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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gamma exposure rate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Effects of gamma radiation on Serratia marcescens; a comparison of effects of two different exposure rates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

'Donovan, Effect of gamma radiation on Serratia marcescens: Comparison of the radiosensi- tivity of pigmented and nonpigmented cells. Radiation Res, 48, 40-52 (1971). 18. Alison P. Casarett, Radiation ~Biolo . p. 159. Prentice-Hall, Inc. , Englewood Cliffs... EFFECTS OF GAMMA RADIATION ON SL'RNATIA MARCESCENS A COMPARISON OF EFFECTS OF TWO DIFFERENT EXPOSURE RATES A Thesis by CHRISTY ANNETTE MOORE Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements...

Moore, Christy Annette

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Results of calculations of external gamma radiation exposure rates from fallout and related radionuclide compositions. Operation Teapot, 1955  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents data on calculated gamma radiation exposure rates and ground deposition of related radionuclides resulting from events that deposited detectable radioactivity outside the Nevada Test Site complex.

Hicks, H.G.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Assessment of gamma dose rates from terrestrial exposure in Serbia and Montenegro  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......obtained in this study, the radiation hazard was found to be...area. INTRODUCTION Gamma radiation emitted from naturally occuring radioisotopes, such as...Norwegian population from naturally occuring radiation and from Chernobyl fallout......

S. Dragovic; Lj. Jankovic; A. Onjia

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Historical estimates of external gamma exposure and collective external gamma exposure from testing at the Nevada Test Site. I. Test series through HARDTACK II, 1958  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1959, the Test Manager's Committee to Establish Fallout Doses calculated estimated external gamma exposure at populated locations based upon measurements of external gamma-exposure rate. Using these calculations and estimates of population, we have tabulated the collective estimated external gamma exposures for communities within established fallout patterns. The total collective estimated external gamma exposure is 85,000 person-R. The greatest collective exposures occurred in three general areas: Saint George, Utah; Ely, Nevada; and Las Vegas, Nevada. Three events, HARRY (May 19, 1953), BEE (March 22, 1955), and SMOKY (August 31, 1957), accounted for over half of the total collective estimated external gamma exposure. The bases of the calculational models for external gamma exposure of ''infinite exposure,'' ''estimated exposure,'' and ''one year effective biological exposure'' are explained. 4 figs., 7 tabs.

Anspaugh, L.R.; Church, B.W.

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Neutrino Event Rates from Gamma Ray Bursts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We recalculate the diffuse flux of high energy neutrinos produced by Gamma Ray Bursts (GRB) in the relativistic fireball model. Although we confirm that the average single burst produces only ~10^{-2} high energy neutrino events in a detector with 1 km^2 effective area, i.e. about 10 events per year, we show that the observed rate is dominated by burst-to-burst fluctuations which are very large. We find event rates that are expected to be larger by one order of magnitude, likely more, which are dominated by a few very bright bursts. This greatly simplifies their detection.

F. Halzen; D. W. Hooper

1999-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

6

Reaction Rate Sensitivity of the gamma-Process Path  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The location of the (gamma,p)/(gamma,n) and (gamma,alpha)/(gamma,n) line at gamma-process temperatures is discussed, using recently published reaction rates based on global Hauser-Feshbach calculations. The results can directly be compared to previously published, classic gamma-process discussions. The nuclei exhibiting the largest sensitivity to uncertainties in nuclear structure and reaction parameters are specified.

T. Rauscher

2004-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

7

Total Gamma Count Rate Analysis Method for Nondestructive Assay Characterization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new approach to nondestructively characterize waste for disposal, based on total gamma response, has been developed at the Idaho Cleanup Project by CH2M-WG Idaho, LLC and Idaho State University, and is called the total gamma count rate analysis method. The total gamma count rate analysis method measures gamma interactions that produce energetic electrons or positrons in a detector. Based on previous experience with waste assays, the radionuclide content of the waste container is then determined. This approach potentially can yield minimum detection limits of less than 10 nCi/g. The importance of this method is twofold. First, determination of transuranic activity can be made for waste containers that are below the traditional minimum detection limits. Second, waste above 10 nCi/g and below 100 nCi/g can be identified, and a potential path for disposal resolved.

Cecilia R. Hoffman; Yale D. Harker

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

E-Print Network 3.0 - activity exposure rate Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

residential sources contributed to variability in total PM2.5 exposures... rates and penetration factors were applied to estimate the exposure. Modeling with multiple zones...

9

Gamma-ray burst rate: high-redshift excess and its possible origins  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Gamma-ray burst rate: high-redshift...E-mail: virgilif@physics.unlv.edu (FJV...USA 2 Department of Physics and Astronomy, University...gamma-ray burst (GRB) rates and their relationship...an increase in GRB rate as (1 +z)delta...models are able to pass the L and z constraints......

Francisco J. Virgili; Bing Zhang; Kentaro Nagamine; Jun-Hwan Choi

2011-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

10

Assessment of the radiological impact of gamma and radon dose rates at former U mining sites in Central Asia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An assessment of the radiological situation due to exposure to gamma radiation, radon and thoron was carried out at selected former uranium mining and processing sites in the Central Asian countries of Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Uzbekistan and Tajikistan. Gamma dose rate measurements were made using various field instruments and radon/thoron measurements were carried out using discriminative radon (222Rn)/thoron (220Rn) solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTD). The detectors were exposed for an extended period of time, including at least three seasonal periods in a year, in different outdoor and indoor public and residential environments at the selected uranium legacy sites. The results showed that gamma, Rn and Tn doses were in general low, which consequently implies a low/relatively low radiological risk. The major radiation hazard is represented by abandoned radioactive filtration material that was being used as insulation by some Minkush residents (Kyrgyzstan) for a longer period of time. Annual radiation doses of several hundred mSv could be received as a consequence of using this material domestically. In addition, the gamma and Rn/Tn dose rates at Digmai, Tajikistan, could reach values of several 10 mSv/a. The doses of ionizing radiation deriving from external radiation (gamma dose rate), indoor radon and thoron with their short-lived progenies in several cases exceeded the recommended annual effective dose threshold level of 10 mSv. At none of the sites investigated did the individual annual effective doses exceed 30 mSv, the internationally recommended value for considering intervention. Current doses of ionizing radiation do not represent a serious hazard to the health of the resident public, but this issue should be adequately addressed to further reduce needless exposure of the resident public to ionizing radiation.

P. Stegnar; I. Shishkov; M. Burkitbayev; B. Tolongutov; M. Yunusov; R. Radyuk; B. Salbu

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Estimates of rates and errors for measurements of direct-. gamma. and direct-. gamma. + jet production by polarized protons at RHIC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Studies of inclusive direct-{gamma} production by pp interactions at RHIC energies were performed. Rates and the associated uncertainties on spin-spin observables for this process were computed for the planned PHENIX and STAR detectors at energies between {radical}s = 50 and 500 GeV. Also, rates were computed for direct-{gamma} + jet production for the STAR detector. The goal was to study the gluon spin distribution functions with such measurements. Recommendations concerning the electromagnetic calorimeter design and the need for an endcap calorimeter for STAR are made.

Beddo, M.E.; Spinka, H.; Underwood, D.G.

1992-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

12

Thermonuclear Reaction Rate of 23Mg(p,gamma)24$Al  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Updated stellar rates for the reaction 23Mg(p,gamma)24Al are calculated by using all available experimental information on 24Al excitation energies. Proton and gamma-ray partial widths for astrophysically important resonances are derived from shell model calculations. Correspondences of experimentally observed 24Al levels with shell model states are based on application of the isobaric multiplet mass equation. Our new rates suggest that the 23Mg(p,gamma)24Al reaction influences the nucleosynthesis in the mass A>20 region during thermonuclear runaways on massive white dwarfs.

H. Herndl; M. Fantini; C. Iliades; P. M. Endt; H. Oberhummer

1998-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

13

Background gamma terrestrial dose rate in Nigerian functional coal mines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......444-448 (2003). 12. Nakaoka, A., Fukushima, M. and Shinji, T. Environmental...TERRESTRIAL DOSE RATE IN NIGERIAN MINES N d Aerial ropeway Figure 2. Surface background...444 448 (2003). 12. Nakaoka, A., Fukushima, M. and Shinji, T. Environmental......

C. E. Mokobia; F. A. Balogun

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Dose-rate conversion factors for external exposure to photons and electrons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dose-rate conversion factors for external exposure to photons and electrons have been calculated for approximately 500 radionuclides of potential importance in environmental radiological assessments. The dose-rate factors were obtained using the DOSFACTER computer code. The results given in this report incorporate calculation of electron dose-rate factors for radiosensitive tissues of the skin, improved estimates of organ dose-rate factors for photons, based on organ doses for monoenergetic sources at the body surface of an exposed individual, and the spectra of scattered photons in air from monoenergetic sources in an infinite, uniformly contaminated atmospheric cloud, calculation of dose-rate factors for other radionuclides in addition to those of interest in the nuclear fuel cycle, and incorporation of updated radioactive decay data for all radionuclides. Dose-rate factors are calculated for three exposure modes - immersion in contaminated air, immersion in contaminated water, and exposure at a height of 1 m above a contaminated ground surface. The report presents the equations used to calculate the external dose-rate factors for photons and electrons, documentation of the revised DOSFACTER computer code, and a complete tabulation of the calculated dose-rate factors. 30 refs., 12 figs.

