Sample records for gamma parameter corresponds

  1. A one-parameter refinement of the Razumov-Stroganov correspondence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luigi Cantini; Andrea Sportiello

    2012-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce and prove a one-parameter refinement of the Razumov-Stroganov correspondence. This is achieved for fully-packed loop configurations (FPL) on domains which generalize the square domain, and which are endowed with the gyration operation. We consider one given side of the domain, and FPLs such that the only straight-line tile on this side is black. We show that the enumeration vector associated to such FPLs, weighted according to the position of the straight line and refined according to the link pattern for the black boundary points, is the ground state of the scattering matrix, an integrable one-parameter deformation of the O(1) Dense Loop Model Hamiltonian. We show how the original Razumov-Stroganov correspondence, and a conjecture formulated by Di Francesco in 2004, follow from our results.

  2. Estimation of the parameters in the generalized gamma distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Claude Ann

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    are printed out. C PROGRAM } ~ ESTIMATION OF PARAMETERS OF GENERALIZED GAMMA DISTRIBUTION C DIMENSION XO(500 ) eEPT(500) eFREQ (500) ePT& 500) ekF(500) ~ XN(500 ') DI MENS ION X & 2e 500 ) ~ S ( 2e 3) e Y (3 ~ '500 ) e TFREQ (3e 500 ) ~ SUMX (2 ) READ (5 e...+I )/TFREQ(2? I I ) ) Y C 3 ? I - I ) ~ALOG ( TFREO I 3 ~ I+I ) /TFREQ (3 ~ 1-1 ) ) WRITE(6?652) 81 L~LI ~ I 0~EXP(ALPHA) OS~OCH)2 ~ WRITE(6 ~ 300) FORMATtlHI ~ 46X?27HGENERALIZED GAMMA VARIABLES)r WRITE(6?301 ) (XN( J) ?J?:I )N) FORMAT( I 0 (9X? IOFI...

  3. Cosmological Parameters From Supernovae Associated With Gamma-ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Xue; Wojtak, Rados?aw

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report estimates of the cosmological parameters $\\Omega_m$ and $\\Omega_{\\Lambda}$ obtained using supernovae (SNe) associated with gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) at redshifts up to 0.606. Eight high-fidelity GRB-SNe with well-sampled light curves across the peak are used. We correct their peak magnitudes for a luminosity-decline rate relation to turn them into accurate standard candles with dispersion $\\sigma = 0.18$ mag. We also estimate the peculiar velocity of the host galaxy of SN 1998bw, using constrained cosmological simulations. In a flat universe, the resulting Hubble diagram leads to best-fit cosmological parameters of $(\\Omega_m, \\Omega_{\\Lambda}) = (0.52^{+0.34}_{-0.31},0.48^{+0.31}_{-0.34})$. This exploratory study suggests that GRB-SNe can potentially be used as standardizable candles to high redshifts to measure distances in the universe and constrain cosmological parameters.

  4. Deconvolution of mixed gamma emitters using peak parameters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gadd, Milan S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Garcia, Francisco [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Magadalena, Vigil M [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    When evaluating samples containing mixtures of nuclides using gamma spectroscopy the situation sometimes arises where the nuclides present have photon emissions that cannot be resolved by the detector. An example of this is mixtures of {sup 241}Am and plutonium that have L x-ray emissions with slightly different energies which cannot be resolved using a high-purity germanium detector. It is possible to deconvolute the americium L x-rays from those plutonium based on the {sup 241}Am 59.54 keV photon. However, this requires accurate knowledge of the relative emission yields. Also, it often results in high uncertainties in the plutonium activity estimate due to the americium yields being approximately an order of magnitude greater than those for plutonium. In this work, an alternative method of determining the relative fraction of plutonium in mixtures of {sup 241}Am and {sup 239}Pu based on L x-ray peak location and shape parameters is investigated. The sensitivity and accuracy of the peak parameter method is compared to that for conventional peak decovolution.

  5. Constraint on the post-Newtonian parameter {gamma} on galactic size scales

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolton, Adam S. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden St., Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Rappaport, Saul; Burles, Scott [Department of Physics and Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2006-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We constrain the post-Newtonian gravity parameter {gamma} on kiloparsec scales by comparing the masses of 15 elliptical lensing galaxies from the Sloan Lens ACS Survey as determined in two independent ways. The first method assumes only that Newtonian gravity is correct and is independent of {gamma}, while the second uses gravitational lensing which depends on {gamma}. More specifically, we combine Einstein radii and radial surface-brightness gradient measurements of the lens galaxies with empirical distributions for the mass concentration and velocity anisotropy of elliptical galaxies in the local universe to predict {gamma}-dependent probability distributions for the lens-galaxy velocity dispersions. By comparing with observed velocity dispersions, we derive a maximum-likelihood value of {gamma}=0.98{+-}0.07 (68% confidence). This result is in excellent agreement with the prediction of general relativity that {gamma}=1, which has previously been verified to this accuracy only on solar-system length scales.

  6. Parameters of the prompt gamma-ray burst emission estimated with the opening angle of jets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. -B. Zhang; Y. -P. Qin

    2006-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We present in this paper an approach to estimate the initial Lorentz factor of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) without referring to the delayed emission of the early afterglow. Under the assumption that the afterglow of the bursts concerned occurs well before the prompt emission dies away, the Lorentz factor measured at the time when the duration of the prompt emission is ended could be estimated by applying the well-known relations of GRB jets. With the concept of the efficiency for converting the explosion energy to radiation, this Lorentz factor can be related to the initial Lorentz factor of the source. The corresponding rest frame peak energy can accordingly be calculated. Applying this method, we estimate the initial Lorentz factor of the bulk motion and the corresponding rest frame spectral peak energy of GRBs for a new sample where the redshift and the break time in the afterglow are known. Our analysis shows that, in the circumstances, the initial Lorentz factor of the sample would peak at 200 and would be distributed mainly within $(100,400)$, and the peak of the distribution of the corresponding rest frame peak energy would be $0.8keV$ and its main region would be $(0.3keV,3keV)$.

  7. Toward a better understanding of the gamma index: Investigation of parameters with a surface-based distance method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li Heng; Dong Lei; Zhang Lifei; Yang, James N.; Gillin, Michael T.; Zhu, X. Ronald [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)

    2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The purpose of this work was to clarify the interactions between the parameters used in the {gamma} index with the surface-based distance method, which itself can be viewed as a generalized version of the {gamma} index. The examined parameters included the distance to agreement (DTA)/dose difference (DD) criteria, the percentage used as a passing criterion, and the passing percentage for given DTA/DD criteria. The specific aims of our work were (1) to understand the relationships between the parameters used in the {gamma} index, (2) to determine the detection limit, or the minimum detectable error, of the {gamma} index with a given set of parameters, and (3) to establish a procedure to determine parameters that are consistent with the capacity of an IMRT QA system. Methods: The surface-based distance technique with dose gradient factor was derived, and then the relationship between surface-based distance and {gamma} index was established. The dose gradient factor for plans and measurements of 10 IMRT patients, 10 spine stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) patients, and 3 Radiological Physics Center (RPC) head and neck phantom were calculated and evaluated. The detection limits of the surface-based distance and {gamma} index methods were examined by introducing known shifts to the 10 IMRT plans. Results: The means of the dose gradient factors were 0.434 mm/% and 0.956 mm/% for the SRS and IMRT plans, respectively. Key quantities (including the mean and 90th and 99th percentiles of the distance distribution) of the surface-based distance distribution between two dose distributions were linearly proportional to the actual shifts. However, the passing percentage of the {gamma} index for a given set of DTA/DD criteria was not associated with the actual shift. For IMRT, using the standard quality assurance criteria of 3 mm/3% DTA/DD and a 90% passing rate, we found that the detection limit of the {gamma} index in terms of global shift was 4.07 mm/4.07 % without noise. Conclusions: Surface-based distance is a direct measure of the difference between two dose distributions and can be used to evaluate or determine parameters for use in calculating the {gamma} index. The dose gradient factor represents the weighting between spatial and dose shift and should be determined before DTA/DD criteria are set. The authors also present a procedure to determine {gamma} index parameters from measurements.

  8. GAMMA-RAY BURSTS: NEW PARAMETERS FOR MEASURING ENERGY-DEPENDENT SPECTRAL LAGS.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Durst, Jeff

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??A new method for measuring the hardness-intensity correlation (HIC) present in gamma-ray bursts (GRB) is developed. This method is used to measure the HIC for… (more)

  9. {gamma} parameter and Solar System constraint in chameleon-Brans-Dicke theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saaidi, Kh.; Mohammadi, A.; Sheikhahmadi, H. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Kurdistan, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The post Newtonian parameter is considered in the chameleon-Brans-Dicke model. In the first step, the general form of this parameter and also effective gravitational constant is obtained. An arbitrary function for f({Phi}), which indicates the coupling between matter and scalar field, is introduced to investigate validity of solar system constraint. It is shown that the chameleon-Brans-Dicke model can satisfy the solar system constraint and gives us an {omega} parameter of order 10{sup 4}, which is in comparable to the constraint which has been indicated in [19].

  10. Measurement of the decay rate and form factor parameter $\\alpha_{K}*$ in the decay $K_{L} \\rightarrow e^{+}e^{-}\\gamma$

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fanti, V; Musa, L; Marras, D; Nappi, A; Hay, B; Moore, R W; Moore, K N; Munday, D J; Needham, M D; Parker, M A; White, T O; Wotton, S A; Barr, Giles David; Bocquet, G; Bremer, J; Ceccucci, Augusto; Cundy, Donald C; Doble, Niels T; Funk, W; Gatignon, L; Gianoli, A; Gonidec, A; Govi, G; Grafström, P; Kubischta, Werner; Lacourt, A; Luitz, S; Kesseler, G; Matheys, J P; Norton, Alan Robert; Palestini, S; Panzer-Steindel, B; Schinzel, D; Taureg, Hans; Velasco, M; Vossnack, O; Wahl, H; Wirrer, G; Kekelidze, V D; Mestvirishvili, A; Potrebenikov, Yu K; Tatishvili, G T; Tkachev, A L; Zinchenko, A I; Boyle, O; Martin, V J; Knowles, I G; Parsons, H; Dalpiaz, Pietro; Duclos, J; Frabetti, P L; Martini, M; Petrucci, F; Porcu, M; Savrié, M; Bizzeti, A; Calvetti, M; Collazuol, G; Graziani, G; Iacopini, E; Lenti, M; Michetti, A; Becker, H G; Blümer, H; Buchholz, P; Coward, D H; Ebersberger, C; Fox, H; Kalter, A; Kleinknecht, K; Koch, U; Köpke, L; Renk, B; Scheidt, J; Schmidt, J; Schönharting, V; Schué, Yu; Wilhelm, R; Winhart, A; Wittgen, M; Chollet, J C; Crépé, S; Iconomidou-Fayard, L; Fayard, Louis; Ocariz, J; Unal, G; Vattolo, D; Wingerter-Seez, I; Anzivino, Giuseppina; Cenci, P; Lubrano, P; Pepé, M; Gorini, B; Calafiura, P; Carosi, R; Cerri, C; Cirilli, M; Costantini, F; Fantechi, R; Giudici, Sergio; Mannelli, I; Marzulli, V M; Pierazzini, G M; Sozzi, M; Chčze, J B; Cogan, J; De Beer, M; Debu, P; Formica, A; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Khristov, P Z; Mazzucato, E; Peyaud, B; Schanne, S; Turlay, René; Vallage, B; Augustin, I; Bender, M; Holder, M; Ziolkowski, M; Arcidiacono, R; Biino, C; Marchetto, F; Menichetti, E; Nassalski, J P; Rondio, Ewa; Szleper, M; Wislicki, W; Wronka, S; Dibon, Heinz; Fischer, G; Jeitler, Manfred; Markytan, Manfred; Mikulec, I; Neuhofer, Günther; Pernicka, Manfred; Taurok, Anton

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The decay rate of the neutral K meson $\\mathrm{K_{L} \\rightarrow e^{+}e^{-}\\gamma}$ has been measured with the NA48 detector at the CERN SPS. A total of 6864 events has been observed with an estimated background of 10 events. The branching ratio is $\\mathrm{\\Gamma(K_{L} \\rightarrow e^{+}e^{-}\\gamma)/\\Gamma(K_{L} rightarrow all) = (1.06 \\pm 0.02_{stat.} \\pm 0.02_{sys.} \\pm 0.04_{calc.})\\times 10^{-5}}$. The parameter describing the relative strength of the two contributing amplitudes to this decay through $\\mathrm{\\alpha_{K^{*}}}$ intermediate seudoscalar or vector mesons, was measured to be $\\mathrm{\\alpha_{K^{*}} = -0.36 \\pm 0.06_{stat.} \\pm 0.02_{sys.}}$

  11. Measurement of $J/\\psi\\to\\gamma\\eta_{\\rm c}$ decay rate and $\\eta_{\\rm c}$ parameters at KEDR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anashin, V V; Baldin, E M; Barladyan, A K; Barnyakov, A Yu; Barnyakov, M Yu; Baru, S E; Basok, I Yu; Bedny, I V; Blinov, A E; Blinov, V E; Bobrov, A V; Bobrovnikov, V S; Bogomyagkov, A V; Bondar, A E; Buzykaev, A R; Eidelman, S I; Glukhovchenko, Yu M; Gulevich, V V; Gusev, D V; Karnaev, S E; Karpov, G V; Karpov, S V; Kharlamova, T A; Kiselev, V A; Kononov, S A; Kotov, K Yu; Kravchenko, E A; Kulikov, V F; Kurkin, G Ya; Kuper, E A; Levichev, E B; Maksimov, D A; Malyshev, V M; Maslennikov, A L; Medvedko, A S; Meshkov, O I; Mishnev, S I; Morozov, I I; Muchnoi, N Yu; Neufeld, V V; Nikitin, S A; Nikolaev, I B; Okunev, I N; Onuchin, A P; Oreshkin, S B; Orlov, I O; Osipov, A A; Peleganchuk, S V; Pivovarov, S G; Piminov, P A; Petrov, V V; Poluektov, A O; Pospelov, G E; Prisekin, V G; Rezanova, O L; Ruban, A A; Sandyrev, V K; Savinov, G A; Shamov, A G; Shatilov, D N; Shwartz, B A; Simonov, E A; Sinyatkin, S V; Skrinsky, A N; Smaluk, V V; Sokolov, A V; Sukharev, A M; Starostina, E V; Talyshev, A A; Tayursky, V A; Telnov, V I; Tikhonov, Yu A; Todyshev, K Yu; Tumaikin, G M; Usov, Yu V; Vorobiov, A I; Yushkov, A N; Zhilich, V N; Zhulanov, V V; Zhuravlev, A N

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using the inclusive photon spectrum based on a data sample collected at the $J/\\psi$ peak with the KEDR detector at the VEPP-4M $e^+e^-$ collider, we measured the rate of the radiative decay $J/\\psi\\to\\gamma\\eta_{\\rm c}$ as well as $\\eta_{\\rm c}$ mass and width. Taking into account an asymmetric photon lineshape we obtained: $\\Gamma^0_{\\gamma\\eta_{\\rm c}}=2.98\\pm0.18 \\phantom{|}^{+0.15}_{-0.33}$ keV, $M_{\\eta_{\\rm c}} = 2983.5 \\pm 1.4 \\phantom{|}^{+1.6}_{-3.6}$ MeV/$c^2$, $\\Gamma_{\\eta_{\\rm c}} = 27.2 \\pm 3.1 \\phantom{|}^{+5.4}_{-2.6}$ MeV.

  12. Gravimagnetic effect of the barycentric motion of the Sun and determination of the post-Newtonian parameter gamma in the Cassini experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. M. Kopeikin; A. G. Polnarev; G. Schaefer; I. Yu. Vlasov

    2007-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The most precise test of the post-Newtonian gamma parameter in the solar system has been achieved in measurement of the frequency shift of radio waves to and from the Cassini spacecraft as they passed near the Sun. The test relies upon the JPL model of radiowave propagation that includes, but does not explicitly parametrize, the impact of the non-stationary component of the gravitational field of the Sun, generated by its barycentric orbital motion, on the Shapiro delay. This non-stationary gravitational field of the Sun is associated with the Lorentz transformation of the metric tensor and the affine connection from the heliocentric to the barycentric frame of the solar system and can be treated as gravimagnetic field. The gravimagnetic field perturbs the propagation of a radio wave and contributes to its frequency shift at the level up to 4 10^{-13} that may affect the precise measurement of the parameter gamma in the Cassini experiment to about one part in 10,000. Our analysis suggests that the translational gravimagnetic field of the Sun can be extracted from the Cassini data, and its effect is separable from the space curvature characterized by the parameter gamma.

  13. Distribution of Correspondence

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1996-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Defines correct procedures for distribution of correspondence to the Naval Reactors laboratories. Does not cancel another directive. Expired 8-30-97.

  14. Gamma-Gamma Colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, K.-J.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    a gamma collider, we need to discuss the laser optics in thegamma collider will be given later, coupled with some discussions of the requisite opticsoptics and an adequate laser for Compton conversion. With this approach, the luminosity for the gamma-

  15. Correspondence (pbl/contracts)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phases on γ-Al2O3. |ID#: 19834 Title: Correlation ofBurn

  16. SCIENTIFIC CORRESPONDENCE Radiation doses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shlyakhter, Ilya

    SCIENTIFIC CORRESPONDENCE Radiation doses and cancert-A T. w- - SIR- In February 1990, the Soviet. Nikipelov et al. published in g Priroda (Nature)' the radiation doses for each year, averaged over environmental impact on the Gulf waters is rapidly ex- ported to the Arabian Sea and then to the Indian Ocean

  17. Correspondences DDT resistance in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buckling, Angus

    Magazine R587 Correspondences DDT resistance in flies carries no cost Caroline McCart1, Angus to carry a cost in the absence of pesticide and consequently not to spread to fixation [1,2]. However, DDT resistance in Drosophila melanogaster (DDT-R) is approaching fixation globally, long after withdrawl of DDT

  18. Comparison of the E(5) Critical Point Symmetry to the {gamma}-Rigid Solution of The Bohr Hamiltonian for {gamma} =30 deg

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonatsos, D.; Lenis, D.; Petrellis, D. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, National Center for Scientific Research 'Demokritos', GR-15310 Aghia Paraskevi, Attiki (Greece); Terziev, P. A. [Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 72 Tzarigrad Road, BG-1784 Sofia (Bulgaria); Yigitoglu, I. [Hasan Ali Yucel Faculty of Education, Istanbul University, TR-34470 Beyazit, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2007-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A {gamma}-rigid solution of the Bohr Hamiltonian for {gamma}=30 deg. is derived. Bohr Hamiltonians {beta}-part being related to the second order Casimir operator of the Euclidean algebra E(4). The solution is called Z(4) since it is corresponds to the Z(5) model with the {gamma} variable ''frozen''. Parameter-free (up to overall scale factors) predictions for spectra and B(E2) transition rates are in close agreement to the E(5) critical point symmetry as well as to the experimental data in the Xe region around A=130.

  19. Time-dependent angular analysis of the decay $B_s^0 \\to J/\\psi \\phi$ and extraction of $\\Delta \\Gamma_s$ and the CP-violating weak phase $\\phi_s$ by ATLAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aad, Georges; Abbott, Brad; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdel Khalek, Samah; Abdelalim, Ahmed Ali; Abdinov, Ovsat; Aben, Rosemarie; Abi, Babak; Abolins, Maris; AbouZeid, Ossama; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Acerbi, Emilio; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adamczyk, Leszek; Adams, David; Addy, Tetteh; Adelman, Jahred; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adragna, Paolo; Adye, Tim; Aefsky, Scott; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Agustoni, Marco; Aharrouche, Mohamed; Ahlen, Steven; Ahles, Florian; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ahsan, Mahsana; Aielli, Giulio; Akdogan, Taylan; ? kesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimoto, Ginga; Akimov, Andrei; Alam, Mohammad; Alam, Muhammad Aftab; Albert, Justin; Albrand, Solveig; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alessandria, Franco; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexandre, Gauthier; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Aliev, Malik; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alison, John; Allbrooke, Benedict; Allport, Phillip; Allwood-Spiers, Sarah; Almond, John; Aloisio, Alberto; Alon, Raz; Alonso, Alejandro; Alonso, Francisco; Alvarez Gonzalez, Barbara; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amako, Katsuya; Amelung, Christoph; Ammosov, Vladimir; Amorim, Antonio; Amram, Nir; Anastopoulos, Christos; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anders, Gabriel; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Anduaga, Xabier; Anger, Philipp; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anisenkov, Alexey; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antonaki, Ariadni; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Antos, Jaroslav; Anulli, Fabio; Aoki, Masato; Aoun, Sahar; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Apolle, Rudi; Arabidze, Giorgi; Aracena, Ignacio; Arai, Yasuo; Arce, Ayana; Arfaoui, Samir; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Arik, Engin; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnal, Vanessa; Arnault, Christian; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Arutinov, David; Asai, Shoji; Asfandiyarov, Ruslan; Ask, Stefan; ? sman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astbury, Alan; Atkinson, Markus; Aubert, Bernard; Auge, Etienne; Augsten, Kamil; Aurousseau, Mathieu; Avolio, Giuseppe; Avramidou, Rachel Maria; Axen, David; Azuelos, Georges; Azuma, Yuya; Baak, Max; Baccaglioni, Giuseppe; Bacci, Cesare; Bach, Andre; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Badescu, Elisabeta; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bahinipati, Seema; Bai, Yu; Bailey, David; Bain, Travis; Baines, John; Baker, Oliver Keith; Baker, Mark; Baker, Sarah; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Piyali; Banerjee, Swagato; Banfi, Danilo; Bangert, Andrea Michelle; Bansal, Vikas; Bansil, Hardeep Singh; Barak, Liron; Baranov, Sergei; Barbaro Galtieri, Angela; Barber, Tom; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Bardin, Dmitri; Barillari, Teresa; Barisonzi, Marcello; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimarăes da Costa, Joăo; Barrillon, Pierre; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartsch, Valeria; Basye, Austin; Bates, Richard; Batkova, Lucia; Batley, Richard; Battaglia, Andreas; Battistin, Michele; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beale, Steven; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Beccherle, Roberto; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans Peter; Becker, Anne Kathrin; Becker, Sebastian; Beckingham, Matthew; Becks, Karl-Heinz; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bedikian, Sourpouhi; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bee, Christopher; Beemster, Lars; Begel, Michael; Behar Harpaz, Silvia; Beimforde, Michael; Belanger-Champagne, Camille; Bell, Paul; Bell, William; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellina, Francesco; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belloni, Alberto; Beloborodova, Olga; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Bendtz, Katarina; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benhar Noccioli, Eleonora; Benitez Garcia, Jorge-Armando; Benjamin, Douglas; Benoit, Mathieu; Bensinger, James; Benslama, Kamal; Bentvelsen, Stan; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Berghaus, Frank; Berglund, Elina; Beringer, Jürg; Bernat, Pauline; Bernhard, Ralf; Bernius, Catrin; Berry, Tracey; Bertella, Claudia; Bertin, Antonio; Bertolucci, Federico; Besana, Maria Ilaria; Besjes, Geert-Jan; Besson, Nathalie; Bethke, Siegfried; Bhimji, Wahid; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Bieniek, Stephen Paul; Bierwagen, Katharina; Biesiada, Jed; Biglietti, Michela; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello; Binet, Sebastien; Bingul, Ahmet; Bini, Cesare; Biscarat, Catherine; Bittner, Bernhard; Black, Kevin; Blair, Robert; Blanchard, Jean-Baptiste; Blanchot, Georges

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A measurement of $B_s^0 \\to J/\\psi \\phi$ decay parameters, including the CP-violating weak phase $\\phi_s$ and the decay width difference $\\Delta \\Gamma_s$ is reported, using 4.9 fb$^{-1}$ of integrated luminosity collected in 2011 by the ATLAS detector from LHC pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 TeV. The mean decay width $\\Gamma_s$ and the transversity amplitudes $|A_0(0)|^2$ and $|A_{||}(0)|^2$ are also measured. The values reported for these parameters are: \\begin{eqnarray}\\cr \\phi_s = 0.22 \\pm 0.41 (stat.) \\pm 0.10 (syst.) rad\\cr \\Delta \\Gamma_s = 0.053 \\pm 0.021 (stat.) \\pm 0.008 (syst.) ps^{-1}\\cr \\Gamma_s = 0.677 \\pm 0.007 (stat.) \\pm 0.004 (syst.) ps^{-1}\\cr |A_0(0)|^2 = 0.528 \\pm 0.006 (stat.) \\pm 0.009 (syst.)\\cr |A_{||}(0)|^2 = 0.220 \\pm 0.008 (stat.) \\pm 0.007 (syst.)\\cr\\end{eqnarray} where the values quoted for $\\phi_s$ and $\\Delta \\Gamma_s$ correspond to the solution compatible with the external measurements to which the strong phase $\\delta$ perpendicular is constrained and ...

  20. A Self-Consistent Model For The Long-Term Gamma-Ray Spectral Variability of Cygnus X-1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fulvio Melia; Ranjeev Misra

    1993-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The long-term transitions of the black hole candidate Cygnus X-1 (between the states gamma_1, gamma_2, and gamma_3) include the occasional appearance of a strong ~ MeV bump (gamma_1), whose strength appears to be anti-correlated with the continuum flux (~ 400 keV) due to the Compton upscattering of cold disk photons by the inner, hot corona. We develop a self-consistent disk picture that accounts naturally for these transitions and their corresponding spectral variations. We argue that the bump is due to the self-Comptonization of bremsstrahlung photons emitted predominantly near the plane of the corona itself. Our results suggest that a decrease by a factor of approx 2 in the viscosity parameter alpha is responsible for quenching this bump and driving the system to the gamma_2 state, whereas a transition from gamma_2 to gamma_3 appears to be induced by an increase of about 25 % in the accretion rate Mdot. In view of the fact that most of the transitions observed in this source seem to be of the gamma_2 to gamma_3 variety, we conclude that much of the long term gamma-ray spectral variability in Cygnus X-1 is due to these small fluctuations in Mdot. The unusual appearance of the gamma_1 state apparently reflects a change in the dissipative processes within the disk.

  1. SAPPHiRE: a Small Gamma-Gamma Higgs Factory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. A. Bogacz; J. Ellis; L. Lusito; D. Schulte; T. Takahashi; M. Velasco; M. Zanetti; F. Zimmermann

    2012-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A new particle with mass ~ 125 GeV that resembles the Higgs boson has recently been discovered by ATLAS and CMS. We propose a low-energy gamma-gamma collider as a cost- and time-efficient option for a Higgs factory capable of studying this particle in detail. In the past, this option has been suggested as a possible application of the CLIC two-beam accelerator technology (the CLIC Higgs Experiment, CLICHE) or as an option for the ILC. Here we propose a design based on a pair of \\sim 10 GeV recirculating Linacs (Small Accelerator for Photon-Photon Higgs production using Recirculating Electrons, SAPPHiRE) similar in design to those proposed for the LHeC. We present parameters for the e- beams and sketch a laser backscattering system capable of producing a gamma-gamma peak luminosity of 0.36 \\times 10^34/cm2/s with E_CM (gamma-gamma) \\sim 125 GeV. A gamma-gamma collider with such a luminosity could be used to measure accurately the mass, bbar, WW\\ast, and gamma-gamma decays of the Higgs boson. We also comment on possible synergies with other projects such as LHeC, the ILC or CLIC, and on other physics prospects in gamma-gamma and e-gamma collisions.

  2. Correspondence between Ricci and other dark energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Surajit Chattopadhyay; Ujjal Debnath

    2010-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose of the present paper is to view the correspondence between Ricci and other dark energies. We have considered the Ricci dark energy in presence of dark matter in non-interacting situation. Subsequently, we have derived the pressure and energy density for Ricci dark energy. The equation of state parameter has been generated from these pressure and energy density. Next, we have considered the correspondence between Ricci and other dark energy models, namely tachyonic field, DBI-essence and new agegraphic dark energy without any interaction and investigated possible cosmological consequences.

  3. TESLA*HERA Based gamma-p and gamma-A Colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. K. Ciftci; S. Sultansoy; O. Yavas

    2000-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Main parameters and physics search potential of gamma-p and gamma-A colliders, which will be available due to constructing the TESLA linear electron-positron collider tangentially to the HERA proton ring, are discussed.

  4. Reaction Rate Sensitivity of the gamma-Process Path

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Rauscher

    2004-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The location of the (gamma,p)/(gamma,n) and (gamma,alpha)/(gamma,n) line at gamma-process temperatures is discussed, using recently published reaction rates based on global Hauser-Feshbach calculations. The results can directly be compared to previously published, classic gamma-process discussions. The nuclei exhibiting the largest sensitivity to uncertainties in nuclear structure and reaction parameters are specified.

  5. Gamma bursts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colgate, S.A.; Petschek, A.G.

    1982-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The origin of cosmic gamma bursts is discussed. Radiation thermalization in magnetic fields, spectral mechanisms, and charge separation and photon heating are discussed. (GHT)

  6. Gamma ray camera

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Perez-Mendez, Victor (Berkeley, CA)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A gamma ray camera for detecting rays emanating from a radiation source such as an isotope. The gamma ray camera includes a sensor array formed of a visible light crystal for converting incident gamma rays to a plurality of corresponding visible light photons, and a photosensor array responsive to the visible light photons in order to form an electronic image of the radiation therefrom. The photosensor array is adapted to record an integrated amount of charge proportional to the incident gamma rays closest to it, and includes a transparent metallic layer, photodiode consisting of a p-i-n structure formed on one side of the transparent metallic layer, and comprising an upper p-type layer, an intermediate layer and a lower n-type layer. In the preferred mode, the scintillator crystal is composed essentially of a cesium iodide (CsI) crystal preferably doped with a predetermined amount impurity, and the p-type upper intermediate layers and said n-type layer are essentially composed of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H). The gamma ray camera further includes a collimator interposed between the radiation source and the sensor array, and a readout circuit formed on one side of the photosensor array.

  7. Gamma ray camera

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Perez-Mendez, V.

    1997-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A gamma ray camera is disclosed for detecting rays emanating from a radiation source such as an isotope. The gamma ray camera includes a sensor array formed of a visible light crystal for converting incident gamma rays to a plurality of corresponding visible light photons, and a photosensor array responsive to the visible light photons in order to form an electronic image of the radiation therefrom. The photosensor array is adapted to record an integrated amount of charge proportional to the incident gamma rays closest to it, and includes a transparent metallic layer, photodiode consisting of a p-i-n structure formed on one side of the transparent metallic layer, and comprising an upper p-type layer, an intermediate layer and a lower n-type layer. In the preferred mode, the scintillator crystal is composed essentially of a cesium iodide (CsI) crystal preferably doped with a predetermined amount impurity, and the p-type upper intermediate layers and said n-type layer are essentially composed of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H). The gamma ray camera further includes a collimator interposed between the radiation source and the sensor array, and a readout circuit formed on one side of the photosensor array. 6 figs.

  8. The neutron-gamma Feynman variance to mean approach: gamma detection and total neutron-gamma detection (theory and practice)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dina Chernikova; Kĺre Axell; Senada Avdic; Imre Pázsit; Anders Nordlund

    2015-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Two versions of the neutron-gamma variance to mean (Feynman-alpha method or Feynman-Y function) formula for either gamma detection only or total neutron-gamma detection, respectively, are derived and compared in this paper. The new formulas have a particular importance for detectors of either gamma photons or detectors sensitive to both neutron and gamma radiation. If applied to a plastic or liquid scintillation detector, the total neutron-gamma detection Feynman-Y expression corresponds to a situation where no discrimination is made between neutrons and gamma particles. The gamma variance to mean formulas are useful when a detector of only gamma radiation is used or when working with a combined neutron-gamma detector at high count rates. The theoretical derivation is based on the Chapman-Kolmogorov equation with inclusion of general reactions and passage intensities for neutrons and gammas, but with the inclusion of prompt reactions only. A one energy group approximation is considered. The comparison of the two different theories is made by using reaction intensities obtained in MCNPX simulations with a simplified geometry for two scintillation detectors and a 252Cf-source enclosed in a steel container. In addition, the variance to mean ratios, neutron, gamma and total neutron-gamma, are evaluated experimentally for a weak 252Cf neutron-gamma source in a steel container, a 137Cs random gamma source and a 22Na correlated gamma source. Due to the focus being on the possibility of using neutron-gamma variance to mean theories for both reactor and safeguards applications, we limited the present study to the general analytical expressions for Feynman-Y formulas.

  9. A Search for the Rare Decay $B\\rightarrow\\gamma\\gamma$

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    del Amo Sanchez, P.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; /INFN, Bari /Bari U.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; /Bergen U.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Hooberman, B.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I.L.; Tanabe, T.; /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Southern Methodist U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas Nuclear Corp., Austin /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2011-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the result of a search for the rare decay B{sup 0} {yields} {gamma}{gamma} in 426 fb{sup -1} of data, corresponding to 226 million B{sup 0}{bar B}{sup 0} pairs, collected on the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} collider using the BABAR detector. We use a maximum likelihood fit to extract the signal yield and observe 21{sub -12}{sup +13} signal events with a statistical signficance of 1.9 {sigma}. This corresponds to a branching fraction {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {gamma}{gamma}) = (1.7 {+-} 1.1(stat.) {+-} 0.2(syst.)) x 10{sup -7}. Based on this result, we set a 90% confidence level upper limit of {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {gamma}{gamma}) < 3.2 x 10{sup -7}.

  10. Black Stars and Gamma Ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tanmay Vachaspati

    2007-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Stars that are collapsing toward forming a black hole but are frozen near the Schwarzschild horizon are termed ``black stars''. Collisions of black stars, in contrast to black hole collisions, may be sources of gamma ray bursts, whose basic parameters are estimated quite simply and are found to be consistent with observed gamma ray bursts. Black star gamma ray bursts should be preceded by gravitational wave emission similar to that from the coalescence of black holes.

  11. Gamma watermarking

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ishikawa, Muriel Y.; Wood, Lowell L.; Lougheed, Ronald W.; Moody, Kenton J.; Wang, Tzu-Fang

    2004-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A covert, gamma-ray "signature" is used as a "watermark" for property identification. This new watermarking technology is based on a unique steganographic or "hidden writing" digital signature, implemented in tiny quantities of gamma-ray-emitting radioisotopic material combinations, generally covertly emplaced on or within an object. This digital signature may be readily recovered at distant future times, by placing a sensitive, high energy-resolution gamma-ray detecting instrument reasonably precisely over the location of the watermark, which location may be known only to the object's owner; however, the signature is concealed from all ordinary detection means because its exceedingly low level of activity is obscured by the natural radiation background (including the gamma radiation naturally emanating from the object itself, from cosmic radiation and material surroundings, from human bodies, etc.). The "watermark" is used in object-tagging for establishing object identity, history or ownership. It thus may serve as an aid to law enforcement officials in identifying stolen property and prosecuting theft thereof. Highly effective, potentially very low cost identification-on demand of items of most all types is thus made possible.

  12. Neutron monitoring systems including gamma thermometers and methods of calibrating nuclear instruments using gamma thermometers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moen, Stephan Craig; Meyers, Craig Glenn; Petzen, John Alexander; Foard, Adam Muhling

    2012-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of calibrating a nuclear instrument using a gamma thermometer may include: measuring, in the instrument, local neutron flux; generating, from the instrument, a first signal proportional to the neutron flux; measuring, in the gamma thermometer, local gamma flux; generating, from the gamma thermometer, a second signal proportional to the gamma flux; compensating the second signal; and calibrating a gain of the instrument based on the compensated second signal. Compensating the second signal may include: calculating selected yield fractions for specific groups of delayed gamma sources; calculating time constants for the specific groups; calculating a third signal that corresponds to delayed local gamma flux based on the selected yield fractions and time constants; and calculating the compensated second signal by subtracting the third signal from the second signal. The specific groups may have decay time constants greater than 5.times.10-1 seconds and less than 5.times.105 seconds.

  13. Analytical solution for the Davydov-Chaban Hamiltonian with sextic potential for $\\gamma=30^{\\circ}$

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buganu, P

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An analytical solution for the Davydov-Chaban Hamiltonian with a sextic oscillator potential for the variable $\\beta$ and $\\gamma$ fixed to $30^{\\circ}$, is proposed. The model is conventionally called Z(4)-Sextic. For the considered potential shapes the solution is exact for the ground and $\\beta$ bands, while for the $\\gamma$ band an approximation is adopted. Due to the scaling property of the problem the energy and $B(E2)$ transition ratios depend on a single parameter apart from an integer number which limits the number of allowed states. For certain constraints imposed on the free parameter, which lead to simpler special potentials, the energy and $B(E2)$ transition ratios are parameter independent. The energy spectra of the ground and first $\\beta$ and $\\gamma$ bands as well as the corresponding $B(E2)$ transitions, determined with Z(4)-Sextic, are studied as function of the free parameter and presented in detail for the special cases. Numerical applications are done for the $^{128,130,132}$Xe and $^{19...

  14. CONSERVATION RELATIONS FOR LOCAL THETA CORRESPONDENCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Chen-Bo

    CONSERVATION RELATIONS FOR LOCAL THETA CORRESPONDENCE BINYONG SUN AND CHEN-BO ZHU Abstract. We Classification. 22E46 (Primary). Key words and phrases. conservation relation, theta correspondence, oscillator, Chapter 11] for details #12;CONSERVATION RELATIONS FOR LOCAL THETA CORRESPONDENCE 3 about Casselman

  15. Gamma Ray Burst and Soft Gamma Repeaters. Spinning, Precessing Gamma Jets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniele Fargion

    1999-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Gamma Ray Bursts as recent GRB990123 and GRB990510 are observed to occur in cosmic volumes with a corresponding output reaching, for isotropic explosions, energies as large as two solar masses annihilation. These energies are underestimated because of the neglected role of comparable ejected neutrinos bursts. These extreme power cannot be explained with any standard spherically symmetric Fireball model. A too heavy black hole or Star would be unable to coexist with the shortest millisecond time structure of Gamma ray Burst. Beaming of the gamma radiation may overcome the energy puzzle. However any mild explosive beam $(\\Omega > 10^{-2})$ should not solve the jet containment at those disruptive energies. Only extreme beaming $(\\Omega < 10^{-8})$, by a slow decaying, but long-lived precessing jet, it may coexist with characteristic Supernova energies, apparent GRBs output, statistics as well as their connection with older and nearer SGRs relics.

  16. Gamma Ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stahl, Bennett

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Olson. “Observations of gamma-ray bursts of cosmic origin. ”E. Lingenfelter. “Gamma-ray bursts. ” Annual Review of652-654. Waxman, Eli. “Gamma-ray-burst afterglow: supporting

  17. Aspects of the PP wave/ CFT correspondence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gürsoy, Umur

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, I discuss various aspects of the PP wave/CFT duality as a concrete example of the gauge-gravity correspondence.

  18. Quantum hair and the string-black hole correspondence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gabriele Veneziano

    2013-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider a thought experiment in which an energetic massless string probes a "stringhole" (a heavy string lying on the correspondence curve between strings and black holes) at large enough impact parameter for the regime to be under theoretical control. The corresponding, explicitly unitary, $S$-matrix turns out to be perturbatively sensitive to the microstate of the stringhole: in particular, at leading order in $l_s/b$, it depends on a projection of the stringhole's Lorentz-contracted quadrupole moment. The string-black hole correspondence is therefore violated if one assumes quantum hair to be exponentially suppressed as a function of black-hole entropy. Implications for the information paradox are briefly discussed.

  19. Gamma ray generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Firestone, Richard B; Reijonen, Jani

    2014-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    An embodiment of a gamma ray generator includes a neutron generator and a moderator. The moderator is coupled to the neutron generator. The moderator includes a neutron capture material. In operation, the neutron generator produces neutrons and the neutron capture material captures at least some of the neutrons to produces gamma rays. An application of the gamma ray generator is as a source of gamma rays for calibration of gamma ray detectors.

  20. Quantum-classical correspondence in response theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kryvohuz, Maksym

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, theoretical analysis of correspondence between classical and quantum dynamics is studied in the context of response theory. Thesis discusses the mathematical origin of time-divergence of classical response ...

  1. Toda-Schrödinger correspondence and orthogonal polynomials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Satoshi Tsujimoto; Alexei Zhedanov

    2014-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    It is known that the unrestricted Toda chain is equivalent to the Riccati equation for the Stieltjes function of the orthogonal polynomials. Under a special condition, this Riccati equation can be reduced to the Schr\\"odinger equation. We show that this condition is equivalent to type B solutions of the Toda chain. We establish some nontrivial consequences arising from this Toda-Schr\\"odinger correspondence. In particular, we show that the KdV densities can be identified with the moments of the corresponding orthogonal polynomials. We establish equivalence between type B solutions of the Toda molecule and the Bargmann potentials of the Schr\\"odinger equation.

  2. System and method for motor parameter estimation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Luhrs, Bin; Yan, Ting

    2014-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A system and method for determining unknown values of certain motor parameters includes a motor input device connectable to an electric motor having associated therewith values for known motor parameters and an unknown value of at least one motor parameter. The motor input device includes a processing unit that receives a first input from the electric motor comprising values for the known motor parameters for the electric motor and receive a second input comprising motor data on a plurality of reference motors, including values for motor parameters corresponding to the known motor parameters of the electric motor and values for motor parameters corresponding to the at least one unknown motor parameter value of the electric motor. The processor determines the unknown value of the at least one motor parameter from the first input and the second input and determines a motor management strategy for the electric motor based thereon.

  3. Gamma ray detector shield

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ohlinger, R.D.; Humphrey, H.W.

    1985-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A gamma ray detector shield comprised of a rigid, lead, cylindrical-shaped vessel having upper and lower portions with an pneumatically driven, sliding top assembly. Disposed inside the lead shield is a gamma ray scintillation crystal detector. Access to the gamma detector is through the sliding top assembly.

  4. Going to Ground(s): The War Correspondent’s Memoir

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, Christopher P.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Obligations in World War II. Washington, DC: SmithsonianNormalcy: Home Fronts, Good Soldiers, War Correspondents. ”War, Literature and the Arts 24 (2012): 1–25. ———. “Stephen

  5. Studying Z/gamma*+Jet Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nilsen, Henrik Wold; /Freiburg U.

    2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The production of jets in association with a Z/{gamma}* boson is an example of an important class of processes at hadron colliders, namely vector boson + jet (V + jet) production. Comparisons of measurements of this class of processes with theory predictions constitute an important, fundamental test of the Standard Model of particle physics, and of the theory of QCD in particular. While having a smaller cross section than other V +jet processes, Z/{gamma}*({yields} e{sup +}e{sup -}) + jets production, with Z/{gamma}* {yields} e{sup +}e{sup -}/{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}, has a distinct experimental signature allowing for measurements characterized by low backgrounds and a direct, precise measurement of the properties of the decay products of the Z/{gamma}* boson. In this thesis, several new measurements of the properties of jets produced in association with a Z/{gamma}* boson in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV are presented. The cross section for Z/{gamma}*({yields} e{sup +}e{sup -}) + N jet production (N {le} 3) is measured, differential in the transverse momentum of the Nth jet in the event, normalized to the inclusive Z/{gamma}* cross section. Also, the cross section for Z/{gamma}*({yields} e{sup +}e{sup -}) + N jets (N {ge} 1) is measured, differential in the difference in azimuthal angle between the di-electron system and any jet in the event, normalized to unity. The data used in the measurements were collected by the D0 experiment located at the Tevatron Collider of the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 1.04 fb{sup -1}. The measured jet transverse momentum spectra are compared with the predictions of perturbative calculations at the next-to-leading order in the strong coupling constant. Given the low sensitivity of the calculations to model parameters, these comparisons represent a stringent test of perturbative QCD. One of the main goals currently being pursued in particle physics is the discovery of the only particle predicted by the Standard Model which has so far no been detected experimentally, namely the Higgs boson. It is assumed that the ATLAS and CMS experiments located at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), a proton-proton collider at {radical}s = 14 TeV, will be able to detect the Higgs boson, or rule out its existence, within the next few years. The collisions delivered by the LHC will also be used to perform a long range of searches for other new particles, for instance particles predicted by models based on the principle of supersymmetry. The associated production of vector bosons with jets has relatively large production rates at the LHC and can produce a long list of different final states which can include charged leptons, missing transverse energy, as well as light- and heavy-flavour jets. This makes V + jet production a major source of background events to many searches for new particles. Most techniques used for estimating the expected number of background events to searches rely on passing the stable final-state particles of simulated hadron collisions generated using a so-called event generator code, through a simulation of the experimental detector system. The development of event generators which are capable of reliably predicting the properties of jets produced in association with a core process, e.g. the production of a vector boson, has been the subject of a large amount of research activity during the last ten years. These efforts have led to the appearance of the CKKW and MLM algorithms which are implemented in several event generators, among them SHERPA and ALPGEN + PYTHIA. The large data sample collected by the D0 experiment during Run II offers an excellent opportunity for validating these new event generators against experimental measurements of V + jet production. As argued above, the Z/{gamma}*({yields} e{sup +}e{sup -}) + jets process offers the combination of a clean experimental signature and large production rates, making it the process of choice for these studies.

  6. Gluon content of the {eta} and {eta}{sup '} mesons and the {eta}{gamma} , {eta}{sup '}{gamma} electromagnetic transition form factors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agaev, S.S.; Stefanis, N.G. [High Energy Physics Laboratory, Baku State University, Z. Khalilov Street 23, 370148 Baku (Azerbaijan); Institut fuer Theoretische Physik II, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany)

    2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We compute power-suppressed corrections to the {eta}{gamma} and {eta}{sup '}{gamma} transition form factors Q{sup 2}F{sub {eta}}{sub ({eta}}{sub {sup '}}{sub {gamma}}(Q{sup 2}) arising from the end point regions x{yields}0,1 by employing the infrared-renormalon approach. The contribution to the form factors from the quark and gluon content of the {eta},{eta}{sup '} mesons is taken into account using for the {eta}-{eta}{sup '} mixing the SU{sub f}(3) singlet {eta}{sub 1} and octet {eta}{sub 8} basis. The theoretical predictions obtained this way are compared with the corresponding CLEO data and restrictions on the input parameters (Gegenbauer coefficients) B{sub 2}{sup q}({eta}{sub 1}), B{sub 2}{sup g}({eta}{sub 1}), and B{sub 2}{sup q}({eta}{sub 8}) in the distribution amplitudes for the {eta}{sub 1},{eta}{sub 8} states with one nonasymptotic term are deduced. Comparison is made with the results from QCD perturbation theory.

  7. Energetics of Gamma Ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raul Jimenez; David Band; Tsvi Piran

    2001-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We determine the distribution of total energy emitted by gamma-ray bursts for bursts with fluences and distance information. Our core sample consists of eight bursts with BATSE spectra and spectroscopic redshifts. We extend this sample by adding four bursts with BATSE spectra and host galaxy R magnitudes. From these R magnitudes we calculate a redshift probability distribution; this method requires a model of the host galaxy population. From a sample of ten bursts with both spectroscopic redshifts and host galaxy R magnitudes (some do not have BATSE spectra) we find that the burst rate is proportional to the galaxy luminosity at the epoch of the burst. Assuming that the total energy emitted has a log-normal distribution, we find that the average emitted energy (assumed to be radiated isotropically) is $gamma iso} > = 1.3^{+1.2}_{-1.0} \\times 10^{53}$ ergs (for H$_0$ = 65 km s$^{-1}$ Mpc$^{-1}$, $\\Omega_m=0.3$ and $\\Omega_\\Lambda=0.7$); the distribution has a logarithmic width of $\\sigma_\\gamma=1.7^{+0.7}_{-0.3}$. The corresponding distribution of X-ray afterglow energy (for seven bursts) has $ = 4.0^{+1.6}_{-1.8} \\times 10^{51}$ergs and $\\sigma_X = 1.3^{+0.4}_{-0.3}$. For completeness, we also provide spectral fits for all bursts with BATSE spectra for which there were afterglow searches.

  8. Can gamma-ray bursts constrain quintessence?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Di Girolamo; R. Catena; M. Vietri; G. Di Sciascio

    2005-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Using the narrow clustering of the geometrically corrected gamma-ray energies released by gamma-ray bursts, we investigate the possibility of using these sources as standard candles to probe cosmological parameters such as the matter density Omega_m and the cosmological constant energy density Omega_Lambda. By simulating different samples of gamma-ray bursts, we find that Omega_m can be determined with accuracy ~7% with data from 300 sources. We also show that, if Omega = 1 is due to a quintessence field, some of the models proposed in the literature may be discriminated from a Universe with cosmological constant, by a similar-sized sample of gamma-ray bursts.

  9. Gamma-ray waveguides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tournear, D. M.; Hoffbauer, M. A.; Akhadov, E. A.; Chen, A. T.; Pendleton, S. J.; Williamson, T. L.; Cha, K. C.; Epstein, R. I. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2008-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed an approach for gamma-ray optics using layered structures acting as planar waveguides. Experiments demonstrating channeling of 122 keV gamma rays in two prototype waveguides validate the feasibility of this technology. Gamma-ray waveguides allow one to control the direction of radiation up to a few MeV. The waveguides are conceptually similar to polycapillary optics, but can function at higher gamma-ray energies. Optics comprised of these waveguides will be able to collect radiation from small solid angles or concentrate radiation into small area detectors. Gamma-ray waveguides may find applications in medical imaging and treatment, astrophysics, and homeland security.

  10. Testing the AdS/CFT Correspondence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klebanov, Igor R. [Joseph Henry Laboratories and Princeton Center for Theoretical Science, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)

    2008-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This lecture begins with some history and basic facts about string theory and its connections with strong interactions. Comparisons of stacks of Dirichlet branes with curved backgrounds produced by them are used to motivate the AdS/CFT correspondence between superconformal gauge theory and string theory on a product of Anti-de Sitter space and a compact manifold. The ensuing duality between semi-classical spinning strings and long gauge theory operators is briefly reviewed. We go on to describe a recent test of the AdS/CFT correspondence using the Wilson loop cusp anomaly as a function of the coupling, which also enters dimensions of high-spin operators. Finally, strongly coupled thermal SYM theory is explored via a black hole in 5-dimensional AdS space, which leads to explicit results for its entropy and shear viscosity.

  11. Afterglows as Diagnostics of Gamma Ray Burst Beaming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James E. Rhoads

    1997-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    If gamma ray bursts are highly collimated, radiating into only a small fraction of the sky, the energy requirements of each event may be reduced by several (up to 4 - 6) orders of magnitude, and the event rate increased correspondingly. The large Lorentz factors (Gamma > 100) inferred from GRB spectra imply relativistic beaming of the gamma rays into an angle 1/Gamma. We are at present ignorant of whether there are ejecta outside this narrow cone. Afterglows allow empirical tests of whether GRBs are well-collimated jets or spherical fireballs. The bulk Lorentz factor decreases and radiation is beamed into an ever increasing solid angle as the burst remnant expands. It follows that if gamma ray bursts are highly collimated, many more optical and radio transients should be observed without associated gamma rays than with them. In addition, a burst whose ejecta are beamed into angle zeta undergoes a qualitative change in evolution when Gamma < 1/zeta: Before this, Gamma ~ r^{-3/2}, while afterwards, Gamma decays exponentially with r. This change results in a potentially observable break in the afterglow light curve. Successful application of either test would eliminate the largest remaining uncertainty in the energy requirements and space density of gamma ray bursters.

  12. Archived EM SSAB Correspondence & Briefings | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Services Communication & Engagement EM SSAB Archived EM SSAB Correspondence & Briefings Archived EM SSAB Correspondence & Briefings 2006 June 21, 2006 Letter:...

  13. W{gamma} Production and Limits on Anomalous WW{gamma} Couplings in pp Collisions at {radical}(s)=1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, V. M.; Alexeev, G. D.; Golovanov, G.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Malyshev, V. L.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Vertogradov, L. S.; Yatsunenko, Y. A. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Abbott, B.; Gutierrez, P.; Jayasinghe, A.; Severini, H.; Skubic, P.; Strauss, M.; Svoisky, P. [University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma 73019 (United States); Acharya, B. S.; Banerjee, S.; Mondal, N. K. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai (India); Adams, M.; Bazterra, V. [University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60607 (United States)

    2011-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We measure the cross section and the difference in rapidities between photons and charged leptons for inclusive W({yields}l{nu})+{gamma} production in e{gamma} and {mu}{gamma} final states. Using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.2 fb{sup -1} collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider, the measured cross section times branching fraction for the process pp{yields}W{gamma}+X{yields}l{nu}{gamma}+X and the distribution of the charge-signed photon-lepton rapidity difference are found to be in agreement with the standard model. These results provide the most stringent limits on anomalous WW{gamma} couplings for data from hadron colliders: -0.4<{Delta}{kappa}{sub {gamma}<}0.4 and -0.08<{lambda}{sub {gamma}<}0.07 at the 95% C.L.

