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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gamma radiation levels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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1

Gamma Radiation & X-Rays  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gamma Radiation and X-Rays 1. Gamma radiation and X-rays are electromagnetic radiation like visible light, radio waves, and ultraviolet light. These electromagnetic radiations...

2

Gamma radiation field intensity meter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode. 4 figs.

Thacker, L.H.

1994-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

3

Gamma radiation field intensity meter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode. 4 figs.

Thacker, L.H.

1995-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

4

Gamma radiation field intensity meter  

SciTech Connect

A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode.

Thacker, Louis H. (Knoxville, TN)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Gamma radiation field intensity meter  

SciTech Connect

A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode.

Thacker, Louis H. (Knoxville, TN)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Virtual Gamma Ray Radiation Sources through Neutron Radiative Capture  

SciTech Connect

The countrate response of a gamma spectrometry system from a neutron radiation source behind a plane of moderating material doped with a nuclide of a large radiative neutron capture cross-section exhibits a countrate response analogous to a gamma radiation source at the same position from the detector. Using a planar, surface area of the neutron moderating material exposed to the neutron radiation produces a larger area under the prompt gamma ray peak in the detector than a smaller area of dimensions relative to the active volume of the gamma detection system.

Scott Wilde, Raymond Keegan

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Apparatus and method for detecting gamma radiation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high efficiency radiation detector for measuring X-ray and gamma radiation from small-volume, low-activity liquid samples with an overall uncertainty better than 0.7% (one sigma SD). The radiation detector includes a hyperpure germanium well detector, a collimator, and a reference source. The well detector monitors gamma radiation emitted by the reference source and a radioactive isotope or isotopes in a sample source. The radiation from the reference source is collimated to avoid attenuation of reference source gamma radiation by the sample. Signals from the well detector are processed and stored, and the stored data is analyzed to determine the radioactive isotope(s) content of the sample. Minor self-attenuation corrections are calculated from chemical composition data.

Sigg, Raymond A. (Martinez, GA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Composition and apparatus for detecting gamma radiation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gamma radiation detector and a radioluminiscent composition for use therein. The detector includes a radioluminscent composition that emits light in a characteristic wavelength region when exposed to gamma radiation, and means for detecting said radiation. The composition contains a scintillant such as anglesite (PbSO.sub.4) or cerussite (PbCO.sub.3) incorporated into an inert, porous glass matrix via a sol-gel process. Particles of radiation-sensitive scintillant are added to, a sol solution. The mixture is polymerized to form a gel, then dried under conditions that preserve the structural integrity and radiation sensitivity of the scintillant. The final product is a composition containing the uniformly-dispersed scintillant in an inert, optically transparent and highly porous matrix. The composition is chemically inert and substantially impervious to environmental conditions including changes in temperature, air pressure, and so forth. It can be fabricated in cylinders, blocks with holes therethrough for flow of fluid, sheets, surface coatings, pellets or other convenient shapes.

Hofstetter, Kenneth J. (Aiken, SC)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Composition and apparatus for detecting gamma radiation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gamma radiation detector and a radioluminescent composition for use therein. The detector includes a radioluminescent composition that emits light in a characteristic wavelength region when exposed to gamma radiation, and means for detecting said radiation. The composition contains a scintillant such as anglesite (PbSO[sub 4]) or cerussite (PbCO[sub 3]) incorporated into an inert, porous glass matrix via a sol-gel process. Particles of radiation-sensitive scintillant are added to, a sol solution. The mixture is polymerized to form a gel, then dried under conditions that preserve the structural integrity and radiation sensitivity of the scintillant. The final product is a composition containing the uniformly-dispersed scintillant in an inert, optically transparent and highly porous matrix. The composition is chemically inert and substantially impervious to environmental conditions including changes in temperature, air pressure, and so forth. It can be fabricated in cylinders, blocks with holes therethrough for flow of fluid, sheets, surface coatings, pellets or other convenient shapes. 3 figs.

Hofstetter, K.J.

1994-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

10

Gamma-Ray Lines from Radiative Dark Matter Decay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The decay of dark matter particles which are coupled predominantly to charged leptons has been proposed as a possible origin of excess high-energy positrons and electrons observed by cosmic-ray telescopes PAMELA and Fermi LAT. Even though the dark matter itself is electrically neutral, the tree-level decay of dark matter into charged lepton pairs will generically induce radiative two-body decays of dark matter at the quantum level. Using an effective theory of leptophilic dark matter decay, we calculate the rates of radiative two-body decays for scalar and fermionic dark matter particles. Due to the absence of astrophysical sources of monochromatic gamma rays, the observation of a line in the diffuse gamma-ray spectrum would constitute a strong indication of a particle physics origin of these photons. We estimate the intensity of the gamma-ray line that may be present in the energy range of a few TeV if the dark matter decay interpretation of the leptonic cosmic-ray anomalies is correct and comment on observational prospects of present and future Imaging Cherenkov Telescopes, in particular the CTA.

Mathias Garny; Alejandro Ibarra; David Tran; Christoph Weniger

2010-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

11

A Device for Search of Gamma-Radiation Intensive Sources at the Radiation Accident Condition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The procedure designed for measuring angular distributions of gamma radiation and for search of gamma radiation intensive sources is described. It is based on application of the original multidetector device ShD-1, for measuring an angular distribution in a complete solid angle (4 pi). The calibration results and data on the angular distributions of intensity of gamma radiation at the roof of Chornobyl NPP ''Shelter'' are presented.

Batiy, Valeriy; Klyuchnykov, A; Kochnev, N; Rudko, Vladimir; shcherbin, vladimir; Yegorov, V; Schmieman, Eric A.

2005-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

12

Design and development of a portable gamma radiation monitor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A portable gamma radiation monitor has been designed and developed. The monitor can be used effectively in the dose range from 0.07 to 500 mGy/h due to gamma rays of energy greater than 65 keV. The monitor overestimated radiation doses and the uncertainty in the measured dose rate has been found to be {+-}30%. Provision has also been added to use the monitor as an installed radiation monitor. In installed mode, it can be operated from a remote location up to 1 km and the timing history can be stored on a personal computer.

Munir, M.; Khalid, M. [Health Physics Division, Directorate of Systems and Services, Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology (PINSTECH), Nilore, Islamabad 45650 (Pakistan); Ahmad, N.; Sohail, S.; Naveed, R. A.; Rafiq, M. Q. [Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences (PIEAS), P. O. Nilore, Islamabad 45650 (Pakistan)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

13

Radiation Level Changes at RAM Package Surfaces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper will explore design considerations required to meet the regulations that limit radiation level variations at external surfaces of radioactive material (RAM) packages. The radiation level requirements at package surfaces (e.g. TS-R-1 paragraphs 531 and 646) invoke not only maximum radiation levels, but also strict limits on the allowable increase in the radiation level during transport. This paper will explore the regulatory requirements by quantifying the amount of near surface movement and/or payload shifting that results in a 20% increase in the radiation level at the package surface. Typical IP-2, IP-3, Type A and Type B packaging and source geometries will be illustrated. Variations in surface radiation levels are typically the result of changes in the geometry of the surface due to an impact, puncture or crush event, or shifting and settling of radioactive contents.

Opperman, Erich [Washington Savannah River Company; Hawk, Mark B [ORNL; Kapoor, Ashok [U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Packaging and Transportation; Natali, Ronald [R. B. Natali Consulting, Inc.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

GRABGAM Analysis of Ultra-Low-Level HPGe Gamma Spectra  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The GRABGAM code has been used successfully for ultra-low level HPGe gamma spectrometry analysis since its development in 1985 at Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC). Although numerous gamma analysis codes existed at that time, reviews of institutional and commercial codes indicated that none addressed all features that were desired by SRTC. Furthermore, it was recognized that development of an in-house code would better facilitate future evolution of the code to address SRTC needs based on experience with low-level spectra. GRABGAM derives its name from Gamma Ray Analysis BASIC Generated At MCA/PC.

Winn, W.G.

1999-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

15

Integrated beta and gamma radiation dose calculations for the ferrocyanide waste tanks  

SciTech Connect

This report contains the total integrated beta and gamma radiation doses in all the ferrocyanide waste tanks. It also contains estimated gamma radiation dose rates for all single-shell waste tanks containing a liquid observation well.

Parra, S.A.

1994-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

16

Gamma Radiation from PSR B1055-52  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The telescopes on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO) have observed PSR B1055-52 a number of times between 1991 and 1998. From these data, a more detailed picture of the gamma radiation from this source has been developed, showing several characteristics which distinguish this pulsar: the light curve is complex; there is no detectable unpulsed emission; the energy spectrum is flat, with no evidence of a sharp high-energy cutoff up to >4 GeV. Comparisons of the gamma-ray data with observations at longer wavelengths show that no two of the known gamma-ray pulsars have quite the same characteristics; this diversity make s interpretation in terms of theoretical models difficult.

D. J. Thompson

1998-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

17

Concerns with low-level ionizing radiation  

SciTech Connect

Populations have been studied in geographic areas of increased natural radiation, in radiation-exposed workers, in patients medically exposed, and in accidental exposures. No reproducible evidence exists of harmful effects from increases in background radiation three to ten times the usual levels. There is no increase in leukemia or other cancers among American military participants in nuclear testing, no increase in leukemia or thyroid cancer among medical patients receiving {sup 131}I for diagnosis or treatment of hypothyroidism, and no increase in lung cancer among nonsmokers exposed to increased radon in the home. The association of radiation with the atomic bomb and with excessive regulatory and health physics as-low-as-reasonably-achievable (ALARA) radiation levels practices has created a climate of fear about the dangers of radiation at any level. However, there is no evidence that radiation exposures at the levels equivalent to medical usage are harmful. The unjustified excessive concern with radiation at any level, however, precludes beneficial uses of radiation and radioactivity in medicine, science, and industry.

Yalow, R.S.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

18

The Gamma Transitions, Level Densities and Gamma Strength Function of Isotopes Yb-172 and Sm-153  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report is presented the level densities and gamma strength function which is extracted from primary gamma transitions of (n,2g) measurement on the Dalat Nuclear Research Reactor (DNRR). The comparisons with others results and model calculations, there are outside the scope of uncertainty. These research results are showed that having of complement research for deformed nucleus in order to evaluate nuclear structure models.

Vuong Huu Tan; Pham Dinh Khang; Nguyen Xuan Hai; Ho Huu Thang; Dao Manh Trinh; Nguyen An Son

2013-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

19

Radiation from Poynting Flux Acceleration and Gamma-Ray Bursts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We compute the radiation output of electrons accelerated by Poynting flux numerically from Particle-In-Cell simulations, and derive an analytic formula to explain these numerical results. We show that the in-situ power output and critical frequency are much below those predicted by the classical synchrotron formulae. We then apply these results to a model of long gamma-ray bursts. This model predicts spectral break energies remarkably consistent with the observed values.

Liang, Edison

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

How dangerous is low level radiation?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Problems in the threshold basis for the linear-no threshold theory of radiation carcinogenesis are reviewed, and it is shown that they very strongly suggest that the theory greatly overestimates the risk of low level radiation. A direct test of the theory, based on the radon-lung cancer relationship is described; it strongly reinforces that conclusion. However, it is shown that even if the linear-no threshold theory is valid; the public`s fear of low level radiation, at least in some contexts, is grossly exaggerated. 30 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

Cohen, B.L. [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gamma radiation levels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

RIS-M-2339 SHIELDING FACTORS FOR VEHICLES TO GAMMA RADIATION FROM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fallout has been approximated by a point source that has been placed in a matrix around and above descriptors: REACTORS ACCIDENTS; EXTERNAL RADIATION; GAMMA RADIATION; RADIATION DOSES; FALLOUT DEPOSITS

22

Gamma thermometer based reactor core liquid level detector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system is provided which employs a modified gamma thermometer for determining the liquid coolant level within a nuclear reactor core. The gamma thermometer which normally is employed to monitor local core heat generation rate (reactor power), is modified by thermocouple junctions and leads to obtain an unambiguous indication of the presence or absence of coolant liquid at the gamma thermometer location. A signal processor generates a signal based on the thermometer surface heat transfer coefficient by comparing the signals from the thermocouples at the thermometer location. The generated signal is a direct indication of loss of coolant due to the change in surface heat transfer when coolant liquid drops below the thermometer location. The loss of coolant indication is independent of reactor power at the thermometer location. Further, the same thermometer may still be used for the normal power monitoring function.

Burns, Thomas J. (Knoxville, TN)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Current Trends in Gamma Radiation Detection for Radiological Emergency Response  

SciTech Connect

Passive and active detection of gamma rays from shielded radioactive materials, including special nuclear materials, is an important task for any radiological emergency response organization. This article reports on the current trends and status of gamma radiation detection objectives and measurement techniques as applied to nonproliferation and radiological emergencies. In recent years, since the establishment of the Domestic Nuclear Detection Office by the Department of Homeland Security, a tremendous amount of progress has been made in detection materials (scintillators, semiconductors), imaging techniques (Compton imaging, use of active masking and hybrid imaging), data acquisition systems with digital signal processing, field programmable gate arrays and embedded isotopic analysis software (viz. gamma detector response and analysis software [GADRAS]1), fast template matching, and data fusion (merging radiological data with geo-referenced maps, digital imagery to provide better situational awareness). In this stride to progress, a significant amount of interdisciplinary research and development has taken place–techniques and spin-offs from medical science (such as x-ray radiography and tomography), materials engineering (systematic planned studies on scintillators to optimize several qualities of a good scintillator, nanoparticle applications, quantum dots, and photonic crystals, just to name a few). No trend analysis of radiation detection systems would be complete without mentioning the unprecedented strategic position taken by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) to deter, detect, and interdict illicit trafficking in nuclear and other radioactive materials across international borders and through the global maritime transportation–the so-called second line of defense.

Mukhopadhyay, S., Guss, P., Maurer, R.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Gravitational radiation from long gamma-ray bursts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are probably powered by high-angular momentum black hole-torus systems in suspended accretion. The torus will radiate gravitational waves as non-axisymmetric instabilities develop. The luminosity in gravitational-wave emissions is expected to compare favorably with the observed isotropic equivalent luminosity in GRB-afterglow emissions. This predicts that long GRBs are potentially the most powerful LIGO/VIRGO burst-sources in the Universe. Their frequency-dynamics is characterized by a horizontal branch in the $\\dot{f}(f)-$diagram.

Maurice H. P. M. van Putten

2001-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

25

ASSESSMENT OF THE PROTECTION AFFORDED BY BUILDINGS AGAINST GAMMA RADIATION FROM FALLOUT  

SciTech Connect

A method is described for estimating the protection against gamma radiation from radioactive fall-out afforded by buildings. A sample calculation is included. (C.H.)

1957-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Background compensation for a radiation level monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Background compensation in a device such as a hand and foot monitor is provided by digital means using a scaler. With no radiation level test initiated, a scaler is down-counted from zero according to the background measured. With a radiation level test initiated, the scaler is up-counted from the previous down-count position according to the radiation emitted from the monitored object and an alarm is generated if, with the scaler having crossed zero in the positive going direction, a particular number is exceeded in a specific time period after initiation of the test. If the test is initiated while the scale is down-counting, the background count from the previous down- count stored in a memory is used as the initial starting point for the up-count.

Keefe, D.J.

1975-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Closed-Form E1 Radiative Strength Functions for Gamma-Decay and Photoabsorption  

SciTech Connect

Photoabsorption cross sections and {gamma}-decay strength functions are calculated and compared with experimental data to test simple phenomenological models of E1 gamma-strength description in the middle-weight and heavy atomic nuclei. Radiative strength functions with energy asymmetric shape are recommended for overall estimation of averaged gamma-strengths. Systematics for giant dipole resonance (GDR) parameters are given.

Plujko, Vladimir A.; Kadenko, Igor M.; Kulich, Elizaveta V.; Gorbachenko, Oleksandr M. [Nuclear Physics Department, Taras Shevchenko National University, Pr. Acad. Glushkova, 2, bldg. 11, 03022 Kyiv (Ukraine)

2009-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

28

Architecture and 3D device simulation of a PIN diode-based Gamma radiation detector  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we present a new IC-based gamma radiation detector. We report 3D simulation results for the PIN diode structure which is used in this detector, along with a discussion of the architecture of the readout electronics for this detector. Gamma ... Keywords: pin diode, radiation detection, solid-state

Amr Elshennawy; Craig M. Marianno; Sunil P. Khatri

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Neutron and gamma radiation shielding material, structure, and process of making structure  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is directed to a novel neutron and gamma radiation shielding material consisting of 95 to 97% by weight SiO/sub 2/ and 5 to 3% by weight sodium silicate. In addition, the method of using this composition to provide a continuous neutron and gamma radiation shielding structure is disclosed.

Hondorp, H.L.

1981-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

30

Neutron and gamma radiation shielding material, structure, and process of making structure  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is directed to a novel neutron and gamma radiation elding material consisting of 95 to 97 percent by weight SiO.sub.2 and 5 to 3 percent by weight sodium silicate. In addition, the method of using this composition to provide a continuous neutron and gamma radiation shielding structure is disclosed.

Hondorp, Hugh L. (Princeton Junction, NJ)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

The development of {sup 3}He neutron detectors for applications in high level gamma-ray backgrounds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To measure high-level-activity scrap and waste, it is necessary to use neutron detectors that are insensitive to the high gamma-ray background. We have developed a combination of {sup 3}He tubes and custom preamplifiers to provide the high efficiency associated with {sup 3}He detectors with good gamma-ray rejection. We have preamplifiers with short time constants in the signal processing to help separate the neutron signals from the slower risetime gamma signals. We have compared AMPTEK (A-111) preamplifiers with Precision Data Technology (PDT 110A) preamplifiers with experimental tests for gamma rejection and radiation damage. Hot cell radiation tests using a 4.5 Ci radium source were performed using {sup 10}B and {sup 3}He detectors to evaluate relative efficiency and the ability to separate neutrons and gamma rays. The AMPTEK A-111 and PDT-110A amplifiers were exposed to gamma doses between {approximately}0.1 R/h and 1500 R/h to observe where the gamma pileup would interfere with the neutron counting. The conclusion is that both amplifiers can operate in gamma fields up to {approximately}500 R/h with modest loss of neutron efficiency. This is valid for the case of only one {sup 3}He tube (30-cm active length) connected to a single amplifier. If an amplifier services multiple tubes or longer tubes, the gamma rejection will get worse. Studies are in progress to determine the lifetime of the amplifiers and {sup 3}He tubes in the high-radiation fields.

Menlove, H.O.; Beddingfield, D.H.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

ON THE KINETIC ENERGY AND RADIATIVE EFFICIENCY OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS Nicole M. Lloyd-Ronning1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ON THE KINETIC ENERGY AND RADIATIVE EFFICIENCY OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS Nicole M. Lloyd-Ronning1 of 17 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) during the afterglow phase and ac- counting for radiative losses, we the implications of these results for the GRB radiation and jet models. Subject headinggs: gamma rays: bursts

Zhang, Bing

33

Monte-Carlo Simulations of Radiation-Induced Activation in a Fast-Neutron and Gamma- Based Cargo Inspection System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An air cargo inspection system combining two nuclear reaction based techniques, namely Fast-Neutron Resonance Radiography and Dual-Discrete-Energy Gamma Radiography is currently being developed. This system is expected to allow detection of standard and improvised explosives as well as special nuclear materials. An important aspect for the applicability of nuclear techniques in an airport inspection facility is the inventory and lifetimes of radioactive isotopes produced by the neutron and gamma radiation inside the cargo, as well as the dose delivered by these isotopes to people in contact with the cargo during and following the interrogation procedure. Using MCNPX and CINDER90 we have calculated the activation levels for several typical inspection scenarios. One example is the activation of various metal samples embedded in a cotton-filled container. To validate the simulation results, a benchmark experiment was performed, in which metal samples were activated by fast-neutrons in a water-filled glass jar. The induced activity was determined by analyzing the gamma spectra. Based on the calculated radioactive inventory in the container, the dose levels due to the induced gamma radiation were calculated at several distances from the container and in relevant time windows after the irradiation, in order to evaluate the radiation exposure of the cargo handling staff, air crew and passengers during flight. The possibility of remanent long-lived radioactive inventory after cargo is delivered to the client is also of concern and was evaluated.

B. Bromberger; D. Bar; M. Brandis; V. Dangendorf; M. B. Goldberg; F. Kaufmann; I. Mor; R. Nolte; M. Schmiedel; K. Tittelmeier; D. Vartsky; H. Wershofen

2012-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

34

Determination and Mitigation of Precipitation Effects on Portal Monitor Gamma Background Levels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this project is to establish a correlation between precipitation and background gamma radiation levels at radiation portal monitors (RPM) deployed at various ports worldwide, and to devise a mechanism by which the effects of these precipitation-induced background fluctuations could be mitigated. The task of detecting special nuclear materials (SNM) by passive gamma spectroscopy is very difficult due to the low signal-to-noise ratio observed in an uncontrolled environment. Due to their low activities and the low energies of their characteristic gamma rays, the signals from many types of SNM can easily be obscured by background radiation. While this can be somewhat mitigated by taking regular background radiation measurements, even this cannot resolve the issue if background levels change suddenly and dramatically. Furthermore, any increase in background count rate will increase the statistical uncertainty of the count rate measurement, and thus decrease the minimum quantity of SNM that can be reliably detected. Existing research suggests that the advent of precipitation is the culprit behind many such large and sudden increases in background radiation. The correlation between precipitation and background levels was explored by in-situ testing on a full-scale portal monitor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and by comparing previously recorded background radiation and weather data from portal monitors located at ports worldwide. The first was utilized to determine the frequency and magnitude at which precipitation introduces background activity, and the second was used to quantify the effects of various quantities and types of precipitation in various parts of the world. Once this analysis was complete, various methods of mitigating these changes in background radiation were developed based on the collected data. Precipitation was found to be the most common culprit for rapid increases in background count rate, and was attributable to 85.6% of all such events. Based on extensive simulation via the Origen-ARP and MCNP software, a response function for the portal monitor was developed, and an algorithm designed to predict the contribution of the precipitation to the background count rate was developed. This algorithm was able to attenuate the contribution of precipitation to the background count rate by an average of 45% with very minimal over-correction. Such an algorithm could be utilized to adjust the alarm levels of the RPM to better allow it to compensate for the rise and fall in background count rate due to precipitation. Additionally, the relative contribution of precipitation which landed at various distances from the portal monitor to the increase in background count rate was measured via simulation. This simulation demonstrated that 37.2% of all background counts were due to the radon daughters which landed within a 2.76 m radius from the center of the portal monitor. This radius encompasses the area between the two portals. Based on this, several designs for shielding were simulated, the most successful of which was a concrete structure that was able to attenuate 71.3% of the background radiation caused by a given precipitation event at a materials cost of approximately $6,000 per RPM. This method is recommended as the primary means of mitigating this issue.

Revis, Stephen

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Constraining |V(td)|/|V(ts)| Using Radiative Penguin B -> V(K*/rho/omega)gamma Decays  

SciTech Connect

Exclusive radiative penguin B decays, B {yields} (K*{sup 0}/K*{sup +}) and B {yields} ({rho}/{omega}){gamma}, are flavor-changing neutral-current (FCNC) processes. Studies of these decays are of special interest in testing Standard Model (SM) predictions and searching for other beyond-the-SM FCNC interactions. Using 89 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} pairs from BABAR, we measure the branching fraction ({Beta}), CP-asymmetry ({Alpha}), and isospin asymmetry ({Delta}{sub 0-}) of B {yields} (K*{sup 0}/K*{sup +}){gamma} as follows: {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} K*{sup 0}{gamma}) = 3.92 {+-} 0.20(stat.) {+-} 0.24(syst.); {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} K*{sup +}{gamma}) = 3.87 {+-} 0.28(stat.) {+-} 0.26(syst.); {Alpha}(B {yields} K*{gamma}) = -0.013 {+-} 0.36(stat.) {+-} 0.10(syst.); {Delta}{sub 0-}(B {yields} K*{gamma}) = 0.050 {+-} 0.045(stat.) {+-} 0.028(syst.) {+-} 0.024(R{sup +/0}). The 90% confidence intervals for the CP-asymmetry and the isospin-asymmetry in the B {yields} K*{gamma} decay are given as: -0.074 < {Alpha}(B {yields} K*{gamma}) < 0.049, -0.046 < {Delta}{sub 0-} (B {yields} K*{gamma}) < 0.146. We also search for B {yields} ({rho}/{omega}){gamma} decays using 211 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} pairs from BABAR. No evidence for these decays is found. We set the upper limits at 90% confidence level for these decays: {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {rho}{sup 0}{gamma}) < 0.4 x 10{sup -6}; {Beta}(B{sup +}{yields} {rho}{sup =}{gamma}) < 1.8 x 10{sup -6}; {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {omega}{gamma}) < 1.0 x 10{sup -6}; {bar {Beta}}(B {yields} ({rho}/{omega}){gamma}) < 1.2 x 10{sup -6}. These results are in good agreement with the SM predictions. The branching fractions of these decays are then used to constrain the ratio |V{sub td}|/|V{sub ts}|.

Tan, Ping; /Wisconsin U., Madison

2006-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

36

Constraining |V(td)|/|V(ts)| Using Radiative Penguin B -> V(K*/rho/omega)gamma Decays  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Exclusive radiative penguin B decays, B {yields} (K*{sup 0}/K*{sup +}) and B {yields} ({rho}/{omega}){gamma}, are flavor-changing neutral-current (FCNC) processes. Studies of these decays are of special interest in testing Standard Model (SM) predictions and searching for other beyond-the-SM FCNC interactions. Using 89 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} pairs from BABAR, we measure the branching fraction ({Beta}), CP-asymmetry ({Alpha}), and isospin asymmetry ({Delta}{sub 0-}) of B {yields} (K*{sup 0}/K*{sup +}){gamma} as follows: {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} K*{sup 0}{gamma}) = 3.92 {+-} 0.20(stat.) {+-} 0.24(syst.); {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} K*{sup +}{gamma}) = 3.87 {+-} 0.28(stat.) {+-} 0.26(syst.); {Alpha}(B {yields} K*{gamma}) = -0.013 {+-} 0.36(stat.) {+-} 0.10(syst.); {Delta}{sub 0-}(B {yields} K*{gamma}) = 0.050 {+-} 0.045(stat.) {+-} 0.028(syst.) {+-} 0.024(R{sup +/0}). The 90% confidence intervals for the CP-asymmetry and the isospin-asymmetry in the B {yields} K*{gamma} decay are given as: -0.074 Alpha}(B {yields} K*{gamma}) < 0.049, -0.046 < {Delta}{sub 0-} (B {yields} K*{gamma}) < 0.146. We also search for B {yields} ({rho}/{omega}){gamma} decays using 211 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} pairs from BABAR. No evidence for these decays is found. We set the upper limits at 90% confidence level for these decays: {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {rho}{sup 0}{gamma}) < 0.4 x 10{sup -6}; {Beta}(B{sup +}{yields} {rho}{sup =}{gamma}) < 1.8 x 10{sup -6}; {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {omega}{gamma}) < 1.0 x 10{sup -6}; {bar {Beta}}(B {yields} ({rho}/{omega}){gamma}) < 1.2 x 10{sup -6}. These results are in good agreement with the SM predictions. The branching fractions of these decays are then used to constrain the ratio |V{sub td}|/|V{sub ts}|.

Tan, Ping; /Wisconsin U., Madison

2006-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

37

Relativistic Winds from Compact Gamma-Ray Sources: II. Pair Loading and Radiative Acceleration in Gamma-ray Bursts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider the effects of rapid pair creation by an intense pulse of gamma-rays propagating ahead of a relativistic shock. Side-scattered photons colliding with the main gamma-ray beam amplify the density of scattering charges. The acceleration rate of the pair-loaded medium is calculated, and its limiting bulk Lorentz factor related to the spectrum and compactness of the photon source. One obtains, as a result, a definite prediction for the relative inertia in baryons and pairs. The deceleration of a relativistic shock in the moving medium, and the resulting synchrotron emissivity, are compared with existing calculations for a static medium. The radiative efficiency is increased dramatically by pair loading. When the initial ambient density exceeds a critical value, the scattering depth traversed by the main gamma-ray pulse rises above unity, and the pulse is broadened. These considerations place significant constraints on burst progenitors: a pre-burst mass loss rate exceeding 10^{-5} M_\\odot per year is difficult to reconcile with individual pulses narrower than 10 s, unless the radiative efficiency is low. An anisotropic gamma-ray flux (on an angular scale \\Gamma^{-1} or larger) drives a large velocity shear that greatly increases the energy in the seed magnetic field forward of the propagating shock.

Christopher Thompson; Piero Madau

1999-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

38

Low Level Gamma Spectroscopy Measurements of Radium and Cesium in Lucerne (Medicago Sativa)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nineteen years after Chernobyl nuclear accident, activity concentration of 137Cs still could be detected in food and soil samples in Central and Eastern Europe. In this paper radiation levels of radium and cesium in Lucerne will be presented. It is a perennial plant with a deep root system and it is widely grown throughout the world as forage for cattle. The samples of Lucerne were taken from twelve different locations in Vojvodina in the summer period July-September 2004. The samples were specially dried on the air and after that ground, powdered and mineralized by method of dry burning on the temperature of 450 deg. C. Gamma spectrometry measurements of the ash were performed by means of actively shielded germanium detector with maximal background reduction. For cesium 137Cs 10 mBq/kg order of magnitude detection limits were achieved.

Fokapic, S.; Bikit, I.; Mrda, D.; Veskovic, M.; Slivka, J. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, University of Novi Sad, Trg Dositeja Obradovica 4, 21 000 Novi Sad (Serbia); Mihaljev, Z. [Scientific Veterinary Institute, Rumenacki put 20, 21 000 Novi Sad (Serbia); Cupic, Z. [Research Institute for Reproduction, A.I. and Embryo Transfer Temerin, 21235 Temerin, Industrijska zona bb. (Serbia)

2007-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

39

Radiation chemistry of salt-mine brines and hydrates. [Gamma radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Certain aspects of the radiation chemistry of NaCl-saturated MgCl/sub 2/ solutions and MgCl/sub 2/ hydrates at temperatures in the range of 30 to 180/sup 0/C were investigated through experiments. A principal objective was to establish the values for the yields of H/sub 2/ (G(H/sub 2/)) and accompanying oxidants in the gamma-ray radiolysis of concentrated brines that might occur in waste repositories in salt. We concluded that G(H/sub 2/) from gamma-irradiated brine solution into a simultaneously irradiated, deaerated atmosphere above the solution is between 0.48 and 0.49 over most of the range 30 to 143/sup 0/C. The yield is probably somewhat lower at the lower end of this range, averaging 0.44 at 30 to 45/sup 0/C. Changes in the relative amounts of MgCl/sub 2/ and NaCl in the NaCl-saturated solutions have negligible effects on the yield. The yield of O/sub 2/ into the same atmosphere averages 0.13, independent of the temperature and brine composition, showing that only about 50% of the radiolytic oxidant that was formed along with the H/sub 2/ was present as O/sub 2/. We did not identify the species that compose the remainder of the oxidant. We concluded that the yield of H/sub 2/ from a gamma-irradiated brine solution into a simultaneously irradiated atmosphere containing 5 to 8% air in He may be greater than the yield in deaerated systems by amounts ranging from 0% for temperatures of 73 to 85/sup 0/C, to about 30 and 40% for temperatures in the ranges 100 to 143/sup 0/C and 30 to 45/sup 0/C, respectively. We did not establish the mechanism whereby the air affected the yields of H/sub 2/ and O/sub 2/. The values found in this work for G(H/sub 2/) in deaerated systems are in approximate agreement with the value of 0.44 for the gamma-irradiation yield of H/sub 2/ in pure H/sub 2/O at room temperature. They are also in agreement with the values predicted by extrapolation from the findings of previous researchers for the value for G(H/sub 2/) in 2 M NaCl solutions at room temperature.

Jenks, G.H.; Walton, J.R.; Bronstein, H.R.; Baes, C.F. Jr.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Coherent Radiation in Gamma-Ray Bursts and Relativistic Collisionless Shocks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We suggest that coherent radiation may occur in relativistic collisionless shocks via two-stream Weibel instabilities. The coherence amplifies the radiation power by many orders [$\\sim 10^{12}$ in Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs)] and particles cool very fast before being randomized. We imply (1) GRBs accompany strong infrared emission, (2) protons efficiently transfer energy to electrons and (3) prompt GRBs might be the upscattered coherent radiation.

Kunihito Ioka

2005-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

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41

What is the radiative process of the prompt phase of Gamma Ray Bursts?  

SciTech Connect

Despite the dramatic improvement of our knowledge of the phenomenology of Gamma Ray Bursts, we still do not know several fundamental aspects of their physics. One of the puzzles concerns the nature of the radiative process originating the prompt phase radiation. Although the synchrotron process qualifies itself as a natural candidate, it faces severe problems, and many efforts have been done looking for alternatives. These, however, suffer from other problems, and there is no general consensus yet on a specific radiation mechanism.

Ghisellini, G. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera, Via Bianchi 46 I-23807 Merate (Italy)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

42

Gamma radiation induced degradation in PE-PP block copolymer  

SciTech Connect

In the present investigation, effect of gamma irradiation on the PP-PE block copolymer has been studied. The polymer has been subjected to gamma irradiation from 100 to 500 Mrad dosages. Characterization of the polymer using XRD and FTIR was done both before irradiation and after irradiation in each step. Effect of irradiation on the electrical properties of the material has also been studied. FTIR study shows that the sample loses C - C stretching mode of vibration but gains C=C stretching mode of vibration after irradiation. Present investigation clearly indicates that though the electrical conductivity increases in the material, it undergoes degradation and shows brittleness due to irradiation.

Ravi, H. R.; Sreepad, H. R.; Ahmed, Khaleel; Govindaiah, T. N. [P.G. Department of Physics, Government College (Autonomous), Mandya - 571401, Karnataka State (India)

2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

43

Gadolinium-doped water cerenkov-based neutron and high energy gamma-ray detector and radiation portal monitoring system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A water Cerenkov-based neutron and high energy gamma ray detector and radiation portal monitoring system using water doped with a Gadolinium (Gd)-based compound as the Cerenkov radiator. An optically opaque enclosure is provided surrounding a detection chamber filled with the Cerenkov radiator, and photomultipliers are optically connected to the detect Cerenkov radiation generated by the Cerenkov radiator from incident high energy gamma rays or gamma rays induced by neutron capture on the Gd of incident neutrons from a fission source. The PMT signals are then used to determine time correlations indicative of neutron multiplicity events characteristic of a fission source.

Dazeley, Steven A; Svoboda, Robert C; Bernstein, Adam; Bowden, Nathaniel

2013-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

44

Radiation detection system for portable gamma-ray spectroscopy  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A portable gamma ray detection apparatus having a gamma ray detector encapsulated by a compact isolation structure having at least two volumetrically-nested enclosures where at least one is a thermal shield. The enclosures are suspension-mounted to each other to successively encapsulate the detector without structural penetrations through the thermal shields. A low power cooler is also provided capable of cooling the detector to cryogenic temperatures without consuming cryogens, due to the heat load reduction by the isolation structure and the reduction in the power requirements of the cooler. The apparatus also includes a lightweight portable power source for supplying power to the apparatus, including to the cooler and the processing means, and reducing the weight of the apparatus to enable handheld operation or toting on a user's person.

Rowland, Mark S. (Alamo, CA); Howard, Douglas E. (Livermore, CA); Wong, James L. (Dublin, CA); Jessup, James L. (Tracy, CA); Bianchini, Greg M. (Livermore, CA); Miller, Wayne O. (Livermore, CA)

2006-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

45

Radiation levels in the SSC interaction regions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The radiation environment in a typical SSC detector has been evaluated using the best available particle production models coupled with Monte Carlo simulations of hadronic and electromagnetic cascades. The problems studied include direct charged particle dose, dose inside a calorimeter from the cascades produced by incident photons and hadrons, the flux of neutrons and photons backscattered from the calorimeter into a central cavity, and neutron flux in the calorimeter. The luminosity lifetime at the SSC is dominated by collision losses in the interaction regions, where the luminosity is equivalent to losing an entire full-energy proton beam into the apparatus every six days. The result of an average p-p collision can be described quite simply. The mean charged multiplicity is about 110, and the particles are distributed nearly uniformly in pseudorapidity ({eta}) over all the angles of interest. The transverse momentum distribution is independent of angle, and for our purposes may be written as p{perpendicular}exp(-p{perpendicular}/{beta}). The mean value of p{perpendicular} may be as high as 0.6 GeV/c. Most of the radiation is produced by the very abundant low-p{perpendicular} particles. The dose or neutron fluence produced by individual particles in this energy region are simulated over a wide variety of conditions, and several measurements serve to confirm the simulation results. In general, the response (a dose, fluence, the number of backscattered neutrons, etc.) for an incident particle of momentum p can be parameterized in the form Np{sup {alpha}}, where 0.5 < {alpha}< 1.0. The authors believe most of their results to be accurate to within a factor of two or three, sufficiently precise to serve as the basis for detailed designs.

Groom, D.E. [ed.

1988-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

46

Monte-Carlo Simulations of Radiation-Induced Activation in a Fast-Neutron and Gamma- Based Cargo Inspection System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An air cargo inspection system combining two nuclear reaction based techniques, namely Fast-Neutron Resonance Radiography and Dual-Discrete-Energy Gamma Radiography is currently being developed. This system is expected to allow detection of standard and improvised explosives as well as special nuclear materials. An important aspect for the applicability of nuclear techniques in an airport inspection facility is the inventory and lifetimes of radioactive isotopes produced by the neutron and gamma radiation inside the cargo, as well as the dose delivered by these isotopes to people in contact with the cargo during and following the interrogation procedure. Using MCNPX and CINDER90 we have calculated the activation levels for several typical inspection scenarios. One example is the activation of various metal samples embedded in a cotton-filled container. To validate the simulation results, a benchmark experiment was performed, in which metal samples were activated by fast-neutrons in a water-filled glass jar. T...

Bromberger, B; Brandis, M; Dangendorf, V; Goldberg, M B; Kaufmann, F; Mor, I; Nolte, R; Schmiedel, M; Tittelmeier, K; Vartsky, D; Wershofen, H

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

THE PHOTOSPHERIC RADIATION MODEL FOR THE PROMPT EMISSION OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS: INTERPRETING FOUR OBSERVED CORRELATIONS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We show that the empirical E{sub p}-L, {Gamma}-L, E{sub p}-{Gamma}, and {eta}-bar{sub {gamma}}-E{sub p} correlations (where L is the time-averaged luminosity of the prompt emission, E{sub p} is the spectral peak energy, {Gamma} is the bulk Lorentz factor, and {eta}-bar{sub {gamma}} is the emission efficiency of gamma-ray bursts, GRBs) are well consistent with the relations between the analogous parameters predicted in the photospheric radiation model of the prompt emission of GRBs. The time-resolved thermal radiation of GRB 090902B does follow the E{sub p}-L and {Gamma}-L correlations. A reliable interpretation of the four correlations in alternative models is still lacking. These may point toward a photospheric origin of prompt emission of some GRBs.

Fan Yizhong; Wei Daming; Zhang Fuwen [Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Zhang Binbin, E-mail: yzfan@pmo.ac.cn, E-mail: dmwei@pmo.ac.cn, E-mail: fwzhang@pmo.ac.cn, E-mail: bbzhang@psu.edu [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

2012-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

48

THE HEALTH EFFECTS IN WOMEN EXPOSED TO LOW-LEVELS OF IONIZING RADIATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Effects of Ionizing Radiation. New York, United Nations,Effects of Ionizing Radiation (BEIR III). The EffectsLevels of Ionizing Radiation. Washington, D.C. , National

Fabrikant, J.I.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

A New Natural Gamma Radiation Measurement System for Marine Sediment and Rock Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new high-efficiency and low-background system for the measurement of natural gamma radioactivity in marine sediment and rock cores retrieved from beneath the seabed was designed, built, and installed on the JOIDES Resolution research vessel. The system includes eight large NaI(Tl) detectors that measure adjacent intervals of the core simultaneously, maximizing counting times and minimizing statistical error for the limited measurement times available during drilling expeditions. Effect to background ratio is maximized with passive lead shielding, including both ordinary and low-activity lead. Large-area plastic scintillator active shielding filters background associated with the high-energy part of cosmic radiation. The new system has at least an order of magnitude higher statistical reliability and significantly enhances data quality compared to other offshore natural gamma radiation (NGR) systems designed to measure geological core samples. Reliable correlations and interpretations of cored intervals are ...

Vasiliev, M A; Chubarian, G; Olsen, R; Bennight, C; Cobine, T; Fackler, D; Hastedt, M; Houpt, D; Mateo, Z; Vasilieva, Y B

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Effects of High Dietary Iron and Gamma Radiation on Oxidative Stress and Bone  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Astronauts in space flight missions are exposed to increased iron (Fe) stores and galactic cosmic radiation, both of which independently induce oxidative stress. Oxidative stress can result in protein, lipid, and DNA oxidation. Recent evidence has linked oxidative stress to bone loss with aging and estrogen deficiency. Whether the increased iron stores and radiation that astronauts face are exacerbating their extreme bone loss while in space is unclear. We hypothesized that elevated iron levels (induced by feeding a high iron diet) and gamma radiation exposure would independently increase markers of oxidative stress and markers of oxidative damage and result in loss of bone mass, with the combined treatment having additive or synergistic effects. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (15-weeks old, n=32) were randomized to receive an adequate (45 mg Fe/kg diet) or high (650 mg Fe/kg diet) Fe diet for 4 weeks and either 3 Gy (8 fractions, 0.375 Gy each) of 137Cs radiation (?RAD) or sham exposure every other day over 16 days starting on day 14. Serum Fe and catalase and liver Fe and glutathione peroxidase (GPX) were assessed by standard techniques. Immunostaining for 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG, marker of DNA adducts) quantified the number of cells with oxidative damage in cortical bone. Bone histomorphometry assessed bone cell activity and cancellous bone microarchitecture in the metaphyseal region. Ex vivo pQCT quantified volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD); bone mechanical strength was assessed by 3-pt bending at the midshaft tibia and compression of the femoral neck. High Fe diet increased liver Fe and decreased volume per total volume (BV/TV). ?RAD decreased osteoid surface per bone surface (OS/BS) and osteocyte density. The combined treatment increased serum catalase, liver GPX, and serum iron and decreased cancellous vBMD and trabecular number (Tb.N). High Fe diet and ?RAD independently increased number of osteocytes stained positive for 8-OHdG, with the combined treatment exhibiting twice as many osteocytes positively stained compared to the control. Higher serum Fe levels were associated with higher oxidative damage (r =0.38) and lower proximal tibial cancellous vBMD (r =–0.38). Higher serum catalase levels were associated with higher oxidative damage (r =0.48), lower BV/TV (r =–0.40) and lower cancellous vBMD (r =–0.39). High dietary iron and fractionated 137Cs ?RAD leads to a moderate elevation in iron stores and results in oxidative damage in bone and are associated with decreased cancellous bone density. Moderate elevations in iron stores are not only found in astronauts, but also naturally occur in healthy human populations. This healthy population with elevated iron stores may also have increased levels of oxidative stress in the body. Elevated levels of oxidative stress not only increase one’s risk for accelerated bone loss, but also the risk of developing other chronic diseases such as insulin resistance, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and metabolic syndrome.

Yuen, Evelyn P

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

The Contribution of Tissue Level Organization to Genomic Stability Following Low Dose/Low Dose Rate Gamma and Proton Irradiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The formation of functional tissue units is necessary in maintaining homeostasis within living systems, with individual cells contributing to these functional units through their three-dimensional organization with integrin and adhesion proteins to form a complex extra-cellular matrix (ECM). This is of particular importance in those tissues susceptible to radiation-induced tumor formation, such as epithelial glands. The assembly of epithelial cells of the thyroid is critical to their normal receipt of, and response to, incoming signals. Traditional tissue culture and live animals present significant challenges to radiation exposure and continuous sampling, however, the production of bioreactor-engineered tissues aims to bridge this gap by improve capabilities in continuous sampling from the same functional tissue, thereby increasing the ability to extrapolate changes induced by radiation to animals and humans in vivo. Our study proposes that the level of tissue organization will affect the induction and persistence of low dose radiation-induced genomic instability. Rat thyroid cells, grown in vitro as 3D tissue analogs in bioreactors and as 2D flask grown cultures were exposed to acute low dose (1, 5, 10 and 200 cGy) gamma rays. To assess immediate (6 hours) and delayed (up to 30 days) responses post-irradiation, various biological endpoints were studied including cytogenetic analyses, apoptosis analysis and cell viability/cytotoxicity analyses. Data assessing caspase 3/7 activity levels show that, this activity varies with time post radiation and that, overall, 3D cultures display more genomic instability (as shown by the lower levels of apoptosis over time) when compared to the 2D cultures. Variation in cell viability levels were only observed at the intermediate and late time points post radiation. Extensive analysis of chromosomal aberrations will give further insight on the whether the level of tissue organization influences genomic instability patterns after low dose radiation exposure. Cells viability/cytotoxicity analysis data are currently being analyzed to determine how these endpoints are affected under our experimental conditions. The results from this study will be translatable to risk assessment for assigning limits to radiation workers, pre-dosing for more effective radiotherapy and the consequences of long duration space flight. The data from this study has been presented a various scientific meetings/workshops and a manuscript, containing the findings, is currently being prepared for publication. Due to unforeseen challenges in collecting the data and standardizing experimental procedures, the second and third aims have not been completed. However, attempts will be made, based on the availability of funds, to continue this project so that these aims can be satisfied.

Cheryl G. Burrell, Ph.D.

