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  1. ARM - AMIE Gan Island - Data Plots

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Gan Related Links amie.png 34h AMIE Home cindy.png 50h CINDY2011 dynamo.png 34h DYNAMO ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Outreach News & Press Blog Backgrounder (PDF, 1.2MB) Education Flyer (PDF, 2.0MB) Images ARM flickr site Official AMIE Logo AMIE Gear Experiment Planning Steering Committee AMIE-MANUS Proposal Abstract AMIE-GAN Proposal Abstract Meetings Cloud Life Cycle Working Group Deployment Operations Science Plan - TWP Manus Site (PDF, 2.1 MB) Science Plan - Gan Island Site (PDF, 2.0

  2. Browse A to Z | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    A to Z Browse A to Z Browse OLWD services alphabetically Learning & Workforce Development Browse A to Z

  3. ARM - Field Campaign - AMIE-Gan Ancillary Disdrometer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govCampaignsAMIE-Gan Ancillary Disdrometer Campaign Links Field Campaign Report ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Related Campaigns ARM MJO Investigation Experiment on Gan Island 2011.10.01, Long, AMF Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : AMIE-Gan Ancillary Disdrometer 2012.01.01 - 2012.02.10 Lead Scientist : Mariko Oue For data sets, see below. Abstract As part of the AMIE-Gan campaign, an ancillary disdrometer for comparison

  4. ARM - News from the Gan Island Deployment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    News from the Gan Island Deployment Related Links amie.png 34h AMIE Home cindy.png 50h CINDY2011 dynamo.png 34h DYNAMO ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Outreach News & Press Blog Backgrounder (PDF, 1.2MB) Education Flyer (PDF, 2.0MB) Images ARM flickr site Official AMIE Logo AMIE Gear Experiment Planning Steering Committee AMIE-MANUS Proposal Abstract AMIE-GAN Proposal Abstract Meetings Cloud Life Cycle Working Group Deployment Operations Science Plan - TWP Manus Site (PDF, 2.1 MB) Science

  5. Browse by Role | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    by Role Browse by Role OLWD_CategoryIcon_Role_500x332.png Role Browse by Role

  6. DOE Research and Development Accomplishments Database Browse

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Database Browse Sorted by: Most Recently Added Sort List By: -------------------- Most Recently Added Title Author Publication Date

  7. ARM - VAP Product - visstpx04m1rv3minnis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    rv3minnis Documentation visst : XDC documentation Data Management Facility Plots (Quick Looks) ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send VAP Output : VISSTPX04M1RV3MINNIS VISST-derived pixel-level products from satellite MTSAT, version 3 Active Dates 2007.10.01 - 2007.12.31

  8. ARM - VAP Product - visstpx04m1rv4minnis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    rv4minnis Documentation visst : XDC documentation Data Management Facility Plots (Quick Looks) ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send VAP Output : VISSTPX04M1RV4MINNIS VISST-derived pixel-level products from satellite MTSAT, version 4 Active Dates 2008.01.01 - 2008.04.30

  9. ARM - VAP Product - visstpx08m1rv4minnis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8m1rv4minnis Documentation visst : XDC documentation Data Management Facility Plots (Quick Looks) ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send VAP Output : VISSTPX08M1RV4MINNIS VISST-derived pixel-level products from satellite MTSAT, version 4 Active Dates 2008.05.01 - 2008.12.31 Originating VAP Process Minnis Cloud Products Using Visst Algorithm : VISST Measurements The measurements below provided by this

  10. ARM - VAP Product - visstpx04m1rv1minnis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    rv1minnis Documentation visst : XDC documentation Data Management Facility Plots (Quick Looks) ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send VAP Output : VISSTPX04M1RV1MINNIS VISST-derived pixel-level products from satellite MTSAT, version 1 Active Dates 2006.01.01 - 2006.02.28 Originating VAP Process Minnis Cloud Products Using Visst Algorithm : VISST Measurements The measurements below provided by this product

  11. Browse Designations - DOE Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Browse Designations Current By Functional Area By Position Designations Assignments Rescinded by Diane Johnson More filters Less filters Current search Δ Hide filters ∇ Show filters (0) [X] Remove all Issue Date Start date End date 4215e3a365085280c76e65d2bb255c3a

  12. Browse Success Stories - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Stories » All Site Map Printable Version Share this resource About Search Categories (15) Advanced Materials Biomass and Biofuels Building Energy Efficiency Electricity Transmission Energy Analysis Energy Storage Geothermal Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Hydropower, Wave and Tidal Industrial Technologies Solar Photovoltaic Solar Thermal Startup America Vehicles and Fuels Wind Energy Partners (27) Visual Patent Search Success Stories Graphic of a full-grown tree with many leaves. Browse Success Stories

  13. Browsing a wealth of millimeter-wavelength doppler spectra data...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    doppler spectra data Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Browsing a wealth of millimeter-wavelength doppler spectra data The ARM Climate Research Facility ...

  14. M 1 Partners | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Partners Jump to: navigation, search Name: M-1 Partners Place: New York Product: M-1 Partners is a joint venture between Peter Marshall and Robert Ott with the objective of...

  15. Browse Draft Directives - DOE Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Browse Draft Directives Current Draft Archives by Website Administrator More filters Less filters Directive Type Order Guide Manual Policy Notice Cancellation Notice HQ Order Sec of Energy Notice Justification Memorandum Certification Memo 0 Series Series All 0000 Subject Classification 100 Leadership/Management Planning 200 Information and Analysis 300 Human Resources 400 Work Processes 500 Business and Support Services 1100 Org. Authorities, Functions and Internal Relationships 1200 External

  16. Observation of 690 MV m^-1 Electron Accelerating Gradient with...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Observation of 690 MV m-1 Electron Accelerating Gradient with a Laser-Driven Dielectric Microstructure Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Observation of 690 MV m-1...

  17. GaN: Defect and Device Issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pearton, S.J.; Ren, F.; Shul, R.J.; Zolper, J.C.

    1998-11-09

    The role of extended and point defects, and key impurities such as C, O and H, on the electrical and optical properties of GaN is reviewed. Recent progress in the development of high reliability contacts, thermal processing, dry and wet etching techniques, implantation doping and isolation and gate insulator technology is detailed. Finally, the performance of GaN-based electronic and photonic devices such as field effect transistors, UV detectors, laser diodes and light-emitting diodes is covered, along with the influence of process-induced or grown-in defects and impurities on the device physics.

  18. MultiFacet: A Faceted Interface for Browsing Large Multimedia Collections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henry, Michael J.; Hampton, Shawn D.; Endert, Alexander; Roberts, Ian E.; Payne, Deborah A.

    2013-10-31

    Faceted browsing is a common technique for exploring collections where the data can be grouped into a number of pre-defined categories, most often generated from textual metadata. Historically, faceted browsing has been applied to a single data type such as text or image data. However, typical collections contain multiple data types, such as information from web pages that contain text, images, and video. Additionally, when browsing a collection of images and video, facets are often created based on the metadata which may be incomplete, inaccurate, or missing altogether instead of the actual visual content contained within those images and video. In this work we address these limitations by presenting MultiFacet, a faceted browsing interface that supports multiple data types. MultiFacet constructs facets for images and video in a collection from the visual content using computer vision techniques. These visual facets can then be browsed in conjunction with text facets within a single interface to reveal relationships and phenomena within multimedia collections. Additionally, we present a use case based on real-world data, demonstrating the utility of this approach towards browsing a large multimedia data collection.

  19. ARM MJO Investigation Experiment on Gan Island (AMIE-Gan) Science Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Long, CL; Del Genio, A; Deng, M; Fu, X; Gustafson, W; Houze, R; Jakob, C; Jensen, M; Johnson, R; Liu, X; Luke, E; May, P; McFarlane, S; Minnis, P; Schumacher, C; Vogelmann, A; Wang, Y; Webster, P; Xie, S; Zhang, C

    2011-04-11

    The overarching campaign, which includes the ARM Mobile Facility 2 (AMF2) deployment in conjunction with the Dynamics of the Madden-Julian Oscillation (DYNAMO) and the Cooperative Indian Ocean experiment on intraseasonal variability in the Year 2011 (CINDY2011) campaigns, is designed to test several current hypotheses regarding the mechanisms responsible for Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) initiation and propagation in the Indian Ocean area. The synergy between the proposed AMF2 deployment with DYNAMO/CINDY2011, and the corresponding funded experiment on Manus, combine for an overarching ARM MJO Investigation Experiment (AMIE) with two components: AMF2 on Gan Island in the Indian Ocean (AMIE-Gan), where the MJO initiates and starts its eastward propagation; and the ARM Manus site (AMIE-Manus), which is in the general area where the MJO usually starts to weaken in climate models. AMIE-Gan will provide measurements of particular interest to Atmospheric System Research (ASR) researchers relevant to improving the representation of MJO initiation in climate models. The framework of DYNAMO/CINDY2011 includes two proposed island-based sites and two ship-based locations forming a square pattern with sonde profiles and scanning precipitation and cloud radars at both island and ship sites. These data will be used to produce a Variational Analysis data set coinciding with the one produced for AMIE-Manus. The synergy between AMIE-Manus and AMIE-Gan will allow studies of the initiation, propagation, and evolution of the convective cloud population within the framework of the MJO. As with AMIE-Manus, AMIE-Gan/DYNAMO also includes a significant modeling component geared toward improving the representation of MJO initiation and propagation in climate and forecast models. This campaign involves the deployment of the second, marine-capable, AMF; all of the included measurement systems; and especially the scanning and vertically pointing radars. The campaign will include sonde

  20. Ge doped GaN with controllable high carrier concentration for...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Ge doped GaN with controllable high carrier concentration for plasmonic applications Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Ge doped GaN with controllable high carrier...

  1. High Voltage GaN Schottky Rectifiers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CAO,X.A.; CHO,H.; CHU,S.N.G.; CHUO,C.-C.; CHYI,J.-I.; DANG,G.T.; HAN,JUNG; LEE,C.-M.; PEARTON,S.J.; REN,F.; WILSON,R.G.; ZHANG,A.P.

    1999-10-25

    Mesa and planar GaN Schottky diode rectifiers with reverse breakdown voltages (V{sub RB}) up to 550V and >2000V, respectively, have been fabricated. The on-state resistance, R{sub ON}, was 6m{Omega}{center_dot} cm{sup 2} and 0.8{Omega}cm{sup 2}, respectively, producing figure-of-merit values for (V{sub RB}){sup 2}/R{sub ON} in the range 5-48 MW{center_dot}cm{sup -2}. At low biases the reverse leakage current was proportional to the size of the rectifying contact perimeter, while at high biases the current was proportional to the area of this contact. These results suggest that at low reverse biases, the leakage is dominated by the surface component, while at higher biases the bulk component dominates. On-state voltages were 3.5V for the 550V diodes and {ge}15 for the 2kV diodes. Reverse recovery times were <0.2{micro}sec for devices switched from a forward current density of {approx}500A{center_dot}cm{sup -2} to a reverse bias of 100V.

  2. Conductivity based on selective etch for GaN devices and applications thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhang, Yu; Sun, Qian; Han, Jung

    2015-12-08

    This invention relates to methods of generating NP gallium nitride (GaN) across large areas (>1 cm.sup.2) with controlled pore diameters, pore density, and porosity. Also disclosed are methods of generating novel optoelectronic devices based on porous GaN. Additionally a layer transfer scheme to separate and create free-standing crystalline GaN thin layers is disclosed that enables a new device manufacturing paradigm involving substrate recycling. Other disclosed embodiments of this invention relate to fabrication of GaN based nanocrystals and the use of NP GaN electrodes for electrolysis, water splitting, or photosynthetic process applications.

  3. Highly transparent ammonothermal bulk GaN substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, WK; Ehrentraut, D; Downey, BC; Kamber, DS; Pakalapati, RT; Do Yoo, H; D'Evelyn, MP

    2014-10-01

    A novel apparatus has been employed to grow ammonothermal (0001) gallium nitride (GaN) with diameters up to 2 in The crystals have been characterized by x-ray diffraction rocking-curve (XRC) analysis, optical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), cathodoluminescence (CL), and optical spectroscopy. High crystallinity GaN with FWHM values about 20-50 arcsec and dislocation densities below 1 x 10(5) cm(-2) have been obtained. High optical transmission was achieved with an optical absorption coefficient below 1 cm(-1) at a wavelength of 450 nm. (C) 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Ferromagnetism in undoped One-dimensional GaN Nanowires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeganathan, K. E-mail: jagan@physics.bdu.ac.in; Purushothaman, V.; Debnath, R.; Arumugam, S.

    2014-05-15

    We report an intrinsic ferromagnetism in vertical aligned GaN nanowires (NW) fabricated by molecular beam epitaxy without any external catalyst. The magnetization saturates at ?0.75 emu/gm with the applied field of 3000 Oe for the NWs grown under the low-Gallium flux of 2.4 10{sup ?8} mbar. Despite a drop in saturation magnetization, narrow hysteresis loop remains intact regardless of Gallium flux. Magnetization in vertical standing GaN NWs is consistent with the spectral analysis of low-temperature photoluminescence pertaining to Ga-vacancies associated structural defects at the nanoscale.

  5. Properties of H, O and C in GaN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pearton, S.J.; Abernathy, C.R.; Lee, J.W.

    1996-04-01

    The electrical properties of the light ion impurities H, O and C in GaN have been examined in both as-grown and implanted material. H is found to efficiently passivate acceptors such as Mg, Ca and C. Reactivation occurs at {ge} 450 C and is enhanced by minority carrier injection. The hydrogen does not leave the GaN crystal until > 800 C, and its diffusivity is relatively high ({approximately} 10{sup {minus}11} cm{sup 2}/s) even at low temperatures (< 200 C) during injection by wet etching, boiling in water or plasma exposure. Oxygen shows a low donor activation efficiency when implanted into GaN, with an ionization level of 30--40 meV. It is essentially immobile up to 1,100 C. Carbon can produce low p-type levels (3 {times} 10{sup 17} cm{sup {minus}3}) in GaN during MOMBE, although there is some evidence it may also create n-type conduction in other nitrides.

  6. Refractive index of erbium doped GaN thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alajlouni, S.; Sun, Z. Y.; Li, J.; Lin, J. Y.; Jiang, H. X.; Zavada, J. M.

    2014-08-25

    GaN is an excellent host for erbium (Er) to provide optical emission in the technologically important as well as eye-safe 1540 nm wavelength window. Er doped GaN (GaN:Er) epilayers were synthesized on c-plane sapphire substrates using metal organic chemical vapor deposition. By employing a pulsed growth scheme, the crystalline quality of GaN:Er epilayers was significantly improved over those obtained by conventional growth method of continuous flow of reaction precursors. X-ray diffraction rocking curve linewidths of less than 300 arc sec were achieved for the GaN (0002) diffraction peak, which is comparable to the typical results of undoped high quality GaN epilayers and represents a major improvement over previously reported results for GaN:Er. Spectroscopic ellipsometry was used to determine the refractive index of the GaN:Er epilayers in the 1540 nm wavelength window and a linear dependence on Er concentration was found. The observed refractive index increase with Er incorporation and the improved crystalline quality of the GaN:Er epilayers indicate that low loss GaN:Er optical waveguiding structures are feasible.

  7. Structural defects in GaN revealed by Transmission Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liliental-Weber, Zuzanna

    2014-04-18

    This paper reviews the various types of structural defects observed by Transmission Electron Microscopy in GaN heteroepitaxial layers grown on foreign substrates and homoepitaxial layers grown on bulk GaN substrates. The structural perfection of these layers is compared to the platelet self-standing crystals grown by High Nitrogen Pressure Solution. Defects in undoped and Mg doped GaN are discussed. Some models explaining the formation of inversion domains in heavily Mg doped layers that are possible defects responsible for the difficulties of p-doping in GaN are also reviewed.

  8. Structural defects in GaN revealed by Transmission Electron Microscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Liliental-Weber, Zuzanna

    2014-09-08

    This paper reviews the various types of structural defects observed by Transmission Electron Microscopy in GaN heteroepitaxial layers grown on foreign substrates and homoepitaxial layers grown on bulk GaN substrates. The structural perfection of these layers is compared to the platelet self-standing crystals grown by High Nitrogen Pressure Solution. Defects in undoped and Mg doped GaN are discussed. Lastly, some models explaining the formation of inversion domains in heavily Mg doped layers that are possible defects responsible for the difficulties of p-doping in GaN are also reviewed.

  9. Browse OSTIblog Articles by Related Topics | OSTI, US Dept of Energy Office

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of Scientific and Technical Information Browse OSTIblog Articles by Related Topics 1 2 3 7 9 @ A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y 1970s 21st century 3D Printing 70th Anniversary 9/11 @ostigov Accelerated Climate Modeling for Energy accelerator accepted manuscript access accomplishments ACME additive manufacturing adhesive tape administrative interval ADNI Advanced Photon Source Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy Advanced Scientific Computing Research AEC Aerogels Albert

  10. This invention relates to methods of generating NP gallium nitride (GaN) across large areas (>1 cm.sup.2) with controlled pore diameters, pore density, and porosity. Also disclosed are methods of generating novel optoelectronic devices based on porous GaN. Additionally a layer transfer scheme to separate and create free-standing crystalline GaN thin layers is disclosed that enables a new device manufacturing paradigm involving substrate recycling. Other disclosed embodiments of this invention relate to fabrication of GaN based nanocrystals and the use of NP GaN electrodes for electrolysis, water splitting, or photosynthetic process applications.

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhang, Yu; Sun, Qian; Han, Jung

    2015-12-08

    This invention relates to methods of generating NP gallium nitride (GaN) across large areas (>1 cm.sup.2) with controlled pore diameters, pore density, and porosity. Also disclosed are methods of generating novel optoelectronic devices based on porous GaN. Additionally a layer transfer scheme to separate and create free-standing crystalline GaN thin layers is disclosed that enables a new device manufacturing paradigm involving substrate recycling. Other disclosed embodiments of this invention relate to fabrication of GaN based nanocrystals and the use of NP GaN electrodes for electrolysis, water splitting, or photosynthetic process applications.

  11. ARM - Datastreams - mpl

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Browse Plots Central Facility, Darwin, Australia retired ARM Mobile Facility NIM M1 Browse Data Browse Plots Niamey, Niger retired PYE M1 Browse Data Browse Plots Point Reyes, CA...

  12. ARM - Instrument - mpl

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Browse Plots Highland Center, Cape Cod MA; AMF1 PYE M1 Browse Data Browse Plots Point Reyes, CA retired SBS S1 Browse Data Steamboat Springs CO, Thunderhead Lodge TMP M1 Browse...

  13. Growth and Band Offsets of Epitaxial Lanthanide Oxides on GaN...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    M.T.T., 60 (6) (2012) 3 Jon Ihlefeld, Sandia National Laboratories Electronic Materials ... Undoped GaN Undoped AlGaN Doped AlGaN 2D Electron Gas Enhancement Mode (nominally ...

  14. Dislocation confinement in the growth of Na flux GaN on metalorganic...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Dislocation confinement in the growth of Na flux GaN on metalorganic chemical vapor deposition-GaN Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Dislocation confinement in the growth ...

  15. Low temperature thin film transistors with hollow cathode plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition based GaN channels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolat, S. E-mail: aokyay@ee.bilkent.edu.tr; Tekcan, B.; Ozgit-Akgun, C.; Biyikli, N.; Okyay, A. K. E-mail: aokyay@ee.bilkent.edu.tr

    2014-06-16

    We report GaN thin film transistors (TFT) with a thermal budget below 250?C. GaN thin films are grown at 200?C by hollow cathode plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition (HCPA-ALD). HCPA-ALD-based GaN thin films are found to have a polycrystalline wurtzite structure with an average crystallite size of 9.3?nm. TFTs with bottom gate configuration are fabricated with HCPA-ALD grown GaN channel layers. Fabricated TFTs exhibit n-type field effect characteristics. N-channel GaN TFTs demonstrated on-to-off ratios (I{sub ON}/I{sub OFF}) of 10{sup 3} and sub-threshold swing of 3.3?V/decade. The entire TFT device fabrication process temperature is below 250?C, which is the lowest process temperature reported for GaN based transistors, so far.