  14. Correspondence Style Guide | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power Systems EngineeringDepartmentSmart GridThird Quarterinto PARS | Department ofCorrespondence

  15. average neutron parameters: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    invariant parameters (ACIPs) are calculated for six groups of BATSE cosmic gamma-ray bursts selected by their peak fluxes on the 1.024 s time scale. The ACIPs represent the...

  16. Gamma Ray Bursts Sudden, intense flashes of gamma rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of - Department of Physics, Electroweak Interaction Research Group

    Gamma Ray Bursts #12;The Case Sudden, intense flashes of gamma rays come from nowhere and disappear with out a trace. Incredibly powerful: A single gamma ray burst is hundreds of times brighter a supernova #12;Who Vela (1960's) Looking for arms testing, found gamma ray bursts Compton Gamma Ray Observatory

  17. Are gamma-ray bursts the sources of ultra-high energy cosmic rays?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Philipp Baerwald; Mauricio Bustamante; Walter Winter

    2014-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We reconsider the possibility that gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are the sources of the ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) within the internal shock model, assuming a pure proton composition of the UHECRs. For the first time, we combine the information from gamma-rays, cosmic rays, prompt neutrinos, and cosmogenic neutrinos quantitatively in a joint cosmic ray production and propagation model, and we show that the information on the cosmic energy budget can be obtained as a consequence. In addition to the neutron model, we consider alternative scenarios for the cosmic ray escape from the GRBs, i.e., that cosmic rays can leak from the sources. We find that the dip model, which describes the ankle in UHECR observations by the pair production dip, is strongly disfavored in combination with the internal shock model because a) unrealistically high baryonic loadings (energy in protons versus energy in electrons/gamma-rays) are needed for the individual GRBs and b) the prompt neutrino flux easily overshoots the corresponding neutrino bound. On the other hand, GRBs may account for the UHECRs in the ankle transition model if cosmic rays leak out from the source at the highest energies. In that case, we demonstrate that future neutrino observations can efficiently test most of the parameter space -- unless the baryonic loading is much larger than previously anticipated.

  18. Parameters of charmonium states from KEDR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aulchenko, V M; Barladyan, A K; Barnyakov, A Yu; Barnyakov, M Yu; Baru, S E; Basok, I Yu; Batrakov, A M; Blinov, A E; Blinov, V E; Bobrov, A V; Bobrovnikov, V S; Bogomyagkov, A V; Bondar, A E; Buzykaev, A R; Eidelman, S I; Grigoriev, D N; Groshev, V R; Glukhovchenko, Yu M; Gulevich, V V; Gusev, D V; Karnaev, S E; Karpov, G V; Karpov, S V; Kharlamova, T A; Kiselev, V A; Kolmogorov, V V; Kononov, S A; Kotov, K Yu; Kravchenko, E A; Kudryavtsev, V N; Kulikov, V F; Kurkin, G Ya; Kuper, E A; Kuyanov, I A; Levichev, E B; Maksimov, D A; Malyshev, V M; Maslennikov, A L; Meshkov, O I; Mishnev, S I; Morozov, I I; Muchnoi, N Yu; Neufeld, V V; Nikitin, S A; Nikolaev, I B; Okunev, I N; Onuchin, A P; Oreshkin, S B; Orlov, I O; Osipov, A A; Ovtin, I V; Peleganchuk, S V; Pivovarov, S G; Piminov, P A; Petrov, V V; Poluektov, A O; Prisekin, V G; Rezanova, O L; Ruban, A A; Sandyrev, V K; Savinov, G A; Shamov, A G; Shatilov, D N; Shwartz, B A; Simonov, E A; Sinyatkin, S V; Skrinsky, A N; Sokolov, A V; Sukharev, A M; Starostina, E V; Talyshev, A A; Tayursky, V A; Telnov, V I; Tikhonov, Yu A; Todyshev, K Yu; Tumaikin, G M; Usov, Yu V; Vorobiov, A I; Zhilich, V N; Zhulanov, V V; Zhuravlev, A N

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report results of experiments performed with the KEDR detector at the VEPP-4M $e^+e^-$ collider. They include final results for the mass and other parameters of the $J/\\psi$, $\\psi(2S)$ and $\\psi(3770)$ and $J/\\psi\\to\\gamma\\eta_c$ branching fraction determination.

  19. A CSP Field Theory with Helicity Correspondence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Philip Schuster; Natalia Toro

    2014-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose the first covariant local action describing the propagation of a single free continuous-spin degree of freedom. The theory is simply formulated as a gauge theory in a "vector superspace", but can also be formulated in terms of a tower of symmetric tensor gauge fields. When the spin invariant $\\rho$ vanishes, the helicity correspondence is manifest -- familiar gauge theory actions are recovered and couplings to conserved currents can easily be introduced. For non-zero $\\rho$, a tower of tensor currents must be present, of which only the lowest rank is exactly conserved. A paucity of local gauge-invariant operators for non-zero $\\rho$ suggests that the equations of motion in any interacting theory should be covariant, not invariant, under a generalization of the free theory's gauge symmetry.

  20. A CSP Field Theory with Helicity Correspondence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schuster, Philip

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose the first covariant local action describing the propagation of a single free continuous-spin degree of freedom. The theory is simply formulated as a gauge theory in a "vector superspace", but can also be formulated in terms of a tower of symmetric tensor gauge fields. When the spin invariant $\\rho$ vanishes, the helicity correspondence is manifest -- familiar gauge theory actions are recovered and couplings to conserved currents can easily be introduced. For non-zero $\\rho$, a tower of tensor currents must be present, of which only the lowest rank is exactly conserved. A paucity of local gauge-invariant operators for non-zero $\\rho$ suggests that the equations of motion in any interacting theory should be covariant, not invariant, under a generalization of the free theory's gauge symmetry.

  1. LORENTZ-FACTOR-ISOTROPIC-LUMINOSITY/ENERGY CORRELATIONS OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS AND THEIR INTERPRETATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lue Jing; Zou Yuanchuan; Lei Weihua; Wu Qingwen; Wang Dingxiong [School of Physics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Zhang Bing; Lue Houjun [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nevada Las Vegas, 4505 Maryland Parkway, Box 454002, Las Vegas, NV 89154-4002 (United States); Liang Enwei, E-mail: zouyc@hust.edu.cn, E-mail: leiwh@hust.edu.cn, E-mail: zhang@physics.unlv.edu [Department of Physics, Guangxi University, Nanning 530004 (China)

    2012-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The bulk Lorentz factor of the gamma-ray burst (GRB) ejecta ({Gamma}{sub 0}) is a key parameter to understanding GRB physics. Liang et al. have discovered a correlation between {Gamma}{sub 0} and isotropic {gamma}-ray energy: {Gamma}{sub 0}{proportional_to}E{sup 0.25}{sub {gamma},iso,52}. By including more GRBs with updated data and more methods to derive {Gamma}{sub 0}, we confirm this correlation and obtain {Gamma}{sub 0} {approx_equal} 91E{sup 0.29}{sub {gamma},iso,52}. Evaluating the mean isotropic {gamma}-ray luminosities L{sub {gamma},iso} of the GRBs in the same sample, we discover an even tighter correlation {Gamma}{sub 0} {approx_equal} 249L{sup 0.30}{sub {gamma},iso,52}. We propose an interpretation to this later correlation. Invoking a neutrino-cooled hyperaccretion disk around a stellar mass black hole as the central engine of GRBs, we derive jet luminosity powered by neutrino annihilation and baryon loading from a neutrino-driven wind. Applying beaming correction, we finally derive {Gamma}{sub 0}{proportional_to}L{sup 0.22}{sub {gamma},iso}, which is consistent with the data. This suggests that the central engine of long GRBs is likely a stellar mass black hole surrounded by a hyper-accreting disk.

  2. Directional gamma detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    LeVert, Francis E. (Downers Grove, Knoxville, TN); Cox, Samson A. (Downers Grove, IL)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved directional gamma radiation detector has a collector sandwiched etween two layers of insulation of varying thicknesses. The collector and insulation layers are contained within an evacuated casing, or emitter, which releases electrons upon exposure to gamma radiation. Delayed electrons and electrons entering the collector at oblique angles are attenuated as they pass through the insulation layers on route to the collector.

  3. Parameter Assignments for Spectral Gamma-Ray Borehole Calibration Models

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department ofT ib l L d F SSalesOE0000652 Srivastava,Pacific1of PageHYDROGENPantexPA(April

  4. Optical gamma thermometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Koster, Glen Peter; Xia, Hua; Lee, Boon Kwee

    2013-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical gamma thermometer includes a metal mass having a temperature proportional to a gamma flux within a core of a nuclear reactor, and an optical fiber cable for measuring the temperature of the heated metal mass. The temperature of the heated mass may be measured by using one or more fiber grating structures and/or by using scattering techniques, such as Raman, Brillouin, and the like. The optical gamma thermometer may be used in conjunction with a conventional reactor heat balance to calibrate the local power range monitors over their useful in-service life. The optical gamma thermometer occupies much less space within the in-core instrument tube and costs much less than the conventional gamma thermometer.

  5. Two-Parameter Dynamics and Geometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhi Hu; Mulin Yan; Sen Hu

    2015-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we present the two-parameter dynamics which is implied by the law of inertia in flat spacetime. A remarkable perception is that (A)dS4 geometry may emerge from the two-parameter dynamics, which exhibits some phenomenon of dynamics/ geometry correspondence. We also discuss the Unruh effects within the context of two-parameter dynamics. In the last section we construct various invariant actions with respect to the broken symmetry groups.

  6. Gamma-ray Astronomy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jim Hinton

    2007-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The relevance of gamma-ray astronomy to the search for the origin of the galactic and, to a lesser extent, the ultra-high-energy cosmic rays has long been recognised. The current renaissance in the TeV gamma-ray field has resulted in a wealth of new data on galactic and extragalactic particle accelerators, and almost all the new results in this field were presented at the recent International Cosmic Ray Conference (ICRC). Here I summarise the 175 papers submitted on the topic of gamma-ray astronomy to the 30th ICRC in Merida, Mexico in July 2007.

  7. Microscopic description of spherical to {gamma}-soft shape transitions in Ba and Xe nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Z. P. [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Physics Department, Faculty of Science, University of Zagreb, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Niksic, T.; Vretenar, D. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, University of Zagreb, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Meng, J. [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); School of Physics and Nuclear Energy Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China)

    2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The rapid transition between spherical and {gamma}-soft shapes in Ba and Xe nuclei in the mass region A>=130 is analyzed using excitation spectra and collective wave functions obtained by diagonalization of a five-dimensional Hamiltonian for quadrupole vibrational and rotational degrees of freedom, with parameters determined by constrained self-consistent relativistic mean-field calculations for triaxial shapes. The results reproduce the characteristic evolution of excitation spectra and E2 transition probabilities, and in general, a good agreement with available data is obtained. The calculated spectra display fingerprints of a second-order shape phase transition that can approximately be described by analytic solutions corresponding to the E(5) dynamical symmetry.

  8. Extraction of {gamma} from charmless hadronic B {yields} PP decays using SU(3) flavor symmetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suprun, Denis A. [High Energy Theory Group, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)

    2006-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The decays of B mesons to a pair of charmless pseudoscalar mesons (PP decays) have been analyzed within the framework of flavor SU(3) symmetry and quark-diagrammatic topological approach. Flavor symmetry breaking is taken into account in tree (T) amplitudes through ratios of decay constants fK and f{pi}; exact SU(3) is assumed elsewhere. Acceptable fits to B {yields} PP branching ratios and CP asymmetries are obtained with tree, color-suppressed and QCD penguin amplitudes. Singlet penguin amplitude was introduced to describe decay amplitudes of the modes with {eta} and {eta}' mesons in the final state. Electroweak penguin amplitudes were expressed in terms of the corresponding tree-level diagrams. Values of the weak phase {gamma} were found to be consistent with the current indirect bounds from other analyses of CKM parameters.

  9. Constraints on Lorentz invariance violation from gamma-ray burst GRB090510

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhi Xiao; Bo-Qiang Ma

    2010-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We obtain modified dispersion relations by requiring the vanishing of determinant of inverse of modified photon propagators in Lorentz invariance violation (LIV) theory. Inspired by these dispersion relations, we give a more general dispersion relation with less assumption and apply it to the recent observed gamma-ray burst GRB090510 to extract various constraints on LIV parameters. We find that the constraint on quantum gravity mass is slightly larger than the Planck mass but is consistent with the other recent observations, so the corresponding LIV coefficient $\\xi_1$ has reached the natural order ($o(1)$) as one expects. From our analysis, the linear LIV corrections to photon group velocity might be not excluded yet.

  10. Gamma-Ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Meszaros

    2006-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Gamma-ray bursts are the most luminous explosions in the Universe, and their origin and mechanism are the focus of intense research and debate. More than three decades after their discovery, and after pioneering breakthroughs from space and ground experiments, their study is entering a new phase with the recently launched Swift satellite. The interplay between these observations and theoretical models of the prompt gamma ray burst and its afterglow is reviewed.

  11. Gamma ray optics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jentschel, M.; Guenther, M. M.; Habs, D.; Thirolf, P. G. [Institut Laue-Langevin, F38042 Grenoble (France); Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, D-85748 Garching, Germany and Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2012-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Via refractive or diffractive scattering one can shape {gamma} ray beams in terms of beam divergence, spot size and monochromaticity. These concepts might be particular important in combination with future highly brilliant gamma ray sources and might push the sensibility of planned experiments by several orders of magnitude. We will demonstrate the experimental feasibility of gamma ray monochromatization on a ppm level and the creation of a gamma ray beam with nanoradian divergence. The results are obtained using the inpile target position of the High Flux Reactor of the ILL Grenoble and the crystal spectrometer GAMS. Since the refractive index is believed to vanish to zero with 1/E{sup 2}, the concept of refractive optics has never been considered for gamma rays. The combination of refractive optics with monochromator crystals is proposed to be a promising design. Using the crystal spectrometer GAMS, we have measured for the first time the refractive index at energies in the energy range of 180 - 2000 keV. The results indicate a deviation from simple 1/E{sup 2} extrapolation of X-ray results towards higher energies. A first interpretation of these new results will be presented. We will discuss the consequences of these results on the construction of refractive optics such as lenses or refracting prisms for gamma rays and their combination with single crystal monochromators.

  12. Observation of eta_c^{prime} Production in gamma gamma Fusion at CLEO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. M. Asner; CLEO Collaboration

    2005-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the observation of the eta_{c}^{prime}(2^{1}S_{0}), the radial excitation of eta_{c}(1^{1}S_{0}) ground state of charmonium, in the two-photon fusion reaction gamma gamma rightarrow eta_{c}^{prime} rightarrow K_{S}^{0}K^{pm}pi^{mp} in 13.6 fb^{-1} of CLEO II/II.V data and 13.1 fb^{-1} of CLEO III data. We obtain M(eta_{c}^{prime})=3642.9 pm 3.1(stat) pm1.5(syst) MeV, and M(eta_{c})=2981.8 pm1.3(stat) pm 1.5(syst) MeV. The corresponding values of hyperfine splittings between ^{1}S_{0} and ^{3}S_{1} states are \\Delta M_{hf}(1S)=115.1 pm 2.0 MeV, Delta M_{hf}(2S)=43.1 pm3.4 MeV. Assuming that the eta_{c} and eta_{c}^{prime} have equal branching fractions to K_{S}K pi, we obtain Gamma_{gamma gamma}(eta_{c}^{prime})=1.3 pm 0.6 keV.

  13. The Optical Afterglows of Gamma-Ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. T. Holland

    2003-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The optical afterglows of gamma-ray bursts can be used to probe the physics, geometry, and environments of gamma-ray bursts. In this article I discuss the how spectra and photometry can be used to constrain fireball parameters, describe several types of breaks that might be observed in the optical decay, and briefly review the late-time bumps and rapid variations in optical light curves.

  14. Observation of eta_c^' Production in gamma-gamma Fusion at CLEO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Ernst

    2003-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the observation of the eta_c^' (2 ^1S_0), the radial excitation of eta_c (1 ^1S_0) ground state of charmonium, in the two-photon fusion reaction gamma gamma to eta_c^' to K_S^0 K^{\\pm} pi^{\\mp} in 13.4 fb^{-1} of CLEO II/II.V data and 9.2 fb^{-1} of CLEO III data. The data have been analyzed to extract the eta_c^' resonance parameters.

  15. A Measurement of the Inclusive Z / gamma* --> mu+ mu- Cross-Section and Study of W and Z Events in proton - anti-proton Collisions at D0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nurse, Emily L

    2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A measurement of the inclusive Z/{gamma}* {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} cross section for M{sub {mu}{mu}} > 40 GeV at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV is presented. The measurement is performed using a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 147.7 pb{sup -1}, collected with the D0 detector at the Tevatron, Fermilab, between September 2002 and October 2003. A total of 14352 di-muon events are selected and a final result of {sigma}(Z/{gamma}*) = 327.8 {+-} 3.4(stat.) {+-} 8.4(syst.) {+-} 21.3(lumi.) pb is obtained. Correcting the number of di-muon events by a factor of 0.885 {+-} 0.015 for the contribution from pure {gamma}* exchange and Z/{gamma}* interference, the inclusive Z {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} cross section is found to be: {sigma}(Z) = 290.1 {+-} 3.0(stat.) {+-} 7.4(syst.) {+-} 18.9(lumi.) pb. Finally, comparisons of W and Z boson p{sub T} distributions as measured with D0 during Run I of the Tevatron are compared to HERWIG and MC{at}NLO predictions. Relevant parameters in the simulations are tuned to obtain the best possible fit to the data. An excellent agreement is found for both HERWIG and MC{at}NLO.

  16. Real time gamma-ray signature identifier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rowland, Mark (Alamo, CA); Gosnell, Tom B. (Moraga, CA); Ham, Cheryl (Livermore, CA); Perkins, Dwight (Livermore, CA); Wong, James (Dublin, CA)

    2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A real time gamma-ray signature/source identification method and system using principal components analysis (PCA) for transforming and substantially reducing one or more comprehensive spectral libraries of nuclear materials types and configurations into a corresponding concise representation/signature(s) representing and indexing each individual predetermined spectrum in principal component (PC) space, wherein an unknown gamma-ray signature may be compared against the representative signature to find a match or at least characterize the unknown signature from among all the entries in the library with a single regression or simple projection into the PC space, so as to substantially reduce processing time and computing resources and enable real-time characterization and/or identification.

  17. Robust Limits on Lorentz Violation from Gamma-Ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John Ellis; Nick E. Mavromatos; Dimitri V. Nanopoulos; Alexander S. Sakharov; Edward K. G. Sarkisyan

    2005-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We constrain the possibility of a non-trivial refractive index in free space corresponding to an energy-dependent velocity of light: c(E) \\simeq c_0 (1 - E/M), where M is a mass scale that might represent effect of quantum-gravitational space-time foam, using the arrival times of sharp features observed in the intensities of radiation with different energies from a large sample of gamma-ray bursters (GRBs) with known redshifts. We use wavelet techniques to identify genuine features, which we confirm in simulations with artificial added noise. Using the weighted averages of the time-lags calculated using correlated features in all the GRB light curves, we find a systematic tendency for more energetic photons to arrive earlier. However, there is a very strong correlation between the parameters characterizing an intrinsic time-lag at the source and a distance-dependent propagation effect. Moreover, the significance of the earlier arrival times is less evident for a subsample of more robust spectral structures. Allowing for intrinsic stochastic time-lags in these features, we establish a statistically robust lower limit: M > 0.9x10^{16} GeV on the scale of violation of Lorentz invariance.

  18. An investigation of the electronic wave functions in solids by the Compton scattering of gamma rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nha, Sang Kyun

    1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    APPARATUS The instrument, which was successfully used to study the behavior of the broadening of the Compton-scattered radiation, produces monochromatic gamma rays continuously variable in energy by selective Compton scattering of gamma photons emitted... was calculated. The system was adjusted to span the energy of- interest, then a count was taken 137 by using the Cs source. The channel corresponding to the peak 137 of Cs radiation was recorded, thon the pulser setting correspond)+8 to 662 1'eV (gamma ray...

  19. Apparatus and method for comparing corresponding acoustic resonances in liquids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sinha, Dipen N. (Los Almos, NM)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus and method for comparing corresponding acoustic resonances in liquids. The present invention permits the measurement of certain characteristics of liquids which affect the speed of sound therein. For example, a direct correlation between the octane rating of gasoline and the speed of sound in a gasoline sample has been experimentally observed. Therefore, changes in the speed of sound therein can be utilized as a sensitive parameter for determining changes in composition of a liquid sample. The present apparatus establishes interference patterns inside of a liquid without requiring the use of very thin, rigorously parallel ceramic discs, but rather uses readily available piezoelectric transducers attached to the outside surface of the usual container for the liquid and located on the same side thereof in the vicinity of one another. That is, various receptacle geometries may be employed, and the driving and receiving transducers may be located on the same side of the receptacle. The cell may also be constructed of any material that is inert to the liquid under investigation. A single-transducer embodiment, where the same transducer provides the excitation to the sample container and receives signals impressed therein, is also described.

  20. Apparatus and method for comparing corresponding acoustic resonances in liquids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sinha, D.N.

    1999-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus and method are disclosed for comparing corresponding acoustic resonances in liquids. The present invention permits the measurement of certain characteristics of liquids which affect the speed of sound therein. For example, a direct correlation between the octane rating of gasoline and the speed of sound in a gasoline sample has been experimentally observed. Therefore, changes in the speed of sound therein can be utilized as a sensitive parameter for determining changes in composition of a liquid sample. The present apparatus establishes interference patterns inside of a liquid without requiring the use of very thin, rigorously parallel ceramic discs, but rather uses readily available piezoelectric transducers attached to the outside surface of the usual container for the liquid and located on the same side thereof in the vicinity of one another. That is, various receptacle geometries may be employed, and the driving and receiving transducers may be located on the same side of the receptacle. The cell may also be constructed of any material that is inert to the liquid under investigation. A single-transducer embodiment, where the same transducer provides the excitation to the sample container and receives signals impressed therein, is also described. 5 figs.

  1. Correspondence Clustering: An Approach to Cluster Multiple Related Spatial Datasets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eick, Christoph F.

    Correspondence Clustering: An Approach to Cluster Multiple Related Spatial Datasets Vadeerat spatial datasets. This capability is important for change analysis and contrast mining. In this paper spatial datasets by maximizing cluster interestingness and correspondence between clusters derived from

  2. Gamma ray bursts in their historic context

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trimble, V

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gamma Ray Bursts In Their Historic Context Virginia TrimbleMD 20742 USA Abstract. Gamma ray bursts remained essentiallyalso applies to the gamma ray bursts. First, an observation

  3. Methods to Collect, Compile, and Analyze Observed Short-lived Fission Product Gamma Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Finn, Erin C.; Metz, Lori A.; Payne, Rosara F.; Friese, Judah I.; Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Kephart, Jeremy D.; Pierson, Bruce D.; Ellis, Tere A.

    2011-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A unique set of fission product gamma spectra was collected at short times (4 minutes to 1 week) on various fissionable materials. Gamma spectra were collected from the neutron-induced fission of uranium, neptunium, and plutonium isotopes at thermal, epithermal, fission spectrum, and 14-MeV neutron energies. This report describes the experimental methods used to produce and collect the gamma data, defines the experimental parameters for each method, and demonstrates the consistency of the measurements.

  4. Determination of thermal neutron capture gamma yields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harper, Thomas Lawrence

    1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of analysing Ge(Li) thermal neutron capture gamma spectra to obtain total gamma yields has been developed. Tie method determines both the yields from the well resolved gamma peaks in a spectrum as well as the gamma ...

  5. Determination of thermal neutron capture gamma yields.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harper, Thomas Lawrence

    1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of analysing Ge(Li) thermal neutron capture gamma spectra to obtain total gamma yields has been developed. Tie method determines both the yields from the well resolved gamma peaks in a spectrum as well as the gamma ...

  6. Gamma Ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peter Mészáros

    2012-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Gamma-ray bursts have been detected at photon energies up to tens of GeV. We review some recent developments in the X-ray to GeV photon phenomenology in the light of Swift and Fermi observations, and some of the theoretical models developed to explain them, with a view towards implications for C.T.A.

  7. Observation of J/{psi}{yields}3{gamma}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, G. S.; Anderson, M.; Cummings, J. P.; Danko, I.; Hu, D.; Moziak, B.; Napolitano, J. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States); He, Q.; Insler, J.; Muramatsu, H.; Park, C. S.; Thorndike, E. H.; Yang, F. [University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States); Artuso, M.; Blusk, S.; Khalil, S.; Li, J.; Mountain, R.; Nisar, S.; Randrianarivony, K. [Syracuse University, Syracuse, New York 13244 (United States)] (and others)

    2008-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the first observation of the decay J/{psi}{yields}3{gamma}. The signal has a statistical significance of 6{sigma} and corresponds to a branching fraction of B(J/{psi}{yields}3{gamma})=(1.2{+-}0.3{+-}0.2)x10{sup -5}, in which the errors are statistical and systematic, respectively. The measurement uses {psi}(2S){yields}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}J/{psi} events acquired with the CLEO-c detector operating at the CESR e{sup +}e{sup -} collider.

  8. Stability of the homogeneous Bose-Einstein condensate at large gas parameter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdulla Rakhimov; Chul Koo Kim; Sang-Hoon Kim; Jae Hyung Yee

    2008-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The properties of the uniform Bose gas is studied within the optimized variational perturbation theory (Gaussian approximation) in a self-consistent way. It is shown that the atomic BEC with a repulsive interaction becomes unstable when the gas parameter gamma=rho a^3 exceeds a critical value gamma_{crit} ~ 0.01. The quantum corrections beyond the Bogoliubov-Popov approximation to the energy density, chemical potential and pressure in powers of gamma expansions are presented.

  9. Department of Energy Response to Correspondence from Mary Celeste...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Mary Celeste Harris Related to District of Columbia Public Service Commission Docket No. EO-05-01 Department of Energy Response to Correspondence from Mary Celeste Harris Related...

  10. Department of Energy Response to Correspondence from Alexandria...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    & Publications Department of Energy Response to Correspondence from Mary Celeste Harris Related to District of Columbia Public Service Commission Docket No. EO-05-01 Comments...

  11. AdS Boundary Conditions and the Topologically Massive Gravity/CFT Correspondence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skenderis, Kostas; Taylor, Marika; Rees, Balt C. van [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Amsterdam, Valckenierstraat 65, 1018 XE Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The AdS/CFT correspondence provides a new perspective on recurrent questions in General Relativity such as the allowed boundary conditions at infinity and the definition of gravitational conserved charges. Here we review the main insights obtained in this direction over the last decade and apply the new techniques to Topologically Massive Gravity. We show that this theory is dual to a non-unitary CFT for any value of its parameter mu and becomes a Logarithmic CFT at mu = 1.

  12. Measurement of the p - anti-p ---> W gamma + X cross section at s**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV and WW gamma anomalous coupling limits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agelou, M.; Agram, J.-L.; Ahn, S.H.; Ahsan, M.; Alexeev, G.D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G.A.; Anastasoaie, M.; Andeen, T.; Anderson, S.; Andrieu, B.; Arnoud, Y.; Askew, A.; /Buenos Aires U. /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /Rio de Janeiro State U. /Sao

    2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The WW{gamma} triple gauge boson coupling parameters are studied using p{bar p} {yields} {ell}{nu}{gamma} + X({ell} = e, {mu}) events at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. The data were collected with the D0 detector from an integrated luminosity of 162 pb{sup -1} delivered by the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The cross section times branching fraction for p{bar p} {yields} W({gamma}) + X {yields} {ell}{nu}{gamma} + X with E{sub T}{sup {gamma}} > 8 GeV and {Delta}R{sub {ell}{gamma}} > 0.7 is 14.8 {+-} 1.6(stat) {+-} 1.0(syst) {+-} 1.0(lum) pb. The one-dimensional 95% confidence level limits on anomalous couplings are -0.88 < {Delta}{kappa}{sub {gamma}} < 0.96 and -0.20 < {lambda}{sub {gamma}} < 0.20.

  13. E-Print Network 3.0 - annihilation gamma rays Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    32 3 grid 74 94 3.05 ora SPEC ray tracing 650 array elements... .0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 GammaGammaGammaGammaGammaGamma GammaGammaGammaGammaGammaGamma GammaGammaGamma...

  14. E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric gamma rays Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    32 3 grid 74 94 3.05 ora SPEC ray tracing 650 array elements... .0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 GammaGammaGammaGammaGammaGamma GammaGammaGammaGammaGammaGamma GammaGammaGamma...

  15. Unidentified Gamma-Ray Sources: Hunting Gamma-Ray Blazars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Massaro, F.; D'Abrusco, R.; Tosti, G.; Ajello, M.; Gasparrini, A.Paggi.D.

    2012-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the main scientific objectives of the ongoing Fermi mission is unveiling the nature of the unidentified {gamma}-ray sources (UGSs). Despite the large improvements of Fermi in the localization of {gamma}-ray sources with respect to the past {gamma}-ray missions, about one third of the Fermi-detected objects are still not associated to low energy counterparts. Recently, using the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) survey, we discovered that blazars, the rarest class of Active Galactic Nuclei and the largest population of {gamma}-ray sources, can be recognized and separated from other extragalactic sources on the basis of their infrared (IR) colors. Based on this result, we designed an association method for the {gamma}-ray sources to recognize if there is a blazar candidate within the positional uncertainty region of a generic {gamma}-ray source. With this new IR diagnostic tool, we searched for {gamma}-ray blazar candidates associated to the UGS sample of the second Fermi {gamma}-ray catalog (2FGL). We found that our method associates at least one {gamma}-ray blazar candidate as a counterpart each of 156 out of 313 UGSs analyzed. These new low-energy candidates have the same IR properties as the blazars associated to {gamma}-ray sources in the 2FGL catalog.

  16. LASER-PLASMA-ACCELERATOR-BASED GAMMA GAMMA COLLIDERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schroeder, C. B.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LASER-PLASMA-ACCELERATOR-BASED ?? COLLIDERS ? C. B.linear col- lider based on laser-plasma-accelerators arediscussed, and a laser-plasma-accelerator-based gamma-

  17. Gamma-ray Burst Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, F Y; Liang, E W

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are the most luminous electromagnetic explosions in the Universe, which emit up to $8.8\\times10^{54}$ erg isotropic equivalent energy in the hard X-ray band. The high luminosity makes them detectable out to the largest distances yet explored in the Universe. GRBs, as bright beacons in the deep Universe, would be the ideal tool to probe the properties of high-redshift universe: including the cosmic expansion and dark energy, star formation rate, the reionization epoch and the metal enrichment history of the Universe. In this article, we review the luminosity correlations of GRBs, and implications for constraining the cosmological parameters and dark energy. Observations show that the progenitors of long GRBs are massive stars. So it is expected that long GRBs are tracers of star formation rate. We also review the high-redshift star formation rate derived from GRBs, and implications for the cosmic reionization history. The afterglows of GRBs generally have broken power-law spectra, so it...

  18. Real time method and computer system for identifying radioactive materials from HPGe gamma-ray spectroscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rowland, Mark S. (Alamo, CA); Howard, Douglas E. (Livermore, CA); Wong, James L. (Dublin, CA); Jessup, James L. (Tracy, CA); Bianchini, Greg M. (Livermore, CA); Miller, Wayne O. (Livermore, CA)

    2007-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A real-time method and computer system for identifying radioactive materials which collects gamma count rates from a HPGe gamma-radiation detector to produce a high-resolution gamma-ray energy spectrum. A library of nuclear material definitions ("library definitions") is provided, with each uniquely associated with a nuclide or isotope material and each comprising at least one logic condition associated with a spectral parameter of a gamma-ray energy spectrum. The method determines whether the spectral parameters of said high-resolution gamma-ray energy spectrum satisfy all the logic conditions of any one of the library definitions, and subsequently uniquely identifies the material type as that nuclide or isotope material associated with the satisfied library definition. The method is iteratively repeated to update the spectrum and identification in real time.

  19. The GAMMA-400 Space Mission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cumani, P; Bonvicini, V; Topchiev, N P; Adriani, O; Aptekar, R L; Arkhangelskaja, I V; Arkhangelskiy, A I; Bergstrom, L; Berti, E; Bigongiari, G; Bobkov, S G; Boezio, M; Bogomolov, E A; Bonechi, S; Bongi, M; Bottai, S; Castellini, G; Cattaneo, P W; Dedenko, G L; De Donato, C; Dogiel, V A; Gorbunov, M S; Gusakov, Yu V; Hnatyk, B I; Kadilin, V V; Kaplin, V A; Kaplun, A A; Kheymits, M D; Korepanov, V E; Larsson, J; Leonov, A A; Loginov, V A; Longo, F; Maestro, P; Marrocchesi, P S; Menshenin, A L; Mikhailov, V V; Mocchiutti, E; Moiseev, A A; Mori, N; Moskalenko, I V; Naumov, P Yu; Papini, P; Pearce, M; Picozza, P; Popov, A V; Rappoldi, A; Ricciarini, S; Runtso, M F; Ryde, F; Serdin, O V; Sparvoli, R; Spillantini, P; Suchkov, S I; Tavani, M; Taraskin, A A; Tiberio, A; Tyurin, E M; Ulanov, M V; Vacchi, A; Vannuccini, E; Vasilyev, G I; Yurkin, Yu T; Zampa, N; Zirakashvili, V N; Zverev, V G

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    GAMMA-400 is a new space mission which will be installed on board the Russian space platform Navigator. It is scheduled to be launched at the beginning of the next decade. GAMMA-400 is designed to study simultaneously gamma rays (up to 3 TeV) and cosmic rays (electrons and positrons from 1 GeV to 20 TeV, nuclei up to 10$^{15}$-10$^{16}$ eV). Being a dual-purpose mission, GAMMA-400 will be able to address some of the most impelling science topics, such as search for signatures of dark matter, cosmic-rays origin and propagation, and the nature of transients. GAMMA-400 will try to solve the unanswered questions on these topics by high-precision measurements of the Galactic and extragalactic gamma-ray sources, Galactic and extragalactic diffuse emission and the spectra of cosmic-ray electrons + positrons and nuclei, thanks to excellent energy and angular resolutions.

  20. The dark connection between the Canis Major dwarf, the Monoceros ring, the gas flaring, the rotation curve and the EGRET excess of diffuse Galactic Gamma Rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. de Boer; I. Gebauer; M. Weber; C. Sander; V. Zhukov; D. Kazakov

    2007-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The excess of diffuse galactic gamma rays above 1 GeV, as observed by the EGRET telescope on the NASA Compton Gamma Ray Observatory, shows all the key features from Dark Matter (DM) annihilation: (i) the energy spectrum of the excess is the same in all sky directions and is consistent with the gamma rays expected for the annihilation of WIMPs with a mass between 50-100 GeV; (ii) the intensity distribution of the excess in the sky is used to determine the halo profile, which was found to correspond to the usual profile from N-body simulations with additional substructure in the form of two doughnut-shaped structures at radii of 4 and 13 kpc; (iii) recent N-body simulations of the tidal disruption of the Canis Major dwarf galaxy show that it is a perfect progenitor of the ringlike Monoceros tidal stream of stars at 13 kpc with ring parameters in agreement with the EGRET data; (iiii) the mass of the outer ring is so large, that its gravitational effects influence both the gas flaring and the rotation curve of the Milky Way. Both effects are clearly observed in agreement with the DMA interpretation of the EGRET excess.

  1. Search for neutrinos from Gamma-Ray Bursts with ANTARES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eleonora Presani

    2011-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A method to search for neutrino induced showers from gamma-ray bursts in the ANTARES detector is presented. ANTARES consists of a three-dimensional array of photosensitive devices that measure Cherenkov light induced by charged particles produced by high energy neutrinos interacting in the detector vicinity. The shower channel is complementary to the more commonly used upgoing muon channel. The corresponding detection volume is smaller, but has the advantage of being sensitive to neutrinos of any flavour.

  2. Constraining axion by polarized prompt emission from gamma ray bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Rubbia; A. S. Sakharov

    2007-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A polarized gamma ray emission spread over a sufficiently wide energy band from a strongly magnetized astrophysical object like gamma ray bursts (GRBs) offers an opportunity to test the hypothesis of invisible axion. The axionic induced dichroism of gamma rays at different energies should cause a misalignment of the polarization plane for higher energy events relative to that one for lower energies events resulting in the loss of statistics needed to form a pattern of the polarization signal to be recognized in a detector. According to this, any evidence of polarized gamma rays coming from an object with extended magnetic field could be interpreted as a constraint on the existence of the invisible axion for a certain parameter range. Based on reports of polarized MeV emission detected in several GRBs we derive a constraint on the axion-photon coupling. This constraint $\\g_{a\\gamma\\gamma}\\le 2.2\\cdot 10^{-11} {\\rm GeV^{-1}}$ calculated for the axion mass $m_a=10^{-3} {\\rm eV}$ is competitive with the sensitivity of CAST and becomes even stronger for lower masses.

  3. Zero sound modes in the AdS/CFT correspondence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roxlo, Thomas (Thomas Q.)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We examine the effects of zero sound wave excitations of charged fermion species living around the charged black hole of an AdS/CFT spacetime. In particular, we show that these bulk modes cause corresponding singularities ...

  4. Simultaneous beta and gamma spectroscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Farsoni, Abdollah T. (Corvallis, OR); Hamby, David M. (Corvallis, OR)

    2010-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A phoswich radiation detector for simultaneous spectroscopy of beta rays and gamma rays includes three scintillators with different decay time characteristics. Two of the three scintillators are used for beta detection and the third scintillator is used for gamma detection. A pulse induced by an interaction of radiation with the detector is digitally analyzed to classify the type of event as beta, gamma, or unknown. A pulse is classified as a beta event if the pulse originated from just the first scintillator alone or from just the first and the second scintillator. A pulse from just the third scintillator is recorded as gamma event. Other pulses are rejected as unknown events.

  5. Gamma Ray Burst Afterglow Observations.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Updike, Adria

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??Gamma ray bursts (GRBs) are among the most luminous explosions in the universe. We present an overview of the observational history of GRBs and the… (more)

  6. Gamma-ray burst populations.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Virgili, Francisco J.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??Over the last fifty years the field of gamma-ray bursts has shown incredible growth, but the amassing of data has also left observers and theorists… (more)

  7. Testing the millisecond pulsar scenario of the Galactic center gamma-ray excess with very high energy gamma-rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiang Yuan; Kunihito Ioka

    2015-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The recent analyses of the Fermi Large Area Telescope data show an extended GeV $\\gamma$-ray excess on top of the expected diffuse background in the Galactic center region, which can be explained with annihilating dark matter or a population of millisecond pulsars (MSPs). We propose to observe the very high energy $\\gamma$-rays for distinguishing the MSP scenario from the dark matter scenario. The GeV $\\gamma$-ray MSPs should release most energy to the relativistic $e^{\\pm}$ wind, which will diffuse in the Galaxy and radiate TeV $\\gamma$-rays through inverse Compton scattering and bremsstrahlung processes. By calculating the spectrum and spatial distribution, we show that such emission is detectable with the next generation very high energy $\\gamma$-ray observatory, the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA), under reasonable model parameters. It is essential to search for the multi-wavelength counterparts to the GeV $\\gamma$-ray excess for solving this mystery in the high energy universe.

  8. Thermonuclear Reaction Rate of 23Mg(p,gamma)24$Al

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Herndl; M. Fantini; C. Iliades; P. M. Endt; H. Oberhummer

    1998-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Updated stellar rates for the reaction 23Mg(p,gamma)24Al are calculated by using all available experimental information on 24Al excitation energies. Proton and gamma-ray partial widths for astrophysically important resonances are derived from shell model calculations. Correspondences of experimentally observed 24Al levels with shell model states are based on application of the isobaric multiplet mass equation. Our new rates suggest that the 23Mg(p,gamma)24Al reaction influences the nucleosynthesis in the mass A>20 region during thermonuclear runaways on massive white dwarfs.

  9. Statefinder parameters in two dark energy models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grigoris Panotopoulos

    2007-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The statefinder parameters ($r,s$) in two dark energy models are studied. In the first, we discuss in four-dimensional General Relativity a two fluid model, in which dark energy and dark matter are allowed to interact with each other. In the second model, we consider the DGP brane model generalized by taking a possible energy exchange between the brane and the bulk into account. We determine the values of the statefinder parameters that correspond to the unique attractor of the system at hand. Furthermore, we produce plots in which we show $s,r$ as functions of red-shift, and the ($s-r$) plane for each model.

  10. THE PHOTOSPHERIC RADIATION MODEL FOR THE PROMPT EMISSION OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS: INTERPRETING FOUR OBSERVED CORRELATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fan Yizhong; Wei Daming; Zhang Fuwen [Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Zhang Binbin, E-mail: yzfan@pmo.ac.cn, E-mail: dmwei@pmo.ac.cn, E-mail: fwzhang@pmo.ac.cn, E-mail: bbzhang@psu.edu [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2012-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that the empirical E{sub p}-L, {Gamma}-L, E{sub p}-{Gamma}, and {eta}-bar{sub {gamma}}-E{sub p} correlations (where L is the time-averaged luminosity of the prompt emission, E{sub p} is the spectral peak energy, {Gamma} is the bulk Lorentz factor, and {eta}-bar{sub {gamma}} is the emission efficiency of gamma-ray bursts, GRBs) are well consistent with the relations between the analogous parameters predicted in the photospheric radiation model of the prompt emission of GRBs. The time-resolved thermal radiation of GRB 090902B does follow the E{sub p}-L and {Gamma}-L correlations. A reliable interpretation of the four correlations in alternative models is still lacking. These may point toward a photospheric origin of prompt emission of some GRBs.

  11. Co-axial, high energy gamma generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reijonen, Jani Petteri (Princeton, NJ); Gicquel, Frederic (Pennington, NJ)

    2011-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A gamma ray generator includes an ion source in a first chamber. A second chamber is configured co-axially around the first chamber at a lower second pressure. Co-axially arranged plasma apertures separate the two chambers and provide for restricted passage of ions and gas from the first to the second chamber. The second chamber is formed by a puller electrode having at least one long channel aperture to draw ions from the first chamber when the puller electrode is subject to an appropriate applied potential. A plurality of electrodes rings in the third chamber in third pressure co-axially surround the puller electrode and have at least one channel corresponding to the at least one puller electrode aperture and plasma aperture. The electrode rings increase the energy of the ions to a selected energy in stages in passing between successive pairs of the electrodes by application of an accelerating voltage to the successive pairs of accelerator electrodes. A target disposed co-axially around the plurality of electrodes receives the beam of accelerated ions, producing gamma rays.

  12. COMPACT, TUNABLE COMPTON SCATTERING GAMMA-RAY SOURCES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartemann, F V; Albert, F; Anderson, G G; Anderson, S G; Bayramian, A J; Betts, S M; Chu, T S; Cross, R R; Ebbers, C A; Fisher, S E; Gibson, D J; Ladran, A S; Marsh, R A; Messerly, M J; O'Neill, K L; Semenov, V A; Shverdin, M Y; Siders, C W; McNabb, D P; Barty, C J; Vlieks, A E; Jongewaard, E N; Tantawi, S G; Raubenheimer, T O

    2009-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent progress in accelerator physics and laser technology have enabled the development of a new class of gamma-ray light sources based on Compton scattering between a high-brightness, relativistic electron beam and a high intensity laser pulse produced via chirped-pulse amplification (CPA). A precision, tunable gamma-ray source driven by a compact, high-gradient X-band linac is currently under development at LLNL. High-brightness, relativistic electron bunches produced by the linac interact with a Joule-class, 10 ps laser pulse to generate tunable {gamma}-rays in the 0.5-2.5 MeV photon energy range via Compton scattering. The source will be used to excite nuclear resonance fluorescence lines in various isotopes; applications include homeland security, stockpile science and surveillance, nuclear fuel assay, and waste imaging and assay. The source design, key parameters, and current status are presented.

  13. A PARAMETER STUDY FOR BAROCLINIC VORTEX AMPLIFICATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raettig, Natalie; Klahr, Hubert [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Lyra, Wladimir, E-mail: raettig@mpia.de, E-mail: klahr@mpia.de, E-mail: Wladimir.Lyra@jpl.nasa.gov [Department of Astrophysics, American Museum of Natural History, 79th Street at Central Park West, New York, NY 10024 (United States)

    2013-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent studies have shown that baroclinic vortex amplification is strongly dependent on certain factors, namely, the global entropy gradient, the efficiency of thermal diffusion and/or relaxation as well as numerical resolution. We conduct a comprehensive study of a broad range and combination of various entropy gradients, thermal diffusion and thermal relaxation timescales via local shearing sheet simulations covering the parameter space relevant for protoplanetary disks. We measure the Reynolds stresses as a function of our control parameters and see that there is angular momentum transport even for entropy gradients as low as {beta} = -dln s/dln r = 1/2. Values we expect in protoplanetary disks are between {beta} = 0.5-2.0 The amplification-rate of the perturbations, {Gamma}, appears to be proportional to {beta}{sup 2} and thus proportional to the square of the Brunt-Vaeisaelae frequency ({Gamma}{proportional_to}{beta}{sup 2}{proportional_to}N {sup 2}). The saturation level of Reynolds stresses, on the other hand, seems to be proportional to {beta}{sup 1/2}. This highlights the importance of baroclinic effects even for the low entropy gradients expected in protoplanetary disks.

  14. The anatomy of $\\gamma$-ray pulsar light curves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seyffert, A S; Johnson, T J; Harding, A K

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We previously obtained constraints on the viewing geometries of 6 Fermi LAT pulsars using a multiwavelength approach (Seyffert et al., 2011). To obtain these constraints we compared the observed radio and $\\gamma$-ray light curves (LCs) for those 6 pulsars by eye to LCs predicted by geometric models detailing the location and extent of emission regions in a pulsar magnetosphere. As a precursor to obtaining these constraints, a parameter study was conducted to reinforce our qualitative understanding of how the underlying model parameters effect the LCs produced by the geometric models. Extracting useful trends from the $\\gamma$-ray model LCs proved difficult though due to the increased complexity of the geometric models for the $\\gamma$-ray emission relative to those for the radio emission. In this paper we explore a second approach to investigating the interplay between the model parameters and the LC atlas. This approach does not attempt to understand how the set of model parameters influences the LC shapes ...

  15. A Functional Correspondence between Evaluators and Abstract Machines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hutton, Graham

    A Functional Correspondence between Evaluators and Abstract Machines Mads Sig Ager, Dariusz machine from an ordinary call-by-name evaluator and by deriving an ordinary call-by-value evaluator from Felleisen et al.'s CEK-machine. The first derivation is strikingly simpler than what can be found

  16. Heat transfer from nanoparticles: a corresponding state analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Heat transfer from nanoparticles: a corresponding state analysis Samy Merabia , Sergei Shenogin that inhibits the formation of an insulating vapor film. heat transfer | nanoparticles | liquids | phase transitions Introduction Sub-micron scale heat transfer is attracting a growing inter- est, motivated by both

  17. Computing with the Lie correspondence Scott H. Murray

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murray, Scott H.

    Computing with the Lie correspondence Scott H. Murray University of Sydney July 30, 2009 #12;Linear: symplectic groups Sp2n(F) Types B and D: orthogonal Types E, F, G: exceptional #12;Almost reductive Lie The Lie algebra of a connected reductive linear algebraic group I sln(F) is almost reductive F has

  18. Dimensioning hospital wards using the Erlang loss model Corresponding author

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -2006. Finally, we demonstrate the efficiency of merging departments. Keywords: hospital resource allocationDimensioning hospital wards using the Erlang loss model Corresponding author: A.M. de Bruin (MSc of Sciences Department of Mathematics Assistant professor Optimization of Business Processes L. van Zanten

  19. * Corresponding author. Journal of Biomechanics 31 (1998) 239--245

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    where the primary energy system utilized is aerobic. Further, V O is a global measure of the energetic* Corresponding author. Journal of Biomechanics 31 (1998) 239--245 Standard mechanical energy to quantify mechanical energy expenditure (MEE) in human movement. To achieve this goal, a theoretical model

  20. * Corresponding author. Chemical Engineering Science 56 (2001) 1035}1039

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palanki, Srinivas

    . A simpli"ed model of the corona reactor is utilized in conjunction with dynamic optimization. Scaling of this optimization strategy. 2001 Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. Keywords: Pulsed corona reactor; Advanced* Corresponding author. Chemical Engineering Science 56 (2001) 1035}1039 Optimization

  1. Correspondence Laboratory observations of debris-bearing ice facies frozen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knight, Peter G.

    , others argue that supercooling is not the only mechanism for producing thick basal ice sequencesCorrespondence Laboratory observations of debris-bearing ice facies frozen from supercooled water. Supercooling has been invoked to explain anomalously thick basal ice sequences beneath temperate glaciers

  2. nature methods | VOL.6 NO.1 | JANUARY 2009 | 3 correspondence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caflisch, Amedeo

    free energies and binding affinities according to the respective thermodynamic cycle (Fig. 1a). We using ensembles of structures. (a) Thermodynamic cycle for the computation of folding free energiesnature methods | VOL.6 NO.1 | JANUARY 2009 | 3 correspondence Predicting free energy changes using

  3. Motion Without Correspondence from Tomographic Projections by Bayesian Inversion Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brandt, Sami

    Computing 3D reconstructions from X-ray projections is al- ready possible in some medical applications by Bayesian formalism as we want to handle either sparsely collected or limited-angle data, which are beyondMotion Without Correspondence from Tomographic Projections by Bayesian Inversion Theory S. S

  4. Other U.S. Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board Correspondence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Appendix F Appendix F Other U.S. Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board Correspondence · Letter UNITED STATES NUCLEAR WASTE TECHNICAL REVIEW BOARD 2300 Clarendon Boulevard, Suite 1300 Arlington, VA: Acknowledgement of letter · Letter from Robert R. Loux, Executive Director, Nevada Agency for Nuclear Projects

  5. How to Tell a Jet from a Balloon: A Proposed Test for Beaming in Gamma Ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James E. Rhoads

    1997-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    If gamma ray bursts are highly collimated, the energy requirements of each event may be reduced by several (~ 4-6) orders of magnitude, and the event rate increased correspondingly. Extreme conditions in gamma ray bursters lead to highly relativistic motions (bulk Lorentz factors Gamma > 100). This results in strong forward beaming of the emitted radiation in the observer's rest frame. Thus, all information on gamma ray bursts comes from those ejecta emitted in a narrow cone (opening angle 1/Gamma) pointing towards the observer. We are at present ignorant of whether there are ejecta outside that cone or not. The recent detection of longer wavelength transients following gamma ray bursts allows an empirical test of whether gamma ray bursts are collimated jets or spherical fireballs. The bulk Lorentz factor of the burst ejecta will decrease with time after the event, as the ejecta sweep up the surrounding medium. Thus, radiation from the ejecta is beamed into an ever increasing solid angle as the burst remnant evolves. It follows that if gamma ray bursts are highly collimated, many more optical and radio transients should be observed without associated gamma rays than with them. Published supernova searches may contain enough data to test the most extreme models of gamma ray beaming. We close with a brief discussion of other possible consequences of beaming, including its effect on the evolution of burst remnants.

  6. {gamma}-RAY LUMINOSITY FUNCTION AND THE CONTRIBUTION TO EXTRAGALACTIC {gamma}-RAY BACKGROUND FOR FERMI-DETECTED BLAZARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zeng, H. D.; Yan, D. H.; Sun, Y. Q.; Zhang, L., E-mail: lizhang@ynu.edu.cn [Department of Physics, Yunnan University, Kunming (China)

    2012-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We study {gamma}-ray luminosity functions (GLFs) and the contribution to the extragalactic diffuse {gamma}-rays for blazars. After using a clean blazar sample in which 485 blazars are observed at both the 8.4 GHz and {approx} GeV bands, we investigate the radio/{gamma}-ray luminosity correlation and find out that a strong correlation exists between the radio and {gamma}-ray luminosities using the partial correlation analysis method. Based on such a correlation, we obtain the GLF, while also considering the GLF based on studies of the X-ray luminosity function of active galactic nuclei and the GLF of the EGRET blazars. K-S tests indicate that these three kinds of GLFs are consistent with the observed data of our sample in a reasonable parameter range. Using these GLFs, we further investigate the blazar contribution to the extragalactic diffuse {gamma}-ray background (EGRB). Our results show that (1) the contribution of blazars are {approx}21.3% {+-} 2.7%, {approx}12.9% {+-} 1.7%, and {approx}37.9% {+-} 4.8% of unresolved Fermi EGRB flux for the three GLFs and (2) the contribution of flat-spectrum radio quasars are {approx}11.2% {+-} 1.6%, {approx}6.9% {+-} 1.0%, and {approx}9.0% {+-} 1.2% of unresolved Fermi EGRB flux for the three GLFs.