Kocher, D.C.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Dietary mercury exposure causes decreased escape takeoff flight performance and increased molt rate in European starlings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dietary mercury exposure causes decreased escape takeoff flight performance and increased molt rate 2014 Ã? Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014 Abstract Mercury is a widespread and persistent that forage from primarily terrestrial sources have shown evidence of bioaccumula- tion of mercury, but little

Swaddle, John

16

Probing the Gamma-Ray Burst Rate with Trigger Simulations of the Swift Burst Alert Telescope  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The long gamma-ray burst (GRB) rate is essential for revealing the connection between GRBs, supernovae and stellar evolution. Additionally, the GRB rate at high redshift provides a strong probe of star formation history in the early universe. While hundreds of GRBs are observed by Swift, it remains difficult to determine the intrinsic GRB rate due to the complex trigger algorithm of Swift. Current studies usually approximate the Swift trigger algorithm by a single detection threshold. However, unlike the previously flown GRB instruments, Swift has over 500 trigger criteria based on photon count rate and additional image threshold for localization. To investigate possible systematic biases and explore the intrinsic GRB properties, we developed a program that is capable of simulating all the rate trigger criteria and mimicking the image trigger threshold. We use this program to search for the intrinsic GRB rate. Our simulations show that adopting the complex trigger algorithm of Swift increases the detection ra...

Lien, Amy; Gehrels, Neil; Palmer, David M; Barthelmy, Scott D; Graziani, Carlo; Cannizzo, John K

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Traffic-related air pollution exposures and changes in heart rate variability in Mexico City: A panel study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen dioxide (NO 2 ), nitrogeninfrared; NO 2 : Nitrogen dioxide; NO x : Nitrogen oxides; OLack of effect of nitrogen dioxide exposure on heart rate

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Thermonuclear 42Ti(p,gamma)43V rate in type I X-ray bursts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The thermonuclear rate of the $^{42}$Ti($p$,$\\gamma$)$^{43}$V reaction has been reevaluated based on a recent precise proton separation energy measurement of $S_p$($^{43}$V)=83$\\pm$43 keV. The astrophysical impact of our new rates has been investigated through one-zone postprocessing type I x-ray burst calculations. It shows that the new experimental value of $S_p$ significantly affects the yields of species between A$\\approx$40--45. As well, the precision of the recent experimental $S_p$ value constrains these yields to better than a factor of three.

He, J J; Brown, B A; Rauscher, T; Hou, S Q; Zhang, Y H; Zhou, X H; Xu, H S

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Thermonuclear 42Ti(p,gamma)43V rate in type I X-ray bursts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The thermonuclear rate of the $^{42}$Ti($p$,$\\gamma$)$^{43}$V reaction has been reevaluated based on a recent precise proton separation energy measurement of $S_p$($^{43}$V)=83$\\pm$43 keV. The astrophysical impact of our new rates has been investigated through one-zone postprocessing type I x-ray burst calculations. It shows that the new experimental value of $S_p$ significantly affects the yields of species between A$\\approx$40--45. As well, the precision of the recent experimental $S_p$ value constrains these yields to better than a factor of three.

J. J. He; A. Parikh; B. A. Brown; T. Rauscher; S. Q. Hou; Y. H. Zhang; X. H. Zhou; H. S. Xu

2014-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

20

Exclusive Measurements of the b to s gamma Transition Rate and Photon Energy Spectrum  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We use 429 fb{sup -1} of e{sup +}e{sup -} collision data collected at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector to measure the radiative transition rate of b {yields} s{gamma} with a sum of 38 exclusive final states. The inclusive branching fraction with a minimum photon energy of 1.9 GeV is found to be {Beta}({bar B} {yields} Xs{gamma}) = (3.29 {+-} 0.19 {+-} 0.48) x 10{sup -4} where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. We also measure the first and second moments of the photon energy spectrum and extract the best fit values for the heavy-quark parameters, m{sub b} and {mu}{sub {pi}}{sup 2}, in the kinetic and shape function models.

Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Palano, A.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; /Bergen U.; Brown, David Nathan; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; /Ruhr U., Bochum; Asgeirsson, D.J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T.S.; McKenna, J.A.; /British Columbia U.; Khan, A.; /Brunel U.; Blinov, V.E.; Buzykaev, A.R.; /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Harvey Mudd Coll. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U., Comp. Sci. Dept. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U.; /more authors..

2012-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gamma exposure rate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Radiation source rate estimation through data assimilation of gamma dose rate measurements for operational nuclear emergency response systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents an evaluation of an innovative data assimilation method that has been recently developed in NCSR Demokritos for estimating an unknown emission rate of radionuclides in the atmosphere, with real-scale experimental data. The efficient algorithm is based on the assimilation of gamma dose rate measured data in the Lagrangian atmospheric dispersion model DIPCOT and uses variational principles. The DIPCOT model is used in the framework of the nuclear emergency response system (ERS) RODOS. The evaluation is performed by computational simulations of dispersion of Ar-41 that was emitted routinely by the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation's (ANSTO) previous research reactor, HIFAR, located in Sydney, Australia. In this paper the algorithm is evaluated against a more complicated case than the others used in previous studies: there was only one monitoring station available each day and the site topography is characterised as moderately complex. Overall the estimated release rate approaches the real one to a very satisfactory degree as revealed by the statistical indicators of errors.

Vasiliki Tsiouri; Spyros Andronopoulos; Ivan Kovalets; Leisa L. Dyer; John G. Bartzis

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Estimates of rates and errors for measurements of direct-{gamma} and direct-{gamma} + jet production by polarized protons at RHIC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Studies of inclusive direct-{gamma} production by pp interactions at RHIC energies were performed. Rates and the associated uncertainties on spin-spin observables for this process were computed for the planned PHENIX and STAR detectors at energies between {radical}s = 50 and 500 GeV. Also, rates were computed for direct-{gamma} + jet production for the STAR detector. The goal was to study the gluon spin distribution functions with such measurements. Recommendations concerning the electromagnetic calorimeter design and the need for an endcap calorimeter for STAR are made.

Beddo, M.E.; Spinka, H.; Underwood, D.G.

1992-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

23

Thermonuclear reaction rate of 18O(p,gamma)19F  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

For stars between 0.8-8.0 solar masses, nucleosynthesis enters its final phase during the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stage. During this evolutionary period, grain condensation occurs in the stellar atmosphere, and the star experiences significant mass loss. The production of presolar grains can often be attributed to this unique stellar environment. A subset of presolar oxide grains features dramatic 18O depletion that cannot be explained by the standard AGB star burning stages and dredge-up models. An extra mixing process, referred to as "cool bottom processing" (CBP), was proposed for low-mass AGB stars. The 18O depletion observed within certain stellar environments and within presolar grain samples may result from the 18O+p processes during CBP. We report here on a study of the 18O(p,gamma)19F reaction at low energies. Based on our new results, we found that the resonance at Er = 95 keV (lab) has a negligible affect on the reaction rate at the temperatures associated with CBP. We also determined that the direct capture S-factor is almost a factor of 2 lower than the previously recommended value at low energies. An improved thermonuclear reaction rate for 18O(p,gamma)19F is presented.

M. Q. Buckner; C. Iliadis; J. M. Cesaratto; C. Howard; T. B. Clegg; A. E. Champagne; S. Daigle

2012-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

24

THE STAR FORMATION RATE IN THE REIONIZATION ERA AS INDICATED BY GAMMA-RAY BURSTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High-redshift gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) offer an extraordinary opportunity to study aspects of the early universe, including the cosmic star formation rate (SFR). Motivated by the two recent highest-z GRBs, GRB 080913 at z approx = 6.7 and GRB 090423 at z approx = 8.1, and more than four years of Swift observations, we first confirm that the GRB rate does not trace the SFR in an unbiased way. Correcting for this, we find that the implied SFR to beyond z = 8 is consistent with Lyman Break Galaxy-based measurements after accounting for unseen galaxies at the faint end of the UV luminosity function. We show that this provides support for the integrated star formation in the range 6 approx< z approx< 8 to have been alone sufficient to reionize the universe.

