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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gamma exposure rate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Effects of gamma radiation on Serratia marcescens; a comparison of effects of two different exposure rates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

'Donovan, Effect of gamma radiation on Serratia marcescens: Comparison of the radiosensi- tivity of pigmented and nonpigmented cells. Radiation Res, 48, 40-52 (1971). 18. Alison P. Casarett, Radiation ~Biolo . p. 159. Prentice-Hall, Inc. , Englewood Cliffs... EFFECTS OF GAMMA RADIATION ON SL'RNATIA MARCESCENS A COMPARISON OF EFFECTS OF TWO DIFFERENT EXPOSURE RATES A Thesis by CHRISTY ANNETTE MOORE Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements...

Moore, Christy Annette

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Experimental and Simulation of Gamma Radiation Dose Rate for High Exposure Building Material  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Natural radioactivity concentrations in high exposure building materials are commonly used in Iran, which is measured a direct exposure by using {\\gamma}-ray spectrometry. The values for 226Ra, 232Th and 40K were in the ranges 3.8 - 94.2, 6.5 - 172.2 and 556.9 - 1539.2 Bqkg-1, respectively. The absorbed dose rates in the standard dwelling room due to 238U, 232Th series and 40K were calculated with MCNPX code. The simulation and experimental results were between 7.95 - 41.74 and 8.36 - 39.99 nGy h-1, respectively. These results were compared with experimental outing and there was overlap closely. The simulation results are able to develop for any kind of dwelling places.

Abbasi, Akbar

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Experimental and Simulation of Gamma Radiation Dose Rate for High Exposure Building Material  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Natural radioactivity concentrations in high exposure building materials are commonly used in Iran, which is measured a direct exposure by using {\\gamma}-ray spectrometry. The values for 226Ra, 232Th and 40K were in the ranges 3.8 - 94.2, 6.5 - 172.2 and 556.9 - 1539.2 Bqkg-1, respectively. The absorbed dose rates in the standard dwelling room due to 238U, 232Th series and 40K were calculated with MCNPX code. The simulation and experimental results were between 7.95 - 41.74 and 8.36 - 39.99 nGy h-1, respectively. These results were compared with experimental outing and there was overlap closely. The simulation results are able to develop for any kind of dwelling places.

Akbar Abbasi; Mustfa Hassanzadeh

2014-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

4

Historical estimates of external gamma exposure and collective external gamma exposure from testing at the Nevada Test Site. I. Test series through HARDTACK II, 1958  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1959, the Test Manager's Committee to Establish Fallout Doses calculated estimated external gamma exposure at populated locations based upon measurements of external gamma-exposure rate. Using these calculations and estimates of population, we have tabulated the collective estimated external gamma exposures for communities within established fallout patterns. The total collective estimated external gamma exposure is 85,000 person-R. The greatest collective exposures occurred in three general areas: Saint George, Utah; Ely, Nevada; and Las Vegas, Nevada. Three events, HARRY (May 19, 1953), BEE (March 22, 1955), and SMOKY (August 31, 1957), accounted for over half of the total collective estimated external gamma exposure. The bases of the calculational models for external gamma exposure of ''infinite exposure,'' ''estimated exposure,'' and ''one year effective biological exposure'' are explained. 4 figs., 7 tabs.

Anspaugh, L.R.; Church, B.W.

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Neutrino Event Rates from Gamma Ray Bursts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We recalculate the diffuse flux of high energy neutrinos produced by Gamma Ray Bursts (GRB) in the relativistic fireball model. Although we confirm that the average single burst produces only ~10^{-2} high energy neutrino events in a detector with 1 km^2 effective area, i.e. about 10 events per year, we show that the observed rate is dominated by burst-to-burst fluctuations which are very large. We find event rates that are expected to be larger by one order of magnitude, likely more, which are dominated by a few very bright bursts. This greatly simplifies their detection.

F. Halzen; D. W. Hooper

1999-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

6

Reaction Rate Sensitivity of the gamma-Process Path  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The location of the (gamma,p)/(gamma,n) and (gamma,alpha)/(gamma,n) line at gamma-process temperatures is discussed, using recently published reaction rates based on global Hauser-Feshbach calculations. The results can directly be compared to previously published, classic gamma-process discussions. The nuclei exhibiting the largest sensitivity to uncertainties in nuclear structure and reaction parameters are specified.

T. Rauscher

2004-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

7

Error Rate Performance of Coded Free-Space Optical Links over Gamma-Gamma Turbulence Channels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Error Rate Performance of Coded Free-Space Optical Links over Gamma-Gamma Turbulence Channels Murat be used over free-space optical (FSO) links to mitigate turbulence-induced fading. In this paper, we channels, considering the recently introduced gamma-gamma turbulence model. We derive a pairwise error

Li, Tiffany Jing

8

Effects of p60 sCo gamma radiation on Sarcina lutea: A comparison of effects at two different exposure rates and a study of the radiosensitizing properties of prodigiosin.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of pigmented and nonpigmented cells. Radiation Res. 48, 40-52 (1971). 8. R. P. Williams, Biosynthesis of Prodigiosin, a Secondary Metabolite of Serratia marcescens, ~A 1. Microbiol. 25, 396-402 (1973). 9. M. M. Matthews, and N. I. Krinsky, The relatioship... Radiation on Sarcina ]utes: A Comparison of Effects at Two Different Exposure Rates and A Study of the Radiosensitizing Properties of. Prodigiosin (August 1973) George W. Blair, Jr. , B. S, , University of Chattanooga Directed by: Dr. R. D. Neff...

Blair, George Washington

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

The Exposure Rate Conversion Factor for Nuclear Fallout  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nuclear fallout is comprised of approximately 2000 radionuclides. About 1000 of these radionuclides are either primary fission products or activated fission products that are created during the burn process. The exposure rate one meter above the surface produced by this complex mixture of radionuclides varies rapidly with time since many of the radionuclides are short-lived and decay numerous times before reaching a stable isotope. As a result, the mixture of radionuclides changes rapidly with time. Using a new code developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, the mixture of radionuclides at any given point in time can be calculated. The code also calculates the exposure rate conversion factor (ECF) for all 3864 individual isotopes contained in its database based on the total gamma energy released per decay. Based on the combination of isotope mixture and individual ECFs, the time-dependent variation of the composite exposure rate conversion factor for nuclear fallout can be easily calculated. As example of this new capability, a simple test case corresponding to a 10 kt, uranium-plutonium fuel has been calculated. The results for the time-dependent, composite ECF for this test case are shown in Figure 1. For comparison, we also calculated the composite exposure rate conversion factor using the conversion factors found in Federal Guidance Report No.12 (FGR-12) published by ORNL, which contains the conversion factors for approximately 1000 isotopes. As can be noted from Figure 1, the two functions agree reasonably well at times greater than about 30 minutes. However, they do not agree at early times since FGR-12 does not include all of the short-lived isotopes that are produced in nuclear fallout. It should also be noted that the composite ECF at one hour is 19.7 R/hr per Ci/m{sup 2}. This corresponds to 3148 R/hr per 1 kt per square mile, which agrees reasonably well with the value of 3000 R/hr per 1 kt per square mile as quoted by Glasstone. We have also tabulated the top 50 contributors to the exposure rate at various points in time following a detonation. These major contributors are given in Table 1.

Spriggs, G D

2009-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

10

Total Gamma Count Rate Analysis Method for Nondestructive Assay Characterization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new approach to nondestructively characterize waste for disposal, based on total gamma response, has been developed at the Idaho Cleanup Project by CH2M-WG Idaho, LLC and Idaho State University, and is called the total gamma count rate analysis method. The total gamma count rate analysis method measures gamma interactions that produce energetic electrons or positrons in a detector. Based on previous experience with waste assays, the radionuclide content of the waste container is then determined. This approach potentially can yield minimum detection limits of less than 10 nCi/g. The importance of this method is twofold. First, determination of transuranic activity can be made for waste containers that are below the traditional minimum detection limits. Second, waste above 10 nCi/g and below 100 nCi/g can be identified, and a potential path for disposal resolved.

Cecilia R. Hoffman; Yale D. Harker

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Light Stau Phenomenology and the Higgs \\gamma\\gamma Rate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recently, an excess of events consistent with a Higgs boson with mass of about 125 GeV was reported by the CMS and ATLAS experiments. This Higgs boson mass is consistent with the values that may be obtained in minimal supersymmetric extensions of the Standard Model (SM), with both stop masses less than a TeV and large mixing. The apparently enhanced photon production rate associated with this potential Higgs signal may be the result of light staus with large mixing. Large stau mixing and large coupling of the staus to the SM-like Higgs boson may be obtained for large values of tan {beta} and moderate to large values of the Higgsino mass parameter, {mu}. We study the phenomenological properties of this scenario, including precision electroweak data, the muon anomalous magnetic moment, Dark Matter, and the evolution of the soft supersymmetry-breaking parameters to high energies. We also analyze the possible collider signatures of light third generation sleptons and demonstrate that it is possible to find evidence of their production at the 8 TeV and the 14 TeV LHC. The most promising channel is stau and tau sneutrino associated production, with the sneutrino decaying into a W boson plus a light stau.

Carena, Marcela; Gori, Stefania; Shah, Nausheen R.; Wagner, Carlos E.M.; Wang, Lian-Tao

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

The Gamma Ray Burst Rate at High Photon Energies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Some gamma-ray burst (GRB) spectra exhibit high energy tails with the highest photon energy detected at 18 GeV. The spectral slope of the high-energy tails is sufficiently flat in nu F_nu to consider the possibility of their detection at still higher energies. We calculate how many bursts can reasonably be expected above a given energy threshold for a cosmological distribution of bursts satisfying the observed apparent brightness distribution. The crucial point is that the gamma-ray absorption by pair production in the intergalactic diffuse radiation field eliminates bursts from beyond the gamma-ray horizon tau ~ 1, thus drastically reducing the number of bursts at high energies. Our results are consistent with the non-detection of bursts by current experiments in the 100 GeV to 100 TeV energy range. For the earth-bound detector array MILAGRO, we predict a maximal GRB rate of ~ 10 events per year. The Whipple Observatory can detect, under favorable conditions, ~1 event per year. The event rate for the HEGRA array is ~ 0.01 per year. Detection of significantly higher rates of bursts would severely challenge cosmological burst scenarios.

Karl Mannheim; Dieter Hartmann; Burkhardt Funk

1996-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

13

High pressure argon ionization chamber systems for the measurement of environmental radiation exposure rates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High pressure argon ionization chamber systems for the measurement of environmental radiation exposure rates

DeCampo, J A; Raft, P D

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Formulation and solution of the delayed gamma dose rate problem using the concept of effective delayed gamma production cross section  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With appropriate approximations, the delayed gamma dose rate problem can be formulated in terms of the effective delayed gamma production cross section. The coupled neutron-delayed-gamma transport equations then take the same form as the coupled neutron-prompt-gamma transport equations and they can, therefore, be solved directly in the same manner. This eliminates the need for the tedious and error prone flux coupling step in conventional calculations. Mathematical formulation and solution algorithms are derived. The advantages of this method are illustrated by an example of its application in the solution of a practical design problem. 62 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

Liew, S.L.; Ku, L.P.

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Thermonuclear Reaction Rate of 23Mg(p,gamma)24$Al  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Updated stellar rates for the reaction 23Mg(p,gamma)24Al are calculated by using all available experimental information on 24Al excitation energies. Proton and gamma-ray partial widths for astrophysically important resonances are derived from shell model calculations. Correspondences of experimentally observed 24Al levels with shell model states are based on application of the isobaric multiplet mass equation. Our new rates suggest that the 23Mg(p,gamma)24Al reaction influences the nucleosynthesis in the mass A>20 region during thermonuclear runaways on massive white dwarfs.

H. Herndl; M. Fantini; C. Iliades; P. M. Endt; H. Oberhummer

1998-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

16

Advanced Computational Approaches for Characterizing Stochastic Cellular Responses to Low Dose, Low Dose Rate Exposures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

OAK - B135 This project final report summarizes modeling research conducted in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Low Dose Radiation Research Program at the Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute from October 1998 through June 2003. The modeling research described involves critically evaluating the validity of the linear nonthreshold (LNT) risk model as it relates to stochastic effects induced in cells by low doses of ionizing radiation and genotoxic chemicals. The LNT model plays a central role in low-dose risk assessment for humans. With the LNT model, any radiation (or genotoxic chemical) exposure is assumed to increase oneˇŻs risk of cancer. Based on the LNT model, others have predicted tens of thousands of cancer deaths related to environmental exposure to radioactive material from nuclear accidents (e.g., Chernobyl) and fallout from nuclear weapons testing. Our research has focused on developing biologically based models that explain the shape of dose-response curves for low-dose radiation and genotoxic chemical-induced stochastic effects in cells. Understanding the shape of the dose-response curve for radiation and genotoxic chemical-induced stochastic effects in cells helps to better understand the shape of the dose-response curve for cancer induction in humans. We have used a modeling approach that facilitated model revisions over time, allowing for timely incorporation of new knowledge gained related to the biological basis for low-dose-induced stochastic effects in cells. Both deleterious (e.g., genomic instability, mutations, and neoplastic transformation) and protective (e.g., DNA repair and apoptosis) effects have been included in our modeling. Our most advanced model, NEOTRANS2, involves differing levels of genomic instability. Persistent genomic instability is presumed to be associated with nonspecific, nonlethal mutations and to increase both the risk for neoplastic transformation and for cancer occurrence. Our research results, based on applications of NEOTRANS2, indicate that nonlinear threshold-type, dose-response relationships for excess stochastic effects (problematic nonlethal mutations, neoplastic transformation) should be expected after exposure to low linear energy transfer (LET) gamma rays or gamma rays in combination with high-LET alpha radiation. Similar thresholds are expected for low-dose-rate low-LET beta irradiation. We attribute the thresholds to low-dose, low-LET radiation induced protection against spontaneous mutations and neoplastic transformations. The protection is presumed mainly to involve selective elimination of problematic cells via apoptosis. Low-dose, low-LET radiation is presumed to trigger wide-area cell signaling, which in turn leads to problematic bystander cells (e.g., mutants, neoplastically transformed cells) selectively undergoing apoptosis. Thus, this protective bystander effect leads to selective elimination of problematic cells (a tissue cleansing process in vivo). However, this protective bystander effects is a different process from low-dose stimulation of the immune system. Low-dose, low-LET radiation stimulation of the immune system may explain why thresholds for inducing excess cancer appear much larger (possibly more than 100-fold larger) than thresholds for inducing excess mutations and neoplastic transformations, when the dose rate is low. For ionizing radiation, the current risk assessment paradigm is such that the relative risk (RR) is always ˇÝ 1, no matter how small the dose. Our research results indicate that for low-dose or low-dose-rate, low-LET irradiation, RR < 1 may be more the rule than the exception. Directly tied to the current RR paradigm are the billion-dollar cleanup costs for radionuclide-contaminated DOE sites. Our research results suggest that continued use of the current RR paradigm for which RR ˇÝ 1 could cause more harm than benefit to society (e.g., by spreading unwarranted fear about phantom excess risks associated with low-dose low-LET radiation). Such phantom risks also may arise from risk assessments conducted for com

Scott, Bobby, R., Ph.D.

2003-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

17

Reconciling leptogenesis with observable mu --> e gamma rates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We perform a detailed analysis of thermal leptogenesis in the framework of seesaw models which approximately conserve lepton number. These models are known to allow for large Yukawa couplings and a low seesaw scale in agreement with neutrino mass constraints, and hence to lead to large lepton flavour violating rates that can be probed experimentally. Although large Yukawa couplings lead to (inverse) decay rates much larger than the Hubble expansion rate, we show that the leptogenesis washout induced is generically small if the mass splitting between the right-handed neutrinos is small enough. As a result, large lepton flavour violating rates are compatible with successful leptogenesis. We emphasize that this scenario does not require any particular flavour structure. A small splitting is natural and radiatively stable in this context because it is protected by the lepton number symmetry.

Steve Blanchet; Thomas Hambye; Francois-Xavier Josse-Michaux

2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

18

E-Print Network 3.0 - activity exposure rate Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to the author for internal non-commercial research Summary: in activity patterns, ages, sex, and other qualities, exposure is widely used as a marker for dose... rate) affecting...

19

ADONIS, high count-rate HP-Ge {gamma} spectrometry algorithm: Irradiated fuel assembly measurement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

ADONIS is a digital system for gamma-ray spectrometry, developed by CEA. This system achieves high count-rate gamma-ray spectrometry with correct dynamic dead-time correction, up to, at least, more than an incoming count rate of 3.10{sup 6} events per second. An application of such a system at AREVA NC's La Hague plant is the irradiated fuel scanning facility before reprocessing. The ADONIS system is presented, then the measurement set-up and, last, the measurement results with reference measurements. (authors)

Pin, P. [AREVA NC La Hague - Nuclear Measurement Team, 50444 Beaumont-Hague Cedex (France); Barat, E.; Dautremer, T.; Montagu, T. [CEA - Saclay, LIST, Electronics and Signal Processing Laboratory, 91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Normand, S. [CEA - Saclay, LIST, Sensors and Electronic Architectures Laboratory, 91191 Gif sur Yvette (France)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Note: Operation of gamma-ray microcalorimeters at elevated count rates using filters with constraints  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Microcalorimeter sensors operated near 0.1 K can measure the energy of individual x- and gamma-ray photons with significantly more precision than conventional semiconductor technologies. Both microcalorimeter arrays and higher per pixel count rates are desirable to increase the total throughput of spectrometers based on these devices. The millisecond recovery time of gamma-ray microcalorimeters and the resulting pulse pileup are significant obstacles to high per pixel count rates. Here, we demonstrate operation of a microcalorimeter detector at elevated count rates by use of convolution filters designed to be orthogonal to the exponential tail of a preceding pulse. These filters allow operation at 50% higher count rates than conventional filters while largely preserving sensor energy resolution.

Alpert, B. K.; Horansky, R. D.; Bennett, D. A.; Doriese, W. B.; Fowler, J. W.; Ullom, J. N. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, Colorado 80305 (United States); Hoover, A. S.; Rabin, M. W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gamma exposure rate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Estimation of compact binary coalescense rates from short gamma-ray burst redshift measurements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Short gamma-ray bursts are believed to originate from the merger of two compact objects. If this scenario is correct, these bursts will be accompanied by the emission of strong gravitational waves, detectable by current or planned GW detectors, such as LIGO and Virgo. No detection of a gravitational wave has been made up to date. In this paper I will use a set of observed redshift measurements of short gamma-ray bursts to fit a model in order to determine the rate of such merger events in the nearby universe. Various corrections will be included in that calculation, as the field-of-view of the satellite missions, the beaming factors of gamma-ray bursts and other parameters. The computed rate estimations will be compared to other rate estimations, based on observations on binary neutron stars and population synthesis models. Given the upper limit established by LIGO/Virgo measurements, it is possible to draw conclusions on the beaming angle of gamma-ray bursts.

Alexander Dietz

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

22

Monte Carlo calculation of delayed gamma dose rate in complex geometry using the concept of effective delayed gamma production cross section  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports on the delayed gamma dose rate problem formulated in terms of the effective delayed gamma production cross section. The coupled neutron-delayed gamma transport equations take the same form as the coupled neutron-prompt gamma transport equations and they can, therefore, be solved directly in the same manner. This eliminates the flux coupling step required in conventional calculations and makes it easier to handle complex, multidimensional problems, especially those that call for Monte Carlo calculations. Mathematical formulation and solution algorithms are derived. The advantages of this method in complex geometry are illustrated by its application in the Monte Carlo solution of a practical design problem.

Liew, S.L.; Ku, L.P. (Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.)

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Probing the Gamma-Ray Burst Rate with Trigger Simulations of the Swift Burst Alert Telescope  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The long gamma-ray burst (GRB) rate is essential for revealing the connection between GRBs, supernovae and stellar evolution. Additionally, the GRB rate at high redshift provides a strong probe of star formation history in the early universe. While hundreds of GRBs are observed by Swift, it remains difficult to determine the intrinsic GRB rate due to the complex trigger algorithm of Swift. Current studies usually approximate the Swift trigger algorithm by a single detection threshold. However, unlike the previously flown GRB instruments, Swift has over 500 trigger criteria based on photon count rate and additional image threshold for localization. To investigate possible systematic biases and explore the intrinsic GRB properties, we developed a program that is capable of simulating all the rate trigger criteria and mimicking the image trigger threshold. We use this program to search for the intrinsic GRB rate. Our simulations show that adopting the complex trigger algorithm of Swift increases the detection ra...

Lien, Amy; Gehrels, Neil; Palmer, David M; Barthelmy, Scott D; Graziani, Carlo; Cannizzo, John K

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Dietary mercury exposure causes decreased escape takeoff flight performance and increased molt rate in European starlings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dietary mercury exposure causes decreased escape takeoff flight performance and increased molt rate 2014 Ă? Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014 Abstract Mercury is a widespread and persistent that forage from primarily terrestrial sources have shown evidence of bioaccumula- tion of mercury, but little

Swaddle, John

25

Traffic-related air pollution exposures and changes in heart rate variability in Mexico City: A panel study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen dioxide (NO 2 ), nitrogeninfrared; NO 2 : Nitrogen dioxide; NO x : Nitrogen oxides; OLack of effect of nitrogen dioxide exposure on heart rate

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Thermonuclear 42Ti(p,gamma)43V rate in type I X-ray bursts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The thermonuclear rate of the $^{42}$Ti($p$,$\\gamma$)$^{43}$V reaction has been reevaluated based on a recent precise proton separation energy measurement of $S_p$($^{43}$V)=83$\\pm$43 keV. The astrophysical impact of our new rates has been investigated through one-zone postprocessing type I x-ray burst calculations. It shows that the new experimental value of $S_p$ significantly affects the yields of species between A$\\approx$40--45. As well, the precision of the recent experimental $S_p$ value constrains these yields to better than a factor of three.

He, J J; Brown, B A; Rauscher, T; Hou, S Q; Zhang, Y H; Zhou, X H; Xu, H S

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Thermonuclear 42Ti(p,gamma)43V rate in type I X-ray bursts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The thermonuclear rate of the $^{42}$Ti($p$,$\\gamma$)$^{43}$V reaction has been reevaluated based on a recent precise proton separation energy measurement of $S_p$($^{43}$V)=83$\\pm$43 keV. The astrophysical impact of our new rates has been investigated through one-zone postprocessing type I x-ray burst calculations. It shows that the new experimental value of $S_p$ significantly affects the yields of species between A$\\approx$40--45. As well, the precision of the recent experimental $S_p$ value constrains these yields to better than a factor of three.

J. J. He; A. Parikh; B. A. Brown; T. Rauscher; S. Q. Hou; Y. H. Zhang; X. H. Zhou; H. S. Xu

2014-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

28

Daily and Long Term Variations of Out-Door Gamma Dose Rate in Khorasan Province, Iran  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In Iran before 1996, only a few hot spots had been identified, no systematic study had been envisaged. Since then preparation of out-door environmental gamma radiation map of Iran was defined as a long term goal in our center, at the same time simultaneous monitoring of outdoor gamma level in Khorasan was also proposed. A Rados area monitoring system (AAM-90) including 10 intelligent RD-02 detector and all associated components were purchased. From 2003 gradually seven stations have been setup in Khorasan. For all seven stations monthly average and one hour daily average on four time intervals have been computed. Statistically no significant differences have been observed. This is also true for monthly averages. The overall average dose rate for present seven stations varies from 0.11 {mu}Sv{center_dot}h{sup -1} for Ferdows, to 0.04 {mu}Sv{center_dot}h{sup -1} for Dargaz. Based on our data, 50 minutes sample in any time interval is an accurate sample size to estimate out door Gamma dose rate.

Toossi, M. T. Bahreyni; Bayani, SH. [Environmental dosimetery laboratory, Medical Physics Research Center, Mashad University of Medical Sciences, Mashad (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2008-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

29

Exclusive Measurements of the b to s gamma Transition Rate and Photon Energy Spectrum  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We use 429 fb{sup -1} of e{sup +}e{sup -} collision data collected at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector to measure the radiative transition rate of b {yields} s{gamma} with a sum of 38 exclusive final states. The inclusive branching fraction with a minimum photon energy of 1.9 GeV is found to be {Beta}({bar B} {yields} Xs{gamma}) = (3.29 {+-} 0.19 {+-} 0.48) x 10{sup -4} where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. We also measure the first and second moments of the photon energy spectrum and extract the best fit values for the heavy-quark parameters, m{sub b} and {mu}{sub {pi}}{sup 2}, in the kinetic and shape function models.

Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Palano, A.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; /Bergen U.; Brown, David Nathan; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; /Ruhr U., Bochum; Asgeirsson, D.J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T.S.; McKenna, J.A.; /British Columbia U.; Khan, A.; /Brunel U.; Blinov, V.E.; Buzykaev, A.R.; /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Harvey Mudd Coll. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U., Comp. Sci. Dept. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U.; /more authors..

2012-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

30

Exclusive Measurements of b -> s gamma Transition Rate and Photon Energy Spectrum  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We use 429 fb$^{-1}$ of $e^+e^-$ collision data collected at the $\\Upsilon(4S)$ resonance with the BABAR detector to measure the radiative transition rate of $b\\rightarrow s\\gamma$ with a sum of 38 exclusive final states. The inclusive branching fraction with a minimum photon energy of 1.9 GeV is found to be $\\mathcal{B}(\\bar B \\rightarrow X_{s}\\gamma)=(3.29\\pm 0.19\\pm 0.48)\\times 10^{-4}$ where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. We also measure the first and second moments of the photon energy spectrum and extract the best fit values for the heavy-quark parameters, $m_{b}$ and $\\mu_{\\pi}^{2}$, in the kinetic and shape function models.

The BABAR Collaboration

2012-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

31

Thermonuclear reaction rate of 18O(p,gamma)19F  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

For stars between 0.8-8.0 solar masses, nucleosynthesis enters its final phase during the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stage. During this evolutionary period, grain condensation occurs in the stellar atmosphere, and the star experiences significant mass loss. The production of presolar grains can often be attributed to this unique stellar environment. A subset of presolar oxide grains features dramatic 18O depletion that cannot be explained by the standard AGB star burning stages and dredge-up models. An extra mixing process, referred to as "cool bottom processing" (CBP), was proposed for low-mass AGB stars. The 18O depletion observed within certain stellar environments and within presolar grain samples may result from the 18O+p processes during CBP. We report here on a study of the 18O(p,gamma)19F reaction at low energies. Based on our new results, we found that the resonance at Er = 95 keV (lab) has a negligible affect on the reaction rate at the temperatures associated with CBP. We also determined that the direct capture S-factor is almost a factor of 2 lower than the previously recommended value at low energies. An improved thermonuclear reaction rate for 18O(p,gamma)19F is presented.

M. Q. Buckner; C. Iliadis; J. M. Cesaratto; C. Howard; T. B. Clegg; A. E. Champagne; S. Daigle

2012-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

32

THE STAR FORMATION RATE IN THE REIONIZATION ERA AS INDICATED BY GAMMA-RAY BURSTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High-redshift gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) offer an extraordinary opportunity to study aspects of the early universe, including the cosmic star formation rate (SFR). Motivated by the two recent highest-z GRBs, GRB 080913 at z approx = 6.7 and GRB 090423 at z approx = 8.1, and more than four years of Swift observations, we first confirm that the GRB rate does not trace the SFR in an unbiased way. Correcting for this, we find that the implied SFR to beyond z = 8 is consistent with Lyman Break Galaxy-based measurements after accounting for unseen galaxies at the faint end of the UV luminosity function. We show that this provides support for the integrated star formation in the range 6 approx< z approx< 8 to have been alone sufficient to reionize the universe.

Kistler, Matthew D.; Beacom, John F. [Center for Cosmology and Astro-Particle Physics, Ohio State University, 191 W. Woodruff Ave., Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Yueksel, Hasan [Bartol Research Institute and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Hopkins, Andrew M. [Anglo-Australian Observatory, P.O. Box 296, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia); Wyithe, J. Stuart B. [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria (Australia)

2009-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

33

Characteristic Count Rate Profiles for a Rotating Modulator Gamma-Ray Imager  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rotating modulation is a technique for indirect imaging in the hard x-ray and soft gamma-ray energy bands, which may offer an advantage over coded aperture imaging at high energies. A rotating modulator (RM) consists of a single mask of co-planar parallel slats typically spaced equidistance apart, suspended above an array of circular non-imaging detectors. The mask rotates, temporally modulating the transmitted image of the object scene. The measured count rate profiles of each detector are folded modulo the mask rotational period, and the object scene is reconstructed using pre-determined characteristic modulation profiles. The use of Monte Carlo simulation to derive the characteristic count rate profiles is accurate but computationally expensive; an analytic approach is preferred for its speed of computation. We present both the standard and a new advanced characteristic formula describing the modulation pattern of the RM; the latter is a more robust description of the instrument response developed as part ...

Budden, Brent S; Case, Gary L; Cherry, Michael L

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Cosmological Evolution of Long Gamma-ray Bursts and Star Formation Rate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) by virtue of their high luminosities can be detected up to very high redshifts and therefore can be excellent probes of the early universe. This task is hampered by the fact that most of their characteristics have a broad range so that we first need to obtain an accurate description of the distribution of these characteristics, and specially, their cosmological evolution. We use a sample of about 200 \\swift long GRBs with known redshift to determine the luminosity and formation rate evolutions and the general shape of the luminosity function. In contrast to most other forward fitting methods of treating this problem we use the Efron Petrosian methods which allow a non-parametric determination of above quantities. We find a relatively strong luminosity evolution, a luminosity function that can be fitted to a broken power law, and an unusually high rate of formation rate at low redshifts, a rate more than one order of magnitude higher than the star formation rate (SFR). On the other hand...

Petrosian, Vahe'; Kocevski, Daniel

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

On the 21Na(p,gamma)22Mg thermonuclear rate for 22Na production in novae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Classical novae are potential sources of gamma-rays, like the 1.275 MeV gamma emission following 22Na beta decay, that could be detected by appropriate instruments on board of future satellites like INTEGRAL. It has been shown that the production of 22Na by novae is affected by the uncertainty on the 21Na(p,gamma)22Mg rate and in particular by the unknown partial widths of the Ex = 5.714 MeV, J^pi = 2^+, 22Mg level. To reduce these uncertainties, we performed shell model calculations with the OXBASH code, compared the results with available spectroscopic data and calculated the missing partial widths. Finally, we discuss the influence of these results on the 21Na(p,gamma)22Mg reaction rate and 22Na synthesis.

Nadya A. Smirnova; Alain Coc

2000-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

36

RECONCILING THE GAMMA-RAY BURST RATE AND STAR FORMATION HISTORIES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

While there are numerous indications that gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) arise from the deaths of massive stars, the GRB rate does not follow the global cosmic star formation rate and, within their hosts, GRBs are more concentrated in regions of very high star formation. We explain both puzzles here. Using the publicly available VESPA database of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7 spectra, we explore a multi-parameter space in galaxy properties such as stellar mass, metallicity, and dust to find the subset of galaxies that reproduces the GRB rate recently obtained by Wanderman and Piran. We find that only galaxies with present stellar masses below <10{sup 10} M{sub Sun} and low metallicity reproduce the observed GRB rate. This is consistent with direct observations of GRB hosts and provides an independent confirmation of the nature of GRB hosts. Because of the significantly larger sample of SDSS galaxies, we compute their correlation function and show that they are anti-biased with respect to dark matter: they are in filaments and voids. Using recent observations of massive stars in local dwarfs we show how the fact that GRB host galaxies are dwarfs can explain the observation that GRBs are more concentrated in regions of high star formation than are supernovae. Finally, we explain these results using new theoretical advances in the field of star formation.

Jimenez, Raul [ICREA and ICC, University of Barcelona (IEEC-UB), Marti i Franques 1, Barcelona E-08024 (Spain); Piran, Tsvi, E-mail: raul.jimenez@icc.ub.edu, E-mail: tsvi.piran@huji.ac.il [Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel)

2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

37

An unexpectedly low-redshift excess of Swift gamma-ray burst rate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are the most violent explosions in the Universe and can be used to explore the properties of high-redshift universe. It is believed that the long GRBs are associated with the deaths of massive stars. So it is possible to use GRBs to investigate the star formation rate (SFR). In this paper, we use Lynden-Bell's $c^-$ method to study the luminosity function and rate of \\emph{Swift} long GRBs without any assumptions. We find that the luminosity of GRBs evolves with redshift as $L(z)\\propto g(z)=(1+z)^k$ with $k=2.43_{-0.38}^{+0.41}$. After correcting the redshift evolution through $L_0(z)=L(z)/g(z)$, the luminosity function can be expressed as $\\psi(L_0)\\propto L_0^{-0.14\\pm0.02}$ for dim GRBs and $\\psi(L_0)\\propto L_0^{-0.70\\pm0.03}$ for bright GRBs, with the break point $L_{0}^{b}=1.43\\times10^{51}~{\\rm erg~s^{-1}}$. We also find that the formation rate of GRBs is almost constant at $z1.0$, the formation rate of GRB is consistent with the SFR. Our results are dramatically different from...

Yu, H; Dai, Z G; Cheng, K S

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

COMPACT OBJECT COALESCENCE RATE ESTIMATION FROM SHORT GAMMA-RAY BURST OBSERVATIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent observational and theoretical results suggest that short-duration gamma-ray bursts (SGRBs) originate from the merger of compact binary systems of two neutron stars or a neutron star and a black hole. The observation of SGRBs with known redshifts allows astronomers to infer the merger rate of these systems in the local universe. We use data from the SWIFT satellite to estimate this rate to be in the range {approx}500-1500 Gpc{sup -3} yr{sup -1}. This result is consistent with earlier published results which were obtained through alternative approaches. We estimate the number of coincident observations of gravitational-wave signals with SGRBs in the advanced gravitational-wave detector era. By assuming that all SGRBs are created by neutron star-neutron star (neutron star-black hole) mergers, we estimate the expected rate of coincident observations to be in the range {approx_equal} 0.2-1 ({approx_equal} 1-3) yr{sup -1}.

Petrillo, Carlo Enrico [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Universita di Napoli ''Federico II'', Compl. Univ. Monte S. Angelo, Ed. N, Via Cinthia, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Dietz, Alexander; Cavaglia, Marco [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Mississippi University, MS 38677-1848 (United States)

2013-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

39

Measurement of $J/\\psi\\to\\gamma\\eta_{\\rm c}$ decay rate and $\\eta_{\\rm c}$ parameters at KEDR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using the inclusive photon spectrum based on a data sample collected at the $J/\\psi$ peak with the KEDR detector at the VEPP-4M $e^+e^-$ collider, we measured the rate of the radiative decay $J/\\psi\\to\\gamma\\eta_{\\rm c}$ as well as $\\eta_{\\rm c}$ mass and width. Taking into account an asymmetric photon lineshape we obtained: $\\Gamma^0_{\\gamma\\eta_{\\rm c}}=2.98\\pm0.18 \\phantom{|}^{+0.15}_{-0.33}$ keV, $M_{\\eta_{\\rm c}} = 2983.5 \\pm 1.4 \\phantom{|}^{+1.6}_{-3.6}$ MeV/$c^2$, $\\Gamma_{\\eta_{\\rm c}} = 27.2 \\pm 3.1 \\phantom{|}^{+5.4}_{-2.6}$ MeV.

Anashin, V V; Baldin, E M; Barladyan, A K; Barnyakov, A Yu; Barnyakov, M Yu; Baru, S E; Basok, I Yu; Bedny, I V; Blinov, A E; Blinov, V E; Bobrov, A V; Bobrovnikov, V S; Bogomyagkov, A V; Bondar, A E; Buzykaev, A R; Eidelman, S I; Glukhovchenko, Yu M; Gulevich, V V; Gusev, D V; Karnaev, S E; Karpov, G V; Karpov, S V; Kharlamova, T A; Kiselev, V A; Kononov, S A; Kotov, K Yu; Kravchenko, E A; Kulikov, V F; Kurkin, G Ya; Kuper, E A; Levichev, E B; Maksimov, D A; Malyshev, V M; Maslennikov, A L; Medvedko, A S; Meshkov, O I; Mishnev, S I; Morozov, I I; Muchnoi, N Yu; Neufeld, V V; Nikitin, S A; Nikolaev, I B; Okunev, I N; Onuchin, A P; Oreshkin, S B; Orlov, I O; Osipov, A A; Peleganchuk, S V; Pivovarov, S G; Piminov, P A; Petrov, V V; Poluektov, A O; Pospelov, G E; Prisekin, V G; Rezanova, O L; Ruban, A A; Sandyrev, V K; Savinov, G A; Shamov, A G; Shatilov, D N; Shwartz, B A; Simonov, E A; Sinyatkin, S V; Skrinsky, A N; Smaluk, V V; Sokolov, A V; Sukharev, A M; Starostina, E V; Talyshev, A A; Tayursky, V A; Telnov, V I; Tikhonov, Yu A; Todyshev, K Yu; Tumaikin, G M; Usov, Yu V; Vorobiov, A I; Yushkov, A N; Zhilich, V N; Zhulanov, V V; Zhuravlev, A N

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Combined methodology for estimating dose rates and health effects from exposure to radioactive pollutants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The work described in the report is basically a synthesis of two previously existing computer codes: INREM II, developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); and CAIRD, developed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The INREM II code uses contemporary dosimetric methods to estimate doses to specified reference organs due to inhalation or ingestion of a radionuclide. The CAIRD code employs actuarial life tables to account for competing risks in estimating numbers of health effects resulting from exposure of a cohort to some incremental risk. The combined computer code, referred to as RADRISK, estimates numbers of health effects in a hypothetical cohort of 100,000 persons due to continuous lifetime inhalation or ingestion of a radionuclide. Also briefly discussed in this report is a method of estimating numbers of health effects in a hypothetical cohort due to continuous lifetime exposure to external radiation. This method employs the CAIRD methodology together with dose conversion factors generated by the computer code DOSFACTER, developed at ORNL; these dose conversion factors are used to estimate dose rates to persons due to radionuclides in the air or on the ground surface. The combination of the life table and dosimetric guidelines for the release of radioactive pollutants to the atmosphere, as required by the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1977.

Dunning, D.E. Jr.; Leggett, R.W.; Yalcintas, M.G.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gamma exposure rate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Persistence of gamma-H2AX and 53BP1 foci in proliferating and nonproliferating human mammary epithelial cells after exposure to gamma-rays or iron ions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To investigate {gamma}-H2AX (phosphorylated histone H2AX) and 53BP1 (tumour protein 53 binding protein No. 1) foci formation and removal in proliferating and non-proliferating human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) after exposure to sparsely and densely ionizing radiation under different cell culture conditions. HMEC cells were grown either as monolayers (2D) or in extracellular matrix to allow the formation of acinar structures in vitro (3D). Foci numbers were quantified by image analysis at various time points after exposure. Our results reveal that in non-proliferating cells under 2D and 3D cell culture conditions, iron-ion induced {gamma}-H2AX foci were still present at 72 h after exposure, although 53BP1 foci returned to control levels at 48 h. In contrast in proliferating HMEC, both {gamma}-H2AX and 53BP1 foci decreased to control levels during the 24-48 h time interval after irradiation under 2D conditions. Foci numbers decreased faster after {gamma}-ray irradiation and returned to control levels by 12 h regardless of marker, cell proliferation status, and cell culture condition. Conclusions: The disappearance of radiation induced {gamma}-H2AX and 53BP1 foci in HMEC have different dynamics that depend on radiation quality and proliferation status. Notably, the general patterns do not depend on the cell culture condition (2D versus 3D). We speculate that the persistent {gamma}-H2AX foci in iron-ion irradiated non-proliferating cells could be due to limited availability of double strand break (DSB) repair pathways in G0/G1-phase, or that repair of complex DSB requires replication or chromatin remodeling.

Groesser, Torsten; Chang, Hang; Fontenay, Gerald; Chen, James; Costes, Sylvain V.; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen; Parvin, Bahram; Rydberg, Bjorn

2010-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

42

Corrosion of zinc in the automotive environment ? Relation Between Corrosion Rate, Corrosion Products and Exposure Site.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? In a previous project, mobile exposures in road environments have been performed in various areas of the world. A number of materials and coatings… (more)

Jonsson, Sanna

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Development of the town data base: Estimates of exposure rates and times of fallout arrival near the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of the U.S. Department of Energy`s Off-Site Radiation Exposure Review Project, the time of fallout arrival and the H+12 exposure rate were estimated for populated locations in Arizona, California, Nevada, and Utah that were affected by fallout from one or more nuclear tests at the Nevada Test Site. Estimates of exposure rate were derived from measured values recorded before and after each test by fallout monitors in the field. The estimate for a given location was obtained by retrieving from a data base all measurements made in the vicinity, decay-correcting them to H+12, and calculating an average. Estimates were also derived from maps produced after most events that show isopleths of exposure rate and time of fallout arrival. Both sets of isopleths on these maps were digitized, and kriging was used to interpolate values at the nodes of a 10-km grid covering the pattern. The values at any location within the grid were then estimated from the values at the surrounding grid nodes. Estimates of dispersion (standard deviation) were also calculated. The Town Data Base contains the estimates for all combinations of location and nuclear event for which the estimated mean H+12 exposure rate was greater than three times background. A listing of the data base is included as an appendix. The information was used by other project task groups to estimate the radiation dose that off-site populations and individuals may have received as a result of exposure to fallout from Nevada nuclear tests.

Thompson, C.B.; McArthur, R.D. [Univ. and Community College System of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Hutchinson, S.W. [Mead Johnson Nutritional Group, Evansville, IN (United States)

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Estimated effective dose rates from radon exposure in workplaces and residences within Los Alamos county in New Mexico  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many millions of office workers are exposed to radon while at work and at home. Though there has been a multitude of studies reporting the measurements of radon concentrations and potential lung and effective doses associated with radon and progeny exposure in homes, similar studies on the concentrations and subsequent effective dose rates in the workplace are lacking. The purposes of this study were to measure radon concentrations in office and residential spaces in the same county and explore the radiation dose implications. Sixty-five track-etch detectors were deployed in office spaces and 47 were deployed in residences, all within Los Alamos County, New Mexico, USA. The sampling periods for these measurements were generally about three months. The measured concentrations were then used to calculate and compare effective dose rates resulting from exposure while at work and at home. Results showed that full-time office workers receive on average about nine times greater exposure at home than while in the office (691 mrem yr{sup -1} versus 78 mrem yr{sup -1}). The estimated effective dose rate for a more homebound person was 896 mrem yr{sup -1}. These effective dose rates are contrasted against the 100 mrem yr{sup -1} threshold for regulation of a 'radiological worker' defined in the Department of Energy regulations occupational exposure and the 10 mrem yr{sup -1} air pathway effective public dose limit regulated by the Environmental Protection Agency.

Whicker, Jeffrey J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mcnaughton, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Tomotherapy treatment plan quality assurance: The impact of applied criteria on passing rate in gamma index method  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Pretreatment patient plan verification with gamma index (GI) metric analysis is standard procedure for intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment. The aim of this paper is to evaluate the variability of the local and global gamma index obtained during standard pretreatment quality assurance (QA) measurements for plans performed with Tomotherapy unit. The QA measurements were performed with a 3D diode array, using variable passing criteria: 3%/3 mm, 2%/2 mm, 1%/1 mm, each with both local and global normalization.Methods: The authors analyzed the pretreatment QA results for 73 verifications; 37 were prostate cancer plans, 16 were head and neck plans, and 20 were other clinical sites. All plans were treated using the Tomotherapy Hi-Art System. Pretreatment QA plans were performed with the commercially available 3D diode array ArcCHECK™. This device has 1386 diodes arranged in a helical geometry spaced 1 cm apart. The dose measurements were acquired on the ArcCHECK™ and then compared with the calculated dose using the standard gamma analysis method. The gamma passing rate (%GP), defined as the percentage of points satisfying the condition GI < 1, was calculated for different criteria (3%/3 mm, 2%/2 mm, 1%/1 mm) and for both global and local normalization. In the case of local normalization method, the authors set three dose difference threshold (DDT) values of 2, 3, and 5 cGy. Dose difference threshold is defined as the minimum absolute dose error considered in the analysis when using local normalization. Low-dose thresholds (TH) of 5% and 10% were also applied and analyzed.Results: Performing a paired-t-test, the authors determined that the gamma passing rate is independent of the threshold values for all of the adopted criteria (5%TH vs 10%TH, p > 0.1). Our findings showed that mean %GPs for local (or global) normalization for the entire study group were 93% (98%), 84% (92%), and 66% (61%) for 3%/3 mm, 2%/2 mm, and 1%/1 mm criteria, respectively. DDT was equal to 2 cGy for the local normalization analysis cases. The authors observed great variability in the resulting %GP. With 3%/3 mm gamma criteria, the overall passing rate with local normalization was 4.6% less on the average than with global one, as expected. The wide difference between %GP calculated with global or local approach is also confirmed by an unpaired t-test statistical analysis.Conclusions: The variability of %GP obtained confirmed the necessity to establish defined agreement criteria that could be universal and comparable between institutions. In particular, while the gamma passing rate does not depend on the choice of threshold, the choice of DDT strongly influences the gamma passing rate for local calculations. The difference between global and local %GP was statistically significant for prostate and other treatment sites when DDT was changed from 2 to 3 cGy.

Bresciani, Sara; Di Dia, Amalia; Maggio, Angelo; Cutaia, Claudia; Miranti, Anna; Infusino, Erminia; Stasi, Michele [Medical Physics Division, Institute for Cancer Research and Treatment (IRCCS), 10060 Candiolo (Italy)] [Medical Physics Division, Institute for Cancer Research and Treatment (IRCCS), 10060 Candiolo (Italy)

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

46

The Swift short gamma-ray burst rate density: prospects for detecting binary neutron star mergers by aLIGO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Presently only 30% of short gamma ray bursts (SGRBs) have accurate redshifts, and this sample is highly biased by the limited sensitivity of {\\it Swift} to detect SGRBs. We account for the dominant biases to calculate a realistic SGRB rate density out to $z = 0.5$ using the {\\it Swift} sample of peak fluxes, redshifts, and those SGRBs with a beaming angle constraint from X-ray/optical observations. Assuming a significant fraction of binary neutron star mergers produce SGRBs, we calculate lower and upper detection rate limits of (1-180) per Yr by an advanced LIGO and Virgo coincidence search. Our detection rate is compatible with extrapolations using Galactic pulsar observations and population synthesis.

David Coward; Eric Howell; Tsvi Piran; Giulia Stratta; Marica Branchesi; Omer Bromberg; Bruce Gendre; Ronald Burman; Dafne Guetta

2012-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

47

Revisiting coincidence rate between Gravitational Wave detection and short Gamma-Ray Burst for the Advanced and third generation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We use realistic Monte-Carlo simulations including both gravitational-wave and short gamma-ray burst selection effects to revisit the coincident rate of binary systems composed of two neutron stars or a neutron star and a black hole. We show that the fraction of GW triggers that can be observed in coincidence with sGRBs is proportional to the beaming factor at $z=0$, but increases with the distance, until it reaches 100 \\% at the GW detector horizon distance. When this is taken into account the rate is improved by a factor of $~3$ compared to the simple beaming factor correction. We provide an estimate of the performance future GRB detectors should achieve in order to fully exploit the potentiality of the planned third generation GW antenna Einstein Telescope, and we propose a simple method to constrain the beaming angle of sGRBs.