  7. Using a scalar parameter to trace dislocation evolution in atomistic modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Jinbo [ORNL; Zhang, Z F [Shenyang National Laboratory for Materials Science; Osetskiy, Yury N [ORNL; Stoller, Roger E [ORNL

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A scalar gamma-parameter is proposed from the Nye tensor. Its maximum value occurs along a dislocation line, either straight or curved, when the coordinate system is purposely chosen. This parameter can be easily obtained from the Nye tensor calculated at each atom in atomistic modeling. Using the gamma-parameter, a fully automated approach is developed to determine core atoms and the Burgers vectors of dislocations simultaneously. The approach is validated by revealing the smallest dislocation loop and by tracing the whole formation process of complicated dislocation networks on the fly.

  8. Study Z gamma events and limits on anomalous ZZ gamma and Z gamma gamma couplings in pp(-) collisions at root s=1.96 Tev

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Christofek, L.; Coppage, Don; Gardner, J.; Hensel, Carsten; Jabeen, S.; Wilson, Graham Wallace

    2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a measurement of the Z gamma production cross section and limits on anomalous ZZ gamma and Z gamma gamma couplings for form-factor scales of Lambda=750 and 1000 GeV. The measurement is based on 138 (152) candidates ...

  9. Gamma ray bursts ROBERT S MACKAY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rourke, Colin

    Gamma ray bursts ROBERT S MACKAY COLIN ROURKE We propose that a gamma ray burst is a kinematic Gamma ray bursts are intense flashes of electromagnetic radiation of cosmic origin lasting from ten accepted mechanism. We propose that a gamma ray burst is simply a kinematic effect, namely the effect

  10. Modeling gamma-ray bursts.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxham, Amanda

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??Discovered serendipitously in the late 1960s, gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are huge explosions of energy that happen at cosmological distances. They provide a grand physical playground… (more)

  11. Gamma-Ray Burst Lines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael S. Briggs

    1999-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The evidence for spectral features in gamma-ray bursts is summarized. As a guide for evaluating the evidence, the properties of gamma-ray detectors and the methods of analyzing gamma-ray spectra are reviewed. In the 1980's, observations indicated that absorption features below 100 keV were present in a large fraction of bright gamma-ray bursts. There were also reports of emission features around 400 keV. During the 1990's the situation has become much less clear. A small fraction of bursts observed with BATSE have statistically significant low-energy features, but the reality of the features is suspect because in several cases the data of the BATSE detectors appear to be inconsistent. Furthermore, most of the possible features appear in emission rather than the expected absorption. Analysis of data from other instruments has either not been finalized or has not detected lines.

  12. Towards a modulo p Langlands correspondence for GL2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Breuil, Christophe

    Towards a modulo p Langlands correspondence for GL2 Christophe Breuil C.N.R.S. & I.H.´E.S. Le Bois and representations of GL2 55 10 Examples of diagrams 62 11 Generic Diamond weights 65 12 The unicity Lemma 69 1 #12 Lemma 101 19 Generic Diamond diagrams and representations of GL2 108 20 The case F = Qp 116 2 #12

  13. On Perturbation Components Correspondence between Diffusion and Transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. Palmiotti

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have established a correspondence between perturbation components in diffusion and transport theory. In particular we have established the correspondence between the leakage perturbation component of the diffusion theory to that of the group self scattering in transport theory. This has been confirmed by practical applications on sodium void reactivity calculations of fast reactors. Why this is important for current investigations? Recently, there has been a renewed interest in designing fast reactors where the sodium void reactivity coefficient is minimized. In particular the ASTRID8,9 reactor concept has been optimized with this goal in mind. The correspondence on the leakage term that has been established here has a twofold implication for the design of this kind of reactors. First, this type of reactor has a radial reflector; therefore, as shown before, the sodium void reactivity coefficient calculation requires the use of transport theory. The minimization of the sodium reactivity coefficient is normally done by increasing the leakage component that has a negative sign. The correspondence established in this paper allows to directly look at this component in transport theory. The second implication is related to the uncertainty evaluation on sodium void reactivity. As it has shown before, the total sodium void reactivity effect is the result of a large compensation (opposite sign) between the scattering (called often spectral) component and the leakage one. Consequently, one has to evaluate separately the uncertainty on each separate component and then combine them statistically. If one wants to compute the cross section sensitivity coefficients of the two different components, the formulation established in this paper allows to achieve this goal by playing on the contribution to the sodium void reactivity coming from the group self scattering of the sodium cross section.

  14. On the E{sub 10}/massive type IIA supergravity correspondence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henneaux, Marc; Persson, Daniel [Physique Theorique et Mathematique, Universite Libre de Bruxelles and International Solvay Institutes, ULB-Campus Plaine C.P. 231, B-105yes0 Bruxelles (Belgium); Laboratoire de Physique Theorique, Ecole Normale Superieure, 24 rue Lhomond, F-75231 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Jamsin, Ella; Kleinschmidt, Axel [Physique Theorique et Mathematique, Universite Libre de Bruxelles and International Solvay Institutes, ULB-Campus Plaine C.P. 231, B-105yes0 Bruxelles (Belgium)

    2009-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we investigate in detail the correspondence between E{sub 10} and Romans' massive deformation of type IIA supergravity. We analyze the dynamics of a nonlinear sigma model for a spinning particle on the coset space E{sub 10}/K(E{sub 10}) and show that it reproduces the dynamics of the bosonic as well as the fermionic sector of the massive IIA theory, within the standard truncation. The mass deformation parameter corresponds to a generator of E{sub 10} outside the realm of the generators entering the usual D=11 analysis, and is naturally included without any deformation of the coset model for E{sub 10}/K(E{sub 10}). Our analysis thus provides a dynamical unification of the massless and massive versions of type IIA supergravity inside E{sub 10}. We discuss a number of additional and general features of relevance in the analysis of any deformed supergravity in the correspondence to Kac-Moody algebras, including recently studied deformations where the trombone symmetry is gauged.

  15. Gamma-RayGamma-Ray Bursts: from SwiftBursts: from Swift

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    Gamma-RayGamma-Ray Bursts: from SwiftBursts: from Swift to GLASTto GLAST Bing ZhangBing ZhangGehrels, et al), et al) #12;Gamma-ray bursts: the mostGamma-ray bursts: the most violent explosions fireball central photosphere internal external shocks engine (shocks) (reverse) (forward) gamma-ray UV

  16. Ratchet transport and periodic structures in parameter space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alan Celestino; Cesar Manchein; Holokx A. Albuquerque; Marcus W. Beims

    2011-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Ratchet models are prominent candidates to describe the transport phenomenum in nature in the absence of external bias. This work analyzes the parameter space of a discrete ratchet model and gives direct connections between chaotic domains and a family of isoperiodic stable structures with the ratchet current. The isoperiodic structures appear along preferred direction in the parameter space giving a guide to follow the current, which usually increases inside the structures but is independent of the corresponding period. One of such structures has the shrimp-shaped form which is known to be an universal structure in the parameter space of dissipative systems. Currents in parameter space provide a direct measure of the momentum asymmetry of the multistable and chaotic attractors times the size of the corresponding basin of attraction. Transport structures are shown to exist in the parameter space of the Langevin equation with an external oscillating force.

  17. Gamma Ray Bursts and CETI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frank D. Smith Jr

    1993-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Gamma ray burst sources are isotropically distributed. They could be located at distances $\\sim 1000$ AU. (Katz \\cite{JK92}) GRB signals have many narrow peaks that are unresolved at the millisecond time resolution of existing observations. \\cite{JK87} CETI could use stars as gravitational lenses for interstellar gamma ray laser beam communication. Much better time resolution of GRB signals could rule out (or confirm?) the speculative hypothesis that GRB = CETI.

  18. Gamma radiation field intensity meter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thacker, L.H.

    1995-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode. 4 figs.

  19. Gamma radiation field intensity meter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thacker, L.H.

    1994-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode. 4 figs.

  20. Gamma radiation field intensity meter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thacker, Louis H. (Knoxville, TN)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode.

  1. Gamma radiation field intensity meter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thacker, Louis H. (Knoxville, TN)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode.

  2. Olive bagasse and nutshell as gamma shielding material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ?naç, Esra; Bayta?, A. Filiz [Energy Institute, Istanbul Technical University, 34469 Istanbul (Turkey)

    2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Gamma ray linear attenuation coefficients have been measured experimentally for olive bagasse and nutshell by using narrow beam geometry for Co-60 and the values have been compared with soil. These values have been used calculate mean free path, half value layer and tenth value layer parameters. Besides, effect of multi-layered systems (soil + olive bagasse and soil + nutshell) has been analyzed in terms of half value layer.

  3. Short Gamma-Ray Bursts from Binary Neutron Star Mergers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roland Oechslin; Thomas Janka

    2006-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the results from new relativistic hydrodynamic simulations of binary neutron star mergers using realistic non-zero temperature equations of state. We vary several unknown parameters in the system such as the neutron star (NS) masses, their spins and the nuclear equation of state. The results are then investigated with special focus on the post-merger torus-remnant system. Observational implications on the Gamma-ray burst (GRB) energetics are discussed and compared with recent observations.

  4. Rigidity-dependent cosmic ray energy spectra in the knee region obtained with the GAMMA experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. P. Garyaka; R. M. Martirosov; S. V. Ter-Antonyan; N. Nikolskaya; Y. A. Gallant; L. Jones; J. Procureur

    2007-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    On the basis of the extensive air shower (EAS) data obtained by the GAMMA experiment, the energy spectra and elemental composition of the primary cosmic rays are derived in the 1-100 PeV energy range. The reconstruction of the primary energy spectra is carried out using an EAS inverse approach in the framework of the SIBYLL2.1 and QGSJET01 interaction models and the hypothesis of power-law primary energy spectra with rigidity-dependent knees. The energy spectra of primary H, He, O-like and Fe-like nuclei obtained with the SIBYLL interaction model agree with corresponding extrapolations of the balloon and satellite data to ~1 PeV energies. The energy spectra obtained from the QGSJET model show a predominantly proton composition in the knee region. The rigidity-dependent knee feature of the primary energy spectra for each interaction model is displayed at the following rigidities: ~2.5+/-0.2 PV (SIBYLL) and ~3.1-4.2 PV (QGSJET). All the results presented are derived taking into account the detector response, the reconstruction uncertainties of the EAS parameters, and fluctuations in the EAS development.

  5. Digital discrimination of neutrons and gamma-rays in organic scintillation detectors using moment analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xie Xufei; Zhang Xing; Yuan Xi; Chen Jinxiang; Li Xiangqing; Zhang Guohui; Fan Tieshuan [School of Physics and State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing (China); Yuan Guoliang; Yang Jinwei; Yang Qingwei [Southwestern Institute of Physics, Chengdu (China)

    2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Digital discrimination of neutron and gamma-ray events in an organic scintillator has been investigated by moment analysis. Signals induced by an americium-beryllium (Am/Be) isotropic neutron source in a stilbene crystal detector have been sampled with a flash analogue-to-digital converter (ADC) of 1 GSamples/s sampling rate and 10-bit vertical resolution. Neutrons and gamma-rays have been successfully discriminated with a threshold corresponding to gamma-ray energy about 217 keV. Moment analysis has also been verified against the results assessed by a time-of-flight (TOF) measurement. It is shown that the classification of neutrons and gamma-rays afforded by moment analysis is consistent with that achieved by digital TOF measurement. This method has been applied to analyze the data acquired from the stilbene crystal detector in mixed radiation field of the HL-2A tokamak deuterium plasma discharges and the results are described.

  6. Bulk-edge correspondence for two-dimensional topological insulators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. M. Graf; M. Porta

    2013-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Topological insulators can be characterized alternatively in terms of bulk or edge properties. We prove the equivalence between the two descriptions for two-dimensional solids in the single-particle picture. We give a new formulation of the $\\mathbb{Z}_{2}$-invariant, which allows for a bulk index not relying on a (two-dimensional) Brillouin zone. When available though, that index is shown to agree with known formulations. The method also applies to integer quantum Hall systems. We discuss a further variant of the correspondence, based on scattering theory.

  7. AdS/CFT correspondence beyond its supergravity approximation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mir Faizal; Ahmed Farag Ali; Ali Nassar

    2014-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We will study the AdS/CFT correspondence beyond its supergravity approximation by deforming an effective field theory on AdS by string length scale effects. We will explicitly show that the conformal dimensions of both the relevant and the irrelevant operators receive correction from these string theory effects going beyond its supergravity approximation. However, as is expected from the full string theory on AdS (not just its supergravity approximation) being dual to the $\\mathcal{N}=4$ super-Yang-Mills theory, the conformal dimension of marginal operators do not receive any such corrections.

  8. Towards the correspondence between Q-clouds and sphalerons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nugaev, Emin

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Non-linear classical equations of motion may admit degenerate solutions at fixed charges. While the solutions with lower energies are classically stable, the ones with larger energies are unstable and refereed as Q-clouds. We consider a theory in which the homogeneous charged condensate is classically stable and argue that Q-clouds correspond to sphalerons between the stable Q-balls and the condensate. For the model with analytic solution, we present Arrhenius formula for the quantum production of Q-balls from the condensate at large temperatures.

  9. EM SSAB Correspondence & Briefings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in Review: TopEnergy DOEDealingVehicle1:EnergyDecember 10, 2014Correspondence &

  10. Exclusive search for Higgs boson to gamma-gamma decay via vector boson fusion production mechanism .

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rankin, Dylan Sheldon

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??We perform an exclusive search for the Higgs boson to gamma-gamma decay via vector boson fusion. We utilize the characteristic features of vector boson fusion,… (more)

  11. Quality assurance for gamma knives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, E.D.; Banks, W.W.; Fischer, L.E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes and summarizes the results of a quality assurance (QA) study of the Gamma Knife, a nuclear medical device used for the gamma irradiation of intracranial lesions. Focus was on the physical aspects of QA and did not address issues that are essentially medical, such as patient selection or prescription of dose. A risk-based QA assessment approach was used. Sample programs for quality control and assurance are included. The use of the Gamma Knife was found to conform to existing standards and guidelines concerning radiation safety and quality control of external beam therapies (shielding, safety reviews, radiation surveys, interlock systems, exposure monitoring, good medical physics practices, etc.) and to be compliant with NRC teletherapy regulations. There are, however, current practices for the Gamma Knife not covered by existing, formalized regulations, standards, or guidelines. These practices have been adopted by Gamma Knife users and continue to be developed with further experience. Some of these have appeared in publications or presentations and are slowly finding their way into recommendations of professional organizations.

  12. The GL(1|1)-symplectic fermion correspondence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Creutzig; Peter B. Ronne

    2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this note we prove a correspondence between the Wess-Zumino-Novikov-Witten model of the Lie supergroup GL(1|1) and a free model consisting of two scalars and a pair of symplectic fermions. This model was discussed earlier by LeClair. Vertex operators for the symplectic fermions include twist fields, and correlation functions of GL(1|1) agree with the known results for the scalars and symplectic fermions. We perform a detailed study of boundary states for symplectic fermions and apply them to branes in GL(1|1). This allows us to compute new amplitudes of strings stretching between branes of different types and confirming Cardy's condition.

  13. All Order Linearized Hydrodynamics from Fluid/Gravity Correspondence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yanyan Bu; Michael Lublinsky

    2014-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Using fluid/gravity correspondence, we determine the (linearized) stress energy tensor of $\\mathcal{N}=4$ super-Yang-Mills theory at strong coupling with all orders in derivatives of fluid velocity included. We find that the dissipative effects are fully encoded in the shear term and a new one, which emerges starting from the third order. We derive, for the first time, closed linear holographic RG flow-type equations for (generalized) momenta-dependent viscosity functions. In the hydrodynamic regime, we obtain the stress tensor up to third order in derivative expansion analytically. We then numerically determine the viscosity functions up to large momenta. As a check of our results, we also derive the generalized Navier-Stokes equations from the Einstein equations in the dual gravity.

  14. Thermodynamics of Black Hole Horizons and Kerr/CFT Correspondence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bin Chen; Shen-xiu Liu; Jia-ju Zhang

    2012-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we investigate the thermodynamics of the inner horizon and its implication on the holographic description of the black hole. We focus on the black holes with two physical horizons. Under reasonable assumption, we prove that the first law of thermodynamics of the outer horizon always indicates that of the inner horizon. As a result, the fact that the area product being mass-independent is equivalent to the relation $T_+S_+=T_-S_-$, with $T_\\pm$ and $S_\\pm$ being the Hawking temperatures and the entropies of the outer and inner horizon respectively. We find that the mass-independence of area product breaks down in general Myers-Perry black holes with spacetime dimension $d\\geq6$ and Kerr-AdS black holes with $d\\geq4$. Moreover we discuss the implication of the first laws of the outer and inner horizons on the thermodynamics of the right- and left-moving sectors of dual CFT in Kerr/CFT correspondence. We show that once the relation $T_+S_+=T_-S_-$ is satisfied, the central charges of two sectors must be same. Furthermore from the thermodynamics relations, we read the dimensionless temperatures of microscopic CFT, which are in exact agreement with the ones obtained from hidden conformal symmetry in the low frequency scattering off the black holes, and then determine the central charges. This method works well in well-known cases in Kerr/CFT correspondence, and reproduce successfully the holographic pictures for 4D Kerr-Newman and 5D Kerr black holes. We go on to predict the central charges and temperatures of a possible holographic CFT description dual to 5D doubly rotating black ring.

  15. Neutrinos from Gamma Ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Halzen; G. Jaczko

    1996-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that the detection of neutrinos from a typical gamma ray burst requires a kilometer-scale detector. We argue that large bursts should be visible with the neutrino telescopes under construction. We emphasize the 3 techniques by which neutrino telescopes can perform this search: by triggering on i) bursts of muons from muon neutrinos, ii) muons from air cascades initiated by high energy gamma rays and iii) showers made by relatively low energy ($\\simeq 100\\,\\mev$) electron neutrinos. Timing of neutrino-photon coincidences may yield a measurement of the neutrino mass to order $10^{-5}$~eV, an interesting range in light of the solar neutrino anomaly.

  16. Gamma source for active interrogation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Lou, Tak Pui; Barletta, William A.

    2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A cylindrical gamma generator includes a coaxial RF-driven plasma ion source and target. A hydrogen plasma is produced by RF excitation in a cylindrical plasma ion generator using an RF antenna. A cylindrical gamma generating target is coaxial with the ion generator, separated by plasma and extraction electrodes which has many openings. The plasma generator emanates ions radially over 360.degree. and the cylindrical target is thus irradiated by ions over its entire circumference. The plasma generator and target may be as long as desired.

  17. sin 2 beta + gamma Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Therin, G; /Paris U., VI-VII

    2005-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    I report on the most recent measurements done to constrain sin(2{beta}+{gamma}) with neutral B mesons. Direct measurements of 2{beta} + {gamma} will provide a precise test of the standard model predictions with higher statistics. Present constraints come from studies of B {yields} D{sup (*){+-}}{pi}{sup {-+}}/{rho}{sup {-+}} decays done by BABAR and Belle collaborations with full and inclusive techniques to reconstruct B mesons. B {yields} D{sup 0(*)}K{sup 0} decays are also very promising but statistics are too low to give any constraint at the moment.

  18. Gamma-ray Imaging Methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vetter, K; Mihailescu, L; Nelson, K; Valentine, J; Wright, D

    2006-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    In this document we discuss specific implementations for gamma-ray imaging instruments including the principle of operation and describe systems which have been built and demonstrated as well as systems currently under development. There are several fundamentally different technologies each with specific operational requirements and performance trade offs. We provide an overview of the different gamma-ray imaging techniques and briefly discuss challenges and limitations associated with each modality (in the appendix we give detailed descriptions of specific implementations for many of these technologies). In Section 3 we summarize the performance and operational aspects in tabular form as an aid for comparing technologies and mapping technologies to potential applications.

  19. Measurements of B to V(Gamma) Decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yarritu, Aaron K.; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; ,

    2010-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The standard model has been highly successful at describing current experimental data. However, extensions of the standard model predict particles that have masses at energy scales that are above the electroweak scale. The flavor-changing neutral current processes of the B meson are sensitive to the influences of these new physics contributions. These processes proceed through loop diagrams, thus allowing new physics to enter at the same order as the standard model. New physics may contribute to the enhancement or suppression of rate asymmetries or the decay rates of these processes. The transition B {yields} V{gamma} (V = K*(892), {rho}(770), {omega}(782), {phi}(1020)) represents radiative decays of the B meson that proceed through penguin processes. Hadronic uncertainties limit the theoretical accuracy of the prediction of the branching fractions. However, uncertainties, both theoretical and experimental, are much reduced when considering quantities involving ratios of branching fractions, such as CP or isospin asymmetries. The most dominant exclusive radiative b {yields} s transition is B {yields} K*{gamma}. We present the best measurements of the branching fractions, direct CP, and isospin asymmetries of B {yields} K*{gamma}. The analogous b {yields} d transitions are B {yields} {rho}{gamma} and B {yields} {omega}{gamma}, which are suppressed by a factor of |V{sub td}/V{sub ts}|{sup 2} {approx} 0.04 relative to B {yields} K*{gamma}. A measurement of the branching fractions and isospin asymmetry of B{sup +} {yields} {rho}{sup +}{gamma} and B{sup 0} {yields} {rho}{sup 0}{gamma}, as well as a search for B {yields} {omega}{gamma}, are also given. These measurements are combined to calculate the ratio of CKM matrix elements |V{sub td}/V{sub ts}|, which corresponds to the length of one side of the unitary triangle. Finally, we present a search for the penguin annihilation process B {yields}{phi}{gamma}. We use a sample of 383 million B{bar B} events collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B factory for the analysis of B {yields} K*{gamma}. We measure the branching fractions {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} K*{sup 0}{gamma}) = (4.47 {+-} 0.10 {+-} 0.16) x 10{sup -5} and {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} K*{sup +}{gamma}) = (4.22 {+-} 0.14 {+-} 0.16) x 10{sup -5}. We measure the direct CP asymmetry to be -0.033 < {Alpha}{sub CP} (B {yields} K*{gamma}) < 0.028 and the isospin asymmetry to be 0.017 < {Delta}{sub 0-} < 0.116, where the limits are determined at the 90% C.L. and include both the statistical and systematic uncertainties. Using a sample of 347 million B{bar B} events, we measure the branching fractions {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {rho}{sup +}{gamma}) = (1.10{sub -0.33}{sup +0.37} {+-} 0.09) x 10{sup -6} and {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {rho}{sup 0}{gamma}) = (0.79{sub -0.20}{sup +0.22} {+-} 0.06) x 10{sup -6}, the isospin asymmetry {Delta} = -0.35 {+-} 0.27, and set a 90% C.L. upper limit {Beta}(B {yields} {omega}{gamma}) < 0.78 x 10{sup -6}. We also measure the isospin-averaged branching fraction {Beta}(B {yields} ({rho}/{omega}){gamma}) = (1.25{sub -0.24}{sup +0.25} {+-} 0.09) x 10{sup -6}, from which we determine |V{sub td}/V{sub ts}|= 0.200{sub -0.020}{sup +0.021} {+-} 0.015, where the first uncertainty is experimental and the second theoretical. Finally, a sample of 124 million B{bar B} events is used to set an upper limit of {Beta}(B {yields} {phi}{gamma}) < 8.5 x 10{sup -7} at the 90% C.L.

  20. Correspondence between classical dynamics and energy level spacing distribution in the transition billiard systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soo-Young Lee; Sunghwan Rim; Eui-Soon Yim; C. H. Lee

    1998-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The Robnik billiard is investigated in detail both classically and quantally in the transition range from integrable to almost chaotic system. We find out that a remarkable correspondence between characteristic features of classical dynamics, especially topological structure of integrable regions in the Poincar\\'{e} surface of section, and the statistics of energy level spacings appears with a system parameter $\\lambda$ being varied. It is shown that the variance of the level spacing distribution changes its behavior at every particular values of $\\lambda$ in such a way that classical dynamics changes its topological structure in the Poincar\\'{e} surface of section, while the skewness and the excess of the level spacings seem to be closely relevant to the interface structure between integrable region and chaotic sea rather than inner structure of intergrable regoin.

  1. Storage Ring Parameters

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmittedStatus TomAbout » Staff125,849 127,174 126,924Storage Ring Parameters

  2. Higgs boson decays into {\\gamma}{\\gamma} and Z{\\gamma} in the MSSM and BLSSM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammad, A; Moretti, S

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We calculate Higgs decay rates into {\\gamma}{\\gamma} and Z{\\gamma} in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) and (B-L) Supersymmetric Standard Model (BLSSM) by allowing for contributions from light staus and charginos. We show that sizable departures are possible from the SM predictions for the 125 GeV state and that they are testable during run 2 at the Large Hadron Collider. Furthermore, we illustrate how a second light scalar Higgs signal in either or both these decay modes can be accessed at the CERN machine rather promptly within the BLSSM, a possibility instead precluded to the MSSM owing to the much larger mass of its heavy scalar state.

  3. PUBLISHED VERSION Gamma ray spectrometer for ITER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ray Scintillation Spectrometer Rev. Sci. Instrum. 24, 1096 (1953); 10.1063/1.1770609 An Automatic Recording Gamma for the spectrometer is presented. Keywords: tokamak, DT plasma, alpha- particles, diagnostics, gamma- spectrometry

  4. Essay on the gamma ray laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silviu Olariu

    1999-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This work discusses the possibility of inducing the emission of gamma radiation from nuclear isomers by two-photon transitions, in the more general context of the problem of the amplification of gamma radiation.

  5. Investigating gamma-ray lines from dark matter with future observatories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bergström, Lars; Conrad, Jan; Farnier, Christian [The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmoparticle Physics, Department of Physics, Stockholm University, AlbaNova, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Bertone, Gianfranco [GRAPPA Institute, University of Amsterdam, Science Park 904, 1090 GL Amsterdam (Netherlands); Weniger, Christoph, E-mail: lbe@fysik.su.se, E-mail: gf.bertone@gmail.com, E-mail: conrad@fysik.su.se, E-mail: Christian.Farnier@fysik.su.se, E-mail: weniger@mpp.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut für Physik, Föhringer Ring 6, 80805 München (Germany)

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the prospects for studying line features in gamma-ray spectra with upcoming gamma-ray experiments, such as HESS-II, the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA), and the GAMMA-400 satellite. As an example we use the narrow feature at 130 GeV seen in public data from the Fermi-LAT satellite. We found that all three experiments should be able to confidently confirm or rule out the presence of this 130 GeV feature. If it is real, it should be confirmed with a confidence level higher than 5?. Assuming it to be a spectral signature of dark matter origin, GAMMA-400, thanks to a projected energy resolution of about 1.5 % at 100 GeV, should also be able to resolve both the ?? line and a corresponding Z? or H? feature, if the corresponding branching ratio is comparable to that into two photons. It will also allow to distinguish between a gamma-ray line and the similar feature resulting from internal bremsstrahlung photons.

  6. CFT/AdS correspondence, massive gravitons, and a connectivity index conjecture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aharony, Ofer [Department of Particle Physics, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel); Clark, Adam B.; Karch, Andreas [Department of Physics, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States)

    2006-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the general question of which conformal field theories have dual descriptions in terms of quantum gravity theories on anti-de Sitter space. We analyze in detail the case of a deformed product of n conformal field theories (each of which has a gravity dual), and we claim that the dual description of this is by a quantum gravity theory on a union of n anti-de Sitter spaces, connected at their boundary (by correlations between their boundary conditions). On this union of spaces (n-1) linear combinations of gravitons obtain a mass, and we compute this mass both from the field theory and from the gravity sides of the correspondence, finding the same result in both computations. This is the first example in which a graviton mass in the bulk of anti-de Sitter space arises continuously by varying parameters. The analysis of these deformed product theories leads us to suggest that field theories may be generally classified by a ''connectivity index,'' corresponding to the number of components (connected at the boundary) in the space-time of the dual gravitational background. In the field theory this index roughly counts the number of independent gauge groups, but we do not have a precise general formula for the index.

  7. The Diverse Environments of Gamma-Ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perley, Daniel Alan

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Galaxies of Dark Gamma-Ray Bursts: Observational Constraintsof a Very Bright Gamma- Ray Burst in a Galactic Halo 3.11.3 Gamma-Ray Burst Classi?cation . . . . . . 1.4 Gamma-Ray

  8. Light Curves of Swift Gamma Ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paolo Cea

    2006-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent observations from the Swift gamma-ray burst mission indicate that a fraction of gamma ray bursts are characterized by a canonical behaviour of the X-ray afterglows. We present an effective theory which allows us to account for X-ray light curves of both (short - long) gamma ray bursts and X-ray rich flashes. We propose that gamma ray bursts originate from massive magnetic powered pulsars.

  9. Pulsed Gamma-Ray-Burst Afterglows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Middleditch

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    provides a candidate for the central engine of the gamma-ray burst (GRB) mechanism, both long and short

  10. E-Print Network 3.0 - angular gamma-gamma perturbada Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Interesting Interesting Summary: 5 10 15 20 25 (4S) Dataset: ffl 3.3 M B B ffl 4.8 M c c ffl 3.9 M + Gamma Gamma GammaGamma... (...

  11. Error Rate Performance of Coded Free-Space Optical Links over Gamma-Gamma Turbulence Channels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Tiffany Jing

    Error Rate Performance of Coded Free-Space Optical Links over Gamma-Gamma Turbulence Channels Murat be used over free-space optical (FSO) links to mitigate turbulence-induced fading. In this paper, we channels, considering the recently introduced gamma-gamma turbulence model. We derive a pairwise error

  12. The Universe Viewed in Gamma-Rays 1 Properties of Gamma-ray Bursts Localized by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Enomoto, Ryoji

    The Universe Viewed in Gamma-Rays 1 Properties of Gamma-ray Bursts Localized by the HETE-2 and localize Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) in wide field of view. HETE-2 have been localized about 20 GRBs per year hours after the burst. 1. The High Energy Transient Explorer 2 Gamma-ray burst (GRB) is the most

  13. Multifrequency Observations of Gamma-Ray Burst

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Greiner

    1995-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Neither a flaring nor a quiescent counterpart to a gamma-ray burst has yet been convincingly identified at any wavelength region. The present status of the search for counterparts of classical gamma-ray bursts is given. Particular emphasis is put on the search for flaring counterparts, i.e. emission during or shortly after the gamma-ray emission.

  14. Neutron/gamma coupled library generation and gamma transport calculation with KARMA 1.2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hong, S. G. [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Kyung Hee Univ., 446-701 Deogyeong-daero, GiHeung-gu, Yongin, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Kim, K. S.; Cho, J. Y.; Lee, K. H. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Inst., 305-353 Duckjin-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    KAERI has developed a lattice transport calculation code KARMA and its multi-group cross section library generation system. Recently, the multi-group cross section library generation system has included a gamma cross section generation capability and KARMA also has been improved to include a gamma transport calculation module. This paper addresses the multi-group gamma cross section generation capability for the KARMA 1.2 code and the preliminary test results of the KARMA 1.2 gamma transport calculations. The gamma transport calculation with KARMA 1.2 gives the gamma flux, gamma smeared power, and gamma energy deposition distributions. The results of the KARMA gamma calculations were compared with those of HELIOS and they showed that KARMA 1.2 gives reasonable gamma transport calculation results. (authors)

  15. Solar Gamma Rays Powered by Secluded Dark Matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brian Batell; Maxim Pospelov; Adam Ritz; Yanwen Shang

    2009-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Secluded dark matter models, in which WIMPs annihilate first into metastable mediators, can present novel indirect detection signatures in the form of gamma rays and fluxes of charged particles arriving from directions correlated with the centers of large astrophysical bodies within the solar system, such as the Sun and larger planets. This naturally occurs if the mean free path of the mediator is in excess of the solar (or planetary) radius. We show that existing constraints from water Cerenkov detectors already provide a novel probe of the parameter space of these models, complementary to other sources, with significant scope for future improvement from high angular resolution gamma-ray telescopes such as Fermi-LAT. Fluxes of charged particles produced in mediator decays are also capable of contributing a significant solar system component to the spectrum of energetic electrons and positrons, a possibility which can be tested with the directional and timing information of PAMELA and Fermi.

  16. THE BATSE 5B GAMMA-RAY BURST SPECTRAL CATALOG

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldstein, Adam; Preece, Robert D.; Briggs, Michael S.; Burgess, J. Michael [University of Alabama in Huntsville, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Mallozzi, Robert S.; Fishman, Gerald J.; Kouveliotou, Chryssa [Space Science Office, VP62, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Paciesas, William S. [Universities Space Research Association, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States)

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present systematic spectral analyses of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) detected with the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) on board the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory during its entire nine years of operation. This catalog contains two types of spectra extracted from 2145 GRBs, and fitted with five different spectral models resulting in a compendium of over 19,000 spectra. The models were selected based on their empirical importance to the spectral shape of many GRBs, and the analysis performed was devised to be as thorough and objective as possible. We describe in detail our procedures and criteria for the analyses, and present the bulk results in the form of parameter distributions. This catalog should be considered an official product from the BATSE Science Team, and the data files containing the complete results are available from the High-Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center (HEASARC)

  17. The energy balancing parameter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walton R. Gutierrez

    2011-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A parameter method is introduced in order to estimate the relationship among the various variables of a system in equilibrium, where the potential energy functions are incompletely known or the quantum mechanical calculations very difficult. No formal proof of the method is given; instead, a sufficient number of valuable examples are shown to make the case for the method's usefulness in classical and quantum systems. The mathematical methods required are quite elementary: basic algebra and minimization of power functions. This method blends advantageously with a simple but powerful approximate method for quantum mechanics, sidestepping entirely formal operators and differential equations. It is applied to the derivation of various well-known results involving centrally symmetric potentials for a quantum particle such as the hydrogen-like atom, the elastic potential and other cases of interest. The same formulas provide estimates for previously unsolved cases. PACS: 03.65.-w 30.00.00

  18. Gamma radiolysis of chlorinated hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arbon, R.E.; Mincher, B.J.; Meikrantz, D.H.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This program is the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) component of a joint collarborative effort with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The purpose of this effort is to demonstrate a viable process for breaking down hazardous halogenated organic wastes to simpler, non-hazardous waste using high energy ionizing radiation. The INEL effort focuses on the use of spent reactor fuel gamma radiation sources to decompose complex wastes such as PCBs. At LLNL, halogenated solvents such as carbon tetrachloride and trichloroethylene are being studied using accelerator radiation sources. The INEL irradiation experiments concentrated on a single PCB congener so that a limited set of decomposition reactions could be studied. The congener 2,2{prime}, 3,3{prime},4,5{prime},6,6{prime} - octachlorobiphenyl was examined following exposure to various gamma doses at the Advanced Test Reactor (AIR) spent fuel pool. The decomposition rates and products in several solvents are discussed. 3 refs.

  19. Gamma radiolysis of chlorinated hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arbon, R.E.; Mincher, B.J.; Meikrantz, D.H.

    1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This program is the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) component of a joint collarborative effort with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The purpose of this effort is to demonstrate a viable process for breaking down hazardous halogenated organic wastes to simpler, non-hazardous waste using high energy ionizing radiation. The INEL effort focuses on the use of spent reactor fuel gamma radiation sources to decompose complex wastes such as PCBs. At LLNL, halogenated solvents such as carbon tetrachloride and trichloroethylene are being studied using accelerator radiation sources. The INEL irradiation experiments concentrated on a single PCB congener so that a limited set of decomposition reactions could be studied. The congener 2,2{prime}, 3,3{prime},4,5{prime},6,6{prime} - octachlorobiphenyl was examined following exposure to various gamma doses at the Advanced Test Reactor (AIR) spent fuel pool. The decomposition rates and products in several solvents are discussed. 3 refs.

  20. Gamma-ray Burst UV/optical afterglow polarimetry as a probe of Quantum Gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yi-Zhong Fan; Da-Ming Wei; Dong Xu

    2009-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A possible birefringence effect that arises in quantum gravity leads to a frequency-dependent rotation of the polarization angle of linearly polarized emission from distant sources. Here we use the UV/optical polarization data of the afterglows of GRB 020813 and GRB 021004 to constrain this effect. We find an upper limit on the Gambini & Pulin birefringence parameter $| \\eta | gamma$-rays.

  1. 1 function fe2d_p_fast ( alpha, beta, gamma, delta, a, b, h, T, delt, u0f, v0f ) 2 %*****************************************************************************80

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garvie, Marcus R

    1 function fe2d_p_fast ( alpha, beta, gamma, delta, a, b, h, T, delt, u0f, v0f ) 2 % Parameters not supplied through the argument list will be prompted for. 20 % 21 % The parameters ALPHA, BETA*V/(U+ALPHA) + U*(1-U) 25 % dVdT = delta * nabla V + BETA*U*V/(U+ALPHA) - GAMMA * V 26 % 27 % Licensing: 28 % 29

  2. Neutrinos from Gamma Ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karl Mannheim

    2000-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The observed fluxes of cosmic rays and gamma rays are used to infer the maximum allowed high-energy neutrino flux allowed for Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs), following Mannheim, Protheroe, and Rachen (2000). It is shown that if GRBs produce the ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays, they should contribute (a) at least 10% of the extragalactic gamma ray background between 3 MeV and 30 GeV, contrary to their observed energy flux which is only a minute fraction of this flux, and (b) a cumulative neutrino flux a factor of 20 below the AMANDA (Neutrino 2000) limit on isotropic neutrinos. This could have two implications, either GRBs do not produce the ultrahigh energy cosmic rays or that the GRBs are strongly beamed and emit most of their power at energies well above 100 GeV implausibly increasing the energy requirements, but consistent with the marginal detections of a few low-redshift GRBs by MILAGRITO, HEGRA-AIROBICC, and the Tibet-Array. All crucial measurements to test the models will be available in the next few years. These are measurements of (i) high-energy neutrinos with AMANDA-ICECUBE or an enlarged ANTARES/NESTOR ocean detector, (ii) GRB redshifts from HETE-2 follow-up studies, and (iii) GRB spectra above 10 GeV with low-threshold imaging air Cherenkov telescopes such as MAGIC and the space telescopes AGILE and GLAST.

  3. LUNAR SOIL SIMULATION TRAFFICABILITY PARAMETERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    LUNAR SOIL SIMULATION and TRAFFICABILITY PARAMETERS by W. David Carrier, III Lunar Geotechnical.0 RECOMMENDED LUNAR SOIL TRAFFICABILITY PARAMETERS Table 9.14 in the Lunar Sourcebook (Carrier et al. 1991, p. 529) lists the current recommended lunar soil trafficability parameters: bc = 0.017 N/cm2 bN = 35° K

  4. Gamma-ray free-electron lasers: Quantum fluid model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silva, H M

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A quantum fluid model is used to describe the interacion of a nondegenerate cold relativistic electron beam with an intense optical wiggler taking into account the beam space-charge potential and photon recoil effect. A nonlinear set of coupled equations are obtained and solved numerically. The numerical results shows that in the limit of plasma wave-breaking an ultra-high power radiation pulse are emitted at the$\\gamma$-ray wavelength range which can reach an output intensity near the Schwinger limit depending of the values of the FEL parameters such as detuning and input signal initial phase at the entrance of the interaction region.

  5. Gamma-Ray Bursts and Dark Energy - Dark Matter interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Barreiro; O. Bertolami; P. Torres

    2010-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work Gamma Ray Burst (GRB) data is used to place constraints on a putative coupling between dark energy and dark matter. Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) constraints from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey II (SDSS-II) first-year results, the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMBR) shift parameter from WMAP seven year results and the baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) peak from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) are also discussed. The prospects for the field are assessed, as more GRB events become available.

  6. GeV Emission from Collisional Magnetized Gamma Ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Mészáros; M. J. Rees

    2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnetic fields may play a dominant role in gamma-ray bursts, and recent observations by the Fermi satellite indicate that GeV radiation, when detected, arrives delayed by seconds from the onset of the MeV component. Motivated by this, we discuss a magnetically dominated jet model where both magnetic dissipation and nuclear collisions are important. We show that, for parameters typical of the observed bursts, such a model involving a realistic jet structure can reproduce the general features of the MeV and a separate GeV radiation component, including the time delay between the two. The model also predicts a multi-GeV neutrino component.

  7. Transformation of the extended Gamma function $?^{2,0}_{0,2}[(b,x)]$ with applications to astrophysical thermonuclear functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Aslam Chaudhry

    1998-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Two representations of the extended gamma functions $\\Gamma^{2,0}_{0,2}[(b,x)]$ are proved. These representations are exploited to find a transformation relation between two Fox's $H$-functions. These results are used to solve Fox's $H$-function in terms of Meijer's $G$-function for certain values of the parameters. A closed form representation of the kernel of the Bessel type integral transform is also proved.

  8. Reduction of Quark Mass Scheme Dependence in B bar -> Xs gamma at the NNLL Level

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asatrian, H.M.; /Yerevan Phys. Inst.; Greub, C.; /Bern U.; Hovhannisyan, A.; /Yerevan Phys. Inst.; Hurth, T.; /CERN /SLAC; Poghosyan, V.; /Yerevan Phys. Inst.

    2005-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The uncertainty of the theoretical prediction of the B {yields} X{sub s}{gamma} branching ratio at NLL level is dominated by the charm mass renormalization scheme ambiguity. In this paper we calculate those NNLL terms which are related to the renormalization of m{sub c}, in order to get an estimate of the corresponding uncertainty at the NNLL level. We find that these terms significantly reduce (by typically a factor of two) the error on BR(B {yields} X{sub s}{gamma}) induced by the definition of m{sub c}. Taking into account the experimental accuracy of around 10% and the future prospects of the B factories, we conclude that a NNLL calculation would increase the sensitivity of the observable B {yields} X{sub s}{gamma} to possible new degrees of freedom beyond the SM significantly.

  9. A study of the appearance of tau neutrinos from a gamma ray burst by detecting their horizontal electromagnetic showers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nayantara Gupta

    2003-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore the possibilty of detecting horizontal electromagnetic showers of tau neutrinos from individual gamma ray bursts, in large scale detectors like HiRes and Telescope Array. We study the role of the parameters of a gamma ray burst in determining the expected number of tau events from that burst. The horizontal beam of tau leptons produce visible signals in the atmosphere. We find that there is a slim chance of observing tau lepton appearances from GRBs with Telescope Array. The number of signals is strongly dependent on the Lorentz factor $\\Gamma$, redshift $z$ of a GRB, energy emitted in muon neutrinos and antineutrinos $E_{\

  10. High energy Gamma-Ray Bursts as a result of the collapse and total annihilation of neutralino clumps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. S. Pasechnik; V. A. Beylin; V. I. Kuksa; G. M. Vereshkov

    2006-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Rare astrophysical events - cosmological gamma-ray bursts with energies over GeV - are considered as an origin of information about some SUSY parameters. The model of generation of the powerful gamma-ray bursts is proposed. According to this model the gamma-ray burst represents as a result of the collapse and the total annihilation of the neutralino clump. About 80 % of the clump mass radiates during about 100 second at the final stage of annihilation. The annihilation spectrum and its characteristic energies are calculated in the framework of Split Higgsino model.

  11. Subsurface Geotechnical Parameters Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. Rigby; M. Mrugala; G. Shideler; T. Davidsavor; J. Leem; D. Buesch; Y. Sun; D. Potyondy; M. Christianson

    2003-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The Yucca Mountain Project is entering a the license application (LA) stage in its mission to develop the nation's first underground nuclear waste repository. After a number of years of gathering data related to site characterization, including activities ranging from laboratory and site investigations, to numerical modeling of processes associated with conditions to be encountered in the future repository, the Project is realigning its activities towards the License Application preparation. At the current stage, the major efforts are directed at translating the results of scientific investigations into sets of data needed to support the design, and to fulfill the licensing requirements and the repository design activities. This document addresses the program need to address specific technical questions so that an assessment can be made about the suitability and adequacy of data to license and construct a repository at the Yucca Mountain Site. In July 2002, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) published an Integrated Issue Resolution Status Report (NRC 2002). Included in this report were the Repository Design and Thermal-Mechanical Effects (RDTME) Key Technical Issues (KTI). Geotechnical agreements were formulated to resolve a number of KTI subissues, in particular, RDTME KTIs 3.04, 3.05, 3.07, and 3.19 relate to the physical, thermal and mechanical properties of the host rock (NRC 2002, pp. 2.1.1-28, 2.1.7-10 to 2.1.7-21, A-17, A-18, and A-20). The purpose of the Subsurface Geotechnical Parameters Report is to present an accounting of current geotechnical information that will help resolve KTI subissues and some other project needs. The report analyzes and summarizes available qualified geotechnical data. It evaluates the sufficiency and quality of existing data to support engineering design and performance assessment. In addition, the corroborative data obtained from tests performed by a number of research organizations is presented to reinforce conclusions derived from the pool of data gathered within a full QA-controlled domain. An evaluation of the completeness of the current data is provided with respect to the requirements for geotechnical data to support design and performance assessment.

  12. WIPP Compliance Certification Application calculations parameters. Part 1: Parameter development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howarth, S.M.

    1997-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in southeast New Mexico has been studied as a transuranic waste repository for the past 23 years. During this time, an extensive site characterization, design, construction, and experimental program was completed, which provided in-depth understanding of the dominant processes that are most likely to influence the containment of radionuclides for 10,000 years. Nearly 1,500 parameters were developed using information gathered from this program; the parameters were input to numerical models for WIPP Compliance Certification Application (CCA) Performance Assessment (PA) calculations. The CCA probabilistic codes frequently require input values that define a statistical distribution for each parameter. Developing parameter distributions begins with the assignment of an appropriate distribution type, which is dependent on the type, magnitude, and volume of data or information available. The development of the parameter distribution values may require interpretation or statistical analysis of raw data, combining raw data with literature values, scaling of lab or field data to fit code grid mesh sizes, or other transformation. Parameter development and documentation of the development process were very complicated, especially for those parameters based on empirical data; they required the integration of information from Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) code sponsors, parameter task leaders (PTLs), performance assessment analysts (PAAs), and experimental principal investigators (PIs). This paper, Part 1 of two parts, contains a discussion of the parameter development process, roles and responsibilities, and lessons learned. Part 2 will discuss parameter documentation, traceability and retrievability, and lessons learned from related audits and reviews.

  13. Simulated observations of gamma-ray bursts with GLAST

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonnell, J. T.; Norris, J. P. [Code 661, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 (United States); Dingus, B. L. [Department of Physics, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 (United States); Scargle, J. D. [NASA Ames Research Center, MS 245-3, Moffett Field, California 94035 (United States)

    1998-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) will incorporate high sensitivity, large field of view, and precision tracker technology, providing arc-minute localizations of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and exploring GRB physics up to {approx}100 GeV. We have simulated the response of GLAST to GRBs with power-law spectra extending to GeV energies to determine the detailed burst localization capability. The simulated properties of GRBs are based on the BATSE peak flux and duration distributions. GLAST's hodoscopic calorimeter design has sufficiently good angular resolution and discrimination power against cosmic rays that >1 GeV gammas which are only detected in the calorimeter may be utilized for bright sources such as GRBs. Our results indicate that GLAST will detect and image {approx}230 GRBs yr{sup -1} with sensitivity to {approx}100 GeV for {approx}20 bursts yr{sup -1}. Many bright burst localizations will be comparable in size to the current InterPlanetary Network error boxes thus probing the cosmological burst parameter space at nearby redshifts and enabling counterpart searches at all lower energies.

  14. 3-10 keV and 0. 1- to 2-MeV observations of four gamma-ray bursts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laros, J.G.; Evans, W.D.; Fenimore, E.E.; Klebesadel, R.W.; Shulman, S.; Fritz, G.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Four catalogued ..gamma..-ray bursts that occurred between 79/3/7 and 79/7/31 have been observed over the 3 to 10 keV range by a joint NRL/Los Alamos experiment on the Air Force P78-1 satellite. The bursts were also well observed by members of the interplanetary network. In this paper we present hardness ratios, x-ray/..gamma..-ray luminosity ratios, and time histories. The most significant results presented herein can be summarized as follows: (1) gamma-ray bursters can emit fairly strongly at x-ray energies near the time of the ..gamma.. burst with L/sub x//L/sub ..gamma../ approx. .02 (L/sub x/ approx. 10/sup 37/ ergs s/sup -1/, 3 to 10 keV, assuming a distance of 1 kpc); (2) the centroid of the x-ray emission generally lags the ..gamma..-ray centroid, but there is also evidence for one or more types of x-ray precursor activity; (3) the ..gamma..-ray hardness ratios were not highly variable for these particular events. However, there is some evidence that the ..gamma..-ray spectra softened near the ends of the bursts when the x-ray/..gamma..-ray ratios were high; (4) the x-ray/..gamma..-ray power law number index during times of the strongest ..gamma..-ray emission ranged from 0.8 to approx. 1.1 for the four bursts; (5) the x-ray tail of GB790307 probably can be modeled as the cooling of hot plasma generated during the ..gamma..-ray burst. Simple versions of this model can be used to estimate various source parameters. These estimates imply a distance of a few hundred to a few thousand pc; (6) gamma-ray bursters probably do not produce events similar to classical x-ray bursts independently of the ..gamma..-ray emission.

  15. Discovery of \\gamma-ray emission from a strongly lobe-dominated quasar 3C 275.1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liao, Neng-Hui; Li, Shang; Jiang, Wei; Liang, Yun-Feng; Li, Xiang; Zhang, Peng-Fei; Chen, Liang; Bai, Jin-Ming; Fan, Yi-Zhong

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We systematically analyze the 6-year Fermi/LAT data of the lobe-dominated quasars (LDQs) in the complete LDQ sample from 3CRR survey and report the discovery of high-energy \\gamma-ray emission from 3C 275.1. The \\gamma-ray emission likely associating with 3C 207 is confirmed and significant variability of the lightcurve is identified. We do not find statistically significant \\gamma-ray emission from other LDQs. 3C 275.1 is the known \\gamma-ray quasar with the lowest core dominance parameter (i.e., R=0.11). We also show that both the northern radio hotspot and parsec jet models provide acceptable descriptions to the \\gamma-ray data. Considering the potential \\gamma-ray variability at the timescale of months, the latter is probably more favorable. The number of \\gamma-ray LDQs would increase when the exposure accumulates and hence LDQs could be non-ignorable contributors for the extragalactic \\gamma-ray background.

  16. Time lag between prompt optical emission and gamma-rays in GRBs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Su Min Tang; Shuang Nan Zhang

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The prompt optical emission contemporaneous with the $\\gamma$-rays from $\\gamma$-ray bursts (GRBs) carries important information on the central engine and explosion mechanism. We study the time lag between prompt optical emission and $\\gamma$-rays in GRB 990123 and GRB 041219a, which are the only two GRBs had been detected at optical wavelengths during the ascending burst phase. Assuming profiles of prompt optical light curves are the same as the prompt $\\gamma$-rays, we simulate optical light curves with different time lags and compare them with the observed optical flux. Then the best fit time lag and its error are determined by chi-squared values. We find that time lags between prompt optical emission and $\\gamma$-rays in GRB host galaxy rest-frames are consistent in the two GRBs, which is $5\\sim7$ s for GRB 990123 and $1\\sim5$ s for GRB 041219a. This result is consistent with a common origin of prompt optical and $\\gamma$-ray emissions in the two GRBs. Based on synchrotron cooling model, we also derive the parameters for the two GRBs.

  17. New experimental study of low-energy (p,gamma) resonances in magnesium isotopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Limata; F. Strieder; A. Formicola; G. Imbriani; M. Junker; H. W. Becker; D. Bemmerer; A. Best; R. Bonetti; C. Broggini; A. Caciolli; P. Corvisiero; H. Costantini; A. DiLeva; Z. Elekes; Zs. Fülöp; G. Gervino; A. Guglielmetti; C. Gustavino; Gy. Gyürky; A. Lemut; M. Marta; C. Mazzocchi; R. Menegazzo; P. Prati; V. Roca; C. Rolfs; C. Rossi Alvarez; C. Salvo; E. Somorjai; O. Straniero; F. Terrasi; H. -P. Trautvetter

    2010-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Proton captures on Mg isotopes play an important role in the Mg-Al cycle active in stellar H shell burning. In particular, the strengths of low-energy resonances with E < 200 keV in 25Mg(p,gamma)26Al determine the production of 26Al and a precise knowledge of these nuclear data is highly desirable. Absolute measurements at such low-energies are often very difficult and hampered by gamma-ray background as well as changing target stoichiometry during the measurements. The latter problem can be partly avoided using higher energy resonances of the same reaction as a normalization reference. Hence the parameters of suitable resonances have to be studied with adequate precision. In the present work we report on new measurements of the resonance strengths omega_gamma of the E = 214, 304, and 326 keV resonances in the reactions 24Mg(p,gamma)25Al, 25Mg(p,gamma)26Al, and 26Mg(p,gamma)27Al, respectively. These studies were performed at the LUNA facility in the Gran Sasso underground laboratory using multiple experimental techniques and provided results with a higher accuracy than previously achieved.