Kistler, Matthew D.; Beacom, John F. [Center for Cosmology and Astro-Particle Physics, Ohio State University, 191 W. Woodruff Ave., Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Yueksel, Hasan [Bartol Research Institute and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Hopkins, Andrew M. [Anglo-Australian Observatory, P.O. Box 296, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia); Wyithe, J. Stuart B. [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria (Australia)

2009-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

25

Characteristic Count Rate Profiles for a Rotating Modulator Gamma-Ray Imager  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rotating modulation is a technique for indirect imaging in the hard x-ray and soft gamma-ray energy bands, which may offer an advantage over coded aperture imaging at high energies. A rotating modulator (RM) consists of a single mask of co-planar parallel slats typically spaced equidistance apart, suspended above an array of circular non-imaging detectors. The mask rotates, temporally modulating the transmitted image of the object scene. The measured count rate profiles of each detector are folded modulo the mask rotational period, and the object scene is reconstructed using pre-determined characteristic modulation profiles. The use of Monte Carlo simulation to derive the characteristic count rate profiles is accurate but computationally expensive; an analytic approach is preferred for its speed of computation. We present both the standard and a new advanced characteristic formula describing the modulation pattern of the RM; the latter is a more robust description of the instrument response developed as part ...

Budden, Brent S; Case, Gary L; Cherry, Michael L

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

On the 21Na(p,gamma)22Mg thermonuclear rate for 22Na production in novae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Classical novae are potential sources of gamma-rays, like the 1.275 MeV gamma emission following 22Na beta decay, that could be detected by appropriate instruments on board of future satellites like INTEGRAL. It has been shown that the production of 22Na by novae is affected by the uncertainty on the 21Na(p,gamma)22Mg rate and in particular by the unknown partial widths of the Ex = 5.714 MeV, J^pi = 2^+, 22Mg level. To reduce these uncertainties, we performed shell model calculations with the OXBASH code, compared the results with available spectroscopic data and calculated the missing partial widths. Finally, we discuss the influence of these results on the 21Na(p,gamma)22Mg reaction rate and 22Na synthesis.

Nadya A. Smirnova; Alain Coc

2000-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

27

Activation, Heating and Exposure Rates for Mo?99 Experiments with 25?Disk Targets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An MCNPX model of the 25-disk target assembly inside the vacuum cube inside the shielded box was prepared. This was used to calculate heating and photon and neutron fluxes throughout the model. Production rates for photonuclear reaction products were calculated using the photon fluxes and ENDF/B-VII cross sections. Measured isomer to ground state yield ratios were used where available. Where not available the new correlation between spin deficit and isomer to ground state yield ratios presented at AccApp'11 was used. The photonuclear production rates and neutron fluxes were input to CINDER2008 for transmutation calculations. A cross section update file was used to supply (n,n') reactions missing from CINDER2008 libraries. Decay photon spectra produced by CINDER2008 were then used to calculate exposure rates using the MCNPX model. Two electron beam irradiations were evaluated. The first was for a thermal test at 15 MeV with 1300 {micro}A incident on one target end and the second was for a production test at 35 MeV with 350 {micro}A incident on both target ends (700 {micro}A total current on target). For the thermal test 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 h irradiation times were simulated, each followed by decay time steps out to 42 days. For the production test 6, 12, 18, 24, 30 and 36 h irradiation times were simulated followed by the same decay periods. For all simulations beam FWHMs in x and y were both assumed to be 6 mm. Simulations were run for Mo-100 enriched and natural Mo targets for both tests. It is planned that thermal test will be run for 4 h with natural target disks and production test will be run for 24 h with enriched target disks. Results for these two simulations only are presented in this report. Other results can be made available upon request. Post irradiation exposure rates were calculated at 30 cm distances from left, right, front and back of the following configurations: (1) Shielded box with everything in it (beam pipes, cooling pipes, vacuum cube, target housing weldment and target assembly), (2) Shielded box with everything in it except the target assembly, (3) Shielded box with nothing in it, (4) Target assembly taken outside of shielded box, (5) Target disks in cradle (target assembly with thermocouple weldment and flange removed), (6) Empty cradle, and (7) Target disks alone. Decay photon spectra from the CINDER2008 calculations were used as sources for the exposure rate calculations in the same model used for the flux calculations with beam on. As components were removed to simulate the seven cases considered the material compositions were changed to air and their respective sources were turned off. The MCNPX model geometry is plotted in Figure 1. The left and right detector locations for cases 1, 2 and 3 were 30 cm from the shielded box walls and 30 cm from the beam pipe openings in the left and right sides of the model (they are not in the beam line). A zoomed in plot of the target assembly alone is in Figure 2. Exposure rates for the seven cases are plotted as a function of time after irradiation in Figures 3, 4 and 5. To aid in comparison between the cases, all of these figures have been plotted using the same scale. Figures 3 and 4 are respectively the thermal and production test results for cases 1 through 6. Figure 5 includes case 7 results for both. Differences between cases 1 and 2 for both tests are not statistically significant showing that activation of components other than the target assembly, many of which are also shielding the target assembly, dominates exposure rates outside the shielded box. Case 3 shows the contribution from activation of the shield box itself. In front where shielded box wall is thickest box activation accounts for essentially all of the exposure rate outside. Differences between cases 4 and 5 are also minimal, showing that the contribution to target assembly exposure rates from the thermocouple flange and weldment are small compared to the target disks and cradle. From the numerical results the contribution is about 1%. Results for case 6, the cradle itself, are ini

Kelsey, Charles T. IV [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

28

RECONCILING THE GAMMA-RAY BURST RATE AND STAR FORMATION HISTORIES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

While there are numerous indications that gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) arise from the deaths of massive stars, the GRB rate does not follow the global cosmic star formation rate and, within their hosts, GRBs are more concentrated in regions of very high star formation. We explain both puzzles here. Using the publicly available VESPA database of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7 spectra, we explore a multi-parameter space in galaxy properties such as stellar mass, metallicity, and dust to find the subset of galaxies that reproduces the GRB rate recently obtained by Wanderman and Piran. We find that only galaxies with present stellar masses below <10{sup 10} M{sub Sun} and low metallicity reproduce the observed GRB rate. This is consistent with direct observations of GRB hosts and provides an independent confirmation of the nature of GRB hosts. Because of the significantly larger sample of SDSS galaxies, we compute their correlation function and show that they are anti-biased with respect to dark matter: they are in filaments and voids. Using recent observations of massive stars in local dwarfs we show how the fact that GRB host galaxies are dwarfs can explain the observation that GRBs are more concentrated in regions of high star formation than are supernovae. Finally, we explain these results using new theoretical advances in the field of star formation.

Jimenez, Raul [ICREA and ICC, University of Barcelona (IEEC-UB), Marti i Franques 1, Barcelona E-08024 (Spain); Piran, Tsvi, E-mail: raul.jimenez@icc.ub.edu, E-mail: tsvi.piran@huji.ac.il [Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel)

2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

29

COMPACT OBJECT COALESCENCE RATE ESTIMATION FROM SHORT GAMMA-RAY BURST OBSERVATIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent observational and theoretical results suggest that short-duration gamma-ray bursts (SGRBs) originate from the merger of compact binary systems of two neutron stars or a neutron star and a black hole. The observation of SGRBs with known redshifts allows astronomers to infer the merger rate of these systems in the local universe. We use data from the SWIFT satellite to estimate this rate to be in the range {approx}500-1500 Gpc{sup -3} yr{sup -1}. This result is consistent with earlier published results which were obtained through alternative approaches. We estimate the number of coincident observations of gravitational-wave signals with SGRBs in the advanced gravitational-wave detector era. By assuming that all SGRBs are created by neutron star-neutron star (neutron star-black hole) mergers, we estimate the expected rate of coincident observations to be in the range {approx_equal} 0.2-1 ({approx_equal} 1-3) yr{sup -1}.

Petrillo, Carlo Enrico [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Universita di Napoli ''Federico II'', Compl. Univ. Monte S. Angelo, Ed. N, Via Cinthia, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Dietz, Alexander; Cavaglia, Marco [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Mississippi University, MS 38677-1848 (United States)

2013-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

30

Combined methodology for estimating dose rates and health effects from exposure to radioactive pollutants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The work described in the report is basically a synthesis of two previously existing computer codes: INREM II, developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); and CAIRD, developed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The INREM II code uses contemporary dosimetric methods to estimate doses to specified reference organs due to inhalation or ingestion of a radionuclide. The CAIRD code employs actuarial life tables to account for competing risks in estimating numbers of health effects resulting from exposure of a cohort to some incremental risk. The combined computer code, referred to as RADRISK, estimates numbers of health effects in a hypothetical cohort of 100,000 persons due to continuous lifetime inhalation or ingestion of a radionuclide. Also briefly discussed in this report is a method of estimating numbers of health effects in a hypothetical cohort due to continuous lifetime exposure to external radiation. This method employs the CAIRD methodology together with dose conversion factors generated by the computer code DOSFACTER, developed at ORNL; these dose conversion factors are used to estimate dose rates to persons due to radionuclides in the air or on the ground surface. The combination of the life table and dosimetric guidelines for the release of radioactive pollutants to the atmosphere, as required by the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1977.

