 10% over net system capability. Rolling blackouts ensued. At the same time, Florida's fragile wetlands environment is suffering from years of unfettered development. Groundwater sources are contaminated, landfill space is scarce, and illegal tire dumps blight the landscape. The recently constructed Ridge generating station in Polk County, Fla. is addressing both the state's electrical and environmental needs. Ridge, which entered commercial operation in May, burns a unique mix of urban woodwaste and scrap tires to provide 45 MW of critically needed electricity while keeping large quantities of solid waste out of landfills. When pipeline construction at an adjacent landfill is completed, the facility also will burn the methane gases produced when garbage decomposes.

  1. Energy conservation technologies based on thermodynamic principles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirata, Masaru

    1996-12-31

    In order to reduce CO{sub 2} emission to prevent global warming, the most promising way for electric generation in the Northeast Asia is to introduce cogeneration and {open_quotes}repowering{close_quotes} technologies based on high temperature gas turbines fueled by natural gas. Especially the old type coal burning boiler-steam turbine plants should be retrofit by introducing gas turbines to become highly efficient combined cycle. Same technologies should be applied to the old garbage incineration plants and/or even to the nuclear power plants. The exhaust heat or steam should become much increased and it should be utilized as the process heat for industries or heat supply as the distinct heating or cooling for residential area. This paper introduces a brief survey of these new technologies.

  2. Recycle plastics into feedstocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kastner, H.; Kaminsky, W.

    1995-05-01

    Thermal cracking of mixed-plastics wastes with a fluidized-bed reactor can be a viable and cost-effective means to meet mandatory recycling laws. Strict worldwide environmental statutes require the hydrocarbon processing industry (HPI) to develop and implement product applications and technologies that reuse post-consumer mixed-plastics waste. Recycling or reuse of plastics waste has a broad definition. Recycling entails more than mechanical regranulation and remelting of polymers for film and molding applications. A European consortium of academia and refiners have investigated if it is possible and profitable to thermally crack plastics into feedstocks for refining and petrochemical applications. Development and demonstration of pyrolysis methods show promising possibilities of converting landfill garbage into valuable feedstocks such as ethylene, propylene, BTX, etc. Fluidized-bed reactor technologies offer HPI operators a possible avenue to meet recycling laws, conserve raw materials and yield a profit. The paper describes thermal cracking for feedstocks and pyrolysis of polyolefins.

  3. Waste from grocery stores

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lieb, K.

    1993-11-01

    The Community Recycling Center, Inc., (CRC, Champaign, Ill.), last year conducted a two-week audit of waste generated at two area grocery stores. The stores surveyed are part of a 10-store chain. For two of the Kirby Foods Stores, old corrugated containers (OCC) accounted for 39-45% of all waste. The summary drew correlations between the amount of OCC and the sum of food and garbage waste. The study suggested that one can reasonably estimate volumes of waste based on the amount of OCC because most things come in a box. Auditors set up a series of containers to make the collection process straightforward. Every day the containers were taken to local recycling centers and weighed. Approximate waste breakdowns for the two stores were as follows: 45% OCC; 35% food waste; 20% nonrecyclable or noncompostable items; and 10% other.

  4. Heavy metal distribution in sediments from Calabar River, southeastern Nigeria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ntekim, E.E.U.; Ekwere, S.J.; Ukpong, E.E.

    1993-08-01

    The concentration and areal distribution of selected metals (Pb, Zn, Cu, Cd, Ni, Fe, and Cr) in the sediments of the Calabar River were studied to determine the extent of anthropogenic input and to estimate the effects of dumping industrial waste materials into the river. The concentrations of Pb, Zn, and Cu indicate relatively moderate pollution mainly on the left-hand side of the river while Ni, Cr, Co, Cd, and Fe levels are below values found to have adverse effects on the lives of marine biota. High metal contents are found close to industrial establishments and so enhanced metal concentrations are related to industrial sewage and metal leaching from garbage and solid waste dumps. 15 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs.

  5. Discussion of and reply to ``Thermoselect: Energy and raw material recovery through thermal chemical transformation in a closed-loop system``

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norton, J.W.; Stahlberg, R.; Runyon, D.J.

    1995-11-01

    Publication of this paper by Rudi Stahlberg and David J. Runyon has made the public aware of the perfect system which would take garbage in, and produce several streams of valuable by-products while emitting little, if any, pollution streams. Prototype testing of the system was done at Fondotoce, Italy. However, the paper gives the impression that perhaps not all of the suggested processing is a part of the present prototype operation, if this is the case, the reader should be clearly informed as to which of the suggested by-product processing systems is presently operational, and which are thought to be possible. Comments are also made concerning pollution control equipment and the disposition of heavy metals. This article also contains the original authors` reply to the comments.

  6. Final report: Efficient and user friendly C++ library for differential algebra

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Svetlana G. Shasharina

    1998-09-29

    In Phase I we proposed the following tasks: Task 1: Identify the units of the Differential Algebra (DA) library, i.e. determine the abstract data types of the DA and the relations between them. Develop the interfaces (.h files) for the DA vectors. Task 2: Implement the DA vector class with garbage collection and expression templates for optimizing all overloaded operators by minimizing creation of temporaries and fusing loops. Task 3: Implement the prototype GUI for instantiating systems from files and invoking the DA methods. Task 4: Develop a suite of tests for the DA vector class and the needed utilities classes. Task 5: Write the final report on this work. This will include documentation on the use of the code. We have completed these tasks. In this section we discuss the results of our work.

  7. Effect of large additions of Cd, Pb, Cr, Zn, to cement raw meal on the composition and the properties of the clinker and the cement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murat, M.; Sorrentino, F.

    1996-03-01

    The utilization of hydraulic binders to solidify and to stabilize industrial wastes and municipal garbage is presently recognized as one of the solutions to the problem of environment protection. Te addition of important quantities of Cd, Pb, Cr, Zn to raw meals of Portland and calcium aluminate cement modifies the mineralogical composition and the properties of the final cement. Portland cement can absorb a large amount of Cd and Zn. This absorption leads to an increase of setting time and a decrease of strengths of the cement. It also can trap chromium with a short setting time and high strengths. Calcium aluminate cements easily trap Cd and Cr with a delayed setting and good strength but also Pb with normal setting time and strengths. Large quantities of zinc oxide have a deleterious effect on calcium aluminate strengths.

  8. Evaluating anaerobic digestion for reduction of organic wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartung, H.A.

    1994-12-31

    A small-scale anaerobic digestion test has been developed for monitoring start-up work with inoperative digesters. The test is described and variables critical to its consistent operation are detailed. The method has been used in many anaerobic digestion studies, including evaluation of the digestibility of various municipal solid wastes like grass and hedge clippings, garbage and newspapers. Digestion rates are expressed in terms of the rate of production of combustible gas and the retention time needed for a fixed degree of volatile solids destruction. An example shows the advantage of digesting selected combined charges, and it is suggested that this approach might be fruitful with many toxic organic materials. Application of this test to find the digestion rates of some high-yield biomass crops is also described.

  9. A Temporal Locality-Aware Page-Mapped Flash Translation Layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Youngjae; Gupta, Aayush; Urgaonkar, Bhuvan

    2013-01-01

    The poor performance of random writes has been a cause of major concern which needs to be addressed to better utilize the potential of flash in enterprise-scale environments. We examine one of the important causes of this poor performance: the design of the flash translation layer (FTL) which performs the virtual-to-physical address translations and hides the erase-before-write characteristics of flash. We propose a complete paradigm shift in the design of the core FTL engine from the existing techniques with our Demand-Based Flash Translation Layer (DFTL) which selectively caches page- level address mappings. Our experimental evaluation using FlashSim with realistic enterprise-scale workloads endorses the utility of DFTL in enterprise-scale storage systems by demonstrating: 1) improved performance, 2) reduced garbage collection overhead and 3) better overload behavior compared with hybrid FTL schemes which are the most popular implementation methods. For example, a predominantly random-write dominant I/O trace from an OLTP application running at a large financial institution shows a 78% improvement in average response time (due to a 3-fold reduction in operations of the garbage collector), compared with the hybrid FTL scheme. Even for the well-known read-dominant TPC-H benchmark, for which DFTL introduces additional overheads, we improve system response time by 56%. Moreover, interestingly, when write-back cache on DFTL-based SSD is enabled, DFTL even outperforms the page-based FTL scheme, improving their response time by 72% in Financial trace.

  10. SX User`s Manual for SX version 2.0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, S.A.; Braddy, D.

    1993-01-04

    Scheme is a lexically scoped, properly tail recursive dialect of the LISP programming language. The PACT implementation is described abstractly in Abelson and Sussman`s book, Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs. It features all of the ``essential procedures`` described in the ``Revised Report on Scheme`` which defines the standard for Scheme. In PACT, Scheme is implemented as a library; however, a small driver delivers a stand alone Scheme interpreter. The PACT implementation features a reference counting incremental garbage collector. This distributes the overhead of memory management throughout the running of Scheme code. It also tends to keep Scheme from trying to grab the entire machine on which it is running which some garbage collection schemes will attempt to do. SX is perhaps the ultimate PACT statement. It is simply Scheme plus the other parts of PACT. A more precise way to describe it is as a dialect of LISP with extensions for PGS, PDB, PDBX, PML, and PANACEA. What this yields is an interpretive language whose primitive procedures span the functionality of all of PACT. Like the Scheme implementation which it extends, SX provides both a library and a stand alone application. The stand alone interpreter is the engine behind applications such as PDBView and PDBDiff. The SX library is the heart of TRANSL, a tool to translate data files from one database format to another. The modularization and layering make it possible to use the PACT components like building blocks. In addition, SX contains functionality which is the generalization of that found in ULTRA II. This means that as the development of SX proceeds, an SX driven application will be able to,perform arbitrary dimensional presentation, analysis, and manipulation tasks. Because of the fundamental unity of these two PACT parts, they are documented in a single manual. The first part will cover the standard Scheme functionality and the second part will discuss the SX extensions.

  11. Application of holographic neural networks for flue gas emissions prediction in the Burnaby incinerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng, L.; Dockrill, P.; Clements, B.

    1997-12-31

    This article describes the development of a parametric prediction system (PPS) for various emission species at the Burnaby incinerator. The continuous emissions monitoring system at the Burnaby incinerator is shared between three boilers and therefore actual results are only available 5 minutes out of every 15 minutes. The PPS was developed to fill in data for the 10 minutes when the Continuous Emission Monitor (CEM) is measuring the other boilers. It bases its prediction on the last few actual readings taken and parametrically predicts CO, SO2 and NOx. The Burnaby Incinerator is located in the commercial/industrial area of South Burnaby, British Columbia. It consists of three separate lines, each burning ten tonnes of garbage per hour and producing about three tonnes of steam for every tonne of garbage burned. The air pollution control system first cools the combustion products with water injection and then scrubs them with very fine hydrated lime. Carbon is added to the lime to enhance the scrubbing of the combustion products. The CEM monitors the levels of oxygen, carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, sulphur dioxide and opacity. In 1996, an expert system was installed on one of boilers at the Burnaby Incinerator plant to determine if it could improve the plant=s operations and reduce overall emission. As part of the expert system, the PPS was developed. Holographic Neural Technology (HNeT), developed by AND Corporation of Toronto, Ontario, is a novel neural network technology using complex numbers in its architecture. Compared to the traditional neural networks, HNeT has some significant advantage. It is more resilient against converging on local minima; is faster training and executing; less prone to over fitting; and, in most cases, has significantly lower error. Selection of independent variabs, training set preparation, testing neural nets and other related issue will be discussed.

  12. SX User's Manual for SX version 2. 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, S.A.; Braddy, D.

    1993-01-04

    Scheme is a lexically scoped, properly tail recursive dialect of the LISP programming language. The PACT implementation is described abstractly in Abelson and Sussman's book, Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs. It features all of the essential procedures'' described in the Revised Report on Scheme'' which defines the standard for Scheme. In PACT, Scheme is implemented as a library; however, a small driver delivers a stand alone Scheme interpreter. The PACT implementation features a reference counting incremental garbage collector. This distributes the overhead of memory management throughout the running of Scheme code. It also tends to keep Scheme from trying to grab the entire machine on which it is running which some garbage collection schemes will attempt to do. SX is perhaps the ultimate PACT statement. It is simply Scheme plus the other parts of PACT. A more precise way to describe it is as a dialect of LISP with extensions for PGS, PDB, PDBX, PML, and PANACEA. What this yields is an interpretive language whose primitive procedures span the functionality of all of PACT. Like the Scheme implementation which it extends, SX provides both a library and a stand alone application. The stand alone interpreter is the engine behind applications such as PDBView and PDBDiff. The SX library is the heart of TRANSL, a tool to translate data files from one database format to another. The modularization and layering make it possible to use the PACT components like building blocks. In addition, SX contains functionality which is the generalization of that found in ULTRA II. This means that as the development of SX proceeds, an SX driven application will be able to,perform arbitrary dimensional presentation, analysis, and manipulation tasks. Because of the fundamental unity of these two PACT parts, they are documented in a single manual. The first part will cover the standard Scheme functionality and the second part will discuss the SX extensions.