  18. Evidence for {psi}' Decays into {gamma}{pi}{sup 0} and {gamma}{eta}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ablikim, M.; An, Z. H.; Bai, J. Z.; Berger, N.; Bian, J. M.; Cai, X.; Cao, G. F.; Cao, X. X.; Chang, J. F.; Chen, G.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, J. C.; Chen, M. L.; Chen, Y.; Chen, Y. B.; Chu, Y. P.; Dai, H. L.; Dai, J. P.; Deng, Z. Y.; Dong, L. Y. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Beijing 100049 (China)

    2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The decays {psi}{sup '}{yields}{gamma}{pi}{sup 0}, {gamma}{eta} and {gamma}{eta}{sup '} are studied using data collected with the BESIII detector at the BEPCII e{sup +}e{sup -} collider. The processes {psi}{sup '}{yields}{gamma}{pi}{sup 0} and {psi}{sup '}{yields}{gamma}{eta} are observed for the first time with signal significances of 4.6{sigma} and 4.3{sigma}, respectively. The branching fractions are determined to be B({psi}{sup '}{yields}{gamma}{pi}{sup 0})=(1.58{+-}0.40{+-}0.13)x10{sup -6}, B({psi}{sup '}{yields}{gamma}{eta})=(1.38{+-}0.48{+-}0.09)x10{sup -6}, and B({psi}{sup '}{yields}{gamma}{eta}{sup '})=(126{+-}3{+-}8)x10{sup -6}, where the first errors are statistical and the second ones systematic.

  19. Measurements of the CKM Angle phi3/gamma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tisserand, Vincent; /Annecy, LAPP

    2007-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a review on the measurements of the CKM angle {gamma} ({phi}{sub 3}){sup 1} as performed by the BABAR and Belle experiments at the asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} B factories colliders PEP-II and KEKB. These measurements are using either charged or neutral B decays. For charged B decays the modes {tilde D}{sup 0}K{sup -}, {tilde D}*{sup 0}K{sup -}, and {tilde D}{sup 0}K*{sup -} are employed, where {tilde D}{sup 0} indicates either a D{sup 0} or a {bar D}{sup 0} meson. Direct CP violation is exploited. It is caused by interferences between V{sub ub} and V{sub cb} accessible transitions that generate asymmetries in the final states. For these decays various methods exist to enhance the sensitivity to the V{sub ub} transition, carrying the weak phase {gamma}. For neutral B decays, the modes D{sup (*){+-}}{pi}{sup {-+}} and D{sup {+-}}{rho}{sup {-+}} are used. In addition to the V{sub ub} and V{sub cb} interferences, these modes are sensitive to the B{sup 0}-{bar B}{sup 0} mixing, so that time dependent analyses are performed to extract sin(2{beta} + {gamma}). An alternative method would use the lower branching ratios decay modes {tilde D}{sup (*)0}{bar K}{sup (*)0} where much larger asymmetries are expected. The various available methods are mostly ''theoretically clean'' and always free of penguins diagrams. In some cases a high sensitivity to {gamma} is expected and large asymmetries may be seen. But these measurements are always experimentally difficult as one has to face with either low branching ratios, or small asymmetries, or additional technical/theoretical difficulties due to Dalitz/SU(3) and re-scattering models needed to treat/estimate nuisance parameters such as unknown strong phases and the relative magnitude of the amplitude of the interfering ''V{sub ub}'' transitions. Thus at the present time only a relatively limited precision on {gamma} can be extracted from these measurements. The current world average is {gamma} = (78{sub -26}{sup +19}){sup o} [1]. For other methods and long term perspectives, as discussed in details, the reader is invited to consult the proceedings of the recent CKM workshop that was held in Nagoya (Japan) in December 2006 [2].

  20. Measurement of \\psi(3770) parameters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anashin, V V; Baldin, E M; Barladyan, A K; Barnyakov, A Yu; Barnyakov, M Yu; Baru, S E; Basok, I Yu; Beloborodova, O L; Blinov, A E; Blinov, V E; Bobrov, A V; Bobrovnikov, V S; Bogomyagkov, A V; Bondar, A E; Buzykaev, A R; Eidelman, S I; Grigoriev, D N; Glukhovchenko, Yu M; Gulevich, V V; Gusev, D V; Karnaev, S E; Karpov, G V; Karpov, S V; Kharlamova, T A; Kiselev, V A; Kolmogorov, V V; Kononov, S A; Kotov, K Yu; Kravchenko, E A; Kudryavtsev, V N; Kulikov, V F; Kurkin, G Ya; Kuper, E A; Levichev, E B; Maksimov, D A; Malyshev, V M; Maslennikov, A L; Medvedko, A S; Meshkov, O I; Mishnev, S I; Morozov, I I; Muchnoi, N Yu; Neufeld, V V; Nikitin, S A; Nikolaev, I B; Okunev, I N; Onuchin, A P; Oreshkin, S B; Orlov, I O; Osipov, A A; Peleganchuk, S V; Pivovarov, S G; Piminov, P A; Petrov, V V; Poluektov, A O; Prisekin, V G; Ruban, A A; Sandyrev, V K; Savinov, G A; Shamov, A G; Shatilov, D N; Shwartz, B A; Simonov, E A; Sinyatkin, S V; Skrinsky, A N; Smaluk, V V; Sokolov, A V; Sukharev, A M; Starostina, E V; Talyshev, A A; Tayursky, V A; Telnov, V I; Tikhonov, Yu A; Todyshev, K Yu; Tumaikin, G M; Usov, Yu V; Vorobiov, A I; Yushkov, A N; Zhilich, V N; Zhulanov, V V; Zhuravlev, A N

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the final results of a study of the \\psi(3770) meson using a data sample collected with the KEDR detector at the VEPP-4M electron-positron collider. The data analysis takes into account the interference between the resonant and nonresonant $D\\bar{D}$ production, where the latter is related to the nonresonant part of the energy-dependent form factor $F_D$. The vector dominance approach and several empirical parameterizations have been tried for the nonresonant $F_D^{\\NR}(s)$. Our results for the mass and total width of \\psi(3770) assuming \\psi(2S) dominance in $F_D^{\\NR}(s)$, are M = 3779.1 ^{+1.8}_{-1.7} +-0.6 ^{+0.2}_{-0.3} MeV/c^2, \\Gamma =25.2 ^{+4.6}_{-4.1} +-0.5 ^{+0.5}_{-0.2} MeV, where the first, second and third uncertainties are statistical, systematic and model, respectively. For the electron partial width two possible solutions have been found: (1) \\Gamma_{ee} = 147 ^{+97}_{-62} +- 13 ^{+11}_{-10} eV, (2) \\Gamma_{ee} = 415 ^{+59}_{-58} +- 38 ^{+160}_{-10} eV. Our statistics are insufficie...

  1. Gamma ray burst outflows and afterglows.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morsony, Brian J.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ?? We carry out a theoretical investigation of jet propagation in Gamma Ray Bursts and examine the jitter radiation mechanism as a means of producing… (more)

  2. Gamma Ray Burst Central Engines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Todd A. Thompson

    2008-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

    I review aspects of the theory of long-duration gamma-ray burst (GRB) central engines. I focus on the requirements of any model; these include the angular momentum of the progenitor, the power, Lorentz factor, asymmetry, and duration of the flow, and both the association and the non-association with bright supernovae. I compare and contrast the collapsar and millisecond proto-magnetar models in light of these requirements. The ability of the latter model to produce a flow with Lorentz factor ~100 while simultaneously maintaining a kinetic luminosity of ~10^50 ergs/s for a timescale of ~10-100 s is emphasized.

  3. Gravitational Waves versus X and Gamma Ray Emission in a Short Gamma-Ray Burst

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. G. Oliveira; Jorge A. Rueda; Remo Ruffini

    2014-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The recent progress in the understanding the physical nature of neutron star equilibrium configurations and the first observational evidence of a genuinely short gamma-ray burst, GRB 090227B, allows to give an estimate of the gravitational waves versus the X and Gamma-ray emission in a short gamma-ray burst.

  4. Neutron/gamma dose separation by the multiple-ion-chamber technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goetsch, S.J.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many mixed n/..gamma.. dosimetry systems rely on two dosimeters, one composed of a tissue-equivalent material and the other made from a non-hydrogenous material. The paired chamber technique works well in fields of neutron radiation nearly identical in spectral composition to that in which the dosimeters were calibrated. However, this technique is drastically compromised in phantom due to the degradation of the neutron spectrum. The three-dosimeter technique allows for the fall-off in neutron sensitivity of the two non-hydrogenous dosimeters. Precise and physically meaningful results were obtained with this technique with a D-T source in air and in phantom and with simultaneous D-T neutron and /sup 60/Co gamma ray irradiation in air. The MORSE-CG coupled n/..gamma.. three-dimensional Monte Carlo code was employed to calculate neutron and gamma doses in a water phantom. Gamma doses calculated in phantom with this code were generally lower than corresponding ion chamber measurements. This can be explained by the departure of irradiation conditions from ideal narrow-beam geometry. 97 references.

  5. Measurement of main parameters of the \\psi(2S) resonance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anashin, V V; Baldin, E M; Barladyan, A K; Barnyakov, A Yu; Barnyakov, M Yu; Baru, S E; Basok, I Yu; Beloborodova, O L; Blinov, A E; Blinov, V E; Bobrov, A V; Bobrovnikov, V S; Bogomyagkov, A V; Bondar, A E; Buzykaev, A R; Eidelman, S I; Grigoriev, D N; Glukhovchenko, Yu M; Gulevich, V V; Gusev, D V; Karnaev, S E; Karpov, G V; Karpov, S V; Kharlamova, T A; Kiselev, V A; Kolmogorov, V V; Kononov, S A; Kotov, K Yu; Kravchenko, E A; Kudryavtsev, V N; Kulikov, V F; Kurkin, G Ya; Kuper, E A; Levichev, E B; Maksimov, D A; Malyshev, V M; Maslennikov, A L; Medvedko, A S; Meshkov, O I; Mishnev, S I; Morozov, I I; Muchnoi, N Yu; Neufeld, V V; Nikitin, S A; Nikolaev, I B; Okunev, I N; Onuchin, A P; Oreshkin, S B; Orlov, I O; Osipov, A A; Peleganchuk, S V; Pivovarov, S G; Piminov, P A; Petrov, V V; Poluektov, A O; Prisekin, V G; Ruban, A A; Sandyrev, V K; Savinov, G A; Shamov, A G; Shatilov, D N; Shwartz, B A; Simonov, E A; Sinyatkin, S V; Skrinsky, A N; Smaluk, V V; Sokolov, A V; Sukharev, A M; Starostina, E V; Talyshev, A A; Tayursky, V A; Telnov, V I; Tikhonov, Yu A; Todyshev, K Yu; Tumaikin, G M; Usov, Yu V; Vorobiov, A I; Yushkov, A N; Zhilich, V N; Zhulanov, V V; Zhuravlev, A N

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-precision determination of the main parameters of the \\psi(2S) resonance has been performed with the KEDR detector at the VEPP-4M e^{+}e^{-} collider in three scans of the \\psi(2S)--\\psi(3770) energy range. Fitting the energy dependence of the multihadron cross section in the vicinity of \\psi(2S) we obtained the mass value which is discussed in a separate paper and the product of the electron partial width by the branching fraction into hadrons \\Gamma_{ee}*B_{h} = 2.233 +- 0.015 +- 0.036 keV. Using the world average values of the electron and hadron branching fractions, one obtains the electron partial width and the total width of \\psi(2S): \\Gamma_{ee} =2.282 +- 0.015 +- 0.037 keV, \\Gamma = 296 +- 2 +- 8 keV. These results are consistent with and more than two times better than any of the previous experiments

  6. An Exactly Separable {gamma}-Rigid Version of The X(5) Critical Point Symmetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonatsos, D.; Lenis, D.; Petrellis, D. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, National Center for Scientific Research 'Demokritos', GR-15310 Aghia Paraskevi, Attiki (Greece); Terziev, P. A. [Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 72 Tzarigrad Road, BG-1784 Sofia (Bulgaria); Yigitoglu, I. [Hasan Ali Yucel Faculty of Education, Istanbul University, TR-34470 Beyazit, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2007-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A {gamma}-rigid version (with {gamma}=0) of the X(5) critical point symmetry is constructed. The model, to be called X(3) since it is proved to cointain three degrees of freedom, utilizes an infinite well potential, is based on exact separation of variables, and leads to parameter free (up to overall scale factors) predictions for spectra and B(E2) transition rates, which are in good agreement with existing experimental data for Os and Pt. An unexpected similarity of the {beta}1 bands of the X(5) nuclei 150Nd, 152Sm, 154Gd, and 156Dy to the X(3) predictions is observed.

  7. Hard x-ray or gamma ray laser by a dense electron beam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Son; S. J. Moon

    2012-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A coherent x-ray or gamma ray can be created from a dense electron beam propagating through an intense laser undulator. It is analyzed by using the Landau damping theory which suits better than the conventional linear analysis for the free electron laser, as the electron beam energy spread is high. The analysis suggests that the currently available physical parameters would enable the generation of the coherent gamma ray of up to 100 keV. The electron quantum diffraction suppresses the FEL action, by which the maximum radiation energy to be generated is limited.

  8. CONSTRAINTS ON VERY HIGH ENERGY GAMMA-RAY EMISSION FROM GAMMA-RAY BURSTS R. Atkins,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    CONSTRAINTS ON VERY HIGH ENERGY GAMMA-RAY EMISSION FROM GAMMA-RAY BURSTS R. Atkins,1,2 W. Benbow,3 emission from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) during the prompt emission phase. Detection of >100 GeV counterparts on potential GRB models. Subject headinggs: gamma rays: bursts -- gamma rays: observations 1. INTRODUCTION

  9. GRB 090727 AND GAMMA-RAY BURSTS WITH EARLY-TIME OPTICAL EMISSION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kopac, D.; Gomboc, A.; Japelj, J. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, University of Ljubljana, Jadranska 19, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Kobayashi, S.; Mundell, C. G.; Bersier, D.; Cano, Z.; Smith, R. J.; Steele, I. A.; Virgili, F. J. [Astrophysics Research Institute, Liverpool John Moores University, Twelve Quays House, Egerton Wharf, Birkenhead, CH41 1LD (United Kingdom); Guidorzi, C. [Physics Departments, University of Ferrara, via Saragat 1, I-44122, Ferrara (Italy); Melandri, A., E-mail: drejc.kopac@fmf.uni-lj.si [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera, via E. Bianchi 46, I-23807 Merate (Italy)

    2013-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a multi-wavelength analysis of Swift gamma-ray burst GRB 090727, for which optical emission was detected during the prompt gamma-ray emission by the 2 m autonomous robotic Liverpool Telescope and subsequently monitored for a further two days with the Liverpool and Faulkes Telescopes. Within the context of the standard fireball model, we rule out a reverse shock origin for the early-time optical emission in GRB 090727 and instead conclude that the early-time optical flash likely corresponds to emission from an internal dissipation process. Putting GRB 090727 into a broader observational and theoretical context, we build a sample of 36 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with contemporaneous early-time optical and gamma-ray detections. From these GRBs, we extract a sub-sample of 18 GRBs, which show optical peaks during prompt gamma-ray emission, and perform detailed temporal and spectral analysis in gamma-ray, X-ray, and optical bands. We find that in most cases early-time optical emission shows sharp and steep behavior, and notice a rich diversity of spectral properties. Using a simple internal shock dissipation model, we show that the emission during prompt GRB phase can occur at very different frequencies via synchrotron radiation. Based on the results obtained from observations and simulation, we conclude that the standard external shock interpretation for early-time optical emission is disfavored in most cases due to sharp peaks ({Delta}t/t < 1) and steep rise/decay indices, and that internal dissipation can explain the properties of GRBs with optical peaks during gamma-ray emission.

  10. A history of gamma ray bursts and other astronomical conundrums

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trimble, V

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    V. Trimble, in “Gamma Ray Bursts: 30 Years of Discovery,”V. Trimble, in “Gamma Ray Bursts,” Ed. C. Ho et al. ,A History of Gamma Ray Bursts and Other Astronomical

  11. Observations of Gamma-Ray Bursts at Extreme Energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aune, Taylor

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Gamma-Ray Bursts . . . . . . . . . . . . . Redshift-CRUZ OBSERVATIONS OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS AT EXTREME ENERGIES AAncient Unvierse with Gamma-Ray Bursts, pages 330–333. AIP,

  12. BBGKY kinetic approach for an e{sup -}e{sup +}{gamma} plasma created from the vacuum in a strong laser-generated electric field: The one-photon annihilation channel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blaschke, D. B. [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Wroclaw, 50-204 Wroclaw (Poland); Bogoliubov Laboratory for Theoretical Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, RU - 141980 Dubna (Russian Federation); Dmitriev, V. V.; Smolyansky, S. A. [Department of Physics, Saratov State University, RU - 410026 Saratov (Russian Federation); Roepke, G. [Institut fuer Physik, University of Rostock, D - 18051 Rostock (Germany)

    2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In the present work a closed system of kinetic equations is obtained from the truncation of the Bogoliubov-Born-Green-Kirkwood-Yvon hierarchy for the description of the vacuum creation of an electron-positron plasma and secondary photons due to a strong laser field. This truncation is performed in the Markovian approximation for the one-photon annihilation channel which is accessible due to the presence of the strong external field. Estimates of the photon production rate are obtained for different domains of laser field parameters (frequency {nu} and field strength E). A huge quantity of optical photons of the quasiclassical laser field is necessary to satisfy the conservation laws of the energy and momentum of the constituents (e{sup -}, e{sup +} and {gamma}) in this channel. Since the number of these optical photons corresponds to the order of perturbation theory, a vanishingly small photon production rate results for the optical region and strongly subcritical fields E<gamma}-ray region {nu} < or approx. m the required number of laser photons is small and the production rate of photons from the one-photon annihilation process becomes accessible to observations for subcritical fields E < or approx. E{sub c}. In the infrared region the photon distribution has a 1/k spectrum typical for flicker noise.

  13. Neutron Resonance Parameters and Covariance Matrix of 239Pu

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Derrien, Herve [ORNL; Leal, Luiz C [ORNL; Larson, Nancy M [ORNL

    2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to obtain the resonance parameters in a single energy range and the corresponding covariance matrix, a reevaluation of 239Pu was performed with the code SAMMY. The most recent experimental data were analyzed or reanalyzed in the energy range thermal to 2.5 keV. The normalization of the fission cross section data was reconsidered by taking into account the most recent measurements of Weston et al. and Wagemans et al. A full resonance parameter covariance matrix was generated. The method used to obtain realistic uncertainties on the average cross section calculated by SAMMY or other processing codes was examined.

  14. ON DIFFERENCE SCHEMES AND SYMPLECTIC GEOMETRY \\Gamma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Tiejun

    ON DIFFERENCE SCHEMES AND SYMPLECTIC GEOMETRY \\Gamma \\Sigma \\Delta \\Theta \\Lambda \\Upsilon \\Psi solution of the canonical system of equations dp i dt = \\Gamma @H @q i ; dq i dt = @H @P i ; i = 1; \\Delta introduced by Hamilton in 1824 as a general mathematical scheme for problems of geometrical optics

  15. Klein-Nishina effects on the high-energy gamma-ray emission of gamma-ray bursts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang Xiangyu [Department of Astronomy, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China) and Key Laboratory of Modern Astronomy and Astrophysics (Nanjing University), Ministry of Education, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Prompt and long-lived high-energy (>100 MeV) gamma-ray emission has been detected by Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) recently from more than ten gamma-ray bursts. It has been suggested that such emission is produced by synchrotron radiation of electrons accelerated in internal and external shocks. Here we show that, during both the prompt and early afterglow phase, inverse-Compton (IC) scattering of these electrons with synchrotron photons are typically in the Klein-Nishina (KN) regime. For the prompt emission, the KN effect may strongly suppress the IC component, which is consistent with one single spectral component seen in some strong bursts, such as in GRB080916C and GRB090217. The KN inverse-Compton cooling may also affect the low-energy electron number distribution and hence results in a low-energy synchrotron photon spectrum harder than the standard fast-cooling spectrum n({nu}){proportional_to}{nu}{sup -3/2}. During the early afterglow, KN effect leads to a low Compton-Y parameter, which is generally less than a few in the first tens of seconds for a wide range of parameter space. Furthermore, we suggest that the KN effect can explain the somewhat faster than expected decay of the early-time high-energy emission observed in some GRBs.

  16. Bounds on Quantum Multiple-Parameter Estimation with Gaussian State

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang Gao; Hwang Lee

    2014-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the quantum Cramer-Rao bounds on the joint multiple-parameter estimation with the Gaussian state as a probe. We derive the explicit right logarithmic derivative and symmetric logarithmic derivative operators in such a situation. We compute the corresponding quantum Fisher information matrices, and find that they can be fully expressed in terms of the mean displacement and covariance matrix of the Gaussian state. Finally, we give some examples to show the utility of our analytical results.

  17. A novel paradigm for short gamma-ray bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luciano Rezzolla; Pawan Kumar

    2014-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The merger of a binary of neutron stars provides natural explanations for many of the features of short gamma-ray bursts SGRBs, such as the generation of a hot torus orbiting a rapidly rotating black hole, which can then build a magnetic jet and provide the energy reservoir to launch a relativistic outflow. Yet, this scenario has problems explaining the recently discovered long-term and sustained X-ray emission associated with the afterglows of a number of SGRBs. We propose a new model that explains how an X-ray afterglow can be sustained by the product of the merger and how the X-ray emission is produced before the corresponding emission in the gamma-band, although it is observed to follow it. Overall, our paradigm combines in a novel manner a number of well-established features of the emission in SGRBs and results from simulations. Because it involves the propagation of an ultra-relativistic outflow and its interaction with a confining medium, the paradigm also highlights a unifying phenomenology between short and long GRBs.

  18. A novel paradigm for short gamma-ray bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rezzolla, Luciano

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The merger of a binary of neutron stars provides natural explanations for many of the features of short gamma-ray bursts SGRBs, such as the generation of a hot torus orbiting a rapidly rotating black hole, which can then build a magnetic jet and provide the energy reservoir to launch a relativistic outflow. Yet, this scenario has problems explaining the recently discovered long-term and sustained X-ray emission associated with the afterglows of a number of SGRBs. We propose a new model that explains how an X-ray afterglow can be sustained by the product of the merger and how the X-ray emission is produced before the corresponding emission in the gamma-band, although it is observed to follow it. Overall, our paradigm combines in a novel manner a number of well-established features of the emission in SGRBs and results from simulations. Because it involves the propagation of an ultra-relativistic outflow and its interaction with a confining medium, the paradigm also highlights a unifying phenomenology between sh...

  19. Accessing the population of high redshift Gamma Ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghirlanda, G; Ghisellini, G; Mereghetti, S; Tagliaferri, G; Campana, S; Osborne, J P; O'Brien, P; Tanvir, N; Willingale, R; Amati, L; Basa, S; Bernardini, M G; Burlon, D; Covino, S; D'Avanzo, P; Frontera, F; Gotz, D; Melandri, A; Nava, L; Piro, L; Vergani, S D

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) are a powerful probe of the high redshift Universe. We present a tool to estimate the detection rate of high-z GRBs by a generic detector with defined energy band and sensitivity. We base this on a population model that reproduces the observed properties of GRBs detected by Swift, Fermi and CGRO in the hard X-ray and gamma-ray bands. We provide the expected cumulative distributions of the flux and fluence of simulated GRBs in different energy bands. We show that scintillator detectors, operating at relatively high energies (e.g. tens of keV to the MeV), can detect only the most luminous GRBs at high redshifts due to the link between the peak spectral energy and the luminosity (Ep-Liso) of GRBs. We show that the best strategy for catching the largest number of high-z bursts is to go softer (e.g. in the soft X-ray band) but with a very high sensitivity. For instance, an imaging soft X-ray detector operating in the 0.2-5 keV energy band reaching a sensitivity, corresponding to a fluence o...

  20. Nickel-based superalloy operating temperature determination via analysis of gamma/gamma' microstructure and coating/base material interdiffusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ham, Wendy D. (Wendy Decker)

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The average operating temperature of RENÉ N5® high pressure turbine blades was evaluated via [gamma]/[gamma]' microstructure and coating/base metal interdiffusion methods. The [gamma]' volume fraction was measured by point ...

  1. Parallel Implementation of Gamma-Point Pseudopotential Plane...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Parallel Implementation of Gamma-Point Pseudopotential Plane-Wave DFT with Exact Exchange. Parallel Implementation of Gamma-Point Pseudopotential Plane-Wave DFT with Exact...

  2. aerial gamma spectrometry: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Gamma Mannheim, Universitt 3 Standard guide for high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry of soil samples CERN Preprints Summary: 1.1 This guide covers the identification...

  3. Strict Limit on CPT Violation from Polarization of Gamma-Ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kenji Toma; Shinji Mukohyama; Daisuke Yonetoku; Toshio Murakami; Shuichi Gunji; Tatehiro Mihara; Yoshiyuki Morihara; Tomonori Sakashita; Takuya Takahashi; Yudai Wakashima; Hajime Yonemochi; Noriyuki Toukairin

    2012-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the strictest observational verification of CPT invariance in the photon sector, as a result of gamma-ray polarization measurement of distant gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), which are brightest stellar-size explosions in the universe. We detected the gamma-ray polarization of three GRBs with high significance, and the source distances may be constrained by a well-known luminosity indicator for GRBs. For the Lorentz- and CPT-violating dispersion relation E_{\\pm}^2=p^2 \\pm 2\\xi p^3/M_{Pl}, where \\pm denotes different circular polarization states of the photon, the parameter \\xi is constrained as |\\xi|

  4. Gamma-insensitive optical sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kruger, Hans W. (Walnut Creek, CA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An ultra-violet/visible/infra-red gamma-insensitive gas avalanche focal plane array comprising a planar photocathode and a planar anode pad array separated by a gas-filled gap and across which is applied an electric potential. Electrons ejected from the photocathode are accelerated sufficiently between collisions with the gas molecules to ionize them, forming an electron avalanche. The gap acts like a proportional counter. The array of anode pad are mounted on the front of an anode plate and are connected to matching contact pads on the back of the anode via feed through wires. Connection of the anode to signal processing electronics is made from the contact pads using standard indium bump techniques, for example.

  5. Gamma-insensitive optical sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kruger, H.W.

    1994-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An ultraviolet/visible/infrared gamma-insensitive gas avalanche focal plane array is described comprising a planar photocathode and a planar anode pad array separated by a gas-filled gap and across which is applied an electric potential. Electrons ejected from the photocathode are accelerated sufficiently between collisions with the gas molecules to ionize them, forming an electron avalanche. The gap acts like a proportional counter. The array of anode pad are mounted on the front of an anode plate and are connected to matching contact pads on the back of the anode via feed through wires. Connection of the anode to signal processing electronics is made from the contact pads using standard indium bump techniques, for example. 6 figures.

  6. * Corresponding author.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    unknown authors

    and data utility are often perceived to be at odds. An omniscient data source would have many the ability to compute the desired ‘‘beneficial outcome’ ’ of sharing data for mining without having to actually

  7. Correspondence Useoilwealthtosave

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (see Nature 455, 438­439; 2008), coastal ports have proliferated to keep pace with the boom. We suggest would help to safeguard the region's rich biodiversity. Some ports are being constructed in conservation, such as the provision of sufficient clean energy, water and food (see go.nature. com/6rs2ih and go.nature. com

  8. A new measurement of the rare decay eta -> pi^0 gamma gamma with the Crystal Ball/TAPS detectors at the Mainz Microtron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nefkens, B. M.; Prakhov, S.; Aguar-Bartolom??, P.; Annand, J. R.; Arends, H. J.; Bantawa, K.; Beck, R.; Bekrenev, V.; Bergh??user, H.; Braghieri, A.; Briscoe, W. J.; Brudvik, J.; Cherepnya, S.; Codling, R. F.; Collicott, C.; Costanza, S.; Danilkin, I. V.; Denig, A.; Demissie, B.; Dieterle, M.; Downie, E. J.; Drexler, P.; Fil'kov, L. V.; Fix, A.; Garni, S.; Glazier, D. I.; Gregor, R.; Hamilton, D.; Heid, E.; Hornidge, D.; Howdle, D.; Jahn, O.; Jude, T. C.; Kashevarov, V. L.; K??ser, A.; Keshelashvili, I.; Kondratiev, R.; Korolija, M.; Kotulla, M.; Koulbardis, A.; Kruglov, S.; Krusche, B.; Lisin, V.; Livingston, K.; MacGregor, I. J.; Maghrbi, Y.; Mancel, J.; Manley, D. M.; McNicoll, E. F.; Mekterovic, D.; Metag, V.; Mushkarenkov, A.; Nikolaev, A.; Novotny, R.; Oberle, M.; Ortega, H.; Ostrick, M.; Ott, P.; Otte, P. B.; Oussena, B.; Pedroni, P.; Polonski, A.; Robinson, J.; Rosner, G.; Rostomyan, T.; Schumann, S.; Sikora, M. H.; Starostin, A.; Strakovsky, I. I.; Strub, T.; Suarez, I. M.; Supek, I.; Tarbert, C. M.; Thiel, M.; Thomas, A.; Unverzagt, M.; Watts, D. P.; Werthmueller, D; Witthauer, L.

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new measurement of the rare, doubly radiative decay eta->pi^0 gamma gamma was conducted with the Crystal Ball and TAPS multiphoton spectrometers together with the photon tagging facility at the Mainz Microtron MAMI. New data on the dependence of the partial decay width, Gamma(eta->pi^0 gamma gamma), on the two-photon invariant mass squared, m^2(gamma gamma), as well as a new, more precise value for the decay width, Gamma(eta->pi^0 gamma gamma) = (0.33+/-0.03_tot) eV, are based on analysis of 1.2 x 10^3 eta->pi^0 gamma gamma decays from a total of 6 x 10^7 eta mesons produced in the gamma p -> eta p reaction. The present results for dGamma(eta->pi^0 gamma gamma)/dm^2(gamma gamma) are in good agreement with previous measurements and recent theoretical calculations for this dependence.

  9. Search for the decays J/{psi}{yields}{gamma}{rho}{phi} and J/{psi}{yields}{gamma}{rho}{omega}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ablikim, M.; Bai, J. Z.; Cai, X.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, H. X.; Chen, J. C.; Chen, Jin; Chen, Y. B.; Chu, Y. P.; Deng, Z. Y.; Du, S. X.; Fang, J.; Fang, S. S.; Gao, C. S.; Gu, S. D.; Guo, Y. N.; He, K. L.; Heng, Y. K.; Hu, H. M.; Hu, T. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Beijing 100049 (China)] (and others)

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using 58x10{sup 6} J/{psi} events collected with the Beijing Spectrometer (BESII) at the Beijing Electron-Positron Collider, the decays J/{psi}{yields}{gamma}{phi}{rho} and J/{psi}{yields}{gamma}{omega}{rho} are searched for, and upper limits on their branching fractions are reported at the 90% C.L. No clear structures are observed in the {gamma}{rho}, {gamma}{phi}, or {rho}{phi} mass spectra for J/{psi}{yields}{gamma}{phi}{rho} nor in the {gamma}{rho}, {gamma}{omega}, or {rho}{omega} mass spectra for J/{psi}{yields}{gamma}{omega}{rho}.

  10. Conservative constraints on dark matter annihilation into gamma rays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mack, Gregory D.; Yueksel, Hasan [Department of Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Center for Cosmology and Astro-Particle Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Jacques, Thomas D.; Bell, Nicole F. [School of Physics, The University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Beacom, John F. [Department of Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Center for Cosmology and Astro-Particle Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)

    2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Using gamma-ray data from observations of the Milky Way, Andromeda (M31), and the cosmic background, we calculate conservative upper limits on the dark matter self-annihilation cross section to monoenergetic gamma rays, <{sigma}{sub A}v>{sub {gamma}}{sub {gamma}}, over a wide range of dark matter masses. (In fact, over most of this range, our results are unchanged if one considers just the branching ratio to gamma rays with energies within a factor of a few of the endpoint at the dark matter mass.) If the final-state branching ratio to gamma rays, Br({gamma}{gamma}), were known, then <{sigma}{sub A}v>{sub {gamma}}{sub {gamma}}/Br({gamma}{gamma}) would define an upper limit on the total cross section; we conservatively assume Br({gamma}{gamma}) > or approx. 10{sup -4}. An upper limit on the total cross section can also be derived by considering the appearance rates of any standard model particles; in practice, this limit is defined by neutrinos, which are the least detectable. For intermediate dark matter masses, gamma-ray-based and neutrino-based upper limits on the total cross section are comparable, while the gamma-ray limit is stronger for small masses and the neutrino limit is stronger for large masses. We comment on how these results depend on the assumptions about astrophysical inputs and annihilation final states, and how GLAST and other gamma-ray experiments can improve upon them.

  11. Escape of VHE gamma-rays from close massive binary Cen X-3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. Bednarek

    2000-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider propagation of very high energy (VHE) gamma-rays in the radiation field of a massive star in the binary system Cen X-3, which has been reported as a source of gamma-ray photons in the GeV and TeV energies. VHE gamma-rays or electrons, injected by the compact object, should develop inverse Compton pair cascades. We predict the gamma-ray spectra and light curves for the parameters of Cen X-3 system. It is found that the gamma-ray spectra, observed at different directions, have different shape and intensity. The gamma-ray light curves, produced in the case of electron injection by the compact object in the Cen X-3 system, should have opposite tendencies for photons with energies above 100 MeV and above 300 GeV, i.e. the photon intensities increases with phase in the first case and decreases with phase in the second case. However the model with injection of primary electrons seems to be in contrary with the reported modulation of the GeV gamma-ray flux with the pulsar's period. The model with injection of primary photons allows such modulation with the pulsar's period, but predicts strong modulation of the TeV flux with the orbital period of the binary. Modulation of TeV emission with the orbital period has been reported by the early Cherenkov observations, but was not confirmed by the recent, more sensitive observations by the Durham Mark 6 telescope.

  12. How precisely neutrino emission from supernova remnants can be constrained by gamma ray observations?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. L. Villante; F. Vissani

    2008-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a conceptually and computationally simple method to evaluate the neutrinos emitted by supernova remnants using the observed gamma-ray spectrum. The proposed method does not require any preliminary parametrization of the gamma ray flux; the gamma ray data can be used as an input. In this way, we are able to propagate easily the observational errors and to understand how well the neutrino flux and the signal in neutrino telescopes can be constrained by gamma-ray data. We discuss the various possible sources of theoretical and systematical uncertainties (e.g., neutrino oscillation parameters, hadronic modeling, etc.), obtaining an estimate of the accuracy of our calculation. Furthermore, we apply our approach to the supernova remnant RX J1713.7-3946, showing that neutrino emission is very-well constrained by the H.E.S.S. gamma-ray data: indeed, the accuracy of our prediction is limited by theoretical uncertainties. Neutrinos from RX J1713.7-3946 can be detected with an exposure of the order km^2 year, provided that the detection threshold in future neutrino telescopes will be equal to about 1 TeV.

  13. Gamma-Ray Bursts and Particle Astrophysics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Gendre

    2008-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Gamma-ray bursts are violent events occurring randomly in the sky. In this review, I will present the fireball model, proposed to explain the phenomenon of gamma-ray bursts. This model has important consequences for the production and observation at Earth of gravitational waves, high energy neutrinos, cosmic rays and high energy photons, and the second part of this review will be focused on these aspects. A last section will briefly discuss the topic of the use of gamma-ray bursts as standard candles and possible cosmological studies.

  14. High-spin structure and multiphonon {gamma} vibrations in very neutron-rich {sup 114}Ru

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yeoh, E. Y.; Wang, J. G.; Ding, H. B.; Gu, L.; Xu, Q.; Xiao, Z. G. [Department of Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Zhu, S. J. [Department of Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Department of Physics, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37235 (United States); Hamilton, J. H.; Li, K.; Ramayya, A. V.; Hwang, J. K. [Department of Physics, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37235 (United States); Liu, Y. X. [School of Science, Huzhou Teachers College, Huzhou 313000 (China); Liu, S. H. [Department of Physics, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37235 (United States); UNIRIB/Oak Ridge Associated Universities, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Sun, Y. [Department of Physics, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Sheikh, J. A.; Bhat, G. H. [Department of Physics, University of Kashmir, Srinagar 190 006 (India); Luo, Y. X. [Department of Physics, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37235 (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Rasmussen, J. O.; Lee, I. Y. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Ma, W. C. [Department of Physics, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, Mississippi 39762 (United States)

    2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    High-spin levels of the neutron-rich {sup 114}Ru have been investigated by measuring the prompt {gamma} rays in the spontaneous fission of {sup 252}Cf. The ground-state band and one-phonon {gamma}-vibrational band have been extended up to 14{sup +} and 9{sup +}, respectively. Two levels are proposed as the members of a two-phonon {gamma}-vibrational band. A back bending (band crossing) has been observed in the ground-state band at ({h_bar}/2{pi}){omega}{approx_equal} 0.40 MeV. Using the triaxial deformation parameters, the cranked shell model calculations indicate that this back bending in {sup 114}Ru should originate from the alignment of a pair of h{sub 11/2} neutrons. Triaxial projected shell model calculations for the {gamma}-vibrational band structures of {sup 114}Ru are in good agreement with the experimental data. However, when using the oblate deformation parameters, both of the above-calculated results are not in agreement with the experimental data.

  15. Thermal evolution behavior of carbides and {gamma} Prime precipitates in FGH96 superalloy powder

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang Lin, E-mail: zhanglincsu@163.com [State Key Laboratory for Advanced Metals and Materials, Beijing Key Laboratory for Powder Metallurgy and Particulate Materials, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing, 100083 (China); Liu Hengsan, E-mail: lhsj63@sohu.com [State Key Laboratory for Advanced Metals and Materials, Beijing Key Laboratory for Powder Metallurgy and Particulate Materials, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing, 100083 (China); He Xinbo, E-mail: xb_he@163.com [State Key Laboratory for Advanced Metals and Materials, Beijing Key Laboratory for Powder Metallurgy and Particulate Materials, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing, 100083 (China); Rafi-ud-din, E-mail: rafiuddi@gmail.com [State Key Laboratory for Advanced Metals and Materials, Beijing Key Laboratory for Powder Metallurgy and Particulate Materials, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing, 100083 (China); Qu Xuanhui, E-mail: quxh@ustb.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Advanced Metals and Materials, Beijing Key Laboratory for Powder Metallurgy and Particulate Materials, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing, 100083 (China); Qin Mingli, E-mail: mlqin75@hotmail.com [State Key Laboratory for Advanced Metals and Materials, Beijing Key Laboratory for Powder Metallurgy and Particulate Materials, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing, 100083 (China); Li Zhou, E-mail: zhouli621@126.com [National Key Lab of High Temperature Structural Materials, Beijing Institute of Aeronautical Materials, Beijing, 100095 (China); Zhang Guoqing, E-mail: g.zhang@126.com [National Key Lab of High Temperature Structural Materials, Beijing Institute of Aeronautical Materials, Beijing, 100095 (China)

    2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The characteristics of rapidly solidified FGH96 superalloy powder and the thermal evolution behavior of carbides and {gamma} Prime precipitates within powder particles were investigated. It was observed that the reduction of powder size and the increase of cooling rate had transformed the solidification morphologies of atomized powder from dendrite in major to cellular structure. The secondary dendritic spacing was measured to be 1.02-2.55 {mu}m and the corresponding cooling rates were estimated to be in the range of 1.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4}-4.7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} K{center_dot}s{sup -1}. An increase in the annealing temperature had rendered the phase transformation of carbides evolving from non-equilibrium MC Prime carbides to intermediate transition stage of M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbides, and finally to thermodynamically stable MC carbides. The superfine {gamma} Prime precipitates were formed at the dendritic boundaries of rapidly solidified superalloy powder. The coalescence, growth, and homogenization of {gamma}' precipitates occurred with increasing annealing temperature. With decreasing cooling rate from 650 Degree-Sign C{center_dot}K{sup -1} to 5 Degree-Sign C{center_dot}K{sup -1}, the morphological development of {gamma} Prime precipitates had been shown to proceed from spheroidal to cuboidal and finally to solid state dendrites. Meanwhile, a shift had been observed from dendritic morphology to recrystallized structure between 900 Degree-Sign C and 1050 Degree-Sign C. Moreover, accelerated evolution of carbides and {gamma}' precipitates had been facilitated by the formation of new grain boundaries which provide fast diffusion path for atomic elements. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Microstructural characteristic of FGH96 superalloy powder was investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The relation between microstructure, particle size, and cooling rate was studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thermal evolution behavior of {gamma} Prime and carbides in loose FGH96 powder was studied.

  16. DISCOVERY OF TeV GAMMA-RAY EMISSION FROM CTA 1 BY VERITAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aliu, E.; Errando, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Barnard College, Columbia University, NY 10027 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Barnard College, Columbia University, NY 10027 (United States); Archambault, S. [Physics Department, McGill University, Montreal, QC H3A 2T8 (Canada)] [Physics Department, McGill University, Montreal, QC H3A 2T8 (Canada); Arlen, T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Aune, T.; Bouvier, A. [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics and Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)] [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics and Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Beilicke, M.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Dickherber, R. [Department of Physics, Washington University, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States)] [Department of Physics, Washington University, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States); Benbow, W. [Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Amado, AZ 85645 (United States)] [Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Amado, AZ 85645 (United States); Cesarini, A.; Connolly, M. P. [School of Physics, National University of Ireland Galway, University Road, Galway (Ireland)] [School of Physics, National University of Ireland Galway, University Road, Galway (Ireland); Ciupik, L. [Astronomy Department, Adler Planetarium and Astronomy Museum, Chicago, IL 60605 (United States)] [Astronomy Department, Adler Planetarium and Astronomy Museum, Chicago, IL 60605 (United States); Collins-Hughes, E. [School of Physics, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland)] [School of Physics, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Cui, W. [Department of Physics, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States)] [Department of Physics, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Duke, C. [Department of Physics, Grinnell College, Grinnell, IA 50112-1690 (United States)] [Department of Physics, Grinnell College, Grinnell, IA 50112-1690 (United States); Dumm, J. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States)] [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Dwarkadas, V. V. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)] [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Falcone, A., E-mail: muk@astro.columbia.edu, E-mail: smcarthur@ulysses.uchicago.edu [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 525 Davey Lab, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); and others

    2013-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the discovery of TeV gamma-ray emission coincident with the shell-type radio supernova remnant (SNR) CTA 1 using the VERITAS gamma-ray observatory. The source, VER J0006+729, was detected as a 6.5 standard deviation excess over background and shows an extended morphology, approximated by a two-dimensional Gaussian of semimajor (semiminor) axis 0. Degree-Sign 30 (0. Degree-Sign 24) and a centroid 5' from the Fermi gamma-ray pulsar PSR J0007+7303 and its X-ray pulsar wind nebula (PWN). The photon spectrum is well described by a power-law dN/dE = N {sub 0}(E/3 TeV){sup -{Gamma}}, with a differential spectral index of {Gamma} = 2.2 {+-} 0.2{sub stat} {+-} 0.3{sub sys}, and normalization N {sub 0} = (9.1 {+-} 1.3{sub stat} {+-} 1.7{sub sys}) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -14} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} TeV{sup -1}. The integral flux, F {sub {gamma}} = 4.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -12} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} above 1 TeV, corresponds to 0.2% of the pulsar spin-down power at 1.4 kpc. The energetics, colocation with the SNR, and the relatively small extent of the TeV emission strongly argue for the PWN origin of the TeV photons. We consider the origin of the TeV emission in CTA 1.

  17. Results from the Milagro Gamma-Ray Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    V energies, and a search for transient emission above 100 GeV from gamma-ray bursts. 1 Introduction remnants and gamma-ray bursts (GRB). Gamma rays are also produced when high-energy cosmic rays interactResults from the Milagro Gamma-Ray Observatory E. Blaufuss for the Milagro Collaboration a,1 , a

  18. Mining Gamma-Ray Burst Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jon Hakkila; Richard J. Roiger; David J. Haglin; Robert S. Mallozzi; Geoffrey N. Pendleton; Charles A. Meegan

    2000-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Gamma-ray bursts provide what is probably one of the messiest of all astrophysical data sets. Burst class properties are indistinct, as overlapping characteristics of individual bursts are convolved with effects of instrumental and sampling biases. Despite these complexities, data mining techniques have allowed new insights to be made about gamma-ray burst data. We demonstrate how data mining techniques have simultaneously allowed us to learn about gamma-ray burst detectors and data collection, cosmological effects in burst data, and properties of burst subclasses. We discuss the exciting future of this field, and the web-based tool we are developing (with support from the NASA AISR Program). We invite others to join us in AI-guided gamma-ray burst classification (http://grb.mnsu.edu/grb/).

  19. Gamma-Ray Pulsar Studies With GLAST

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, D.J.; /NASA, Goddard

    2011-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Some pulsars have their maximum observable energy output in the gamma-ray band, offering the possibility of using these high-energy photons as probes of the particle acceleration and interaction processes in pulsar magnetospheres. After an extended hiatus between satellite missions, the recently-launched AGILE mission and the upcoming Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) Large Area Telescope (LAT) will allow gamma-ray tests of the theoretical models developed based on past discoveries. With its greatly improved sensitivity, better angular resolution, and larger energy reach than older instruments, GLAST LAT should detect dozens to hundreds of new gamma-ray pulsars and measure luminosities, light curves, and phase-resolved spectra with unprecedented resolution. It will also have the potential to find radio-quiet pulsars like Geminga, using blind search techniques. Cooperation with radio and X-ray pulsar astronomers is an important aspect of the LAT team's planning for pulsar studies.

  20. Gravitational waves and short gamma ray bursts.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Predoi, Valeriu

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??Short hard gamma-ray bursts (GRB) are believed to be produced by compact binary coalescences (CBC) { either double neutron stars or neutron star{black hole binaries.… (more)

  1. Airborne Gamma-Spectrometry in Switzerland

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Butterweck, Gernot [Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Bucher, Benno [Swiss Federal Nuclear Safety Inspectorate, 5232 Villigen HSK (Switzerland); Rybach, Ladislaus [Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich, Institute of Geophysics, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2008-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Airborne gamma-spectrometry is able to obtain fast radiological information over large areas. The airborne gamma-spectrometry unit deployed in Switzerland by the Swiss National Emergency Operations Centre (NEOC) consists of a Swiss army Super Puma helicopter equipped with four NaI-Detectors with a total volume of 17 liters, associated electronics and a real-time data evaluation and mapping unit developed by the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH) and the Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI). The operational readiness of the airborne gamma-spectrometry system is validated in annual exercises of one week duration. Data from 2005 and 2006 exercises are represented in maps of {sup 137}Cs activity concentration for two towns located in southern and western Switzerland. An indicator of man-made radioactivity (MMGC ratio) is demonstrated for an area with four different types of nuclear installations. The intercomparison between airborne gamma-spectrometry and ground measurements showed good agreement between both methods.

  2. Experimental conditions for the gamma optical scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silviu Olariu

    1999-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This work discusses the possibility of observation of nuclear multiphoton processes in which the interaction of a gamma ray photon with a nucleus takes place simultaneously with the interaction of a radio-frequency photon.

  3. Gravitational waves and gamma-ray bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alessandra Corsi; for the LIGO Scientific Collaboration; for the Virgo Collaboration

    2012-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Gamma-Ray Bursts are likely associated with a catastrophic energy release in stellar mass objects. Electromagnetic observations provide important, but indirect information on the progenitor. On the other hand, gravitational waves emitted from the central source, carry direct information on its nature. In this context, I give an overview of the multi-messenger study of gamma-ray bursts that can be carried out by using electromagnetic and gravitational wave observations. I also underline the importance of joint electromagnetic and gravitational wave searches, in the absence of a gamma-ray trigger. Finally, I discuss how multi-messenger observations may probe alternative gamma-ray burst progenitor models, such as the magnetar scenario.

  4. Studying Gamma Ray Bursts from a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Â?umer, Slobodan

    Studying Gamma Ray Bursts from a new perspective! {... Unraveling some mysteries and adding new Radio Op0cal X-ray Short ( energy -ray photons... ... accompained by a considerable long las0ng emission

  5. Diffuse gamma-rays from galactic halos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Pohl

    1996-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Here we review our current knowledge on diffuse gamma-rays from galactic halos. Estimates of the relative contribution of the various emission processes at low and high latitudes are compared to the data over 6 decades in energy. The observed spectral shape differs from what was expected, especially at ver low and very high energies. In the latter case, above 1 GeV, the sky emission related to gas exceeds the expected pi^0 decay spectrum. At energies below 1 MeV the relatively high gamma-ray intensity indicates at high density of nearly relativistic electrons which would have a strong influence on the energy and ionisation balance of the interstellar medium. Given the EGRET results for the Magellanic Clouds the gamma-ray emissivity in the outer halo is probably small, so that a substantial amount of baryonic dark matter may be hidden at 20-50 kpc radius without inducing observable gamma-ray emission.

  6. The HAWC Gamma-Ray Observatory: Sensitivity to Steady and Transient Sources of Gamma Rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abeysekara, A U; Alvarez, C; Álvarez, J D; Arceo, R; Arteaga-Velázquez, J C; Solares, H A Ayala; Barber, A S; Baughman, B M; Bautista-Elivar, N; Belmont, E; BenZvi, S Y; Berley, D; Rosales, M Bonilla; Braun, J; Caballero-Lopez, R A; Caballero-Mora, K S; Carramińana, A; Castillo, M; Cotti, U; Cotzomi, J; de la Fuente, E; De León, C; DeYoung, T; Hernandez, R Diaz; Díaz-Vélez, J C; Dingus, B L; DuVernois, M A; Ellsworth, R W; Fernandez, A; Fiorino, D W; Fraija, N; Galindo, A; Garfias, F; González, L X; González, M M; Goodman, J A; Grabski, V; Gussert, M; Hampel-Arias, Z; Hui, C M; Hüntemeyer, P; Imran, A; Iriarte, A; Karn, P; Kieda, D; Kunde, G J; Lara, A; Lauer, R J; Lee, W H; Lennarz, D; Vargas, H León; Linares, E C; Linnemann, J T; Longo, M; Luna-GarcIa, R; Marinelli, A; Martinez, H; Martinez, O; Martínez-Castro, J; Matthews, J A J; Miranda-Romagnoli, P; Moreno, E; Mostafá, M; Nava, J; Nellen, L; Newbold, M; Noriega-Papaqui, R; Oceguera-Becerra, T; Patricelli, B; Pelayo, R; Pérez-Pérez, E G; Pretz, J; Rivičre, C; Rosa-González, D; Salazar, H; Salesa, F; Sanchez, F E; Sandoval, A; Santos, E; Schneider, M; Silich, S; Sinnis, G; Smith, A J; Sparks, K; Springer, R W; Taboada, I; Toale, P A; Tollefson, K; Torres, I; Ukwatta, T N; Villaseńor, L; Weisgarber, T; Westerhoff, S; Wisher, I G; Wood, J; Yodh, G B; Younk, P W; Zaborov, D; Zepeda, A; Zhou, H

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The High-Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Gamma-Ray Observatory is designed to record air showers produced by cosmic rays and gamma rays between 100 GeV and 100 TeV. Because of its large field of view and high livetime, HAWC is well-suited to measure gamma rays from extended sources, diffuse emission, and transient sources. We describe the sensitivity of HAWC to emission from the extended Cygnus region as well as other types of galactic diffuse emission; searches for flares from gamma-ray bursts and active galactic nuclei; and the first measurement of the Crab Nebula with HAWC-30.

  7. Neutrinos and Gamma Rays from Galaxy Clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brandon Wolfe; Fulvio Melia; Roland M. Crocker; Raymond R. Volkas

    2008-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The next generation of neutrino and gamma-ray detectors should provide new insights into the creation and propagation of high-energy protons within galaxy clusters, probing both the particle physics of cosmic rays interacting with the background medium and the mechanisms for high-energy particle production within the cluster. In this paper we examine the possible detection of gamma-rays (via the GLAST satellite) and neutrinos (via the ICECUBE and Auger experiments) from the Coma cluster of galaxies, as well as for the gamma-ray bright clusters Abell 85, 1758, and 1914. These three were selected from their possible association with unidentified EGRET sources, so it is not yet entirely certain that their gamma-rays are indeed produced diffusively within the intracluster medium, as opposed to AGNs. It is not obvious why these inconspicuous Abell-clusters should be the first to be seen in gamma-rays, but a possible reason is that all of them show direct evidence of recent or ongoing mergers. Their identification with the EGRET gamma-ray sources is also supported by the close correlation between their radio and (purported) gamma-ray fluxes. Under favorable conditions (including a proton spectral index of 2.5 in the case of Abell 85, and sim 2.3 for Coma, and Abell 1758 and 1914), we expect ICECUBE to make as many as 0.3 neutrino detections per year from the Coma cluster of galaxies, and as many as a few per year from the Abell clusters 85, 1758, and 1914. Also, Auger may detect as many as 2 events per decade at ~ EeV energies from these gamma-ray bright clusters.