Dunning, D.E. Jr.; Leggett, R.W.; Yalcintas, M.G.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Microbial Community in the Soil Determines the Forest Recovery Post-Exposure to Gamma Irradiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

High concentrations of radioactive isotopes can find their way into the environment mainly during the storage of high-level radioactive wastes,(1) including spent nuclear reactor fuels generated by nuclear power plants, wastes generated during reprocessing of these fuels, and wastes generated during development of nuclear weapons. ... (5-9) The question of whether microbial populations exposed to ionizing radiation recover in natural environments remains unanswered. ... In the areas where ionizing radiation exposure is likely, such as nuclear reactors or high-level radioactive waste storage sites, it would be valuable to study and archive the radiation sensitive microbial organisms that are essential for proper ecosystem function. ...

Vishal Shah; Shreya Shah; Herman Mackey; Murty Kambhampati; Daniel Collins; Scot E. Dowd; Robert Colichio; Kevin T. McDonnell; Timothy Green

2013-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

32

Persistence of gamma-H2AX and 53BP1 foci in proliferating and nonproliferating human mammary epithelial cells after exposure to gamma-rays or iron ions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To investigate {gamma}-H2AX (phosphorylated histone H2AX) and 53BP1 (tumour protein 53 binding protein No. 1) foci formation and removal in proliferating and non-proliferating human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) after exposure to sparsely and densely ionizing radiation under different cell culture conditions. HMEC cells were grown either as monolayers (2D) or in extracellular matrix to allow the formation of acinar structures in vitro (3D). Foci numbers were quantified by image analysis at various time points after exposure. Our results reveal that in non-proliferating cells under 2D and 3D cell culture conditions, iron-ion induced {gamma}-H2AX foci were still present at 72 h after exposure, although 53BP1 foci returned to control levels at 48 h. In contrast in proliferating HMEC, both {gamma}-H2AX and 53BP1 foci decreased to control levels during the 24-48 h time interval after irradiation under 2D conditions. Foci numbers decreased faster after {gamma}-ray irradiation and returned to control levels by 12 h regardless of marker, cell proliferation status, and cell culture condition. Conclusions: The disappearance of radiation induced {gamma}-H2AX and 53BP1 foci in HMEC have different dynamics that depend on radiation quality and proliferation status. Notably, the general patterns do not depend on the cell culture condition (2D versus 3D). We speculate that the persistent {gamma}-H2AX foci in iron-ion irradiated non-proliferating cells could be due to limited availability of double strand break (DSB) repair pathways in G0/G1-phase, or that repair of complex DSB requires replication or chromatin remodeling.

Groesser, Torsten; Chang, Hang; Fontenay, Gerald; Chen, James; Costes, Sylvain V.; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen; Parvin, Bahram; Rydberg, Bjorn

2010-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

33

Gamma radiation and dose rate investigations on the Adriatic islands of magmatic origin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Gamma ray spectrometry in seawater The underwater measuring system...electronics for data acquisition, storage and transmission. The power...direct gamma ray spectrometry in seawater, the obtained spectrum from...spectrometric measurement in the seawater. Isotope Energy (keV) Net......

Branko Petrinec; Zdenko Franic; Nenad Leder; Christos Tsabaris; Tomislav Bituh; Gordana Marovic

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Corrosion of zinc in the automotive environment ? Relation Between Corrosion Rate, Corrosion Products and Exposure Site.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? In a previous project, mobile exposures in road environments have been performed in various areas of the world. A number of materials and coatings… (more)

Jonsson, Sanna

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Development of the town data base: Estimates of exposure rates and times of fallout arrival near the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of the U.S. Department of Energy`s Off-Site Radiation Exposure Review Project, the time of fallout arrival and the H+12 exposure rate were estimated for populated locations in Arizona, California, Nevada, and Utah that were affected by fallout from one or more nuclear tests at the Nevada Test Site. Estimates of exposure rate were derived from measured values recorded before and after each test by fallout monitors in the field. The estimate for a given location was obtained by retrieving from a data base all measurements made in the vicinity, decay-correcting them to H+12, and calculating an average. Estimates were also derived from maps produced after most events that show isopleths of exposure rate and time of fallout arrival. Both sets of isopleths on these maps were digitized, and kriging was used to interpolate values at the nodes of a 10-km grid covering the pattern. The values at any location within the grid were then estimated from the values at the surrounding grid nodes. Estimates of dispersion (standard deviation) were also calculated. The Town Data Base contains the estimates for all combinations of location and nuclear event for which the estimated mean H+12 exposure rate was greater than three times background. A listing of the data base is included as an appendix. The information was used by other project task groups to estimate the radiation dose that off-site populations and individuals may have received as a result of exposure to fallout from Nevada nuclear tests.

Thompson, C.B.; McArthur, R.D. [Univ. and Community College System of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Hutchinson, S.W. [Mead Johnson Nutritional Group, Evansville, IN (United States)

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

The Impact of Star Formation and Gamma-Ray Burst Rates at High Redshift on Cosmic Chemical Evolution and Reionization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent observations in the total luminosity density have led to significant progress in establishing the star formation rate (SFR) at high redshift. Concurrently observed gamma-ray burst rates have also been used to extract the SFR at high redshift. The SFR in turn can be used to make a host of predictions concerning the ionization history of the Universe, the chemical abundances, and supernova rates. We compare the predictions made using a hierarchical model of cosmic chemical evolution based on three recently proposed SFRs: two based on extracting the SFR from the observed gamma-ray burst rate at high redshift, and one based on the observed galaxy luminosity function at high redshift. Using the WMAP/Planck data on the optical depth and epoch of reionization, we find that only the SFR inferred from gamma-ray burst data at high redshift suffices to allow a single mode (in the initial mass function) of star formation which extends from z = 0 to redshifts > 10. For the case of the more conservative SFR based on...

Vangioni, E; Prestegard, T; Silk, J; Petitjean, P; Mandic, V

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

The Estimation of Molecular and Cytogenetic Effects in Mice Exposed to Chronic Low Dose-Rate Gamma-Radiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Molecular and cytogenetic parameters were estimated in male CBA/lac mice exposed to chronic low dose-rate ?-radiation (62 cGy/year) for 40, 80, 120, 210, and 365 days. After 40 days of exposure (6.7 cGy), sple...

A. N. Osipov; A. L. Elakov; P. V. Puchkov…

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

National primary standard for the unit of air kerma, air kerma rate, exposure, exposure rate, and x- and gamma-ray energy flux  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

According to the recommendations of the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) [2], as well as government decrees of the Russian Federation [3...], at present the basic physical quant...

A. V. Oborin; A. Yu. Villevalde; S. G. Trofimchuk

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Quantification of the relationship between pulmonary ventilation rate and vapor contaminant concentration in exposure profiles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Human Factor's Laboratory located on the garage level of the Zachry Engineering Center was used as the exposure chamber facility. It has an approximate volume of 107, 000 liters. Through the use of an elaborate environmental monitoring... The Human Factor's Laboratory located on the garage level of the Zachry Engineering Center was used as the exposure chamber facility. It has an approximate volume of 107, 000 liters. Through the use of an elaborate environmental monitoring...

Horbal, Terrence Myron

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

40

High-precision (p,t) reaction to determine {sup 25}Al(p,{gamma}){sup 26}Si reaction rates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since the identification of ongoing {sup 26}Al production in the universe, the reaction sequence {sup 24}Mg(p,{gamma}){sup 25}Al({beta}{sup +{nu}}){sup 25}Mg(p,{gamma}){sup 26}Al has been studied intensively. At temperatures where the radiative capture on {sup 25}Al (t{sub 1/2}=7.2 s) becomes faster than the {beta}{sup +} decay, the production of {sup 26}Al can be reduced due to the depletion of {sup 25}Al. To determine the resonances relevant for the {sup 25}Al(p,{gamma}){sup 26}Si bypass reaction, we measured the {sup 28}Si(p,t){sup 26}Si reaction with high-energy precision using the Grand Raiden spectrometer at the Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka. Several new energy levels were found above the p threshold and for known states excitation energies were determined with smaller uncertainties. The calculated stellar rates of the bypass reaction agree well with previous results, suggesting that these rates are well established.