2012-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

52

PHOTOSPHERIC EMISSION AS THE DOMINANT RADIATION MECHANISM IN LONG-DURATION GAMMA-RAY BURSTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present the results of a set of numerical simulations of long-duration gamma-ray burst jets associated with massive, compact stellar progenitors. The simulations extend to large radii and allow us to locate the region in which the peak frequency of the advected radiation is set before the radiation is released at the photosphere. Light curves and spectra are calculated for different viewing angles as well as different progenitor structures and jet properties. We find that the radiation released at the photosphere of matter-dominated jets is able to reproduce the observed Amati and energy-Lorentz factor correlations. Our simulations also predict a correlation between the burst energy and the radiative efficiency of the prompt phase, consistent with observations.

Lazzati, Davide [Department of Physics, NC State University, 2401 Stinson Drive, Raleigh, NC 27695-8202 (United States); Morsony, Brian J. [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 3321 Sterling Hall, 475 N. Charter Street, Madison WI 53706-1582 (United States); Margutti, Raffaella [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, ITC, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Begelman, Mitchell C. [JILA, University of Colorado and National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, CO 80309-0440 (United States)

2013-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

53

Flash polymerization of silicone oils using gamma radiation for conserving waterlogged wood  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A series of experiments were designed to develop a collection of irradiation parameters for polymerizing a variety of molecular weights of polymer siloxanes for the purpose of bulking and conserving waterlogged archaeological organic materials. Waterlogged wooden tongue depressors (Betula spp) were bulked with five different silicone oils of varying molecular weights, denoted as PS340, PS341, PS343, SFD-1, and an equal mix of SFD-1 and SFD-5. The lightest weight oil being PS340 and the heaviest being the SFD-I /SFD-5 mix. These bulked samples were exposed to gamma radiation emitted from a nuclear research reactor and received gamma doses ranging from 30 Gy to 228 Gy with dose rates ranging from 0.6 Gy/min to 5.1 Gy/min. Following irradiation, thin cross sections of each tongue depressor were analyzed and photographed using a photomicroscope. The results of the irradiation indicated that the heavier molecular weights of siloxanes fully bulked the wood cells. For these fully bulked samples, large radiation doses induced polymerization in the oil to such an extent the cells swelled and became extremely distorted. However, for the same fully bulked samples, small radiation doses produced little to moderate polymerization of the oil in the wood cells. For the tongue depressors bulked with the lighter weight siloxanes, low radiation doses produced very little polymerization, whereas the higher doses induced substantially more polymerization within the wood cells but not to the point of distortion. With these lighter weight siloxanes, the wood cells were not as fully bulked nor looked as natural as those cells bulked with the heavier weight oils. The best combination of molecular weight and radiation dose occurred with the samples bulked in PS343 and irradiated with gamma-rays to a dose of 150 Gy.

Gidden, Richmond Paul

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Determining the Impact of Concrete Roadways on Gamma Ray Background Readings for Radiation Portal Monitoring Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The dissolution of the Soviet Union coupled with the growing sophistication of international terror organizations has brought about a desire to ensure that a sound infrastructure exists to interdict smuggled nuclear material prior to leaving its country of origin. To combat the threat of nuclear trafficking, radiation portal monitors (RPMs) are deployed around the world to intercept illicit material while in transit by passively detecting gamma and neutron radiation. Portal monitors in some locations have reported abnormally high gamma background count rates. The higher background data has been attributed, in part, to the concrete surrounding the portal monitors. Higher background can ultimately lead to more material passing through the RPMs undetected. This work is focused on understanding the influence of the concrete surrounding the monitors on the total gamma ray background for the system. This research employed a combination of destructive and nondestructive analytical techniques with computer simulations to form a model that may be adapted to any RPM configuration. Six samples were taken from three different composition concrete slabs. The natural radiologcal background of these samples was determined using a high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector in conjunction with the Canberra In-Situ Object Counting System (ISOCS™) and Genie™ 2000 software packages. The composition of each sample was determined using thermal and fast neutron activation analysis (NAA) techniques. The results from these experiments were incorporated into a Monte Carlo N-Particle (MNCP) photon transport simulation to determine the expected gamma ray count rate in the RPM due to the concrete. The results indicate that a quantitative estimate may be possible if the experimental conditions are optimized to eliminate sources of uncertainty. Comparisons of actual and simulated count rate data for 137Cs check sources showed that the model was accurate to within 15%. A comparison of estimated and simulated count rates in one concrete slab showed that the model was accurate to within 4%. Subsequent sensitivity analysis showed that if the elemental concentrations are well known, the carbon and hydrogen content could be easily estimated. Another sensitivity analysis revealed that the small fluctuations in density have a minimal impact on the gamma count rate. The research described by this thesis provides a method by which RPM end users may quantitatively estimate the expected gamma background from concrete foundations beneath the systems. This allows customers to adjust alarm thresholds to compensate for the elevated background due to the concrete, thereby increasing the probability of intercepting illicit radiological and nuclear material.

Ryan, Christopher Michael

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

P ORNiiTM-7004 Results of Ground Level Radiation  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

ORNiiTM-7004 ORNiiTM-7004 Results of Ground Level Radiation Measurements in Support of the 1978 Aerial Survey of the Lake Ontario Ordnance W o rks, Lewiston, New York _ ict~~.. By A, grven _, ,_~ ~.~ _,. :::;(' ~. . ' -- .- ,. R. W . Doane F. F. Haywood W . H. Shinpaugh ORNL/TM-7004 Dist. Category UC-41 Contract No. W-7405eng-26 RESULTS OF GROUND LEVEL RADIATION MEASUREMENTS IN SUPPORT OF THE 1978 AERIAL SURVEY OF THE LAKE ONTARIO ORDNANCE WORKS, LEWISTON, NEW YORK B. A. Berven F. F. Haywood R. W. Doane W. H. Shinpaugh Work performed by Health and Safety Research Division Date Published: September 1979 Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830 operated by UNION CARBIDE CORPORATION for the DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY as part of the Formerly Utilized Sites -

56

Alpha and gamma radiation effects on air-water systems at high gas/liquid ratios  

SciTech Connect

Radiolysis tests were conducted on air-water systems to examine the effects of radiation on liquid phase chemistry under high gas/liquid volume (G/L) ratios that are characteristic of an unsaturated nuclear waste repository setting. Test parameters included temperatures of 25, 90, and 200{degrees}C; gamma vs. alpha radiation; dose rates of {approximately}3500 and 50,000 rad/h; and G/L ratios of 10 and 100. Formate, oxalate, and total organic carbon contents increased during irradiation of the air-water systems in gamma and alpha tests at low-dose rate ({approximately}3500 rad/h). Increases in organic components were not observed for tests run at 200{degrees}C or high-dose rates (50,000 rad/h). In the tests where increases in organics occurred, the formate and oxalate were preferentially enriched in solutions that were rinsed from the test vessel walls. Nitrate (NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}) is the dominant anion produced during the radiolysis reactions. Significant nitrite (NO{sub 2}{sup {minus}}) also occurs in some high-dose rate tests, with the reduced form of nitrogen possibly resulting from reactions with the test vessels. These results indicate that nitrogen acids are being produced and concentrated in the limited quantities of solution present in the tests. Nitrate + nitrite production varied inversely with temperature, with the lowest quantities being detected for the higher temperature tests. The G(NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} + NO{sub 2}{sup {minus}}) values for the 25, 90, and 200{degrees}C experiments with gamma radiation are 3.2 {+-} 0.7, 1.3 {+-} 1.0, and 0.4 {+-} 0.3, respectively. Thus, the elevated temperatures expected early in the life of a repository may counteract pH decreases resulting from nitrogen acid production. Little variation was observed in G values as a function of dose rate or gas/liquid ratio.

Wronkiewicz, D.J.; Bates, J.K.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Comparison of radon fluxes with gamma-radiation exposure rates and soil /sup 226/Ra concentrations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radon fluxes and contact gamma-radiation-exposure rates were measured at the grid points of rectangular grids on three properties in Edgemont, South Dakota that were known to have deposits of residual radioactivity relatively near to the surface. The coefficient of determination, r/sup 2/, between the radon fluxes and the contact gamma-radiation-exposure rates varied from 0.89 to 0.31 for the three properties. The property having the highest fluxes and residual radioactivity of relatively uniform depth showed the highest correlation between fluxes and exposure rates, and the property having residual radioactivity that varied considerably in depth showed the lowest. Correlations between fluxes and /sup 226/Ra concentrations measured in boreholes that varied in depth from 60 to 195 cm were lower than those between fluxes and exposure rates, indicating that exposure rates are better than /sup 226/Ra measurements for detecting elevated radon fluxes from near-surface deposits. Measurements made on one property at two different times indicated that if the average flux were determined from a large number (40) of measurements at one time, the average flux at a later time could be estimated from a few measurements using the assumption that the change in the flux at individual locations will be equal to the change in the average flux. Flux measurements around two buildings showing elevated indoor radon-daughter concentrations, but around which no residual radioactivity had been discovered by /sup 226/Ra and gamma-radiation measurements, provided no clear indication of the presence of such material, possibly because none was present.

Young, J.A.; Thomas, V.W.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Air Kerma Calibrations in Radiation Protection Level 137Cs ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Such instruments are used by radiation workers and users in the field of radiation protection, emergency response, homeland security, medicine ...

2013-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

59

SOLIDIFICATION TESTING FOR A HIGH ACTIVITY WASTESTREAM FROM THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE USING GROUT AND GAMMA RADIATION SHEILDING MATERIALS - 10017  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) tasked MSE Technology Applications, Inc. (MSE) with evaluating grouts that include gamma radiation shielding materials to solidify surrogates of liquid aqueous radioactive wastes from across the DOE Complex. The Savannah River Site (SRS) identified a High Activity Waste (HAW) that will be treated and solidified at the Waste Solidification Building (WSB) for surrogate grout testing. The HAW, which is produced at the Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF), is an acidic aqueous wastestream generated by the alkaline treatment process and the aqueous purification process. The HAW surrogate was solidified using Portland cement with and without the inclusion of different gamma radiation shielding materials to determine the shielding material that is the most effective to attenuate gamma radiation for this application.

Burns, H.

2009-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

60

State background-radiation levels: results of measurements taken during 1975-1979  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Background radiation levels across the United States have been measured by the Off-Site Pollutant Measurements Group of the Health and Safety Research Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). These measurements have been conducted as part of the ORNL program of radiological surveillance at inactive uranium mills and sites formerly utilized during Manhattan Engineer District and early Atomic Energy Commission projects. The measurements included determination of /sup 226/Ra, /sup 232/Th, and /sup 238/U concentrations in surface soil samples and measurement of external gamma-ray exposure rates at 1 m above the ground surface at the location of soil sampling. This information is being utilized for comparative purposes to determine the extent of contamination present at the survey sites and surrounding off-site areas. The sampling program to date has provided background information at 356 locations in 33 states. External gamma-ray exposure rates were found to range from less than 1 to 34 ..mu..R/h, with an US average of 8.5 ..mu..R/h. The nationwide average concentrations of /sup 226/Ra, /sup 232/Th, and /sup 238/U in surface soil were determined to be 1.1, 0.98, and 1.0 pCi/g, respectively.

Myrick, T.E.; Berven, B.A.; Haywood, F.F.

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gamma radiation levels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Relativistic Winds from Compact Gamma-ray Sources: I. Radiative Acceleration in the Klein-Nishina Regime  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider the radiative acceleration to relativistic bulk velocities of a cold, optically thin plasma which is exposed to an external source of gamma-rays. The flow is driven by radiative momentum input to the gas, the accelerating force being due to Compton scattering in the relativistic Klein-Nishina limit. The bulk Lorentz factor of the plasma, Gamma, derived as a function of distance from the radiating source, is compared with the corresponding result in the Thomson limit. Depending on the geometry and spectrum of the radiation field, we find that particles are accelerated to the asymptotic Lorentz factor at infinity much more rapidly in the relativistic regime; and the radiation drag is reduced as blueshifted, aberrated photons experience a decreased relativistic cross section and scatter preferentially in the forward direction. The random energy imparted to the plasma by gamma-rays can be converted into bulk motion if the hot particles execute many Larmor orbits before cooling. This `Compton afterburn' may be a supplementary source of momentum if energetic leptons are injected by pair creation, but can be neglected in the case of pure Klein-Nishina scattering. Compton drag by side-scattered radiation is shown to be more important in limiting the bulk Lorentz factor than the finite inertia of the accelerating medium. The processes discussed here may be relevant to a variety of astrophysical situations where luminous compact sources of hard X- and gamma-ray photons are observed, including active galactic nuclei, galactic black hole candidates, and gamma-ray bursts.

Piero Madau; Christopher Thompson

1999-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

62

FY06 Annual Report: Amorphous Semiconductors for Gamma Radiation Detection (ASGRAD)  

SciTech Connect

We describe progress in the development of new materials for portable, room-temperature, gamma-radiation detection at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory at the Hanford Site in Washington State. High Z, high resistivity, amorphous semiconductors are being designed for use as solid-state detectors at near ambient temperatures; principles of operation are analogous to single-crystal semiconducting detectors. Amorphous semiconductors have both advantages and disadvantages compared to single crystals, and this project is developing methods to mitigate technical problems and design optimized material for gamma detection. Several issues involved in the fabrication of amorphous semiconductors are described, including reaction thermodynamics and kinetics, the development of pyrolytic coating, and the synthesis of ingots. The characterization of amorphous semiconductors is described, including sectioning and polishing protocols, optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, optical spectroscopy, particle-induced X-ram emission, Rutherford backscattering, and electrical testing. Then collaboration with the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign is discussed in the areas of Hall-effect measurements and current voltage data. Finally, we discuss the strategy for continuing the program.

Johnson, Bradley R.; Riley, Brian J.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Sundaram, S. K.; Henager, Charles H.; Zhang, Yanwen; Shutthanandan, V.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

New study sees greater low-level radiation threat  

SciTech Connect

A new analysis of Energy Department medical records has found higher than expected cancer rates among workers at DOE's Hanford nuclear weapons plant, suggesting occupational exposure to low-level radiation may be more dangerous than previously thought. The study, released Tuesday by the Philadelphia-based Three Mile Island Public Health Fund, is important not only because of its controversial conclusions, but also because it represents the first independent review of DOE's long-secret worker medical records. The new study done by Stewart and Kneale looked at Hanford worker health records dating up to 1986 - part of a huge trove of data withheld by DOE from independent researchers until two years ago. In their re-analysis of the Hanford worker records, Stewart and Kneale found increased cancer rates among older workers who were over 40 years of age when exposed. And they said that increased susceptibility of older people to radiation-induced cancer was not reflected in the highly influential Japanese atomic bomb studies because people over 50 years of age were [open quotes]grossly under-represented[close quotes] in the A-bomb analyses, possibly because many bomb victims suffered early deaths from high doses.

Lobsenz, G.

1992-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

64

Preprint typeset using L ATEX style emulateapj ON THE KINETIC ENERGY AND RADIATIVE EFFICIENCY OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using measured X-ray luminosities to 17 Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) during the afterglow phase and accounting for radiative losses, we calculate the kinetic energy of these bursts and investigate its relation to other GRB properties. We then use the observed radiated energy during the prompt phase to determine the radiative efficiency of these bursts, and explore how the efficiency relates to other GRB observables. We find that the kinetic energy in the afterglow phase is directly correlated with the radiated energy, total energy as well as possibly the jet opening angle and spectral peak energy. More importantly, we find the intriguing fact that the efficiency is correlated with the radiated energy, and mildly with the total energy, jet opening angle and spectral peak energy. XRF020903 also seems to follow the trends we find for our GRB sample. We discuss the implications of these results for the GRB radiation and jet models. 1.

Nicole M. Lloyd-ronning; Bing Zhang

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Sandia National Laboratories: Research: Facilities: Gamma Irradiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gamma Irradiation Facility Gamma Irradiation Facility Photo of Gamma Irradiation Facility The Gamma Irradiation Facility (GIF) provides high-fidelity simulation of nuclear radiation environments for materials and component testing. The low-dose irradiation facility also offers an environment for long-duration testing of materials and electronic components. Such testing may take place over a number of months or even years. Research and other activities The single-structure GIF can house a wide variety of gamma irradiation experiments with various test configurations and at different dose and dose rate levels. Radiation fields at the GIF are produced by high-intensity gamma-ray sources. To induce ionizing radiation effects and damage in test objects, the objects are subjected to high-energy photons from gamma-source

66

Analysis of Gamma Radiation from a Radon Source: Indications of a Solar Influence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This article presents an analysis of about 29,000 measurements of gamma radiation associated with the decay of radon in a sealed container at the Geological Survey of Israel (GSI) Laboratory in Jerusalem between 28 January 2007 and 10 May 2010. These measurements exhibit strong variations in time of year and time of day, which may be due in part to environmental influences. However, time-series analysis reveals a number of periodicities, including two at approximately 11.2 year$^{-1}$ and 12.5 year$^{-1}$. We have previously found these oscillations in nuclear-decay data acquired at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), and we have suggested that these oscillations are attributable to some form of solar radiation that has its origin in the deep solar interior. A curious property of the GSI data is that the annual oscillation is much stronger in daytime data than in nighttime data, but the opposite is true for all other oscillations. This may be a systematic effect but, if it is not, this property should help narrow the theoretical options for the mechanism responsible for decay-rate variability.

Peter A. Sturrock; Gideon Steinitz; Ephraim Fischbach; Daniel Javorsek, II; Jere H. Jenkins

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Identification of Low-Level Point Radiation Sources Using a Sensor Network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Identification of a low-level point radiation source amidst background radiation is achieved by a network of radiation sensors using a two-step approach. Based on measurements from three sensors, the geometric difference triangulation method is used ... Keywords: Point radiation source, detection and localization, sequential probability ratio test

Nageswara S. V. Rao; Mallikarjun Shankar; Jren-Chit Chin; David K. Y. Yau; Srinivasagopalan Srivathsan; S. Sitharama Iyengar; Yong Yang; Jennifer C. Hou

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

The influence of {gamma}-ray radiation on electrical properties of CuGaSe{sub 2}  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effect of {gamma}-ray radiation on the conductivity of low-resistivity (10{sup 2}2-10{sup 4} {Omega} cm) and high-resistivity (10{sup 5}-10{sup 7} {Omega} cm) CuGaSe{sub 2} single crystals has been studied in the temperature range 77-330 K. It is found that the resistivity of low-resistivity samples increases as the dose of {gamma}-ray radiation is increased, while the resistivity of high-resistivity samples is practically independent of the radiation dose. It is assumed that a decrease in the conductivity of the low-resistivity samples occurs owing to scattering of free charge carriers at defects (charged centers) formed as a result of irradiation with {gamma}-ray photons. It is found that the dose of the {gamma}-ray irradiation does not affect the temperature dependence of resistivity in the low- and high-resistivity samples in the temperature range 77-300 K.

Kasumoglu, I.; Kerimova, T. G., E-mail: ktaira@physics.ab.az; Mamedova, I. A. [National Academy of Sciences of Azerbaijan, Institute of Physics (Azerbaijan)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

69

An Analysis of a Spreader Bar Crane Mounted Gamma-Ray Radiation Detection System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Over 95% of imports entering the United States from outside North America arrive via cargo containers by sea at 329 ports of entry. The current layered approach for the detection only scans 5% of cargo bound for the United States. This is inadequate to protect our country. This research involved the building of a gamma-ray radiation detection system used for cargo scanning. The system was mounted on a spreader bar crane (SBC) at the Port of Tacoma (PoT) and the applicability and capabilities of the system were analyzed. The detection system provided continuous count rate and spectroscopic data among three detectors while operating in an extreme environment. In a separate set of experiments, 60Co and 137Cs sources were positioned inside a cargo container and data were recorded for several count times. The Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) code was used to simulate a radioactive source inside an empty cargo container and the results were compared to experimentally recorded data. The detection system demonstrated the ability to detect 60Co, 137Cs, 192Ir, highly-enriched uranium (HEU), and weapons-grade plutonium (WGPu) with minimum detectable activities (MDA) of 5.9 ± 0.4 microcuries (?Ci), 19.3 ± 1.1 ?Ci, 11.7 ± 0.6 ?Ci, 3.5 ± 0.3 kilograms (kg), and 30.6 ± 1.3 grams (g), respectively. This system proved strong gamma-ray detection capabilities, but was limited in the detection of fissile materials Additional details of this system are presented and advantages of this approach to cargo scanning over current approaches are discussed.

Grypp, Matthew D

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

A ground level gamma-ray burst observed in association with rocket-triggered lightning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ray bursts which BeppoSAX satellite detected with one arcminute accuracy. 3 VHE GAMMA RAY EMISSION 1111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111 (d) 30 20 10 0 -10 1051520 ActiveGalacticNuclei Log(Sizer(cm)) SuperNova Explosion GammaRayBurst@icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp ABSTRACT Copious production of electrons and positrons results in very high energy gamma-rays from

Slatton, Clint

71

Effect of Low Dose Radiation on Antioxidant Levels in Rat Brain  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Low Dose Radiation on Antioxidant Levels in Rat Brain Mohan Doss Fox Chase Cancer Center Abstract Background: Parkinsons disease (PD) is characterized by progressive...

72

Radiation Properties and Emissivity Parameterization of High Level Thin Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To parameterize emissivity of clouds at 11 ?m, a study has been made in an effort to understand the radiation field of thin clouds. The contributions to the intensity and flux from different sources and through different physical processes are ...

Man-Li C. Wu

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Radioactive waste isolation in salt: geochemistry of brine in rock salt in temperature gradients and gamma-radiation fields - a selective annotated bibliography  

SciTech Connect

Evaluation of the extensive research concerning brine geochemistry and transport is critically important to successful exploitation of a salt formation for isolating high-level radioactive waste. This annotated bibliography has been compiled from documents considered to provide classic background material on the interactions between brine and rock salt, as well as the most important results from more recent research. Each summary elucidates the information or data most pertinent to situations encountered in siting, constructing, and operating a mined repository in salt for high-level radioactive waste. The research topics covered include the basic geology, depositional environment, mineralogy, and structure of evaporite and domal salts, as well as fluid inclusions, brine chemistry, thermal and gamma-radiation effects, radionuclide migration, and thermodynamic properties of salts and brines. 4 figs., 6 tabs.

Hull, A.B.; Williams, L.B.

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Projection of needs for gamma radiation sources and other radioisotopes and assessment of alternatives for providing radiation sources  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest Laboratory reviewed the projected uses and demands for a variety of nuclear byproducts. Because the major large-scale near-term demand is for gamma irradiation sources, this report concentrates on the needs for gamma sources and evaluates the options for providing the needed material. Projections of possible growth in the irradiation treatment industry indicate that there will be a need for 180 to 320 MCi of /sup 60/Co (including /sup 137/Cs equivalent) in service in the year 2000. The largest current and projected use of gamma irradiation is for the sterilization of medical devices and disposable medical supplies. Currently, 40% of US disposable medical products are treated by irradiation, and within 10 years it is expected that 90% will be treated in this manner. Irradiation treatment of food for destruction of pathogens or parasites, disinfestation, or extension of allowable storage periods is estimated to require an active inventory of 75 MCi of /sup 60/Co-equivalent gamma source in about a decade. 90 refs., 7 figs., 25 tabs.

Ross, W.A.; Jensen, G.A.; Clark, L.L.; Eakin, D.E.; Jarrett, J.H.; Katayama, Y.B.; McKee, R.W.; Morgan, L.G.; Nealey, S.M.; Platt, A.M.; Tingey, G.L.

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Semiconductor Radiation Detectors with Frisch Collars and Collimators for Gamma Ray Spectroscopy and Imaging  

SciTech Connect

To study CdZnTe as a high energy resolution gamma ray detector with a novel new design, and to build a detector array from the new detector design

Douglas McGregor; Alireza Kargar; Mark Harrison; Adam Brooks; Walter McNei; Rans Lowell; Adam Graebner

2006-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

76

Research Programs on Low-Level Radiation Health Effects Supported by FEPCO  

SciTech Connect

The federation of Electric Power Companies (FEPCO) of Japan has been supporting several research projects on low-level radiation health effects for the purpose of the following: 1. to assist in the establishment of a reasonable system of radiation protection; 2. to release the public from unnecessary fear of ionizing radiation. We present some of the findings and current research programs funded or supported by FEPCO.

Kaneko, Masahito

1999-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

77

Definition of Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gamma Radiation and X-Rays Beta Radiation Alpha Radiation Irradiation Radioactive Contamination Definitions Detection Measurement Safety Around Radiation Sources Types of...

78

Deep diode atomic battery. [Patent: electron-hole pair production by gamma or x radiation  

SciTech Connect

A deep diode atomic battery is made from a bulk semiconductor crystal containing three-dimensional arrays of columnar and lamellar P-N junctions. The battery is powered by gamma rays and x-ray emission from a radioactive source embedded in the interior of the semiconductor crystal.

Anthony, T.R.; Cline, H.E.

1977-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

79

FY08 Annual Report: Amorphous Semiconductors for Gamma Radiation Detection (ASGRAD)  

SciTech Connect

This is the annual report for an old project funded by NA22. The purpose of the project was to develop amorphous semiconductors for use as radiation detectors. The annual report contains information about the progress made in synthesizing, characterizing, and radiation response testing of these new materials.

Johnson, Bradley R.; Riley, Brian J.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Ryan, Joseph V.; Sundaram, S. K.; McCloy, John S.; Rockett, Angus

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Use of ionizing radiation for fixing textile resins on wool. [Gamma rays  

SciTech Connect

Ambient-temperature treatments with ionizing radiation can be used as an alternative to conventional thermal/catalytic cure methods of fixing textile resins on wool materials. The effectiveness of the radiation-induced fixation of resins on wool has been demonstrated by machine-wash shrinkage tests on fabrics treated with a variety of commercial polymer resins.

McLaren, K.G.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gamma radiation levels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

BEIR-III report and the health effects of low-level radiation  

SciTech Connect

The present BEIR-III Committee has not highlighted any controversy over the health effects of low-level radiation. In its evaluation of the experimental data and epidemiological surveys, the Committee has carefully reviewed and assessed the value of all the available scientific evidence for estimating numerical risk coefficients for the health hazards to human populations exposed to low levels of ionizing radiation. Responsible public awareness of the possible health effects of ionizing radiations from medical and industrial radiation exposure, centers on three important matters of societal concern: (1) to place into perspective the extent of harm to the health of man and his descendants to be expected in the present and in the future from those societal activities involving ionizing radiation; (2) to develop quantitative indices of harm based on dose-effect relationships; such indices could then be used with prudent caution to introduce concepts of the regulation of population doses on the basis of somatic and genetic risks; and (3) to identify the magnitude and extent of radiation activities which could cause harm, to assess their relative significance, and to provide a framework for recommendations on how to reduce unnecessary radiation exposure to human populations. The main difference of the BEIR Committee Report is not so much from new data or new interpretations of existing data, but rather from a philosophical approach and appraisal of existing and future radiation protection resulting from an atmosphere of constantly changing societal conditions and public attitudes. (PCS)

Fabrikant, J.I.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Determining Background Radiation Levels in Support of Decommissioning Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is a technical reference for determining background radiation levels in support of surveys for decommissioning nuclear power facilities. Careful planning and data evaluation are essential for a valid survey. The report discusses important considerations for successful establishment of background levels for soils, surfaces, structures, and groundwater. It also explores alternatives to performing a formal background study.

2001-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

83

OBSERVATIONAL SIGNATURES OF SUB-PHOTOSPHERIC RADIATION-MEDIATED SHOCKS IN THE PROMPT PHASE OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS  

SciTech Connect

A shock that forms below the photosphere of a gamma-ray burst (GRB) outflow is mediated by Compton scattering of radiation advected into the shock by the upstream fluid. The characteristic scale of such a shock, a few Thomson depths, is larger than any kinetic scale involved by several orders of magnitude. Hence, unlike collisionless shocks, radiation-mediated shocks cannot accelerate particles to nonthermal energies. The spectrum emitted by a shock that emerges from the photosphere of a GRB jet reflects the temperature profile downstream of the shock, with a possible contribution at the highest energies from the shock transition layer itself. We study the properties of radiation-mediated shocks that form during the prompt phase of GRBs and compute the time-integrated spectrum emitted by the shocked fluid following shock breakout. We show that the time-integrated emission from a single shock exhibits a prominent thermal peak, with the location of the peak depending on the shock velocity profile. We also point out that multiple shock emission can produce a spectrum that mimics a Band spectrum.

Levinson, Amir, E-mail: Levinson@wise.tau.ac.il [School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel); JILA, University of Colorado and National Institute of Standards and Technology, 440 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309-0440 (United States)

2012-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

84

Strategy to detect the gravitational radiation counterpart of gamma-ray bursts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Both observational and theoretical rates of binary neutron star coalescence give low prospects for detection of a single event by the initial LIGO/VIRGO interferometers. However, by utilizing at the best all the a priori information on the expected signal, a positive detection can be achieved. This relies on the hypothesis that $\\gamma$-ray bursts are the electromagnetic signature of neutron star coalescences. The information about the direction of the source can then be used to add in phase the signals from different detectors in order (i) to increase the signal-to-noise ratio and (ii) to make the noise more Gaussian. Besides, the information about the time of arrival can be used to drastically decrease the observation time and thereby the false alarm rate. Moreover the fluence of the $\\gamma$-ray emission gives some information about the amplitude of the gravitational signal. One can then add the signals from $\\sim 10^4$ observation boxes ($\\sim$ number of $\\gamma$-ray bursts during 10 years) to yield a positive detection. Such a detection, based on the Maximum a Posteriori Probability Criterium, is a minimal one, in the sense that no information on the position and time of the events, nor on any parameter of the model, is collected. The advantage is that this detection requires an improvement of the detector sensitivity by a factor of only $\\sim 1.5$ with respect to the initial LIGO/VIRGO interferometers, and that, if positive, it will confirm the $\\gamma$-ray burst model.

S. Bonazzola; E. Gourgoulhon

1998-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

85

Search for Dimuon Decays of a Light Scalar in Radiative Transitions Y(3S) -> gamma A0  

SciTech Connect

The fundamental nature of mass is one of the greatest mysteries in physics. The Higgs mechanism is a theoretically appealing way to account for the different masses of elementary particles and implies the existence of a new, yet unseen particle, the Higgs boson. We search for evidence of a light scalar (e.g. a Higgs boson) in the radiative decays of the narrow {Upsilon}(3S) resonance: {Upsilon}(3S) {yields} {gamma}A{sup 0}, A{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}. Such an object appears in extensions of the Standard Model, where a light CP-odd Higgs boson naturally couples strongly to b-quarks. We find no evidence for such processes in a sample of 122 x 10{sup 6} {Upsilon}(3S) decays collected by the BABAR collaboration at the PEP-II B-factory, and set 90% C.L. upper limits on the branching fraction product {Beta}({Upsilon}(3S) {yields} {gamma}A{sup 0}) x {Beta}(A{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}) at (0.25 - 5.2) x 10{sup -6} in the mass range 0.212 {<=} m{sub A{sup 0}} {<=} 9.3 GeV. We also set a limit on the dimuon branching fraction of the {eta}{sub b} meson {Beta}({eta}{sub b} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}) < 0.8% at 90% C.L. The results are preliminary.

Aubert, B

2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

86

Gamma knife radiosurgery of radiation-induced intracranial tumors: Local control, outcomes, and complications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To determine local control (LC) and complication rates for patients who underwent radiosurgery for radiation-induced intracranial tumors. Methods and Materials: Review of a prospectively maintained database (2,714 patients) identified 16 patients (20 tumors) with radiation-induced tumors treated with radiosurgery between 1990 and 2004. Tumor types included typical meningioma (n = 17), atypical meningioma (n = 2), and schwannoma (n 1). Median patient age at radiosurgery was 47.5 years (range, 27-70 years). The median tumor margin dose was 16 Gy (range, 12-20 Gy). Median follow-up was 40.2 months (range, 10.8-146.2 months). Time-to-event outcomes were calculated with Kaplan-Meier estimates. Results: Three-year and 5-year LC rates were 100%. Three-year and 5-year overall survival rates were 92% and 80%, respectively. Cause-specific survival rates at 3 and 5 years were 100%. Three patients died: 1 had in-field progression 65.1 months after radiosurgery and later died of the tumor, 1 died of progression of a preexisting brain malignancy, and 1 died of an unrelated cause. One patient had increased seizure activity that correlated with development of edema seen on neuroimaging. Conclusions: LC, survival, and complication rates in our series are comparable to those in previous reports of radiosurgery for intracranial meningiomas. Also, LC rates with radiosurgery are at least comparable to those of surgical series for radiation-induced meningiomas. Radiosurgery is a safe and effective treatment option for radiation-induced intracranial tumors, most of which are typical meningiomas.

Jensen, Ashley W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Brown, Paul D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Pollock, Bruce E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Department of Neurologic Surgery, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Stafford, Scott L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Link, Michael J. [Department of Neurologic Surgery, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Garces, Yolanda I. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Foote, Robert L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Gorman, Deborah A. [Department of Neurologic Surgery, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Schomberg, Paula J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States)

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Limitations and Problems in Deriving Risk Estimates for Low-level Radiation Exposure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Some of the problems in determining the cancer risk of low-level radiation from studies of exposed groups are reviewed and applied to the study of Hanford workers by Mancuso, Stewart, and Kneale. Problems considered are statistical limitations, variation of cancer rates with geography and race, the "healthy worker effect, " calendar year and age variation of cancer mortality, choosing from long lists, use of proportional mortality rates, cigarette smoking-cancer correlations, use of averages to represent data distributions, ignoring other data, and correlations between radiation exposure and other factors that may cause cancer. The current status of studies of the Hanford workers is reviewed. There have been several papers in recent years purporting to give evidence that low level radiation (- 10 rad) is more dangerous than indicated by conventional estimates like those of the National Academy of Sciences Committee on Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation (BEIR) [1], the United Nations Scientific Committee on Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR) [21, and the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) [3]. The best known of these is the study by Mancuso, Stewart, and Kneale [4] (hereafter referred to as MSK) on workers at the

Bernard L. Cohen; D. Sc

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

RADIATION SAFETY POLICY Effective Date: April 4, 2012 Originating Office: Office of the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

radiation exposure "As Low as Reasonably Achievable" "Internal Radiation Permit" ("IRP") means and the general public from unnecessary or potentially harmful levels of radiation exposure. PURPOSE capable of generating X or Gamma radiation "Radiology" involves external exposure of humans to Radiation

Doedel, Eusebius

89

Effect of {gamma}-ray radiation on electrical properties of heat-treated Tb{sub x}Sn{sub 1-x}Se single crystals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effect of {gamma}-ray radiation on the electrical properties of heat-treated Tb{sub 0.01}Sn{sub 0.99}Se (sample 1) and Tb{sub 0.05}Sn{sub 0.95}Se (sample 2) samples is studied. It is found that, as a result of irradiation with {gamma}-ray 1.25-MeV photons, the charge-carrier concentration decreases in the temperature range T = 77-200 K by 17 and 6.3% for samples 1 and 2, respectively. It is assumed that, in the course of irradiation with {gamma}-ray photons, terbium impurity atoms are located between sites of the crystal lattice; in addition, Frenkel defects are formed.

Huseynov, J. I., E-mail: cih_58@mail.ru; Jafarov, T. A. [Azerbaijan State Pedagogical University (Azerbaijan)

2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

90

Collision-induced amplification of radiation in inversionless two-level systems  

SciTech Connect

Amplification of probe radiation by an inversionless two-level system in the 'red' wing of its spectral line is studied theoretically during the resonance absorption of intense cw laser radiation. The effect is caused by the inequality of the spectral densities of the Einstein coefficients for absorption and stimulated emission outside the absorption line under conditions when homogeneous broadening, due to the interaction of particles with the buffer gas, significantly exceeds the natural broadening (at high pressures of the buffer gas). It is found that the larger the inversionless gain, the higher the buffer gas pressure and the pump radiation intensity. It is established that at high enough pump intensity, the probe field is amplified along the entire region of the 'red' wing of the line (at any negative detunings of the probe field frequency). (nonlinear optical phenomena)

Parkhomenko, A I; Shalagin, Anatolii M [Institute of Automation and Electrometry, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

2009-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

91

Assessing risks from occupational exposure to low-level radiation: The statistician's role  

SciTech Connect

Currently, several epidemiological studies of workers who have been exposed occupationally to radiation are being conducted. These include workers in the United States, Great Britain, and Canada, involved in the production of both defense materials and nuclear power. A major reason for conducting these studies is to evaluate possible adverse health effects that may have resulted because of the radiation exposure received. The general subject of health effects resulting from low levels of radiation, including these worker studies, has attracted the attention of various news media, and has been the subject of considerable controversy. These studies provide a good illustration of certain other aspects of the statistician's role; namely, communication and adequate subject matter knowledge. A competent technical job is not sufficient if these other aspects are not fulfilled.

Gilbert, E.S.

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Energy spectrum and mass composition of primary cosmic radiation in the region above the knee from the GAMMA experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The energy spectrum of the primary cosmic radiation in the energy range 1 - 100 PeV and the extensive air shower (EAS) characteristics obtained on the basis of the expanded data bank of the GAMMA experiment (Mt. Aragats, Armenia) are presented. With increased statistics we confirm our previous results on the energy spectrum. The spectral index above the knee is about -3.1, but at energies beyond 20 PeV a flattening of the spectrum is observed. The existence of the 'bump' at about 70 PeV is confirmed with a significance of more than 4{\\sigma}. In the energy range of 10 - 100 PeV the shower age becomes energy independent and we observe a direct proportionality of the EAS size to the primary energy. This suggests an approximately constant depth of the EAS maximum in this energy range. This is evidence in favour of an increasing average mass of primary particles at energies above 20 PeV. The additional source scenario, which is a possible explanation of the 'bump' in the spectrum, also leads to the conclusion of ...

Martirosov, R M; Vardanyan, H S; Erlykin, A D; Nikolskaya, N M; Gallant, Y A; Jones, L W; Babayan, H A

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Concentration of leucogenenol in the serum of dogs following their exposure to lethal $gamma$ radiation from cobalt-60  

SciTech Connect

>Three male and 3 female dogs were exposed in the AFRRI whole body irradiator to 350 rads of cobalt-60 gamma -radiation at approximately 39.5 rads/ min. Prior to and at intervals following irradiation, a sample of serum was obtained from each dog and assayed for its leucogenenol content. Before irradiation the average concentration of leucogenenol in the serum was 10.5 plus or minus 6 mu g/liter. The day after irradiation the average concentration in 5 dogs fell to 0.002 mu g/liter and in 1 dog to 1.5 mu g/liter. However, 2 days after irradiation the average concentration in all dogs was elevated to 41 plus or minus 10 mu g/liter. The concentration of leucogenenol in the serum then declined so that 7 days after irradiation it was 0.47 plus or minus 0.24 mu g/liter. Leucogenenol was not measureable (< 0.001 mu g/liter) in each dog's serum for approximately 4 days before the dog died. Individual dogs survived for from 1;3 to 20 days after irradiation. (auth)

Rice, F.A.; Chen, C.G.; Rene, A.A.

1973-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Directional gamma detector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved directional gamma radiation detector has a collector sandwiched etween two layers of insulation of varying thicknesses. The collector and insulation layers are contained within an evacuated casing, or emitter, which releases electrons upon exposure to gamma radiation. Delayed electrons and electrons entering the collector at oblique angles are attenuated as they pass through the insulation layers on route to the collector.

LeVert, Francis E. (Downers Grove, Knoxville, TN); Cox, Samson A. (Downers Grove, IL)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Hubble diagrams of soft and hard radiation sources in the graviton background: to an apparent contradiction between supernova 1a and gamma-ray burst observations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the sea of super-strong interacting gravitons, non-forehead collisions with gravitons deflect photons, and this deflection may differ for soft and hard radiations. As a result, the Hubble diagram would not be a universal function and it will have a different view for such sources as supernovae in visible light and gamma-ray bursts. Observations of these two kinds are compared here with the limit cases of the Hubble diagram.

Michael A. Ivanov

2006-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

96

Gamma-Ray Exposure Rate Distribution in a Steam Generator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gamma-ray exposure rate measurements were made with thermoluminescent dosimeters to determine the relative contribution of various surface areas in a steam generator to the overall radiation levels. The measurements were compared with analytic predictions based on discrete ordinates and point kernel techniques, and assessments of the radiation source inventory of the various surfaces were developed.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

THE BEIR-III REPORT AND THE HEALTH EFFECTS OF LOW-LEVEL RADIATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Protection Against Ionizing Radiation from External Sources,Protection Against Ionizing Radiation from External Sources:induction by ionizing radiation. Brit. J. Radiol. 51: 401-

Fabrikant, J.I.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Low Dose Radiation Response Curves, Networks and Pathways in Human Lymphoblastoid Cells Exposed from 1 to 10 cGy of Acute Gamma Radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

R.B. Mikkelsen, Ionizing radiation-induced, mitochondria-W.K. Rorrer, P.B. Chen, Radiation-induced proliferation ofresponse genes to ionizing radiation in human lymphoblastoid

Wyrobek, A. J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Results of calculations of external gamma radiation exposure rates from local fallout and the related radionuclide compositions of selected US Pacific events  

SciTech Connect

This report presents data on calculated gamma radiation exposure rates and local surface deposition of related radionuclides resulting from selected US Pacific events. Results of the calculations of relative external gamma radiation exposure rate and related radionuclide ground deposition are given in six appendices. The output of the calculation has 30 decay times: 10 from 1 to 21 h, 10 from 1 to 300 d, and 10 from 1 to 50 y. For each of these times and for zero time, there are values of the external gamma radiation exposure rate normalized to 1 mR/h, 1 m above the surface, 12 h after the event; the associated values of ..mu..Ci/m/sup 2/ for each radionuclide; and the total ..mu..Ci/m/sup 2/. Surface roughness effects are simulated by using Beck's values of (mR/h)/..mu..Ci/m/sup 2/) for a relaxation length of 0.16 g/cm/sup 2/. Fractionation effects, simulated by the removal of a fraction of the refractory nuclides from the calculation, were found for unfractionated debris and for debris with 0.5 and 0.1 of the refractory elements present. Each Appendix contains three sets of 11 pages of calculated results relating to one event in Table 1. Each set of 11 pages is marked page 2 through page 12. Page 2 of each set gives the external gamma-ray exposure rates and associated values of total microcuries per square meter at 30 decay intervals and at zero time. The value for each activation product at zero time is the result of a measurement. The measurements were performed on debris samples taken by aircraft approximately 1 to 4 h after detonation. When no measurement exists, the value appears as zero. Fission products were calculated from the fissioning nuclides and neutron energy spectra. Calculated values for each radionuclide at various decay intervals are given.

Hicks, H.G.

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Measured Radiation and Background Levels During Transmission of Megawatt Electron Beams Through Millimeter Apertures  

SciTech Connect

We report measurements of photon and neutron radiation levels observed while transmitting a 0.43 MW electron beam through millimeter-sized apertures and during beam-off, but accelerating gradient RF-on, operation. These measurements were conducted at the Free-Electron Laser (FEL) facility of the Jefferson National Accelerator Laboratory (JLab) using a 100 MeV electron beam from an energy-recovery linear accelerator. The beam was directed successively through 6 mm, 4 mm, and 2 mm diameter apertures of length 127 mm in aluminum at a maximum current of 4.3 mA (430 kW beam power). This study was conducted to characterize radiation levels for experiments that need to operate in this environment, such as the proposed DarkLight Experiment. We find that sustained transmission of a 430 kW continuous-wave (CW) beam through a 2 mm aperture is feasible with manageable beam-related backgrounds. We also find that during beam-off, RF-on operation, multipactoring inside the niobium cavities of the accelerator cryomodules is the primary source of ambient radiation when the machine is tuned for 130 MeV operation.

Alarcon, Ricardo [Arizona State University, Glendale, AZ (United States); Balascuta, S. [Arizona State University, Glendale, AZ (United States); Benson, Stephen V. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Bertozzi, William [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Boyce, James R. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Cowan, Ray [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Douglas, David R. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Evtushenko, Pavel [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Fisher, P. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Ihloff, Ernest E. [Hampton University, Hampton, VA (United States); Kalantarians, Narbe [Hampton University, Hampton, VA (United States); Kelleher, Aidan Michael [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Krossler, W. J. [William and Mary College, Williamsburg, VA (United States); Legg, Robert A. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Long, Elena [University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH (United States); Milner, Richard [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Neil, George R. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Ou, Longwu [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Schmookler, Barack Abraham [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Tennant, Christopher D. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Tschalar, C. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Williams, Gwyn P. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Zhang, Shukui [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States)

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gamma radiation levels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Evaluation of CLM4 Solar Radiation Partitioning Scheme Using Remote Sensing and Site Level FPAR Datasets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: This paper examines a land surface solar radiation partitioning scheme, i.e., that of the Community Land Model version 4 (CLM4) with coupled carbon and nitrogen cycles. Taking advantage of a unique 30-year fraction of absorbed photosynthetically active radiation (FPAR) dataset, derived from the Global Inventory Modeling and Mapping Studies (GIMMS) normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) data set, multiple other remote sensing datasets, and site level observations, we evaluated the CLM4 FPAR’s seasonal cycle, diurnal cycle, long-term trends, and spatial patterns. Our findings show that the model generally agrees with observations in the seasonal cycle, long-term trends, and spatial patterns, but does not reproduce the diurnal cycle. Discrepancies also exist in seasonality magnitudes, peak value months, and spatial heterogeneity. We identify the discrepancy in the diurnal cycle as, due to, the absence of dependence on sun angle in the model. Implementation of sun angle dependence in a one-dimensional (1-D) model is proposed. The need for better relating of vegetation to climate in the model, indicated by long-term trends, is also noted. Evaluation of the CLM4 land surface solar radiation partitioning scheme using remote sensing and site level FPAR datasets provides targets for

Kai Wang; Jiafu Mao; Robert E. Dickinson; Xiaoying Shi; Wilfred M. Post; Zaichun Zhu; Ranga B. Myneni

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Radiation coloration resistant glass  

SciTech Connect

A radiation coloration resistant glass is disclosed which is used in a radiation environment sufficient to cause coloration in most forms of glass. The coloration resistant glass includes higher proportions by weight of water and has been found to be extremely resistant to color change when exposed to such radiation levels. The coloration resistant glass is free of cerium oxide and has more than about 0.5% by weight water content. Even when exposed to gamma radiation of more than 10.sup.7 rad, the coloration resistant glass does not lose transparency.