  16. Hybrid device based on GaN nanoneedles and MEH-PPV/PEDOT:PSS polymer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shin, Min Jeong; Gwon, Dong-Oh; Lee, Chan-Mi; Lee, Gang Seok; Jeon, In-Jun; Ahn, Hyung Soo; Yi, Sam Nyung; Ha, Dong Han

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • A hybrid device was demonstrated by using MEH-PPV, PEDOT:PSS, and GaN nanoneedles. • I–V curve of the hybrid device showed its rectification behaviour, similar to a diode. • EL peak originated by the different potential barriers at MEH-PPV and GaN interface. - Abstract: A hybrid device that combines the properties of organic and inorganic semiconductors was fabricated and studied. It incorporated poly[2-methoxy-5-(2-ethylhexyloxy)- 1,4-phenylenevinylene] (MEH-PPV) and poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) as organic polymers and GaN nanoneedles as an inorganic semiconductor. Layers of the two polymers were spin coated on to the GaN nanoneedles. The one peak in the electroluminescence spectrum originated from the MEH-PPV layer owing to the different potential barriers of electrons and holes at its interface with the GaN nanoneedles. However, the photoluminescence spectrum showed peaks due to both GaN nanoneedles and MEH-PPV. Such hybrid structures, suitably developed, might be able to improve the efficiency of optoelectronic devices.

  17. Intrinsic polarization control in rectangular GaN nanowire lasers

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Li, Changyi; Liu, Sheng; Luk, Ting S.; Figiel, Jeffrey J.; Brener, Igal; Brueck, S. R. J.; Wang, George T.

    2016-02-01

    In this study, we demonstrate intrinsic, linearly polarized lasing from single GaN nanowires using cross-sectional shape control. A two-step top-down fabrication approach was employed to create straight nanowires with controllable rectangular cross-sections. A clear lasing threshold of 444kW/cm2 and a narrow spectral line width of 0.16 nm were observed under optical pumping at room temperature, indicating the onset of lasing. The polarization was along the short dimension (y-direction) of the nanowire due to the higher transverse confinement factors for y-polarized transverse modes resulting from the rectangular nanowire cross-section. The results show that cross-sectioned shape control can enable inherent control overmore » the polarization of nanowire lasers without additional environment requirements, such as placement onto lossy substrates.« less

  18. SECTION M EVALUATION FACTORS FOR AWARD TABLE OF CONTENTS M-1 EVALUATION OF PROPOSALS .....................................................................................2

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    M EVALUATION FACTORS FOR AWARD TABLE OF CONTENTS M-1 EVALUATION OF PROPOSALS .....................................................................................2 M-2 BASIS FOR CONTRACT AWARD ...................................................................................3 M-3 TECHNICAL AND MANAGEMENT CRITERIA ..........................................................3 M-4 COST CRITERION

  19. SECTION M EVALUATION FACTORS FOR AWARD TABLE OF CONTENTS M-1 EVALUATION OF PROPOSALS .....................................................................................2

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    TABLE OF CONTENTS M-1 EVALUATION OF PROPOSALS .....................................................................................2 M-2 BASIS FOR CONTRACT AWARD ...................................................................................3 M-3 TECHNICAL AND MANAGEMENT CRITERIA ..........................................................3 M-4 COST EVALUATION CRITERION .................................................................................5 Section M, Evaluation Factors Request for

  20. High active nitrogen flux growth of GaN by plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McSkimming, Brian M. Speck, James S.; Chaix, Catherine

    2015-09-15

    In the present study, the authors report on a modified Riber radio frequency (RF) nitrogen plasma source that provides active nitrogen fluxes more than 30 times higher than those commonly used for plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy (PAMBE) growth of gallium nitride (GaN) and thus a significantly higher growth rate than has been previously reported. GaN films were grown using N{sub 2} gas flow rates between 5 and 25 sccm while varying the plasma source's RF forward power from 200 to 600 W. The highest growth rate, and therefore the highest active nitrogen flux, achieved was ∼7.6 μm/h. For optimized growth conditions, the surfaces displayed a clear step-terrace structure with an average RMS roughness (3 × 3 μm) on the order of 1 nm. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy impurity analysis demonstrates oxygen and hydrogen incorporation of 1 × 10{sup 16} and ∼5 × 10{sup 17}, respectively. In addition, the authors have achieved PAMBE growth of GaN at a substrate temperature more than 150 °C greater than our standard Ga rich GaN growth regime and ∼100 °C greater than any previously reported PAMBE growth of GaN. This growth temperature corresponds to GaN decomposition in vacuum of more than 20 nm/min; a regime previously unattainable with conventional nitrogen plasma sources. Arrhenius analysis of the decomposition rate shows that samples with a flux ratio below stoichiometry have an activation energy greater than decomposition of GaN in vacuum while samples grown at or above stoichiometry have decreased activation energy. The activation energy of decomposition for GaN in vacuum was previously determined to be ∼3.1 eV. For a Ga/N flux ratio of ∼1.5, this activation energy was found to be ∼2.8 eV, while for a Ga/N flux ratio of ∼0.5, it was found to be ∼7.9 eV.

  1. GaN Initiative for Grid Applications (GIGA)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, George

    2015-07-03

    For nearly 4 ½ years, MIT Lincoln Laboratory (MIT/LL) led a very successful, DoE-funded team effort to develop GaN-on-Si materials and devices, targeting high-voltage (>1 kV), high-power, cost-effective electronics for grid applications. This effort, called the GaN Initiative for Grid Applications (GIGA) program, was initially made up of MIT/LL, the MIT campus group of Prof. Tomas Palacios (MIT), and the industrial partner M/A Com Technology Solutions (MTS). Later in the program a 4th team member was added (IQE MA) to provide commercial-scale GaN-on-Si epitaxial materials. A basic premise of the GIGA program was that power electronics, for ubiquitous utilization -even for grid applications - should be closer in cost structure to more conventional Si-based power electronics. For a number of reasons, more established GaN-on-SiC or even SiC-based power electronics are not likely to reach theses cost structures, even in higher manufacturing volumes. An additional premise of the GIGA program was that the technical focus would be on materials and devices suitable for operating at voltages > 1 kV, even though there is also significant commercial interest in developing lower voltage (< 1 kV), cost effective GaN-on-Si devices for higher volume applications, like consumer products. Remarkable technical progress was made during the course of this program. Advances in materials included the growth of high-quality, crack-free epitaxial GaN layers on large-diameter Si substrates with thicknesses up to ~5 μm, overcoming significant challenges in lattice mismatch and thermal expansion differences between Si and GaN in the actual epitaxial growth process. Such thick epilayers are crucial for high voltage operation of lateral geometry devices such as Schottky barrier (SB) diodes and high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs). New “Normally-Off” device architectures were demonstrated – for safe operation of power electronics circuits. The trade-offs between lateral and

  2. Nanostructural engineering of nitride nucleation layers for GaN substrate dislocation reduction.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koleske, Daniel David; Lee, Stephen Roger; Lemp, Thomas Kerr; Coltrin, Michael Elliott; Cross, Karen Charlene; Thaler, Gerald

    2009-07-01

    With no lattice matched substrate available, sapphire continues as the substrate of choice for GaN growth, because of its reasonable cost and the extensive prior experience using it as a substrate for GaN. Surprisingly, the high dislocation density does not appear to limit UV and blue LED light intensity. However, dislocations may limit green LED light intensity and LED lifetime, especially as LEDs are pushed to higher current density for high end solid state lighting sources. To improve the performance for these higher current density LEDs, simple growth-enabled reductions in dislocation density would be highly prized. GaN nucleation layers (NLs) are not commonly thought of as an application of nano-structural engineering; yet, these layers evolve during the growth process to produce self-assembled, nanometer-scale structures. Continued growth on these nuclei ultimately leads to a fully coalesced film, and we show in this research program that their initial density is correlated to the GaN dislocation density. In this 18 month program, we developed MOCVD growth methods to reduce GaN dislocation densities on sapphire from 5 x 10{sup 8} cm{sup -2} using our standard delay recovery growth technique to 1 x 10{sup 8} cm{sup -2} using an ultra-low nucleation density technique. For this research, we firmly established a correlation between the GaN nucleation thickness, the resulting nucleation density after annealing, and dislocation density of full GaN films grown on these nucleation layers. We developed methods to reduce the nuclei density while still maintaining the ability to fully coalesce the GaN films. Ways were sought to improve the GaN nuclei orientation by improving the sapphire surface smoothness by annealing prior to the NL growth. Methods to eliminate the formation of additional nuclei once the majority of GaN nuclei were developed using a silicon nitride treatment prior to the deposition of the nucleation layer. Nucleation layer thickness was determined

  3. Mission hazard assessment for STARS Mission 1 (M1) in the Marshall Islands area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Outka, D.E.; LaFarge, R.A.

    1993-07-01

    A mission hazard assessment has been performed for the Strategic Target System Mission 1 (known as STARS M1) for hazards due to potential debris impact in the Marshall Islands area. The work was performed at Sandia National Laboratories as a result of discussion with Kwajalein Missile Range (KMR) safety officers. The STARS M1 rocket will be launched from the Kauai Test Facility (KTF), Hawaii, and deliver two payloads to within the viewing range of sensors located on the Kwajalein Atoll. The purpose of this work has been to estimate upper bounds for expected casualty rates and impact probability or the Marshall Islands areas which adjoin the STARS M1 instantaneous impact point (IIP) trace. This report documents the methodology and results of the analysis.

  4. E1 and M1 γ-strength functions in 144Nd

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Voinov, A. V.; Grimes, S. M.

    2015-12-14

    Both E1 and M1 γ-strength functions below the neutron separation energy were analyzed based on experimental data from 143Nd(n,γ)144Nd and 143Nd(n,γα)140Ce reactions. It is confirmed that the commonly adopted E1 model based on the temperature dependence of the width of the giant dipole resonance works well. The popular M1 strength function due to the spin-flip magnetic resonance located near the neutron binding energy is not capable of reproducing experimental data. As a result, the low-energy enhancement of the M1 strength or the energy-independent model of Weisskopf, both leading to the low-energy strength sizable to E1 one, fit experimental data best.

  5. Synthesis, morphology and optical properties of GaN and AlGaN semiconductor nanostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuppulingam, B. Singh, Shubra Baskar, K.

    2014-04-24

    Hexagonal Gallium Nitride (GaN) and Aluminum Gallium Nitride (AlGaN) nanoparticles were synthesized by sol-gel method using Ethylene Diamine Tetra Acetic acid (EDTA) complex route. Powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) analysis confirms the hexagonal wurtzite structure of GaN and Al{sub 0.25}Ga{sub 0.75}N nanoparticles. Surface morphology and elemental analysis were carried out by Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). The room temperature Photoluminescence (PL) study shows the near band edge emission for GaN at 3.35 eV and at 3.59 eV for AlGaN nanoparticles. The Aluminum (Al) composition of 20% has been obtained from PL emission around 345 nm.

  6. Electrical and optical properties of carbon-doped GaN grown by MBE on MOCVD GaN templates using a CCl4 dopant source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Armitage, Rob; Yang, Qing; Feick, Henning; Park, Yeonjoon; Weber, Eicke R.

    2002-04-15

    Carbon-doped GaN was grown by plasma-assisted molecular-beam epitaxy using carbon tetrachloride vapor as the dopant source. For moderate doping mainly acceptors were formed, yielding semi-insulating GaN. However at higher concentrations p-type conductivity was not observed, and heavily doped films (>5 x 10{sup 20} cm{sup -3}) were actually n-type rather than semi-insulating. Photoluminescence measurements showed two broad luminescence bands centered at 2.2 and 2.9 eV. The intensity of both bands increased with carbon content, but the 2.2 eV band dominated in n-type samples. Intense, narrow ({approx}6 meV) donor-bound exciton peaks were observed in the semi-insulating samples.

  7. New probe of M1 and E1 strengths in GDR regions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hayakawa, T. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency and National Astronomical Observatory in Japan (Japan); Ogata, K. [RCNP, Osaka University (Japan); Miyamoto, S.; Mochizuki, T.; Horikawa, K.; Amano, S. [University of Hyogo (Japan); Imazaki, K.; Li, D.; Izawa, Y. [Institute for Laser Technology (Japan); Chiba, S. [Tokyo Institute of Technology (Japan)

    2014-05-02

    The M1 strengths (or level density of 1{sup +} states) are of importance for estimation of interaction strengths between neutrinos and nuclei for the study of the supernova neutrino-process. In 1957, Agodi predicted theoretically angular distribution of neutrons emitted from states excited via dipole transitions with linearly polarized gamma-ray beam at the polar angle of ?=90 should be followed by a simple function, a + b cos(2?), where ?, is azimuthal angel. However, this theoretical prediction has not been verified over the wide mass region except for light nuclei as deuteron. We have measured neutron angular distributions with (polarized gamma, n) reactions on Au, Nal, and Cu. We have verified the Agodi's prediction for the first time over the wide mass region. This suggests that (polarized gamma, n) reactions may be useful tools to study M1 strengths in giant resonance regions.

  8. Surface Termination of M1 Phase and Rational Design of Propane Ammoxidation Catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guliants, Vadim

    2015-02-16

    This final report describes major accomplishments in this research project which has demonstrated that the M1 phase is the only crystalline phase required for propane ammoxidation to acrylonitrile and that a surface monolayer terminating the ab planes of the M1 phase is responsible for their activity and selectivity in this reaction. Fundamental studies of the topmost surface chemistry and mechanism of propane ammoxidation over the Mo-V-(Te,Sb)-(Nb,Ta)-O M1 and M2 phases resulted in the development of quantitative understanding of the surface molecular structure – reactivity relationships for this unique catalytic system. These oxides possess unique catalytic properties among mixed metal oxides, because they selectively catalyze three alkane transformation reactions, namely propane ammoxidation to acrylonitrile, propane oxidation to acrylic acid and ethane oxidative dehydrogenation, all of considerable economic significance. Therefore, the larger goal of this research was to expand this catalysis to other alkanes of commercial interest, and more broadly, demonstrate successful approaches to rational design of improved catalysts that can be applied to other selective (amm)oxidation processes.

  9. Tunnel-injection GaN quantum dot ultraviolet light-emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verma, Jai; Kandaswamy, Prem Kumar; Protasenko, Vladimir; Verma, Amit; Grace Xing, Huili; Jena, Debdeep

    2013-01-28

    We demonstrate a GaN quantum dot ultraviolet light-emitting diode that uses tunnel injection of carriers through AlN barriers into the active region. The quantum dot heterostructure is grown by molecular beam epitaxy on AlN templates. The large lattice mismatch between GaN and AlN favors the formation of GaN quantum dots in the Stranski-Krastanov growth mode. Carrier injection by tunneling can mitigate losses incurred in hot-carrier injection in light emitting heterostructures. To achieve tunnel injection, relatively low composition AlGaN is used for n- and p-type layers to simultaneously take advantage of effective band alignment and efficient doping. The small height of the quantum dots results in short-wavelength emission and are simultaneously an effective tool to fight the reduction of oscillator strength from quantum-confined Stark effect due to polarization fields. The strong quantum confinement results in room-temperature electroluminescence peaks at 261 and 340 nm, well above the 365 nm bandgap of bulk GaN. The demonstration opens the doorway to exploit many varied features of quantum dot physics to realize high-efficiency short-wavelength light sources.

  10. Ultra High p-doping Material Research for GaN Based Light Emitters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vladimir Dmitriev

    2007-06-30

    The main goal of the Project is to investigate doping mechanisms in p-type GaN and AlGaN and controllably fabricate ultra high doped p-GaN materials and epitaxial structures. Highly doped p-type GaN-based materials with low electrical resistivity and abrupt doping profiles are of great importance for efficient light emitters for solid state lighting (SSL) applications. Cost-effective hydride vapor phase epitaxial (HVPE) technology was proposed to investigate and develop p-GaN materials for SSL. High p-type doping is required to improve (i) carrier injection efficiency in light emitting p-n junctions that will result in increasing of light emitting efficiency, (ii) current spreading in light emitting structures that will improve external quantum efficiency, and (iii) parameters of Ohmic contacts to reduce operating voltage and tolerate higher forward currents needed for the high output power operation of light emitters. Highly doped p-type GaN layers and AlGaN/GaN heterostructures with low electrical resistivity will lead to novel device and contact metallization designs for high-power high efficiency GaN-based light emitters. Overall, highly doped p-GaN is a key element to develop light emitting devices for the DOE SSL program. The project was focused on material research for highly doped p-type GaN materials and device structures for applications in high performance light emitters for general illumination P-GaN and p-AlGaN layers and multi-layer structures were grown by HVPE and investigated in terms of surface morphology and structure, doping concentrations and profiles, optical, electrical, and structural properties. Tasks of the project were successfully accomplished. Highly doped GaN materials with p-type conductivity were fabricated. As-grown GaN layers had concentration N{sub a}-N{sub d} as high as 3 x 10{sup 19} cm{sup -3}. Mechanisms of doping were investigated and results of material studies were reported at several International conferences providing

  11. ARM - Datastreams - twrcam3m

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Atqasuk AK retired ARM Mobile Facility FKB M1 Browse Data Browse Plots Black Forest, Germany retired GRW M1 Browse Data Browse Plots Graciosa Island, Azores, Portugal retired NIM...

  12. ARM - Instrument - ccn

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PVC M1 Browse Data Highland Center, Cape Cod MA; AMF1 retired PYE M1 Browse Data Point Reyes, CA retired SBS S2 Browse Data Browse Plots Steamboat Springs CO, Christie Peak...

  13. ARM - Datastreams - nfov2ch

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Observatory, Nainital, Uttarkhand, India; AMF1 retired PVC M1 Browse Data Browse Plots Highland Center, Cape Cod MA; AMF1 retired PYE M1 Browse Data Browse Plots Point Reyes, CA...

  14. ARM - Instrument - aos

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    M1 Browse Data Browse Plots Highland Center, Cape Cod MA; AMF1 PYE M1 Browse Data Point Reyes, CA retired SBS S2 Browse Data Steamboat Springs CO, Christie Peak retired TMP S1...

  15. ARM - Instrument - sonde

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Plots Highland Center, Cape Cod MA; AMF1 retired PYE M1 Browse Data Browse Plots Point Reyes, CA retired SBS M1 Browse Data Browse Plots Steamboat Springs CO, Valley Site; AMF2...

  16. ARM - Datastreams - sondewnpn

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Plots Highland Center, Cape Cod MA; AMF1 retired PYE M1 Browse Data Browse Plots Point Reyes, CA retired SBS M1 Browse Data Browse Plots Steamboat Springs CO, Valley Site; AMF2...

  17. ARM - Datastreams - tsiskyimage

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PVC M1 Browse Data Highland Center, Cape Cod MA; AMF1 retired PYE M1 Browse Data Point Reyes, CA retired SBS M1 Browse Data Steamboat Springs CO, Valley Site; AMF2 retired TMP M1...

  18. Influence of growth temperature and temperature ramps on deep level defect incorporation in m-plane GaN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Armstrong, A. M.; Kelchner, K.; Nakamura, S.; DenBaars, S. P.; Materials Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 ; Speck, J. S.