Matic, A.; Berg, A. M. van den; Harakeh, M. N.; Woertche, H. J.; Berg, G. P. A.; Couder, M.; Goerres, J.; LeBlanc, P.; O'Brien, S.; Wiescher, M.; Fujita, K.; Hatanaka, K.; Sakemi, Y.; Shimizu, Y.; Tameshige, Y.; Tamii, A.; Yosoi, M.; Adachi, T.; Fujita, Y.; Shimbara, Y. [Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut, University of Groningen, Zernikelaan 25, NL-9747 AA Groningen (Netherlands); Department of Physics and the Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 (United States); Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka University, Ibaraki, Osaka 560-0047 (Japan); Department of Physics, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); School of Physics, University of the Witwatersrand, P.O. Wits, Johannesburg 2050 (South Africa); Department of Physics, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 812-8581 (Japan); Department of Physics and Astronomy, National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory and the Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States)

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gamma exposure rate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Improving the {sup 33}S(p,{gamma}){sup 34}Cl Reaction Rate for Models of Classical Nova Explosions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reduced uncertainty in the thermonuclear rate of the {sup 33}S(p,{gamma}){sup 34}Cl reaction would help to improve our understanding of nucleosynthesis in classical nova explosions. At present, models are generally in concordance with observations that nuclei up to roughly the calcium region may be produced in these explosive phenomena; better knowledge of this rate would help with the quantitative interpretation of nova observations over the S-Ca mass region, and contribute towards the firm establishment of a nucleosynthetic endpoint. As well, models find that the ejecta of nova explosions on massive oxygen-neon white dwarfs may contain as much as 150 times the solar abundance of {sup 33}S. This characteristic isotopic signature of a nova explosion could possibly be observed through the analysis of microscopic grains formed in the environment surrounding a nova and later embedded within primitive meteorites. An improved {sup 33}S(p,{gamma}){sup 34}Cl rate (the principal destruction mechanism for {sup 33}S in novae) would help to ensure a robust model prediction for the amount of {sup 33}S that may be produced. Finally, constraining this rate could confirm or rule out the decay of an isomeric state of {sup 34}Cl(E{sub x} = 146 keV, t{sub 1/2} = 32 m) as a source for observable gamma-rays from novae. We have performed several complementary experiments dedicated to improving our knowledge of the {sup 33}S(p,{gamma}){sup 34}Cl rate, using both indirect methods (measurement of the {sup 34}S({sup 3}He,t){sup 34}Cl and {sup 33}S({sup 3}He,d){sup 34}Cl reactions with the Munich Q3D spectrograph) and direct methods (in normal kinematics at CENPA, University of Washington, and in inverse kinematics with the DRAGON recoil mass separator at TRIUMF). Our results will be used with nova models to facilitate comparisons of model predictions with present and future nova observables.

Parikh, A.; Faestermann, Th.; Kruecken, R.; Bildstein, V.; Bishop, S.; Eppinger, K.; Herlitzius, C.; Lepyoshkina, O.; Maierbeck, P.; Seiler, D.; Wimmer, K. [Physik Department E12, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, D-85748, Garching (Germany); Hertenberger, R.; Wirth, H.-F. [Fakultaet fuer Physik, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Fallis, J.; Hager, U.; Hutcheon, D.; Ruiz, Ch.; Buchmann, L.; Ottewell, D. [TRIUMF, Vancouver, BC, V6T 2A3 (Canada); Freeman, B. [Center for Experimental Nuclear Physics and Astrophysics, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States)

2011-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

42

The Swift short gamma-ray burst rate density: prospects for detecting binary neutron star mergers by aLIGO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Presently only 30% of short gamma ray bursts (SGRBs) have accurate redshifts, and this sample is highly biased by the limited sensitivity of {\\it Swift} to detect SGRBs. We account for the dominant biases to calculate a realistic SGRB rate density out to $z = 0.5$ using the {\\it Swift} sample of peak fluxes, redshifts, and those SGRBs with a beaming angle constraint from X-ray/optical observations. Assuming a significant fraction of binary neutron star mergers produce SGRBs, we calculate lower and upper detection rate limits of (1-180) per Yr by an advanced LIGO and Virgo coincidence search. Our detection rate is compatible with extrapolations using Galactic pulsar observations and population synthesis.

David Coward; Eric Howell; Tsvi Piran; Giulia Stratta; Marica Branchesi; Omer Bromberg; Bruce Gendre; Ronald Burman; Dafne Guetta

2012-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

43

Revisiting coincidence rate between Gravitational Wave detection and short Gamma-Ray Burst for the Advanced and third generation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We use realistic Monte-Carlo simulations including both gravitational-wave and short gamma-ray burst selection effects to revisit the coincident rate of binary systems composed of two neutron stars or a neutron star and a black hole. We show that the fraction of GW triggers that can be observed in coincidence with sGRBs is proportional to the beaming factor at $z=0$, but increases with the distance, until it reaches 100 \\% at the GW detector horizon distance. When this is taken into account the rate is improved by a factor of $~3$ compared to the simple beaming factor correction. We provide an estimate of the performance future GRB detectors should achieve in order to fully exploit the potentiality of the planned third generation GW antenna Einstein Telescope, and we propose a simple method to constrain the beaming angle of sGRBs.

Regimbau, T; Meacher, D; Gendre, B; er, M Bo\\"

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Estimation of the contribution of photon radiation for measurement of the exposure dose rate of neutron sources based on 252Cf  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A method for the estimation of the contribution of photon radiation to the detector readings for measurement of the exposure dose rate and the equivalent activity of neutron ... screens and filters is considered....

N. F. Demchenko; R. N. Minvaliev; V. I. Shipilov…

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Effects of an acute dose of gamma radiation exposure on stem diameter growth, carbon gain, and biomass partitioning in Helianthus annuus  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nineteen-day-old dwarf sunflower plants (Helianthus annuus, variety NK894) received a variable dose (0-40 Gy) from a cobalt-60 gamma source. A very sensitive stem monitoring device, developed at Battelle's Pacific Northwest Laboratories, Richland, Washington was used to measure real-time changes in stem diameter. Exposure of plants caused a significant reduction in stem growth and root biomass. Doses as low as 5 Gy resulted in a significant increase in leaf density, suggesting that nonreversible morphological growth changes could be induced by very low doses of radiation. Carbohydrate analysis of 40-Gy irradiated plants demonstrated significantly more starch content in leaves and significantly less starch content in stems 18 days after exposure than did control plants. In contrast, the carbohydrate content in roots of 40-Gy irradiated plants were not significantly different from unirradiated plants 18 days after exposure. These results indicate that radiation either decreased phloem transport or reduced the availability of sugar reducing enzymes in irradiated plants. 44 refs., 12 figs.

Thiede, M.E.

1988-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

46

Non-destructive method for determining neutron exposure  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A non-destructive method for determination of neutron exposure in an object, such as a reactor pressure vessel, is based on the observation of characteristic gamma-rays emitted by activation products in the object by using a unique continuous gamma-ray spectrometer. The spectrometer views the object through appropriate collimators to determine the absolute emission rate of these characteristic gamma-rays, thereby ascertaining the absolute activity of given activation products in the object. These data can then be used to deduce the spatial and angular dependence of neutron exposure at regions of interest within the object.

Gold, R.; McElroy, W.N.

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Measurement of the decay rate and form factor parameter $\\alpha_{K}*$ in the decay $K_{L} \\rightarrow e^{+}e^{-}\\gamma$  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The decay rate of the neutral K meson $\\mathrm{K_{L} \\rightarrow e^{+}e^{-}\\gamma}$ has been measured with the NA48 detector at the CERN SPS. A total of 6864 events has been observed with an estimated background of 10 events. The branching ratio is $\\mathrm{\\Gamma(K_{L} \\rightarrow e^{+}e^{-}\\gamma)/\\Gamma(K_{L} rightarrow all) = (1.06 \\pm 0.02_{stat.} \\pm 0.02_{sys.} \\pm 0.04_{calc.})\\times 10^{-5}}$. The parameter describing the relative strength of the two contributing amplitudes to this decay through $\\mathrm{\\alpha_{K^{*}}}$ intermediate seudoscalar or vector mesons, was measured to be $\\mathrm{\\alpha_{K^{*}} = -0.36 \\pm 0.06_{stat.} \\pm 0.02_{sys.}}$