  13. Assessment of Radioactive Liquid Effluents Release at IPEN-CNEN/SP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bessa Nisti, Marcelo; Godoy dos Santos, Adir Janete

    2008-08-07

    A continuous effluent monitoring program has been established at IPEN's plant in order to allow an environmental impact assessment due to radioactive liquid effluent discharge to sanitary system. Representative samples of radioactive liquid effluents are analyzed by using high resolution gamma spectroscopy and instrumental neutron activation analysis, facing to Brazilian radioprotection regulatory rules. The results are consolidating yearly in the Institute source-term. In this paper, results of the source-term are presented, concerning to years 2004, 2005 and 2006. The total activity discharged was 8.5xl0{sup 8} Bq, 5.7x10{sup 8} Bq and 2.7xl0{sup 8} Bq, respectively. As the release is strongly dependent on the total amount of the effluent and on the dilution factor, special attention is needed in order to obtain the correct value of that last one. The estimated inside plant dilution factor, considering the recent facilities and the reshaping of the sewerage system was 80, 180 and 130, for period of 2004, 2005 and 2006 discharged liquid radioactive effluent.

  14. Methods of reducing liquid effluent from the OSU TRIGA MKII Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Higginbotham, J.F.; Dodd, B.; Pratt, D.S.; Smith, S.; Anderson, T.V.

    1992-07-01

    In 1991, the OSU Radiation Center implemented a program to minimize the liquid effluent generated by the reactor facility. The goal of program is to become a 'zero' release facility with regards to routine liquid discharges. Only two liquid waste streams exist for the OSU reactor facility: discharges resulting from changing resin in the deminerializer and decontamination of equipment, primarily sample loading tubes. This paper describes a system which allows remote resin exchange to performed with the collection of all flush water. This water is then recycled for use as makeup for the primary water system. The service life of the resin is maximized by using a steam distillation unit as the source of makeup water to the deminerializer system instead of water coming directly from the City of Corvallis water supply. The second source of liquid waste water comes from the decontamination of the plastic loading tubes used to encapsulate samples. This process originally involved placing the tubes in a dishwasher and sending the discharge to a hold up tank. If the radionuclide concentrations in the tank were below the maximum permissible concentrations of 10CFR20 then it was released to the sanitary sewerage. This process was replaced in 1991 with a system which involved manual washing and rinsing of the tubes with the liquids being absorbed for disposal as solid waste. This paper will also describe the system which is being built to replace this process. It will use the dishwasher unit again but the liquid discharge will collected for absorption and disposal as solid waste. (author)

  15. Pahoa geothermal industrial park. Engineering and economic analysis for direct applications of geothermal energy in an industrial park at Pahoa, Hawaii

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moreau, J.W.

    1980-12-01

    This engineering and economic study evaluated the potential for developing a geothermal industrial park in the Puna District near Pahoa on the Island of Hawaii. Direct heat industrial applications were analyzed from a marketing, engineering, economic, environmental, and sociological standpoint to determine the most viable industries for the park. An extensive literature search produced 31 existing processes currently using geothermal heat. An additional list was compiled indicating industrial processes that require heat that could be provided by geothermal energy. From this information, 17 possible processes were selected for consideration. Careful scrutiny and analysis of these 17 processes revealed three that justified detailed economic workups. The three processes chosen for detailed analysis were: an ethanol plant using bagasse and wood as feedstock; a cattle feed mill using sugar cane leaf trash as feedstock; and a papaya processing facility providing both fresh and processed fruit. In addition, a research facility to assess and develop other processes was treated as a concept. Consideration was given to the impediments to development, the engineering process requirements and the governmental support for each process. The study describes the geothermal well site chosen, the pipeline to transmit the hydrothermal fluid, and the infrastructure required for the industrial park. A conceptual development plan for the ethanol plant, the feedmill and the papaya processing facility was prepared. The study concluded that a direct heat industrial park in Pahoa, Hawaii, involves considerable risks.

  16. Engineered plant biomass feedstock particles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dooley, James H.; Lanning, David N.; Broderick, Thomas F.

    2012-04-17

    A new class of plant biomass feedstock particles characterized by consistent piece size and shape uniformity, high skeletal surface area, and good flow properties. The particles of plant biomass material having fibers aligned in a grain are characterized by a length dimension (L) aligned substantially parallel to the grain and defining a substantially uniform distance along the grain, a width dimension (W) normal to L and aligned cross grain, and a height dimension (H) normal to W and L. In particular, the L.times.H dimensions define a pair of substantially parallel side surfaces characterized by substantially intact longitudinally arrayed fibers, the W.times.H dimensions define a pair of substantially parallel end surfaces characterized by crosscut fibers and end checking between fibers, and the L.times.W dimensions define a pair of substantially parallel top and bottom surfaces. The L.times.W surfaces of particles with L/H dimension ratios of 4:1 or less are further elaborated by surface checking between longitudinally arrayed fibers. The length dimension L is preferably aligned within 30.degree. parallel to the grain, and more preferably within 10.degree. parallel to the grain. The plant biomass material is preferably selected from among wood, agricultural crop residues, plantation grasses, hemp, bagasse, and bamboo.

  17. Engineered plant biomass feedstock particles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dooley, James H.; Lanning, David N.; Broderick, Thomas F.

    2011-10-11

    A novel class of flowable biomass feedstock particles with unusually large surface areas that can be manufactured in remarkably uniform sizes using low-energy comminution techniques. The feedstock particles are roughly parallelepiped in shape and characterized by a length dimension (L) aligned substantially with the grain direction and defining a substantially uniform distance along the grain, a width dimension (W) normal to L and aligned cross grain, and a height dimension (H) normal to W and L. The particles exhibit a disrupted grain structure with prominent end and surface checks that greatly enhances their skeletal surface area as compared to their envelope surface area. The L.times.H dimensions define a pair of substantially parallel side surfaces characterized by substantially intact longitudinally arrayed fibers. The W.times.H dimensions define a pair of substantially parallel end surfaces characterized by crosscut fibers and end checking between fibers. The L.times.W dimensions define a pair of substantially parallel top surfaces characterized by some surface checking between longitudinally arrayed fibers. The feedstock particles are manufactured from a variety of plant biomass materials including wood, crop residues, plantation grasses, hemp, bagasse, and bamboo.

  18. Engineered plant biomass feedstock particles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dooley, James H.; Lanning, David N.; Broderick, Thomas F.

    2011-10-18

    A novel class of flowable biomass feedstock particles with unusually large surface areas that can be manufactured in remarkably uniform sizes using low-energy comminution techniques. The feedstock particles are roughly parallelepiped in shape and characterized by a length dimension (L) aligned substantially with the grain direction and defining a substantially uniform distance along the grain, a width dimension (W) normal to L and aligned cross grain, and a height dimension (H) normal to W and L. The particles exhibit a disrupted grain structure with prominent end and surface checks that greatly enhances their skeletal surface area as compared to their envelope surface area. The L.times.H dimensions define a pair of substantially parallel side surfaces characterized by substantially intact longitudinally arrayed fibers. The W.times.H dimensions define a pair of substantially parallel end surfaces characterized by crosscut fibers and end checking between fibers. The L.times.W dimensions define a pair of substantially parallel top surfaces characterized by some surface checking between longitudinally arrayed fibers. At least 80% of the particles pass through a 1/4 inch screen having a 6.3 mm nominal sieve opening but are retained by a No. 10 screen having a 2 mm nominal sieve opening. The feedstock particles are manufactured from a variety of plant biomass materials including wood, crop residues, plantation grasses, hemp, bagasse, and bamboo.

  19. Potential for electricity generation from biomass residues in Cuba

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lora, E.S.

    1995-11-01

    The purpose of this paper is the study of the availability of major biomass residues in Cuba and the analysis of the electricity generation potential by using different technologies. An analysis of the changes in the country`s energy balance from 1988 up to date is presented, as well as a table with the availability study results and the energy equivalent for the following biomass residues: sugar cane bagasse and trash, rice and coffee husk, corn an cassava stalks and firewood. A total equivalent of 4.42 10{sup 6} tons/year of fuel-oil was obtained. Possible scenarios for the electricity production increase in the sugar industry are presented too. The analysis is carried out for a high stream parameter CEST and two BIG/GT system configurations. Limitations are introduced about the minimal milling capacity of the sugar mills for each technology. The calculated {open_quotes}real{close_quotes} electricity generation potential for BIG/GT systems, based on GE LM5000 CC gas turbines, an actual cane harvest of 58.0 10{sup 6} tons/year, half the available trash utilization and an specific steam consumption of 210 kg/tc, was 18601,0 GWh/year. Finally different alternatives are presented for low-scale electricity generation based on the other available agricultural residues.

  20. Victorias energy efficiency and cogeneration project. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-10-31

    This report describes a two-phase energy project currently contemplated for joint implementation at the Victorias Milling Company, a large sugar mill and refinery on the island of Negros in the Visayas region of the Philippines. The Energy Efficiency (EE) phase is expected to reduce of eliminate VMC`s fossil fuel consumption, which will have a direct and substantial impact on carbon emissions. Phase I is an EE project which involves the installation of equipment to reduce steam and electricity demand in the factories. Phase II, will involve retrofitting and increasing the capacity of the steam and power generation systems, and selling power to the grid. By increasing efficiency and output, the cogeneration project will allow the factory to use only bagasse sugar cane fiber waste as fuel for energy needs. The cogeneration project will also eliminate VMC`s electricity purchases and supply additional power for the island, which will offset generation capacity expansion on the island and the Visayas region.

  1. BEST: Bilingual environmental science training: Grades 5--6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-03-01

    This booklet is one of a series of bilingual guides to environmental-science learning activities for students to do at home. Lesson objectives, materials required, procedure, vocabulary, and subjects integrated into the lesson are described in English. A bilingual glossary, alphabetized by English entries, with Spanish equivalents and definitions in both English and Spanish, follows the lesson descriptions, and is itself followed by a bibliography of English-language references. This booklet includes descriptions of ten lessons that cover the following topics: safe and unsafe conditions for chemical combinations; growth rates and environmental needs of plants; photosynthesis and effects of ozone-layer depletion; the circulatory system, the importance of exercise to the heart, and selected circulatory diseases; the nervous system; specific nutritional values of the different food groups; significance of including, reducing, or eliminating certain foods for a healthy diet; effects of some common chemicals on plant growth and animal life; plants` and animals` natural habitats; and dangers of non-biodegradable garbage.

  2. Production of energy and high-value chemicals from municipal solid waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colucci-Raeos, J.A.; Saliceti-Piazza, L.; Herncndez, A.

    1996-12-31

    Landfills have been used for decades in Puerto Rico as the only alternative for the disposal of municipal solid waste (MSW). In the present, 7,300 metric tons (8,000 tons) of MSW are generated on a daily basis, of which about 43% are generated in the San Juan Metropolitan Area. Garbage dumps in the Metropolitan Area have an estimated useful life of two years from now. Furthermore, Puerto Rico`s average daily per capita generation exceeds that of US and is almost as twice as that of Europe. A novel alternative for the disposal of MSW needs to be implemented. The University of Puerto Rico (Department of Chemical Engineering), in a collaborative effort with the Sandia National Laboratory, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Puerto Rico`s Energy Affairs Administration, and the Institute of Chemical Engineers of Puerto Rico, have conceptualized a research program that would address the utilization of MSW and other agricultural residues for the generation of energy and/or high-value chemical products. The concept, {open_quotes}biorefinery{close_quotes} would consist of the collection of MSW and other agricultural wastes, separation of materials for recycling (glass, ceramics, metals), and use of gasification and/or hydrolysis of the screened material to produce energy and/or chemicals (such as alcohols and oxyaromatics).

  3. Riocell nurtures environmental accomplishments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meadows, D.G.

    1994-05-01

    Environmental concerns have very much influenced operations at Riocell's pulp and paper mill in Guaiba, Brazil. Celso Foelkel, environmental and technical director, refers to it as a minimal environmental impact mill that's moving toward becoming a zero impact mill. In many cases, Riocell has developed simple methods to reduce or recycle 99.7% of the 15,000 tons/month of solid residue it generates. It uses composted mill waste to renourish the soil of its plantations, though most of the organic fertilizer produced is sold to local farmers for agricultural use. About half of the solid residue is converted to agricultural use, especially as organic fertilizers. Sawdust is used as fuel or as bedding for poultry. Another 40% goes to industrial uses such as cement manufacturing. The rest is used as fill for the recovery of mined areas. Event the garbage from the mill is sorted and 85% is recycled. A new concern for the Riocell mill is a move toward placing taxes on the use of natural resources such as water. That's prompted the mill to look into going a step beyond tertiary treatment. The Clean-Rio process makes use of sand-bed filtration and reverse osmosis. Settling with activated carbon might also work well.

  4. Effect of morphology of sulfurized materials in the retention of mercury from gas streams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guijarro, M.I.; Mendioroz, S.; Munoz, V.