Tomozawa, Minoru (Troy, NY); Watson, E. Bruce (Troy, NY); Acocella, John (Troy, NY)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Higgs boson decay to mu mubar gamma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Higgs boson decay, H -> mu mubar gamma, is studied in the Standard Model at the tree and one-loop levels. It is shown that for Higgs boson masses above 110 GeV, the contribution to the radiative width from the one-loop level exceeds the contribution from the tree level, and for Higgs boson masses above 140 GeV, it even exceeds the contribution from the tree level decay H -> mu mubar. We also show that the contributions to the radiative decay width from the interference terms between the tree and one-loop diagrams are negligible.

Ali Abbasabadi; Wayne W. Repko

2000-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

104

Carcinogenesis and low-level ionizing radiation with special reference to lung cancer and exposure to radon daughters  

SciTech Connect

Of the important health effects of ionizing radiation, three important late effects - carcinogenesis, teratogenesis and mutagenesis are of greatest concern. This is because any exposure, even at low levels, carries some risk of such deleterious effects. As the dose of radiation increases above very low levels, the risk of health effects increases. Cancer-induction is the most important late somatic effect of low-dose ionizing radiation. Solid cancers, rather than leukemia, are principal late effects in exposed individuals. Tissues vary greatly in their susceptibility to radiation carcinogenesis. The most frequently occurring radiation-induced cancers in man include, in decreasing order of susceptibility: the female breast, the thyroid gland, the blood-forming tissues, the lung, certain organs of the gastrointestinal tract, and the bones. A number of biological and physical factors affect the cancer risk, such as age, sex, life-style, LET, and RBE. Despite uncertainty about low-level radiation risks, regulatory and advisory bodies must set standards for exposure, and individuals need information to be able to make informed judgments for themselves. From the point of view of the policy maker, the overriding concern is the fact that small doses of radiation can cause people to have more cancers than would otherwise be expected. While concern for all radiation effects exists, our human experience is limited to cancer-induction in exposed populations. This discussion is limited to cancer risk estimation and decision-making in relation to the health effects on populations of exposure to low levels of ionizing radiation. Here, low-level radiation will refer to yearly whole-body doses up to 5 rems or 0.05 Sv, or to cumulative doses up to 50 rems or 0.5 Sv from low-LET radiation and from high-LET radiation. (ERB)

Fabrikant, J.I.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Alpha Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Basics of Radiation Basics of Radiation Gamma Radiation and X-Rays Beta Radiation Alpha Radiation Irradiation Radioactive Contamination Definitions Detection Measurement Safety Around Radiation Sources Types of Radiation Exposure Managing Radiation Emergencies Basics of Radiation Characteristics of Alpha Radiation 1. Alpha radiation is not able to penetrate skin. 2. Alpha-emitting materials can be harmful to humans if the materials are inhaled, swallowed, or absorbed through open wounds. 3. A variety of instruments have been designed to measure alpha radiation. Special training in use of these instruments is essential for making accurate measurements. 4. A civil defense instrument (CD V-700) cannot detect the presence of radioactive materials that produce alpha radiation unless the radioactive materials also produce beta and/or gamma radiation.

106

Spatial and Temporal Variations in Long-Term Normal Percent Possible Solar Radiation Levels in the United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to analyze the time and space variations in long-term monthly-averaged daily percent possible solar radiation levels in the United States. Both principal components analysis and harmonic analysis were used to ...

Robert C. Balling Jr.; Randall S. Cerveny

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Improving the Fermilab Booster Notching Efficiency, Beam Losses and Radiation Levels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A fast vertical 1.08-m long kicker (notcher) located in the Fermilab Booster Long-05 straight section is currently used to remove 3 out of 84 circulating bunches after injection to generate an abort gap. With the maximum magnetic field of 72.5 Gauss, it removes only 87% of the 3-bunch intensity at 400 MeV, with 75% loss on pole tips of the focusing Booster magnets, 11% on the Long-06 collimators, and 1% in the rest of the ring. We propose to improve the notching efficiency and reduce beam loss in the Booster by using three horizontal kickers in the Long-12 section. STRUCT calculations show that using horizontal notchers, one can remove up to 96% of the 3-bunch intensity at 400-700 MeV, directing 95% of it to a new beam dump at the Long-13 section. This fully decouples notching and collimation. The beam dump absorbs most of the impinging proton energy in its jaws. The latter are encapsulated into an appropriate radiation shielding that reduces impact on the machine components, personnel and environment to the tolerable levels. MARS simulations show that corresponding prompt and residual radiation levels can be reduced ten times compared to the current ones.

Rakhno, I.L.; Drozhdin, A.I.; Mokhov, N.V.; Sidorov, V.I.; Tropin, I.S.; /Fermilab

2012-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

108

Potential GTCC LLW sealed radiation source recycle initiatives. National Low-Level Waste Management Program  

SciTech Connect

This report suggests 11 actions that have the potential to facilitate the recycling (reuse or radionuclide) of surplus commercial sealed radiation sources that would otherwise be disposed of as greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste. The suggestions serve as a basis for further investigation and discussion between the Department of Energy, Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Agreement States, and the commercial sector. Information is also given that describes sealed sources, how they are used, and problems associated with recycling, including legal concerns. To illustrate the nationwide recycling potential, Appendix A gives the estimated quantity and application information for sealed sources that would qualify for disposal in commercial facilities if not recycle. The report recommends that the Department of Energy initiate the organization of a forum to explore the suggested actions and other recycling possibilities.

Fischer, D.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

RADIATION MECHANISM AND JET COMPOSITION OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS AND GeV-TeV-SELECTED RADIO-LOUD ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and GeV-TeV-selected radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are compared based on our systematic modeling of the observed spectral energy distributions of a sample of AGNs with a single-zone leptonic model. We show that the correlation between the jet power (P{sub jet}) and the prompt gamma-ray luminosity (L{sub jet}) of GRBs is consistent, within the uncertainties, with the correlation between jet power and the synchrotron peak luminosity (L{sub s,jet}) of flat spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs). Their radiation efficiencies ({epsilon}) are also comparable (>10% for most sources), which increase with the bolometric jet luminosity (L{sub bol,jet}) for FSRQs and with the L{sub jet} for GRBs with similar power-law indices. BL Lac objects (BL Lacs) do not follow the P{sub jet}-L{sub s,jet} relation of FSRQs. They have lower {epsilon} and L{sub bol,jet} values than FSRQs, and a tentative L{sub bol,jet}-{epsilon} relation is also found, with a power-law index different from that of the FSRQs. The magnetization parameters ({sigma}) of FSRQs are on average larger than that of BL Lacs. They are anti-correlated with {epsilon} for the FSRQs, but positively correlated with {epsilon} for the BL Lacs. GeV narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxies potentially share similar properties with FSRQs. Based on the analogy between GRBs and FSRQs, we suggest that the prompt gamma-ray emission of GRBs is likely produced by the synchrotron process in a magnetized jet with high radiation efficiency, similar to FSRQs. The jets of BL Lacs, on the other hand, are less efficient and are likely more matter-dominated.

Zhang Jin; Lu Ye; Zhang Shuangnan [National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Liang Enwei; Sun Xiaona [Department of Physics and GXU-NAOC Center for Astrophysics and Space Sciences, Guangxi University, Nanning 530004 (China); Zhang Bing, E-mail: lew@gxu.edu.cn [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV 89154 (United States)

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Blazar Duty-Cycle at gamma-ray Frequecies: Constraints from Extragalactic Background Radiation and Prospects for AGILE and GLAST  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We take into account the constraints from the observed extragalactic gamma-ray background to estimate the maximum duty cycle allowed for a selected sample of WMAP Blazars, in order to be detectable by AGILE and GLAST gamma-ray experiments. For the nominal sensitivity values of both instruments, we identify a subset of sources which can in principle be detectable also in a steady state without over-predicting the extragalactic background. This work is based on the results of a recently derived Blazar radio LogN-LogS obtained by combining several multi-frequency surveys.

Pittori, Carlotta; Colafrancesco, Sergio; Giommi, Paolo

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Miniaturized radiation chirper  

SciTech Connect

The disclosure relates to a miniaturized radiation chirper for use with a small battery supplying on the order of 5 volts. A poor quality CdTe crystal which is not necessarily suitable for high resolution gamma ray spectroscopy is incorporated with appropriate electronics so that the chirper emits an audible noise at a rate that is proportional to radiation exposure level. The chirper is intended to serve as a personnel radiation warning device that utilizes new and novel electronics with a novel detector, a CdTe crystal. The resultant device is much smaller and has much longer battery life than existing chirpers.

Umbarger, C. John (Los Alamos, NM); Wolf, Michael A. (Los Alamos, NM)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Least Squares Fitting of Low-Level Gamma-ray Spectra with B-Spline Basis Functions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, new methods for smoothing gamma-ray spectra measured by NaI detector are derived. Least squares fitting method with B-spline basis functions is used to reduce the influence of statistical fluctuations. The derived procedures are simple and automatic. The results show that this method is better than traditional method with a more complete reduction of staistical fluctuation.

Zhu, M H; You, Z; Xu, A A

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

The association betweeen cancers and low level radiation: An evaluation of the epidemiological evidence at the Hanford Nuclear Weapons Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cancer has traditionally been linked to exposure to high doses of radiation, but there is considerable controversy regarding the carcinogenicity of low doses of ionizing radiation in humans. Over the past 30 years there have been 14 studies conducted on employees at the Hanford nuclear weapons facility to investigate the relationship between exposure to low doses of radiation and mortality due to cancer (1-14). Interest in this issue was originally stimulated by the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) which was trying to determine whether the linear extrapolation of health effects from high to low dose exposure was accurate. If the risk has been underestimated, then the maximum permissible occupational radiation exposure in the United States had been set too high. Because the health risk associated with low level radiation are unclear and controversial it seems appropriate to review the studies relating to Hanford at this time.

Britton, J. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). School of Public Health]|[Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Level  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

7 at level 3 (FHEQ level 6) and the rest at level M (FHEQ level 7) 4. Other entry N/A Credit Level awards (if applicable): 5. Exit Awards: PGDip Advanced Computer Science 120 credits with not more than 30 credits at level 3 (FHEQ level 6) and the rest at level M (FHEQ level 7) Credit

Programme Csad

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Level  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

7 at level 3 (FHEQ level 6) and the rest at level M (FHEQ level 7) 4. Other entry N/A Credit Level awards (if applicable): 5. Exit Awards: PGDip Computer Science 120 credits with not more than 30 credits at level 3 (FHEQ level 6) and the rest at level M (FHEQ level 7) Credit

unknown authors

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Ion-induced gammas for photofission interrogation of HEU.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-energy photons and neutrons can be used to actively interrogate for heavily shielded special nuclear material (SNM), such as HEU (highly enriched uranium), by detecting prompt and/or delayed induced fission signatures. In this work, we explore the underlying physics for a new type of photon source that generates high fluxes of mono-energetic gamma-rays from low-energy (ion accelerator experiments and radiation transport modeling. The data were used to assess gamma and neutron yields, background, and photofission-induced signal levels from several (p,{gamma}) target materials under consideration.

Doyle, Barney Lee (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Antolak, Arlyn J.; Morse, Daniel H.; Provencio, Paula Polyak (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM)

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Precise Measurement of the e(+)e(-)->pi(+)pi(-)(gamma) Cross Section with the Initial State Radiation Method at BABAR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A precise measurement of the cross section of the process e[superscript +]e[superscript -]??[superscript +]?[superscript -](?) from threshold to an energy of 3 GeV is obtained with the initial state radiation (ISR) method ...

Cowan, Ray Franklin

118

Gamma ray bursts ROBERT S MACKAY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gamma ray bursts ROBERT S MACKAY COLIN ROURKE We propose that a gamma ray burst is a kinematic Gamma ray bursts are intense flashes of electromagnetic radiation of cosmic origin lasting from ten accepted mechanism. We propose that a gamma ray burst is simply a kinematic effect, namely the effect

Rourke, Colin

119

Level  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

7 180 credits with not more than 30 credits at level 3 (FHEQ level 6) and the rest at level M (FHEQ level 7) 4. Other entry N/A Credit Level awards (if applicable): 5. Exit Awards: PGDip in Advanced Computer Science with

Programme Csci

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

DNA Double-Strand Break Analysis by {gamma}-H2AX Foci: A Useful Method for Determining the Overreactors to Radiation-Induced Acute Reactions Among Head-and-Neck Cancer Patients  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Interindividual variability in normal tissue toxicity during radiation therapy is a limiting factor for successful treatment. Predicting the risk of developing acute reactions before initiation of radiation therapy may have the benefit of opting for altered radiation therapy regimens to achieve minimal adverse effects with improved tumor cure. Methods and Materials: DNA double-strand break (DSB) induction and its repair kinetics in lymphocytes of head-and-neck cancer patients undergoing chemoradiation therapy was analyzed by counting {gamma}-H2AX foci, neutral comet assay, and a modified version of neutral filter elution assay. Acute normal tissue reactions were assessed by Radiation Therapy Oncology Group criteria. Results: The correlation between residual DSBs and the severity of acute reactions demonstrated that residual {gamma}-H2AX foci in head-and-neck cancer patients increased with the severity of oral mucositis and skin reaction. Conclusions: Our results suggest that {gamma}-H2AX analysis may have predictive implications for identifying the overreactors to mucositis and skin reactions among head-and-neck cancer patients prior to initiation of radiation therapy.

Goutham, Hassan Venkatesh; Mumbrekar, Kamalesh Dattaram [Division of Radiobiology and Toxicology, Manipal Life Sciences Centre, Manipal University, Manipal, Karnataka (India)] [Division of Radiobiology and Toxicology, Manipal Life Sciences Centre, Manipal University, Manipal, Karnataka (India); Vadhiraja, Bejadi Manjunath [Manipal Hospital, Bangalore, Karnataka (India)] [Manipal Hospital, Bangalore, Karnataka (India); Fernandes, Donald Jerard; Sharan, Krishna [Department of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Shiridi Sai Baba Cancer Hospital and Research Centre, Kasturba Hospital, Manipal, Karnataka (India)] [Department of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Shiridi Sai Baba Cancer Hospital and Research Centre, Kasturba Hospital, Manipal, Karnataka (India); Kanive Parashiva, Guruprasad; Kapaettu, Satyamoorthy [Division of Biotechnology, Manipal Life Sciences Centre, Manipal University, Manipal, Karnataka (India)] [Division of Biotechnology, Manipal Life Sciences Centre, Manipal University, Manipal, Karnataka (India); Bola Sadashiva, Satish Rao, E-mail: satishraomlsc@gmail.com [Division of Radiobiology and Toxicology, Manipal Life Sciences Centre, Manipal University, Manipal, Karnataka (India)

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gamma radiation levels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Low Dose Radiation Response Curves, Networks and Pathways in Human Lymphoblastoid Cells Exposed from 1 to 10 cGy of Acute Gamma Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We investigated the low dose dependency of the transcriptional response of human cells to characterize the shape and biological functions associated with the dose response curve and to identify common and conserved functions of low dose expressed genes across cells and tissues. Human lymphoblastoid (HL) cells from two unrelated individuals were exposed to graded doses of radiation spanning the range of 1-10 cGy were analyzed by transcriptome profiling, qPCR and bioinformatics, in comparison to sham irradiated samples. A set of {approx}80 genes showed consistent responses in both cell lines; these genes were associated with homeostasis mechanisms (e.g., membrane signaling, molecule transport), subcellular locations (e.g., Golgi, and endoplasmic reticulum), and involved diverse signal transduction pathways. The majority of radiation-modulated genes had plateau-like responses across 1-10 cGy, some with suggestive evidence that transcription was modulated at doses below 1 cGy. MYC, FOS and TP53 were the major network nodes of the low-dose response in HL cells. Comparison our low dose expression findings in HL cells with those of prior studies in mouse brain after whole body exposure, in human keratinocyte cultures, and in endothelial cells cultures, indicates that certain components of the low dose radiation response are broadly conserved across cell types and tissues, independent of proliferation status.

Wyrobek, A. J.; Manohar, C. F.; Nelson, D. O.; Furtado, M. R.; Bhattacharya, M. S.; Marchetti, F.; Coleman, M.A.

2011-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

122

Estimation of Surface Radiation and Energy Flux Densities from Single-Level Weather Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A scheme is proposed that relates surface flux densities of sensible heat, latent heat, and momentum to routine weather data. The scheme contains parameterizations concerning the radiation components and the surface energy flux densities. The ...

Wim C. de Rooy; A. A. M. Holtslag

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Gamma Ray Pulsars: Observations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High-energy gamma rays are a valuable tool for studying particle acceleration and radiation in the magnetospheres of energetic pulsars. The six or more pulsars seen by CGRO/EGRET show that: the light curves usually have double-peak structures (suggesting a broad cone of emission); gamma rays are frequently the dominant component of the radiated power; and all the spectra show evidence of a high-energy turnover. Unless a new pulsed component appears at higher energies, progress in gamma-ray pulsar studies will be greatest in the 1-20 GeV range. Ground-based telescopes whose energy ranges extend downward toward 10 GeV should make important measurements of the spectral cutoffs. The Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST), now in planning for a launch in 2005, will provide a major advance in sensitivity, energy range, and sky coverage.

David J. Thompson

2001-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

124

Simultaneous beta and gamma spectroscopy  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A phoswich radiation detector for simultaneous spectroscopy of beta rays and gamma rays includes three scintillators with different decay time characteristics. Two of the three scintillators are used for beta detection and the third scintillator is used for gamma detection. A pulse induced by an interaction of radiation with the detector is digitally analyzed to classify the type of event as beta, gamma, or unknown. A pulse is classified as a beta event if the pulse originated from just the first scintillator alone or from just the first and the second scintillator. A pulse from just the third scintillator is recorded as gamma event. Other pulses are rejected as unknown events.

Farsoni, Abdollah T. (Corvallis, OR); Hamby, David M. (Corvallis, OR)

2010-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

125

Radiators  

SciTech Connect

A heat-exchange radiator is connected to a fluid flow circuit by a connector which provides one member of an interengageable spigot and socket pair for push-fit, fluid-tight, engagement between the connector and the radiator, with latching formations at least one of which is resilient. Preferably the connector carries the spigot which tapers and engages with a socket of corresponding shape, the spigot carrying an O-ring seal and either latching fingers or a resilient latching circlip.

Webster, D. M.

1985-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

126

System level latchup mitigation for single event and transient radiation effects on electronics  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A `blink` technique, analogous to a person blinking at a flash of bright light, is provided for mitigating the effects of single event current latchup and prompt pulse destructive radiation on a micro-electronic circuit. The system includes event detection means, power dump logic means, and energy limiting measures with autonomous recovery. The event detection means includes ionizing radiation pulse detection means for detecting a pulse of ionizing radiation and for providing at an output terminal thereof a detection signal indicative of the detection of a pulse of ionizing radiation or by ion-induced destructive latchup of a semiconductor device. The current sensing means is coupled to the power bus for determining an occurrence of excess current through the power bus caused by ionizing radiation. The power dump means includes power dump logic means having a first input terminal connected to the output terminal of the ionizing radiation pulse detection means and having a second input terminal connected to the output terminal of the current sensing means. The power dump logic means provides an output signal to the input terminal of the means for opening the power bus and the means for shorting the power bus to a ground potential to remove power from the power bus. The energy limiting mean with autonomous recovery includes means for opening the power bus and means for shorting the power bus to a ground potential. The means for opening the power bus and means for shorting the power bus to a ground potential includes a series FET and a shunt FET. The invention provides for self-contained sensing for latchup, first removal of power to protect latched components, and autonomous recovery to enable transparent operation of other system elements.

Kimbrough, J.R.; Colella, N.J.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

127

System level latchup mitigation for single event and transient radiation effects on electronics  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A ``blink`` technique, analogous to a person blinking at a flash of bright light, is provided for mitigating the effects of single event current latchup and prompt pulse destructive radiation on a micro-electronic circuit. The system includes event detection circuitry, power dump logic circuitry, and energy limiting measures with autonomous recovery. The event detection circuitry includes ionizing radiation pulse detection means for detecting a pulse of ionizing radiation and for providing at an output terminal thereof a detection signal indicative of the detection of a pulse of ionizing radiation. The current sensing circuitry is coupled to the power bus for determining an occurrence of excess current through the power bus caused by ionizing radiation or by ion-induced destructive latchup of a semiconductor device. The power dump circuitry includes power dump logic circuitry having a first input terminal connected to the output terminal of the ionizing radiation pulse detection circuitry and having a second input terminal connected to the output terminal of the current sensing circuitry. The power dump logic circuitry provides an output signal to the input terminal of the circuitry for opening the power bus and the circuitry for shorting the power bus to a ground potential to remove power from the power bus. The energy limiting circuitry with autonomous recovery includes circuitry for opening the power bus and circuitry for shorting the power bus to a ground potential. The circuitry for opening the power bus and circuitry for shorting the power bus to a ground potential includes a series FET and a shunt FET. The invention provides for self-contained sensing for latchup, first removal of power to protect latched components, and autonomous recovery to enable transparent operation of other system elements. 18 figs.

Kimbrough, J.R.; Colella, N.J.

1997-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

128

System level latchup mitigation for single event and transient radiation effects on electronics  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A "blink" technique, analogous to a person blinking at a flash of bright light, is provided for mitigating the effects of single event current latchup and prompt pulse destructive radiation on a micro-electronic circuit. The system includes event detection circuitry, power dump logic circuitry, and energy limiting measures with autonomous recovery. The event detection circuitry includes ionizing radiation pulse detection means for detecting a pulse of ionizing radiation and for providing at an output terminal thereof a detection signal indicative of the detection of a pulse of ionizing radiation. The current sensing circuitry is coupled to the power bus for determining an occurrence of excess current through the power bus caused by ionizing radiation or by ion-induced destructive latchup of a semiconductor device. The power dump circuitry includes power dump logic circuitry having a first input terminal connected to the output terminal of the ionizing radiation pulse detection circuitry and having a second input terminal connected to the output terminal of the current sensing circuitry. The power dump logic circuitry provides an output signal to the input terminal of the circuitry for opening the power bus and the circuitry for shorting the power bus to a ground potential to remove power from the power bus. The energy limiting circuitry with autonomous recovery includes circuitry for opening the power bus and circuitry for shorting the power bus to a ground potential. The circuitry for opening the power bus and circuitry for shorting the power bus to a ground potential includes a series FET and a shunt FET. The invention provides for self-contained sensing for latchup, first removal of power to protect latched components, and autonomous recovery to enable transparent operation of other system elements.

Kimbrough, Joseph Robert (Pleasanton, CA); Colella, Nicholas John (Livermore, CA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Discovery of Very High-Energy Gamma-Ray Radiation from the BL Lac 1ES 0806+524  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The high-frequency-peaked BL-Lacertae object \\objectname{1ES 0806+524}, at redshift z=0.138, was observed in the very-high-energy (VHE) gamma-ray regime by VERITAS between November 2006 and April 2008. These data encompass the two-, and three-telescope commissioning phases, as well as observations with the full four-telescope array. \\objectname{1ES 0806+524} is detected with a statistical significance of 6.3 standard deviations from 245 excess events. Little or no measurable variability on monthly time scales is found. The photon spectrum for the period November 2007 to April 2008 can be characterized by a power law with photon index $3.6 \\pm 1.0_{\\mathrm{stat}} \\pm 0.3_{\\mathrm{sys}}$ between $\\sim$300 GeV and $\\sim$700 GeV. The integral flux above 300 GeV is $(2.2\\pm0.5_{\\mathrm{stat}}\\pm0.4_{\\mathrm{sys}})\\times10^{-12}\\:\\mathrm{cm}^{2}\\:\\mathrm{s}^{-1}$ which corresponds to 1.8% of the Crab Nebula flux. Non contemporaneous multiwavelength observations are combined with the VHE data to produce a broadband spectral energy distribution that can be reasonably described using a synchrotron-self Compton model.

VERITAS Collaboration; V. Acciari; E. Aliu; T. Arlen; M. Bautista; M. Beilicke; W. Benbow; M. Böttcher; S. M. Bradbury; J. H. Buckley; V. Bugaev; Y. Butt; K. Byrum; A. Cannon; O. Celik; A. Cesarini; Y. C. Chow; L. Ciupik; P. Cogan; P. Colin; W. Cui; R. Dickherber; C. Duke; T. Ergin; A. Falcone; S. J. Fegan; J. P. Finley; G. Finnegan; P. Fortin; L. Fortson; A. Furniss; D. Gall; K. Gibbs; G. H. Gillanders; J. Grube; R. Guenette; G. Gyuk; D. Hanna; E. Hays; J. Holder; D. Horan; C. M. Hui; T. B. Humensky; A. Imran; P. Kaaret; N. Karlsson; M. Kertzman; D. Kieda; J. Kildea; A. Konopelko; H. Krawczynski; F. Krennrich; M. J. Lang; S. LeBohec; G. Maier; A. McCann; M. McCutcheon; J. Millis; P. Moriarty; R. Mukherjee; T. Nagai; R. A. Ong; A. N. Otte; D. Pandel; J. S. Perkins; D. Petry; M. Pohl; J. Quinn; K. Ragan; L. C. Reyes; P. T. Reynolds; E. Roache; J. Rose; M. Schroedter; G. H. Sembroski; A. W. Smith; D. Steele; S. P. Swordy; M. Theiling; J. A. Toner; L. Valcarcel; A. Varlotta; V. V. Vassiliev; R. G. Wagner; S. P. Wakely; J. E. Ward; T. C. Weekes; A. Weinstein; R. J. White; D. A. Williams; S. Wissel; M. Wood; B. Zitzer

2008-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

130

Radiation dose assessments to support evaluations of radiological control levels for recycling or reuse of materials and equipment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest Laboratory is providing Environmental Protection Support and Assistance to the USDOE, Office of Environmental Guidance. Air, Water, and Radiation Division. As part of this effort, PNL is collecting data and conducting technical evaluations to support DOE analyses of the feasibility of developing radiological control levels for recycling or reuse of metals, concrete, or equipment containing residual radioactive contamination from DOE operations. The radiological control levels will be risk-based, as developed through a radiation exposure scenario and pathway analysis. The analysis will include evaluation of relevant radionuclides, potential mechanisms of exposure, and both health and non-health-related impacts. The main objective of this report is to develop a methodology for establishing radiological control levels for recycle or reuse. This report provides the results of the radiation exposure scenario and pathway analyses for 42 key radionuclides generated during DOE operations that may be contained in metals or equipment considered for either recycling or reuse. The scenarios and information developed by the IAEA. Application of Exemption Principles to the Recycle and Reuse of Materials from Nuclear Facilities, are used as the initial basis for this study. The analyses were performed for both selected worker populations at metal smelters and for the public downwind of a smelter facility. Doses to the public downwind were estimated using the US (EPA) CAP88-PC computer code with generic data on atmospheric dispersion and population density. Potential non-health-related effects of residual activity on electronics and on film were also analyzed.

Hill, R.L.; Aaberg, R.L.; Baker, D.A.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Defining Top-of-the-Atmosphere Flux Reference Level for Earth Radiation Budget Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To estimate the earth's radiation budget at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) from satellite-measured radiances, it is necessary to account for the finite geometry of the earth and recognize that the earth is a solid body surrounded by a ...

Norman G. Loeb; Seiji Kato; Bruce A. Wielicki

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

A PORTABLE DOSE RATE INSTRUMENT FOR MEASUREMENT OF NATURAL BACK-GROUND RADIATION LEVELS  

SciTech Connect

An instrument of the ionization chamber type which is capable of measuring radiation dose rates down to and below those encountered in natural background was designed and constructed. It consists of a 40-liter ionization chamber coupled to a portable battery-powered electrometer. The chamber polarizing battery is a part of the chamber center electrode assembly and is located inside the chamber. (auth)

Rising, F.L.

1960-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

133

Gamma ray burst outflows and afterglows.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? We carry out a theoretical investigation of jet propagation in Gamma Ray Bursts and examine the jitter radiation mechanism as a means of producing… (more)

Morsony, Brian J.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

The Association between Cancers and Low Level Radiation: an evaluation of the epidemiological evidence at the Hanford Nuclear Weapons Facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

date of death, internal radiation and exposure period, thedeath, death year, internal radiation, exposure period, andexposures (chemical and smoking), internal doses, and types of radiation.

Britton, Julie

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Astrophysical S factor for the radiative-capture reaction p{sup 6}Li {yields} {sup 7}Be{gamma}  

SciTech Connect

A new measurement of differential cross sections for elastic p{sup 6}Li scattering in the energy range 0.35-1.2 MeV was performed. A partial-wave analysis of the data obtained in this way was carried out, and potentials simulating the p{sup 6}Li interaction were constructed. Various experiments devoted to studying elastic p{sup 6}Li scattering over the broad energy range of 0.5-50 MeV were analyzed on the basis of the optical model. By using the potentials obtained from the partial-wave analysis, the possibility of describing the astrophysical S factor for radiative proton capture on {sup 6}Li at low energies was considered within the potential cluster model involving forbidden states.

Dubovichenko, S. B., E-mail: sergey@dubovichenko.ru [National Space Agency of the Republic of Kazakhstan, Fessenkov Astrophysical Institute, National Center of Space Research and Technology (Kazakhstan); Burtebaev, N., E-mail: burteb@inp.kz; Zazulin, D. M.; Kerimkulov, Zh. K. [National Nuclear Center of Republic of Kazakhstan, Institute of Nuclear Physics (Kazakhstan); Amar, A. S. A. [Al-Farabi Kazakh National University (Kazakhstan)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

136

Quick Reference Information - Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gamma and x-rays are photons. Protons: Positively charged elementary particles found in atomic nuclei. Radiation: The propagation of energy through space, or some other medium,...

137

Integrated Radiation Transport and Nuclear Fuel Performance for Assembly-Level Simulations  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Multi-Physics (AMP) Nuclear Fuel Performance code (AMPFuel) is focused on predicting the temperature and strain within a nuclear fuel assembly to evaluate the performance and safety of existing and advanced nuclear fuel bundles within existing and advanced nuclear reactors. AMPFuel was extended to include an integrated nuclear fuel assembly capability for (one-way) coupled radiation transport and nuclear fuel assembly thermo-mechanics. This capability is the initial step toward incorporating an improved predictive nuclear fuel assembly modeling capability to accurately account for source-terms and boundary conditions of traditional (single-pin) nuclear fuel performance simulation, such as the neutron flux distribution, coolant conditions, and assembly mechanical stresses. A novel scheme is introduced for transferring the power distribution from the Scale/Denovo (Denovo) radiation transport code (structured, Cartesian mesh with smeared materials within each cell) to AMPFuel (unstructured, hexagonal mesh with a single material within each cell), allowing the use of a relatively coarse spatial mesh (10 million elements) for the radiation transport and a fine spatial mesh (3.3 billion elements) for thermo-mechanics with very little loss of accuracy. In addition, a new nuclear fuel-specific preconditioner was developed to account for the high aspect ratio of each fuel pin (12 feet axially, but 1 4 inches in diameter) with many individual fuel regions (pellets). With this novel capability, AMPFuel was used to model an entire 17 17 pressurized water reactor fuel assembly with many of the features resolved in three dimensions (for thermo-mechanics and/or neutronics), including the fuel, gap, and cladding of each of the 264 fuel pins; the 25 guide tubes; the top and bottom structural regions; and the upper and lower (neutron) reflector regions. The final, full assembly calculation was executed on Jaguar using 40,000 cores in under 10 hours to model over 162 billion degrees of freedom for 10 loading steps. The single radiation transport calculation required about 50% of the time required to solve the thermo-mechanics with a single loading step, which demonstrates that it is feasible to incorporate, in a single code, a high-fidelity radiation transport capability with a high-fidelity nuclear fuel thermo-mechanics capability and anticipate acceptable computational requirements. The results of the full assembly simulation clearly show the axial, radial, and azimuthal variation of the neutron flux, power, temperature, and deformation of the assembly, highlighting behavior that is neglected in traditional axisymmetric fuel performance codes that do not account for assembly features, such as guide tubes and control rods.

Clarno, Kevin T [ORNL; Hamilton, Steven P [ORNL; Philip, Bobby [ORNL; Berrill, Mark A [ORNL; Sampath, Rahul S [ORNL; Allu, Srikanth [ORNL; Pugmire, Dave [ORNL; Dilts, Gary [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Banfield, James E [ORNL

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Integrated Radiation Transport and Nuclear Fuel Performance for Assembly-Level Simulations  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Multi-Physics (AMP) Nuclear Fuel Performance code (AMPFuel) is focused on predicting the temperature and strain within a nuclear fuel assembly to evaluate the performance and safety of existing and advanced nuclear fuel bundles within existing and advanced nuclear reactors. AMPFuel was extended to include an integrated nuclear fuel assembly capability for (one-way) coupled radiation transport and nuclear fuel assembly thermo-mechanics. This capability is the initial step toward incorporating an improved predictive nuclear fuel assembly modeling capability to accurately account for source-terms, such as neutron flux distribution, coolant conditions and assembly mechanical stresses, of traditional (single-pin) nuclear fuel performance simulation. A novel scheme is introduced for transferring the power distribution from the Scale/Denovo (Denovo) radiation transport code (structured, Cartesian mesh with smeared materials within each cell) to AMPFuel (unstructured, hexagonal mesh with a single material within each cell), allowing the use of a relatively coarse spatial mesh (10 million elements) for the radiation transport and a fine spatial mesh (3.3 billion elements) for thermo-mechanics with very little loss of accuracy. With this novel capability, AMPFuel was used to model an entire 1717 pressurized water reactor fuel assembly with many of the features resolved in three dimensions (for thermo-mechanics and/or neutronics). A full assembly calculation was executed on Jaguar using 40,000 cores in under 10 hours to model over 160 billion degrees of freedom for 10 loading steps. The single radiation transport calculation required about 50% of the time required to solve the thermo-mechanics with a single loading step, which demonstrates that it is feasible to incorporate, in a single code, a high-fidelity radiation transport capability with a high-fidelity nuclear fuel thermo-mechanics capability and anticipate acceptable computational requirements. The results of the full assembly simulation clearly show the axial, radial, and azimuthal variation of the neutron flux, power, temperature, and deformation of the assembly, highlighting behavior that is neglected in traditional axisymmetric fuel performance codes that do not account for assembly features, such as guide tubes and control rods.

Hamilton, Steven P [ORNL; Clarno, Kevin T [ORNL; Philip, Bobby [ORNL; Berrill, Mark A [ORNL; Sampath, Rahul S [ORNL; Allu, Srikanth [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Gamma Irradiation | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gamma Irradiation Gamma Irradiation Gamma Irradiation Facility Gamma irradiation chamber Gamma irradiation chamber. The HFIR Gamma Irradiation Facility is an experimental facility designed to irradiate materials with gamma radiation from spent fuel elements. The facility chamber is stainless steel and is made of 0.065-thick tubing to maximize the internal dimensions of the chamber. This allows for the largest samples possible that can still fit inside the cadmium post of the spent fuel loading station positions. The interior chamber is approximately 3.75 inches inside diameter and accommodates samples up to 25 inches long. There are two configurations for the chamber assembly, with the only difference being the plugs. The uninstrumented configuration has a top plug that is used for installation of the samples, to support the inert gas

140

Definition: Gamma Log | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Gamma Log Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Gamma Log Gamma logging is a method of measuring naturally occurring gamma radiation to characterize the rock or sediment in a borehole or drill hole. It is a wireline logging method used in mining, mineral exploration, water-well drilling, for formation evaluation in oil and gas well drilling and for other related purposes. Different types of rock emit different amounts and different spectra of natural gamma radiation.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Gamma ray logging is a method of measuring naturally occurring gamma radiation to characterize the rock or sediment in a borehole or drill hole. It is a wireline logging method used in mining, mineral exploration,

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141

A Microphysical Retrieval Scheme for Continental Low-Level Stratiform Clouds: Impacts of the Subadiabatic Character on Microphysical Properties and Radiation Budgets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using measurements from the Department of Energy’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program, a modified ground-based remote sensing technique is developed and evaluated to study the impacts of the subadiabatic character of continental low-level ...

Hung-Neng S. Chin; Daniel J. Rodriguez; Richard T. Cederwall; Catherine C. Chuang; Allen S. Grossman; John J. Yio; Qiang Fu; Mark A. Miller

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Search for B0 to p Lambdabar pi- gamma at Belle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We search for the charmless B^0 decay with final state particles p Lambdabar pi^- gamma using the full data sample that contains 772 * 10^6 B Bar pairs collected at the Upsilon(4S) resonance with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e^+ e^- collider. This decay is predicted to proceed predominantly via the b to s gamma radiative penguin process with a high energy photon. No significant signal is found. We set an upper limit of 6.5 * 10^-7 for the branching fraction of B^0 to p Lambdabar pi^- gamma at the 90% confidence level.

Y. -T. Lai; M. -Z. Wang; I. Adachi; H. Aihara; D. M. Asner; V. Aulchenko; T. Aushev; A. M. Bakich; A. Bala; B. Bhuyan; A. Bobrov; A. Bozek; M. Bra?ko; T. E. Browder; P. Chang; V. Chekelian; A. Chen; P. Chen; B. G. Cheon; I. -S. Cho; K. Cho; V. Chobanova; S. -K. Choi; Y. Choi; D. Cinabro; J. Dalseno; Z. Doležal; A. Drutskoy; S. Eidelman; H. Farhat; J. E. Fast; T. Ferber; A. Frey; V. Gaur; S. Ganguly; R. Gillard; Y. M. Goh; B. Golob; J. Haba; H. Hayashii; Y. Hoshi; W. -S. Hou; Y. B. Hsiung; T. Iijima; A. Ishikawa; R. Itoh; Y. Iwasaki; T. Iwashita; I. Jaegle; T. Julius; J. H. Kang; E. Kato; T. Kawasaki; C. Kiesling; H. O. Kim; J. H. Kim; M. J. Kim; Y. J. Kim; J. Klucar; B. R. Ko; P. Kodyš; S. Korpar; P. Križan; P. Krokovny; T. Kuhr; T. Kumita; Y. -J. Kwon; J. S. Lange; S. -H. Lee; J. Li; J. Libby; Y. Liu; P. Lukin; D. Matvienko; H. Miyata; R. Mizuk; A. Moll; R. Mussa; E. Nakano; M. Nakao; M. Nayak; C. Ng; N. K. Nisar; S. Nishida; O. Nitoh; S. Ogawa; Y. Onuki; H. Ozaki; G. Pakhlova; C. W. Park; H. Park; T. K. Pedlar; R. Pestotnik; M. Petri?; L. E. Piilonen; M. Ritter; M. Röhrken; A. Rostomyan; S. Ryu; H. Sahoo; T. Saito; Y. Sakai; S. Sandilya; D. Santel; L. Santelj; T. Sanuki; Y. Sato; O. Schneider; G. Schnell; C. Schwanda; D. Semmler; K. Senyo; M. Shapkin; C. P. Shen; T. -A. Shibata; J. -G. Shiu; B. Shwartz; A. Sibidanov; Y. -S. Sohn; E. Solovieva; S. Stani?; M. Stari?; M. Steder; T. Sumiyoshi; U. Tamponi; K. Tanida; Y. Teramoto; M. Uchida; S. Uehara; T. Uglov; Y. Unno; S. Uno; P. Urquijo; S. E. Vahsen; C. Van Hulse; P. Vanhoefer; G. Varner; A. Vossen; M. N. Wagner; C. H. Wang; P. Wang; Y. Watanabe; K. M. Williams; E. Won; J. Yamaoka; Y. Yamashita; S. Yashchenko; Z. P. Zhang; V. Zhilich; V. Zhulanov; A. Zupanc

2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

143

Gamma Ray Pulsars: Multiwavelength Observations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High-energy gamma rays are a valuable tool for studying particle acceleration and radiation in the magnetospheres of energetic pulsars. The seven or more pulsars seen by instruments on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO) show that: the light curves usually have double-peak structures (suggesting a broad cone of emission); gamma rays are frequently the dominant component of the radiated power; and all the spectra show evidence of a high-energy turnover. For all the known gamma-ray pulsars, multiwavelength observations and theoretical models based on such observations offer the prospect of gaining a broad understanding of these rotating neutron stars. The Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST), now in planning for a launch in 2007, will provide a major advance in sensitivity, energy range, and sky coverage.

David J. Thompson

2003-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

144

Radiation-induced Soft Errors: A Chip-level Modeling Perspective  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chip-level soft-error rate (SER) estimation can come from two sources: direct experimental measurement and simulation. Because SER mitigation decisions need to be made very early in the product design cycle, long before product Si is available, a simulation-based ...

Norbert Seifert

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Nuclear radiation-warning detector that measures impedance  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is a nuclear radiation-warning detector that measures impedance of silver-silver halide on an interdigitated electrode to detect light or radiation comprised of alpha particles, beta particles, gamma rays, X rays, and/or neutrons. The detector is comprised of an interdigitated electrode covered by a layer of silver halide. After exposure to alpha particles, beta particles, X rays, gamma rays, neutron radiation, or light, the silver halide is reduced to silver in the presence of a reducing solution. The change from the high electrical resistance (impedance) of silver halide to the low resistance of silver provides the radiation warning that detected radiation levels exceed a predetermined radiation dose threshold.

Savignac, Noel Felix; Gomez, Leo S; Yelton, William Graham; Robinson, Alex; Limmer, Steven

2013-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

146

The Association between Cancers and Low Level Radiation: an evaluation of the epidemiological evidence at the Hanford Nuclear Weapons Facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

indiv. indiv. Gilbertetal. (Hanford & Combined) Gilbertetal.on both radiation and the Hanford facility. The data used toG. Radiation exposures of Hanford workers dying from cancer

Britton, Julie

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Superradiant control of gamma-ray propagation by vibrating nuclear arrays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The collective nature of light interactions with atomic and nuclear ensembles yields the fascinating phenomena of superradiance and radiation trapping. We study the interaction of gamma rays with a coherently vibrating periodic array of two-level nuclei. Such nuclear motion can be generated, e.g., in ionic crystals illuminated by a strong driving optical laser field. We find that deflection of the incident gamma beam into the Bragg angle can be switched on and off by nuclear vibrations on a superradiant time scale determined by the collective nuclear frequency, which is of the order of terahertz. Namely, if the incident gamma wave is detuned from the nuclear transition by much larger frequency it passes through the static nuclear array. However, if the nuclei vibrate with the frequency of the gamma ray detuning then parametric resonance can yield energy transfer into the Bragg deflected beam on the superradiant time scale, which can be used for fast control of gamma rays.

Xiwen Zhang; Anatoly A. Svidzinsky

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

148

Perspectives of Decision-Making and Estimation of Risk in Populations Exposed to Low Levels of Ionizing Radiations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

exposure to radioactive fallout in radiation-associatedheight of the radioactive fallout deliberations in the early

Fabrikant, J.I.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

EXPERIENCE MONITORING FOR LOW LEVEL NEUTRON RADIATION AT THE H-CANYON AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Department of Energy contractors are required to monitor external occupational radiation exposure of an individual likely to receive an effective dose equivalent to the whole body of 0.1 rem (0.001sievert) or more in a year. For a working year of 2000 hours, this translates to a dose rate of 0.05 mrem/hr (0.5 {micro}Sv/hr). This can be a challenging requirement for neutron exposure because traditional surveys with shielded BF{sub 3} proportional counters are difficult to conduct, particularly at low dose rates. A modified survey method was used at the Savannah River Site to find low dose rates in excess of 0.05 mrem/hr. An unshielded He{sup 3} detector was used to find elevated gross slow neutron counts. Areas with high count rates on the unshielded He{sup 3} detector were further investigated with shielded BF{sub 3} proportional counters and thermoluminescent neutron dosimeters were placed in the area of interest. An office area was investigated with this method. The data initially suggested that whole body neutron dose rates to office workers could be occurring at levels significantly higher than 0.1 rem (0.001sievert). The final evaluation, however, showed that the office workers were exposed to less than 0.1 rem/yr (0.001sievert/yr) of neutron radiation.

HOGUE, MARK

2005-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

150

RADIATION SOURCES  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A novel long-lived source of gamma radiation especially suitable for calibration purposes is described. The source of gamma radiation is denoted mock iodine131, which comprises a naixture of barium-133 and cesium-137. The barium and cesium are present in a barium-cesium ratio of approximately 5.7/1 to 14/1, uniformly dispersed in an ion exchange resin and a filter surrounding the resin comprised of a material of atomic number below approximately 51, and substantially 0.7 to 0.9 millimeter thick.

Brucer, M.H.

1958-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

151

GAMMA PROPORTIONAL COUNTER CONTAINING HIGH Z GAS AND LOW Z MODERATOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gamma radiation counter employing a gas proportional counter is described. The radiation counter comprises a cylindrical gas proportional counter which contains a high atomic number gas and is surrounded by a low atomic number gamma radiation moderator material. At least one slit is provided in the moderator to allow accident gamma radiation to enter the moderator in the most favorable manner for moderation, and also to allow low energy gamma radiation to enter the counter without the necessity of passing through the moderator. This radiation counter is capable of detecting and measuring gamma radiation in the energy range of 0.5-5 Mev. (AEC)

Fox, R.