Fanti, V; Musa, L; Marras, D; Nappi, A; Hay, B; Moore, R W; Moore, K N; Munday, D J; Needham, M D; Parker, M A; White, T O; Wotton, S A; Barr, Giles David; Bocquet, G; Bremer, J; Ceccucci, Augusto; Cundy, Donald C; Doble, Niels T; Funk, W; Gatignon, L; Gianoli, A; Gonidec, A; Govi, G; Grafström, P; Kubischta, Werner; Lacourt, A; Luitz, S; Kesseler, G; Matheys, J P; Norton, Alan Robert; Palestini, S; Panzer-Steindel, B; Schinzel, D; Taureg, Hans; Velasco, M; Vossnack, O; Wahl, H; Wirrer, G; Kekelidze, V D; Mestvirishvili, A; Potrebenikov, Yu K; Tatishvili, G T; Tkachev, A L; Zinchenko, A I; Boyle, O; Martin, V J; Knowles, I G; Parsons, H; Dalpiaz, Pietro; Duclos, J; Frabetti, P L; Martini, M; Petrucci, F; Porcu, M; Savrié, M; Bizzeti, A; Calvetti, M; Collazuol, G; Graziani, G; Iacopini, E; Lenti, M; Michetti, A; Becker, H G; Blümer, H; Buchholz, P; Coward, D H; Ebersberger, C; Fox, H; Kalter, A; Kleinknecht, K; Koch, U; Köpke, L; Renk, B; Scheidt, J; Schmidt, J; Schönharting, V; Schué, Yu; Wilhelm, R; Winhart, A; Wittgen, M; Chollet, J C; Crépé, S; Iconomidou-Fayard, L; Fayard, Louis; Ocariz, J; Unal, G; Vattolo, D; Wingerter-Seez, I; Anzivino, Giuseppina; Cenci, P; Lubrano, P; Pepé, M; Gorini, B; Calafiura, P; Carosi, R; Cerri, C; Cirilli, M; Costantini, F; Fantechi, R; Giudici, Sergio; Mannelli, I; Marzulli, V M; Pierazzini, G M; Sozzi, M; Chèze, J B; Cogan, J; De Beer, M; Debu, P; Formica, A; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Khristov, P Z; Mazzucato, E; Peyaud, B; Schanne, S; Turlay, René; Vallage, B; Augustin, I; Bender, M; Holder, M; Ziolkowski, M; Arcidiacono, R; Biino, C; Marchetto, F; Menichetti, E; Nassalski, J P; Rondio, Ewa; Szleper, M; Wislicki, W; Wronka, S; Dibon, Heinz; Fischer, G; Jeitler, Manfred; Markytan, Manfred; Mikulec, I; Neuhofer, Günther; Pernicka, Manfred; Taurok, Anton

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Childhood exposures to Rn-222 and background gamma radiation in the uranium provinces of south Kazakhstan and northern Kyrgyzstan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The project was undertaken in southern Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan. It was speculated that the radiation doses in these areas would be sufficiently high and dispersed to facilitate a case–control study where the radiation doses to leukaemia subjects/their siblings could be compared with those received by control children. As a precursor a pilot project was undertaken to confirm radiation exposures in the region. This was undertaken in association with regional childhood cancer treatment centres. Children from families affected by childhood leukaemia were monitored for 1 month for external ?-radiation dose and for exposure to radon gas. 28 children from families in Kazakhstan and from 31 families in Kyrgyzstan were monitored. The median measured radon in air concentration recorded in Kazakhstan was 123 Bq m?3 and in Kyrgyzstan was 177 Bq m?3. These represent 24-h average indoor/outdoor values. In the case of the ?-doses the mean annual dose was 1.2 mGy for Kazakhstan and 2.1 mGy for Kyrgyzstan. Overall, the results suggest that the populations studied receive similar annual radiation doses to those received by populations living in other areas with enhanced natural radioactivity and that further study of Kazakh and Kyrgyz populations would not facilitate a successful case–control study for childhood leukaemia.

N.D. Priest; D. Hoel; B. Uralbekov; D.O. Baizakova; M. Burkitbayev

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Selection effects in Gamma Ray Bursts correlations: consequences on the ratio between GRB and star formation rates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) visible up to very high redshift have become attractive targets as potential new distance indicators. It is still not clear whether the relations proposed so far originate from an unknown GRB physics or result from selection effects. We investigate this issue in the case of the $L_X-T^*_a$ correlation (hereafter LT) between the X-ray luminosity $L_X (T_a)$ at the end of the plateau phase, $T_a$, and the rest frame time $T^{*}_a$. We devise a general method to build mock data sets starting from a GRB world model and taking into account selection effects on both time and luminosity. This method shows how not knowing the efficiency function could influence the evaluation of the intrinsic slope of any correlation and the GRB density rate. We investigate biases (small offsets in slope or normalization) that would occur in the LT relation as a result of truncations, possibly present in the intrinsic distributions of $L_X$ and $T^*_a$. We compare these results with the ones in Dainotti et al....

Dainotti, Maria Giovanna; Shigehiro, Nagataki; Capozziello, Salvatore

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Experimental measurements of the O15(alpha,gamma)Ne19 reaction rate and the stability of thermonuclear burning on accreting neutron stars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Neutron stars in close binary star systems often accrete matter from their companion stars. Thermonuclear ignition of the accreted material in the atmosphere of the neutron star leads to a thermonuclear explosion which is observed as an X-ray burst occurring periodically between hours and days depending on the accretion rate. The ignition conditions are characterized by a sensitive interplay between the accretion rate of the fuel supply and its depletion rate by nuclear burning in the hot CNO cycle and the rp-process. For accretion rates close to stable burning the burst ignition therefore depends critically on the hot CNO breakout reaction, O15(alpha,gamma)Ne19, that regulates the flow between the hot CNO cycle and the rapid proton capture process. Until recently, the O15(alpha,gamma)Ne19-reaction rate was not known experimentally and the theoretical estimates carried significant uncertainties. In this paper we perform a parameter study of the uncertainty of this reaction rate and determine the astrophysical consequences of the first measurement of this reaction rate. Our results corroborate earlier predictions and show that theoretically burning remains unstable up to accretion rates near the Eddington limit, in contrast to astronomical observations.

Jacob Lund Fisker; Wanpeng Tan; Joachim Goerres; Michael Wiescher; Randall L. Cooper

2007-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

51

RATES  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Planning & Projects Planning & Projects Power Marketing Rates You are here: SN Home page > Power Marketing > RATES Rates and Repayment Services Rates Current Rates Power Revenue Requirement Worksheet (FY 2014) (Oct 2013 - Sep 2014) (PDF - 30K) PRR Notification Letter (Sep 27, 2013) (PDF - 959K) FY 2012 FP% True-Up Calculations(PDF - 387K) Variable Resource Scheduling Charge FY12-FY16 (October 1, 2012) PRR Forecast FY14-FY17 (May 23, 2013) (PDF - 100K) Forecasted Transmission Rates (May 2013) (PDF - 164K) Past Rates 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 Historical CVP Transmission Rates (April 2013) (PDF - 287K) Rate Schedules Power - CV-F13 - CPP-2 Transmission - CV-T3 - CV-NWT5 - PACI-T3 - COTP-T3 - CV-TPT7 - CV-UUP1 Ancillary - CV-RFS4 - CV-SPR4 - CV-SUR4 - CV-EID4 - CV-GID1 Federal Register Notices - CVP, COTP and PACI

52

RATES  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Marketing > RATES Marketing > RATES RATES Current Rates Past Rates 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Rates Schedules Power CV-F13 CPP-2 Transmissions CV-T3 CV-NWT5 PACI-T3 COTP-T3 CV-TPT7 CV-UUP1 Ancillary CV-RFS4 CV-SPR4 CV-SUR4 CV-EID4 CV-GID1 Future and Other Rates SNR Variable Resource Scheduling Charge FY12-FY16 (October 1, 2012) SNR Rates Process Calendar (PDF - 171K) Procedures Informal Process Transmission Action Items List (PDF - 144K) Power Action Item List updated on 4-27-10 (PDF - 155K) Power Action Item List (Quick links to relevant documents) Formal Process Rates Brochure (01/11/2011) (PDF - 900K) Appendix A - Federal Register Notice (01/03/2011) (PDF - 8000K) Appendix B - Central Valley Project Power Repayment Study (PDF - 22,322K) Appendix C - Development of the CVP Cost of Service Study (PDF - 2038K)

53

RATES  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

RATES RATES Rates Document Library SNR Rates Process Calendar (PDF - 171K) Procedures Informal Process Transmission Action Items List (PDF - 144K) Power Action Item List updated on 4-27-10 (PDF - 155K) Power Action Item List (Quick links to relevant documents) Formal Process Rates Brochure (01/11/2011) (PDF - 900K) Appendix A - Federal Register Notice (01/03/2011) (PDF - 8000K) Appendix B - Central Valley Project Power Repayment Study (PDF - 22,322K) Appendix C - Development of the CVP Cost of Service Study (PDF - 2038K) Appendix D - Western Transmission System Facilities Map (PDF - 274K) Appendix E - Estimated FY12 FP and BR Customer (PDF - 1144K) Appendix F - Forecasted Replacements and Additions FY11 - FY16 (PDF - 491K) Appendix G - Definitions (PDF - 1758K) Appendix H - Acronyms (PDF - 720K)

54

Plutonium-aerosol emission rates and potential inhalation exposure during cleanup and treatment test at Area 11, Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Cleanup and Treatment (CAT) test was conducted in 1981 at Area 11, Nevada Test Site. Its purpose was to evaluate the effectiveness of using a large truck-mounted vacuum cleaner similar to those used to clean paved streets for cleaning radiological contamination from the surface of desert soils. We found that four passes with the vehicle removed 97% of the alpha contamination and reduced resuspension by 99.3 to 99.7%. Potential exposure to cleanup workers was slight when compared to natural background exposure. 7 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

Shinn, J.H.; Homan, D.N.