Regimbau, T; Meacher, D; Gendre, B; er, M Bo\\"

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

On the combination of delayed neutron and delayed gamma techniques for fission rate measurement in nuclear fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Novel techniques to measure newly induced fissions in spent fuel after re-irradiation at low power have been developed and tested at the Proteus zero-power research reactor. The two techniques are based on the detection of high energy gamma-rays emitted by short-lived fission products and delayed neutrons. The two techniques relate the measured signals to the total fission rate, the isotopic composition of the fuel, and nuclear data. They can be combined to derive better estimates on each of these parameters. This has potential for improvement in many areas. Spent fuel characterisation and safeguard applications can benefit from these techniques for non-destructive assay of plutonium content. Another application of choice is the reduction of uncertainties on nuclear data. As a first application of the combination of the delayed neutron and gamma measurement techniques, this paper shows how to reduce the uncertainties on the relative abundances of the longest delayed neutron group for thermal fissions in {sup 235}U, {sup 239}Pu and fast fissions in {sup 238}U. The proposed experiments are easily achievable in zero-power research reactors using fresh UO{sub 2} and MOX fuel and do not require fast extraction systems. The relative uncertainties (1{sigma}) on the relative abundances are expected to be reduced from 13% to 4%, 16% to 5%, and 38% to 12% for {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U and {sup 239}Pu, respectively. (authors)

Perret, G.; Jordan, K. A. [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen, 5232 (Switzerland)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Effects of an acute dose of gamma radiation exposure on stem diameter growth, carbon gain, and biomass partitioning in Helianthus annuus  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nineteen-day-old dwarf sunflower plants (Helianthus annuus, variety NK894) received a variable dose (0-40 Gy) from a cobalt-60 gamma source. A very sensitive stem monitoring device, developed at Battelle's Pacific Northwest Laboratories, Richland, Washington was used to measure real-time changes in stem diameter. Exposure of plants caused a significant reduction in stem growth and root biomass. Doses as low as 5 Gy resulted in a significant increase in leaf density, suggesting that nonreversible morphological growth changes could be induced by very low doses of radiation. Carbohydrate analysis of 40-Gy irradiated plants demonstrated significantly more starch content in leaves and significantly less starch content in stems 18 days after exposure than did control plants. In contrast, the carbohydrate content in roots of 40-Gy irradiated plants were not significantly different from unirradiated plants 18 days after exposure. These results indicate that radiation either decreased phloem transport or reduced the availability of sugar reducing enzymes in irradiated plants. 44 refs., 12 figs.

Thiede, M.E.

1988-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

50

Non-destructive method for determining neutron exposure  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A non-destructive method for determination of neutron exposure in an object, such as a reactor pressure vessel, is based on the observation of characteristic gamma-rays emitted by activation products in the object by using a unique continuous gamma-ray spectrometer. The spectrometer views the object through appropriate collimators to determine the absolute emission rate of these characteristic gamma-rays, thereby ascertaining the absolute activity of given activation products in the object. These data can then be used to deduce the spatial and angular dependence of neutron exposure at regions of interest within the object.

Gold, R.; McElroy, W.N.

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Measurement of the decay rate and form factor parameter $\\alpha_{K}*$ in the decay $K_{L} \\rightarrow e^{+}e^{-}\\gamma$  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The decay rate of the neutral K meson $\\mathrm{K_{L} \\rightarrow e^{+}e^{-}\\gamma}$ has been measured with the NA48 detector at the CERN SPS. A total of 6864 events has been observed with an estimated background of 10 events. The branching ratio is $\\mathrm{\\Gamma(K_{L} \\rightarrow e^{+}e^{-}\\gamma)/\\Gamma(K_{L} rightarrow all) = (1.06 \\pm 0.02_{stat.} \\pm 0.02_{sys.} \\pm 0.04_{calc.})\\times 10^{-5}}$. The parameter describing the relative strength of the two contributing amplitudes to this decay through $\\mathrm{\\alpha_{K^{*}}}$ intermediate seudoscalar or vector mesons, was measured to be $\\mathrm{\\alpha_{K^{*}} = -0.36 \\pm 0.06_{stat.} \\pm 0.02_{sys.}}$

Fanti, V; Musa, L; Marras, D; Nappi, A; Hay, B; Moore, R W; Moore, K N; Munday, D J; Needham, M D; Parker, M A; White, T O; Wotton, S A; Barr, Giles David; Bocquet, G; Bremer, J; Ceccucci, Augusto; Cundy, Donald C; Doble, Niels T; Funk, W; Gatignon, L; Gianoli, A; Gonidec, A; Govi, G; Grafström, P; Kubischta, Werner; Lacourt, A; Luitz, S; Kesseler, G; Matheys, J P; Norton, Alan Robert; Palestini, S; Panzer-Steindel, B; Schinzel, D; Taureg, Hans; Velasco, M; Vossnack, O; Wahl, H; Wirrer, G; Kekelidze, V D; Mestvirishvili, A; Potrebenikov, Yu K; Tatishvili, G T; Tkachev, A L; Zinchenko, A I; Boyle, O; Martin, V J; Knowles, I G; Parsons, H; Dalpiaz, Pietro; Duclos, J; Frabetti, P L; Martini, M; Petrucci, F; Porcu, M; Savrié, M; Bizzeti, A; Calvetti, M; Collazuol, G; Graziani, G; Iacopini, E; Lenti, M; Michetti, A; Becker, H G; Blümer, H; Buchholz, P; Coward, D H; Ebersberger, C; Fox, H; Kalter, A; Kleinknecht, K; Koch, U; Köpke, L; Renk, B; Scheidt, J; Schmidt, J; Schönharting, V; Schué, Yu; Wilhelm, R; Winhart, A; Wittgen, M; Chollet, J C; Crépé, S; Iconomidou-Fayard, L; Fayard, Louis; Ocariz, J; Unal, G; Vattolo, D; Wingerter-Seez, I; Anzivino, Giuseppina; Cenci, P; Lubrano, P; Pepé, M; Gorini, B; Calafiura, P; Carosi, R; Cerri, C; Cirilli, M; Costantini, F; Fantechi, R; Giudici, Sergio; Mannelli, I; Marzulli, V M; Pierazzini, G M; Sozzi, M; Chčze, J B; Cogan, J; De Beer, M; Debu, P; Formica, A; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Khristov, P Z; Mazzucato, E; Peyaud, B; Schanne, S; Turlay, René; Vallage, B; Augustin, I; Bender, M; Holder, M; Ziolkowski, M; Arcidiacono, R; Biino, C; Marchetto, F; Menichetti, E; Nassalski, J P; Rondio, Ewa; Szleper, M; Wislicki, W; Wronka, S; Dibon, Heinz; Fischer, G; Jeitler, Manfred; Markytan, Manfred; Mikulec, I; Neuhofer, Günther; Pernicka, Manfred; Taurok, Anton

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

THE INFLUENCE OF UNCERTAINTIES IN THE {sup 15}O({alpha}, {gamma}){sup 19}Ne REACTION RATE ON MODELS OF TYPE I X-RAY BURSTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a Monte Carlo calculation of the astrophysical rate of the {sup 15}O({alpha}, {gamma}){sup 19}Ne reaction based on an evaluation of published experimental data. By considering the likelihood distributions of individual resonance parameters derived from measurements, estimates of upper and lower limits on the reaction rate at the 99.73% confidence level are derived in addition to the recommended, median value. These three reaction rates are used as input for three separate calculations of Type I X-ray bursts (XRBs) using spherically symmetric, hydrodynamic simulations of an accreting neutron star. In this way the influence of the {sup 15}O({alpha}, {gamma}){sup 19}Ne reaction rate on the peak luminosity, recurrence time, and associated nucleosynthesis in models of Type I XRBs is studied. Contrary to previous findings, no substantial effect on any of these quantities is observed in a sequence of four bursts when varying the reaction rate between its lower and upper limits. Rather, the differences in these quantities are comparable to the burst-to-burst variations with a fixed reaction rate, indicating that uncertainties in the {sup 15}O({alpha}, {gamma}){sup 19}Ne reaction rate do not strongly affect the predictions of this Type I XRB model.

Davids, Barry [TRIUMF, Vancouver, BC V6T 2A3 (Canada); Cyburt, Richard H. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics and National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (United States); Jose, Jordi [Departament de Fisica i Enginyeria Nuclear, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya and Institut d'Estudis Espacials de Catalunya, Barcelona (Spain); Mythili, Subramanian [Physics Department, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA (United States)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Selection effects in Gamma Ray Bursts correlations: consequences on the ratio between GRB and star formation rates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) visible up to very high redshift have become attractive targets as potential new distance indicators. It is still not clear whether the relations proposed so far originate from an unknown GRB physics or result from selection effects. We investigate this issue in the case of the $L_X-T^*_a$ correlation (hereafter LT) between the X-ray luminosity $L_X (T_a)$ at the end of the plateau phase, $T_a$, and the rest frame time $T^{*}_a$. We devise a general method to build mock data sets starting from a GRB world model and taking into account selection effects on both time and luminosity. This method shows how not knowing the efficiency function could influence the evaluation of the intrinsic slope of any correlation and the GRB density rate. We investigate biases (small offsets in slope or normalization) that would occur in the LT relation as a result of truncations, possibly present in the intrinsic distributions of $L_X$ and $T^*_a$. We compare these results with the ones in Dainotti et al....

Dainotti, Maria Giovanna; Shigehiro, Nagataki; Capozziello, Salvatore

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

High Exposure Facility Technical Description  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The High Exposure Facility is a collimated high-level gamma irradiator that is located in the basement of the 318 building. It was custom developed by PNNL back in 1982 to meet the needs for high range radiological instrument calibrations and dosimeter irradiations. At the time no commercially available product existed that could create exposure rates up to 20,000 R/h. This document is intended to pass on the design criteria that was employed to create this unique facility, while maintaining compliance with ANSI N543-1974, "General Safety Standard for Installations Using Non-Medical X-Ray and Sealed Gamma-Ray Sources, Energies up to 10 MeV."

Carter, Gregory L.; Stithem, Arthur R.; Murphy, Mark K.; Smith, Alex K.

2008-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

55

Experimental measurements of the O15(alpha,gamma)Ne19 reaction rate and the stability of thermonuclear burning on accreting neutron stars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Neutron stars in close binary star systems often accrete matter from their companion stars. Thermonuclear ignition of the accreted material in the atmosphere of the neutron star leads to a thermonuclear explosion which is observed as an X-ray burst occurring periodically between hours and days depending on the accretion rate. The ignition conditions are characterized by a sensitive interplay between the accretion rate of the fuel supply and its depletion rate by nuclear burning in the hot CNO cycle and the rp-process. For accretion rates close to stable burning the burst ignition therefore depends critically on the hot CNO breakout reaction, O15(alpha,gamma)Ne19, that regulates the flow between the hot CNO cycle and the rapid proton capture process. Until recently, the O15(alpha,gamma)Ne19-reaction rate was not known experimentally and the theoretical estimates carried significant uncertainties. In this paper we perform a parameter study of the uncertainty of this reaction rate and determine the astrophysical consequences of the first measurement of this reaction rate. Our results corroborate earlier predictions and show that theoretically burning remains unstable up to accretion rates near the Eddington limit, in contrast to astronomical observations.

Jacob Lund Fisker; Wanpeng Tan; Joachim Goerres; Michael Wiescher; Randall L. Cooper

2007-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

56

Work to save dose: contrasting effective dose rates from radon exposure in workplaces and residences against the backdrop of public and occupational limits  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Office workers are exposed to radon while at work and at home. Though there has been a multitude of studies reporting the measurements of radon concentrations and potential lung and effective doses associated with radon and progeny exposure in homes, similar studies on the concentrations and subsequent effective dose rates in the non-mine workplaces are lacking. Additionally, there are few, if any, comparative analyses of radon exposures at more 'typical' workplace with residential exposures within the same county. The purposes of this study were to measure radon concentrations in office and residential spaces in the same county and explore the radiation dose implications. Sixty-five track-etch detectors were deployed in office spaces and 47 were deployed in residences, all within Los Alamos County, New Mexico, USA. The sampling periods for these measurements were generally about three months. The measured concentrations were used to calculate and compare effective dose rates resulting from exposure while at work and at home. Results showed that full-time office workers receive on average about 8 times greater exposure at home than while in the office (2.3 mSv yr-! versus 0.3 mSv yr-!). The estimated effective dose rate for a more homebound person was about 3 mSv yr-!. Estimating effective doses from background radon exposure in the same county as Los Alamos National Laboratory, with thousands of'radiological workers,' highlights interesting contrasts in radiation protection standards that span public and occupational settings. For example, the effective dose rate from background radon exposure in unregulated office spaces ranged up to 1.1 mSv yr-!, which is similar to the 1 mSv yr-! threshold for regulation ofa 'radiological worker,' as defined in the Department of Energy regulations for occupational exposure. Additionally, the estimated average effective dose total of> 3 mSv yf! from radon background exposure in homes stands in contrast to the 0.1 mSv yr-! air pathway effective public dose limit regulated by the Environmental Protection Agency for radioactive air emissions.

Whicker, Jeffrey J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mcnaughton, Michael W [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Traffic-related air pollution exposures and changes in heart rate variability in Mexico City: A panel study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract Background While air pollution exposures have been linked to cardiovascular outcomes, the contribution from acute gas and particle traffic-related pollutants remains unclear. Using a panel study design with repeated ...

Shields, Kyra Naumoff

58

Non-destructive method for determining neutron exposure and constituent concentrations of a body  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A non-destructive method for determination of neutron exposure and constituent concentrations in an object, such as reactor pressure vessel, is based on the observation of characteristic gamma-rays emitted by activation products in the object by using a unique continuous gamma-ray spectrometer. The spectrometer views the object through appropriate collimators to determine the absolute emission rate of these characteristic gamma-rays, thereby ascertaining the absolute activity of given activation products in the object. These data can then be used to deduce the spatial and angular dependence of neutron exposure or the spatial constituent concentration at regions of interest within the object.

Gold, Raymond (Richland, WA); McElroy, William N. (Richland, WA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Non-destructive method for determining neutron exposure and constituent concentrations of a body  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A non-destructive method for determination of neutron exposure and constituent concentrations in an object, such as a reactor pressure vessel, is based on the observation of characteristic gamma-rays emitted by activation products in the object by using a unique continuous gamma-ray spectrometer. The spectrometer views the object through appropriate collimators to determine the absolute emission rate of these characteristic gamma-rays, thereby ascertaining the absolute activity of given activation products in the object. These data can then be used to deduce the spatial and angular dependence of neutron exposure or the spatial constituent concentrations at regions of interest within the object.

Gold, R.; McElroy, W.N.

1984-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

60

High-Resolution Neutron Capture and Total Cross-Section Measurements, and the Astrophysical 95Mo(n,gamma) Reaction Rate at s-process Temperatures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abundances of Mo isotopes predicted by stellar models of the s process are, except for 95Mo, in good agreement with data from single grains of mainstream presolar SiC. Because the meteorite data seemed sound and no reasonable modification to stellar theory resulted in good agreement for 95Mo, it has been suggested that the recommended neutron capture reaction rate for this nuclide is 30% too low. Therefore, we have made a new determination of the 95Mo(n,gamma) reaction rate via high-resolution measurements of the neutron-capture and total cross sections of 95Mo at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator. These data were analyzed with the R-matrix code SAMMY to obtain parameters for resonances up to En = 10 keV. Also, a small change to our capture apparatus allowed us to employ a new technique to vastly improve resonance spin and parity assignments. These new resonance parameters, together with our data in the unresolved range, were used to calculate the 95Mo(n,gamma) reaction rate at s-process temperatures. We compare the currently recommended rate to our new results and discuss their astrophysical impact.

P. E. Koehler; J. A. Harvey; K. H. Guber; D. Wiarda

2008-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gamma exposure rate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Plutonium-aerosol emission rates and potential inhalation exposure during cleanup and treatment test at Area 11, Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Cleanup and Treatment (CAT) test was conducted in 1981 at Area 11, Nevada Test Site. Its purpose was to evaluate the effectiveness of using a large truck-mounted vacuum cleaner similar to those used to clean paved streets for cleaning radiological contamination from the surface of desert soils. We found that four passes with the vehicle removed 97% of the alpha contamination and reduced resuspension by 99.3 to 99.7%. Potential exposure to cleanup workers was slight when compared to natural background exposure. 7 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

Shinn, J.H.; Homan, D.N.

1985-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

62

Directional gamma detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved directional gamma radiation detector has a collector sandwiched etween two layers of insulation of varying thicknesses. The collector and insulation layers are contained within an evacuated casing, or emitter, which releases electrons upon exposure to gamma radiation. Delayed electrons and electrons entering the collector at oblique angles are attenuated as they pass through the insulation layers on route to the collector.

LeVert, Francis E. (Downers Grove, Knoxville, TN); Cox, Samson A. (Downers Grove, IL)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

An Improved Reaction Rate Formulation for Charged-Particle Induced Thermonuclear Reaction of {sup 2}H(d,{gamma}){sup 4}He  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The reaction rate formula utilized in compilations such as the Nuclear Astrophysics Compilation of Reaction Rates (NACRE) uses low energy approximation due to temperatures in stars are in the region of a few keVs. Most nuclear reaction experiments were done in MeV range and the interior temperatures of massive stars are {approx}10{sup 9} K. Hence an improved formulation for calculating the nuclear reaction rate that is applicable to high temperatures is discussed in this work. The exact tunneling probability that is applicable for all energies is obtained by solving the Schroedinger equation. This yields an enhanced expression for the astrophysical S-factor for calculating the thermonuclear reaction rate at high temperature. The thermonuclear reaction rate from this work is applied to the {sup 2}H(d,{gamma}){sup 4}He reaction and is compared with the NACRE compilation. This improved reaction rate can be included in the nuclear reaction network in a Big Bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) code or a stellar nuclear network code.

Aziz, Azni Abdul; Yusof, Norhasliza; Idris, Mahirah; Kassim, Hasan Abu [Department of Physics, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

2011-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

64

Gamma radiolysis of chlorinated hydrocarbons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This program is the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) component of a joint collarborative effort with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The purpose of this effort is to demonstrate a viable process for breaking down hazardous halogenated organic wastes to simpler, non-hazardous waste using high energy ionizing radiation. The INEL effort focuses on the use of spent reactor fuel gamma radiation sources to decompose complex wastes such as PCBs. At LLNL, halogenated solvents such as carbon tetrachloride and trichloroethylene are being studied using accelerator radiation sources. The INEL irradiation experiments concentrated on a single PCB congener so that a limited set of decomposition reactions could be studied. The congener 2,2{prime}, 3,3{prime},4,5{prime},6,6{prime} - octachlorobiphenyl was examined following exposure to various gamma doses at the Advanced Test Reactor (AIR) spent fuel pool. The decomposition rates and products in several solvents are discussed. 3 refs.

Arbon, R.E.; Mincher, B.J.; Meikrantz, D.H.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Gamma radiolysis of chlorinated hydrocarbons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This program is the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) component of a joint collarborative effort with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The purpose of this effort is to demonstrate a viable process for breaking down hazardous halogenated organic wastes to simpler, non-hazardous waste using high energy ionizing radiation. The INEL effort focuses on the use of spent reactor fuel gamma radiation sources to decompose complex wastes such as PCBs. At LLNL, halogenated solvents such as carbon tetrachloride and trichloroethylene are being studied using accelerator radiation sources. The INEL irradiation experiments concentrated on a single PCB congener so that a limited set of decomposition reactions could be studied. The congener 2,2{prime}, 3,3{prime},4,5{prime},6,6{prime} - octachlorobiphenyl was examined following exposure to various gamma doses at the Advanced Test Reactor (AIR) spent fuel pool. The decomposition rates and products in several solvents are discussed. 3 refs.

Arbon, R.E.; Mincher, B.J.; Meikrantz, D.H.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Traffic-related air pollution exposures and changes in heart rate variability in Mexico City: A panel study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

participated in the Mexico City Air Pollution Campaign [33].as part of the Mexico City Air Pollution Campaign. In 2004,pollution, PM 2.5 , Ozone, Heart rate variability, Mexico

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Scaling of three microwave exposure systems on the basis of averaged whole-body specific absorption rate. Final report, 1 June 1983-1 June 1986  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three systems for exposing small laboratory animals to 2450-MHz microwave radiation were compared using whole-body averaged specific absorption rate (SAR). The three systems were a plane wave propogated in an anechoic chamber, a circularly polarized waveguide, and a multimode cavity. Following calibration of the three systems, a temperature-profile study assessing brain and colonic temperature in rat carcasses was performed. A third study investigated seizures in young mouse pups. There were statistically significant differences between the three systems regarding heat distribution as indicated by brain and colonic temperatures. Exposure in the circularly polarized waveguide resulted in lower temperatures at both sites. However, when young mouse pups were placed in the chambers and exposed at levels calculated to produce whole-body averaged SARs of 90 W/kg, the seizures produced by the plane wave exposures required nearly twice the amount of time as those in the waveguide or multimode cavity. The results suggest that average whole-body SAR should not be used for making comparisons of effects obtained in different exposure systems.

O'Connor, M.E.

1987-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

68

Gamma-Gamma Colliders  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a gamma collider, we need to discuss the laser optics in thegamma collider will be given later, coupled with some discussions of the requisite opticsoptics and an adequate laser for Compton conversion. With this approach, the luminosity for the gamma-

Kim, K.-J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

New 34Cl proton-threshold states and the thermonuclear 33S(p,gamma)34Cl rate in ONe novae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Analysis of presolar grains in primitive meteorites has shown isotopic ratios largely characteristic of the conditions thought to prevail in various astrophysical environments. A possible indicator for a grain of ONe nova origin is a large 33S abundance: nucleosynthesis calculations predict as much as 150 times the solar abundance of 33S in the ejecta of nova explosions on massive ONe white dwarfs. This overproduction factor may, however, vary by factors of at least 0.01 - 3 because of uncertainties of several orders of magnitude in the 33S(p,gamma)34Cl reaction rate at nova peak temperatures (Tpeak ~ 0.1 - 0.4 GK). These uncertainties arise due to the lack of nuclear physics information for states within ~ 600 keV of the 33S+p threshold in 34Cl (Sp(34Cl) = 5143 keV). To better constrain this rate we have measured, for the first time, the 34S(3He,t)34Cl reaction over the region Ex(34Cl) = 4.9 - 6 MeV. We confirm previous states and find 15 new states in this energy region. New 33S(p,gamma)34Cl resonances at ER = 281(2), 301(2) and 342(2) keV may dominate this rate at relevant nova temperatures. Our results could affect predictions of sulphur isotopic ratios in nova ejecta (e.g., 32S/33S) that may be used as diagnostic tools for the nova paternity of grains.

A. Parikh; T. Faestermann; R. Hertenberger; R. Kruecken; D. Schafstadler; H. -F. Wirth; T. Behrens; V. Bildstein; S. Bishop; K. Eppinger; C. Herlitzius; C. Hinke; M. Schlarb; D. Seiler; K. Wimmer

2009-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

70

BrachyView: Proof-of-principle of a novel in-body gamma camera for low dose-rate prostate brachytherapy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: The conformity of the achieved dose distribution to the treatment plan strongly correlates with the accuracy of seed implantation in a prostate brachytherapy treatment procedure. Incorrect seed placement leads to both short and long term complications, including urethral and rectal toxicity. The authors present BrachyView, a novel concept of a fast intraoperative treatment planning system, to provide real-time seed placement information based on in-body gamma camera data. BrachyView combines the high spatial resolution of a pixellated silicon detector (Medipix2) with the volumetric information acquired by a transrectal ultrasound (TRUS). The two systems will be embedded in the same probe so as to provide anatomically correct seed positions for intraoperative planning and postimplant dosimetry. Dosimetric calculations are based on the TG-43 method using the real position of the seeds. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the feasibility of BrachyView using the Medipix2 pixel detector and a pinhole collimator to reconstruct the real-time 3D position of low dose-rate brachytherapy seeds in a phantom. Methods: BrachyView incorporates three Medipix2 detectors coupled to a multipinhole collimator. Three-dimensionally triangulated seed positions from multiple planar images are used to determine the seed placement in a PMMA prostate phantom in real time. MATLAB codes were used to test the reconstruction method and to optimize the device geometry. Results: The results presented in this paper show a 3D position reconstruction accuracy of the seed in the range of 0.5-3 mm for a 10-60 mm seed-to-detector distance interval (Z direction), respectively. The BrachyView system also demonstrates a spatial resolution of 0.25 mm in the XY plane for sources at 10 mm distance from Medipix2 detector plane, comparable to the theoretical value calculated for an equivalent gamma camera arrangement. The authors successfully demonstrated the capability of BrachyView for real-time imaging (using a 3 s data acquisition time) of different brachytherapy seed configurations (with an activity of 0.05 U) throughout a 60 Multiplication-Sign 60 Multiplication-Sign 60 mm{sup 3} Perspex prostate phantom. Conclusions: The newly developed miniature gamma camera component of BrachyView, with its high spatial resolution and real time capability, allows accurate 3D localization of seeds in a prostate phantom. Combination of the gamma camera with TRUS in a single probe will complete the BrachyView system.

Petasecca, M.; Loo, K. J.; Safavi-Naeini, M.; Han, Z.; Metcalfe, P. E.; Lerch, M. L. F.; Qi, Y.; Rosenfeld, A. B. [Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia); Meikle, S. [Brain and Mind Research Institute, University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia and Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia); Pospisil, S.; Jakubek, J. [Institute of Experimental and Applied Physics, Czech Technical University of Prague, Prague (Czech Republic); Bucci, J. A. [St George Cancer Care Centre, St George Hospital, Kogarah, NSW 2217 (Australia); Zaider, M. [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York 10021 (United States)

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

71

Electronic equilibrium as a function of depth in tissue from Cobalt-60 point source exposures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Skin exposure can arise from both the beta and gamma components of radioactive particles and gamma radiation can contribute significantly to skin doses. The gamma component of dose increases dramatically when layers of protective clothing are interposed...

Myrick, Jo Ann

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Radiation Risk from Chronic Low Dose-Rate Radiation Exposures: The Role of Life-Time Animal Studies - Workshop October 2005  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As a part of Radiation research conference, a workshop was held on life-long exposure studies conducted in the course of irradiation experiements done at Argonne National Laboratory between 1952-1992. A recent review article documents many of the issues discussed at that workshop.

Gayle Woloschak

2009-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

73

Gamma bursts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The origin of cosmic gamma bursts is discussed. Radiation thermalization in magnetic fields, spectral mechanisms, and charge separation and photon heating are discussed. (GHT)

Colgate, S.A.; Petschek, A.G.

1982-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

74

Gamma radiation field intensity meter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode. 4 figs.

Thacker, L.H.

1995-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

75

Gamma radiation field intensity meter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode. 4 figs.

Thacker, L.H.

1994-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

76

Gamma radiation field intensity meter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode.

Thacker, Louis H. (Knoxville, TN)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Gamma radiation field intensity meter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode.

Thacker, Louis H. (Knoxville, TN)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

30S Studied with the 32S(p,t)30S Reaction and the 29P(p,{gamma})30S Reaction Rate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 29P(p,gamma)30S rate affects interpretation of nova Si abundances, which have been precisely measured in presolar grains. The rate is thought to be dominated by previously unobserved 3+ and 2+ resonances above the 30S proton threshold at 4400 keV. To better understand the 29P(p,gamma)30S rate, we have studied the 30S nucleus with the 32S(p,t)30S reaction. We have observed 13 30S levels - 9 of which are above the proton threshold including a level at 4704 keV that is a candidate to be the important 3+ resonance. From the observed triton angular distributions, we additionally constrain the spins of several levels. Using our updated information, we estimate the 29P(p,gamma)30S reaction rate is approximately six times larger at nova temperatures than previously thought.

Bardayan, Daniel W [ORNL; Blackmon, Jeff C [ORNL; Fitzgerald, Ryan [ORNL; Hix, William Raphael [ORNL; Grzywacz-Jones, Kate L [ORNL; KOZUB, RAYMOND L [ORNL; Liang, J Felix [ORNL; Livesay, Jake [ORNL; Ma, Zhanwen [ORNL; Roberts, Luke F [ORNL; Smith, Michael Scott [ORNL; Thomas, Jeffrey S [ORNL; Visser, Dale William [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Inspection and Gamma-Ray Dose Rate Measurements of the Annulus of the VSC-17 Concrete Spent Nuclear Fuel Storage Cask  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The air cooling annulus of the Ventilated Storage Cask (VSC)-17 spent fuel storage cask was inspected using a Toshiba 7 mm (1/4”) CCD video camera. The dose rates observed in the annular space were measured to provide a reference for the activity to which the camera(s) being tested were being exposed. No gross degradation, pitting, or general corrosion was observed.

P. L. Winston

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

RADON DAUGHTER EXPOSURES IN ENERGY EFFICIENT BUILDINGS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DAUGHTER EXPOSURES IN ENERGY-EFFICIENT BUILDINGS A.V. Nero,DAUGHTER EXPOSURES IN ENERGY-EFFICIENT BUILDINGS A.V. Nero,vs. VENTILATION IN ENERGY EFFICIENT HOUSES Air change rate(

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gamma exposure rate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

The neutron-gamma Feynman variance to mean approach: gamma detection and total neutron-gamma detection (theory and practice)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Two versions of the neutron-gamma variance to mean (Feynman-alpha method or Feynman-Y function) formula for either gamma detection only or total neutron-gamma detection, respectively, are derived and compared in this paper. The new formulas have a particular importance for detectors of either gamma photons or detectors sensitive to both neutron and gamma radiation. If applied to a plastic or liquid scintillation detector, the total neutron-gamma detection Feynman-Y expression corresponds to a situation where no discrimination is made between neutrons and gamma particles. The gamma variance to mean formulas are useful when a detector of only gamma radiation is used or when working with a combined neutron-gamma detector at high count rates. The theoretical derivation is based on the Chapman-Kolmogorov equation with inclusion of general reactions and passage intensities for neutrons and gammas, but with the inclusion of prompt reactions only. A one energy group approximation is considered. The comparison of the two different theories is made by using reaction intensities obtained in MCNPX simulations with a simplified geometry for two scintillation detectors and a 252Cf-source enclosed in a steel container. In addition, the variance to mean ratios, neutron, gamma and total neutron-gamma, are evaluated experimentally for a weak 252Cf neutron-gamma source in a steel container, a 137Cs random gamma source and a 22Na correlated gamma source. Due to the focus being on the possibility of using neutron-gamma variance to mean theories for both reactor and safeguards applications, we limited the present study to the general analytical expressions for Feynman-Y formulas.

Dina Chernikova; Kĺre Axell; Senada Avdic; Imre Pázsit; Anders Nordlund

2015-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

82

Gamma watermarking  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A covert, gamma-ray "signature" is used as a "watermark" for property identification. This new watermarking technology is based on a unique steganographic or "hidden writing" digital signature, implemented in tiny quantities of gamma-ray-emitting radioisotopic material combinations, generally covertly emplaced on or within an object. This digital signature may be readily recovered at distant future times, by placing a sensitive, high energy-resolution gamma-ray detecting instrument reasonably precisely over the location of the watermark, which location may be known only to the object's owner; however, the signature is concealed from all ordinary detection means because its exceedingly low level of activity is obscured by the natural radiation background (including the gamma radiation naturally emanating from the object itself, from cosmic radiation and material surroundings, from human bodies, etc.). The "watermark" is used in object-tagging for establishing object identity, history or ownership. It thus may serve as an aid to law enforcement officials in identifying stolen property and prosecuting theft thereof. Highly effective, potentially very low cost identification-on demand of items of most all types is thus made possible.

Ishikawa, Muriel Y.; Wood, Lowell L.; Lougheed, Ronald W.; Moody, Kenton J.; Wang, Tzu-Fang

2004-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

83

The reaction of glass in a gamma irradiated saturated tuff environment: Part 2, Data package for ATM-1c and ATM-8 glasses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of experiments have been performed in support of the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) project that investigate the efects of gamma radiation on groundwater and glass reaction. Experiments have been done in a gamma radiation field at exposure rates ranging between 2 x 10{sup 5} and 0 R/h, and have been performed over a period of four years. All the data that have been generated during these experiments and which were used in writing the article are presented. The report consists of a series of Tables that provide the (1) groundwater compositions; (2) glass compositions; (3) experimental matrices and selected results; (4) cation analyses; (5) anion analyses; (6) Np and Pu analyses; (7) SEM/EDS analyses; and (8) SIMS analyses exposure rates of 2 x 10{sup 5} (2R), 1 x 10{sup 3} (1R), and 0 (OR) R/h. 2 refs., 7 figs., 16 tabs.

Bates, J.K.; Gerding, T.J.; Fischer, D.F.; Ebert, W.L.

1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Conservative constraints on dark matter annihilation into gamma rays  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using gamma-ray data from observations of the Milky Way, Andromeda (M31), and the cosmic background, we calculate conservative upper limits on the dark matter self-annihilation cross section to monoenergetic gamma rays, <{sigma}{sub A}v>{sub {gamma}}{sub {gamma}}, over a wide range of dark matter masses. (In fact, over most of this range, our results are unchanged if one considers just the branching ratio to gamma rays with energies within a factor of a few of the endpoint at the dark matter mass.) If the final-state branching ratio to gamma rays, Br({gamma}{gamma}), were known, then <{sigma}{sub A}v>{sub {gamma}}{sub {gamma}}/Br({gamma}{gamma}) would define an upper limit on the total cross section; we conservatively assume Br({gamma}{gamma}) > or approx. 10{sup -4}. An upper limit on the total cross section can also be derived by considering the appearance rates of any standard model particles; in practice, this limit is defined by neutrinos, which are the least detectable. For intermediate dark matter masses, gamma-ray-based and neutrino-based upper limits on the total cross section are comparable, while the gamma-ray limit is stronger for small masses and the neutrino limit is stronger for large masses. We comment on how these results depend on the assumptions about astrophysical inputs and annihilation final states, and how GLAST and other gamma-ray experiments can improve upon them.

Mack, Gregory D.; Yueksel, Hasan [Department of Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Center for Cosmology and Astro-Particle Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Jacques, Thomas D.; Bell, Nicole F. [School of Physics, The University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Beacom, John F. [Department of Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Center for Cosmology and Astro-Particle Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

85

Quality assurance for gamma knives  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes and summarizes the results of a quality assurance (QA) study of the Gamma Knife, a nuclear medical device used for the gamma irradiation of intracranial lesions. Focus was on the physical aspects of QA and did not address issues that are essentially medical, such as patient selection or prescription of dose. A risk-based QA assessment approach was used. Sample programs for quality control and assurance are included. The use of the Gamma Knife was found to conform to existing standards and guidelines concerning radiation safety and quality control of external beam therapies (shielding, safety reviews, radiation surveys, interlock systems, exposure monitoring, good medical physics practices, etc.) and to be compliant with NRC teletherapy regulations. There are, however, current practices for the Gamma Knife not covered by existing, formalized regulations, standards, or guidelines. These practices have been adopted by Gamma Knife users and continue to be developed with further experience. Some of these have appeared in publications or presentations and are slowly finding their way into recommendations of professional organizations.

Jones, E.D.; Banks, W.W.; Fischer, L.E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Gamma Ray Bursts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Olson. “Observations of gamma-ray bursts of cosmic origin. ”E. Lingenfelter. “Gamma-ray bursts. ” Annual Review of652-654. Waxman, Eli. “Gamma-ray-burst afterglow: supporting

Stahl, Bennett

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Gamma ray generator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An embodiment of a gamma ray generator includes a neutron generator and a moderator. The moderator is coupled to the neutron generator. The moderator includes a neutron capture material. In operation, the neutron generator produces neutrons and the neutron capture material captures at least some of the neutrons to produces gamma rays. An application of the gamma ray generator is as a source of gamma rays for calibration of gamma ray detectors.

Firestone, Richard B; Reijonen, Jani

2014-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

88

Higgs boson decays into {\\gamma}{\\gamma} and Z{\\gamma} in the MSSM and BLSSM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We calculate Higgs decay rates into {\\gamma}{\\gamma} and Z{\\gamma} in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) and (B-L) Supersymmetric Standard Model (BLSSM) by allowing for contributions from light staus and charginos. We show that sizable departures are possible from the SM predictions for the 125 GeV state and that they are testable during run 2 at the Large Hadron Collider. Furthermore, we illustrate how a second light scalar Higgs signal in either or both these decay modes can be accessed at the CERN machine rather promptly within the BLSSM, a possibility instead precluded to the MSSM owing to the much larger mass of its heavy scalar state.

Hammad, A; Moretti, S

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Prompt Optical Observations of Gamma-ray Bursts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Robotic Optical Transient Search Experiment (ROTSE) seeks to measure simultaneous and early afterglow optical emission from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). A search for optical counterparts to six GRBs with localization errors of 1 square degree or better produced no detections. The earliest limiting sensitivity is m(ROTSE) > 13.1 at 10.85 seconds (5 second exposure) after the gamma-ray rise, and the best limit is m(ROTSE) > 16.0 at 62 minutes (897 second exposure). These are the most stringent limits obtained for GRB optical counterpart brightness in the first hour after the burst. Consideration of the gamma-ray fluence and peak flux for these bursts and for GRB990123 indicates that there is not a strong positive correlation between optical flux and gamma-ray emission.

Carl Akerlof; Richard Balsano; Scott Barthelmy; Jeff Bloch; Paul Butterworth; Don Casperson; Tom Cline; Sandra Fletcher; Fillippo Frontera; Galen Gisler; John Heise; Jack Hills; Kevin Hurley; Robert Kehoe; Brian Lee; Stuart Marshall; Tim McKay; Andrew Pawl; Luigi Piro; John Szymanski; Jim Wren

2000-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

90

Gamma ray detector shield  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A gamma ray detector shield comprised of a rigid, lead, cylindrical-shaped vessel having upper and lower portions with an pneumatically driven, sliding top assembly. Disposed inside the lead shield is a gamma ray scintillation crystal detector. Access to the gamma detector is through the sliding top assembly.

Ohlinger, R.D.; Humphrey, H.W.

1985-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

91

Track 3: Exposure Hazards  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

ISM Workshop Presentations Knoxville Convention Center, Knoxville, TN August 2009 Track 3: Exposure Hazards

92

air crew exposure: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

E. 18 Traffic-related air pollution exposures and changes in heart rate variability in Mexico City: A panel study MIT - DSpace Summary: Abstract Background While air pollution...

93

air endotoxin exposure: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

E. 17 Traffic-related air pollution exposures and changes in heart rate variability in Mexico City: A panel study MIT - DSpace Summary: Abstract Background While air pollution...

94

Gamma-ray waveguides  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have developed an approach for gamma-ray optics using layered structures acting as planar waveguides. Experiments demonstrating channeling of 122 keV gamma rays in two prototype waveguides validate the feasibility of this technology. Gamma-ray waveguides allow one to control the direction of radiation up to a few MeV. The waveguides are conceptually similar to polycapillary optics, but can function at higher gamma-ray energies. Optics comprised of these waveguides will be able to collect radiation from small solid angles or concentrate radiation into small area detectors. Gamma-ray waveguides may find applications in medical imaging and treatment, astrophysics, and homeland security.

Tournear, D. M.; Hoffbauer, M. A.; Akhadov, E. A.; Chen, A. T.; Pendleton, S. J.; Williamson, T. L.; Cha, K. C.; Epstein, R. I. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

2008-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

95

Effects of High Dietary Iron and Gamma Radiation on Oxidative Stress and Bone  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(induced by feeding a high iron diet) and gamma radiation exposure would independently increase markers of oxidative stress and markers of oxidative damage and result in loss of bone mass, with the combined treatment having additive or synergistic effects...

Yuen, Evelyn P

2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

96

Gamma Ray Bursts Sudden, intense flashes of gamma rays  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gamma Ray Bursts #12;The Case Sudden, intense flashes of gamma rays come from nowhere and disappear with out a trace. Incredibly powerful: A single gamma ray burst is hundreds of times brighter a supernova #12;Who Vela (1960's) Looking for arms testing, found gamma ray bursts Compton Gamma Ray Observatory

Washington at Seattle, University of - Department of Physics, Electroweak Interaction Research Group

97

Energetics of Gamma Ray Bursts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We determine the distribution of total energy emitted by gamma-ray bursts for bursts with fluences and distance information. Our core sample consists of eight bursts with BATSE spectra and spectroscopic redshifts. We extend this sample by adding four bursts with BATSE spectra and host galaxy R magnitudes. From these R magnitudes we calculate a redshift probability distribution; this method requires a model of the host galaxy population. From a sample of ten bursts with both spectroscopic redshifts and host galaxy R magnitudes (some do not have BATSE spectra) we find that the burst rate is proportional to the galaxy luminosity at the epoch of the burst. Assuming that the total energy emitted has a log-normal distribution, we find that the average emitted energy (assumed to be radiated isotropically) is $gamma iso} > = 1.3^{+1.2}_{-1.0} \\times 10^{53}$ ergs (for H$_0$ = 65 km s$^{-1}$ Mpc$^{-1}$, $\\Omega_m=0.3$ and $\\Omega_\\Lambda=0.7$); the distribution has a logarithmic width of $\\sigma_\\gamma=1.7^{+0.7}_{-0.3}$. The corresponding distribution of X-ray afterglow energy (for seven bursts) has $ = 4.0^{+1.6}_{-1.8} \\times 10^{51}$ergs and $\\sigma_X = 1.3^{+0.4}_{-0.3}$. For completeness, we also provide spectral fits for all bursts with BATSE spectra for which there were afterglow searches.

Raul Jimenez; David Band; Tsvi Piran

2001-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

98

X-Ray Observations of Gamma-Ray Burst Afterglows  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The discovery by the BeppoSAX satellite of X-ray afterglow emission from the gamma-ray burst which occurred on 28 February 1997 produced a revolution in our knowledge of the gamma-ray burst phenomenon. Along with the discovery of X-ray afterglows, the optical afterglows of gamma-ray bursts were discovered and the distance issue was settled, at least for long $\\gamma$-ray bursts. The 30 year mystery of the gamma-ray burst phenomenon is now on the way to solution. Here I rewiew the observational status of the X-ray afterglow emission, its mean properties (detection rate, continuum spectra, line features, and light curves), and the X-ray constraints on theoretical models of gamma-ray bursters and their progenitors. I also discuss the early onset afterglow emission, the remaining questions, and the role of future X-ray afterglow observations.

Filippo Frontera

2004-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

99

Afterglows as Diagnostics of Gamma Ray Burst Beaming  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

If gamma ray bursts are highly collimated, radiating into only a small fraction of the sky, the energy requirements of each event may be reduced by several (up to 4 - 6) orders of magnitude, and the event rate increased correspondingly. The large Lorentz factors (Gamma > 100) inferred from GRB spectra imply relativistic beaming of the gamma rays into an angle 1/Gamma. We are at present ignorant of whether there are ejecta outside this narrow cone. Afterglows allow empirical tests of whether GRBs are well-collimated jets or spherical fireballs. The bulk Lorentz factor decreases and radiation is beamed into an ever increasing solid angle as the burst remnant expands. It follows that if gamma ray bursts are highly collimated, many more optical and radio transients should be observed without associated gamma rays than with them. In addition, a burst whose ejecta are beamed into angle zeta undergoes a qualitative change in evolution when Gamma < 1/zeta: Before this, Gamma ~ r^{-3/2}, while afterwards, Gamma decays exponentially with r. This change results in a potentially observable break in the afterglow light curve. Successful application of either test would eliminate the largest remaining uncertainty in the energy requirements and space density of gamma ray bursters.

James E. Rhoads

1997-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

100

Optical gamma thermometer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An optical gamma thermometer includes a metal mass having a temperature proportional to a gamma flux within a core of a nuclear reactor, and an optical fiber cable for measuring the temperature of the heated metal mass. The temperature of the heated mass may be measured by using one or more fiber grating structures and/or by using scattering techniques, such as Raman, Brillouin, and the like. The optical gamma thermometer may be used in conjunction with a conventional reactor heat balance to calibrate the local power range monitors over their useful in-service life. The optical gamma thermometer occupies much less space within the in-core instrument tube and costs much less than the conventional gamma thermometer.

Koster, Glen Peter; Xia, Hua; Lee, Boon Kwee

2013-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gamma exposure rate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Results of mobile gamma scanning activities in St. Louis, Missouri  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

From 1942 through approximately 1966, the Mallinckrodt Chemical Works operated four plants in St. Louis, Missouri, for the Manhattan Engineer District and the Atomic Energy Commission. A variety of production processes using uranium- and radium-bearing ore materials were performed at the plants. It is the policy of the DOE to verify that radiological conditions at such sites or facilities comply with current DOE guidelines. Guidelines for release and use of such sites have become more stringent as research has provided more information since previous cleanups. The Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) was established as part of that effort to confirm the closeout status of facilities under contract to agencies preceding DOE during early nuclear energy development. Under the FUSRAP program, the Mallinckrodt properties have been previously investigated to determine the extent of on-site radiological contamination. At the request of DOE, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) conducted a survey in May 1990, of public roadways and suspected haul routes between the Mallinckrodt plant and storage sites in St. Louis to ensure that no residual radioactive materials were conveyed off-site. A mobile gamma scanning van with an on-board computer system was used to identify possible anomalies. Suspect areas are those displaying measurements deviating from gamma exposure rates identified as typical for radiologically unenhanced areas in the vicinity of the areas of interest. The instrumentation highlighted three anomaly locations each of which measured less than 1m{sup 2} in size. None of the slightly elevated radiation levels originated from material associated with former AEC-related processing operations in the area. The anomalies resulted from elevated concentrations of radionuclides present in phosphate fertilizers, increased thorium in road-base gravel, and emanations from the radioactive storage site near the Latty Avenue airport. 9 refs., 3 figs.

Rodriguez, R E; Witt, D A; Cottrell, W D; Carrier, R F

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

GAMMA RAYS FROM STAR FORMATION IN CLUSTERS OF GALAXIES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Star formation in galaxies is observed to be associated with gamma-ray emission, presumably from non-thermal processes connected to the acceleration of cosmic-ray nuclei and electrons. The detection of gamma rays from starburst galaxies by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) has allowed the determination of a functional relationship between star formation rate and gamma-ray luminosity. Since star formation is known to scale with total infrared (8-1000 {mu}m) and radio (1.4 GHz) luminosity, the observed infrared and radio emission from a star-forming galaxy can be used to quantitatively infer the galaxy's gamma-ray luminosity. Similarly, star-forming galaxies within galaxy clusters allow us to derive lower limits on the gamma-ray emission from clusters, which have not yet been conclusively detected in gamma rays. In this study, we apply the functional relationships between gamma-ray luminosity and radio and IR luminosities of galaxies derived by the Fermi Collaboration to a sample of the best candidate galaxy clusters for detection in gamma rays in order to place lower limits on the gamma-ray emission associated with star formation in galaxy clusters. We find that several clusters have predicted gamma-ray emission from star formation that are within an order of magnitude of the upper limits derived in Ackermann et al. based on non-detection by Fermi-LAT. Given the current gamma-ray limits, star formation likely plays a significant role in the gamma-ray emission in some clusters, especially those with cool cores. We predict that both Fermi-LAT over the course of its lifetime and the future Cerenkov Telescope Array will be able to detect gamma-ray emission from star-forming galaxies in clusters.

Storm, Emma M.; Jeltema, Tesla E.; Profumo, Stefano [Department of Physics, University of California, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

2012-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

103

Rate Schedules  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

One of the major responsibilities of Southeastern is to design, formulate, and justify rate schedules. Repayment studies prepared by the agency determine revenue requirements and appropriate rate...

104

Gamma-ray Astronomy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The relevance of gamma-ray astronomy to the search for the origin of the galactic and, to a lesser extent, the ultra-high-energy cosmic rays has long been recognised. The current renaissance in the TeV gamma-ray field has resulted in a wealth of new data on galactic and extragalactic particle accelerators, and almost all the new results in this field were presented at the recent International Cosmic Ray Conference (ICRC). Here I summarise the 175 papers submitted on the topic of gamma-ray astronomy to the 30th ICRC in Merida, Mexico in July 2007.

Jim Hinton

2007-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

105

Gamma-Ray Bursts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gamma-ray bursts are the most luminous explosions in the Universe, and their origin and mechanism are the focus of intense research and debate. More than three decades after their discovery, and after pioneering breakthroughs from space and ground experiments, their study is entering a new phase with the recently launched Swift satellite. The interplay between these observations and theoretical models of the prompt gamma ray burst and its afterglow is reviewed.

P. Meszaros

2006-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

106

Avian inhalation exposure chamber  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An exposure system for delivering gaseous material ranging in particle size from 0.4 micrometers to 20.0 micrometers uniformly to the heads of experimental animals, primarily birds. The system includes a vertical outer cylinder and a central chimney with animal holding bottles connected to exposure ports on the vertical outer cylinder.

Briant, James K. (P.O. Box 999, Richland, WA 99352); Driver, Crystal J. (P.O. Box 999, Richland, WA 99352)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Avian inhalation exposure chamber  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An exposure system is designed for delivering gaseous material ranging in particle size from 0.4 micrometers to 20.0 micrometers uniformly to the heads of experimental animals, primarily birds. The system includes a vertical outer cylinder and a central chimney with animal holding bottles connected to exposure ports on the vertical outer cylinder. 2 figs.