  8. Gamma Ray Bursts from Ordinary Cosmic Strings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. H. Brandenberger; A. T. Sornborger; M. Trodden

    1993-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We give an upper estimate for the number of gamma ray bursts from ordinary (non-superconducting) cosmic strings expected to be observed at terrestrial detectors. Assuming that cusp annihilation is the mechanism responsible for the bursts we consider strings arising at a GUT phase transition and compare our estimate with the recent BATSE results. Further we give a lower limit for the effective area of future detectors designed to detect the cosmic string induced flux of gamma ray bursts.

  9. Differential Pair Distribution Function Study of the Structure of Arsenate Adsorbed on Nanocrystalline [gamma]-Alumina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Wei; Harrington, Richard; Tang, Yuanzhi; Kubicki, James D.; Aryanpour, Masoud; Reeder, Richard J.; Parise, John B.; Phillips, Brian L. (SBU); (Penn)

    2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Structural information is important for understanding surface adsorption mechanisms of contaminants on metal (hydr)oxides. In this work, a novel technique was employed to study the interfacial structure of arsenate oxyanions adsorbed on {gamma}-alumina nanoparticles, namely, differential pair distribution function (d-PDF) analysis of synchrotron X-ray total scattering. The d-PDF is the difference of properly normalized PDFs obtained for samples with and without arsenate adsorbed, otherwise identically prepared. The real space pattern contains information on atomic pair correlations between adsorbed arsenate and the atoms on {gamma}-alumina surface (Al, O, etc.). PDF results on the arsenate adsorption sample on {gamma}-alumina prepared at 1 mM As concentration and pH 5 revealed two peaks at 1.66 {angstrom} and 3.09 {angstrom}, corresponding to As-O and As-Al atomic pair correlations. This observation is consistent with those measured by extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy, which suggests a first shell of As-O at 1.69 {+-} 0.01 {angstrom} with a coordination number of 4 and a second shell of As-Al at 3.13 {+-} 0.04 {angstrom} with a coordination number of 2. These results are in agreement with a bidentate binuclear coordination environment to the octahedral Al of {gamma}-alumina as predicted by density functional theory (DFT) calculation.

  10. Neutrino Emission from Gamma-Ray Burst Fireballs, Revised

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Svenja Hümmer; Philipp Baerwald; Walter Winter

    2012-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We review the neutrino flux from gamma-ray bursts, which is estimated from gamma-ray observations and used for the interpretation of recent IceCube data, from a particle physics perspective. We numerically calculate the neutrino flux for the same astrophysical assumptions as the analytical fireball neutrino model, including the dominant pion and kaon production modes, flavor mixing, and magnetic field effects on the secondary muons, pions, and kaons. We demonstrate that taking into account the full energy dependencies of all spectra, the normalization of the expected neutrino flux reduces by about one order of magnitude and the spectrum shifts to higher energies, where we can pin down the exact origin of the discrepancies by the re-computation of the analytical models. We also reproduce the IceCube-40 analysis for exactly the same bursts and same assumptions and illustrate the impact of uncertainties. We conclude that the baryonic loading of the fireballs, which is an important control parameter for the emission of cosmic rays, can be constrained significantly with the full-scale experiment after about ten years.

  11. MAGNETIZATION DEGREE OF GAMMA-RAY BURST FIREBALLS: NUMERICAL STUDY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrison, Richard; Kobayashi, Shiho, E-mail: R.M.Harrison@2006.ljmu.ac.uk [Astrophysics Research Institute, Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool, L3 5RF (United Kingdom)

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The relative strength between forward and reverse shock emission in early gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglow reflects that of magnetic energy densities in the two shock regions. We numerically show that with the current standard treatment, the fireball magnetization is underestimated by up to two orders of magnitude. This discrepancy is especially large in the sub-relativistic reverse shock regime (i.e., the thin shell and intermediate regime), where most optical flashes were detected. We provide new analytic estimates of the reverse shock emission based on a better shock approximation, which well describe numerical results in the intermediate regime. We show that the reverse shock temperature at the onset of afterglow is constant, ( {Gamma}-bar{sub d}-1){approx}8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -2}, when the dimensionless parameter {xi}{sub 0} is more than several. Our approach is applied to case studies of GRB 990123 and 090102, and we find that magnetic fields in the fireballs are even stronger than previously believed. However, these events are still likely to be due to a baryonic jet with {sigma} {approx} 10{sup -3} for GRB 990123 and {approx}3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4} to 3 for GRB 090102.

  12. The Universe Viewed in Gamma-Rays 1 Toward Ultra Short Gamma Ray Burst Ground Based De-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Enomoto, Ryoji

    The Universe Viewed in Gamma-Rays 1 Toward Ultra Short Gamma Ray Burst Ground Based De- tection- liminary data taking started in November 2002. 1. Introduction Gamma-ray bursts observed with space Tcherenkovlightfromoneshower Few 100MeV gamma-rays Fig. 1. In an imaging telescope, -ray bursts should appear as a Cherenkov

  13. Achieving Higher Accuracy in the Gamma-Ray Spectrocopic Assay of Holdup

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russo, P.A.; Wenz, T.R.; Smith, S.E.; Harris, J.F.

    2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gamma-ray spectroscopy is an important technique for the measurement of quantities of nuclear material holdup in processing equipment. Because the equipment in large facilities dedicated to uranium isotopic enrichment, uranium/plutonium scrap recovery or various stages of fuel fabrication is extensive, the total holdup may be large by its distribution alone, even if deposit thicknesses are small. Good accountability practices require unbiased measurements with uncertainties that are as small as possible. This paper describes new procedures for use with traditional holdup analysis methods based on gamma-ray spectroscopy. The procedures address the two sources of bias inherent in traditional gamma-ray measurements of holdup. Holdup measurements are performed with collimated, shielded gamma-ray detectors. The measurement distance is chosen to simplify the deposit geometry to that of a point, line or area. The quantitative holdup result is based on the net count rate of a representative gamma ray. This rate is corrected for contributions from room background and for attenuation by the process equipment. Traditional holdup measurements assume that the width of the point or line deposit is very small compared to the measurement distance, and that the self-attenuation effects can be neglected. Because each point or line deposit has a finite width and because self-attenuation affects all measurements, bias is incurred in both assumptions. In both cases the bias is negative, explaining the systematically low results of gamma-ray holdup measurements. The new procedures correct for bias that arises from both the finite-source effects and the gamma-ray self-attenuation. The procedures used to correct for both of these effects apply to the generalized geometries. One common empirical parameter is used for both corrections. It self-consistently limits the total error incurred (from uncertain knowledge of this parameter) in the combined correction process, so that it is compelling to use these procedures. The algorithms and the procedures are simple, general, and easily automated for use plant-wide. This paper shows the derivation of the new, generalized correction algorithms for finite-source and self-attenuation effects. It also presents an analysis of the sensitivity of the holdup result to the uncertainty in the empirical parameter when one or both corrections are made. The paper uses specific examples of the magnitudes of finite-source and self-attenuation corrections to measurements that were made in the field. It discusses the automated implementation of the correction procedure.

  14. 900 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON ELECTRON DEVICES, VOL. 47, NO. 4, APRIL 2000 Correspondence________________________________________________________________________

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hwang, Sung Woo

    900 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON ELECTRON DEVICES, VOL. 47, NO. 4, APRIL 2000 Correspondence was supported by LG semicon- ductor, Korea. The review of this correspondence was arranged by Editor D. A. Antoniadis. Y. S. Yu and S. W. Hwang are with the Department of Electronics Engineering, Korea University

  15. Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board Correspondence with the Department of Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    85 Appendix E Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board Correspondence with the Department of Energy #12;#12;Appendix E 87 Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board Correspondence with the Department of Energy I n of Energy's (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM). The letters typically provide

  16. SAYA's head-eye coordination system Correspondence of image-width and angle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beimel, Amos

    SAYA's head-eye coordination system Correspondence of image-width and angle 335 - 359 [deg] 0 - 25 - 25 [deg] is input, head and eyes move to right side. b) If the angle within 335 - 359 [deg] is input, head and eyes move to left side. SAYA's head-eye coordination system Correspondence of image

  17. Finding (or not) New Gamma-ray Pulsars with GLAST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott M. Ransom

    2007-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Young energetic pulsars will likely be the largest class of Galactic sources observed by GLAST, with many hundreds detected. Many will be unknown as radio pulsars, making pulsation detection dependent on radio and/or x-ray observations or on blind periodicity searches of the gamma-rays. Estimates for the number of pulsars GLAST will detect in blind searches have ranged from tens to many hundreds. I argue that the number will be near the low end of this range, partly due to observations being made in a scanning as opposed to a pointing mode. This paper briefly reviews how blind pulsar searches will be conducted using GLAST, what limits these searches, and how the computations and statistics scale with various parameters.

  18. 5, 95145, 2008 Soil parameter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    tools to sim- ulate mass and energy fluxes within the soil vegetation atmosphere continuum for nu, linking the water and energy fluxes at the land surface. An appropriate parameterisation of soil hydraulicHESSD 5, 95­145, 2008 Soil parameter inversion ­ potential and limits A. Loew and W. Mauser Title

  19. Light Stau Phenomenology and the Higgs \\gamma\\gamma Rate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carena, Marcela; Gori, Stefania; Shah, Nausheen R.; Wagner, Carlos E.M.; Wang, Lian-Tao

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently, an excess of events consistent with a Higgs boson with mass of about 125 GeV was reported by the CMS and ATLAS experiments. This Higgs boson mass is consistent with the values that may be obtained in minimal supersymmetric extensions of the Standard Model (SM), with both stop masses less than a TeV and large mixing. The apparently enhanced photon production rate associated with this potential Higgs signal may be the result of light staus with large mixing. Large stau mixing and large coupling of the staus to the SM-like Higgs boson may be obtained for large values of tan {beta} and moderate to large values of the Higgsino mass parameter, {mu}. We study the phenomenological properties of this scenario, including precision electroweak data, the muon anomalous magnetic moment, Dark Matter, and the evolution of the soft supersymmetry-breaking parameters to high energies. We also analyze the possible collider signatures of light third generation sleptons and demonstrate that it is possible to find evidence of their production at the 8 TeV and the 14 TeV LHC. The most promising channel is stau and tau sneutrino associated production, with the sneutrino decaying into a W boson plus a light stau.

  20. Propagation of Neutrinos through Magnetized Gamma-Ray Burst Fireball

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarira Sahu; Nissim Fraija; Yong-Yeon Keum

    2009-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The neutrino self-energy is calculated in a weakly magnetized plasma consists of electrons, protons, neutrons and their anti-particles and using this we have calculated the neutrino effective potential up to order $M^{-4}_W$. In the absence of magnetic field it reduces to the known result. We have also calculated explicitly the effective potentials for different backgrounds which may be helpful in different environments. By considering the mixing of three active neutrinos in the medium with the magnetic field we have derived the survival and conversion probabilities of neutrinos from one flavor to another and also the resonance condition is derived. As an application of the above, we considered the dense and relativistic plasma of the Gamma-Ray Bursts fireball through which neutrinos of 5-30 MeV can propagate and depending on the fireball parameters they may oscillate resonantly or non-resonantly from one flavor to another. These MeV neutrinos are produced due to stellar collapse or merger events which trigger the Gamma-Ray Burst. The fireball itself also produces MeV neutrinos due to electron positron annihilation, inverse beta decay and nucleonic bremsstrahlung. Using the three neutrino mixing and considering the best fit values of the neutrino parameters, we found that electron neutrinos are hard to oscillate to another flavors. On the other hand, the muon neutrinos and the tau neutrinos oscillate with equal probability to one another, which depends on the neutrino energy, temperature and size of the fireball. Comparison of oscillation probabilities with and without magnetic field shows that, they depend on the neutrino energy and also on the size of the fireball. By using the resonance condition, we have also estimated the resonance length of the propagating neutrinos as well as the baryon content of the fireball.

  1. PHYSICAL PARAMETERS OF STANDARD AND BLOWOUT JETS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pucci, Stefano; Romoli, Marco [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Firenze, I-50121 Firenze (Italy); Poletto, Giannina [INAF-Arcetri Astrophysical Observatory, I-50125 Firenze (Italy); Sterling, Alphonse C., E-mail: stpucci@arcetri.astro.it [Space Science Office, NASA/MSFC, Huntsville, Al 35812 (United States)

    2013-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The X-ray Telescope on board the Hinode mission revealed the occurrence, in polar coronal holes, of much more numerous jets than previously indicated by the Yohkoh/Soft X-ray Telescope. These plasma ejections can be of two types, depending on whether they fit the standard reconnection scenario for coronal jets or if they include a blowout-like eruption. In this work, we analyze two jets, one standard and one blowout, that have been observed by the Hinode and STEREO experiments. We aim to infer differences in the physical parameters that correspond to the different morphologies of the events. To this end, we adopt spectroscopic techniques and determine the profiles of the plasma temperature, density, and outflow speed versus time and position along the jets. The blowout jet has a higher outflow speed, a marginally higher temperature, and is rooted in a stronger magnetic field region than the standard event. Our data provide evidence for recursively occurring reconnection episodes within both the standard and the blowout jet, pointing either to bursty reconnection or to reconnection occurring at different locations over the jet lifetimes. We make a crude estimate of the energy budget of the two jets and show how energy is partitioned among different forms. Also, we show that the magnetic energy that feeds the blowout jet is a factor of 10 higher than the magnetic energy that fuels the standard event.

  2. Exclusive search for Higgs boson to gamma-gamma decay via vector boson fusion production mechanism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rankin, Dylan Sheldon

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We perform an exclusive search for the Higgs boson to gamma-gamma decay via vector boson fusion. We utilize the characteristic features of vector boson fusion, such as the di-jet [Delta][eta] and mass, as well as the ...

  3. The Excitation of Solar Oscillations \\Gamma\\GammaObservations and Simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stein, Robert

    The Excitation of Solar Oscillations \\Gamma\\GammaObservations and Simulations Philip R. Goode Big Bear Solar Observatory, New Jersey Institute of Technology, Big Bear City, CA 92314 Louis H. Strous Big Bear Solar Observatory, New Jersey Institute of Technology, Big Bear City, CA 92314 Lockheed

  4. Development of a database for prompt gamma-ray neutron activation analysis: Summary report of the third research coordination meeting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindstrom, Richard M.; Firestone, Richard B.; Pavi, ???

    2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The main discussions and conclusions from the Third Co-ordination Meeting on the Development of a Database for Prompt Gamma-ray Neutron Activation Analysis are summarized in this report. All results were reviewed in detail, and the final version of the TECDOC and the corresponding software were agreed upon and approved for preparation. Actions were formulated with the aim of completing the final version of the TECDOC and associated software by May 2003.

  5. Characterization of the unfolding, refolding, and aggregation pathways of two protein implicated in cataractogenesis : human gamma D and human gamma S crystallin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kosinski-Collins, Melissa Sue, 1978-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Human [gamma]D crystallin (H[gamma]D-Crys) and human [gamma]S crystallin (H[gamma]S-Crys), are major proteins of the human eye lens and are components of cataracts. H[gamma]D-Crys is expressed early in life in the lens ...

  6. Gamma-Ray and Parsec-Scale Jet Properties of a Complete Sample of Blazars From the MOJAVE Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lister, M L; Aller, H; Hovatta, T; Kellermann, K I; Kovalev, Y Y; Meyer, E T; Pushkarev, A B; Ros, E; Ackermann, M; Antolini, E; Baldini, L; Ballet, J; Barbiellini, G; Bastieri, D; Bechtol, K; Bellazzini, R; Berenji, B; Blandford, R D; Bloom, E D; Boeck, M; Bonamente, E; Borgland, A W; Bregeon, J; Brigida, M; Bruel, P; Buehler, R; Buson, S; Caliandro, G A; Cameron, R A; Caraveo, P A; Casandjian, J M; Cavazzuti, E; Cecchi, C; Chang, C S; Charles, E; Chekhtman, A; Cheung, C C; Chiang, J; Ciprini, S; Claus, R; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Conrad, J; Cutini, S; de Palma, F; Dermer, C D; Silva, E do Couto e; Drell, P S; Drlica-Wagner, A; Favuzzi, C; Fegan, S J; Ferrara, E C; Finke, J; Focke, W B; Fortin, P; Fukazawa, Y; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Gasparrini, D; Gehrels, N; Germani, S; Giglietto, N; Giordano, F; Giroletti, M; Glanzman, T; Godfrey, G; Grenier, I A; Guiriec, S; Hadasch, D; Hayashida, M; Hays, E; Horan, D; Hughes, R E; Jóhannesson, G; Johnson, A S; Kadler, M; Katagiri, H; Kataoka, J; Knödlseder, J; Kuss, M; Lande, J; Longo, F; Loparco, F; Lott, B; Lovellette, M N; Lubrano, P; Madejski, G M; Mazziotta, M N; McConville, W; McEnery, J E; Mehault, J; Michelson, P F; Mizuno, T; Monte, C; Monzani, M E; Morselli, A; Moskalenko, I V; Murgia, S; Naumann-Godo, M; Nishino, S; Nolan, P L; Norris, J P; Nuss, E; Ohno, M; Ohsugi, T; Okumura, A; Omodei, N; Orlando, E; Ozaki, M; Paneque, D; Parent, D; Pesce-Rollins, M; Pierbattista, M; Piron, F; Pivato, G; Rainň, S; Readhead, A; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Richards, J L; Ritz, S; Sadrozinski, H F -W; Sgrň, C; Shaw, M S; Siskind, E J; Spandre, G; Spinelli, P; Takahashi, H; Tanaka, T; Thayer, J G; Thayer, J B; Thompson, D J; Tosti, G; Tramacere, A; Troja, E; Usher, T L; Vandenbroucke, J; Vasileiou, V; Vianello, G; Vitale, V; Waite, A P; Wang, P; Winer, B L; Wood, K S; Zimmer, S

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the Fermi LAT gamma-ray and 15 GHz VLBA radio properties of a joint gamma-ray- and radio-selected sample of AGNs obtained during the first 11 months of the Fermi mission (2008 Aug 4 - 2009 Jul 5). Our sample contains the brightest 173 AGNs in these bands above declination -30 deg. during this period, and thus probes the full range of gamma-ray loudness (gamma-ray to radio band luminosity ratio) in the bright blazar population. The latter quantity spans at least four orders of magnitude, reflecting a wide range of spectral energy distribution (SED) parameters in the bright blazar population. The BL Lac objects, however, display a linear correlation of increasing gamma-ray loudness with synchrotron SED peak frequency, suggesting a universal SED shape for objects of this class. The synchrotron self-Compton model is favored for the gamma-ray emission in these BL Lacs over external seed photon models, since the latter predict a dependence of Compton dominance on Doppler factor that would destroy any...

  7. Gamma-Ray Emission in Dissipative Pulsar Magnetospheres: From Theory to Fermi Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Constantinos Kalapotharakos; Alice K. Harding; Demosthenes Kazanas

    2014-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We compute the patterns of $\\gamma$-ray emission due to curvature radiation in dissipative pulsar magnetospheres. Our ultimate goal is to construct macrophysical models that are able to reproduce the observed $\\gamma$-ray light-curve phenomenology recently published in the Second Fermi Pulsar Catalog. We apply specific forms of Ohm's law on the open field lines using a broad range for the macroscopic conductivity values that result in solutions ranging, from near-vacuum to near Force-Free. Using these solutions, we generate model $\\gamma$-ray light curves by calculating realistic trajectories and Lorentz factors of radiating particles, under the influence of both the accelerating electric fields and curvature radiation-reaction. We further constrain our models using the observed dependence of the phase-lags between the radio and $\\gamma$-ray emission on the $\\gamma$-ray peak-separation. We perform a statistical comparison of our model radio-lag vs peak-separation diagram and the one obtained for the Fermi standard pulsars. We find that for models of uniform conductivity over the entire open magnetic field line region, agreement with observations favors higher values of this parameter. We find, however, significant improvement in fitting the data with models that employ a hybrid form of conductivity; specifically, infinite conductivity interior to the light-cylinder and high but finite conductivity on the outside. In these models the $\\gamma$-ray emission is produced in regions near the equatorial current sheet but modulated by the local physical properties. These models have radio-lags near the observed values and statistically best reproduce the observed light-curve phenomenology. Additionally, these models produce GeV photon cut-off energies.

  8. PATHWAY PARAMETER AND THERMONUCLEAR FUNCTIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. J. Haubold

    Abstract. In the theory of thermonuclear reaction rates, analytical evaluation of thermonuclear functions for non-resonant reactions, including cases with cut-off and depletion of the tail of the Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution function were considered in a series of papers by Mathai and Haubold (1988). In the present paper we study more general classes of thermonuclear functions by introducing a pathway parameter ?, so that when ? ? 1 the thermonuclear functions in the Maxwell-Boltzmannian case are recovered. We will also give interpretations for the pathway parameter ? in the case of cut-off and in terms of moments. 1. Thermonuclear Functions The standard thermonuclear function in the Maxwell-Boltzmann case in the theory of nuclear reactions, is given by the following (Critchfield, 1972; Haubold and Mathai, 1985; Mathai and

  9. High spins in gamma-soft nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leander, G.A.; Frauendorf, S.; May, F.R.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclei which are soft with respect to the ..gamma.. shape degree of freedom are expected to have many different structures coexisting in the near-yrast regime. In particular, the lowest rotational quasi-particle in a high-j shell exerts a strong polarizing effect on ..gamma... The ..gamma.. to which it drives is found to vary smoothly over a 180/sup 0/ range as the position of the Fermi level varies. This simple rule is seen to have a direct connection with the energy staggering of alternate spin states in rotational bands. A diagram is presented which provides a general theoretical reference for experimental tests of the relation between ..gamma.., spin staggering, configuration, and nucleon number. In a quasicontinuum spectrum, the coexistence of different structures are expected to make several unrelated features appear within any one slice of sum energy and multiplicity. However, it is also seen that the in-band moment of inertia may be similar for many bands of different ..gamma...

  10. Gamma Reaction History for the NIF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herrmann, H W; Evans, S C; Kim, Y; Mack, J M; Young, C S; Cox, B C; Frogget, B C; Kaufman, M I; Malone, R M; Tunnell, T W; Stoeffl, W

    2009-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Bang time and reaction history measurements are fundamental components of diagnosing ICF implosions and will be essential contributors to diagnosing attempts at ignition on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Fusion gammas provide a direct measure of fusion interaction rate without being compromised by Doppler spreading. Gamma-based gas Cherenkov detectors that convert fusion gamma rays to optical Cherenkov photons for collection by fast recording systems have been developed and fielded at Omega. These systems have established their usefulness in illuminating ICF physics in several experimental campaigns. Bang time precision better than 25 ps has been demonstrated, well below the 50 ps accuracy requirement defined by the NIF System Design Requirements. A staged approach of implementing Gamma Reaction History (GRH) diagnostics on the NIF has been initiated. In the early stage, multiple detectors located close to target chamber center (at 2 and 6 m) and coupled to photomultiplier tubes are geared toward the loweryield THD campaign. In the later stage, streak camera–coupled instruments will be used for improved temporal resolution at the higher yields expected from the DT ignition campaign. Multiple detectors will allow for increased dynamic range and gamma energy spectral information.

  11. Observation of the Crab Nebula in Soft Gamma Rays with the Nuclear Compton Telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bandstra, Mark ShenYu

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gamma-ray bursts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.268] G. J. Fishman. The gamma-ray burst capabilities of BATSEOlson. Observations of Gamma- Ray Bursts of Cosmic Origin.

  12. Development of Superconducting High-Resolution Gamma-Ray Spectrometers for Nuclear Safeguards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dreyer, Jonathan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Counting 2.4.3 High-Resolution Gamma Spectrometry 2.5coincidence counting and gamma spectrometry system (CANEGA)High-Resolution Gamma Spectrometry Isotopic correlation

  13. Low latency search for Gravitational waves from BH-NS binaries in coincidence with Short Gamma Ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrea Maselli; Valeria Ferrari

    2014-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a procedure to be used in the search for gravitational waves from black hole-neutron star coalescing binaries, in coincidence with short gamma-ray bursts. It is based on two recently proposed semi-analytic fits, one reproducing the mass of the remnant disk surrounding the black hole which forms after the merging as a function of some binary parameters, the second relating the neutron star compactness, i.e. the ratio of mass and radius, with its tidal deformability. Using a Fisher matrix analysis and the two fits, we assign a probability that the emitted gravitational signal is associated to the formation of an accreting disk massive enough to supply the energy needed to power a short gamma ray burst. This information can be used in low-latency data analysis to restrict the parameter space searching for gravitational wave signals in coincidence with short gamma-ray bursts, and to gain information on the dynamics of the coalescing system and on the internal structure of the components. In addition, when the binary parameters will be measured with high accuracy, it will be possible to use this information to trigger the search for off-axis gamma-ray bursts afterglows.

  14. doi: 10.3319/TAO.2011.09.23.02(T) * Corresponding author

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yih-Min

    doi: 10.3319/TAO.2011.09.23.02(T) * Corresponding author E-mail: cchan@ntu.edu.tw Terr. Atmos, directivity, high fault strength, a slapdown phase, and hanging wall effect. The Darfield sequence case

  15. doi: 10.3319/TAO.2013.05.30.01(T) * Corresponding author

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yih-Min

    doi: 10.3319/TAO.2013.05.30.01(T) * Corresponding author E-mail: drymwu@ntu.edu.tw Terr. Atmos City. The earthquakes occur- ring in southern Taiwan, due to considerable site effects along

  16. doi: 10.3319/TAO.2013.01.22.01(T) * Corresponding author

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yih-Min

    doi: 10.3319/TAO.2013.01.22.01(T) * Corresponding author E-mail: cchan@ntu.edu.tw Terr. Atmos the path and site effect using ground motion prediction equations, a proba- bilistic seismic hazard

  17. Correspondences: A personal photographic journey between past/Iran and present/Australia.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Javan, Katayoun

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??This project is an autobiographical photography series entitled: Correspondences; A personal photographic journey between past/Iran and present/Australia. This series of photographs are partly influenced by… (more)

  18. Specifying authentication using signal events in CSP Siraj A. Shaikh (first and corresponding author)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doran, Simon J.

    1 Specifying authentication using signal events in CSP Siraj A. Shaikh (first and corresponding in the process algebra Communicating Sequential Processes (CSP) to specify authentication. The purpose, security protocols, CSP, formal specification, Kerberos 1. Introduction Schneider [1] uses Communicating

  19. Shifted one-parameter supersymmetric family of quartic asymmetric double-well potentials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. C. Rosu; S. C. Mancas; P. Chen

    2014-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Extending our previous work (Rosu, Mancas, Chen, Ann.Phys. 343 (2014) 87-102), we define supersymmetric partner potentials through a particular Riccati solution of the form F(x)=(x-c)^2-1, where c is a real shift parameter, and work out the quartic double-well family of one-parameter isospectral potentials obtained by using the corresponding general Riccati solution. For these parametric double well potentials, we study how the localization properties of the two wells depend on the parameter of the potentials for various values of the shifting parameter. We also consider the supersymmetric parametric family of the first double-well potential in the Razavy chain of double well potentials corresponding to F(x)=(1/2)sinh 2x-2(1+sqrt 2)sinh 2x/[(1+sqrt 2) cosh 2x+1], both unshifted and shifted, to test and compare the localization properties

  20. DEVELOPMENT OF A PRECISION TUNABLE GAMMA-RAY SOURCE DRIVEN BY A COMPACT X-BAND LINAC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartemann, F V; Albert, F; Anderson, G G; Anderson, S G; Bayramian, A J; Betts, S M; Chu, T S; Cross, R R; Ebbers, C A; Fisher, S E; Gibson, D J; Ladran, A S; Messerly, M J; Semenov, V A; Shverdin, M Y; Siders, C W; McNabb, D P; Barty, C J; Vlieks, A E; Jongewaard, E N; Tantawi, S G

    2009-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A precision, tunable gamma-ray source driven by a compact, high-gradient X-band linac is currently under development at LLNL. High-brightness, relativistic electron bunches produced by the linac interact with a Joule-class, 10 ps laser pulse to generate tunable {gamma}-rays in the 0.5-2.5 MeV photon energy range via Compton scattering. The source will be used to excite nuclear resonance fluorescence lines in various isotopes; applications include homeland security, stockpile science and surveillance, nuclear fuel assay, and waste imaging and assay. The source design, key parameters, and current status are presented.

  1. Apparatus and method for detecting gamma radiation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sigg, Raymond A. (Martinez, GA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high efficiency radiation detector for measuring X-ray and gamma radiation from small-volume, low-activity liquid samples with an overall uncertainty better than 0.7% (one sigma SD). The radiation detector includes a hyperpure germanium well detector, a collimator, and a reference source. The well detector monitors gamma radiation emitted by the reference source and a radioactive isotope or isotopes in a sample source. The radiation from the reference source is collimated to avoid attenuation of reference source gamma radiation by the sample. Signals from the well detector are processed and stored, and the stored data is analyzed to determine the radioactive isotope(s) content of the sample. Minor self-attenuation corrections are calculated from chemical composition data.

  2. Apparatus and method for detecting gamma radiation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sigg, R.A.

    1994-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A high efficiency radiation detector is disclosed for measuring X-ray and gamma radiation from small-volume, low-activity liquid samples with an overall uncertainty better than 0.7% (one sigma SD). The radiation detector includes a hyperpure germanium well detector, a collimator, and a reference source. The well detector monitors gamma radiation emitted by the reference source and a radioactive isotope or isotopes in a sample source. The radiation from the reference source is collimated to avoid attenuation of reference source gamma radiation by the sample. Signals from the well detector are processed and stored, and the stored data is analyzed to determine the radioactive isotope(s) content of the sample. Minor self-attenuation corrections are calculated from chemical composition data. 4 figures.

  3. Phenomenology of Gamma-Ray Jets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amir Levinson

    2007-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss some phenomenological aspects of $\\gamma$-ray emitting jets. In particular, we present calculations of the $\\gamma$-sphere and $\\pi$-sphere for various target photon fields, and employ them to demonstrate how $\\gamma$-ray observations at very high energies can be used to constraint the Doppler factor of the emitting plasma and the production of VHE neutrinos. We also consider the implications of the rapid TeV variability observed in M87 and the TeV blazars, and propose a model for the very rapid TeV flares observed with HESS and MAGIC in some blazars,that accommodates the relatively small Doppler factors inferred from radio observations. Finally, we briefly discuss the prospects for detecting VHE neutrinos from relativistic jets.

  4. Pressurised xenon as scintillator for gamma spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Resnati, F

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Detectors based on liquid or gas xenon have been used and are in use for a number of applications, in particular for the detection of gamma rays. Xenon is a well-suited medium for gamma spectroscopy thanks to its high atomic number and, consequently, large cross-section for photo-electric absorption. This paper presents experimental studies of high pressure xenon as a scintillator, with the aim of developing a gamma ray detector for the detection of Special Nuclear Materials (SNM). The first goal was to study the dependence of the light yield and of the energy resolution on the thermodynamic conditions. We present preliminary results from an optimised version of the detector.

  5. Fermi Observations of Gamma-ray Bursts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ohno, Masanori [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, JAXA, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan)

    2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The gamma-ray emission mechanism of Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are still unknown. Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope successfully detected high-energy (> 100 MeV) emission from 17 GRBs since its launch. Fermi revealed the distinct temporal behaviors and extra spectral component from high-energy emission. These new observational results are driving many theoretical implications, such as leptonic, hadronic and afterglow origin. The highest energy photon detected by Fermi gives a constraint on the bulk Lorentz factor of the ultra-relativistic jets of GRBs. The impact of the Fermi GRB observations extends not only to the GRB-related issues but also to the outside GRB physics, such as quantum gravity and model of the extra galactic background light.

  6. Note: Characteristic beam parameter for the line electron gun

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iqbal, M. [Centre for High Energy Physics, University of the Punjab, Lahore 45590 (Pakistan) [Centre for High Energy Physics, University of the Punjab, Lahore 45590 (Pakistan); Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Islam, G. U. [Centre for High Energy Physics, University of the Punjab, Lahore 45590 (Pakistan)] [Centre for High Energy Physics, University of the Punjab, Lahore 45590 (Pakistan); Zhou, Z.; Chi, Y. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China)] [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We have optimized the beam parameters of line source electron gun using Stanford Linear Accelerator Centre electron beam trajectory program (EGUN), utilizing electrostatic focusing only. We measured minimum beam diameter as 0.5 mm that corresponds to power density of 68.9 kW/cm{sup 2} at 13.5 mm in the post-anode region which is more than two-fold (33 kW/cm{sup 2}), of the previously reported results. The gun was operated for the validation of the theoretical results and found in good agreement. The gun is now without any magnetic and electrostatic focusing thus much simpler and more powerful.

  7. Cosmic-ray induced gamma-ray emission from the starburst galaxy NGC 253

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Xilu; Fields, Brian D. [Department of Astronomy, MC-221, 1002 W. Green Street, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)

    2014-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Cosmic rays in galaxies interact with the interstellar medium and give us a direct view of nuclear and particle interactions in the cosmos. For example, cosmic-ray proton interactions with interstellar hydrogen produce gamma rays via PcrPism??{sup 0}???. For a 'normal' star-forming galaxy like the Milky Way, most cosmic rays escape the Galaxy before such collisions, but in starburst galaxies with dense gas and huge star formation rate, most cosmic rays do suffer these interactions [1,2]. We construct a 'thick-target' model for starburst galaxies, in which cosmic rays are accelerated by supernovae, and escape is neglected. This model gives an upper limit to the gamma-ray emission. Only two free parameters are involved in the model: cosmic-ray proton acceleration energy rate from supernova and the proton injection spectral index. The pionic gamma-radiation is calculated from 10 MeV to 10 TeV for the starburst galaxy NGC 253, and compared to Fermi and HESS data. Our model fits NGC 253 well, suggesting that cosmic rays in this starburst are in the thick target limit, and that this galaxy is a gamma-ray calorimeter.

  8. Observations of GRB 990123 by the Compton $\\gamma$-Ray Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Briggs, M S; Kippen, R M; Preece, R D; Kouveliotou, C; Van Paradijs, J; Share, G H; Murphy, R J; Matz, S M; Connors, A; Winkler, C; McConnell, M L; Ryan, J M; Williams, O R; Young, C A; Dingus, B L; Catelli, J R; Wijers, R A M J

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    GRB 990123 was the first burst from which simultaneous optical, X-ray and gamma-ray emission was detected; its afterglow has been followed by an extensive set of radio, optical and X-ray observations. We have studied the gamma-ray burst itself as observed by the CGRO detectors. We find that gamma-ray fluxes are not correlated with the simultaneous optical observations, and the gamma-ray spectra cannot be extrapolated simply to the optical fluxes. The burst is well fit by the standard four-parameter GRB function, with the exception that excess emission compared to this function is observed below ~15 keV during some time intervals. The burst is characterized by the typical hard-to-soft and hardness-intensity correlation spectral evolution patterns. The energy of the peak of the nu f_nu spectrum, E_p, reaches an unusually high value during the first intensity spike, 1470 +/- 110 keV, and then falls to consistent with a power law with a photon index of about -3. By fluence, GRB 990123 is brighter than all but 0.4...

  9. Estimation of compact binary coalescense rates from short gamma-ray burst redshift measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Dietz

    2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Short gamma-ray bursts are believed to originate from the merger of two compact objects. If this scenario is correct, these bursts will be accompanied by the emission of strong gravitational waves, detectable by current or planned GW detectors, such as LIGO and Virgo. No detection of a gravitational wave has been made up to date. In this paper I will use a set of observed redshift measurements of short gamma-ray bursts to fit a model in order to determine the rate of such merger events in the nearby universe. Various corrections will be included in that calculation, as the field-of-view of the satellite missions, the beaming factors of gamma-ray bursts and other parameters. The computed rate estimations will be compared to other rate estimations, based on observations on binary neutron stars and population synthesis models. Given the upper limit established by LIGO/Virgo measurements, it is possible to draw conclusions on the beaming angle of gamma-ray bursts.

  10. Neutrinos from Decaying Muons, Pions, Kaons and Neutrons in Gamma Ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reetanjali Moharana; Nayantara Gupta

    2012-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    In the internal shock model of gamma ray bursts ultrahigh energy muons, pions, neutrons and kaons are likely to be produced in the interactions of shock accelerated relativistic protons with low energy photons (KeV-MeV). These particles subsequently decay to high energy neutrinos/antineutrinos and other secondaries. In the high internal magnetic fields of gamma ray bursts, the ultrahigh energy charged particles ($\\mu^+$, $\\pi^+$, $K^+$) lose energy significantly due to synchrotron radiations before decaying into secondary high energy neutrinos and antineutrinos. The relativistic neutrons decay to high energy antineutrinos, protons and electrons. We have calculated the total neutrino flux (neutrino and antineutrino) considering the decay channels of ultrahigh energy muons, pions, neutrons and kaons. We have shown that the total neutrino flux generated in neutron decay can be higher than that produced in $\\mu^+$ and $\\pi^+$ decay. The charged kaons being heavier than pions, lose energy slowly and their secondary total neutrino flux is more than that from muons and pions at very high energy. Our detailed calculations on secondary particle production in $p\\gamma$ interactions give the total neutrino fluxes and their flavour ratios expected on earth. Depending on the values of the parameters (luminosity, Lorentz factor, variability time, spectral indices and break energy in the photon spectrum) of a gamma ray burst the contributions to the total neutrino flux from the decay of different particles (muon, pion, neutron and kaon) may vary and they would also be reflected on the neutrino flavour ratios.

  11. The effect of neutrinos on the initial fireballs in gamma-ray bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hylke B. J. Koers; Ralph A. M. J. Wijers

    2005-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the fate of very compact, sudden energy depositions that may lie at the origin of gamma-ray bursts. Following on from the work of Cavallo and Rees (1978), we take account of the much higher energies now believed to be involved. The main effect of this is that thermal neutrinos are present and energetically important. We show that these may provide sufficient cooling to tap most of the explosion energy. However, at the extreme energies usually invoked for gamma-ray bursts, the neutrino opacity suffices to prevent dramatic losses, provided that the heating process is sufficiently fast. In a generic case, a few tens of percent of the initial fireball energy will escape as an isotropic millisecond burst of thermal neutrinos with a temperature of about 60 MeV, which is detectable for nearby gamma-ray bursts and hypernovae. For parameters we find most likely for gamma-ray burst fireballs, the dominant processes are purely leptonic, and thus the baryon loading of the fireball does not affect our conclusions.

  12. Study of Active Shielding for {gamma} - Spectrometers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bikit, I.; Mrdja, D.; Forkapic, S.; Todorovic, N.; Veskovic, M.; Slivka, J.; Conkic, Lj.; Krmar, M.; Varga, E. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, University of Novi Sad, Trg Dositeja Obradovica 4, 21 000 Novi Sad (Serbia and Montenegro)

    2006-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The features of the ground located gamma ray spectrometer shielded passively with 12 cm of lead and actively by five 0.5m x 0.5m x 0.05m plastic veto shields are described. The detector mass related background was 0.345 C/kg s. The 511 keV annihilation line was reduced by the factor of 7 by the anticoincidence gate. It is shown that the plastic shields increase the neutron capture gamma line intensities due to neutron thermalization.

  13. Status of the Milagro $\\gamma$ Ray Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atkins, R; Berley, D; Chen, M L; Coyne, D G; Delay, R S; Dingus, B L; Dorfan, D E; Ellsworth, R W; Evans, D; Falcone, A D; Fleysher, L; Fleysher, R; Gisler, G; Goodman, J A; Haines, T J; Hoffman, C M; Hugenberger, S; Kelley, L A; Leonor, I; Macri, J R; McConnell, M; McCullough, J F; McEnery, J E; Miller, R S; Mincer, A I; Morales, M F; Némethy, P; Ryan, J M; Schneider, M; Shen, B; Shoup, A L; Sinnis, G; Smith, A J; Sullivan, G W; Thompson, T N; Tümer, T O; Wang, K; Wascko, M O; Westerhoff, S; Williams, D A; Yang, T; Yodh, G B

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Milagro Gamma Ray Observatory is the world's first large-area water Cherenkov detector capable of continuously monitoring the sky at TeV energies. Located in northern New Mexico, Milagro will perform an all sky survey of the Northern Hemisphere at energies between ~250 GeV and 50 TeV. With a high duty cycle, large detector area (~5000 square meters), and a wide field-of-view (~1 sr), Milagro is uniquely capable of searching for transient and DC sources of high-energy gamma-ray emission. Milagro has been operating since February, 1999. The current status of the Milagro Observatory and initial results will be discussed.

  14. Gamma-Ray Bursts: Jets and Energetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. A. Frail

    2003-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The relativistic outflows from gamma-ray bursts are now thought to be narrowly collimated into jets. After correcting for this jet geometry there is a remarkable constancy of both the energy radiated by the burst and the kinetic energy carried by the outflow. Gamma-ray bursts are still the most luminous explosions in the Universe, but they release energies that are comparable to supernovae. The diversity of cosmic explosions appears to be governed by the fraction of energy that is coupled to ultra-relativistic ejecta.

  15. Status of the Milagro Gamma Ray Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Atkins; W. Benbow; D. Berley; M. -L. Chen; D. G. Coyne; R. S. Delay; B. L. Dingus; D. E. Dorfan; R. W. Ellsworth; D. Evans; A. Falcone; L. Fleysher; R. Fleysher; G. Gisler; J. A. Goodman; T. J. Haines; C. M. Hoffman; S. Hugenberger; L. A. Kelley; I. Leonor; J. Macri; M. McConnell; J. F. McCullough; J. E. McEnery; R. S. Miller; A. I. Mincer; M. F. Morales; P. Nemethy; J. M. Ryan; M. Schneider; B. Shen; A. Shoup; G. Sinnis; A. J. Smith; G. W. Sullivan; T. N. Thompson; O. T. Tumer; K. Wang; M. O. Wascko; S. Westerhoff; D. A. Williams; T. Yang; G. B. Yodh

    1999-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The Milagro Gamma Ray Observatory is the world's first large-area water Cherenkov detector capable of continuously monitoring the sky at TeV energies. Located in northern New Mexico, Milagro will perform an all sky survey of the Northern Hemisphere at energies between ~250 GeV and 50 TeV. With a high duty cycle, large detector area (~5000 square meters), and a wide field-of-view (~1 sr), Milagro is uniquely capable of searching for transient and DC sources of high-energy gamma-ray emission. Milagro has been operating since February, 1999. The current status of the Milagro Observatory and initial results will be discussed.

  16. A supersymmetric model of gamma ray bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Clavelli; G. Karatheodoris

    2005-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a model for gamma ray bursts in which a star subject to a high level of fermion degeneracy undergoes a phase transition to a supersymmetric state. The burst is initiated by the transition of fermion pairs to sfermion pairs which, uninhibited by the Pauli exclusion principle, can drop to the ground state of minimum momentum through photon emission. The jet structure is attributed to the Bose statistics of sfermions whereby subsequent sfermion pairs are preferentially emitted into the same state (sfermion amplification by stimulated emission). Bremsstrahlung gamma rays tend to preserve the directional information of the sfermion momenta and are themselves enhanced by stimulated emission.

  17. Redshift indicators for gamma-ray bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J-L. Atteia

    2005-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The measure of the distances and luminosities of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) led to the discovery that many GRB properties are strongly correlated with their intrinsic luminosity, leading to the construction of reliable luminosity indicators. These GRB luminosity indicators have quickly found applications, like the construction of 'pseudo-redshifts', or the measure of luminosity distances, which can be computed independently of the measure of the redshift. In this contribution I discuss various issues connected with the construction of luminosity-redshift indicators for gamma-ray bursts.

  18. Ultrahigh Energy Cosmic Rays and Prompt TeV Gamma Rays from Gamma Ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pijushpani Bhattacharjee; Nayantara Gupta

    2003-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) have been proposed as one {\\it possible} class of sources of the Ultrahigh Energy Cosmic Ray (UHECR) events observed up to energies $\\gsim10^{20}\\ev$. The synchrotron radiation of the highest energy protons accelerated within the GRB source should produce gamma rays up to TeV energies. Here we briefly discuss the implications on the energetics of the GRB from the point of view of the detectability of the prompt TeV gamma rays of proton-synchrotron origin in GRBs in the up-coming ICECUBE muon detector in the south pole.

  19. Multi-parameter on-line coal bulk analysis. Technical progress report, March 16, 1995--June 15, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research continued on multi-parameter on-line coal bulk analysis. The thermal neutron flux distribution in coal and free air for two types of neutron sources was performed. The MCNP code was used to calculate the gamma ray response function and to determine the thermal neutron flux in coal when a lead collimator was used and when paraffin blocks were placed in front of the sample. The identification of chlorine in coal is discussed along with the analysis of the gamma spectra.

  20. Spinar Paradigm and Gamma Ray Bursts Central Engine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Lipunov; E. Gorbovskoy

    2007-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A spinar is a quasi-equilibrium collapsing object whose equilibrium is maintained by the balance of centrifugal and gravitational forces and whose evolution is determined by its magnetic field. The spinar quasi equilibrium model recently discussed as the course for extralong X-ray plateu in GRB (Lipunov & Gorbovskoy, 2007). We propose a simple non stationary three-parameter collapse model with the determining role of rotation and magnetic field in this paper. The input parameters of the theory are the mass, angular momentum, and magnetic field of the collapsar. The model includes approximate description of the following effects: centrifugal force, relativistic effects of the Kerr metrics, pressure of nuclear matter, dissipation of angular momentum due to magnetic field, decrease of the dipole magnetic moment due to compression and general-relativity effects (the black hole has no hare), neutrino cooling, time dilatation, and gravitational redshift. The model describes the temporal behavior of the central engine and demonstrates the qualitative variety of the types of such behavior in nature. We apply our approach to explain the observed features of gamma-ray bursts of all types. In particular, the model allows the phenomena of precursors, x-ray and optical bursts, and the appearance of a plateau on time scales of several thousand seconds to be unified.

  1. accrued complex gamma: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sie, da? g p n Gamma Grassl, Markus 8 A Complexity-Brightness Correlation in Gamma Ray Bursts Astrophysics (arXiv) Summary: We observe strong correlations between the...

  2. Measurements of the CKM Angle Gamma at BaBar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Latour, Emmanuel; /Ecole Polytechnique

    2007-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a short review of the measurements of the CKM angle {gamma} performed by the BABAR experiment. We focus on methods using charged B decays, which give a direct access to {gamma} and provide the best constraints so far.

  3. PoGOLite -The Polarised Gamma-ray Observer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haviland, David

    PoGOLite - The Polarised Gamma-ray Observer CECILIA MARINI BETTOLO Licentiate Thesis Stockholm, Sweden 2008 #12;#12;Licentiate Thesis PoGOLite - The Polarised Gamma-ray Observer Cecilia Marini Bettolo

  4. Active Detection and Imaging of Nuclear Materials with High-Brightness Gamma Rays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barty, C J; Gibson, D J; Albert, F; Anderson, S G; Anderson, G G; Betts, S M; Berry, R D; Fisher, S E; Hagmann, C A; Johnson, M S; Messerly, M J; Phan, H H; Semenov, V A; Shverdin, M Y; Tremaine, A M; Hartemann, F V; Siders, C W; McNabb, D P

    2009-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A Compton scattering {gamma}-ray source, capable of producing photons with energies ranging from 0.1 MeV to 0.9 MeV has been commissioned and characterized, and then used to perform nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) experiments. The performances of the two laser systems (one for electron production, one for scattering), the electron photoinjector, and the linear accelerator are also detailed, and {gamma}-ray results are presented. The key source parameters are the size (0.01 mm{sup 2}), horizontal and vertical divergence (6 x 10 mrad{sup 2}), duration (10 ps), spectrum and intensity (10{sup 5} photons/shot). These parameters are summarized by the peak brightness, 1.5 x 10{sup 15} photons/mm{sup 2}/mrad{sup 2}/s/0.1% bandwidth, measured at 478 keV. Additional measurements of the flux as a function of the timing difference between the drive laser pulse and the relativistic photo-electron bunch, {gamma}-ray beam profile, and background evaluations are presented. These results are systematically compared to theoretical models and computer simulations. NRF measurements performed on {sup 7}Li in LiH demonstrate the potential of Compton scattering photon sources to accurately detect isotopes in situ.

  5. Coincidence searches of gravitational waves and short gamma-ray bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrea Maselli; Valeria Ferrari

    2014-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Black-hole neutron-star coalescing binaries have been invoked as one of the most suitable scenario to explain the emission of short gamma-ray bursts. Indeed, if the black-hole which forms after the merger, is surrounded by a massive disk, neutrino annihilation processes may produce high-energy and collimated electromagnetic radiation. In this paper, we devise a new procedure, to be used in the search for gravitational waves from black-hole-neutron-star binaries, to assign a probability that a detected gravitational signal is associated to the formation of an accreting disk, massive enough to power gamma-ray bursts. This method is based on two recently proposed semi-analytic fits, one reproducing the mass of the remnant disk surrounding the black hole as a function of some binary parameters, the second relating the neutron star compactness, with its tidal deformability. Our approach can be used in low-latency data analysis to restrict the parameter space searching for gravitational signals associated with short gamma-ray bursts, and to gain information on the dynamics of the coalescing system and on the neutron star equation of state.

  6. TEMPORAL DECONVOLUTION STUDY OF LONG AND SHORT GAMMA-RAY BURST LIGHT CURVES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhat, P. N.; Briggs, Michael S.; Connaughton, Valerie; Paciesas, William; Burgess, Michael; Chaplin, Vandiver; Goldstein, Adam; Guiriec, Sylvain [Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomic Research (CSPAR), University of Alabama in Huntsville, NSSTC, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Fishman, Gerald [Space Science Office, VP62, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Van der Horst, Alexander J.; Meegan, Charles A. [Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomic Research (CSPAR), Universities Space Research Association, NSSTC, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Bissaldi, Elisabetta [Institute of Astro and Particle Physics, University of Innsbruck, Technikerstr. 25, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Diehl, Roland; Foley, Suzanne; Greiner, Jochen; Gruber, David [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse 1, 85748 Garching (Germany); Fitzpatrick, Gerard [School of Physics, University College Dublin, Belfield, Stillorgan Road, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Gibby, Melissa; Giles, Misty M. [Jacobs Technology, Inc., Huntsville, AL 35806 (United States); and others

    2012-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The light curves of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are believed to result from internal shocks reflecting the activity of the GRB central engine. Their temporal deconvolution can reveal potential differences in the properties of the central engines in the two populations of GRBs which are believed to originate from the deaths of massive stars (long) and from mergers of compact objects (short). We present here the results of the temporal analysis of 42 GRBs detected with the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor onboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. We deconvolved the profiles into pulses, which we fit with lognormal functions. The distributions of the pulse shape parameters and intervals between neighboring pulses are distinct for both burst types and also fit with lognormal functions. We have studied the evolution of these parameters in different energy bands and found that they differ between long and short bursts. We discuss the implications of the differences in the temporal properties of long and short bursts within the framework of the internal shock model for GRB prompt emission.

  7. Mechanism of the efficient quenching of tryptophan fluorescence in human gamma crystallin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Jiejin, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Quenching of the fluorescence of buried tryptophans (Trps) is an important reporter of protein conformation. Human [gamma]D-crystallin (H[gamma]D-Crys) and human [gamma]S-crystallin (H[gamma]S-Crys) are both very stable ...

  8. High Efficiency of Gamma-Ray Bursts Revisited

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. C. Zou A; Z. G. Dai B

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    efficiency of gamma-ray bursts by assuming that the ejecta from the central engine are equally massive and

  9. X-Ray Spectral Parameters for a Sample of 95 Active Galactic Nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vasylenko, A; Fedorova, E

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a broadband X-ray analysis of a new homogeneous sample of 95 active galactic nuclei (AGN) from the 22-month Swift/BAT all-sky survey. For this sample we treated jointly the X-ray spectra observed by XMM-Newton and INTEGRAL missions for the total spectral range of 0.5-250 keV. Photon index \\Gamma, relative reflection R, equivalent width of Fe $K_{\\alpha}$ line (EW Fe $K_{\\alpha}$), hydrogen column density $N_{H}$, exponential cut-off energy $E_{c}$ and intrinsic luminosity $L_{corr}$ are determined for all objects of the sample. We investigated correlations \\Gamma - R, EW Fe $K_{\\alpha}$ - $L_{corr}$, \\Gamma - $E_{c}$, EW Fe $K_{\\alpha}$ - $N_{H}$. Dependence \\Gamma - R for Seyfert 1 and 2 type of galaxies has been investigated separately. We found that the relative reflection parameter at low power-law indexes for Seyfert 2 galaxies is systematically higher than for Seyfert 1 ones. This can be related to an increasing contribution of the reflected radiation from the gas-dust torus. Our data show th...