1985-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

55

Non-destructive method for determining neutron exposure and constituent concentrations of a body  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A non-destructive method for determination of neutron exposure and constituent concentrations in an object, such as reactor pressure vessel, is based on the observation of characteristic gamma-rays emitted by activation products in the object by using a unique continuous gamma-ray spectrometer. The spectrometer views the object through appropriate collimators to determine the absolute emission rate of these characteristic gamma-rays, thereby ascertaining the absolute activity of given activation products in the object. These data can then be used to deduce the spatial and angular dependence of neutron exposure or the spatial constituent concentration at regions of interest within the object.

Gold, Raymond (Richland, WA); McElroy, William N. (Richland, WA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Non-destructive method for determining neutron exposure and constituent concentrations of a body  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A non-destructive method for determination of neutron exposure and constituent concentrations in an object, such as a reactor pressure vessel, is based on the observation of characteristic gamma-rays emitted by activation products in the object by using a unique continuous gamma-ray spectrometer. The spectrometer views the object through appropriate collimators to determine the absolute emission rate of these characteristic gamma-rays, thereby ascertaining the absolute activity of given activation products in the object. These data can then be used to deduce the spatial and angular dependence of neutron exposure or the spatial constituent concentrations at regions of interest within the object.

Gold, R.; McElroy, W.N.

1984-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

57

High-Resolution Neutron Capture and Total Cross-Section Measurements, and the Astrophysical 95Mo(n,gamma) Reaction Rate at s-process Temperatures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abundances of Mo isotopes predicted by stellar models of the s process are, except for 95Mo, in good agreement with data from single grains of mainstream presolar SiC. Because the meteorite data seemed sound and no reasonable modification to stellar theory resulted in good agreement for 95Mo, it has been suggested that the recommended neutron capture reaction rate for this nuclide is 30% too low. Therefore, we have made a new determination of the 95Mo(n,gamma) reaction rate via high-resolution measurements of the neutron-capture and total cross sections of 95Mo at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator. These data were analyzed with the R-matrix code SAMMY to obtain parameters for resonances up to En = 10 keV. Also, a small change to our capture apparatus allowed us to employ a new technique to vastly improve resonance spin and parity assignments. These new resonance parameters, together with our data in the unresolved range, were used to calculate the 95Mo(n,gamma) reaction rate at s-process temperatures. We compare the currently recommended rate to our new results and discuss their astrophysical impact.

P. E. Koehler; J. A. Harvey; K. H. Guber; D. Wiarda

2008-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

58

Directional gamma detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved directional gamma radiation detector has a collector sandwiched etween two layers of insulation of varying thicknesses. The collector and insulation layers are contained within an evacuated casing, or emitter, which releases electrons upon exposure to gamma radiation. Delayed electrons and electrons entering the collector at oblique angles are attenuated as they pass through the insulation layers on route to the collector.

LeVert, Francis E. (Downers Grove, Knoxville, TN); Cox, Samson A. (Downers Grove, IL)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

An Improved Reaction Rate Formulation for Charged-Particle Induced Thermonuclear Reaction of {sup 2}H(d,{gamma}){sup 4}He  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The reaction rate formula utilized in compilations such as the Nuclear Astrophysics Compilation of Reaction Rates (NACRE) uses low energy approximation due to temperatures in stars are in the region of a few keVs. Most nuclear reaction experiments were done in MeV range and the interior temperatures of massive stars are {approx}10{sup 9} K. Hence an improved formulation for calculating the nuclear reaction rate that is applicable to high temperatures is discussed in this work. The exact tunneling probability that is applicable for all energies is obtained by solving the Schroedinger equation. This yields an enhanced expression for the astrophysical S-factor for calculating the thermonuclear reaction rate at high temperature. The thermonuclear reaction rate from this work is applied to the {sup 2}H(d,{gamma}){sup 4}He reaction and is compared with the NACRE compilation. This improved reaction rate can be included in the nuclear reaction network in a Big Bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) code or a stellar nuclear network code.

Aziz, Azni Abdul; Yusof, Norhasliza; Idris, Mahirah; Kassim, Hasan Abu [Department of Physics, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

2011-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

60

LEVEL STRUCTURE OF 30S AND THE 29P(p, gamma)30S THERMONUCLEAR REACTION RATE.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? In order to determine the parent stellar sites for the presolar grains of potential nova origin, it is crucial to know the rates of… (more)

Setoodehnia, Kiana

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gamma exposure rate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Gamma radiolysis of chlorinated hydrocarbons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This program is the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) component of a joint collarborative effort with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The purpose of this effort is to demonstrate a viable process for breaking down hazardous halogenated organic wastes to simpler, non-hazardous waste using high energy ionizing radiation. The INEL effort focuses on the use of spent reactor fuel gamma radiation sources to decompose complex wastes such as PCBs. At LLNL, halogenated solvents such as carbon tetrachloride and trichloroethylene are being studied using accelerator radiation sources. The INEL irradiation experiments concentrated on a single PCB congener so that a limited set of decomposition reactions could be studied. The congener 2,2{prime}, 3,3{prime},4,5{prime},6,6{prime} - octachlorobiphenyl was examined following exposure to various gamma doses at the Advanced Test Reactor (AIR) spent fuel pool. The decomposition rates and products in several solvents are discussed. 3 refs.

Arbon, R.E.; Mincher, B.J.; Meikrantz, D.H.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Gamma radiolysis of chlorinated hydrocarbons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This program is the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) component of a joint collarborative effort with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The purpose of this effort is to demonstrate a viable process for breaking down hazardous halogenated organic wastes to simpler, non-hazardous waste using high energy ionizing radiation. The INEL effort focuses on the use of spent reactor fuel gamma radiation sources to decompose complex wastes such as PCBs. At LLNL, halogenated solvents such as carbon tetrachloride and trichloroethylene are being studied using accelerator radiation sources. The INEL irradiation experiments concentrated on a single PCB congener so that a limited set of decomposition reactions could be studied. The congener 2,2{prime}, 3,3{prime},4,5{prime},6,6{prime} - octachlorobiphenyl was examined following exposure to various gamma doses at the Advanced Test Reactor (AIR) spent fuel pool. The decomposition rates and products in several solvents are discussed. 3 refs.

Arbon, R.E.; Mincher, B.J.; Meikrantz, D.H.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

New {sup 34}Cl proton-threshold states and the thermonuclear {sup 33}S(p,{gamma}){sup 34}Cl rate in ONe novae  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Analysis of presolar grains in primitive meteorites has shown isotopic ratios largely characteristic of the conditions thought to prevail in various astrophysical environments. A possible indicator for a grain of ONe nova origin is a large {sup 33}S abundance: nucleosynthesis calculations predict as much as 150 times the solar abundance of {sup 33}S in the ejecta of nova explosions on massive ONe white dwarfs. This overproduction factor may, however, vary by factors of at least 0.01-3 because of uncertainties of several orders of magnitude in the {sup 33}S(p,{gamma}){sup 34}Cl reaction rate at nova peak temperatures (T{sub peak}{approx}0.1-0.4 GK). These uncertainties arise due to the lack of nuclear physics information for states within {approx}600 keV of the {sup 33}S+p threshold in {sup 34}Cl (S{sub p}({sup 34}Cl) = 5143 keV). To better constrain this rate we have measured, for the first time, the {sup 34}S({sup 3}He,t){sup 34}Cl reaction over the region E{sub x}({sup 34}Cl) = 4.9-6 MeV. We confirm previous states and find 15 new states in this energy region. New {sup 33}S(p,{gamma}){sup 34}Cl resonances at E{sub R}=281(2), 301(2), and 342(2) keV may dominate this rate at relevant nova temperatures. Our results could affect predictions of sulphur isotopic ratios in nova ejecta (e.g., {sup 32}S/{sup 33}S) that may be used as diagnostic tools for the nova paternity of grains.

Parikh, A.; Faestermann, T.; Kruecken, R.; Behrens, T.; Bildstein, V.; Bishop, S.; Eppinger, K.; Herlitzius, C.; Hinke, C.; Schlarb, M.; Seiler, D.; Wimmer, K. [Physik Department E12, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Maier-Leibnitz-Laboratorium der Muenchner Universitaeten (MLL), D-85748 Garching (Germany); Hertenberger, R.; Wirth, H.-F. [Maier-Leibnitz-Laboratorium der Muenchner Universitaeten (MLL), D-85748 Garching (Germany); Fakultaet fuer Physik, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Schafstadler, D. [Physik Department E12, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

64

New 34Cl proton-threshold states and the thermonuclear 33S(p,gamma)34Cl rate in ONe novae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Analysis of presolar grains in primitive meteorites has shown isotopic ratios largely characteristic of the conditions thought to prevail in various astrophysical environments. A possible indicator for a grain of ONe nova origin is a large 33S abundance: nucleosynthesis calculations predict as much as 150 times the solar abundance of 33S in the ejecta of nova explosions on massive ONe white dwarfs. This overproduction factor may, however, vary by factors of at least 0.01 - 3 because of uncertainties of several orders of magnitude in the 33S(p,gamma)34Cl reaction rate at nova peak temperatures (Tpeak ~ 0.1 - 0.4 GK). These uncertainties arise due to the lack of nuclear physics information for states within ~ 600 keV of the 33S+p threshold in 34Cl (Sp(34Cl) = 5143 keV). To better constrain this rate we have measured, for the first time, the 34S(3He,t)34Cl reaction over the region Ex(34Cl) = 4.9 - 6 MeV. We confirm previous states and find 15 new states in this energy region. New 33S(p,gamma)34Cl resonances at ER = 281(2), 301(2) and 342(2) keV may dominate this rate at relevant nova temperatures. Our results could affect predictions of sulphur isotopic ratios in nova ejecta (e.g., 32S/33S) that may be used as diagnostic tools for the nova paternity of grains.