Briant, J.K.; Driver, C.J.

1992-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

108

Gamma-Ray Bursts Detected From BATSE DISCLA Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have searched for gamma-ray bursts (GRB) in the BATSE DISCLA data covering the period TJD 8365-10528. We employ an algorithm that uses the background both before and after the onset of the burst, and that requires an excess of at least 5 sigma over background in the energy range 50-300 keV. For the initial set of 7536 triggers, we find strong concentrations at given geographic locations of the satellite. After excluding these geographic areas, we are left with 4485 triggers. We exclude triggers close in position to solar flares, CygX-1, and Nova Persei 1992 when active, as well as soft bursts close to the sun. We accept 1018 triggers that occur within 230 sec of a GRB listed in the BATSE catalog, and upon visual inspection classify 881 triggers as magnetospheric events and 404 as GRBs. The final sample of 1422 GRBs represents effectively 2.0 years of isotropic exposure, for an annual rate of 710 GRBs per year.

M. Schmidt

1999-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

109

Gamma ray optics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Via refractive or diffractive scattering one can shape {gamma} ray beams in terms of beam divergence, spot size and monochromaticity. These concepts might be particular important in combination with future highly brilliant gamma ray sources and might push the sensibility of planned experiments by several orders of magnitude. We will demonstrate the experimental feasibility of gamma ray monochromatization on a ppm level and the creation of a gamma ray beam with nanoradian divergence. The results are obtained using the inpile target position of the High Flux Reactor of the ILL Grenoble and the crystal spectrometer GAMS. Since the refractive index is believed to vanish to zero with 1/E{sup 2}, the concept of refractive optics has never been considered for gamma rays. The combination of refractive optics with monochromator crystals is proposed to be a promising design. Using the crystal spectrometer GAMS, we have measured for the first time the refractive index at energies in the energy range of 180 - 2000 keV. The results indicate a deviation from simple 1/E{sup 2} extrapolation of X-ray results towards higher energies. A first interpretation of these new results will be presented. We will discuss the consequences of these results on the construction of refractive optics such as lenses or refracting prisms for gamma rays and their combination with single crystal monochromators.

Jentschel, M.; Guenther, M. M.; Habs, D.; Thirolf, P. G. [Institut Laue-Langevin, F38042 Grenoble (France); Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, D-85748 Garching, Germany and Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

2012-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

110

Gamma Reaction History for the NIF  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bang time and reaction history measurements are fundamental components of diagnosing ICF implosions and will be essential contributors to diagnosing attempts at ignition on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Fusion gammas provide a direct measure of fusion interaction rate without being compromised by Doppler spreading. Gamma-based gas Cherenkov detectors that convert fusion gamma rays to optical Cherenkov photons for collection by fast recording systems have been developed and fielded at Omega. These systems have established their usefulness in illuminating ICF physics in several experimental campaigns. Bang time precision better than 25 ps has been demonstrated, well below the 50 ps accuracy requirement defined by the NIF System Design Requirements. A staged approach of implementing Gamma Reaction History (GRH) diagnostics on the NIF has been initiated. In the early stage, multiple detectors located close to target chamber center (at 2 and 6 m) and coupled to photomultiplier tubes are geared toward the loweryield THD campaign. In the later stage, streak camera–coupled instruments will be used for improved temporal resolution at the higher yields expected from the DT ignition campaign. Multiple detectors will allow for increased dynamic range and gamma energy spectral information.

Herrmann, H W; Evans, S C; Kim, Y; Mack, J M; Young, C S; Cox, B C; Frogget, B C; Kaufman, M I; Malone, R M; Tunnell, T W; Stoeffl, W

2009-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

111

Radiation Leukemogenesis at Low Dose Rates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The major goals of this program were to study the efficacy of low dose rate radiation exposures for the induction of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and to characterize the leukemias that are caused by radiation exposures at low dose rate. An irradiator facility was designed and constructed that allows large numbers of mice to be irradiated at low dose rates for protracted periods (up to their life span). To the best of our knowledge this facility is unique in the US and it was subsequently used to study radioprotectors being developed for radiological defense (PLoS One. 7(3), e33044, 2012) and is currently being used to study the role of genetic background in susceptibility to radiation-induced lung cancer. One result of the irradiation was expected; low dose rate exposures are ineffective in inducing AML. However, another result was completely unexpected; the irradiated mice had a very high incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), approximately 50%. It was unexpected because acute exposures are ineffective in increasing HCC incidence above background. This is a potential important finding for setting exposure limits because it supports the concept of an 'inverse dose rate effect' for some tumor types. That is, for the development of some tumor types low dose rate exposures carry greater risks than acute exposures.

Weil, Michael; Ullrich, Robert

2013-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

112

Ultraviolet irradiation selectively disrupts the gamma-aminobutyric acid/benzodiazepine receptor-linked chloride ionophore  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ability of UV light to affect radioligand binding and 36Cl-uptake at the gamma-aminobutyric acidA (GABAA) receptor-chloride channel complex was examined. Exposure to 302 nm UV light produced a rapid (t1/2 = 4 min) reduction in (35S)t-butylbicyclo-phosphorothionate binding (assayed in the presence of 200 mM chloride) to sites associated with the GABAA receptor-coupled chloride ionophore. Saturation analysis revealed that this effect could be attributed entirely to a decrease in the maximum number of binding sites. Exposure to UV irradiation at lower (254 nm) and higher (366 nm) wavelengths also inhibited (35S)t-butylbicy-clophosphorothionate binding, but the respective rates of inactivation were 8- and 27-fold slower, compared with 302 nm. Other anion-dependent interactions at the GABAA receptor complex were disrupted in a similar manner. In the absence of permeant anion, (3H)flunitrazepam binding to benzodiazepine receptors was unaffected by 302 nm UV irradiation, whereas chloride-enhanced (3H)flunitrazepam binding was inhibited markedly. In the presence of 250-500 mM chloride, (3H)methyl-6,7-dimethoxy-4-ethyl-beta-carboline-3-carboxylate binding to benzodiazepine receptors was also inhibited after UV exposure. Basal 36Cl- uptake into synaptoneurosomes was nearly doubled after 15 min of exposure to 302 nm light, whereas pentobarbital- and muscimol-stimulated 36Cl- uptake were reduced significantly. UV irradiation at 302 nm appears to disrupt selectively the anion-dependent functional interactions at the GABAA receptor complex. The apparent wavelength specificity suggests that the gating structure (channel) may contain tryptophan and/or tyrosine residues vital to the regulation of anion movement through the ionophore portion of this supramolecular receptor-ion channel complex.

Evoniuk, G.; Moody, E.J.; Skolnick, P. (National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, Bethesda, MD (USA))

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Large-Scale Anisotropy of EGRET Gamma Ray Sources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the course of its operation, the EGRET experiment detected high-energy gamma ray sources at energies above 100 MeV over the whole sky. In this communication, we search for large-scale anisotropy patterns among the catalogued EGRET sources using an expansion in spherical harmonics, accounting for EGRET's highly non-uniform exposure. We find significant excess in the quadrupole and octopole moments. This is consistent with the hypothesis that, in addition to the galactic plane, a second mid-latitude (5^{\\circ} < |b| < 30^{\\circ}) population, perhaps associated with the Gould belt, contributes to the gamma ray flux above 100 MeV.

Luis Anchordoqui; Thomas McCauley; Thomas Paul; Olaf Reimer; Diego F. Torres

2005-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

114

Energy Rating  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Consistent, accurate, and uniform ratings based on a single statewide rating scale Reasonable estimates of potential utility bill savings and reliable recommendations on cost-effective measures to improve energy efficiency Training and certification procedures for home raters and quality assurance procedures to promote accurate ratings and to protect consumers Labeling procedures that will meet the needs of home buyers, homeowners, renters, the real estate industry, and mortgage lenders with an interest in home energy ratings

Cabec Conference; Rashid Mir P. E

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Resonances and the thermonuclear reaction rate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present an approximate analytic expression for thermonuclear reaction rate of charged particles when the cross section contains a single narrow or wide resonance described by a Breit-Wigner shape. The resulting expression is uniformly valid as the effective energy and resonance energy coalesce. We use our expressions to calculate the reaction rate for $^{12}$C(p,$\\gamma$)$^{13}$N.

M. S. Hussein; M. Ueda; A. J. Sargeant; M. P. Pato

2003-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

116

Gamma ray camera  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A gamma ray camera for detecting rays emanating from a radiation source such as an isotope. The gamma ray camera includes a sensor array formed of a visible light crystal for converting incident gamma rays to a plurality of corresponding visible light photons, and a photosensor array responsive to the visible light photons in order to form an electronic image of the radiation therefrom. The photosensor array is adapted to record an integrated amount of charge proportional to the incident gamma rays closest to it, and includes a transparent metallic layer, photodiode consisting of a p-i-n structure formed on one side of the transparent metallic layer, and comprising an upper p-type layer, an intermediate layer and a lower n-type layer. In the preferred mode, the scintillator crystal is composed essentially of a cesium iodide (CsI) crystal preferably doped with a predetermined amount impurity, and the p-type upper intermediate layers and said n-type layer are essentially composed of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H). The gamma ray camera further includes a collimator interposed between the radiation source and the sensor array, and a readout circuit formed on one side of the photosensor array.

Perez-Mendez, Victor (Berkeley, CA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Gamma ray camera  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A gamma ray camera is disclosed for detecting rays emanating from a radiation source such as an isotope. The gamma ray camera includes a sensor array formed of a visible light crystal for converting incident gamma rays to a plurality of corresponding visible light photons, and a photosensor array responsive to the visible light photons in order to form an electronic image of the radiation therefrom. The photosensor array is adapted to record an integrated amount of charge proportional to the incident gamma rays closest to it, and includes a transparent metallic layer, photodiode consisting of a p-i-n structure formed on one side of the transparent metallic layer, and comprising an upper p-type layer, an intermediate layer and a lower n-type layer. In the preferred mode, the scintillator crystal is composed essentially of a cesium iodide (CsI) crystal preferably doped with a predetermined amount impurity, and the p-type upper intermediate layers and said n-type layer are essentially composed of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H). The gamma ray camera further includes a collimator interposed between the radiation source and the sensor array, and a readout circuit formed on one side of the photosensor array. 6 figs.

Perez-Mendez, V.

1997-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

118

Gamma ray bursts in their historic context  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gamma Ray Bursts In Their Historic Context Virginia TrimbleMD 20742 USA Abstract. Gamma ray bursts remained essentiallyalso applies to the gamma ray bursts. First, an observation

Trimble, V

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

SAPPHiRE: a Small Gamma-Gamma Higgs Factory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A new particle with mass ~ 125 GeV that resembles the Higgs boson has recently been discovered by ATLAS and CMS. We propose a low-energy gamma-gamma collider as a cost- and time-efficient option for a Higgs factory capable of studying this particle in detail. In the past, this option has been suggested as a possible application of the CLIC two-beam accelerator technology (the CLIC Higgs Experiment, CLICHE) or as an option for the ILC. Here we propose a design based on a pair of \\sim 10 GeV recirculating Linacs (Small Accelerator for Photon-Photon Higgs production using Recirculating Electrons, SAPPHiRE) similar in design to those proposed for the LHeC. We present parameters for the e- beams and sketch a laser backscattering system capable of producing a gamma-gamma peak luminosity of 0.36 \\times 10^34/cm2/s with E_CM (gamma-gamma) \\sim 125 GeV. A gamma-gamma collider with such a luminosity could be used to measure accurately the mass, bbar, WW\\ast, and gamma-gamma decays of the Higgs boson. We also comment on possible synergies with other projects such as LHeC, the ILC or CLIC, and on other physics prospects in gamma-gamma and e-gamma collisions.

S. A. Bogacz; J. Ellis; L. Lusito; D. Schulte; T. Takahashi; M. Velasco; M. Zanetti; F. Zimmermann

2012-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

120

air change rate: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Rydhof 2 Traffic-related air pollution exposures and changes in heart rate variability in Mexico City: A panel study MIT - DSpace Summary: Abstract Background While air pollution...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gamma exposure rate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

air change rates: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Rydhof 2 Traffic-related air pollution exposures and changes in heart rate variability in Mexico City: A panel study MIT - DSpace Summary: Abstract Background While air pollution...

122

Indoor and Outdoor in Situ High-Resolution Gamma Radiation Measurements in Urban Areas of Cyprus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In situ, high-resolution, gamma-ray spectrometry of a total number of 70 outdoor and 20 indoor representative measurements were performed in preselected, common locations of the main urban areas of Cyprus. Specific activities and gamma absorbed dose rates in air due to the naturally occurring radionuclides of Th-232 and U-238 series, and K-40 are determined and discussed. Effective dose rate to the Cyprus population due to terrestrial gamma radiation is derived directly from this work. The results obtained outdoors match very well with those derived previously by high-resolution gamma spectrometry of soil samples, which were collected from the main island bedrock surface. This implies that the construction and building materials in urban areas do not affect the external gamma dose rate; thus they are mostly of local origin. Finally, the indoor/outdoor gamma dose ratio was found to be 1.4 +- 0.5.

Svoukis, E

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Indoor and Outdoor in Situ High-Resolution Gamma Radiation Measurements in Urban Areas of Cyprus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In situ, high-resolution, gamma-ray spectrometry of a total number of 70 outdoor and 20 indoor representative measurements were performed in preselected, common locations of the main urban areas of Cyprus. Specific activities and gamma absorbed dose rates in air due to the naturally occurring radionuclides of Th-232 and U-238 series, and K-40 are determined and discussed. Effective dose rate to the Cyprus population due to terrestrial gamma radiation is derived directly from this work. The results obtained outdoors match very well with those derived previously by high-resolution gamma spectrometry of soil samples, which were collected from the main island bedrock surface. This implies that the construction and building materials in urban areas do not affect the external gamma dose rate; thus they are mostly of local origin. Finally, the indoor/outdoor gamma dose ratio was found to be 1.4 +- 0.5.

E. Svoukis; H. Tsertos

2006-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

124

Gamma-ray Burst Cosmology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are the most luminous electromagnetic explosions in the Universe, which emit up to $8.8\\times10^{54}$ erg isotropic equivalent energy in the hard X-ray band. The high luminosity makes them detectable out to the largest distances yet explored in the Universe. GRBs, as bright beacons in the deep Universe, would be the ideal tool to probe the properties of high-redshift universe: including the cosmic expansion and dark energy, star formation rate, the reionization epoch and the metal enrichment history of the Universe. In this article, we review the luminosity correlations of GRBs, and implications for constraining the cosmological parameters and dark energy. Observations show that the progenitors of long GRBs are massive stars. So it is expected that long GRBs are tracers of star formation rate. We also review the high-redshift star formation rate derived from GRBs, and implications for the cosmic reionization history. The afterglows of GRBs generally have broken power-law spectra, so it...

Wang, F Y; Liang, E W

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Determination of thermal neutron capture gamma yields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A method of analysing Ge(Li) thermal neutron capture gamma spectra to obtain total gamma yields has been developed. Tie method determines both the yields from the well resolved gamma peaks in a spectrum as well as the gamma ...

Harper, Thomas Lawrence

1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Determination of thermal neutron capture gamma yields.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A method of analysing Ge(Li) thermal neutron capture gamma spectra to obtain total gamma yields has been developed. Tie method determines both the yields from the well resolved gamma peaks in a spectrum as well as the gamma ...

Harper, Thomas Lawrence

1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Gamma Ray Bursts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gamma-ray bursts have been detected at photon energies up to tens of GeV. We review some recent developments in the X-ray to GeV photon phenomenology in the light of Swift and Fermi observations, and some of the theoretical models developed to explain them, with a view towards implications for C.T.A.

Peter Mészáros

2012-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

128

Delayed Nickel Decay in Gamma Ray Bursts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recently observed emission lines in the X-ray afterglow of gamma ray bursts suggest that iron group elements are either produced in the gamma ray burst, or are present nearby. If this material is the product of a thermonuclear burn, then such material would be expected to be rich in Nickel-56. If the nickel remains partially ionized, this prevents the electron capture reaction normally associated with the decay of Nickel-56, dramatically increasing the decay timescale. Here we examine the consequences of rapid ejection of a fraction of a solar mass of iron group material from the center of a collapsar/hypernova. The exact rate of decay then depends on the details of the ionization and therefore the ejection process. Future observations of iron, nickel and cobalt lines can be used to diagnose the origin of these elements and to better understand the astrophysical site of gamma ray bursts. In this model, the X-ray lines of these iron-group elements could be detected in suspected hypernovae that did not produce an observable gamma ray burst due to beaming.

G. C. McLaughlin; R. A. M. J. Wijers

2002-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

129

Radiation Exposure Monitoring Systems Data Reporting Guide  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Instructions for preparing occupational exposure data for submittal to the Radiation Exposure Monitoring System (REMS) repository.

130

E-Print Network 3.0 - annihilation gamma rays Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

32 3 grid 74 94 3.05 ora SPEC ray tracing 650 array elements... .0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 GammaGammaGammaGammaGammaGamma GammaGammaGammaGammaGammaGamma GammaGammaGamma...

131

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric gamma rays Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

32 3 grid 74 94 3.05 ora SPEC ray tracing 650 array elements... .0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 GammaGammaGammaGammaGammaGamma GammaGammaGammaGammaGammaGamma GammaGammaGamma...

132

Unidentified Gamma-Ray Sources: Hunting Gamma-Ray Blazars  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the main scientific objectives of the ongoing Fermi mission is unveiling the nature of the unidentified {gamma}-ray sources (UGSs). Despite the large improvements of Fermi in the localization of {gamma}-ray sources with respect to the past {gamma}-ray missions, about one third of the Fermi-detected objects are still not associated to low energy counterparts. Recently, using the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) survey, we discovered that blazars, the rarest class of Active Galactic Nuclei and the largest population of {gamma}-ray sources, can be recognized and separated from other extragalactic sources on the basis of their infrared (IR) colors. Based on this result, we designed an association method for the {gamma}-ray sources to recognize if there is a blazar candidate within the positional uncertainty region of a generic {gamma}-ray source. With this new IR diagnostic tool, we searched for {gamma}-ray blazar candidates associated to the UGS sample of the second Fermi {gamma}-ray catalog (2FGL). We found that our method associates at least one {gamma}-ray blazar candidate as a counterpart each of 156 out of 313 UGSs analyzed. These new low-energy candidates have the same IR properties as the blazars associated to {gamma}-ray sources in the 2FGL catalog.

Massaro, F.; D'Abrusco, R.; Tosti, G.; Ajello, M.; Gasparrini, A.Paggi.D.

2012-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

133

Modifiers of Exposure-Response Estimates for Lung Cancer among Miners Exposed to Radon Progeny  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The association between lung cancer and exposure to radon decay products has been well established. Despite agreement on this point, there is still some degree of uncertainty regarding characteristics of the exposure-response relationship. The use of studies of underground miners to estimate lung cancer risks due to residential radon exposure depends upon a better understanding of factors potentially modifying the exposure-response relationship. Given the diversity in study populations regarding smoking status, mining conditions, risk analysis methodology, and referent populations, the risk estimates across studies are quite similar. However, several factors partially contributing to differences in risk estimates are modified by attained age, time since last exposure, exposure rate, and cigarette smoking patterns. There is growing agreement across studies that relative risk decreases with attained age and time since last exposure. Several studies have also found an inverse exposure-rate effect, i.e., low exposure rates for protracted duration of exposure are more hazardous than equivalent cumulative exposures received at higher rates for shorter periods of time. Additionally, the interaction between radon exposure and cigarette smoking appears to be intermediate between additive and multiplicative in a growing number of studies. Quantitative estimates of these modifying factors are given using a new analysis of data from the latest update of the Colorado Plateau uranium miners cohort.- Environ Health Perspect 1 03(Suppl 2):49-53 (1995)

Richard W. Hornung; James Deddens; Robert Roscoe

134

LASER-PLASMA-ACCELERATOR-BASED GAMMA GAMMA COLLIDERS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LASER-PLASMA-ACCELERATOR-BASED ?? COLLIDERS ? C. B.linear col- lider based on laser-plasma-accelerators arediscussed, and a laser-plasma-accelerator-based gamma-

Schroeder, C. B.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Specific gamma-ray dose constants for nuclides important to dosimetry and radiological assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tables of specific gamma-ray dose constants (the unshielded gamma-ray dose equivalent rate at 1 m from a point source) have been computed for approximately 500 nuclides important to dosimetry and radiological assessment. The half life, the mean attenuation coefficient, and thickness for a lead shield providing 95% dose equivalent attenuation are also listed.

Unger, L.M.; Trubey, D.K.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

The GAMMA-400 Space Mission  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GAMMA-400 is a new space mission which will be installed on board the Russian space platform Navigator. It is scheduled to be launched at the beginning of the next decade. GAMMA-400 is designed to study simultaneously gamma rays (up to 3 TeV) and cosmic rays (electrons and positrons from 1 GeV to 20 TeV, nuclei up to 10$^{15}$-10$^{16}$ eV). Being a dual-purpose mission, GAMMA-400 will be able to address some of the most impelling science topics, such as search for signatures of dark matter, cosmic-rays origin and propagation, and the nature of transients. GAMMA-400 will try to solve the unanswered questions on these topics by high-precision measurements of the Galactic and extragalactic gamma-ray sources, Galactic and extragalactic diffuse emission and the spectra of cosmic-ray electrons + positrons and nuclei, thanks to excellent energy and angular resolutions.

Cumani, P; Bonvicini, V; Topchiev, N P; Adriani, O; Aptekar, R L; Arkhangelskaja, I V; Arkhangelskiy, A I; Bergstrom, L; Berti, E; Bigongiari, G; Bobkov, S G; Boezio, M; Bogomolov, E A; Bonechi, S; Bongi, M; Bottai, S; Castellini, G; Cattaneo, P W; Dedenko, G L; De Donato, C; Dogiel, V A; Gorbunov, M S; Gusakov, Yu V; Hnatyk, B I; Kadilin, V V; Kaplin, V A; Kaplun, A A; Kheymits, M D; Korepanov, V E; Larsson, J; Leonov, A A; Loginov, V A; Longo, F; Maestro, P; Marrocchesi, P S; Menshenin, A L; Mikhailov, V V; Mocchiutti, E; Moiseev, A A; Mori, N; Moskalenko, I V; Naumov, P Yu; Papini, P; Pearce, M; Picozza, P; Popov, A V; Rappoldi, A; Ricciarini, S; Runtso, M F; Ryde, F; Serdin, O V; Sparvoli, R; Spillantini, P; Suchkov, S I; Tavani, M; Taraskin, A A; Tiberio, A; Tyurin, E M; Ulanov, M V; Vacchi, A; Vannuccini, E; Vasilyev, G I; Yurkin, Yu T; Zampa, N; Zirakashvili, V N; Zverev, V G

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Electrothermal controlled-exposure technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A technology is presented for exposing the contents of microfabricated cavities in a substrate. These contents are hermetically sealed until exposure is triggered by an electronic signal. The exposure mechanism uses ...

Maloney, John Mapes

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Simultaneous beta and gamma spectroscopy  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A phoswich radiation detector for simultaneous spectroscopy of beta rays and gamma rays includes three scintillators with different decay time characteristics. Two of the three scintillators are used for beta detection and the third scintillator is used for gamma detection. A pulse induced by an interaction of radiation with the detector is digitally analyzed to classify the type of event as beta, gamma, or unknown. A pulse is classified as a beta event if the pulse originated from just the first scintillator alone or from just the first and the second scintillator. A pulse from just the third scintillator is recorded as gamma event. Other pulses are rejected as unknown events.

Farsoni, Abdollah T. (Corvallis, OR); Hamby, David M. (Corvallis, OR)

2010-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

139

Gamma Ray Burst Afterglow Observations.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Gamma ray bursts (GRBs) are among the most luminous explosions in the universe. We present an overview of the observational history of GRBs and the… (more)

Updike, Adria

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Gamma-ray burst populations.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Over the last fifty years the field of gamma-ray bursts has shown incredible growth, but the amassing of data has also left observers and theorists… (more)

Virgili, Francisco J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gamma exposure rate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Gamma irradiation of the prenatal mouse dentition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as the dental lamina to the stage of the deposition of enamel and dentin. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of a continuous stress of gamma irradiation on the structure of the odontogenic cells, the relative size and rate of development... development. In 1927, Leist (9) made a study of the effect of X-rays on teeth, which was brought about by the following rase. A worker in a Roentgen tube factory was exposed daily to a considerable dose of X-irradiation. Sometime later he began to show...

Kerley, Michael Auston

1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Gamma ray spectroscopic analysis of building materials used in Tiruvannamalai, Tamilnadu, India  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Building materials cause direct radiation exposure because of their radium, thorium and potassium content. In this paper, samples of commonly used building materials in Tiruvannamalai, city, have been collected randomly over the city. The samples were tested for their radioactivity contents by using gamma spectroscopic measurements. All samples under investigation are within the recommended safety limit when used as building construction.

Ravisankar, R.; Vanasundari, K.; Suganya, M.; Chandrasekaran, A.; Raghu, Y.; Sivakumar, S.; Vijayagopal, P.; Meenakshisundaram, V. [Post Graduate and Research Department of Physics, Government Arts College, Tiruvannamalai-606603 (India); Department of Physics, Global Institute of Engineering and Technology, Vellore-632509, Tamilnadu (India); Department of Physics, Aarupadai Veedu Institute of Technology, Paiyanoor-603 104.Tamilnadu (India); Department of Physics, Arunai Engineering College, Tiruvannamalai-606603, Tamilnadu (India); Radiological Safety Division. Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102 (India)

2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

143

Gamma-Ray Bursts from Neutron Star Mergers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Binary neutron stars merger (NS$^2$M) at cosmological distances is probably the only $\\gamma$-ray bursts model based on an independently observed phenomenon which is known to be taking place at a comparable rate. We describe this model, its predictions and some open questions.

T. Piran

1994-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

144

Did a gamma-ray burst initiate the late Ordovician mass extinction?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) produce a flux of radiation detectable across the observable Universe. A GRB within our own galaxy could do considerable damage to the Earth's biosphere; rate estimates suggest that a dangerously near GRB should occur...

Melott, Adrian L.; Lieberman, Bruce S.; Laird, C. M.; Martin, Larry D.; Medvedev, Mikhail V.; Thomas, B. C.; Cannizzo, J. K.; Gehrels, N.; Jackman, C. H.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Rate schedule  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298, andEpidermal Growth Factor. |INCIDENCET3PACI-T3Rate

146

Effect of {gamma} phase on corrosive wear of duplex stainless steel in sulfuric acid solution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A modified pin-on-ring device was used to study corrosive wear of a duplex stainless steel (DSS) containing ferrite ({alpha}) and austenite ({gamma}) phases in 1 mol/L sulfuric acid (H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) at room temperature. Different percentages of {gamma} phase in the matrix ({gamma}{sub p}) were obtained by annealing at different solution temperatures. The corrosive wear resistance of the DSS containing small amounts of {gamma} phase was shown to be greater than that of DSS containing large amounts of {gamma} phase under low loads (< 22 N), but the opposite was true under high loads (> 22 N). The same relationships between corrosive wear rate and load were found under cathodic protection at {minus}600 mV{sub SCE}. The morphologies of wear tracks and debris were observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The influence of the amount of {gamma} phase in the matrix on hardness, corrosion, and corrosive wear resistance was evaluated.

Lu, X.C. [Tsinghua Univ., Beijing (China). National Tribology Lab.; Li, S.Z.; Jiang, X.X.; Zhang, T.C. [Academia Sinica, Shenyang (China). Inst. of Metal Research

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Exposure Evaluation Process  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing ZirconiaPolicy and Assistance100JeffersonMarkExploratorysurfaceExposure

148

Oriel UV Exposure Station  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - September 2006 The 2002Optics Group (X-rayLSD Logo About UsAboutOriel UV Exposure

149

Neutron counting and gamma spectroscopy with PVT detectors.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radiation portals normally incorporate a dedicated neutron counter and a gamma-ray detector with at least some spectroscopic capability. This paper describes the design and presents characterization data for a detection system called PVT-NG, which uses large polyvinyl toluene (PVT) detectors to monitor both types of radiation. The detector material is surrounded by polyvinyl chloride (PVC), which emits high-energy gamma rays following neutron capture reactions. Assessments based on high-energy gamma rays are well suited for the detection of neutron sources, particularly in border security applications, because few isotopes in the normal stream of commerce have significant gamma ray yields above 3 MeV. Therefore, an increased count rate for high-energy gamma rays is a strong indicator for the presence of a neutron source. The sensitivity of the PVT-NG sensor to bare {sup 252}Cf is 1.9 counts per second per nanogram (cps/ng) and the sensitivity for {sup 252}Cf surrounded by 2.5 cm of polyethylene is 2.3 cps/ng. The PVT-NG sensor is a proof-of-principal sensor that was not fully optimized. The neutron detector sensitivity could be improved, for instance, by using additional moderator. The PVT-NG detectors and associated electronics are designed to provide improved resolution, gain stability, and performance at high-count rates relative to PVT detectors in typical radiation portals. As well as addressing the needs for neutron detection, these characteristics are also desirable for analysis of the gamma-ray spectra. Accurate isotope identification results were obtained despite the common impression that the absence of photopeaks makes data collected by PVT detectors unsuitable for spectroscopic analysis. The PVT detectors in the PVT-NG unit are used for both gamma-ray and neutron detection, so the sensitive volume exceeds the volume of the detection elements in portals that use dedicated components to detect each type of radiation.

Mitchell, Dean James; Brusseau, Charles A.

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Relativistic Winds from Compact Gamma-Ray Sources: II. Pair Loading and Radiative Acceleration in Gamma-ray Bursts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider the effects of rapid pair creation by an intense pulse of gamma-rays propagating ahead of a relativistic shock. Side-scattered photons colliding with the main gamma-ray beam amplify the density of scattering charges. The acceleration rate of the pair-loaded medium is calculated, and its limiting bulk Lorentz factor related to the spectrum and compactness of the photon source. One obtains, as a result, a definite prediction for the relative inertia in baryons and pairs. The deceleration of a relativistic shock in the moving medium, and the resulting synchrotron emissivity, are compared with existing calculations for a static medium. The radiative efficiency is increased dramatically by pair loading. When the initial ambient density exceeds a critical value, the scattering depth traversed by the main gamma-ray pulse rises above unity, and the pulse is broadened. These considerations place significant constraints on burst progenitors: a pre-burst mass loss rate exceeding 10^{-5} M_\\odot per year is difficult to reconcile with individual pulses narrower than 10 s, unless the radiative efficiency is low. An anisotropic gamma-ray flux (on an angular scale \\Gamma^{-1} or larger) drives a large velocity shear that greatly increases the energy in the seed magnetic field forward of the propagating shock.

Christopher Thompson; Piero Madau

2000-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

151

High energy cosmic-rays from gamma-ray burst sources: A stronger case  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The suggested association between the sources of gamma-ray bursts (GRB's) and the sources of ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECR's) is based on two arguments: (i) The average energy generation rate of UHECR's is similar to the gamma-ray generation rate of GRB's, and (ii) The constraints that UHECR sources must satisfy to allow proton acceleration to >10^{20} eV are similar to those inferred for GRB sources from gamma-ray observations. We show that recent GRB and UHECR observations strengthen both arguments, and hence strengthen the suggested association.

E. Waxman

2004-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

152

Measurement of 25Mg(p; gamma)26Al resonance strengths via gamma spectrometry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The COMPTEL instrument performed the first mapping of the 1.809 MeV photons in the Galaxy, triggering considerable interest in determing the sources of interstellar 26Al. The predicted 26Al is too low compared to the observation, for a better understanding more accurate rates for the 25Mg(p; gamma)26Al reaction are required. The 25Mg(p;gamma)26Al reaction has been investigated at the resonances at Er= 745; 418; 374; 304 keV at Ruhr-Universitat-Bochum using a Tandem accelerator and a 4piNaI detector. In addition the resonance at Er = 189 keV has been measured deep underground laboratory at Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, exploiting the strong suppression of cosmic background. This low resonance has been studied with the 400 kV LUNA accelerator and a HPGe detector. The preliminary results of the resonance strengths will be reported.

A. Formicola; A. Best; G. Imbriani; M. Junker; D. Bemmerer; R. Bonetti; C. Broggini; A. Caciolli; F. Confortola; P. Corvisiero; H. Costantini; Z. Elekes; Zs Fulop; G. Gervino; A. Guglielmetti; Gy Gyurky; C. Gustavino; A. Lemut; B. Limata; M. Marta; C. Mazzocchi; R. Menegazzo; P. Prati; V. Roca; C. Rolfs; C. Rossi Alvarez; E. Somorjai; O. Straniero; F. Strieder; F. Terrasi; H. P. Trautvetter

2007-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

153

Measurement of 25Mg(p; gamma)26Al resonance strengths via gamma spectrometry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The COMPTEL instrument performed the first mapping of the 1.809 MeV photons in the Galaxy, triggering considerable interest in determing the sources of interstellar 26Al. The predicted 26Al is too low compared to the observation, for a better understanding more accurate rates for the 25Mg(p; gamma)26Al reaction are required. The 25Mg(p;gamma)26Al reaction has been investigated at the resonances at Er= 745; 418; 374; 304 keV at Ruhr-Universitat-Bochum using a Tandem accelerator and a 4piNaI detector. In addition the resonance at Er = 189 keV has been measured deep underground laboratory at Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, exploiting the strong suppression of cosmic background. This low resonance has been studied with the 400 kV LUNA accelerator and a HPGe detector. The preliminary results of the resonance strengths will be reported.

Formicola, A; Imbriani, G; Junker, M; Bemmerer, D; Bonetti, R; Broggini, C; Caciolli, A; Confortola, F; Corvisiero, P; Costantini, H; Elekes, Z; Fülöp, Z; Gervino, G; Guglielmetti, A; Gyurky, Gy; Gustavino, C; Lemut, A; Limata, B; Marta, M; Mazzocchi, C; Menegazzo, R; Prati, P; Roca, V; Rolfs, C; Alvarez, C Rossi; Somorjai, E; Straniero, O; Strieder, F; Terrasi, F; Trautvetter, H P

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Archival search for recurrent activity at the position the gamma-ray burst GRB 970228 optical counterpart  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have examined 8004 plates at the Harvard College Observatory Plate Collection searching for optical transient emission from the gamma-ray burst GRB 970228. This is the first archival search carried out so far for a gamma-ray burst with known transient optical emission. The total exposure time amounts to ~1.1 yr. No convincing optical activity was found above 12.5 mag at the expected position of the GRB 970228 optical counterpart.

Javier Gorosabel; Alberto J. Castro-Tirado

1998-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

155

[sup 3]He neutron detector performance in mixed neutron gamma environments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A test program of the performance of 3He neutron proportional detectors with varying gas pressures, and their response to lligh level gamma-ray exposure in a mixed neutrodgamma environment, ha$ been performed Our intent was to identie the optimal gas pressure to reduce the gamma-ray sensitivity of these detectors. These detectors were manufxtured using materials to minimize their gamma response. Earlier work focused on 3He fill pressures of four atmospheres and above, whereas the present work focuses on a wider range of pressures. Tests have shown that reducing the .filling pressure will M e r increase the gamma-ray dose range in which the detectors can be operated.

Johnson, N. H. (Nathan H.); Beddingfield, D. H. (David H.)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

A comparison of the alpha and gamma radiolysis of CMPO  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The radiation chemistry of CMPO has been investigated using a combination of irradiation and analytical techniques. The {alpha}-, and {gamma}-irradiation of CMPO resulted in identical degradation rates (G-value, in {mu}mol Gy{sup -1}) for both radiation types, despite the difference in their linear energy transfer (LET). Similarly, variations in {gamma}-ray dose rates did not affect the degradation rate of CMPO. The solvent extraction behavior was different for the two radiation types, however. Gamma-irradiation resulted in steadily increasing distribution ratios for both forward and stripping extractions, with respect to increasing absorbed radiation dose. This was true for samples irradiated as a neat organic solution, or irradiated in contact with the acidic aqueous phase. In contrast, {alpha}-irradiated samples showed a rapid drop in distribution ratios for forward and stripping extractions, followed by essentially constant distribution ratios at higher absorbed doses. These differences in extraction behavior are reconciled by mass spectrometric examination of CMPO decomposition products under the different irradiation sources. Irradiation by {gamma}-rays resulted in the rupture of phosphoryl-methylene bonds with the production of phosphinic acid products. These species are expected to be complexing agents for americium that would result in higher distribution ratios. Irradiation by {alpha}-sources appeared to favor rupture of carbamoyl-methylene bonds with the production of less deleterious acetamide products.

Bruce J. Mincher; Stephen P. Mezyk; Gary Groenewold; Gracy Elias

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

DOE 2012 Occupational Radiation Exposure October 2013  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Analysis within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) publishes the annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report to provide an overview of the status of radiation protection practices at DOE (including the National Nuclear Security Administration [NNSA]). The DOE 2012 Occupational Radiation Exposure Report provides an evaluation of DOE-wide performance regarding compliance with Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations (C.F.R.), Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection dose limits and as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) process requirements. In addition, the report provides data to DOE organizations responsible for developing policies for protection of individuals from the adverse health effects of radiation. The report provides a summary and an analysis of occupational radiation exposure information from the monitoring of individuals involved in DOE activities. Over the past 5-year period, the occupational radiation exposure information is analyzed in terms of aggregate data, dose to individuals, and dose by site. As an indicator of the overall amount of radiation dose received during the conduct of operations at DOE, the report includes information on collective total effective dose (TED). The TED is comprised of the effective dose (ED) from external sources, which includes neutron and photon radiation, and the internal committed effective dose (CED), which results from the intake of radioactive material into the body. The collective ED from photon exposure decreased by 23% between 2011 and 2012, while the neutron dose increased by 5%. The internal dose components of the collective TED decreased by 7%. Over the past 5-year period, 99.99% of the individuals receiving measurable TED have received doses below the 2 roentgen equivalent in man (rems) (20 millisievert [mSv]) TED administrative control level (ACL), which is well below the DOE regulatory limit of 5 rems (50 mSv) TED annually. The occupational radiation exposure records show that in 2012, DOE facilities continued to comply with DOE dose limits and ACLs and worked to minimize exposure to individuals. The DOE collective TED decreased 17.1% from 2011 to 2012. The collective TED decreased at three of the five sites with the largest collective TED. u Idaho Site – Collective dose reductions were achieved as a result of continuing improvements at the Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project (AMWTP) through the planning of drum movements that reduced the number of times a container is handled; placement of waste containers that created highradiation areas in a centralized location; and increased worker awareness of high-dose rate areas. In addition, Idaho had the largest decrease in the total number of workers with measurable TED (1,143 fewer workers). u Hanford Site (Hanford) – An overall reduction of decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) activities at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) and Transuranic (TRU) retrieval activities resulted in collective dose reductions. u Savannah River Site (SRS) – Reductions were achieved through ALARA initiatives employed site wide. The Solid Waste Management Facility used extended specialty tools, cameras and lead shield walls to facilitate removal of drums. These tools and techniques reduce exposure time through improved efficiency, increase distance from the source of radiation by remote monitoring, shield the workers to lower the dose rate, and reduce the potential for contamination and release of material through repacking of waste. Overall, from 2011 to 2012, there was a 19% decrease in the number of workers with measurable dose. Furthermore, due to a slight decrease in both the DOE workforce (7%) and monitored workers (10%), the ratio of workers with measurable doses to monitored workers decreased to 13%. Another primary indicator of the level of radiation exposure covered in this report is the average measurable dose, which normalizes the collective dose over the population of workers who actually received a measurable dose. The average measurable TED in

none,

2012-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

158

Gamma thermometer based reactor core liquid level detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system is provided which employs a modified gamma thermometer for determining the liquid coolant level within a nuclear reactor core. The gamma thermometer which normally is employed to monitor local core heat generation rate (reactor power), is modified by thermocouple junctions and leads to obtain an unambiguous indication of the presence or absence of coolant liquid at the gamma thermometer location. A signal processor generates a signal based on the thermometer surface heat transfer coefficient by comparing the signals from the thermocouples at the thermometer location. The generated signal is a direct indication of loss of coolant due to the change in surface heat transfer when coolant liquid drops below the thermometer location. The loss of coolant indication is independent of reactor power at the thermometer location. Further, the same thermometer may still be used for the normal power monitoring function.

Burns, Thomas J. (Knoxville, TN)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Study Z gamma events and limits on anomalous ZZ gamma and Z gamma gamma couplings in pp(-) collisions at root s=1.96 Tev  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a measurement of the Z gamma production cross section and limits on anomalous ZZ gamma and Z gamma gamma couplings for form-factor scales of Lambda=750 and 1000 GeV. The measurement is based on 138 (152) candidates ...

Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Christofek, L.; Coppage, Don; Gardner, J.; Hensel, Carsten; Jabeen, S.; Wilson, Graham Wallace

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Gamma ray bursts ROBERT S MACKAY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gamma ray bursts ROBERT S MACKAY COLIN ROURKE We propose that a gamma ray burst is a kinematic Gamma ray bursts are intense flashes of electromagnetic radiation of cosmic origin lasting from ten accepted mechanism. We propose that a gamma ray burst is simply a kinematic effect, namely the effect

Rourke, Colin

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gamma exposure rate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Modeling gamma-ray bursts.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Discovered serendipitously in the late 1960s, gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are huge explosions of energy that happen at cosmological distances. They provide a grand physical playground… (more)

Maxham, Amanda

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Gamma-Ray Burst Lines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The evidence for spectral features in gamma-ray bursts is summarized. As a guide for evaluating the evidence, the properties of gamma-ray detectors and the methods of analyzing gamma-ray spectra are reviewed. In the 1980's, observations indicated that absorption features below 100 keV were present in a large fraction of bright gamma-ray bursts. There were also reports of emission features around 400 keV. During the 1990's the situation has become much less clear. A small fraction of bursts observed with BATSE have statistically significant low-energy features, but the reality of the features is suspect because in several cases the data of the BATSE detectors appear to be inconsistent. Furthermore, most of the possible features appear in emission rather than the expected absorption. Analysis of data from other instruments has either not been finalized or has not detected lines.

Michael S. Briggs

1999-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

163

Comparison of the E(5) Critical Point Symmetry to the {gamma}-Rigid Solution of The Bohr Hamiltonian for {gamma} =30 deg  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A {gamma}-rigid solution of the Bohr Hamiltonian for {gamma}=30 deg. is derived. Bohr Hamiltonians {beta}-part being related to the second order Casimir operator of the Euclidean algebra E(4). The solution is called Z(4) since it is corresponds to the Z(5) model with the {gamma} variable ''frozen''. Parameter-free (up to overall scale factors) predictions for spectra and B(E2) transition rates are in close agreement to the E(5) critical point symmetry as well as to the experimental data in the Xe region around A=130.

Bonatsos, D.; Lenis, D.; Petrellis, D. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, National Center for Scientific Research 'Demokritos', GR-15310 Aghia Paraskevi, Attiki (Greece); Terziev, P. A. [Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 72 Tzarigrad Road, BG-1784 Sofia (Bulgaria); Yigitoglu, I. [Hasan Ali Yucel Faculty of Education, Istanbul University, TR-34470 Beyazit, Istanbul (Turkey)

2007-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

164

Gamma-RayGamma-Ray Bursts: from SwiftBursts: from Swift  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gamma-RayGamma-Ray Bursts: from SwiftBursts: from Swift to GLASTto GLAST Bing ZhangBing ZhangGehrels, et al), et al) #12;Gamma-ray bursts: the mostGamma-ray bursts: the most violent explosions fireball central photosphere internal external shocks engine (shocks) (reverse) (forward) gamma-ray UV

California at Santa Cruz, University of

165

Novel technique for constraining r-process (n,$?$) reaction rates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A novel technique has been developed, which will open exciting new opportunities for studying the very neutron-rich nuclei involved in the r-process. As a proof-of-principle, the $\\gamma$-spectra from the $\\beta$-decay of $^{76}$Ga have been measured with the SuN detector at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory. The nuclear level density and $\\gamma$-ray strength function are extracted and used as input to Hauser-Feshbach calculations. The present technique is shown to strongly constrain the $^{75}$Ge($n,\\gamma$)$^{76}$Ge cross section and reaction rate.

A. Spyrou; S. N. Liddick; A. C. Larsen; M. Guttormsen; K. Cooper; A. C. Dombos; D. J. Morrissey; F. Naqvi; G. Perdikakis; S. J. Quinn; T. Renstrřm; J. A. Rodriguez; A. Simon; C. S. Sumithrarachchi; R. G. T. Zegers

2014-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

166

Gamma Ray Bursts and CETI  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gamma ray burst sources are isotropically distributed. They could be located at distances $\\sim 1000$ AU. (Katz \\cite{JK92}) GRB signals have many narrow peaks that are unresolved at the millisecond time resolution of existing observations. \\cite{JK87} CETI could use stars as gravitational lenses for interstellar gamma ray laser beam communication. Much better time resolution of GRB signals could rule out (or confirm?) the speculative hypothesis that GRB = CETI.

Frank D. Smith Jr

1993-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

167

Gamma-Ray Bursts from Radio-Quiet Quasars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study positional coincidences between gamma-ray bursts in the BATSE 3B catalogue and quasars/AGN taken from the Veron-Cetty & Veron compilation. For most classes of AGN, for BL Lac objects and for radio-loud quasars, we find no excess coincidences above random expectation, and we give upper limits for their burst emission rate. However, surprising evidence is found for a positional correlation between gamma-ray bursts and radio-quiet quasars. A total of 134 selected bursts with a position error radius 99.7% to be associated with each other. An analysis of a smaller sample of well-localized interplanetary network gamma-ray burst positions supports this result. This correlation strongly favours the cosmological origin of gamma-ray bursts and enables to estimate its distance scale. The average luminosity of those gamma-ray bursts which we associate directly with radio-quiet quasars is of the order of 4*10^52 erg (assuming isotropic emission).

N. Schartel; H. Andernach; J. Greiner

1996-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

168

Lymphocyte pyknosis following cobalt - 60 gamma irradiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

F on the Texas A&M campus was used. The cylindrical source is 6 inches high and 1 inch in diameter and is raised and lowered pneumatically. The dosimetry was performed using Harshaw thermoluminescent extruded LiF dosimeters (I mm diameter and 6... mm in length) calibrated with a Victoreen Condenser R-meter and read on a Harshaw TL Detector, Model 2000A. The dose rate was determined for mid-line exposures by placing TLDs in Intramedic tubing and suspending them in the center of the specimen...

Lane, Linda Kay

1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

A Self-Consistent Model For The Long-Term Gamma-Ray Spectral Variability of Cygnus X-1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The long-term transitions of the black hole candidate Cygnus X-1 (between the states gamma_1, gamma_2, and gamma_3) include the occasional appearance of a strong ~ MeV bump (gamma_1), whose strength appears to be anti-correlated with the continuum flux (~ 400 keV) due to the Compton upscattering of cold disk photons by the inner, hot corona. We develop a self-consistent disk picture that accounts naturally for these transitions and their corresponding spectral variations. We argue that the bump is due to the self-Comptonization of bremsstrahlung photons emitted predominantly near the plane of the corona itself. Our results suggest that a decrease by a factor of approx 2 in the viscosity parameter alpha is responsible for quenching this bump and driving the system to the gamma_2 state, whereas a transition from gamma_2 to gamma_3 appears to be induced by an increase of about 25 % in the accretion rate Mdot. In view of the fact that most of the transitions observed in this source seem to be of the gamma_2 to gamma_3 variety, we conclude that much of the long term gamma-ray spectral variability in Cygnus X-1 is due to these small fluctuations in Mdot. The unusual appearance of the gamma_1 state apparently reflects a change in the dissipative processes within the disk.