    1998-03-01

    Mercury pollution sources are chloralkali industries, metal sulfide ore smelting, gold refining, cement production, industrial applications of metals, and, especially, fossil fuel combustion and incineration of sewage sludge or municipal garbage. The retention of mercury vapor by sulfur supported on sepiolite has been studied, and the utility of sepiolite as a dispersant for the active phase, sulfur, has been thoroughly ascertained. Samples with 10% S supported on sepiolite of varying size and shape have been prepared from powders sulfurized by reaction/deposit, and their efficiency in depurating air streams with 95 ppm mercury has been tested in a dynamic system using a fixed-bed glass reactor and fluid velocities ranging from 3.1 to 18.9 cm/s. From breakthrough curves under various sets of conditions, the importance of mass transfer under the process conditions has been proven. The progress of the reaction is limited by the resistance to reactant diffusion inside the solid through the layer of product formed. Sulfur reaction to HgS is reduced to an external zone of the solid, giving rise to an egg-shell deposit whose extension is related to sulfur dispersion and porosity of the adsorbent. Then, conversion and capacity of the samples are related to their porosity and S/V ratio. The use of SEM helps to confirm those statements. The 10% S samples compare well with the more conventional S/activated carbon, with their use being advantageous for the low price and abundance of the substrate.

  5. Still the same after all these years: Santa Rosa`s curbside recycling model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Egan, K.

    1997-10-01

    When Santa Rosa, located north of San Francisco, first began its recycling program in 1977, it was no different from the other fledgling curbside recycling programs in the state. Back then, residents collected recyclables in their homes and put them out on the curb each week next to the garbage cans in whatever container they could find, whether it was a paper grocery bag or a cardboard box. The city`s pre-bin recycling program had a participation rate of about 25%. Then in 1978, with the firm`s help, Empire officials came up with the idea of providing recycling bins to residents. The program planners asked residents to source-separate their recyclables and then put the metals (including steel, tin, and aluminum); all three glass colors (brown, green, and clear); and newspaper in three individual bins. A few weeks after city officials distributed the bins to residents, the program showed a participation rate of 77%, indicating to Clark that the bins were necessary to significantly increase public awareness of the program.

  6. Composting in tandem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheehan, K.

    1994-03-01

    A composting company, a county, and a waste company have formed a symbiotic public/private relationship that is helping to extend the life of the area's landfills, as well as produce a needed product. California state assembly bill 939, passed in 1989, directed local governments to reduce the amount of garbage being landfilled in order to curtail the need for new landfills. Cities and counties in California are now mandated to reduce the volume of their waste stream by 25% by 1995. By the year 2000, the waste stream must be reduced by 50%. And the law has teeth -- to ensure these percentages are met, a $10,000 fine can be imposed for each day a deadline is missed. According to 1990 figures, Sonoma County's well-established recycling programs have been successful at diverting 15% of the county's waste stream from the landfill. Paula Magyari, a waste management specialist with the county Public Works Department, says yard wastes account for 13% of the waste stream in Sonoma County; wood wastes for at least 15%. At 13% and 15%, they are two of the largest components of the waste stream, and, equally important, they represent the portion of the waste stream that is most readily reusable to meet the 25% goal.

  7. An evaluation of Java's I/O capabilities for high-performance computing.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dickens, P. M.; Thakur, R.

    2000-11-10

    Java is quickly becoming the preferred language for writing distributed applications because of its inherent support for programming on distributed platforms. In particular, Java provides compile-time and run-time security, automatic garbage collection, inherent support for multithreading, support for persistent objects and object migration, and portability. Given these significant advantages of Java, there is a growing interest in using Java for high-performance computing applications. To be successful in the high-performance computing domain, however, Java must have the capability to efficiently handle the significant I/O requirements commonly found in high-performance computing applications. While there has been significant research in high-performance I/O using languages such as C, C++, and Fortran, there has been relatively little research into the I/O capabilities of Java. In this paper, we evaluate the I/O capabilities of Java for high-performance computing. We examine several approaches that attempt to provide high-performance I/O--many of which are not obvious at first glance--and investigate their performance in both parallel and multithreaded environments. We also provide suggestions for expanding the I/O capabilities of Java to better support the needs of high-performance computing applications.

  8. Development of auxiliary power units for electric hybrid vehicles. Interim report, July 1993-February 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Owens, E.C.; Steiber, J.

    1997-06-01

    Larger urban commercial vehicles (such as shuttle and transit buses), various delivery and service vehicles (such as panel and step vans), and garbage trucks and school buses are particularly well suited for electric drive propulsion systems due to their relatively short operating routes, and operation and maintenance from central sites. Furthermore, these vehicles contribute a proportionately large amount to metropolitan air pollution by virtue of their continuous operation in those areas. It is necessary to develop auxiliary power units (APUs) that minimize emissions and in addition, increase range of electric vehicles. This report focuses on the first phase study of the development of APUs for large, electric drive commercial vehicles, intended primarily for metropolitan applications. This paper (1) summarizes the differences between available mobile APUs and Electric Vehicle APU requirements, (2) describes the major components in APUs, and (3) discusses APU integration issues. During this phase, three potential APU manufacturers were identified and selected for development of prototype units at 25 kW and 50 kW power levels.

  9. Replacement of petroleum based hydraulic fluids with a soybean-based alternative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rose, B.; Rivera, P.

    1998-05-01

    Despite the best preventative measures, ruptured hoses, spills and leaks occur with use of all hydraulic equipment. Although these releases do not usually produce a RCRA regulated waste, they are often a reportable occurrence. Clean-up and subsequent administrative procedure involves additional costs, labor and work delays. Concerns over these releases, especially related to Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) vehicles hauling waste on public roads prompted Fleet Services (FS) to seek an alternative to the standard petroleum based hydraulic fluid. Since 1996 SNL has participated in a pilot program with the University of Iowa (UNI) and selected vehicle manufacturers, notably John Deere, to field test hydraulic fluid produced from soybean oil in twenty of its vehicles. The vehicles included loaders, graders, sweepers, forklifts and garbage trucks. Research was conducted for several years at UNI to modify and market soybean oils for industrial uses. Soybean oil ranks first in worldwide production of vegetable oils (29%), and represents a tremendous renewable resource. Initial tests with soybean oil showed excellent lubrication and wear protection properties. Lack of oxidative stability and polymerization of the oil were concerns. These concerns were being addressed through genetic alteration, chemical modification and use of various additives, and the improved lubricant is in the field testing stage.

  10. The earth is in your hands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Browner, C.M.

    1995-08-01

    Earth Day 25 is a time to reflect on how mankind is doing in protecting their environment. Twenty-five years ago, in the wake of the first Earth Day, the US has created, virtually from scratch, the most advanced system of environmental protection in the world. In the course of a very short history--a mere quarter-century--man has made tremendous progress. Their skies and rivers are cleaner. And US environmental expertise and technology are in demand throughout the world. In the years since the first Earth Day, EPA banned lead in gasoline, lowering lead levels in the air by more than 90 percent and protecting millions of children from harm. Dangerous and widely used pesticides were banned. Unsafe local garbage dumps all over the nation were closed and recycling has become a household habit. American towns have been provided with substantial funding for wastewater treatment--the second biggest public works effort in US history, resulting in cleaner rivers all over the US. All cars and trucks now have standards for fuel economy, set by EPA, that allow consumers to choose a car for its energy efficiency. And EPA has played an important role in ensuring that companies and others comply with their environmental laws or face stiff penalties. Perhaps most important, the nation has gained a new understanding. More Americans than ever understand that to ensure a good quality of life they must act as responsible stewards of their air, their water, and their land.

  11. Taiwan`s experience with municipal waste recycling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, C.H.

    1998-12-31

    Currently, each person on the average produces 1.15 kg of the municipal waste per day and a total of 9 million metric tons were generated annually in Taiwan. The disposal of such a huge amount of waste presents tremendous challenge for the island due to the scarcity of landfills and incineration facilities available locally. EPA of Taiwan, R.O.C. thus takes an active role in promoting waste recycling to reduce the garbage produced in municipalities. In order to efficiently utilize the government`s human and financial resources used in recycling, started from January 31, 1989, EPA has mandated the producer responsibility recycling program for several designated post-consumer products such as PET, PVC bottles, scrap tires, scrap motor vehicles, etc. Producer responsibility recycling program specifies that the manufacturers, importers and sellers of these designated products have the responsibility to retrieve their products and recycle them properly. Several negative effects have been encountered while the implementation of this producer responsibility recycling program in Taiwan which resulted in a modification of this recycling program recently. This paper presents the encountered experiences on the implementation of municipal waste recycling program in Taiwan.

  12. Control strategies for an expert system at a municipal solid waste incinerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dockrill, P.; Zheng, L.; Clements, B.; Ram, K.; Boatwright, K.

    1997-12-31

    Optimal burning of municipal waste is challenging due to the unknown variability of the garbage and the strict limits on the emission streams. Proper operation relies upon procedures that are, to a certain extent, based upon previous experience. Therefore this is an excellent application for an expert system since they are designed to initiate operator actions before actual operator intervention is necessary. This paper briefly discusses the rationale for developing an expert system at the Burnaby Incinerator, Burnaby, British Columbia and how it was implemented. The Burnaby Incinerator, owned by the Greater Vancouver Regional District and operated by Montenay, Inc., was a test location for an expert system jointly funded by Environment Canada and the Panel for Energy Research and Development and developed by the CANMET Energy Technology Centre. The expert system was designed to perform a number of functions: identification of boiler upsets due to fuel variations, prediction of stack emissions and control of lime injection for SO{sub 2} emissions. These particular functions were chosen to smooth the boiler operation and reduce the cost of plant operation. The expert system is a PC based system using both commercial and developed software. It incorporates rule based and model based techniques and neural network technology. The results of the expert system project are presented.

  13. Water quality evaluation and geochemical assessment of iron, manganese, and arsenic in a landfill site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pisigan, R.A. Jr.

    1995-12-31

    Several monitoring wells at a landfill site were sampled for water quality parameters to determine the nature of groundwater contamination. The landfill, located beneath a limestone and dolomitic bedrock, has been used for about 20 years for trash and garbage disposal. The monitoring parameters include major cations and anions, as well as iron, manganese, arsenic, and other parameters measured in the field to characterize the subsurface conditions. Groundwater samples collected near the landfill and downgradient locations had higher levels of iron, manganese, arsenic, alkalinity, hardness than those samples from an upgradient well. The downgradient and on-site samples were also more acidic and turbid, The dissolved oxygen data tend to suggest reducing conditions in the leachate environment. The elevated groundwater concentrations of the three metals, especially iron, were most probably caused by the acidity generated by carbon dioxide and organic acids released from microbial degradation of organic compounds dumped into the landfill. The acidic pH led to the dissolution of iron, manganese, and arsenic bearing mineral phases. The buffering reactions of limestone and dolomite to neutralize the acidic degradation products increased the hardness cations, Ca{sup +2} and Mg{sup +2}. Inorganic speciation modeling indicates that iron, manganese, and arsenic predominantly exist as Fe {sup +2}, Mn{sup +2}, and H{sub 3}AsO{sub 3}. The possible presence of organic complexes of iron was discussed, but could be modeled due to lack of appropriate equilibrium constant data.

  14. Combustion test for RDF and coal in the 1.3 MWth ACFB

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kajita, A.; Tanaka, T.; Narukawa, K.; Kobayashi, N.; Nishiyama, A.; Oide, M.

    1999-07-01

    The diversification of fuel for the generating electricity becomes necessary to secure long-term energy. In this situation, coal is very important fuel resource because of great quantity of reserves under the ground and wide production area over the world. Therefore, the development of the high efficiency burning technology of coal fuel is required. The city garbage is also useful energy resource and it is socially expected the effective utilization technology with renewal energy and good for the environment. In such a background, it becomes important to know the combustion performance of RDF (Refuse Derived Fuel) in a efficient way with minimizing pollutant emissions. The authors conducted the coal and RDF burn tests using the 1.3 MW{sub th} ACFB (Atmospheric Circulating Fluidized-Bed) combustion test facility. The tests were conducted for both of 100% RDF combustion and combination of coal and RDF combustion with varied Ca contents and varied Cl contents in RDF. During combustion test, NO{sub x}, SO{sub 2} and HCl emissions in flue gas were measured. The result of the tests is reported and discussed in this paper.

  15. Waste-to-energy plants face costly emissions-control upgrades

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McIlvaine, R.W.

    1995-06-01

    One treatment method of municipal solid waste, incineration, has fallen in and out of public favor. In the 1970s, emerging consciousness of the threat to groundwater posed by leaking landfills made incineration an attractive option. Prompted by disrupted energy supplies and steeply rising prices, more than 100 municipalities began to generate electricity from the heat produced by burning trash. In the 1990s, the pendulum of public enthusiasm has swung away from incineration. Energy prices have declined dramatically, and safety and siting concerns complicate new projects. A recent Supreme Court decision ruled that municipal incinerator ash must be tested as hazardous waste and disposed accordingly if levels of such pollutants as cadmium and lead exceed Resource Conservation and Recovery Act limits. So-called flow control regulations, which allowed municipalities to apportion garbage disposal to ensure steady supplies to incinerators, also have been struck down. EPA is tackling the issue of air emissions from waste-to-energy and non-energy-producing municipal waste combustors. Emissions guidelines for MWCs and new-source performance standards for new units, proposed Sept. 20 under Sec. 129 of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990, are the culmination of a stalled and litigated initiative dating back to the CAA Amendments of 1977.