    2013-12-02

    The dependence of deep level defect incorporation in m-plane GaN films grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition on bulk m-plane GaN substrates as a function of growth temperature (T{sub g}) and T{sub g} ramping method was investigated using deep level optical spectroscopy. Understanding the influence of T{sub g} on GaN deep level incorporation is important for InGaN/GaN multi-quantum well (MQW) light emitting diodes (LEDs) and laser diodes (LDs) because GaN quantum barrier (QB) layers are grown much colder than thin film GaN to accommodate InGaN QW growth. Deep level spectra of low T{sub g} (800?C) GaN films grown under QB conditions were compared to deep level spectra of high T{sub g} (1150?C) GaN. Reducing T{sub g}, increased the defect density significantly (>50) through introduction of emergent deep level defects at 2.09?eV and 2.9?eV below the conduction band minimum. However, optimizing growth conditions during the temperature ramp when transitioning from high to low T{sub g} substantially reduced the density of these emergent deep levels by approximately 40%. The results suggest that it is important to consider the potential for non-radiative recombination in QBs of LED or LD active regions, and tailoring the transition from high T{sub g} GaN growth to active layer growth can mitigate such non-radiative channels.

  19. ARM - Datastreams - met

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... field: PWS instantaneous present weather code unitless qcpwspwcodeinst ... Data Browse Plots Shouxian, Anhui, China retired MAO M1 Browse Data Browse Plots Manacapuru, Amazonas, ...

  20. Localized tip enhanced Raman spectroscopic study of impurity incorporated single GaN nanowire in the sub-diffraction limit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patsha, Avinash E-mail: dhara@igcar.gov.in; Dhara, Sandip; Tyagi, A. K.

    2015-09-21

    The localized effect of impurities in single GaN nanowires in the sub-diffraction limit is reported using the study of lattice vibrational modes in the evanescent field of Au nanoparticle assisted tip enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS). GaN nanowires with the O impurity and the Mg dopants were grown by the chemical vapor deposition technique in the catalyst assisted vapor-liquid-solid process. Symmetry allowed Raman modes of wurtzite GaN are observed for undoped and doped nanowires. Unusually very strong intensity of the non-zone center zone boundary mode is observed for the TERS studies of both the undoped and the Mg doped GaN single nanowires. Surface optical mode of A{sub 1} symmetry is also observed for both the undoped and the Mg doped GaN samples. A strong coupling of longitudinal optical (LO) phonons with free electrons, however, is reported only in the O rich single nanowires with the asymmetric A{sub 1}(LO) mode. Study of the local vibration mode shows the presence of Mg as dopant in the single GaN nanowires.

  1. Search for 14.4 keV solar axions from M1 transition of Fe-57...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Search for 14.4 keV solar axions from M1 transition of Fe-57 with CUORE crystals Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Search for 14.4 keV solar axions from M1 transition of...

  2. Performance and breakdown characteristics of irradiated vertical power GaN P-i-N diodes

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    King, M. P.; Armstrong, A. M.; Dickerson, J. R.; Vizkelethy, G.; Fleming, R. M.; Campbell, J.; Wampler, W. R.; Kizilyalli, I. C.; Bour, D. P.; Aktas, O.; et al

    2015-10-29

    Electrical performance and defect characterization of vertical GaN P-i-N diodes before and after irradiation with 2.5 MeV protons and neutrons is investigated. Devices exhibit increase in specific on-resistance following irradiation with protons and neutrons, indicating displacement damage introduces defects into the p-GaN and n- drift regions of the device that impact on-state device performance. The breakdown voltage of these devices, initially above 1700 V, is observed to decrease only slightly for particle fluence <; 1013 cm-2. Furthermore, the unipolar figure of merit for power devices indicates that while the on-resistance and breakdown voltage degrade with irradiation, vertical GaN P-i-Ns remainmore » superior to the performance of the best available, unirradiated silicon devices and on-par with unirradiated modern SiC-based power devices.« less

  3. Surfactant assisted growth of MgO films on GaN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paisley, E. A.; Shelton, T. C.; Collazo, R.; Sitar, Z.; Maria, J.-P.; Christen, H. M.; Biegalski, M. D.; Mita, S.

    2012-08-27

    Thin epitaxial films of <111> oriented MgO on [0001]-oriented GaN were grown by molecular beam epitaxy and pulsed laser deposition using the assistance of a vapor phase surfactant. In both cases, surfactant incorporation enabled layer-by-layer growth and a smooth terminal surface by stabilizing the {l_brace}111{r_brace} rocksalt facet. Metal-insulator-semiconductor capacitor structures were fabricated on n-type GaN. A comparison of leakage current density for conventional and surfactant-assisted growth reveals a nearly 100 Multiplication-Sign reduction in leakage current density for the surfactant-assisted samples. These data verify numerous predictions regarding the role of H-termination in regulating the habit of rocksalt crystals.

  4. Anisotropy of two-photon absorption and free-carrier effect in nonpolar GaN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fang, Yu; Zhou, Feng; Yang, Junyi; Wu, Xingzhi; Xiao, Zhengguo; Li, Zhongguo; Song, Yinglin

    2015-03-30

    We reported a systematic study about the anisotropic optical nonlinearities in bulk m-plane and a-plane GaN crystals by Z-scan and pump-probe with phase object methods under picosecond at 532 nm. The two-photon absorption coefficient, which was measured as a function of polarization angle, exhibited oscillation curves with a period of π/2, indicating a highly polarized optical third-order nonlinearity in both nonpolar GaN samples. Furthermore, free-carrier absorption revealed stronger hole-related absorption for E⊥c than for E//c probe polarization. In contrast, free-carrier refraction was found almost isotropic due to electron-related refraction in the isotropic conduction bands.

  5. Catalyst and its diameter dependent growth kinetics of CVD grown GaN nanowires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Samanta, Chandan [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur (India)] [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur (India); Chander, D. Sathish [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur (India) [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur (India); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur (India); Ramkumar, J. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur (India)] [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur (India); Dhamodaran, S., E-mail: kdams2003@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur (India)

    2012-04-15

    Graphical abstract: GaN nanowires with controlled diameter and aspect ratio has been grown using a simple CVD technique. The growth kinetics of CVD grown nanowires investigated in detail for different catalysts and their diameters. A critical diameter important to distinguish the growth regimes has been discussed in detail. The results are important which demonstrates the growth of diameter and aspect ratio controlled GaN nanowires and also understand their growth kinetics. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Controlled diameter and aspect ratio of GaN nanowires achieved in simple CVD reactor. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanowire growth kinetics for different catalyst and its diameters were understood. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adatoms vapor pressure inside reactor plays a crucial role in growth kinetics. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Diffusion along nanowire sidewalls dominate for gold and nickel catalysts. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Gibbs-Thomson effect dominates for palladium catalyst. -- Abstract: GaN nanowires were grown using chemical vapor deposition with controlled aspect ratio. The catalyst and catalyst-diameter dependent growth kinetics is investigated in detail. We first discuss gold catalyst diameter dependent growth kinetics and subsequently compare with nickel and palladium catalyst. For different diameters of gold catalyst there was hardly any variation in the length of the nanowires but for other catalysts with different diameter a strong length variation of the nanowires was observed. We calculated the critical diameter dependence on adatoms pressure inside the reactor and inside the catalytic particle. This gives an increasing trend in critical diameter as per the order gold, nickel and palladium for the current set of experimental conditions. Based on the critical diameter, with gold and nickel catalyst the nanowire growth was understood to be governed by limited surface diffusion of adatoms and by Gibbs-Thomson effect for the palladium

  6. Hafnium nitride buffer layers for growth of GaN on silicon

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Armitage, Robert D.; Weber, Eicke R.

    2005-08-16

    Gallium nitride is grown by plasma-assisted molecular-beam epitaxy on (111) and (001) silicon substrates using hafnium nitride buffer layers. Wurtzite GaN epitaxial layers are obtained on both the (111) and (001) HfN/Si surfaces, with crack-free thickness up to 1.2 {character pullout}m. However, growth on the (001) surface results in nearly stress-free films, suggesting that much thicker crack-free layers could be obtained.

  7. Formation of manganese {delta}-doped atomic layer in wurtzite GaN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shi Meng; Chinchore, Abhijit; Wang Kangkang; Mandru, Andrada-Oana; Liu Yinghao; Smith, Arthur R.

    2012-09-01

    We describe the formation of a {delta}-doped manganese layer embedded within c-plane wurtzite gallium nitride using a special molecular beam epitaxy growth process. Manganese is first deposited on the gallium-poor GaN (0001) surface, forming a {radical}(3) Multiplication-Sign {radical}(3)-R30 Degree-Sign reconstructed phase. This well-defined surface reconstruction is then nitrided using plasma nitridation, and gallium nitride is overgrown. The manganese content of the {radical}(3) Multiplication-Sign {radical}(3)-R30 Degree-Sign phase, namely one Mn per each {radical}(3) Multiplication-Sign {radical}(3)-R30 Degree-Sign unit cell, implies that the MnGaN alloy layer has a Mn concentration of up to 33%. The structure and chemical content of the surface are monitored beginning from the initial growth stage up through the overgrowth of 20 additional monolayers (MLs) of GaN. An exponential-like drop-off of the Mn signal with increasing GaN monolayers, as measured by Auger electron spectroscopy, indicates that the highly concentrated Mn layer remains at the {delta}-doped interface. A model of the resultant {delta}-doped structure is formulated based on the experimental data, and implications for possible spintronic applications are discussed.

  8. Analysis of the carbon-related 'blue' luminescence in GaN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Armitage, R.; Yang, Q.; Weber, E.R.

    2004-09-24

    The properties of a broad 2.86 eV photoluminescence band in carbon-doped GaN were studied as a function of C-doping level, temperature, and excitation density. The results are consistent with a C{sub Ga}-C{sub N} deep donor-deep acceptor recombination mechanism as proposed by Seager et al. For GaN:C grown by molecular-beam epitaxy (MBE) the 2.86 eV band is observed in Si co-doped layers exhibiting high n-type conductivity as well as in semi-insulating material. For low excitation density (4 W/cm{sup 2}) the 2.86 eV band intensity decreases as a function of cw-laser exposure time over a period of many minutes. The transient behavior is consistent with a model based on carrier diffusion and charge trapping-induced Coulomb barriers. The temperature dependence of the blue luminescence below 150 K was different for carbon-contaminated GaN grown by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE) compared to C-doped MBE GaN.

  9. Theoretical and experimental study of dynamics of photoexcited carriers in GaN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shishehchi, Sara; Bellotti, Enrico; Rudin, Sergey; Garrett, Gregory A.; Wraback, Michael

    2013-12-21

    We present a theoretical and experimental study of the sub-picosecond dynamics of photo-excited carriers in GaN. In the theoretical model, interaction with an external ultrafast laser pulse is treated coherently and to account for the scattering mechanisms and dephasing processes, a generalized Monte-Carlo simulation is used. The scattering mechanisms included are carrier interactions with polar optical phonons and acoustic phonons, and carrier-carrier Coulomb interactions. We study the effect of different scattering mechanisms on the carrier densities. In the case that the excitation energy satisfies the threshold for polar optical scattering, phonon contribution is the dominant process in relaxing the system, otherwise, carrier-carrier mechanism is dominant. Furthermore, we present the temperature and pulse power dependent normalized luminescence intensity. The results are presented over a range of temperatures, electric field, and excitation energy of the laser pulse. For comparison, we also report the experimental time-resolved photoluminescence studies on GaN samples. There is a good agreement between the simulation and experiment in normalized luminescence intensity results. Therefore, we show that we can explain the dynamics of the photo-excited carriers in GaN by including only carrier-carrier and carrier-phonon interactions and a relatively simple two-band electronic structure model.

  10. Vertical GaN power diodes with a bilayer edge termination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dickerson, Jeramy R.; Allerman, Andrew A.; Bryant, Benjamin N.; Fischer, Arthur J.; King, Michael P.; Moseley, Michael W.; Armstrong, Andrew M.; Kaplar, Robert J.; Kizilyalli, Isik C.; Aktas, Ozgur; Wierer, Jr., Jonathan J.

    2015-12-07

    Vertical GaN power diodes with a bilayer edge termination (ET) are demonstrated. The GaN p-n junction is formed on a low threading dislocation defect density (104 - 105 cm-2) GaN substrate, and has a 15-μm-thick n-type drift layer with a free carrier concentration of 5 × 1015 cm-3. The ET structure is formed by N implantation into the p+-GaN epilayer just outside the p-type contact to create compensating defects. The implant defect profile may be approximated by a bilayer structure consisting of a fully compensated layer near the surface, followed by a 90% compensated (p) layer near the n-type drift region. These devices exhibit avalanche breakdown as high as 2.6 kV at room temperature. In addition simulations show that the ET created by implantation is an effective way to laterally distribute the electric field over a large area. This increases the voltage at which impact ionization occurs and leads to the observed higher breakdown voltages.

  11. Vertical GaN power diodes with a bilayer edge termination

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dickerson, Jeramy R.; Allerman, Andrew A.; Bryant, Benjamin N.; Fischer, Arthur J.; King, Michael P.; Moseley, Michael W.; Armstrong, Andrew M.; Kaplar, Robert J.; Kizilyalli, Isik C.; Aktas, Ozgur; et al

    2015-12-07

    Vertical GaN power diodes with a bilayer edge termination (ET) are demonstrated. The GaN p-n junction is formed on a low threading dislocation defect density (104 - 105 cm-2) GaN substrate, and has a 15-μm-thick n-type drift layer with a free carrier concentration of 5 × 1015 cm-3. The ET structure is formed by N implantation into the p+-GaN epilayer just outside the p-type contact to create compensating defects. The implant defect profile may be approximated by a bilayer structure consisting of a fully compensated layer near the surface, followed by a 90% compensated (p) layer near the n-type driftmore » region. These devices exhibit avalanche breakdown as high as 2.6 kV at room temperature. In addition simulations show that the ET created by implantation is an effective way to laterally distribute the electric field over a large area. This increases the voltage at which impact ionization occurs and leads to the observed higher breakdown voltages.« less

  12. Discovery of low-lying E1 and M1 strengths in {sup 232}Th

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adekola, A. S.; Hammond, S. L.; Hill, A.; Karwowski, H. J.; Angell, C. T.; Howell, C. R.; Kwan, E.; Kelley, J. H.

    2011-03-15

    Properties of low-energy dipole states in {sup 232}Th have been investigated with the nuclear resonance fluorescence technique. The present work used monoenergetic {gamma}-ray beams at energies of 2-4 MeV from the high-intensity {gamma}-ray source at Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory. Over 40 transitions corresponding to deexcitation to the ground state and first excited state were observed for the first time. Excitation energies, integrated cross sections, decay widths, branching ratios, and transition strengths for those states in {sup 232}Th were determined and compared with quasiparticle random-phase-approximation calculations. A large number of E1 transitions were observed for the first time in actinide nuclei with summed strength of 3.28(69)x10{sup -3} e{sup 2} fm{sup 2}. The observed summed M1 strength of 4.26(63){mu}{sub N}{sup 2} is in good agreement with the other actinides and with the systematics of the scissors mode in deformed rare-earth nuclei.

  13. Spectroscopic and magnetic properties of Mn doped GaN epitaxial films grown by plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vidyasagar, R.; Lin, Y.-T.; Tu, L.-W.

    2012-12-15

    Graphical abstract: We report here that micro-Raman scattering spectrum for Mn doped GaN thin film has displayed a new peak manifested at 578 cm{sup −1}, by which it is attributed to interior LVM originated by the incorporation of Mn ions in place of Ga sites. Mn doped GaN thin film also showed the typical negative magnetoresistance up to ∼50 K, revealing that the film showed magnetic ordering of spins below 50 K. Display Omitted Highlights: ► GaN and Mn doped GaN single phase wurtzite structures grown by PAMBE. ► The phase purity of the epilayers investigated by HRXRD, HRSEM and EDX. ► The red shift in near band edge emission has been observed using micro-PL. ► A new peak related LVM at 578 cm{sup −1} in micro-Raman scattering measurements confirmed Mn doped into GaN. ► Negative-magnetoresistance investigations have showed that the film has T{sub c} < 50 K. -- Abstract: Spectroscopic and magnetic properties of Mn doped GaN, and GaN epitaxial films have been investigated by employing micro-photoluminescence, micro-Raman, and temperature dependent magneto-resistance measurements. The HR-XRD profiles have shown that the epitaxial films are in hexagonal wurtzite structures. Morphology and composition of the films have been examined by field emission scanning electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive X-ray analysis. Micro-photoluminescence spectrum displayed a dominant near band edge emission at 362 nm, which is assigned to near band edge transition within the hexagonal structure of GaN. Raman scattering profiles showed a new vibrational mode at 578 cm{sup −1}, which is attributed to the vacancy-related local vibrational mode of Mn occupying the Ga site. Temperature dependent negative magnetoresistance measurements provide a direct evidence of magnetic ordering below 50 K for the Mn doped GaN thin film.

  14. Multicycle rapid thermal annealing optimization of Mg-implanted GaN: Evolution of surface, optical, and structural properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greenlee, Jordan D.; Feigelson, Boris N.; Anderson, Travis J.; Hite, Jennifer K.; Mastro, Michael A.; Eddy, Charles R.; Hobart, Karl D.; Kub, Francis J.; Tadjer, Marko J.

    2014-08-14

    The first step of a multi-cycle rapid thermal annealing process was systematically studied. The surface, structure, and optical properties of Mg implanted GaN thin films annealed at temperatures ranging from 900 to 1200?C were investigated by Raman spectroscopy, photoluminescence, UV-visible spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, and Nomarski microscopy. The GaN thin films are capped with two layers of in-situ metal organic chemical vapor deposition -grown AlN and annealed in 24 bar of N{sub 2} overpressure to avoid GaN decomposition. The crystal quality of the GaN improves with increasing annealing temperature as confirmed by UV-visible spectroscopy and the full widths at half maximums of the E{sub 2} and A{sub 1} (LO) Raman modes. The crystal quality of films annealed above 1100?C exceeds the quality of the as-grown films. At 1200?C, Mg is optically activated, which is determined by photoluminescence measurements. However, at 1200?C, the GaN begins to decompose as evidenced by pit formation on the surface of the samples. Therefore, it was determined that the optimal temperature for the first step in a multi-cycle rapid thermal anneal process should be conducted at 1150?C due to crystal quality and surface morphology considerations.

  15. Utilization of native oxygen in Eu(RE)-doped GaN for enabling device compatibility in optoelectronic applications

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mitchell, Brandon; Timmerman, D.; Poplawsky, Jonathan D.; Zhu, W.; Lee, D.; Wakamatsu, R.; Takatsu, J.; Matsuda, M.; Guo, Wei; Lorenz, K.; et al

    2016-01-04

    The detrimental influence of oxygen on the performance and reliability of V/III nitride based devices is well known. However, the influence of oxygen on the nature of the incorporation of other co-dopants, such as rare earth ions, has been largely overlooked in GaN. Here, we report the first comprehensive study of the critical role that oxygen has on Eu in GaN, as well as atomic scale observation of diffusion and local concentration of both atoms in the crystal lattice. We find that oxygen plays an integral role in the location, stability, and local defect structure around the Eu ions thatmore » were doped into the GaN host. Although the availability of oxygen is essential for these properties, it renders the material incompatible with GaN-based devices. However, the utilization of the normally occurring oxygen in GaN is promoted through structural manipulation, reducing its concentration by 2 orders of magnitude, while maintaining both the material quality and the favorable optical properties of the Eu ions. Furthermore, these findings open the way for full integration of RE dopants for optoelectronic functionalities in the existing GaN platform.« less

  16. ARM - Datastreams - skyrad20s

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    retired PVC M1 Browse Data Highland Center, Cape Cod MA; AMF1 retired PYE M1 Browse Data Point Reyes, CA retired SBS M1 Browse Data Steamboat Springs CO, Valley Site; AMF2 retired...

  17. ARM - Instrument - gndrad

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Plots Highland Center, Cape Cod MA; AMF1 retired PYE M1 Browse Data Browse Plots Point Reyes, CA retired SBS M1 Browse Data Steamboat Springs CO, Valley Site; AMF2 retired TMP M1...