Fulvio Melia; Ranjeev Misra

1993-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

170

Chronic respiratory effects of indoor formaldehyde exposure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The relation of chronic respiratory symptoms and pulmonary function to formaldehyde (HCHO) in homes was studied in a sample of 298 children (6-15 years of age) and 613 adults. HCHO measurements were made with passive samplers two one-week periods. Data on chronic cough and phlegm, wheeze, attacks of breathlessness, and doctor diagnoses of chronic bronchitis and asthma were collected with self-completed questionnaires. Peak expiratory flow rates (PEFR) were obtained during the evenings and mornings for up to 14 consecutive days for each individual. Significantly greater prevalence rates of asthma and chronic bronchitis were found in children from houses with HCHO levels 60-120 ppb than in those less exposed, especially in children also exposed to environmental tobacco smoke. In children, levels of PEFR linearly decreased with HCHO exposure, with estimated decrease due to 60 ppb of HCHO equivalent to 22% of PEFR level in nonexposed children.

Krzyzanowski, M.; Quackenboss, J.J.; Lebowitz, M.D.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Population Studies of Gamma Ray Sources Using Stacking Analysis at Low Galactic Latitudes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We studied the problem of the treatment of uncertainties in the diffuse gamma radiation apparent in stacking analysis of EGRET data at low Galactic latitudes for several classes of sources like PSRs. For those classes of sources we co-added maps of counts, exposure and diffuse background, and residuals, in varying numbers for different sub-categories. Finally we tested for gamma-ray excess emission in those maps and attempt to quantify the systematic biases in such approach. Such kinds of analysis will support and provide confidence in the classification processes of sources and source populations in the GLAST era.

Cillis, Analia N.; /NASA, Goddard; Reimer, Olaf; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Torres, Diego F.; /ICREA, Barcelona /Barcelona, Autonoma U.

2007-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

172

Effective gamma-ray doses due to natural radiation from soils of southeastern Brazil  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have used gamma-ray spectrometry to study the distribution of natural radiation from soils of southeastern Brazil: Billings reservoir, Sao Bernardo do Campo Parks, Diadema Parks, Interlagos region, Sao Paulo, and soil from Sao Paulo and Rio de Janeiro beaches. In most of the regions studied we have found that the dose due the external exposure to gamma-rays, proceeding from natural terrestrial elements, are between the values 0.3 and 0.6 mSv/year, established by the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation.

Silveira, M. A. G.; Moreira, R. H.; Bellini, B. S. [Centro Universitario da FEI, Sao Bernardo do Campo, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Medina, N. H.; Aguiar, V. A. P. [Instituto de Fisica da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

2010-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

173

Real time method and computer system for identifying radioactive materials from HPGe gamma-ray spectroscopy  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A real-time method and computer system for identifying radioactive materials which collects gamma count rates from a HPGe gamma-radiation detector to produce a high-resolution gamma-ray energy spectrum. A library of nuclear material definitions ("library definitions") is provided, with each uniquely associated with a nuclide or isotope material and each comprising at least one logic condition associated with a spectral parameter of a gamma-ray energy spectrum. The method determines whether the spectral parameters of said high-resolution gamma-ray energy spectrum satisfy all the logic conditions of any one of the library definitions, and subsequently uniquely identifies the material type as that nuclide or isotope material associated with the satisfied library definition. The method is iteratively repeated to update the spectrum and identification in real time.

Rowland, Mark S. (Alamo, CA); Howard, Douglas E. (Livermore, CA); Wong, James L. (Dublin, CA); Jessup, James L. (Tracy, CA); Bianchini, Greg M. (Livermore, CA); Miller, Wayne O. (Livermore, CA)

2007-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

174

Short Gamma Ray Bursts as possible electromagnetic counterpart of coalescing binary systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Coalescing binary systems, consisting of two collapsed objects, are among the most promising sources of high frequency gravitational waves signals detectable, in principle, by ground-based interferometers. Binary systems of Neutron Star or Black Hole/Neutron Star mergers should also give rise to short Gamma Ray Bursts, a subclass of Gamma Ray Bursts. Short-hard-Gamma Ray Bursts might thus provide a powerful way to infer the merger rate of two-collapsed object binaries. Under the hypothesis that most short Gamma Ray Bursts originate from binaries of Neutron Star or Black Hole/Neutron Star mergers, we outline here the possibility to associate short Gamma Ray Bursts as electromagnetic counterpart of coalescing binary systems.

S. Capozziello; M. De Laurentis; I. De Martino; M. Formisano

2010-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

175

Exclusive search for Higgs boson to gamma-gamma decay via vector boson fusion production mechanism .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??We perform an exclusive search for the Higgs boson to gamma-gamma decay via vector boson fusion. We utilize the characteristic features of vector boson fusion,… (more)

Rankin, Dylan Sheldon

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Ratios of heavy hadron semileptonic decay rates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ratios of charmed meson and baryon semileptonic decay rates appear to be satisfactorily described by considering only the lowest-lying (S-wave) hadronic final states and assuming the kinematic factor describing phase space suppression is the same as that for free quarks. For example, the rate for $D_s$ semileptonic decay is known to be $(17.0 \\pm 5.3)%$ lower than those for $D^0$ or $D^+$, and the model accounts for this difference. When applied to hadrons containing $b$ quarks, this method implies that the $B_s$ semileptonic decay rate is about 1% higher than that of the nonstrange $B$ mesons. This small difference thus suggests surprisingly good local quark-hadron duality for $B$ semileptonic decays, complementing the expectation based on inclusive quark-hadron duality that these differences in rates should not exceed a few tenths of a percent. For $\\Lambda_b$ semileptonic decay, however, the inclusive rate is predicted to be about 13% greater than that of the nonstrange $B$ mesons. This value, representing a considerable departure from a calculation using a heavy quark expansion, is close to the corresponding experimental ratio $\\Gamma(\\Lambda_b)/ \\bar \\Gamma(B) = 1.13 \\pm 0.03$ of total decay rates.

Michael Gronau; Jonathan L. Rosner

2010-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

177

STELLAR ENCOUNTER RATE IN GALACTIC GLOBULAR CLUSTERS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The high stellar densities in the cores of globular clusters cause significant stellar interactions. These stellar interactions can produce close binary mass-transferring systems involving compact objects and their progeny, such as X-ray binaries and radio millisecond pulsars. Comparing the numbers of these systems and interaction rates in different clusters drives our understanding of how cluster parameters affect the production of close binaries. In this paper we estimate stellar encounter rates ({Gamma}) for 124 Galactic globular clusters based on observational data as opposed to the methods previously employed, which assumed 'King-model' profiles for all clusters. By deprojecting cluster surface brightness profiles to estimate luminosity density profiles, we treat 'King-model' and 'core-collapsed' clusters in the same way. In addition, we use Monte Carlo simulations to investigate the effects of uncertainties in various observational parameters (distance, reddening, surface brightness) on {Gamma}, producing the first catalog of globular cluster stellar encounter rates with estimated errors. Comparing our results with published observations of likely products of stellar interactions (numbers of X-ray binaries, numbers of radio millisecond pulsars, and {gamma}-ray luminosity) we find both clear correlations and some differences with published results.

Bahramian, Arash; Heinke, Craig O.; Sivakoff, Gregory R.; Gladstone, Jeanette C., E-mail: bahramia@ualberta.ca [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, CCIS 4-183, Edmonton, AB, T5K 1V4 (Canada)

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

High-Power Laser Pulse Recirculation for Inverse Compton Scattering-Produced Gamma-Rays  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Inverse Compton scattering of high-power laser pulses on relativistic electron bunches represents an attractive method for high-brightness, quasi-monoenergetic {gamma}-ray production. The efficiency of {gamma}-ray generation via inverse Compton scattering is severely constrained by the small Thomson scattering cross section. Furthermore, repetition rates of high-energy short-pulse lasers are poorly matched with those available from electron accelerators, resulting in low repetition rates for generated {gamma}-rays. Laser recirculation has been proposed as a method to address those limitations, but has been limited to only small pulse energies and peak powers. Here we propose and experimentally demonstrate an alternative method for laser pulse recirculation that is uniquely capable of recirculating short pulses with energies exceeding 1 J. Inverse Compton scattering of recirculated Joule-level laser pulses has a potential to produce unprecedented peak and average {gamma}-ray brightness in the next generation of sources.

Jovanovic, I; Shverdin, M; Gibson, D; Brown, C

2007-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

179

Marginal costs of freeway traffic congestion with on-road pollution exposure externality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Traffic congestion On-road In-vehicle Pollution exposure Vehicle emissions a b s t r a c t The health cost improvements. When considering distinct vehicle classes, inclusion of on-road exposure costs greatly increases heavy-duty vehicle marginal costs because of their higher emissions rates and greater roadway capacity

Bertini, Robert L.

180

Gamma doses from phospho-gypsum plaster-board  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of phospho-gypsum plaster-board and plaster cement in buildings as a substitute for natural gypsum may constitute an additional source of radiation exposure to both workers and members of the public, both from inhalation of radon progeny produced from radon which is exhaled from the plaster-board and from beta and gamma radiation produced by radioactive decay in the plaster-board. The calculations presented in this paper indicate that if phospho-gypsum sheets 1 cm thick containing a {sup 226}Ra concentration of 400 Bq kg{sup -1} are used to line the walls and ceiling of a room of dimensions up to 5 m {times} 5 m {times} 3 m, the annual effective dose from gamma radiation for a person continually occupying the room should not exceed approximately 0.13 mSv. This compares with a measured annual average effective dose from gamma radiation in Australian homes of 0.9 mSv. The annual effective dose from such thin sheets is directly proportional to the {sup 226}Ra concentration in the plaster-board. 13 refs., 6 figs.

O`Brien, R.S. [Australian Radiation Lab., Victoria (Australia)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gamma exposure rate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Gamma-ray lines from SN2014J  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On 21 January 2014, SN2014J was discovered in M82 and found to be the closest type Ia supernova (SN Ia) in the last four decades. INTEGRAL observed SN2014J from the end of January until late June for a total exposure time of about 7 Ms. SNe Ia light curves are understood to be powered by the radioactive decay of iron peak elements of which $^{56}$Ni is dominantly synthesized during the thermonuclear disruption of a CO white dwarf (WD). The measurement of $\\gamma$-ray lines from the decay chain $^{56}$Ni$\\rightarrow$$^{56}$Co$\\rightarrow$$^{56}$Fe provides unique information about the explosion in supernovae. Canonical models assume $^{56}$Ni buried deeply in the supernova cloud, absorbing most of the early $\\gamma$-rays, and only the consecutive decay of $^{56}$Co should become directly observable through the overlaying material several weeks after the explosion when the supernova envelope dilutes as it expands. Surprisingly, with the spectrometer on INTEGRAL, SPI, we detected $^{56}$Ni $\\gamma$-ray lines at ...

Siegert, Thomas

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Studying Z/gamma*+Jet Production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The production of jets in association with a Z/{gamma}* boson is an example of an important class of processes at hadron colliders, namely vector boson + jet (V + jet) production. Comparisons of measurements of this class of processes with theory predictions constitute an important, fundamental test of the Standard Model of particle physics, and of the theory of QCD in particular. While having a smaller cross section than other V +jet processes, Z/{gamma}*({yields} e{sup +}e{sup -}) + jets production, with Z/{gamma}* {yields} e{sup +}e{sup -}/{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}, has a distinct experimental signature allowing for measurements characterized by low backgrounds and a direct, precise measurement of the properties of the decay products of the Z/{gamma}* boson. In this thesis, several new measurements of the properties of jets produced in association with a Z/{gamma}* boson in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV are presented. The cross section for Z/{gamma}*({yields} e{sup +}e{sup -}) + N jet production (N {le} 3) is measured, differential in the transverse momentum of the Nth jet in the event, normalized to the inclusive Z/{gamma}* cross section. Also, the cross section for Z/{gamma}*({yields} e{sup +}e{sup -}) + N jets (N {ge} 1) is measured, differential in the difference in azimuthal angle between the di-electron system and any jet in the event, normalized to unity. The data used in the measurements were collected by the D0 experiment located at the Tevatron Collider of the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 1.04 fb{sup -1}. The measured jet transverse momentum spectra are compared with the predictions of perturbative calculations at the next-to-leading order in the strong coupling constant. Given the low sensitivity of the calculations to model parameters, these comparisons represent a stringent test of perturbative QCD. One of the main goals currently being pursued in particle physics is the discovery of the only particle predicted by the Standard Model which has so far no been detected experimentally, namely the Higgs boson. It is assumed that the ATLAS and CMS experiments located at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), a proton-proton collider at {radical}s = 14 TeV, will be able to detect the Higgs boson, or rule out its existence, within the next few years. The collisions delivered by the LHC will also be used to perform a long range of searches for other new particles, for instance particles predicted by models based on the principle of supersymmetry. The associated production of vector bosons with jets has relatively large production rates at the LHC and can produce a long list of different final states which can include charged leptons, missing transverse energy, as well as light- and heavy-flavour jets. This makes V + jet production a major source of background events to many searches for new particles. Most techniques used for estimating the expected number of background events to searches rely on passing the stable final-state particles of simulated hadron collisions generated using a so-called event generator code, through a simulation of the experimental detector system. The development of event generators which are capable of reliably predicting the properties of jets produced in association with a core process, e.g. the production of a vector boson, has been the subject of a large amount of research activity during the last ten years. These efforts have led to the appearance of the CKKW and MLM algorithms which are implemented in several event generators, among them SHERPA and ALPGEN + PYTHIA. The large data sample collected by the D0 experiment during Run II offers an excellent opportunity for validating these new event generators against experimental measurements of V + jet production. As argued above, the Z/{gamma}*({yields} e{sup +}e{sup -}) + jets process offers the combination of a clean experimental signature and large production rates, making it the process of choice for these studies.

Nilsen, Henrik Wold; /Freiburg U.

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

MAPPING CLIMATE CHANGE EXPOSURES, VULNERABILITIES,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MAPPING CLIMATE CHANGE EXPOSURES, VULNERABILITIES, AND ADAPTATION TO PUBLIC HEALTH RISKS's California Climate Change Center JULY 2012 CEC5002012041 Prepared for: California Energy Commission of California. #12; ii ABSTRACT This study reviewed first available frameworks for climate change adaptation

184

Gamma-Ray Burst Detection with INTEGRAL/SPI  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The spectrometer SPI, one of the two main instruments of the INTEGRAL spacecraft, has strong capabilities in the field of Gamma-Ray Burst (GRB) detections. In its 16 deg field of view (FoV) SPI is able to trigger and to localize GRBs with an accuracy for strong bursts better than 1 deg. The expected GRB detection rate is about one per month.

Andreas von Kienlin; Nikolas Arend; Giselher Lichti; Andrew Strong; Paul Connell

2004-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

185

Activity concentrations and dose rates from decorative granite countertops W.J. Llope*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Activity concentrations and dose rates from decorative granite countertops W.J. Llope* Rice 19 April 2011 Keywords: Granite Gamma radiation Dose Human phantom a b s t r a c t The gamma radiation emitted from a variety of commercial decorative granites available for use in U.S. homes has been

Llope, William J.

186

Discovery of \\gamma-ray emission from a strongly lobe-dominated quasar 3C 275.1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We systematically analyze the 6-year Fermi/LAT data of the lobe-dominated quasars (LDQs) in the complete LDQ sample from 3CRR survey and report the discovery of high-energy \\gamma-ray emission from 3C 275.1. The \\gamma-ray emission likely associating with 3C 207 is confirmed and significant variability of the lightcurve is identified. We do not find statistically significant \\gamma-ray emission from other LDQs. 3C 275.1 is the known \\gamma-ray quasar with the lowest core dominance parameter (i.e., R=0.11). We also show that both the northern radio hotspot and parsec jet models provide acceptable descriptions to the \\gamma-ray data. Considering the potential \\gamma-ray variability at the timescale of months, the latter is probably more favorable. The number of \\gamma-ray LDQs would increase when the exposure accumulates and hence LDQs could be non-ignorable contributors for the extragalactic \\gamma-ray background.

Liao, Neng-Hui; Li, Shang; Jiang, Wei; Liang, Yun-Feng; Li, Xiang; Zhang, Peng-Fei; Chen, Liang; Bai, Jin-Ming; Fan, Yi-Zhong

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Stochastic Microenvironment Models for Air Pollution Exposure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

human exposure to air pollution." SIMS Technical Report No.human exposure to air pollution." Environment International.Annual Meeting of the A i r Pollution Control Association,

Naihua Duan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1974 Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Seventh Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for AEC & AEC Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) and its contractor employees during 1974.

189

Comparing Accelerated Testing and Outdoor Exposure | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Comparing Accelerated Testing and Outdoor Exposure Comparing Accelerated Testing and Outdoor Exposure Presented at the PV Module Reliability Workshop, February 26 - 27 2013,...

190

Estimating Pedestrian Accident Exposure: Protocol Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Method of Measuring Exposure to Pedestrian Accident Risk.Accident Analysis and Prevention, Vol. 14, 1982, pp 397-405.Estimating Pedestrian Accident Exposure: Protocol Report,

Greene-Roesel, Ryan; Diogenes, Mara Chagas; Ragland, David R

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

A Case Study Correlating Innovative Gamma Ray Scanning Detection Systems Data to Surface Soil Gamma Spectrometry Results - 13580  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

HydroGeoLogic (HGL), Inc. completed a United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) study to characterize radiological contamination at a site near Canoga Park, California. The characterized area contained 470 acres including the site of a prototype commercial nuclear reactor and other nuclear design, testing, and support operations from the 1950's until 1988 [1]. The site history included radiological releases during operation followed by D and D activities. The characterization was conducted under an accelerated schedule and the results will support the project remediation. The project has a rigorous cleanup to background agenda and does not allow for comparison to risk-based guidelines. To target soil sample locations, multiple lines of evidence were evaluated including a gamma radiation survey, geophysical surveys, historical site assessment, aerial photographs, and former worker interviews. Due to the time since production and decay, the primary gamma emitting radionuclide remaining is cesium-137 (Cs-137). The gamma ray survey covered diverse, rugged terrain using custom designed sodium iodide thallium-activated (NaI(Tl)) scintillation detection systems. The survey goals included attaining 100% ground surface coverage and detecting gamma radiation as sensitively as possible. The effectiveness of innovative gamma ray detection systems was tested by correlating field Cs-137 static count ratios to Cs-137 laboratory gamma spectrometry results. As a case study, the area encompassing the former location of the first nuclear power station in the U. S. was scanned, and second by second global positioning system (GPS)-linked gamma spectral data were evaluated by examining total count rate and nuclide-specific regions of interest. To compensate for Compton scattering from higher energy naturally occurring radionuclides (U-238, Th-232 and their progeny, and K-40), count rate ratios of anthropogenic nuclide-specific regions of interest to the total count rate were calculated. From the scanning data, locations with observed Cs-137 ratios exceeding six standard deviations above the mean ratio were mapped in high resolution [2]. Field teams returned to those locations to collect static count measurements using the same detection systems. Soil surface samples were collected at 30 locations and analyzed for Cs-137. An exponential correlation was identified between Cs-137 concentrations in surface soil and field-scanned Cs-137 ratios. The data indicate field minimum detectable concentration (MDC) of Cs-137 at 0.02 Bq/g (0.5 pCi/g) or lower depending on contaminant distribution in soil. (authors)

Thompson, Shannon; Rodriguez, Rene; Billock, Paul [HydroGeoLogic, Inc., 11107 Sunset Hills Road, Suite 400, Reston, VA 20190 (United States)] [HydroGeoLogic, Inc., 11107 Sunset Hills Road, Suite 400, Reston, VA 20190 (United States); Lit, Peter [Nomad Science Group, 7738 Nautilus Shell Street, Las Vegas, NV 89139 (United States)] [Nomad Science Group, 7738 Nautilus Shell Street, Las Vegas, NV 89139 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Neutrinos from Gamma Ray Bursts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We show that the detection of neutrinos from a typical gamma ray burst requires a kilometer-scale detector. We argue that large bursts should be visible with the neutrino telescopes under construction. We emphasize the 3 techniques by which neutrino telescopes can perform this search: by triggering on i) bursts of muons from muon neutrinos, ii) muons from air cascades initiated by high energy gamma rays and iii) showers made by relatively low energy ($\\simeq 100\\,\\mev$) electron neutrinos. Timing of neutrino-photon coincidences may yield a measurement of the neutrino mass to order $10^{-5}$~eV, an interesting range in light of the solar neutrino anomaly.

F. Halzen; G. Jaczko

1996-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

193

Gamma source for active interrogation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A cylindrical gamma generator includes a coaxial RF-driven plasma ion source and target. A hydrogen plasma is produced by RF excitation in a cylindrical plasma ion generator using an RF antenna. A cylindrical gamma generating target is coaxial with the ion generator, separated by plasma and extraction electrodes which has many openings. The plasma generator emanates ions radially over 360.degree. and the cylindrical target is thus irradiated by ions over its entire circumference. The plasma generator and target may be as long as desired.

Leung, Ka-Ngo; Lou, Tak Pui; Barletta, William A.

2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

194

sin 2 beta + gamma Measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

I report on the most recent measurements done to constrain sin(2{beta}+{gamma}) with neutral B mesons. Direct measurements of 2{beta} + {gamma} will provide a precise test of the standard model predictions with higher statistics. Present constraints come from studies of B {yields} D{sup (*){+-}}{pi}{sup {-+}}/{rho}{sup {-+}} decays done by BABAR and Belle collaborations with full and inclusive techniques to reconstruct B mesons. B {yields} D{sup 0(*)}K{sup 0} decays are also very promising but statistics are too low to give any constraint at the moment.

Therin, G; /Paris U., VI-VII

2005-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

195

Gamma-ray Imaging Methods  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this document we discuss specific implementations for gamma-ray imaging instruments including the principle of operation and describe systems which have been built and demonstrated as well as systems currently under development. There are several fundamentally different technologies each with specific operational requirements and performance trade offs. We provide an overview of the different gamma-ray imaging techniques and briefly discuss challenges and limitations associated with each modality (in the appendix we give detailed descriptions of specific implementations for many of these technologies). In Section 3 we summarize the performance and operational aspects in tabular form as an aid for comparing technologies and mapping technologies to potential applications.

Vetter, K; Mihailescu, L; Nelson, K; Valentine, J; Wright, D

2006-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

196

Evaluation of exposures of hospital employees to anesthetic gases  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hospital employees who work in hospital operating and recovery rooms are often exposed to a number of anesthetic gases. There is evidence to support the belief that such exposures have led to higher rates of miscarriages and spontaneous abortions of pregnancies among women directly exposed to these gases than among women not exposed. Most of the studies assessing exposure levels were conducted prior to the widespread use of scavenging systems. Air sampling was conducted in hospital operatories and recovery rooms of three large hospitals to assess the current exposure levels in these areas and determine the effectiveness of these systems in reducing exposures to fluoride-containing anesthetic gases. It was determined that recovery-room personnel are exposed to levels of anesthesia gases that often approach and exceed the recommended Threshold Limit Value-Time Weighted Average (TLV-TWA) of 2.0 ppm. Recovery-room personnel do not have the protection from exposure provided by scavenging systems in operating rooms. Operating-room personnel were exposed to anesthesia gas levels above the TLV-TWA only when patients were masked, or connected and disconnected from the scavenging systems. Recovery-room personnel also need to be protected from exposure to anesthesia gases by a scavenging system.

Lambeth, J.D.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Kidney cancer and hydrocarbon exposures among petroleum refinery workers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To evaluate the hypothesis of increased kidney cancer risk after exposure to hydrocarbons, especially those present in gasoline, we conducted a case-control study in a cohort of approximately 100,000 male refinery workers from five petroleum companies. A review of 18,323 death certificates identified 102 kidney cancer cases, to each of whom four controls were matched by refinery location and decade of birth. Work histories, containing an average of 15.7 job assignments per subject, were found for 98% of the cases and 94% of the controls. Tb each job, industrial hygienists assigned semiquantitative ratings for the intensity and frequency of exposures to three hydrocarbon categories: nonaromatic liquid gasoline distillates, aromatic hydrocarbons, and the more volatile hydrocarbons. Ratings of {open_quotes}present{close_quotes} or {open_quotes}absent{close_quotes} were assigned for seven additional exposures: higher boiling hydrocarbons, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, asbestos, chlorinated solvents, ionizing radiation, and lead. Each exposure had either no association or a weak association with kidney cancer. For the hydrocarbon category of principal a priori interest, the nonaromatic liquid gasoline distillates, the estimated relative risk (RR) for any exposure above refinery background was 1.0 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.5-1.9). Analyses of cumulative exposures and of exposures in varying time periods before kidney cancer occurrence also produced null or near-null results. In an analysis of the longest job held by each subject (average duration 9.2 years or 40% of the refiner&y work history), three groups appeared to be at increased risk: laborers (RR = 1.9,95% CI 1.0-3.9); workers in receipt, storage, and movements (RR = 2.5,95% CI 0.9-6.6); and unit cleaners (RR = 2.3, 95% CI 0.5-9.9). 53 refs., 7 tabs.

Poole, C.; Dreyer, N.A.; Satterfield, M.H. [Epidemiology Resources Inc., Newton Lower Falls, MA (United States); Levin, L. [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

TWO POPULATIONS OF GAMMA-RAY BURST RADIO AFTERGLOWS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The detection rate of gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows is ?30% at radio wavelengths, much lower than in the X-ray (?95%) or optical (?70%) bands. The cause of this low radio detection rate has previously been attributed to limited observing sensitivity. We use visibility stacking to test this idea, and conclude that the low detection rate is instead due to two intrinsically different populations of GRBs: radio-bright and radio-faint. We calculate that no more than 70% of GRB afterglows are truly radio-bright, leaving a significant population of GRBs that lack a radio afterglow. These radio-bright GRBs have higher gamma-ray fluence, isotropic energies, X-ray fluxes, and optical fluxes than the radio-faint GRBs, thus confirming the existence of two physically distinct populations. We suggest that the gamma-ray efficiency of the prompt emission is responsible for the difference between the two populations. We also discuss the implications for future radio and optical surveys.

Hancock, P. J.; Gaensler, B. M.; Murphy, T., E-mail: Paul.Hancock@Sydney.edu.au [Also at Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for All-sky Astrophysics (CAASTRO), The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia. (Australia)

2013-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

199

How to Tell a Jet from a Balloon: A Proposed Test for Beaming in Gamma Ray Bursts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

If gamma ray bursts are highly collimated, the energy requirements of each event may be reduced by several (~ 4-6) orders of magnitude, and the event rate increased correspondingly. Extreme conditions in gamma ray bursters lead to highly relativistic motions (bulk Lorentz factors Gamma > 100). This results in strong forward beaming of the emitted radiation in the observer's rest frame. Thus, all information on gamma ray bursts comes from those ejecta emitted in a narrow cone (opening angle 1/Gamma) pointing towards the observer. We are at present ignorant of whether there are ejecta outside that cone or not. The recent detection of longer wavelength transients following gamma ray bursts allows an empirical test of whether gamma ray bursts are collimated jets or spherical fireballs. The bulk Lorentz factor of the burst ejecta will decrease with time after the event, as the ejecta sweep up the surrounding medium. Thus, radiation from the ejecta is beamed into an ever increasing solid angle as the burst remnant evolves. It follows that if gamma ray bursts are highly collimated, many more optical and radio transients should be observed without associated gamma rays than with them. Published supernova searches may contain enough data to test the most extreme models of gamma ray beaming. We close with a brief discussion of other possible consequences of beaming, including its effect on the evolution of burst remnants.

James E. Rhoads

1997-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

200

Gamma Ray Burst and Soft Gamma Repeaters. Spinning, Precessing Gamma Jets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gamma Ray Bursts as recent GRB990123 and GRB990510 are observed to occur in cosmic volumes with a corresponding output reaching, for isotropic explosions, energies as large as two solar masses annihilation. These energies are underestimated because of the neglected role of comparable ejected neutrinos bursts. These extreme power cannot be explained with any standard spherically symmetric Fireball model. A too heavy black hole or Star would be unable to coexist with the shortest millisecond time structure of Gamma ray Burst. Beaming of the gamma radiation may overcome the energy puzzle. However any mild explosive beam $(\\Omega > 10^{-2})$ should not solve the jet containment at those disruptive energies. Only extreme beaming $(\\Omega < 10^{-8})$, by a slow decaying, but long-lived precessing jet, it may coexist with characteristic Supernova energies, apparent GRBs output, statistics as well as their connection with older and nearer SGRs relics.

Daniele Fargion

1999-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gamma exposure rate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

PUBLISHED VERSION Gamma ray spectrometer for ITER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ray Scintillation Spectrometer Rev. Sci. Instrum. 24, 1096 (1953); 10.1063/1.1770609 An Automatic Recording Gamma for the spectrometer is presented. Keywords: tokamak, DT plasma, alpha- particles, diagnostics, gamma- spectrometry

202

Essay on the gamma ray laser  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This work discusses the possibility of inducing the emission of gamma radiation from nuclear isomers by two-photon transitions, in the more general context of the problem of the amplification of gamma radiation.

Silviu Olariu

1999-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

203

Measurements of B to V(Gamma) Decays  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The standard model has been highly successful at describing current experimental data. However, extensions of the standard model predict particles that have masses at energy scales that are above the electroweak scale. The flavor-changing neutral current processes of the B meson are sensitive to the influences of these new physics contributions. These processes proceed through loop diagrams, thus allowing new physics to enter at the same order as the standard model. New physics may contribute to the enhancement or suppression of rate asymmetries or the decay rates of these processes. The transition B {yields} V{gamma} (V = K*(892), {rho}(770), {omega}(782), {phi}(1020)) represents radiative decays of the B meson that proceed through penguin processes. Hadronic uncertainties limit the theoretical accuracy of the prediction of the branching fractions. However, uncertainties, both theoretical and experimental, are much reduced when considering quantities involving ratios of branching fractions, such as CP or isospin asymmetries. The most dominant exclusive radiative b {yields} s transition is B {yields} K*{gamma}. We present the best measurements of the branching fractions, direct CP, and isospin asymmetries of B {yields} K*{gamma}. The analogous b {yields} d transitions are B {yields} {rho}{gamma} and B {yields} {omega}{gamma}, which are suppressed by a factor of |V{sub td}/V{sub ts}|{sup 2} {approx} 0.04 relative to B {yields} K*{gamma}. A measurement of the branching fractions and isospin asymmetry of B{sup +} {yields} {rho}{sup +}{gamma} and B{sup 0} {yields} {rho}{sup 0}{gamma}, as well as a search for B {yields} {omega}{gamma}, are also given. These measurements are combined to calculate the ratio of CKM matrix elements |V{sub td}/V{sub ts}|, which corresponds to the length of one side of the unitary triangle. Finally, we present a search for the penguin annihilation process B {yields}{phi}{gamma}. We use a sample of 383 million B{bar B} events collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B factory for the analysis of B {yields} K*{gamma}. We measure the branching fractions {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} K*{sup 0}{gamma}) = (4.47 {+-} 0.10 {+-} 0.16) x 10{sup -5} and {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} K*{sup +}{gamma}) = (4.22 {+-} 0.14 {+-} 0.16) x 10{sup -5}. We measure the direct CP asymmetry to be -0.033 < {Alpha}{sub CP} (B {yields} K*{gamma}) < 0.028 and the isospin asymmetry to be 0.017 < {Delta}{sub 0-} < 0.116, where the limits are determined at the 90% C.L. and include both the statistical and systematic uncertainties. Using a sample of 347 million B{bar B} events, we measure the branching fractions {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {rho}{sup +}{gamma}) = (1.10{sub -0.33}{sup +0.37} {+-} 0.09) x 10{sup -6} and {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {rho}{sup 0}{gamma}) = (0.79{sub -0.20}{sup +0.22} {+-} 0.06) x 10{sup -6}, the isospin asymmetry {Delta} = -0.35 {+-} 0.27, and set a 90% C.L. upper limit {Beta}(B {yields} {omega}{gamma}) < 0.78 x 10{sup -6}. We also measure the isospin-averaged branching fraction {Beta}(B {yields} ({rho}/{omega}){gamma}) = (1.25{sub -0.24}{sup +0.25} {+-} 0.09) x 10{sup -6}, from which we determine |V{sub td}/V{sub ts}|= 0.200{sub -0.020}{sup +0.021} {+-} 0.015, where the first uncertainty is experimental and the second theoretical. Finally, a sample of 124 million B{bar B} events is used to set an upper limit of {Beta}(B {yields} {phi}{gamma}) < 8.5 x 10{sup -7} at the 90% C.L.

Yarritu, Aaron K.; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; ,

2010-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

204

The Diverse Environments of Gamma-Ray Bursts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Galaxies of Dark Gamma-Ray Bursts: Observational Constraintsof a Very Bright Gamma- Ray Burst in a Galactic Halo 3.11.3 Gamma-Ray Burst Classi?cation . . . . . . 1.4 Gamma-Ray

Perley, Daniel Alan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Light Curves of Swift Gamma Ray Bursts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent observations from the Swift gamma-ray burst mission indicate that a fraction of gamma ray bursts are characterized by a canonical behaviour of the X-ray afterglows. We present an effective theory which allows us to account for X-ray light curves of both (short - long) gamma ray bursts and X-ray rich flashes. We propose that gamma ray bursts originate from massive magnetic powered pulsars.

Paolo Cea

2006-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

206

Pulsed Gamma-Ray-Burst Afterglows  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

provides a candidate for the central engine of the gamma-ray burst (GRB) mechanism, both long and short

J. Middleditch

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

E-Print Network 3.0 - angular gamma-gamma perturbada Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Interesting Interesting Summary: 5 10 15 20 25 (4S) Dataset: ffl 3.3 M B B ffl 4.8 M c c ffl 3.9 M + Gamma Gamma GammaGamma... (...

208

The Universe Viewed in Gamma-Rays 1 Properties of Gamma-ray Bursts Localized by  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Universe Viewed in Gamma-Rays 1 Properties of Gamma-ray Bursts Localized by the HETE-2 and localize Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) in wide field of view. HETE-2 have been localized about 20 GRBs per year hours after the burst. 1. The High Energy Transient Explorer 2 Gamma-ray burst (GRB) is the most

Enomoto, Ryoji

209

Multifrequency Observations of Gamma-Ray Burst  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Neither a flaring nor a quiescent counterpart to a gamma-ray burst has yet been convincingly identified at any wavelength region. The present status of the search for counterparts of classical gamma-ray bursts is given. Particular emphasis is put on the search for flaring counterparts, i.e. emission during or shortly after the gamma-ray emission.

J. Greiner

1995-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

210

Gamma Ray Bursts as Probes of the First Stars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The redshift where the first stars formed is an important and unknown milestone in cosmological structure formation. The evidence linking gamma ray bursts (GRBs) with star formation activity implies that the first GRBs occurred shortly after the first stars formed. Gamma ray bursts and their afterglows may thus offer a unique probe of this epoch, because they are bright from gamma ray to radio wavelengths and should be observable to very high redshift. Indeed, our ongoing near-IR followup programs already have the potential to detect bursts at redshift z ~ 10. In these proceedings, we discuss two distinct ways of using GRBs to probe the earliest star formation. First, direct GRB counts may be used as a proxy for star formation rate measurements. Second, high energy cutoffs in the GeV spectra of gamma ray bursts due to pair production with high redshift optical and ultraviolet background photons contain information on early star formation history. The second method is observationally more demanding, but also more rewarding, because each observed pair creation cutoff in a high redshift GRB spectrum will tell us about the integrated star formation history prior to the GRB redshift.

James E. Rhoads

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Neutron/gamma coupled library generation and gamma transport calculation with KARMA 1.2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

KAERI has developed a lattice transport calculation code KARMA and its multi-group cross section library generation system. Recently, the multi-group cross section library generation system has included a gamma cross section generation capability and KARMA also has been improved to include a gamma transport calculation module. This paper addresses the multi-group gamma cross section generation capability for the KARMA 1.2 code and the preliminary test results of the KARMA 1.2 gamma transport calculations. The gamma transport calculation with KARMA 1.2 gives the gamma flux, gamma smeared power, and gamma energy deposition distributions. The results of the KARMA gamma calculations were compared with those of HELIOS and they showed that KARMA 1.2 gives reasonable gamma transport calculation results. (authors)

Hong, S. G. [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Kyung Hee Univ., 446-701 Deogyeong-daero, GiHeung-gu, Yongin, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Kim, K. S.; Cho, J. Y.; Lee, K. H. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Inst., 305-353 Duckjin-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejon (Korea, Republic of)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

E-Print Network 3.0 - accretion rate modulation Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

370, L61L65 (2006) doi:10.1111j.1745-3933.2006.00189.x The late time evolution of gamma-ray bursts: ending hyperaccretion Summary: role in determining the rate of accretion, and...

213

Chlorite Dissolution Rates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Spreadsheets provides measured chlorite rate data from 100 to 300C at elevated CO2. Spreadsheet includes derived rate equation.

Carroll, Susan

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Chlorite Dissolution Rates  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Spreadsheets provides measured chlorite rate data from 100 to 300C at elevated CO2. Spreadsheet includes derived rate equation.

Carroll, Susan

215

The Interest Rate Conundrum  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Flows and US Interest Rates,” NBER Working Paper No 12560. [Working Paper # 2008 -03 The Interest Rate Conundrum Roger

Craine, Roger; Martin, Vance L.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Long lived central engines in Gamma Ray Bursts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The central engine of Gamma Ray Bursts may live much longer than the duration of the prompt emission. Some evidence of it comes from the presence of strong precursors, post-cursors, and X-ray flares in a sizable fraction of bursts. Additional evidence comes from the fact that often the X-ray and the optical afterglow light curves do not track one another, suggesting that they are two different emission components. The typical "steep-flat-steep" behavior of the X-ray light curve can be explained if the same central engine responsible for the main prompt emission continues to be active for a long time, but with a decreasing power. The early X-ray "afterglow" emission is then the extension of the prompt emission, originating at approximately the same location, and is not due to forward shocks. If the bulk Lorentz factor Gamma is decreasing in time, the break ending the shallow phase can be explained, since at early times Gamma is large, and we see only a fraction of the emitting area. Later, when Gamma decreases, we see an increasing fraction of the emitting surface up to the time when Gamma ~ 1/theta_j. This time ends the shallow phase of the X-ray light curve. The origin of the late prompt emission can be the accretion of the fall-back material, with an accretion rate dot M proportional to t^(-5/3). The combination of this late prompt emission with the flux produced by the standard forward shock can explain the great diversity of the optical and the X-ray light curves.

G. Ghisellini

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Simulated Irradiation of Samples in HFIR for use as Possible Test Materials in the MPEX (Material Plasma Exposure Experiment) Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The importance of Plasma Material Interaction (PMI) is a major concern in fusion reactor design and analysis. The Material-Plasma Exposure eXperiment (MPEX) facility will explore PMI under fusion reactor plasma conditions. Samples with accumulated displacements per atom (DPA) damage produced by irradiations in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) will be studied in the MPEX facility. The project presented in this paper involved performing assessments of the induced radioactivity and resulting radiation fields of a variety of potential fusion reactor materials. The scientific code packages MCNP and SCALE were used to simulate irradiation of the samples in HFIR; generation and depletion of nuclides in the material and the subsequent composition, activity levels, gamma radiation fields, and resultant dose rates as a function of cooling time. These state-of-the-art simulation methods were used in addressing the challenge of the MPEX project to minimize the radioactive inventory in the preparation of the samples for inclusion in the MPEX facility.

Ellis, Ronald James [ORNL; Rapp, Juergen [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Joint US/Russian Studies of Population Exposures Resulting from Nuclear Production Activities in the Southern Urals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Beginning in 1948, the Soviet Union initiated a program for production of nuclear materials for a weapons program. The first facility for production of plutonium was constructed in the central portion of the country east of the southern Ural Mountains, about halfway between the major industrial cities of Ekaterinburg and Chelyabinsk. The facility now known as the Mayak Production Association and its associated town, now known as Ozersk, were built to irradiate uranium in reactors, separate the resulting plutonium in reprocessing plants, and prepare plutonium metal. The rush to production, coupled with inexperience in handling radioactive materials, lead to large radiation exposures, not only to the workers in the facilities, but also to the surrounding public. Fuel processing started with no controls on releases, and fuel dissolution and accidents in reactors resulted in release of about 37 PBq (1015 Bq) of 131I between 1948 and 1967. Designed disposals of low- and intermediate-level liquid radioactive wastes, and accidental releases via cooling water from tank farms of high-level liquid radioactive wastes, into the small Techa River caused significant contamination and exposures to residents of numerous small riverside villages downstream of the site. Discovery of the magnitude of the aquatic contamination in late 1951 caused revisions to the waste handling regimes, but not before over 200 PBq of radionuclides (with large contributions of 90Sr and 137Cs) were released. Liquid wastes were diverted to tiny Lake Karachay (which today holds over 4 EBq); cooling water was stopped in the tank farms. In 1957, one of the tanks in the tank farm overheated and exploded; over 70 PBq, disproportionately 90Sr, was blown over a large area to the northeast of the site; a large area was contaminated and many villages evacuated. This area today is known as the East Urals Radioactive Trace (EURT). Each of these releases was significant; together they have created a group of cohorts unrivaled in the world for their chronic, low-dose-rate radiation exposure. The 26,000 workers at Mayak were highly exposed to external gamma and inhaled plutonium. A cohort of individuals raised as children in Ozersk is under evaluation for their exposures to radioiodine. The Techa River Cohort consists of over 30,000 people who were born before the start of exposure in 1949 and lived along the Techa River. The Techa River Offspring Cohort consists of about 21,000 persons born to one or more exposed parents of this group - many of whom also lived along the contaminated river. The EURT Cohort consists of about 18,000 people who were evacuated from the EURT soon after the 1957 explosion and another 8000 who remained. These groups together are the focus of dose reconstruction and epidemiological studies funded by the US, Russia, and the European Union to address the question “Are doses delivered at low dose rates as effective in producing health effects as the same doses delivered at high dose rates?”

Napier, Bruce A.

2014-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

219

Neutrinos from Gamma Ray Bursts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The observed fluxes of cosmic rays and gamma rays are used to infer the maximum allowed high-energy neutrino flux allowed for Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs), following Mannheim, Protheroe, and Rachen (2000). It is shown that if GRBs produce the ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays, they should contribute (a) at least 10% of the extragalactic gamma ray background between 3 MeV and 30 GeV, contrary to their observed energy flux which is only a minute fraction of this flux, and (b) a cumulative neutrino flux a factor of 20 below the AMANDA (Neutrino 2000) limit on isotropic neutrinos. This could have two implications, either GRBs do not produce the ultrahigh energy cosmic rays or that the GRBs are strongly beamed and emit most of their power at energies well above 100 GeV implausibly increasing the energy requirements, but consistent with the marginal detections of a few low-redshift GRBs by MILAGRITO, HEGRA-AIROBICC, and the Tibet-Array. All crucial measurements to test the models will be available in the next few years. These are measurements of (i) high-energy neutrinos with AMANDA-ICECUBE or an enlarged ANTARES/NESTOR ocean detector, (ii) GRB redshifts from HETE-2 follow-up studies, and (iii) GRB spectra above 10 GeV with low-threshold imaging air Cherenkov telescopes such as MAGIC and the space telescopes AGILE and GLAST.

Karl Mannheim

2000-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

220

Gamma Ray Mirrors for Direct Measurement of Spent Nuclear Fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Direct measurement of the amount of Pu and U in spent nuclear fuel represents a challenge for the safeguards community. Ideally, the characteristic gamma-ray emission lines from different isotopes provide an observable suitable for this task. However, these lines are generally lost in the fierce flux of radiation emitted by the fuel. The rates are so high that detector dead times limit measurements to only very small solid angles of the fuel. Only through the use of carefully designed view ports and long dwell times are such measurements possible. Recent advances in multilayer grazing-incidence gamma-ray optics provide one possible means of overcoming this difficulty. With a proper optical and coating design, such optics can serve as a notch filter, passing only narrow regions of the overall spectrum to a fully shielded detector that does not view the spent fuel directly. We report on the design of a mirror system and a number of experimental measurements.

Pivovaroff, Dr. Michael J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL)] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Ziock, Klaus-Peter [ORNL] [ORNL; Harrison, Mark J [ORNL] [ORNL; Soufli, Regina [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL)] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gamma exposure rate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Do Gamma-Ray Bursts Come from the Oort Cloud?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We examine the possibility that gamma-ray bursts arise from sources in the Oort comet cloud, basing most of our arguments on accepted models for the formation and spatial distribution of the cloud. We identify three severe problems with such models: (1) There is no known mechanism for producing bursts that can explain the observed burst rate and energetics without violating other observational constraints. (2) The bright source counts cannot be reconciled with standard models for the phase-space distribution of objects in the Oort cloud. (3) The observed isotropy of the available burst data is inconsistent with the expected angular distribution of sources in the Oort cloud. We therefore assert that Oort cloud models of gamma-ray bursts are extremely implausible.

T. E. Clarke; O. Blaes; adn S. Tremaine

1993-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

222

Exposure of nuclear track emulsion to thermal neutrons, heavy ions and muons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Physical analysis of exposures of test samples of reproduced nuclear track emulsion (NTE) is presented. In boron enriched NTE the angular and energy correlations of products of the reaction induced by thermal neutrons n$_{th} + ^{10}B \\rightarrow ^{7}Li + (\\gamma) + \\alpha$ are studied. NTE was exposed to ions $^{86}Kr^{+17}$ and $^{124}Xe^{+26}$ of energy about 1.2 A MeV. Measurements of the heavy ion ranges of in NTE allowed one to determine their energy on a basis of the SRIM model. Nuclear stars of large multiplicity of target nuclei are observed in exposure of NTE to ultrarelativistic $\\mu$-mesons. The kinematical characteristics of the events of splitting of carbon nuclei into three $\\alpha$-particles studied in this exposure point to a nuclear diffractive mechanism of interactions.

D. A. Artemenkov; V. Bradnova; A. A. Zaitsev; P. I. Zarubin; I. G. Zarubina; R. R. Kattabekov; K. Z. Mamatkulov; V. V. Rusakova

2014-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

223

Digital discrimination of neutrons and gamma-rays in organic scintillation detectors using moment analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Digital discrimination of neutron and gamma-ray events in an organic scintillator has been investigated by moment analysis. Signals induced by an americium-beryllium (Am/Be) isotropic neutron source in a stilbene crystal detector have been sampled with a flash analogue-to-digital converter (ADC) of 1 GSamples/s sampling rate and 10-bit vertical resolution. Neutrons and gamma-rays have been successfully discriminated with a threshold corresponding to gamma-ray energy about 217 keV. Moment analysis has also been verified against the results assessed by a time-of-flight (TOF) measurement. It is shown that the classification of neutrons and gamma-rays afforded by moment analysis is consistent with that achieved by digital TOF measurement. This method has been applied to analyze the data acquired from the stilbene crystal detector in mixed radiation field of the HL-2A tokamak deuterium plasma discharges and the results are described.

Xie Xufei; Zhang Xing; Yuan Xi; Chen Jinxiang; Li Xiangqing; Zhang Guohui; Fan Tieshuan [School of Physics and State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing (China); Yuan Guoliang; Yang Jinwei; Yang Qingwei [Southwestern Institute of Physics, Chengdu (China)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

224

How precisely neutrino emission from supernova remnants can be constrained by gamma ray observations?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose a conceptually and computationally simple method to evaluate the neutrinos emitted by supernova remnants using the observed gamma-ray spectrum. The proposed method does not require any preliminary parametrization of the gamma ray flux; the gamma ray data can be used as an input. In this way, we are able to propagate easily the observational errors and to understand how well the neutrino flux and the signal in neutrino telescopes can be constrained by gamma-ray data. We discuss the various possible sources of theoretical and systematical uncertainties (e.g., neutrino oscillation parameters, hadronic modeling, etc.), obtaining an estimate of the accuracy of our calculation. Furthermore, we apply our approach to the supernova remnant RX J1713.7-3946, showing that neutrino emission is very-well constrained by the H.E.S.S. gamma-ray data: indeed, the accuracy of our prediction is limited by theoretical uncertainties. Neutrinos from RX J1713.7-3946 can be detected with an exposure of the order km^2 year, provided that the detection threshold in future neutrino telescopes will be equal to about 1 TeV.