1963-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

152

Observations of Gamma-Ray Burst Afterglows with the AEOS Burst Camera.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), are variable bursts of gamma-ray radiation, that lasts from milliseconds to hundreds of seconds. These bursts of gamma rays are detected in… (more)

Flewelling, Heather Anne

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Plutonium radiation surrogate  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A self-contained source of gamma-ray and neutron radiation suitable for use as a radiation surrogate for weapons-grade plutonium is described. The source generates a radiation spectrum similar to that of weapons-grade plutonium at 5% energy resolution between 59 and 2614 keV, but contains no special nuclear material and emits little .alpha.-particle radiation. The weapons-grade plutonium radiation surrogate also emits neutrons having fluxes commensurate with the gamma-radiation intensities employed.

Frank, Michael I. (Dublin, CA)

2010-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

154

Gamma Log | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gamma Log Gamma Log Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Gamma Log Details Activities (6) Areas (6) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Well Log Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Well Log Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: provides information on changes in rock type near the wellbore from changes in measured gamma radiation Stratigraphic/Structural: using multiple gamma logs over an area, the depth to the sandstone and shale layers can be correlated over larger areas Hydrological: Thermal: Cost Information Low-End Estimate (USD): 0.2525 centUSD 2.5e-4 kUSD 2.5e-7 MUSD 2.5e-10 TUSD / foot Median Estimate (USD): 0.3838 centUSD

155

X-RAYRICH GAMMA-RAY BURSTS, PHOTOSPHERES, AND VARIABILITY P. Meszaros,1,2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

X-RAY­RICH GAMMA-RAY BURSTS, PHOTOSPHERES, AND VARIABILITY P. Me´sza´ros,1,2 E. Ramirez-Ruiz,3 M. J of the observational gamma-ray variability-luminosity relation. Subject headings: gamma rays: bursts -- radiation mechanisms: nonthermal 1. INTRODUCTION Gamma-ray burst (GRB) light curves at gamma-ray ener- gies are often

Zhang, Bing

156

Working safely in gamma radiography. A training manual for industrial radiographers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This manual is designed for classroom training in working safely in industrial radiography using gamma sources. The purpose is to train radiographers' assistants to work safely as a qualified gamma radiographer. The contents cover the essentials of radiation, radiation protection, emergency procedures, gamma cameras, and biological effects of radiation. (ACR)

McGuire, S.A.; Peabody, C.A.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Underwater radiation detector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A detector apparatus for differentiating between gamma and neutron radiation is provided. The detector includes a pair of differentially shielded Geiger-Mueller tubes. The first tube is wrapped in silver foil and the second tube is wrapped in lead foil. Both the silver and lead foils allow the passage of gamma rays at a constant rate in a gamma ray only field. When neutrons are present, however, the silver activates and emits beta radiation that is also detected by the silver wrapped Geiger-Mueller tube while the radiation detected by the lead wrapped Geiger-Mueller tube remains constant. The amount of radiation impinging on the separate Geiger-Mueller tubes is then correlated in order to distinguish between the neutron and gamma radiations.

Kruse, Lyle W. (Albuquerque, NM); McKnight, Richard P. (Albuquerque, NM)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Composition for radiation shielding  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A composition for use as a radiation shield. The shield has a depleted urum core for absorbing gamma rays and a bismuth coating for preventing chemical corrosion and absorbing gamma rays. Alternatively, a sheet of gadolinium may be positioned between the uranium core and the bismuth coating for absorbing neutrons. The composition is preferably in the form of a container for storing materials that emit radiation such as gamma rays and neutrons. The container is preferably formed by casting bismuth around a pre-formed uranium container having a gadolinium sheeting, and allowing the bismuth to cool. The resulting container is a structurally sound, corrosion-resistant, radiation-absorbing container.

Kronberg, James W. (Aiken, SC)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Ion-induced gammas for photofission interrogation of HEU.  

SciTech Connect

High-energy photons and neutrons can be used to actively interrogate for heavily shielded special nuclear material (SNM), such as HEU (highly enriched uranium), by detecting prompt and/or delayed induced fission signatures. In this work, we explore the underlying physics for a new type of photon source that generates high fluxes of mono-energetic gamma-rays from low-energy (<500 keV) proton-induced nuclear reactions. The characteristic energies (4- to 18-MeV) of the gamma-rays coincide with the peak of the photonuclear cross section. The source could be designed to produce gamma-rays of certain selected energies, thereby improving the probability of detecting shielded HEU or providing a capability to determine enrichment inside sealed containers. The fundamental physics of such an interrogation source were studied in this LDRD through scaled ion accelerator experiments and radiation transport modeling. The data were used to assess gamma and neutron yields, background, and photofission-induced signal levels from several (p,{gamma}) target materials under consideration.

Doyle, Barney Lee (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Antolak, Arlyn J.; Morse, Daniel H.; Provencio, Paula Polyak (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM)

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Cellular and molecular research to reduce uncertainties in estimates of health effects from low-level radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A study was undertaken by five radiation scientists to examine the feasibility of reducing the uncertainties in the estimation of risk due to protracted low doses of ionizing radiation. In addressing the question of feasibility, a review was made by the study group: of the cellular, molecular, and mammalian radiation data that are available; of the way in which altered oncogene properties could be involved in the loss of growth control that culminates in tumorigenesis; and of the progress that had been made in the genetic characterizations of several human and animal neoplasms. On the basis of this analysis, the study group concluded that, at the present time, it is feasible to mount a program of radiation research directed at the mechanism(s) of radiation-induced cancer with special reference to risk of neoplasia due to protracted, low doses of sparsely ionizing radiation. To implement a program of research, a review was made of the methods, techniques, and instruments that would be needed. This review was followed by a survey of the laboratories and institutions where scientific personnel and facilities are known to be available. A research agenda of the principal and broad objectives of the program is also discussed. 489 refs., 21 figs., 14 tabs.

Elkind, M.M.; Bedford, J.; Benjamin, S.A.; Waldren, C.A. (Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (USA)); Gotchy, R.L. (Science Applications International Corp., McLean, VA (USA))

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gamma radiation levels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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161

BWR radiation control: plant demonstration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The first year's progress is presented for a four-year program intended to implement and evaluate BRAC radiation reduction operational guidelines at the Vermont Yankee BWR and to document the results in sufficient detail to provide guidance to other BWR owners. Past operational, chemistry and radiation level data have been reviewed to provide a historical base of reference. Extensive sampling and chemistry monitoring systems have been installed to evaluate plant chemistry status and the effects of program implemented changes. Radiation surveys and piping gamma scans are being performed at targeted locations to quantify radiation level trends and to identify and quantify piping isotopics. Contact radiation levels on the recirculation line at Vermont Yankee have been increasing at a rate of 175 mR/h-EFPY since 1978. A materials survey of feedwater and reactor components in contact with the process liquid has been performed to identify sources of corrosion product release, particularly cobalt and nickel. A feedwater oxygen injection system has been installed to evaluate the effects of oxygen control on feedwater materials corrosion product releases. A baseline performance evaluation of the condensate treatment and reactor water cleanup systems has been completed. Data on organics and ionics at Vermont Yankee have been obtained. A methodology of BWR feedwater system layup during extended outages was developed, and an evaluation performed of layup and startup practices utilized at Vermont Yankee during the fall 1980 and 1981 refueling outages.

Palino, G.F.; Hobart, R.L.; Wall, P.S.; Sawochka, S.G.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Development of autonomous gamma dose logger for environmental monitoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Continuous monitoring and archiving of background radiation levels in and around the nuclear installation is essential and the data would be of immense use during analysis of any untoward incidents. A portable Geiger Muller detector based autonomous gamma dose logger (AGDL) for environmental monitoring is indigenously designed and developed. The system operations are controlled by microcontroller (AT89S52) and the main features of the system are software data acquisition, real time LCD display of radiation level, data archiving at removable compact flash card. The complete system operates on 12 V battery backed up by solar panel and hence the system is totally portable and ideal for field use. The system has been calibrated with Co-60 source (8.1 MBq) at various source-detector distances. The system is field tested and performance evaluation is carried out. This paper covers the design considerations of the hardware, software architecture of the system along with details of the front-end operation of the autonomous gamma dose logger and the data file formats. The data gathered during field testing and inter comparison with GammaTRACER are also presented in the paper. AGDL has shown excellent correlation with energy fluence monitor tuned to identify {sup 41}Ar, proving its utility for real-time plume tracking and source term estimation.

Jisha, N. V.; Krishnakumar, D. N.; Surya Prakash, G.; Kumari, Anju; Baskaran, R.; Venkatraman, B. [Radiological Safety Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102, Tamil Nadu (India)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

163

Real-Time Optical Flux Limits From Gamma-Ray Bursts Measured By The GROCSE Experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Gamma-Ray Optical Counterpart Search Experiment (GROCSE) presents new experimental upper limits on the optical flux from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Our experiment consisted of a fully-automated very wide-field opto-electronic detection system that imaged locations of GRBs within a few seconds of receiving trigger signals provided by BATSE’s real-time burst coordinate distribution network (BACODINE). The experiment acquired 3800 observing hours, recording 22 gamma-ray burst triggers within ?30 s of the start of the burst event. Some of these bursts were imaged while gamma-ray radiation was being detected by BATSE. We identified no optical counterparts associated with gamma-ray bursts amongst these events at the mV ? 7.0 to 8.5 sensitivity level. We find the ratio of the upper limit to the V-band optical flux, F?, to the gamma-ray fluence, ??, from these data to be 2 × 10?18 gamma rays: bursts – 3 – 1.

H. S. Park; E. Ables; S. D. Barthelmy; R. M. Bionta; P. S. Butterworth; T. L. Cline; D. H. Ferguson; G. J. Fishman; N. Gehrels; K. Hurley; C. Kouveliotou; B. C. Lee; C. A. Meegan; L. L. Ott; E. L. Parker Received Accepted

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Patient radiation doses in interventional cardiology in the U.S.: Advisory data sets and possible initial values for U.S. reference levels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To determine patient radiation doses from interventional cardiology procedures in the U.S and to suggest possible initial values for U.S. benchmarks for patient radiation dose from selected interventional cardiology procedures [fluoroscopically guided diagnostic cardiac catheterization and percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI)]. Methods: Patient radiation dose metrics were derived from analysis of data from the 2008 to 2009 Nationwide Evaluation of X-ray Trends (NEXT) survey of cardiac catheterization. This analysis used deidentified data and did not require review by an IRB. Data from 171 facilities in 30 states were analyzed. The distributions (percentiles) of radiation dose metrics were determined for diagnostic cardiac catheterizations, PCI, and combined diagnostic and PCI procedures. Confidence intervals for these dose distributions were determined using bootstrap resampling. Results: Percentile distributions (advisory data sets) and possible preliminary U.S. reference levels (based on the 75th percentile of the dose distributions) are provided for cumulative air kerma at the reference point (K{sub a,r}), cumulative air kerma-area product (P{sub KA}), fluoroscopy time, and number of cine runs. Dose distributions are sufficiently detailed to permit dose audits as described in National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements Report No. 168. Fluoroscopy times are consistent with those observed in European studies, but P{sub KA} is higher in the U.S. Conclusions: Sufficient data exist to suggest possible initial benchmarks for patient radiation dose for certain interventional cardiology procedures in the U.S. Our data suggest that patient radiation dose in these procedures is not optimized in U.S. practice.

Miller, Donald L.; Hilohi, C. Michael; Spelic, David C. [Center for Devices and Radiological Health, Food and Drug Administration, 10903 New Hampshire Avenue, Silver Spring, Maryland 20993 (United States)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

165

Quality assurance for gamma knives  

SciTech Connect

This report describes and summarizes the results of a quality assurance (QA) study of the Gamma Knife, a nuclear medical device used for the gamma irradiation of intracranial lesions. Focus was on the physical aspects of QA and did not address issues that are essentially medical, such as patient selection or prescription of dose. A risk-based QA assessment approach was used. Sample programs for quality control and assurance are included. The use of the Gamma Knife was found to conform to existing standards and guidelines concerning radiation safety and quality control of external beam therapies (shielding, safety reviews, radiation surveys, interlock systems, exposure monitoring, good medical physics practices, etc.) and to be compliant with NRC teletherapy regulations. There are, however, current practices for the Gamma Knife not covered by existing, formalized regulations, standards, or guidelines. These practices have been adopted by Gamma Knife users and continue to be developed with further experience. Some of these have appeared in publications or presentations and are slowly finding their way into recommendations of professional organizations.

Jones, E.D.; Banks, W.W.; Fischer, L.E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Astrophysical relevance of {gamma} transition energies  

SciTech Connect

The relevant {gamma} energy range is explicitly identified where additional {gamma} strength must be located to have an impact on astrophysically relevant reactions. It is shown that folding the energy dependences of the transmission coefficients and the level density leads to maximal contributions for {gamma} energies of 2{<=}E{sub {gamma}}{<=}4 unless quantum selection rules allow isolated states to contribute. Under this condition, electric dipole transitions dominate. These findings allow us to more accurately judge the relevance of modifications of the {gamma} strength for astrophysics.

Rauscher, Thomas [Departement Physik, Universitaet Basel, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland)

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

167

For Radiation Detection Systems – Specific Methods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The test procedures outlined within this TTOP will cover radiation detection instruments used for gamma-ray and neutron detection as well as ...

2013-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

168

NIST Ionizing Radiation Division 1998 - Current Directions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Cs gamma-ray ranges, and the low-energy photon ... beam, and a high-dose- rate Gammacell used in our radiation-processing dosimetry ...

169

High resistivity aluminum antimonide radiation detector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Bulk Aluminum Antimonide (AlSb)-based single crystal materials have been prepared for use as ambient (room) temperature X-ray and Gamma-ray radiation detection.

Sherohman, John W. (Livermore, CA); Coombs, III, Arthur W. (Patterson, CA); Yee, Jick H. (Livermore, CA)

2007-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

170

Persistence of gamma-H2AX and 53BP1 foci in proliferating and nonproliferating human mammary epithelial cells after exposure to gamma-rays or iron ions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To investigate {gamma}-H2AX (phosphorylated histone H2AX) and 53BP1 (tumour protein 53 binding protein No. 1) foci formation and removal in proliferating and non-proliferating human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) after exposure to sparsely and densely ionizing radiation under different cell culture conditions. HMEC cells were grown either as monolayers (2D) or in extracellular matrix to allow the formation of acinar structures in vitro (3D). Foci numbers were quantified by image analysis at various time points after exposure. Our results reveal that in non-proliferating cells under 2D and 3D cell culture conditions, iron-ion induced {gamma}-H2AX foci were still present at 72 h after exposure, although 53BP1 foci returned to control levels at 48 h. In contrast in proliferating HMEC, both {gamma}-H2AX and 53BP1 foci decreased to control levels during the 24-48 h time interval after irradiation under 2D conditions. Foci numbers decreased faster after {gamma}-ray irradiation and returned to control levels by 12 h regardless of marker, cell proliferation status, and cell culture condition. Conclusions: The disappearance of radiation induced {gamma}-H2AX and 53BP1 foci in HMEC have different dynamics that depend on radiation quality and proliferation status. Notably, the general patterns do not depend on the cell culture condition (2D versus 3D). We speculate that the persistent {gamma}-H2AX foci in iron-ion irradiated non-proliferating cells could be due to limited availability of double strand break (DSB) repair pathways in G0/G1-phase, or that repair of complex DSB requires replication or chromatin remodeling.

Groesser, Torsten; Chang, Hang; Fontenay, Gerald; Chen, James; Costes, Sylvain V.; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen; Parvin, Bahram; Rydberg, Bjorn

2010-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

171

GammaCam Technology Demonstration at ORNL Buildings 3026C and 3026D  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The GammaCam system is an effective tool for remotely identifying high gamma radiation in radioactive environments.  Its versatility allows the user to perform preliminary characterization of an...

172

Method and Apparatus for Measuring Radiation Quantities  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent application describes a compact dosimeter for measuring X-ray and gamma radiation by the use of solutions which undergo a visible color change upon exposure to a predetermined quantity of radiation.

Roberts, N.O.

1950-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

173

Gamma-Ray Bursts, Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays, and Cosmic Gamma-Ray Background  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We argue that gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) may be the origin of the cosmic gamma-ray background radiation observed in GeV range. It has theoretically been discussed that protons may carry a much larger amount of energy than electrons in GRBs, and this large energy can be radiated in TeV range by synchrotron radiation of ultra-high-energy protons (\\sim 10^{20} eV). The possible detection of GRBs above 10 TeV suggested by the Tibet and HEGRA groups also supports this idea. If this is the case, most of TeV gamma-rays from GRBs are absorbed in intergalactic fields and eventually form GeV gamma-ray background, whose flux is in good agreement with the recent observation.

Tomonori Totani

1998-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

174

Astrophysical S-factor for the radiative-capture reaction p{sup 13}C {yields} {sup 14}N{gamma}  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The possibility of describing experimental data on the astrophysical S factor for radiative proton capture on a {sup 13}C nucleus at energies in the range 0.03-0.8 MeV is considered within the potential cluster model involving forbidden states. It is shown that the energy dependence of this astrophysical S factor can be reasonably explained on the basis of the E1 transition to the {sup 3}P{sub 1}-wave bound state of the {sup 14}N nucleus in the p{sup 13}C channel from the {sup 3}S{sub 1} wave of p{sup 13}C scattering in the resonance energy region around 0.55 MeV in the laboratory frame.

Dubovichenko, S. B., E-mail: sergey@dubovichenko.ru [V.G. Fessenkov Astrophysical Institute (Kazakhstan)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

175

Gamma Ray Burst and Soft Gamma Repeaters. Spinning, Precessing Gamma Jets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gamma Ray Bursts as recent GRB990123 and GRB990510 are observed to occur in cosmic volumes with a corresponding output reaching, for isotropic explosions, energies as large as two solar masses annihilation. These energies are underestimated because of the neglected role of comparable ejected neutrinos bursts. These extreme power cannot be explained with any standard spherically symmetric Fireball model. A too heavy black hole or Star would be unable to coexist with the shortest millisecond time structure of Gamma ray Burst. Beaming of the gamma radiation may overcome the energy puzzle. However any mild explosive beam $(\\Omega > 10^{-2})$ should not solve the jet containment at those disruptive energies. Only extreme beaming $(\\Omega < 10^{-8})$, by a slow decaying, but long-lived precessing jet, it may coexist with characteristic Supernova energies, apparent GRBs output, statistics as well as their connection with older and nearer SGRs relics.

Daniele Fargion

1999-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

176

Intraoperative validation of CT-based lymph nodal levels, sublevels IIa and IIb: Is it of clinical relevance in selective radiation therapy?  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The objectives of this study are to discuss the intraoperative validation of CT-based boundaries of lymph nodal levels in the neck, and in particular the clinical relevance of the delineation of sublevels IIa and IIb in case of selective radiation therapy (RT). Methods and Materials: To validate the radiologically defined level contours, clips were positioned intraoperatively at the level boundaries defined by surgical anatomy. In 10 consecutive patients, clips were placed, at the time of a neck dissection being performed, at the most cranial border of the neck. Anterior-posterior and lateral X-ray films were obtained intraoperatively. Next, in 3 patients, neck levels were contoured on preoperative contrast-enhanced CT scans according to the international consensus guidelines. From each of these 3 patients, an intraoperative CT scan was also obtained, with clips placed at the surgical-anatomy-based level boundaries. The preoperative (CT-based) and intraoperative (surgery-defined) CT scans were matched. Results: Clips placed at the most cranial part of the neck lined up at the caudal part of the transverse process of the cervical vertebra C-I. The posterior border of surgical level IIa (spinal accessory nerve [SAN]) did not match with the posterior border of CT-based level IIa (internal jugular vein [IJV]). Other surgical boundaries and CT-based contours were in good agreement. Conclusions: The cranial border of the neck, i.e., the cranial border of level IIa/IIb, corresponds to the caudal edge of the lateral process of C-I. Except for the posterior border between level IIa and level IIb, a perfect match was observed between the other surgical-clip-identified levels II-V boundaries (surgical-anatomy) and the CT-based delineation contours. It is argued that (1) because of the parotid gland overlapping part of level II, and (2) the frequent infestation of occult metastatic cells in the lymph channels around the IJV, the division of level II into radiologic sublevels IIa and IIb may not be relevant. Sparing of, for example, the ipsilateral parotid gland in selective RT can even be a treacherous undertaking with respect to regional tumor control. In contrast, the surgeon's reasoning for preserving the surgical sublevel IIb is that the morbidity associated with dissection of the supraspinal accessory nerve compartment of level II is reduced, whereas there is evidence from the surgical literature that no extra risk for regional tumor control is observed. Therefore, in selective neck dissections, the division into surgical sublevels IIa/IIb makes sense.

Levendag, Peter [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus Medical Center-Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands)]. E-mail: p.levendag@erasmusmc.nl; Gregoire, Vincent [Department of Radiation Oncology, St-Luc University Hospital, Brussels (Belgium); Hamoir, Marc [Department of ENT Surgery, St-Luc University Hospital, Brussels (Belgium); Voet, Peter [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus Medical Center-Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Est, Henrie van der [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus Medical Center-Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Heijmen, Ben [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus Medical Center-Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Kerrebijn, Jeroen [Department of ENT Surgery, Erasmus Medical Center-Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Radiation shielding composition  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A composition for use as a radiation shield. The shield is a concrete product containing a stable uranium aggregate for attenuating gamma rays and a neutron absorbing component, the uranium aggregate and neutron absorbing component being present in the concrete product in sufficient amounts to provide a concrete having a density between about 4 and about 15 grams/cm.sup.3 and which will at a predetermined thickness, attenuate gamma rays and absorb neutrons from a radioactive material of projected gamma ray and neutron emissions over a determined time period. The composition is preferably in the form of a container for storing radioactive materials that emit gamma rays and neutrons. The concrete container preferably comprises a metal liner and/or a metal outer shell. The resulting radiation shielding container has the potential of being structurally sound, stable over a long period of time, and, if desired, readily mobile.

Quapp, William J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Lessing, Paul A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Radiation shielding composition  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A composition for use as a radiation shield. The shield is a concrete product containing a stable uranium aggregate for attenuating gamma rays and a neutron absorbing component, the uranium aggregate and neutron absorbing component being present in the concrete product in sufficient amounts to provide a concrete having a density between about 4 and about 15 grams/cm.sup.3 and which will at a predetermined thickness, attenuate gamma rays and absorb neutrons from a radioactive material of projected gamma ray and neutron emissions over a determined time period. The composition is preferably in the form of a container for storing radioactive materials that emit gamma rays and neutrons. The concrete container preferably comprises a metal liner and/or a metal outer shell. The resulting radiation shielding container has the potential of being structurally sound, stable over a long period of time, and, if desired, readily mobile.

Quapp, William J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Lessing, Paul A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2000-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

179

Composition for radiation shielding  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A composition for use as a radiation shield is disclosed. The shield has a depleted uranium core for absorbing gamma rays and a bismuth coating for preventing chemical corrosion and absorbing gamma rays. Alternatively, a sheet of gadolinium may be positioned between the uranium core and the bismuth coating for absorbing neutrons. The composition is preferably in the form of a container for storing materials that emit radiation such as gamma rays and neutrons. The container is preferably formed by casting bismuth around a pre-formed uranium container having a gadolinium sheeting, and allowing the bismuth to cool. The resulting container is a structurally sound, corrosion-resistant, radiation-absorbing container. 2 figs.

Kronberg, J.W.

1994-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

180

Dynamical instability of collapsing radiating fluid  

SciTech Connect

We take the collapsing radiative fluid to investigate the dynamical instability with cylindrical symmetry. We match the interior and exterior cylindrical geometries. Dynamical instability is explored at radiative and non-radiative perturbations. We conclude that the dynamical instability of the collapsing cylinder depends on the critical value {gamma} < 1 for both radiative and nonradiative perturbations.

Sharif, M., E-mail: msharif.math@pu.edu.pk; Azam, M., E-mail: azammath@gmail.com [University of the Punjab, Department of Mathematics (Pakistan)

2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gamma radiation levels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Health physics applications of nuclear safeguards radiation monitors  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear safeguards needs fostered the development of radiation monitors whose sensitivity and microprocessor-controlled logic permit detection of small, transient increases in environmental levels of gamma radiation. While this capability was originally developed to detect the diversion of the special nuclear materials /sup 235/U and plutonium, adaptation to health physics monitoring is straigthforward. Applications of the safeguards instruments range from small, handheld instruments used to monitor laundry of salvage-bound materials to more complex systems devoted to monitoring moving vehicles at entry/exit points. In addition to these health physics applications, other new applications for safeguards instruments are being considered.

Fehlau, P.E.; Dvorak, R.F.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Gamma Radiation Dose Rate in Air due to Terrestrial Radionuclides in Southern Brazil: Synthesis by Geological Units and Lithotypes Covered by the Serra do Mar Sul Aero?Geophysical Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The absorbed dose rates in air due to terrestrial radionuclides were estimated from aerial gamma spectrometric data for an area of 48

Rodrigo O. Bastos; Carlos R. Appoloni; José P. P. Pinese

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

CHROMOSOMAL ABERRATIONS IN A NATURAL POPULATION OF CHIRONOMUS TENTANS EXPOSED TO CHRONIC LOW-LEVEL ENVIRONMENTAL RADIATION  

SciTech Connect

The salivary gland chromosomes of Chironomus tentans larvae collected from White Oak Creek, an area contaminated by radioactive waste from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and from six uncontaminated areas were examined for chromosomal aberrations. White Oak Creek populations were exposed to absorbed doses as high as 230 rads per year or about 1000 times background. Chromosomal maps were constructed to make a general comparison of the banding pattern of the salivary chromosomes of the C. tentans in the East Tennessee area with those of Canada and Europe. These maps were used as a reference in scoring aberrations. Fifteen different chromosomal aberrations were found in 365 larvae taken from the irradiated population as compared with five different aberrations observed in 356 larvae from six control populations, but the mean number of aberrations per larva did not differ in any of the populations. The quantitative amount of heterozygosity was essentially the same in the irradiated and the control population, but there were three times the variety of chromosomal aberrations found in the irradiated area. From this evidence it was concluded that chronic low-level irradiation from radioactive waste was increasing the variability of chromosomal aberrations without significantly increasing the frequency. It was also concluded that chromosomal polymorphism can be maintained in a natural population without superiority of the heterozygous individuals. (C.H.)

Blaylock, B G; Auerbach, S I; Nelson, D J

1964-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

184

Current Trends in Gamma Ray Detection for Radiological Emergency Response  

SciTech Connect

Passive and active detection of gamma rays from shielded radioactive materials, including special nuclear materials, is an important task for any radiological emergency response organization. This article reports on the current trends and status of gamma radiation detection objectives and measurement techniques as applied to nonproliferation and radiological emergencies.

Mukhopadhyay, S., Guss, P., Maurer, R.

2011-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

185

A Model-Independent Search for the decay B->l nu gamma  

SciTech Connect

The authors present a search for the radiative leptonic decay B{sup +} {yields} {ell}{sup +}{nu}{sub {ell}}{gamma}, where {ell} = e, {mu}, using a data sample of 465 million B{bar B} pairs collected by the BABAR experiment. In this analysis, they fully reconstruct the hadronic decay of one of the B mesons in {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{sup +}B{sup -} decays, then search for evidence of B{sup +} {yields} {ell}{sup +}{nu}{sub {ell}}{gamma} in the rest of the event. They observe no significant evidence of signal decays and report model-independent branching fraction upper limits of {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} e{sup +}{nu}{sub e}{gamma}) < 17 x 10{sup -6}, {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{nu}{sub {mu}}{gamma}) < 24 x 10{sup -6}, and {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {ell}{sup +}{nu}{sub {ell}}{gamma}) < 15.6 x 10{sup -6} ({ell} = e or {mu}), all at the 90% confidence level.

Aubert, Bernard; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; /INFN, Bari /Bari U.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; /Bergen U.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, David Nathan; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I.L.; /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS; /more authors..

2012-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

186

B{yields}{gamma}{gamma} in an Appelquist-Cheng-Dobrescu model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a full calculation of the amplitudes for B{sub d[s]}{yields}{gamma}{gamma} in a simple Appelquist-Cheng-Dobrescu model that extends an incomplete one in a previous paper. We find cancellations between the contributions from different Kaluza-Klein towers and a small decrease relative to the standard model predictions. It is conjectured that radiative QCD corrections might actually lead to an enhancement in the branching ratios and CP asymmetries, but no more than modest ones.

Bigi, I. I. [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame du Lac, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 (United States); Devidze, G. G.; Liparteliani, A. G. [Institute of High Energy Physics and Informatization, Tbilisi State University, 9 University Street, 0186 Tbilisi (Georgia); Meissner, U.-G. [Helmholtz-Institut fuer Strahlen- und Kernphysik (Theorie) and Bethe Center for Theoretical Physics, Universitaet Bonn, D-53115 Bonn (Germany); Forschungszentrum Juelich, Institut fuer Kernphysik (IKP-3) and Juelich Center for Hadron Physics, D-52425 Juelich (Germany)

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Radiation-induced changes in the cuticular hydrocarbons of the granary weevil and their relationship to desiccation and adult mortality  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radiation from the nuclear waste products, such as Cesium-137, offers a scope and could be used for large scale disinfestation of grain. It is known that 0.15 to 0.20 kGy dose of gamma radiation is sufficient to kill insects in grain and grain products. However, the mode of action (in terms of lethal effects) is not understood. The purpose of this project, therefore, is to study the ways in which gamma radiation causes death in the granary weevil. Sitophilus granarius (L.) is a major and cosmopolitan pest of stored grain all over the world. Radiation damage, in particular the specific effects on the physiology of the insects exposed to radiation has been elucidated. In stored grain insects, conservation of water is a critical factor for their survival. Epicuticular hydrocarbons play an important role in water proofing. The laboratory rearing of the granary weevil was standardized so that large numbers of weevils of known ages could be produced for experimentation. Stock cultures were maintained at 27 {plus minus} 2{degree}C and 65 {plus minus} 5% R.H. Tests with various age groups (adults) and different doses of gamma radiation indicate that lethal effects are both age and dose related. Younger weevils, in general, survive for a longer period after irradiation compared to older weevils. Complete mortality results within about two weeks after exposure to gamma radiation at dose of 0.15 kGy or above. Data on wet and dry weights of the weevils kept at different (low, medium and higher) levels of humidity after irradiation indicate that gamma radiation induces greater water loss leading to desiccation and early death. Low humidity environment (17% R.H.) greatly accelerates lethal effects.

Sriharan, S. (Selma Univ., AL (USA). Div. of Natural and Applied Sciences)

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Construction and operation of an improved radiation calibration facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Environmental assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Calibration of instruments used to detect and measure ionizing radiation has been conducted over the last 20 years at Brookhaven National Laboratory`s (BNL) Radiation Calibration Facility, Building 348. Growth of research facilities, projects in progress, and more stringent Department of Energy (DOE) orders which involve exposure to nuclear radiation have placed substantial burdens on the existing radiation calibration facility. The facility currently does not meet the requirements of DOE Order 5480.4 or American National Standards Institute (ANSI) N323-1978, which establish calibration methods for portable radiation protection instruments used in the detection and measurement of levels of ionizing radiation fields or levels of radioactive surface contaminations. Failure to comply with this standard could mean instrumentation is not being calibrated to necessary levels of sensitivity. The Laboratory has also recently obtained a new neutron source and gamma beam irradiator which can not be made operational at existing facilities because of geometry and shielding inadequacies. These sources are needed to perform routine periodic calibrations of radiation detecting instruments used by scientific and technical personnel and to meet BNL`s substantial increase in demand for radiation monitoring capabilities. To place these new sources into operation, it is proposed to construct an addition to the existing radiation calibration facility that would house all calibration sources and bring BNL calibration activities into compliance with DOE and ANSI standards. The purpose of this assessment is to identify potential significant environmental impacts associated with the construction and operation of an improved radiation calibration facility at BNL.

NONE

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

A Search for Muon Neutrinos from Gamma-Ray Bursts wih the IceCube 22-String Detector.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Two searches are conducted for muon neutrinos from Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) using the IceCube detector. Gamma-Ray Bursts are brief and transient emissions of keV/MeV radiation… (more)

Roth, A Philip

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Process for gamma ray induced degradation of polychlorinated biphenyls  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is a process for the in-situ destruction of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) compounds in transformer oils and transformers. These compounds are broken down selectively by irradiation of the object or mixture using spent nuclear fuel or any isotopic source of high energy gamma radiation. For example, the level of applied dose required to decompose 400 ppm of polychlorinated biphenyl in transformer oil to less than 50 ppm is 500 kilograms. Destruction of polychlorinated biphenyls to levels of less than 50 ppm renders the transformer oil or transformer non-PCB contaminated under current regulations. Therefore, this process can be used to treat PCB contaminated oil and equipment to minimize or eliminate the generation of PCB hazardous waste. 5 figs.

Meikrantz, D.H.; Mincher, B.J.; Arbon, R.E.

1998-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

191

Process for gamma ray induced degradation of polychlorinated biphenyls  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is a process for the in-situ destruction of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) compounds in transformer oils and transformers. These compounds are broken down selectively by irradiation of the object or mixture using spent nuclear fuel or any isotopic source of high energy gamma radiation. For example, the level of applied dose required to decompose 400 ppm of polychlorinated biphenyl in transformer oil to less than 50 ppm is 500 kilogray. Destruction of polychlorinated biphenyls to levels of less than 50 ppm renders the transformer oil or transformer non-PCB contaminated under current regulations. Therefore, this process can be used to treat PCB contaminated oil and equipment to minimize or eliminate the generation of PCB hazardous waste.

Meikrantz, David H. (Idaho Falls, ID); Mincher, Bruce J. (Shelley, ID); Arbon, Rodney E. (Blackfoot, ID)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Ultrahigh Energy Cosmic Rays and Prompt TeV Gamma Rays from Gamma Ray Bursts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) have been proposed as one {\\it possible} class of sources of the Ultrahigh Energy Cosmic Ray (UHECR) events observed up to energies $\\gsim10^{20}\\ev$. The synchrotron radiation of the highest energy protons accelerated within the GRB source should produce gamma rays up to TeV energies. Here we briefly discuss the implications on the energetics of the GRB from the point of view of the detectability of the prompt TeV gamma rays of proton-synchrotron origin in GRBs in the up-coming ICECUBE muon detector in the south pole.

Pijushpani Bhattacharjee; Nayantara Gupta

2003-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

193

Lesson 4 - Ionizing Radiation | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 - Ionizing Radiation 4 - Ionizing Radiation Lesson 4 - Ionizing Radiation Lesson Three showed that unstable isotopes emit energy as they become more stable. This energy is known as radiation. This lesson explores forms of radiation, where radiation is found, how we detect and measure radiation, what sources of radiation people are exposed to, whether radiation is harmful, and how we can limit our exposure. Specific topics covered in this lesson include: Types of radiation Non-ionizing Ionizing Forms of ionizing radiation Alpha particles Beta particles Gamma rays Radiation Decay chain Half-life Dose Radiation measurements Sources of radiation Average annual exposure Lesson 4 - Ionizing Radiation.pptx More Documents & Publications DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 DOE-HDBK-1130-2007

194

Galactic Models of Gamma-Ray Bursts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe observational evidence and theoretical calculations which support the high velocity neutron star model of gamma-ray bursts. We estimate the energetic requirements in this model, and discuss possible energy sources. we also consider radiative processes involved in the bursts.

Donald Q. Lamb; Tomasz Bulik; Paolo S. Coppi

1995-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

195

Did a gamma-ray burst initiate the late Ordovician mass extinction?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Did a gamma-ray burst initiate the late Ordovician mass extinction? A.L. Melott1 , B.S. Lieberman2 Abstract: Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) produce a flux of radiation detectable across the observable Universe words: Population and evolution, mass extinction, gamma-ray burst, Ordovician, ultraviolet ozone

Jackman, Charles H.

196

Low-lying levels in Cu-57 and the rp process  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The level scheme of Cu-57 is investigated via the H-1(Ni-58,Cu-57-gamma)2n reaction by using the recoil mass spectrometer MARS at the Texas AandM Cyclotron Institute. Three low-lying excited states are observed in Cu-57 at 1028 +/- 4, 1106 +/- 4, and 2398 +/- 10 keV. The results are compared with well known excited states of the mirror nucleus Ni-57. Th, measured excited states of Cu-57 allow recalculation of the astrophysical reaction rate for the stellar radiative proton capture reaction Ni-56(p,gamma)Cu-57.

Zhou, XG; Dejbakhsh, H.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Jiang, J.; Trache, L.; Tribble, Robert E.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Measurements and Characterization of Neutron and Gamma Dose Quantities in the Vicinity of an Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation  

SciTech Connect

As part of the decommissioning of the Maine Yankee Atomic Power Company (MYAPCo) nuclear power plant, the spent nuclear fuel is being temporarily stored in a dry cask storage facility on a portion of the original licensed property. Each of the spent nuclear fuel (SNF) storage casks hold approximately 25 spent fuel assemblies. Additional storage casks for the greater-than-Class C waste (GTCC) are also used. This waste is contained in 64 casks (60 SNF, 4 GTCC), each of which contain a substantial amount of concrete for shielding and structural purposes. The vertical concrete casks (VCCs) are typically separated by a distance of 4 and 6 feet. The storage casks are effective personnel radiation shields for most of the gamma and neutron radiation emitted from the fuel. However measurable gamma and neutron radiation levels are present in the vicinity of the casks. In order to establish a controlled area boundary around the facility such that a member of the public annual dose level of 0.25-mSv could be demonstrated, measurements of gamma and neutron dose equivalents were conducted. External gamma exposure rates were measured with a Pressurized Ion Chamber (PIC). Neutron absorbed dose and dose equivalent rates were measured with a Rossi-type tissue equivalent proportional counter (TEPC). Both gamma and neutron measurements were made at increasing distances from the facility as well as at a background location. The results of the measurements show that the distance to the 0.25-mSv per year boundary for 100% occupancy conditions varies from 321 feet to 441 feet from the geometric center of the storage pads, depending on the direction from the pad. For the TEPC neutron measurements, the average quality factor from the facilities was approximately 7.4. This quality factor compares well with the average quality factor of 7.6 that was measured during a calibration performed with a bare Cf-252 source. (authors)

Darois, E.L.; Keefer, D.G.; Plazeski, P.E. [Radiation Safety and Control Services, 91 Portsmouth Avenue, Stratham, NH 03885 (United States); Connell, J. [Maine Yankee Atomic Power Company, Wiscasset, ME 04568 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Oak Ridge D and D Plan 3515 Project - Technology Review (2007) and GammaCam Technology Demonstration for Characterizing Building 3515 at Oak Ridge (2007)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the results from the Characterization, Decontamination and Decommissioning (CD and D) Study performed by MSE Technology Application, Inc. (MSE) to assist the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in the preparation of a Project Execution Plan and Remediation Plan for Building 3515 at ORNL. Primary objectives of this study were to identify innovative CD and D technologies and methodologies and recommend alternatives applicable to the CD and D of Building 3515. Building 3515 is a small heavily shielded concrete and cement block structure centrally located in the Bethel Valley portion of the ORNL. The building's interior is extensively contaminated with Cesium 137 (Cs-137), the primary contaminant of concern. A previous attempt to characterize the building was limited to general interior area radiation exposure level measurements and a few surface smears gathered by inserting monitoring equipment into the building on long poles. Consequently, the spatial distribution of the gamma radiation source inside the building was not determined. A subsequent plan for D and D of the building presented a high risk of worker radiation dose in excess of as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) because the source of the interior gamma radiation field is not completely understood and conventional practices required workers to be in close proximity of the building. As part of an initial literature search, MSE reviewed new generation gamma source characterization technologies and identified the GammaCam{sup TM} portable gamma ray imaging system as an innovative technology applicable to locating the dominant gamma ray sources within the building. The GammaCam{sup TM} gamma-ray imaging system is a commercially available technology marketed by the EDO Corporation. This system consists of a sensor head with a co-aligned camera and a portable computer. The system is designed to provide two-dimensional spatial mappings of gamma ray emitting nuclides in real time. The gamma radiation sensor and camera can be set up within or outside of the radiation field while the system operator and PC can be located 30 to 60 m (100 to 200 ft) from the sensor head. The system has been used successfully at numerous DOE and commercial nuclear facilities to precisely locate gamma radiation sources. However, literature attesting to the ability of this technology to detect radiation sources within heavily shielded structures was not available. Consequently, MSE was not certain if this technology would be capable of locating gamma ray sources within the heavily shielded Building 3515. To overcome this uncertainty, MSE sent two individuals to the EDO Corporation for training. At completion of the training, MSE leased the GammaCam{sup TM} portable system and brought it to ORNL to evaluate the capability of the system. An overview from this evaluation is summarized in this paper. (authors)

Byrne-Kelly, D.; Hart, A.; Brown, Ch.; Jordan, D. [MSE Technology Applications, Inc., Montana (United States); Phillips, E. [U.S. Department of Energy, Oak Ridge Operations Office, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

A Search for the Rare Decay $B\\rightarrow\\gamma\\gamma$  

SciTech Connect

We report the result of a search for the rare decay B{sup 0} {yields} {gamma}{gamma} in 426 fb{sup -1} of data, corresponding to 226 million B{sup 0}{bar B}{sup 0} pairs, collected on the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} collider using the BABAR detector. We use a maximum likelihood fit to extract the signal yield and observe 21{sub -12}{sup +13} signal events with a statistical signficance of 1.9 {sigma}. This corresponds to a branching fraction {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {gamma}{gamma}) = (1.7 {+-} 1.1(stat.) {+-} 0.2(syst.)) x 10{sup -7}. Based on this result, we set a 90% confidence level upper limit of {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {gamma}{gamma}) < 3.2 x 10{sup -7}.

del Amo Sanchez, P.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; /INFN, Bari /Bari U.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; /Bergen U.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Hooberman, B.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I.L.; Tanabe, T.; /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Southern Methodist U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas Nuclear Corp., Austin /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

2011-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

200

Actively driven thermal radiation shield  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermal radiation shield for cooled portable gamma-ray spectrometers. The thermal radiation shield is located intermediate the vacuum enclosure and detector enclosure, is actively driven, and is useful in reducing the heat load to mechanical cooler and additionally extends the lifetime of the mechanical cooler. The thermal shield is electrically-powered and is particularly useful for portable solid-state gamma-ray detectors or spectrometers that dramatically reduces the cooling power requirements. For example, the operating shield at 260K (40K below room temperature) will decrease the thermal radiation load to the detector by 50%, which makes possible portable battery operation for a mechanically cooled Ge spectrometer.

Madden, Norman W. (Livermore, CA); Cork, Christopher P. (Pleasant Hill, CA); Becker, John A. (Alameda, CA); Knapp, David A. (Livermore, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gamma radiation levels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Fiber fed x-ray/gamma ray imaging apparatus  

SciTech Connect

X-ray/gamma ray imaging apparatus is disclosed for detecting the position, energy, and intensity of x-ray/gamma ray radiation comprising scintillation means disposed in the path of such radiation and capable of generating photons in response to such radiation; first photodetection means optically bonded to the scintillation means and capable of generating an electrical signal indicative of the intensity, and energy of the radiation detected by the scintillation means; second photodetection means capable of generating an electrical signal indicative of the position of the radiation in the radiation pattern; and means for optically coupling the scintillation means to the second photodetection means. The photodetection means are electrically connected to control and storage means which may also be used to screen out noise by rejecting a signal from one photodetection means not synchronized to a signal from the other photodetection means; and also to screen out signals from scattered radiation.

Hailey, Charles J. (San Francisco, CA); Ziock, Klaus-Peter (Livermore, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Angular and Energy Characteristics of Gamma Field at the New Safe Confinement Construction Sit  

SciTech Connect

To results of measurements of angular y and energy distribution of gamma-radiation at the cites of New Safe Confinement erection. The data analysis permitted to identify the main sources of gamma-radiation and to systematize the obtained results.

Batiy, Valeriy; Glebkin, S; Pavlovskiy, L; Pravdyvyi, O; Rudko, Vladimir; Shcherbin, Vladimir; Stojanov, O; Schmieman, Eric A.

2005-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

203

EPIDEMIOLOGICAL STUDIES ON RADIATION CARCINOGENESIS IN HUMAN POPULATIONS FOLLOWING ACUTE EXPOSURE: NUCLEAR EXPLOSIONS AND MEDICAL RADIATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EPIDEMIOLOGICAL STUDIES ON RADIATION CARCINOGENESIS IN HUMANEXPLOSIONS AND MEDICAL RADIATION . Jacob I. Fabrikant, MD,Low Levels of Ionizing Radiation, Yale University School of

Fabrikant, J.I.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

JOINT EPA/DOE STATEMENT: Radiation Monitors Confirm That No Radiation...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

JOINT EPADOE STATEMENT: Radiation Monitors Confirm That No Radiation Levels of Concern Have Reached the United States JOINT EPADOE STATEMENT: Radiation Monitors Confirm That No...

205

Gamma ray detector shield  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gamma ray detector shield comprised of a rigid, lead, cylindrical-shaped vessel having upper and lower portions with an pneumatically driven, sliding top assembly. Disposed inside the lead shield is a gamma ray scintillation crystal detector. Access to the gamma detector is through the sliding top assembly.

Ohlinger, R.D.; Humphrey, H.W.

1985-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

206

Remote Gamma Scanning System for Characterization of BWR and PWR Fuel Rod Sections  

SciTech Connect

Sometimes challenges with the design and deployment of automated equipment in remote environments deals more with the constraints imposed by the remote environment than it does with the details of the automation. This paper discusses the development of a scanning system used to provide gamma radiation profiles of irradiated fuel rod segments. The system needed the capability to provide axial scans of cut segments of BWR and PWR fuel rods. The scanning location is A-Cell at the Radiochemical Processing Laboratory (RPL) at the Hanford site in Washington State. The criteria for the scanning equipment included axial scanning increments of a tenth of an inch or less, ability to scan fuel rods with diameters ranging from 3/8 inch to 5/8 inch in diameter, and fuel rod segments up to seven feet in length. Constraints imposed by the environment included having the gamma detector and operator controls on the outside of the hot cell and the scanning hardware on the inside of the hot cell. This entailed getting a narrow, collimated beam of radiation from the fuel rod to the detector on the outside of the hot cell while minimizing the radiation exposure caused by openings for the wires and cables traversing the hot cell walls. Setup and operation of all of the in-cell hardware needed to accommodate limited access ports and use of hot cell manipulators. The radiation levels inside the cell also imposed constraints on the materials used.