  16. Sour landfill gas problem solved

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nagl, G.; Cantrall, R.

    1996-05-01

    In Broward County, Fla., near Pompano Beach, Waste Management of North America (WMNA, a subsidiary of WMX Technologies, Oak Brook, IL) operates the Central Sanitary Landfill and Recycling Center, which includes the country`s largest landfill gas-to-energy plant. The landfill consists of three collection sites: one site is closed, one is currently receiving garbage, and one will open in the future. Approximately 9 million standard cubic feet (scf) per day of landfill gas is collected from approximately 300 wells spread over the 250-acre landfill. With a dramatic increase of sulfur-containing waste coming to a South Florida landfill following Hurricane Andrew, odors related to hydrogen sulfide became a serious problem. However, in a matter of weeks, an innovative desulfurization unit helped calm the landfill operator`s fears. These very high H{sub 2}S concentrations caused severe odor problems in the surrounding residential area, corrosion problems in the compressors, and sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) emission problems in the exhaust gas from the turbine generators.

  17. Choosing among alternative recycling systems: An economic analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stedge, G.D. . Dept. of Agricultural and Applied Economics); Halstead, J.M. . Dept. of Resource Economics and Development)

    1994-03-01

    Due to the increasing concern over the disposal of municipal solid waste, municipalities have begun searching for ways to recycle a larger percentage to their waste stream at a reasonable cost. This report examines bag-based recycling. This system, due to its efficient collection and separation method, and its convenience, should be able to capture a larger share of the waste stream at a lower cost per metric ton than conventional recycling programs. Using a case study approach, a bag-based program is compared with a curbside-sort program and a drop-off program. Using time/motion analysis, a garbage composition study, a household survey, and the recording of set-out rates of a sample of dwelling units, the efficiency of the three programs was defined and estimated. The efficiency of the bag-based system was also estimated for three areas with distinct household densities. Although the curbside-sort program was found to divert a larger percentage of the residential waste stream than the bag-based system, the cost per metric ton of the bag-based system is so much lower that it clearly is the most efficient of the three programs. The drop-off program had a very low cost per metric ton; however, if failed to divert the minimum acceptable level of the waste stream. The bag-based system proved to be more efficient in areas with higher household densities.

  18. Strings of liquid beads for gas-liquid contact operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hattori, Kenji; Ishikawa, Mitsukuni; Mori, Y.H. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1994-12-01

    Energy recovery from hot gases exhausted from power plants, garbage incineration facilities, and many industrial processes has been growing due to demands for saving the primary-energy consumption. A novel device for gas-liquid contact operations is proposed to feed a liquid onto wires (or threads) hanging down in a gas stream is proposed. The liquid disintegrates into beads strung on each wire at regular intervals; if the wire is moderately wettable, a thin film forms to sheathe the wire, thereby interconnecting the beads. Since the beads fall down slowly, which possibly renews the film flowing down even more slowly, a sufficient gas-liquid contact time is available even in a contactor with considerably limited height. An approximate calculation method is developed for predicting the variation in the temperature effectiveness for the liquid (the fractional approach of the liquid exit temperature to the gas inlet temperature) with the falling distance, assuming an applicability of strings-of-beads contactors to thermal energy recovery from hot gas streams.

  19. HybridPlan: A Capacity Planning Technique for Projecting Storage Requirements in Hybrid Storage Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Youngjae; Gupta, Aayush; Urgaonkar, Bhuvan; Piotr, Berman; Sivasubramaniam, Anand

    2014-01-01

    Economic forces, driven by the desire to introduce flash into the high-end storage market without changing existing software-base, have resulted in the emergence of solid-state drives (SSDs), flash packaged in HDD form factors and capable of working with device drivers and I/O buses designed for HDDs. Unlike the use of DRAM for caching or buffering, however, certain idiosyncrasies of NAND Flash-based solid-state drives (SSDs) make their integration into hard disk drive (HDD)-based storage systems nontrivial. Flash memory suffers from limits on its reliability, is an order of magnitude more expensive than the magnetic hard disk drives (HDDs), and can sometimes be as slow as the HDD (due to excessive garbage collection (GC) induced by high intensity of random writes). Given the complementary properties of HDDs and SSDs in terms of cost, performance, and lifetime, the current consensus among several storage experts is to view SSDs not as a replacement for HDD, but rather as a complementary device within the high-performance storage hierarchy. Thus, we design and evaluate such a hybrid storage system with HybridPlan that is an improved capacity planning technique to administrators with the overall goal of operating within cost-budgets. HybridPlan is able to find the most cost-effective hybrid storage configuration with different types of SSDs and HDDs

  20. Recycling efficiency: The shape of things to come

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, C.

    1995-09-01

    In the mid-`70s, curbside recycling was easy. Virtually all the programs collected only newspaper at the curbside. They were placed in a rack beneath the garbage truck or in a trailer behind the truck. Of course, the rack might fill up too soon, but that was a minor problem, usually resolved by offloading sites for the newspaper. Today, curbside recycling is much more complicated. Curbside programs can collect a bewildering array of materials, including plastics, mixed paper, and even textiles. The simple rack is in the Smithsonian, replaced by highly sophisticated vehicles. Some can automatically collect recyclables without the driver ever getting out of the cab. Simplicity, it seems, has given way to complexity as recycling rates have skyrocketed. The recycling industry has been buffeted recently by a slew of anti-recycling articles in the popular press, yet, ironically, it has been enjoying the best markets has blunted the anti-recyclers. However, bull markets are not forever. Recyclers cannot afford to adopt a ``What, me worry?`` attitude towards the business of recycling. As collectors become increasingly skilled in collecting recyclables, they can translating these skills into more efficient programs.

  1. BEST: Bilingual environmental science training, Grades 3--4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-03-01

    This booklet is one of a series of bilingual guides to environmental-science learning activities for students to do at home. Lesson objectives, materials required, procedure, vocabulary, and subjects integrated into the lesson are described in English for each lesson. A bilingual glossary, alphabetized by English entries, with Spanish equivalents and definitions in both English and Spanish, follows the lesson descriptions, and is itself followed by a bibliography of English-language references with annotations in English. This booklet includes descriptions of ten lessons that cover the following topics: the identification of primary and secondary colors in the environment; recognizing the basic food tastes; the variety of colors that can be made by crushing plant parts; the variety of animal life present in common soil; animal tracks; evidence of plant and animal life in the local environment; recycling, reducing, and composting as alternative means of garbage disposal; waste associated with packaging; paper- recycling principles; and how organic waste can be composted into usable soil. 2 figs.

  2. Backyard waste management - problems and benefits of individuals managing their solid waste at home

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whalen, M.

    1995-05-01

    The problems and benefits of individuals managing their solid wastes at home are surveyed. The survey indicates that as the population rises people tend to burn only the combustible portions of their waste. Some communities have limited ordinances that ban the burning of raw garbage, but other municipalities allow residents to burn all of their wastestream, even though some materials are not combustible and cannot be burned. Potential environmental effects involve both the ash residue and the air emissions. While selected burning can reduce some of the environmental hazards these would probably only be marginally less than the impacts of burning it all. The study clearly indicates that the environmental problems of burn barrels are not insignificant. However, the attitudes and motivations of those who burn waste will have to be addressed by the communities that attempt or should attempt to control this problem. These include: avoidance of waste collection costs; availability of trash cartage services; and habit. Habit is probably as strong a motivation as cost avoidance and ease of collection combined. Residents have often burned trash for several generations and regard the practice as a {open_quotes}god-given right.{close_quotes}

  3. Pollution prevention opportunity assessment for Building 922 solid office waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, N.M.

    1995-01-01

    Building 922 houses all of SNL/California`s ES and H Departments: Health Protection, Environmental Protection, Safety, and Environmental Operations. It covers approximately 10,000 square feet and houses about 80 people. The office personnel generate nonhazardous solid office wastes in their daily activities. To determine the types and amounts of waste generated, a special PPOA sorting team sorted all of the trash collected from the building for a period of one-week (including paper and aluminum cans in the recycling bins). The team sorted the trash into major categories: paper, plastic, metals, glass, wet garbage, rest room waste, and miscellaneous materials. They then sorted it into subcategories within each major category. Rest room waste was collected but not sorted. The waste in each category was weighed separately. The total amount of trash collected during the week was approximately 168.8 kg (371.4 lbs). The results of this PPOA indicate that SNL/California is minimizing most nonhazardous office waste and reductions planned for the near future will add significantly to the minimization efforts.

  4. Development and pilot test of an intensive municipal solid waste recycling system for the Town of East Hampton

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Commoner, B.; Frisch, M.; Pitot, H.A.; Quigley, J.; Stege, A.; Wallace, D.; Webster, T.

    1990-02-01

    This report presents the results of a project to design and test a new type of trash disposal system for the Town of East Hampton, Long Island: the Intensive Recycling System. The system is intended to serve as the Town's primary means of regular trash disposal. The Intensive Recycling System is based on separation of regular trash, by household and commercial establishments, into four fractions: (1) food garbage and soiled paper; (2) paper/cardboard; (3) metal cans/glass bottles; (4) non-recyclables. Fraction 1, together with yard waste, is processed at a compost facility, yielding marketable compost. Fractions 2 and 3 are processed by a materials recovery facility (MRF) into marketable products: several grades of paper and cardboard; aluminum cans; tin cans; scrap metal; and color-sorted crushed glass (cullet). The non-recyclable components (fraction 4) and misclassified components rejected during processing are consigned to a landfill. This document is Volume 2 of two volumes and contains the appendix for Volume 1.

  5. Pennsylvania to require statewide recycling of solid wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-11-01

    The new law, requiring trash recycling in 407 communities affecting 7.8 million Pennsylvanians, is a key component of the Casey administration's comprehensive environmental clean up plant. The new recycling law requires municipalities with more than 10,000 residents to start curb-side recycling programs within two years. Communities with 5000 to 10,000 residents must start recycling in three years. The goal is to reduce the state's volume of solid waste by 25 percent by 1997. Nine million tons of trash are generated each year in Pennsylvania, with 95 percent of it landfilled and only one percent recycled. Much of the state's solid waste must be transported over increasing distances at increasing costs to be disposed of. Average trash disposal costs have increased 150 percent in the past three years. The new law requires communities to recycle three of eight materials, including glass, colored glass, aluminum, steel and bimetallic cans, high-grade office paper, newsprint, corrugated paper and plastics. All communities must recycle leaf waste. The legislation shifts responsibility for planning solid waste disposal from municipalities to counties, reimbursing counties 80 percent of the cost of developing comprehensive recycling plans and 50 percent of the cost of hiring a recycling coordinator. The program will be self-supporting through a $2-per-ton fee on all garbage going to landfills and resource recovery.

  6. Development and pilot test of an intensive municipal solid waste recycling system for the Town of East Hampton

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Commoner, B.; Frisch, M.; Pitot, H.A.; Quigley, J.; Stege, A.; Wallace, D.; Webster, T.

    1990-02-01

    This report presents the results of a project to design and test a new type of trash disposal system for the Town of East Hampton, Long Island: the Intensive Recycling System. The system is intended to serve as the Town's primary means of regular trash disposal. The Intensive Recycling System is based on separation of regular trash, by households and commercial establishments, into four fractions: (1) food garbage and soiled paper; (2) paper/cardboard; (3) metal cans/glass bottles; (4) non-recyclables. Fraction 1, together with yard waste, is processed at a compost facility, yielding marketable compost. Fractions 2 and 3 are processed by a materials recovery facility (MRF) into marketable products: several grades of paper and cardboard; aluminum cans; tin cans; scrap metal; and color-sorted crushed glass (cullet). The non-recyclable components (fraction 4) and misclassified components rejected during processing are consigned to a landfill. This document is Volume 1 of two volumes. 75 refs., 24 figs., 81 tabs.

  7. Using wastes as resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prakasam, T.B.S.; Lue-Hing, C. )

    1992-09-01

    The collection, treatment, and disposal of domestic and industrial wastewater, garbage, and other wastes present considerable problems in urban and semiurban areas of developing countries. Major benefits of using integrated treatment and resource recovery systems include waste stabilization, recovering energy as biogas, producing food from algae and fish, irrigation, improved public health, and aquatic weed control and use. Information and research are needed, however, to assesss the appropriateness, benefits, and limitations of such technology on a large scale. System configuration depends on the types and quantities of wastes available for processing. There must be enough collectable waste for the system to be viable. Information should be gathered to asses whether there is a net public health benefit by implementing a waste treatment and resource recovery system. Benefits such as savings in medical expenses and increased worker productivity due to improved health may be difficult to quantify. The potential health risks created by implementing a resource recovery system should be studied. The most difficult issues to contend with are socioeconomic in nature. Often, the poor performance of a proven technology is attributed to a lack of proper understanding of its principles by the operators, lack of community interest, improper operator training, and poor management. Public education to motivate people to accept technologies that are beneficial to them is important.