F. L. Villante; F. Vissani

2008-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

225

Occupational Radiation Exposure Analysis of US ITER DCLL TBM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents an Occupational Radiation Exposure (ORE) analysis that was performed for the US International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) Dual Coolant Lead Lithium (DCLL) Test Blanket Module (TBM). This analysis was performed with the QADMOD dose code for anticipated maintenance activities for this TBM concept and its ancillary systems. The QADMOD code was used to model the PbLi cooling loop of this TBM concept by specifying gamma ray source terms that simulated radioactive material within the piping, valves, heat exchanger, permeator, pump, drain tank, and cold trap of this cooling system. Estimates of the maintenance tasks that will have to be performed and the time required to perform these tasks where developed based on either expert opinion or on industrial maintenance experience for similar technologies. This report details the modeling activity and the calculated doses for the maintenance activities envisioned for the US DCLL TBM.

Merrill, Brad J; Cadwallader, Lee C; Dagher, Mohamad

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

EFFECTS OF TRITIUM GAS EXPOSURE ON THE GLASS TRANSITION TEMPERATURE OF EPDM ELASTOMER AND ON THE CONDUCTIVITY OF POLYANILINE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Four formulations of EPDM (ethylene-propylene diene monomer) elastomer were exposed to tritium gas initially at one atmosphere and ambient temperature for between three and four months in closed containers. Material properties that were characterized include density, volume, mass, appearance, flexibility, and dynamic mechanical properties. The glass transition temperature was determined by analysis of the dynamic mechanical property data per ASTM standards. EPDM samples released significant amounts of gas when exposed to tritium, and the glass transition temperature increased by about 3 C. during the exposure. Effects of ultraviolet and gamma irradiation on the surface electrical conductivity of two types of polyaniline films are also documented as complementary results to planned tritium exposures. Future work will determine the effects of tritium gas exposure on the electrical conductivity of polyaniline films, to demonstrate whether such films can be used as a sensor to detect tritium. Surface conductivity was significantly reduced by irradiation with both gamma rays and ultraviolet light. The results of the gamma and UV experiments will be correlated with the tritium exposure results.

Clark, E; Marie Kane, M

2008-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

227

TEST RESULTS FROM GAMMA IRRADIATION OF ALUMINUM OXYHYDROXIDES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydrated metal oxides or oxyhydroxides boehmite and gibbsite that can form on spent aluminum-clad nuclear fuel assemblies during in-core and post-discharge wet storage were exposed as granular powders to gamma irradiation in a {sup 60}Co irradiator in closed laboratory test vessels with air and with argon as separate cover gases. The results show that boehmite readily evolves hydrogen with exposure up to a dose of 1.8 x 10{sup 8} rad, the maximum tested, in both a full-dried and moist condition of the powder, whereas only a very small measurable quantity of hydrogen was generated from the granular powder of gibbsite. Specific information on the test setup, sample characteristics, sample preparation, irradiation, and gas analysis are described.

Fisher, D.; Westbrook, M.; Sindelar, R.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Effective Rate Period  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of the FY Mid-Year Change 10012013 - 03312014 04012014 - 09302014 Power Rates Annual Revenue Requirement Rate Schedule Power Revenue Requirement 73,441,557...

229

Chronic respiratory effects of indoor formaldehyde exposure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The relation of chronic respiratory symptoms and pulmonary function to formaldehyde (HCHO) in homes was studied in a sample of 298 children (6-15 years of age) and 613 adults. HCHO measurements were made with passive samplers during two 1-week periods. Data on chronic cough and phlegm, wheeze, attacks of breathlessness, and doctor diagnoses of chronic bronchitis and asthma were collected with self-completed questionnaires. Peak expiratory flow rates (PEFR) were obtained during the evenings and mornings for up to 14 consecutive days for each individual. Significantly greater prevalence rates of asthma and chronic bronchitis were found in children from houses with HCHO levels 60-120 ppb than in those less exposed, especially in children also exposed to environmental tobacco smoke. In children, levels of PEFR decreased linearly with HCHO exposure, with the estimated decrease due to 60 ppb of HCHO equivalent to 22% of PEFR level in nonexposed children. The effects in asthmatic children exposed to HCHO below 50 ppb were greater than in healthy ones. The effects in adults were less evident: decrements in PEFR due to HCHO over 40 ppb were seen only in the morning, and mainly in smokers.

Krzyzanowski, M.; Quackenboss, J.J.; Lebowitz, M.D. (Univ. of Arizona Health Sciences Center, Tucson (USA))

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Uncertainty Analysis for Photovoltaic Degradation Rates (Poster)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dependable and predictable energy production is the key to the long-term success of the PV industry. PV systems show over the lifetime of their exposure a gradual decline that depends on many different factors such as module technology, module type, mounting configuration, climate etc. When degradation rates are determined from continuous data the statistical uncertainty is easily calculated from the regression coefficients. However, total uncertainty that includes measurement uncertainty and instrumentation drift is far more difficult to determine. A Monte Carlo simulation approach was chosen to investigate a comprehensive uncertainty analysis. The most important effect for degradation rates is to avoid instrumentation that changes over time in the field. For instance, a drifting irradiance sensor, which can be achieved through regular calibration, can lead to a substantially erroneous degradation rates. However, the accuracy of the irradiance sensor has negligible impact on degradation rate uncertainty emphasizing that precision (relative accuracy) is more important than absolute accuracy.

Jordan, D.; Kurtz, S.; Hansen, C.

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Black Stars and Gamma Ray Bursts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stars that are collapsing toward forming a black hole but are frozen near the Schwarzschild horizon are termed ``black stars''. Collisions of black stars, in contrast to black hole collisions, may be sources of gamma ray bursts, whose basic parameters are estimated quite simply and are found to be consistent with observed gamma ray bursts. Black star gamma ray bursts should be preceded by gravitational wave emission similar to that from the coalescence of black holes.

Tanmay Vachaspati

2007-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

232

Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1980 Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Thirteenth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1980.

233

Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1983 Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Sixteenth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1983.

234

Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1986 Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Nineteenth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1986.

235

Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1982 Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Fifteenth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1982.

236

Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1979 Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Twelfth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1979.

237

Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1985 Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Eighteenth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1985.

238

Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1984 Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Seventeenth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1984.

239

Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1981 Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Fourteenth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1981.

240

Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1977 Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Tenth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1977.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gamma exposure rate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1978 Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Eleventh Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1978.

242

Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1975 Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Eighth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for ERDA & ERDA Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) and its contractor employees during 1975.

243

Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1976 Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Ninth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1976.

244

Evidence for {psi}' Decays into {gamma}{pi}{sup 0} and {gamma}{eta}  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The decays {psi}{sup '}{yields}{gamma}{pi}{sup 0}, {gamma}{eta} and {gamma}{eta}{sup '} are studied using data collected with the BESIII detector at the BEPCII e{sup +}e{sup -} collider. The processes {psi}{sup '}{yields}{gamma}{pi}{sup 0} and {psi}{sup '}{yields}{gamma}{eta} are observed for the first time with signal significances of 4.6{sigma} and 4.3{sigma}, respectively. The branching fractions are determined to be B({psi}{sup '}{yields}{gamma}{pi}{sup 0})=(1.58{+-}0.40{+-}0.13)x10{sup -6}, B({psi}{sup '}{yields}{gamma}{eta})=(1.38{+-}0.48{+-}0.09)x10{sup -6}, and B({psi}{sup '}{yields}{gamma}{eta}{sup '})=(126{+-}3{+-}8)x10{sup -6}, where the first errors are statistical and the second ones systematic.

Ablikim, M.; An, Z. H.; Bai, J. Z.; Berger, N.; Bian, J. M.; Cai, X.; Cao, G. F.; Cao, X. X.; Chang, J. F.; Chen, G.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, J. C.; Chen, M. L.; Chen, Y.; Chen, Y. B.; Chu, Y. P.; Dai, H. L.; Dai, J. P.; Deng, Z. Y.; Dong, L. Y. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Beijing 100049 (China)

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

245

TESLA*HERA Based gamma-p and gamma-A Colliders  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Main parameters and physics search potential of gamma-p and gamma-A colliders, which will be available due to constructing the TESLA linear electron-positron collider tangentially to the HERA proton ring, are discussed.

A. K. Ciftci; S. Sultansoy; O. Yavas

2000-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

246

Characterization of guinea pig transfer factor collected by In vivo exposure to antilymphocyte gamma globulin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abbreviations used in this thesis; DNCB, 2, 4-dinitrochloro- benzene; KLH, keyhole limpet hemocyanin; DNFBp 2p4-dinitroflouro- benzene; DS, double stranded; SS, single stranded; BCG, Bacille Calmette-Guerin; PPD, purified protein derivative; ALS, anti..., 8, 10, 36-39), diphtheria toxoid (11), coccidioidin (13, 40-42), histoplasmin (13, 41, 42), keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) (38), Candida antigens (14), bacterial spores (40, 41. , , modified serum components (44), mumps virus, leprosy bacillus...

Stewart, Robert Stanley

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Gamma ray burst outflows and afterglows.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? We carry out a theoretical investigation of jet propagation in Gamma Ray Bursts and examine the jitter radiation mechanism as a means of producing… (more)

Morsony, Brian J.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Modeling Residential Exposure to Secondhand Tobacco Smoke  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

transfer factors for air pollution health risk assessment.combustion, air pollution exposure, and health: The situa-

Klepeis, Neil E; Nazaroff, William W

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Gamma Ray Burst Central Engines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I review aspects of the theory of long-duration gamma-ray burst (GRB) central engines. I focus on the requirements of any model; these include the angular momentum of the progenitor, the power, Lorentz factor, asymmetry, and duration of the flow, and both the association and the non-association with bright supernovae. I compare and contrast the collapsar and millisecond proto-magnetar models in light of these requirements. The ability of the latter model to produce a flow with Lorentz factor ~100 while simultaneously maintaining a kinetic luminosity of ~10^50 ergs/s for a timescale of ~10-100 s is emphasized.

Todd A. Thompson

2008-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

250

Gravitational Waves versus X and Gamma Ray Emission in a Short Gamma-Ray Burst  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The recent progress in the understanding the physical nature of neutron star equilibrium configurations and the first observational evidence of a genuinely short gamma-ray burst, GRB 090227B, allows to give an estimate of the gravitational waves versus the X and Gamma-ray emission in a short gamma-ray burst.

F. G. Oliveira; Jorge A. Rueda; Remo Ruffini

2014-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

251

Asbestos exposure--quantitative assessment of risk  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Methods for deriving quantitative estimates of asbestos-associated health risks are reviewed and their numerous assumptions and uncertainties described. These methods involve extrapolation of risks observed at past relatively high asbestos concentration levels down to usually much lower concentration levels of interest today--in some cases, orders of magnitude lower. These models are used to calculate estimates of the potential risk to workers manufacturing asbestos products and to students enrolled in schools containing asbestos products. The potential risk to workers exposed for 40 yr to 0.5 fibers per milliliter (f/ml) of mixed asbestos fiber type (a permissible workplace exposure limit under consideration by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) ) are estimated as 82 lifetime excess cancers per 10,000 exposed. The risk to students exposed to an average asbestos concentration of 0.001 f/ml of mixed asbestos fiber types for an average enrollment period of 6 school years is estimated as 5 lifetime excess cancers per one million exposed. If the school exposure is to chrysotile asbestos only, then the estimated risk is 1.5 lifetime excess cancers per million. Risks from other causes are presented for comparison; e.g., annual rates (per million) of 10 deaths from high school football, 14 from bicycling (10-14 yr of age), 5 to 20 for whooping cough vaccination. Decisions concerning asbestos products require participation of all parties involved and should only be made after a scientifically defensible estimate of the associated risk has been obtained. In many cases to date, such decisions have been made without adequate consideration of the level of risk or the cost-effectiveness of attempts to lower the potential risk. 73 references.

Hughes, J.M.; Weill, H.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Thermal evolution behavior of carbides and {gamma} Prime precipitates in FGH96 superalloy powder  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The characteristics of rapidly solidified FGH96 superalloy powder and the thermal evolution behavior of carbides and {gamma} Prime precipitates within powder particles were investigated. It was observed that the reduction of powder size and the increase of cooling rate had transformed the solidification morphologies of atomized powder from dendrite in major to cellular structure. The secondary dendritic spacing was measured to be 1.02-2.55 {mu}m and the corresponding cooling rates were estimated to be in the range of 1.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4}-4.7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} K{center_dot}s{sup -1}. An increase in the annealing temperature had rendered the phase transformation of carbides evolving from non-equilibrium MC Prime carbides to intermediate transition stage of M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbides, and finally to thermodynamically stable MC carbides. The superfine {gamma} Prime precipitates were formed at the dendritic boundaries of rapidly solidified superalloy powder. The coalescence, growth, and homogenization of {gamma}' precipitates occurred with increasing annealing temperature. With decreasing cooling rate from 650 Degree-Sign C{center_dot}K{sup -1} to 5 Degree-Sign C{center_dot}K{sup -1}, the morphological development of {gamma} Prime precipitates had been shown to proceed from spheroidal to cuboidal and finally to solid state dendrites. Meanwhile, a shift had been observed from dendritic morphology to recrystallized structure between 900 Degree-Sign C and 1050 Degree-Sign C. Moreover, accelerated evolution of carbides and {gamma}' precipitates had been facilitated by the formation of new grain boundaries which provide fast diffusion path for atomic elements. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Microstructural characteristic of FGH96 superalloy powder was investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The relation between microstructure, particle size, and cooling rate was studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thermal evolution behavior of {gamma} Prime and carbides in loose FGH96 powder was studied.

Zhang Lin, E-mail: zhanglincsu@163.com [State Key Laboratory for Advanced Metals and Materials, Beijing Key Laboratory for Powder Metallurgy and Particulate Materials, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing, 100083 (China); Liu Hengsan, E-mail: lhsj63@sohu.com [State Key Laboratory for Advanced Metals and Materials, Beijing Key Laboratory for Powder Metallurgy and Particulate Materials, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing, 100083 (China); He Xinbo, E-mail: xb_he@163.com [State Key Laboratory for Advanced Metals and Materials, Beijing Key Laboratory for Powder Metallurgy and Particulate Materials, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing, 100083 (China); Rafi-ud-din, E-mail: rafiuddi@gmail.com [State Key Laboratory for Advanced Metals and Materials, Beijing Key Laboratory for Powder Metallurgy and Particulate Materials, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing, 100083 (China); Qu Xuanhui, E-mail: quxh@ustb.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Advanced Metals and Materials, Beijing Key Laboratory for Powder Metallurgy and Particulate Materials, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing, 100083 (China); Qin Mingli, E-mail: mlqin75@hotmail.com [State Key Laboratory for Advanced Metals and Materials, Beijing Key Laboratory for Powder Metallurgy and Particulate Materials, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing, 100083 (China); Li Zhou, E-mail: zhouli621@126.com [National Key Lab of High Temperature Structural Materials, Beijing Institute of Aeronautical Materials, Beijing, 100095 (China); Zhang Guoqing, E-mail: g.zhang@126.com [National Key Lab of High Temperature Structural Materials, Beijing Institute of Aeronautical Materials, Beijing, 100095 (China)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

253

Estimating Pedestrian Accident Exposure: Automated Pedestrian Counting Devices Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

291. Estimating Pedestrian Accident Exposure: Draft ProtocolEstimating Pedestrian Accident Exposure: Draft Protocol39. Estimating Pedestrian Accident Exposure: Draft Protocol

Bu, Fanping; Greene-Roesel, Ryan; Diogenes, Mara Chagas; Ragland, David R

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

CONSTRAINTS ON VERY HIGH ENERGY GAMMA-RAY EMISSION FROM GAMMA-RAY BURSTS R. Atkins,1,2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CONSTRAINTS ON VERY HIGH ENERGY GAMMA-RAY EMISSION FROM GAMMA-RAY BURSTS R. Atkins,1,2 W. Benbow,3 emission from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) during the prompt emission phase. Detection of >100 GeV counterparts on potential GRB models. Subject headinggs: gamma rays: bursts -- gamma rays: observations 1. INTRODUCTION

California at Santa Cruz, University of

255

Gamma-Ray Bursts Above 1 GeV  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

One of the principal results obtained by the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory relating to the study of gamma-ray bursts was the detection by the EGRET instrument of energetic ($>$100 MeV) photons from a handful of bright bursts. The most extreme of these was the single 18 GeV photon from the GRB940217 source. Given EGRET's sensitivity and limited field of view, the detection rate implies that such high energy emission may be ubiquitous in bursts. Hence expectations that bursts emit out to at least TeV energies are quite realistic, and the associated target-of-opportunity activity of the TeV gamma-ray community is well-founded. This review summarizes the observations and a handful of theoretical models for generating GeV--TeV emission in bursts sources, outlining possible ways that future positive detections could discriminate between different scenarios. The power of observations in the GeV--TeV range to distinguish between spectral structure intrinsic to bursts and that due to the intervening medium between source and observer is also discussed.

Matthew G. Baring

1997-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

256

Unveiling the population of orphan Gamma Ray Bursts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gamma Ray Bursts are detectable in the gamma-ray band if their jets are oriented towards the observer. However, for each GRB with a typical theta_jet, there should be ~2/theta_jet^2 bursts whose emission cone is oriented elsewhere in space. These off-axis bursts can be eventually detected when, due to the deceleration of their relativistic jets, the beaming angle becomes comparable to the viewing angle. Orphan Afterglows (OA) should outnumber the current population of bursts detected in the gamma-ray band even if they have not been conclusively observed so far at any frequency. We compute the expected flux of the population of orphan afterglows in the mm, optical and X-ray bands through a population synthesis code of GRBs and the standard afterglow emission model. We estimate the detection rate of OA by on-going and forthcoming surveys. The average duration of OA as transients above a given limiting flux is derived and described with analytical expressions: in general OA should appear as daily transients in o...

Ghirlanda, G; Campana, S; Vergani, S D; Japelj, J; Bernardini, M G; Burlon, D; D'Avanzo, P; Melandri, A; Gomboc, A; Nappo, F; Paladini, R; Pescalli, A; Salafia, O S; Tagliaferri, G

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

INTERPLANETARY NETWORK LOCALIZATIONS OF KONUS SHORT GAMMA-RAY BURSTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Between the launch of the Global Geospace Science Wind spacecraft in 1994 November and the end of 2010, the Konus-Wind experiment detected 296 short-duration gamma-ray bursts (including 23 bursts which can be classified as short bursts with extended emission). During this period, the Interplanetary Network (IPN) consisted of up to 11 spacecraft, and using triangulation, the localizations of 271 bursts were obtained. We present the most comprehensive IPN localization data on these events. The short burst detection rate, {approx}18 yr{sup -1}, exceeds that of many individual experiments.

Pal'shin, V. D.; Svinkin, D. S.; Aptekar, R. L.; Golenetskii, S. V.; Frederiks, D. D.; Mazets, E. P.; Oleynik, P. P.; Ulanov, M. V. [Ioffe Physical Technical Institute, St. Petersburg, 194021 (Russian Federation); Hurley, K. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, 7 Gauss Way, Berkeley, CA 94720-7450 (United States); Cline, T.; Trombka, J.; McClanahan, T. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Mitrofanov, I. G.; Golovin, D. V.; Kozyrev, A. S.; Litvak, M. L.; Sanin, A. B. [Space Research Institute, 84/32, Profsoyuznaya, Moscow 117997 (Russian Federation); Boynton, W.; Fellows, C.; Harshman, K., E-mail: val@mail.ioffe.ru [Department of Planetary Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); and others

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

258

Slow elimination of phosphorylated histone {gamma}-H2AX from DNA of terminally differentiated mouse heart cells in situ  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Phosphorylation of replacement histone H2AX occurs in megabase chromatin domains around double-strand DNA breaks (DSBs) and this modification (called {gamma}-H2AX) may serve as a useful marker of genome damage and repair in terminally differentiated cells. Here using immunohistochemistry we studied kinetics of {gamma}-H2AX formation and elimination in the X-irradiated mouse heart and renal epithelial tissues in situ. Unirradiated tissues have 3-5% {gamma}-H2AX-positive cells and in tissues fixed 1 h after X-irradiation {gamma}-H2AX-positive nuclei are induced in a dose-dependent manner approaching 20-30% after 3 Gy of IR. Analysis of mouse tissues at different times after 3 Gy of IR showed that maximal induction of {gamma}-H2AX in heart is observed 20 min after IR and then is decreased slowly with about half remaining 23 h later. In renal epithelium maximum of the {gamma}-H2AX-positive cells is observed 40 min after IR and then decreases to control values in 23 h. This indicates that there are significant variations between non-proliferating mammalian tissues in the initial H2AX phosphorylation rate as well as in the rate of {gamma}-H2AX elimination after X-irradiation, which should be taken into account in the analysis of radiation responses.

Gavrilov, Boris [Institute of Cytology, Russian Academy of Sciences, 194064 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Vezhenkova, Irina [Institute of Cytology, Russian Academy of Sciences, 194064 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Firsanov, Denis [Institute of Cytology, Russian Academy of Sciences, 194064 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Solovjeva, Liudmila [Institute of Cytology, Russian Academy of Sciences, 194064 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Svetlova, Maria [Institute of Cytology, Russian Academy of Sciences, 194064 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Mikhailov, Vyacheslav [Institute of Cytology, Russian Academy of Sciences, 194064 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Tomilin, Nikolai [Institute of Cytology, Russian Academy of Sciences, 194064 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)]. E-mail: nvtom@hotmail.com

2006-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

259

Effects on chickens of continuous exposure to low level electromagnetic, electric, and magnetic fields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1972 Major Subjects Nuclear Engineering (Health Physics) EFFECTS ON CHI CKENS OF CONT INUOUS EXPOSURE TO LOW LEVEL ELECTRONAGNETIC, ELECTRIC, AND MAGNETIC 1 IELDS A Thesis by ROBERT SHERWOOD HOWELL Approved... exposure to ionizing radiation. The treated groups appear to have a significantly reduced growth rate and a slightly increased feed conversion ratio. The spleen weight in the 260 MHz {calculated average input power density of 0. 029 mW/cm ) group...

Howell, Robert Sherwood

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

A history of gamma ray bursts and other astronomical conundrums  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

V. Trimble, in “Gamma Ray Bursts: 30 Years of Discovery,”V. Trimble, in “Gamma Ray Bursts,” Ed. C. Ho et al. ,A History of Gamma Ray Bursts and Other Astronomical

Trimble, V

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gamma exposure rate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Observations of Gamma-Ray Bursts at Extreme Energies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Gamma-Ray Bursts . . . . . . . . . . . . . Redshift-CRUZ OBSERVATIONS OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS AT EXTREME ENERGIES AAncient Unvierse with Gamma-Ray Bursts, pages 330–333. AIP,

Aune, Taylor

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

ON DIFFERENCE SCHEMES AND SYMPLECTIC GEOMETRY \\Gamma  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ON DIFFERENCE SCHEMES AND SYMPLECTIC GEOMETRY \\Gamma \\Sigma \\Delta \\Theta \\Lambda \\Upsilon \\Psi solution of the canonical system of equations dp i dt = \\Gamma @H @q i ; dq i dt = @H @P i ; i = 1; \\Delta introduced by Hamilton in 1824 as a general mathematical scheme for problems of geometrical optics

Li, Tiejun

263

First Direct Measurement of the 17F(p,gamma)18Ne Cross Section  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The rate of the {sup 17}F(p,{gamma}){sup 18}Ne reaction is of significant importance in astrophysical events like novae and x-ray bursts. The decay of {sup 17}F is thought to help drive the expansion of the nova envelope, and the {sup 17}F(p,{gamma}){sup 18}Ne reaction affects the production of {sup 18}F, a target of gamma-ray astronomy, as well as being an important link in the ({alpha},p) reaction chain during the ignition phase of x-ray bursts. A 3{sup +} state in {sup 18}Ne predicted to dominate the rate was found at 599.8 keV using the {sup 17}F(p,p){sup 17}F reaction [1], but the resonance strength was unknown. For the first time, the {sup 17}F(p,{gamma}){sup 18}Ne reaction has been measured directly with the Daresbury Recoil Separator, using a mixed beam of radioactive {sup 17}F and stable {sup 17}O from the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. A {gamma} width was found for the 599.8 keV resonance in {sup 18}Ne, and an upper limit on the direct capture S factor was determined at an intermediate energy of 800 keV.

Chipps, Kelly A [ORNL; Bardayan, Daniel W [ORNL; Blackmon, Jeff C [ORNL; Chae, K. Y. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Greife, U. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden; Hatarik, Robert [Rutgers University; Kozub, R. L. [Tennessee Technological University; Matei, Catalin [Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU); Moazen, Brian [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Nesaraja, Caroline D [ORNL; Pain, Steven D [ORNL; Peters, W. A. [Rutgers University; Pittman, S. T. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); ShrinerJr., J. F. [Tennessee Technological University; Smith, Michael Scott [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Nuclear photonics at ultra-high counting rates and higher multipole excitations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Next-generation {gamma} beams from laser Compton-backscattering facilities like ELI-NP (Bucharest)] or MEGa-Ray (Livermore) will drastically exceed the photon flux presently available at existing facilities, reaching or even exceeding 10{sup 13}{gamma}/sec. The beam structure as presently foreseen for MEGa-Ray and ELI-NP builds upon a structure of macro-pulses ({approx}120 Hz) for the electron beam, accelerated with X-band technology at 11.5 GHz, resulting in a micro structure of 87 ps distance between the electron pulses acting as mirrors for a counterpropagating intense laser. In total each 8.3 ms a {gamma} pulse series with a duration of about 100 ns will impinge on the target, resulting in an instantaneous photon flux of about 10{sup 18}{gamma}/s, thus introducing major challenges in view of pile-up. Novel {gamma} optics will be applied to monochromatize the {gamma} beam to ultimately {Delta}E/E{approx}10{sup -6}. Thus level-selective spectroscopy of higher multipole excitations will become accessible with good contrast for the first time. Fast responding {gamma} detectors, e.g. based on advanced scintillator technology (e.g. LaBr{sub 3}(Ce)) allow for measurements with count rates as high as 10{sup 6}-10{sup 7}{gamma}/s without significant drop of performance. Data handling adapted to the beam conditions could be performed by fast digitizing electronics, able to sample data traces during the micro-pulse duration, while the subsequent macro-pulse gap of ca. 8 ms leaves ample time for data readout. A ball of LaBr{sub 3} detectors with digital readout appears to best suited for this novel type of nuclear photonics at ultra-high counting rates.

Thirolf, P. G.; Habs, D.; Filipescu, D.; Gernhaeuser, R.; Guenther, M. M.; Jentschel, M.; Marginean, N.; Pietralla, N. [Fakultaet f. Physik, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Garching (Germany); Fakultaet f. Physik, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Garching, Germany and Max-Planck-Institute f. Quantum Optics, Garching (Germany); IFIN-HH, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Physik Department E12,Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Garching (Germany); Max-Planck-Institute f. Quantum Optics, Garching (Germany); Institut Laue-Langevin, Grenoble (France); Physik Department E12,Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Garching (Germany); Institut f. Kernphysik, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt (Germany)

2012-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

265

Neutron monitoring systems including gamma thermometers and methods of calibrating nuclear instruments using gamma thermometers  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of calibrating a nuclear instrument using a gamma thermometer may include: measuring, in the instrument, local neutron flux; generating, from the instrument, a first signal proportional to the neutron flux; measuring, in the gamma thermometer, local gamma flux; generating, from the gamma thermometer, a second signal proportional to the gamma flux; compensating the second signal; and calibrating a gain of the instrument based on the compensated second signal. Compensating the second signal may include: calculating selected yield fractions for specific groups of delayed gamma sources; calculating time constants for the specific groups; calculating a third signal that corresponds to delayed local gamma flux based on the selected yield fractions and time constants; and calculating the compensated second signal by subtracting the third signal from the second signal. The specific groups may have decay time constants greater than 5.times.10-1 seconds and less than 5.times.105 seconds.

Moen, Stephan Craig; Meyers, Craig Glenn; Petzen, John Alexander; Foard, Adam Muhling

2012-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

266

RAPID TeV GAMMA-RAY FLARING OF BL LACERTAE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report on the detection of a very rapid TeV gamma-ray flare from BL Lacertae on 2011 June 28 with the Very Energetic Radiation Imaging Telescope Array System (VERITAS). The flaring activity was observed during a 34.6 minute exposure, when the integral flux above 200 GeV reached (3.4 {+-} 0.6) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6} photons m{sup -2} s{sup -1}, roughly 125% of the Crab Nebula flux measured by VERITAS. The light curve indicates that the observations missed the rising phase of the flare but covered a significant portion of the decaying phase. The exponential decay time was determined to be 13 {+-} 4 minutes, making it one of the most rapid gamma-ray flares seen from a TeV blazar. The gamma-ray spectrum of BL Lacertae during the flare was soft, with a photon index of 3.6 {+-} 0.4, which is in agreement with the measurement made previously by MAGIC in a lower flaring state. Contemporaneous radio observations of the source with the Very Long Baseline Array revealed the emergence of a new, superluminal component from the core around the time of the TeV gamma-ray flare, accompanied by changes in the optical polarization angle. Changes in flux also appear to have occurred at optical, UV, and GeV gamma-ray wavelengths at the time of the flare, although they are difficult to quantify precisely due to sparse coverage. A strong flare was seen at radio wavelengths roughly four months later, which might be related to the gamma-ray flaring activities. We discuss the implications of these multiwavelength results.

Arlen, T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Aune, T.; Bouvier, A. [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics and Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)] [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics and Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Beilicke, M.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Dickherber, R. [Department of Physics, Washington University, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States)] [Department of Physics, Washington University, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States); Benbow, W. [Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Amado, AZ 85645 (United States)] [Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Amado, AZ 85645 (United States); Cesarini, A.; Connolly, M. P. [School of Physics, National University of Ireland Galway, University Road, Galway (Ireland)] [School of Physics, National University of Ireland Galway, University Road, Galway (Ireland); Ciupik, L. [Astronomy Department, Adler Planetarium and Astronomy Museum, Chicago, IL 60605 (United States)] [Astronomy Department, Adler Planetarium and Astronomy Museum, Chicago, IL 60605 (United States); Cui, W.; Feng, Q.; Finley, J. P. [Department of Physics, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States)] [Department of Physics, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Dumm, J.; Fortson, L. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States)] [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Errando, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Barnard College, Columbia University, NY 10027 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Barnard College, Columbia University, NY 10027 (United States); Falcone, A. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 525 Davey Lab, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)] [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 525 Davey Lab, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Federici, S. [DESY, Platanenallee 6, D-15738 Zeuthen (Germany)] [DESY, Platanenallee 6, D-15738 Zeuthen (Germany); Finnegan, G., E-mail: qfeng@purdue.edu, E-mail: cui@purdue.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Collaboration: VERITAS Collaboration; and others

2013-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

267

Nickel-based superalloy operating temperature determination via analysis of gamma/gamma' microstructure and coating/base material interdiffusion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The average operating temperature of RENÉ N5® high pressure turbine blades was evaluated via [gamma]/[gamma]' microstructure and coating/base metal interdiffusion methods. The [gamma]' volume fraction was measured by point ...

Ham, Wendy D. (Wendy Decker)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Parallel Implementation of Gamma-Point Pseudopotential Plane...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Parallel Implementation of Gamma-Point Pseudopotential Plane-Wave DFT with Exact Exchange. Parallel Implementation of Gamma-Point Pseudopotential Plane-Wave DFT with Exact...

269

aerial gamma spectrometry: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Gamma Mannheim, Universitt 3 Standard guide for high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry of soil samples CERN Preprints Summary: 1.1 This guide covers the identification...

270

Gamma-insensitive optical sensor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An ultra-violet/visible/infra-red gamma-insensitive gas avalanche focal plane array comprising a planar photocathode and a planar anode pad array separated by a gas-filled gap and across which is applied an electric potential. Electrons ejected from the photocathode are accelerated sufficiently between collisions with the gas molecules to ionize them, forming an electron avalanche. The gap acts like a proportional counter. The array of anode pad are mounted on the front of an anode plate and are connected to matching contact pads on the back of the anode via feed through wires. Connection of the anode to signal processing electronics is made from the contact pads using standard indium bump techniques, for example.

Kruger, Hans W. (Walnut Creek, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Gamma-insensitive optical sensor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An ultraviolet/visible/infrared gamma-insensitive gas avalanche focal plane array is described comprising a planar photocathode and a planar anode pad array separated by a gas-filled gap and across which is applied an electric potential. Electrons ejected from the photocathode are accelerated sufficiently between collisions with the gas molecules to ionize them, forming an electron avalanche. The gap acts like a proportional counter. The array of anode pad are mounted on the front of an anode plate and are connected to matching contact pads on the back of the anode via feed through wires. Connection of the anode to signal processing electronics is made from the contact pads using standard indium bump techniques, for example. 6 figures.

Kruger, H.W.

1994-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

272

In-cell reaction rate distributions and cell-average reaction rates in fast critical assemblies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Measurements are described for determining average values of fission rates in /sup 235/U, /sup 238/U and /sup 239/Pu and capture rates in /sup 238/U for heterogeneous cells used to construct fast critical assemblies. The measurements are based on irradiations of foils of /sup 238/U, /sup 235/U and /sup 239/Pu with counting of fission and capture products using gamma-ray spectroscopy. Both plate and pin cells are considered. Procedures are described for inferring cell-average reaction rate values from a single foil location based on a cell using a quantity called a cell factor. Cell factors are determined from special measurements in which several foils are irradiated within a cell. Comparisons are presented between cell factors determined by measurements and by Monte Carlo calculations which lend credibility to the measurement procedures.

Brumbach, S.B.; Gasidlo, J.M.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

A new measurement of the rare decay eta -> pi^0 gamma gamma with the Crystal Ball/TAPS detectors at the Mainz Microtron  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new measurement of the rare, doubly radiative decay eta->pi^0 gamma gamma was conducted with the Crystal Ball and TAPS multiphoton spectrometers together with the photon tagging facility at the Mainz Microtron MAMI. New data on the dependence of the partial decay width, Gamma(eta->pi^0 gamma gamma), on the two-photon invariant mass squared, m^2(gamma gamma), as well as a new, more precise value for the decay width, Gamma(eta->pi^0 gamma gamma) = (0.33+/-0.03_tot) eV, are based on analysis of 1.2 x 10^3 eta->pi^0 gamma gamma decays from a total of 6 x 10^7 eta mesons produced in the gamma p -> eta p reaction. The present results for dGamma(eta->pi^0 gamma gamma)/dm^2(gamma gamma) are in good agreement with previous measurements and recent theoretical calculations for this dependence.

Nefkens, B. M.; Prakhov, S.; Aguar-Bartolom??, P.; Annand, J. R.; Arends, H. J.; Bantawa, K.; Beck, R.; Bekrenev, V.; Bergh??user, H.; Braghieri, A.; Briscoe, W. J.; Brudvik, J.; Cherepnya, S.; Codling, R. F.; Collicott, C.; Costanza, S.; Danilkin, I. V.; Denig, A.; Demissie, B.; Dieterle, M.; Downie, E. J.; Drexler, P.; Fil'kov, L. V.; Fix, A.; Garni, S.; Glazier, D. I.; Gregor, R.; Hamilton, D.; Heid, E.; Hornidge, D.; Howdle, D.; Jahn, O.; Jude, T. C.; Kashevarov, V. L.; K??ser, A.; Keshelashvili, I.; Kondratiev, R.; Korolija, M.; Kotulla, M.; Koulbardis, A.; Kruglov, S.; Krusche, B.; Lisin, V.; Livingston, K.; MacGregor, I. J.; Maghrbi, Y.; Mancel, J.; Manley, D. M.; McNicoll, E. F.; Mekterovic, D.; Metag, V.; Mushkarenkov, A.; Nikolaev, A.; Novotny, R.; Oberle, M.; Ortega, H.; Ostrick, M.; Ott, P.; Otte, P. B.; Oussena, B.; Pedroni, P.; Polonski, A.; Robinson, J.; Rosner, G.; Rostomyan, T.; Schumann, S.; Sikora, M. H.; Starostin, A.; Strakovsky, I. I.; Strub, T.; Suarez, I. M.; Supek, I.; Tarbert, C. M.; Thiel, M.; Thomas, A.; Unverzagt, M.; Watts, D. P.; Werthmueller, D; Witthauer, L.

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Characterization of irradiation cell dose rates at the Nuclear Science Center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-filled proportional counter. The high-range ionization 3 chamber was used to measure the gamma-ray component while the BF -filled proportional counter measured the thermal and 3 fast neutron components. The TLD chips utilized were the TLD-100, TLD-600... with a Keithley Model-6014 electrometer to measure the current response of the chamber when exposed to gamma radiation. Ionization chambers have a response magnitude directly proportional to the rate of energy absorption and are widely used in making...

Jeffords, Eugene Lamarr

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Search for the decays J/{psi}{yields}{gamma}{rho}{phi} and J/{psi}{yields}{gamma}{rho}{omega}  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using 58x10{sup 6} J/{psi} events collected with the Beijing Spectrometer (BESII) at the Beijing Electron-Positron Collider, the decays J/{psi}{yields}{gamma}{phi}{rho} and J/{psi}{yields}{gamma}{omega}{rho} are searched for, and upper limits on their branching fractions are reported at the 90% C.L. No clear structures are observed in the {gamma}{rho}, {gamma}{phi}, or {rho}{phi} mass spectra for J/{psi}{yields}{gamma}{phi}{rho} nor in the {gamma}{rho}, {gamma}{omega}, or {rho}{omega} mass spectra for J/{psi}{yields}{gamma}{omega}{rho}.

Ablikim, M.; Bai, J. Z.; Cai, X.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, H. X.; Chen, J. C.; Chen, Jin; Chen, Y. B.; Chu, Y. P.; Deng, Z. Y.; Du, S. X.; Fang, J.; Fang, S. S.; Gao, C. S.; Gu, S. D.; Guo, Y. N.; He, K. L.; Heng, Y. K.; Hu, H. M.; Hu, T. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Beijing 100049 (China)] (and others)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

An Exactly Separable {gamma}-Rigid Version of The X(5) Critical Point Symmetry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A {gamma}-rigid version (with {gamma}=0) of the X(5) critical point symmetry is constructed. The model, to be called X(3) since it is proved to cointain three degrees of freedom, utilizes an infinite well potential, is based on exact separation of variables, and leads to parameter free (up to overall scale factors) predictions for spectra and B(E2) transition rates, which are in good agreement with existing experimental data for Os and Pt. An unexpected similarity of the {beta}1 bands of the X(5) nuclei 150Nd, 152Sm, 154Gd, and 156Dy to the X(3) predictions is observed.

Bonatsos, D.; Lenis, D.; Petrellis, D. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, National Center for Scientific Research 'Demokritos', GR-15310 Aghia Paraskevi, Attiki (Greece); Terziev, P. A. [Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 72 Tzarigrad Road, BG-1784 Sofia (Bulgaria); Yigitoglu, I. [Hasan Ali Yucel Faculty of Education, Istanbul University, TR-34470 Beyazit, Istanbul (Turkey)

2007-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

277

The exceptionally powerful TeV gamma-ray emitters in the Large Magellanic Cloud  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Large Magellanic Cloud, a satellite galaxy of the Milky Way, has been observed with the High Energy Stereoscopic System (H.E.S.S.) above an energy of 100 billion electron volts for a deep exposure of 210 hours. Three sources of different types were detected: the pulsar wind nebula of the most energetic pulsar known N 157B, the radio-loud supernova remnant N 132D and the largest non-thermal X-ray shell - the superbubble 30 Dor C. The unique object SN 1987A is, surprisingly, not detected, which constrains the theoretical framework of particle acceleration in very young supernova remnants. These detections reveal the most energetic tip of a gamma-ray source population in an external galaxy, and provide via 30 Dor C the unambiguous detection of gamma-ray emission from a superbubble.

:,; Aharonian, F; Benkhali, F Ait; Akhperjanian, A G; Angüner, E O; Backes, M; Balenderan, S; Balzer, A; Barnacka, A; Becherini, Y; Becker-Tjus, J; Berge, D; Bernhard, S; Bernlöhr, K; Birsin, E; Biteau, J; Böttcher, M; Boisson, C; Bolmont, J; Bordas, P; Bregeon, J; Brun, F; Brun, P; Bryan, M; Bulik, T; Carrigan, S; Casanova, S; Chadwick, P M; Chakraborty, N; Chalme-Calvet, R; Chaves, R C G; Chrétien, M; Colafrancesco, S; Cologna, G; Conrad, J; Couturier, C; Cui, Y; Dalton, M; Davids, I D; Degrange, B; Deil, C; de Wilt, P; Djannati-Ataď, A; Domainko, W; Donath, A; Drury, L O'C; Dubus, G; Dutson, K; Dyks, J; Dyrda, M; Edwards, T; Egberts, K; Eger, P; Espigat, P; Farnier, C; Fegan, S; Feinstein, F; Fernandes, M V; Fernandez, D; Fiasson, A; Fontaine, G; Förster, A; ling, M Füß; Gabici, S; Gajdus, M; Gallant, Y A; Garrigoux, T; Giavitto, G; Giebels, B; Glicenstein, J F; Gottschall, D; Grondin, M -H; Grudzi?ska, M; Hadasch, D; Häffner, S; Hahn, J; Harris, J; Heinzelmann, G; Henri, G; Hermann, G; Hervet, O; Hillert, A; Hinton, J A; Hofmann, W; Hofverberg, P; Holler, M; Horns, D; Ivascenko, A; Jacholkowska, A; Jahn, C; Jamrozy, M; Janiak, M; Jankowsky, F; Jung, I; Kastendieck, M A; Katarzy?ski, K; Katz, U; Kaufmann, S; Khélifi, B; Kieffer, M; Klepser, S; Klochkov, D; Klu?niak, W; Kolitzus, D; Komin, Nu; Kosack, K; Krakau, S; Krayzel, F; Krüger, P P; Laffon, H; Lamanna, G; Lefaucheur, J; Lefranc, V; Lemičre, A; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Lenain, J -P; Lohse, T; Lopatin, A; Lu, C -C; Marandon, V; Marcowith, A; Marx, R; Maurin, G; Maxted, N; Mayer, M; McComb, T J L; Méhault, J; Meintjes, P J; Menzler, U; Meyer, M; Mitchell, A M W; Moderski, R; Mohamed, M; Morĺ, K; Moulin, E; Murach, T; de Naurois, M; Niemiec, J; Nolan, S J; Oakes, L; Odaka, H; Ohm, S; Opitz, B; Ostrowski, M; Oya, I; Panter, M; Parsons, R D; Arribas, M Paz; Pekeur, N W; Pelletier, G; Perez, J; Petrucci, P -O; Peyaud, B; Pita, S; Poon, H; Pühlhofer, G; Punch, M; Quirrenbach, A; Raab, S; Reichardt, I; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Renaud, M; Reyes, R de los; Rieger, F; Rob, L; Romoli, C; Rosier-Lees, S; Rowell, G; Rudak, B; Sahakian, C B Rulten V; Salek, D; Sanchez, D A; Santangelo, A; Schlickeiser, R; Schüssler, F; Schulz, A; Schwanke, U; Schwarzburg, S; Schwemmer, S; Sol, H; Spanier, F; Spengler, G; Spies, F; Stawarz, ?; Steenkamp, R; Stegmann, C; Stinzing, F; Stycz, K; Sushch, I; Tavernet, J -P; Tavernier, T; Taylor, A M; Terrier, R; Tluczykont, M; Trichard, C; Valerius, K; van Eldik, C; van Soelen, B; Vasileiadis, G; Veh, J; Venter, C; Viana, A; Vincent, P; Vink, J; Völk, H J; Volpe, F; Vorster, M; Vuillaume, T; Wagner, S J; Wagner, P; Wagner, R M; Ward, M; Weidinger, M; Weitzel, Q; White, R; Wierzcholska, A; Willmann, P; Wörnlein, A; Wouters, D; Yang, R; Zabalza, V; Zaborov, D; Zacharias, M; Zdziarski, A A; Zech, A; Zechlin, H -S

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Electric and magnetic field exposure associated with electric blankets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

electric blankets may be important contributors to the public's overall exposure to 60 Hz electric and magnetic fields (EMFs) since they are common appliances that are used close to the body for long periods of time. This report describes a series of experimental and computer analyses characterizing various aspects of EMF exposure from electric blankets in use prior to Fall 1990. Almost of electric blankets were found to use on/off controllers with cycle periods of minutes. Calculations of magnetic fields within the body show that, when blankets are heating, flux densities averaged over the whole body range from 15--33 mG during the on'' cycle with typical values of 22 mG. Duty cycles are predicted to vary widely from user-to-user, with typical values of perhaps 40%. Given typical blanket usage patterns, the long-term body-averaged magnetic field exposure from blankets is expected to be comparable to that form other EMF sources for a significant fraction of the blanket-using population. No significant differences were found between time-averaged magnetic field exposures from blankets with metal alloy and plastic polymer heating elements. Blankets with alloy and polymer heating elements did differ significantly in electric field exposure. Calculations show that the unperturbed field 5 cm above flat blankets range from 60--150 V/m for alloy heating cables and unperturbed field 5 cm above flat blankets range from 60--150 V/m for alloy heating cables and 10--40 V/m polymer cables. Starting in Fall 1990, electric blanket manufactures introduced new designs that produce much smaller magnetic fields. These are expected to replace the current in-use stock at a rate of 10--15% per year.

Florig, H.K.; Hoburg, J.F. (Carnegie-Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Dept. of Engineering and Public Policy)

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Pulsed Gamma-Rays From the Millisecond Pulsar J0030+0451 with the Fermi Large Area Telescope  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report the discovery of gamma-ray pulsations from the nearby isolated millisecond pulsar PSR J0030+0451 with the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (formerly GLAST). This discovery makes PSR J0030+0451 the second millisecond pulsar to be detected in gamma-rays after PSR J0218+4232, observed by the EGRET instrument on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory. The spin-down power {dot E} = 3.5 x 10{sup 33} ergs s{sup -1} is an order of magnitude lower than the empirical lower bound of previously known gamma-ray pulsars. The emission profile is characterized by two narrow peaks, respectively 0.07 {+-} 0.01 and 0.08 {+-} 0.02 wide, separated by 0.44 {+-} 0.02 in phase. The first gamma-ray peak falls 0.15 {+-} 0.01 after the main radio peak. The pulse shape is similar to that of the 'normal' gamma-ray pulsars. An exponentially cut-off power-law fit of the emission spectrum leads to an integral photon flux above 100 MeV of (6.76 {+-} 1.05 {+-} 1.35) x 10{sup -8} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} with cut-off energy (1.7 {+-} 0.4 {+-} 0.5) GeV. Based on its parallax distance of (300 {+-} 90) pc, we obtain a gamma-ray efficiency L{sub {gamma}}/{dot E} {approx_equal} 15% for the conversion of spin-down energy rate into gamma-ray radiation, assuming isotropic emission.

Abdo, Aous A.; /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C.; Ackermann, M.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Atwood, W.B.; /UC, Santa Cruz; Axelsson, M. /Stockholm U., OKC /Stockholm U.; Baldini, L.; /INFN, Pisa; Ballet, J.; /DAPNIA, Saclay; Barbiellini, Guido; /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U.; Bastieri, Denis; /INFN, Padua /Padua U.; Battelino, M.; /Stockholm U., OKC /Royal Inst. Tech., Stockholm; Baughman, B.M.; /Ohio State U.; Bechtol, K.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bellazzini, R.; /INFN, Pisa; Berenji, B.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bloom, Elliott D.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bonamente, E.; /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U.; Borgland, A.W.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bregeon, J.; /INFN, Pisa; Brez, A.; /INFN, Pisa; Brigida, M.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Bruel, P.; /Ecole Polytechnique; Burnett, Thompson H.; /Washington U., Seattle /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /IASF, Milan /IASF, Milan /DAPNIA, Saclay /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /George Mason U. /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /NASA, Goddard /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /LPCE, Orleans /Montpellier U. /Sonoma State U. /Stockholm U., OKC /Royal Inst. Tech., Stockholm /Stockholm U. /ASDC, Frascati /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /INFN, Trieste /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /UC, Santa Cruz /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /CENBG, Gradignan /CENBG, Gradignan /Montpellier U. /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /INFN, Trieste /Hiroshima U.; /more authors..