  18. ARM - VAP Product - sondeadjust

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    retired HFE M1 Browse Data Shouxian, Anhui, China retired NIM M1 Browse Data Niamey, Niger retired PGH M1 Browse Data ARIES Observatory, Nainital, Uttarkhand, India; AMF1...

  19. Ab initio study on noncompensated CrO codoping of GaN for enhanced solar energy conversion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pan, Hui; Gu, Baohua; Eres, Gyula; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2010-03-01

    We describe a novel photocatalyst obtained by codoping GaN with CrO, according to a new "noncompensated" codoping concept based on first-principles calculations. The approach enables controllable narrowing of the GaN band gap with significantly enhanced carrier mobility and photocatalytic activity in the visible light region and thus offers immense potential for application in solar energy conversion, water splitting, and a variety of solar-assisted photocatalysis. Our calculations indicate that the formation energy for the cation doping is greatly reduced by noncompensated codoping with an anion. Although Cr doping alone can split the band gap with the formation of an intermediate band, the mobility is low due to carrier trapping by the localized states. The first-principles calculations also demonstrate that CrO codoping of GaN shifts the Fermi level into the conduction band resulting in high carrier density and mobility.

  20. Properties of radio-frequency-sputter-deposited GaN films in a nitrogen/hydrogen mixed gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miyazaki, Takayuki; Takada, Kouhei; Adachi, Sadao; Ohtsuka, Kohji

    2005-05-01

    GaN films have been deposited by reactive sputtering in nitrogen gas at pressures from 0.08 to 2.70 Pa with and without the addition of hydrogen gas. X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), optical absorption, and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy have been used to characterize the sputter-deposited GaN films. The XRD pattern reveals that the GaN films deposited in nitrogen gas at pressures lower than 0.53 Pa are polycrystals with the (0001) texture ({alpha}-GaN), while those deposited at or above 1.07 Pa display mixed crystalline orientations or an amorphous-like nature. The GaN:H films deposited in nitrogen/hydrogen mixed gas, on the other hand, show an amorphous or amorphous-like nature. The FTIR spectra indicate that the GaN:H films show peaks arising from hydrogen-related bonds at {approx}1000 and {approx}3200 cm{sup -1}, in addition to the GaN absorption band at {approx}555 cm{sup -1}. The optical absorption spectra at 300 K indicate the fundamental absorption edges at {approx}3.38 and {approx}3.7 eV for the highly oriented {alpha}-GaN and amorphous GaN:H films, respectively. PL emission has been observed from sputter-deposited {alpha}-GaN films at temperatures below 100 K. The GaN:H films also show strong band-edge and donor-acceptor pair emissions. The PL emission in the GaN:H film may arise from crystalline GaN particles embedded in the amorphous GaN matrix.

  1. Fundamental Bulk/Surface Structure Photoactivity Relationships of Supported (Rh2-yCryO3)/GaN Photocatalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phivilay, Somphonh; Roberts, Charles; Puretzky, Alexander A; Domen, Kazunari Domen; Wachs, Israel

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT. The supported (Rh2-yCryO3)/GaN photocatalyst was examined as a model nitride photocatalyst system to assist in the development of fundamental structure photoactivity relationships for UV activated water splitting. Surface characterization of the outermost surface layers by High Sensitivity-LEIS and High Resolution-XPS revealed for the first time that the GaN support consists of a GaOx outermost surface layer and a thin film of GaOxNy in the surface region. HR-XPS also demonstrates that the supported (Rh2-yCryO3) mixed oxide nanoparticles (NPs) exclusively consist of Cr+3 and Rh+3 cations and are surface enriched for the supported (Rh2-yCryO3)/GaN photocatalyst. Bulk analysis by Raman and UV-vis spectroscopy show that the bulk molecular and electronic structures, respectively, of the GaN support are not perturbed by the deposition of the (Rh2-yCryO3) mixed oxide NPs. The function of the GaN bulk lattice is to generate photoexcited electrons/holes, with the electrons harnessed by the surface Rh+3 sites for evolution of H2 and the holes trapped at the Ga oxide/oxynitride surface sites for splitting of water and evolving O2. These new structure-photoactivity relationships for supported (Rh2-yCryO3)/GaN also extend to the best performing visible light activated supported (Rh2-yCryO3)/(Ga1-xZnx)(N1-xOx) photocatalyst.

  2. Electroreflectance study of the effect of {gamma} radiation on the optical properties of epitaxial GaN films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belyaev, A. E.; Klyui, N. I. Konakova, R. V.; Lukyanov, A. N.; Danilchenko, B. A.; Sveshnikov, J. N.; Klyui, A. N.

    2012-03-15

    Experimental data on the electroreflectance spectra of {gamma}-irradiated epitaxial GaN films on sapphire are reported. The irradiation doses are 10{sup 5}-2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} rad. The theoretical electroreflectance spectra calculated on the basis of a model of three types of transitions are in agreement with experimental data with reasonable accuracy. The energies and broadenings of the transitions derived in the context of the model give grounds to infer that, in the GaN films, there are internal stresses dependent on the {gamma}-irradiation dose.

  3. Nanoscale size dependence parameters on lattice thermal conductivity of Wurtzite GaN nanowires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mamand, S.M.; Omar, M.S.; Muhammad, A.J.

    2012-05-15

    Graphical abstract: Temperature dependence of calculated lattice thermal conductivity of Wurtzite GaN nanowires. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A modified Callaway model is used to calculate lattice thermal conductivity of Wurtzite GaN nanowires. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A direct method is used to calculate phonon group velocity for these nanowires. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 3-Gruneisen parameter, surface roughness, and dislocations are successfully investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dislocation densities are decreases with the decrease of wires diameter. -- Abstract: A detailed calculation of lattice thermal conductivity of freestanding Wurtzite GaN nanowires with diameter ranging from 97 to 160 nm in the temperature range 2-300 K, was performed using a modified Callaway model. Both longitudinal and transverse modes are taken into account explicitly in the model. A method is used to calculate the Debye and phonon group velocities for different nanowire diameters from their related melting points. Effect of Gruneisen parameter, surface roughness, and dislocations as structure dependent parameters are successfully used to correlate the calculated values of lattice thermal conductivity to that of the experimentally measured curves. It was observed that Gruneisen parameter will decrease with decreasing nanowire diameters. Scattering of phonons is assumed to be by nanowire boundaries, imperfections, dislocations, electrons, and other phonons via both normal and Umklapp processes. Phonon confinement and size effects as well as the role of dislocation in limiting thermal conductivity are investigated. At high temperatures and for dislocation densities greater than 10{sup 14} m{sup -2} the lattice thermal conductivity would be limited by dislocation density, but for dislocation densities less than 10{sup 14} m{sup -2}, lattice thermal conductivity would be independent of that.

  4. Mechanism of the GaN LED efficiency falloff with increasing current

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bochkareva, N. I.; Voronenkov, V. V.; Gorbunov, R. I.; Zubrilov, A. S.; Lelikov, Y. S.; Latyshev, F. E.; Rebane, Y. T.; Tsyuk, A. I.; Shreter, Y. G.

    2010-06-15

    The quantum efficiency of GaN LED structures has been studied at various temperatures and biases. It was found that an efficiency falloff is observed with increasing current density and, simultaneously, the tunnel component of the current through the LED grows and the quasi-Fermi levels reach the mobility edge in the InGaN active layer. It is shown that the internal quantum efficiency falloff with increasing current density is due to the carrier leakage from the quantum well as a result of tunnel transitions from its band-tail states to local defect-related energy levels within the energy gaps of the barrier layers.

  5. Impact of the GaN nanowire polarity on energy harvesting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gogneau, Noelle Galopin, Elisabeth; Guilet, Stephane; Travers, Laurent; Harmand, Jean-Christophe; Chrétien, Pascal; Houzé, Frédéric

    2014-05-26

    We investigate the piezoelectric generation properties of GaN nanowires (NWs) by atomic force microscopy equipped with a Resiscope module for electrical measurements. By correlating the topography profile of the NWs with the recorded voltage peaks generated by these nanostructures in response to their deformation, we demonstrate the influence of their polarity on the rectifying behavior of the Schottky diode formed between the NWs and the electrode of measurement. These results establish that the piezo-generation mechanism crucially depends on the structural characteristics of the NWs.

  6. Enhanced UV detection by non-polar epitaxial GaN films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mukundan, Shruti; Chandan, Greeshma; Mohan, Lokesh; Krupanidhi, S. B.; Roul, Basanta; Shetty, Arjun

    2015-12-15

    Nonpolar a-GaN (11-20) epilayers were grown on r-plane (1-102) sapphire substrates using plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy. High resolution x-ray diffractometer confirmed the orientation of the grown film. Effect of the Ga/N ratio on the morphology and strain of a-GaN epilayers was compared and the best condition was obtained for the nitrogen flow of 1 sccm. Atomic force microscopy was used to analyze the surface morphology while the strain in the film was quantitatively measured using Raman spectroscopy and qualitatively analyzed by reciprocal space mapping technique. UV photo response of a-GaN film was measured after fabricating a metal-semiconductor-metal structure over the film with gold metal. The external quantum efficiency of the photodetectors fabricated in the (0002) polar and (11-20) nonpolar growth directions were compared in terms of responsivity and nonpolar GaN showed the best sensitivity at the cost of comparatively slow response time.

  7. Surfactant assisted growth of MgO films on GaN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paisley, Elisibeth A.; Shelton, T C; Mita, S; Gaddy, Brian E.; Irving, D L; Christen, Hans M; Sitar, Z; Biegalski, Michael D; Maria, Jon Paul

    2012-01-01

    Thin epitaxial films of <111> oriented MgO on [0001]-oriented GaN were grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) and pulsed laser deposition (PLD) using the assistance of a vapor phase surfactant. In both cases, surfactant incorporation enabled layer-by-layer growth and a smooth terminal surface due to stabilizing the {111} rocksalt facet. MBE growth of MgO in water terminates after several monolayers, and is attributed to saturation of surface active sites needed to facilitate the Mg oxidation reaction. MgO films prepared by PLD grow continuously, this occurs due to the presence of excited oxidizing species in the laser plasma eliminate the need for catalytic surface sites. Metal-insulator-semiconductor capacitor structures were fabricated on n-type GaN. A comparison of leakage current density for conventional and surfactant-assisted growth reveals a nearly two order of magnitude reduction in leakage current density for the smoother surfactant-assisted samples. Collectively, these data verify numerous predictions and calculations regarding the role of H-termination in regulating the habit of MgO crystals.

  8. The effect of N-polar GaN domains as Ohmic contacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xie, J.; Mita, S.; Collazo, R.; Rice, A.; Tweedie, J.; Sitar, Z.

    2010-09-20

    Transfer line method measurements revealed that if the Ohmic contact regions were replaced by N-polar GaN, the contact resistance could be reduced from 0.71 {Omega} mm (or {rho}{sub c}=4x10{sup -6} {Omega} cm{sup 2}) to 0.24 {Omega} mm for a {approx}200 nm thick Si-doped GaN layer. The reduction in contact resistance was largely due to the {approx}10{sup 19} cm{sup -3} free carriers in N-polar source/drain regions as measured by Hall effect. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy confirmed that oxygen doping in the N-polar region was more than three orders of magnitude greater than that in the Ga-polar region that was explained by the large difference in the adsorption energy for oxygen ({approx}1.3 eV/atom) between the N- and Ga-polar surfaces during the metalorganic chemical vapor deposition.

  9. Excitation mechanisms of Er optical centers in GaN epilayers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    George, D. K.; Hawkins, M. D.; McLaren, M.; Vinh, N. Q.; Jiang, H. X.; Lin, J. Y.; Zavada, J. M.

    2015-10-26

    We report direct evidence of two mechanisms responsible for the excitation of optically active Er{sup 3+} ions in GaN epilayers grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition. These mechanisms, resonant excitation via the higher-lying inner 4f shell transitions and band-to-band excitation of the semiconductor host, lead to narrow emission lines from isolated and the defect-related Er optical centers. However, these centers have different photoluminescence spectra, local defect environments, decay dynamics, and excitation cross sections. The photoluminescence at 1.54 μm from the isolated Er optical center which can be excited by either mechanism has the same decay dynamics, but possesses a much higher excitation cross-section under band-to-band excitation. In contrast, the photoluminescence at 1.54 μm from the defect-related Er optical center can only be observed through band-to-band excitation but has the largest excitation cross-section. These results explain the difficulty in achieving gain in Er doped GaN and indicate approaches for realization of optical amplification, and possibly lasing, at room temperature.

  10. Growth modes of InN(000-1) on GaN buffer layers on sapphire

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Bing; Kitajima, Takeshi; Chen, Dongxue; Leone, Stephen R.

    2005-01-24

    In this work, using atomic force microscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy, we study the surface morphologies of epitaxial InN films grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy with intervening GaN buffer layers on sapphire substrates. On smooth GaN buffer layers, nucleation and evolution of three-dimensional InN islands at various coverages and growth temperatures are investigated. The shapes of the InN islands are observed to be predominantly mesa-like with large flat (000-1) tops, which suggests a possible role of indium as a surfactant. Rough GaN buffer layers composed of dense small GaN islands are found to significantly improve uniform InN wetting of the substrates, on which atomically smooth InN films are obtained that show the characteristics of step-flow growth. Scanning tunneling microscopy imaging reveals the defect-mediated surface morphology of smooth InN films, including surface terminations of screw dislocations and a high density of shallow surface pits with depths less than 0.3 nm. The mechanisms of the three-dimensional island size and shape evolution and formation of defects on smooth surfaces are considered.

  11. Impact of defects on the electrical transport, optical properties and failure mechanisms of GaN nanowires.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Armstrong, Andrew M.; Aubry, Sylvie; Shaner, Eric Arthur; Siegal, Michael P.; Li, Qiming; Jones, Reese E.; Westover, Tyler; Wang, George T.; Zhou, Xiao Wang; Talin, Albert Alec; Bogart, Katherine Huderle Andersen; Harris, C. Thomas; Huang, Jian Yu

    2010-09-01

    We present the results of a three year LDRD project that focused on understanding the impact of defects on the electrical, optical and thermal properties of GaN-based nanowires (NWs). We describe the development and application of a host of experimental techniques to quantify and understand the physics of defects and thermal transport in GaN NWs. We also present the development of analytical models and computational studies of thermal conductivity in GaN NWs. Finally, we present an atomistic model for GaN NW electrical breakdown supported with experimental evidence. GaN-based nanowires are attractive for applications requiring compact, high-current density devices such as ultraviolet laser arrays. Understanding GaN nanowire failure at high-current density is crucial to developing nanowire (NW) devices. Nanowire device failure is likely more complex than thin film due to the prominence of surface effects and enhanced interaction among point defects. Understanding the impact of surfaces and point defects on nanowire thermal and electrical transport is the first step toward rational control and mitigation of device failure mechanisms. However, investigating defects in GaN NWs is extremely challenging because conventional defect spectroscopy techniques are unsuitable for wide-bandgap nanostructures. To understand NW breakdown, the influence of pre-existing and emergent defects during high current stress on NW properties will be investigated. Acute sensitivity of NW thermal conductivity to point-defect density is expected due to the lack of threading dislocation (TD) gettering sites, and enhanced phonon-surface scattering further inhibits thermal transport. Excess defect creation during Joule heating could further degrade thermal conductivity, producing a viscous cycle culminating in catastrophic breakdown. To investigate these issues, a unique combination of electron microscopy, scanning luminescence and photoconductivity implemented at the nanoscale will be used in

  12. Tellurium n-type doping of highly mismatched amorphous GaN1-xAsx alloys in plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Novikov, S. V.; Ting, M.; Yu, K. M.; Sarney, W. L.; Martin, R. W.; Svensson, S. P.; Walukiewicz, W.; Foxon, C. T.

    2014-10-01

    In this paper we report our study on n-type Te doping of amorphous GaN1-xAsx layers grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. We have used a low temperature PbTe source as a source of tellurium. Reproducible and uniform tellurium incorporation in amorphous GaN1-xAsx layers has been successfully achieved with a maximum Te concentration of 9×10²⁰ cm⁻³. Tellurium incorporation resulted in n-doping of GaN1-xAsx layers with Hall carrier concentrations up to 3×10¹⁹ cm⁻³ and mobilities of ~1 cm²/V s. The optimal growth temperature window for efficient Te doping of the amorphous GaN1-xAsx layers has been determined.

  13. Effect of ZnO seed layer on the morphology and optical properties of ZnO nanorods grown on GaN buffer layers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nandi, R. Mohan, S. Major, S. S.; Srinivasa, R. S.

    2014-04-24

    ZnO nanorods were grown by chemical bath deposition on sputtered, polycrystalline GaN buffer layers with and without ZnO seed layer. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction show that the ZnO nanorods on GaN buffer layers are not vertically well aligned. Photoluminescence spectrum of ZnO nanorods grown on GaN buffer layer, however exhibits a much stronger near-band-edge emission and negligible defect emission, compared to the nanorods grown on ZnO buffer layer. These features are attributed to gallium incorporation at the ZnO-GaN interface. The introduction of a thin (25 nm) ZnO seed layer on GaN buffer layer significantly improves the morphology and vertical alignment of ZnO-NRs without sacrificing the high optical quality of ZnO nanorods on GaN buffer layer. The presence of a thick (200 nm) ZnO seed layer completely masks the effect of the underlying GaN buffer layer on the morphology and optical properties of nanorods.

  14. Highly c-axis oriented GaN films grown on free-standing diamond substrates for high-power devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, D. [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China) [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Key Laboratory of Materials Modification by Laser, Ion and Electron Beams, Ministry of Education, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Bian, J.M., E-mail: jmbian@dlut.edu.cn [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Qin, F.W.; Wang, J.; Pan, L. [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China) [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Key Laboratory of Materials Modification by Laser, Ion and Electron Beams, Ministry of Education, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Zhao, J.M. [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)] [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Zhao, Y.; Bai, Y.Z. [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China) [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Key Laboratory of Materials Modification by Laser, Ion and Electron Beams, Ministry of Education, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Du, G.T. [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)] [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)

    2011-10-15

    Highlights: {yields} GaN films are deposited on diamond substrates by ECR-PEMOCVD. {yields} Influence of deposition temperature on the properties of samples is investigated. {yields} Properties of GaN films are dependent on the deposition temperature. -- Abstract: GaN films with highly c-axis preferred orientation are deposited on free-standing thick diamond films by low temperature electron cyclotron resonance plasma enhanced metal organic chemical vapor deposition (ECR-PEMOCVD). The TMGa and N{sub 2} are applied as precursors of Ga and N, respectively. The quality of as-grown GaN films are systematically investigated as a function of deposition temperature by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, Hall Effect measurement (HL), room temperature photoluminescence (PL) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The results show that the dense and uniformed GaN films with highly c-axis preferred orientation are successfully achieved on free-standing diamond substrates under optimized deposition temperature of 400 {sup o}C, and the room temperature PL spectra of the optimized GaN film show a intense ultraviolet near band edge emission and a weak yellow luminescence. The obtained GaN/diamond structure has great potential for the development of high-power semiconductor devices due to its excellent heat dissipation nature.

  15. Demonstration of forward inter-band tunneling in GaN by polarization engineering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Park, Pil Sung; Rajan, Siddharth

    2011-12-05

    We report on the design, fabrication, and characterization of GaN interband tunnel junction showing forward tunneling characteristics. We have achieved very high forward tunneling currents (153 mA/cm{sup 2} at 10 mV, and 17.7 A/cm{sup 2} peak current) in polarization-engineered GaN/InGaN/GaN heterojunction diodes grown by plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy. We also report the observation of repeatable negative differential resistance in interband III-Nitride tunnel junctions, with peak-valley current ratio of 4 at room temperature. The forward current density achieved in this work meets the typical current drive requirements of a multi-junction solar cell.