  8. Solar production of intermediate temperature process heat. Phase I design. Final report. [For sugarcane processing plant in Hawaii

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1980-08-01

    This report is the final effort in the Phase I design of a solar industrial process heat system for the Hilo Coast Processing Company (HCPC) in Pepeekeo, Hawaii. The facility is used to wash, grind and extract sugar from the locally grown sugarcane and it operates 24 hours a day, 305 days per year. The major steam requirements in the industrial process are for the prime movers (mill turbines) in the milling process and heat for evaporating water from the extracted juices. Bagasse (the fibrous residue of milled sugarcane) supplied 84% of the fuel requirement for steam generation in 1979, while 65,000 barrels of No. 6 industrial fuel oil made up the remaining 16%. These fuels are burned in the power plant complex which produces 825/sup 0/F, 1,250 psi superheated steam to power a turbogenerator set which, in addition to serving the factory, generates from 7 to 16 megawatts of electricity that is exported to the local utility company. Extracted steam from the turbo-generator set supplies the plant's process steam needs. The system consists of 42,420 ft./sup 2/ of parabolic trough, single axis tracking, concentrating solar collectors. The collectors will be oriented in a North-South configuration and will track East-West. A heat transfer fluid (Gulf Synfluid 4cs) will be circulated in a closed loop fashion through the solar collectors and a series of heat exchangers. The inlet and outlet fluid temperatures for the collectors are 370/sup 0/F and 450/sup 0/F respectively. It is estimated that the net useable energy delivered to the industrial process will be 7.2 x 10/sup 9/ Btu's per year. With an HCPC boiler efficiency of 78% and 6.2 x 10/sup 6/ Btu's per barrel of oil, the solar energy system will displace 1489 barrels of oil per year. (WHK)

  9. Biomass energy opportunities on former sugarcane plantations in Hawaii

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, V.D.; Tvedten, A.E.; Lu, W.

    1995-11-01

    Electricity produced from burning sugarcane bagasse has provided as much as 10 percent of Hawaii`s electricity supply in the past. As sugarcane production has ceased on the islands of Oahu and Hawaii and diminished on Maui and Kauai, the role of biomass energy will be reduced unless economically viable alternatives can be identified. An empirical biomass yield and cost system model linked to a geographical information system has been developed at the University of Hawaii. This short-rotation forestry decision support system was used to estimate dedicated biomass feedstock supplies and delivered costs of tropical hardwoods for ethanol, methanol, and electricity production. Output from the system model was incorporated in a linear programming optimization model to identify the mix of tree plantation practices, wood processing technologies, and end-products that results in the highest economic return on investment under given market situations. An application of these decision-support tools is presented for hypothetical integrated forest product systems established at two former sugarcane plantations in Hawaii. Results indicate that the optimal profit opportunity exists for the production of medium density fibreboard and plywood, with annual net return estimates of approximately $3.5 million at the Hamakua plantation on the island of Hawaii and $2.2 million at the Waialua plantation on Oahu. Sensitivity analyses of the effects of different milling capacities, end-product market prices, increased plantation areas, and forced saw milling were performed. Potential economic credits for carbon sequestration and wastewater effluent management were estimated. While biofuels are not identified as an economical viable component, energy co-products may help reduce market risk via product diversification in such forestry ventures.

  10. Development of Agave as a dedicated biomass source: production of biofuels from whole plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mielenz, Jonathan R.; Rodriguez, Jr, Miguel; Thompson, Olivia A; Yang, Xiaohan; Yin, Hengfu

    2015-01-01

    Background: Agave species can grow well in semi-arid marginal agricultural lands around the world. Selected Agave species are used largely for alcoholic beverage production in Mexico. There are expanding research efforts to use the plentiful residues (bagasse) for ethanol production as the beverage manufacturing process only uses the juice from the central core of mature plants. Here we investigate the potential of over a dozen Agave species, including three from cold semi-arid regions of the United States, to produce biofuels using the whole plant. Results: Ethanol was readily produced by Saccharomyces cerevisiae from hydrolysate of ten whole Agaves with the use of a proper blend of biomass degrading enzymes that overcomes toxicity of most of the species tested. Unlike yeast fermentations, Clostridium beijerinckii produced butanol plus acetone from nine species tested. Butyric acid, a precursor of butanol, was also present due to incomplete conversion during the screening process. Since Agave contains high levels of free and poly-fructose which are readily destroyed by acidic pretreatment, a two step process was used developed to depolymerized poly-fructose while maintaining its fermentability. The hydrolysate from before and after dilute acid processing was used in C. beijerinckii acetone and butanol fermentations with selected Agave species. Conclusions: Results have shown Agave s potential to be a source of fermentable sugars beyond the existing beverage species to now include species previously unfermentable by yeast, including cold tolerant lines. This development may stimulate development of Agave as a dedicated feedstock for biofuels in semi-arid regions throughout the globe.

  11. Biofuel Feedstock Assessment for Selected Countries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kline, K.L.; Oladosu, G.A.; Wolfe, A.K.; Perlack, R.D.; Dale, V.H.

    2008-02-18

    Findings from biofuel feedstock production assessments and projections of future supply are presented and discussed. The report aims to improve capabilities to assess the degree to which imported biofuel could contribute to meeting future U.S. targets to reduce dependence on imported oil. The study scope was focused to meet time and resource requirements. A screening process identified Argentina, Brazil, Canada, China, Colombia, India, Mexico, and the Caribbean Basin Initiative (CBI) region for initial analysis, given their likely role in future feedstock supply relevant to U.S. markets. Supply curves for selected feedstocks in these countries are projected for 2012, 2017 and 2027. The supply functions, along with calculations to reflect estimated supplies available for export and/or biofuel production, were provided to DOE for use in a broader energy market allocation study. Potential cellulosic supplies from crop and forestry residues and perennials were also estimated for 2017 and 2027. The analysis identified capacity to potentially double or triple feedstock production by 2017 in some cases. A majority of supply growth is derived from increasing the area cultivated (especially sugarcane in Brazil). This is supplemented by improving yields and farming practices. Most future supplies of corn and wheat are projected to be allocated to food and feed. Larger shares of future supplies of sugarcane, soybean and palm oil production will be available for export or biofuel. National policies are catalyzing investments in biofuel industries to meet targets for fuel blending that generally fall in the 5-10% range. Social and environmental concerns associated with rapid expansion of feedstock production are considered. If the 2017 projected feedstock supply calculated as ‘available’ for export or biofuel were converted to fuel, it would represent the equivalent of about 38 billion gallons of gasoline. Sugarcane and bagasse dominate the available supply, representing 64% of the total. Among the nations studied, Brazil is the source of about two-thirds of available supplies, followed distantly by Argentina (12%), India and the CBI region.

  12. Biofuel Feedstock Assessment For Selected Countries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kline, Keith L; Oladosu, Gbadebo A; Wolfe, Amy K; Perlack, Robert D; Dale, Virginia H; McMahon, Matthew

    2008-02-01

    Findings from biofuel feedstock production assessments and projections of future supply are presented and discussed. The report aims to improve capabilities to assess the degree to which imported biofuel could contribute to meeting future U.S. targets to reduce dependence on imported oil. The study scope was focused to meet time and resource requirements. A screening process identified Argentina, Brazil, Canada, China, Colombia, India, Mexico, and the Caribbean Basin Initiative (CBI) region for initial analysis, given their likely role in future feedstock supply relevant to U.S. markets. Supply curves for selected feedstocks in these countries are projected for 2012, 2017 and 2027. The supply functions, along with calculations to reflect estimated supplies available for export and/or biofuel production, were provided to DOE for use in a broader energy market allocation study. Potential cellulosic supplies from crop and forestry residues and perennials were also estimated for 2017 and 2027. The analysis identified capacity to potentially double or triple feedstock production by 2017 in some cases. A majority of supply growth is derived from increasing the area cultivated (especially sugarcane in Brazil). This is supplemented by improving yields and farming practices. Most future supplies of corn and wheat are projected to be allocated to food and feed. Larger shares of future supplies of sugarcane, soybean and palm oil production will be available for export or biofuel. National policies are catalyzing investments in biofuel industries to meet targets for fuel blending that generally fall in the 5-10% range. Social and environmental concerns associated with rapid expansion of feedstock production are considered. If the 2017 projected feedstock supply calculated as 'available' for export or biofuel were converted to fuel, it would represent the equivalent of about 38 billion gallons of gasoline. Sugarcane and bagasse dominate the available supply, representing 64% of the total. Among the nations studied, Brazil is the source of about two-thirds of available supplies, followed distantly by Argentina (12%), India and the CBI region.

  13. Catalytic gasification studies in a pressurized fluid-bed unit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mudge, L.K.; Baker, E.G.; Mitchell, D.H.; Robertus, R.J.; Brown, M.D.

    1983-07-01

    The purpose of the project is to evaluate the technical and economic feasibility of producing specific gas products via the catalytic gasification of biomass. This report presents the results of research conducted from October 1980 to November 1982. In the laboratory scale studis, active catalysts were developed for generation of synthesis gases from wood by steam gasification. A trimetallic catalyst, Ni-Co-Mo on silica-alumina doped with 2 wt % Na, was found to retain activity indefinitely for generation of a methanol synthesis gas from wood at 1380/sup 0/F (750/sup 0/C) and 1 atm (100 kPa) absolute pressure. Catalysts for generation of a methane-rich gas were deactivated rapidly and could not be regenerated as required for economic application. Sodium carbonate and potassium carbonate were effective as catalysts for conversion of wood to synthesis gases and methane-rich gas and should be economically viable. Catalytic gasification conditions were found to be suitable for processing of alternative feedstocks: bagasse, alfalfa, rice hulls, and almond hulls. The PDU was operated successfully at absolute pressures of up to 10 atm (1000 kPa) and temperatures of up to 1380/sup 0/F (750/sup 0/C). Yields of synthesis gases at elevated pressure were greater than those used for previous economic evaluations. A trimetallic catalyst, Ni-Cu-Mo on silica-alumina, did not display a long life as did the doped trimetallic catalyst used in laboratory studies. A computer program for a Radio Shack TRS-80 Model I microcomputer was developed to evaluate rapidly the economics of producing either methane or methanol from wood. The program is based on economic evaluations reported in previous studies. Improved yields from the PDU studies were found to result in a reduction of about 9 cents/gal in methanol cost.

  14. Development of Agave as a dedicated biomass source: production of biofuels from whole plants

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mielenz, Jonathan R.; Rodriguez, Jr, Miguel; Thompson, Olivia A; Yang, Xiaohan; Yin, Hengfu

    2015-01-01

    Background: Agave species can grow well in semi-arid marginal agricultural lands around the world. Selected Agave species are used largely for alcoholic beverage production in Mexico. There are expanding research efforts to use the plentiful residues (bagasse) for ethanol production as the beverage manufacturing process only uses the juice from the central core of mature plants. Here we investigate the potential of over a dozen Agave species, including three from cold semi-arid regions of the United States, to produce biofuels using the whole plant. Results: Ethanol was readily produced by Saccharomyces cerevisiae from hydrolysate of ten whole Agaves with themore » use of a proper blend of biomass degrading enzymes that overcomes toxicity of most of the species tested. Unlike yeast fermentations, Clostridium beijerinckii produced butanol plus acetone from nine species tested. Butyric acid, a precursor of butanol, was also present due to incomplete conversion during the screening process. Since Agave contains high levels of free and poly-fructose which are readily destroyed by acidic pretreatment, a two step process was used developed to depolymerized poly-fructose while maintaining its fermentability. The hydrolysate from before and after dilute acid processing was used in C. beijerinckii acetone and butanol fermentations with selected Agave species. Conclusions: Results have shown Agave s potential to be a source of fermentable sugars beyond the existing beverage species to now include species previously unfermentable by yeast, including cold tolerant lines. This development may stimulate development of Agave as a dedicated feedstock for biofuels in semi-arid regions throughout the globe.« less

  15. Dust Bowl migration as an analog for possible global warming-induced migration from Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, M.H.; Longstreth, J.D.; Johnson, A.K.; Rosenberg, N.J.

    1994-06-01

    As a result of increases in CO{sub 2} and other radiatively important trace gases, scientists have predicted increases in mean worldwide temperatures of 2--5 degrees C over the next 50 to 100 years. Such temperature increases may result in climate modifications that would in turn be associated with increases in drought and desertification and could even change the patterns of the monsoons and tropical rains, which are important to agriculture throughout the world. They predicted that the rise in sea level caused by melting and thermal expansion of glaciers and polar icecaps could flood large population centers, destroying habitation and displacing populations. This will result in approximately 50 million ``environmental refugees`` worldwide, triple the number of today. The expected shifts in precipitation are also likely to result in (1) increased runoff contaminated with pesticides, salts, garbage, sewage, and eroded soil, and (2) drought also leading to increased soil erosion and salinization, as well as depletion of limited water resources. The total impact of global warming on agriculture and human habitation could considerably slow the economic development of some nations and would particularly affect agricultural production. Loss of homes, the inability to raise food, an increased prevalence of disease and worsened economic conditions may drive people to leave their homelands, seeking entry into countries which have more resources and greater resistance to the economic consequences of climatic change. This report looks at the possible environmental impacts and economic impacts of the greenhouse effect on Mexico while using the American Dust Bowl event as an analog.