  10. Beta and gamma decays April 9, 2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landstreet, John D.

    Beta and gamma decays April 9, 2002 1 Simple Fermi theory of beta decay ² Beta decay is one by the emission of a positive or negative beta particle (positron or electron). To ensure conservation of lepton emitted in beta decay is a continuum of energies, up to a maximum value, with most emitted betas having

  11. Laser Electron Gamma Source. Biennial progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sandorfi, A.M. [ed.; Caracappa, A.; Kuczewski, A.; Kistner, O.C.; Lincoln, F.; Miceli, L.; Thorn, C.E. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Hoblit, S. [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States). Dept. of Physics; Khandaker, M. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)]|[Virginia Polytechnic Institute & State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The LEGS facility provides intense, polarized, monochromatic {gamma}-ray beams by Compton backscattering laser light from relativistic electrons circulating in the X-Ray storage ring of the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. With the start of ring operations at 2.8 GeV, LEGS {gamma}-ray energies now extend to 370 MeV. Considerable progress has been made in the development of a new laser system that will increase the beam energies to 470 MeV, and this system is expected to come into operation before the next biennial report. The total flux is administratively held at 6 {times} 10{sup 6} s{sup {minus}1}. The {gamma}-ray energy is determined, with a resolution of 5.5 MeV, by detecting the scattering electrons in a magnetic spectrometer. This spectrometer can `tag` all {gamma}-rays with energies from 185 MeV up to the Compton edge. The beam spot size at the target position is 8 mm (V) {times} 18 mm (H), FWHM. For a single laser wavelength, the linear polarization of the beam is 98% at the Compton edge and decreases to 50% at about 1/2 the energy of the edge. By choosing the laser wavelengths appropriately the polarization can be maintained above 85% throughout the tagging range. During the last two years, experimental running at LEGS occupied an average of 3000 hours annually. Highlights of some of the programs are discussed below.

  12. Current segmented gamma-ray scanner technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bjork, C.W.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new generation of segmented gamma-ray scanners has been developed at Los Alamos for scrap and waste measurements at the Savannah River Plant and the Los Alamos Plutonium Facility. The new designs are highly automated and exhibit special features such as good segmentation and thorough shielding to improve performance.

  13. Gamma-ray bursts: a Centauro's cry?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Z. K. Silagadze

    2003-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A new candidate for the gamma-ray bursts central engine is proposed: if in some energetic cosmic event a macroscopic amount of bubbles of the disoriented chiral condensate can be formed, then their subsequent decays will produce a relativistic fireball without the baryon loading problem. The neutron star to strange star transition is considered as a candidate example of such cosmic event.

  14. Gamma Ray Imaging for Environmental Remediation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B.F. Philips; R.A. Kroeger: J.D. Kurfess: W.N. Johnson; E.A. Wulf; E. I. Novikova

    2004-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This program is the development of germanium strip detectors for environmental remediation. It is a collaboration between the Naval Research Laboratory and Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. The goal is to develop detectors that are simultaneously capable of excellent spectroscopy and imaging of gamma radiation.

  15. Delayed Nickel Decay in Gamma Ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. C. McLaughlin; R. A. M. J. Wijers

    2002-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently observed emission lines in the X-ray afterglow of gamma ray bursts suggest that iron group elements are either produced in the gamma ray burst, or are present nearby. If this material is the product of a thermonuclear burn, then such material would be expected to be rich in Nickel-56. If the nickel remains partially ionized, this prevents the electron capture reaction normally associated with the decay of Nickel-56, dramatically increasing the decay timescale. Here we examine the consequences of rapid ejection of a fraction of a solar mass of iron group material from the center of a collapsar/hypernova. The exact rate of decay then depends on the details of the ionization and therefore the ejection process. Future observations of iron, nickel and cobalt lines can be used to diagnose the origin of these elements and to better understand the astrophysical site of gamma ray bursts. In this model, the X-ray lines of these iron-group elements could be detected in suspected hypernovae that did not produce an observable gamma ray burst due to beaming.

  16. A supersymmetric origin of gamma ray bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Clavelli

    2004-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Bright bursts of gamma rays from outer space have been puzzling Astronomers for more than thirty years and there is still no conceptually complete model for the phenomenon within the standard model of particle physics. Is it time to consider a supersymmetric (SUSY) origin for these bursts to add to the astronomical indications of supersymmetry from dark matter?

  17. Neutrino Balls and Gamma-Ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Holdom; R. A. Malaney

    1993-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a mechanism by which the neutrino emission from a supernova-type explosion can be converted into a gamma-ray burst of total energy $\\sim 10^{50}$ ergs. This occurs naturally if the explosion is situated inside a ball of trapped neutrinos, which in turn may lie at a galactic core. There are possible unique signatures of this scenario.

  18. High redshift Gamma-Ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salvaterra, R

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ten years of operations of the Swift satellite have allow us to collect a small sample of long Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) at redshift larger than six. I will review here the present status of this research field and discuss the possible use of GRBs as a fundamental new tool to explore the early Universe, complementary to quasar and galaxy surveys.

  19. \\Gamma \\Gamma \\Gamma \\Gamma \\Gamma \\Gamma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mannheim, Universität

    Zachmann y \\Lambda RWTH Aachen y Universit¨ at Karlsruhe Lehrstuhl f¨ ur Informatik III Fakult¨ at f¨ ur

  20. Corrected Table for the Parametric Coefficients for the Optical Depth of the Universe to Gamma-rays at Various Redshifts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. W. Stecker; M. A. Malkan; S. T. Scully

    2007-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Table 1 in our paper, ApJ 648, 774 (2006) entitled "Intergalactic Photon Spectra from the Far IR to the UV Lyman Limit for 0 Optical Depth of the Universe to High Energy Gamma-Rays" had erroneous numbers for the coefficients fitting the parametric form for the optical depth of the universe to gamma-rays. The correct values for these parameters as described in the original text are given here in a corrected table for various redshifts for the baseline model (upper row) and fast evolution (lower row) for each individual redshift. The parametric approximation is good for optical depths between 0.01 and 100 and for gamma-ray energies up to ~2 TeV for all redshifts but also for energies up to ~10 TeV for redshifts less than 1.

  1. Effective atomic numbers of blue topaz at different gamma-rays energies obtained from Compton scattering technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tuschareon, S., E-mail: tuscharoen@hotmail.com; Limkitjaroenporn, P., E-mail: tuscharoen@hotmail.com; Kaewkhao, J., E-mail: tuscharoen@hotmail.com [Center of Excellence in Glass Technology and Materials Science (CEGM), Nakhon Pathom Rajabhat University, Nakhon Pathom, 73000, Thailand and Science Program, Faculty of Science and Technology, Nakhon Pathom Rajabhat University, Nakhon Pathom, 73000 (Thailand)

    2014-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Topaz occurs in a wide range of colors, including yellow, orange, brown, pink-to-violet and blue. All of these color differences are due to color centers. In order to improve the color of natural colorless topaz, the most commonly used is irradiated with x- or gamma-rays, indicated that attenuation parameters is important to enhancements by irradiation. In this work, the mass attenuation coefficients of blue topaz were measured at the different energy of ?-rays using the Compton scattering technique. The results show that, the experimental values of mass attenuation coefficient are in good agreement with the theoretical values. The mass attenuation coefficients increase with the decrease in gamma rays energies. This may be attributed to the higher photon interaction probability of blue topaz at lower energy. This result is a first report of mass attenuation coefficient of blue topaz at different gamma rays energies.

  2. Gamma-Ray Bursts, Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays, and Cosmic Gamma-Ray Background

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomonori Totani

    1999-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We argue that gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) may be the origin of the cosmic gamma-ray background radiation observed in GeV range. It has theoretically been discussed that protons may carry a much larger amount of energy than electrons in GRBs, and this large energy can be radiated in TeV range by synchrotron radiation of ultra-high-energy protons (\\sim 10^{20} eV). The possible detection of GRBs above 10 TeV suggested by the Tibet and HEGRA groups also supports this idea. If this is the case, most of TeV gamma-rays from GRBs are absorbed in intergalactic fields and eventually form GeV gamma-ray background, whose flux is in good agreement with the recent observation.

  3. CONSTRAINTS ON THE SYNCHROTRON EMISSION MECHANISM IN GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beniamini, Paz; Piran, Tsvi, E-mail: paz.beniamini@mail.huji.ac.il, E-mail: tsvi.piran@mail.huji.ac.il [Racah Institute for Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel)

    2013-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We reexamine the general synchrotron model for gamma-ray bursts' (GRBs') prompt emission and determine the regime in the parameter phase space in which it is viable. We characterize a typical GRB pulse in terms of its peak energy, peak flux, and duration and use the latest Fermi observations to constrain the high-energy part of the spectrum. We solve for the intrinsic parameters at the emission region and find the possible parameter phase space for synchrotron emission. Our approach is general and it does not depend on a specific energy dissipation mechanism. Reasonable synchrotron solutions are found with energy ratios of 10{sup -4} < {epsilon}{sub B}/{epsilon}{sub e} < 10, bulk Lorentz factor values of 300 < {Gamma} < 3000, typical electrons' Lorentz factor values of 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 3} < {gamma}{sub e} < 10{sup 5}, and emission radii of the order 10{sup 15} cm < R < 10{sup 17} cm. Most remarkable among those are the rather large values of the emission radius and the electron's Lorentz factor. We find that soft (with peak energy less than 100 keV) but luminous (isotropic luminosity of 1.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 53}) pulses are inefficient. This may explain the lack of strong soft bursts. In cases when most of the energy is carried out by the kinetic energy of the flow, such as in the internal shocks, the synchrotron solution requires that only a small fraction of the electrons are accelerated to relativistic velocities by the shocks. We show that future observations of very high energy photons from GRBs by CTA could possibly determine all parameters of the synchrotron model or rule it out altogether.

  4. Measuring neutrino oscillation parameters using $\

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Backhouse, Christopher James; /Oxford U.

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MINOS is a long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment. It consists of two large steel-scintillator tracking calorimeters. The near detector is situated at Fermilab, close to the production point of the NuMI muon-neutrino beam. The far detector is 735 km away, 716m underground in the Soudan mine, Northern Minnesota. The primary purpose of the MINOS experiment is to make precise measurements of the 'atmospheric' neutrino oscillation parameters ({Delta}m{sub atm}{sup 2} and sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub atm}). The oscillation signal consists of an energy-dependent deficit of {nu}{sub {mu}} interactions in the far detector. The near detector is used to characterize the properties of the beam before oscillations develop. The two-detector design allows many potential sources of systematic error in the far detector to be mitigated by the near detector observations. This thesis describes the details of the {nu}{sub {mu}}-disappearance analysis, and presents a new technique to estimate the hadronic energy of neutrino interactions. This estimator achieves a significant improvement in the energy resolution of the neutrino spectrum, and in the sensitivity of the neutrino oscillation fit. The systematic uncertainty on the hadronic energy scale was re-evaluated and found to be comparable to that of the energy estimator previously in use. The best-fit oscillation parameters of the {nu}{sub {mu}}-disappearance analysis, incorporating this new estimator were: {Delta}m{sup 2} = 2.32{sub -0.08}{sup +0.12} x 10{sup -3} eV{sup 2}, sin {sup 2} 2{theta} > 0.90 (90% C.L.). A similar analysis, using data from a period of running where the NuMI beam was operated in a configuration producing a predominantly {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} beam, yielded somewhat different best-fit parameters {Delta}{bar m}{sup 2} = (3.36{sub -0.40}{sup +0.46}(stat.) {+-} 0.06(syst.)) x 10{sup -3}eV{sup 2}, sin{sup 2} 2{bar {theta}} = 0.86{sub -0.12}{sup _0.11}(stat.) {+-} 0.01(syst.). The tension between these results is intriguing, and additional antineutrino data is currently being taken in order to further investigate this apparent discrepancy.

  5. Gamma-ray Sky Observed with Fermi Large Area Telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yamamoto, Hirosuke

    detection reported Flare activity reported via ATel Gamma Ray Bursts reported via GCN Giant MC imageGamma-ray Sky Observed with Fermi Large Area Telescope RESCEU Symposium on Astroparticle Physics) Measure the photon direction Identification of the gamma-ray shower 36 planes of Si strip detectors (228 m

  6. The Biggest Bangs The Mystery of Gamma-Ray Bursts,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katz, Jonathan I.

    The Biggest Bangs The Mystery of Gamma-Ray Bursts, The Most Violent Explosions in The Universe J. I. Did a Gamma-Ray Burst Kill the Dinosaurs? Will a Burst Kill Us? #15; Glossary #15; Sources #15; Index. On January 23, 1999, one of these four cameras recorded visible light from a gamma-ray burst

  7. The Biggest Bangs The Mystery of Gamma-Ray Bursts,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katz, Jonathan I.

    The Biggest Bangs The Mystery of Gamma-Ray Bursts, The Most Violent Explosions in The Universe J. I a Gamma-Ray Burst Kill the Dinosaurs? Will a Burst Kill Us? · Glossary · Sources · Index viii #12;Chapter of these four cameras recorded visible light from a gamma-ray burst as it was happening, which had been the holy

  8. Gamma-Ray Bursts Nuclear Test Ban Treaty, 1963

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harrison, Thomas

    Lecture 18 Gamma-Ray Bursts #12;Nuclear Test Ban Treaty, 1963 First Vela satellite pair launched and their predecessors, Vela 4, discovered the first gamma-ray bursts. The discovery was announced by Klebesadel, Strong, and Olson (ApJ, 182, 85) in 1973. #12;First Gamma-Ray Burst The Vela 5 satellites functioned from July, 1969

  9. Exclusive Measurements of the b to s gamma Transition Rate and Photon Energy Spectrum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Palano, A.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; /Bergen U.; Brown, David Nathan; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; /Ruhr U., Bochum; Asgeirsson, D.J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T.S.; McKenna, J.A.; /British Columbia U.; Khan, A.; /Brunel U.; Blinov, V.E.; Buzykaev, A.R.; /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Harvey Mudd Coll. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U., Comp. Sci. Dept. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U.; /more authors..

    2012-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We use 429 fb{sup -1} of e{sup +}e{sup -} collision data collected at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector to measure the radiative transition rate of b {yields} s{gamma} with a sum of 38 exclusive final states. The inclusive branching fraction with a minimum photon energy of 1.9 GeV is found to be {Beta}({bar B} {yields} Xs{gamma}) = (3.29 {+-} 0.19 {+-} 0.48) x 10{sup -4} where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. We also measure the first and second moments of the photon energy spectrum and extract the best fit values for the heavy-quark parameters, m{sub b} and {mu}{sub {pi}}{sup 2}, in the kinetic and shape function models.

  10. X(3): An exactly separable {gamma}-rigid version of the X(5) critical point symmetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonatsos, D., E-mail: bonat@inp.demokritos.gr; Lenis, D., E-mail: lenis@inp.demokritos.gr; Petrellis, D. [N.C.S.R., Institute of Nuclear Physics (Greece)], E-mail: petrellis@inp.demokritos.gr; Yigitoglu, I. [Istanbul University, Hasan Ali Yucel Faculty of Education (Turkey)], E-mail: yigitoglu@istanbul.edu.tr

    2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A {gamma}-rigid version (with {gamma} = 0) of the X(5) critical point symmetry is constructed. The model, to be called X(3) since it is proved to contain three degrees of freedom, utilizes an infinite well potential, is based on exact separation of variables, and leads to parameter-free (up to overall scale factors) predictions for spectra and B(E2) transition rates which are in good agreement with existing experimental data for {sup 172}Os and {sup 186}Pt. An unexpected similarity of the {beta}{sub 1} bands of the X(5) nuclei {sup 150}Nd, {sup 152}Sm, {sup 154}Gd, and {sup 156}Dy to the X(3) predictions is observed.

  11. Exclusive Measurements of b -> s gamma Transition Rate and Photon Energy Spectrum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The BABAR Collaboration

    2012-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We use 429 fb$^{-1}$ of $e^+e^-$ collision data collected at the $\\Upsilon(4S)$ resonance with the BABAR detector to measure the radiative transition rate of $b\\rightarrow s\\gamma$ with a sum of 38 exclusive final states. The inclusive branching fraction with a minimum photon energy of 1.9 GeV is found to be $\\mathcal{B}(\\bar B \\rightarrow X_{s}\\gamma)=(3.29\\pm 0.19\\pm 0.48)\\times 10^{-4}$ where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. We also measure the first and second moments of the photon energy spectrum and extract the best fit values for the heavy-quark parameters, $m_{b}$ and $\\mu_{\\pi}^{2}$, in the kinetic and shape function models.

  12. Magnetic Field and Flavor Effects on the Gamma-Ray Burst Neutrino Flux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Philipp Baerwald; Svenja Hümmer; Walter Winter

    2011-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We reanalyze the prompt muon neutrino flux from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), at the example of the often used reference Waxman-Bahcall GRB flux, in terms of the particle physics involved. We first reproduce this reference flux treating synchrotron energy losses of the secondary pions explicitly. Then we include additional neutrino production modes, the neutrinos from muon decays, the magnetic field effects on all secondary species, and flavor mixing with the current parameter uncertainties. We demonstrate that the combination of these effects modifies the shape of the original Waxman-Bahcall GRB flux significantly, and changes the normalization by a factor of three to four. As a consequence, the gamma-ray burst search strategy of neutrino telescopes may be based on the wrong flux shape, and the constraints derived for the GRB neutrino flux, such as the baryonic loading, may in fact be already much stronger than anticipated.

  13. Improved methods for detecting gravitational waves associated with short gamma-ray bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williamson, A R; Fairhurst, S; Harry, I W; Macdonald, E; Macleod, D; Predoi, V

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the era of second generation ground-based gravitational wave detectors, short gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) will be among the most promising astrophysical events for joint electromagnetic and gravitational wave observation. A targeted search for gravitational wave compact binary merger signals in coincidence with short GRBs was developed and used to analyze data from the first generation LIGO and Virgo instruments. In this paper, we present improvements to this search that enhance our ability to detect gravitational wave counterparts to short GRBs. Specifically, we introduce an improved method for estimating the gravitational wave background to obtain the event significance required to make detections; implement a method of tiling extended sky regions, as required when searching for signals associated to poorly localized GRBs from Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor or the InterPlanetary Network; and incorporate astrophysical knowledge about the beaming of GRB emission to restrict the search parameter space. We descri...

  14. Identification and elimination of anomalous thermal decay in gamma-ray microcalorimeters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horansky, Robert D.; Bennett, Douglas A.; Schmidt, Daniel R.; Ullom, Joel N. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, 325 Broadway MS 686.02, Boulder, Colorado 80305 (United States)] [National Institute of Standards and Technology, 325 Broadway MS 686.02, Boulder, Colorado 80305 (United States); Zink, Barry L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Denver, Denver, Colorado 80208 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Denver, Denver, Colorado 80208 (United States)

    2013-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Microcalorimeter detectors rely on superconducting components and cryogenic temperatures to provide over an order-of-magnitude improvement in energy resolution compared to semiconducting sensors. Resolution improvements impact fields from gamma-ray astrophysics to nuclear safeguards. The temporal response of these detectors has been much slower than predicted from the known device parameters. This discrepancy has been attributed to the dynamics of quasiparticles and phonons in the bulk absorber used for absorbing photons. We will show that long-lived states in the glue used for absorber attachment have been the dominant cause of the slow response. Also, we have fabricated microcalorimeters using metal-to-metal diffusion bonding to attach the absorber. These detectors show a significant improvement in their recovery after gamma-ray events and will now enable study of the internal scattering dynamics of the bulk absorber.

  15. MAGNETICALLY AND BARYONICALLY DOMINATED PHOTOSPHERIC GAMMA-RAY BURST MODEL FITS TO FERMI-LAT OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veres, Peter; Meszaros, Peter [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Department of Physics, and Center for Particle and Gravitational Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, 525 Davey Lab, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)] [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Department of Physics, and Center for Particle and Gravitational Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, 525 Davey Lab, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Zhang, Bin-Bin, E-mail: veresp@psu.edu [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, 525 Davey Lab, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)] [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, 525 Davey Lab, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2013-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider gamma-ray burst models where the radiation is dominated by a photospheric region providing the MeV Band spectrum, and an external shock region responsible for the GeV radiation via inverse Compton scattering. We parameterize the initial dynamics through an acceleration law {Gamma}{proportional_to}r {sup {mu}}, with {mu} between 1/3 and 1 to represent the range between an extreme magnetically dominated and a baryonically dominated regime, depending also on the magnetic field configuration. We compare these models to several bright Fermi-LAT bursts, and show that both the time-integrated and the time-resolved spectra, where available, can be well described by these models. We discuss the parameters which result from these fits, and discuss the relative merits and shortcomings of the two models.

  16. MilagroA TeV Observatory for Gamma Ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    Milagro­A TeV Observatory for Gamma Ray Bursts B.L. Dingus and the Milagro Collaboration Los energy gamma-rays from gamma-ray bursts. The highest energy gamma rays supply very strong constraints on the nature of gamma-ray burst sources as well as fundamental physics. Because the highest energy gamma-rays

  17. Imaging system for cardiac planar imaging using a dedicated dual-head gamma camera

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Majewski, Stanislaw (Morgantown, VA); Umeno, Marc M. (Woodinville, WA)

    2011-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A cardiac imaging system employing dual gamma imaging heads co-registered with one another to provide two dynamic simultaneous views of the heart sector of a patient torso. A first gamma imaging head is positioned in a first orientation with respect to the heart sector and a second gamma imaging head is positioned in a second orientation with respect to the heart sector. An adjustment arrangement is capable of adjusting the distance between the separate imaging heads and the angle between the heads. With the angle between the imaging heads set to 180 degrees and operating in a range of 140-159 keV and at a rate of up to 500kHz, the imaging heads are co-registered to produce simultaneous dynamic recording of two stereotactic views of the heart. The use of co-registered imaging heads maximizes the uniformity of detection sensitivity of blood flow in and around the heart over the whole heart volume and minimizes radiation absorption effects. A normalization/image fusion technique is implemented pixel-by-corresponding pixel to increase signal for any cardiac region viewed in two images obtained from the two opposed detector heads for the same time bin. The imaging system is capable of producing enhanced first pass studies, bloodpool studies including planar, gated and non-gated EKG studies, planar EKG perfusion studies, and planar hot spot imaging.

  18. On The Gamma-Ray Emission From Reticulum II and Other Dwarf Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hooper, Dan

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The recent discovery of ten new dwarf galaxy candidates by the Dark Energy Survey (DES) and the Panoramic Survey Telescope and Rapid Response System (Pan-STARRS) could increase the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope's sensitivity to annihilating dark matter particles, potentially enabling a definitive test of the dark matter interpretation of the long-standing Galactic Center gamma-ray excess. In this paper, we compare the previous analyses of Fermi data from the directions of the new dwarf candidates (including the relatively nearby Reticulum II) and perform our own analysis, with the goal of establishing the statistical significance of any gamma-ray signal from these sources. We confirm the presence of an excess from Reticulum II, with a spectral shape that is compatible with the Galactic Center signal. The significance of this emission is greater than that observed from 99.84% of randomly chosen high-latitude blank-sky locations, corresponding to a local detection significance of 3.2 sigma. We improve upon th...

  19. Generalized Macdonald polynomials, spectral duality for conformal blocks and AGT correspondence in five dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zenkevich, Yegor

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study five dimensional AGT correspondence by means of the q-deformed beta-ensemble technique. We provide a special basis of states in the q-deformed CFT Hilbert space consisting of generalized Macdonald polynomials, derive the loop equations for the beta-ensemble and obtain the factorization formulas for the corresponding matrix elements. We prove the spectral duality for Nekrasov functions and discuss its meaning for conformal blocks. We also clarify the relation between topological strings and q-Liouville vertex operators.

  20. Generalized Macdonald polynomials, spectral duality for conformal blocks and AGT correspondence in five dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yegor Zenkevich

    2014-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We study five dimensional AGT correspondence by means of the q-deformed beta-ensemble technique. We provide a special basis of states in the q-deformed CFT Hilbert space consisting of generalized Macdonald polynomials, derive the loop equations for the beta-ensemble and obtain the factorization formulas for the corresponding matrix elements. We prove the spectral duality for Nekrasov functions and discuss its meaning for conformal blocks. We also clarify the relation between topological strings and q-Liouville vertex operators.

  1. Shock Hugoniots of molecular liquids and the principle of corresponding states

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chisolm, Eric D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Crockett, Scott D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Shaw, Milton S [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We observe that the shock velocity-particle velocity Hugoniots for various liquids (e.g. nitrogen, oxygen, carbon dioxide, argon) lie almost on top of one another. Recalling the work of Ross and Ree [J. Chem. Phys. 73, 6146-6152 (1980)], we hypothesize that these materials obey a principle of corresponding states. We use the principle to deduce how the Hugoniots of two corresponding materials should be related, and we compare the results with data and find good agreement. We suggest this as a method for estimating the Hugoniot of a material of the appropriate type in the absence of shock data, and we illustrate with fluorine.

  2. Method for determining the octane rating of gasoline samples by observing corresponding acoustic resonances therein

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sinha, D.N.; Anthony, B.W.

    1997-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is described for determining the octane rating of gasoline samples by observing corresponding acoustic resonances therein. A direct correlation between the octane rating of gasoline and the frequency of corresponding acoustic resonances therein has been experimentally observed. Therefore, the octane rating of a gasoline sample can be directly determined through speed of sound measurements instead of by the cumbersome process of quantifying the knocking quality of the gasoline. Various receptacle geometries and construction materials may be employed. Moreover, it is anticipated that the measurements can be performed on flowing samples in pipes, thereby rendering the present method useful in refineries and distilleries. 3 figs.

  3. Method for determining the octane rating of gasoline samples by observing corresponding acoustic resonances therein

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sinha, Dipen N. (Los Alamos, NM); Anthony, Brian W. (Clearfield, PA)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for determining the octane rating of gasoline samples by observing corresponding acoustic resonances therein. A direct correlation between the octane rating of gasoline and the frequency of corresponding acoustic resonances therein has been experimentally observed. Therefore, the octane rating of a gasoline sample can be directly determined through speed of sound measurements instead of by the cumbersome process of quantifying the knocking quality of the gasoline. Various receptacle geometries and construction materials may be employed. Moreover, it is anticipated that the measurements can be performed on flowing samples in pipes, thereby rendering the present method useful in refineries and distilleries.

  4. Simulation and physical model based gamma-ray burst afterglow analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Eerten, Hendrik

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Advances in our numerical and theoretical understanding of gamma-ray burst afterglow processes allow us to construct models capable of dealing with complex relativistic jet dynamics and non-thermal emission, that can be compared directly to data from instruments such as Swift. Because afterglow blast waves and power law spectra are intrinsically scale-invariant under changes of explosion energy and medium density, templates can be generated from large-scale hydrodynamics simulations. This allows for iterative template-based model fitting using the physical model parameters (quantifying the properties of the burster, emission and observer) directly as fit variables. Here I review how such an approach to afterglow analysis works in practice, paying special attention to the underlying model assumptions, possibilities, caveats and limitations of this type of analysis. Because some model parameters can be degenerate in certain regions of parameter space, or unconstrained if data in a limited number of a bands is a...

  5. Observations of GRB 990123 by the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. S. Briggs; D. L. Band; R. M. Kippen; R. D. Preece; C. Kouveliotou; J. van Paradijs; G. H. Share; R. J. Murphy; S. M. Matz; A. Connors; C. Winkler; M. L. McConnell; J. M. Ryan; O. R. Williams; C. A. Young; B. Dingus; J. R. Catelli; R. A. M. J. Wijers

    1999-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    GRB 990123 was the first burst from which simultaneous optical, X-ray and gamma-ray emission was detected; its afterglow has been followed by an extensive set of radio, optical and X-ray observations. We have studied the gamma-ray burst itself as observed by the CGRO detectors. We find that gamma-ray fluxes are not correlated with the simultaneous optical observations, and the gamma-ray spectra cannot be extrapolated simply to the optical fluxes. The burst is well fit by the standard four-parameter GRB function, with the exception that excess emission compared to this function is observed below ~15 keV during some time intervals. The burst is characterized by the typical hard-to-soft and hardness-intensity correlation spectral evolution patterns. The energy of the peak of the nu f_nu spectrum, E_p, reaches an unusually high value during the first intensity spike, 1470 +/- 110 keV, and then falls to \\~300 keV during the tail of the burst. The high-energy spectrum above ~MeV is consistent with a power law with a photon index of about -3. By fluence, GRB 990123 is brighter than all but 0.4% of the GRBs observed with BATSE, clearly placing it on the -3/2 power-law portion of the intensity distribution. However, the redshift measured for the afterglow is inconsistent with the Euclidean interpretation of the -3/2 power-law. Using the redshift value of >= 1.61 and assuming isotropic emission, the gamma-ray fluence exceeds 10E54 ergs.

  6. On detecting oscillations of gamma rays into axion-like particles in turbulent and coherent magnetic fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manuel Meyer; Daniele Montanino; Jan Conrad

    2014-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Background radiation fields pervade the Universe, and above a certain energy any $\\gamma$-ray flux emitted by an extragalactic source should be attenuated due to $e^+e^-$ pair production. The opacity could be alleviated if photons oscillated into hypothetical axion-like particles (ALPs) in ambient magnetic fields, leading to a $\\gamma$-ray excess especially at high optical depths that could be detected with imaging air Cherenkov telescopes (IACTs). Here, we introduce a method to search for such a signal in $\\gamma$-ray data and to estimate sensitivities for future observations. Different magnetic fields close to the $\\gamma$-ray source are taken into account in which photons can convert into ALPs that then propagate unimpeded over cosmological distances until they re-convert in the magnetic field of the Milky Way. Specifically, we consider the coherent field at parsec scales in a blazar jet as well as the turbulent field inside a galaxy cluster. For the latter, we explicitly derive the transversal components of a magnetic field with gaussian turbulence which are responsible for the photon-ALP mixing. To illustrate the method, we apply it to a mock IACT array with characteristics similar to the Cherenkov Telescope Array and investigate the dependence of the sensitivity to detect a $\\gamma$-ray excess on the magnetic-field parameters.

  7. Four-point vector correlators and AdS/QCD correspondence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Konyushikhin, Maxim

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive the four-point vector correlators in QCD from AdS/QCD correspondence. It is shown that meson poles are correctly reproduced. The final expression also suggests a nonzero amplitude in the limit of zero virtuality of two longitudinal gluons. This fact does not mean that one can produce, absorb or scatter real longitudinal gluons.

  8. Corresponding author: TaeWon Seo E-mail: taewon.seo1@gmail.com

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Jongwon

    Corresponding author: TaeWon Seo E-mail: taewon.seo1@gmail.com Journal of Bionic Engineering 6 , TaeWon Seo2 , Byungwook Kim1 , Dongsu Jeon1 , Kyu-Jin Cho1 , Jongwon Kim1 1. School of Mechanical

  9. NATURE|Vol 437|20 October 2005 CORRESPONDENCE Don'tunderestimatethe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mousseau, Timothy A.

    NATURE|Vol 437|20 October 2005 CORRESPONDENCE 1089 Don'tunderestimatethe deathratefromChernobyl SIR -- Your News story "Chernobyl: poverty and stress pose `bigger threat' than radiation" (Nature 437, 181; 2005) suggests that the health and environmental effects of the Chernobyl accident were not as great

  10. Canadian Journal of Archaeology/Journal Canadien d'Archologie 37:4869 (2013) Corresponding author

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) Corresponding author: Université de Montréal, Anthropologie, C.P. 6128 Centre-Ville, Montréal, QC, Canada H3T 3J. This is due to significant discov- eries made at Atapuerca (at Gran Dolina and Sima de los Huesos) during

  11. Protein NMR Structures Refined with Rosetta Have Higher Accuracy Relative to Corresponding Xray Crystal Structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, David

    Protein NMR Structures Refined with Rosetta Have Higher Accuracy Relative to Corresponding Xray Information ABSTRACT: We have found that refinement of protein NMR structures using Rosetta with experimental in the PDB using standard refinement protocols. Using 40 pairs of NMR and X-ray crystal structures determined

  12. THE JACQUET-LANGLANDS CORRESPONDENCE FOR GL2 1. Local statement and examples 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Conrad, Brian

    THE JACQUET-LANGLANDS CORRESPONDENCE FOR GL2 Contents 1. Local statement and examples 1 2. Global X(F) = F Ă? FĂ? , viewed as the space of semisimple conjugacy classes in GL2(F) via GL2(F) XD/F mean reduced trace and norm. For regular semisimple GL2(F) and DĂ? , we write if they have

  13. Methods in comparative genomics: genome correspondence, gene identification and motif discovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kellis, Manolis

    1 Methods in comparative genomics: genome correspondence, gene identification and motif discovery@mit.edu, nickp@genome.wi.mit.edu, bwb@genome.wi.mit.edu, bab@mit.edu, lander@wi.mit.edu (1) MIT/Whitehead Institute Center for Genome Research, 320 Charles St., Cambridge MA 02139 (2) MIT Computer Science

  14. 368 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON FUZZY SYSTEMS, VOL. 7, NO. 3, JUNE 1999 Correspondence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuncheva, Ludmila I.

    to make and publish comparisons of models and their performance on common data sets and the pattern368 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON FUZZY SYSTEMS, VOL. 7, NO. 3, JUNE 1999 Correspondence Will the Real Iris models. On the other hand, there are certain risks too. Sometimes conclusions that are legitimate

  15. * Corresponding author. Solar Energy Materials & Solar Cells 58 (1999) 209}218

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Romeo, Alessandro

    * Corresponding author. Solar Energy Materials & Solar Cells 58 (1999) 209}218 A highly e solar cells based on the CdTe/CdS heterojunction still exhibits quite a few open problems$cient and stable CdTe/CdS thin "lm solar cell N. Romeo, A. Bosio, R. Tedeschi*, A. Romeo, V. Canevari Dipartimento

  16. N-fusion plan divides backers Toshiro Ikemura / Yomiuri Shimbun Correspondent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to make ITER a showpiece of international cooperation. Japan has played a leading role in nuclear fusionN-fusion plan divides backers Toshiro Ikemura / Yomiuri Shimbun Correspondent Japan and France, a technology proponents believe is the future of energy generation. France appears determined to prevail over

  17. corresponding author: jean-luc.maurice@polytechnique.edu DEVELOPING LOW-COST GRAPHENE DEVICES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    corresponding author: jean-luc.maurice@polytechnique.edu DEVELOPING LOW-COST GRAPHENE DEVICES C. S In spite of numerous efforts for developing the applications of graphene, it remains difficult to put-area (industrial) graphene includes in its structure and on its surfaces a significant density of defects that make

  18. *Correspondence address. Fermilab, MS 122 E 871, Batavia, IL 60510, USA. Fax: 16308403867.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fermilab Experiment E871

    *Correspondence address. Fermilab, MS 122 E 871, Batavia, IL 60510, USA. Fax: 1­630­840­3867. E, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA #Fermilab, Batavia, IL 60510, USA; accepted 29 April 2000 Abstract The data acquisition system of the HyperCP experiment at Fermilab recorded

  19. Impact of Private Tutoring on Learning Levels: Evidence from India Ambrish Dongre (Corresponding Author),

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bandyopadhyay, Antar

    Author), Fellow, Centre for Policy Research, Dharam Marg, Chanakyapuri, New Delhi ­ 110 021, India. Email, Centre for Policy Research, Dharam Marg, Chanakyapuri, New Delhi ­ 110 021, India. Email: vibhutewary1 Impact of Private Tutoring on Learning Levels: Evidence from India Ambrish Dongre (Corresponding

  20. Notes and Correspondence Are Tropical Cyclones Less Effectively Formed by Easterly Waves in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Tsing-Chang "Mike"

    tropical cyclones in the western North Pacific. By carefully separating easterly waves from the lowerNotes and Correspondence Are Tropical Cyclones Less Effectively Formed by Easterly Waves@iastate.edu #12;1 Abstract It has been observed that the percentage of tropical cyclones originating from easterly

  1. NOTES AND CORRESPONDENCE Surface Melting over Ice Shelves and Ice Sheets as Assessed from Modeled

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meissner, Katrin Juliane

    NOTES AND CORRESPONDENCE Surface Melting over Ice Shelves and Ice Sheets as Assessed from Modeled of ice shelves and their progenitor ice sheets. To explore the magnitude of surface melt occurring over) and most of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GIS) by the year 2500. Capping CO2 concentrations at present

  2. LASER TRANSFER DOPING USING AMORPHOUS SILICON Rafel Ferr (Correspondence author)1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LASER TRANSFER DOPING USING AMORPHOUS SILICON Rafel Ferré (Correspondence author)1 , Ralf Gogolin1@isfh.de ABSTRACT: We demonstrate and characterize "Laser Transfer Doping" (LTD) for producing locally doped regions. For this purpose we use nanosecond pulsed laser for transferring phosphorus doped amorphous silicon from a carrier

  3. Corresponding Author: Biotactic@hotmail.com Mobility of Riverine Smallmouth Bass Related to Tournament

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cooke, Steven J.

    of tournament fish originate. There are no available data on dis- persal of bass from tournament release areas1 1 Corresponding Author: Biotactic@hotmail.com Mobility of Riverine Smallmouth Bass Related.--Mobility of tournament-caught and released smallmouth bass Micropterus dolomieu was monitored in the Grand River, Ontario

  4. IIR Workshop on Refrigerant Charge Reduction in Refrigerating Systems Corresponding author: P. Leblay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    3rd IIR Workshop on Refrigerant Charge Reduction in Refrigerating Systems Corresponding author: P on the refrigerant side and louver fins on the air side. The flat tubes are grouped within a header, to use the heat exchangers with round tubes, such as charge reduction and higher heat transfer efficiency. But a reduced

  5. Exploring and quantifying the `co-variability' of the extremes corresponding to different climate components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miami, University of

    Exploring and quantifying the `co-variability' of the extremes corresponding to different climate to the fact that there might be moisture-temperature feedback that has further implications on the extremes. Having said, we aim to study how extreme precipitation and temperature co-vary and are determined

  6. Analysis of $f(R)$ Theory Corresponding to NADE and NHDE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Sharif; M. Zubair

    2013-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop the connection of $f(R)$ theory with new agegraphic and holographic dark energy models. The function $f(R)$ is reconstructed, regarding the $f(R)$ theory as an effective description for these dark energy models. We show the future evolution of $f$ and conclude that these functions represent distinct pictures of cosmological eras. The cosmological parameters such as equation of state parameter, deceleration parameter, statefinder diagnostic and $\\omega-\\omega'$ analysis are investigated which assure the evolutionary paradigm of $f$.

  7. Redshifts of the Long Gamma-Ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Z. Bagoly; I. Csabai; A. Meszaros; P. Meszaros; I. Horvath; L. G. Balazs; R. Vavrek

    2007-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The low energy spectra of some gamma-ray bursts' show excess components beside the power-law dependence. The consequences of such a feature allows to estimate the gamma photometric redshift of the long gamma-ray bursts in the BATSE Catalog. There is good correlation between the measured optical and the estimated gamma photometric redshifts. The estimated redshift values for the long bright gamma-ray bursts are up to z=4, while for the the faint long bursts - which should be up to z=20 - the redshifts cannot be determined unambiguously with this method. The redshift distribution of all the gamma-ray bursts with known optical redshift agrees quite well with the BATSE based gamma photometric redshift distribution.

  8. Compositions containing poly (.gamma.-glutamylcysteinyl)glycines

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jackson, Paul J. (Los Alamos, NM); Delhaize, Emmanuel (Los Alamos, NM); Robinson, Nigel J. (Durham, GB2); Unkefer, Clifford J. (Los Alamos, NM); Furlong, Clement (Seattle, WA)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of removing heavy metals from aqueous solution, a composition of matter used in effecting said removal, and apparatus used in effecting said removal. One or more of the polypeptides, poly (.gamma.-glutamylcysteinyl)glycines, is immobilized on an inert material in particulate form. Upon contact with an aqueous solution containing heavy metals, the polypeptides sequester the metals, removing them from the solution. There is selectivity of poly (.gamma.-glutamylcysteinyl)glycines having a particular number of monomer repeat units for particular metals. The polypeptides are easily regenerated by contact with a small amount of an organic acid, so that they can be used again to remove heavy metals from solution. This also results in the removal of the metals from the column in a concentrated form.

  9. Compositions containing poly ([gamma]glutamylcysteinyl)glycines

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jackson, P.J.; Delhaize, E.; Robinson, N.J.; Unkefer, C.J.; Furlong, C.

    1992-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of removing heavy metals from aqueous solution, a composition of matter used in effecting the removal, and the apparatus used in effecting the removal are described. One or more of the polypeptides, poly ([gamma]glutamylcysteinyl)glycines, is immobilized on an inert material in particulate form. Upon contact with an aqueous solution containing heavy metals, the polypeptides sequester the metals, removing them from the solution. There is selectivity of poly ([gamma]glutamylcysteinyl)glycines having a particular number of monomer repeat units for particular metals. The polypeptides are easily regenerated by contact with a small amount of an organic acid, so that they can be used again to remove heavy metals from solution. This also results in the removal of the metals from the column in a concentrated form. 1 figs.

  10. Neutron-driven gamma-ray laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bowman, Charles D. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A lasing cylinder emits laser radiation at a gamma-ray wavelength of 0.87 .ANG. when subjected to an intense neutron flux of about 400 eV neutrons. A 250 .ANG. thick layer of Be is provided between two layers of 100 .ANG. thick layer of .sup.57 Co and these layers are supported on a foil substrate. The coated foil is coiled to form the lasing cylinder. Under the neutron flux .sup.57 Co becomes .sup.58 Co by neutron absorption. The .sup.58 Co then decays to .sup.57 Fe by 1.6 MeV proton emission. .sup.57 Fe then transitions by mesne decay to a population inversion for lasing action at 14.4 keV. Recoil from the proton emission separates the .sup.57 Fe from the .sup.57 Co and into the Be, where Mossbauer emission occurs at a gamma-ray wavelength.

  11. Fissile interrogation using gamma rays from oxygen

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Donald; Micklich, Bradley J.; Fessler, Andreas

    2004-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The subject apparatus provides a means to identify the presence of fissionable material or other nuclear material contained within an item to be tested. The system employs a portable accelerator to accelerate and direct protons to a fluorine-compound target. The interaction of the protons with the fluorine-compound target produces gamma rays which are directed at the item to be tested. If the item to be tested contains either a fissionable material or other nuclear material the interaction of the gamma rays with the material contained within the test item with result in the production of neutrons. A system of neutron detectors is positioned to intercept any neutrons generated by the test item. The results from the neutron detectors are analyzed to determine the presence of a fissionable material or other nuclear material.

  12. Factorization in B to V gamma Decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Becher, T

    2005-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The factorization properties of the radiative decays B {yields} V{gamma} are analyzed at leading order in 1/mb using the soft-collinear effective theory. It is shown that the decay amplitudes can be expressed in terms of a B {yields} V form factor evaluated at q{sup 2} = 0, light-cone distribution amplitudes of the B and V mesons, and calculable hard-scattering kernels. The renormalization-group equations in the effective theory are solved to resume perturbative logarithms of the different scales in the decay process. Phenomenological implications for the B {yields} K*{gamma} branching ratio, isospin asymmetry, and CP asymmetries are discussed, with particular emphasis on possible effects from physics beyond the Standard Model.

  13. Lorentz violation from gamma-ray bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shu Zhang; Bo-Qiang Ma

    2014-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The constancy of light speed is a basic assumption in Einstein's special relativity, and consequently the Lorentz invariance is a fundamental symmetry of space-time in modern physics. However, it is speculated that the speed of light becomes energy-dependent due to the Lorentz invariance violation~(LV) in various new physics theories. We analyse the data of the energetic photons from the gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) by the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope, and find more events to support the energy dependence in the light speed with both linear and quadratic form corrections. We provide two scenarios to understand all the new-released Pass~8 data of bright GRBs by the Fermi-LAT Collaboration, with predictions from such scenarios being testable by future detected GRBs.

  14. Hydrodynamics with conserved current via AdS/CFT correspondence in the Maxwell-Gauss-Bonnet gravity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu Yapeng; Sun Peng; Zhang Jianhui [Center for High-Energy Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Using the AdS/CFT correspondence, we study the hydrodynamics with conserved current from the dual Maxwell-Gauss-Bonnet gravity. After constructing the perturbative solution to the first order based on the boosted black brane solution in the bulk Maxwell-Gauss-Bonnet gravity, we extract the stress tensor and conserved current of the dual conformal fluid on its boundary, and also find the effect of the Gauss-Bonnet term on the dual conformal fluid. Our results show that the Gauss-Bonnet term can affect the parameters such as the shear viscosity {eta}, entropy density s, thermal conductivity {kappa} and electrical conductivity {sigma}. However, it does not affect the so-called Wiedemann-Franz law which relates {kappa} to {sigma}, while it affects the ratio {eta}/s. In addition, another interesting result is that {eta}/s can also be affected by the bulk Maxwell field in our case, which is consistent with some previous results predicted through the Kubo formula. Moreover, the anomalous magnetic and vortical effects by adding the Chern-Simons term are also considered in our case in the Maxwell-Gauss-Bonnet gravity.

  15. Parameters Identification for Motorcycle Simulator's Platform Characterization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Parameters Identification for Motorcycle Simulator's Platform Characterization L. Nehaoua H modeling and parameters identification of a motorcycle simulator's platform. This model begins with some (cars and motorcycles) is possible by taking in care some characteristics of land vehicles. Indeed

  16. Gamma-Ray Line Observations with RHESSI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David M. Smith

    2004-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) has been observing gamma-ray lines from the Sun and the Galaxy since its launch in February 2002. Here I summarize the status of RHESSI observations of solar lines (nuclear de-excitation, neutron capture, and positron annihilation), the lines of $^{26}$Al and $^{60}$Fe from the inner Galaxy, and the search for positron annihilation in novae.

  17. NO CORRELATION BETWEEN HOST GALAXY METALLICITY AND GAMMA-RAY ENERGY RELEASE FOR LONG-DURATION GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levesque, Emily M.; Kewley, Lisa J. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Soderberg, Alicia M.; Berger, Edo, E-mail: emsque@ifa.hawaii.ed, E-mail: kewley@ifa.hawaii.ed, E-mail: asoderbe@cfa.harvard.ed, E-mail: eberger@cfa.harvard.ed [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden St., MS-20, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We compare the redshifts, host galaxy metallicities, and isotropic (E{sub {gamma}},iso) and beaming-corrected (E{sub {gamma}}) gamma-ray energy release of 16 long-duration gamma-ray bursts (LGRBs) at z < 1. From this comparison, we find no statistically significant correlation between host metallicity and redshift, E{sub {gamma}},iso, or E{sub {gamma}}. These results are at odds with previous theoretical and observational predictions of an inverse correlation between gamma-ray energy release and host metallicity, as well as the standard predictions of metallicity-driven wind effects in stellar evolutionary models. We consider the implications that these results have for LGRB progenitor scenarios, and discuss our current understanding of the role that metallicity plays in the production of LGRBs.

  18. Planet Parameters in Microlensing Events

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Scott Gaudi; Andrew Gould

    1996-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A planetary microlensing event occurs when a planet perturbs one of the two images created in a point-mass microlensing event, causing a deviation from the standard Paczy\\'nski curve. Determination of the two physical parameters that can be extracted from a planetary microlensing event, the planet/star mass ratio q, and the planet/star separation in units of the stellar Einstein ring, $y_p$, is hampered by several types of degeneracies. There are two distinct and qualitatively different classes of planetary events: major and minor image perturbations. For major image perturbations, there is a potentially crippling continuous degeneracy in q which is of order $\\delta_d^{-1}$, where $\\delta_d$ is the maximum fractional deviation of the planetary perturbation. Since the threshold of detection is expected to be $\\delta_d \\sim 5%$, this degeneracy in q can be a factor of $\\sim 20$. For minor image perturbations, the continuous degeneracy in q is considerably less severe, and is typically less than a factor 4. We show that these degeneracies can be resolved by observations from dedicated telescopes on several continents together with optical/infrared photometry from one of these sites. There also exists a class of discrete degeneracies. These are typically easy to resolve given good temporal coverage of the planetary event. Unambiguous interpretation of planetary microlensing events requires the resolution of both types of degeneracy. We describe the degeneracies in detail and specify the situations in which they are problematic. We also describe how individual planet masses and physical projected separations can be measured.

  19. Automated Tuning of Optimization Software Parameters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Automated Tuning of Optimization Software Parameters. University of Pittsburgh Department of Industrial Engineering. Technical Report 2007-7. Mustafa Baz ...

  20. Automated Tuning of Optimization Software Parameters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mustafa Baz

    2007-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Oct 29, 2007 ... Keywords: parameter tuning, machine learning, design of experiments, artificial intelligence. Category 1: Optimization Software and Modeling ...

  1. Solution To The Gamma Ray Burst Mystery?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nir J. Shaviv; Arnon Dar

    1996-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Photoexcitation and ionization of partially ionized heavy atoms in highly relativistic flows by interstellar photons, followed by their reemission in radiative recombination and decay, boost star-light into beamed $\\gamma$ rays along the flow direction. Repeated excitation/decay of highly relativistic baryonic ejecta from merger or accretion induced collapse of neutron stars in dense stellar regions (DSRs), like galactic cores, globular clusters and super star-clusters, can convert enough kinetic energy in such events in distant galaxies into cosmological gamma ray bursts (GRBs). The model predicts remarkably well all the main observed temporal and spectral properties of GRBs. Its success strongly suggests that GRBs are $\\gamma$ ray tomography pictures of DSRs in galaxies at cosmological distances with unprecedented resolution: A time resolution of $dt\\sim 1~ms$ in a GRB can resolve stars at a Hubble distance which are separated by only $D\\sim 10^{10}cm$. This is equivalent to the resolving power of an optical telescope with a diameter larger than one Astronomical Unit!

  2. The Galactic gamma-ray club

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isabelle A. Grenier

    2008-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The exclusive Galactic gamma-ray club has opened up to new members. Supernova remnants, pulsar wind nebulae, and massive binary systems hosting a compact object have recently joined the young pulsars as firmly established sources of gamma rays in the Milky Way. Massive young stellar clusters are on the waiting list to join the club. Only the fine imaging recently obtained at TeV energies could resolve specific sources. The samples are sparse, but raise exciting questions. The jet or pulsar-wind origin of the emission in binaries has been hotly debated, but it seems that both types of systems have been recently detected. The nature of the radiation in shock accelerators is still questioned: do nuclei contribute a lot, a little, or not to the gamma rays and what energy do they carry away from the shock budget? The acceleration process and the structural evolution of the pulsar winds are still uncertain. The magnetic field distribution in all these systems is a key, but poorly constrained, ingredient to model the multi-wavelength data, particle transport and electron ageing. It must, however, be determined in order to efficiently probe particle distributions and the acceleration mechanisms. The source samples soon to be expected from GLAST and the Cherenkov telescopes should bring new valuable test cases and they will, for the first time, shed statistical light on the collective behaviour of these different types of accelerators.

  3. Measurement of the total hadronic cross section in tagged. gamma. gamma. reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aihara, H.; Alston-Garnjost, M.; Avery, R.E.; Barker, A.R.; Bauer, D.A.; Bay, A.; Belcinski, R.; Bingham, H.H.; Bloom, E.D.; Buchanan, C.D.; Caldwell, D.O.; Chao, H.; Chun, S.; Clark, A.R.; Cowan, G.D.; Crane, D.A.; Dahl, O.I.; Daoudi, M.; Derby, K.A.; Eastman, J.J.; Eberhard, P.H.; Edberg, T.K.; Eisner, A.M.; Erne, F.C.; Fairfield, K.H.; Fridman, A.; Godfrey, G.; Hauptman, J.M.; Ho, C.; Hofmann, W.; Kamae, T.; Kenney, R.W.; Khacheryan, S.; Kofler, R.R.; Lambert, D.J.; Langeveld, W.G.J.; Layter, J.G.; Lin, W.T.; Linde, F.L.; Loken, S.C.; Lu, A.; Lynch, G.R.; Lys, J.E.; Madaras, R.J.; Magnuson, B.D.; Marsiske, H.; Masek, G.E.; Mathis, L.G.; Maxfield, S.J.; McNeil, R.R.; Miller, E.S.; Nicol, N.A.; Nygren, D.R.; Oddone, P.J.; Oh, H.; Oyang, Y.; Paar, H.P.; Palounek, A.P.T.; Park, S.K.; Pellett, D.E.; Pripstein, M.; Ronan, M.T.; Ross, R.R.; Rouse, F.R.; Schwitkis, K.A.; Sens, J.C.; Shapiro, G.; Shen, B.C.; Smith, J.R.; Steinman, J.S.; Stephens, R.W.; Stevenson, M.L.; Stork, D.H.; Strauss,; TPC /Two-Gamma Collaboration

    1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a measurement of the total cross section for {gamma}{gamma}{r arrow}hadrons, with one photon quasireal and the other a spacelike photon of mass squared {minus}{ital Q}{sup 2}. Results are presented as a function of {ital Q}{sup 2} and the {gamma}{gamma} center-of-mass energy {ital W}, with the {ital Q}{sup 2} range extending from 0.2 to 60 GeV{sup 2}, and {ital W} in the range from 2 to 10 GeV. The data were taken with the TPC/Two-Gamma facility at the SLAC {ital e}{sup +}{ital e}{sup {minus}} storage ring PEP, which was operated at a beam energy of 14.5 GeV. The cross section exhibits a gentle falloff with increasing {ital W}. Its {ital Q}{sup 2} dependence is shown to be well described by an incoherent sum of vector-meson and pointlike scattering over most of the observed {ital W} range. Agreement at high {ital Q}{sup 2} is improved if a minimum-{ital p}{sub {ital T}} cutoff (motivated by QCD) is imposed on the pointlike contribution.