  16. Resonant energy transfer between Eu luminescent sites and their local geometry in GaN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Timmerman, Dolf; Wakamatsu, Ryuta; Tanaka, Kazuteru; Lee, Dong-gun; Koizumi, Atsushi; Fujiwara, Yasufumi

    2015-10-12

    Eu-doped GaN is a solid state material with promising features for quantum manipulation. In this study, we investigate the population dynamics of Eu in ions in this system by resonant excitation. From differences in the emission related to transitions between the {sup 5}D{sub 0} and {sup 7}F{sub 2} manifold in the Eu ions, we can distinguish different luminescence sites and observe that a resonant energy transfer takes place between two of these sites which are in proximity of each other. The time constants related to this energy transfer are on the order of 100 μs. By using different substrates, the energy transfer efficiency could be strongly altered, and it is demonstrated that the coupling between ions has an out-of-plane character. Based on these results, a microscopic model of this combined center is presented.

  17. Influence of the adatom diffusion on selective growth of GaN nanowire regular arrays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gotschke, T.; Schumann, T.; Limbach, F.; Calarco, R.; Stoica, T.

    2011-03-07

    Molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) on patterned Si/AlN/Si(111) substrates was used to obtain regular arrays of uniform-size GaN nanowires (NWs). The silicon top layer has been patterned with e-beam lithography, resulting in uniform arrays of holes with different diameters (d{sub h}) and periods (P). While the NW length is almost insensitive to the array parameters, the diameter increases significantly with d{sub h} and P till it saturates at P values higher than 800 nm. A diffusion induced model was used to explain the experimental results with an effective diffusion length of the adatoms on the Si, estimated to be about 400 nm.

  18. Monolithic single GaN nanowire laser with photonic crystal microcavity on silicon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heo, Junseok; Guo Wei; Bhattacharya, Pallab

    2011-01-10

    Optically pumped lasing at room temperature in a silicon based monolithic single GaN nanowire with a two-dimensional photonic crystal microcavity is demonstrated. Catalyst-free nanowires with low density ({approx}10{sup 8} cm{sup -2}) are grown on Si by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. High resolution transmission electron microscopy images reveal that the nanowires are of wurtzite structure and they have no observable defects. A single nanowire laser fabricated on Si is characterized by a lasing transition at {lambda}=371.3 nm with a linewidth of 0.55 nm. The threshold is observed at a pump power density of {approx}120 kW/cm{sup 2} and the spontaneous emission factor {beta} is estimated to be 0.08.

  19. ARM - Datastreams - twrcam3m

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    M1 Browse Data Highland Center, Cape Cod MA; AMF1 retired PYE M1 Browse Data Browse Plots Point Reyes, CA retired retired Originating instrument has been retired at this location...

  20. ARM - Instrument - mwr

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Plots ARIES Observatory, Nainital, Uttarkhand, India; AMF1 retired PVC M1 Browse Data Highland Center, Cape Cod MA; AMF1 retired PYE M1 Browse Data Browse Plots Point Reyes, CA...

  1. ARM - Instrument - mfr

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Central Facility, Lamont, OK ARM Mobile Facility AWR M1 Browse Data McMurdo Station Ross Ice Shelf, Antarctica; AMF2 MAO M1 Browse Data Browse Plots Manacapuru, Amazonas,...

  2. The E2/M1 mixing ratio in the excitation of the {Delta} from polarized photo-reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    The LEGS Collaboration

    1993-12-01

    In constituent quark models, a tensor interaction, mixing quark spins with their relative motion, is introduced to reproduce the observed baryon spectrum. This has a consequence completely analogous to the nuclear tensor force between the n and p in deuterium. A D state component is mixed into what would otherwise be a purely S-wave object. The D-wave component breaks spherical symmetry, resulting in a non-vanishing matrix element for the nucleon and a static quadrupole moment and deformation for its first excited state, the {Delta} resonance, at {approximately}325 MeV. The magnitude and sign of this D-state component are quite sensitive to the internal structure of the proton and have been of great interest in recent years. The intrinsic deformation of the spin 1/2 nucleon cannot be observed directly; it must be inferred from transition amplitudes such as N {yields} {Delta}. In a spherical bag model, the {Delta} is viewed as a pure quark-spin-flip transition proceeding only through M1 excitation. If there are D-state admixtures in the ground state of the nucleon and/or {Delta}, quadrupole excitation, in addition to spin-flip M1, is also allowed. The problem is to evaluate the relative magnitude of this E2 excitation in the presence of the dominant M1 transition. A variety of models predict this mixing ratio to be quite small, anywhere from {minus}0.9% to {minus}6%, so that a high degree of precision is demanded of experiment.

  3. Efficient Switches for Solar Power Conversion: Four Quadrant GaN Switch Enabled Three Phase Grid-Tied Microinverters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-02-13

    Solar ADEPT Project: Transphorm is developing power switches for new types of inverters that improve the efficiency and reliability of converting energy from solar panels into useable electricity for the grid. Transistors act as fast switches and control the electrical energy that flows in an electrical circuit. Turning a transistor off opens the circuit and stops the flow of electrical current; turning it on closes the circuit and allows electrical current to flow. In this way a transistor can be used to convert DC from a solar panel into AC for use in a home. Transphorm’s transistors will enable a single semiconductor device to switch electrical currents at high-voltage in both directions—making the inverter more compact and reliable. Transphorm is using Gallium Nitride (GaN) as a semiconductor material in its transistors instead of silicon, which is used in most conventional transistors, because GaN transistors have lower losses at higher voltages and switching frequencies.

  4. Method of growing GaN films with a low density of structural defects using an interlayer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bourret-Courchesne, Edith D.

    2003-01-01

    A dramatic reduction of the dislocation density in GaN was obtained by insertion of a single thin interlayer grown at an intermediate temperature (IT-IL) after the growth of an initial grown at high temperature. A description of the growth process is presented with characterization results aimed at understanding the mechanisms of reduction in dislocation density. A large percentage of the threading dislocations present in the first GaN epilayer are found to bend near the interlayer and do not propagate into the top layer which grows at higher temperature in a lateral growth mode. TEM studies show that the mechanisms of dislocation reduction are similar to those described for the epitaxial lateral overgrowth process, however a notable difference is the absence of coalescence boundaries.

  5. Performance and breakdown characteristics of irradiated vertical power GaN P-i-N diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King, M. P.; Armstrong, A. M.; Dickerson, J. R.; Vizkelethy, G.; Fleming, R. M.; Campbell, J.; Wampler, W. R.; Kizilyalli, I. C.; Bour, D. P.; Aktas, O.; Nie, H.; Disney, D.; Wierer, Jr., J.; Allerman, A. A.; Moseley, M. W.; Kaplar, R. J.

    2015-10-29

    Electrical performance and defect characterization of vertical GaN P-i-N diodes before and after irradiation with 2.5 MeV protons and neutrons is investigated. Devices exhibit increase in specific on-resistance following irradiation with protons and neutrons, indicating displacement damage introduces defects into the p-GaN and n- drift regions of the device that impact on-state device performance. The breakdown voltage of these devices, initially above 1700 V, is observed to decrease only slightly for particle fluence <; 1013 cm-2. Furthermore, the unipolar figure of merit for power devices indicates that while the on-resistance and breakdown voltage degrade with irradiation, vertical GaN P-i-Ns remain superior to the performance of the best available, unirradiated silicon devices and on-par with unirradiated modern SiC-based power devices.

  6. Electronic and optical device applications of hollow cathode plasma assisted atomic layer deposition based GaN thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolat, Sami Tekcan, Burak; Ozgit-Akgun, Cagla; Biyikli, Necmi; Okyay, Ali Kemal

    2015-01-15

    Electronic and optoelectronic devices, namely, thin film transistors (TFTs) and metalsemiconductormetal (MSM) photodetectors, based on GaN films grown by hollow cathode plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition (PA-ALD) are demonstrated. Resistivity of GaN thin films and metal-GaN contact resistance are investigated as a function of annealing temperature. Effect of the plasma gas and postmetallization annealing on the performances of the TFTs as well as the effect of the annealing on the performance of MSM photodetectors are studied. Dark current to voltage and responsivity behavior of MSM devices are investigated as well. TFTs with the N{sub 2}/H{sub 2} PA-ALD based GaN channels are observed to have improved stability and transfer characteristics with respect to NH{sub 3} PA-ALD based transistors. Dark current of the MSM photodetectors is suppressed strongly after high-temperature annealing in N{sub 2}:H{sub 2} ambient.

  7. Transistors for Electric Motor Drives: High-Performance GaN HEMT Modules for Agile Power Electronics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-09-01

    ADEPT Project: Transphorm is developing transistors with gallium nitride (GaN) semiconductors that could be used to make cost-effective, high-performance power converters for a variety of applications, including electric motor drives which transmit power to a motor. A transistor acts like a switch, controlling the electrical energy that flows around an electrical circuit. Most transistors today use low-cost silicon semiconductors to conduct electrical energy, but silicon transistors don’t operate efficiently at high speeds and voltage levels. Transphorm is using GaN as a semiconductor material in its transistors because GaN performs better at higher voltages and frequencies, and it is more energy efficient than straight silicon. However, Transphorm is using inexpensive silicon as a base to help keep costs low. The company is also packaging its transistors with other electrical components that can operate quickly and efficiently at high power levels—increasing the overall efficiency of both the transistor and the entire motor drive.

  8. GaN nanowires with pentagon shape cross-section by ammonia-source molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Yong; Leung, Benjamin; Li, Qiming; Figiel, Jeffrey J.; Wang, George T.

    2015-07-14

    In this study, ammonia-based molecular beam epitaxy (NH3-MBE) was used to grow catalyst-assisted GaN nanowires on (11¯02) r-plane sapphire substrates. Dislocation free [112¯0] oriented nanowires are formed with pentagon shape cross-section, instead of the usual triangular shape facet configuration. Specifically, the cross-section is the result of the additional two nonpolar {101¯0} side facets, which appear due to a decrease in relative growth rate of the {101¯0} facets to the {101¯1} and {101¯1} facets under the growth regime in NH3-MBE. Compared to GaN nanowires grown by Ni-catalyzed metal–organic chemical vapor deposition, the NH3-MBE grown GaN nanowires show more than an order of magnitude increase in band-edge to yellow luminescence intensity ratio, as measured by cathodoluminescence, indicating improved microstructural and optical properties.

  9. Elimination of surface band bending on N-polar InN with thin GaN capping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuzmík, J. Haščík, Š.; Kučera, M.; Kúdela, R.; Dobročka, E.; Adikimenakis, A.; Mičušík, M.; Gregor, M.; Plecenik, A.; Georgakilas, A.

    2015-11-09

    0.5–1 μm thick InN (0001) films grown by molecular-beam epitaxy with N- or In-polarity are investigated for the presence of native oxide, surface energy band bending, and effects introduced by 2 to 4 monolayers of GaN capping. Ex situ angle-resolved x-ray photo-electron spectroscopy is used to construct near-surface (GaN)/InN energy profiles, which is combined with deconvolution of In3d signal to trace the presence of InN native oxide for different types of polarity and capping. Downwards surface energy band bending was observed on bare samples with native oxide, regardless of the polarity. It was found that the In-polar InN surface is most readily oxidized, however, with only slightly less band bending if compared with the N-polar sample. On the other hand, InN surface oxidation was effectively mitigated by GaN capping. Still, as confirmed by ultra-violet photo-electron spectroscopy and by energy band diagram calculations, thin GaN cap layer may provide negative piezoelectric polarization charge at the GaN/InN hetero-interface of the N-polar sample, in addition to the passivation effect. These effects raised the band diagram up by about 0.65 eV, reaching a flat-band profile.

  10. GaN nanowires with pentagon shape cross-section by ammonia-source molecular beam epitaxy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lin, Yong; Leung, Benjamin; Li, Qiming; Figiel, Jeffrey J.; Wang, George T.

    2015-07-14

    In this study, ammonia-based molecular beam epitaxy (NH3-MBE) was used to grow catalyst-assisted GaN nanowires on (11¯02) r-plane sapphire substrates. Dislocation free [112¯0] oriented nanowires are formed with pentagon shape cross-section, instead of the usual triangular shape facet configuration. Specifically, the cross-section is the result of the additional two nonpolar {101¯0} side facets, which appear due to a decrease in relative growth rate of the {101¯0} facets to the {101¯1} and {101¯1} facets under the growth regime in NH3-MBE. Compared to GaN nanowires grown by Ni-catalyzed metal–organic chemical vapor deposition, the NH3-MBE grown GaN nanowires show more than an ordermore » of magnitude increase in band-edge to yellow luminescence intensity ratio, as measured by cathodoluminescence, indicating improved microstructural and optical properties.« less

  11. Characterization of GaN nanowires grown on PSi, PZnO and PGaN on Si (111) substrates by thermal evaporation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shekari, Leila; Hassan, Haslan Abu; Thahab, Sabah M.; Hassan, Zainuriah

    2012-06-20

    In this research, we used an easy and inexpensive method to synthesize highly crystalline GaN nanowires (NWs); on different substrates such as porous silicon (PSi), porous zinc oxide (PZnO) and porous gallium nitride (PGaN) on Si (111) wafer by thermal evaporation using commercial GaN powder without any catalyst. Micro structural studies by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscope measurements reveal the role of different substrates in the morphology, nucleation and alignment of the GaN nanowires. The degree of alignment of the synthesized nanowires does not depend on the lattice mismatch between wires and their substrates. Further structural and optical characterizations were performed using high resolution X-ray diffraction and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Results indicate that the nanowires are of single-crystal hexagonal GaN. The quality and density of grown GaN nanowires for different substrates are highly dependent on the lattice mismatch between the nanowires and their substrates and also on the size of the porosity of the substrates. Nanowires grown on PGaN have the best quality and highest density as compared to nanowires on other substrates. By using three kinds of porous substrates, we are able to study the increase in the alignment and density of the nanowires.

  12. Carrier and photon dynamics in a topological insulator Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3}/GaN type II staggered heterostructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chaturvedi, P.; Chouksey, S.; Banerjee, D.; Ganguly, S.; Saha, D.

    2015-11-09

    We have demonstrated a type-II band-aligned heterostructure between pulsed laser deposited topological insulator bismuth telluride and metal organic-chemical-vapour deposited GaN on a sapphire substrate. The heterostructure shows a large valence band-offset of 3.27 eV as determined from x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, which is close to the bandgap of GaN (3.4 eV). Further investigation using x-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, and energy-dispersive x-ray spectrum reveals the stoichiometric and material properties of bismuth telluride on GaN. Steady state photon emission from GaN is found to be modulated by the charge transfer process due to diffusion across the junction. The time constant involved with the charge transfer process is found to be 0.6 ns by transient absorption spectroscopy. The heterostructure can be used for designing devices with different functionalities and improving the performance of the existing devices on GaN.

  13. TEM studies of laterally overgrown GaN layers grown on non-polarsubstrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liliental-Weber, Z.; Ni, X.; Morkoc, H.

    2006-01-05

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to study pendeo-epitaxial GaN layers grown on polar and non-polar 4H SiC substrates. The structural quality of the overgrown layers was evaluated using a number of TEM methods. Growth of pendeo-epitaxial layers on polar substrates leads to better structural quality of the overgrown areas, however edge-on dislocations are found at the meeting fronts of two wings. Some misorientation between the 'seed' area and wing area was detected by Convergent Beam Electron Diffraction. Growth of pendeo-epitaxial layers on non-polar substrates is more difficult. Two wings on the opposite site of the seed area grow in two different polar directions with different growth rates. Most dislocations in a wing grown with Ga polarity are 10 times wider than wings grown with N-polarity making coalescence of these layers difficult. Most dislocations in a wing grown with Ga polarity bend in a direction parallel to the substrate, but some of them also propagate to the sample surface. Stacking faults formed on the c-plane and prismatic plane occasionally were found. Some misorientation between the wings and seed was detected using Large Angle Convergent Beam Diffraction.

  14. Radiation-induced defects in GaN bulk grown by halide vapor phase epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duc, Tran Thien; Pozina, Galia; Son, Nguyen Tien; Janzn, Erik; Hemmingsson, Carl; Ohshima, Takeshi

    2014-09-08

    Defects induced by electron irradiation in thick free-standing GaN layers grown by halide vapor phase epitaxy were studied by deep level transient spectroscopy. In as-grown materials, six electron traps, labeled D2 (E{sub C}0.24?eV), D3 (E{sub C}0.60?eV), D4 (E{sub C}0.69?eV), D5 (E{sub C}0.96?eV), D7 (E{sub C}1.19?eV), and D8, were observed. After 2?MeV electron irradiation at a fluence of 1??10{sup 14?}cm{sup ?2}, three deep electron traps, labeled D1 (E{sub C}0.12?eV), D5I (E{sub C}0.89?eV), and D6 (E{sub C}1.14?eV), were detected. The trap D1 has previously been reported and considered as being related to the nitrogen vacancy. From the annealing behavior and a high introduction rate, the D5I and D6 centers are suggested to be related to primary intrinsic defects.

  15. Electrochemical removal of hydrogen atoms in Mg-doped GaN epitaxial layers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, June Key E-mail: hskim7@jbnu.ac.kr; Hyeon, Gil Yong; Tawfik, Wael Z.; Choi, Hee Seok; Ryu, Sang-Wan; Jeong, Tak; Jung, Eunjin; Kim, Hyunsoo E-mail: hskim7@jbnu.ac.kr

    2015-05-14

    Hydrogen atoms inside of an Mg-doped GaN epitaxial layer were effectively removed by the electrochemical potentiostatic activation (EPA) method. The role of hydrogen was investigated in terms of the device performance of light-emitting diodes (LEDs). The effect of the main process parameters for EPA such as solution type, voltage, and time was studied and optimized for application to LED fabrication. In optimized conditions, the light output of 385-nm LEDs was improved by about 26% at 30 mA, which was caused by the reduction of the hydrogen concentration by ∼35%. Further removal of hydrogen seems to be involved in the breaking of Ga-H bonds that passivate the nitrogen vacancies. An EPA process with high voltage breaks not only Mg-H bonds that generate hole carriers but also Ga-H bonds that generate electron carriers, thus causing compensation that impedes the practical increase of hole concentration, regardless of the drastic removal of hydrogen atoms. A decrease in hydrogen concentration affects the current-voltage characteristics, reducing the reverse current by about one order and altering the forward current behavior in the low voltage region.

  16. Enhanced stability of Eu in GaN nanoparticles: Effects of Si co-doping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaur, Prabhsharan; Sekhon, S. S.; Zavada, J. M.; Kumar, Vijay

    2015-06-14

    Ab initio calculations on Eu doped (GaN){sub n} (n = 12, 13, and 32) nanoparticles show that Eu doping in nanoparticles is favorable compared with bulk GaN as a large fraction of atoms lie on the surface where strain can be released compared with bulk where often Eu doping is associated with a N vacancy. Co-doping of Si further facilitates Eu doping as strain from an oversized Eu atom and an undersized Si atom is compensated. These results along with low symmetry sites in nanoparticles make them attractive for developing strongly luminescent nanomaterials. The atomic and electronic structures are discussed using generalized gradient approximation (GGA) for the exchange-correlation energy as well as GGA + U formalism. In all cases of Eu (Eu + Si) doping, the magnetic moments are localized on the Eu site with a large value of 6μ{sub B} (7μ{sub B}). Our results suggest that co-doping can be a very useful way to achieve rare-earth doping in different hosts for optoelectronic materials.