  16. Municipal solid waste management in India: From waste disposal to recovery of resources?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Narayana, Tapan

    2009-03-15

    Unlike that of western countries, the solid waste of Asian cities is often comprised of 70-80% organic matter, dirt and dust. Composting is considered to be the best option to deal with the waste generated. Composting helps reduce the waste transported to and disposed of in landfills. During the course of the research, the author learned that several developing countries established large-scale composting plants that eventually failed for various reasons. The main flaw that led to the unsuccessful establishment of the plants was the lack of application of simple scientific methods to select the material to be composted. Landfills have also been widely unsuccessful in countries like India because the landfill sites have a very limited time frame of usage. The population of the developing countries is another factor that detrimentally impacts the function of landfill sites. As the population keeps increasing, the garbage quantity also increases, which, in turn, exhausts the landfill sites. Landfills are also becoming increasingly expensive because of the rising costs of construction and operation. Incineration, which can greatly reduce the amount of incoming municipal solid waste, is the second most common method for disposal in developed countries. However, incinerator ash may contain hazardous materials including heavy metals and organic compounds such as dioxins, etc. Recycling plays a large role in solid waste management, especially in cities in developing countries. None of the three methods mentioned here are free from problems. The aim of this study is thus to compare the three methods, keeping in mind the costs that would be incurred by the respective governments, and identify the most economical and best option possible to combat the waste disposal problem.

  17. NRC's 13th Annual Congress highlights the mainstream of recycling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, K.M.

    1994-12-01

    The theme of the National Recycling Coalition's (NRC, Washington, DC) recent 13th Annual Congress and Exposition in Portland, OR, was ''Jump into the Mainstream: Recycle,'' which is an action organizers of the show set out to prove is currently happening across this country. Indeed, this year's congress was designed to demonstrate how far recycling has jumped into the mainstream of American life, and show attendees what it will take to make recycling succeed in the future. Lending testament to recycling's increasing visibility, the most dominant topic at this year's show was the creation of national recycling policy. Through this agenda, and other programs that surfaced at the congress, NRC is hoping to move closer to its goal of making recycling as mainstream as taking out the garbage. NRC's board of directors unanimously voted to adopt a draft advocacy message that promotes recycling initiatives at the national level, but rejected a proposed demand-side initiative that would have established post-consumer-content recycling rates for certain materials, with product-specific, minimum-content standards as an alternative method of compliance. The initiative had called for glass, metal, paper, plastic, and wood used in primary and secondary packaging to achieve a 50% post-consumer recycling rate by the year 2000. As an alternative method of compliance, individual companies could meet the following post-consumer, minimum-content standards for products: glass, metal, paper, plastic, and wood packaging: 40% by 2000; newsprint and tissue paper: 50% by 2000; and printing and writing papers: 25% by 2000.

  18. A case study: Environmental benefit plan for Blydenburgh Landfill

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, J.M.; Druback, G.W.

    1995-12-31

    The Town of Islip, New York, encompasses 285 square kilometers (110 square miles) along the southern shore of Suffolk County, Long Island. The Town relied upon Blydenburgh Landfill for the disposal of its estimated 290 kilotonnes per year (320,000 tons per year) of municipal solid waste (MSW) without having to contract for off-Long Island hauling and disposal. In 1983, the Long Island Landfill Law was enacted and effectively banned landfilling of raw garbage on most of Long Island after December 18, 1990. The act precluded the economic development of new landfill capacity for the Town. Blydenburgh Landfill was projected to reach capacity in early 1987 and close. To conserve landfill capacity for residential use, the Town prohibited commercial haulers from the landfill in the fall of 1986. In response, the Mobro barge departed Long Island City on March 22, 1987 loaded with commercial MSW that was no longer accepted at the Blydenburgh site. Negative publicity surrounded the Mobro barge and the continuing need to provide for waste disposal. In response, the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC) and the Town`s Resource Recovery Agency entered into an Order on Consent on May 12, 1987. This allowed for continued operations and a vertical MSW {open_quotes}piggyback{close_quotes} expansion on top of a closed and capped portion of the existing 181,000 square meter (44.8 acre) landfill mound. In addition, the Order on Consent permitted construction of a separate 12,000 square meter (3.0 acre) ash residue vertical piggyback expansion adjacent to the MSW piggyback expansion. Both expansions were designed for and constructed on top of existing landfilled MSW.

  19. HIA, the next step: Defining models and roles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Putters, Kim . E-mail: k.putters@uvt.nl

    2005-10-15

    If HIA is to be an effective instrument for optimising health interests in the policy making process it has to recognise the different contests in which policy is made and the relevance of both technical rationality and political rationality. Policy making may adopt a rational perspective in which there is a systematic and orderly progression from problem formulation to solution or a network perspective in which there are multiple interdependencies, extensive negotiation and compromise, and the steps from problem to formulation are not followed sequentially or in any particular order. Policy problems may be simple with clear causal pathways and responsibilities or complex with unclear causal pathways and disputed responsibilities. Network analysis is required to show which stakeholders are involved, their support for health issues and the degree of consensus. From this analysis three models of HIA emerge. The first is the phases model which is fitted to simple problems and a rational perspective of policymaking. This model involves following structured steps. The second model is the rounds (Echternach) model that is fitted to complex problems and a network perspective of policymaking. This model is dynamic and concentrates on network solutions taking these steps in no particular order. The final model is the 'garbage can' model fitted to contexts which combine simple and complex problems. In this model HIA functions as a problem solver and signpost keeping all possible solutions and stakeholders in play and allowing solutions to emerge over time. HIA models should be the beginning rather than the conclusion of discussion the worlds of HIA and policymaking.

  20. Electrical efficiency in modern waste to energy plants -- The advanced solutions adopted in a new Italian plant (Milan)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lucchini, F.M.; Pezzella, B.

    1998-07-01

    The paper has the goal to give a general overview of the current approach for the design of modern Waste to Energy (WtE) plants. The thermal treatment of solid waste is an environmentally sound method to get rid of the garbage produced by everyone and to recover energy simultaneously. A typical waste to energy plant is divided in four segments: incineration/boiler, air pollution control, residues treatment and power generation. Still in the 80's a WtE plant was simply consisting of a these four segments without any particular effort in putting them together into a coordinated plant; therefore the results were very poor in term of overall plant performances even if the single segments were properly designed. This paper shows how this approach is changing and how the synergism between the segments allows to reach interesting performances in term of electric efficiency, always keeping in mind that power must be considered a by-product of the incinerator. Therefore all these efforts have to be done without affecting the burning capacity of the station. The new Milan WtE plant is taken as example throughout the paper. The first section of the paper tries to consider the Municipal Solid Waste as standard fuel; then focal point becomes the electrical efficiency of the plant. In the fourth section the flue gas cleaning system is approached, pointing out the gas quality at stack. Then in the fifth and sixth paragraphs all most important and innovative technical solutions of the Milan plant are shown with some details on water/steam cycle, giving also some availability results. Chapter seven shows some interesting key-figures, related to the combustion of 1,000 kg of MSW at 11 MJ/kg, with also some economical evaluations in term of investment cost per ton of waste per day.

  1. Berkeley Disk Resource Manager

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2004-02-27

    The Berkeley Disk Resource Manager (B-DRM) is a middleware component whose function is to provide dynamic space allocation and file management of a shared disk system on the Grid. It provides space allocation and dynamic information on storage availability for the planning and execution of Grid jobs. The B-DRM manages two types of resources: space and files. Vi1en managing space, the B-DRM allocates space to the requesting client based on a default space quota, Then managing files, the B-DRM allocates space for files, invokes file transfer services to move files into the space, pins files for a certain lifetime, releases files upon the client?s request, and uses file replacement policies to optimize the use of the shared space. The B-DRM is designed to provide effective sharing of files, by monitoring the activity of shared files, and making dynamic decisions on which files to replace when space is needed. In addition, the B-DRM performs automatic garbage collection of unused files when space is needed by removing selected files that were released by the client or whose lifetime has expired. The BDRM supports requests to get multiple files in a single call, manages a queue of the requested files, brings in as many files as the space quota permits, and continues to reuse the space when files are released to stream files to the client until the entire request is satisfied. Similarly, the B-DRM supports requests to put multiple files into its space, streaming files into the allocated space and reusing the space if necessary.

  2. Characterization of Aerosols Containing Zn, Pb, and Cl from an Industrial Region of Mexico City

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moffet, Ryan C.; Desyaterik, Yury; Hopkins, Rebecca J.; Tivanski, Alexei V.; Gilles, Marry K.; Wang, Yan A.; Shutthanandan, V.; Molina, Luisa T.; Abraham, Rodrigo G.; Johnson, Kirsten S.; Mugica, Violeta; Molina, Mario J.; Laskin, Alexander; Prather, Kimberly A.

    2008-10-01

    During the March, 2006 MILAGRO campaign, measurements in the Northern Mexico City Metropolitan Area revealed the frequent appearance of particles with a characteristically high content of internally mixed Zn, Pb, Cl, and P. A comprehensive study of the chemical and physical properties of these particles was performed using a complementary combination of aerosol measurement techniques. Individual particles were analyzed using Aerosol Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (ATOFMS) and Computer Controlled Scanning Electron Microscopy/Energy Dispersive X-Ray spectroscopy (CCSEM/EDX). Proton Induced X-Ray Emission (PIXE) analysis of bulk aerosol samples provided time-resolved mass concentrations of individual elements. The PIXE measurements indicated that Zn is more strongly correlated with Cl than with any other element and that Zn concentrations are higher than other non-ferrous transition metals. The Zn- and Pb - containing particles have both spherical and non-spherical morphologies. Many metal rich particles had needle-like structures and were found to be composed of ZnO and/or Zn(NO3)2?6H2O as indicated by scanning transmission x-ray microscopy/near edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS). The Zn and Pb rich particles were primarily in the submicron size range and internally mixed with elemental carbon. The unique chemical associations most closely match signatures acquired for garbage incineration. This unique combination of complementary analytical techniques has allowed for a comprehensive evaluation of Zn- and Pb- containing particles in a complex urban environment, highlighting unique characteristics that give powerful insight into their origin.

  3. Berkeley Disk Resource Manager

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2004-02-27

    The Berkeley Disk Resource Manager (B-DRM) is a middleware component whose function is to provide dynamic space allocation and file management of a shared disk system on the Grid. It provides space allocation and dynamic information on storage availability for the planning and execution of Grid jobs. The B-DRM manages two types of resources: space and files. Vi1en managing space, the B-DRM allocates space to the requesting client based on a default space quota, Thenmore » managing files, the B-DRM allocates space for files, invokes file transfer services to move files into the space, pins files for a certain lifetime, releases files upon the client’s request, and uses file replacement policies to optimize the use of the shared space. The B-DRM is designed to provide effective sharing of files, by monitoring the activity of shared files, and making dynamic decisions on which files to replace when space is needed. In addition, the B-DRM performs automatic garbage collection of unused files when space is needed by removing selected files that were released by the client or whose lifetime has expired. The BDRM supports requests to get multiple files in a single call, manages a queue of the requested files, brings in as many files as the space quota permits, and continues to reuse the space when files are released to stream files to the client until the entire request is satisfied. Similarly, the B-DRM supports requests to put multiple files into its space, streaming files into the allocated space and reusing the space if necessary.« less

  4. Studies of the combustion of coal/refuse derived fuels using thermogravimetric-Fourier transform infrared-mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Huagang; Li, Jigui; Lloyd, W.G.

    1995-11-01

    According to a report of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), `Characterization of Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) in the United States`, the total MSW produced in the U.S. increased from 179 million tons in 1988 to 195 million tons in 1990. The EPA predicted that the country would produce about 216 million tons of garbage in the year 2000. The amount of waste generated and the rapidly declining availability of sanitary landfills has forced most municipalities to evaluate alternative waste management technologies for reducing the volume of waste sent to landfills. The fraction of MSW that is processed by such technologies as separation and recycling, composting, and waste-to-energy was forecast to increase from a few percent today to 30-40% by the year 2000. Waste-to-energy conversion of MSW can appear to be attractive because of the energy recovered, the economic value of recycled materials, and the cost savings derived from reduced landfill usage. However, extra care needs to be taken in burning MSW or refuse-derived fuel (RDF) to optimize the operating conditions of a combustor so that the combustion takes place in an environmentally acceptable manner. For instance, polychlorinated dibenzodioxins (PCDDs) and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs) have been found in the precipitator fly ash and flue gas of some incinerator facilities in the United States and Europe. The amount of PCDDs and PCDFs occurs only in the parts-per-billion to parts-per-trillion range, but these chlorinated organics exhibit very high toxicity (LD{sub 50} < 10 {mu}g/Kg). The compound 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzodioxin has been found to be acnegenic, carcinogenic, and teratogenic. This has slowed or even stopped the construction and operation of waste-to-energy plants.