Crowell, Shannon L.; Alzheimer, James M.

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

207

Final deactivation project report on the High Radiation Level Analytical Facility, Building 3019B at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to document the condition of the High Radiation Level Analytical Facility (Building 3019B) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) after completion of deactivation activities. This report identifies the activities conducted to place the facility in a safe and environmentally sound condition prior to transfer to the Environmental Restoration EM-40 Program. This document provides a history and description of the facility prior to the commencement of deactivation activities and documents the condition of the building after completion of all deactivation activities. Turnover items, such as the Post-Deactivation Surveillance and Maintenance (S&M) Plan, remaining hazardous materials inventory, radiological controls, safeguards and security, quality assurance, facility operations, and supporting documentation provided in the Nuclear Material and Facility Stabilization (EM-60) Turnover package are discussed. Building 3019B will require access to perform required S&M activities to maintain the building safety envelope. Building 3019B was stabilized during deactivation so that when transferred to the EM-40 Program, only a minimal S&M effort would be required to maintain the building safety envelope. Other than the minimal S&M activities the building will be unoccupied and the exterior doors locked to prevent unauthorized access. The building will be entered only to perform the required S&M until decommissioning activities begin.

NONE

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

UTILIZATION OF PHOSWICH DETECTORS FOR SIMULTANEOUS, MULTIPLE RADIATION DETECTION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A phoswich radiation detector is comprised of a phosphor sandwich in which several different phosphors are viewed by a common photomultiplier. By selecting the appropriate phosphors, this system can be used to simultaneously measure multiple radiation types (alpha, beta, gamma and/or neutron) with a single detector. Differentiation between the signals from the different phosphors is accomplished using digital pulse shape discrimination techniques. This method has been shown to result in accurate discrimination with highly reliable and versatile digital systems. This system also requires minimal component count (i.e. only the detector and a computer for signal processing). A variety of detectors of this type have been built and tested including: (1) a triple phoswich system for alpha/beta/gamma swipe counting, (2) two well-type detectors for measuring low levels of low energy photons in the presence of a high energy background, (3) a large area detector for measuring beta contamination in the presence of a photon background, (4) another large area detector for measuring low energy photons from radioactive elements such as uranium in the presence of a photon background. An annular geometry, triple phoswich system optimized for measuring alpha/beta/gamma radiation in liquid waste processing streams is currently being designed.

William H. Miller; Manuel Diaz de Leon

2003-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

209

Gamma Radiation Dose Rate in Air due to Terrestrial Radionuclides in Southern Brazil: Synthesis by Geological Units and Lithotypes Covered by the Serra do Mar Sul Aero-Geophysical Project  

SciTech Connect

The absorbed dose rates in air due to terrestrial radionuclides were estimated from aerial gamma spectrometric data for an area of 48,600 km{sup 2} in Southern Brazil. The source data was the Serra do Mar Sul Aero-Geophysical Project back-calibrated in a cooperative work among the Geological Survey of Brazil, the Geological Survey of Canada, and Paterson, Grant and Watson Ltd. The concentrations of eU (ppm), eTh (ppm) and K (%) were converted to dose rates in air (nGy{center_dot}h{sup -1}) by accounting for the contribution of each element's concentration. Regional variation was interpreted according to lithotypes and a synthesis was performed according to the basic geological units present in the area. Higher values of total dose were estimated for felsic igneous and metamorphic rocks, with average values varying up to 119{+-}24 nGy{center_dot}h{sup -1}, obtained by Anitapolis syenite body. Sedimentary, metasedimentary and metamafic rocks presented the lower dose levels, and some beach deposits reached the lowest average total dose, 18.5{+-}8.2 nGy{center_dot}h{sup -1}. Thorium gives the main average contribution in all geological units, the highest value being reached by the nebulitic gneisses of Atuba Complex, 71{+-}23 nGy{center_dot}h{sup -1}. Potassium presents the lowest average contribution to dose rate in 53 of the 72 units analyzed, the highest contribution being obtained by intrusive alkaline bodies (28{+-}12 nGy{center_dot}h{sup -1}). The general pattern of geographic dose distribution respects well the hypotheses on geo-physicochemical behavior of radioactive elements.

Bastos, Rodrigo O.; Appoloni, Carlos R. [Applied Nuclear Physics Laboratory-Department of Physics-CCE State University of Londrina Campus Universitario-Rodovia Celso Garcia Cid s/n, Cx. Postal 6001, CEP 86051-990, Londrina, PR (Brazil); Pinese, Jose P. P. [Department of Geosciences-CCE State University of Londrina Campus Universitario-Rodovia Celso Garcia Cid s/n, Cx. Postal 6001, CEP 86051-990, Londrina, PR (Brazil)

2008-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

210

Gamma-ray burst interaction with dense interstellar medium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Interaction of cosmological gamma ray burst radiation with the dense interstellar medium of host galaxy is considered. Gas dynamical motion of interstellar medium driven by gamma ray burst is investigated in 2D approximation for different initial density distributions of host galaxy matter and different total energy of gamma ray burst. The maximum velocity of motion of interstellar medium is $1.8\\cdot10^4$ km/s. Light curves of gamma ray burst afterglow are calculated for set of non homogeneous density, distribution gamma ray burst total energy, and different viewing angles. Spectra of gamma ray burst afterglow are modeled taking into account conversion of hard photons (soft X-ray, hard UV) to soft UV and optics photons.

Maxim Barkov; Gennady Bisnovatyi-Kogan

2004-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

211

Radiation Detection Computational Benchmark Scenarios  

SciTech Connect

Modeling forms an important component of radiation detection development, allowing for testing of new detector designs, evaluation of existing equipment against a wide variety of potential threat sources, and assessing operation performance of radiation detection systems. This can, however, result in large and complex scenarios which are time consuming to model. A variety of approaches to radiation transport modeling exist with complementary strengths and weaknesses for different problems. This variety of approaches, and the development of promising new tools (such as ORNL’s ADVANTG) which combine benefits of multiple approaches, illustrates the need for a means of evaluating or comparing different techniques for radiation detection problems. This report presents a set of 9 benchmark problems for comparing different types of radiation transport calculations, identifying appropriate tools for classes of problems, and testing and guiding the development of new methods. The benchmarks were drawn primarily from existing or previous calculations with a preference for scenarios which include experimental data, or otherwise have results with a high level of confidence, are non-sensitive, and represent problem sets of interest to NA-22. From a technical perspective, the benchmarks were chosen to span a range of difficulty and to include gamma transport, neutron transport, or both and represent different important physical processes and a range of sensitivity to angular or energy fidelity. Following benchmark identification, existing information about geometry, measurements, and previous calculations were assembled. Monte Carlo results (MCNP decks) were reviewed or created and re-run in order to attain accurate computational times and to verify agreement with experimental data, when present. Benchmark information was then conveyed to ORNL in order to guide testing and development of hybrid calculations. The results of those ADVANTG calculations were then sent to PNNL for compilation. This is a report describing the details of the selected Benchmarks and results from various transport codes.

Shaver, Mark W.; Casella, Andrew M.; Wittman, Richard S.; McDonald, Ben S.

2013-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

212

Energetics of Gamma Ray Bursts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We determine the distribution of total energy emitted by gamma-ray bursts for bursts with fluences and distance information. Our core sample consists of eight bursts with BATSE spectra and spectroscopic redshifts. We extend this sample by adding four bursts with BATSE spectra and host galaxy R magnitudes. From these R magnitudes we calculate a redshift probability distribution; this method requires a model of the host galaxy population. From a sample of ten bursts with both spectroscopic redshifts and host galaxy R magnitudes (some do not have BATSE spectra) we find that the burst rate is proportional to the galaxy luminosity at the epoch of the burst. Assuming that the total energy emitted has a log-normal distribution, we find that the average emitted energy (assumed to be radiated isotropically) is $gamma iso} > = 1.3^{+1.2}_{-1.0} \\times 10^{53}$ ergs (for H$_0$ = 65 km s$^{-1}$ Mpc$^{-1}$, $\\Omega_m=0.3$ and $\\Omega_\\Lambda=0.7$); the distribution has a logarithmic width of $\\sigma_\\gamma=1.7^{+0.7}_{-0.3}$. The corresponding distribution of X-ray afterglow energy (for seven bursts) has $ = 4.0^{+1.6}_{-1.8} \\times 10^{51}$ergs and $\\sigma_X = 1.3^{+0.4}_{-0.3}$. For completeness, we also provide spectral fits for all bursts with BATSE spectra for which there were afterglow searches.

Raul Jimenez; David Band; Tsvi Piran

2001-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

213

Gamma-Ray Bursts: Jets and Energetics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The relativistic outflows from gamma-ray bursts are now thought to be narrowly collimated into jets. After correcting for this jet geometry there is a remarkable constancy of both the energy radiated by the burst and the kinetic energy carried by the outflow. Gamma-ray bursts are still the most luminous explosions in the Universe, but they release energies that are comparable to supernovae. The diversity of cosmic explosions appears to be governed by the fraction of energy that is coupled to ultra-relativistic ejecta.

D. A. Frail

2003-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

214

RADIATION COUNTER  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent relates to a radiation counter, and more particularly, to a scintillation counter having high uniform sensitivity over a wide area and capable of measuring alpha, beta, and gamma contamination over wide energy ranges, for use in quickly checking the contami-nation of personnel. Several photomultiplier tubes are disposed in parallel relationship with a light tight housing behind a wall of scintillation material. Mounted within the housing with the photomultipliers are circuit means for producing an audible sound for each pulse detected, and a range selector developing a voltage proportional to the repetition rate of the detected pulses and automatically altering its time constant when the voltage reaches a predetermined value, so that manual range adjustment of associated metering means is not required.

Goldsworthy, W.W.

1958-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Measuring Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Measurement Activity SI Units and Prefixes Conversions Safety Around Radiation Sources Types of Radiation Exposure Managing Radiation Emergencies Procedure Demonstration...

216

Atomic Radiation (Illinois)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This article states permissible levels of radiation in unrestricted areas, environmental standards for uranium fuel cycle and information about notification of incidents.

217

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Thomas Weber  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2005 Workshop: A Paracrine Signal Mediates The Cell Transformation Response To Low Dose Gamma Radiation in JB6 Cells. Weber, T.J., Siegel, R.W., Markillie, L.M., Chrisler,...

218

A Climatology of Midlatitude Continental Clouds from the ARM SGP Central Facility: Part I: Low-Level Cloud Macrophysical, Microphysical, and Radiative Properties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A record of single-layer and overcast low cloud (stratus) properties has been generated using approximately 4000 h of data collected from January 1997 to December 2002 at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains Central ...

Xiquan Dong; Patrick Minnis; Baike Xi

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

BWR radiation control: plant demonstration. Volume 2. Appendixes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The first year's progress is presented for a four-year program intended to implement and evaluate BRAC radiation reduction operational guidelines at the Vermont Yankee BWR and to document the results in sufficient detail to provide guidance to other BWR owners. Past operational, chemistry and radiation level data have been reviewed to provide a historical base of reference. Extensive sampling and chemistry monitoring systems have been installed to evaluate plant chemistry status and the effects of program implemented changes. Radiation surveys and piping gamma scans are being performed at targeted locations to quantify radiation level trends and to identify and quantify piping isotopics. Contact radiation levels on the recirculation line at Vermont Yankee have been increasing at a rate of 175 mR/h-EFPY since 1978. A materials survey of feedwater and reactor components in contact with the process liquid has been performed to identify sources of corrosion product release, particularly cobalt and nickel. A feedwater oxygen injection system has been installed to evaluate the effects of oxygen control on feedwater materials corrosion product releases. A baseline performance evaluation of the condensate treatment and reactor water cleanup systems has been completed. Data on organics and ionics at Vermont Yankee have been obtained. A methodology of BWR feedwater system layup during extended outages was developed, and an evaluation performed of layup and startup practices utilized at Vermont Yankee during the fall 1980 and 1981 refueling outages.

Palino, G.F.; Hobart, R.L.; Wall, P.S.; Sawochka, S.G.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Anomalous Radiative Decay of Heavy Higgs Boson  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The radiative decay width of a heavy Higgs boson $H \\rightarrow W^+W^-\\gamma$ for a {\\it hard} photon is calculated in the Standard Model and its extension with anomalous $\\gamma WW$ couplings. Its dependence on the Higgs mass, the two unknown anomalous couplings, and the photon energy cutoff are studied in detail. We show that this radiative decay of a heavy Higgs is not very sensitive to a wide range of the anomalous couplings compared to the Standard Model result.

Tzu Chiang Yuan

1992-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gamma radiation levels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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221

Developing a Methodology for Characterizing the Effects of Building Materials’ Natural Radiation Background on a Radiation Portal Monitoring System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Trafficking of radioactive material, particularly special nuclear material (SNM), has long been a worldwide concern. To interdict this material the US government has installed radiation portal monitors (RPMs) around the globe. Building materials surrounding an RPM can greatly effect the detector’s background radiation levels due to Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material (NORM). In some cases this effect is so great that the initial RPM setup had to be rebuilt. This thesis develops a methodology for quick and efficient determination of the specific activity and composition of building materials surrounding a RPM to predict background levels, therefore determining the minimum detectable quantity (MDQ) of material. This methodology builds on previous work by Ryan et al by generating material and source cards for a detailed Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) deck, based on an experimental RPM setup to predict the overall gamma background at a site. Gamma spectra were acquired from samples of building materials and analyzed to determine the specific activity of the samples. A code was developed to estimate the elemental composition of building materials using the gamma transmission of the samples. These results were compared to previous Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) on the same samples. It was determined that densitometry provided an elemental approximation within 5% of that found through NAA. Using the specific activity and material composition, an MCNP deck was used to predict the gamma background levels in the detectors of a typical RPM. These results were compared against actual measurements at the RPM site, and shown to be within 10% of each other.

Fitzmaurice, Matthew Blake 1988-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Effect of gamma irradiation on optical isolators  

SciTech Connect

The effects of gamma radiation on optical isolators have been investigated. This study has included the simultaneous irradiation and measurement of the individual emitters and detectors making up the isolators. In this manner, the net effect of irradiation on the isolators could be attributed to the degradation of either the emitter or detector, or both. As expected, isolators containing photodiodes are more radiation resistant than those containing phototransistors. In the photodiode isolator the LED is responsible for essentially all the gamma-induced isolator degradation. The performance of phototransistor isolators depends strongly on the phototransistor bias, V/sub CE/ , and the LED input current, I/sub LED/. At high I/sub LED/ and low V/sub CE/ where gamma-induced surface effects in the phototransistor are minimized, the degradation of the isolator is due primarily to the LED which is more sensitive than the LED in the photodiode isolator. In contrast, at low I/sub LED/ and high V/sub CE/, gamma-induced surface damage in the phototransistor is the dominant effect and the isolator is quite sensitive to irradiation. (auth)

Soda, K.J.; Barnes, C.E.; Kiehl, R.A.

1975-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Perspectives on Gamma-Ray Pulsar Emission  

SciTech Connect

Pulsars are powerful sources of radiation across the electromagnetic spectrum. This paper highlights some theoretical insights into non-thermal, magnetospheric pulsar gamma-ray radiation. These advances have been driven by NASA's Fermi mission, launched in mid-2008. The Large Area Telescope (LAT) instrument on Fermi has afforded the discrimination between polar cap and slot gap/outer gap acceleration zones in young and middle-aged pulsars. Altitude discernment using the highest energy pulsar photons will be addressed, as will spectroscopic interpretation of the primary radiation mechanism in the LAT band, connecting to both polar cap/slot gap and outer gap scenarios. Focuses will mostly be on curvature radiation and magnetic pair creation, including population trends that may afford probes of the magnetospheric accelerating potential.

Baring, Matthew G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, MS-108, Rice University, P. O. Box 1892, Houston, TX 77251-1892 (United States)

2011-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

224

Gamma irradiation effects in W films  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using the van Der Pauw methodology, the surface resistivity of irradiated tungsten films deposited on Silicon substrate was measured. The films were exposed to {gamma} radiation using a isotopic {sup 60}Co source in three irradiation stages attaining 40.35 kGy in total dose. The obtained results for superficial resistivity display a time annealing features and their values are proportional to the total dose.

Claro, Luiz H. [Instituto de Estudos Avancados - IEAv, Rod. dos Tamoios, km 5,5, CEP: 12228-840, Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil) and Faculdade de Tecnologia Sao Francisco - FATESF, Av. Siqueira Campos, 1174, CEP: 12207-000, Jacarei (Brazil); Santos, Ingrid A. [Instituto de Estudos Avancados - IEAv, Rod. dos Tamoios, km 5,5, CEP: 12228-840, Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Silva, Cassia F. [Faculdade de Tecnologia Sao Francisco - FATESF, Av. Siqueira Campos, 1174, CEP: 12207-000, Jacarei, SP (Brazil)

2013-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

225

Parameters of Cascade Gamma-Decay of Compound-Nuclei Nd-146, Gd-156, Yb-172, Ta-182, W-184, Os-191, Th-231,233, U-239, Pu-240 from Experimental Data of Reaction $(n,?)$  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Re-analysis of experimental data on primary gamma-transitions averaged over some energy intervals of neutron resonances has been performed. Approximation of their cumulative sums together with extrapolation of the obtained distribution to zero value allowed us to determine mean intensities of of E1- and M1-transitions, their probable number and total dispersion of intensity deviations from the mean value. The level density and sum of radiative strength functions determined in this way confirm main peculiarities of these nuclear parameters determined from intensities of the two-step gamma-cascades.

A. M. Sukhovoj; V. A. Khitrov

2009-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

226

Cellular and molecular level responses after radiofrequency radiation exposure, alone or in combination with x-rays or chemicals. Final report, 1 April 1991-30 September 1994  

SciTech Connect

This project was initiated to explore the potential bioeffects of microwave radiation, alone or in combination with ionizing radiation and chemicals. Over the time period of the project, an automated thermal control system, to be used for maintaining the temperature in tissue culture medium during microwave exposures, was designed, constructed, and software was created. While this was underway during the project period, numerous positive control biological experiments were performed on two different cell types, the Epstein Barr Virus transformed 244B human lymphoblastoid cell, and the freshly isolated peripheral human lymphocyte. The 244B cells were used to address the question of whether a physical agent, ionizing radiation, at low doses where cells would predominantly remain viable, would induce the DNA binding protein NF-kB, and/or four immediate early genes (IEG) (protooncogenes).

Meltz, M.L.; Natarajan, M.; Prasad, A.V.

1995-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

227

On the mechanism of prompt emission of gamma-ray bursts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose a model in which prompt gamma emission of gamma-ray bursts is the synchrotron radiation of electron-positron plasma in the ordered magnetic field in the direct vicinity of horizon of a young black hole formed in the core collapse of a massive star. This mechanism can naturally explain high degree of polarization of the gamma-ray flux and hard low energy photon spectral index. Interaction of gamma-quanta with ambient matter provides a mechanism of formation of relativistic ejecta which are responsible for the gamma-ray burst afterglows.

Andrey Neronov

2003-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

228

Protective surface coatings on semiconductor nuclear radiation detectors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Surface states on germanium p-i-n junctions have been investigated using deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) and collimated beams of 60 keV gamma-rays. The DLTS spectra have a characteristic signature for each surface treatment but the spectra are complex and not readily interpretable as to suitability for radiation detectors. Collimated gamma-ray beams give a direct measure of surface channel effects and typeness. Hydrogenated amorphous germanium (a-Ge:H) was explored as a surface layer to adjust the electrical state and passivate the surface. Our measurements show that these layers produce flat band conditions, introduce no additional noise and appear to be stable against a variety of ambients.

Hansen, W.L.; Haller, E.E.; Hubbard, G.S.

1979-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

IONIZING RADIATION RISKS TO SATELLITE POWER SYSTEMS (SPS) WORKERS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and A. I. Sladkova, "Radiation Levels in InterplanetaryPrognoz Satellites," Cosmic Radiation, 12_, No. 5, 716-718 (0. ArchamDeau, Mammalian Radiation Lethargy, A Disturbance

Lyman, J.T.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Contribution of Tissue Level Organization to Genomic Stability...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Tissue Level Organization to Genomic Stability Following Low Dose Gamma Irradiation Cheryl Burrell Loma Linda University Abstract Our study proposes that the level of...

231

Amorphous silicon radiation detectors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Hydrogenated amorphous silicon radiation detector devices having enhanced signal are disclosed. Specifically provided are transversely oriented electrode layers and layered detector configurations of amorphous silicon, the structure of which allow high electric fields upon application of a bias thereby beneficially resulting in a reduction in noise from contact injection and an increase in signal including avalanche multiplication and gain of the signal produced by incoming high energy radiation. These enhanced radiation sensitive devices can be used as measuring and detection means for visible light, low energy photons and high energy ionizing particles such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation. Particular utility of the device is disclosed for precision powder crystallography and biological identification.

Street, Robert A. (Palo Alto, CA); Perez-Mendez, Victor (Berkeley, CA); Kaplan, Selig N. (El Cerrito, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Amorphous silicon radiation detectors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Hydrogenated amorphous silicon radiation detector devices having enhanced signal are disclosed. Specifically provided are transversely oriented electrode layers and layered detector configurations of amorphous silicon, the structure of which allow high electric fields upon application of a bias thereby beneficially resulting in a reduction in noise from contact injection and an increase in signal including avalanche multiplication and gain of the signal produced by incoming high energy radiation. These enhanced radiation sensitive devices can be used as measuring and detection means for visible light, low energy photons and high energy ionizing particles such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation. Particular utility of the device is disclosed for precision powder crystallography and biological identification. 13 figs.

Street, R.A.; Perez-Mendez, V.; Kaplan, S.N.

1992-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

233

Radiation effects on MOS devices: dosimetry, annealing, irradiation sequence and sources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports on some investigations of dosimetry, annealing, irradiation sequences, and radioactive sources, involved in the determination of radiation effects on MOS devices. Results show that agreement in the experimental and theoretical surface to average doses support the use of thermo-luminescent dosimeters (manganese activated calcium fluoride) in specifying the surface dose delivered to thin gate insulators of MOS devices. Annealing measurements indicate the existence of at least two energy levels, or activation energies, for recovery of soft oxide MOS devices after irradiation by electrons, protons, and gammas. Damage sensitivities of MOS devices were found to be independent of combinations and sequences of radiation type or energies. Comparison of various gamma sources indicated a small dependence of damage sensitivity on the Cobalt facility, but a more significant dependence in the case of the Cesium source. These results were attributed to differences in the spectral content of the several sources.

Stassinopoulos, E.; Brucker, G.; Gunten, O.; Jordan, T.; Knudson, A.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Gamma-ray astronomy: From Fermi up to the HAWC high-energy {gamma}-ray observatory in Sierra Negra  

SciTech Connect

Gamma-rays represent the most energetic electromagnetic window for the study of the Universe. They are studied both from space at MeV and GeV energies, with instruments like the Fermi{gamma}-ray Space Telescope, and at TeV energies with ground based instruments profiting of particle cascades in the atmosphere and of the Cerenkov radiation of charged particles in the air or in water. The Milagro gamma-ray observatory represented the first instrument to successfully implement the water Cerenkov technique for {gamma}-ray astronomy, opening the ground for the more sensitive HAWC {gamma}-ray observatory, currently under development in the Sierra Negra site and already providing early science results.

Carraminana, Alberto [Instituto Nacional de Astrofisica, Optica y Electronica Luis Enrique Erro 1, Tonantzintla, Puebla 72840 (Mexico); Collaboration: HAWC Collaboration

2013-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

235

RADIATION SHIELDING DEVICE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

ABS>A radiation shield that is suitable for the protection of personnel from both gamma rays and nentrons is described. The shield is comprised of a hollow wall and an aggregate consisting of iron and water in approximately equal amounts by volume substantially filling the wall. A means is provided to circulate the water through the wall to cool the shield when in use.

Wigner, E.P.; Young, G.J.

1958-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

236

Enhancement of h --> gamma gamma in the Two Higgs Doublet Model Type I  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show that in the Two Higgs Doublet Model (THDM) Type I the partial decay width of h --> gamma gamma can be considerably larger than in Type II, due to light charged scalars with a mass about 100 GeV, which are not yet excluded in Type I. A possible enhancement of the width compared to the SM is analyzed for different Higgs potentials, subject to constraints from tree-level unitarity, vacuum stability and electroweak precision tests.

Paul Posch

2010-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

237

Sex-dependent Differences in Intestinal Tumorigenesis Induced in Apc1638N/+ Mice by Exposure to {gamma} Rays  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The purpose of the present study was to assess the effect of 1 and 5 Gy radiation doses and to investigate the interplay of gender and radiation with regard to intestinal tumorigenesis in an adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) mutant mouse model. Methods and Materials: Apc1638N/+ female and male mice were exposed whole body to either 1 Gy or 5 Gy of {gamma} rays and euthanized when most of the treated mice became moribund. Small and large intestines were processed to determine tumor burden, distribution, and grade. Expression of proliferation marker Ki-67 and estrogen receptor (ER)-{alpha} were also assessed by immunohistochemistry. Results: We observed that, with both 1 Gy and 5 Gy of {gamma} rays, females displayed reduced susceptibility to radiation-induced intestinal tumorigenesis compared with males. As for radiation effect on small intestinal tumor progression, although no substantial differences were found in the relative frequency and degree of dysplasia of adenomas in irradiated animals compared with controls, invasive carcinomas were found in 1-Gy- and 5-Gy-irradiated animals. Radiation exposure was also shown to induce an increase in protein levels of proliferation marker Ki-67 and sex-hormone receptor ER-{alpha} in both non tumor mucosa and intestinal tumors from irradiated male mice. Conclusions: We observed important sex-dependent differences in susceptibility to radiation-induced intestinal tumorigenesis in Apc1638N/+ mutants. Furthermore, our data provide evidence that exposure to radiation doses as low as 1 Gy can induce a significant increase in intestinal tumor multiplicity as well as enhance tumor progression in vivo.

Trani, Daniela [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular and Cellular Biology, Georgetown University, Washington, District of Columbia (United States) [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular and Cellular Biology, Georgetown University, Washington, District of Columbia (United States); Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington, District of Columbia (United States); Maastricht Radiation Oncology (MaastRO) Lab, GROW-School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, University of Maastricht (Netherlands); Moon, Bo-Hyun [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular and Cellular Biology, Georgetown University, Washington, District of Columbia (United States) [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular and Cellular Biology, Georgetown University, Washington, District of Columbia (United States); Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington, District of Columbia (United States); Kallakury, Bhaskar; Hartmann, Dan P. [Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington, District of Columbia (United States)] [Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington, District of Columbia (United States); Datta, Kamal [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular and Cellular Biology, Georgetown University, Washington, District of Columbia (United States) [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular and Cellular Biology, Georgetown University, Washington, District of Columbia (United States); Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington, District of Columbia (United States); Fornace, Albert J., E-mail: af294@georgetown.edu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular and Cellular Biology, Georgetown University, Washington, District of Columbia (United States); Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington, District of Columbia (United States); Center of Excellence in Genomic Medicine Research (CEGMR), King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah (Saudi Arabia)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Radiation evaluation study of LSI RAM technologies. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Five commercial LSI static RAM technologies having a 1 kilobit capacity were radiation characterized. Arrays from the TTL, Schottky TTL, NMOS, CMOS, and CMOS/SOS families were evaluated. Radiation failure thresholds for gamma dose-rate logic upset, total gamma dose survivability, and neutron fluence survivability were determined. Included is a brief analysis of the radiation failure mechanism for each of the logic families tested.

Dinger, G.L.; Knoll, M.G.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Inelastic cross sections from gamma-ray measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurements of gamma rays following neutron induced reactions have been studied with the Germanium Array for Neutron-induced Excitations (GEANIE) at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) for many years. Gamma-ray excitation functions and coincidence studies provide insight into nuclear reaction mechanisms as well as expanding our knowledge of energy levels and gamma-rays. Samples studied with Ge detectors at LANSCE range from Be to Pu. Fe, Cr and Ti have been considered for use as reference cross sections. An overview of the measurements and efforts to create a reliable neutron-induced gamma-ray reference cross section will be presented.

Nelson, Ronald Owen [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

240

Low Dose Radiation Program: Radiation Biology and the Radiation Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biology and the Radiation Research Program Biology and the Radiation Research Program The Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessor organizations, Energy Research and Development Agency (ERDA) and Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), always have been concerned about the health effects of ionizing radiation. Extensive research has been conducted under their sponsorship at all levels of biological organization from molecules to man. Over the past 60 years, studies using every type of radiation source have included exposure to both external radiation sources and to internally deposited radioactive materials. These exposures used different dose patterns and distributions delivered over a wide range of experimental times. This extensive research provided the basis for the new Low Dose Radiation Research Program, linking

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gamma radiation levels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Microsoft PowerPoint - Ultrasonic Liquid Level ProbeSRNL-L9100...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

addition, an optional shielded plug has been developed to reduce or eliminate gamma radiation exposure to personnel. Background A researcher at the Savannah River Site has...

242

Standards for Protection Against Radiation (Michigan)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This rule establishes standards for protection against radiation hazards. In addition to complying with requirements set forth, every reasonable effort should be made to maintain radiation levels...

243

Gamma-ray Astronomy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The relevance of gamma-ray astronomy to the search for the origin of the galactic and, to a lesser extent, the ultra-high-energy cosmic rays has long been recognised. The current renaissance in the TeV gamma-ray field has resulted in a wealth of new data on galactic and extragalactic particle accelerators, and almost all the new results in this field were presented at the recent International Cosmic Ray Conference (ICRC). Here I summarise the 175 papers submitted on the topic of gamma-ray astronomy to the 30th ICRC in Merida, Mexico in July 2007.

Hinton, Jim

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Gamma-ray Astronomy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The relevance of gamma-ray astronomy to the search for the origin of the galactic and, to a lesser extent, the ultra-high-energy cosmic rays has long been recognised. The current renaissance in the TeV gamma-ray field has resulted in a wealth of new data on galactic and extragalactic particle accelerators, and almost all the new results in this field were presented at the recent International Cosmic Ray Conference (ICRC). Here I summarise the 175 papers submitted on the topic of gamma-ray astronomy to the 30th ICRC in Merida, Mexico in July 2007.

Jim Hinton

2007-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

245

Neutron And Gamma Detector Using An Ionization Chamber With An Integrated  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Neutron And Gamma Detector Using An Ionization Chamber Neutron And Gamma Detector Using An Ionization Chamber Neutron And Gamma Detector Using An Ionization Chamber With An Integrated Body And Moderator A detector for detecting neutrons and gamma radiation includes a cathode that defines an interior surface and an interior volume. Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email Neutron And Gamma Detector Using An Ionization Chamber With An Integrated Body And Moderator A detector for detecting neutrons and gamma radiation includes a cathode that defines an interior surface and an interior volume. A conductive neutron-capturing layer is disposed on the interior surface of the cathode and a plastic housing surrounds the cathode. A plastic lid is attached to the housing and encloses the interior volume of the cathode forming an

246

Neutron counting and gamma spectroscopy with PVT detectors.  

SciTech Connect

Radiation portals normally incorporate a dedicated neutron counter and a gamma-ray detector with at least some spectroscopic capability. This paper describes the design and presents characterization data for a detection system called PVT-NG, which uses large polyvinyl toluene (PVT) detectors to monitor both types of radiation. The detector material is surrounded by polyvinyl chloride (PVC), which emits high-energy gamma rays following neutron capture reactions. Assessments based on high-energy gamma rays are well suited for the detection of neutron sources, particularly in border security applications, because few isotopes in the normal stream of commerce have significant gamma ray yields above 3 MeV. Therefore, an increased count rate for high-energy gamma rays is a strong indicator for the presence of a neutron source. The sensitivity of the PVT-NG sensor to bare {sup 252}Cf is 1.9 counts per second per nanogram (cps/ng) and the sensitivity for {sup 252}Cf surrounded by 2.5 cm of polyethylene is 2.3 cps/ng. The PVT-NG sensor is a proof-of-principal sensor that was not fully optimized. The neutron detector sensitivity could be improved, for instance, by using additional moderator. The PVT-NG detectors and associated electronics are designed to provide improved resolution, gain stability, and performance at high-count rates relative to PVT detectors in typical radiation portals. As well as addressing the needs for neutron detection, these characteristics are also desirable for analysis of the gamma-ray spectra. Accurate isotope identification results were obtained despite the common impression that the absence of photopeaks makes data collected by PVT detectors unsuitable for spectroscopic analysis. The PVT detectors in the PVT-NG unit are used for both gamma-ray and neutron detection, so the sensitive volume exceeds the volume of the detection elements in portals that use dedicated components to detect each type of radiation.

Mitchell, Dean James; Brusseau, Charles A.

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Gamma-ray events thunderclouds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Andromeda: A mission to determine the gamma-ray burst distance scale F.A. Harrison, W.R. Cook, T was submitted to the STEDI program, and will also be proposed as a NASA Small Explorer. Keywords: bursts, gamma-rays, small missions 1 SCIENTIFIC OBJECTIVES 1.1 Gamma-ray Bursts Gamma-ray bursts GRBs were discovered

California at Berkeley, University of

248

Soft gamma repeaters Kevin Hurley *  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1331 1. Introduction The soft gamma repeaters (SGRs) are sporadic sources of bursts of X- and gamma-rays), and a rather soft spectrum compared to those of cosmic gamma-ray bursts; a rough description of the spectrumReview Soft gamma repeaters Kevin Hurley * University of California, Berkeley, Space Sciences

California at Berkeley, University of

249

DNA microarray analyses reveal a post-irradiation differential time-dependent gene expression profile in yeast cells exposed to X-rays and {gamma}-rays  

SciTech Connect

Ionizing radiation (IR) is the most enigmatic of genotoxic stress inducers in our environment that has been around from the eons of time. IR is generally considered harmful, and has been the subject of numerous studies, mostly looking at the DNA damaging effects in cells and the repair mechanisms therein. Moreover, few studies have focused on large-scale identification of cellular responses to IR, and to this end, we describe here an initial study on the transcriptional responses of the unicellular genome model, yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain S288C), by cDNA microarray. The effect of two different IR, X-rays, and gamma ({gamma})-rays, was investigated by irradiating the yeast cells cultured in YPD medium with 50 Gy doses of X- and {gamma}-rays, followed by resuspension of the cells in YPD for time-course experiments. The samples were collected for microarray analysis at 20, 40, and 80 min after irradiation. Microarray analysis revealed a time-course transcriptional profile of changed gene expressions. Up-regulated genes belonged to the functional categories mainly related to cell cycle and DNA processing, cell rescue defense and virulence, protein and cell fate, and metabolism (X- and {gamma}-rays). Similarly, for X- and {gamma}-rays, the down-regulated genes belonged to mostly transcription and protein synthesis, cell cycle and DNA processing, control of cellular organization, cell fate, and C-compound and carbohydrate metabolism categories, respectively. This study provides for the first time a snapshot of the genome-wide mRNA expression profiles in X- and {gamma}-ray post-irradiated yeast cells and comparatively interprets/discusses the changed gene functional categories as effects of these two radiations vis-a-vis their energy levels.

Kimura, Shinzo [Laboratory of Environmental Biology, Department of Preventive Medicine, Hokkaido University School of Medicine, Sapporo 060-8638 (Japan); Ishidou, Emi [Human Stress Signal Research Center (HSS), National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST) WEST, 16-1 Onogawa, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8569 (Japan); Kurita, Sakiko [Human Stress Signal Research Center (HSS), National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST) WEST, 16-1 Onogawa, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8569 (Japan); Suzuki, Yoshiteru [Human Stress Signal Research Center (HSS), National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST) WEST, 16-1 Onogawa, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8569 (Japan); Shibato, Junko [Human Stress Signal Research Center (HSS), National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST) WEST, 16-1 Onogawa, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8569 (Japan); Rakwal, Randeep [Human Stress Signal Research Center (HSS), National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST) WEST, 16-1 Onogawa, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8569 (Japan)]. E-mail: rakwal-68@aist.go.jp; Iwahashi, Hitoshi [Human Stress Signal Research Center (HSS), National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST) WEST, 16-1 Onogawa, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8569 (Japan)

2006-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

250

Gamma-Ray Bursts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gamma-ray bursts are the most luminous explosions in the Universe, and their origin and mechanism are the focus of intense research and debate. More than three decades after their discovery, and after pioneering breakthroughs from space and ground experiments, their study is entering a new phase with the recently launched Swift satellite. The interplay between these observations and theoretical models of the prompt gamma ray burst and its afterglow is reviewed.

P. Meszaros

2006-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

251

Ion Technique for Identifying Gamma Detector Candidates  

SciTech Connect

Recent demands for radiation detector materials with better energy resolution at room temperature have prompted research efforts on both accelerated material discovery and efficient analysis techniques. Ions can easily deposit their energy in thin films or small crystals and the radiation response can be used to identify material properties relevant to detector performance. In an effort to identify gamma detector candidates using small crystals or film samples, an ion technique is developed to measure relative light yield and energy resolution of candidate materials and to evaluate radiation detection performance. Employing a unique time-of-flight (TOF) telescope, light yield and energy resolution resulting from ion excitation are investigated over a continuous energy region. The efficiency of this ion technique is demonstrated using both organic (plastic scintillator) and inorganic (CaF2:Eu, YAP:Ce, CsI:Tl and BGO) scintillators.

Zhang, Yanwen; Xiang, Xia; Rausch, Julie L.; Zu, Xiaotao T.; Weber, William J.

2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

252

Literature survey of chemical analysis by thermal neutron induced capture gamma ray spectrometry  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A brief discussion of the principles and techniques of chemical analysis by neutron capture gamma radiation is presented, and the widely scattered literature is collected into a single table arranged by element measured.

Gladney, E.S.

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Performance degradation of P3HT:PCBM Polymer/fullerene photovoltaic cells under gamma irradiation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The gamma radiation damage effect on polymer-based hybrid photovoltaic cells consisting of a blend of poly-3-hexylthiophene (P3HT) and [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) is investigated.… (more)

Todd, Aaron

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

A leptonic-hadronic model for the afterglow of gamma-ray burst 090510  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We model multiwavelength afterglow data from the short Gamma-Ray Burst (GRB) 090510 using a combined leptonic-hadronic model of synchrotron radiation from an adiabatic blast wave. High energy, >100 MeV, emission in our model is dominated by proton-synchrotron radiation, while electron-synchrotron radiation dominates in the X ray and ultraviolet wavelengths. The collimation-corrected GRB energy, depending on the jet-break time, in this model could be as low as 3e51 erg but two orders of magnitude larger than the gamma-ray energy. We also calculated the opacities for electron-positron pair production by gamma rays and found that TeV gamma rays from proton-synchrotron radiation can escape the blast wave at early time, and their detection can provide evidence of a hadronic emission component dominating at high energies.

Soebur Razzaque

2010-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

255

About Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation What is radiation? Radiation is a form of energy that is a part of our everyday lives. All of us receive a "dose" of radiation each day. Most of the dose comes from...

256

SRNL Deploys Innovative Radiation Mapping Device | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SRNL Deploys Innovative Radiation Mapping Device SRNL Deploys Innovative Radiation Mapping Device SRNL Deploys Innovative Radiation Mapping Device November 3, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis The Savannah River National Laboratory completed successful deployments of the RadBall, a gamma radiation-mapping device. The Savannah River National Laboratory completed successful deployments of the RadBall, a gamma radiation-mapping device. AIKEN, S.C. - The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), EM's national lab, has made strides with remote technology designed to reduce worker exposure while measuring radiation in contaminated areas. uilding on a successful collaboration with the United Kingdom's National Nuclear Laboratory, SRNL completed successful deployments of RadBall, a gamma radiation-mapping device, after testing the technology. The device

257

Angular Signatures of Dark Matter in the Diffuse Gamma Ray Background  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dark matter annihilating in our Galaxy's halo and elsewhere in the universe is expected to generate a diffuse flux of gamma rays, potentially observable with next generation satellite-based experiments, such as GLAST. In this article, we study the signatures of dark matter in the angular distribution of this radiation, in particular the deterministic ones. Pertaining to the extragalactic contribution, we discuss the effect of the motion of the solar system with respect to the cosmological rest frame, and anisotropies due to the structure of our local universe. For the gamma ray flux from dark matter in our own Galactic halo, we discuss the effects of the offset position of the solar system, the Compton-Getting effect, the asphericity of the Milky Way halo, and the signatures of nearby substructure. We explore the prospects for the detection of these features by the GLAST satellite and find that, if ~10% or more of the diffuse gamma ray background observed by EGRET is the result of dark matter annihilations, then GLAST should be sensitive to anisotropies at the sub-percent level. Such precision would be sufficient to detect many, if not all, of the signatures discussed in this paper.

Dan Hooper; Pasquale D. Serpico

2007-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

258

A supersymmetric model of gamma ray bursts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose a model for gamma ray bursts in which a star subject to a high level of fermion degeneracy undergoes a phase transition to a supersymmetric state. The burst is initiated by the transition of fermion pairs to sfermion pairs which, uninhibited by the Pauli exclusion principle, can drop to the ground state of minimum momentum through photon emission. The jet structure is attributed to the Bose statistics of sfermions whereby subsequent sfermion pairs are preferentially emitted into the same state (sfermion amplification by stimulated emission). Bremsstrahlung gamma rays tend to preserve the directional information of the sfermion momenta and are themselves enhanced by stimulated emission.

L. Clavelli; G. Karatheodoris

2004-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

259

Hard x-ray or gamma ray laser by a dense electron beam  

SciTech Connect

A dense electron beam propagating through a laser undulator can radiate a coherent x-ray or gamma ray. This lasing scheme is studied with the Landau damping theory. The analysis suggests that, with currently available physical parameters, coherent gamma rays of up to 50 keV can be generated. The electron quantum diffraction suppresses the free electron laser action, which limits the maximum radiation.

Son, S. [18 Caleb Lane, Princeton, New Jersey 08540 (United States); Joon Moon, Sung [8 Benjamin Rush Ln., Princeton, New Jersey 08540 (United States)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

260

Compton Electrons and Electromagnetic Pulse in Supernovae and Gamma-Ray Bursts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

When gamma-rays emerge from a central source they may undergo Compton scattering in surrounding matter. The resulting Compton-scattered electrons radiate. Coherent radiation by such Compton electrons follows nuclear explosions above the Earth's atmosphere. Particle acceleration in instabilities produced by Compton electron currents may explain the radio emission by SN1998bw. Bounds on coherent radiation are suggested for supernovae and gamma-ray bursts; these bounds are very high, but it is unknown if coherent radiation occurs in these objects.

J. I. Katz

1999-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gamma radiation levels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Measurements of B -> V gamma Decays  

SciTech Connect

The standard model has been highly successful at describing current experimental data. However, extensions of the standard model predict particles that have masses at energy scales that are above the electroweak scale. The flavor-changing neutral current processes of the B meson are sensitive to the influences of these new physics contributions. These processes proceed through loop diagrams, thus allowing new physics to enter at the same order as the standard model. New physics may contribute to the enhancement or suppression of rate asymmetries or the decay rates of these processes. The transition B {yields} V{gamma} (V = K*(892), {rho}(770), {omega}(782), {phi}(1020)) represents radiative decays of the B meson that proceed through penguin processes. Hadronic uncertainties limit the theoretical accuracy of the prediction of the branching fractions. However, uncertainties, both theoretical and experimental, are much reduced when considering quantities involving ratios of branching fractions, such as CP or isospin asymmetries. The most dominant exclusive radiative b {yields} s transition is B {yields} K*{gamma}. We present the best measurements of the branching fractions, direct CP, and isospin asymmetries of B {yields} K*{gamma}. The analogous b {yields} d transitions are B {yields} {rho}{gamma} and B {yields} {omega}{gamma}, which are suppressed by a factor of |V{sub td}/V{sub ts}|{sup 2} {approx} 0.04 relative to B {yields} K*{gamma}. A measurement of the branching fractions and isospin asymmetry of B{sup +} {yields} {rho}{sup +}{gamma} and B{sup 0} {yields} {rho}{sup 0}{gamma}, as well as a search for B {yields} {omega}{gamma}, are also given. These measurements are combined to calculate the ratio of CKM matrix elements |V{sub td}/V{sub ts}|, which corresponds to the length of one side of the unitary triangle. Finally, we present a search for the penguin annihilation process B {yields}{phi}{gamma}. We use a sample of 383 million B{bar B} events collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B factory for the analysis of B {yields} K*{gamma}. We measure the branching fractions {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} K*{sup 0}{gamma}) = (4.47 {+-} 0.10 {+-} 0.16) x 10{sup -5} and {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} K*{sup +}{gamma}) = (4.22 {+-} 0.14 {+-} 0.16) x 10{sup -5}. We measure the direct CP asymmetry to be -0.033 < {Alpha}{sub CP} (B {yields} K*{gamma}) < 0.028 and the isospin asymmetry to be 0.017 < {Delta}{sub 0-} < 0.116, where the limits are determined at the 90% C.L. and include both the statistical and systematic uncertainties. Using a sample of 347 million B{bar B} events, we measure the branching fractions {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {rho}{sup +}{gamma}) = (1.10{sub -0.33}{sup +0.37} {+-} 0.09) x 10{sup -6} and {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {rho}{sup 0}{gamma}) = (0.79{sub -0.20}{sup +0.22} {+-} 0.06) x 10{sup -6}, the isospin asymmetry {Delta} = -0.35 {+-} 0.27, and set a 90% C.L. upper limit {Beta}(B {yields} {omega}{gamma}) < 0.78 x 10{sup -6}. We also measure the isospin-averaged branching fraction {Beta}(B {yields} ({rho}/{omega}){gamma}) = (1.25{sub -0.24}{sup +0.25} {+-} 0.09) x 10{sup -6}, from which we determine |V{sub td}/V{sub ts}|= 0.200{sub -0.020}{sup +0.021} {+-} 0.015, where the first uncertainty is experimental and the second theoretical. Finally, a sample of 124 million B{bar B} events is used to set an upper limit of {Beta}(B {yields} {phi}{gamma}) < 8.5 x 10{sup -7} at the 90% C.L.