  4. A Link between Prompt Optical and Prompt Gamma-Ray Emission in Gamma-Ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. T. Vestrand; P. R. Wozniak; J. A. Wren; E. E. Fenimore; T. Sakamoto; R. R. White; D. Casperson; H. Davis; S. Evans; M. Galassi; K. E. McGowan; J. A. Schier; J. W. Asa; S. D. Barthelmy; J. R. Cummings; N. Gehrels; D. Hullinger; H. A. Krimm; C. B. Markwardt; K. McLean; D. Palmer; A. Parsons; J. Tueller

    2005-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The prompt optical emission that arrives with gamma-rays from a cosmic gamma-ray burst (GRB) is a signature of the engine powering the burst, the properties of the ultra-relativistic ejecta of the explosion, and the ejecta's interactions with the surroundings. Until now, only GRB 990123 had been detected at optical wavelengths during the burst phase. Its prompt optical emission was variable and uncorrelated with the prompt gamma-ray emission, suggesting that the optical emission was generated by a reverse shock arising from the ejecta's collision with the surrounding material. Here we report prompt optical emission from GRB 041219a. It is variable and correlated with the prompt gamma-rays, indicating a common origin for the optical light and the gamma-rays. Within the context of the standard fireball model of GRBs, we attribute this new optical component to internal shocks driven into the burst ejecta by variations of the inner engine. The correlated optical emission is a direct probe of the jet isolated from the medium. The timing of the uncorrelated optical emission is strongly dependent on the nature of the medium.

  5. Free Parameters and Frameworks in Minimal Supersymmetry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    405 Appendix A Free Parameters and Frameworks in Minimal Supersymmetry It is useful to discuss what the various schemes that exist for reducing the set of free parameters to a manageable number. The information, and so is fixed by experiment. The free parameters consist mainly of the coe#cients of the ``soft

  6. Free Parameters and Frameworks in Minimal Supersymmetry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    405 Appendix A Free Parameters and Frameworks in Minimal Supersymmetry It is useful to discuss what the various schemes that exist for reducing the set of free parameters to a manageable number. The information, and so is fixed by experiment. The free parameters consist mainly of the coefficients of the "soft

  7. Prediction of average. beta. and. gamma. energies and probabilities of. beta. -delayed neutron emission in the region of fission products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirsch, M.; Staudt, A.; Klapdor-Kleingrothaus, H.V. (Max-Planck-Inst. fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany))

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mean {beta} and {gamma} energies and probabilities of {beta}-delayed neutron emission (P{sub n}) in the region of fission products are calculated using a proton-neutron quasiparticle random-phase approximation nuclear model. {beta}-decay properties of these nuclides are essential input parameters for decay heat calculations for nuclear reactors. The results are compared with recent measurements. Mean energies and the P{sub n} values of {approximately}150 experimentally unknown short-lived isotopes are predicted.

  8. Gamma spectroscopic measurements using the PID350 pixelated CdTe radiation detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karafasoulis, K; Seferlis, S; Papadakis, I; Loukas, D; Lambropoulos, C; Potiriadis, C

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Spectroscopic measurements are presented using the PID350 pixelated gamma radiation detectors. A high-speed data acquisition system has been developed in order to reduce the data loss during the data reading in case of a high flux of photons. A data analysis framework has been developed in order to improve the resolution of the acquired energy spectra, using specific calibration parameters for each PID350's pixel. Three PID350 detectors have been used to construct a stacked prototype system and spectroscopic measurements have been performed in order to test the ability of the prototype to localize radioactive sources.

  9. Gamma spectroscopic measurements using the PID350 pixelated CdTe radiation detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Karafasoulis; K. Zachariadou; S. Seferlis; I. Papadakis; D. Loukas; C. Lambropoulos; C. Potiriadis

    2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Spectroscopic measurements are presented using the PID350 pixelated gamma radiation detectors. A high-speed data acquisition system has been developed in order to reduce the data loss during the data reading in case of a high flux of photons. A data analysis framework has been developed in order to improve the resolution of the acquired energy spectra, using specific calibration parameters for each PID350's pixel. Three PID350 detectors have been used to construct a stacked prototype system and spectroscopic measurements have been performed in order to test the ability of the prototype to localize radioactive sources.

  10. Search for Prompt Neutrino Emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts with IceCube

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aartsen, M G; Adams, J; Aguilar, J A; Ahlers, M; Ahrens, M; Altmann, D; Anderson, T; Arguelles, C; Arlen, T C; Auffenberg, J; Bai, X; Barwick, S W; Baum, V; Bay, R; Beatty, J J; Tjus, J Becker; Becker, K -H; BenZvi, S; Berghaus, P; Berley, D; Bernardini, E; Bernhard, A; Besson, D Z; Binder, G; Bindig, D; Bissok, M; Blaufuss, E; Blumenthal, J; Boersma, D J; Bohm, C; Bos, F; Bose, D; Böser, S; Botner, O; Brayeur, L; Bretz, H -P; Brown, A M; Buzinsky, N; Casey, J; Casier, M; Cheung, E; Chirkin, D; Christov, A; Christy, B; Clark, K; Classen, L; Clevermann, F; Coenders, S; Cowen, D F; Silva, A H Cruz; Daughhetee, J; Davis, J C; Day, M; de André, J P A M; De Clercq, C; De Ridder, S; Desiati, P; de Vries, K D; de With, M; DeYoung, T; Díaz-Vélez, J C; Dunkman, M; Eagan, R; Eberhardt, B; Ehrhardt, T; Eichmann, B; Eisch, J; Euler, S; Evenson, P A; Fadiran, O; Fazely, A R; Fedynitch, A; Feintzeig, J; Felde, J; Filimonov, K; Finley, C; Fischer-Wasels, T; Flis, S; Frantzen, K; Fuchs, T; Gaisser, T K; Gaior, R; Gallagher, J; Gerhardt, L; Gier, D; Gladstone, L; Glüsenkamp, T; Goldschmidt, A; Golup, G; Gonzalez, J G; Goodman, J A; Góra, D; Grant, D; Gretskov, P; Groh, J C; Groß, A; Ha, C; Haack, C; Ismail, A Haj; Hallen, P; Hallgren, A; Halzen, F; Hanson, K; Hebecker, D; Heereman, D; Heinen, D; Helbing, K; Hellauer, R; Hellwig, D; Hickford, S; Hill, G C; Hoffman, K D; Hoffmann, R; Homeier, A; Hoshina, K; Huang, F; Huelsnitz, W; Hulth, P O; Hultqvist, K; Ishihara, A; Jacobi, E; Jacobsen, J; Japaridze, G S; Jero, K; Jlelati, O; Jurkovic, M; Kaminsky, B; Kappes, A; Karg, T; Karle, A; Kauer, M; Keivani, A; Kelley, J L; Kheirandish, A; Kiryluk, J; Kläs, J; Klein, S R; Köhne, J -H; Kohnen, G; Kolanoski, H; Koob, A; Köpke, L; Kopper, C; Kopper, S; Koskinen, D J; Kowalski, M; Kriesten, A; Krings, K; Kroll, G; Kroll, M; Kunnen, J; Kurahashi, N; Kuwabara, T; Labare, M; Lanfranchi, J L; Larsen, D T; Larson, M J; Lesiak-Bzdak, M; Leuermann, M; Lünemann, J; Madsen, J; Maggi, G; Maruyama, R; Mase, K; Matis, H S; Maunu, R; McNally, F; Meagher, K; Medici, M; Meli, A; Meures, T; Miarecki, S; Middell, E; Middlemas, E; Milke, N; Miller, J; Mohrmann, L; Montaruli, T; Morse, R; Nahnhauer, R; Naumann, U; Niederhausen, H; Nowicki, S C; Nygren, D R; Obertacke, A; Odrowski, S; Olivas, A; Omairat, A; O'Murchadha, A; Palczewski, T; Paul, L; Penek, Ö; Pepper, J A; Heros, C Pérez de los; Pfendner, C; Pieloth, D; Pinat, E; Posselt, J; Price, P B; Przybylski, G T; Pütz, J; Quinnan, M; Rädel, L; Rameez, M; Rawlins, K; Redl, P; Rees, I; Reimann, R; Relich, M; Resconi, E; Rhode, W; Richman, M; Riedel, B; Robertson, S; Rodrigues, J P; Rongen, M; Rott, C; Ruhe, T; Ruzybayev, B; Ryckbosch, D; Saba, S M; Sander, H -G; Sandroos, J; Santander, M; Sarkar, S; Schatto, K; Scheriau, F; Schmidt, T; Schmitz, M; Schoenen, S; Schöneberg, S; Schönwald, A; Schukraft, A; Schulte, L; Schulz, O; Seckel, D; Sestayo, Y; Seunarine, S; Shanidze, R; Smith, M W E; Soldin, D; Spiczak, G M; Spiering, C; Stamatikos, M; Stanev, T; Stanisha, N A; Stasik, A; Stezelberger, T; Stokstad, R G; Stößl, A; Strahler, E A; Ström, R; Strotjohann, N L; Sullivan, G W; Taavola, H; Taboada, I; Tamburro, A; Tepe, A; Ter-Antonyan, S; Terliuk, A; Teši?, G; Tilav, S; Toale, P A; Tobin, M N; Tosi, D; Tselengidou, M; Unger, E; Usner, M; Vallecorsa, S; van Eijndhoven, N; Vandenbroucke, J; van Santen, J; Vanheule, S; Vehring, M; Voge, M; Vraeghe, M; Walck, C; Wallraff, M; Weaver, Ch; Wellons, M; Wendt, C; Westerhoff, S; Whelan, B J; Whitehorn, N; Wichary, C; Wiebe, K; Wiebusch, C H; Williams, D R; Wissing, H; Wolf, M; Wood, T R; Woschnagg, K; Xu, D L; Xu, X W; Xu, Y; Yanez, J P; Yodh, G; Yoshida, S; Zarzhitsky, P; Ziemann, J; Zoll, M

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present constraints derived from a search of four years of IceCube data for a prompt neutrino flux from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). A single low-significance neutrino was found in coincidence with one of the 506 observed bursts, consistent with the expectation from atmospheric backgrounds. Although GRBs have been proposed as candidate sources for ultra-high energy cosmic rays, our limits on the neutrino flux disfavor much of the parameter space for the latest models. We also find that no more than $\\sim1\\%$ of the recently observed astrophysical neutrino flux consists of prompt emission from GRBs that are potentially observable by existing satellites.

  11. The $Z_H \\to \\gamma H$ decay in the Littlest Higgs Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aranda, J I; Ramírez-Zavaleta, F; Tututi, E S

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the calculation of the $Z_H \\to \\gamma H$ decay in the context of the Littlest Higgs model at one-loop level. Our calculations include the contributions of fermions, scalars and gauge bosons in accordance with the most recent experimental constraints on the parameters space of the model. We find branching ratios of the order of $10^{-5}$ for the energy scale $f=2,3,4$ TeV on the $0.1energy of 14 TeV. By using the integrated luminosity projected for the Large Hadron Collider in the last stage of operation, we estimated the number of events for this process.

  12. GAMMA RAYS FROM STAR FORMATION IN CLUSTERS OF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Storm, Emma M.; Jeltema, Tesla E.; Profumo, Stefano [Department of Physics, University of California, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

    2012-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Star formation in galaxies is observed to be associated with gamma-ray emission, presumably from non-thermal processes connected to the acceleration of cosmic-ray nuclei and electrons. The detection of gamma rays from starburst galaxies by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) has allowed the determination of a functional relationship between star formation rate and gamma-ray luminosity. Since star formation is known to scale with total infrared (8-1000 {mu}m) and radio (1.4 GHz) luminosity, the observed infrared and radio emission from a star-forming galaxy can be used to quantitatively infer the galaxy's gamma-ray luminosity. Similarly, star-forming galaxies within galaxy clusters allow us to derive lower limits on the gamma-ray emission from clusters, which have not yet been conclusively detected in gamma rays. In this study, we apply the functional relationships between gamma-ray luminosity and radio and IR luminosities of galaxies derived by the Fermi Collaboration to a sample of the best candidate galaxy clusters for detection in gamma rays in order to place lower limits on the gamma-ray emission associated with star formation in galaxy clusters. We find that several clusters have predicted gamma-ray emission from star formation that are within an order of magnitude of the upper limits derived in Ackermann et al. based on non-detection by Fermi-LAT. Given the current gamma-ray limits, star formation likely plays a significant role in the gamma-ray emission in some clusters, especially those with cool cores. We predict that both Fermi-LAT over the course of its lifetime and the future Cerenkov Telescope Array will be able to detect gamma-ray emission from star-forming galaxies in clusters.

  13. Correspondence Between $5D$ Ricci-Flat Cosmological Models and Quintessence Dark Energy Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lixin Xu; Hongya Liu; Baorong Chang

    2005-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the accelerating expansion and the induced dark energy of the $5D$ Ricci-flat universe which is characterized by having a big bounce as opposed to a big bang. We show that the arbitrary function $\\mu(t)$ contained in the $5D$ solutions can be rewritten in terms of the redshift $z$ as a new arbitrary function $f(z)$, and we find that there is a correspondence between this $f(z)$ and the potential $V(\\phi)$ of the 4D quintessence models. Using this correspondence, the arbitrary function $f(z)$ and the $5D$ solution could be specified for a given form of the potential $V(\\phi)$.

  14. Index of selected OSW correspondence. EPA Office of Solid Waste, updated as of December 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is an index of selected Office of Solid Waste (OSW) correspondence that has been developed by the staff of EPA`s RCRA/UST, Superfund, and EPCR Hotline for use as a research tool about RCRA issues. This index organizes summaries of over 900 letters and memoranda issued by OSW. Addressed primarily to persons in the regulated community as well as state and Regional regulators, the correspondence represents past EPA interpretations of the RCRA regulations governing management of solid, hazardous, nd medical wastes. This document is designed for use by readers familiar with the federal RCRA program and the relevant regulations. The index`s organization parallels that of 40 CFR Parts 258 to 279. The document indexes each letter or memorandum under the apropriate CFR citation (or citations) which the letter or memorandum clarifies.

  15. Energy Injection in Gamma-ray Burst Afterglows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laskar, Tanmoy; Margutti, Raffaella; Perley, Daniel; Zauderer, B Ashley; Sari, Re'em; Fong, Wen-fai

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present multi-wavelength observations and modeling of Gamma-ray Bursts (GRBs) that exhibit a simultaneous re-brightening in their X-ray and optical light curves, and are also detected at radio wavelengths. We show that the re-brightening episodes can be modeled by injection of energy into the blastwave and that in all cases the energy injection rate falls within the theoretical bounds expected for a distribution of energy with ejecta Lorentz factor. Our measured values of the circumburst density, jet opening angle, and beaming corrected kinetic energy are consistent with the distribution of these parameters for long-duration GRBs at both z~1 and z>6, suggesting that the jet launching mechanism and environment of these events are similar to that of GRBs that do not have bumps in their light curves. However, events exhibiting re-brightening episodes have lower radiative efficiencies than average, suggesting that a majority of the kinetic energy of the outflow is carried by slow-moving ejecta, which is furthe...

  16. Application of Artificial Neural Network to Search for Gravitational-Wave Signals Associated with Short Gamma-Ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Kyungmin; Hodge, Kari A; Kim, Young-Min; Lee, Chang-Hwan; Lee, Hyun Kyu; Oh, John J; Oh, Sang Hoon; Son, Edwin J

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We apply a machine learning algorithm, the artificial neural network, to the search for gravitational-wave signals associated with short gamma-ray bursts. The multi-dimensional samples consisting of data corresponding to the statistical and physical quantities from the coherent search pipeline are fed into the artificial neural network to distinguish simulated gravitational-wave signals from background noise artifacts. Our result shows that the data classification efficiency at a fixed false alarm probability is improved by the artificial neural network in comparison to the conventional detection statistic. Therefore, this algorithm increases the distance at which a gravitational-wave signal could be observed in coincidence with a gamma-ray burst. In order to demonstrate the performance, we also evaluate a few seconds of gravitational-wave data segment using the trained networks and obtain the false alarm probability. We suggest that the artificial neural network can be a complementary method to the conventio...

  17. What can the L3 $\\gamma\\gamma ll$ events be?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garisto, R; Garisto, Robert; Ng, John N.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the 4 $\\gamma\\gamma ll$ ($l=\\mu,\\ e$) events reported by the L3 collaboration, and go through the logical possibilities which could explain the events. If they are not coincidental bremsstrahlung events, we find that the physics which they could point to is extremely limited. One possibility would be to have a new 60 GeV scalar (or pseudoscalar) particle $X^0$ with an off-diagonal coupling to a $Z$ and $Z'$ which is non-perturbative ($\\alpha > 1$), where the $Z'$ couplings to $\

  18. Searches for Lepton Flavor Violation in the Decays tau+- ---> e+- gamma and tau+- ---> mu+- gamma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aubert, Bernard; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; /INFN, Bari /Bari U.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; /Bergen U.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, David Nathan; Hooberman, B.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS; /more authors.; ,

    2010-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Searches for lepton-flavor-violating decays of a {tau} lepton to a lighter mass lepton and a photon have been performed with the entire dataset of (963 {+-} 7) x 10{sup 6} {tau} decays collected by the BABAR detector near the {Upsilon}(4S), {Upsilon}(3S) and {Upsilon}(2S) resonances. The searches yield no evidence of signals and they set upper limits on the branching fractions of {Beta}({tau}{sup {+-}} {yields} e{sup {+-}}{gamma}) < 3.3 x 10{sup -8} and {Beta}({tau}{sup {+-}} {yields} {mu}{sup {+-}}{gamma}) < 4.4 x 10{sup -8} at 90% confidence level.

  19. Instructions for calibrating gamma detectors using the Canberra-Nuclear Data Genie Gamma Spectroscopy System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brunk, J.L.

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A straight forward protocol provides a way to guide the calibration of a gamma detector for a particular geometry and material. Several programs have used the Low Level Gamma Counting Facility of the Health and Ecological Assessment Division of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to count a variety of large environmental samples contained in several unique geometries. The equipment and calibration requirements needed to analyze these types of samples are explained. This document describes the calibration protocol that has been developed and describes how it is used to calibrate the detectors.

  20. Coal deposit characterization by gamma-gamma density/percent dry ash relationships

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, David Scott

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Density/Ash Relationship . APPLICATION OF THE GAMMA-GAMMA DENSITY/PERCENT DRY ASH RELATIONSHIPS The Density/Ash Relationship of a South Texas Lignite Deposit Characterization of a South Texas Lignite Deposit CONCLUSIONS REFERENCES. 52 53 53 53... 58 64 67 6g 80 87 LIST OF TABLES TABLE I Coal Classification by Rank. 2 Common Minerals in Coal. 3 Results of Linear Regression Analyses for a South Texas Lignite Deposit. 4 Variability of Geophysica11y-Derived Percent Dry Ash Values...

  1. DISCOVERY OF TeV GAMMA-RAY EMISSION TOWARD SUPERNOVA REMNANT SNR G78.2+2.1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aliu, E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Barnard College, Columbia University, NY 10027 (United States); Archambault, S. [Physics Department, McGill University, Montreal, QC H3A 2T8 (Canada); Arlen, T.; Aune, T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Beilicke, M.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Dickherber, R. [Department of Physics, Washington University, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States); Benbow, W. [Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Amado, AZ 85645 (United States); Bird, R.; Cannon, A.; Collins-Hughes, E. [School of Physics, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Bouvier, A. [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics and Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Bradbury, S. M. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leeds, Leeds, LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Byrum, K. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Cesarini, A.; Connolly, M. P. [School of Physics, National University of Ireland Galway, University Road, Galway (Ireland); Ciupik, L. [Astronomy Department, Adler Planetarium and Astronomy Museum, Chicago, IL 60605 (United States); Cui, W. [Department of Physics, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Duke, C., E-mail: amandajw@iastate.edu [Department of Physics, Grinnell College, Grinnell, IA 50112-1690 (United States); and others

    2013-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the discovery of an unidentified, extended source of very-high-energy gamma-ray emission, VER J2019+407, within the radio shell of the supernova remnant SNR G78.2+2.1, using 21.4 hr of data taken by the VERITAS gamma-ray observatory in 2009. These data confirm the preliminary indications of gamma-ray emission previously seen in a two-year (2007-2009) blind survey of the Cygnus region by VERITAS. VER J2019+407, which is detected at a post-trials significance of 7.5 standard deviations in the 2009 data, is localized to the northwestern rim of the remnant in a region of enhanced radio and X-ray emission. It has an intrinsic extent of 0.23 Degree-Sign .23 {+-} 0. Degree-Sign 03{sub stat-0 Degree-Sign .02sys}{sup +0 Degree-Sign .04} and its spectrum is well-characterized by a differential power law (dN/dE = N{sub 0} Multiplication-Sign (E/TeV){sup -{Gamma}}) with a photon index of {Gamma} = 2.37 {+-} 0.14{sub stat} {+-} 0.20{sub sys} and a flux normalization of N{sub 0} = 1.5 {+-} 0.2{sub stat} {+-} 0.4{sub sys} Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -12} photon TeV{sup -1} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}. This yields an integral flux of 5.2 {+-} 0.8{sub stat} {+-} 1.4{sub sys} Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -12} photon cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} above 320 GeV, corresponding to 3.7% of the Crab Nebula flux. We consider the relationship of the TeV gamma-ray emission with the GeV gamma-ray emission seen from SNR G78.2+2.1 as well as that seen from a nearby cocoon of freshly accelerated cosmic rays. Multiple scenarios are considered as possible origins for the TeV gamma-ray emission, including hadronic particle acceleration at the SNR shock.

  2. Parameter Estimation of Gravitational Waves from Precessing BH-NS Inspirals with higher harmonics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. O'Shaughnessy; B. Farr; E. Ochsner; H. S. Cho; V. Raymond; C. Kim; C. H. Lee

    2014-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Precessing black hole-neutron star (BH-NS) binaries produce a rich gravitational wave signal, encoding the binary's nature and inspiral kinematics. Using the lalinference\\_mcmc Markov-chain Monte Carlo parameter estimation code, we use two fiducial examples to illustrate how the geometry and kinematics are encoded into the modulated gravitational wave signal, using coordinates well-adapted to precession. Even for precessing binaries, we show the performance of detailed parameter estimation can be estimated by "effective" estimates: comparisons of a prototype signal with its nearest neighbors, adopting a fixed sky location and idealized two-detector network. We use detailed and effective approaches to show higher harmonics provide nonzero but small local improvement when estimating the parameters of precessing BH-NS binaries. That said, we show higher harmonics can improve parameter estimation accuracy for precessing binaries ruling out approximately-degenerate source orientations. Our work illustrates quantities gravitational wave measurements can provide, such as reliable component masses and the precise orientation of a precessing short gamma ray burst progenitor relative to the line of sight. "Effective" estimates may provide a simple way to estimate trends in the performance of parameter estimation for generic precessing BH-NS binaries in next-generation detectors. For example, our results suggest that the orbital chirp rate, precession rate, and precession geometry are roughly-independent observables, defining natural variables to organize correlations in the high-dimensional BH-NS binary parameter space.

  3. Dirac Coupled Channel Analyses of the 2$^-$ Gamma Vibrational band excitation in $^{20}$Ne

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sugie Shim

    2014-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Dirac coupled channel analyses are performed using optical potential model for the high-lying excited states that belong to the 2$^-$ gamma vibrational band at the 800 MeV unpolarized proton inelastic scatterings from $^{20}$Ne. The first order vibrational collective models are used to obtain the transition optical potentials to describe the high-lying excited vibrational collective states and Lorentz-covariant scalar and time-like vector potentials are used as direct optical potentials. The complicated Dirac coupled channel equations are solved phenomenologically to reproduce the differential cross sections data by varying the optical potential and deformation parameters using minimum chi-square method. It is found that relativistic Dirac coupled channel calculation could describe the excited states of the 2$^-$ gamma vibrational band in $^{20}$Ne much better than the nonrelativistic coupled channel calculation, especially for the 2$^-$ and 3$^-$ states of the band. It is shown that the multistep excitation process via channel coupling with the $3^-$ state is essential to describe the $2^-$ state excitation and pure direct transition from the ground state is dominant for the 3$^-$ state excitation of the 2$^-$ gamma vibrational band in $^{20}$Ne.

  4. Gamma-ray burst data from DMSP satellites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terrell, J.; Klebesadel, R.W.; Lee, P. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Griffee, J.W. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States))

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A number of gamma-ray bursts have been detected by means of gamma-ray detectors aboard three Air Force Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) satellites, in polar orbits at 800 km altitude. The gamma-ray data have a 2-second resolving time, and are usually telemetered in 5 energy bins in the range 50--1000 keV. Although it is not possible to detect gamma-ray bursts when the DMSP satellites are passing through the radiation belt or the South Atlantic Anomaly, or when the source is obscured by the Earth, a number of gamma-ray bursts have been detected by two or even three of the satellites. The DMSP data may be of considerable, assistance in evaluating time histories, locations, and spectra of gamma-ray bursts.

  5. Gamma-ray burst data from DMSP satellites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terrell, J.; Klebesadel, R.W.; Lee, P. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Griffee, J.W. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A number of gamma-ray bursts have been detected by means of gamma-ray detectors aboard three Air Force Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) satellites, in polar orbits at 800 km altitude. The gamma-ray data have a 2-second resolving time, and are usually telemetered in 5 energy bins in the range 50--1000 keV. Although it is not possible to detect gamma-ray bursts when the DMSP satellites are passing through the radiation belt or the South Atlantic Anomaly, or when the source is obscured by the Earth, a number of gamma-ray bursts have been detected by two or even three of the satellites. The DMSP data may be of considerable, assistance in evaluating time histories, locations, and spectra of gamma-ray bursts.

  6. X-Ray Observations of Gamma-Ray Burst Afterglows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Filippo Frontera

    2004-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The discovery by the BeppoSAX satellite of X-ray afterglow emission from the gamma-ray burst which occurred on 28 February 1997 produced a revolution in our knowledge of the gamma-ray burst phenomenon. Along with the discovery of X-ray afterglows, the optical afterglows of gamma-ray bursts were discovered and the distance issue was settled, at least for long $\\gamma$-ray bursts. The 30 year mystery of the gamma-ray burst phenomenon is now on the way to solution. Here I rewiew the observational status of the X-ray afterglow emission, its mean properties (detection rate, continuum spectra, line features, and light curves), and the X-ray constraints on theoretical models of gamma-ray bursters and their progenitors. I also discuss the early onset afterglow emission, the remaining questions, and the role of future X-ray afterglow observations.

  7. Gamma-ray burst interaction with dense interstellar medium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxim Barkov; Gennady Bisnovatyi-Kogan

    2004-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Interaction of cosmological gamma ray burst radiation with the dense interstellar medium of host galaxy is considered. Gas dynamical motion of interstellar medium driven by gamma ray burst is investigated in 2D approximation for different initial density distributions of host galaxy matter and different total energy of gamma ray burst. The maximum velocity of motion of interstellar medium is $1.8\\cdot10^4$ km/s. Light curves of gamma ray burst afterglow are calculated for set of non homogeneous density, distribution gamma ray burst total energy, and different viewing angles. Spectra of gamma ray burst afterglow are modeled taking into account conversion of hard photons (soft X-ray, hard UV) to soft UV and optics photons.

  8. Gamma Ray Bursts, Neutron Star Quakes, and the Casimir Effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Carlson; T. Goldman; J. Perez-Mercader

    1994-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose that the dynamic Casimir effect is a mechanism that converts the energy of neutron starquakes into $\\gamma$--rays. This mechanism efficiently produces photons from electromagnetic Casimir energy released by the rapid motion of a dielectric medium into a vacuum. Estimates based on the cutoff energy of the gamma ray bursts and the volume involved in a starquake indicate that the total gamma ray energy emission is consonant with observational requirements.

  9. Gamma-ray Bursts as Probes of Galaxy Evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Â?umer, Slobodan

    Gamma-ray Bursts as Probes of Galaxy Evolution Daniele Malesani, Dark Cosmology Centre and the X of the "Universe") #12;What is a gamma-ray burst? Brief (ms - min) and intense (~10-7 erg cm­2 s­1 ) burst of soft to ongoing star formation "Naked-eye" GRB 080319B GRBs explode within star-forming galaxies Gamma-ray bursts

  10. Nuclear Criticality as a Contributor to Gamma Ray Burst Events

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert Bruce Hayes

    2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Most gamma ray bursts are able to be explained using supernovae related phenomenon. Some measured results still lack compelling explanations and a contributory cause from nuclear criticality is proposed. This is shown to have general properties consistent with various known gamma ray burst properties. The galactic origin of fast rise exponential decay gamma ray bursts is considered a strong candidate for these types of events.

  11. Delayed neutron data and group parameters for 43 fissioning systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brady, M.C. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); England, T.R. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA))

    1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The quality and quantity of delayed neutron precursor data have greatly improved over the past decade and a half. Supplementation of the data with model calculations and the use of models to extend the number of precursors to 271 is now practical. These data, along with other improved fission product parameters, permit direct calculations of aggregate behavior for many fissioning nuclides. The results can still be approximated using a few (usually six) temporal groups, including corresponding spectra, as in past practice for reactor physics. An extensive effort to provide a complete set of evaluated data is summarized, with an emphasis on its use to generate the temporal approximations; precursor data and group values are intended for inclusion in ENDF/B-VI.

  12. X-ray Flares in Gamma-Ray Bursts.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morris, David

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??Data from the Swift mission have now shown that flares are a common component of Gamma-Ray Burst afterglows, appearing in roughly 50% of GRBs to… (more)

  13. The Diverse Environments of Gamma-Ray Bursts.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perley, Daniel Alan

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??I present results from several years of concerted observations of the afterglows and host galaxies of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), the most energetic explosions in the… (more)

  14. Virtual Gamma Ray Radiation Sources through Neutron Radiative Capture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott Wilde, Raymond Keegan

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The countrate response of a gamma spectrometry system from a neutron radiation source behind a plane of moderating material doped with a nuclide of a large radiative neutron capture cross-section exhibits a countrate response analogous to a gamma radiation source at the same position from the detector. Using a planar, surface area of the neutron moderating material exposed to the neutron radiation produces a larger area under the prompt gamma ray peak in the detector than a smaller area of dimensions relative to the active volume of the gamma detection system.

  15. Picture of the Week: Gamma Ray Bursts: infographic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Gamma Ray Bursts: infographic Today with the help of sophisticated tools like the ground based RAPTOR robotic observatory system that can find, and study on its own, transient...

  16. Compton scattering effects on the duration of terrestrial gamma-ray flashes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasko, Victor

    ; published 18 January 2012. [1] Terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) are gamma-ray bursts detected from space) recently discovered by the gamma-ray burst monitor (GBM) aboard the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope. Introduction [2] Terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) are bursts of high-energy photons originating from

  17. OBSERVATIONS OF THE PROMPT GAMMA-RAY EMISSION OF GRB 070125 Eric C. Bellm,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    2007 November 13; accepted 2008 July 25 ABSTRACT The long, bright gamma-ray burst GRB 070125: gamma rays: bursts 1. INTRODUCTION The prompt gamma-ray emission of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) is the mostOBSERVATIONS OF THE PROMPT GAMMA-RAY EMISSION OF GRB 070125 Eric C. Bellm,1 Kevin Hurley,1 Valentin

  18. Study of Celestial Objects with Very High Energy Gamma Rays CANGAROO III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Enomoto, Ryoji

    ), the doppler boosting of secondary gamma-rays is sufficient to produce TeV gamma-rays. Gamma-ray bursts: Fireballs expanding with relativistic speed explain gamma-ray bursts at cosmological distancesStudy of Celestial Objects with Very High Energy Gamma Rays CANGAROO III Project Description

  19. X-RAYRICH GAMMA-RAY BURSTS, PHOTOSPHERES, AND VARIABILITY P. Meszaros,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Bing

    X-RAY­RICH GAMMA-RAY BURSTS, PHOTOSPHERES, AND VARIABILITY P. Me´sza´ros,1,2 E. Ramirez-Ruiz,3 M. J of the observational gamma-ray variability-luminosity relation. Subject headings: gamma rays: bursts -- radiation mechanisms: nonthermal 1. INTRODUCTION Gamma-ray burst (GRB) light curves at gamma-ray ener- gies are often

  20. Search for GeV Emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts Using Milagro Scaler Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    Search for GeV Emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts Using Milagro Scaler Data D. A. Williams to search for high energy emission from a sample of 98 gamma-ray bursts (GRB) detected from January 2000: gamma-ray sources; gamma-ray bursts; astronomical observations: gamma-ray PACS: 98.70.Rz,95.85.Pw Air

  1. Covariance Analysis of Gamma Ray Spectra

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trainham, R.; Tinsley, J.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The covariance method exploits fluctuations in signals to recover information encoded in correlations which are usually lost when signal averaging occurs. In nuclear spectroscopy it can be regarded as a generalization of the coincidence technique. The method can be used to extract signal from uncorrelated noise, to separate overlapping spectral peaks, to identify escape peaks, to reconstruct spectra from Compton continua, and to generate secondary spectral fingerprints. We discuss a few statistical considerations of the covariance method and present experimental examples of its use in gamma spectroscopy.

  2. Gamma irradiation of the prenatal mouse dentition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kerley, Michael Auston

    1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    as the dental lamina to the stage of the deposition of enamel and dentin. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of a continuous stress of gamma irradiation on the structure of the odontogenic cells, the relative size and rate of development... development. In 1927, Leist (9) made a study of the effect of X-rays on teeth, which was brought about by the following rase. A worker in a Roentgen tube factory was exposed daily to a considerable dose of X-irradiation. Sometime later he began to show...

  3. Gamma-ray bursts with ROSAT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Greiner

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I review the use of ROSAT over the last years for the investigation of well localized gamma-ray burst (GRB) error boxes. In particular, I cover (i) the systematic study of several dozens of IPN locations using the ROSAT All-Sky-Survey data, (ii) results of deep ROSAT pointings of selected small GRB error boxes, (iii) the attempts for and results of quick follow-up observations after GRB events including the three GRBs localized with BeppoSAX, (iv) the correlation of GRB locations with serendipitous ROSAT pointings and (v) the search for X-ray flashes in the database of pointed ROSAT observations.

  4. Can Naked Singularities Yield Gamma Ray Bursts?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. M. Antia

    1998-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Gamma-ray bursts are believed to be the most luminous objects in the Universe. There has been some suggestion that these arise from quantum processes around naked singularities. The main problem with this suggestion is that all known examples of naked singularities are massless and hence there is effectively no source of energy. It is argued that a globally naked singularity coupled with quantum processes operating within a distance of the order of Planck length of the singularity will probably yield energy burst of the order of M_pc^2\\approx2\\times 10^{16} ergs, where M_p is the Planck mass.

  5. Higgs boson decay to mu mubar gamma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ali Abbasabadi; Wayne W. Repko

    2000-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The Higgs boson decay, H -> mu mubar gamma, is studied in the Standard Model at the tree and one-loop levels. It is shown that for Higgs boson masses above 110 GeV, the contribution to the radiative width from the one-loop level exceeds the contribution from the tree level, and for Higgs boson masses above 140 GeV, it even exceeds the contribution from the tree level decay H -> mu mubar. We also show that the contributions to the radiative decay width from the interference terms between the tree and one-loop diagrams are negligible.

  6. Gamma-Ray Bursts observed by INTEGRAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Mereghetti

    2003-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    During the first six months of operations, six Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) have been detected in the field of view of the INTEGRAL instruments and localized by the INTEGRAL Burst Alert System (IBAS): a software for the automatic search of GRBs and the rapid distribution of their coordinates. I describe the current performances of IBAS and review the main results obtained so far. The coordinates of the latest burst localized by IBAS, GRB 031203, have been distributed within 20 s from the burst onset and with an uncertainty radius of only 2.7 arcmin.

  7. Neutrino Event Rates from Gamma Ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Halzen; D. W. Hooper

    1999-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We recalculate the diffuse flux of high energy neutrinos produced by Gamma Ray Bursts (GRB) in the relativistic fireball model. Although we confirm that the average single burst produces only ~10^{-2} high energy neutrino events in a detector with 1 km^2 effective area, i.e. about 10 events per year, we show that the observed rate is dominated by burst-to-burst fluctuations which are very large. We find event rates that are expected to be larger by one order of magnitude, likely more, which are dominated by a few very bright bursts. This greatly simplifies their detection.

  8. Gamma Ray Burst Neutrinos Probing Quantum Gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. C. Gonzalez-Garcia; F. Halzen

    2006-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Very high energy, short wavelength, neutrinos may interact with the space-time foam predicted by theories of quantum gravity. They would propagate like light through a crystal lattice and be delayed, with the delay depending on the energy. This will appear to the observer as a violation of Lorenz invariance. Back of the envelope calculations imply that observations of neutrinos produced by gamma ray bursts may reach Planck-scale sensitivity. We revisit the problem considering two essential complications: the imprecise timing of the neutrinos associated with their poorly understood production mechanism in the source and the indirect nature of their energy measurement made by high energy neutrino telescopes.

  9. Verification of Gamma Knife extend system based fractionated treatment planning using EBT2 film

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Natanasabapathi, Gopishankar; Bisht, Raj Kishor [Gamma Knife Unit, Department of Neurosurgery, Neurosciences Centre, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Ansari Nagar, New Delhi 110029 (India)] [Gamma Knife Unit, Department of Neurosurgery, Neurosciences Centre, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Ansari Nagar, New Delhi 110029 (India)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: This paper presents EBT2 film verification of fractionated treatment planning with the Gamma Knife (GK) extend system, a relocatable frame system for multiple-fraction or serial multiple-session radiosurgery.Methods: A human head shaped phantom simulated the verification process for fractionated Gamma Knife treatment. Phantom preparation for Extend Frame based treatment planning involved creating a dental impression, fitting the phantom to the frame system, and acquiring a stereotactic computed tomography (CT) scan. A CT scan (Siemens, Emotion 6) of the phantom was obtained with following parameters: Tube voltage—110 kV, tube current—280 mA, pixel size—0.5 × 0.5 and 1 mm slice thickness. A treatment plan with two 8 mm collimator shots and three sectors blocking in each shot was made. Dose prescription of 4 Gy at 100% was delivered for the first fraction out of the two fractions planned. Gafchromic EBT2 film (ISP Wayne, NJ) was used as 2D verification dosimeter in this process. Films were cut and placed inside the film insert of the phantom for treatment dose delivery. Meanwhile a set of films from the same batch were exposed from 0 to 12 Gy doses for calibration purposes. An EPSON (Expression 10000 XL) scanner was used for scanning the exposed films in transparency mode. Scanned films were analyzed with inhouse written MATLAB codes.Results: Gamma index analysis of film measurement in comparison with TPS calculated dose resulted in high pass rates >90% for tolerance criteria of 1%/1 mm. The isodose overlay and linear dose profiles of film measured and computed dose distribution on sagittal and coronal plane were in close agreement.Conclusions: Through this study, the authors propose treatment verification QA method for Extend frame based fractionated Gamma Knife radiosurgery using EBT2 film.

  10. Observation of eta '(c) production in gamma gamma fusion at CLEO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Besson, David Zeke

    2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ) = 115.1 +/- 2.0 MeV and DeltaM(hf)(2S) = 43.1 +/- 3.4 MeV. Assuming that the eta(c) and eta(c)' have equal branching fractions to K(s)Kpi, we obtain Gamma(gammagamma)(eta(c)') = 1.3 +/- 0.6 keV....

  11. Impact of gamma-V vertex corrections on the V-P-gamma transition form factors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sergii Raspopov

    2014-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The aim of this paper is to present an effective field theory description of the conversion transition of the vector meson V into the pseudoscalar P and the lepton-pair l+l-. The normalized form factor for omega to pi^0 gamma^ast transition is presented and compared to the available data and to the predictions of other models.

  12. The Animated Gamma-ray Sky Revealed by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Isabelle Grenier

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has been observing the sky in gamma-rays since August 2008.  In addition to breakthrough capabilities in energy coverage (20 MeV-300 GeV) and angular resolution, the wide field of view of the Large Area Telescope enables observations of 20% of the sky at any instant, and of the whole sky every three hours. It has revealed a very animated sky with bright gamma-ray bursts flashing and vanishing in minutes, powerful active galactic nuclei flaring over hours and days, many pulsars twinkling in the Milky Way, and X-ray binaries shimmering along their orbit. Most of these variable sources had not been seen by the Fermi predecessor, EGRET, and the wealth of new data already brings important clues to the origin of the high-energy emission and particles powered by the compact objects. The telescope also brings crisp images of the bright gamma-ray emission produced by cosmic-ray interactions in the interstellar medium, thus allowing to measure the cosmic nuclei and electron spectra across the Galaxy, to weigh interstellar clouds, in particular in the dark-gas phase. The telescope sensitivity at high energy will soon provide useful constraints on dark-matter annihilations in a variety of environments. I will review the current results and future prospects of the Fermi mission.

  13. Gamma-Ray Burst Prompt Emission Light Curves and Power Density Spectra in the ICMART Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Bo

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we simulate the prompt emission light curves of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) within the framework of the Internal-Collision-induced MAgnetic Reconnection and Turbulence (ICMART) model. This model applies to GRBs with a moderately-high magnetization parameter $\\sigma$ in the emission region. We show that this model can produce highly variable light curves with both fast and slow components. The rapid variability is caused by many locally Doppler-boosted mini-emitters due to turbulent magnetic reconnection in a moderately-high-$\\sigma$ flow. The run-away growth and subsequent depletion of these mini-emitters as a function time define a broad slow component for each ICMART event. A GRB light curve is usually composed of multiple ICMART events that are fundamentally driven by the erratic GRB central engine activity. Allowing variations of the model parameters, one is able to reproduce a variety of light curves and the power density spectra as observed.

  14. Circular geodesics and accretion disks in Janis-Newman-Winicour and Gamma metric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anirban N. Chowdhury; Mandar Patil; Daniele Malafarina; Pankaj S. Joshi

    2012-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We study here circular timelike geodesics in the Janis-Newman-Winicour and Gamma metric spacetimes which contain a strong curvature naked singularity and reduce to the Schwarzschild metric for a specific value of one of the parameters. We show that for both the metrics the range of allowed parameters can be divided into three regimes where structure of the circular geodesics is qualitatively different. It follows that the properties of the accretion disks around such naked singularities can be significantly different from those of disks around black holes. This adds to previous studies showing that if naked singularities exist in nature, their observational signature would be significantly different from that of the black hole.

  15. Design of a 2 MeV Compton scattering gamma-ray source for DNDO missions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartemann, F V; Albert, F

    2009-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear resonance fluorescence-based isotope-specific detection and imaging is a powerful new technology that can enable access to new mission spaces for DNDO. Within this context, the development of advanced mono-energetic gamma ray sources plays an important role in the DNDO R&D portfolio, as it offers a faster, more precise, and safer alternative to conventional Bremsstrahlung sources. In this report, a specific design strategy is presented, along with a series of theoretical and computational tools, with the goal of optimizing source parameters for DNDO applications. In parallel, key technologies are outlined, along with discussions justifying specific choices and contrasting those with other alternatives. Finally, a complete conceptual design is described, and machine parameters are presented in detail.

  16. Observational Constraints on Cosmological Models with the Updated Long Gamma-Ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hao Wei

    2010-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    In the present work, by the help of the newly released Union2 compilation which consists of 557 Type Ia supernovae (SNIa), we calibrate 109 long Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) with the well-known Amati relation, using the cosmology-independent calibration method proposed by Liang {\\it et al.}. We have obtained 59 calibrated high-redshift GRBs which can be used to constrain cosmological models without the circularity problem (we call them ``Hymnium'' GRBs sample for convenience). Then, we consider the joint constraints on 7 cosmological models from the latest observational data, namely, the combination of 557 Union2 SNIa dataset, 59 calibrated Hymnium GRBs dataset (obtained in this work), the shift parameter $R$ from the WMAP 7-year data, and the distance parameter $A$ of the measurement of the baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) peak in the distribution of SDSS luminous red galaxies. We also briefly consider the comparison of these 7 cosmological models.

  17. Can black-hole neutrino-cooled disks power short gamma-ray bursts?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Tong; Hou, Shu-Jin; Gu, Wei-Min

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Stellar-mass black holes (BHs) surrounded by neutrino-dominated accretion flows (NDAFs) are the plausible candidates to power gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) via neutrinos emission and their annihilation. The progenitors of short-duration GRBs (SGRBs) are generally considered to be compact binaries mergers. According to the simulation results, the disk mass of the NDAF has been limited after merger events. We can estimate such disk mass by using the current SGRB observational data and fireball model. The results show that the disk mass of a certain SGRB mainly depends on its output energy, jet opening angle, and central BH characteristics. Even for the extreme BH parameters, some SGRBs require massive disks, which approach or exceed the limits in simulations. We suggest that there may exist alternative magnetohydrodynamic processes or some mechanisms increasing the neutrino emission to produce SGRBs with the reasonable BH parameters and disk mass.

  18. Ray-wave correspondence in the nonlinear description of stadium-cavity lasers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Susumu Shinohara; Takahisa Harayama; Hakan E. Tureci; A. Douglas Stone

    2006-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that the solution of fully nonlinear lasing equations for stadium cavities exhibits a highly directional emission pattern. This directionality can be well explained by a ray-dynamical model, where the dominant ray-escape dynamics is governed by the unstable manifolds of the unstable short periodic orbits for the stadium cavity. Investigating the cold-cavity modes relevant for the lasing, we found that all of the high-Q modes have the emission directionality corresponding to that of the ray-dynamical model.

  19. Correspondence (Top Secret) of the Manhattan Engineer District, 1942--1946

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1982-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This pamphlet prepared by the National Archives Trust Fund Board, National Archives Records Service provides an overview to a collection of formerly security classified `Top Secret` correspondence maintained by Major General Leslie Groves when commanding general of the Manhattan District from September, 1942 to December, 1946. The pamphlet describes the administrative history of the record collection. The records are described as well as how they are arranged along with finding aids and content of records. For further details concerning the se records the user is referred to the US National Archives, Washington.

  20. Exceptional Laguerre and Jacobi polynomials and the corresponding potentials through Darboux-Crum Transformations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryu Sasaki; Satoshi Tsujimoto; Alexei Zhedanov

    2010-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Simple derivation is presented of the four families of infinitely many shape invariant Hamiltonians corresponding to the exceptional Laguerre and Jacobi polynomials. Darboux-Crum transformations are applied to connect the well-known shape invariant Hamiltonians of the radial oscillator and the Darboux-P\\"oschl-Teller potential to the shape invariant potentials of Odake-Sasaki. Dutta and Roy derived the two lowest members of the exceptional Laguerre polynomials by this method. The method is expanded to its full generality and many other ramifications, including the aspects of generalised Bochner problem and the bispectral property of the exceptional orthogonal polynomials, are discussed.

  1. Adjustable Robust Parameter Design with Unknown Distributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ihsan Yanikoglu

    2013-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Mar 27, 2013 ... Adjustable Robust Parameter Design with Unknown Distributions. ihsan Yanikoglu(i.yanikoglu ***at*** uvt.nl) Dick den Hertog(d.denhertog ...

  2. ONE-PARAMETER CONTINUOUS FIELDS OF KIRCHBERG ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    One-parameter separable unital continuous fields of Kirchberg algebras (nuclear purely infinite simple C*-algebras) with torsion free Ki-groups and trivial ...

  3. Sandia National Laboratories: main parameter determining laminate...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    parameter determining laminate fatigue lifetime is the cumulative time under load New Material Tests Show Biaxial Laminate Creep Is Important for Large Wind-Turbine Blades On...

  4. Relativistic Winds from Compact Gamma-ray Sources: I. Radiative Acceleration in the Klein-Nishina Regime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piero Madau; Christopher Thompson

    1999-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the radiative acceleration to relativistic bulk velocities of a cold, optically thin plasma which is exposed to an external source of gamma-rays. The flow is driven by radiative momentum input to the gas, the accelerating force being due to Compton scattering in the relativistic Klein-Nishina limit. The bulk Lorentz factor of the plasma, Gamma, derived as a function of distance from the radiating source, is compared with the corresponding result in the Thomson limit. Depending on the geometry and spectrum of the radiation field, we find that particles are accelerated to the asymptotic Lorentz factor at infinity much more rapidly in the relativistic regime; and the radiation drag is reduced as blueshifted, aberrated photons experience a decreased relativistic cross section and scatter preferentially in the forward direction. The random energy imparted to the plasma by gamma-rays can be converted into bulk motion if the hot particles execute many Larmor orbits before cooling. This `Compton afterburn' may be a supplementary source of momentum if energetic leptons are injected by pair creation, but can be neglected in the case of pure Klein-Nishina scattering. Compton drag by side-scattered radiation is shown to be more important in limiting the bulk Lorentz factor than the finite inertia of the accelerating medium. The processes discussed here may be relevant to a variety of astrophysical situations where luminous compact sources of hard X- and gamma-ray photons are observed, including active galactic nuclei, galactic black hole candidates, and gamma-ray bursts.

  5. Formulation and solution of the delayed gamma dose rate problem using the concept of effective delayed gamma production cross section

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liew, S.L.; Ku, L.P.

    1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With appropriate approximations, the delayed gamma dose rate problem can be formulated in terms of the effective delayed gamma production cross section. The coupled neutron-delayed-gamma transport equations then take the same form as the coupled neutron-prompt-gamma transport equations and they can, therefore, be solved directly in the same manner. This eliminates the need for the tedious and error prone flux coupling step in conventional calculations. Mathematical formulation and solution algorithms are derived. The advantages of this method are illustrated by an example of its application in the solution of a practical design problem. 62 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  6. A Reconnection Switch to Trigger gamma-Ray Burst Jet Dissipation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKinney, Jonathan C.; Uzdensky, Dmitri A.; ,

    2012-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Prompt gamma-ray burst (GRB) emission requires some mechanism to dissipate an ultrarelativistic jet. Internal shocks or some form of electromagnetic dissipation are candidate mechanisms. Any mechanism needs to answer basic questions, such as what is the origin of variability, what radius does dissipation occur at, and how does efficient prompt emission occur. These mechanisms also need to be consistent with how ultrarelativistic jets form and stay baryon pure despite turbulence and electromagnetic reconnection near the compact object and despite stellar entrainment within the collapsar model. We use the latest magnetohydrodynamical models of ultrarelativistic jets to explore some of these questions in the context of electromagnetic dissipation due to the slow collisional and fast collisionless reconnection mechanisms, as often associated with Sweet-Parker and Petschek reconnection, respectively. For a highly magnetized ultrarelativistic jet and typical collapsar parameters, we find that significant electromagnetic dissipation may be avoided until it proceeds catastrophically near the jet photosphere at large radii (r {approx} 10{sup 13}-10{sup 14}cm), by which the jet obtains a high Lorentz factor ({gamma} {approx} 100-1000), has a luminosity of L{sub j} {approx} 10{sup 50}-10{sup 51} erg s{sup -1}, has observer variability timescales of order 1s (ranging from 0.001-10s), achieves {gamma}{theta}{sub j} {approx} 10-20 (for opening half-angle {theta}{sub j}) and so is able to produce jet breaks, and has comparable energy available for both prompt and afterglow emission. A range of model parameters are investigated and simplified scaling laws are derived. This reconnection switch mechanism allows for highly efficient conversion of electromagnetic energy into prompt emission and associates the observed prompt GRB pulse temporal structure with dissipation timescales of some number of reconnecting current sheets embedded in the jet. We hope this work helps motivate the development of self-consistent radiative compressible relativistic reconnection models.

  7. Composition and apparatus for detecting gamma radiation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hofstetter, K.J.