  17. Performance enhancement of GaN metalsemiconductormetal ultraviolet photodetectors by insertion of ultrathin interfacial HfO{sub 2} layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, Manoj E-mail: aokyay@ee.bilkent.edu.tr; Tekcan, Burak; Okyay, Ali Kemal E-mail: aokyay@ee.bilkent.edu.tr

    2015-03-15

    The authors demonstrate improved device performance of GaN metalsemiconductormetal ultraviolet (UV) photodetectors (PDs) by ultrathin HfO{sub 2} (UT-HfO{sub 2}) layer on GaN. The UT-HfO{sub 2} interfacial layer is grown by atomic layer deposition. The dark current of the PDs with UT-HfO{sub 2} is significantly reduced by more than two orders of magnitude compared to those without HfO{sub 2} insertion. The photoresponsivity at 360?nm is as high as 1.42 A/W biased at 5 V. An excellent improvement in the performance of the devices is ascribed to allowed electron injection through UT-HfO{sub 2} on GaN interface under UV illumination, resulting in the photocurrent gain with fast response time.

  18. High-power blue laser diodes with indium tin oxide cladding on semipolar (202{sup }1{sup }) GaN substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pourhashemi, A. Farrell, R. M.; Cohen, D. A.; Speck, J. S.; DenBaars, S. P.; Nakamura, S.

    2015-03-16

    We demonstrate a high power blue laser diode (LD) using indium tin oxide as a cladding layer on semipolar oriented GaN. These devices show peak output powers and external quantum efficiencies comparable to state-of-the-art commercial c-plane devices. Ridge waveguide LDs were fabricated on (202{sup }1{sup }) oriented GaN substrates using InGaN waveguiding layers and GaN cladding layers. At a lasing wavelength of 451?nm at room temperature, an output power of 2.52?W and an external quantum efficiency of 39% were measured from a single facet under a pulsed injection current of 2.34?A. The measured differential quantum efficiency was 50%.

  19. Better Catalysts through Microscopy: Nanometer Scale M1/M2 Intergrown Heterostructure in Mo-V-M Complex Oxides

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    He, Qian; Woo, Jungwon; Belianinov, Alex; Guliants, Vadim V.; Borisevich, Albina Y

    2015-01-01

    In recent decades, catalysis research has transformed from the predominantly empirical field to one where it is possible to control the catalytic properties via characterization and modification of the atomic-scale active centers. Many phenomena in catalysis, such as synergistic effect, however, transcend the atomic scale and also require the knowledge and control of the mesoscale structure of the specimen to harness. In this paper, we use our discovery of atomic-scale epitaxial interfaces in molybdenum vanadium based complex oxide catalysts systems (i.e., MoVMO, M = Ta, Te, Sb, Nb, etc.) to achieve control of the mesoscale structure of this complex mixturemore » of very different active phases. We can now achieve true epitaxial intergrowth between the catalytically critical M1 and M2 phases in the system that are hypothesized to have synergistic interactions, and demonstrate that the resulting catalyst has improved selectivity in the initial studies. Finally, we highlight the crucial role atomic scale characterization and mesoscale structure control play in uncovering the complex underpinnings of the synergistic effect in catalysis.« less

  20. Better Catalysts through Microscopy: Nanometer Scale M1/M2 Intergrown Heterostructure in Mo-V-M Complex Oxides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    He, Qian [ORNL; Woo, Jungwon [University of Cincinnati; Belianinov, Alex [ORNL; Guliants, Vadim V. [University of Cincinnati; Borisevich, Albina Y [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    In recent decades, catalysis research has transformed from the predominantly empirical field to one where it is possible to control the catalytic properties via characterization and modification of the atomic-scale active centers. Many phenomena in catalysis, such as synergistic effect, however, transcend the atomic scale and also require the knowledge and control of the mesoscale structure of the specimen to harness. In this paper, we use our discovery of atomic-scale epitaxial interfaces in molybdenum vanadium based complex oxide catalysts systems (i.e., MoVMO, M = Ta, Te, Sb, Nb, etc.) to achieve control of the mesoscale structure of this complex mixture of very different active phases. We can now achieve true epitaxial intergrowth between the catalytically critical M1 and M2 phases in the system that are hypothesized to have synergistic interactions, and demonstrate that the resulting catalyst has improved selectivity in the initial studies. Finally, we highlight the crucial role atomic scale characterization and mesoscale structure control play in uncovering the complex underpinnings of the synergistic effect in catalysis.

  1. Highly mismatched crystalline and amorphous GaN(1-x)As(x) alloys in the whole composition range

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, K. M.; Novikov, S. V.; Broesler, R.; Demchenko, I. N.; Denlinger, J. D.; Liliental-Weber, Z.; Luckert, F.; Martin, R. W.; Walukiewicz, W.; Foxon, C. T.

    2009-08-29

    Alloying is a commonly accepted method to tailor properties of semiconductor materials for specific applications. Only a limited number of semiconductor alloys can be easily synthesized in the full composition range. Such alloys are, in general, formed of component elements that are well matched in terms of ionicity, atom size, and electronegativity. In contrast there is a broad class of potential semiconductor alloys formed of component materials with distinctly different properties. In most instances these mismatched alloys are immiscible under standard growth conditions. Here we report on the properties of GaN1-xAsx, a highly mismatched, immiscible alloy system that was successfully synthesized in the whole composition range using a nonequilibrium low temperature molecular beam epitaxy technique. The alloys are amorphous in the composition range of 0.17GaN to ~;;0.8 eV at x~;;0.85. The reduction in the band gap can be attributed primarily to the downward movement of the conduction band for alloys with x>0.2, and to the upward movement of the valence band for alloys with x<0.2. The unique features of the band structure offer an opportunity of using GaN1-xAsx alloys for various types of solar power conversion devices.

  2. ARM - Instrument - mwrp

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The data are useful for input to numerical weather forecast models and others that require continuous, high ... Browse Plots Shouxian, Anhui, China retired MAO M1 Browse Data ...

  3. Ultraviolet light-emitting diodes grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy on semipolar GaN (2021) substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sawicka, M.; Grzanka, S.; Skierbiszewski, C.; Turski, H.; Muziol, G.; Krysko, M.; Grzanka, E.; Sochacki, T.; Siekacz, M.; Kucharski, R.

    2013-03-18

    Multi-quantum well (MQW) structures and light emitting diodes (LEDs) were grown on semipolar (2021) and polar (0001) GaN substrates by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. The In incorporation efficiency was found to be significantly lower for the semipolar plane as compared to the polar one. The semipolar MQWs exhibit a smooth surface morphology, abrupt interfaces, and a high photoluminescence intensity. The electroluminescence of semipolar (2021) and polar (0001) LEDs fabricated in the same growth run peaks at 387 and 462 nm, respectively. Semipolar LEDs with additional (Al,Ga)N cladding layers exhibit a higher optical output power but simultaneously a higher turn-on voltage.

  4. Diagonalization of transfer matrix of supersymmetry U{sub q}(sl-caret(M+1|N+1)) chain with a boundary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kojima, Takeo

    2013-04-15

    We study the supersymmetry U{sub q}(sl-caret(M+1|N+1)) analogue of the supersymmetric t-J model with a boundary. Our approach is based on the algebraic analysis method of solvable lattice models. We diagonalize the commuting transfer matrix by using the bosonizations of the vertex operators associated with the quantum affine supersymmetry U{sub q}(sl-caret(M+1|N+1)).

  5. Strong geometrical effects in submillimeter selective area growth and light extraction of GaN light emitting diodes on sapphire

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tanaka, Atsunori; Chen, Renjie; Jungjohann, Katherine L.; Dayeh, Shadi A.

    2015-11-27

    Advanced semiconductor devices often utilize structural and geometrical effects to tailor their characteristics and improve their performance. Our detailed understanding of such geometrical effects in the epitaxial selective area growth of GaN on sapphire substrates is reported here, and we utilize them to enhance light extraction from GaN light emitting diodes. Systematic size and spacing effects were performed side-by-side on a single 2” sapphire substrate to minimize experimental sampling errors for a set of 144 pattern arrays with circular mask opening windows in SiO2. We show that the mask opening diameter leads to as much as 4 times increase in the thickness of the grown layers for 20 μm spacings and that spacing effects can lead to as much as 3 times increase in thickness for a 350 μm dot diameter. We also observed that the facet evolution in comparison with extracted Ga adatom diffusion lengths directly influences the vertical and lateral overgrowth rates and can be controlled with pattern geometry. Lastly, such control over the facet development led to 2.5 times stronger electroluminescence characteristics from well-faceted GaN/InGaN multiple quantum well LEDs compared to non-faceted structures.

  6. Strong geometrical effects in submillimeter selective area growth and light extraction of GaN light emitting diodes on sapphire

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tanaka, Atsunori; Chen, Renjie; Jungjohann, Katherine L.; Dayeh, Shadi A.

    2015-11-27

    Advanced semiconductor devices often utilize structural and geometrical effects to tailor their characteristics and improve their performance. Our detailed understanding of such geometrical effects in the epitaxial selective area growth of GaN on sapphire substrates is reported here, and we utilize them to enhance light extraction from GaN light emitting diodes. Systematic size and spacing effects were performed side-by-side on a single 2” sapphire substrate to minimize experimental sampling errors for a set of 144 pattern arrays with circular mask opening windows in SiO2. We show that the mask opening diameter leads to as much as 4 times increase inmore » the thickness of the grown layers for 20 μm spacings and that spacing effects can lead to as much as 3 times increase in thickness for a 350 μm dot diameter. We also observed that the facet evolution in comparison with extracted Ga adatom diffusion lengths directly influences the vertical and lateral overgrowth rates and can be controlled with pattern geometry. Lastly, such control over the facet development led to 2.5 times stronger electroluminescence characteristics from well-faceted GaN/InGaN multiple quantum well LEDs compared to non-faceted structures.« less

  7. Ar{sup +}-irradiation-induced damage in hydride vapor-phase epitaxy GaN films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakano, Yoshitaka Ogawa, Daisuke; Nakamura, Keiji; Kawakami, Retsuo; Niibe, Masahito

    2015-07-15

    The authors have investigated the electrical characteristics of hydride vapor-phase epitaxy GaN films exposed to Ar{sup +} irradiation, employing Schottky barrier diodes. The Ar{sup +} irradiation tends to largely increase the effective carrier concentration in the near surface region of GaN up to ∼25 nm, due to the generation of donor-type N vacancy defects, compared to the original value before the irradiation. More interestingly, acceptor-type deep-level defects are found to be formed at ∼2.1, ∼2.9, and ∼3.2 eV below the conduction band in the subsequently deeper region, in which Ga vacancies introduced by the Ar{sup +} irradiation are considered to be in-diffused and immediately combined with hydrogen. These N vacancies and hydrogenated Ga vacancies formed are dominantly responsible for changing the depth profiles of the effective carrier concentration via the carrier generation, the carrier trapping, and/or carrier compensation.

  8. Effect of Fe-doping on nonlinear optical responses and carrier trapping dynamics in GaN single crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fang, Yu; Yang, Junyi; Yang, Yong; Zhou, Feng; Wu, Xingzhi; Xiao, Zhengguo; Song, Yinglin

    2015-08-03

    We presented a quantitative study on the Fe-doping concentration dependence of optical nonlinearities and ultrafast carrier dynamics in Fe-doped GaN (GaN:Fe) single crystals using picosecond Z-scan and femtosecond pump-probe with phase object techniques under two-photon excitation. In contrast to the two-photon absorption that was found to be independent on the Fe-doping, the nonlinear refraction decreased with the Fe concentration due to the fast carrier trapping effect of Fe{sup 3+}/Fe{sup 2+} deep acceptors, which simultaneously acted as an efficient non-radiative recombination channels for excess carriers. Remarkably, compared to that of Si-doped GaN bulk crystal, the free-carrier refraction effect in GaN:Fe crystals was found to be enhanced considerably since Fe-doping and the effective carrier lifetime (∼10 ps) could be tuned over three orders of magnitude at high Fe-doping level of 1 × 10{sup 19 }cm{sup −3}.

  9. Increased p-type conductivity through use of an indium surfactant in the growth of Mg-doped GaN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kyle, Erin C. H. Kaun, Stephen W.; Young, Erin C.; Speck, James S.

    2015-06-01

    We have examined the effect of an indium surfactant on the growth of p-type GaN by ammonia-based molecular beam epitaxy. p-type GaN was grown at temperatures ranging from 700 to 780 °C with and without an indium surfactant. The Mg concentration in all films in this study was 4.5–6 × 10{sup 19} cm{sup −3} as measured by secondary ion mass spectroscopy. All p-type GaN films grown with an indium surfactant had higher p-type conductivities and higher hole concentrations than similar films grown without an indium surfactant. The lowest p-type GaN room temperature resistivity was 0.59 Ω-cm, and the highest room temperature carrier concentration was 1.6 × 10{sup 18} cm{sup −3}. Fits of the temperature-dependent carrier concentration data showed a one to two order of magnitude lower unintentional compensating defect concentration in samples grown with the indium surfactant. Samples grown at higher temperature had a lower active acceptor concentration. Improvements in band-edge luminescence were seen by cathodoluminescence for samples grown with the indium surfactant, confirming the trends seen in the Hall data.

  10. Effect of AlN buffer layer properties on the morphology and polarity of GaN nanowires grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brubaker, Matt D.; Rourke, Devin M.; Sanford, Norman A.; Bertness, Kris A.; Bright, Victor M.

    2011-09-01

    Low-temperature AlN buffer layers grown via plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy on Si (111) were found to significantly affect the subsequent growth morphology of GaN nanowires. The AlN buffer layers exhibited nanowire-like columnar protrusions, with their size, shape, and tilt determined by the AlN V/III flux ratio. GaN nanowires were frequently observed to adopt the structural characteristics of the underlying AlN columns, including the size and the degree of tilt. Piezoresponse force microscopy and polarity-sensitive etching indicate that the AlN films and the protruding columns have a mixed crystallographic polarity. Convergent beam electron diffraction indicates that GaN nanowires are Ga-polar, suggesting that Al-polar columns are nanowire nucleation sites for Ga-polar nanowires. GaN nanowires of low density could be grown on AlN buffers that were predominantly N-polar with isolated Al-polar columns, indicating a high growth rate for Ga-polar nanowires and suppressed growth of N-polar nanowires under typical growth conditions. AlN buffer layers grown under slightly N-rich conditions (V/III flux ratio = 1.0 to 1.3) were found to provide a favorable growth surface for low-density, coalescence-free nanowires.

  11. Study of the effects of GaN buffer layer quality on the dc characteristics of AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ahn, Shihyun; Zhu, Weidi; Dong, Chen; Le, Lingcong; Hwang, Ya-Hsi; Kim, Byung-Jae; Ren, Fan; Pearton, Stephen J.; Lind, Aaron G.; Jones, Kevin S.; et al

    2015-04-21

    Here we studied the effect of buffer layer quality on dc characteristics of AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility (HEMTs). AlGaN/GaN HEMT structures with 2 and 5 μm GaN buffer layers on sapphire substrates from two different vendors with the same Al concentration of AlGaN were used. The defect densities of HEMT structures with 2 and 5 μm GaN buffer layer were 7 × 109 and 5 × 108 cm₋2, respectively, as measured by transmission electron microscopy. There was little difference in drain saturation current or in transfer characteristics in HEMTs on these two types of buffer. However, there was no dispersionmore » observed on the nonpassivated HEMTs with 5 μm GaN buffer layer for gate-lag pulsed measurement at 100 kHz, which was in sharp contrast to the 71% drain current reduction for the HEMT with 2 μm GaN buffer layer.« less

  12. ALD TiO2-Al2O3 Stack: An Improved Gate Dielectrics on Ga-polar GaN MOSCAPs

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wei, Daming; Edgar, James H.; Briggs, Dayrl P.; Srijanto, Bernadeta R.; Retterer, Scott T.; Meyer, III, Harry M.

    2014-10-15

    This research focuses on the benefits and properties of TiO2-Al2O3 nano-stack thin films deposited on Ga2O3/GaN by plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition (PA-ALD) for gate dielectric development. This combination of materials achieved a high dielectric constant, a low leakage current, and a low interface trap density. Correlations were sought between the films’ structure, composition, and electrical properties. The gate dielectrics were approximately 15 nm thick and contained 5.1 nm TiO2, 7.1 nm Al2O3 and 2 nm Ga2O3 as determined by spectroscopic ellipsometry. The interface carbon concentration, as measured by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) depth profile, was negligible for GaN pretreated bymore » thermal oxidation in O2 for 30 minutes at 850°C. The RMS roughness slightly increased after thermal oxidation and remained the same after ALD of the nano-stack, as determined by atomic force microscopy. The dielectric constant of TiO2-Al2O3 on Ga2O3/GaN was increased to 12.5 compared to that of pure Al2O3 (8~9) on GaN. In addition, the nano-stack's capacitance-voltage (C-V) hysteresis was small, with a total trap density of 8.74 × 1011 cm-2. The gate leakage current density (J=2.81× 10-8 A/cm2) was low at +1 V gate bias. These results demonstrate the promising potential of plasma ALD deposited TiO2/Al2O3 for serving as the gate oxide on Ga2O3/GaN based MOS devices.« less

  13. Temperature-dependent Raman and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy studies on phase transition behavior of VO{sub 2} films with M1 and M2 phases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Okimura, Kunio Hanis Azhan, Nurul; Hajiri, Tetsuya; Kimura, Shin-ichi; Zaghrioui, Mustapha; Sakai, Joe

    2014-04-21

    Structural and electronic phase transitions behavior of two polycrystalline VO{sub 2} films, one with pure M1 phase and the other with pure M2 phase at room temperature, were investigated by temperature-controlled Raman spectroscopy and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS). We observed characteristic transient dynamics in which the Raman modes at 195 cm{sup −1} (V-V vibration) and 616 cm{sup −1} (V-O vibration) showed remarkable hardening along the temperature in M1 phase film, indicating the rearrangements of V-V pairs and VO{sub 6} octahedra. It was also shown that the M1 Raman mode frequency approached those of invariant M2 peaks before entering rutile phase. In UPS spectra with high energy resolution of 0.03 eV for the M2 phase film, narrower V{sub 3d} band was observed together with smaller gap compared to those of M1 phase film, supporting the nature of Mott insulator of M2 phase even in the polycrystalline film. Cooperative behavior of lattice rearrangements and electronic phase transition was suggested for M1 phase film.

  14. Role of an ultra-thin AlN/GaN superlattice interlayer on the strain engineering of GaN films grown on Si(110) and Si(111) substrates by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, X. Q.; Takahashi, T.; Matsuhata, H.; Ide, T.; Shimizu, M.; Rong, X.; Chen, G.; Wang, X. Q.; Shen, B.

    2013-12-02

    We investigate the role of an ultra-thin AlN/GaN superlattice interlayer (SL-IL) on the strain engineering of the GaN films grown on Si(110) and Si(111) substrates by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. It is found that micro-cracks limitted only at the SL-IL position are naturally generated. These micro-cracks play an important role in relaxing the tensile strain caused by the difference of the coefficient of thermal expansion between GaN and Si and keeping the residual strain in the crack-free GaN epilayers resulted from the SL-IL during the growth. The mechanism understanding of the strain modulation by the SL-IL in the GaN epilayers grown on Si substrates makes it possible to design new heterostructures of III-nitrides for optic and electronic device applications.

  15. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Advanced Low-Cost SiC and GaN Wide Bandgap Inverters for Under-the-Hood Electric Vehicle Traction Drives

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by APEI Inc. at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about Advanced low-cost SIC and GaN wide...

  16. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Advanced Low-Cost SiC and GaN Wide Bandgap Inverters for Under-the-Hood Electric Vehicle Traction Drives

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by APEI Inc. at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about advanced low-cost SiC and GaN wide...