Yarritu, Aaron K.; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

2010-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

262

Low Dose Radiation Program: Links - Agencies with Radiation Regulatory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Agencies with Radiation Regulatory Concerns and Involvement Agencies with Radiation Regulatory Concerns and Involvement Biological Effects of Low Level Exposures (BELLE) Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission Center for Risk Excellence Health Protection Agency The Health Risks of Extraterrestrial Environments International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements, Inc. International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) International Radiation Protection Association (IRPA) NASA Space Radiation Program National Academy of Sciences (NAS) Nuclear and Radiation Studies Board National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) NASA OBRR Task Book Publication National Council on Radiation Protection (NCRP) National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) National Toxicology Program (NTP) Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA)

263

Nano {gamma}'/{gamma}'' composite precipitates in Alloy 718  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nanoscale composite precipitates of Alloy 718 have been investigated with both high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy and phase field modeling. Chemical analysis via energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy allowed for the differentiation of {gamma}' and {gamma}'' particles, which is not otherwise possible through traditional Z-contrast methods. Phase field modeling was applied to determine the stress distribution and elastic interaction around and between the particles, respectively, and it was determined that a composite particle (of both {gamma}' and {gamma}'') has an elastic energy that is significantly lower than, for example, single {gamma}' and {gamma}'' precipitates which are non-interacting.

Phillips, P. J. [Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60607 (United States); McAllister, D.; Gao, Y.; Lv, D.; Williams, R. E. A.; Wang, Y.; Mills, M. J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Peterson, B. [Honeywell Aerospace, Phoenix, Arizona 85034 (United States)

2012-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

264

The Inverse-Compton And Extragalactic Components Of The Diffuse Gamma-Ray Emission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present spectra of the inverse-Compton and extragalactic components of the high-energy gamma-radiation based on an analysis of the emission at high galactic latitudes ($\\vert$b$\\vert$ $\\geq$ $30\\deg$). We correlate the gamma-ray intensity with a model consisting of an isotropic component, a component proportional to the 408 MHz synchrotron radiation, and a component proportional to atomic hydrogen (H I) column density with different emissivities in eight galactic octants. The spectrum of gamma-radiation that is correlated with the H I column density indicates that this component originates in cosmic-ray/matter interactions. The cosmic-ray electrons which produce the 408 MHz radio continuum emission also produce gamma-radiation through inverse-Compton interactions with interstellar photons. By correlating the gamma-radiation with the 408 MHz continuum, we measure the spectrum and absolute intensity of the IC emission. The isotropic component gives us the spectrum and intensity of the extragalactic gamma-radiation. We discuss interpretation of the extragalactic spectrum.

Andrew Chen; Joseph Dwyer; Philip Kaaret

1995-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

265

Neutron-driven gamma-ray laser  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A lasing cylinder emits laser radiation at a gamma-ray wavelength of 0.87 {angstrom} when subjected to an intense neutron flux of about 400 eV neutrons. A 250 {angstrom} thick layer of Be is provided between two layers of 100 {angstrom} thick layer of {sup 57}Co and these layers are supported on a foil substrate. The coated foil is coiled to form the lasing cylinder. Under the neutron flux {sup 57}Co becomes {sup 58}Co by neutron absorption. The {sup 58}Co then decays to {sup 57}Fe by 1.6 MeV proton emission. {sup 57}Fe then transitions by mesne decay to a population inversion for lasing action at 14.4 keV. Recoil from the proton emission separates the {sup 57}Fe from the {sup 57}Co and into the Be, where Mossbauer emission occurs at a gamma-ray wavelength.

Bowman, C.D.

1989-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

266

Factorization in B ---> V gamma decays  

SciTech Connect

The factorization properties of the radiative decays B {yields} V{gamma} are analyzed at leading order in 1/m{sub b} using the soft-collinear effective theory. It is shown that the decay amplitudes can be expressed in terms of a B {yields} V form factor evaluated at q{sup 2} = 0, light-cone distribution amplitudes of the B and V mesons, and calculable hard-scattering kernels. The renormalization-group equations in the effective theory are solved to resum perturbative logarithms of the different scales in the decay process. Phenomenological implications for the B {yields} K*{gamma} branching ratio, isospin asymmetry, and CP asymmetries are discussed, with particular emphasis on possible effects from physics beyond the Standard Model.

Becher, Thomas; /Fermilab; Hill, Richard J.; /SLAC; Neubert, Matthias; /Cornell U., LEPP

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Neutron-driven gamma-ray laser  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A lasing cylinder emits laser radiation at a gamma-ray wavelength of 0.87 .ANG. when subjected to an intense neutron flux of about 400 eV neutrons. A 250 .ANG. thick layer of Be is provided between two layers of 100 .ANG. thick layer of .sup.57 Co and these layers are supported on a foil substrate. The coated foil is coiled to form the lasing cylinder. Under the neutron flux .sup.57 Co becomes .sup.58 Co by neutron absorption. The .sup.58 Co then decays to .sup.57 Fe by 1.6 MeV proton emission. .sup.57 Fe then transitions by mesne decay to a population inversion for lasing action at 14.4 keV. Recoil from the proton emission separates the .sup.57 Fe from the .sup.57 Co and into the Be, where Mossbauer emission occurs at a gamma-ray wavelength.

Bowman, Charles D. (Los Alamos, NM)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Neutron and gamma irradiation damage to organic materials.  

SciTech Connect

This document discusses open literature reports which investigate the damage effects of neutron and gamma irradiation on polymers and/or epoxies - damage refers to reduced physical chemical, and electrical properties. Based on the literature, correlations are made for an SNL developed epoxy (Epon 828-1031/DDS) with an expected total fast-neutron fluence of {approx}10{sup 12} n/cm{sup 2} and a {gamma} dosage of {approx}500 Gy received over {approx}30 years at < 200 C. In short, there are no gamma and neutron irradiation concerns for Epon 828-1031/DDS. To enhance the fidelity of our hypotheses, in regards to radiation damage, we propose future work consisting of simultaneous thermal/irradiation (neutron and gamma) experiments that will help elucidate any damage concerns at these specified environmental conditions.

White, Gregory Von, II; Bernstein, Robert

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Radiation: Radiation Control (Indiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

It is the policy of the state to encourage the constructive uses of radiation and to control its harmful effects. This section contains regulations pertaining to the manufacture, use,...

270

Particle Acceleration and Gamma-Ray Production in Shell Remnants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A number of nearby Northern Hemisphere shell-type Supernova Remnants (SNRs) has been observed in TeV gamma rays, but none of them could be detected so far. This failure calls for a critical reevaluation of the theoretical arguments for gamma-ray emission of SNRs. The present paper discusses diffusive shock acceleration in shell-type SNRs in full kinetic theory. Emphasis is also given to the possible problems for VHE gamma-ray production due to the environmental conditions a SN progenitor finds itself in. Observational upper limits are compared with theoretical predictions for the gamma-ray flux. Empirical arguments from the observation of X-ray power law continua for electron-induced Inverse Compton gamma-ray emission at TeV energies are discussed in their relation to the nucleonic Pi-zero decay emission from the same objects. Finally, a point is made for the simplest case of SNe Ia, expected to explode in a uniform circumstellar medium. Here in particular the very recently detected Southern Hemisphere remnant of SN 1006 is compared with Tycho's SNR. On the basis of the assumed parameters for the two remnants SN 1006 is tentatively identified with a remnant whose TeV gamma-ray emission is dominated by Inverse Compton radiation. Tycho might be dominantly a Pi-zero decay gamma-ray source.

H. J. Volk

1997-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

271

Influence of Extraterrestrial Radiation on Radiation Portal Monitors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cosmic radiation and solar flares can be a major source of background radiation at the Earth’s surface. This paper examines the relationship between extraterrestrial radiation and the detectable background in radiation portal monitors used for homeland security applications. Background radiation data from 13 radiation portal monitor facilities are examined and compared against external sources of data related to extraterrestrial radiation, including measurements at neutron monitors located at 53 cosmic-ray observatories around the Earth, four polar orbiting satellites, three geostationary satellites, ground-based geomagnetic field data from observatories around the Earth, a solar magnetic index, solar radio flux data, and sunspot activity data. Four-years (January 2003 through December 2006) of data are used in this study, which include the latter part of Solar Cycle 23 as solar activity was on the decline. The analysis shows a significant relationship between some extraterrestrial radiation and the background detected in the radiation portal monitors. A demonstrable decline is shown in the average gamma ray and neutron background at the radiation portal monitors as solar activity declined over the period of the study.

Keller, Paul E.; Kouzes, Richard T.

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Using a Borated Panel to Form a Dual Neutron-Gamma Detector  

SciTech Connect

A borated polyethylene plane placed between a neutron source and a gamma spectrometer is used to form a dual neutron-gamma detection system. The polyethylene thermalizes the source neutrons so that they are captured by {sup 10}B to produce a flux of 478 keV gamma-rays that radiate from the plane. This results in a buildup of count rate in the detector over that from a disk of the same diameter as the detector crystal (same thickness as the panel). Radiation portal systems are a potential application of this technique.

Scott Wilde; Raymond Keegan

2008-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

273

Measurement of the gamma gamma* --> eta and gamma gamma* --> eta' transition form factors  

SciTech Connect

We study the reactions e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} e{sup +}e{sup -} {eta}{sup (/)} in the single-tag mode and measure the {gamma}{gamma}* {yields} {eta}{sup (/)} transition form factors in the momentum transfer range from 4 to 40 GeV{sup 2}. The analysis is based on 469 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected at PEP-II with the BABAR detector at e{sup +}e{sup -} center-of-mass energies near 10.6 GeV.

del Amo Sanchez et al, P.

2011-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

274

Monte Carlo calculations of channeling radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results of classical Monte Carlo calculations are presented for the radiation produced by ultra-relativistic positrons incident in a direction parallel to the (110) plane of Si in the energy range 30 to 100 MeV. The results all show the characteristic CR(channeling radiation) peak in the energy range 20 keV to 100 keV. Plots of the centroid energies, widths, and total yields of the CR peaks as a function of energy show the power law dependences of ..gamma../sup 1/ /sup 5/, ..gamma../sup 1/ /sup 7/, and ..gamma../sup 2/ /sup 5/ respectively. Except for the centroid energies and power-law dependence is only approximate. Agreement with experimental data is good for the centroid energies and only rough for the widths. Adequate experimental data for verifying the yield dependence on ..gamma.. does not yet exist.

Bloom, S.D.; Berman, B.L.; Hamilton, D.C.; Alguard, M.J.; Barrett, J.H.; Datz, S.; Pantell, R.H.; Swent, R.H.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Protection Against Ionizing Radiation in Extreme Radiation ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Protection Against Ionizing Radiation in Extreme Radiation-resistant Microorganisms. ... Elucidated radiation protection by intracellular halides. ...

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Polarization mesurements of gamma ray bursts and axion like particles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A polarized gamma ray emission spread over a sufficiently wide energy band from a strongly magnetized astrophysical object like gamma ray bursts (GRBs) offers an opportunity to test the hypothesis of axion like particles (ALPs). Based on evidences of polarized gamma ray emission detected in several gamma ray bursts we estimated the level of ALPs induced dichroism, which could take place in the magnetized fireball environment of a GRB. This allows to estimate the sensitivity of polarization measurements of GRBs to the ALP-photon coupling. This sensitivity $\\gag\\le 2.2\\cdot 10^{-11} {\\rm GeV^{-1}}$ calculated for the ALP mass $m_a=10^{-3}~{\\rm eV}$ and MeV energy spread of gamma ray emission is competitive with the sensitivity of CAST and becomes even stronger for lower ALPs masses.

Andre Rubbia; Alexander Sakharov

2008-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

277

Determination of thermal neutron capture gamma yields.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A method of analysing Ge(Li) thermal neutron capture gamma spectra to obtain total gamma yields has been developed. Tie method determines both the yields from the well resolved gamma peaks in a spectrum as well as the gamma ...

Harper, Thomas Lawrence

1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Hybrid model of GeV-TeV gamma ray emission from Galactic Center  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The observations of high energy $\\gamma$-ray emission from the Galactic center (GC) by HESS, and recently by Fermi, suggest the cosmic ray acceleration in the GC and possibly around the supermassive black hole. In this work we propose a lepton-hadron hybrid model to explain simultaneously the GeV-TeV $\\gamma$-ray emission. Both electrons and hadronic cosmic rays were accelerated during the past activity of the GC. Then these particles would diffuse outwards and interact with the interstellar gas and background radiation field. The collisions between hadronic cosmic rays with gas is responsible to the TeV $\\gamma$-ray emission detected by HESS. With fast cooling in the strong radiation field, the electrons would cool down and radiate GeV photons through inverse Compton scattering off the soft background photons. This scenario provides a natural explanation of the observed GeV-TeV spectral shape of $\\gamma$-rays.

Yi-Qing Guo; Qiang Yuan; Cheng Liu; Ai-Feng Li

2013-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

279

Beta Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Beta Radiation 1. Beta radiation may travel meters in air and is moderately penetrating. 2. Beta radiation can penetrate human skin to the "germinal layer," where new skin cells...

280

RADIATION MONITORING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Monitoring for Radiation Protection of Workers" in ICRPNo. 9, in "Advances in Radiation Protection and Dosimetry inDosimetry f o r Stray Radiation Monitoring on the CERN S i t

Thomas, R.H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gamma radiation levels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Gamma Ray Bursts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gamma-ray bursts have been detected at photon energies up to tens of GeV. We review some recent developments in the X-ray to GeV photon phenomenology in the light of Swift and Fermi observations, and some of the theoretical models developed to explain them, with a view towards implications for C.T.A.

Peter Mészáros

2012-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

282

Engineering hot-cell windows for radiation protection  

SciTech Connect

Radiation protection considerations in the design and construction of hot-cell windows are discussed. The importance of evaluating the potential gamma spectra and neutron source terms is stressed. 11 references. (ACR)

Ferguson, K.R.; Courtney, J.C.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Radiological Safety Training for Radiation-Producing (X-Ray)...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

for General Radiation Safety Installations Using Non-Medical X-Ray and Sealed Gamma-Ray Sources, Energies up to 10 MEV, ANSI Standard N43.3, American National Standards...

284

3D Radiation Field Estimation Algorithm v1.0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The product is a calculational subprogram to be used within CAD, Laser scan or GIS software products to extrapolate / interpolate gamma radiation dose rates at 3-D locations for which no field survey data had been ...

2013-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

285

Recent developments in radiative B decays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report on recent theoretical progress in radiative B decays. We focus on a calculation of logarithmically enhanced QED corrections to the branching ratio and forward-backward asymmetry in the inclusive rare decay anti-B --> X(s) l+ l-, and present the results of a detailed phenomenological analysis. We also report on the calculation of NNLO QCD corrections to the inclusive decay anti-B --> X(s) gamma. As far as exclusive modes are concerned we consider transversity amplitudes and the impact of right-handed currents in the exclusive anti-B --> K^* l+ l- decay. Finally, we state results for exclusive B --> V gamma decays, notably the time-dependent CP-asymmetry in the exclusive B --> K^* gamma decay and its potential to serve as a so-called ``null test'' of the Standard Model, and the extraction of CKM and unitarity triangle parameters from B --> (rho,omega) gamma and B --> K^* gamma decays.

Huber, T

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

RADIATION SHIELDING COMPOSITION  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A light weight radiation shielding composition is described whose mechanical and radiological properties can be varied within wide limits. The composition of this shielding material consists of four basic ingredients: powder of either Pb or W, a plastic resin, a resin plasticizer, and a polymerization catalyst to promote an interaction of the plasticizer with the plastic resin. Air may be mixed into the above ingredients in order to control the density of the final composition. For equivalent gamma attenuation, the shielding composition weighs one-third to one-half as much as conventional Pb shielding. (AEC)

Dunegan, H.L.

1963-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

287

Low Dose Radiation Program: Links - Organizations Conducting Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Conducting Low Dose Radiation Research Conducting Low Dose Radiation Research DOE Low Dose Radiation Research Program DoReMi Integrating Low Dose Research High Level Expert Group (HLEG) on European Low Dose Risk Research Multidisciplinary European Low Dose Initiative (MELODI) RISC-RAD Radiosensitivity of Individuals and Susceptibility to Cancer induced by Ionizing Radiation United States Transuranium & Uranium Registries Organizations Conducting other Radiation Research Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) Armed Forces Radiology Research Institute (AFRRI) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH) Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI) Colorado State University Columbia University

288

A Search for Gamma-Ray Bursts and Pulsars, and the Application of Kalman Filters to Gamma-Ray Reconstruction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Part I describes the analysis of periodic and transient signals in EGRET data. A method to search for the transient flux from gamma-ray bursts independent of triggers from other gamma-ray instruments is developed. Several known gamma-ray bursts were independently detected, and there is evidence for a previously unknown gamma-ray burst candidate. Statistical methods using maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference are developed and implemented to extract periodic signals from gamma-ray sources in the presence of significant astrophysical background radiation. The analysis was performed on six pulsars and three pulsar candidates. The three brightest pulsars, Crab, Vela, and Geminga, were readily identified, and would have been detected independently in the EGRET data without knowledge of the pulse period. No significant pulsation was detected in the three pulsar candidates. Eighteen X-ray binaries were examined. None showed any evidence of periodicity. In addition, methods for calculating the detection threshold of periodic flux modulation were developed. The future hopes of gamma-ray astronomy lie in the development of the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope, or GLAST. Part II describes the development and results of the particle track reconstruction software for a GLAST science prototype instrument beam test. The Kalman filtering method of track reconstruction is introduced and implemented. Monte Carlo simulations, very similar to those used for the full GLAST instrument, were performed to predict the instrumental response of the prototype. The prototype was tested in a gamma-ray beam at SLAC. The reconstruction software was used to determine the incident gamma-ray direction. It was found that the simulations did an excellent job of representing the actual instrument response.

B. B. Jones

2002-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

289

Instructions for calibrating gamma detectors using the Canberra-Nuclear Data Genie Gamma Spectroscopy System  

SciTech Connect

A straight forward protocol provides a way to guide the calibration of a gamma detector for a particular geometry and material. Several programs have used the Low Level Gamma Counting Facility of the Health and Ecological Assessment Division of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to count a variety of large environmental samples contained in several unique geometries. The equipment and calibration requirements needed to analyze these types of samples are explained. This document describes the calibration protocol that has been developed and describes how it is used to calibrate the detectors.

Brunk, J.L.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Two Classes of Gamma-Ray Bursts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

If gamma-ray bursts are at cosmological distances, as suggested by their isotropy on the sky and the comparative deficiency of weak bursts, then they represent radiated energies of ? 1051 erg, and imply the release of an even greater energy. Only neutron stars and black holes have binding energies sufficient to power such extraordinarily violent and energetic events. General considerations of neutrino opacity imply1 that the escape of a neutron star’s (or black hole’s) binding energy requires a time of about 10 sec, as shown by the observed duration of neutrino emission from SN1987A. The distribution of durations of gamma-ray bursts is known2 to be bimodal, with one peak between 10 and 100 sec and the other between 0.1 and 1 sec. We hypothesize that the durations of the longer bursts may be explained as the result of the diffusion of energy, by means of neutrinos, from a forming neutron star or black hole, but that the brevity of the shorter bursts requires different physics. An alternative hypothesis supposes that all bursts (excepting soft gamma repeaters, which we do not discuss) represent a single class of events, whose differing durations reflect differences in one or more parameters. These two hypotheses may be tested using data from the recently released 3B Catalogue3.

J. I. Katz; L. M. Canel

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Gamma-ray decay schemes for $sup 93$Kr, $sup 93$Rb, and $sup 93$Sr  

SciTech Connect

A study of the gamma-ray de-excitation following the beta decays of $sup 93$Kr, $sup 93$Rb, and $sup 93$Sr using the TRISTAN on-line separator facility is reported. Gamma-ray singles and gamma-gamma coincidence measurements were made using Ge(Li) detectors. Of the 162 gamma rays observed in the decay of $sup 93$Sr, 143, representing more than 99 percent of the total gamma-ray intensity observed, were placed in a level scheme containing 36 levels. For the decay of $sup 93$Rb, 243 gamma rays were observed, of which 231 are placed in a level scheme consisting of 74 levels. This again represents a placement of over 99 percent of the total gamma-ray intensity measured. In the case of the $sup 93$Kr decay approximately 98.5 percent of the observed gamma-ray intensity has been accounted for by the proposed level scheme. This results from the placement of 203 of the 217 gamma rays assigned to this decay in a level scheme comprising 56 levels. Beta-branching for these decays were determined from transition intensity balances. Spin and parity assignments were proposed, whenever possible, on the basis of gamma-ray transition probabilities and deduced log ft values. A comparison is made with the available reaction data for the $sup 93$Y level scheme. In all cases an attempt has been made to explain some of the levels in terms of the nuclear shell model and decay systematics. 18 figures, 20 tables, 68 references. (auth)

Bischof, C.J.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Optical Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

*. Bookmark and Share. Optical Radiation Measurements. Fees for services are located directly below the technical contacts ...

2013-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

293

Ionizing Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

*. Bookmark and Share. Ionizing Radiation Measurements. Fees for services are located directly below the technical contacts ...

2013-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

294

METHOD AND MEANS FOR RADIATION DOSIMETRY  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent relates to a method and device for determining quantities of gamma radiation and x radiation by exposing to such radiation a mature of a purified halogenated hydrocarbon chosen from the class consisting of chloroform, bromoform, tetrachloroethane and 1,1,2trichloroethane, and a minor quantity of a sensitizer chosen from the class consisting of oxygen, benzoyl peroxide, sodium peroxide, and nitrobenzene, the proportion of the sensitizer being at least about 10/sup -5/ moles per cubic centimeter of halogenated hydrocarbon, the total amount of sensitizer depending upon the range of radiation to be measured, and chemically measuring the amount of decomposition generated by the irradiation of the sensitized halogenated hydrocarbon.

Shulte, J.W.; Suttle, J.F.

1958-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

295

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: DOE Lowdose Radiation Program Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Using a Low LET Electron Microbeam to Investigate Non-Targeted Using a Low LET Electron Microbeam to Investigate Non-Targeted Effects of Low Dose Radiation. Authors: William F. Morgan1 and Marianne B. Sowa2 Institutions: 1Radiation Oncology Research Laboratory, University of Maryland, Baltimore MD 21201 2 Chemical Structure and Dynamics, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 We have recently installed a low LET electron microbeam that generates energetic electrons to mimic radiation damage from gamma and x-ray sources. It has been designed such that high-energy electrons deposit energy in a pre-selected subset of cells leaving neighboring cells unirradiated (Figure 1). In this way it is possible to examine non-targeted effects associated with low dose radiation exposure including induced genomic instability and

296

High-resolution core-level photoemission study of CF{sub 4}-treated Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}(Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3}) gate dielectric on Ge probed by synchrotron radiation  

SciTech Connect

High-resolution core-level photoemission analysis using synchrotron radiation was used to investigate the superior electrical performance of aGa{sub 2}O{sub 3}(Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}) gate dielectric on Ge(001) after CF{sub 4} treatment. Prior to the treatment, a thin germanate-like oxide layer that formed at the interface prevented Ge from diffusing to the surface. The Ge surface retained a small amount of buckled dimers from the as-grown sample. The buckled dimers were quickly removed by CF{sub 4} plasma treatment followed by an annealing process, resulting in a more uniform interface than that of the as-grown sample. The detailed interfacial electronic structure for the untreated and treated samples are presented.

Pi, T.-W. [National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, Hsinchu 30076, Taiwan (China); Huang, M. L.; Kwo, J. [Center for Condensed Matter Sciences, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Department of Physics, National TsingHua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Lee, W. C.; Chu, L. K.; Lin, T. D.; Chiang, T. H.; Wang, Y. C.; Wu, Y. D.; Hong, M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National TsingHua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China)

2011-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

297

Strong Equivalence, Lorentz and CPT Violation, Anti-Hydrogen Spectroscopy and Gamma-Ray Burst Polarimetry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The strong equivalence principle, local Lorentz invariance and CPT symmetry are fundamental ingredients of the quantum field theories used to describe elementary particle physics. Nevertheless, each may be violated by simple modifications to the dynamics while apparently preserving the essential fundamental structure of quantum field theory itself. In this paper, we analyse the construction of strong equivalence, Lorentz and CPT violating Lagrangians for QED and review and propose some experimental tests in the fields of astrophysical polarimetry and precision atomic spectroscopy. In particular, modifications of the Maxwell action predict a birefringent rotation of the direction of linearly polarised radiation from synchrotron emission which may be studied using radio galaxies or, potentially, gamma-ray bursts. In the Dirac sector, changes in atomic energy levels are predicted which may be probed in precision spectroscopy of hydrogen and anti-hydrogen atoms, notably in the Doppler-free, two-photon $1s-2s$ and $2s-nd (n \\sim 10)$ transitions.

Graham M. Shore

2004-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

298

Medical gamma ray imaging  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for determining the distribution of a position-emitting radioisotope into an object, the apparatus consisting of a wire mesh radiation converter, an ionizable gas for propagating ionization events caused by electrodes released by the converter, a drift field, a spatial position detector and signal processing circuitry for correlating near-simultaneous ionization events and determining their time differences, whereby the position sources of back-to-back collinear radiation can be located and a distribution image constructed.

Osborne, Louis S. (Lexington, MA); Lanza, Richard C. (Brookline, MA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Gamma Ray Bursts Sudden, intense flashes of gamma rays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Sakamoto1,12 , C. L. Sarazin13 , P. Schady6,10 , M. Stamatikos1,12 & S. E. Woosley14 Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs. Identification of two classes of gamma-ray bursts. Astrophys. J. 413, L101­L104 (1993). 2. Fruchter, A. et al). 3. Woosley, S. E. Gamma-ray bursts from stellar mass accretion disks around black holes. Astrophys

Washington at Seattle, University of - Department of Physics, Electroweak Interaction Research Group

300

LASER-PLASMA-ACCELERATOR-BASED GAMMA GAMMA COLLIDERS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LASER-PLASMA-ACCELERATOR-BASED ?? COLLIDERS ? C. B.linear col- lider based on laser-plasma-accelerators arediscussed, and a laser-plasma-accelerator-based gamma-

Schroeder, C. B.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gamma radiation levels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

About Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation Radiation What is radiation? Radiation is a form of energy that is a part of our everyday lives. All of us receive a "dose" of radiation each day. Most of the dose comes from naturally occurring radioactive materials such as uranium, thorium, radon, and certain forms of potassium and carbon. The air we breathe contains radon, the food we eat contains uranium and thorium from the soil, and our bodies contain radioactive forms of potassium and carbon. Cosmic radiation from the sun also contributes to our natural radiation dose. We also receive radiation doses from man-made sources such as X-rays, nuclear medical procedures, power plants, smoke detectors and older television sets. Some people, such as nuclear plant operators, flight crews, and nuclear medicine staff may also receive an occupational radiation dose.

302

Effect of dietary fat levels on the susceptibility of colonic cells to nuclear-damaging agents  

SciTech Connect

The effect of two levels and types of dietary fats on the susceptibility of colonic cells to the nuclear-damaging effect of 1,2-dimethylhydrazine dihydrochloride (DMH), 2-amino-3,4-dimethylimidazo(4,5-f)quinoline (MeIQ), and gamma-radiation was investigated. Corn oil and beef tallow were added to the semisynthetic diet at 5% and 20% levels (weight/weight). A diet-related effect was not evident until after two weeks of feeding. Animals (C57BL/6J female mice) that were given the 20% corn oil or beef tallow diets had significantly (p less than 0.05) more nuclear aberrations in their colons 24 hours following treatment with DMH (5 mg or 10 mg/kg body wt or MeIQ (100 mg/kg body weight) than did those given low-fat diets (5% corn oil or beef tallow). The nuclear-damaging effect of gamma radiation was unaffected by dietary treatments. A high-fat diet had the most pronounced effect on DMH-treated animals, and maximum nuclear aberrations were observed 24 hours following the treatment. Thus, we concluded that increased levels of dietary fats elevate the toxicity of DMH and MeIQ to colonic epithelial cells.

Bird, R.P.; Bruce, W.R.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Neutron and gamma irradiation damage to organic materials.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document discusses open literature reports which investigate the damage effects of neutron and gamma irradiation on polymers and/or epoxies - damage refers to reduced physical chemical, and electrical properties. Based on the literature, correlations are made for an SNL developed epoxy (Epon 828-1031/DDS) with an expected total fast-neutron fluence of {approx}10{sup 12} n/cm{sup 2} and a {gamma} dosage of {approx}500 Gy received over {approx}30 years at irradiation concerns for Epon 828-1031/DDS. To enhance the fidelity of our hypotheses, in regards to radiation damage, we propose future work consisting of simultaneous thermal/irradiation (neutron and gamma) experiments that will help elucidate any damage concerns at these specified environmental conditions.

White, Gregory Von, II; Bernstein, Robert

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Fermi GBM Observations of Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes are short pulses of energetic radiation associated with thunderstorms and lightning. While the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on Fermi was designed to observe gamma-ray bursts, its large BGO detectors are excellent for observing TGFs. Using GBM, TGF pulses are seen to either be symmetrical or have faster rise time than fall times. Some TGFs are resolved into double, partially overlapping pulses. Using ground-based radio observations of lightning from the World Wide Lightning Location Network (WWLLN), TGFs and their associated lightning are found to be simultaneous to {approx_equal}40 {mu} s. The lightning locations are typically within 300 km of the sub-spacecraft point.

Briggs, Michael S. [CSPAR, NSSTC, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States)

2011-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

305

Pulsed Photofission Delayed Gamma Ray Detection for Nuclear Material Identification  

SciTech Connect

Innovative systems with increased sensitivity and resolution are in great demand to detect diversion and to prevent misuse in support of nuclear materials management for the U.S. fuel cycle. Nuclear fission is the most important multiplicative process involved in non-destructive active interrogation. This process produces the most easily recognizable signature for nuclear materials. High-energy gamma rays can also excite a nucleus and cause fission through a process known as photofission. After photofission reactions, delayed signals are easily distinguishable from the interrogating radiation. Linac-based, advanced inspection techniques utilizing the fission signals after photofission have been extensively studied for homeland security applications. Previous research also showed that a unique delayed gamma ray energy spectrum exists for each fissionable isotope. Isotopic composition measurement methods based on delayed gamma ray spectroscopy will be the primary focus of this work.

John Kavouras; Xianfei Wen; Daren R. Norman; Dante R. Nakazawa; Haori Yang

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

How to Tell a Jet from a Balloon: A Proposed Test for Beaming in Gamma Ray Bursts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

If gamma ray bursts are highly collimated, the energy requirements of each event may be reduced by several (~ 4-6) orders of magnitude, and the event rate increased correspondingly. Extreme conditions in gamma ray bursters lead to highly relativistic motions (bulk Lorentz factors Gamma > 100). This results in strong forward beaming of the emitted radiation in the observer's rest frame. Thus, all information on gamma ray bursts comes from those ejecta emitted in a narrow cone (opening angle 1/Gamma) pointing towards the observer. We are at present ignorant of whether there are ejecta outside that cone or not. The recent detection of longer wavelength transients following gamma ray bursts allows an empirical test of whether gamma ray bursts are collimated jets or spherical fireballs. The bulk Lorentz factor of the burst ejecta will decrease with time after the event, as the ejecta sweep up the surrounding medium. Thus, radiation from the ejecta is beamed into an ever increasing solid angle as the burst remnant evolves. It follows that if gamma ray bursts are highly collimated, many more optical and radio transients should be observed without associated gamma rays than with them. Published supernova searches may contain enough data to test the most extreme models of gamma ray beaming. We close with a brief discussion of other possible consequences of beaming, including its effect on the evolution of burst remnants.

James E. Rhoads

1997-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

307

Radiation Physics Portal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST Home > Radiation Physics Portal. Radiation Physics Portal. ... more. >> see all Radiation Physics programs and projects ... ...

2013-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

308

RADIATION FROM COMOVING POYNTING FLUX ACCELERATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We derive analytic formulas for the radiation power output when electrons are accelerated by a relativistic comoving kinetic Poynting flux, and validate these analytic results with particle-in-cell simulations. We also derive analytically the critical frequency of the radiation spectrum. Potential astrophysical applications of these results are discussed. A quantitative model of gamma-ray bursts based on the breakout of kinetic Poynting flux is presented.

Liang, Edison; Noguchi, Koichi [Rice University, Houston TX 77005-1892 (United States)

2009-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

309

Radiation from Comoving Poynting Flux Acceleration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We derive analytic formulas for the radiation power output when electrons are accelerated by a relativistic comoving kinetic Poynting flux, and validate these analytic results with Particle-In-Cell simulations. We also derive analytically the critical frequency of the radiation spectrum. Potential astrophysical applications of these results are discussed. A quantitative model of gamma-ray bursts based on the breakout of kinetic Poynting flux is presented.

Liang, Edison

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

ANIMATION: Crystallography: Gamma Prime - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 9, 2007 ... This 21-second animation demonstrates the crystal structure of gamma prime in nickel based superalloys. SOURCE: Bhadeshia, H. K. D. H. ...

311

Gamma-ray burst populations.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Over the last fifty years the field of gamma-ray bursts has shown incredible growth, but the amassing of data has also left observers and theorists… (more)

Virgili, Francisco J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

EFFECTS OF GAMMA IRRADIATION ON EPDM ELASTOMERS (REVISION 1)  

SciTech Connect

Two formulations of EPDM elastomer, one substituting a UV stabilizer for the normal antioxidant in this polymer, and the other the normal formulation, were synthesized and samples of each were exposed to gamma irradiation in initially pure deuterium gas to compare their radiation stability. Stainless steel containers having rupture disks were designed for this task. After 130 MRad dose of cobalt-60 radiation in the SRNL Gamma Irradiation Facility, a significant amount of gas was created by radiolysis; however the composition indicated by mass spectroscopy indicated an unexpected increase in the total amount deuterium in both formulations. The irradiated samples retained their ductility in a bend test. No change of sample weight, dimensions, or density was observed. No change of the glass transition temperature as measured by dynamic mechanical analysis was observed, and most of the other dynamic mechanical properties remained unchanged. There appeared to be an increase in the storage modulus of the irradiated samples containing the UV stabilizer above the glass transition, which may indicate hardening of the material by radiation damage. Revision 1 adds a comparison with results of a study of tritium exposed EPDM. The amount of gas produced by the gamma irradiation was found to be equivalent to about 280 days exposure to initially pure tritium gas at one atmosphere. The glass transition temperature of the tritium exposed EPDM rose about 10 ?C. over 280 days, while no glass transition temperature change was observed for gamma irradiated EPDM. This means that gamma irradiation in deuterium cannot be used as a surrogate for tritium exposure.

Clark, E.

2013-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

313

E6 Gamma Decay  

SciTech Connect

Rare electric hexacontatetrapole (E6) transitions are studied in the full (f{sub 7/2},f{sub 5/2},p{sub 3/2},p{sub 1/2}) shell-model basis. Comparison of theory to the results from the gamma decay in {sup 53}Fe and from inelastic electron scattering on {sup 52}Cr provides unique and interesting tests of the valence wavefunctions, the models used for energy density functionals and into the origin of effective charge.

Brown, B. Alex [Department of Physics and Astronomy, and National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824-1321 (United States); Rae, W. D. M. [Knollhouse, Garsington, Oxford, Oxfordshire, OX44 9DB (United Kingdom)

2011-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

314

Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 401, 14651474 (2010) doi:10.1111/j.1365-2966.2009.15760.x Towards the properties of long gamma-ray burst progenitors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the properties of long gamma-ray burst progenitors with Swift data Xiao-Hong Cui,1 En-Wei Liang,2 Hou-Jun Lv,2 investigate the properties of both the prompt and X-ray afterglows of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) in the burst . Key words: radiation mechanisms: non-thermal ­ gamma-rays: bursts. 1 INTRODUCTION One

Xu, Ren-Xin

315

Gamma-ray Emission from Crushed Clouds in Supernova Remnants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is shown that the radio and gamma-ray emission observed from newly-found "GeV-bright" supernova remnants (SNRs) can be explained by a model, in which a shocked cloud and shock-accelerated cosmic rays (CRs) frozen in it are simultaneously compressed by the supernova blastwave as a result of formation of a radiative cloud shock. Simple reacceleration of pre-existing CRs is generally sufficient to power the observed gamma-ray emission through the decays of neutral pions produced in hadronic interactions between high-energy protons (nuclei) and gas in the compressed-cloud layer. This model provides a natural account of the observed synchrotron radiation in SNRs W51C, W44 and IC 443 with flat radio spectral index, which can be ascribed to a combination of secondary and reaccelerated electrons and positrons.

Uchiyama, Yasunobu; Funk, Stefan; Tajima, Hiroyasu; Tanaka, Takaaki

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Stochastic wake field particle acceleration in Gamma-Ray Bursts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gamma-Ray Burst (GRB) prompt emission can, for specific conditions, be so powerful and short-pulsed to strongly influence any surrounding plasma. In this paper, we briefly discuss the possibility that a very intense initial burst of radiation produced by GRBs satisfy the intensity and temporal conditions to cause stochastic wake-field particle acceleration in a surrounding plasma of moderate density. Recent laboratory experiments clearly indicate that powerful laser beam pulses of tens of femtosecond duration hitting on target plasmas cause efficient particle acceleration and betatron radiation up to tens of MeV. We consider a simple but realistic GRB model for which particle wake-field acceleration can first be excited by a very strong low-energy precursor, and then be effective in producing the observed prompt X-ray and gamma-ray GRB emission. We also briefly discuss some of the consequences of this novel GRB emission mechanism.

G. Barbiellini; F. Longo; N. Omodei; A. Celotti; M. Tavani

2006-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

317

The effect of gamma irradiation on optical isolators. Technical report  

SciTech Connect

The effects of gamma radiation on optical isolators have been investigated. This study has included the simultaneous irradiation and measurement of the individual emitters and detectors making up the isolators. In this manner, the net effect of irradiation on the isolators could be attributed to the degradation of either the emitter or detector, or both. As expected, isolators containing photodiodes are more radiation resistant than those containing phototransistors. In the photodiode isolator the LED is responsible for essentially all the gamma-induced isolator degradation. The performance of phototransistor isolators depends strongly on the phototransistor bias, V sub CE, and the LED input current, I sub LED. At high I sub LED and low V sub CE where gamma-induced surface effects in the phototransistor are minimized, the degradation of the isolator is due primarily to the LED which is more sensitive than the LED in the photodiode isolator. In contrast, at low I sub LED and high V sub CE, gamma-induced surface damage in the phototransistor is the dominant effect and the isolator is quite sensitive to irradiation. (GRA)

Soda, K.J.; Barnes, C.E.; Kiehl, R.A.

1975-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Afterglows as Diagnostics of Gamma Ray Burst Beaming  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. If gamma ray bursts are highly collimated, radiating into only a small fraction of the sky, the energy requirements of each event may be reduced by several (up to 4–6) orders of magnitude, and the event rate increased correspondingly. The large Lorentz factors (?> ? 100) inferred from GRB spectra imply relativistic beaming of the gamma rays into an angle ? 1/?. We are at present ignorant of whether there are ejecta outside this narrow cone. Afterglows allow empirical tests of whether GRBs are well-collimated jets or spherical fireballs. The bulk Lorentz factor decreases and radiation is beamed into an ever increasing solid angle as the burst remnant expands. It follows that if gamma ray bursts are highly collimated, many more optical and radio transients should be observed without associated gamma rays than with them. In addition, a burst whose ejecta are beamed into angle ?m undergoes a qualitative change in evolution when ??m < ? 1: Before this, ? ? r?3/2, while afterwards, ? ? exp(?r/r ?

James E. Rhoads

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Are there cosmological evolution of Gamma-Ray Bursts?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The variability of gamma-ray burst (GRB) is thought to be correlated with its absolute peak luminosity, and this relation had been used to derive an estimate of the redshifts of GRBs. Recently Amati et al. present the results of spectral and energetic properties of several GRBs with know redshifts. Here we analyse the properties of two group GRBs, one group with known redshift from afterglow observation, and another group with redshift derived from the luminosity- variability relation. We study the redshift dependence of various GRBs features in their cosmological rest frames, including the burst duration, the isotropic luminosity and radiated energy, and the peak energy Ep of ?F? spectra. We find that the properties of these two group GRBs are very similar, which strongly implies that the redshift derived from the luminosity-variability relation may be reliable. If this is true, then we see that the burst properties, such as their intrinsic duration, luminosity, radiated energy and peak energy Ep, are all correlated with the redshift, which means that the GRBs features are redshift dependent, i.e. there are cosmological evolution of gamma-ray bursts, and this can provide an interesting clue to the nature of GRBs. Furthermore we find that the Ep- L relation strongly supports the idea that gamma-ray burst emission comes from the internal shock. Key words: gamma rays: bursts

D. M. Wei

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Radiation effects at a high power accelerator and applications to advanced energy sources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many materials are exposed to atom-displacing radiation at high-power accelerators such as the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF). Beam current densities in the 800-MeV proton beam vary from 12.5 mA cm{sup {minus}2} (8 {times} 10{sup 16} p/cm{sup 2}s) on graphite targets to 20-{mu}A cm{sup {minus}2} (1.3 {times} 10{sup 14} p/cm{sup 2}s) on metal-alloy windows. High-level radiation damage results from these particle fluxes. As a consequence of secondary-particle generation in targets and windows and low-level beam losses that lead to particle interactions with structural material, various components are exposed to low-level proton fluxes, gamma radiation, and neutron fluxes of 10{sup 6}--10{sup 10} n/cm{sup 2}s. These include vacuum seals and vacuum chambers of stainless steel and aluminum alloys, solid-state devices for control, diagnostic, and data acquisition electronics, closed-loop cooling-water systems, and insulators. Properties of these materials are degraded by the radiation exposure. Studies of LAMPF and other accelerators, however, have produced solutions to materials problems, allowing the machines to operate for acceptable times without failure. Nevertheless, additional improvements are being investigated in order to further improve operational reliability and safety. 25 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

Sommer, W.F.; Garner, F.A.; Brown, R.D.; Wechsler, M.S. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA); Battelle Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA); Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA); Iowa State Univ. of Science and Technology, Ames, IA (USA))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gamma radiation levels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Radiation Cataract  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

radiation including patients undergoing diagnostic CT scans or radiotherapy, atomic bomb survivors, residents of radioactively contaminated buildings, victims of the...

322

Lecture 7Lecture 7 The GammaThe Gamma--RayRay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Milagro­A TeV Observatory for Gamma Ray Bursts B.L. Dingus and the Milagro Collaboration Los energy gamma-rays from gamma-ray bursts. The highest energy gamma rays supply very strong constraints on the nature of gamma-ray burst sources as well as fundamental physics. Because the highest energy gamma-rays

323

KINEMATIC ORIGIN OF CORRELATIONS BETWEEN GAMMA-RAY BURST OBSERVABLES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recently, several new correlations between gamma-ray burst (GRB) observables have been discovered. Like previously well-established correlations, they challenge GRB models. Here, we show that in the cannonball (CB) model of GRBs, the newly discovered correlations have the same simple kinematic origin as those discovered earlier. They all result from the strong dependence of the observed radiations on the Lorentz and Doppler factors of the jet of highly relativistic plasmoids (CBs) that produces the observed radiations by interaction with the medium through which it propagates.

Dado, Shlomo; Dar, Arnon, E-mail: dado@phep3.technion.ac.il, E-mail: arnon@physics.technion.ac.il [Physics Department, Technion, Haifa 32000 (Israel)

2012-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

324

GeV Emission from Collisional Magnetized Gamma Ray Bursts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Magnetic fields may play a dominant role in gamma-ray bursts, and recent observations by the Fermi satellite indicate that GeV radiation, when detected, arrives delayed by seconds from the onset of the MeV component. Motivated by this, we discuss a magnetically dominated jet model where both magnetic dissipation and nuclear collisions are important. We show that, for parameters typical of the observed bursts, such a model involving a realistic jet structure can reproduce the general features of the MeV and a separate GeV radiation component, including the time delay between the two. The model also predicts a multi-GeV neutrino component.