    1994-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A gamma radiation detector and a radioluminescent composition for use therein. The detector includes a radioluminescent composition that emits light in a characteristic wavelength region when exposed to gamma radiation, and means for detecting said radiation. The composition contains a scintillant such as anglesite (PbSO[sub 4]) or cerussite (PbCO[sub 3]) incorporated into an inert, porous glass matrix via a sol-gel process. Particles of radiation-sensitive scintillant are added to, a sol solution. The mixture is polymerized to form a gel, then dried under conditions that preserve the structural integrity and radiation sensitivity of the scintillant. The final product is a composition containing the uniformly-dispersed scintillant in an inert, optically transparent and highly porous matrix. The composition is chemically inert and substantially impervious to environmental conditions including changes in temperature, air pressure, and so forth. It can be fabricated in cylinders, blocks with holes therethrough for flow of fluid, sheets, surface coatings, pellets or other convenient shapes. 3 figs.

  8. Gamma neutron assay method and apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cole, Jerald D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Aryaeinejad, Rahmat (Idaho Falls, ID); Greenwood, Reginald C. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The gamma neutron assay technique is an alternative method to standard safeguards techniques for the identification and assaying of special nuclear materials in a field or laboratory environment, as a tool for dismantlement and destruction of nuclear weapons, and to determine the isotopic ratios for a blend-down program on uranium. It is capable of determining the isotopic ratios of fissionable material from the spontaneous or induced fission of a sample to within approximately 0.5%. This is based upon the prompt coincidence relationships that occur in the fission process and the proton conservation and quasi-conservation of nuclear mass (A) that exists between the two fission fragments. The system is used in both passive (without an external neutron source and active (with an external neutron source) mode. The apparatus consists of an array of neutron and gamma-ray detectors electronically connected to determine coincident events. The method can also be used to assay radioactive waste which contains fissile material, even in the presence of a high background radiation field.

  9. Gamma neutron assay method and apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cole, J.D.; Aryaeinejad, R.; Greenwood, R.C.

    1995-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The gamma neutron assay technique is an alternative method to standard safeguards techniques for the identification and assaying of special nuclear materials in a field or laboratory environment, as a tool for dismantlement and destruction of nuclear weapons, and to determine the isotopic ratios for a blend-down program on uranium. It is capable of determining the isotopic ratios of fissionable material from the spontaneous or induced fission of a sample to within approximately 0.5%. This is based upon the prompt coincidence relationships that occur in the fission process and the proton conservation and quasi-conservation of nuclear mass (A) that exists between the two fission fragments. The system is used in both passive (without an external neutron source) and active (with an external neutron source) mode. The apparatus consists of an array of neutron and gamma-ray detectors electronically connected to determine coincident events. The method can also be used to assay radioactive waste which contains fissile material, even in the presence of a high background radiation field. 7 figures.

  10. Radio flares from gamma-ray bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kopac, D; Kobayashi, S; Virgili, F J; Harrison, R; Japelj, J; Guidorzi, C; Melandri, A; Gomboc, A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present predictions of centimeter and millimeter radio emission from reverse shocks in the early afterglows of gamma-ray bursts with the goal of determining their detectability with current and future radio facilities. Using a range of GRB properties, such as peak optical brightness and time, isotropic equivalent gamma-ray energy and redshift, we simulate radio light curves in a framework generalized for any circumburst medium structure and including a parametrization of the shell thickness regime that is more realistic than the simple assumption of thick- or thin-shell approximations. Building on earlier work by Mundell et al. (2007) and Melandri et al. (2010) in which the typical frequency of the reverse shock was suggested to lie at radio, rather than optical wavelengths at early times, we show that the brightest and most distinct reverse-shock radio signatures are detectable up to 0.1 -- 1 day after the burst, emphasizing the need for rapid radio follow-up. Detection is easier for bursts with later opt...

  11. Light-Front Quantization Approach to the Gauge Gravity Correspondence and Hadron Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    de Teramond, Guy F.; /Costa Rica U.; Brodsky, Stanley J.; /SLAC

    2010-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We find a correspondence between semiclassical QCD quantized on the light-front and a dual gravity model in anti-de Sitter (AdS) space, thus providing an initial approximation to QCD in its strongly coupled regime. This correspondence - light-front holography - leads to a light-front Hamiltonian and relativistic bound-state wave equations that are functions of an invariant impact variable {zeta} which measures the separation of the quark and gluonic constituents within hadrons at equal lightfront time. The eigenvalues of the resulting light-front Schrodinger and Dirac equations are consistent with the observed light meson and baryon spectrum, and the eigenmodes provide the light-front wavefunctions, the probability amplitudes describing the dynamics of the hadronic constituents. The light-front equations of motion, which are dual to an effective classical gravity theory, possess remarkable algebraic and integrability properties which are dictated by the underlying conformal properties of the theory. We extend the algebraic construction to include a confining potential while preserving the integrability of the mesonic and baryonic bound-state equations.

  12. Light-Front Quantization Approach to the Gauge-Gravity Correspondence and Hadron Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teramond, Guy F. de [Universidad de Costa Rica, San Jose (Costa Rica); Brodsky, Stanley J. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94309 (United States)

    2010-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We find a correspondence between semiclassical QCD quantized on the light-front and a dual gravity model in anti--de Sitter (AdS) space, thus providing an initial approximation to QCD in its strongly coupled regime. This correspondence--light-front holography--leads to a light-front Hamiltonian and relativistic bound-state wave equations that are functions of an invariant impact variable {zeta} which measures the separation of the quark and gluonic constituents within hadrons at equal light-front time. The eigenvalues of the resulting light-front Schroedinger and Dirac equations are consistent with the observed light meson and baryon spectrum, and the eigenmodes provide the light-front wavefunctions, the probability amplitudes describing the dynamics of the hadronic constituents. The light-front equations of motion, which are dual to an effective classical gravity theory, possess remarkable algebraic and integrability properties which are dictated by the underlying conformal properties of the theory. We extend the algebraic construction to include a confining potential while preserving the integrability of the mesonic and baryonic bound-state equations.

  13. THE BRIGHT GAMMA-RAY BURST OF 2000 FEBRUARY 10: A CASE STUDY OF AN OPTICALLY DARK GAMMA-RAY BURST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fynbo, Johan

    THE BRIGHT GAMMA-RAY BURST OF 2000 FEBRUARY 10: A CASE STUDY OF AN OPTICALLY DARK GAMMA-RAY BURST L Received 2002 January 16; accepted 2002 June 8 ABSTRACT The gamma-ray burst GRB 000210 had the highest: observations -- gamma-rays: bursts 1. INTRODUCTION It is observationally well established that about half

  14. Correspondence: Email: korpela@ssl.berkeley.edu; Telephone: (510) 643-6538; URL: http://setiathome.ssl.berkeley.edu/~korpela

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Korpela, Eric J.

    ___________________ Correspondence: Email: korpela@ssl.berkeley.edu; Telephone: (510) 643-6538; URL: http://setiathome.ssl.berkeley.edu/~korpela The SPEAR Science Payload Eric J. Korpelaa , Jerry

  15. Bianchi type-VI anisotropic dark energy model with varying EoS parameter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bijan Saha

    2012-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Within the scope of an anisotropic Bianchi type-VI cosmological model we have studied the evolution of the universe filled with perfect fluid and dark energy. To get the deterministic model of Universe, we assume that the shear scalar $(\\sigma)$ in the model is proportional to expansion scalar $(\\vartheta)$. This assumption allows only isotropic distribution of fluid. Exact solution to the corresponding equations are obtained. The EoS parameter for dark energy as well as deceleration parameter is found to be the time varying functions. Using the observational data qualitative picture of the evolution of the universe corresponding to different of its stages is given. The stability of the solutions obtained is also studied.

  16. PARAMETER ESTIMATION IN PETROLEUM AND GROUNDWATER MODELING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ewing, Richard E.

    on grand challenge problems. In today's petroleum industry, reservoir simulators are routinely usedPARAMETER ESTIMATION IN PETROLEUM AND GROUNDWATER MODELING R.E. Ewing, M.S. Pilant, J.G. Wade in the model, the numerical discretization used, and the solution algorithms employed. Parameter identification

  17. Extragalactic database. VII Reduction of astrophysical parameters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Paturel; H. Andernach; L. Bottinelli; H. Di Nella; N. Durand; R. Garnier; L. Gouguenheim; P. Lanoix; M. C. Marthinet; C. Petit; J. Rousseau; G. Theureau; I. Vauglin

    1998-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The Lyon-Meudon Extragalactic database (LEDA) gives a free access to the main astrophysical parameters for more than 100,000 galaxies. The most common names are compiled allowing users to recover quickly any galaxy. All these measured astrophysical parameters are first reduced to a common system according to well defined reduction formulae leading to mean homogeneized parameters. Further, these parameters are also transformed into corrected parameters from widely accepted models. For instance, raw 21-cm line widths are transformed into mean standard widths after correction for instrumental effect and then into maximum velocity rotation properly corrected for inclination and non-circular velocity. This paper presents the reduction formulae for each parameter: coordinates, morphological type and luminosity class, diameter and axis ratio, apparent magnitude (UBV, IR, HI) and colors, maximum velocity rotation and central velocity dispersion, radial velocity, mean surface brightness, distance modulus and absolute magnitude, and group membership. For each of these parameters intermediate quantities are given: galactic extinction, inclination, K-correction etc.. All these parameters are available from direct connexion to LEDA (telnet lmc.univ-lyon1.fr, login: leda, no passwd OR http://www-obs.univ-lyon1.fr/leda ) and distributed on a standard CD-ROM (PGC-ROM 1996) by the Observatoire de Lyon via the CNRS (mail to petit@obs.univ-lyon1.fr).

  18. Observations of Gamma-Ray Burst Afterglows with the AEOS Burst Camera.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flewelling, Heather Anne

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), are variable bursts of gamma-ray radiation, that lasts from milliseconds to hundreds of seconds. These bursts of gamma rays are detected in… (more)

  19. GRB 020410: A Gamma-ray burst afterglow discovered by its supernova light

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Training Network “Gamma-Ray Bursts: An Enigma and a Tool”,Journal GRB 020410: A Gamma-Ray Burst Afterglow DiscoveredSubject headings: gamma rays: bursts – supernova: general

  20. Compton Recoil Electron Tracking With the TIGRE Gamma-Ray Balloon Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kamiya, Kaoru

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AGNs), pulsars, gamma-ray bursts, cosmic ray interactionssensitive to cosmic gamma-ray bursts in the energy range ofGalactic center, a single gamma-ray burst which occurred 10

  1. Measurement of uranium enrichment by gamma spectroscopy: result of an experimental design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Gamma Spectrometry, uranium enrichment #12;PAPER Measurement of uranium enrichment by gamma spectroscopy: result of an experimental design Gamma spectroscopy is commonly used in nuclear safeguards to measure uranium enrichment. An experimental

  2. THE EFFECT OF RADON TRANSPORT IN GROUNDWATER UPON GAMMA-RAY BOREHOLE LOGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nelson, P.H.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    f o r Uranium by Gamma-Ray Spectrometry." Geophysics, 45,222 Emanation from Gamma Spectrometry on Stripa Samples B.222 Emanation from Gamma Spectrometry on Stripa Samples B.

  3. Global episodic beta/gamma synchrony 1 Freeman & Rogers A neurobiological theory of meaning in perception.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Freeman, Walter J.

    Global episodic beta/gamma synchrony 1 Freeman & Rogers A neurobiological theory of meaning words: analytic phase, beta oscillation, EEG synchronization, gamma oscillation, Hilbert transform, phase transition Running Title: Global episodic beta/gamma synchrony #12;Global episodic beta

  4. Physics of Gamma-ray Bursts and Multi-messenger Signals from Double Neutron Star Mergers.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, He

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??My dissertation includes two parts: Physics of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs): Gamma-ray bursts are multi-wavelength transients, with both prompt gamma-ray emission and late time afterglow emission… (more)

  5. E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric gamma-ray imaging Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    gamma-ray imaging Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: atmospheric gamma-ray imaging Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Ivan De Mitri VHE Gamma...

  6. The Search for Muon Neutrinos from Northern Hemisphere Gamma-Ray Bursts with AMANDA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Achterberg, A.; IceCube Collaboration

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    see also the Swift Gamma-Ray Burst Mission Page: http://from Northern Hemisphere Gamma-Ray Bursts with AMANDA A.Northern Hemisphere Gamma-Ray Bursts with AMANDA The IceCube

  7. Search for muon neutrinos from Gamma-Ray Bursts with the IceCube neutrino telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abbasi, R.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2009, GCN: The Gamma ray bursts Coordinates Network, http://for muon neutrinos from Gamma-Ray Bursts with the IceCubeMereghetti, S. 2004, in Gamma-ray Bursts: 30 Years of

  8. Long gamma-ray bursts and core-collapse supernovae have different environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Progenitor Stars of Gamma-Ray Bursts. Astrophys. J. 637, 45.massive stars towards gamma-ray bursts. Astr. Astrophys.On the Lyalpha emission from gamma-ray burst host galaxies:

  9. Current Trends in Gamma Ray Detection for Radiological Emergency Response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mukhopadhyay, S., Guss, P., Maurer, R.

    2011-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Passive and active detection of gamma rays from shielded radioactive materials, including special nuclear materials, is an important task for any radiological emergency response organization. This article reports on the current trends and status of gamma radiation detection objectives and measurement techniques as applied to nonproliferation and radiological emergencies.

  10. THE INTERPLANETARY NETWORK SUPPLEMENT TO THE FERMI GBM CATALOG OF COSMIC GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hurley, K. [University of California, Berkeley, Space Sciences Laboratory, 7 Gauss Way, Berkeley, CA 94720-7450 (United States); Pal'shin, V. D.; Aptekar, R. L.; Golenetskii, S. V.; Frederiks, D. D.; Mazets, E. P.; Svinkin, D. S. [Ioffe Physical Technical Institute, St. Petersburg 194021 (Russian Federation); Briggs, M. S.; Connaughton, V. [University of Alabama in Huntsville, NSSTC, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Meegan, C. [Universities Space Research Association, NSSTC, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Goldsten, J. [Applied Physics Laboratory, Johns Hopkins University, Laurel, MD 20723 (United States); Boynton, W.; Fellows, C.; Harshman, K. [University of Arizona, Department of Planetary Sciences, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Mitrofanov, I. G.; Golovin, D. V.; Kozyrev, A. S.; Litvak, M. L.; Sanin, A. B. [Space Research Institute, 84/32, Profsoyuznaya, Moscow 117997 (Russian Federation); Rau, A., E-mail: khurley@ssl.berkeley.edu [Max-Planck-Institut fuer extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse, Postfach 1312, D-85748 Garching (Germany); and others

    2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present Interplanetary Network (IPN) data for the gamma-ray bursts in the first Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) catalog. Of the 491 bursts in that catalog, covering 2008 July 12 to 2010 July 11, 427 were observed by at least one other instrument in the nine-spacecraft IPN. Of the 427, the localizations of 149 could be improved by arrival time analysis (or {sup t}riangulation{sup )}. For any given burst observed by the GBM and one other distant spacecraft, triangulation gives an annulus of possible arrival directions whose half-width varies between about 0.'4 and 32 Degree-Sign , depending on the intensity, time history, and arrival direction of the burst, as well as the distance between the spacecraft. We find that the IPN localizations intersect the 1{sigma} GBM error circles in only 52% of the cases, if no systematic uncertainty is assumed for the latter. If a 6 Degree-Sign systematic uncertainty is assumed and added in quadrature, the two localization samples agree about 87% of the time, as would be expected. If we then multiply the resulting error radii by a factor of three, the two samples agree in slightly over 98% of the cases, providing a good estimate of the GBM 3{sigma} error radius. The IPN 3{sigma} error boxes have areas between about 1 arcmin{sup 2} and 110 deg{sup 2}, and are, on the average, a factor of 180 smaller than the corresponding GBM localizations. We identify two bursts in the IPN/GBM sample that did not appear in the GBM catalog. In one case, the GBM triggered on a terrestrial gamma flash, and in the other, its origin was given as ''uncertain''. We also discuss the sensitivity and calibration of the IPN.

  11. MODELING PHASE-ALIGNED GAMMA-RAY AND RADIO MILLISECOND PULSAR LIGHT CURVES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venter, C. [Centre for Space Research, North-West University, Potchefstroom Campus, Potchefstroom 2520 (South Africa); Johnson, T. J.; Harding, A. K. [Astrophysics Science Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the discovery of the first eight gamma-ray millisecond pulsars (MSPs) by the Fermi Large Area Telescope, this population has been steadily expanding. Four of the more recent detections, PSR J0034-0534, PSR J1939+2134 (B1937+21; the first MSP ever discovered), PSR J1959+2048 (B1957+20; the first discovery of a black widow system), and PSR J2214+3000, exhibit a phenomenon not present in the original discoveries: nearly phase-aligned radio and gamma-ray light curves (LCs). To account for the phase alignment, we explore models where both the radio and gamma-ray emission originate either in the outer magnetosphere near the light cylinder or near the polar caps. Using a Markov Chain Monte Carlo technique to search for best-fit model parameters, we obtain reasonable LC fits for the first three of these MSPs in the context of 'altitude-limited' outer gap (alOG) and two-pole caustic (alTPC) geometries (for both gamma-ray and radio emission). These models differ from the standard outer gap (OG)/two-pole caustic (TPC) models in two respects: the radio emission originates in caustics at relatively high altitudes compared to the usual conal radio beams, and we allow both the minimum and maximum altitudes of the gamma-ray and radio emission regions to vary within a limited range (excluding the minimum gamma-ray altitude of the alTPC model, which is kept constant at the stellar radius, and that of the alOG model, which is set to the position-dependent null charge surface altitude). Alternatively, phase-aligned solutions also exist for emission originating near the stellar surface in a slot gap scenario ('low-altitude slot gap' (laSG) models). We find that the alTPC models provide slightly better LC fits than the alOG models, and both of these give better fits than the laSG models (for the limited range of parameters considered in the case of the laSG models). Thus, our fits imply that the phase-aligned LCs are likely of caustic origin, produced in the outer magnetosphere, and that the radio emission for these pulsars may come from close to the light cylinder. In addition, we were able to constrain the minimum and maximum emission altitudes with typical uncertainties of {approx}30% of the light cylinder radius. Our results therefore describe a third gamma-ray MSP subclass, in addition to the two previously found by Venter et al.: those with LCs fit by standard OG/TPC models and those with LCs fit by pair-starved polar cap models.

  12. A Plasma Instability Theory of Gamma-Ray Burst Emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. J. Brainerd

    1999-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A new theory for gamma-ray burst radiation is presented. In this theory, magnetic fields and relativistic electrons are created through plasma processes arising as a relativistic shell passes through the interstellar medium. The gamma-rays are produced through synchrotron self-Compton emission. It is found that shocks do not arise in this theory, and that efficient gamma-ray emission only occurs for a high Lorentz factor and a high-density interstellar medium. The former explains the absence of gamma-ray bursts with thermal spectra. The latter provides the Compton attenuation theory with an explanation of why the interstellar medium density is always high. The theory predicts the existence of a class of extragalactic optical transient that emit no gamma-rays.

  13. Gamma decay of unbound states following neutron capture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raman, S.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutron capture ..gamma..-ray spectroscopy is a powerful technique to study the ..gamma..-decay of unbound levels just above the neutron separation energy. It is generally believed that the (n,..gamma..) reaction proceeds by way of a compound nucleus reaction of great complexity; and, therefore, the capture ..gamma..-ray spectrum should be describable in terms of statistical laws. However, measurements have shown that effects are present due to single-particle motions and due to giant resonances. The study of (n,..gamma..) spectra averaged over as many resonances as possible provides one of the best experimental means of directly obtaining reliable values for radiative transition probabilities from highly excited nuclear states. In very select cases, unbound levels which are populated in allowed ..beta.. decay can also be observed as neutron resonances. These ideas are illustrated with examples of recent data.

  14. Probing WWgamma coupling through e gamma --> nu W at ILC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, Satendra

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The anomalous WWgamma coupling is probed through e gamma--> nu W at the ILC. With a spectacular single lepton final state, this process is well suited to study the above coupling. Within the narrow-width approximation, a semi-analytical study of the secondary lepton energy-angle double distribution is performed. Cross section measurements can probe delta-kappa-gamma to about +/- 0.004 for a luminosity of 100 /fb at 500 GeV center of mass energy with unpolarised electron beam. The limits derivable on lambda-gamma are comparatively more relaxed. These limits can be improved significantly by considering the angle and energy distributions of the final state muon. More importantly, the angular distributions at fixed energy values, and energy distribution at fixed angles present very interesting possibility of distinguishing the case of lambda-gamma=0, lambda-gamma 0.

  15. Polarization mesurements of gamma ray bursts and axion like particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andre Rubbia; Alexander Sakharov

    2008-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A polarized gamma ray emission spread over a sufficiently wide energy band from a strongly magnetized astrophysical object like gamma ray bursts (GRBs) offers an opportunity to test the hypothesis of axion like particles (ALPs). Based on evidences of polarized gamma ray emission detected in several gamma ray bursts we estimated the level of ALPs induced dichroism, which could take place in the magnetized fireball environment of a GRB. This allows to estimate the sensitivity of polarization measurements of GRBs to the ALP-photon coupling. This sensitivity $\\gag\\le 2.2\\cdot 10^{-11} {\\rm GeV^{-1}}$ calculated for the ALP mass $m_a=10^{-3}~{\\rm eV}$ and MeV energy spread of gamma ray emission is competitive with the sensitivity of CAST and becomes even stronger for lower ALPs masses.

  16. Analysis of neutron scattering data: Visualization and parameter estimation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beauchamp, J.J.; Fedorov, V.; Hamilton, W.A.; Yethiraj, M.

    1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Traditionally, small-angle neutron and x-ray scattering (SANS and SAXS) data analysis requires measurements of the signal and corrections due to the empty sample container, detector efficiency and time-dependent background. These corrections are then made on a pixel-by-pixel basis and estimates of relevant parameters (e.g., the radius of gyration) are made using the corrected data. This study was carried out in order to determine whether treatment of the detector efficiency and empty sample cell in a more statistically sound way would significantly reduce the uncertainties in the parameter estimators. Elements of experiment design are shortly discussed in this paper. For instance, we studied the way the time for a measurement should be optimally divided between the counting for signal, background and detector efficiency. In Section 2 we introduce the commonly accepted models for small-angle neutron and x-scattering and confine ourselves to the Guinier and Rayleigh models and their minor generalizations. The traditional approaches of data analysis are discussed only to the extent necessary to allow their comparison with the proposed techniques. Section 3 describes the main stages of the proposed method: visual data exploration, fitting the detector sensitivity function, and fitting a compound model. This model includes three additive terms describing scattering by the sampler, scattering with an empty container and a background noise. We compare a few alternatives for the first term by applying various scatter plots and computing sums of standardized squared residuals. Possible corrections due to smearing effects and randomness of estimated parameters are also shortly discussed. In Section 4 the robustness of the estimators with respect to low and upper bounds imposed on the momentum value is discussed. We show that for the available data set the most accurate and stable estimates are generated by models containing double terms either of Guinier's or Rayleigh's type. The optimal partitioning of the total experimental time between measuring various signals is discussed in Section 5. We applied a straightforward optimization instead of some special experimental techniques because of the numerical simplicity of the corresponding problem. As a criterion of optimality we selected the variance of the gyration radius maximum likelihood estimator. The statistical background of the proposed approach is given in the appendix. The properties of the maximum likelihood estimators and the corresponding iterated estimator together with its possible numerical realization are presented in subsection A.1. In subsection A.2 we prove that the use of a compound model leads to more efficient estimators than a stage-wise analysis of different components entering that model.

  17. Note on Gauge Theories on M/G and the AdS/CFT Correspondence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gary T. Horowitz; Ted Jacobson

    2002-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

    It is well known that a weakly coupled U(N) gauge theory on a torus with sides of length L has extra light states with energies of order 1/NL. We show that a similar result holds for gauge theories on M/G where M is any compact Riemannian manifold and G is any freely acting discrete isometry group. As in the toroidal case, this is achieved by adding a suitable nontrivial flat connection. As one application, we consider the AdS/CFT correspondence on spacetimes asymptotic to AdS_5/G. By considering finite size effects at nonzero temperature, we show that consistency requires these extra light states of the gauge theory on S^3/G.

  18. From AdS/CFT correspondence to hydrodynamics. II. Sound waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Policastro; D. T. Son; A. O. Starinets

    2005-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    As a non-trivial check of the non-supersymmetric gauge/gravity duality, we use a near-extremal black brane background to compute the retarded Green's functions of the stress-energy tensor in N=4 super-Yang-Mills (SYM) theory at finite temperature. For the long-distance, low-frequency modes of the diagonal components of the stress-energy tensor, hydrodynamics predicts the existence of a pole in the correlators corresponding to propagation of sound waves in the N=4 SYM plasma. The retarded Green's functions obtained from gravity do indeed exhibit this pole, with the correct values for the sound speed and the rate of attenuation.

  19. Correspondence Between Magnetoresistance and Magnetization in Co/Cu Multilayers Studied at Higher Spacer Layer Thickness

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patil, P. B.; Kumar, M. Senthil [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai 400076 (India); Aswal, D. K.; Gupta, S. K. [Technical Physics and Prototype Engineering Division, BARC, Mumbai 400085 (India)

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of [Cu(t{sub Cu})/Co(25 A)]{sub 25} multilayers at higher spacer layer thickness have been deposited by dc magnetron sputtering. Magnetoresistance (MR) measurements have been carried out at different temperatures. MR curves showed hysteresis by displaying peaks at magnetic field H{sub p}. The field values exhibiting the maximum resistance in the magnetoresistance curve (H{sub p}) were greater than the coercivity (H{sub c}). The correspondence between the shape of the MR curve and that of the magnetization curve has been established and observed peak splitting in MR curves is attributed to a hardening in the magnetization reversal of some magnetic grains.

  20. Deep Broadband Observations of the Distant Gamma-ray Blazar PKS 1424+240

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Archambault, S; Behera, B; Beilicke, M; Benbow, W; Berger, K; Bird, R; Biteau, J; Bugaev, V; Byrum, K; Cardenzana, J V; Cerruti, M; Chen, X; Ciupik, L; Connolly, M P; Cui, W; Dumm, J; Errando, M; Falcone, A; Federici, S; Feng, Q; Finley, J P; Fleischhack, H; Fortson, L; Furniss, A; Galante, N; Gillanders, G H; Griffin, S; Griffiths, S T; Grube, J; Gyuk, G; Hanna, D; Holder, J; Hughes, G; Humensky, T B; Johnson, C A; Kaaret, P; Kertzman, M; Khassen, Y; Kieda, D; Krawczynski, H; Krennrich, F; Kumar, S; Lang, M J; Madhavan, A S; Maier, G; McCann, A; Meagher, K; Moriarty, P; Mukherjee, R; Nieto, D; de Bhroithe, A O'Faolain; Ong, R A; Otte, A N; Park, N; Pohl, M; Popkow, A; Prokoph, H; Quinn, J; Ragan, K; Rajotte, J; Reyes, L C; Reynolds, P T; Richards, G T; Roache, E; Sembroski, G H; Shahinyan, K; Staszak, D; Telezhinsky, I; Tucci, J V; Tyler, J; Varlotta, A; Vassiliev, V V; Vincent, S; Wakely, S P; Weinstein, A; Welsing, R; Wilhelm, A; Williams, D A; Ackermann, M; Ajello, M; Albert, A; Baldini, L; Bastieri, D; Bellazzini, R; Bissaldi, E; Bregeon, J; Buehler, R; Buson, S; Caliandro, G A; Cameron, R A; Caraveo, P A; Cavazzuti, E; Charles, E; Chiang, J; Ciprini, S; Claus, R; Cutini, S; D'Ammando, F; de Angelis, A; de Palma, F; Dermer, C D; Digel, S W; Di Venere, L; Drell, P S; Favuzzi, C; Franckowiak, A; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Gasparrini, D; Giglietto, N; Giordano, F; Giroletti, M; Grenier, I A; Guiriec, S; Jogler, T; Kuss, M; Larsson, S; Latronico, L; Longo, F; Loparco, F; Lubrano, P; Madejski, G M; Mayer, M; Mazziotta, M N; Michelson, P F; Mizuno, T; Monzani, M E; Morselli, A; Murgia, S; Nuss, E; Ohsugi, T; Ormes, J F; Perkins, J S; Piron, F; Pivato, G; Raino, S; Razzano, M; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Ritz, S; Schaal, M; Sgro, C; Siskind, E J; Spinelli, P; Takahashi, H; Tibaldo, L; Tinivella, M; Troja, E; Vianello, G; Werner, M; Wood, M

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present deep VERITAS observations of the blazar PKS 1424+240, along with contemporaneous Fermi Large Area Telescope, Swift X-ray Telescope and Swift UV Optical Telescope data between 2009 February 19 and 2013 June 8. This blazar resides at a redshift of $z\\ge0.6035$, displaying a significantly attenuated gamma-ray flux above 100 GeV due to photon absorption via pair-production with the extragalactic background light. We present more than 100 hours of VERITAS observations from three years, a multiwavelength light curve and the contemporaneous spectral energy distributions. The source shows a higher flux of (2.1$\\pm0.3$)$\\times10^{-7}$ ph m$^{-2}$s$^{-1}$ above 120 GeV in 2009 and 2011 as compared to the flux measured in 2013, corresponding to (1.02$\\pm0.08$)$\\times10^{-7}$ ph m$^{-2}$s$^{-1}$ above 120 GeV. The measured differential very high energy (VHE; $E\\ge100$ GeV) spectral indices are $\\Gamma=$3.8$\\pm$0.3, 4.3$\\pm$0.6 and 4.5$\\pm$0.2 in 2009, 2011 and 2013, respectively. No significant spectral change...

  1. DISCOVERY OF A NEW TeV GAMMA-RAY SOURCE: VER J0521+211

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Archambault, S. [Physics Department, McGill University, Montreal, QC H3A 2T8 (Canada); Arlen, T.; Aune, T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Behera, B.; Federici, S. [DESY, Platanenallee 6, D-15738 Zeuthen (Germany); Beilicke, M.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V. [Department of Physics, Washington University, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States); Benbow, W. [Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Amado, AZ 85645 (United States); Bird, R. [School of Physics, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Bouvier, A. [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics and Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Byrum, K. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Cesarini, A.; Connolly, M. P. [School of Physics, National University of Ireland Galway, University Road, Galway (Ireland); Ciupik, L. [Astronomy Department, Adler Planetarium and Astronomy Museum, Chicago, IL 60605 (United States); Cui, W.; Feng, Q.; Finley, J. P. [Department of Physics, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Errando, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Barnard College, Columbia University, NY 10027 (United States); Falcone, A., E-mail: fortin@veritas.sao.arizona.edu, E-mail: errando@astro.columbia.edu, E-mail: jholder@physics.udel.edu, E-mail: sfegan@llr.in2p3.fr [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 525 Davey Lab, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Collaboration: VERITAS Collaboration; and others

    2013-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the detection of a new TeV gamma-ray source, VER J0521+211, based on observations made with the VERITAS imaging atmospheric Cherenkov Telescope Array. These observations were motivated by the discovery of a cluster of >30 GeV photons in the first year of Fermi Large Area Telescope observations. VER J0521+211 is relatively bright at TeV energies, with a mean photon flux of (1.93 ± 0.13{sub stat} ± 0.78{sub sys}) × 10{sup –11} cm{sup –2} s{sup –1} above 0.2 TeV during the period of the VERITAS observations. The source is strongly variable on a daily timescale across all wavebands, from optical to TeV, with a peak flux corresponding to ?0.3 times the steady Crab Nebula flux at TeV energies. Follow-up observations in the optical and X-ray bands classify the newly discovered TeV source as a BL Lac-type blazar with uncertain redshift, although recent measurements suggest z = 0.108. VER J0521+211 exhibits all the defining properties of blazars in radio, optical, X-ray, and gamma-ray wavelengths.

  2. Milagro Constraints on Very High Energy Emission from Short Duration Gamma-Ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. A. Abdo; B. T. Allen; D. Berley; E. Blaufuss; S. Casanova; B. L. Dingus; R. W. Ellsworth; M. M. Gonzalez; J. A. Goodman; E. Hays; C. M. Hoffman; B. E. Kolterman; C. P. Lansdell; J. T. Linnemann; J. E. McEnery; A. I. Mincer; P. Nemethy; D. Noyes; J. M. Ryan; F. W. Samuelson; P. M. Saz Parkinson; A. Shoup; G. Sinnis; A. J. Smith; G. W. Sullivan; V. Vasileiou; G. P. Walker; D. A. Williams; X. W. Xu; G. B. Yodh

    2007-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent rapid localizations of short, hard gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) by the Swift and HETE satellites have led to the observation of the first afterglows and the measurement of the first redshifts from this type of burst. Detection of >100 GeV counterparts would place powerful constraints on GRB mechanisms. Seventeen short duration (100 GeV counterparts to these GRBs and find no significant emission correlated with these bursts. Due to the absorption of high-energy gamma rays by the extragalactic background light (EBL), detections are only expected for redshifts less than ~0.5. While most long duration GRBs occur at redshifts higher than 0.5, the opposite is thought to be true of short GRBs. Lack of a detected VHE signal thus allows setting meaningful fluence limits. One GRB in the sample (050509b) has a likely association with a galaxy at a redshift of 0.225, while another (051103) has been tentatively linked to the nearby galaxy M81. Fluence limits are corrected for EBL absorption, either using the known measured redshift, or computing the corresponding absorption for a redshift of 0.1 and 0.5, as well as for the case of z=0.

  3. A novel paradigm for short gamma-ray bursts with extended X-ray emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luciano Rezzolla; Pawan Kumar

    2015-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The merger of a binary of neutron stars provides natural explanations for many of the features of short gamma-ray bursts (SGRBs), such as the generation of a hot torus orbiting a rapidly rotating black hole, which can then build a magnetic jet and provide the energy reservoir to launch a relativistic outflow. Yet, this scenario has problems explaining the recently discovered long-term and sustained X-ray emission associated with the afterglows of a subclass of SGRBs. We propose a new model that explains how an X-ray afterglow can be sustained by the product of the merger and how the X-ray emission is produced before the corresponding emission in the gamma-band, although it is observed to follow it. Overall, our paradigm combines in a novel manner a number of well-established features of the emission in SGRBs and results from simulations. Because it involves the propagation of an ultra-relativistic outflow and its interaction with a confining medium, the paradigm also highlights a unifying phenomenology between short and long GRBs.

  4. Hafnium Resonance Parameter Analysis Using Neutron Capture and Transmission Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trbovich, M J; Barry, D P; Slovacek, R E; Danon, Y; Block, R C; Francis, N C; Lubert, M; Burke, J A; Drindak, N J; Lienweber, G; Ballad, R

    2007-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The focus of this work is to determine the resonance parameters for stable hafnium isotopes in the 0.005 - 200 eV region, with special emphasis on the overlapping {sup 176}Hf and {sup 178}Hf resonances near 8 eV. Accurate hafnium cross sections and resonance parameters are needed in order to quantify the effects of hafnium found in zirconium, a metal commonly used in reactors. The accuracy of the cross sections and the corresponding resonance parameters used in current nuclear analysis tools are rapidly becoming the limiting factor in reducing the overall uncertainty on reactor physics calculations. Experiments measuring neutron capture and transmission are routinely performed at the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) LINAC using the time-of flight technique. {sup 6}Li glass scintillation detectors were used for transmission experiments at flight path lengths of 15 and 25 m, respectively. Capture experiments were performed using a sixteen section NaI multiplicity detector at a flight path length of 25 m. These experiments utilized several thicknesses of metallic and isotope-enriched liquid Hf samples. The liquid Hf samples were designed to provide information on the {sup 176}Hf and {sup 178}Hf contributions to the 8 eV doublet without saturation. Data analyses were performed using the R-matrix Bayesian code SAMMY. A combined capture and transmission data analysis yielded resonance parameters for all hafnium isotopes from 0.005 - 200 eV. Additionally, resonance integrals were calculated, along with errors for each hafnium isotope, using the NJOY and INTER codes. The isotopic resonance integrals calculated were significantly different than previous values. The {sup 176}Hf resonance integral, based on this work, is approximately 73% higher than the ENDF/B-VI value. This is due primarily to the changes to resonance parameters in the 8 eV resonance, the neutron width presented in this work is more than twice that of the previous value. The calculated elemental hafnium resonance integral however, changed very little.

  5. E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced gamma ray Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    gamma ray Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: advanced gamma ray Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Memory Referencing Behavior in...

  6. A new approach in the detection of weak {\\gamma}-ray peak of the radioactive waste in tomography {\\gamma} scanning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jinzha, Zhang

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate a new approach to efficiently detect weak {\\gamma}-ray peak of the radioactive waste in tomographic {\\gamma} scanning (TGS). In the TGS measurement, {\\gamma}-ray peak identification is usually difficult due to the short measurement time that results in a lower {\\gamma}-ray energy produced by the decay. Consequently, the resulting significant scattering in the low-energy side leads to strong statistical fluctuations and low detection efficiency that overwhelm the {\\gamma}-ray peak. Here, we propose the use of shift invariance wavelet algorithm for low-energy part of the spectrum for weak {\\gamma}-ray peak smoothing. The proposed algorithm not only overcomes the pseudo-Gibbs in the high-resolution {\\gamma}-ray spectrum de-noising by the traditional wavelet transform, but also keeps quality of the weak {\\gamma}-ray characteristic peak as well. Our new approach shows a significantly improved performance of the figure of merit (FOM) together with lower limit of quantitation (LLOQ) compared with the ...

  7. MFV Reductions of MSSM Parameter Space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. S. AbdusSalam; C. P. Burgess; F. Quevedo

    2015-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The 100+ free parameters of the minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM) make it computationally difficult to compare systematically with data, motivating the study of specific parameter reductions such as the cMSSM and pMSSM. Here we instead study the reductions of parameter space implied by using minimal flavour violation (MFV) to organise the R-parity conserving MSSM, with a view towards systematically building in constraints on flavour-violating physics. Within this framework the space of parameters is reduced by expanding soft supersymmetry-breaking terms in powers of the Cabibbo angle, leading to a 24-, 30- or 42-parameter framework (which we call MSSM-24, MSSM-30, and MSSM-42 respectively), depending on the order kept in the expansion. We provide a Bayesian global fit to data of the MSSM-30 parameter set to show that this is manageable with current tools. We compare the MFV reductions to the 19-parameter pMSSM choice and show that the pMSSM is not contained as a subset. The MSSM-30 analysis favours a relatively lighter TeV-scale pseudoscalar Higgs boson and $\\tan \\beta \\sim 10$ with multi-TeV sparticles.

  8. The Parameter Space of Galaxy Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bower, R G; Goldstein, M; Benson, A J; Lacey, C G; Baugh, C M; Cole, S; Frenk, C S; .,

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Semi-analytic models are a powerful tool for studying the formation of galaxies. However, these models inevitably involve a significant number of poorly constrained parameters that must be adjusted to provide an acceptable match to the observed universe. In this paper, we set out to quantify the degree to which observational data-sets can constrain the model parameters. By revealing degeneracies in the parameter space we can hope to better understand the key physical processes probed by the data. We use novel mathematical techniques to explore the parameter space of the GALFORM semi-analytic model. We base our investigation on the Bower et al. 2006 version of GALFORM, adopting the same methodology of selecting model parameters based on an acceptable match to the local bJ and K luminosity functions. The model contains 16 parameters that are poorly constrained, and we investigate this parameter space using the Model Emulator technique, constructing a Bayesian approximation to the GALFORM model that can be rapid...

  9. Cross Sections for the $\\gamma p \\to K^{*0}\\Sigma^+$ Reaction at $E_\\gamma = 1.7 - 3.0$ GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    I. Hleiqawi; K. Hicks; D.Carman; T.Mibe

    2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Differential cross sections for the reaction $\\gamma p \\to K^{*0} \\Sigma^+$ are presented at nine bins in photon energy in the range from 1.7 to 3.0 GeV. The \\kstar was detected by its decay products, $K^+\\pi^-$, in the CLAS detector at Jefferson Lab. These data are the first \\kstar photoproduction cross sections ever published over a broad range of angles. Comparison with a theoretical model based on the vector and tensor $K^*$-quark couplings shows good agreement with the data in general, after adjusting the model's two parameters in a fit to our data. Disagreement between the data at forward angles and the global angle-energy fit to the model suggests that the role of scalar $\\kappa$ meson exchange in $t$-channel diagrams should be investigated.

  10. Measurement of 25Mg(p; gamma)26Al resonance strengths via gamma spectrometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Formicola; A. Best; G. Imbriani; M. Junker; D. Bemmerer; R. Bonetti; C. Broggini; A. Caciolli; F. Confortola; P. Corvisiero; H. Costantini; Z. Elekes; Zs Fulop; G. Gervino; A. Guglielmetti; Gy Gyurky; C. Gustavino; A. Lemut; B. Limata; M. Marta; C. Mazzocchi; R. Menegazzo; P. Prati; V. Roca; C. Rolfs; C. Rossi Alvarez; E. Somorjai; O. Straniero; F. Strieder; F. Terrasi; H. P. Trautvetter

    2007-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The COMPTEL instrument performed the first mapping of the 1.809 MeV photons in the Galaxy, triggering considerable interest in determing the sources of interstellar 26Al. The predicted 26Al is too low compared to the observation, for a better understanding more accurate rates for the 25Mg(p; gamma)26Al reaction are required. The 25Mg(p;gamma)26Al reaction has been investigated at the resonances at Er= 745; 418; 374; 304 keV at Ruhr-Universitat-Bochum using a Tandem accelerator and a 4piNaI detector. In addition the resonance at Er = 189 keV has been measured deep underground laboratory at Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, exploiting the strong suppression of cosmic background. This low resonance has been studied with the 400 kV LUNA accelerator and a HPGe detector. The preliminary results of the resonance strengths will be reported.

  11. Measurement of 25Mg(p; gamma)26Al resonance strengths via gamma spectrometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Formicola, A; Imbriani, G; Junker, M; Bemmerer, D; Bonetti, R; Broggini, C; Caciolli, A; Confortola, F; Corvisiero, P; Costantini, H; Elekes, Z; Fülöp, Z; Gervino, G; Guglielmetti, A; Gyurky, Gy; Gustavino, C; Lemut, A; Limata, B; Marta, M; Mazzocchi, C; Menegazzo, R; Prati, P; Roca, V; Rolfs, C; Alvarez, C Rossi; Somorjai, E; Straniero, O; Strieder, F; Terrasi, F; Trautvetter, H P

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The COMPTEL instrument performed the first mapping of the 1.809 MeV photons in the Galaxy, triggering considerable interest in determing the sources of interstellar 26Al. The predicted 26Al is too low compared to the observation, for a better understanding more accurate rates for the 25Mg(p; gamma)26Al reaction are required. The 25Mg(p;gamma)26Al reaction has been investigated at the resonances at Er= 745; 418; 374; 304 keV at Ruhr-Universitat-Bochum using a Tandem accelerator and a 4piNaI detector. In addition the resonance at Er = 189 keV has been measured deep underground laboratory at Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, exploiting the strong suppression of cosmic background. This low resonance has been studied with the 400 kV LUNA accelerator and a HPGe detector. The preliminary results of the resonance strengths will be reported.

  12. Magnetic Structures in Gamma-Ray Burst Jets Probed by Gamma-Ray Polarization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daisuke Yonetoku; Toshio Murakami; Shuichi Gunji; Tatehiro Mihara; Kenji Toma; Yoshiyuki Morihara; Takuya Takahashi; Yudai Wakashima; Hajime Yonemochi; Tomonori Sakashita; Noriyuki Toukairin; Hirofumi Fujimoto; Yoshiki Kodama

    2012-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We report polarization measurements in two prompt emissions of gamma-ray bursts, GRB 110301A and GRB 110721A, observed with the Gamma-ray burst polarimeter (GAP) aboard IKAROS solar sail mission. We detected linear polarization signals from each burst with polarization degree of $\\Pi = 70 \\pm 22$% with statistical significance of $3.7 \\sigma$ for GRB 110301A, and $\\Pi = 84^{+16}_{-28}$% with $3.3 \\sigma$ confidence level for GRB 110721A. We did not detect any significant change of polarization angle. These two events had shorter durations and dimmer brightness compared with GRB 100826A, which showed a significant change of polarization angle, as reported in Yonetoku et al. (2011). Synchrotron emission model can be consistent with all the data of the three GRBs, while photospheric quasi-thermal emission model is not favorable. We suggest that magnetic field structures in the emission region are globally-ordered fields advected from the central engine.

  13. MAGNETIC STRUCTURES IN GAMMA-RAY BURST JETS PROBED BY GAMMA-RAY POLARIZATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yonetoku, Daisuke; Murakami, Toshio; Morihara, Yoshiyuki; Takahashi, Takuya; Wakashima, Yudai; Yonemochi, Hajime; Sakashita, Tomonori; Fujimoto, Hirofumi; Kodama, Yoshiki [College of Science and Engineering, School of Mathematics and Physics, Kanazawa University, Kakuma, Kanazawa, Ishikawa 920-1192 (Japan); Gunji, Shuichi; Toukairin, Noriyuki [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Yamagata University, 1-4-12, Koshirakawa, Yamagata, Yamagata 990-8560 (Japan); Mihara, Tatehiro [Cosmic Radiation Laboratory, RIKEN, 2-1, Hirosawa, Wako City, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Toma, Kenji, E-mail: yonetoku@astro.s.kanazawa-u.ac.jp [Department of Earth and Space Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka 560-0043 (Japan)

    2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We report polarization measurements in two prompt emissions of gamma-ray bursts, GRB 110301A and GRB 110721A, observed with the gamma-ray burst polarimeter (GAP) on borad the IKAROS solar sail mission. We detected linear polarization signals from each burst with polarization degree of {Pi} = 70 {+-} 22% with statistical significance of 3.7{sigma} for GRB 110301A, and {Pi} = 84{sup +16}{sub -28}% with 3.3{sigma} confidence level for GRB 110721A. We did not detect any significant change of polarization angle. These two events had shorter durations and dimmer brightness compared with GRB 100826A, which showed a significant change of polarization angle, as reported in Yonetoku et al. Synchrotron emission model can be consistent with the data of the three GRBs, while the photospheric quasi-thermal emission model is not favored. We suggest that magnetic field structures in the emission region are globally ordered fields advected from the central engine.

  14. Measurement of the W Gamma --> mu nu gamma Cross-Section, Limits on Anomalous Trilinear Vector Boson Couplings, and the Radiation Amplitude Zero in p anti-p Collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Askew, Andrew Warren

    2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis details the measurement of the p{bar p} {yields} W{gamma} + X {yields} {mu}{nu}{gamma} + X cross section at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV using the D0 detector at Fermilab, in 134.5 pb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity. From the photon E{sub T} spectrum limits on anomalous couplings of the photon to the W are obtained. At 95% confidence level, limits of -1.05 < {Delta}{kappa} < 1.04 for {lambda} = 0 and -0.28 < {lambda} < 0.27 for {Delta}{kappa} = 0 are obtained on the anomalous coupling parameters. The charge signed rapidity difference from the data is displayed, and its significance discussed.

  15. Lorentz invariance violation with gamma rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel, Michael

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The assumption of Lorentz invariance is one of the founding principles of Modern Physics and violation of it would have profound implications to our understanding of the universe. For instance, certain theories attempting a unified theory of quantum gravity predict there could be an effective refractive index of the vacuum; the introduction of an energy dependent dispersion to photons could in turn lead to an observable Lorentz invariance violation signature. Whilst a very small effect on local scales the effect will be cumulative, and so for very high energy particles that travel very large distances the difference in arrival times could become sufficiently large to be detectable. This proceedings will look at testing for such Lorentz invariance violation (LIV) signatures in the astronomical lightcurves of gamma-ray emitting objects, with particular notice being given to the prospects for LIV testing with, the next generation observatory, the Cherenkov Telescope Array.

  16. Gamma-ray blind beta particle probe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weisenberger, Andrew G. (Grafton, VA)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An intra-operative beta particle probe is provided by placing a suitable photomultiplier tube (PMT), micro channel plate (MCP) or other electron multiplier device within a vacuum housing equipped with: 1) an appropriate beta particle permeable window; and 2) electron detection circuitry. Beta particles emitted in the immediate vicinity of the probe window will be received by the electron multiplier device and amplified to produce a detectable signal. Such a device is useful as a gamma insensitive, intra-operative, beta particle probe in surgeries where the patient has been injected with a beta emitting radiopharmaceutical. The method of use of such a device is also described, as is a position sensitive such device.

  17. Short Gamma-Ray Bursts Are Different

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. P. Norris; J. D. Scargle; J. T. Bonnell

    2001-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze BATSE time-tagged event (TTE) data for short gamma-ray bursts (T90 duration burst. Performing the cross-correlation between two energy bands, we measure an average lag ~ 20-40 x shorter than for long bursts, and a lag distribution close to symmetric about zero - unlike long bursts. Using a "Bayesian Block" method to identify significantly distinct pulse peaks, we find an order of magnitude fewer pulses than found in studies of long bursts. The disparity in lag magnitude is discontinuous across the ~ 2-s valley between long and short bursts. Thus, short bursts do not appear to be representable as a continuation of long bursts' temporal characteristics.

  18. Constraining Lorentz violations with Gamma Ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maria Rodriguez Martinez; Tsvi Piran

    2006-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Gamma ray bursts are excellent candidates to constrain physical models which break Lorentz symmetry. We consider deformed dispersion relations which break the boost invariance and lead to an energy-dependent speed of light. In these models, simultaneously emitted photons from cosmological sources reach Earth with a spectral time delay that depends on the symmetry breaking scale. We estimate the possible bounds which can be obtained by comparing the spectral time delays with the time resolution of available telescopes. We discuss the best strategy to reach the strongest bounds. We compute the probability of detecting bursts that improve the current bounds. The results are encouraging. Depending on the model, it is possible to build a detector that within several years will improve the present limits of 0.015 m_pl.

  19. Search for Gamma Ray Bursts at Chacaltaya

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silvia Vernetto; for the INCA Collaboration

    2000-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A search for Gamma Ray Bursts in the GeV-TeV energy range has been performed by INCA, an air shower array working at 5200 m of altitude at the Chacaltaya Laboratory (Bolivia). The altitude of the detector and the use of the "single particle technique" allows to lower the energy threshold up to few GeVs. No significant signals are observed during the occurrence of 125 GRBs detected by BATSE, and the obtained upper limits on the energy fluence in the interval 1-1000(100) GeV range from 3.2(8.6) 10^-5 to 2.6(7.0) 10^-2 erg/cm^2 depending on the zenith angle of the events. These limits, thanks to the extreme altitude of INCA, are the lowest ever obtained in the sub-TeV energy region by a ground based esperiment.

  20. Gamma Knife Radiosurgery for the Treatment of Cystic Cerebral Metastases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ebinu, Julius O.; Lwu, Shelly; Monsalves, Eric; Arayee, Mandana [Division of Neurosurgery, Department of Surgery, Toronto Western Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)] [Division of Neurosurgery, Department of Surgery, Toronto Western Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Chung, Caroline; Laperriere, Normand J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Kulkarni, Abhaya V.; Goetz, Pablo [Division of Neurosurgery, Department of Surgery, The Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)] [Division of Neurosurgery, Department of Surgery, The Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Zadeh, Gelareh, E-mail: gelareh.zadeh@uhn.on.ca [Division of Neurosurgery, Department of Surgery, Toronto Western Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)] [Division of Neurosurgery, Department of Surgery, Toronto Western Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To assess the role of Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS) in the treatment of nonsurgical cystic brain metastasis, and to determine predictors of response to GKRS. Methods: We reviewed a prospectively maintained database of brain metastases patients treated at our institution between 2006 and 2010. All lesions with a cystic component were identified, and volumetric analysis was done to measure percentage of cystic volume on day of treatment and consecutive follow-up MRI scans. Clinical, radiologic, and dosimetry parameters were reviewed to establish the overall response of cystic metastases to GKRS as well as identify potential predictive factors of response. Results: A total of 111 lesions in 73 patients were analyzed; 57% of lesions received prior whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT). Lung carcinoma was the primary cancer in 51% of patients, 10% breast, 10% colorectal, 4% melanoma, and 26% other. Fifty-seven percent of the patients were recursive partitioning analysis class 1, the remainder class 2. Mean target volume was 3.3 mL (range, 0.1-23 mL). Median prescription dose was 21 Gy (range, 15-24 Gy). Local control rates were 91%, 63%, and 37% at 6, 12, and 18 months, respectively. Local control was improved in lung primary and worse in patients with prior WBRT (univariate). Only lung primary predicted local control in multivariate analysis, whereas age and tumor volume did not. Lesions with a large cystic component did not show a poorer response compared with those with a small cystic component. Conclusions: This study supports the use of GKRS in the management of nonsurgical cystic metastases, despite a traditionally perceived poorer response. Our local control rates are comparable to a matched cohort of noncystic brain metastases, and therefore the presence of a large cystic component should not deter the use of GKRS. Predictors of response included tumor subtype. Prior WBRT decreased effectiveness of SRS for local control rates.