  17. Phase-field simulations of GaN growth by selective area epitaxy from complex mask geometries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aagesen, Larry K.; Thornton, Katsuyo; Coltrin, Michael E.; Han, Jung

    2015-05-21

    Three-dimensional phase-field simulations of GaN growth by selective area epitaxy were performed. The model includes a crystallographic-orientation-dependent deposition rate and arbitrarily complex mask geometries. The orientation-dependent deposition rate can be determined from experimental measurements of the relative growth rates of low-index crystallographic facets. Growth on various complex mask geometries was simulated on both c-plane and a-plane template layers. Agreement was observed between simulations and experiment, including complex phenomena occurring at the intersections between facets. The sources of the discrepancies between simulated and experimental morphologies were also investigated. The model provides a route to optimize masks and processing conditions during materials synthesis for solar cells, light-emitting diodes, and other electronic and opto-electronic applications.

  18. Phase-field simulations of GaN growth by selective area epitaxy on complex mask geometries

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aagesen, Larry K.; Coltrin, Michael Elliott; Han, Jung; Thornton, Katsuyo

    2015-05-15

    Three-dimensional phase-field simulations of GaN growth by selective area epitaxy were performed. Furthermore, this model includes a crystallographic-orientation-dependent deposition rate and arbitrarily complex mask geometries. The orientation-dependent deposition rate can be determined from experimental measurements of the relative growth rates of low-index crystallographic facets. Growth on various complex mask geometries was simulated on both c-plane and a-plane template layers. Agreement was observed between simulations and experiment, including complex phenomena occurring at the intersections between facets. The sources of the discrepancies between simulated and experimental morphologies were also investigated. We found that the model provides a route to optimize masks andmore » processing conditions during materials synthesis for solar cells, light-emitting diodes, and other electronic and opto-electronic applications.« less

  19. Polarity characterization by anomalous x-ray dispersion of ZnO films and GaN lateral polar structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shelton, Christopher T.; Sachet, Edward; Paisley, Elizabeth A.; Hoffmann, Marc P.; Rajan, Joseph; Collazo, Ramn; Sitar, Zlatko; Maria, Jon-Paul

    2014-01-28

    We demonstrate the use of anomalous x-ray scattering of constituent cations at their absorption edge, in a conventional Bragg-Brentano diffractometer, to measure absolutely and quantitatively the polar orientation and polarity fraction of unipolar and mixed polar wurtzitic crystals. In one set of experiments, the gradual transition between c+ and c? polarity of epitaxial ZnO films on sapphire as a function of MgO buffer layer thickness is monitored quantitatively, while in a second experiment, we map the polarity of a lateral polar homojunction in GaN. The dispersion measurements are compared with piezoforce microscopy images, and we demonstrate how x-ray dispersion and scanning probe methods can provide complementary information that can discriminate between polarity fractions at a material surface and polarity fractions averaged over the film bulk.

  20. Compositionally graded relaxed AlGaN buffers on semipolar GaN for mid-ultraviolet emission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, Erin C.; Wu Feng; Haeger, Daniel A.; Nakamura, Shuji; Denbaars, Steven P.; Cohen, Daniel A.; Speck, James S.; Romanov, Alexey E.

    2012-10-01

    In this Letter, we report on the growth and properties of relaxed, compositionally graded Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N buffer layers on freestanding semipolar (2021) GaN substrates. Continuous and step compositional grades with Al concentrations up to x = 0.61 have been achieved, with emission wavelengths in the mid-ultraviolet region as low as 265 nm. Coherency stresses were relaxed progressively throughout the grades by misfit dislocation generation via primary (basal) slip and secondary (non-basal) slip systems. Threading dislocation densities in the final layers of the grades were less than 10{sup 6}/cm{sup 2} as confirmed by plan-view transmission electron microscopy and cathodoluminescence studies.

  1. Carbon doped GaN buffer layer using propane for high electron mobility transistor applications: Growth and device results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, X.; Nilsson, D.; Danielsson, Ö.; Pedersen, H.; Janzén, E.; Forsberg, U.; Bergsten, J.; Rorsman, N.

    2015-12-28

    The creation of a semi insulating (SI) buffer layer in AlGaN/GaN High Electron Mobility Transistor (HEMT) devices is crucial for preventing a current path beneath the two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG). In this investigation, we evaluate the use of a gaseous carbon gas precursor, propane, for creating a SI GaN buffer layer in a HEMT structure. The carbon doped profile, using propane gas, is a two stepped profile with a high carbon doping (1.5 × 10{sup 18 }cm{sup −3}) epitaxial layer closest to the substrate and a lower doped layer (3 × 10{sup 16 }cm{sup −3}) closest to the 2DEG channel. Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry measurement shows a uniform incorporation versus depth, and no memory effect from carbon doping can be seen. The high carbon doping (1.5 × 10{sup 18 }cm{sup −3}) does not influence the surface morphology, and a roughness root-mean-square value of 0.43 nm is obtained from Atomic Force Microscopy. High resolution X-ray diffraction measurements show very sharp peaks and no structural degradation can be seen related to the heavy carbon doped layer. HEMTs are fabricated and show an extremely low drain induced barrier lowering value of 0.1 mV/V, demonstrating an excellent buffer isolation. The carbon doped GaN buffer layer using propane gas is compared to samples using carbon from the trimethylgallium molecule, showing equally low leakage currents, demonstrating the capability of growing highly resistive buffer layers using a gaseous carbon source.

  2. Temperature dependent dielectric function and the E{sub 0} critical points of hexagonal GaN from 30 to 690 K

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Tae Jung Hwang, Soon Yong; Byun, Jun Seok; Barange, Nilesh S.; Park, Han Gyeol; Dong Kim, Young

    2014-02-15

    The complex dielectric function ? and the E{sub 0} excitonic and band-edge critical-point structures of hexagonal GaN are reported for temperatures from 30 to 690 K and energies from 0.74 to 6.42 eV, obtained by rotating-compensator spectroscopic ellipsometry on a 1.9 ?m thick GaN film deposited on a c-plane (0001) sapphire substrate by molecular beam epitaxy. Direct inversion and B-splines in a multilayer-structure calculation were used to extract the optical properties of the film from the measured pseudodielectric function ???. At low temperature sharp E{sub 0} excitonic and critical-point interband transitions are separately observed. Their temperature dependences were determined by fitting the data to the empirical Varshni relation and the phenomenological expression that contains the Bose-Einstein statistical factor.

  3. Zero lattice mismatch and twin-free single crystalline ScN buffer layers for GaN growth on silicon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lupina, L.; Zoellner, M. H.; Dietrich, B.; Capellini, G.; Niermann, T.; Lehmann, M.; Thapa, S. B.; Haeberlen, M.; Storck, P.; Schroeder, T.

    2015-11-16

    We report the growth of thin ScN layers deposited by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy on Sc{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Si(111) substrates. Using x-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy, we find that ScN films grown at 600 °C are single crystalline, twin-free with rock-salt crystal structure, and exhibit a direct optical band gap of 2.2 eV. A high degree of crystalline perfection and a very good lattice matching between ScN and GaN (misfit < 0.1%) makes the ScN/Sc{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} buffer system a very promising template for the growth of high quality GaN layers on silicon.

  4. Structural anisotropic properties of a-plane GaN epilayers grown on r-plane sapphire by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lotsari, A.; Kehagias, Th.; Katsikini, M.; Arvanitidis, J.; Ves, S.; Komninou, Ph.; Dimitrakopulos, G. P.; Tsiakatouras, G.; Tsagaraki, K.; Georgakilas, A.; Christofilos, D.

    2014-06-07

    Heteroepitaxial non-polar III-Nitride layers may exhibit extensive anisotropy in the surface morphology and the epilayer microstructure along distinct in-plane directions. The structural anisotropy, evidenced by the M-shape dependence of the (112{sup }0) x-ray rocking curve widths on the beam azimuth angle, was studied by combining transmission electron microscopy observations, Raman spectroscopy, high resolution x-ray diffraction, and atomic force microscopy in a-plane GaN epilayers grown on r-plane sapphire substrates by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (PAMBE). The structural anisotropic behavior was attributed quantitatively to the high dislocation densities, particularly the Frank-Shockley partial dislocations that delimit the I{sub 1} intrinsic basal stacking faults, and to the concomitant plastic strain relaxation. On the other hand, isotropic samples exhibited lower dislocation densities and a biaxial residual stress state. For PAMBE growth, the anisotropy was correlated to N-rich (or Ga-poor) conditions on the surface during growth, that result in formation of asymmetric a-plane GaN grains elongated along the c-axis. Such conditions enhance the anisotropy of gallium diffusion on the surface and reduce the GaN nucleation rate.

  5. ARM - Instrument - sashe

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AMF1 PGH M1 Browse Data ARIES Observatory, Nainital, Uttarkhand, India; AMF1 retired PVC M1 Browse Data Highland Center, Cape Cod MA; AMF1 retired retired Originating...

  6. Final decision document for the interim response action at the M-1 Settling Basins, Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Version 4. 0. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-03-01

    The objective of the interim response action at the M-1 settling basins is to mitigate the threat of release of contaminants from the basins which are a direct source of as contamination to the ground water. The proposed IRA consists of (1) construction of a 360 degree subsurface barrier and (2) treatment of the wastes with in-situ vitrification. This decision document provides summaries of: (1) alternative technologies considered; (2) significant events leading to the initiation of the IRA; (3) the IRA project; and (4) applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements, standards, criteria, and limitations (ARAR's) associated with the program.

  7. Psychological effects of sustained operations in a simulated NBC (nuclear, biological or chemical) environment on M1 tank crews. Technical report, May-June 1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munro, I.; Rauch, T.M.; Banderet, L.E.; Lussier, A.R.; Tharion, W.J.

    1987-07-03

    Forty-eight M1 crewmen were tested in a temperate climate under conditions simulating 72-hour operations in an area contaminated with chemical agents. Over 50% of the crewman voluntarily withdrew from the test, and maximum unit endurance did not exceed 32 hours. Two problems were found to be related to endurance failure. Soldiers who withdrew reported more intense symptoms associated with respiratory distress than did those who remained in the test. In addition, soldiers who withdrew experienced greater cognitive difficulties. Near-term countermeasures, assessed in some test iterations, showed no significant endurance-extending effects. Alternative solutions based on the identified problems were proposed.

  8. Design, fabrication, and performance analysis of GaN vertical electron transistors with a buried p/n junction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yeluri, Ramya Lu, Jing; Keller, Stacia; Mishra, Umesh K.; Hurni, Christophe A.; Browne, David A.; Speck, James S.; Chowdhury, Srabanti

    2015-05-04

    The Current Aperture Vertical Electron Transistor (CAVET) combines the high conductivity of the two dimensional electron gas channel at the AlGaN/GaN heterojunction with better field distribution offered by a vertical design. In this work, CAVETs with buried, conductive p-GaN layers as the current blocking layer are reported. The p-GaN layer was regrown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition and the subsequent channel regrowth was done by ammonia molecular beam epitaxy to maintain the p-GaN conductivity. Transistors with high ON current (10.9?kA/cm{sup 2}) and low ON-resistance (0.4 m? cm{sup 2}) are demonstrated. Non-planar selective area regrowth is identified as the limiting factor to transistor breakdown, using planar and non-planar n/p/n structures. Planar n/p/n structures recorded an estimated electric field of 3.1 MV/cm, while non-planar structures showed a much lower breakdown voltage. Lowering the p-GaN regrowth temperature improved breakdown in the non-planar n/p/n structure. Combining high breakdown voltage with high current will enable GaN vertical transistors with high power densities.

  9. Measurement of the hot electron mean free path and the momentum relaxation rate in GaN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suntrup, Donald J.; Gupta, Geetak; Li, Haoran; Keller, Stacia; Mishra, Umesh K.

    2014-12-29

    We present a method for measuring the mean free path and extracting the momentum relaxation time of hot electrons in GaN using the hot electron transistor (HET). In this device, electrons are injected over a high energy emitter barrier into the base where they experience quasi-ballistic transport well above the conduction band edge. After traversing the base, high energy electrons either surmount the base-collector barrier and become collector current or reflect off the barrier and become base current. We fabricate HETs with various base thicknesses and measure the common emitter transfer ratio (α) for each device. The mean free path is extracted by fitting α to a decaying exponential as a function of base width and the relaxation time is computed using a suitable injection velocity. For devices with an injection energy of ∼1 eV, we measure a hot electron mean free path of 14 nm and calculate a momentum relaxation time of 16 fs. These values are in agreement with theoretical calculations where longitudinal optical phonon scattering is the dominant momentum relaxation mechanism.

  10. InGaN/GaN tunnel junctions for hole injection in GaN light emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krishnamoorthy, Sriram E-mail: rajan@ece.osu.edu; Akyol, Fatih; Rajan, Siddharth E-mail: rajan@ece.osu.edu

    2014-10-06

    InGaN/GaN tunnel junction contacts were grown using plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) on top of a metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD)-grown InGaN/GaN blue (450?nm) light emitting diode. A voltage drop of 5.3?V at 100?mA, forward resistance of 2 10{sup ?2} ? cm{sup 2}, and a higher light output power compared to the reference light emitting diodes (LED) with semi-transparent p-contacts were measured in the tunnel junction LED (TJLED). A forward resistance of 5??10{sup ?4} ? cm{sup 2} was measured in a GaN PN junction with the identical tunnel junction contact as the TJLED, grown completely by MBE. The depletion region due to the impurities at the regrowth interface between the MBE tunnel junction and the MOCVD-grown LED was hence found to limit the forward resistance measured in the TJLED.

  11. Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP): Model AL-M1 nuclear packaging (DOE C of C No. USA/9507/BLF)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coleman, H.L.; Whitney, M.A.; Williams, M.A.; Alexander, B.M.; Shapiro, A.

    1987-11-24

    This Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) satisfies the request of the US Department of Energy for a formal safety analysis of the shipping container identified as USA/9507/BLF, also called AL-M1, configuration 5. This report makes available to all potential users the technical information and the limits pertinent to the construction and use of the shipping containers. It includes discussions of structural integrity, thermal resistance, radiation shielding and radiological safety, nuclear criticality safety, and quality control. A complete physical and technical description of the package is presented. The package consists of an inner container centered within an insulated steel drum. The configuration-5 package contains tritiated water held on sorbent material. There are two other AL-M1 packages, designated configurations 1 and 3. These use the same insulated outer drum, but licensing of these containers will not be addressed in this SARP. Design and development considerations, the tests and evaluations required to prove the ability of the container to withstand normal transportation conditions, and the sequence of four hypothetical accident conditions (free drop, puncture, thermal, and water immersion) are discussed. Tables, graphs, dimensional sketches, photographs, technical references, loading and shipping procedures, Monsanto Research Corporation-Mound experience in using the containers, and a copy of the DOE/OSD/ALO Certificate of Compliance are included.

  12. Ultraviolet GaN photodetectors on Si via oxide buffer heterostructures with integrated short period oxide-based distributed Bragg reflectors and leakage suppressing metal-oxide-semiconductor contacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szyszka, A. E-mail: adam.szyszka@pwr.wroc.pl; Haeberlen, M.; Storck, P.; Thapa, S. B.; Schroeder, T.

    2014-08-28

    Based on a novel double step oxide buffer heterostructure approach for GaN integration on Si, we present an optimized Metal-Semiconductor-Metal (MSM)-based Ultraviolet (UV) GaN photodetector system with integrated short-period (oxide/Si) Distributed Bragg Reflector (DBR) and leakage suppressing Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor (MOS) electrode contacts. In terms of structural properties, it is demonstrated by in-situ reflection high energy electron diffraction and transmission electron microscopy-energy dispersive x-ray studies that the DBR heterostructure layers grow with high thickness homogeneity and sharp interface structures sufficient for UV applications; only minor Si diffusion into the Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} films is detected under the applied thermal growth budget. As revealed by comparative high resolution x-ray diffraction studies on GaN/oxide buffer/Si systems with and without DBR systems, the final GaN layer structure quality is not significantly influenced by the growth of the integrated DBR heterostructure. In terms of optoelectronic properties, it is demonstrated thatwith respect to the basic GaN/oxide/Si system without DBRthe insertion of (a) the DBR heterostructures and (b) dark current suppressing MOS contacts enhances the photoresponsivity below the GaN band-gap related UV cut-off energy by almost up to two orders of magnitude. Given the in-situ oxide passivation capability of grown GaN surfaces and the one order of magnitude lower number of superlattice layers in case of higher refractive index contrast (oxide/Si) systems with respect to classical III-N DBR superlattices, virtual GaN substrates on Si via functional oxide buffer systems are thus a promising robust approach for future GaN-based UV detector technologies.

  13. Propane ammoxidation over the Mo-V-Te-Nb-O M1 phase: Reactivity of surface cations in hydrogen abstraction steps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muthukumar, Kaliappan; Yu, Junjun; Xu, Ye; Guliants, Vadim V.

    2011-01-01

    Density functional theory calculations (GGA-PBE) have been performed to investigate the adsorption of C3 (propane, isopropyl, propene, and allyl) and H species on the proposed active center present in the surface ab planes of the bulk Mo-V-Te-Nb-O M1 phase in order to better understand the roles of the different surface cations in propane ammoxidation. Modified cluster models were employed to isolate the closely spaced V=O and Te=O from each other and to vary the oxidation state of the V cation. While propane and propene adsorb with nearly zero adsorption energy, the isopropyl and allyl radicals bind strongly to V=O and Te=O with adsorption energies, {Delta}E, being {le} -1.75 eV, but appreciably more weakly on other sites, such as Mo=O, bridging oxygen (Mo-O-V and Mo-O-Mo), and empty metal apical sites ({Delta}E > -1 eV). Atomic H binds more strongly to Te = O ({Delta}E {le} -3 eV) than to all the other sites, including V = O ({Delta}E = -2.59 eV). The reduction of surface oxo groups by dissociated H and their removal as water are thermodynamically favorable except when both H atoms are bonded to the same Te=O. Consistent with the strong binding of H, Te=O is markedly more active at abstracting the methylene H from propane (E{sub a} {le} 1.01 eV) than V = O (E{sub a} = 1.70 eV on V{sup 5+} = O and 2.13 eV on V{sup 4+} = O). The higher-than-observed activity and the loose binding of Te = O moieties to the mixed metal oxide lattice of M1 raise the question of whether active Te = O groups are in fact present in the surface ab planes of the M1 phase under propane ammoxidation conditions.

  14. Effects of substrate temperature, substrate orientation, and energetic atomic collisions on the structure of GaN films grown by reactive sputtering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schiaber, Ziani S.; Lisboa-Filho, Paulo N.; Silva, Jos H. D. da; Leite, Douglas M. G.; Bortoleto, Jos R. R.

    2013-11-14

    The combined effects of substrate temperature, substrate orientation, and energetic particle impingement on the structure of GaN films grown by reactive radio-frequency magnetron sputtering are investigated. Monte-Carlo based simulations are employed to analyze the energies of the species generated in the plasma and colliding with the growing surface. Polycrystalline films grown at temperatures ranging from 500 to 1000 C clearly showed a dependence of orientation texture and surface morphology on substrate orientation (c- and a-plane sapphire) in which the (0001) GaN planes were parallel to the substrate surface. A large increase in interplanar spacing associated with the increase in both a- and c-parameters of the hexagonal lattice and a redshift of the optical bandgap were observed at substrate temperatures higher than 600 C. The results showed that the tensile stresses produced during the film's growth in high-temperature deposition ranges were much larger than the expected compressive stresses caused by the difference in the thermal expansion coefficients of the film and substrate in the cool-down process after the film growth. The best films were deposited at 500 C, 30 W and 600 C, 45 W, which corresponds to conditions where the out diffusion from the film is low. Under these conditions the benefits of the temperature increase because of the decrease in defect density are greater than the problems caused by the strongly strained lattice that occurr at higher temperatures. The results are useful to the analysis of the growth conditions of GaN films by reactive sputtering.

  15. Photo-induced water oxidation at the aqueous GaN (1010) interface: Deprotonation kinetics of the first proton-coupled electron-transfer step

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ertem, Mehmed Z.; Kharche, Neerav; Batista, Victor S.; Hybertsen, Mark S.; Tully, John C.; Muckerman, James T.