P. Mészáros; M. J. Rees

2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

325

JOINT EPA/DOE STATEMENT: Radiation Monitors Confirm That No Radiation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EPA/DOE STATEMENT: Radiation Monitors Confirm That No EPA/DOE STATEMENT: Radiation Monitors Confirm That No Radiation Levels of Concern Have Reached the United States JOINT EPA/DOE STATEMENT: Radiation Monitors Confirm That No Radiation Levels of Concern Have Reached the United States March 18, 2011 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON - The United States Government has an extensive network of radiation monitors around the country and no radiation levels of concern have been detected. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency RadNet system is designed to protect the public by notifying scientists, in near real time, of elevated levels of radiation so they can determine whether protective action is required. The EPA's system has not detected any radiation levels of concern. In addition to EPA's RadNet system, the U.S. Department of Energy has

326

Initial radiation dosimetry at Hiroshima and Nagasaki  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The dosimetry of A-bomb survivors at Hiroshima and Nagasaki is discussed in light of the new dosimetry developed in 1980 by the author. The important changes resulting from the new dosimetry are the ratios of neutron to gamma doses, particularly at Hiroshima. The implications of these changes in terms of epidemiology and radiation protection standards are discussed. (ACR)

Loewe, W.E.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Gamma-ray spectra and doses from the Little Boy replica  

SciTech Connect

Most radiation safety guidelines in the nuclear industry are based on the data concerning the survivors of the nuclear explosions at Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Crucial to determining these guidelines is the radiation from the explosions. We have measured gamma-ray pulse-height distributions from an accurate replica of the Little Boy device used at Hiroshima, operated at low power levels near critical. The device was placed outdoors on a stand 4 m from the ground to minimize environmental effects. The power levels were based on a monitor detector calibrated very carefully in independent experiments. High-resolution pulse-height distributions were acquired with a germanium detector to identify the lines and to obtain line intensities. The 7631 to 7645 keV doublet from neutron capture in the heavy steel case was dominant. Low-resolution pulse-height distributions were acquired with bismuth-germanate detectors. We calculated flux spectra from these distributions using accurately measured detector response functions and efficiency curves. We then calculated dose-rate spectra from the flux spectra using a flux-to-dose-rate conversion procedure. The integral of each dose-rate spectrum gave an integral dose rate. The integral doses at 2 m ranged from 0.46 to 1.03 mrem per 10/sup 13/ fissions. The output of the Little Boy replica can be calculated with Monte Carlo codes. Comparison of our experimental spectra, line intensities, and integral doses can be used to verify these calculations at low power levels and give increased confidence to the calculated values from the explosion at Hiroshima. These calculations then can be used to establish better radiation safety guidelines. 7 references, 7 figures, 2 tables.

Moss, C.E.; Lucas, M.C.; Tisinger, E.W.; Hamm, M.E.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

RADIATION EFFECTS ON EPOXY CARBON FIBER COMPOSITE  

SciTech Connect

Carbon fiber-reinforced bisphenol-A epoxy matrix composite was evaluated for gamma radiation resistance. The composite was exposed to total gamma doses of 50, 100, and 200 Mrad. Irradiated and baseline samples were tested for tensile strength, hardness and evaluated using FTIR (Fourier transform infrared) spectroscopy and DSC (differential scanning calorimetry) for structural changes. Scanning electron microscopy was used to evaluate microstructural behavior. Mechanical testing of the composite bars revealed no apparent change in modulus, strain to failure, or fracture strength after exposures. However, testing of only the epoxy matrix revealed changes in hardness, thermal properties, and FTIR results with increasing gamma irradiation. The results suggest the epoxy within the composite can be affected by exposure to gamma irradiation.

Hoffman, E

2008-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

329

High-energy gamma rays in Hiroshima and Nagasaki: Implications for risk and W{sub R}  

SciTech Connect

Based on the DS86 dosimetry system, nearly all of the dose to survivors of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki was due to unusually high-energy gamma rays, predominantly in the 2- to 5-MeV range. These high energies resulted in part from neutron capture gamma rays as the bomb neutrons penetrated large distances of air. Because of the inverse relationship between energy and biological effectiveness, these high-energy gamma rays are expected to be substantially less effective in producing biological damage than the radiations commonly used in radiobiology and risk assessment. This observation has implications for radiation protection and risk assessment.

Straume, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Cooling of Accelerated Nucleons and Neutrino Emission in Gamma-Ray Bursts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using Monte Carlo simulations, we demonstrate photopion production from Fermi-accelerated protons and the resulting neutrino production in gamma-ray bursts. Unless internal shocks occur at quite large distance from the center, ultra high-energy protons are depleted by photopion production and synchrotron radiation. Internal shocks at fiducial distance cause neutrino bursts, which accompany gamma-ray bursts originating from electromagnetic cascades.

Katsuaki Asano

2005-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

331

MCNP capabilities at the dawn of the 21st century: Neutron-gamma applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Los Alamos National Laboratory Monte Carlo N-Particle radiation transport code, MCNP, has become an international standard for a wide spectrum of neutron-gamma radiation transport applications. These include nuclear criticality safety, radiation shielding, nuclear safeguards, nuclear well-logging, fission and fusion reactor design, accelerator target design, detector design and analysis, health physics, medical radiation therapy and imaging, radiography, decontamination and decommissioning, and waste storage and disposal. The latest version of the code, MCNP4C, was released to the Radiation Safety Information Computational Center (RSICC) in February 2000.This paper described the new features and capabilities of the code, and discusses the specific applicability to neutron-gamma problems. We will also discuss the future directions for MCNP code development, including rewriting the code in Fortran 90.

Selcow, E.C.; McKinney, G.W. [and others

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Diffuse gamma-ray emission: Galactic and extragalactic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Here is reviewed our current understanding of Galactic and extragalactic diffuse gamma-ray emission. The spectrum of the extragalactic gamma-ray background above 30 MeV can be well described by a power law with photon index s=2.1. In the 2-10 MeV range a preliminary analysis of COMPTEL data indicates a lower intensity than previously found, with no evidence for an MeV bump. Most of the models of a truly diffuse background seem to be in conflict with the observed spectrum. Though AGN are the most likely input from discrete sources, two independent attempts to model the high energy background as the superposition of unresolved AGN indicate that AGN underproduce the observed intensity. Therefore the origin of the extragalactic gamma-ray background is still unknown. The Galactic diffuse gamma-ray continuum is more intense than expected both at very low energies (energies (> 1 GeV). The published models for these excesses all involve cosmic ray electron interactions. While the low energy excess may have something to do with in-situ acceleration of electrons, the excess at high energies may be understood if the sources of cosmic ray electrons are discrete. The measured energy spectrum of the diffuse Galactic gamma-ray continuum radiation thus may provide new insights into the acceleration of cosmic rays.

Martin Pohl

1998-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

333

Prompt TeV Emission from Cosmic Rays Accelerated by Gamma Ray Bursts Interacting with Surrounding Stellar Wind  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Protons accelerated in the internal shocks of a long duration gamma ray burst can escape the fireball as cosmic rays by converting to neutrons. Hadronic interactions of these neutrons inside a stellar wind bubble created by the progenitor star will produce TeV gamma rays via neutral meson decay and synchrotron radiation by charged pion-decay electrons in the wind magnetic field. Such gamma rays should be observable from nearby gamma ray bursts by currently running and upcoming ground-based detectors.

Soebur Razzaque; Olga Mena; Charles D. Dermer

2008-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

334

Very-High-Energy Gamma Rays from a Distant Quasar: How Transparent Is the Universe?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The atmospheric Cherenkov gamma-ray telescope MAGIC, designed for a low-energy threshold, has detected very-high-energy gamma rays from a giant flare of the distant Quasi-Stellar Radio Source (in short: radio quasar) 3C 279, at a distance of more than 5 billion light-years (a redshift of 0.536). No quasar has been observed previously in very-high-energy gamma radiation, and this is also the most distant object detected emitting gamma rays above 50 gigaelectron volts. Since high-energy gamma rays may be stopped by interacting with the diffuse background light in the universe, the observations by MAGIC imply a low amount for such light, consistent with that known from galaxy counts.

MAGIC Collaboration; J. Albert

2008-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

335

Real time method and computer system for identifying radioactive materials from HPGe gamma-ray spectroscopy  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A real-time method and computer system for identifying radioactive materials which collects gamma count rates from a HPGe gamma-radiation detector to produce a high-resolution gamma-ray energy spectrum. A library of nuclear material definitions ("library definitions") is provided, with each uniquely associated with a nuclide or isotope material and each comprising at least one logic condition associated with a spectral parameter of a gamma-ray energy spectrum. The method determines whether the spectral parameters of said high-resolution gamma-ray energy spectrum satisfy all the logic conditions of any one of the library definitions, and subsequently uniquely identifies the material type as that nuclide or isotope material associated with the satisfied library definition. The method is iteratively repeated to update the spectrum and identification in real time.

Rowland, Mark S. (Alamo, CA); Howard, Douglas E. (Livermore, CA); Wong, James L. (Dublin, CA); Jessup, James L. (Tracy, CA); Bianchini, Greg M. (Livermore, CA); Miller, Wayne O. (Livermore, CA)

2007-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

336

High Energy Gamma-Ray Emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts - Before GLAST  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are short and intense emission of soft {gamma}-rays, which have fascinated astronomers and astrophysicists since their unexpected discovery in 1960s. The X-ray/optical/radio afterglow observations confirm the cosmological origin of GRBs, support the fireball model, and imply a long-activity of the central engine. The high-energy {gamma}-ray emission (> 20 MeV) from GRBs is particularly important because they shed some lights on the radiation mechanisms and can help us to constrain the physical processes giving rise to the early afterglows. In this work, we review observational and theoretical studies of the high-energy emission from GRBs. Special attention is given to the expected high-energy emission signatures accompanying the canonical early-time X-ray afterglow that was observed by the Swift X-ray Telescope. We also discuss the detection prospect of the upcoming GLAST satellite and the current ground-based Cerenkov detectors.

Fan, Yi-Zhong; Piran, Tsvi

2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

337

How to Tell a Jet from a Balloon: A Proposed Test for Beaming in Gamma-Ray Bursts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

If gamma ray bursts are highly collimated, radiating into only a small fraction of the sky, the energy requirements of each event may be reduced by several ( ? 4–6) orders of magnitude, and the event rate increased correspondingly. Extreme conditions in gamma ray bursters lead to highly relativistic motions (bulk Lorentz factors ? ?> 100). This results in strong forward beaming of the emitted radiation in the observer’s rest frame. Thus, all information on gamma ray bursts comes from those ejecta emitted in a narrow cone (opening angle ? 1/?) pointing towards the observer. We are at present ignorant of whether there are ejecta outside that cone or not. The recent detection of longer wavelength transients following gamma ray bursts allows an empirical test of whether gamma ray bursts are well-collimated jets or spherical fireballs. The bulk Lorentz factor of the burst ejecta will decrease with time after the event, as the ejecta sweep up the surrounding medium. Thus, radiation from the ejecta is beamed into an ever increasing solid angle as the burst remnant evolves. It follows that if gamma ray bursts are highly collimated, many more optical and radio transients should be observed without associated gamma rays than with them. Published supernova searches may contain enough data to test the most extreme models of gamma ray beaming. We close with a brief discussion of other possible consequences of beaming, including its effect on the evolution of burst remnants.

James E. Rhoads

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Comparison of structural properties of pristine and gamma irradiated single-wall carbon nanotubes: Effects of medium and irradiation dose  

SciTech Connect

A systematic study of the gamma irradiation effects on single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) structure was conducted. Nanotubes were exposed to different doses of gamma irradiation in three media. Irradiation was carried out in air, water and aqueous ammonia. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), elemental analysis (EA) and Raman spectroscopy confirmed the changes in the SWCNT structure. TGA measurements showed the highest percentage of introduced groups for the SWCNTs irradiated with 100 kGy. FTIR spectroscopy provided evidence for the attachment of hydroxyl, carboxyl and nitrile functional groups to the SWCNT sidewalls. Those groups were confirmed by EA. All irradiated SWCNTs had hydroxyl and carboxyl groups irrelevant to media used for irradiation, but nitrile functional groups were only identified in SWCNTs irradiated in aqueous ammonia. Raman spectroscopy indicated that the degree of disorder in the carbon nanotube structure correlates with the irradiation dose. For the nanotubes irradiated with the dose of 100 kGy, the Raman I{sub D}/I{sub G} ratio was three times higher than for the pristine ones. Atomic force microscopy showed a 50% decrease in nanotube length at a radiation dose of 100 kGy. Scanning and transmission electron microscopies showed significant changes in the morphology and structure of gamma irradiated SWCNTs. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Gamma irradiation causes SWCNT covalent functionalization. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Type of covalently attached groups to SWCNT surface depends on irradiation medium. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The SWCNT shortening level increases with applied irradiation dose. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The average length of carbon nanotubes decreased by 50% at the highest dose. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The diameter of SWCNT bundles becomes small as irradiation dose rises.

Kleut, D. [Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences, P.O.B. 522, University of Belgrade, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia)] [Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences, P.O.B. 522, University of Belgrade, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia); Jovanovic, S., E-mail: svetlanajovanovic@vinca.rs [Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences, P.O.B. 522, University of Belgrade, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia); Markovic, Z.; Kepic, D.; Tosic, D. [Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences, P.O.B. 522, University of Belgrade, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia)] [Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences, P.O.B. 522, University of Belgrade, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia); Romcevic, N. [Insitute of Physics, P.O.B. 68, University of Belgrade, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia)] [Insitute of Physics, P.O.B. 68, University of Belgrade, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia); Marinovic-Cincovic, M.; Dramicanin, M. [Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences, P.O.B. 522, University of Belgrade, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia)] [Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences, P.O.B. 522, University of Belgrade, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia); Holclajtner-Antunovic, I. [Faculty of Physical Chemistry, P.O.B. 47, University of Belgrade, 11158 Belgrade (Serbia)] [Faculty of Physical Chemistry, P.O.B. 47, University of Belgrade, 11158 Belgrade (Serbia); Pavlovic, V. [Faculty of Agriculture, P.O.B. 127, University of Belgrade, 11080 Belgrade (Serbia)] [Faculty of Agriculture, P.O.B. 127, University of Belgrade, 11080 Belgrade (Serbia); Drazic, G. [Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)] [Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Milosavljevic, M.; Todorovic Markovic, B. [Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences, P.O.B. 522, University of Belgrade, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia)] [Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences, P.O.B. 522, University of Belgrade, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

339

An alpha/beta/gamma health physics instrument with pulse-shape discrimination  

SciTech Connect

A recent breakthrough in alpha scintillation detector design supports the feasibility of extending this new technology to the development of a monolithic alpha/beta/gamma ({alpha}/{beta}/{gamma}) scintillation detector. The new scintillator is physically robust and chemically resistant to environmental conditions encountered in radiation monitoring, and yet inexpensive to manufacture. The use of pulse-shape discrimination electronics allows pulses from each scintillator to be separated for particle identification. An {alpha}/{beta}/{gamma} detector has a wide variety of possible applications including laundry monitoring, wastewater monitoring, air sampling, and health physics instrumentation. 2 refs., 1 fig.

McElhaney, S.A.; Chiles, M.M.; Ramsey, J.A.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Sensitivity of the FERMI Detectors to Gamma-Ray Bursts from Evaporating Primordial Black Holes (PBHs)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Primordial Black Holes (PBHs), which may have been created in the early Universe, are predicted to be detectable by their Hawking radiation. The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope observatory offers increased sensitivity to the gamma-ray bursts produced by PBHs with an initial mass of $\\sim 5\\times 10^{14}$ g expiring today. PBHs are candidate progenitors of unidentified Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) that lack X-ray afterglow. We propose spectral lag, which is the temporal delay between the high and low energy pulses, as an efficient method to identify PBH evaporation events with the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT).

T. N. Ukwatta; Jane H. MacGibbon; W. C. Parke; K. S. Dhuga; S. Rhodes; A. Eskandarian; N. Gehrels; L. Maximon; D. C. Morris

2010-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gamma radiation levels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Radiation Damping of Shallow Foundations on Nonlinear Soil Medium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to the reduction of radiation damping due to soil yielding.since the reduced radiation damping at foundation level will2007 Paper No. 1150 RADIATION DAMPING OF SHALLOW FOUNDATIONS

Zhang, Jian; Tang, Yuchuan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Radiation effects on humans  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation effects on humans Radiation effects on humans Name: Joe Kemna Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: I am trying to find information on radiation. I need the effects on humans, the damage it causes to the environment, and any extra information you might have on the subject. Thank you for your time. Replies: Your library should be a good place to start, but first you need to narrow your question a bit. "Radiation" means radio waves, heat, light (including the ultraviolet light that causes suntan and sunburn), and what's called "ionizing radiation." By far the major source of the first three is the Sun, while the last I believe comes principally from cosmic rays and various naturally radioactive elements like uranium and radon. The most significant manmade sources of exposure would --- I think --- be household wiring and appliances (radio), engines and heating devices (heat), lamps (light), and X-ray machines, flying at high altitude in airplanes, and living in well-insulated homes built over radon sources (ionizing radiation). Heat, light and ionizing radiation play vital roles in the ecology of the Earth. Radio, light (in particular "tanning" ultraviolet), and ionizing radiation have all been widely assumed at different times to be particularly good or particularly bad for human health. Some recent issues of public concern have been the effect of radio waves from electric transmission lines, the effect on skin cancer incidence from tanning and sunburns, the depletion of the ultraviolet-light-produced ozone in the upper atmosphere by chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), "global warming" from the increased absorption of heat radiation from the surface by atmospheric carbon dioxide and methane, and the effect of a long exposure to low levels of ionizing radiation as for example the people of Eastern Europe are experiencing from the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident.

343

Gamma neutron assay method and apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The gamma neutron assay technique is an alternative method to standard safeguards techniques for the identification and assaying of special nuclear materials in a field or laboratory environment, as a tool for dismantlement and destruction of nuclear weapons, and to determine the isotopic ratios for a blend-down program on uranium. It is capable of determining the isotopic ratios of fissionable material from the spontaneous or induced fission of a sample to within approximately 0.5%. This is based upon the prompt coincidence relationships that occur in the fission process and the proton conservation and quasi-conservation of nuclear mass (A) that exists between the two fission fragments. The system is used in both passive (without an external neutron source) and active (with an external neutron source) mode. The apparatus consists of an array of neutron and gamma-ray detectors electronically connected to determine coincident events. The method can also be used to assay radioactive waste which contains fissile material, even in the presence of a high background radiation field. 7 figures.

Cole, J.D.; Aryaeinejad, R.; Greenwood, R.C.

1995-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

344

Gamma neutron assay method and apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The gamma neutron assay technique is an alternative method to standard safeguards techniques for the identification and assaying of special nuclear materials in a field or laboratory environment, as a tool for dismantlement and destruction of nuclear weapons, and to determine the isotopic ratios for a blend-down program on uranium. It is capable of determining the isotopic ratios of fissionable material from the spontaneous or induced fission of a sample to within approximately 0.5%. This is based upon the prompt coincidence relationships that occur in the fission process and the proton conservation and quasi-conservation of nuclear mass (A) that exists between the two fission fragments. The system is used in both passive (without an external neutron source and active (with an external neutron source) mode. The apparatus consists of an array of neutron and gamma-ray detectors electronically connected to determine coincident events. The method can also be used to assay radioactive waste which contains fissile material, even in the presence of a high background radiation field.

Cole, Jerald D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Aryaeinejad, Rahmat (Idaho Falls, ID); Greenwood, Reginald C. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Ionizing radiation detector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ionizing radiation detector is provided which is based on the principal of analog electronic integration of radiation sensor currents in the sub-pico to nano ampere range between fixed voltage switching thresholds with automatic voltage reversal each time the appropriate threshold is reached. The thresholds are provided by a first NAND gate Schmitt trigger which is coupled with a second NAND gate Schmitt trigger operating in an alternate switching state from the first gate to turn either a visible or audible indicating device on and off in response to the gate switching rate which is indicative of the level of radiation being sensed. The detector can be configured as a small, personal radiation dosimeter which is simple to operate and responsive over a dynamic range of at least 0.01 to 1000 R/hr.

Thacker, L.H.

1989-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

346

Ionizing radiation detector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ionizing radiation detector is provided which is based on the principle of analog electronic integration of radiation sensor currents in the sub-pico to nano ampere range between fixed voltage switching thresholds with automatic voltage reversal each time the appropriate threshold is reached. The thresholds are provided by a first NAND gate Schmitt trigger which is coupled with a second NAND gate Schmitt trigger operating in an alternate switching state from the first gate to turn either a visible or audible indicating device on and off in response to the gate switching rate which is indicative of the level of radiation being sensed. The detector can be configured as a small, personal radiation dosimeter which is simple to operate and responsive over a dynamic range of at least 0.01 to 1000 R/hr.

Thacker, Louis H. (Knoxville, TN)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Remote radiation dosimetry  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed are methods and apparatus for remotely measuring radiation levels. Such are particularly useful for measuring relatively high levels or dosages of radiation being administered in radiation therapy. They are also useful for more general radiation level measurements where remote sensing from the remaining portions of the apparatus is desirable. The apparatus uses a beam generator, such as a laser beam, to provide a stimulating beam. The stimulating beam is preferably of wavelengths shorter than 6 microns, or more advantageously less than 2 microns. The stimulating beam is used to stimulate a remote luminescent sensor mounted in a probe which emits stored luminescent energy resulting from exposure of the sensor to ionizing radiation. The stimulating beam is communicated to the remote luminescent sensor via transmissive fiber which also preferably serves to return the emission from the luminescent sensor. The stimulating beam is advantageously split by a beam splitter to create a detector beam which is measured for power during a reading period during which the luminescent phosphor is read. The detected power is preferably used to control the beam generator to thus produce desired beam power during the reading period. The luminescent emission from the remote sensor is communicated to a suitable emission detector, preferably after filtering or other selective treatment to better isolate the luminescent emission.

Braunlich, Peter F. (Pullman, WA); Tetzlaff, Wolfgang (Pullman, WA); Hegland, Joel E. (Pullman, WA); Jones, Scott C. (Pullman, WA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Remote radiation dosimetry  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed are methods and apparatus for remotely measuring radiation levels. Such are particularly useful for measuring relatively high levels or dosages of radiation being administered in radiation therapy. They are also useful for more general radiation level measurements where remote sensing from the remaining portions of the apparatus is desirable. The apparatus uses a beam generator, such as a laser beam, to provide a stimulating beam. The stimulating beam is preferably of wavelengths shorter than 6 microns, or more advantageously less than 2 microns. The stimulating beam is used to stimulate a remote luminescent sensor mounted in a probe which emits stored luminescent energy resulting from exposure of the sensor to ionizing radiation. The stimulating beam is communicated to the remote luminescent sensor via a transmissive fiber which also preferably serves to return the emission from the luminescent sensor. The stimulating beam is advantageously split by a beam splitter to create a detector beam which is measured for power during a reading period during which the luminescent phosphor is read. The detected power is preferably used to control the beam generator to thus produce desired beam power during the reading period. The luminescent emission from the remote sensor is communicated to a suitable emission detector, preferably after filtering or other selective treatment to better isolate the luminescent emission. 8 figures.

Braunlich, P.F.; Tetzlaff, W.; Hegland, J.E.; Jones, S.C.

1991-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

349

Radiative Effects on Particle Acceleration in Electromagnetic Dominated Outflows  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Plasma outflows from gamma-ray bursts (GRB), pulsar winds, relativistic jets, and ultra-intense laser targets radiate high energy photons. However, radiation damping is ignored in conventional PIC simulations. In this letter, we study the radiation damping effect on particle acceleration via Poynting fluxes in two-and-half-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) plasma simulation of electron-positron plasmas. Radiation damping force is self-consistently calculated for each particle and reduces the net acceleration force. The emitted radiation is peaked within a few degrees from the direction of Poynting flux and strongly linear-polarized.

Koichi Noguchi; Edison Liang; Kazumi Nishimura

2004-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

350

High resolution x-ray and gamma ray imaging using diffraction lenses with mechanically bent crystals  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for high spatial resolution imaging of a plurality of sources of x-ray and gamma-ray radiation is provided. High quality mechanically bent diffracting crystals of 0.1 mm radial width are used for focusing the radiation and directing the radiation to an array of detectors which is used for analyzing their addition to collect data as to the location of the source of radiation. A computer is used for converting the data to an image. The invention also provides for the use of a multi-component high resolution detector array and for narrow source and detector apertures.

Smither, Robert K. (Hinsdale, IL)

2008-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

351

NEW FERMI-LAT EVENT RECONSTRUCTION REVEALS MORE HIGH-ENERGY GAMMA RAYS FROM GAMMA-RAY BURSTS  

SciTech Connect

Based on the experience gained during the four and a half years of the mission, the Fermi-LAT Collaboration has undertaken a comprehensive revision of the event-level analysis going under the name of Pass 8. Although it is not yet finalized, we can test the improvements in the new event reconstruction with the special case of the prompt phase of bright gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), where the signal-to-noise ratio is large enough that loose selection cuts are sufficient to identify gamma rays associated with the source. Using the new event reconstruction, we have re-analyzed 10 GRBs previously detected by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) for which an X-ray/optical follow-up was possible and found four new gamma rays with energies greater than 10 GeV in addition to the seven previously known. Among these four is a 27.4 GeV gamma ray from GRB 080916C, which has a redshift of 4.35, thus making it the gamma ray with the highest intrinsic energy ({approx}147 GeV) detected from a GRB. We present here the salient aspects of the new event reconstruction and discuss the scientific implications of these new high-energy gamma rays, such as constraining extragalactic background light models, Lorentz invariance violation tests, the prompt emission mechanism, and the bulk Lorentz factor of the emitting region.

Atwood, W. B. [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics, Department of Physics and Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California at Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Baldini, L. [Universita di Pisa and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Bregeon, J.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Sgro, C.; Tinivella, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Bruel, P. [Laboratoire Leprince-Ringuet, Ecole polytechnique, CNRS/IN2P3, Palaiseau (France); Chekhtman, A. [Center for Earth Observing and Space Research, College of Science, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States); Cohen-Tanugi, J. [Laboratoire Univers et Particules de Montpellier, Universite Montpellier 2, CNRS/IN2P3, F-34095 Montpellier (France); Drlica-Wagner, A.; Omodei, N.; Rochester, L. S.; Usher, T. L. [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Department of Physics and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Granot, J. [Department of Natural Sciences, The Open University of Israel, 1 University Road, P.O. Box 808, Ra'anana 43537 (Israel); Longo, F. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Trieste, I-34127 Trieste (Italy); Razzaque, S. [Department of Physics, University of Johannesburg, Auckland Park 2006 (South Africa); Zimmer, S., E-mail: melissa.pesce.rollins@pi.infn.it, E-mail: nicola.omodei@stanford.edu, E-mail: granot@openu.ac.il [Department of Physics, Stockholm University, AlbaNova, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden)

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Radiation Information  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation Information << Timeline >> Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player. Get Adobe Flash player July 31, 1942 The Army Corp of Engineers leases...

353

Audible radiation monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention consists of a method and apparatus for monitoring ionizing radiation comprising radiation detectors in electrical connection with an isotopic analyzer and a device for producing chords to which each isotope is mapped so that the device produces a unique chord for each isotope. Preferably the chords are pleasing to the ear, except for chords representing unexpected isotopes, and are louder or softer depending on the level of radioactivity produced by each isotope, and musical instrument voices may be simulated in producing the chords as an aid to distinguishing similar-sounding chords. Because of the representation by chords, information regarding the level and composition of the radiation in an area can be conveyed to workers in that area more effectively and yet without distracting them.

Odell, D.M.C.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

354

Fermi Large Area Telescope Measurements of the Diffuse Gamma-Ray Emission at Intermediate Galactic Latitudes  

SciTech Connect

The diffuse galactic {gamma}-ray emission is produced by cosmic rays (CRs) interacting with the interstellar gas and radiation field. Measurements by the Energetic Gamma-Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) instrument on the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory indicated excess {gamma}-ray emission {ge}1 GeV relative to diffuse galactic {gamma}-ray emission models consistent with directly measured CR spectra (the so-called 'EGRET GeV excess'). The Large Area Telescope (LAT) instrument on the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope has measured the diffuse {gamma}-ray emission with improved sensitivity and resolution compared to EGRET. We report on LAT measurements for energies 100 MeV to 10 GeV and galactic latitudes 10{sup o} {le} |b| {le} 20{sup o}. The LAT spectrum for this region of the sky is well reproduced by a diffuse galactic {gamma}-ray emission model that is consistent with local CR spectra and inconsistent with the EGRET GeV excess.

Abdo, A.A.; /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; /SLAC; Anderson, B.; Atwood, W.B.; /UC, Santa Cruz; Axelsson, M.; /Stockholm U. /Stockholm U., OKC; Baldini, L.; /INFN, Pisa; Ballet, J.; /DAPNIA, Saclay; Barbiellini, G.; /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U.; Bastieri, D.; /INFN, Padua /Padua U.; Baughman, B.M.; /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /Ohio State U.; Bechtol, K.; /SLAC; Bellazzini, R.; /INFN, Pisa; Berenji, B.; Blandford, R.D.; Bloom, E.D.; /SLAC; Bonamente, E.; /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U.; Borgland, A.W.; /SLAC; Bregeon, J.; Brez, A.; /INFN, Pisa; Brigida, M.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Ecole Polytechnique /Washington U., Seattle /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /IASF, Milan /DAPNIA, Saclay /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /George Mason U. /NASA, Goddard /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /Montpellier U. /Stockholm U. /Stockholm U., OKC /Royal Inst. Tech., Stockholm /Padua U. /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /Udine U. /INFN, Trieste /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /INFN, Pisa /UC, Santa Cruz /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /CENBG, Gradignan /CENBG, Gradignan /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /Montpellier U. /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Ecole Polytechnique /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /Udine U. /INFN, Trieste /Hiroshima U. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /INFN, Pisa /INFN, Bari /NASA, Goddard /Maryland U.; /more authors..

2012-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

355

Search for anomalous ZZ{gamma} and Z{gamma}{gamma} couplings with D0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A direct test of the Standard Model by searching for anomalous ZZ{gamma} and Z{gamma}{gamma} couplings is presented. The authors analyze p{bar p} {yields} ll{gamma} + X, (l = e,{mu}) events at {radical}s = 1.8 TeV with the D0d detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. A fit to the transverse energy spectrum of the photon in the signal events, based on the data set corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 13.9 pb{sup {minus}1} (13.3 pb{sup {minus}1}) for the electron (muon) channel, yields the following 95% CL limits on the anomalous CP-conserving ZZ{gamma} couplings: -1.9 < h{sub 30}{sup Z} < 1.8 (h{sub 40}{sup Z} = 0), and -0.5 < h{sub 40}{sup Z} < 0.5 ({sub 30}{sup Z} = 0), for a form-factor scale {Lambda} = 500 GeV. Limits on the Z{gamma}{gamma} couplings and CP-violating couplings are also discussed.

Landsberg, G.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Diffuse Gamma-Rays from Local Group Galaxies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Diffuse gamma-ray radiation in galaxies is produced by cosmic ray interactions with the interstellar medium. With the completion of EGRET observations, the only extragalactic object from which there has been a positive detection of diffuse gamma-ray emission is the Large Magellanic Cloud. We systematically estimate the expected diffuse gamma-ray flux from Local Group galaxies, and determine their detectability by new generation gamma-ray observatories such as GLAST. For each galaxy, the expected gamma-ray flux depends only on its total gas content and its cosmic ray flux. We present a method for calculating cosmic ray flux in these galaxies in terms of the observed rate of supernova explosions, where cosmic ray acceleration is believed to take place. The difficulty in deriving accurate supernova rates from observational data is a dominant uncertainty in our calculations. We estimate the gamma-ray flux for Local Group galaxies and find that our predictions are consistent with the observations for the LMC and with the observational upper limits for the Small Magellanic Cloud and M31. Both the Andromeda galaxy, with a flux of $\\sim 1.0 \\times 10^{-8}$ photons sec$^{-1}$ cm$^{-2}$ above 100 MeV, and the SMC, with a flux of $\\sim 1.7 \\times 10^{-8}$ photons sec$^{-1}$ cm$^{-2}$ above 100 MeV, are expected to be observable by GLAST. M33 is at the limit of detectability with a flux of $\\sim 0.11 \\times 10^{-8}$ sec$^{-1}$ cm$^{-2}$. Other Local Group galaxies are at least two orders of magnitude below GLAST sensitivity.

Vasiliki Pavlidou; Brian D. Fields

2001-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

357

Gamma-Ray Burst Lines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The evidence for spectral features in gamma-ray bursts is summarized. As a guide for evaluating the evidence, the properties of gamma-ray detectors and the methods of analyzing gamma-ray spectra are reviewed. In the 1980's, observations indicated that absorption features below 100 keV were present in a large fraction of bright gamma-ray bursts. There were also reports of emission features around 400 keV. During the 1990's the situation has become much less clear. A small fraction of bursts observed with BATSE have statistically significant low-energy features, but the reality of the features is suspect because in several cases the data of the BATSE detectors appear to be inconsistent. Furthermore, most of the possible features appear in emission rather than the expected absorption. Analysis of data from other instruments has either not been finalized or has not detected lines.

Michael S. Briggs

1999-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

358

Modeling gamma-ray bursts.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Discovered serendipitously in the late 1960s, gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are huge explosions of energy that happen at cosmological distances. They provide a grand physical playground… (more)

Maxham, Amanda

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Measurement of Radiation Damage on Silica Aerogel \\v Cerenkov Radiator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We measured the radiation damage on silica aerogel \\v Cerenkov radiators originally developed for the $B$-factory experiment at KEK. Refractive index of the aerogel samples ranged from 1.012 to 1.028. The samples were irradiated up to 9.8~MRad of equivalent dose. Measurements of transmittance and refractive index were carried out and these samples were found to be radiation hard. Deteriorations in transparency and changes of refractive index were observed to be less than 1.3\\% and 0.001 at 90\\% confidence level, respectively. Prospects of using aerogels under high-radiation environment are discussed.

S. K. Sahu et al

1996-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

360

Gamma-RayGamma-Ray Bursts: from SwiftBursts: from Swift  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gamma-RayGamma-Ray Bursts: from SwiftBursts: from Swift to GLASTto GLAST Bing ZhangBing ZhangGehrels, et al), et al) #12;Gamma-ray bursts: the mostGamma-ray bursts: the most violent explosions Bursts Apparently high gamma-ray efficiency. Highly magnetized flow? Roming et al., 2005 #12;Surprises

California at Santa Cruz, University of

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361

On the possible effects of gluon number fluctuations on {gamma}{gamma} collisions at high energies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We investigate the effects of the fluctuations on the total {gamma}{gamma}, {gamma}*{gamma}* cross sections and the real photon structure function F{sup {gamma}}{sub 2}(x,Q{sup 2}), considering a saturation phenomenological model for the dipole-dipole cross section and scattering amplitude with fluctuations included.

Goncalves, V. P.; De Santana Amaral, J. T. [Instituto de Fisica e Matematica, Universidade Federal de Pelotas, Caixa Postal 354, 96010-900, Pelotas, RS (Brazil)

2013-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

362

Gamma Ray Bursts and CETI  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gamma ray burst sources are isotropically distributed. They could be located at distances $\\sim 1000$ AU. (Katz \\cite{JK92}) GRB signals have many narrow peaks that are unresolved at the millisecond time resolution of existing observations. \\cite{JK87} CETI could use stars as gravitational lenses for interstellar gamma ray laser beam communication. Much better time resolution of GRB signals could rule out (or confirm?) the speculative hypothesis that GRB = CETI.

Frank D. Smith Jr

1993-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

363

Magnetic Structures in Gamma-Ray Burst Jets Probed by Gamma-Ray Polarization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report polarization measurements in two prompt emissions of gamma-ray bursts, GRB 110301A and GRB 110721A, observed with the Gamma-ray burst polarimeter (GAP) aboard IKAROS solar sail mission. We detected linear polarization signals from each burst with polarization degree of $\\Pi = 70 \\pm 22$% with statistical significance of $3.7 \\sigma$ for GRB 110301A, and $\\Pi = 84^{+16}_{-28}$% with $3.3 \\sigma$ confidence level for GRB 110721A. We did not detect any significant change of polarization angle. These two events had shorter durations and dimmer brightness compared with GRB 100826A, which showed a significant change of polarization angle, as reported in Yonetoku et al. (2011). Synchrotron emission model can be consistent with all the data of the three GRBs, while photospheric quasi-thermal emission model is not favorable. We suggest that magnetic field structures in the emission region are globally-ordered fields advected from the central engine.

Daisuke Yonetoku; Toshio Murakami; Shuichi Gunji; Tatehiro Mihara; Kenji Toma; Yoshiyuki Morihara; Takuya Takahashi; Yudai Wakashima; Hajime Yonemochi; Tomonori Sakashita; Noriyuki Toukairin; Hirofumi Fujimoto; Yoshiki Kodama

2012-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

364

MAGNETIC STRUCTURES IN GAMMA-RAY BURST JETS PROBED BY GAMMA-RAY POLARIZATION  

SciTech Connect

We report polarization measurements in two prompt emissions of gamma-ray bursts, GRB 110301A and GRB 110721A, observed with the gamma-ray burst polarimeter (GAP) on borad the IKAROS solar sail mission. We detected linear polarization signals from each burst with polarization degree of {Pi} = 70 {+-} 22% with statistical significance of 3.7{sigma} for GRB 110301A, and {Pi} = 84{sup +16}{sub -28}% with 3.3{sigma} confidence level for GRB 110721A. We did not detect any significant change of polarization angle. These two events had shorter durations and dimmer brightness compared with GRB 100826A, which showed a significant change of polarization angle, as reported in Yonetoku et al. Synchrotron emission model can be consistent with the data of the three GRBs, while the photospheric quasi-thermal emission model is not favored. We suggest that magnetic field structures in the emission region are globally ordered fields advected from the central engine.

Yonetoku, Daisuke; Murakami, Toshio; Morihara, Yoshiyuki; Takahashi, Takuya; Wakashima, Yudai; Yonemochi, Hajime; Sakashita, Tomonori; Fujimoto, Hirofumi; Kodama, Yoshiki [College of Science and Engineering, School of Mathematics and Physics, Kanazawa University, Kakuma, Kanazawa, Ishikawa 920-1192 (Japan); Gunji, Shuichi; Toukairin, Noriyuki [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Yamagata University, 1-4-12, Koshirakawa, Yamagata, Yamagata 990-8560 (Japan); Mihara, Tatehiro [Cosmic Radiation Laboratory, RIKEN, 2-1, Hirosawa, Wako City, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Toma, Kenji, E-mail: yonetoku@astro.s.kanazawa-u.ac.jp [Department of Earth and Space Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka 560-0043 (Japan)

2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

365

A Targeted LIGO-Virgo Search for Gravitational Waves Associated with Gamma-Ray Bursts Using Low-Threshold Swift GRB Triggers .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are short, intense flashes of 0.1-1 MeV electromagnetic radiation that are routinely observed by Earth orbiting satellites. The sources of GRBs are… (more)

Harstad, Emelie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

LIGHT CURVES OF SWIFT GAMMA RAY BURSTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent observations from the Swift gamma-ray burst mission indicate that a fraction of gamma ray bursts are characterized by a canonical behaviour of the X-ray afterglows. We present an effective theory which allows us to account for X-ray light curves of both (short- long) gamma ray bursts and X-ray rich flashes. We propose that gamma ray bursts originate from massive magnetic powered pulsars. Subject headings: gamma-rays: bursts 1.

Paolo Cea

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

How to Detect Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

How to Detect Radiation How to Survey Measurement Safety Around Radiation Sources Types of Radiation Exposure Managing Radiation Emergencies Procedure Demonstration Detection How...

368

Higgs Self-Coupling in gamma-gamma Collisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To establish the Higgs mechanism experimentally, one has to determine the Higgs self-interaction potential responsible for the electroweak symmetry breaking. This requires a measurement of the trilinear and quadrilinear self-couplings of the Higgs particle, as predicted by the Standard Model (SM). We propose to measure the trilinear Higgs self-coupling in gamma-gamma collisions just above the kinematic threshold E_thr = 2M_H, where M_H is the Higgs mass. Our calculation reveals that the sensitivity of the cross-section sigma(gamma gamma -> HH) to the Higgs self-coupling is maximal near the 2M_H threshold for M_H = 115-150 GeV, and is larger than the sensitivities of sigma(e+e- -> ZHH) and sigma(e+e- -> nu nu HH) to this coupling for 2E_e H by constructing an X-band e-e- linac and a terawatt laser system in order to produce Compton-scattered gamma-ray beams for a 160-GeV photon collider (2E_e = 200 GeV); (b) add a positron source and repeat all measurements done at LEP and SLC with much better precision; and (c) subsequently install 70-MeV/m rf cavities in order to study e+e- -> H+Z, e+e- -> tt and gamma gamma -> H+H at 2E_e = 350 GeV. The total length of the linac would be about 7 km.

R. Belusevic; G. Jikia

2004-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

369

Enhanced radiation resistant fiber optics  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for producing an optical fiber having enhanced radiation resitance is provided, the process including maintaining an optical fiber within a hydrogen-containing atmosphere for sufficient time to yield a hydrogen-permeated optical fiber having an elevated internal hydrogen concentration, and irradiating the hydrogen-permeated optical fiber at a time while the optical fiber has an elevated internal hydrogen concentration with a source of ionizing radiation. The radiation source is typically a cobalt-60 source and the fiber is pre-irradiated with a dose level up to about 1000 kilorads of radiation.

Lyons, P.B.; Looney, L.D.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

370

Atomic Radiation (Illinois) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

permissible levels of radiation in unrestricted areas, environmental standards for uranium fuel cycle and information about notification of incidents. Policy Contact Contact...

371

NIST Ionizing Radiation Division 2001 - Program Directions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... seen a tremendous increase in the use of low-energy photon ... for the high levels of absorbed dose used in the industrial radiation processing of ...

372

NIST Ionizing Radiation Division 2000 - Future Directions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... will enable dose-reconstruction studies for populations exposed at the natural background levels of ionizing radiation. Calibrations of Low-Energy ...

373

COMPACT CdZnTe-BASED GAMMA CAMERA FOR PROSTATE CANCER IMAGING  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, we discuss the design of a compact gamma camera for high-resolution prostate cancer imaging using Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CdZnTe or CZT) radiation detectors. Prostate cancer is a common disease in men. Nowadays, a blood test measuring the level of prostate specific antigen (PSA) is widely used for screening for the disease in males over 50, followed by (ultrasound) imaging-guided biopsy. However, PSA tests have a high false-positive rate and ultrasound-guided biopsy has a high likelihood of missing small cancerous tissues. Commercial methods of nuclear medical imaging, e.g. PET and SPECT, can functionally image the organs, and potentially find cancer tissues at early stages, but their applications in diagnosing prostate cancer has been limited by the smallness of the prostate gland and the long working distance between the organ and the detectors comprising these imaging systems. CZT is a semiconductor material with wide band-gap and relatively high electron mobility, and thus can operate at room temperature without additional cooling. CZT detectors are photon-electron direct-conversion devices, thus offering high energy-resolution in detecting gamma rays, enabling energy-resolved imaging, and reducing the background of Compton-scattering events. In addition, CZT material has high stopping power for gamma rays; for medical imaging, a few-mm-thick CZT material provides adequate detection efficiency for many SPECT radiotracers. Because of these advantages, CZT detectors are becoming popular for several SPECT medical-imaging applications. Most recently, we designed a compact gamma camera using CZT detectors coupled to an application-specific-integrated-circuit (ASIC). This camera functions as a trans-rectal probe to image the prostate gland from a distance of only 1-5 cm, thus offering higher detection efficiency and higher spatial resolution. Hence, it potentially can detect prostate cancers at their early stages. The performance tests of this camera have been completed. The results show better than 6-mm resolution at a distance of 1 cm. Details of the test results are discussed in this paper.

CUI, Y.; LALL, T.; TSUI, B.; YU, J.; MAHLER, G.; BOLOTNIKOV, A.; VASKA, P.; DeGERONIMO, G.; O' CONNOR, P.; MEINKEN, G.; JOYAL, J.; BARRETT, J.; CAMARDA, G.; HOSSAIN, A.; KIM, K.H.; YANG, G.; POMPER, M.; CHO, S.; WEISMAN, K.; SEO, Y.; BABICH, J.; LaFRANCE, N.; AND JAMES, R.B.

2011-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

374

Results of mobile gamma scanning activities in Tonawanda, New York  

SciTech Connect

During the 1940s, the Linde Air Products Division of Union Carbide operated a plant in Tonawanda, New York, for the Manhattan Engineer District (MED) and the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC). Uranium production and some nickel processing were conducted at the site. It is the policy of the US Department of Energy (DOE) to verify that radiological conditions at such sites or facilities comply with current DOE guidelines. Guidelines for release and use of such sites have become more stringent as research has provided more information since previous cleanups. The Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) was established as part of that effort to confirm the closeout status of facilities under contract to agencies preceding DOE during early nuclear energy development. Under the FUSRAP program, the Linde site itself has been previously investigated to determine the extent of on-site radiological contamination. As a precaution to insure that no residual radioactive materials were transported off-site, the Department of Energy requested that ORNL survey the area in the vicinity of the Linde Plant, the waste water treatment facility on Tower Road, the Sheridan Park Fire Station (District 4), and the Tonawanda Landfill to assess whether any residual radioactive material could be detected. The survey was conducted the week of April 3, 1990. Results of analysis of soil samples from the Tonawanda Landfill revealed slightly elevated concentrations of {sup 238}U and {sup 226}Ra suggestive of residuals from former Linde Plant operations. Therefore, it is recommended that additional surveying of the landfill property and of Sheridan Creek from south of the Linde property to its confluence with the Niagara River be conducted. The survey should include the measurement of gamma radiation levels and radionuclide analysis of silt samples. 6 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

Cottrell, W.D.; Witt, D.A.; Rodriguez, R.E.; Carrier, R.F.

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

ANALYSIS OF FUEL ELEMENT CORE BLANKS FOR ARGONNE LOW POWER REACTOR BY GAMMA COUNTING  

SciTech Connect

A technique based on a determinaiion of the differential counting rate exhibited by the 184-kev gamma radiation associated with the decay of U/sup 235/ was developed for the determination of the U/sup 235/ content in Argonne Low Power Reactor fuel element core blanks. The Argonne Low Power Reactor core blanks were an aluminum-highly enriched uranium alloy containing 17.5 weight per cent uranium (approximately 4 g U/sup 235/) having the following dimensions: length, 6.875 inches, width, 3.31 inches, and thickness, 0.200 inch. The gamma- ray spectrum emitied by uranium is rather complex. Using a scintillation spectrometer and scanning the spectrum, the energy is found to be concentrated primarily in two regions, at 184 and 90 kev. The 184-kev gamma rays result primarily from the decay of U/sup 235/ The gammas in the 90-kev region result from the U/sup 235/ decay and daughter products of U/sup 238/ and U/sup 235/. Using a pulse-height analyzer, it is possibie to select the desired radiation emitted from the source and determine the counting rate for a given source. In this work the 184-kev gamma radiation was counted to determine the amount of U/ sup 235/ present in the individual core blanks. (auth)

McGonnagle, W.J.; Perry, R.B.