2011-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

280

Determination of the asymptotic normalization coefficients for 14C + n <--> 15C, the 14C(n, gamma)15C reaction rate, and evaluation of a new method to determine spectroscopic factors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 14C + n <--> 15C system has been used as a test case in the evaluation of a new method to determine spectroscopic factors that uses the asymptotic normalization coefficient (ANC). The method proved to be unsuccessful for this case. As part of this experimental program, the ANCs for the 15C ground state and first excited state were determined using a heavy-ion neutron transfer reaction as well as the inverse kinematics (d,p) reaction, measured at the Texas A&M Cyclotron Institute. The ANCs were used to evaluate the astrophysical direct neutron capture rate on 14C, which was then compared with the most recent direct measurement and found to be in good agreement. A study of the 15C SF via its mirror nucleus 15F and a new insight into deuteron stripping theory are also presented.

McCleskey, M. [Texas A and M Univ., Cyclotron Inst., TX (United States); Mukhamedzhanov, A. M. [Texas A and M Univ., Cyclotron Inst., TX (United States); Trache, L. [Texas A and M Univ., Cyclotron Inst., TX (United States); Tribble, R. E. [Texas A and M Univ., Cyclotron Inst., TX (United States); Banu, A. [Texas A and M Univ., Cyclotron Inst., TX (United States); Eremenko, V. [Texas A and M Univ., Cyclotron Inst., TX (United States); Goldberg, V. Z. [Texas A and M Univ., Cyclotron Inst., TX (United States); Lui, Y. W. [Texas A and M Univ., Cyclotron Inst., TX (United States); McCleskey, E. [Texas A and M Univ., Cyclotron Inst., TX (United States); Roeder, B. T. [Texas A and M Univ., Cyclotron Inst., TX (United States); Spiridon, A. [Texas A and M Univ., Cyclotron Inst., TX (United States); Carstoiu, F. [National Inst. for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Burjan, V. [Nuclear Physics Inst., Czech Academy of Sciences, Prague (Czech Republic); Hons, Z. [Nuclear Physics Inst., Czech Academy of Sciences, Prague (Czech Republic); Thompson, I. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

2014-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gamma exposure rate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

WON EXPOSURE AND LUNG CANCER RISK  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

As information on indoor air quality accumulated * it became apparent that radon and its progeny are invariably present in indoor environments and that concentrations may reach unacceptably high levels. The lung cancer excess anong miners exposed to radon progeny raised concern that exposure to radon progeny might also cause lung cancer in the general population. This presentation first provides an ovemiew of radon daughter carcinogenesis, and then reviews the recent BEIR IV report. The report described a statistical model * based on analysis of data from four studies of miners, for estimating the lung cancer risk associated with exposure to radon progeny. Tbe analyses showed that the risk of radon exposure declines with time since exposure and with increasing age. The BEIR IV committee concluded that radon progeny and cigarette smoking interact in a multiplicative fashion and that exposure-dose relationships are similar for exposure in homes and in mines.

unknown authors

282

Y-12 Uranium Exposure Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Following the recent restart of operations at the Y-12 Plant, the Radiological Control Organization (RCO) observed that the enriched uranium exposures appeared to involve insoluble rather than soluble uranium that presumably characterized most earlier Y-12 operations. These observations necessitated changes in the bioassay program, particularly the need for routine fecal sampling. In addition, it was not reasonable to interpret the bioassay data using metabolic parameter values established during earlier Y-12 operations. Thus, the recent urinary and fecal bioassay data were interpreted using the default guidance in Publication 54 of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP); that is, inhalation of Class Y uranium with an activity median aerodynamic diameter (AMAD) of 1 {micro}m. Faced with apparently new workplace conditions, these actions were appropriate and ensured a cautionary approach to worker protection. As additional bioassay data were accumulated, it became apparent that the data were not consistent with Publication 54. Therefore, this study was undertaken to examine the situation.

Eckerman, K.F.; Kerr, G.D.

1999-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

283

Gamma-Ray Bursts and Particle Astrophysics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gamma-ray bursts are violent events occurring randomly in the sky. In this review, I will present the fireball model, proposed to explain the phenomenon of gamma-ray bursts. This model has important consequences for the production and observation at Earth of gravitational waves, high energy neutrinos, cosmic rays and high energy photons, and the second part of this review will be focused on these aspects. A last section will briefly discuss the topic of the use of gamma-ray bursts as standard candles and possible cosmological studies.

B. Gendre

2008-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

284

A Search for the Rare Decay $B\\rightarrow\\gamma\\gamma$  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report the result of a search for the rare decay B{sup 0} {yields} {gamma}{gamma} in 426 fb{sup -1} of data, corresponding to 226 million B{sup 0}{bar B}{sup 0} pairs, collected on the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} collider using the BABAR detector. We use a maximum likelihood fit to extract the signal yield and observe 21{sub -12}{sup +13} signal events with a statistical signficance of 1.9 {sigma}. This corresponds to a branching fraction {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {gamma}{gamma}) = (1.7 {+-} 1.1(stat.) {+-} 0.2(syst.)) x 10{sup -7}. Based on this result, we set a 90% confidence level upper limit of {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {gamma}{gamma}) < 3.2 x 10{sup -7}.

del Amo Sanchez, P.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; /INFN, Bari /Bari U.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; /Bergen U.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Hooberman, B.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I.L.; Tanabe, T.; /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Southern Methodist U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas Nuclear Corp., Austin /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

2011-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

285

Heart Rate Artifact Suppression.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Motion artifact strongly corrupts heart rate measurements in current pulse oximetry systems. In many, almost any motion will greatly diminish the system’s ability to extract… (more)

Dickson, Christopher

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Residential Solar Valuation Rates  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Residential Solar Valuation Rates Karl R. Rbago Rbago Energy LLC 1 The Ideal Residential Solar Tariff Fair to the utility and non-solar customers Fair compensation to...

287

Effective Rate Period  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

charges or credits associated with the creation, termination, or modification to any tariff, contract, or rate schedule accepted or approved by the Federal Energy Regulatory...

288

LCC Guidance Rates  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Notepad text file provides the LCC guidance rates in a numbered format for the various regions throughout the U.S.

289

Gamma-thermometer-based reactor-core liquid-level detector. [PWR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A system is provided which employs a modified gamma thermometer for determining the liquid coolant level within a nuclear reactor core. The gamma thermometer which normally is employed to monitor local core heat generation rate (reactor power), is modified by thermocouple junctions and leads to obtain an unambiguous indication of the presence or absence of coolant liquid at the gamma thermometer location. A signal processor generates a signal based on the thermometer surface heat transfer coefficient by comparing the signals from the thermocouples at the thermometer location. The generated signal is a direct indication of loss of coolant due to the change in surface heat transfer when coolant liquid drops below the thermometer location. The loss of coolant indication is independent of reactor power at the thermometer location. Further, the same thermometer may still be used for the normal power monitoring function.

Burns, T.J.

1981-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

290

Results from the Milagro Gamma-Ray Observatory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

V energies, and a search for transient emission above 100 GeV from gamma-ray bursts. 1 Introduction remnants and gamma-ray bursts (GRB). Gamma rays are also produced when high-energy cosmic rays interactResults from the Milagro Gamma-Ray Observatory E. Blaufuss for the Milagro Collaboration a,1 , a

California at Santa Cruz, University of

291

Mining Gamma-Ray Burst Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gamma-ray bursts provide what is probably one of the messiest of all astrophysical data sets. Burst class properties are indistinct, as overlapping characteristics of individual bursts are convolved with effects of instrumental and sampling biases. Despite these complexities, data mining techniques have allowed new insights to be made about gamma-ray burst data. We demonstrate how data mining techniques have simultaneously allowed us to learn about gamma-ray burst detectors and data collection, cosmological effects in burst data, and properties of burst subclasses. We discuss the exciting future of this field, and the web-based tool we are developing (with support from the NASA AISR Program). We invite others to join us in AI-guided gamma-ray burst classification (http://grb.mnsu.edu/grb/).

Jon Hakkila; Richard J. Roiger; David J. Haglin; Robert S. Mallozzi; Geoffrey N. Pendleton; Charles A. Meegan

2000-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

292

Gamma-Ray Pulsar Studies With GLAST  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Some pulsars have their maximum observable energy output in the gamma-ray band, offering the possibility of using these high-energy photons as probes of the particle acceleration and interaction processes in pulsar magnetospheres. After an extended hiatus between satellite missions, the recently-launched AGILE mission and the upcoming Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) Large Area Telescope (LAT) will allow gamma-ray tests of the theoretical models developed based on past discoveries. With its greatly improved sensitivity, better angular resolution, and larger energy reach than older instruments, GLAST LAT should detect dozens to hundreds of new gamma-ray pulsars and measure luminosities, light curves, and phase-resolved spectra with unprecedented resolution. It will also have the potential to find radio-quiet pulsars like Geminga, using blind search techniques. Cooperation with radio and X-ray pulsar astronomers is an important aspect of the LAT team's planning for pulsar studies.

Thompson, D.J.; /NASA, Goddard

2011-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

293

Gravitational waves and short gamma ray bursts.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Short hard gamma-ray bursts (GRB) are believed to be produced by compact binary coalescences (CBC) { either double neutron stars or neutron star{black hole binaries.… (more)

Predoi, Valeriu

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Airborne Gamma-Spectrometry in Switzerland  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Airborne gamma-spectrometry is able to obtain fast radiological information over large areas. The airborne gamma-spectrometry unit deployed in Switzerland by the Swiss National Emergency Operations Centre (NEOC) consists of a Swiss army Super Puma helicopter equipped with four NaI-Detectors with a total volume of 17 liters, associated electronics and a real-time data evaluation and mapping unit developed by the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH) and the Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI). The operational readiness of the airborne gamma-spectrometry system is validated in annual exercises of one week duration. Data from 2005 and 2006 exercises are represented in maps of {sup 137}Cs activity concentration for two towns located in southern and western Switzerland. An indicator of man-made radioactivity (MMGC ratio) is demonstrated for an area with four different types of nuclear installations. The intercomparison between airborne gamma-spectrometry and ground measurements showed good agreement between both methods.

Butterweck, Gernot [Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Bucher, Benno [Swiss Federal Nuclear Safety Inspectorate, 5232 Villigen HSK (Switzerland); Rybach, Ladislaus [Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich, Institute of Geophysics, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland)

2008-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

295

Experimental conditions for the gamma optical scattering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This work discusses the possibility of observation of nuclear multiphoton processes in which the interaction of a gamma ray photon with a nucleus takes place simultaneously with the interaction of a radio-frequency photon.

Silviu Olariu

1999-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

296

Gravitational waves and gamma-ray bursts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gamma-Ray Bursts are likely associated with a catastrophic energy release in stellar mass objects. Electromagnetic observations provide important, but indirect information on the progenitor. On the other hand, gravitational waves emitted from the central source, carry direct information on its nature. In this context, I give an overview of the multi-messenger study of gamma-ray bursts that can be carried out by using electromagnetic and gravitational wave observations. I also underline the importance of joint electromagnetic and gravitational wave searches, in the absence of a gamma-ray trigger. Finally, I discuss how multi-messenger observations may probe alternative gamma-ray burst progenitor models, such as the magnetar scenario.

Alessandra Corsi; for the LIGO Scientific Collaboration; for the Virgo Collaboration

2012-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

297

Studying Gamma Ray Bursts from a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Studying Gamma Ray Bursts from a new perspective! {... Unraveling some mysteries and adding new Radio Op0cal X-ray Short ( energy -ray photons... ... accompained by a considerable long las0ng emission

Â?umer, Slobodan

298

Can gamma-ray bursts constrain quintessence?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using the narrow clustering of the geometrically corrected gamma-ray energies released by gamma-ray bursts, we investigate the possibility of using these sources as standard candles to probe cosmological parameters such as the matter density Omega_m and the cosmological constant energy density Omega_Lambda. By simulating different samples of gamma-ray bursts, we find that Omega_m can be determined with accuracy ~7% with data from 300 sources. We also show that, if Omega = 1 is due to a quintessence field, some of the models proposed in the literature may be discriminated from a Universe with cosmological constant, by a similar-sized sample of gamma-ray bursts.

T. Di Girolamo; R. Catena; M. Vietri; G. Di Sciascio

2005-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

299

Diffuse gamma-rays from galactic halos  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Here we review our current knowledge on diffuse gamma-rays from galactic halos. Estimates of the relative contribution of the various emission processes at low and high latitudes are compared to the data over 6 decades in energy. The observed spectral shape differs from what was expected, especially at ver low and very high energies. In the latter case, above 1 GeV, the sky emission related to gas exceeds the expected pi^0 decay spectrum. At energies below 1 MeV the relatively high gamma-ray intensity indicates at high density of nearly relativistic electrons which would have a strong influence on the energy and ionisation balance of the interstellar medium. Given the EGRET results for the Magellanic Clouds the gamma-ray emissivity in the outer halo is probably small, so that a substantial amount of baryonic dark matter may be hidden at 20-50 kpc radius without inducing observable gamma-ray emission.

M. Pohl

1996-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

300

The HAWC Gamma-Ray Observatory: Sensitivity to Steady and Transient Sources of Gamma Rays  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The High-Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Gamma-Ray Observatory is designed to record air showers produced by cosmic rays and gamma rays between 100 GeV and 100 TeV. Because of its large field of view and high livetime, HAWC is well-suited to measure gamma rays from extended sources, diffuse emission, and transient sources. We describe the sensitivity of HAWC to emission from the extended Cygnus region as well as other types of galactic diffuse emission; searches for flares from gamma-ray bursts and active galactic nuclei; and the first measurement of the Crab Nebula with HAWC-30.

Abeysekara, A U; Alvarez, C; Álvarez, J D; Arceo, R; Arteaga-Velázquez, J C; Solares, H A Ayala; Barber, A S; Baughman, B M; Bautista-Elivar, N; Belmont, E; BenZvi, S Y; Berley, D; Rosales, M Bonilla; Braun, J; Caballero-Lopez, R A; Caballero-Mora, K S; Carramińana, A; Castillo, M; Cotti, U; Cotzomi, J; de la Fuente, E; De León, C; DeYoung, T; Hernandez, R Diaz; Díaz-Vélez, J C; Dingus, B L; DuVernois, M A; Ellsworth, R W; Fernandez, A; Fiorino, D W; Fraija, N; Galindo, A; Garfias, F; González, L X; González, M M; Goodman, J A; Grabski, V; Gussert, M; Hampel-Arias, Z; Hui, C M; Hüntemeyer, P; Imran, A; Iriarte, A; Karn, P; Kieda, D; Kunde, G J; Lara, A; Lauer, R J; Lee, W H; Lennarz, D; Vargas, H León; Linares, E C; Linnemann, J T; Longo, M; Luna-GarcIa, R; Marinelli, A; Martinez, H; Martinez, O; Martínez-Castro, J; Matthews, J A J; Miranda-Romagnoli, P; Moreno, E; Mostafá, M; Nava, J; Nellen, L; Newbold, M; Noriega-Papaqui, R; Oceguera-Becerra, T; Patricelli, B; Pelayo, R; Pérez-Pérez, E G; Pretz, J; Rivičre, C; Rosa-González, D; Salazar, H; Salesa, F; Sanchez, F E; Sandoval, A; Santos, E; Schneider, M; Silich, S; Sinnis, G; Smith, A J; Sparks, K; Springer, R W; Taboada, I; Toale, P A; Tollefson, K; Torres, I; Ukwatta, T N; Villaseńor, L; Weisgarber, T; Westerhoff, S; Wisher, I G; Wood, J; Yodh, G B; Younk, P W; Zaborov, D; Zepeda, A; Zhou, H

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gamma exposure rate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Neutrinos and Gamma Rays from Galaxy Clusters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The next generation of neutrino and gamma-ray detectors should provide new insights into the creation and propagation of high-energy protons within galaxy clusters, probing both the particle physics of cosmic rays interacting with the background medium and the mechanisms for high-energy particle production within the cluster. In this paper we examine the possible detection of gamma-rays (via the GLAST satellite) and neutrinos (via the ICECUBE and Auger experiments) from the Coma cluster of galaxies, as well as for the gamma-ray bright clusters Abell 85, 1758, and 1914. These three were selected from their possible association with unidentified EGRET sources, so it is not yet entirely certain that their gamma-rays are indeed produced diffusively within the intracluster medium, as opposed to AGNs. It is not obvious why these inconspicuous Abell-clusters should be the first to be seen in gamma-rays, but a possible reason is that all of them show direct evidence of recent or ongoing mergers. Their identification with the EGRET gamma-ray sources is also supported by the close correlation between their radio and (purported) gamma-ray fluxes. Under favorable conditions (including a proton spectral index of 2.5 in the case of Abell 85, and sim 2.3 for Coma, and Abell 1758 and 1914), we expect ICECUBE to make as many as 0.3 neutrino detections per year from the Coma cluster of galaxies, and as many as a few per year from the Abell clusters 85, 1758, and 1914. Also, Auger may detect as many as 2 events per decade at ~ EeV energies from these gamma-ray bright clusters.

Brandon Wolfe; Fulvio Melia; Roland M. Crocker; Raymond R. Volkas

2008-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

302

Gamma Ray Bursts from Ordinary Cosmic Strings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We give an upper estimate for the number of gamma ray bursts from ordinary (non-superconducting) cosmic strings expected to be observed at terrestrial detectors. Assuming that cusp annihilation is the mechanism responsible for the bursts we consider strings arising at a GUT phase transition and compare our estimate with the recent BATSE results. Further we give a lower limit for the effective area of future detectors designed to detect the cosmic string induced flux of gamma ray bursts.

R. H. Brandenberger; A. T. Sornborger; M. Trodden

1993-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

303

Statistical Methods for Thermonuclear Reaction Rates and Nucleosynthesis Simulations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rigorous statistical methods for estimating thermonuclear reaction rates and nucleosynthesis are becoming increasingly established in nuclear astrophysics. The main challenge being faced is that experimental reaction rates are highly complex quantities derived from a multitude of different measured nuclear parameters (e.g., astrophysical S-factors, resonance energies and strengths, particle and gamma-ray partial widths). We discuss the application of the Monte Carlo method to two distinct, but related, questions. First, given a set of measured nuclear parameters, how can one best estimate the resulting thermonuclear reaction rates and associated uncertainties? Second, given a set of appropriate reaction rates, how can one best estimate the abundances from nucleosynthesis (i.e., reaction network) calculations? The techniques described here provide probability density functions that can be used to derive statistically meaningful reaction rates and final abundances for any desired coverage probability. Examples ...

Iliadis, Christian; Coc, Alain; Timmes, F X; Champagne, Art E

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Fourth National Report on Human Exposure to Environmental Chemicals Fourth National Report on Human Exposure to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for Disease Control and Prevention #12;Fourth National Report on Human Exposure to Environmental Chemicals i2009 Fourth National Report on Human Exposure to Environmental Chemicals #12;Fourth National Report on Human Exposure to Environmental Chemicals 2009 Department of Health and Human Services Centers

305

Exposure assessment in ergonomic epidemiology Is there something specific to the assessment of biomechanical exposures?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Exposure assessment in ergonomic epidemiology Is there something specific to the assessment.leclerc@st-maurice.inserm.fr Key words : ergonomics, work, exposure, cancer In this issue of the Journal the authors of two articles in "ergonomic epidemiology" stress several necessary qualities of exposure data: they must

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

306

Verification of the content, isotopic composition and age of plutonium in Pu-Be neutron sources by gamma-spectrometry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A non-destructive, gamma-spectrometric method for verifying the plutonium content of Pu-Be neutron sources has been developed. It is also shown that the isotopic composition and the age of plutonium (Pu) can be determined in the intensive neutron field of these sources by the ``Multi-Group Analysis'' method. Gamma spectra were taken in the far-field of the sample, which was assumed to be cylindrical. The isotopic composition and the age of Pu were determined using a commercial implementation of the Multi-Group Analysis algorithm. The Pu content of the sources was evaluated from the count rates of the gamma-peaks of 239Pu, relying on the assumption that the gamma-rays are coming to the detector parallel to each other. The determination of the specific neutron yields and the problem of neutron damage to the detector are also discussed.

Cong Tam Nguyen

2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

307

Verification of the content, isotopic composition and age of plutonium in Pu-Be neutron sources by gamma-spectrometry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A non-destructive, gamma-spectrometric method for verifying the plutonium content of Pu-Be neutron sources has been developed. It is also shown that the isotopic composition and the age of plutonium (Pu) can be determined in the intensive neutron field of these sources by the ``Multi-Group Analysis'' method. Gamma spectra were taken in the far-field of the sample, which was assumed to be cylindrical. The isotopic composition and the age of Pu were determined using a commercial implementation of the Multi-Group Analysis algorithm. The Pu content of the sources was evaluated from the count rates of the gamma-peaks of 239Pu, relying on the assumption that the gamma-rays are coming to the detector parallel to each other. The determination of the specific neutron yields and the problem of neutron damage to the detector are also discussed.

Nguyen, C T

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Previous Power Rates (rates/current)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar Home DesignPresentations Presentations SortConferences PreviousRates

309

Power Rate Cases (pbl/rates)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - September 2006PhotovoltaicSeptember 22,ReactorAbout Power > FinancialPowerRates

310

Power Rates Announcements (pbl/rates)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - September 2006PhotovoltaicSeptember 22,ReactorAbout Power > FinancialPowerRates

311

Rates Meetings and Workshops (pbl/rates)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298, andEpidermal Growth Factor. |INCIDENCET3PACI-T3Rate

312

The Universe Viewed in Gamma-Rays 1 Toward Ultra Short Gamma Ray Burst Ground Based De-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Universe Viewed in Gamma-Rays 1 Toward Ultra Short Gamma Ray Burst Ground Based De- tection- liminary data taking started in November 2002. 1. Introduction Gamma-ray bursts observed with space Tcherenkovlightfromoneshower Few 100MeV gamma-rays Fig. 1. In an imaging telescope, -ray bursts should appear as a Cherenkov

Enomoto, Ryoji

313

Evaluating indoor exposure modeling alternatives for LCA: A case study in the vehicle repair industry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We evaluated three exposure models with data obtained from measurements among workers who use"aerosol" solvent products in the vehicle repair industry and with field experiments using these products to simulate the same exposure conditions. The three exposure models were the: 1) homogeneously-mixed-one-box model, 2) multi-zone model, and 3) eddy-diffusion model. Temporally differentiated real-time breathing zone volatile organic compound (VOC) concentration measurements, integrated far-field area samples, and simulated experiments were used in estimating parameters, such as emission rates, diffusivity, and near-field dimensions. We assessed differences in model input requirements and their efficacy for predictive modeling. The One-box model was not able to resemble the temporal profile of exposure concentrations, but it performed well concerning time-weighted exposure over extended time periods. However, this model required an adjustment for spatial concentration gradients. Multi-zone models and diffusion-models may solve this problem. However, we found that the reliable use of both these models requires extensive field data to appropriately define pivotal parameters such as diffusivity or near-field dimensions. We conclude that it is difficult to apply these models for predicting VOC exposures in the workplace. However, for comparative exposure scenarios in life-cycle assessment they may be useful.

Demou, Evangelia; Hellweg, Stefanie; Wilson, Michael P.; Hammond, S. Katharine; McKone, Thomas E.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Gamma-Ray Bursts as a Cosmic Window for Galaxy Evolution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Present knowledge indicates that gamma-ray bursts are linked with massive stars. They will become invaluable probes of the early universe and galaxy formation. In the future, it will be possible to use gamma-ray bursts for two purposes: 1) to probe the history of massive star formation in the Universe by the rate of occurence of gamma-ray bursts, and 2) for the study of galaxy evolution at all lookback times by determining the nature of the galaxy hosts. Because gamma-rays are not attenuated by intervening dust and gas, the selection of the cosmic sites of massive star formation by this method is less affected by the biases associated with optical-uv surveys (e.g. UV-dropout techniques). Infrared and sub-millimeter follow up studies of the hosts of gamma-ray bursts may: 1) reveal a putative population of reddened ($R-K \\geq 4$) galaxies at high redshifts, and 2) detect very massive stars (population III) formed at $z \\geq$ 5.

I. F. Mirabel; D. B. Sanders; E. Le Floc'h

2000-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

315

Ambient air pollution exposure and the incidence of related health effects among racial/ethnic minorities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Differences among racial and ethnic groups in morbidity and mortality rates for diseases, including diseases with environmental causes, have been extensively documented. However, documenting the linkages between environmental contaminants, individual exposures, and disease incidence has been hindered by difficulties in measuring exposure for the population in general and for minority populations in particular. After briefly discussing research findings on associations of common air pollutants with disease incidence, the authors summarize recent studies of radial/ethnic subgroup differences in incidence of these diseases in the US. They then present evidence of both historic and current patterns of disproportionate minority group exposure to air pollution as measured by residence in areas where ambient air quality standards are violated. The current indications of disproportionate potential exposures of minority and low-income populations to air pollutants represent the continuation of a historical trend. The evidence of linkage between disproportionate exposure to air pollution of racial/ethnic minorities and low-income groups and their higher rates of some air pollution-related diseases is largely circumstantial. Differences in disease incidence and mortality rates among racial/ethnic groups are discussed for respiratory diseases, cancers, and lead poisoning. Pollutants of concern include CO, Pb, SO{sub 2}, O{sub 3}, and particulates.

Nieves, L.A.; Wernette, D.R.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Pulmonary function and symptom responses after 6. 6-hour exposure to 0. 12 ppm ozone with moderate exercise  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Episodes occasionally occur when ambient ozone (O/sub 3/) levels remain at or near 0.12 ppm for more than 6 h. Small decrements in lung function have been reported following 2-h exposures to 0.12 ppm O/sub 3/. For short exposures to higher O/sub 3/ concentrations, lung function decrements are a function of exposure duration. Thus, we investigated the hypothesis that prolonged exposure to 0.12 ppm O/sub 3/ would result in progressively larger changes in respiratory function and symptoms over time. Ten nonsmoking males were exposed once to clean air and once to 0.12 ppm O/sub 3/ for 6.6 h. Exposures consisted of six 50-min exercise periods, each followed by 10-min rest and measurement; a 35-min lunch period followed by the third exercise period. Exercise ventilation averaged approximately 40 L/min. Forced expiratory and inspiratory spirometry and respiratory symptoms were measured prior to exposure and after each exercise. Airway reactivity to methacholine was determined after each exposure. After correcting for the air exposures, FEV 1.0 was found to decrease linearly during the O/sub 3/ exposure and was decreased by an average of 13.0 percent at the end of exposure. Decreases in FVC and FEF24-75% were also linear and averaged 8.3 and 17.4 percent, respectively, at the end of exposure. On forced inspiratory tests, the FIVC and FIV05 were decreased 12.6 and 20.7 percent, respectively. Increases in the symptom ratings of cough and pain on deep inspiration were observed with O/sub 3/ exposure but not with clean air. Airway reactivity to methacholine was approximately doubled following O/sub 3/ exposure.

Folinsbee, L.J.; McDonnell, W.F.; Horstman, D.H.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Estimating exposure of terrestrial wildlife to contaminants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes generalized models for the estimation of contaminant exposure experienced by wildlife on the Oak Ridge Reservation. The primary exposure pathway considered is oral ingestion, e.g. the consumption of contaminated food, water, or soil. Exposure through dermal absorption and inhalation are special cases and are not considered hereIN. Because wildlife mobile and generally consume diverse diets and because environmental contamination is not spatial homogeneous, factors to account for variation in diet, movement, and contaminant distribution have been incorporated into the models. To facilitate the use and application of the models, life history parameters necessary to estimate exposure are summarized for 15 common wildlife species. Finally, to display the application of the models, exposure estimates were calculated for four species using data from a source operable unit on the Oak Ridge Reservation.

Sample, B.E.; Suter, G.W. II

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

RADIOLYTIC GAS PRODUCTION RATES OF POLYMERS EXPOSED TO TRITIUM GAS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Data from previous reports on studies of polymers exposed to tritium gas is further analyzed to estimate rates of radiolytic gas production. Also, graphs of gas release during tritium exposure from ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMW-PE), polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE, a trade name is Teflon®), and Vespel® polyimide are re-plotted as moles of gas as a function of time, which is consistent with a later study of tritium effects on various formulations of the elastomer ethylene-propylene-diene monomer (EPDM). These gas production rate estimates may be useful while considering using these polymers in tritium processing systems. These rates are valid at least for the longest exposure times for each material, two years for UHMW-PE, PTFE, and Vespel®, and fourteen months for filled and unfilled EPDM. Note that the production “rate” for Vespel® is a quantity of H{sub 2} produced during a single exposure to tritium, independent of length of time. The larger production rate per unit mass for unfilled EPDM results from the lack of filler- the carbon black in filled EPDM does not produce H{sub 2} or HT. This is one aspect of how inert fillers reduce the effects of ionizing radiation on polymers.

Clark, E.

2013-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

319

Cosmic-ray induced gamma-ray emission from the starburst galaxy NGC 253  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cosmic rays in galaxies interact with the interstellar medium and give us a direct view of nuclear and particle interactions in the cosmos. For example, cosmic-ray proton interactions with interstellar hydrogen produce gamma rays via PcrPism??{sup 0}???. For a 'normal' star-forming galaxy like the Milky Way, most cosmic rays escape the Galaxy before such collisions, but in starburst galaxies with dense gas and huge star formation rate, most cosmic rays do suffer these interactions [1,2]. We construct a 'thick-target' model for starburst galaxies, in which cosmic rays are accelerated by supernovae, and escape is neglected. This model gives an upper limit to the gamma-ray emission. Only two free parameters are involved in the model: cosmic-ray proton acceleration energy rate from supernova and the proton injection spectral index. The pionic gamma-radiation is calculated from 10 MeV to 10 TeV for the starburst galaxy NGC 253, and compared to Fermi and HESS data. Our model fits NGC 253 well, suggesting that cosmic rays in this starburst are in the thick target limit, and that this galaxy is a gamma-ray calorimeter.

Wang, Xilu; Fields, Brian D. [Department of Astronomy, MC-221, 1002 W. Green Street, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)

2014-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

320

Exclusive search for Higgs boson to gamma-gamma decay via vector boson fusion production mechanism  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We perform an exclusive search for the Higgs boson to gamma-gamma decay via vector boson fusion. We utilize the characteristic features of vector boson fusion, such as the di-jet [Delta][eta] and mass, as well as the ...

Rankin, Dylan Sheldon

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gamma exposure rate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

The Excitation of Solar Oscillations \\Gamma\\GammaObservations and Simulations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Excitation of Solar Oscillations \\Gamma\\GammaObservations and Simulations Philip R. Goode Big Bear Solar Observatory, New Jersey Institute of Technology, Big Bear City, CA 92314 Louis H. Strous Big Bear Solar Observatory, New Jersey Institute of Technology, Big Bear City, CA 92314 Lockheed

Stein, Robert

322

Electrochemically induced deposition method to prepare {gamma}-MnO{sub 2}/multi-walled carbon nanotube composites as electrode material in supercapacitors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The {gamma}-MnO{sub 2}/multi-walled carbon nanotube ({gamma}-MnO{sub 2}/MWNT) composite has been prepared by electrochemically induced deposition method. The morphology and crystal structure of the composite were investigated by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy, respectively. The capacitive properties of the {gamma}-MnO{sub 2}/MWNT composite have been investigated by cyclic voltammetry (CV). A specific capacitance (based on {gamma}-MnO{sub 2}) as high as 579 F g{sup -1} is obtained at a scan rate of 10 mV s{sup -1} in 0.1 M Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} aqueous solution. Additionally, the {gamma}-MnO{sub 2}/MWNT composite electrode shows excellent long-term cycle stability (only 2.4% decrease of the specific capacitance is observed after 500 CV cycles)

Fan Zhen [State Key Laboratory of Chemo/Biosensing and Chemometrics, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Chen Jinhua [State Key Laboratory of Chemo/Biosensing and Chemometrics, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China)], E-mail: chenjinhua@hnu.cn; Zhang Bing; Sun Feng; Liu Bo; Kuang Yafei [State Key Laboratory of Chemo/Biosensing and Chemometrics, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China)

2008-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

323

Characterization of the unfolding, refolding, and aggregation pathways of two protein implicated in cataractogenesis : human gamma D and human gamma S crystallin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Human [gamma]D crystallin (H[gamma]D-Crys) and human [gamma]S crystallin (H[gamma]S-Crys), are major proteins of the human eye lens and are components of cataracts. H[gamma]D-Crys is expressed early in life in the lens ...

Kosinski-Collins, Melissa Sue, 1978-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

On Thermonuclear Reaction Rates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nuclear reactions govern major aspects of the chemical evolution od galaxies and stars. Analytic study of the reaction rates and reaction probability integrals is attempted here. Exact expressions for the reaction rates and reaction probability integrals for nuclear reactions in the case of nonresonant, modified nonresonant, screened nonresonant and resonant cases are given. These are expressed in terms of H-functions, G-functions and in computable series forms. Computational aspects are also discussed.

H. J. Haubold; A. M. Mathai

1996-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

325

Accessing the population of high redshift Gamma Ray Bursts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) are a powerful probe of the high redshift Universe. We present a tool to estimate the detection rate of high-z GRBs by a generic detector with defined energy band and sensitivity. We base this on a population model that reproduces the observed properties of GRBs detected by Swift, Fermi and CGRO in the hard X-ray and gamma-ray bands. We provide the expected cumulative distributions of the flux and fluence of simulated GRBs in different energy bands. We show that scintillator detectors, operating at relatively high energies (e.g. tens of keV to the MeV), can detect only the most luminous GRBs at high redshifts due to the link between the peak spectral energy and the luminosity (Ep-Liso) of GRBs. We show that the best strategy for catching the largest number of high-z bursts is to go softer (e.g. in the soft X-ray band) but with a very high sensitivity. For instance, an imaging soft X-ray detector operating in the 0.2-5 keV energy band reaching a sensitivity, corresponding to a fluence o...

Ghirlanda, G; Ghisellini, G; Mereghetti, S; Tagliaferri, G; Campana, S; Osborne, J P; O'Brien, P; Tanvir, N; Willingale, R; Amati, L; Basa, S; Bernardini, M G; Burlon, D; Covino, S; D'Avanzo, P; Frontera, F; Gotz, D; Melandri, A; Nava, L; Piro, L; Vergani, S D

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

The SKA view of Gamma-ray Bursts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are some of the most extreme events in the Universe. As well as providing a natural laboratory for investigating fundamental physical processes, they might trace the cosmic star formation rate up to extreme redshifts and probe the composition of the intergalactic medium over most of the Universe's history. Radio observations of GRBs play a key part in determining their physical properties, but currently they are largely limited to follow-up observations of $\\gamma$-ray-detected objects. The SKA will significantly increase our ability to study GRB afterglows, following up several hundred objects in the high frequency bands already in the "early science" implementation of the telescope. SKA1-MID Bands 4 (4 GHz) and 5 (9.2 GHz) will be particularly suited to the detection of these transient phenomena. The SKA will trace the peak of the emission, sampling the thick-to-thin transition of the evolving spectrum, and follow-up the afterglow down to the time the ejecta slow down to non-relativi...

Burlon, Davide; van der Horst, Alexander; Murphy, Tara; Wijers, Ralph; Gaensler, Bryan; Ghisellini, Gabriele; Prandoni, Isabella

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Probing Massive Stars Around Gamma-Ray Burst Progenitors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Long Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) are produced by ultra-relativistic jets launched from core collapse of massive stars. Most massive stars form in binaries and/or in star clusters, which means that there may be a significant external photon field (EPF) around the GRB progenitor. We calculate the inverse-Compton scattering of EPF by the hot electrons in the GRB jet. Three possible cases of EPFs are considered: the progenitor is (I) in a massive binary system, (II) surrounded by a Wolf-Rayet-star wind, and (III) in a dense star cluster. Typical luminosities of 10^47 - 10^50 erg/s in the 10 - 100 GeV band are expected, depending on the stellar luminosity, binary separation (I), wind mass loss rate (II), stellar number density (III), etc. We calculate the lightcurve and spectrum in each case, taking fully into account the equal-arrival time surfaces and possible pair-production absorption with the prompt gamma-rays. Observations can put constraints on the existence of such EPFs (and hence on the nature of GRB progenit...

Lu, Wenbin; Smoot, George F

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Protocols of radiocontaminant air monitoring for inhalation exposure estimates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Monitoring the plutonium and americium particle emissions from soils contaminated during atmospheric nuclear testing or due to accidental releases is important for several reasons. First, it is important to quantify the extent of potential human exposure from inhalation of alpha-emitting particles, which is the major exposure pathway from transuranic radionuclides. Second, the information provided by resuspension monitoring is the basis of criteria that determine the target soil concentrations for management and cleanup of contaminated soil sites. There are other radioactive aerosols, such as the fission products (cesium and strontium) and neutron-activation products (europium isotopes), which may be resuspended and therefore necessary to monitor as well. This Standard Protocol (SP) provides the method used for radiocontaminant air monitoring by the Health and Ecological Assessment Division (formerly Environmental Sciences Division), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, as developed and tested at Nevada Test Site (NTS) and in the Marshall Islands. The objective of this SP is to document the applications and methods of monitoring of all the relevant variables. This protocol deals only with measuring air concentrations of radionuclides and total suspended particulates (TSP, or {open_quotes}dust{close_quotes}). A separate protocol presents the more difficult measurements required to determine transuranic aerosol emission rates, or {open_quotes}resuspension rate{close_quotes}.

Shinn, J.H.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Custom Device for Low-Dose Gamma Irradiation of Biological Samples  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, the structural material is efficient to absorb most of the cosmic-ray energy and reduce the interior dose rate to below 1.2 mGy per day. However, the biological effects of prolonged exposure to low-dose radiation are not well understood. The purpose...

Bi, Ruoming

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

330

High spins in gamma-soft nuclei  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nuclei which are soft with respect to the ..gamma.. shape degree of freedom are expected to have many different structures coexisting in the near-yrast regime. In particular, the lowest rotational quasi-particle in a high-j shell exerts a strong polarizing effect on ..gamma... The ..gamma.. to which it drives is found to vary smoothly over a 180/sup 0/ range as the position of the Fermi level varies. This simple rule is seen to have a direct connection with the energy staggering of alternate spin states in rotational bands. A diagram is presented which provides a general theoretical reference for experimental tests of the relation between ..gamma.., spin staggering, configuration, and nucleon number. In a quasicontinuum spectrum, the coexistence of different structures are expected to make several unrelated features appear within any one slice of sum energy and multiplicity. However, it is also seen that the in-band moment of inertia may be similar for many bands of different ..gamma...

Leander, G.A.; Frauendorf, S.; May, F.R.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Genetic Factors Affecting Susceptibility to Low Dose & Low Dose-Rate Radiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Our laboratory has, among other things, developed and used the gamma H2AX focus assay and other chromosomal and cell killing assays to show that differences in this DNA double strand break (dsb) related response can be clearly and distinctly demonstrated for cells which are mildly hyper-radiosensitive such as those associated with A-T heterozygosity. We have found this level of mild hypersensitivity for cells from some 20 to 30 % of apparently normal individuals and from apparently normal parents of Retinoblastoma patients. We found significant differences in gene expression in somatic cells from unaffected parents of Rb patients as compared with normal controls, suggesting that these parents may harbor some as yet unidentified genetic abnormality. In other experiments we sought to determine the extent of differences in normal human cellular reaponses to radiation depending on their irradiation in 2D monolayer vs 3D organized acinar growth conditions. We exmined cell reproductive death, chromosomal aberration induction, and the levels of ?-H2AX foci in cells after single acute gamma-ray doses and immediately after 20 hours of irradiation at a dose rate of 0.0017 Gy/min. We found no significant differences in the dose-responses of these cells under the 2D or 3D growth conditions. While this does not mean such differences cannot occur in other situations, it does mean that they do not generally or necessarily occur. In another series of studies in collaboration with Dr Chuan Li, with supprt from this current grant. We reported a role for apoptotic cell death in promoting wound healing and tissue regeneration in mice. Apoptotic cells released growth signals that stimulated the proliferation of progenitor or stem cells. In yet another collaboration with Dr, B. Chen with funds from this grant, the relative radiosensitivity to cell killing as well as chromosomal instability of 13 DNA-PKcs site-directed mutant cell lines (defective at phosphorylation sites or kinase activity) were examined after exposure of synchronized G1 cells to 137Cs c rays. DNA-PKcs mutant cells defective in phosphorylation at multiple sites withinthe T2609 cluster or within the PI3K domain displayed extreme radiosensitivity. Cells defective at the S2056 cluster or T2609 single site alone were only mildly radiosensitive, but cells defective at even one site in both the S2056 and T2609 clusters were maximally radiosensitive. Thus a synergism between the capacity for phosphorylation at the S2056 and T2609 clusterswas found to be critical for induction of radiosensitivity.

Bedford, Joel

2014-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

332

Observation of the Crab Nebula in Soft Gamma Rays with the Nuclear Compton Telescope  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gamma-ray bursts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.268] G. J. Fishman. The gamma-ray burst capabilities of BATSEOlson. Observations of Gamma- Ray Bursts of Cosmic Origin.

Bandstra, Mark ShenYu

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Development of Superconducting High-Resolution Gamma-Ray Spectrometers for Nuclear Safeguards  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Counting 2.4.3 High-Resolution Gamma Spectrometry 2.5coincidence counting and gamma spectrometry system (CANEGA)High-Resolution Gamma Spectrometry Isotopic correlation

Dreyer, Jonathan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Chance Estimations for Detecting Gravitational Waves with LIGO/Virgo Associated with Gamma Ray Bursts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Short Gamma Ray Bursts (SGRB) are believed to originate from the merger of two compact objects. If this scenario is correct, SGRB will be accompanied by the emission of strong gravitational waves, detectable by current or planned GW detectors, such as LIGO and Virgo. No detection of a gravitational wave has been made up to date. In this paper I will use a set of SGRB with observed redshifts to fit a model describing the cumulative number of SGRB as a function of redshift, to determine the rate of such merger events in the nearby universe. These estimations will be used to make probability statements about detecting a gravitational wave associated with a short gamma ray burst during the latest science run of LIGO/Virgo. Chance estimations for the enhanced and advanced detectors will also be made, and a comparison between the rates deduced from this work will be compared to the existing literature.

Alexander Dietz

2009-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

335

Studying Gamma-Ray Blazars With the GLAST-LAT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thanks to its sensitivity (4 10{sup -9} ph (E> 100 MeV) cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} for one year of observation), the GLAST LAT should detect many more (over a thousand) gamma-ray blazars than currently known. This large blazar sample will enable detailed population studies to be carried out. Moreover, the LAT large field-of-view combined with the scanning mode will provide a very uniform exposure over the sky, allowing a constant monitoring of several tens of blazars and flare alerts to be issued. This poster presents the LAT performance relevant to blazar studies, more particularly related to timing and spectral properties. Major specific issues regarding the blazar phenomenon that the LAT data should shed light on thanks to these capabilities will be discussed, as well as the different approaches foreseen to address them. The associated data required in other bands, to be collected in contemporaneous/simultaneous multiwavelength campaigns are mentioned as well.

Lott, B.; /CENBG, Gradignan /Bordeaux U. /SLAC; Carson, J.; Madejski, G.; /SLAC; Ciprini, S.; /INFN, Perugia; Dermer, C.D.; /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C.; Giommi, P.; /ASDC, Frascati; Lonjou, V.; /CENBG, Gradignan /Bordeaux U.; Reimer, A.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park

2007-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

336

Effect of Saline Waste Solution Infiltration Rates on Uranium Retention and Spatial Distribution in Hanford Sediments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

U content by gamma spectrometry (Gamma Table Detector, GMX-for sediment using gamma ray spectrometry (triplicates). In

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Gamma-ray bursts and terrestrial planetary atmospheres  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We describe results of modeling the effects on Earth-like planets of long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) within a few kiloparsecs. A primary effect is generation of nitrogen oxide compounds which deplete ozone. Ozone depletion leads to an increase in solar UVB radiation at the surface, enhancing DNA damage, particularly in marine microorganisms such as phytoplankton. In addition, we expect increased atmospheric opacity due to buildup of nitrogen dioxide produced by the burst and enhanced precipitation of nitric acid. We review here previous work on this subject and discuss recent developments, including further discussion of our estimates of the rates of impacting GRBs and the possible role of short-duration bursts.

Brian C. Thomas; Adrian L. Melott

2006-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

338

Pile-up recovery in gamma-ray detection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Count rates in gamma-ray detectors are fundamentally limited at the high end by the physics of the detection process but should not be limited further by the design of read-out. Using intense stimuli, such as the ELI, it is desirable to extract the full wealth of information flow that sensors can deliver. We discuss the photon-statistical limitations of scintillation systems and charge-collection issues of solid-state detectors. With high-speed digitizing in particular, two promising approach architectures are those of posterior list mode corrections and of time-domain adaptive filters, introducing a 'rich list mode with uncertainties' and thus a somewhat different look at experimental spectra. Real-time performance is also considered.

Vencelj, Matjaz; Likar, Andrej; Loeher, Bastian; Miklavec, Mojca; Novak, Roman; Pietralla, Norbert; Savran, Deniz [Jozef Stefan Instute, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Jozef Stefan Instute, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana, Slovenia and FMF, Univ. of Ljubljana, Jadranska 19, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); ExtreMe Matter Institute EMMI, GSI, Planckstr. 1, D-64291 Darmstadt, Germany and Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, Ruth-Moufang-Str. 1, D-60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Jozef Stefan Instute, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); IKP, TU Darmstadt, Schlossgartenstrasse 9, D-64289 Darmstadt (Germany); ExtreMe Matter Institute EMMI, GSI, Planckstr. 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany) and Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, Ruth-Moufang-Str. 1, D-60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

2012-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

339

Polarized Gravitational Waves from Gamma-Ray Bursts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Significant gravitational wave emission is expected from gamma-ray bursts arising from compact stellar mergers, and possibly also from bursts associated with fast-rotating massive stellar core collapses. These models have in common a high angular rotation rate, and observations provide evidence for jet collimation of the photon emission, with properties depending on the polar angle, which may also be of relevance for X-ray flashes. Here we consider the gravitational wave emission and its polarization as a function of angle which is expected from such sources. We discuss possible correlations between the burst photon luminosity, or the delay between gravitational wave bursts and X-ray flashes, and the polarization degree of the gravitational waves.

Shiho Kobayashi; Peter Meszaros

2003-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

340

Cosmological Parameters From Supernovae Associated With Gamma-ray Bursts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report estimates of the cosmological parameters $\\Omega_m$ and $\\Omega_{\\Lambda}$ obtained using supernovae (SNe) associated with gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) at redshifts up to 0.606. Eight high-fidelity GRB-SNe with well-sampled light curves across the peak are used. We correct their peak magnitudes for a luminosity-decline rate relation to turn them into accurate standard candles with dispersion $\\sigma = 0.18$ mag. We also estimate the peculiar velocity of the host galaxy of SN 1998bw, using constrained cosmological simulations. In a flat universe, the resulting Hubble diagram leads to best-fit cosmological parameters of $(\\Omega_m, \\Omega_{\\Lambda}) = (0.52^{+0.34}_{-0.31},0.48^{+0.31}_{-0.34})$. This exploratory study suggests that GRB-SNe can potentially be used as standardizable candles to high redshifts to measure distances in the universe and constrain cosmological parameters.

Li, Xue; Wojtak, Rados?aw

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gamma exposure rate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

General Relativistic Binary Merger Simulations and Short Gamma Ray Bursts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The recent localization of some short-hard gamma ray bursts (GRBs) in galaxies with low star formation rates has lent support to the suggestion that these events result from compact object binary mergers. We discuss how new simulations in general relativity are helping to identify the central engine of short-hard GRBs. Motivated by our latest relativistic black hole-neutron star merger calculations, we discuss a scenario in which these events may trigger short-hard GRBs, and compare this model to competing relativistic models involving binary neutron star mergers and the delayed collapse of hypermassive neutron stars. Distinguishing features of these models may help guide future GRB and gravitational wave observations to identify the nature of the sources.

Joshua A. Faber; Thomas W. Baumgarte; Stuart L. Shapiro; Keisuke Taniguchi

2006-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

342

Evidence For and Against Collimation of Gamma Ray Bursts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The degree to which gamma ray bursts are collimated is now the dominant uncertainty in their energy requirements and event rates. In this review I begin with the reasons for studying GRB collimation, then discuss existing tests for collimation and their applications to date, and finally outline some possible future tests. The most important conclusions are that (1) mean collimation angles much tighter than 1 degree appear ruled out; (2) the collimation angle appears to vary from burst to burst (like most other GRB properties). Some alternative explanations of apparent collimation signatures remain, but it should be possible to distinguish them from true collimation with future data sets and may be possible already. New satellites, improved followup observations, and new tests for collimation all promise continued rapid progress in coming years.