  5. 1994 Washington State directory of Biomass Energy Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deshaye, J.A.; Kerstetter, J.D.

    1994-03-01

    This is the fourth edition of the Washington Directory of Biomass Energy Facilities, the first edition was published in 1987. The purpose of this directory is to provide a listing of and basic information about known biomass producers and users within the state to help demonstrate the importance of biomass energy in fueling our state`s energy needs. In 1992 (latest statistical year), estimates show that the industrial sector in Washington consumed nearly 128 trillion Btu of electricity, nearly 49.5 trillion Btu of petroleum, over 82.2 trillion Btu of natural gas, and over 4.2 trillion Btu of coal. Facilities listed in this directory generated approximately 114 trillion Btu of biomass energy - 93 trillion were consumed from waste wood and spent chemicals. In the total industrial energy picture, wood residues and chemical cooking liquors placed second only to electricity. This directory is divided into four main sections biogas production, biomass combustion, ethanol production, and solid fuel processing facilities. Each section contains maps and tables summarizing the information for each type of biomass. Provided in the back of the directory for reference are a conversion table, a table of abbreviations, a glossary, and an index. Chapter 1 deals with biogas production from both landfills and sewage treatment plants in the state. Biogas produced from garbage and sewage can be scrubbed and used to generate electricity. At the present time, biogas collected at landfills is being flared on-site, however four landfills are investigating the feasibility of gas recovery for energy. Landfill biogas accounted for approximately 6 percent of the total biomass reported. Sewage treatment biogas accounted for 0.6 percent. Biogas generated from sewage treatment plants is primarily used for space and process heat, only one facility presently scrubs and sells methane. Together, landfill and sewage treatment plant biogas represented over 6.6 percent of the total biomass reported.

  6. HybridStore: A Cost-Efficient, High-Performance Storage System Combining SSDs and HDDs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Youngjae; Gupta, Aayush; Urgaonkar, Bhuvan; Piotr, Berman; Sivasubramaniam, Anand

    2011-01-01

    Unlike the use of DRAM for caching or buffering, certain idiosyncrasies of NAND Flash-based solid-state drives (SSDs) make their integration into existing systems non-trivial. Flash memory suffers from limits on its reliability, is an order of magnitude more expensive than the magnetic hard disk drives (HDDs), and can sometimes be as slow as the HDD (due to excessive garbage collection (GC) induced by high intensity of random writes). Given these trade-offs between HDDs and SSDs in terms of cost, performance, and lifetime, the current consensus among several storage experts is to view SSDs not as a replacement for HDD but rather as a complementary device within the high-performance storage hierarchy. We design and evaluate such a hybrid system called HybridStore to provide: (a) HybridPlan: improved capacity planning technique to administrators with the overall goal of operating within cost-budgets and (b) HybridDyn: improved performance/lifetime guarantees during episodes of deviations from expected workloads through two novel mechanisms: write-regulation and fragmentation busting. As an illustrative example of HybridStore s ef cacy, HybridPlan is able to nd the most cost-effective storage con guration for a large scale workload of Microsoft Research and suggest one MLC SSD with ten 7.2K RPM HDDs instead of fourteen 7.2K RPM HDDs only. HybridDyn is able to reduce the average response time for an enterprise scale random-write dominant workload by about 71% as compared to a HDD-based system.

  7. Combined Grinding and Drying of Biomass in One Operation Phase I

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sokhansanj, S.

    2008-06-26

    First American Scientific Corporation (FASC) has developed a unique and innovative grinder/dryer called KDS Micronex. The KS (Kinetic Disintegration System) combines two operations of grinding and drying into a single operation which reduces dependence on external heat input. The machine captures the heat of comminution and combines it will centrifugal forces to expedite moisture extraction from wet biomass. Because it uses mechanical forces rather than providing direct heat to perform the drying operation, it is a simpler machine and uses less energy than conventional grinding and drying operations which occur as two separate steps. The entire compact unit can be transported on a flatbed trailer to the site where biomass is available. Hence, the KDS Micronex is a technology that enables inexpensive pretreatment of waste materials and biomass. A well prepared biomass can be used as feed, fuel or fertilizer instead of being discarded. Electricity and chemical feedstock produced from such biomass would displace the use of fossil fuels and no net greenhouse gas emissions would result from such bio-based operations. Organic fertilizers resulting from the KS Micronex grinding/drying process will be pathogen-free unlike raw animal manures. The feasibility tests on KS during Phase I showed that a prototype machine can be developed, field tested and the technology demonstrated for commercial applications. The present KDS machine can remove up to 400 kg/h of water from a wet feed material. Since biomass processors demand a finished product that is only 10% moist and most raw materials like corn stover, bagasse, layer manure, cow dung, and waste wood have moisture contents of the order of 50%, this water removal rate translates to a production rate of roughly half a ton per hour. this is too small for most processors who are unwilling to acquire multiple machines because of the added complexity to the feed and product removal systems. The economics suffer due to small production rates, because the labor costs are a much larger fraction of the production cost. The goal for further research and development work is to scale up the KDS technology incorporating findings from Phase I into a machine that has superior performance characteristics.

  8. Biofuel Production Initiative at Claflin University Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chowdhury, Kamal

    2011-07-20

    For US transportation fuel independence or reduced dependence on foreign oil, the Federal Government has mandated that the country produce 36 billion gallons (bg) of renewable transportation fuel per year for its transportation fuel supply by 2022. This can be achieved only if development of efficient technology for second generation biofuel from ligno-cellulosic sources is feasible. To be successful in this area, development of a widely available, renewable, cost-effective ligno-cellulosic biomass feedstock that can be easily and efficiently converted biochemically by bacteria or other fast-growing organisms is required. Moreover, if the biofuel type is butanol, then the existing infrastructure to deliver fuel to the customer can be used without additional costs and retrofits. The Claflin Biofuel Initiative project is focused on helping the US meet the above-mentioned targets. With support from this grant, Claflin University (CU) scientists have created over 50 new strains of microorganisms that are producing butanol from complex carbohydrates and cellulosic compounds. Laboratory analysis shows that a number of these strains are producing higher percentages of butanol than other methods currently in use. All of these recombinant bacterial strains are producing relatively high concentrations of acetone and numerous other byproducts as well. Therefore, we are carrying out intense mutations in the selected strains to reduce undesirable byproducts and increase the desired butanol production to further maximize the yield of butanol. We are testing the proof of concept of producing pre-industrial large scale biobutanol production by utilizing modifications of currently commercially available fermentation technology and instrumentation. We have already developed an initial process flow diagram (PFD) and selected a site for a biobutanol pilot scale facility in Orangeburg, SC. With the recent success in engineering new strains of various biofuel producing bacteria at CU, it will soon be possible to provide other technical information for the development of process flow diagrams (PFD’s) and piping and instrumentation diagrams (P&ID’s). This information can be used for the equipment layout and general arrangement drawings for the proposed process and eventual plant. An efficient bio-butanol pilot plant to convert ligno-cellulosic biomass feedstock from bagasse and wood chips will create significant number of green jobs for the Orangeburg, SC community that will be environmentally-friendly and generate much-needed income for farmers in the area.

  9. Ethnic differences in ecological concerns: Spanish-speaking Hispanics are more concerned than others

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burger, Joanna . E-mail: burger@biology.rutgers.edu; Greenberg, Michael

    2006-09-15

    We postulated that environmental concern encompasses a wide range of different issues, often lumping pollution with habitat loss (or land use) and ecological resources (fish and wildlife). In this paper, we compare perceptions about a range of environmental and ecological resource issues, and explore ethnic/racial differences. We surveyed 1513 residents of New Jersey about 'environmental concerns', using both general environmental questions (two questions: How serious are environmental problems in New Jersey? Are you concerned about the loss of open space?) and ecological resource questions (12 questions: e.g., how important is planting trees in your neighborhood, how concerned are you about loss of breeding and feeding habitat for fish and birds?) in New Jersey. Not all concerns were rated equally. For the ecological questions, there were no ethnic differences in concerns over preserving areas around water supplies, loss of places to hunt and fish, and loss of places for quiet walks and cycling, but there were for the other 9 ecological concerns. For eight of these nine concerns, Spanish-speaking Hispanics were more concerned than others (including English-speaking Hispanics). We divided the ecological resources into three categories: ecological services (clean water and safety), ecological resources (fish and wildlife), and recreational services. The strongest correlates of people's association with enlarging and enhancing recreational services were Spanish-speaking Hispanics, who are supportive of regulations and believe local government is not doing enough for environmental problems. People concerned about the loss of ecological resources and open space believe the federal government and the state are not doing enough for the environment, were non-Hispanic White, want continued environmental regulations, were longer-term residents, were high school graduates, and were older (45-54 years). People interested in ecological services were college-educated, non-White, not rich, females that did not trust DEP's environmental actions, and thought the state was not doing enough environmentally. There was a high correlation between general environmental concern and the ecological resource variables for the population overall, and for each ethnic group. Overall, only 39% of the subjects were very concerned about the seriousness of environmental problems in New Jersey, yet from 36% to 81% of the people were very concerned about 11 of 12 ecological issues. This indicates that people respond different to the term 'environmental problems' compared to specific 'ecological resource' issues. The greatest concern (81%) was for preserving areas around water supplies and cleaning up garbage in the parks, and the least concern was for the loss of places to hunt and fish (26%). Our results indicate that people distinguish between general environmental concern and ecological concerns, as well as distinguishing ecological services from ecological resources.

  10. Application for Permit to Operate a Class II Solid Waste Disposal Site at the Nevada Test Site - U10c Disposal Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Programs

    2010-03-31

    The Nevada Test Site (NTS) is located approximately 105 km (65 mi) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) is the federal lands management authority for the NTS and National Security Technologies LLC (NSTec) is the Management and Operations contractor. Access on and off the NTS is tightly controlled, restricted, and guarded on a 24-hour basis. The NTS is posted with signs along its entire perimeter. NSTec is the operator of all solid waste disposal sites on the NTS. The site will be used for the disposal of refuse, rubbish, garbage, sewage sludge, pathological waste, Asbestos-Containing Material (ACM), industrial solid waste, hydrocarbon-burdened soil, hydrocarbon-burdened demolition and construction waste, and other inert waste (hereafter called permissible waste). Waste containing free liquids or regulated under Subtitle C of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) will not be accepted for disposal at the site. Waste regulated under the Toxic Substance Control Act (TSCA), excluding Polychlorinated Biphenyl [PCB], Bulk Product Waste (see Section 6.2.5) and ACM (see Section 6.2.2.2) will not be accepted for disposal at the site. The disposal site will be used as the sole depository of permissible waste which is: (1) Generated by entities covered under the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Hazardous Waste Generator Identification Number for the NTS; (2) Generated at sites identified in the Federal Facilities Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO); (3) Sensitive records and media, including documents, vugraphs, computer disks, typewriter ribbons, magnetic tapes, etc., generated by NNSA/NSO or its contractors; (4) ACM generated by NNSA/NSO or its contractors according to Section 6.2.2.2, as necessary; (5) Hydrocarbon-burdened soil and solid waste from areas covered under the EPA Hazardous Waste Generator Identification Number for the NTS; (6) Other waste on a case-by-case concurrence by NDEP/BFF. The generator of permissible waste is responsible for preparing documentation related to waste acceptance criteria, waste characterization, and load verification. Waste and Water (WW) personnel are responsible for operating the disposal site and reviewing documentation to determine if the waste is acceptable.