1959-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Radiation dosimeter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radiation detector readout circuit is provided which produces a radiation dose-rate readout from a detector even though the detector output may be highly energy dependent. A linear charge amplifier including an output charge pump circuit amplifies the charge signal pulses from the detector and pumps the charge into a charge storage capacitor. The discharge rate of the capacitor through a resistor is controlled to provide a time-dependent voltage which when integrated provides an output proportional to the dose-rate of radiation detected by the detector. This output may be converted to digital form for readout on a digital display.

Fox, Richard J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Radiation dosimeter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radiation detector readout circuit is provided which produces a radiation dose-rate readout from a detector even through the detector output may be highly energy dependent. A linear charge amplifier including an output charge pump circuit amplifies the charge signal pulses from the detector and pumps the charge into a charge storage capacitor. The discharge rate of the capacitor through a resistor is controlled to provide a time-dependent voltage which when integrated provides an output proportional to the dose-rate of radiation detected by the detector. This output may be converted to digital form for readout on a digital display.

Fox, R.J.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Radiation Hydrodynamics  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The discipline of radiation hydrodynamics is the branch of hydrodynamics in which the moving fluid absorbs and emits electromagnetic radiation, and in so doing modifies its dynamical behavior. That is, the net gain or loss of energy by parcels of the fluid material through absorption or emission of radiation are sufficient to change the pressure of the material, and therefore change its motion; alternatively, the net momentum exchange between radiation and matter may alter the motion of the matter directly. Ignoring the radiation contributions to energy and momentum will give a wrong prediction of the hydrodynamic motion when the correct description is radiation hydrodynamics. Of course, there are circumstances when a large quantity of radiation is present, yet can be ignored without causing the model to be in error. This happens when radiation from an exterior source streams through the problem, but the latter is so transparent that the energy and momentum coupling is negligible. Everything we say about radiation hydrodynamics applies equally well to neutrinos and photons (apart from the Einstein relations, specific to bosons), but in almost every area of astrophysics neutrino hydrodynamics is ignored, simply because the systems are exceedingly transparent to neutrinos, even though the energy flux in neutrinos may be substantial. Another place where we can do ''radiation hydrodynamics'' without using any sophisticated theory is deep within stars or other bodies, where the material is so opaque to the radiation that the mean free path of photons is entirely negligible compared with the size of the system, the distance over which any fluid quantity varies, and so on. In this case we can suppose that the radiation is in equilibrium with the matter locally, and its energy, pressure and momentum can be lumped in with those of the rest of the fluid. That is, it is no more necessary to distinguish photons from atoms, nuclei and electrons, than it is to distinguish hydrogen atoms from helium atoms, for instance. There are all just components of a mixed fluid in this case. So why do we have a special subject called ''radiation hydrodynamics'', when photons are just one of the many kinds of particles that comprise our fluid? The reason is that photons couple rather weakly to the atoms, ions and electrons, much more weakly than those particles couple with each other. Nor is the matter-radiation coupling negligible in many problems, since the star or nebula may be millions of mean free paths in extent. Radiation hydrodynamics exists as a discipline to treat those problems for which the energy and momentum coupling terms between matter and radiation are important, and for which, since the photon mean free path is neither extremely large nor extremely small compared with the size of the system, the radiation field is not very easy to calculate. In the theoretical development of this subject, many of the relations are presented in a form that is described as approximate, and perhaps accurate only to order of {nu}/c. This makes the discussion cumbersome. Why are we required to do this? It is because we are using Newtonian mechanics to treat our fluid, yet its photon component is intrinsically relativistic; the particles travel at the speed of light. There is a perfectly consistent relativistic kinetic theory, and a corresponding relativistic theory of fluid mechanics, which is perfectly suited to describing the photon gas. But it is cumbersome to use this for the fluid in general, and we prefer to avoid it for cases in which the flow velocity satisfies {nu} << c. The price we pay is to spend extra effort making sure that the source-sink terms relating to our relativistic gas component are included in the equations of motion in a form that preserves overall conservation of energy and momentum, something that would be automatic if the relativistic equations were used throughout.

Castor, J I

2003-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

379

Apparatus and method for identification of matrix materials in which transuranic elements are embedded using thermal neutron capture gamma-ray emission  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An invention is described that enables the quantitative simultaneous identification of the matrix materials in which fertile and fissile nuclides are embedded to be made along with the quantitative assay of the fertile and fissile materials. The invention also enables corrections for any absorption of neutrons by the matrix materials and by the measurement apparatus by the measurement of the prompt and delayed neutron flux emerging from a sample after the sample is interrogated by simultaneously applied neutrons and gamma radiation. High energy electrons are directed at a first target to produce gamma radiation. A second target receives the resulting pulsed gamma radiation and produces neutrons from the interaction with the gamma radiation. These neutrons are slowed by a moderator surrounding the sample and bathe the sample uniformly, generating second gamma radiation in the interaction. The gamma radiation is then resolved and quantitatively detected, providing a spectroscopic signature of the constituent elements contained in the matrix and in the materials within the vicinity of the sample. (LEW)

Close, D.A.; Franks, L.A.; Kocimski, S.M.

1984-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

380

Gamma-ray bursts, axion emission and string theory dilaton  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The emission of axions from supernovae is an interesting possibility to account for the Gamma-Ray Bursts provided their energy can be effectively converted into electromagnetic energy elsewhere. The connection between supernova and gamma-ray bursts has been recently confirmed by the observed correlation between the burst of April 25, 1998 and the supernova SN1998bw. We argue that the axion convertion into photons can be more efficient if one considers the coupling between an intermediate scale axion and the string theory dilaton along with the inclusion of string loops. We also discuss the way dilaton dynamics may allow for a more effective energy exchange with electromagnetic radiation in the expansion process of fireballs.

O. Bertolami

1999-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gamma radiation levels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Photospheric signatures imprinted on the gamma-ray burst spectra  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A solution is presented for the spectrum of high-energy gamma-ray burst photons confined to a quasi-thermal baryonic photosphere. The solution is valid in the steady-state limit assuming the region under consideration is optically thick to the continuously injected photons. It is shown that for a high luminosity photosphere, the non-thermal electrons resulting from gamma-ray Compton cooling lose their energy by upscattering the soft thermalised radiation. The resulting spectral modifications offer the possibility of diagnosing not only the burst comoving luminosity but also the baryon load of the ejecta. This model leads to a simple physical interpretation of X-ray rich bursts and anomalous low-energy slopes.

Enrico Ramirez-Ruiz

2005-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

382

Gamma ray spectroscopic analysis of building materials used in Tiruvannamalai, Tamilnadu, India  

SciTech Connect

Building materials cause direct radiation exposure because of their radium, thorium and potassium content. In this paper, samples of commonly used building materials in Tiruvannamalai, city, have been collected randomly over the city. The samples were tested for their radioactivity contents by using gamma spectroscopic measurements. All samples under investigation are within the recommended safety limit when used as building construction.

Ravisankar, R.; Vanasundari, K.; Suganya, M.; Chandrasekaran, A.; Raghu, Y.; Sivakumar, S.; Vijayagopal, P.; Meenakshisundaram, V. [Post Graduate and Research Department of Physics, Government Arts College, Tiruvannamalai-606603 (India); Department of Physics, Global Institute of Engineering and Technology, Vellore-632509, Tamilnadu (India); Department of Physics, Aarupadai Veedu Institute of Technology, Paiyanoor-603 104.Tamilnadu (India); Department of Physics, Arunai Engineering College, Tiruvannamalai-606603, Tamilnadu (India); Radiological Safety Division. Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102 (India)

2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

383

High spatial resolution X-ray and gamma ray imaging system using diffraction crystals  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and a device for high spatial resolution imaging of a plurality of sources of x-ray and gamma-ray radiation are provided. The device comprises a plurality of arrays, with each array comprising a plurality of elements comprising a first collimator, a diffracting crystal, a second collimator, and a detector.

Smither, Robert K. (Hinsdale, IL)

2011-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

384

Exclusive search for Higgs boson to gamma-gamma decay via vector boson fusion production mechanism.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??We perform an exclusive search for the Higgs boson to gamma-gamma decay via vector boson fusion. We utilize the characteristic features of vector boson fusion,… (more)

Rankin, Dylan Sheldon

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

The Diffuse Galactic Gamma-Ray Emission Model for GLAST LAT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Diffuse emission from the Milky Way dominates the gamma-ray sky. About 80% of the high-energy luminosity of the Milky Way comes from processes in the interstellar medium. The Galactic diffuse emission traces interactions of energetic particles, primarily protons and electrons, with the interstellar gas and radiation field, thus delivering information about cosmic-ray spectra and interstellar mass in distant locations. Additionally, the Galactic diffuse emission is the celestial foreground for the study of gamma-ray point sources and the extragalactic diffuse gamma-ray emission. We will report on the latest developments in the modelling of the Galactic diffuse emission, which will be used for the Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) investigations.

Porter, T A; Grenier, I A; Moskalenko, I V; Strong, A W

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

The Diffuse Galactic Gamma-Ray Emission Model for GLAST LAT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Diffuse emission from the Milky Way dominates the gamma-ray sky. About 80% of the high-energy luminosity of the Milky Way comes from processes in the interstellar medium. The Galactic diffuse emission traces interactions of energetic particles, primarily protons and electrons, with the interstellar gas and radiation field, thus delivering information about cosmic-ray spectra and interstellar mass in distant locations. Additionally, the Galactic diffuse emission is the celestial foreground for the study of gamma-ray point sources and the extragalactic diffuse gamma-ray emission. We will report on the latest developments in the modeling of the Galactic diffuse emission, which will be used for the Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) investigations.

Porter, T.A.; /UC, Santa Cruz; Digel, S.W.; /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Grenier, I.A.; /Saclay; Moskalenko, I.V.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Strong, A.W.; /Garching, Max Planck Inst., MPE

2007-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

387

Overview of the Gamma Reaction History Diagnostic for the National Ignition Facility (NIF)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) has a need for measuring gamma radiation as part of a nuclear diagnostic program. A new gamma-detection diagnostic uses 90º off-axis parabolic mirrors to relay Cherenkov light from a volume of pressurized gas. This nonimaging optical system has the high-speed detector placed at a stop position with the Cherenkov light delayed until after the prompt gammas have passed through the detector. Because of the wavelength range (250 to 700 nm), the optical element surface finish was a key design constraint. A cluster of four channels (each set to a different gas pressure) will collect the time histories for different energy ranges of gammas.

Malone, R M; Frogget, B C; Kaufman, M I; Tibbitts, A; Tunnell, T W; Evans, S C; Herrmann, H W; Kim, Y H; Mack, J M; Young, C S; McGillivray, K D; Palagi, M J

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Fundamental physics in space with the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Successfully launched in June 2008, the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, formerly named GLAST, has been observing the high-energy gamma-ray sky with unprecedented sensitivity for more than two years, opening a new window on a wide variety of exotic astrophysical objects. This paper is a short overview of the main science highlights, aimed at non-specialists, with emphasis on those which are more directly connected with the study of fundamental physics---particularly the search for signals of new physics in the diffuse gamma-ray emission and in the cosmic radiation and the study of Gamma-Ray Burst as laboratories for testing possible violations of the Lorentz invariance.

Luca Baldini for the Fermi LAT Collaboration

2011-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

389

RADIATION DETECTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radiation detector of the type is described wherein a condenser is directly connected to the electrodes for the purpose of performing the dual function of a guard ring and to provide capacitance coupling for resetting the detector system.

Wilson, H.N.; Glass, F.M.

1960-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

390

Gamma Survey of a Permeable Reactive Barrier at Monticello, Utah...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Gamma Survey of a Permeable Reactive Barrier at Monticello, Utah Gamma Survey of a Permeable Reactive Barrier at Monticello, Utah Gamma Survey of a Permeable Reactive Barrier at...

391

Gamma Industry Processing Alliance Overview | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Gamma Industry Processing Alliance Overview Gamma Industry Processing Alliance Overview Gamma Industry Processing Alliance Overview More Documents & Publications 2011 NTSF Meeting...

392

Search for the b --> d gamma process  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report search results for the flavor-changing neutral current process b --> d gamma with a data sample containing 274 million B meson pairs accumulated at the Upsilon(4S) resonance with the Belle detector at KEKB. We studied the exclusive decays B- --> rho- gamma, B0bar --> rho0 gamma, and B0bar --> omega gamma, and find no significant signal. We set an upper limit for a combined branching fraction Br(B --> (rho,omega) gamma) rho- gamma assuming an isospin relation between the three modes.

K. Abe; for the Belle Collaboration

2004-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

393

NIST Radiation thermometry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radiation thermometry. Summary: ... Description: Radiation thermometers are calibrated using a range of variable-temperature blackbodies. ...

2011-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

394

NIST Optical Radiation Group  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Optical Radiation Group. Welcome. The Optical Radiation Group maintains, improves, and disseminates the national scales ...

2013-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

395

ON THE RECENTLY DISCOVERED CORRELATIONS BETWEEN GAMMA-RAY AND X-RAY PROPERTIES OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS  

SciTech Connect

Recently, many correlations between the prompt {gamma}-ray emission properties and the X-ray afterglow properties of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) have been inferred from a comprehensive analysis of the X-ray light curves of more than 650 GRBs measured with the Swift X-Ray Telescope (Swift/XRT) during the years 2004-2010. We show that these correlations are predicted by the cannonball (CB) model of GRBs. They result from the dependence of GRB observables on the bulk motion Lorentz factor and viewing angle of the jet of highly relativistic plasmoids (CBs) that produces the observed radiations by interaction with the medium through which it propagates. Moreover, despite their different physical origins, long GRBs (LGRBs) and short-hard bursts (SHBs) in the CB model share similar kinematic correlations, which can be combined into triple correlations satisfied by both LGRBs and SHBs.

Dado, Shlomo; Dar, Arnon [Physics Department, Technion, Haifa 32000 (Israel)

2013-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

396

Constraints on dark matter annihilations from diffuse gamma-ray emission in the Galaxy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent advances in gamma-ray cosmic ray, infrared and radio astronomy have allowed us to develop a significantly better understanding of the galactic medium properties in the last few years. In this work using the DRAGON code, that numerically solves the CR propagation equation and calculating gamma-ray emissivities in a 2-dimensional grid enclosing the Galaxy, we study in a self consistent manner models for the galactic diffuse gamma-ray emission. Our models are cross-checked to both the available CR and gamma-ray data. We address the extend to which dark matter annihilations in the Galaxy can contribute to the diffuse gamma-ray flux towards different directions on the sky. Moreover we discuss the impact that astrophysical uncertainties of non DM nature, have on the derived gamma-ray limits. Such uncertainties are related to the diffusion properties on the Galaxy, the interstellar gas and the interstellar radiation field energy densities. Light ~10 GeV dark matter annihilating dominantly to hadrons is more strongly constrained by gamma-ray observations towards the inner parts of the Galaxy and influenced the most by assumptions of the gas distribution; while TeV scale DM annihilating dominantly to leptons has its tightest constraints from observations towards the galactic center avoiding the galactic disk plane, with the main astrophysical uncertainty being the radiation field energy density. In addition, we present a method of deriving constraints on the dark matter distribution profile from the diffuse gamma-ray spectra. These results critically depend on the assumed mass of the dark matter particles and the type of its end annihilation products.

Maryam Tavakoli; Ilias Cholis; Carmelo Evoli; Piero Ullio

2013-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

397

Significance of radiation effects in solid radioactive waste  

SciTech Connect

Proposed NRC criteria for disposal of high-level nuclear waste require development of waste packages to contain radionuclide for at least 1000 years, and design of repositories to prevent radionuclide release at an annual rate greater than 1 part in 100,000 of the total activity. The high-level wastes that are now temporarily stored as aqueous salts, sludges, and calcines must be converted to high-integrity solid forms that resist deterioration from radiation and other effects of long-term storage. Spent fuel may be encapsulated for similar long-term storage. Candidate waste forms beside the spent fuel elements themselves, include borosilicate and related glasses, mineral-like crystalline ceramics, concrete formulations, and metal-matrix glass or ceramic composites. these waste forms will sustain damage produced by beta-gamma radiation up to 10/sup 12/ rads, by alpha radiation up to 10/sup 19/ particles/g, by internal helium generation greater than about 0.1 atom percent, and by the atom transmutations accompanying radioactive decay. Current data indicate that under these conditions the glass forms suffer only minor volume changes, stored energy deposition, and leachability effects. The crystalline ceramics appear susceptible to the potentially more severe alterations accompanying metamictization and natural analogs of candidate materials are being examined to establish their suitability as waste forms. Helium concentrations in the waste forms are generally below thresholds for severe damage in either glass or crystalline ceramics at low temperatures, but microstructural effects are not well characterized. Transmutation effects remain to be established.

Permar, P H; McDonell, W R

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Neutrinos from Gamma Ray Bursts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show that the detection of neutrinos from a typical gamma ray burst requires a kilometer-scale detector. We argue that large bursts should be visible with the neutrino telescopes under construction. We emphasize the 3 techniques by which neutrino telescopes can perform this search: by triggering on i) bursts of muons from muon neutrinos, ii) muons from air cascades initiated by high energy gamma rays and iii) showers made by relatively low energy ($\\simeq 100\\,\\mev$) electron neutrinos. Timing of neutrino-photon coincidences may yield a measurement of the neutrino mass to order $10^{-5}$~eV, an interesting range in light of the solar neutrino anomaly.

F. Halzen; G. Jaczko

1996-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

399

Neutron and Gamma Probe Application to Hanford Tank 241-SY-101  

SciTech Connect

A neutron (moisture-sensitive) and gamma (in-situ radiation) probe technique has been utilized at a number of Hanford radioactive waste tanks for many years. This technology has been adapted for use in tank 241-SY-101's two Multifunction Instrument Trees (MITs) which have a hollow dry-well center opening two inches (51 cm) in diameter. These probes provide scans starting within a few inches of the tank bottom and traversing up through the top of the tank revealing a variety of waste features as a function of tank elevation. These features have been correlated with void fraction data obtained independently from two other devices, the Retained Gas Sampler (RGS) and the Void Fraction Instrument (VFI). The MIT probes offer the advantage of nearly continuous count-rate versus elevation scans and they can be operated significantly more often and at lower cost than temperature probes or the RGS or VFI devices while providing better depth resolution. The waste level in tank 241-SY-101 had been rising at higher rates than expected during 1998 and early 1999 indicating an increasing amount of trapped gas in the waste. The use of the MIT probes has assisted in evaluating changes in crust thickness and level and also in estimating relative changes in gas stored in the crust. This information is important in assuring that the tank remains in a safe configuration and will support safe waste transfer when those operations take place.

CANNON, N.S.

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Gamma-rays from PSR B1259 -63  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The high-energy gamma-ray emission discovered using the H.E.S.S. telescopes from the binary system PSR B1259 -63, is modelled using an extension of the approach that successfully predicted it. We find that the simultaneous INTEGRAL and H.E.S.S. data permit both a model with dominant radiative losses, high pulsar wind Lorentz factor and modest efficiency as well as one with dominant adiabatic losses, a slower wind and higher efficiency. Additional, simultaneous, X-ray and TeV data sets are needed to lift this degeneracy.

J. G. Kirk; Lewis Ball; S. Johnston

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gamma radiation levels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Tritium monitor with improved gamma-ray discrimination  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus and method for selective measurement of tritium oxide in an environment which may include other radioactive components and gamma radiation, the measurement including the selective separation of tritium oxide from a sample gas through a membrane into a counting gas, the generation of electrical pulses individually representative by rise times of tritium oxide and other radioactivity in the counting gas, separation of the pulses by rise times, and counting of those pulses representative of tritium oxide. The invention further includes the separate measurement of any tritium in the sample gas by oxidizing the tritium to tritium oxide and carrying out a second separation and analysis procedure as described above.

Cox, Samson A. (Downers Grove, IL); Bennett, Edgar F. (Downers Grove, IL); Yule, Thomas J. (West Chicago, IL)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Tritium monitor with improved gamma-ray discrimination  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus and method are presented for selective measurement of tritium oxide in an environment which may include other radioactive components and gamma radiation, the measurement including the selective separation of tritium oxide from a sample gas through a membrane into a counting gas, the generation of electrical pulses individually representative by rise times of tritium oxide and other radioactivity in the counting gas, separation of the pulses by rise times, and counting of those pulses representative of tritium oxide. The invention further includes the separate measurement of any tritium in the sample gas by oxidizing the tritium to tritium oxide and carrying out a second separation and analysis procedure as described above.

Cox, S.A.; Bennett, E.F.; Yule, T.J.

1982-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

403

Wood-Polymer composites obtained by gamma irradiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this work we impregnate three Peruvian woods (Calycophy spruceanum Be, Aniba amazonica Meiz and Hura crepitans L) with styrene-polyester resin and methyl methacrylate. The polymerization of the system was promoted by gamma radiation and the experimental optimal condition was obtained with styrene-polyester 1:1 and 15 kGy. The obtained composites show reduced water absorption and better mechanical properties compared to the original wood. The structure of the wood-polymer composites was studied by light microscopy. Water absorption and hardness were also obtained.

Gago, J. [Instituto Peruano de Energia Nuclear, Av. Canada 1470 Lima 41 (Peru); Lopez, A.; Rodriguez, J. [Instituto Peruano de Energia Nuclear, Av. Canada 1470 Lima 41 (Peru); Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional de Ingenieria, Av. Tupac Amaru 210, Lima 25 (Peru); Santiago, J. [Instituto Peruano de Energia Nuclear, Av. Canada 1470 Lima 41 (Peru); Facultad de Quimica e Ing. Quimica, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima 1 (Peru); Acevedo, M. [Facultad de Ciencias Forestales, Universidad Nacional Agraria la Molina, Lima 12 (Peru)

2007-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

404

Gamma-Ray Bursts and Dark Energy - Dark Matter interaction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this work Gamma Ray Burst (GRB) data is used to place constraints on a putative coupling between dark energy and dark matter. Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) constraints from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey II (SDSS-II) first-year results, the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMBR) shift parameter from WMAP seven year results and the baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) peak from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) are also discussed. The prospects for the field are assessed, as more GRB events become available.

T. Barreiro; O. Bertolami; P. Torres

2010-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

405

Gamma ray astrophysics: the EGRET results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cosmic gamma rays provide insight into some of the most dynamic processes in the Universe. At the dawn of a new generation of gamma-ray telescopes, this review summarizes results from the Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory, the principal predecessor mission studying high-energy photons in the 100 MeV energy range. EGRET viewed a gamma-ray sky dominated by prominent emission from the Milky Way, but featuring an array of other sources, including quasars, pulsars, gamma-ray bursts, and many sources that remain unidentified. A central feature of the EGRET results was the high degree of variability seen in many gamma-ray sources, indicative of the powerful forces at work in objects visible to gamma-ray telescopes.

D J Thompson

2008-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

406

Radiation-hardened microelectronics for accelerators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ionization and displacement phenomena in semiconducting materials are reviewed. The different classes of radiation discussed include fast neutron, x-rays and gamma rays and heavy charged particles. Both transient and steady state phenomena will be discussed. How these basic effects lead to change in the electrical characteristics of transistors and diodes and the functionality of intergrated circuits are summarized. The fundamental radiation limits for various semiconductor technologies are summarized. Recommendations and precautions are given regarding the applicability of various microelectronic technologies to different accelerator environments. 14 refs., 7 tabs.

Gover, J.E.; Fischer, T.A.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Window for radiation detectors and the like  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved x- and gamma-radiation and particle transparent window for the environment-controlling enclosure of various types of radiation and particle detectors is provided by a special graphite foil of a thickness of from about 0.1 to 1 mil. The graphite must have very parallel hexagonal planes with a mosaic spread no greater than 5$sup 0$ to have the necessary strength in thin sections to support one atmosphere or more of pressure. Such graphite is formed by hot- pressing and annealing pyrolytically deposited graphite and thereafter stripping off layers of sufficient thickness to form the window.

Sparks, C.J. Jr.; Ogle, J.C.

1975-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

408

The Diverse Environments of Gamma-Ray Bursts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of a Very Bright Gamma- Ray Burst in a Galactic Halo 3.1Galaxies of Dark Gamma-Ray Bursts: Observational Constraints1.3 Gamma-Ray Burst Classi?cation . . . . . . 1.4 Gamma-Ray

Perley, Daniel Alan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Bremsstrahlung {gamma}-ray generation by electrons from gas jets irradiated by laser pulses for radiographic testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electron generation from a gas jet irradiated by low energy femtosecond laser pulses is studied experimentally as a promising source of radiation for radioisotope-free {gamma}-ray imaging systems. The calculated yield of {gamma}-rays in the 0.5-2 MeV range, produced by low-average-power lasers and gas targets, exceeds the yields from solid tape targets up to 60 times. In addition, an effect of quasi-mono energetic electrons on {gamma}-ray imaging is also discussed.

Oishi, Yuji; Nayuki, Takuya; Zhidkov, Alexei; Fujii, Takashi; Nemoto, Koshichi [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Yokosuka, Kanagawa 240-0196 (Japan); Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Yokosuka, Kanagawa 240-0196, Japan and Photon Pioneers Center in Osaka University, Yamadaoka 2-1, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Yokosuka, Kanagawa 240-0196 (Japan)

2012-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

410

High energy Gamma-Ray Bursts as a result of the collapse and total annihilation of neutralino clumps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rare astrophysical events - cosmological gamma-ray bursts with energies over GeV - are considered as an origin of information about some SUSY parameters. The model of generation of the powerful gamma-ray bursts is proposed. According to this model the gamma-ray burst represents as a result of the collapse and the total annihilation of the neutralino clump. About 80 % of the clump mass radiates during about 100 second at the final stage of annihilation. The annihilation spectrum and its characteristic energies are calculated in the framework of Split Higgsino model.

R. S. Pasechnik; V. A. Beylin; V. I. Kuksa; G. M. Vereshkov

2006-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

411

Light Curves of Swift Gamma Ray Bursts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent observations from the Swift gamma-ray burst mission indicate that a fraction of gamma ray bursts are characterized by a canonical behaviour of the X-ray afterglows. We present an effective theory which allows us to account for X-ray light curves of both (short - long) gamma ray bursts and X-ray rich flashes. We propose that gamma ray bursts originate from massive magnetic powered pulsars.

Paolo Cea

2006-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

412

FUNDAMENTALS OF GAMMA TITANIUM ALUMINIDES: VI ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

FUNDAMENTALS OF GAMMA TITANIUM ALUMINIDES: Session VI: Microstructure/Property Relationships--Creep and Environmental Effects. Sponsored by: ...

413

FUNDAMENTALS OF GAMMA TITANIUM ALUMINIDES: IV ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

FUNDAMENTALS OF GAMMA TITANIUM ALUMINIDES: Session IV: Microstructure/Property Relationships--Strength, Plasticity, and Toughness. Sponsored by: ...

414

FUNDAMENTALS OF GAMMA TITANIUM ALUMINIDES: III ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

FUNDAMENTALS OF GAMMA TITANIUM ALUMINIDES: Session III: Processing, Microstructure and Properties. Sponsored by: MSD Flow & Fracture and Phase ...

415

FUNDAMENTALS OF GAMMA TITANIUM ALUMINIDES: V ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

FUNDAMENTALS OF GAMMA TITANIUM ALUMINIDES: Session V: Microstructure/Property Relationships--Fatigue, Fracture, and Damage Modeling.

416

RADIOLYTIC HYDROGEN GENERATION INSAVANNAH RIVER SITE (SRS) HIGH LEVEL WASTETANKS COMPARISON OF SRS AND HANFORDMODELING PREDICTIONS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the high level waste tanks at the Savannah River Site (SRS), hydrogen is produced continuously by interaction of the radiation in the tank with water in the waste. Consequently, the vapor spaces of the tanks are purged to prevent the accumulation of H{sub 2} and possible formation of a flammable mixture in a tank. Personnel at SRS have developed an empirical model to predict the rate of H{sub 2} formation in a tank. The basis of this model is the prediction of the G value for H{sub 2} production. This G value is the number of H{sub 2} molecules produced per 100 eV of radiolytic energy absorbed by the waste. Based on experimental studies it was found that the G value for H{sub 2} production from beta radiation and from gamma radiation were essentially equal. The G value for H{sub 2} production from alpha radiation was somewhat higher. Thus, the model has two equations, one for beta/gamma radiation and one for alpha radiation. Experimental studies have also indicated that both G values are decreased by the presence of nitrate and nitrite ions in the waste. These are the main scavengers for the precursors of H{sub 2} in the waste; thus the equations that were developed predict G values for hydrogen production as a function of the concentrations of these two ions in waste. Knowing the beta/gamma and alpha heat loads in the waste allows one to predict the total generation rate for hydrogen in a tank. With this prediction a ventilation rate can be established for each tank to ensure that a flammable mixture is not formed in the vapor space in a tank. Recently personnel at Hanford have developed a slightly different model for predicting hydrogen G values. Their model includes the same precursor for H{sub 2} as the SRS model but also includes an additional precursor not in the SRS model. Including the second precursor for H{sub 2} leads to different empirical equations for predicting the G values for H{sub 2} as a function of the nitrate and nitrite concentrations in the waste. The difference in the two models has led to the questions of how different are the results predicted by the two models and which model predicts the more conservative (larger) G values. More conservative G values would predict higher H{sub 2} generation rates that would require higher ventilation rates in the SRS tanks. This report compares predictions based on the two models at various nitrate and nitrite concentrations in the SRS HLW tanks for both beta/gamma and for alpha radiation. It also compares predicted G values with those determined by actually measuring the H{sub 2} production from four SRS HLW tanks (Tanks 32H, 35H, 39H, and 42H). Lastly, the H{sub 2} generation rates predicted by the two models are compared for the 47 active SRS high level waste tanks using the most recent tank nitrate and nitrite concentrations and the beta/gamma and alpha heat loads for each tank. The predictions of the models for total H{sub 2} generation rates from the 47 active SRS waste were, for the most part, similar. For example, the predictions for both models applied to 25 tanks agreed within {+-}10% of each other. For the remaining 22 tanks, the SRS prediction was more conservative for 9 tanks (maximum 29% higher) and the Hanford prediction was more conservative for 13 tanks (maximum 19% higher). When comparing G values predicted by the equations presuming only alpha radiation or only beta/gamma was present the results were somewhat different. The results of predictions for alpha radiation, at the 47 current nitrate and nitrite concentrations in the SRS tanks indicated that all the SRS predictions were higher (up to 30%) than the Hanford predictions and thus more conservative. For beta/gamma radiation the predictions for both models agreed to {+-}10% for 18 of the combinations, the Hanford model predicted higher values (11 up to 17%) for 25 of the concentrations considered, and the SRS model predicted higher G values for the remaining two combinations (12 and 17%). For the four SRS tanks, where we compared measured G values to those predicted by the two differen

Crawford, C; Ned Bibler, N

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

417

Radiation Detector R&D | Global and Regional Solutions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation Detector and Nonproliferation R&D Group Radiation Detector and Nonproliferation R&D Group A major element in nonproliferation, arms control verification, nuclear materials safeguards and homeland security is the ability to detect, identify and measure nuclear, radioactive and chemical materials. BNL has a significant and world-class capability in radiation detection including the design and fabrication of advanced detector systems for scientific R&D and nonproliferation applications that has evolved over more than six decades. To support nonproliferation, arms control, safeguards and homeland security, BNL has focused on advanced radiation detector systems that offer room temperature operation with high energy resolution for gamma-ray detectors, imaging and direction indicating capabilities for both gamma-ray

418

Radiation receiver  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The apparatus for collecting radiant energy and converting same to alternate energy form includes a housing having an interior space and a radiation transparent window allowing, for example, solar radiation to be received in the interior space of the housing. Means are provided for passing a stream of fluid past said window and for injecting radiation absorbent particles in said fluid stream. The particles absorb the radiation and because of their very large surface area, quickly release the heat to the surrounding fluid stream. The fluid stream particle mixture is heated until the particles vaporize. The fluid stream is then allowed to expand in, for example, a gas turbine to produce mechanical energy. In an aspect of the present invention properly sized particles need not be vaporized prior to the entrance of the fluid stream into the turbine, as the particles will not damage the turbine blades. In yet another aspect of the invention, conventional fuel injectors are provided to inject fuel into the fluid stream to maintain the proper temperature and pressure of the fluid stream should the source of radiant energy be interrupted. In yet another aspect of the invention, an apparatus is provided which includes means for providing a hot fluid stream having hot particles disbursed therein which can radiate energy, means for providing a cooler fluid stream having cooler particles disbursed therein, which particles can absorb radiant energy and means for passing the hot fluid stream adjacent the cooler fluid stream to warm the cooler fluid and cooler particles by the radiation from the hot fluid and hot particles. 5 figs.

Hunt, A.J.

1983-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

419

Radiation receiver  

SciTech Connect

The apparatus for collecting radiant energy and converting same to alternate energy form includes a housing having an interior space and a radiation transparent window allowing, for example, solar radiation to be received in the interior space of the housing. Means are provided for passing a stream of fluid past said window and for injecting radiation absorbent particles in said fluid stream. The particles absorb the radiation and because of their very large surface area, quickly release the heat to the surrounding fluid stream. The fluid stream particle mixture is heated until the particles vaporize. The fluid stream is then allowed to expand in, for example, a gas turbine to produce mechanical energy. In an aspect of the present invention properly sized particles need not be vaporized prior to the entrance of the fluid stream into the turbine, as the particles will not damage the turbine blades. In yet another aspect of the invention, conventional fuel injectors are provided to inject fuel into the fluid stream to maintain the proper temperature and pressure of the fluid stream should the source of radiant energy be interrupted. In yet another aspect of the invention, an apparatus is provided which includes means for providing a hot fluid stream having hot particles disbursed therein which can radiate energy, means for providing a cooler fluid stream having cooler particles disbursed therein, which particles can absorb radiant energy and means for passing the hot fluid stream adjacent the cooler fluid stream to warm the cooler fluid and cooler particles by the radiation from the hot fluid and hot particles.

Hunt, Arlon J. (Oakland, CA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

GAMMA DETECTOR RESPONSE/SOIL CONCENTRATION CORRELATION STUDY AT THE AAR MANUFACTURING, INC. SITE, LIVONIA, MICHIGAN  

SciTech Connect

At the NRC?s request, ORAU conducted surveys of the AAR Manufacturing site during the period of September 25 through September 27, 2012. The survey activities included walkover surveys and sampling activities. Once the survey team was onsite, the NRC personnel decided to forgo survey activities in the ?New Addition? and the pickling area. Areas of the planned study boundary were inaccessible due to overgrowth/large pieces of concrete covering the soil surface; therefore, the study boundary was redefined. Gamma walkover scans of the site boundary and ?front yard? identified multiple areas of elevated gamma radiation. As a result, two judgmental samples were collected. Sample results were above thorium background levels The answer to the PSQ relating to the relationship between thorium concentration in soil and NaI instrument response is ?Yes.? NaI instrument response can be used as a predictor of Th-232 concentration in the 0 to 1 m layer. An R2 value of 0.79 was determined for the surface soil relationship, thus satisfying the DQOs. Moreover, the regression was cross-checked by comparing the predicted Th-232 soil core concentration to the average Th-232 concentration (Section 5.3.2). Based on the cross-check, the regression equation provides a reasonable estimate for the Th-232 concentration at the judgmental locations. Consideration must be given when applying this equation to other soil areas of the site. If the contamination was heterogeneously distributed, and not distributed in a discrete layer as it was in the study area, then using the regression equation to predict Th-232 concentration would not be applicable.

ALTIC, NICK A

2013-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

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421

Stellar Sources of Gamma-ray Bursts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Correlation analysis of Swift gamma-ray burst coordinates and nearby star locations (catalog Gliese) reveals 4 coincidences with good angular accuracy. The random probability is 4\\times 10^{-5}, so evidencing that coincident stars are indeed gamma-ray burst sources. Some additional search of stellar gamma-ray bursts is discussed.

Luchkov, B I

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Fermi Observations of Gamma?ray Bursts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The gamma?ray emission mechanism of Gamma?ray bursts (GRBs) are still unknown. Fermi Gamma?ray Space Telescope successfully detected high?energy (> 100 MeV) emission from 17 GRBs since its launch. Fermi revealed the distinct temporal behaviors and extra spectral component from high?energy emission. These new observational results are driving many theoretical implications

Masanori Ohno; The Fermi?LAT collaborations; The GBM collaborations

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Multifrequency Observations of Gamma-Ray Burst  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Neither a flaring nor a quiescent counterpart to a gamma-ray burst has yet been convincingly identified at any wavelength region. The present status of the search for counterparts of classical gamma-ray bursts is given. Particular emphasis is put on the search for flaring counterparts, i.e. emission during or shortly after the gamma-ray emission.

J. Greiner

1995-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

424

Radiation transport phenomena and modeling - part A: Codes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The need to understand how particle radiation (high-energy photons and electrons) from a variety of sources affects materials and electronics has motivated the development of sophisticated computer codes that describe how radiation with energies from 1.0 keV to 100.0 GeV propagates through matter. Predicting radiation transport is the necessary first step in predicting radiation effects. The radiation transport codes that are described here are general-purpose codes capable of analyzing a variety of radiation environments including those produced by nuclear weapons (x-rays, gamma rays, and neutrons), by sources in space (electrons and ions) and by accelerators (x-rays, gamma rays, and electrons). Applications of these codes include the study of radiation effects on electronics, nuclear medicine (imaging and cancer treatment), and industrial processes (food disinfestation, waste sterilization, manufacturing.) The primary focus will be on coupled electron-photon transport codes, with some brief discussion of proton transport. These codes model a radiation cascade in which electrons produce photons and vice versa. This coupling between particles of different types is important for radiation effects. For instance, in an x-ray environment, electrons are produced that drive the response in electronics. In an electron environment, dose due to bremsstrahlung photons can be significant once the source electrons have been stopped.

Lorence, L.J.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Neutron/gamma coupled library generation and gamma transport calculation with KARMA 1.2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

KAERI has developed a lattice transport calculation code KARMA and its multi-group cross section library generation system. Recently, the multi-group cross section library generation system has included a gamma cross section generation capability and KARMA also has been improved to include a gamma transport calculation module. This paper addresses the multi-group gamma cross section generation capability for the KARMA 1.2 code and the preliminary test results of the KARMA 1.2 gamma transport calculations. The gamma transport calculation with KARMA 1.2 gives the gamma flux, gamma smeared power, and gamma energy deposition distributions. The results of the KARMA gamma calculations were compared with those of HELIOS and they showed that KARMA 1.2 gives reasonable gamma transport calculation results. (authors)

Hong, S. G. [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Kyung Hee Univ., 446-701 Deogyeong-daero, GiHeung-gu, Yongin, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Kim, K. S.; Cho, J. Y.; Lee, K. H. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Inst., 305-353 Duckjin-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejon (Korea, Republic of)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

An evolution of technologies and applications of gamma imagers in the nuclear cycle industry  

SciTech Connect

The tracking of radiation contamination and distribution has become a high priority in the nuclear cycle industry in order to respect the ALARA principle which is a main challenge during decontamination and dismantling activities. To support this need, AREVA/CANBERRA and CEA LIST have been actively carrying out research and development on a gamma-radiation imager. In this paper we will present the new generation of gamma camera, called GAMPIX. This system is based on the Timepix chip, hybridized with a CdTe substrate. A coded mask could be used in order to increase the sensitivity of the camera. Moreover, due to the USB connection with a standard computer, this gamma camera is immediately operational and user-friendly. The final system is a very compact gamma camera (global weight is less than 1 kg without any shielding) which could be used as a hand-held device for radioprotection purposes. In this article, we present the main characteristics of this new generation of gamma camera and we expose experimental results obtained during in situ measurements. Even though we present preliminary results the final product is under industrialization phase to address various applications specifications. (authors)

Khalil, R. A. [AREVA/CANBERRA - Nuclear Measurements Business Unit (France); Carrel, F. [CEA, LIST, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Menaa, N.; De Toro, D. [AREVA/CANBERRA - Nuclear Measurements Business Unit (France); Schoepff, V.; Gmar, M. [CEA, LIST, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Varet, T. [AREVA/Nuclear Site Value Development Business Unit (France); Toubon, H. [AREVA/CANBERRA - Nuclear Measurements Business Unit (France)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

TeV Burst of Gamma-Ray Bursts and Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Some recent experiments detecting very high energy (VHE) gamma-rays above 10-20 TeV independently reported VHE bursts for some of bright gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). If these signals are truly from GRBs, these GRBs must emit a much larger amount of energy as VHE gamma-rays than in the ordinary photon energy range of GRBs (keV-MeV). We show that such extreme phenomena can be reasonably explained by synchrotron radiation of protons accelerated to \\sim 10^{20-21} eV, which has been predicted by Totani (1998a). Protons seem to carry about (m_p/m_e) times larger energy than electrons, and hence the total energy liberated by one GRB becomes as large as \\sim 10^{56} (\\Delta \\Omega / 4 \\pi) ergs. Therefore a strong beaming of GRB emission is highly likely. Extension of the VHE spectrum beyond 20 TeV gives a nearly model-independent lower limit of the Lorentz factor of GRBs, as $\\gamma \\gtilde 500$. Furthermore, our model gives the correct energy range and time variability of ordinary keV-MeV gamma-rays of GRBs by synchrotron radiation of electrons. Therefore the VHE bursts of GRBs strongly support the hypothesis that ultra high energy cosmic rays observed on the Earth are produced by GRBs.

Tomonori Totani

1998-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

428

The Use of Gamma-Ray Imaging to Improve Portal Monitor Performance  

SciTech Connect

We have constructed a prototype, rapid-deployment portal monitor that uses visible-light and gamma-ray imaging to allow simultaneous monitoring of multiple lanes of traffic from the side of a roadway. Our Roadside Tracker uses automated target acquisition and tracking (TAT) software to identify and track vehicles in visible light images. The field of view of the visible camera overlaps with and is calibrated to that of a one-dimensional gamma-ray imager. The TAT code passes information on when vehicles enter and exit the system field of view and when they cross gamma-ray pixel boundaries. Based on this in-formation, the gamma-ray imager "harvests" the gamma-ray data specific to each vehicle, integrating its radiation signature for the entire time that it is in the field of view. In this fashion we are able to generate vehicle-specific radiation signatures and avoid source confusion problems that plague nonimaging approaches to the same problem.

Ziock, Klaus-Peter [ORNL; Collins, Jeff [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Fabris, Lorenzo [ORNL; Gee, Timothy Felix [ORNL; Goddard, James K [ORNL; Habte Ghebretatios, Frezghi [ORNL; Karnowski, Thomas Paul [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

On an Improvement of the Planck radiation Energy Distribution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The probability distribution function for thermodynamics and econophysics is obtained by solving an equilibrium equation. This approach is different from the common one of optimizing the entropy of the system or obtaining the state of maximum probability, which usually obtains as a result the Boltzmann distribution. The Gamma distribution is proposed as a better equation to describe the blackbody radiation in substitution of Planck's radiation equation. Also, a new form of entropy is proposed, that maintains the correct relation with the Clausius' formula.

Diego Saa

2006-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

430

Short communication: A software component for estimating solar radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

GSRad (global solar radiation) is a software component containing models to estimate extra-terrestrial and ground-level solar radiation (global and photosynthetically active; direct, diffuse, and reflected components) from alternative methods. Radiation ... Keywords: Atmospheric transmissivity, Component architecture, GSRad, Model extensibility, Solar radiation fractions

M. Donatelli; L. Carlini; G. Bellocchi

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Radiation Protection Act (Pennsylvania)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This Act combines the radiation safety provisions of The Atomic Energy Development and Radiation Control Act and the Environmental Radiation Protection Act, and empowers the Department of...

432

Radiation Tolerant Metallic Multilayers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Strategies that can alleviate radiation damage may assist the design of radiation tolerant materials. We will summarize our recent studies on radiation damage in ...

433

NEW SOURCES OF RADIATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Project Report No. 75/07.IBL 79M0733 Fig. 20. Radiation emission pattern by electronsWinick, Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory. Fig. 21.

Schimmerling, W.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Radiation-induced angiosarcoma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1a Figure 1b Figure 1. Radiation-induced angiosarcoma in afollowing completion of radiation therapy. Figure 2a Figurecell histiocytosis after radiation for breast carcinoma: can

Anzalone, C Lane; Cohen, Philip R; Diwan, Abdul H; Prieto, Victor G

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Measurement of the gamma gamma* -> pi0 transition form factor  

SciTech Connect

We study the reaction e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} e{sup +}e{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} in the single tag mode and measure the differential cross section d{sigma}/dQ{sup 2} and the {gamma}{gamma}* {yields} {pi}{sup 0} transition form factor in the mometum transfer range from 4 to 40 GeV{sup 2}. At Q{sup 2} > 10 GeV{sup 2} the measured form factor exceeds the asymptotic limit predicted by perturbative QCD. The analysis is based on 442 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected at PEP-II with the BABAR detector at e{sup +}e{sup -} center-of-mass energies near 10.6 GeV.

Aubert, B.

2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

436

Radiation Management Act (Oklahoma) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Radiation Management Act (Oklahoma) Radiation Management Act (Oklahoma) Radiation Management Act (Oklahoma) < Back Eligibility Utility Investor-Owned Utility Program Info State Oklahoma Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality This Act establishes The Department of Environmental Quality as the designated official agency of the State of Oklahoma for all regulatory activities for the use of atomic energy and sources of radiation, except for the use of