James E. Rhoads

2001-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

343

NMIS With Gamma Spectrometry for Attributes of Pu and HEU, Explosives and Chemical Agents  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The concept for the system described herein is an active/passive Nuclear Materials Identification System{sup 2} (NMIS) that incorporates gamma ray spectrometry{sup 3}. This incorporation of gamma ray spectrometry would add existing capability into this system. This Multiple Attribute System can determine a wide variety of attributes for Pu and highly enriched uranium (HEU) of which a selected subset could be chosen. This system can be built using commercial off the shelf (COTS) components. NMIS systems are at All-Russian Scientific Research Institute of Experimental Physics (VNIIEF) and Russian Federal Nuclear Center Institute of Technical Physics, (VNIITF) and measurements with Pu have been performed at VNIIEF and analyzed successfully for mass and thickness of Pu. NMIS systems are being used successfully for HEU at the Y-12 National Security Complex. The use of active gamma ray spectrometry for high explosive HE and chemical agent detection is a well known activation analysis technique, and it is incorporated here. This report describes the system, explains the attribute determination methods for fissile materials, discusses technical issues to be resolved, discusses additional development needs, presents a schedule for building from COTS components, and assembly with existing components, and discusses implementation issues such as lack of need for facility modification and low radiation exposure.

Mihalczo, J. T.; Mattingly, J. K.; Mullens, J. A.; Neal, J. S.

2002-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

344

Gamma-ray Spectral Evolution of NGC1275 Observed with Fermi-LAT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report on a detailed investigation of the high-energy gamma-ray emission from NGC\\,1275, a well-known radio galaxy hosted by a giant elliptical located at the center of the nearby Perseus cluster. With the increased photon statistics, the center of the gamma-ray emitting region is now measured to be separated by only 0.46' from the nucleus of NGC1275, well within the 95% confidence error circle with radius ~1.5'. Early Fermi-LAT observations revealed a significant decade-timescale brightening of NGC1275 at GeV photon energies, with a flux about seven times higher than the one implied by the upper limit from previous EGRET observations. With the accumulation of one-year of Fermi-LAT all-sky-survey exposure, we now detect flux and spectral variations of this source on month timescales, as reported in this paper. The average >100 MeV gamma-ray spectrum of NGC1275 shows a possible deviation from a simple power-law shape, indicating a spectral cut-off around an observed photon energy of E = 42.2+-19.6 GeV, with...

Kataoka, J; Cheung, C C; Tosti, G; Cavazzuti, E; Celotti, A; Nishino, S; Fukazawa, Y; Thompson, D J; McConville, W F

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Apparatus and method for detecting gamma radiation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A high efficiency radiation detector for measuring X-ray and gamma radiation from small-volume, low-activity liquid samples with an overall uncertainty better than 0.7% (one sigma SD). The radiation detector includes a hyperpure germanium well detector, a collimator, and a reference source. The well detector monitors gamma radiation emitted by the reference source and a radioactive isotope or isotopes in a sample source. The radiation from the reference source is collimated to avoid attenuation of reference source gamma radiation by the sample. Signals from the well detector are processed and stored, and the stored data is analyzed to determine the radioactive isotope(s) content of the sample. Minor self-attenuation corrections are calculated from chemical composition data.

Sigg, Raymond A. (Martinez, GA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Apparatus and method for detecting gamma radiation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A high efficiency radiation detector is disclosed for measuring X-ray and gamma radiation from small-volume, low-activity liquid samples with an overall uncertainty better than 0.7% (one sigma SD). The radiation detector includes a hyperpure germanium well detector, a collimator, and a reference source. The well detector monitors gamma radiation emitted by the reference source and a radioactive isotope or isotopes in a sample source. The radiation from the reference source is collimated to avoid attenuation of reference source gamma radiation by the sample. Signals from the well detector are processed and stored, and the stored data is analyzed to determine the radioactive isotope(s) content of the sample. Minor self-attenuation corrections are calculated from chemical composition data. 4 figures.

Sigg, R.A.

1994-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

347

Phenomenology of Gamma-Ray Jets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss some phenomenological aspects of $\\gamma$-ray emitting jets. In particular, we present calculations of the $\\gamma$-sphere and $\\pi$-sphere for various target photon fields, and employ them to demonstrate how $\\gamma$-ray observations at very high energies can be used to constraint the Doppler factor of the emitting plasma and the production of VHE neutrinos. We also consider the implications of the rapid TeV variability observed in M87 and the TeV blazars, and propose a model for the very rapid TeV flares observed with HESS and MAGIC in some blazars,that accommodates the relatively small Doppler factors inferred from radio observations. Finally, we briefly discuss the prospects for detecting VHE neutrinos from relativistic jets.

Amir Levinson

2007-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

348

Pressurised xenon as scintillator for gamma spectroscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Detectors based on liquid or gas xenon have been used and are in use for a number of applications, in particular for the detection of gamma rays. Xenon is a well-suited medium for gamma spectroscopy thanks to its high atomic number and, consequently, large cross-section for photo-electric absorption. This paper presents experimental studies of high pressure xenon as a scintillator, with the aim of developing a gamma ray detector for the detection of Special Nuclear Materials (SNM). The first goal was to study the dependence of the light yield and of the energy resolution on the thermodynamic conditions. We present preliminary results from an optimised version of the detector.

Resnati, F

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Fermi Observations of Gamma-ray Bursts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The gamma-ray emission mechanism of Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are still unknown. Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope successfully detected high-energy (> 100 MeV) emission from 17 GRBs since its launch. Fermi revealed the distinct temporal behaviors and extra spectral component from high-energy emission. These new observational results are driving many theoretical implications, such as leptonic, hadronic and afterglow origin. The highest energy photon detected by Fermi gives a constraint on the bulk Lorentz factor of the ultra-relativistic jets of GRBs. The impact of the Fermi GRB observations extends not only to the GRB-related issues but also to the outside GRB physics, such as quantum gravity and model of the extra galactic background light.

Ohno, Masanori [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, JAXA, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

350

Immunoassay for Monitoring Environmental and Human Exposure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

rising worldwide (4). PBDEs accumulate in house dust, sewage sludge, biosolids, wildlife/pets, and humans workers in electronic-recycling facilities that experience high PBDE exposure (11), a major route

Hammock, Bruce D.

351

Potential oxidative stress due to Pb exposure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The hazards of Pb exposure has been a topic of concern for many years. This research was developed to investigate the possibility of Pb induced oxidative stress. The research objectives were to observe Pb induced lipid peroxidation and Pb induced...

Elms, Rene' Davina

2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

352

{gamma}-ray measurements and neutron sensitivity in a fusion environment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A system based on a LaBr{sub 3}(Ce) scintillator and digital data acquisition is discussed in view of {gamma}-ray spectroscopy measurements on a fusion burning plasma. High energy resolution and high rate capability of the system are demonstrated in laboratory tests and in dedicated experiments at nuclear accelerators. Preliminary results on sensitivity of the detector to 14 MeV neutrons are presented.

Nocente, M.; Angelone, M.; Blanchard, P. [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma, EURATOM-ENEA-CNR Association, Milan (Italy); Associazione EURATOM-ENEA sulla Fusione, Frascati (Italy); and others

2012-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

353

Real time chemical exposure and risk monitor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The apparatus of the present invention is a combination of a breath interface and an external exposure dosimeter interface to a chemical analysis device, all controlled by an electronic processor for quantitatively analyzing chemical analysis data from both the breath interface and the external exposure dosimeter for determining internal tissue dose. The method of the present invention is a combination of steps of measuring an external dose, measuring breath content, then analyzing the external dose and breath content and determining internal tissue dose.

Thrall, Karla D. (3804 Alder Lake Ct., West Richland, WA 99353); Kenny, Donald V. (6947 Sparrow La., Worthington, OH 43235); Endres, George W. R. (2112 Briarwood Ct., Richland, WA 99352); Sisk, Daniel R. (1211 Marshall Ave., Richland, WA 99352)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Air Distribution Effectiveness for Residential Mechanical Ventilation: Simulation and Comparison of Normalized Exposures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of ventilation is to dilute indoor contaminants that an occupant is exposed to. Even when providing the same nominal rate of outdoor air, different ventilation systems may distribute air in different ways, affecting occupants' exposure to household contaminants. Exposure ultimately depends on the home being considered, on source disposition and strength, on occupants' behavior, on the ventilation strategy, and on operation of forced air heating and cooling systems. In any multi-zone environment dilution rates and source strengths may be different in every zone and change in time, resulting in exposure being tied to occupancy patterns.This paper will report on simulations that compare ventilation systems by assessing their impact on exposure by examining common house geometries, contaminant generation profiles, and occupancy scenarios. These simulations take into account the unsteady, occupancy-tied aspect of ventilation such as bathroom and kitchen exhaust fans. As most US homes have central HVAC systems, the simulation results will be used to make appropriate recommendations and adjustments for distribution and mixing to residential ventilation standards such as ASHRAE Standard 62.2.This paper will report on work being done to model multizone airflow systems that are unsteady and elaborate the concept of distribution matrix. It will examine several metrics for evaluating the effect of air distribution on exposure to pollutants, based on previous work by Sherman et al. (2006).

Petithuguenin, T.D.P.; Sherman, M.H.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Pamphlet, A Basic Overview of Occupational Radiation Exposure...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Pamphlet, A Basic Overview of Occupational Radiation Exposure Monitoring, Analysis & Reporting Pamphlet, A Basic Overview of Occupational Radiation Exposure Monitoring, Analysis &...

356

ORISE: Worker Health Studies - Radiation Exposure Data Collection  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Resource Book How to Work With Us Contact Us Oak Ridge Institute for Science Education Radiation Exposure Data Collection ORISE manages large, occupation radition exposure...

357

assessing inhalation exposure: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Total- Body Radiation Exposure Dosimetry CiteSeer Summary: The risk of radiation exposure, due to accidental or malicious release of ionizing radiation, is a major public...

358

acute radiation exposure: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

plant species. Search method: In nature, most alpha radiation exposure is caused by radon progeny. Exposure is particularly high below ground, and is also elevated on plant...

359

Millimetric Properties of Gamma Ray Burst Host Galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present millimetre (mm) and submillimetre (submm) photometry of a sample of host galaxies of Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs), obtained using the MAMBO2 and SCUBA bolometer arrays respectively. These observations were obtained as part of an ongoing project to investigate the status of GRBs as indicators of star formation. Our targets include two of the most unusual GRB host galaxies, selected as likely candidate submm galaxies: the extremely red (R-K approx 5) host of GRB 030115, and the extremely faint (R>29.5) host of GRB 020124. Neither of these galaxies is detected, but the deep upper limits for GRB 030115 impose constraints on its spectral energy distribution. As a framework for interpreting these data, and for predicting the results of forthcoming submm surveys of Swift-derived host samples, we model the expected flux and redshift distributions based on luminosity functions of both submm galaxies and GRBs, assuming a direct proportionality between the GRB rate density and the global star formation rate density. We derive the effects of possible sources of uncertainty in these assumptions, including an anticorrelation between GRB rate and the global average metallicity.

R. S. Priddey; N. R. Tanvir; A. J. Levan; A. S. Fruchter; C. Kouveliotou; I. A. Smith; R. A. M. J. Wijers

2006-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

360

Rates and Repayment Services  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298, andEpidermal Growth Factor.Tariff Rates FY 2015 Rates

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gamma exposure rate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Study of Active Shielding for {gamma} - Spectrometers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The features of the ground located gamma ray spectrometer shielded passively with 12 cm of lead and actively by five 0.5m x 0.5m x 0.05m plastic veto shields are described. The detector mass related background was 0.345 C/kg s. The 511 keV annihilation line was reduced by the factor of 7 by the anticoincidence gate. It is shown that the plastic shields increase the neutron capture gamma line intensities due to neutron thermalization.

Bikit, I.; Mrdja, D.; Forkapic, S.; Todorovic, N.; Veskovic, M.; Slivka, J.; Conkic, Lj.; Krmar, M.; Varga, E. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, University of Novi Sad, Trg Dositeja Obradovica 4, 21 000 Novi Sad (Serbia and Montenegro)

2006-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

362

Status of the Milagro $\\gamma$ Ray Observatory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Milagro Gamma Ray Observatory is the world's first large-area water Cherenkov detector capable of continuously monitoring the sky at TeV energies. Located in northern New Mexico, Milagro will perform an all sky survey of the Northern Hemisphere at energies between ~250 GeV and 50 TeV. With a high duty cycle, large detector area (~5000 square meters), and a wide field-of-view (~1 sr), Milagro is uniquely capable of searching for transient and DC sources of high-energy gamma-ray emission. Milagro has been operating since February, 1999. The current status of the Milagro Observatory and initial results will be discussed.

Atkins, R; Berley, D; Chen, M L; Coyne, D G; Delay, R S; Dingus, B L; Dorfan, D E; Ellsworth, R W; Evans, D; Falcone, A D; Fleysher, L; Fleysher, R; Gisler, G; Goodman, J A; Haines, T J; Hoffman, C M; Hugenberger, S; Kelley, L A; Leonor, I; Macri, J R; McConnell, M; McCullough, J F; McEnery, J E; Miller, R S; Mincer, A I; Morales, M F; Némethy, P; Ryan, J M; Schneider, M; Shen, B; Shoup, A L; Sinnis, G; Smith, A J; Sullivan, G W; Thompson, T N; Tümer, T O; Wang, K; Wascko, M O; Westerhoff, S; Williams, D A; Yang, T; Yodh, G B

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Gamma-Ray Bursts: Jets and Energetics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The relativistic outflows from gamma-ray bursts are now thought to be narrowly collimated into jets. After correcting for this jet geometry there is a remarkable constancy of both the energy radiated by the burst and the kinetic energy carried by the outflow. Gamma-ray bursts are still the most luminous explosions in the Universe, but they release energies that are comparable to supernovae. The diversity of cosmic explosions appears to be governed by the fraction of energy that is coupled to ultra-relativistic ejecta.

D. A. Frail

2003-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

364

Status of the Milagro Gamma Ray Observatory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Milagro Gamma Ray Observatory is the world's first large-area water Cherenkov detector capable of continuously monitoring the sky at TeV energies. Located in northern New Mexico, Milagro will perform an all sky survey of the Northern Hemisphere at energies between ~250 GeV and 50 TeV. With a high duty cycle, large detector area (~5000 square meters), and a wide field-of-view (~1 sr), Milagro is uniquely capable of searching for transient and DC sources of high-energy gamma-ray emission. Milagro has been operating since February, 1999. The current status of the Milagro Observatory and initial results will be discussed.

R. Atkins; W. Benbow; D. Berley; M. -L. Chen; D. G. Coyne; R. S. Delay; B. L. Dingus; D. E. Dorfan; R. W. Ellsworth; D. Evans; A. Falcone; L. Fleysher; R. Fleysher; G. Gisler; J. A. Goodman; T. J. Haines; C. M. Hoffman; S. Hugenberger; L. A. Kelley; I. Leonor; J. Macri; M. McConnell; J. F. McCullough; J. E. McEnery; R. S. Miller; A. I. Mincer; M. F. Morales; P. Nemethy; J. M. Ryan; M. Schneider; B. Shen; A. Shoup; G. Sinnis; A. J. Smith; G. W. Sullivan; T. N. Thompson; O. T. Tumer; K. Wang; M. O. Wascko; S. Westerhoff; D. A. Williams; T. Yang; G. B. Yodh

1999-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

365

A supersymmetric model of gamma ray bursts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose a model for gamma ray bursts in which a star subject to a high level of fermion degeneracy undergoes a phase transition to a supersymmetric state. The burst is initiated by the transition of fermion pairs to sfermion pairs which, uninhibited by the Pauli exclusion principle, can drop to the ground state of minimum momentum through photon emission. The jet structure is attributed to the Bose statistics of sfermions whereby subsequent sfermion pairs are preferentially emitted into the same state (sfermion amplification by stimulated emission). Bremsstrahlung gamma rays tend to preserve the directional information of the sfermion momenta and are themselves enhanced by stimulated emission.

L. Clavelli; G. Karatheodoris

2005-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

366

Redshift indicators for gamma-ray bursts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The measure of the distances and luminosities of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) led to the discovery that many GRB properties are strongly correlated with their intrinsic luminosity, leading to the construction of reliable luminosity indicators. These GRB luminosity indicators have quickly found applications, like the construction of 'pseudo-redshifts', or the measure of luminosity distances, which can be computed independently of the measure of the redshift. In this contribution I discuss various issues connected with the construction of luminosity-redshift indicators for gamma-ray bursts.

J-L. Atteia

2005-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

367

DOE occupational radiation exposure 1996 report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of the US Department of Energy (DOE) is to conduct its radiological operations to ensure the health and safety of all DOE employees including contractors and subcontractors. The DOE strives to maintain radiation exposures to its workers below administrative control levels and DOE limits and to further reduce these exposures and releases to levels that are ``As Low As Reasonably Achievable`` (ALARA). The DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report, 1996 provides summary and analysis of the occupational radiation exposure received by individuals associated with DOE activities. The DOE mission includes stewardship of the nuclear weapons stockpile and the associated facilities, environmental restoration of DOE and precursor agency sites, and energy research. Collective exposure at DOE has declined by 80% over the past decade due to a cessation in opportunities for exposure during the transition in DOE mission from weapons production to cleanup, deactivation and decommissioning, and changes in reporting requirements and dose calculation methodology. In 1996, the collective dose decreased by 10% from the 1995 value due to decreased doses at five of the seven highest-dose DOE sites. For 1996, these sites attributed the reduction in collective dose to the completion of several decontamination and decommissioning projects, reduced spent fuel storage activities, and effective ALARA practices. This report is intended to be a valuable tool for managers in their management of radiological safety programs and commitment of resources.

NONE

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

368

Quantification of the relationship between pulmonary ventilation rate and vapor contaminant concentration in exposure profiles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Error Range Estimates 51 APPENDIX D Wilks Miran Infrared Gas Analyzer Calibration Data for Ethanol 52 APPENDIX E Evaluation of Ethanol Loss During Filter Cartridge Storage 53 APPENDIX F Evaluation of Filter Cartridge Analysis Method 55 APPENDIX... removed by the sampling apparatus. Ethanol is also easily vapor- ized and lends itself to collection on activated charcoal for sub- sequent analysis by gas chromatography. The Problem It can be seen from previous discussion that while the con...

Horbal, Terrence Myron

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

R1S-M-2322 TABLE OF EXPOSURE RATE CONSTANTS AND DOSE EQUIVALENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in units of MeV/photon , (pen/p)air in cm2 /g gives r in R»m2 /Ci«h if the following conversion factors a point source . 4 5. DOSE BUILD-UP FACTORS 7 6. MASS ENERGY ABSORPTION COEFFICIENTS AND LINEAR

370

Exposure-Rate Calibration Using Large-Area Calibration Pads (September  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector General Office of Audit|Department of Energy56Executive212-2012 June 2012 DOE

371

Ultrahigh Energy Cosmic Rays and Prompt TeV Gamma Rays from Gamma Ray Bursts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) have been proposed as one {\\it possible} class of sources of the Ultrahigh Energy Cosmic Ray (UHECR) events observed up to energies $\\gsim10^{20}\\ev$. The synchrotron radiation of the highest energy protons accelerated within the GRB source should produce gamma rays up to TeV energies. Here we briefly discuss the implications on the energetics of the GRB from the point of view of the detectability of the prompt TeV gamma rays of proton-synchrotron origin in GRBs in the up-coming ICECUBE muon detector in the south pole.

Pijushpani Bhattacharjee; Nayantara Gupta

2003-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

372

accrued complex gamma: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sie, da? g p n Gamma Grassl, Markus 8 A Complexity-Brightness Correlation in Gamma Ray Bursts Astrophysics (arXiv) Summary: We observe strong correlations between the...

373

Measurements of the CKM Angle Gamma at BaBar  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a short review of the measurements of the CKM angle {gamma} performed by the BABAR experiment. We focus on methods using charged B decays, which give a direct access to {gamma} and provide the best constraints so far.

Latour, Emmanuel; /Ecole Polytechnique

2007-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

374

PoGOLite -The Polarised Gamma-ray Observer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PoGOLite - The Polarised Gamma-ray Observer CECILIA MARINI BETTOLO Licentiate Thesis Stockholm, Sweden 2008 #12;#12;Licentiate Thesis PoGOLite - The Polarised Gamma-ray Observer Cecilia Marini Bettolo

Haviland, David

375

PLANNING TOOLS FOR ESTIMATING RADIATION EXPOSURE AT THE NATIONAL IGNITION FACILITY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A set of computational tools was developed to help estimate and minimize potential radiation exposure to workers from material activation in the National Ignition Facility (NIF). AAMI (Automated ALARA-MCNP Interface) provides an efficient, automated mechanism to perform the series of calculations required to create dose rate maps for the entire facility with minimal manual user input. NEET (NIF Exposure Estimation Tool) is a web application that combines the information computed by AAMI with a given shot schedule to compute and display the dose rate maps as a function of time. AAMI and NEET are currently used as work planning tools to determine stay-out times for workers following a given shot or set of shots, and to help in estimating integrated doses associated with performing various maintenance activities inside the target bay. Dose rate maps of the target bay were generated following a low-yield 10{sup 16} D-T shot and will be presented in this paper.

Verbeke, J; Young, M; Brereton, S; Dauffy, L; Hall, J; Hansen, L; Khater, H; Kim, S; Pohl, B; Sitaraman, S

2010-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

376

Mechanism of the efficient quenching of tryptophan fluorescence in human gamma crystallin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quenching of the fluorescence of buried tryptophans (Trps) is an important reporter of protein conformation. Human [gamma]D-crystallin (H[gamma]D-Crys) and human [gamma]S-crystallin (H[gamma]S-Crys) are both very stable ...

Chen, Jiejin, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

High Efficiency of Gamma-Ray Bursts Revisited  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

efficiency of gamma-ray bursts by assuming that the ejecta from the central engine are equally massive and

Y. C. Zou A; Z. G. Dai B

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Beta and gamma decays April 9, 2002  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Beta and gamma decays April 9, 2002 1 Simple Fermi theory of beta decay ² Beta decay is one by the emission of a positive or negative beta particle (positron or electron). To ensure conservation of lepton emitted in beta decay is a continuum of energies, up to a maximum value, with most emitted betas having

Landstreet, John D.

379

Laser Electron Gamma Source. Biennial progress report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The LEGS facility provides intense, polarized, monochromatic {gamma}-ray beams by Compton backscattering laser light from relativistic electrons circulating in the X-Ray storage ring of the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. With the start of ring operations at 2.8 GeV, LEGS {gamma}-ray energies now extend to 370 MeV. Considerable progress has been made in the development of a new laser system that will increase the beam energies to 470 MeV, and this system is expected to come into operation before the next biennial report. The total flux is administratively held at 6 {times} 10{sup 6} s{sup {minus}1}. The {gamma}-ray energy is determined, with a resolution of 5.5 MeV, by detecting the scattering electrons in a magnetic spectrometer. This spectrometer can `tag` all {gamma}-rays with energies from 185 MeV up to the Compton edge. The beam spot size at the target position is 8 mm (V) {times} 18 mm (H), FWHM. For a single laser wavelength, the linear polarization of the beam is 98% at the Compton edge and decreases to 50% at about 1/2 the energy of the edge. By choosing the laser wavelengths appropriately the polarization can be maintained above 85% throughout the tagging range. During the last two years, experimental running at LEGS occupied an average of 3000 hours annually. Highlights of some of the programs are discussed below.

Sandorfi, A.M. [ed.; Caracappa, A.; Kuczewski, A.; Kistner, O.C.; Lincoln, F.; Miceli, L.; Thorn, C.E. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Hoblit, S. [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States). Dept. of Physics; Khandaker, M. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)]|[Virginia Polytechnic Institute & State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States). Dept. of Physics

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Current segmented gamma-ray scanner technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new generation of segmented gamma-ray scanners has been developed at Los Alamos for scrap and waste measurements at the Savannah River Plant and the Los Alamos Plutonium Facility. The new designs are highly automated and exhibit special features such as good segmentation and thorough shielding to improve performance.

Bjork, C.W.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gamma exposure rate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Gamma-ray bursts: a Centauro's cry?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A new candidate for the gamma-ray bursts central engine is proposed: if in some energetic cosmic event a macroscopic amount of bubbles of the disoriented chiral condensate can be formed, then their subsequent decays will produce a relativistic fireball without the baryon loading problem. The neutron star to strange star transition is considered as a candidate example of such cosmic event.

Z. K. Silagadze

2003-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

382

Gamma Ray Imaging for Environmental Remediation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This program is the development of germanium strip detectors for environmental remediation. It is a collaboration between the Naval Research Laboratory and Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. The goal is to develop detectors that are simultaneously capable of excellent spectroscopy and imaging of gamma radiation.

B.F. Philips; R.A. Kroeger: J.D. Kurfess: W.N. Johnson; E.A. Wulf; E. I. Novikova

2004-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

383

A supersymmetric origin of gamma ray bursts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bright bursts of gamma rays from outer space have been puzzling Astronomers for more than thirty years and there is still no conceptually complete model for the phenomenon within the standard model of particle physics. Is it time to consider a supersymmetric (SUSY) origin for these bursts to add to the astronomical indications of supersymmetry from dark matter?

L. Clavelli

2004-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

384

Neutrino Balls and Gamma-Ray Bursts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose a mechanism by which the neutrino emission from a supernova-type explosion can be converted into a gamma-ray burst of total energy $\\sim 10^{50}$ ergs. This occurs naturally if the explosion is situated inside a ball of trapped neutrinos, which in turn may lie at a galactic core. There are possible unique signatures of this scenario.

B. Holdom; R. A. Malaney

1993-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

385

High redshift Gamma-Ray Bursts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ten years of operations of the Swift satellite have allow us to collect a small sample of long Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) at redshift larger than six. I will review here the present status of this research field and discuss the possible use of GRBs as a fundamental new tool to explore the early Universe, complementary to quasar and galaxy surveys.

Salvaterra, R

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

\\Gamma \\Gamma \\Gamma \\Gamma \\Gamma \\Gamma  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Zachmann y \\Lambda RWTH Aachen y Universit¨ at Karlsruhe Lehrstuhl f¨ ur Informatik III Fakult¨ at f¨ ur

Mannheim, Universität

387

Gamma-Ray Bursts, Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays, and Cosmic Gamma-Ray Background  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We argue that gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) may be the origin of the cosmic gamma-ray background radiation observed in GeV range. It has theoretically been discussed that protons may carry a much larger amount of energy than electrons in GRBs, and this large energy can be radiated in TeV range by synchrotron radiation of ultra-high-energy protons (\\sim 10^{20} eV). The possible detection of GRBs above 10 TeV suggested by the Tibet and HEGRA groups also supports this idea. If this is the case, most of TeV gamma-rays from GRBs are absorbed in intergalactic fields and eventually form GeV gamma-ray background, whose flux is in good agreement with the recent observation.

Tomonori Totani

1999-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

388

Achieving Higher Accuracy in the Gamma-Ray Spectrocopic Assay of Holdup  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gamma-ray spectroscopy is an important technique for the measurement of quantities of nuclear material holdup in processing equipment. Because the equipment in large facilities dedicated to uranium isotopic enrichment, uranium/plutonium scrap recovery or various stages of fuel fabrication is extensive, the total holdup may be large by its distribution alone, even if deposit thicknesses are small. Good accountability practices require unbiased measurements with uncertainties that are as small as possible. This paper describes new procedures for use with traditional holdup analysis methods based on gamma-ray spectroscopy. The procedures address the two sources of bias inherent in traditional gamma-ray measurements of holdup. Holdup measurements are performed with collimated, shielded gamma-ray detectors. The measurement distance is chosen to simplify the deposit geometry to that of a point, line or area. The quantitative holdup result is based on the net count rate of a representative gamma ray. This rate is corrected for contributions from room background and for attenuation by the process equipment. Traditional holdup measurements assume that the width of the point or line deposit is very small compared to the measurement distance, and that the self-attenuation effects can be neglected. Because each point or line deposit has a finite width and because self-attenuation affects all measurements, bias is incurred in both assumptions. In both cases the bias is negative, explaining the systematically low results of gamma-ray holdup measurements. The new procedures correct for bias that arises from both the finite-source effects and the gamma-ray self-attenuation. The procedures used to correct for both of these effects apply to the generalized geometries. One common empirical parameter is used for both corrections. It self-consistently limits the total error incurred (from uncertain knowledge of this parameter) in the combined correction process, so that it is compelling to use these procedures. The algorithms and the procedures are simple, general, and easily automated for use plant-wide. This paper shows the derivation of the new, generalized correction algorithms for finite-source and self-attenuation effects. It also presents an analysis of the sensitivity of the holdup result to the uncertainty in the empirical parameter when one or both corrections are made. The paper uses specific examples of the magnitudes of finite-source and self-attenuation corrections to measurements that were made in the field. It discusses the automated implementation of the correction procedure.

Russo, P.A.; Wenz, T.R.; Smith, S.E.; Harris, J.F.

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Gamma-ray Sky Observed with Fermi Large Area Telescope  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

detection reported Flare activity reported via ATel Gamma Ray Bursts reported via GCN Giant MC imageGamma-ray Sky Observed with Fermi Large Area Telescope RESCEU Symposium on Astroparticle Physics) Measure the photon direction Identification of the gamma-ray shower 36 planes of Si strip detectors (228 m

Yamamoto, Hirosuke

390

The Biggest Bangs The Mystery of Gamma-Ray Bursts,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Biggest Bangs The Mystery of Gamma-Ray Bursts, The Most Violent Explosions in The Universe J. I. Did a Gamma-Ray Burst Kill the Dinosaurs? Will a Burst Kill Us? #15; Glossary #15; Sources #15; Index. On January 23, 1999, one of these four cameras recorded visible light from a gamma-ray burst

Katz, Jonathan I.

391

The Biggest Bangs The Mystery of Gamma-Ray Bursts,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Biggest Bangs The Mystery of Gamma-Ray Bursts, The Most Violent Explosions in The Universe J. I a Gamma-Ray Burst Kill the Dinosaurs? Will a Burst Kill Us? · Glossary · Sources · Index viii #12;Chapter of these four cameras recorded visible light from a gamma-ray burst as it was happening, which had been the holy

Katz, Jonathan I.

392

Gamma-Ray Bursts Nuclear Test Ban Treaty, 1963  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lecture 18 Gamma-Ray Bursts #12;Nuclear Test Ban Treaty, 1963 First Vela satellite pair launched and their predecessors, Vela 4, discovered the first gamma-ray bursts. The discovery was announced by Klebesadel, Strong, and Olson (ApJ, 182, 85) in 1973. #12;First Gamma-Ray Burst The Vela 5 satellites functioned from July, 1969

Harrison, Thomas

393

Standard Practice for Determining NeutronExposures for Nuclear Reactor Vessel Support Structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1.1 This practice covers procedures for monitoring the neutron radiation exposures experienced by ferritic materials in nuclear reactor vessel support structures located in the vicinity of the active core. This practice includes guidelines for: 1.1.1 Selecting appropriate dosimetric sensor sets and their proper installation in reactor cavities. 1.1.2 Making appropriate neutronics calculations to predict neutron radiation exposures. 1.2 This practice is applicable to all pressurized water reactors whose vessel supports will experience a lifetime neutron fluence (E > 1 MeV) that exceeds 1 × 1017 neutrons/cm2 or 3.0 × 10?4 dpa. (See Terminology E 170.) 1.3 Exposure of vessel support structures by gamma radiation is not included in the scope of this practice, but see the brief discussion of this issue in 3.2. 1.4 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and h...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Search for very high energy gamma-rays from WIMP annihilations near the Sun with the Milagro Detector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The neutralino, the lightest stable supersymmetric particle, is a strong theoretical candidate for the missing astronomical ``dark matter''. A profusion of such neutralinos can accumulate near the Sun when they lose energy upon scattering and are gravitationally captured. Pair-annihilations of those neutralinos may produce very high energy (VHE, above $100 GeV$) gamma-rays. Milagro is an air shower array which uses the water Cherenkov technique to detect extensive air showers and is capable of observing VHE gamma-rays from the direction of the Sun with an angular resolution of $0.75^{\\circ}$. Analysis of Milagro data with an exposure to the Sun of 1165 hours presents the first attempt to detect TeV gamma-rays produced by annihilating neutralinos captured by the Solar system and shows no statistically significant signal. Resulting limits that can be set on gamma-ray flux due to near-Solar neutralino annihilations and on neutralino cross-section are presented.

Atkins, R; Berley, D; Blaufuss, E; Bussons, J; Coyne, D G; De Young, T R; Dingus, B L; Dorfan, D E; Ellsworth, R W; Fleysher, L; Fleysher, R; Gisler, G; González, M M; Goodman, J A; Haines, T J; Hays, E; Hoffman, C M; Kelley, L A; Lansdell, C P; Linnemann, J T; McEnery, J E; Miller, R S; Mincer, A I; Morales, M F; Némethy, P; Noyes, D; Ryan, J M; Samuelson, F W; Shoup, A; Sinnis, G; Smith, A J; Sullivan, G W; Williams, D A; Westerhoff, S; Wilson, M E; Xu, X W; Yodh, G B

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Statistical Properties of Multiple Optical Emission Components in Gamma-Ray Bursts and Implications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Well-sampled optical lightcurves of 146 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are complied from the literature. Multiple optical emission components are extracted with power-law function fits to these lightcurves. We present a systematical analysis for statistical properties and their relations to prompt gamma-ray emission and X-ray afterglow for each component. We show that peak luminosity in the prompt and late flares are correlated and the evolution of the peak luminosity may signal the evolution of the accretion rate. No tight correlation between the shallow decay phase/plateau and prompt gamma-ray emission is found. Assuming that they are due to a long-lasting wind injected by a compact object, we show that the injected behavior favors the scenarios of a long-lasting wind after the main burst episode. The peak luminosity of the afterglow onset is tightly correlated with Eiso, and it is dimmer as peaking later. Assuming that the onset bump is due to the fireball deceleration by the external medium, we examine the Gamma...

Liang, En-Wei; Tang, Qing-Wen; Chen, Jie-Min; Zhang, Bing

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Magnetic Flux of Progenitor Stars Sets Gamma-ray Burst Luminosity and Variability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are thought to come from the core-collapse of Wolf-Rayet stars. Whereas their stellar masses $M_*$ have a rather narrow distribution, the population of GRBs is very diverse, with gamma-ray luminosities $L_\\gamma$ spanning several orders of magnitude. This suggests the existence of a "hidden" stellar variable whose burst-to-burst variation leads to a spread in $L_\\gamma$. Whatever this hidden variable is, its variation should not noticeably affect the shape of GRB lightcurves, which display a constant luminosity (in a time-average sense) followed by a sharp drop at the end of the burst seen with Swift/XRT. We argue that such a hidden variable is progenitor star's large-scale magnetic flux. Shortly after the core collapse, most of stellar magnetic flux accumulates near the black hole (BH) and remains there. The flux extracts BH rotational energy and powers jets of roughly a constant luminosity, $L_j$. However, once BH mass accretion rate $\\dot M$ falls below $\\sim L_j/c^2$,...

Tchekhovskoy, Alexander

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

On the Annihilation Rate of WIMPs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We develop a formalism that allows one to systematically calculate the WIMP annihilation rate into gamma rays whose energy far exceeds the weak scale. A factorization theorem is presented which separates the radiative corrections stemming from initial state potential interactions from loops involving the final state. This separation allows us to go beyond the fixed order calculation, which is polluted by large infrared logarithms. For the case of Majorana WIMPs transforming in the adjoint representation of SU(2), we present the result for the resummed rate at leading double log accuracy in terms of two initial state partial wave matrix elements and one hard matching coefficient. For a given model, one may calculate the cross section by calculating the tree level matching coefficient and determining the value of a local four fermion operator. We find that the effects of resummation can be as large as 100% for a 20 TeV WIMP. The generalization of the formalism to other types of WIMPs is discussed.

Matthew Baumgart; Ira Z. Rothstein; Varun Vaidya

2014-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

398

Magnetic field exposure among utility workers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Electric and Magnetic Field Measurement Project for Utilities -- the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Electric and Magnetic Field Digital Exposure (EMDEX) Project (the EPRI EMDEX Project) -- was a multifaceted project that entailed technology transfer, measurement protocol design, data management, and exposure assessment analyses. This paper addresses one specific objective of the project: the collection, analysis, and documentation of power-frequency magnetic filed exposures for a diverse population of utility employees at 59 sites in four countries between September, 1988, and September, 1989. Specially designed sampling procedures and data collection protocols were used to ensure uniform implementation across sites. Volunteers within 13 job classifications recorded which of eight work or three nonwork environments they occupied while wearing an EMDEX meter. Approximately 50,000 hours of magnetic field exposure records taken at 10 s intervals were obtained, about 70% of which were from work environments. Exposures and time spent in environments were analyzed by primary work environment, by occupied environment, and by job classification.

Bracken, T.D.; Senior, R.S. [T. Dan Bracken, Inc., Portland, OR (United States); Rankin, R.F. [Applied Research Services, Inc., Lake Oswego, OR (United States); Alldredge, J.R. [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States); Sussman, S.S. [Electric Power Research Institute, Palo Alto, CA (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Evolving Adjustments to External (Gamma) Slope Factors for CERCLA Risk and Dose Assessments - 12290  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To model the external exposure pathway in risk and dose assessments of radioactive contamination at Superfund sites, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) uses slope factors (SFs), also known as risk coefficients, and dose conversion factors (DCFs). Without any adjustment these external radiation exposure pathways effectively assumes that an individual is exposed to a source geometry that is effectively an infinite slab. The concept of an 'infinite slab' means that the thickness of the contaminated zone and its aerial extent are so large that it behaves as if it were infinite in its physical dimensions. EPA has been making increasingly complex adjustments to account for the extent of the contamination and its corresponding radiation field to provide more accurate risk and dose assessment modeling when using its calculators. In most instances, the more accurate modeling results derived from these gamma adjustments are less conservative. The notable exception are for some radionuclides in rooms with contaminated walls, ceiling, and floors, and the receptor is in location of the room with the highest amount of radiation exposure, usually the corner of small rooms and the center of large conference rooms. (authors)

Walker, Stuart [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

MilagroA TeV Observatory for Gamma Ray Bursts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Milagro­A TeV Observatory for Gamma Ray Bursts B.L. Dingus and the Milagro Collaboration Los energy gamma-rays from gamma-ray bursts. The highest energy gamma rays supply very strong constraints on the nature of gamma-ray burst sources as well as fundamental physics. Because the highest energy gamma-rays

California at Santa Cruz, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gamma exposure rate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

The characteristics of a low background germanium gamma ray spectrometer at China JinPing underground Laboratory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A low background germanium gamma ray spectrometer, GeTHU, has been installed at China JinPing underground Laboratory. The integral background count rate between 40 and 2700 keV was 0.6 cpm, and the origin was studied by Monte Carlo simulation. Detection limits and efficiencies were calculated for selected gamma peaks. Boric acid and silica sand samples were measured and 137Cs contamination was found in boric acid. GeTHU will be mainly used to measure environmental samples and screen materials in dark matter experiments.

Yuhao Mi; Hao Ma; Zhi Zeng; Jianping Cheng; Jian Su; Qian Yue

2014-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

402

Personal/Mobile Exposure Monitors D K Arvind & Michael Walters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Personal/Mobile Exposure Monitors D K Arvind & Michael Walters School of Informatics dka · Personal/Mobile Exposure Monitoring · Mapping the public space using numerous personal/mobile exposure per second) #12;Mobile Exposure Monitor · 16-bin (PM10 ­ PM1.0) Optical Particle Counter (Alphasense

403

Graduate Kentucky Metropolitan Rate Application  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Graduate Kentucky Metropolitan Rate Application REGISTRAR'S OFFICE University of Cincinnati PO Box Kentucky counties are able to attend UC at an established metropolitan tuition rate. Non Kentucky residency, these students are not eligible for the graduate metropolitan rate. Kentucky counties

Franco, John

404

Imaginary-time method for radiative capture reaction rate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose a new computational method for astrophysical reaction rate of radiative capture process. In the method, an evolution of a wave function is calculated along the imaginary-time axis which is identified as the inverse temperature. It enables direct evaluation of reaction rate as a function of temperature without solving any scattering problem. The method is tested for two-body radiative capture reaction, ${^{16}{\\rm O}}(\\alpha,\\gamma){^{20}{\\rm Ne}}$, showing that it gives identical results to that calculated by the ordinary procedure. The new method will be suited for calculation of triple-alpha radiative capture rate for which an explicit construction of the scattering solution is difficult.

Kazuhiro Yabana; Yasuro Funaki

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

405

Ultra-accelerated natural sunlight exposure testing  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Process and apparatus for providing ultra accelerated natural sunlight exposure testing of samples under controlled weathering without introducing unrealistic failure mechanisms in exposed materials and without breaking reciprocity relationships between flux exposure levels and cumulative dose that includes multiple concurrent levels of temperature and relative humidity at high levels of natural sunlight comprising: a) concentrating solar flux uniformly; b) directing the controlled uniform sunlight onto sample materials in a chamber enclosing multiple concurrent levels of temperature and relative humidity to allow the sample materials to be subjected to accelerated irradiance exposure factors for a sufficient period of time in days to provide a corresponding time of about at least a years worth of representative weathering of the sample materials.

Jorgensen, Gary J. (Pine, CO); Bingham, Carl (Lakewood, CO); Goggin, Rita (Englewood, CO); Lewandowski, Allan A. (Evergreen, CO); Netter, Judy C. (Westminster, CO)

2000-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

406

Exposure of Ceramics and Ceramic Matrix Composites in Simulated and Actual Combustor Environments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A high-temperature, high-pressure, tube furnace has been used to evaluate the long term stability of different monolithic ceramic and ceramic matrix composite materials in a simulated combustor environment. All of the tests have been run at 150 psia, 1204 degrees C, and 15% steam in incremental 500 h runs. The major advantage of this system is the high sample throughput; >20 samples can be exposed in each tube at the same time under similar exposure conditions. Microstructural evaluations of the samples were conducted after each 500 h exposure to characterize the extent of surface damage, to calculate surface recession rates, and to determine degradation mechanisms for the different materials. The validity of this exposure rig for simulating real combustor environments was established by comparing materials exposed in the test rig and combustor liner materials exposed for similar times in an actual gas turbine combustor under commercial operating conditions.

Brentnall, W.D.; Ferber, M.K.; Keiser, j.R.; Miriyala, N.; More, K.L.; Price, J.R.; Tortorelli, P.F.; Walker, L.R.

1999-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

407

High removal rate laser-based coating removal system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A compact laser system that removes surface coatings (such as paint, dirt, etc.) at a removal rate as high as 1000 ft.sup.2 /hr or more without damaging the surface. A high repetition rate laser with multiple amplification passes propagating through at least one optical amplifier is used, along with a delivery system consisting of a telescoping and articulating tube which also contains an evacuation system for simultaneously sweeping up the debris produced in the process. The amplified beam can be converted to an output beam by passively switching the polarization of at least one amplified beam. The system also has a personal safety system which protects against accidental exposures.

Matthews, Dennis L. (Moss Beach, CA); Celliers, Peter M. (Berkeley, CA); Hackel, Lloyd (Livermore, CA); Da Silva, Luiz B. (Danville, CA); Dane, C. Brent (Livermore, CA); Mrowka, Stanley (Richmond, CA)

1999-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

408

Real time chemical exposure and risk monitor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The apparatus of the present invention is a combination of a breath interface and an external exposure dosimeter interface to a chemical analysis device, all controlled by an electronic processor for quantitatively analyzing chemical analysis data from both the breath interface and the external exposure dosimeter for determining internal tissue dose. The method of the present invention is a combination of steps of measuring an external dose, measuring breath content, then analyzing the external dose and breath content and determining internal tissue dose. 7 figs.

Thrall, K.D.; Kenny, D.V.; Endres, G.W.R.; Sisk, D.R.

1997-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

409

EFFECTS OF TRITIUM GAS EXPOSURE ON POLYMERS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Effects of tritium gas exposure on various polymers have been studied over the last several years. Despite the deleterious effects of beta exposure on many material properties, structural polymers continued to be used in tritium systems. Improved understanding of the tritium effects will allow more resistant materials to be selected. Currently polymers find use mainly in tritium gas sealing applications (eg. valve stem tips, O-rings). Future uses being evaluated including polymeric based cracking of tritiated water, and polymer-based sensors of tritium.

Clark, E.; Fox, E.; Kane, M.; Staack, G.

2011-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

410

Rates and Repayment Services  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar HomePromising Science for1PrincipalRare Iron Oxide in AncientRates and

411

Rates and Repayment Services  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar HomePromising Science for1PrincipalRare Iron Oxide in AncientRates

412

Rating Agency Reports  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298, andEpidermal Growth Factor.Tariff Rates FY 2015

413

BCP Annual Rate Process  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAboutScience Program CumulusA t i o nLiquids Reserve2015 BCP Annual Rate

414

Analyses Of Two End-User Software Vulnerability Exposure Metrics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The risk due to software vulnerabilities will not be completely resolved in the near future. Instead, putting reliable vulnerability measures into the hands of end-users so that informed decisions can be made regarding the relative security exposure incurred by choosing one software package over another is of importance. To that end, we propose two new security metrics, average active vulnerabilities (AAV) and vulnerability free days (VFD). These metrics capture both the speed with which new vulnerabilities are reported to vendors and the rate at which software vendors fix them. We then examine how the metrics are computed using currently available datasets and demonstrate their estimation in a simulation experiment using four different browsers as a case study. Finally, we discuss how the metrics may be used by the various stakeholders of software and to software usage decisions.

Jason L. Wright; Miles McQueen; Lawrence Wellman

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Redshifts of the Long Gamma-Ray Bursts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The low energy spectra of some gamma-ray bursts' show excess components beside the power-law dependence. The consequences of such a feature allows to estimate the gamma photometric redshift of the long gamma-ray bursts in the BATSE Catalog. There is good correlation between the measured optical and the estimated gamma photometric redshifts. The estimated redshift values for the long bright gamma-ray bursts are up to z=4, while for the the faint long bursts - which should be up to z=20 - the redshifts cannot be determined unambiguously with this method. The redshift distribution of all the gamma-ray bursts with known optical redshift agrees quite well with the BATSE based gamma photometric redshift distribution.

Z. Bagoly; I. Csabai; A. Meszaros; P. Meszaros; I. Horvath; L. G. Balazs; R. Vavrek

2007-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

416

Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays and Gamma Ray Bursts from Axion Stars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose a model in which ultra high energy cosmic rays and gamma ray bursts are produced by collisions between neutron stars and axion stars. The acceleration of such a cosmic ray is made by the electric field, $\\sim 10^{15} (B/10^{12} {G}) {eV} {cm}^{-1}$, which is induced in an axion star by relatively strong magnetic field $B>10^{12}$ G of a neutron star. On the other hand, similar collisions generate gamma ray bursts when magnetic field is relatively small, e.g. $\\leq 10^{10}$ G. Assuming that the axion mass is $\\sim 10^{-9}$ eV, we can explain huge energies of the gamma ray bursts $\\sim 10^{54}$ erg as well as the ultra high energies of the cosmic rays $\\sim 10^{20}$ eV. We estimate rate of energy release in the collisions and we find that the rate roughly agrees with observations. In addition, we show that these axion stars are plausible candidates for MACHOs. Since the axion star induces oscillating electric current under the magnetic field, observable monochromatic radiations are emitted.