    2015-03-12

    Photoeclectrochemical water splitting plays a key role in a promising path to the carbon-neutral generation of solar fuels. Wurzite GaN and its alloys (e.g., GaN/ZnO and InGaN) are demonstrated photocatalysts for water oxidation, and they can drive the overall water splitting reaction when coupled with co-catalysts for proton reduction. In the present work, we investigate the water oxidation mechanism on the prototypical GaN (1010) surface using a combined ab initio molecular dynamics and molecular cluster model approach taking into account the role of water dissociation and hydrogen bonding within the first solvation shell of the hydroxylated surface. The investigation of free-energy changes for the four proton-coupled electron-transfer (PCET) steps of the water oxidation mechanism shows that the first PCET step for the conversion of Ga-OH to Ga-O?? requires the highest energy input. We further examine the sequential PCETs, with the proton transfer (PT) following the electron transfer (ET), and find that photo-generated holes localize on surface NH sites is thermodynamically more favorable than OH sites. However, proton transfer from OH sites with subsequent localization of holes on oxygen atoms is kinetically favored owing to hydrogen bonding interactions at the GaN (1010)water interface. We find that the deprotonation of surface OH sites is the limiting factor for the generation of reactive oxyl radical ion intermediates and consequently for water oxidation.

  16. Photo-induced water oxidation at the aqueous GaN (101¯0) interface: Deprotonation kinetics of the first proton-coupled electron-transfer step

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ertem, Mehmed Z.; Kharche, Neerav; Batista, Victor S.; Hybertsen, Mark S.; Tully, John C.; Muckerman, James T.

    2015-03-12

    Photoeclectrochemical water splitting plays a key role in a promising path to the carbon-neutral generation of solar fuels. Wurzite GaN and its alloys (e.g., GaN/ZnO and InGaN) are demonstrated photocatalysts for water oxidation, and they can drive the overall water splitting reaction when coupled with co-catalysts for proton reduction. In the present work, we investigate the water oxidation mechanism on the prototypical GaN (101¯0) surface using a combined ab initio molecular dynamics and molecular cluster model approach taking into account the role of water dissociation and hydrogen bonding within the first solvation shell of the hydroxylated surface. The investigation ofmore » free-energy changes for the four proton-coupled electron-transfer (PCET) steps of the water oxidation mechanism shows that the first PCET step for the conversion of –Ga-OH to –Ga-O˙⁻ requires the highest energy input. We further examine the sequential PCETs, with the proton transfer (PT) following the electron transfer (ET), and find that photo-generated holes localize on surface –NH sites is thermodynamically more favorable than –OH sites. However, proton transfer from –OH sites with subsequent localization of holes on oxygen atoms is kinetically favored owing to hydrogen bonding interactions at the GaN (101¯0)–water interface. We find that the deprotonation of surface –OH sites is the limiting factor for the generation of reactive oxyl radical ion intermediates and consequently for water oxidation.« less

  17. Mismatch relaxation by stacking fault formation of AlN islands in AlGaN/GaN structures on m-plane GaN substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smalc-Koziorowska, Julita; Sawicka, Marta; Skierbiszewski, Czeslaw; Grzegory, Izabella

    2011-08-08

    We study the mismatch relaxation of 2-5 nm thin elongated AlN islands formed during growth of AlGaN on bulk m-plane GaN by molecular beam epitaxy. The relaxation of these m-plane AlN layers is anisotropic and occurs through the introduction of stacking faults in [0001] planes during island coalescence, while no relaxation is observed along the perpendicular [1120] direction. This anisotropy in the mismatch relaxation and the formation of stacking faults in the AlN islands are explained by the growth mode of the AlN platelets and their coalescence along the [0001] direction.

  18. The influenza fingerprints: NS1 and M1 proteins contribute to specific host cell ultrastructure signatures upon infection by different influenza A viruses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terrier, Olivier; Moules, Vincent; Carron, Coralie; Cartet, Gaeelle; Frobert, Emilie; Yver, Matthieu; Traversier, Aurelien; Wolff, Thorsten; Naffakh, Nadia; and others

    2012-10-10

    Influenza A are nuclear replicating viruses which hijack host machineries in order to achieve optimal infection. Numerous functional virus-host interactions have now been characterized, but little information has been gathered concerning their link to the virally induced remodeling of the host cellular architecture. In this study, we infected cells with several human and avian influenza viruses and we have analyzed their ultrastructural modifications by using electron and confocal microscopy. We discovered that infections lead to a major and systematic disruption of nucleoli and the formation of a large number of diverse viral structures showing specificity that depended on the subtype origin and genomic composition of viruses. We identified NS1 and M1 proteins as the main actors in the remodeling of the host ultra-structure and our results suggest that each influenza A virus strain could be associated with a specific cellular fingerprint, possibly correlated to the functional properties of their viral components.

  19. Upbend and M1 scissors mode in neutron-rich nuclei - consequences for r-process $$(n,\\gamma )$$ reaction rates

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Larsen, A. C.; Goriely, S.; Bernstein, L. A.; Bleuel, D. L.; Bracco, A.; Brown, B. A.; Camera, F.; Eriksen, T. K.; Frauendorf, S.; Giacoppo, F.; et al

    2015-01-01

    An enhanced probability for low-energy γ-emission (upbend, Eγ < 3 MeV) at high excitation energies has been observed for several light and medium-mass nuclei close to the valley of stability. Also the M1 scissors mode seen in deformed nuclei increases the γ-decay probability for low-energy γ-rays (Eγ ≈ 2–3 MeV). These phenomena, if present in neutron-rich nuclei, have the potential to increase radiative neutron-capture rates relevant for the r-process. Furthermore, the experimental and theoretical status of the upbend is discussed, and preliminary calculations of (n,γ) reaction rates for neutron-rich, mid-mass nuclei including the scissors mode are shown.

  20. STEM HAADF Image Simulation of the Orthorhombic M1 Phase in the Mo-V-Nb-Te-O Propane Oxidation Catalyst

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D Blom; X Li; S Mitra; T Vogt; D Buttrey

    2011-12-31

    A full frozen phonon multislice simulation of high angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF STEM) images from the M1 phase of the Mo-V-Nb-Te-O propane oxidation catalyst has been performed by using the latest structural model obtained using the Rietveld method. Simulated contrast results are compared with experimental HAADF images. Good agreement is observed at ring sites, however significant thickness dependence is noticed at the linking sites. The remaining discrepancies between the model based on Rietveld refinement and image simulations indicate that the sampling of a small volume element in HAADF STEM and averaging elemental contributions of a disordered site in a crystal slab by using the virtual crystal approximation might be problematic, especially if there is preferential Mo/V ordering near the (001) surface.

  1. Thermal stability of deep level defects induced by high energy proton irradiation in n-type GaN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Z.; Farzana, E.; Sun, W. Y.; Arehart, A. R.; Ringel, S. A.; Chen, J.; Zhang, E. X.; Fleetwood, D. M.; Schrimpf, R. D.; McSkimming, B.; Kyle, E. C. H.; Speck, J. S.

    2015-10-21

    The impact of annealing of proton irradiation-induced defects in n-type GaN devices has been systematically investigated using deep level transient and optical spectroscopies. Moderate temperature annealing (>200–250 °C) causes significant reduction in the concentration of nearly all irradiation-induced traps. While the decreased concentration of previously identified N and Ga vacancy related levels at E{sub C} − 0.13 eV, 0.16 eV, and 2.50 eV generally followed a first-order reaction model with activation energies matching theoretical values for N{sub I} and V{sub Ga} diffusion, irradiation-induced traps at E{sub C} − 0.72 eV, 1.25 eV, and 3.28 eV all decrease in concentration in a gradual manner, suggesting a more complex reduction mechanism. Slight increases in concentration are observed for the N-vacancy related levels at E{sub C} − 0.20 eV and 0.25 eV, which may be due to the reconfiguration of other N-vacancy related defects. Finally, the observed reduction in concentrations of the states at E{sub C} − 1.25 and E{sub C} − 3.28 eV as a function of annealing temperature closely tracks the detailed recovery behavior of the background carrier concentration as a function of annealing temperature. As a result, it is suggested that these two levels are likely to be responsible for the underlying carrier compensation effect that causes the observation of carrier removal in proton-irradiated n-GaN.

  2. Better Catalysts through Microscopy: Mesoscale M1/M2 Intergrowth in Molybdenum–Vanadium Based Complex Oxide Catalysts for Propane Ammoxidation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    He, Qian; Woo, Jungwon; Belianinov, Alexei; Guliants, Vadim V.; Borisevich, Albina Y.

    2015-03-06

    Catalysis research has transformed from the predominantly empirical field to one where it is possible to control the catalytic properties via characterization and modification of the atomic-scale active centers. Many phenomena in catalysis, such as synergistic effect, however, transcend the atomic scale and also require the knowledge and control of the mesoscale structure of the specimen to harness. Our paper, we use our discovery of atomic-scale epitaxial interfaces in molybdenum vanadium based complex oxide catalysts systems (i.e., MoVMO, M = Ta, Te, Sb, Nb, etc.) to achieve control of the mesoscale structure of this complex mixture of very different active phases. We can now achieve true epitaxial intergrowth between the catalytically critical M1 and M2 phases in the system that are hypothesized to have synergistic interactions, and demonstrate that the resulting catalyst has improved selectivity in the initial studies. Finally, we highlight the crucial role atomic scale characterization and mesoscale structure control play in uncovering the complex underpinnings of the synergistic effect in catalysis.

  3. Adsorption of propane, isopropyl, and hydrogen on cluster models of the M1 phase of Mo-V-Te-Nb-O mixed metal oxide catalyst

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Govindasamy, Agalya; Muthukumar, Kaliappan; Yu, Junjun; Xu, Ye; Guliants, Vadim V.

    2010-01-01

    The Mo-V-Te-Nb-O mixed metal oxide catalyst possessing the M1 phase structure is uniquely capable of directly converting propane into acrylonitrile. However, the mechanism of this complex eight-electron transformation, which includes a series of oxidative H-abstraction and N-insertion steps, remains poorly understood. We have conducted a density functional theory study of cluster models of the proposed active and selective site for propane ammoxidation, including the adsorption of propane, isopropyl (CH{sub 3}CHCH{sub 3}), and H which are involved in the first step of this transformation, that is, the methylene C-H bond scission in propane, on these active site models. Among the surface oxygen species, the telluryl oxo (Te=O) is found to be the most nucleophilic. Whereas the adsorption of propane is weak regardless of the MO{sub x} species involved, isopropyl and H adsorption exhibits strong preference in the order of Te=O > V=O > bridging oxygens > empty Mo apical site, suggesting the importance of TeO{sub x} species for H abstraction. The adsorption energies of isopropyl and H and consequently the reaction energy of the initial dehydrogenation of propane are strongly dependent on the number of ab planes included in the cluster, which points to the need to employ multilayer cluster models to correctly capture the energetics of surface chemistry on this mixed metal oxide catalyst.

  4. Better Catalysts through Microscopy: Mesoscale M1/M2 Intergrowth in Molybdenum–Vanadium Based Complex Oxide Catalysts for Propane Ammoxidation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    He, Qian; Woo, Jungwon; Belianinov, Alexei; Guliants, Vadim V.; Borisevich, Albina Y.

    2015-03-06

    Catalysis research has transformed from the predominantly empirical field to one where it is possible to control the catalytic properties via characterization and modification of the atomic-scale active centers. Many phenomena in catalysis, such as synergistic effect, however, transcend the atomic scale and also require the knowledge and control of the mesoscale structure of the specimen to harness. Our paper, we use our discovery of atomic-scale epitaxial interfaces in molybdenum vanadium based complex oxide catalysts systems (i.e., MoVMO, M = Ta, Te, Sb, Nb, etc.) to achieve control of the mesoscale structure of this complex mixture of very different activemore » phases. We can now achieve true epitaxial intergrowth between the catalytically critical M1 and M2 phases in the system that are hypothesized to have synergistic interactions, and demonstrate that the resulting catalyst has improved selectivity in the initial studies. Finally, we highlight the crucial role atomic scale characterization and mesoscale structure control play in uncovering the complex underpinnings of the synergistic effect in catalysis.« less

  5. Donor impurity states and related terahertz range nonlinear optical response in GaN cylindrical quantum wires: Effects of external electric and magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Correa, J. D.; Mora-Ramos, M. E.; Duque, C. A.

    2014-06-07

    We report a study on the optical absorption coefficient associated to hydrogenic impurity interstate transitions in zinc-blende GaN quantum wires of cylindrical shape taking into account the effects of externally applied static electric and magnetic fields. The electron states emerge within the effective mass approximation, via the exact diagonalization of the donor-impurity Hamiltonian with parabolic confinement and external field effects. The nonlinear optical absorption is calculated using a recently derived expression for the dielectric susceptibility, obtained via a nonperturbative solution of the density-matrix Bloch equation. Our results show that this treatment eliminates not only the intensity-dependent bleaching effect but also the change in sign of the nonlinear contribution due to the combined effect of asymmetric impurity location and the applied electric field.

  6. ARM - Instrument - twrcam

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    Data Highland Center, Cape Cod MA; AMF1 retired PYE M1 Browse Data Browse Plots Point Reyes, CA retired retired Originating instrument has been retired at this location...

  7. ARM - Instrument - nfov

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    Plots Highland Center, Cape Cod MA; AMF1 retired PYE M1 Browse Data Browse Plots Point Reyes, CA retired retired Originating instrument has been retired at this location...

  8. Three-dimensional spectrum mapping of bright emission centers: Investigating the brightness-limiting process in Eu-doped GaN red light emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ishii, Masashi; Koizumi, Atsushi; Fujiwara, Yasufumi

    2015-08-24

    A pulse-driven emission-spectroscopy mapping technique is used to investigate the bright emission centers in Eu-doped GaN (GaN:Eu) red light emitting diodes (LED). The LEDs are operated in pulse-driven mode, and the emission spectra are acquired for a range of pulse frequencies. This ensemble of emission spectral data yields a three-dimensional mapping that allows the origin of emission lines to be identified by visual inspection. The identification was achieved even for a weak {sup 5}D{sub 0} → {sup 7}F{sub 3} transition in conventional photoluminescence measurements. A peculiar split is observed in the {sup 5}D{sub 0} → {sup 7}F{sub 3} transition for the bright emission center referred to as OMVPE 8. Despite the unique transition at this emission center, the emission efficiencies for the {sup 5}D{sub 0} → {sup 7}F{sub 3} and {sup 5}D{sub 0} → {sup 7}F{sub 2} transitions were identical. This finding indicates that the excitation of the emission centers, rather than the radiative transitions, is the limiting process that determines the GaN:Eu red LED brightness.

  9. Relaxation and critical strain for maximum In incorporation in AlInGaN on GaN grown by metal organic vapour phase epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reuters, Benjamin; Finken, M.; Wille, A.; Kalisch, H.; Vescan, A.; Hollaender, B.; Heuken, M.

    2012-11-01

    Quaternary AlInGaN layers were grown on conventional GaN buffer layers on sapphire by metal organic vapour phase epitaxy at different surface temperatures and different reactor pressures with constant precursor flow conditions. A wide range in compositions within 30-62% Al, 5-29% In, and 23-53% Ga was covered, which leads to different strain states from high tensile to high compressive. From high-resolution x-ray diffraction and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, we determined the compositions, strain states, and crystal quality of the AlInGaN layers. Atomic force microscopy measurements were performed to characterize the surface morphology. A critical strain value for maximum In incorporation near the AlInGaN/GaN interface is presented. For compressively strained layers, In incorporation is limited at the interface as residual strain cannot exceed an empirical critical value of about 1.1%. Relaxation occurs at about 15 nm thickness accompanied by strong In pulling. Tensile strained layers can be grown pseudomorphically up to 70 nm at a strain state of 0.96%. A model for relaxation in compressively strained AlInGaN with virtual discrete sub-layers, which illustrates the gradually changing lattice constant during stress reduction is presented.

  10. DOE Research and Development Accomplishments Database Browse

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    J. J.; Sinclair, D.; Skensved, P.; Smith, M. W. E.; Sonley, T. J.; Steiger, T. D.; ... Simpson, D. Sinclair, P. Skensved, A. R. Smith, M. W. E. Smith, N. Starinsky, T. D. ...

  11. Browse By Region | Open Energy Information

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    (231) States (50) Congressional Districts (437) Counties (3142) Cities (27936) Clean Energy Economy Regions (7) Programs (1157) Tools (1669) Retrieved from "http:...

  12. Browse Archived Directives - DOE Directives, Delegations, and...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Issue Date Start date End date Subjects match any Administration Environment Finance Health Human Resources Information Technology Management and Operations Procurement Safety...

  13. Browse Archived Directives - DOE Directives, Delegations, and

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Requirements Accessibility Text size: (Requires JavaScript) Large Normal Small This site uses the Open Source Content Management System Plone and has been designed to be completely accessible and usable, working in accordance with the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG v1.0). If there is anything on this site - accessibility or validation related - that is not according to the standard, please contact the Site Administration, and not the Plone Team. Access keys Access keys are a

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    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Accessibility Text size: (Requires JavaScript) Large Normal Small This site uses the Open Source Content Management System Plone and has been designed to be completely accessible and usable, working in accordance with the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG v1.0). If there is anything on this site - accessibility or validation related - that is not according to the standard, please contact the Site Administration, and not the Plone Team. Access keys Access keys are a navigation device

  15. M1 Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    either solely or in partnership. Their project scope is focused on small to medium-sized oil, gas and electricity projects. Coordinates: 41.88415, -87.632409 Show Map Loading...

  16. ARM - Instrument - mwacr

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The following measurements are those considered scientifically relevant. Radar Doppler Radar reflectivity Locations ARM Mobile Facility ACX M1 Browse Data Off the Coast...

  17. ARM - Instrument - csphot

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    maintenance during periods of adverse weather conditions. ... For more details, see the External Data Center web page. ... Data Shouxian, Anhui, China retired MAO M1 Browse Data ...

  18. Poole-Frenkel effect on electrical characterization of Al-doped ZnO films deposited on p-type GaN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Bohr-Ran; Liao, Chung-Chi; Ke, Wen-Cheng Chang, Yuan-Ching; Huang, Hao-Ping; Chen, Nai-Chuan

    2014-03-21

    This paper presents the electrical properties of Al-doped ZnO (AZO) films directly grown on two types of p-type GaN thin films. The low-pressure p-GaN thin films (LP-p-GaN) exhibited structural properties of high-density edge-type threading dislocations (TDs) and compensated defects (i.e., nitrogen vacancy). Compared with high-pressure p-GaN thin films (HP-p-GaN), X-ray photoemission spectroscopy of Ga 3d core levels indicated that the surface Fermi-level shifted toward the higher binding-energy side by approximately 0.7 eV. The high-density edge-type TDs and compensated defects enabled surface Fermi-level shifting above the intrinsic Fermi-level, causing the surface of LP-p-GaN thin films to invert to n-type semiconductor. A highly nonlinear increase in leakage current regarding reverse-bias voltage was observed for AZO/LP-p-GaN. The theoretical fits for the reverse-bias voltage region indicated that the field-assisted thermal ionization of carriers from defect associated traps, which is known as the Poole-Frenkel effect, dominated the I-V behavior of AZO/LP-p-GaN. The fitting result estimated the trap energy level at 0.62 eV below the conduction band edge. In addition, the optical band gap increased from 3.50 eV for as-deposited AZO films to 3.62 eV for 300 °C annealed AZO films because of the increased carrier concentration. The increasing Fermi-level of the 300 °C annealed AZO films enabled the carrier transport to move across the interface into the LP-p-GaN thin films without any thermal activated energy. Thus, the Ohmic behavior of AZO contact can be achieved directly on the low-pressure p-GaN films at room temperature.

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