  11. Determination of saccharides and ethanol from biomass conversion using Raman spectroscopy: Effects of pretreatment and enzyme composition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shih, Chien-Ju

    2010-05-16

    This dissertation focuses on the development of facile and rapid quantitative Raman spectroscopy measurements for the determination of conversion products in producing bioethanol from corn stover. Raman spectroscopy was chosen to determine glucose, xylose and ethanol in complex hydrolysis and fermentation matrices. Chapter 1 describes the motives and main goals of this work, and includes an introduction to biomass, commonly used pretreatment methods, hydrolysis and fermentation reactions. The principles of Raman spectroscopy, its advantages and applications related to biomass analysis are also illustrated. Chapter 2 and 3 comprise two published or submitted manuscripts, and the thesis concludes with an appendix. In Chapter 2, a Raman spectroscopic protocol is described to study the efficiency of enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose by measuring the main product in hydrolysate, glucose. Two commonly utilized pretreatment methods were investigated in order to understand their effect on glucose measurements by Raman spectroscopy. Second, a similar method was set up to determine the concentration of ethanol in fermentation broth. Both of these measurements are challenged by the presence of complex matrices. In Chapter 3, a quantitative comparison of pretreatment protocols and the effect of enzyme composition are studied using systematic methods. A multipeak fitting algorithm was developed to analyze spectra of hydrolysate containing two analytes: glucose and xylose. Chapter 4 concludes with a future perspective of this research area. An appendix describes a convenient, rapid spectrophotometric method developed to measure cadmium in water. This method requires relatively low cost instrumentation and can be used in microgravity, such as space shuttles or the International Space Station. This work was performed under the supervision of Professor Marc Porter while at Iowa State University. Research related to producing biofuel from bio-renewable resources, especially bioethanol from biomass, has grown significantly in the past decade due to the high demand and rising costs of fossil fuels. More than 3 percent of the energy consumption in the U.S. is derived from renewable biomass, mostly through industrial heat and steam production by the pulp and paper industry, and electricity generation from municipal solid waste (MSW) and forest industry residues. The utilization of food-based biomass to make fuels has been widely criticized because it may increase food shortages throughout the world and raise the cost of food. Thus, nonfood-based and plentiful lignocellulosic feedstocks, such as corn stover, perennial grass, bagasse, sorghum, wheat/rice straw, herbaceous and woody crops, have great potential to be new bio-renewable sources for energy production. Given that many varieties of biomass are available, there is need for a rapid, simple, high-throughput method to screen the conversion of many plant varieties. The most suitable species for each geographic region must be determined, as well as the optimal stage of harvest, impacts of environmental conditions (temperature, soil, pH, etc.). Various genetically modified plants should be studied in order to establish the desired biomass in bioethanol production. The main screening challenge, however, is the complexity of plant cell wall structures that make reliable and sensitive analysis difficult. To date, one of the most popular methods to produce lignocellulosic ethanol is to perform enzymatic hydrolysis followed by fermentation of the hydrolysate with yeast. There are several vital needs related to the field of chemistry that have been suggested as primary research foci needed to effectively improve lignocellulosic ethanol production. These topics include overcoming the recalcitrance of cellulosic biomass, the pervasiveness of pretreatment, advanced biological processing and better feedstocks. In this thesis, a novel approach using Raman spectroscopy has been developed to address important issues related to bioethanol generation, which will aid the research aimed to solve the topics mentioned above.

  12. GTI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GTI

    2003-07-01

    Biomass represents a large potential feedstock resource for environmentally clean processes that produce power or chemicals. It lends itself to both biological and thermal conversion processes and both options are currently being explored. Hydrogen can be produced in a variety of ways. The majority of the hydrogen produced in this country is produced through natural gas reforming and is used as chemical feedstock in refinery operations. In this report we will examine the production of hydrogen by gasification of biomass. Biomass is defined as organic matter that is available on a renewable basis through natural processes or as a by-product of processes that use renewable resources. The majority of biomass is used in combustion processes, in mills that use the renewable resources, to produce electricity for end-use product generation. This report will explore the use of hydrogen as a fuel derived from gasification of three candidate biomass feedstocks: bagasse, switchgrass, and a nutshell mix that consists of 40% almond nutshell, 40% almond prunings, and 20% walnut shell. In this report, an assessment of the technical and economic potential of producing hydrogen from biomass gasification is analyzed. The resource base was assessed to determine a process scale from feedstock costs and availability. Solids handling systems were researched. A GTI proprietary gasifier model was used in combination with a Hysys. design and simulation program to determine the amount of hydrogen that can be produced from each candidate biomass feed. Cost estimations were developed and government programs and incentives were analyzed. Finally, the barriers to the production and commercialization of hydrogen from biomass were determined. The end-use of the hydrogen produced from this system is small PEM fuel cells for automobiles. Pyrolysis of biomass was also considered. Pyrolysis is a reaction in which biomass or coal is partially vaporized by heating. Gasification is a more general term, and includes heating as well as the injection of other ''ingredients'' such as oxygen and water. Pyrolysis alone is a useful first step in creating vapors from coal or biomass that can then be processed in subsequent steps to make liquid fuels. Such products are not the objective of this project. Therefore pyrolysis was not included in the process design or in the economic analysis. High-pressure, fluidized bed gasification is best known to GTI through 30 years of experience. Entrained flow, in contrast to fluidized bed, is a gasification technology applied at much larger unit sizes than employed here. Coal gasification and residual oil gasifiers in refineries are the places where such designs have found application, at sizes on the order of 5 to 10 times larger than what has been determined for this study. Atmospheric pressure gasification is also not discussed. Atmospheric gasification has been the choice of all power system pilot plants built for biomass to date, except for the Varnamo plant in Sweden, which used the Ahlstrom (now Foster Wheeler) pressurized gasifier. However, for fuel production, the disadvantage of the large volumetric flows at low pressure leads to the pressurized gasifier being more economical.

  13. Techno Economic Analysis of Hydrogen Production by gasification of biomass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Francis Lau

    2002-12-01

    Biomass represents a large potential feedstock resource for environmentally clean processes that produce power or chemicals. It lends itself to both biological and thermal conversion processes and both options are currently being explored. Hydrogen can be produced in a variety of ways. The majority of the hydrogen produced in this country is produced through natural gas reforming and is used as chemical feedstock in refinery operations. In this report we will examine the production of hydrogen by gasification of biomass. Biomass is defined as organic matter that is available on a renewable basis through natural processes or as a by-product of processes that use renewable resources. The majority of biomass is used in combustion processes, in mills that use the renewable resources, to produce electricity for end-use product generation. This report will explore the use of hydrogen as a fuel derived from gasification of three candidate biomass feedstocks: bagasse, switchgrass, and a nutshell mix that consists of 40% almond nutshell, 40% almond prunings, and 20% walnut shell. In this report, an assessment of the technical and economic potential of producing hydrogen from biomass gasification is analyzed. The resource base was assessed to determine a process scale from feedstock costs and availability. Solids handling systems were researched. A GTI proprietary gasifier model was used in combination with a Hysys(reg. sign) design and simulation program to determine the amount of hydrogen that can be produced from each candidate biomass feed. Cost estimations were developed and government programs and incentives were analyzed. Finally, the barriers to the production and commercialization of hydrogen from biomass were determined. The end-use of the hydrogen produced from this system is small PEM fuel cells for automobiles. Pyrolysis of biomass was also considered. Pyrolysis is a reaction in which biomass or coal is partially vaporized by heating. Gasification is a more general term, and includes heating as well as the injection of other ''ingredients'' such as oxygen and water. Pyrolysis alone is a useful first step in creating vapors from coal or biomass that can then be processed in subsequent steps to make liquid fuels. Such products are not the objective of this project. Therefore pyrolysis was not included in the process design or in the economic analysis. High-pressure, fluidized bed gasification is best known to GTI through 30 years of experience. Entrained flow, in contrast to fluidized bed, is a gasification technology applied at much larger unit sizes than employed here. Coal gasification and residual oil gasifiers in refineries are the places where such designs have found application, at sizes on the order of 5 to 10 times larger than what has been determined for this study. Atmospheric pressure gasification is also not discussed. Atmospheric gasification has been the choice of all power system pilot plants built for biomass to date, except for the Varnamo plant in Sweden, which used the Ahlstrom (now Foster Wheeler) pressurized gasifier. However, for fuel production, the disadvantage of the large volumetric flows at low pressure leads to the pressurized gasifier being more economical.

  14. Active Flash: Performance-Energy Tradeoffs for Out-of-Core Processing on Non-Volatile Memory Devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boboila, Simona; Kim, Youngjae; Vazhkudai, Sudharshan S; Desnoyers, Peter; Shipman, Galen M

    2012-01-01

    In this abstract, we study the performance and energy tradeoffs involved in migrating data analysis into the flash device, a process we refer to as Active Flash. The Active Flash paradigm is similar to 'active disks', which has received considerable attention. Active Flash allows us to move processing closer to data, thereby minimizing data movement costs and reducing power consumption. It enables true out-of-core computation. The conventional definition of out-of-core solvers refers to an approach to process data that is too large to fit in the main memory and, consequently, requires access to disk. However, in Active Flash, processing outside the host CPU literally frees the core and achieves real 'out-of-core' analysis. Moving analysis to data has long been desirable, not just at this level, but at all levels of the system hierarchy. However, this requires a detailed study on the tradeoffs involved in achieving analysis turnaround under an acceptable energy envelope. To this end, we first need to evaluate if there is enough computing power on the flash device to warrant such an exploration. Flash processors require decent computing power to run the internal logic pertaining to the Flash Translation Layer (FTL), which is responsible for operations such as address translation, garbage collection (GC) and wear-leveling. Modern SSDs are composed of multiple packages and several flash chips within a package. The packages are connected using multiple I/O channels to offer high I/O bandwidth. SSD computing power is also expected to be high enough to exploit such inherent internal parallelism within the drive to increase the bandwidth and to handle fast I/O requests. More recently, SSD devices are being equipped with powerful processing units and are even embedded with multicore CPUs (e.g. ARM Cortex-A9 embedded processor is advertised to reach 2GHz frequency and deliver 5000 DMIPS; OCZ RevoDrive X2 SSD has 4 SandForce controllers, each with 780MHz max frequency Tensilica core). Efforts that take advantage of the available computing cycles on the processors on SSDs to run auxiliary tasks other than actual I/O requests are beginning to emerge. Kim et al. investigate database scan operations in the context of processing on the SSDs, and propose dedicated hardware logic to speed up scans. Also, cluster architectures have been explored, which consist of low-power embedded CPUs coupled with small local flash to achieve fast, parallel access to data. Processor utilization on SSD is highly dependent on workloads and, therefore, they can be idle during periods with no I/O accesses. We propose to use the available processing capability on the SSD to run tasks that can be offloaded from the host. This paper makes the following contributions: (1) We have investigated Active Flash and its potential to optimize the total energy cost, including power consumption on the host and the flash device; (2) We have developed analytical models to analyze the performance-energy tradeoffs for Active Flash, by treating the SSD as a blackbox, this is particularly valuable due to the proprietary nature of the SSD internal hardware; and (3) We have enhanced a well-known SSD simulator (from MSR) to implement 'on-the-fly' data compression using Active Flash. Our results provide a window into striking a balance between energy consumption and application performance.

  15. Final Technical Report: Hawaii Hydrogen Center for Development and Deployment of Distributed Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rocheleau, Richard E.

    2008-09-30

    Hydrogen power park experiments in Hawai‘i produced real-world data on the performance of commercialized electrochemical components and power systems integrating renewable and hydrogen technologies. By analyzing the different losses associated with the various equipment items involved, this work identifies the different improvements necessary to increase the viability of these technologies for commercial deployment. The stand-alone power system installed at Kahua Ranch on the Big Island of Hawaii required the development of the necessary tools to connect, manage and monitor such a system. It also helped the electrolyzer supplier to adapt its unit to the stand-alone power system application. Hydrogen fuel purity assessments conducted at the Hawai‘i Natural Energy Institute (HNEI) fuel cell test facility yielded additional knowledge regarding fuel cell performance degradation due to exposure to several different fuel contaminants. In addition, a novel fitting strategy was developed to permit accurate separation of the degradation of fuel cell performance due to fuel impurities from other losses. A specific standard MEA and a standard flow field were selected for use in future small-scale fuel cell experiments. Renewable hydrogen production research was conducted using photoelectrochemical (PEC) devices, hydrogen production from biomass, and biohydrogen analysis. PEC device activities explored novel configurations of ‘traditional’ photovoltaic materials for application in high-efficiency photoelectrolysis for solar hydrogen production. The model systems investigated involved combinations of copper-indium-gallium-diselenide (CIGS) and hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H). A key result of this work was the establishment of a robust “three-stage” fabrication process at HNEI for high-efficiency CIGS thin film solar cells. The other key accomplishment was the development of models, designs and prototypes of novel ‘four-terminal’ devices integrating high-efficiency CIGS and a-Si:H with operating features compatible with high-efficiency photoelectrochemical (PEC) water-splitting. The objective of one activity under the hydrogen production from biomass task was to conduct parametric testing of the Pearson gasifier and to determine the effects of gasifier operating conditions on the gas yields and quality. The hydrogen yield from this gasifier was evaluated in a parametric test series over a range of residence times from 0.8 to 2.2 seconds. H2 concentrations as high as 55% (volume) were measured in the product gas at the longer residence times and this corresponds to a hydrogen yield of 90 kg per tonne of bagasse without gas upgrading. The objective of another activity was to develop hot gas clean-up capabilities for the HNEI gasifier test facility to support hydrogen-from-biomass research. The product gas stream at the outlet of the hot gas filter was characterized for concentrations of permanent gas species and contaminants. Biomass feedstock processing activity included a preliminary investigation into methods for processing sugar cane trash at the Puunene Sugar Factory on the island of Maui, Hawaii. The objective of the investigation was to explore treatment methods that would enable the successful use of cane trash as fuel for the production of hydrogen via gasification. Analyses were completed for the technical and economic feasibility of producing biofuel from photosynthetic marine microbes on a commercial scale. Results included estimates for total costs, energy efficiency, and return on investment. The biohydrogen team undertook a comprehensive review of the field and came to what is considered a realistic conclusion. To summarize, continued research is recommended in the fundamentals of the science related to genetic engineering and specific topics to cover knowledge gaps. In the meantime, the team also advocates continued development of related processes which can be linked to pollution control and other real world applications. The extra revenues hydrogen can provide to these multi-product systems can improve profitability. The fact of the matter, though, is that the focused commercialization of hydrogen from biological processes awaits some necessary scientific breakthroughs and much higher conventional energy prices.