Aiichi Iwazaki

2000-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

417

Test results of a new detector system for gamma ray isotopic measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new type of gamma-ray detector system for isotopic measurements has been developed. This new system, a ``Duo detector`` array, consists of two intrinsic germanium detectors, a planar followed by a coaxial mounted on the same axis within a single cryostat assembly. This configuration allows the isotopic analysis system to take advantage of spectral data results that are collected simultaneously from different gamma-ray energy regimes. Princeton Gamma Tech (PGT) produced several prototypes of this Duo detector array which were then tested by Rocky Flats personnel until the design was optimized. An application for this detector design is in automated, roboticized NDA systems such as those being developed at the Los Alamos TA-55 Plutonium Facility. The Duo detector design reduces the space necessary for the isotopic instrument by a factor of two (only one liquid nitrogen dewar is needed), and also reduces the complexity of the mechanical systems and controlling software. Data will be presented on measurements of nuclear material with a Duo detector for a wide variety of matrices. Results indicate that the maximum count rate can be increased up to 100,000 counts per second yet maintaining excellent resolution and energy rate product.

Malcom, J.E.; Bonner, C.A.; Hurd, J.R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Fleissner, [EG and G Rocky Flats, Inc., Golden, CO (United States)

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Comparison of proton and neutron carrier removal rates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Displacement damage induced carrier removal rates for proton irradiations in the energy range 10-175 MeV were compared to 1 MeV equivalent neutrons using power MOSFETs as a test vehicle. The results showed that, within experimental error, the degradation mechanisms were qualitatively similar and the ratio of proton to neutron carrier removal rates as a function of proton energy correlate with a calculation based on nonionization energy loss in silicon. For exposures under junction bias, p-type silicon was found to have a smaller carrier removal rate for both proton and neutron irradiations, whereas, for n-type silicon, junction bias had little effect on the carrier removal rate.

Pease, R.L.; Enlow, E.W.; Dinger, G.L.; Marshall, P.

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Experimental investigation of silicon photomultipliers as compact light readout systems for gamma-ray spectroscopy applications in fusion plasmas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A matrix of Silicon Photo Multipliers has been developed for light readout from a large area 1 in. × 1 in. LaBr{sub 3} crystal. The system has been characterized in the laboratory and its performance compared to that of a conventional photo multiplier tube. A pulse duration of 100 ns was achieved, which opens up to spectroscopy applications at high counting rates. The energy resolution measured using radioactive sources extrapolates to 3%–4% in the energy range E{sub ?} = 3–5 MeV, enabling gamma-ray spectroscopy measurements at good energy resolution. The results reported here are of relevance in view of the development of compact gamma-ray detectors with spectroscopy capabilities, such as an enhanced gamma-ray camera for high power fusion plasmas, where the use of photomultiplier is impeded by space limitation and sensitivity to magnetic fields.

Nocente, M., E-mail: massimo.nocente@mib.infn.it; Gorini, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica “G. Occhialini,” Universitŕ degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca, Milano (Italy); Istituto di Fisica del Plasma “P. Caldirola,” EURATOM-ENEA-CNR Association, Milano (Italy); Fazzi, A.; Lorenzoli, M.; Pirovano, C. [Dipartimento di Energia, CeSNEF, Politecnico di Milano, Milano (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Milano, Milano (Italy); Tardocchi, M. [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma “P. Caldirola,” EURATOM-ENEA-CNR Association, Milano (Italy); Cazzaniga, C.; Rebai, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica “G. Occhialini,” Universitŕ degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca, Milano (Italy); Uboldi, C.; Varoli, V. [Dipartimento di Energia, CeSNEF, Politecnico di Milano, Milano (Italy)

2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

420

NEUTRINO-COOLED ACCRETION MODEL WITH MAGNETIC COUPLING FOR X-RAY FLARES IN GAMMA-RAY BURSTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The neutrino-cooled accretion disk, which was proposed to work as the central engine of gamma-ray bursts, encounters difficulty in interpreting the X-ray flares after the prompt gamma-ray emission. In this paper, the magnetic coupling (MC) between the inner disk and the central black hole (BH) is taken into consideration. For mass accretion rates around 0.001 {approx} 0.1 M{sub Sun} s{sup -1}, our results show that the luminosity of neutrino annihilation can be significantly enhanced due to the coupling effects. As a consequence, after the gamma-ray emission, a remnant disk with mass M{sub disk} {approx}< 0.5 M{sub Sun} may power most of the observed X-ray flares with the rest frame duration less than 100 s. In addition, a comparison between the MC process and the Blandford-Znajek mechanism is shown on the extraction of BH rotational energy.

Luo Yang; Gu Weimin; Liu Tong; Lu Jufu, E-mail: guwm@xmu.edu.cn [Department of Astronomy and Institute of Theoretical Physics and Astrophysics, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China)

2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

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421

Critical Dose of Internal Organs Internal Exposure - 13471  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The health threat posed by radionuclides has stimulated increased efforts to developed characterization on the biological behavior of radionuclides in humans in all ages. In an effort motivated largely by the Chernobyl nuclear accident, the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) is assembling a set of age specific biokinetic models for environmentally important radioelements. Radioactive substances in the air, mainly through the respiratory system and digestive tract, is inside the body. Radioactive substances are unevenly distributed in various organs and tissues. Therefore, the degree of damage will depend not only on the dose of radiation have but also on the critical organ, which is the most accumulation of radioactive substances, which leads to the defeat of the entire human body. The main objective of radiation protection, to avoid exceeding the maximum permissible doses of external and internal exposure of a person to prevent the physical and genetic damage people. The maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of radiation is called a dose of radiation a person in uniform getting her for 50 years does not cause changes in the health of the exposed individual and his progeny. The following classification of critical organs, depending on the category of exposure on their degree of sensitivity to radiation: First group: the whole body, gonads and red bone marrow; Second group: muscle, fat, liver, kidney, spleen, gastrointestinal tract, lungs and lens of the eye; The third group: bone, thyroid and skin; Fourth group: the hands, forearms, feet. MTD exposure whole body, gonads and bone marrow represent the maximum exposures (5 rem per year) experienced by people in their normal activities. The purpose of this article is intended dose received from various internal organs of the radionuclides that may enter the body by inhalation, and gastrointestinal tract. The biokinetic model describes the time dependent distribution and excretion of different radionuclides that have intake into the organism or absorbed into blood. Transport of different radionuclides between compartments is assumed to follow first order kinetics provided the concentration in red blood cells (RBCs) stays below a nonlinear threshold concentration. When the concentration in RBCs exceeds that threshold, the transfer rate from diffusible plasma to RBCs is assumed to decrease as the concentration in RBCs increases. For the calculations used capabilities AMBER by using the traces of radionuclides in the body. Model for the transfer of radionuclides in the body has been built on the basis of existing models at AMBER for lead. (authors)

Grigoryan, G.; Amirjanyan, A. [Nuclear and Radiation Safety Centre (Armenia)] [Nuclear and Radiation Safety Centre (Armenia); Grigoryan, N. [Yerevan State Medical University 4Tigran Mets,375010 Yerevan (Armenia)] [Yerevan State Medical University 4Tigran Mets,375010 Yerevan (Armenia)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

The Role of Gamma-ray Imaging in Performing Radiological Characterisation at the Magnox Storage Ponds at the Bradwell Decommissioning Site - 13628  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A gamma-ray imaging device has been used to perform radiological characterisation work at the spent fuel ponds complex at the site of the Bradwell Magnox Power Station, which is currently undergoing accelerated decommissioning. The objective of using a gamma-ray imaging system was to independently verify previous radiological survey work and to evaluate the adequacy of the random distribution of the destructive core sampling which had been performed. In performing this work the gamma-ray imager clearly identified the exact locations of the sources of radiation that gave rise to the elevated gamma dose rates measured by conventional health physics surveys of the area. In addition, the gamma-ray imager was able to characterise each hotspot as being either dominated by Cs-137 or by Co-60. The gamma imaging survey was undertaken with a RadScan gamma imaging system deployed on the walkways which run along the lengths of the ponds; this enabled the whole imaging survey to be performed with minimal dose uptake, demonstrating the ALARP principle within decommissioning. (authors)

Hughes, Karl; Shaw, Tracey [Babcock International, B14.1, Sellafield, Cumbria, CA20 1PG (United Kingdom)] [Babcock International, B14.1, Sellafield, Cumbria, CA20 1PG (United Kingdom)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Real time gamma-ray signature identifier  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A real time gamma-ray signature/source identification method and system using principal components analysis (PCA) for transforming and substantially reducing one or more comprehensive spectral libraries of nuclear materials types and configurations into a corresponding concise representation/signature(s) representing and indexing each individual predetermined spectrum in principal component (PC) space, wherein an unknown gamma-ray signature may be compared against the representative signature to find a match or at least characterize the unknown signature from among all the entries in the library with a single regression or simple projection into the PC space, so as to substantially reduce processing time and computing resources and enable real-time characterization and/or identification.

Rowland, Mark (Alamo, CA); Gosnell, Tom B. (Moraga, CA); Ham, Cheryl (Livermore, CA); Perkins, Dwight (Livermore, CA); Wong, James (Dublin, CA)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

424

Compositions containing poly (.gamma.-glutamylcysteinyl)glycines  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of removing heavy metals from aqueous solution, a composition of matter used in effecting said removal, and apparatus used in effecting said removal. One or more of the polypeptides, poly (.gamma.-glutamylcysteinyl)glycines, is immobilized on an inert material in particulate form. Upon contact with an aqueous solution containing heavy metals, the polypeptides sequester the metals, removing them from the solution. There is selectivity of poly (.gamma.-glutamylcysteinyl)glycines having a particular number of monomer repeat units for particular metals. The polypeptides are easily regenerated by contact with a small amount of an organic acid, so that they can be used again to remove heavy metals from solution. This also results in the removal of the metals from the column in a concentrated form.

Jackson, Paul J. (Los Alamos, NM); Delhaize, Emmanuel (Los Alamos, NM); Robinson, Nigel J. (Durham, GB2); Unkefer, Clifford J. (Los Alamos, NM); Furlong, Clement (Seattle, WA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Compositions containing poly ([gamma]glutamylcysteinyl)glycines  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of removing heavy metals from aqueous solution, a composition of matter used in effecting the removal, and the apparatus used in effecting the removal are described. One or more of the polypeptides, poly ([gamma]glutamylcysteinyl)glycines, is immobilized on an inert material in particulate form. Upon contact with an aqueous solution containing heavy metals, the polypeptides sequester the metals, removing them from the solution. There is selectivity of poly ([gamma]glutamylcysteinyl)glycines having a particular number of monomer repeat units for particular metals. The polypeptides are easily regenerated by contact with a small amount of an organic acid, so that they can be used again to remove heavy metals from solution. This also results in the removal of the metals from the column in a concentrated form. 1 figs.

Jackson, P.J.; Delhaize, E.; Robinson, N.J.; Unkefer, C.J.; Furlong, C.

1992-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

426

Neutron-driven gamma-ray laser  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A lasing cylinder emits laser radiation at a gamma-ray wavelength of 0.87 .ANG. when subjected to an intense neutron flux of about 400 eV neutrons. A 250 .ANG. thick layer of Be is provided between two layers of 100 .ANG. thick layer of .sup.57 Co and these layers are supported on a foil substrate. The coated foil is coiled to form the lasing cylinder. Under the neutron flux .sup.57 Co becomes .sup.58 Co by neutron absorption. The .sup.58 Co then decays to .sup.57 Fe by 1.6 MeV proton emission. .sup.57 Fe then transitions by mesne decay to a population inversion for lasing action at 14.4 keV. Recoil from the proton emission separates the .sup.57 Fe from the .sup.57 Co and into the Be, where Mossbauer emission occurs at a gamma-ray wavelength.

Bowman, Charles D. (Los Alamos, NM)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Fissile interrogation using gamma rays from oxygen  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The subject apparatus provides a means to identify the presence of fissionable material or other nuclear material contained within an item to be tested. The system employs a portable accelerator to accelerate and direct protons to a fluorine-compound target. The interaction of the protons with the fluorine-compound target produces gamma rays which are directed at the item to be tested. If the item to be tested contains either a fissionable material or other nuclear material the interaction of the gamma rays with the material contained within the test item with result in the production of neutrons. A system of neutron detectors is positioned to intercept any neutrons generated by the test item. The results from the neutron detectors are analyzed to determine the presence of a fissionable material or other nuclear material.

Smith, Donald; Micklich, Bradley J.; Fessler, Andreas

2004-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

428

Factorization in B to V gamma Decays  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The factorization properties of the radiative decays B {yields} V{gamma} are analyzed at leading order in 1/mb using the soft-collinear effective theory. It is shown that the decay amplitudes can be expressed in terms of a B {yields} V form factor evaluated at q{sup 2} = 0, light-cone distribution amplitudes of the B and V mesons, and calculable hard-scattering kernels. The renormalization-group equations in the effective theory are solved to resume perturbative logarithms of the different scales in the decay process. Phenomenological implications for the B {yields} K*{gamma} branching ratio, isospin asymmetry, and CP asymmetries are discussed, with particular emphasis on possible effects from physics beyond the Standard Model.

Becher, T

2005-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

429

Lorentz violation from gamma-ray bursts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The constancy of light speed is a basic assumption in Einstein's special relativity, and consequently the Lorentz invariance is a fundamental symmetry of space-time in modern physics. However, it is speculated that the speed of light becomes energy-dependent due to the Lorentz invariance violation~(LV) in various new physics theories. We analyse the data of the energetic photons from the gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) by the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope, and find more events to support the energy dependence in the light speed with both linear and quadratic form corrections. We provide two scenarios to understand all the new-released Pass~8 data of bright GRBs by the Fermi-LAT Collaboration, with predictions from such scenarios being testable by future detected GRBs.

Shu Zhang; Bo-Qiang Ma

2014-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

430

Black holes and the absorption rate of cosmological scalar fields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the absorption of a massless scalar field by a static black hole. Using the continuity equation that arises from the Klein-Gordon equation, it is possible to define a normalized absorption rate $\\Gamma(t)$ for the scalar field as it falls into the black hole. It is found that the absorption mainly depends upon the characteristics wavelengths involved in the physical system: the mean wavenumber and the width of the wave packet, but that it is insensitive to the scalar field's strength. By taking a limiting procedure, we determine the minimum absorption fraction of the scalar field's mass by the black hole, which is around 50%.

L. Arturo Urena-Lopez; Lizbeth M. Fernandez

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

431

Cumulative arsenic exposure and lung cancer in smelter workers: a dose-response study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The cause-specific mortality was followed through 1981 in a cohort of 3,916 male Swedish smelter workers employed for at least 3 months from 1928 through 1967. Arsenic levels in the air of all workplaces within the smelter were estimated for three different time periods. Using this exposure matrix and detailed information of the work history, cumulative arsenic exposure could be computed for each worker. Standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) were calculated for several dose categories using age-specific mortality rates from the county where the smelter was situated. A positive dose-response relationship was found between cumulative arsenic exposure and lung cancer mortality with an overall SMR of 372 (304-450, 95% confidence interval). The lung cancer mortality was related to the estimated average intensity of exposure to arsenic but not to the duration. No positive dose-response relationship was found between arsenic and ischemic heart disease or cerebrovascular disease. There was also no evident dose-response relationship between estimated exposure to sulfur dioxide and lung cancer.

Jaerup, L.P.; Pershagen, G.; Wall, S.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Gamma-Ray Line Observations with RHESSI  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) has been observing gamma-ray lines from the Sun and the Galaxy since its launch in February 2002. Here I summarize the status of RHESSI observations of solar lines (nuclear de-excitation, neutron capture, and positron annihilation), the lines of $^{26}$Al and $^{60}$Fe from the inner Galaxy, and the search for positron annihilation in novae.

David M. Smith

2004-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

433

NO CORRELATION BETWEEN HOST GALAXY METALLICITY AND GAMMA-RAY ENERGY RELEASE FOR LONG-DURATION GAMMA-RAY BURSTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We compare the redshifts, host galaxy metallicities, and isotropic (E{sub {gamma}},iso) and beaming-corrected (E{sub {gamma}}) gamma-ray energy release of 16 long-duration gamma-ray bursts (LGRBs) at z < 1. From this comparison, we find no statistically significant correlation between host metallicity and redshift, E{sub {gamma}},iso, or E{sub {gamma}}. These results are at odds with previous theoretical and observational predictions of an inverse correlation between gamma-ray energy release and host metallicity, as well as the standard predictions of metallicity-driven wind effects in stellar evolutionary models. We consider the implications that these results have for LGRB progenitor scenarios, and discuss our current understanding of the role that metallicity plays in the production of LGRBs.

Levesque, Emily M.; Kewley, Lisa J. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Soderberg, Alicia M.; Berger, Edo, E-mail: emsque@ifa.hawaii.ed, E-mail: kewley@ifa.hawaii.ed, E-mail: asoderbe@cfa.harvard.ed, E-mail: eberger@cfa.harvard.ed [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden St., MS-20, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

434

Statistical Exposure Estimation Spatial Confounding Bias  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and 3 Account for spatial correlation in the health outcome data. Applications include air pollution Epidemiology Estimates of chronic health effects of air pollution are identified from cross-sectional (i Exposure Estimation Methods for Air Pollution Often researchers estimate ambient concentrations and use

Paciorek, Chris

435

Energy Management Through Innovative Rates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of energy efficiency in the industrial sector and specific rate design alternatives for doing so....

Williams, M. L.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Exposure-Relevant Ozone Chemistry in Occupied Spaces  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ozone, an ambient pollutant, is transformed into other airborne pollutants in the indoor environment. In this dissertation, the type and amount of byproducts that result from ozone reactions with common indoor surfaces, surface residues, and vapors were determined, pollutant concentrations were related to occupant exposure, and frameworks were developed to predict byproduct concentrations under various indoor conditions. In Chapter 2, an analysis is presented of secondary organic aerosol formation from the reaction of ozone with gas-phase, terpene-containing consumer products in small chamber experiments under conditions relevant for residential and commercial buildings. The full particle size distribution was continuously monitored, and ultrafine and fine particle concentrations were in the range of 10 to>300 mu g m-3. Particle nucleation and growth dynamics were characterized.Chapter 3 presents an investigation of ozone reactions with aircraft cabin surfaces including carpet, seat fabric, plastics, and laundered and worn clothing fabric. Small chamber experiments were used to determine ozone deposition velocities, ozone reaction probabilities, byproduct emission rates, and byproduct yields for each surface category. The most commonly detected byproducts included C1?C10 saturated aldehydes and skin oil oxidation products. For all materials, emission rates were higher with ozone than without. Experimental results were used to predict byproduct exposure in the cabin and compare to other environments. Byproduct levels are predicted to be similar to ozone levels in the cabin, which have been found to be tens to low hundreds of ppb in the absence of an ozone converter. In Chapter 4, a model is presented that predicts ozone uptake by and byproduct emission from residual chemicals on surfaces. The effects of input parameters (residue surface concentration, ozone concentration, reactivity of the residue and the surface, near-surface airflow conditions, and byproduct yield) were explored. In Chapter 5, the reaction of ozone with permethrin, a residual insecticide used in aircraft cabins, to form phosgene is investigated. A derivatization technique was developed to detect phosgene at low levels, and chamber experiments were conducted with permethrin-coated cabin materials. It was determined that phosgene formation, if it occurs in the aircraft cabin, is not likely to exceed the relevant, health-based phosgene exposure guidelines.

Coleman, Beverly Kaye

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Solution To The Gamma Ray Burst Mystery?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Photoexcitation and ionization of partially ionized heavy atoms in highly relativistic flows by interstellar photons, followed by their reemission in radiative recombination and decay, boost star-light into beamed $\\gamma$ rays along the flow direction. Repeated excitation/decay of highly relativistic baryonic ejecta from merger or accretion induced collapse of neutron stars in dense stellar regions (DSRs), like galactic cores, globular clusters and super star-clusters, can convert enough kinetic energy in such events in distant galaxies into cosmological gamma ray bursts (GRBs). The model predicts remarkably well all the main observed temporal and spectral properties of GRBs. Its success strongly suggests that GRBs are $\\gamma$ ray tomography pictures of DSRs in galaxies at cosmological distances with unprecedented resolution: A time resolution of $dt\\sim 1~ms$ in a GRB can resolve stars at a Hubble distance which are separated by only $D\\sim 10^{10}cm$. This is equivalent to the resolving power of an optical telescope with a diameter larger than one Astronomical Unit!

Nir J. Shaviv; Arnon Dar

1996-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

438

The Galactic gamma-ray club  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The exclusive Galactic gamma-ray club has opened up to new members. Supernova remnants, pulsar wind nebulae, and massive binary systems hosting a compact object have recently joined the young pulsars as firmly established sources of gamma rays in the Milky Way. Massive young stellar clusters are on the waiting list to join the club. Only the fine imaging recently obtained at TeV energies could resolve specific sources. The samples are sparse, but raise exciting questions. The jet or pulsar-wind origin of the emission in binaries has been hotly debated, but it seems that both types of systems have been recently detected. The nature of the radiation in shock accelerators is still questioned: do nuclei contribute a lot, a little, or not to the gamma rays and what energy do they carry away from the shock budget? The acceleration process and the structural evolution of the pulsar winds are still uncertain. The magnetic field distribution in all these systems is a key, but poorly constrained, ingredient to model the multi-wavelength data, particle transport and electron ageing. It must, however, be determined in order to efficiently probe particle distributions and the acceleration mechanisms. The source samples soon to be expected from GLAST and the Cherenkov telescopes should bring new valuable test cases and they will, for the first time, shed statistical light on the collective behaviour of these different types of accelerators.

Isabelle A. Grenier

2008-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

439

Toward a better understanding of the gamma index: Investigation of parameters with a surface-based distance method  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: The purpose of this work was to clarify the interactions between the parameters used in the {gamma} index with the surface-based distance method, which itself can be viewed as a generalized version of the {gamma} index. The examined parameters included the distance to agreement (DTA)/dose difference (DD) criteria, the percentage used as a passing criterion, and the passing percentage for given DTA/DD criteria. The specific aims of our work were (1) to understand the relationships between the parameters used in the {gamma} index, (2) to determine the detection limit, or the minimum detectable error, of the {gamma} index with a given set of parameters, and (3) to establish a procedure to determine parameters that are consistent with the capacity of an IMRT QA system. Methods: The surface-based distance technique with dose gradient factor was derived, and then the relationship between surface-based distance and {gamma} index was established. The dose gradient factor for plans and measurements of 10 IMRT patients, 10 spine stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) patients, and 3 Radiological Physics Center (RPC) head and neck phantom were calculated and evaluated. The detection limits of the surface-based distance and {gamma} index methods were examined by introducing known shifts to the 10 IMRT plans. Results: The means of the dose gradient factors were 0.434 mm/% and 0.956 mm/% for the SRS and IMRT plans, respectively. Key quantities (including the mean and 90th and 99th percentiles of the distance distribution) of the surface-based distance distribution between two dose distributions were linearly proportional to the actual shifts. However, the passing percentage of the {gamma} index for a given set of DTA/DD criteria was not associated with the actual shift. For IMRT, using the standard quality assurance criteria of 3 mm/3% DTA/DD and a 90% passing rate, we found that the detection limit of the {gamma} index in terms of global shift was 4.07 mm/4.07 % without noise. Conclusions: Surface-based distance is a direct measure of the difference between two dose distributions and can be used to evaluate or determine parameters for use in calculating the {gamma} index. The dose gradient factor represents the weighting between spatial and dose shift and should be determined before DTA/DD criteria are set. The authors also present a procedure to determine {gamma} index parameters from measurements.

Li Heng; Dong Lei; Zhang Lifei; Yang, James N.; Gillin, Michael T.; Zhu, X. Ronald [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

440

X(3): An exactly separable {gamma}-rigid version of the X(5) critical point symmetry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A {gamma}-rigid version (with {gamma} = 0) of the X(5) critical point symmetry is constructed. The model, to be called X(3) since it is proved to contain three degrees of freedom, utilizes an infinite well potential, is based on exact separation of variables, and leads to parameter-free (up to overall scale factors) predictions for spectra and B(E2) transition rates which are in good agreement with existing experimental data for {sup 172}Os and {sup 186}Pt. An unexpected similarity of the {beta}{sub 1} bands of the X(5) nuclei {sup 150}Nd, {sup 152}Sm, {sup 154}Gd, and {sup 156}Dy to the X(3) predictions is observed.

Bonatsos, D., E-mail: bonat@inp.demokritos.gr; Lenis, D., E-mail: lenis@inp.demokritos.gr; Petrellis, D. [N.C.S.R., Institute of Nuclear Physics (Greece)], E-mail: petrellis@inp.demokritos.gr; Yigitoglu, I. [Istanbul University, Hasan Ali Yucel Faculty of Education (Turkey)], E-mail: yigitoglu@istanbul.edu.tr

2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gamma exposure rate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Search for Short Duration Bursts of TeV $\\gamma$ Rays with the Milagrito Telescope  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Milagrito water Cherenkov telescope operated for over a year. The most probable gamma-ray energy was ~1 TeV and the trigger rate was as high as 400 Hz. We have developed an efficient technique for searching the entire sky for short duration bursts of TeV photons. Such bursts may result from "traditional" gamma-ray bursts that were not in the field-of-view of any other instruments, the evaporation of primordial black holes, or some as yet undiscovered phenomenon. We have begun to search the Milagrito data set for bursts of duration 10 seconds. Here we will present the technique and the expected results. Final results will be presented at the conference.

Atkins, R; Berley, D; Chen, M L; Coyne, D G; Delay, R S; Dingus, B L; Dorfan, D E; Ellsworth, R W; Evans, D; Falcone, A D; Fleysher, L; Fleysher, R; Gisler, G; Goodman, J A; Haines, T J; Hoffman, C M; Hugenberger, S; Kelley, L A; Leonor, I; Macri, J R; McConnell, M; McCullough, J F; McEnery, J E; Miller, R S; Mincer, A I; Morales, M F; Némethy, P; Ryan, J M; Schneider, M; Shen, B; Shoup, A L; Sinnis, G; Smith, A J; Sullivan, G W; Thompson, T N; Tümer, T O; Wang, K; Wascko, M O; Westerhoff, S; Williams, D A; Yang, T; Yodh, G B

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

The 40Ca(alpha,gamma)44Ti reaction in the energy regime of supernova nucleosynthesis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The 44Ti(t1/2 = 59 y) nuclide, an important signature of supernova nucleosynthesis, has recently been observed as live radioactivity by gamma-ray astronomy from the Cas A remnant. We investigate in the laboratory the major 44Ti production reaction, 40Ca(alpha,gamma)44Ti (E_cm = 0.6-1.2 MeV/u), by direct off- line counting of 44Ti nuclei. The yield, significantly higher than inferred from previous experiments, is analyzed in terms of a statistical model using microscopic nuclear inputs. The associated stellar rate has important astrophysical consequences, increasing the calculated supernova 44Ti yield by a factor ~2 over previous estimates and bringing it closer to Cas A observations.

H. Nassar; M. Paul; I. Ahmad; Y. Ben-Dov; J. Caggiano; S. Ghelberg; S. Goriely; J. P. Greene; M. Hass; A. Heger; A. Heinz; D. J. Henderson; R. V. F. Janssens; C. L. Jiang; Y. Kashiv; B. S. Nara Singh; A. Ofan; R. C. Pardo; T. Pennington; K. E. Rehm; G. Savard; R. Scott; R. Vondrasek

2006-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

443

Search for Short Duration Bursts of TeV Gamma Rays with the Milagrito Telescope  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Milagrito water Cherenkov telescope operated for over a year. The most probable gamma-ray energy was ~1 TeV and the trigger rate was as high as 400 Hz. We have developed an efficient technique for searching the entire sky for short duration bursts of TeV photons. Such bursts may result from "traditional" gamma-ray bursts that were not in the field-of-view of any other instruments, the evaporation of primordial black holes, or some as yet undiscovered phenomenon. We have begun to search the Milagrito data set for bursts of duration 10 seconds. Here we will present the technique and the expected results. Final results will be presented at the conference.

R. Atkins; W. Benbow; D. Berley; M. -L. Chen; D. G. Coyne; R. S. Delay; B. L. Dingus; D. E. Dorfan; R. W. Ellsworth; D. Evans; A. Falcone; L. Fleysher; R. Fleysher; G. Gisler; J. A. Goodman; T. J. Haines; C. M. Hoffman; S. Hugenberger; L. A. Kelley; I. Leonor; J. Macri; M. McConnell; J. F. McCullough; J. E. McEnery; R. S. Miller; A. I. Mincer; M. F. Morales; P. Nemethy; J. M. Ryan; M. Schneider; B. Shen; A. Shoup; G. Sinnis; A. J. Smith; G. W. Sullivan; T. N. Thompson; O. T. Tumer; K. Wang; M. O. Wascko; S. Westerhoff; D. A. Williams; T. Yang; G. B. Yodh

1999-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

444

Observation of eta_c^{prime} Production in gamma gamma Fusion at CLEO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report on the observation of the eta_{c}^{prime}(2^{1}S_{0}), the radial excitation of eta_{c}(1^{1}S_{0}) ground state of charmonium, in the two-photon fusion reaction gamma gamma rightarrow eta_{c}^{prime} rightarrow K_{S}^{0}K^{pm}pi^{mp} in 13.6 fb^{-1} of CLEO II/II.V data and 13.1 fb^{-1} of CLEO III data. We obtain M(eta_{c}^{prime})=3642.9 pm 3.1(stat) pm1.5(syst) MeV, and M(eta_{c})=2981.8 pm1.3(stat) pm 1.5(syst) MeV. The corresponding values of hyperfine splittings between ^{1}S_{0} and ^{3}S_{1} states are \\Delta M_{hf}(1S)=115.1 pm 2.0 MeV, Delta M_{hf}(2S)=43.1 pm3.4 MeV. Assuming that the eta_{c} and eta_{c}^{prime} have equal branching fractions to K_{S}K pi, we obtain Gamma_{gamma gamma}(eta_{c}^{prime})=1.3 pm 0.6 keV.

D. M. Asner; CLEO Collaboration

2005-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

445

Measurement of the total hadronic cross section in tagged. gamma. gamma. reactions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a measurement of the total cross section for {gamma}{gamma}{r arrow}hadrons, with one photon quasireal and the other a spacelike photon of mass squared {minus}{ital Q}{sup 2}. Results are presented as a function of {ital Q}{sup 2} and the {gamma}{gamma} center-of-mass energy {ital W}, with the {ital Q}{sup 2} range extending from 0.2 to 60 GeV{sup 2}, and {ital W} in the range from 2 to 10 GeV. The data were taken with the TPC/Two-Gamma facility at the SLAC {ital e}{sup +}{ital e}{sup {minus}} storage ring PEP, which was operated at a beam energy of 14.5 GeV. The cross section exhibits a gentle falloff with increasing {ital W}. Its {ital Q}{sup 2} dependence is shown to be well described by an incoherent sum of vector-meson and pointlike scattering over most of the observed {ital W} range. Agreement at high {ital Q}{sup 2} is improved if a minimum-{ital p}{sub {ital T}} cutoff (motivated by QCD) is imposed on the pointlike contribution.

Aihara, H.; Alston-Garnjost, M.; Avery, R.E.; Barker, A.R.; Bauer, D.A.; Bay, A.; Belcinski, R.; Bingham, H.H.; Bloom, E.D.; Buchanan, C.D.; Caldwell, D.O.; Chao, H.; Chun, S.; Clark, A.R.; Cowan, G.D.; Crane, D.A.; Dahl, O.I.; Daoudi, M.; Derby, K.A.; Eastman, J.J.; Eberhard, P.H.; Edberg, T.K.; Eisner, A.M.; Erne, F.C.; Fairfield, K.H.; Fridman, A.; Godfrey, G.; Hauptman, J.M.; Ho, C.; Hofmann, W.; Kamae, T.; Kenney, R.W.; Khacheryan, S.; Kofler, R.R.; Lambert, D.J.; Langeveld, W.G.J.; Layter, J.G.; Lin, W.T.; Linde, F.L.; Loken, S.C.; Lu, A.; Lynch, G.R.; Lys, J.E.; Madaras, R.J.; Magnuson, B.D.; Marsiske, H.; Masek, G.E.; Mathis, L.G.; Maxfield, S.J.; McNeil, R.R.; Miller, E.S.; Nicol, N.A.; Nygren, D.R.; Oddone, P.J.; Oh, H.; Oyang, Y.; Paar, H.P.; Palounek, A.P.T.; Park, S.K.; Pellett, D.E.; Pripstein, M.; Ronan, M.T.; Ross, R.R.; Rouse, F.R.; Schwitkis, K.A.; Sens, J.C.; Shapiro, G.; Shen, B.C.; Smith, J.R.; Steinman, J.S.; Stephens, R.W.; Stevenson, M.L.; Stork, D.H.; Strauss,; TPC /Two-Gamma Collaboration

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

A Link between Prompt Optical and Prompt Gamma-Ray Emission in Gamma-Ray Bursts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The prompt optical emission that arrives with gamma-rays from a cosmic gamma-ray burst (GRB) is a signature of the engine powering the burst, the properties of the ultra-relativistic ejecta of the explosion, and the ejecta's interactions with the surroundings. Until now, only GRB 990123 had been detected at optical wavelengths during the burst phase. Its prompt optical emission was variable and uncorrelated with the prompt gamma-ray emission, suggesting that the optical emission was generated by a reverse shock arising from the ejecta's collision with the surrounding material. Here we report prompt optical emission from GRB 041219a. It is variable and correlated with the prompt gamma-rays, indicating a common origin for the optical light and the gamma-rays. Within the context of the standard fireball model of GRBs, we attribute this new optical component to internal shocks driven into the burst ejecta by variations of the inner engine. The correlated optical emission is a direct probe of the jet isolated from the medium. The timing of the uncorrelated optical emission is strongly dependent on the nature of the medium.

W. T. Vestrand; P. R. Wozniak; J. A. Wren; E. E. Fenimore; T. Sakamoto; R. R. White; D. Casperson; H. Davis; S. Evans; M. Galassi; K. E. McGowan; J. A. Schier; J. W. Asa; S. D. Barthelmy; J. R. Cummings; N. Gehrels; D. Hullinger; H. A. Krimm; C. B. Markwardt; K. McLean; D. Palmer; A. Parsons; J. Tueller

2005-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

447

A Retrospective Review of Supratherapeutic Modafinil Exposures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as a heart rate >100 bpm, and hypertension was defined as aand ranged from 101 to 168 bpm. Hypertension occurred in sixrevealed a heart rate of 64 bpm and blood pressure of 137/78

Carstairs, Shaun D.; Urquhart, Andrew; Hoffman, Justin; Clark, Richard F.; Cantrell, F. Lee

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Geographical scenario uncertainty in generic fate and exposure factors of toxic pollutants for life-cycle impact assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In environmental life-cycle assessments (LCA), fate and exposure factors account for the general fate and exposure properties of chemicals under generic environmental conditions by means of 'evaluative' multi-media fate and exposure box models. To assess the effect of using different generic environmental conditions, fate and exposure factors of chemicals emitted under typical conditions of (1) Western Europe, (2) Australia and (3) the United States of America were compared with the multi-media fate and exposure box model USES-LCA. Comparing the results of the three evaluative environments, it was found that the uncertainty in fate and exposure factors for ecosystems and humans due to choice of an evaluative environment, as represented by the ratio of the 97.5th and 50th percentile, is between a factor 2 and 10. Particularly, fate and exposure factors of emissions causing effects in fresh water ecosystems and effects on human health have relatively high uncertainty. This uncertainty i s mainly caused by the continental difference in the average soil erosion rate, the dimensions of the fresh water and agricultural soil compartment, and the fraction of drinking water coming from ground water.

Huijbregts, Mark A.J.; Lundi, Sven; McKone, Thomas E.; van de Meent, D.

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

FIVE NEW MILLISECOND PULSARS FROM A RADIO SURVEY OF 14 UNIDENTIFIED FERMI-LAT GAMMA-RAY SOURCES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have discovered five millisecond pulsars (MSPs) in a survey of 14 unidentified Fermi Large Area Telescope sources in the southern sky using the Parkes radio telescope. PSRs J0101-6422, J1514-4946, and J1902-5105 reside in binaries, while PSRs J1658-5324 and J1747-4036 are isolated. Using an ephemeris derived from timing observations of PSR J0101-6422 (P = 2.57 ms, DM = 12 pc cm{sup -3}), we have detected {gamma}-ray pulsations and measured its proper motion. Its {gamma}-ray spectrum (a power law of {Gamma} = 0.9 with a cutoff at 1.6 GeV) and efficiency are typical of other MSPs, but its radio and {gamma}-ray light curves challenge simple geometric models of emission. The high success rate of this survey-enabled by selecting {gamma}-ray sources based on their detailed spectral characteristics-and other similarly successful searches indicate that a substantial fraction of the local population of MSPs may soon be known.

Kerr, M. [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Department of Physics and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Camilo, F. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Johnson, T. J. [National Academy of Sciences, Washington, DC 20001 (United States); Ferrara, E. C.; Harding, A. K. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Guillemot, L.; Kramer, M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie, Auf dem Huegel 69, 53121 Bonn (Germany); Hessels, J. [Netherlands Institute for Radio Astronomy (ASTRON), Postbus 2, 7990 AA Dwingeloo (Netherlands); Johnston, S.; Keith, M.; Reynolds, J. E. [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, Australia Telescope National Facility, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia); Ransom, S. M. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO), Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Ray, P. S.; Wood, K. S. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375-5352 (United States); Sarkissian, J., E-mail: kerrm@stanford.edu, E-mail: fernando@astro.columbia.edu, E-mail: tyrel.j.johnson@gmail.com [CSIRO Parkes Observatory, Parkes, NSW 2870 (Australia)

2012-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

450

THE EXTRAGALACTIC BACKGROUND LIGHT FROM THE MEASUREMENTS OF THE ATTENUATION OF HIGH-ENERGY GAMMA-RAY SPECTRUM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The attenuation of high-energy gamma-ray spectrum due to the electron-positron pair production against the extragalactic background light (EBL) provides an indirect method to measure the EBL of the universe. We use the measurements of the absorption features of the gamma-rays from blazars as seen by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope to explore the EBL flux density and constrain the EBL spectrum, star formation rate density (SFRD), and photon escape fraction from galaxies out to z = 6. Our results are basically consistent with the existing determinations of the quantities. We find a larger photon escape fraction at high redshifts, especially at z = 3, compared to the result from recent Ly{alpha} measurements. Our SFRD result is consistent with the data from both gamma-ray burst and ultraviolet (UV) observations in the 1{sigma} level. However, the average SFRD we obtain at z {approx}> 3 matches the gamma-ray data better than the UV data. Thus our SFRD result at z {approx}> 6 favors the fact that star formation alone is sufficiently high enough to reionize the universe.

Gong Yan; Cooray, Asantha [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States)

2013-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

451

Workshop Report on Atomic Bomb Dosimetry--Residual Radiation Exposure: Recent Research and Suggestions for Future Studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There is a need for accurate dosimetry for studies of health effects in the Japanese atomic bomb survivors because of the important role that these studies play in worldwide radiation protection standards. International experts have developed dosimetry systems, such as the Dosimetry System 2002 (DS02), which assess the initial radiation exposure to gamma rays and neutrons but only briefly consider the possibility of some minimal contribution to the total body dose by residual radiation exposure. In recognition of the need for an up-to-date review of the topic of residual radiation exposure in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, recently reported studies were reviewed at a technical session at the 57th Annual Meeting of the Health Physics Society in Sacramento, California, 22-26 July 2012. A one-day workshop was also held to provide time for detailed discussion of these newer studies and to evaluate their potential use in clarifying the residual radiation exposures to the atomic-bomb survivors at Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Suggestions for possible future studies are also included in this workshop report.

none,

2013-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

452

Gamma Knife Radiosurgery for the Treatment of Cystic Cerebral Metastases  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To assess the role of Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS) in the treatment of nonsurgical cystic brain metastasis, and to determine predictors of response to GKRS. Methods: We reviewed a prospectively maintained database of brain metastases patients treated at our institution between 2006 and 2010. All lesions with a cystic component were identified, and volumetric analysis was done to measure percentage of cystic volume on day of treatment and consecutive follow-up MRI scans. Clinical, radiologic, and dosimetry parameters were reviewed to establish the overall response of cystic metastases to GKRS as well as identify potential predictive factors of response. Results: A total of 111 lesions in 73 patients were analyzed; 57% of lesions received prior whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT). Lung carcinoma was the primary cancer in 51% of patients, 10% breast, 10% colorectal, 4% melanoma, and 26% other. Fifty-seven percent of the patients were recursive partitioning analysis class 1, the remainder class 2. Mean target volume was 3.3 mL (range, 0.1-23 mL). Median prescription dose was 21 Gy (range, 15-24 Gy). Local control rates were 91%, 63%, and 37% at 6, 12, and 18 months, respectively. Local control was improved in lung primary and worse in patients with prior WBRT (univariate). Only lung primary predicted local control in multivariate analysis, whereas age and tumor volume did not. Lesions with a large cystic component did not show a poorer response compared with those with a small cystic component. Conclusions: This study supports the use of GKRS in the management of nonsurgical cystic metastases, despite a traditionally perceived poorer response. Our local control rates are comparable to a matched cohort of noncystic brain metastases, and therefore the presence of a large cystic component should not deter the use of GKRS. Predictors of response included tumor subtype. Prior WBRT decreased effectiveness of SRS for local control rates.

Ebinu, Julius O.; Lwu, Shelly; Monsalves, Eric; Arayee, Mandana [Division of Neurosurgery, Department of Surgery, Toronto Western Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)] [Division of Neurosurgery, Department of Surgery, Toronto Western Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Chung, Caroline; Laperriere, Normand J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Kulkarni, Abhaya V.; Goetz, Pablo [Division of Neurosurgery, Department of Surgery, The Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)] [Division of Neurosurgery, Department of Surgery, The Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Zadeh, Gelareh, E-mail: gelareh.zadeh@uhn.on.ca [Division of Neurosurgery, Department of Surgery, Toronto Western Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)] [Division of Neurosurgery, Department of Surgery, Toronto Western Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Estimating Pedestrian Accident Exposure: Approaches to a Statewide Pedestrian Exposure Database  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pedestrian Exposure to Risk of Road Accident in New Zealand.Accident Analysis and Prevention, Vol. 27, No. 3, 1995, pp.Automated Traffic Accident Surveillance and Analysis System,

Greene-Roesel, Ryan; Diogenes, Mara Chagas; Ragland, David R

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

The resonance triplet at E_alpha = 4.5 MeV in the 40Ca(alpha,gamma)44Ti reaction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The 40Ca(alpha,gamma)44Ti reaction is believed to be the main production channel for the radioactive nuclide 44Ti in core-collapse supernovae. Radiation from decaying 44Ti has been observed so far for two supernova remnants, and a precise knowledge of the 44Ti production rate may help improve supernova models. The 40Ca(alpha,gamma)44Ti astrophysical reaction rate is determined by a number of narrow resonances. Here, the resonance triplet at E_alpha = 4497, 4510, and 4523 keV is studied both by activation, using an underground laboratory for the gamma counting, and by in-beam gamma spectrometry. The target properties are determined by elastic recoil detection analysis and by nuclear reactions. The strengths of the three resonances are determined to omega gamma = (0.92+-0.20), (6.2+-0.5), and (1.32+-0.24) eV, respectively, a factor of two more precise than before. The strengths of this resonance triplet may be used in future works as a point of reference. In addition, the present new data directly affect the astrophysical reaction rate at relatively high temperatures, above 3.5 GK.

Konrad Schmidt; Shavkat Akhmadaliev; Michael Anders; Daniel Bemmerer; Konstanze Boretzky; Antonio Caciolli; Detlev Degering; Mirco Dietz; Rugard Dressler; Zoltán Elekes; Zsolt Fülöp; György Gyürky; Roland Hannaske; Arnd R. Junghans; Michele Marta; Marie-Luise Menzel; Frans Munnik; Dorothea Schumann; Ronald Schwengner; Tamás Szücs; Andreas Wagner; Dmitry Yakorev; Kai Zuber

2013-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

455

Observation of eta_c^' Production in gamma-gamma Fusion at CLEO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report on the observation of the eta_c^' (2 ^1S_0), the radial excitation of eta_c (1 ^1S_0) ground state of charmonium, in the two-photon fusion reaction gamma gamma to eta_c^' to K_S^0 K^{\\pm} pi^{\\mp} in 13.4 fb^{-1} of CLEO II/II.V data and 9.2 fb^{-1} of CLEO III data. The data have been analyzed to extract the eta_c^' resonance parameters.

J. Ernst

2003-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

456

What can the L3 $\\gamma\\gamma ll$ events be?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider the 4 $\\gamma\\gamma ll$ ($l=\\mu,\\ e$) events reported by the L3 collaboration, and go through the logical possibilities which could explain the events. If they are not coincidental bremsstrahlung events, we find that the physics which they could point to is extremely limited. One possibility would be to have a new 60 GeV scalar (or pseudoscalar) particle $X^0$ with an off-diagonal coupling to a $Z$ and $Z'$ which is non-perturbative ($\\alpha > 1$), where the $Z'$ couplings to $\

Garisto, R; Garisto, Robert; Ng, John N.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Searches for Lepton Flavor Violation in the Decays tau+- ---> e+- gamma and tau+- ---> mu+- gamma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Searches for lepton-flavor-violating decays of a {tau} lepton to a lighter mass lepton and a photon have been performed with the entire dataset of (963 {+-} 7) x 10{sup 6} {tau} decays collected by the BABAR detector near the {Upsilon}(4S), {Upsilon}(3S) and {Upsilon}(2S) resonances. The searches yield no evidence of signals and they set upper limits on the branching fractions of {Beta}({tau}{sup {+-}} {yields} e{sup {+-}}{gamma}) < 3.3 x 10{sup -8} and {Beta}({tau}{sup {+-}} {yields} {mu}{sup {+-}}{gamma}) < 4.4 x 10{sup -8} at 90% confidence level.

Aubert, Bernard; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; /INFN, Bari /Bari U.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; /Bergen U.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, David Nathan; Hooberman, B.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS; /more authors.; ,

2010-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

458

Instructions for calibrating gamma detectors using the Canberra-Nuclear Data Genie Gamma Spectroscopy System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A straight forward protocol provides a way to guide the calibration of a gamma detector for a particular geometry and material. Several programs have used the Low Level Gamma Counting Facility of the Health and Ecological Assessment Division of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to count a variety of large environmental samples contained in several unique geometries. The equipment and calibration requirements needed to analyze these types of samples are explained. This document describes the calibration protocol that has been developed and describes how it is used to calibrate the detectors.

Brunk, J.L.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Coal deposit characterization by gamma-gamma density/percent dry ash relationships  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Density/Ash Relationship . APPLICATION OF THE GAMMA-GAMMA DENSITY/PERCENT DRY ASH RELATIONSHIPS The Density/Ash Relationship of a South Texas Lignite Deposit Characterization of a South Texas Lignite Deposit CONCLUSIONS REFERENCES. 52 53 53 53... 58 64 67 6g 80 87 LIST OF TABLES TABLE I Coal Classification by Rank. 2 Common Minerals in Coal. 3 Results of Linear Regression Analyses for a South Texas Lignite Deposit. 4 Variability of Geophysica11y-Derived Percent Dry Ash Values...

Wright, David Scott

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

National Utility Rate Database: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

When modeling solar energy technologies and other distributed energy systems, using high-quality expansive electricity rates is essential. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) developed a utility rate platform for entering, storing, updating, and accessing a large collection of utility rates from around the United States. This utility rate platform lives on the Open Energy Information (OpenEI) website, OpenEI.org, allowing the data to be programmatically accessed from a web browser, using an application programming interface (API). The semantic-based utility rate platform currently has record of 1,885 utility rates and covers over 85% of the electricity consumption in the United States.

Ong, S.; McKeel, R.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gamma exposure rate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Gamma-ray burst data from DMSP satellites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A number of gamma-ray bursts have been detected by means of gamma-ray detectors aboard three Air Force Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) satellites, in polar orbits at 800 km altitude. The gamma-ray data have a 2-second resolving time, and are usually telemetered in 5 energy bins in the range 50--1000 keV. Although it is not possible to detect gamma-ray bursts when the DMSP satellites are passing through the radiation belt or the South Atlantic Anomaly, or when the source is obscured by the Earth, a number of gamma-ray bursts have been detected by two or even three of the satellites. The DMSP data may be of considerable, assistance in evaluating time histories, locations, and spectra of gamma-ray bursts.

Terrell, J.; Klebesadel, R.W.; Lee, P. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Griffee, J.W. (Sandia