A. Parikh; T. Faestermann; R. Hertenberger; R. Kruecken; D. Schafstadler; H. -F. Wirth; T. Behrens; V. Bildstein; S. Bishop; K. Eppinger; C. Herlitzius; C. Hinke; M. Schlarb; D. Seiler; K. Wimmer

2009-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

65

BrachyView: Proof-of-principle of a novel in-body gamma camera for low dose-rate prostate brachytherapy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: The conformity of the achieved dose distribution to the treatment plan strongly correlates with the accuracy of seed implantation in a prostate brachytherapy treatment procedure. Incorrect seed placement leads to both short and long term complications, including urethral and rectal toxicity. The authors present BrachyView, a novel concept of a fast intraoperative treatment planning system, to provide real-time seed placement information based on in-body gamma camera data. BrachyView combines the high spatial resolution of a pixellated silicon detector (Medipix2) with the volumetric information acquired by a transrectal ultrasound (TRUS). The two systems will be embedded in the same probe so as to provide anatomically correct seed positions for intraoperative planning and postimplant dosimetry. Dosimetric calculations are based on the TG-43 method using the real position of the seeds. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the feasibility of BrachyView using the Medipix2 pixel detector and a pinhole collimator to reconstruct the real-time 3D position of low dose-rate brachytherapy seeds in a phantom. Methods: BrachyView incorporates three Medipix2 detectors coupled to a multipinhole collimator. Three-dimensionally triangulated seed positions from multiple planar images are used to determine the seed placement in a PMMA prostate phantom in real time. MATLAB codes were used to test the reconstruction method and to optimize the device geometry. Results: The results presented in this paper show a 3D position reconstruction accuracy of the seed in the range of 0.5-3 mm for a 10-60 mm seed-to-detector distance interval (Z direction), respectively. The BrachyView system also demonstrates a spatial resolution of 0.25 mm in the XY plane for sources at 10 mm distance from Medipix2 detector plane, comparable to the theoretical value calculated for an equivalent gamma camera arrangement. The authors successfully demonstrated the capability of BrachyView for real-time imaging (using a 3 s data acquisition time) of different brachytherapy seed configurations (with an activity of 0.05 U) throughout a 60 Multiplication-Sign 60 Multiplication-Sign 60 mm{sup 3} Perspex prostate phantom. Conclusions: The newly developed miniature gamma camera component of BrachyView, with its high spatial resolution and real time capability, allows accurate 3D localization of seeds in a prostate phantom. Combination of the gamma camera with TRUS in a single probe will complete the BrachyView system.

Petasecca, M.; Loo, K. J.; Safavi-Naeini, M.; Han, Z.; Metcalfe, P. E.; Lerch, M. L. F.; Qi, Y.; Rosenfeld, A. B. [Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia); Meikle, S. [Brain and Mind Research Institute, University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia and Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia); Pospisil, S.; Jakubek, J. [Institute of Experimental and Applied Physics, Czech Technical University of Prague, Prague (Czech Republic); Bucci, J. A. [St George Cancer Care Centre, St George Hospital, Kogarah, NSW 2217 (Australia); Zaider, M. [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York 10021 (United States)

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

66

Low dose diagnostic radiation exposure and cancer risk in Trp53+/- mice  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

diagnostic radiation exposure and cancer risk in Trp53+/- mice diagnostic radiation exposure and cancer risk in Trp53+/- mice K Taylor, N Phan, ME Cybulski, L Laframboise, DR Boreham Department of Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton ON L8S 4K1 The cancer risk associated with exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation has traditionally been extrapolated from effects observed at high doses and high dose rates using a linear no threshold model. Based on this approach, it has been postulated that human exposure to medical imaging involving low doses of x-rays and gamma rays increase an individual's risk of developing cancer throughout their lifetime. Conversely, there is evidence that low doses of gamma radiation increase the latency period of cancer depending upon genotype, cancer type, and the magnitude of

67

Gamma ray bursts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The time histories size spectrum spatial distribution and repetition rates of gamma ray bursts are reviewed briefly. Evidence for a neutron star origin for gamma ray bursts may be found in many of these aspects of bursters. New results from optical searches are described. Substantial progress has been made recently in the optical identificaiton of the 1978 November 19 burst.

K. Hurley

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Gamma/neutron analysis for SNM signatures at high-data rates(greater than 107 cps) for single-pulse active interrogation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We are developing a high data gamma/neutron spectrometer suitable for active interrogation of special nuclear materials (SNM) activated by a single burst from an intense source. We have tested the system at Naval Research Laboratory's (NRL) Mercury pulsed-power facility at distances approaching 10 meters from a depleted uranium (DU) target. We have found that the gamma-ray field in the target room 'disappears' 10 milliseconds after the x-ray flash, and that gamma ray spectroscopy will then be dominated by isomeric states/beta decay of fission products. When a polyethylene moderator is added to the DU target, a time-dependent signature of the DU is produced by thermalized neutrons. We observe this signature in gamma-spectra measured consecutively in the 0.1-1.0 ms time range. These spectra contain the Compton edge line (2.2 MeV) from capture in hydrogen, and a continuous high energy gamma-spectrum from capture or fission in minority constituents of the DU.

Forman L.; Dioszegi, I.; Salwen, C.

2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

69

In-situ gamma-ray site characterization of the Tatum Salt Dome Test Site in Lamar County, Mississippi  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Field surveys of gamma-ray emitting nuclides and soil core sampling were conducted at 12 sites on the Tatum Salt Dome Test Site and surrounding control areas to determine exposure rates from surficial radioactivity. 137Cs was the only man-made radionuclide detected and was most abundant at three off-site locations on cultivated lawns. 137Cs inventories at all of the on-site survey locations were lower than expected, given the high annual precipitation in the area. The vertical distributions were more extended than those reported for undisturbed sites. Pressurized ion chamber measurements indicated no significant differences in exposure rates on and off the test site.

Faller, S.H. (Environmental Protection Agency, Las Vegas, NV (United States))

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Exposure factors handbook  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The document provides a summary of the available data on various factors used in assessing human exposure including drinking-water consumption, consumption rates of broad classes of food including fruits, vegetables, beef, dairy products, and fish; soil ingestion; inhalation rate; skin area; lifetime; activity patterns; and body weight. Additionally, a number of specific exposure scenarios are identified with recommendations for default values to use when site-specific data are not available. The basic equations using these parameters to calculate exposure levels are also presented for each scenario. Default values are presented as ranges from typical to reasonable worst case and as frequency distributions where appropriate data were available. Finally, procedures for assessing the uncertainties in exposure assessments are also presented with illustrative examples. These procedures include qualitative and quantitative methods such as Monte Carlo and sensitivity analysis.

Konz, J.J.; Lisi, K.; Friebele, E.; Dixon, D.A.

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

30S Studied with the 32S(p,t)30S Reaction and the 29P(p,{gamma})30S Reaction Rate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 29P(p,gamma)30S rate affects interpretation of nova Si abundances, which have been precisely measured in presolar grains. The rate is thought to be dominated by previously unobserved 3+ and 2+ resonances above the 30S proton threshold at 4400 keV. To better understand the 29P(p,gamma)30S rate, we have studied the 30S nucleus with the 32S(p,t)30S reaction. We have observed 13 30S levels - 9 of which are above the proton threshold including a level at 4704 keV that is a candidate to be the important 3+ resonance. From the observed triton angular distributions, we additionally constrain the spins of several levels. Using our updated information, we estimate the 29P(p,gamma)30S reaction rate is approximately six times larger at nova temperatures than previously thought.

Bardayan, Daniel W [ORNL; Blackmon, Jeff C [ORNL; Fitzgerald, Ryan [ORNL; Hix, William Raphael [ORNL; Grzywacz-Jones, Kate L [ORNL; KOZUB, RAYMOND L [ORNL; Liang, J Felix [ORNL; Livesay, Jake [ORNL; Ma, Zhanwen [ORNL; Roberts, Luke F [ORNL; Smith, Michael Scott [ORNL; Thomas, Jeffrey S [ORNL; Visser, Dale William [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

PRODUCTION OF {sup 26}Al, {sup 44}Ti, AND {sup 60}Fe IN CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE: SENSITIVITY TO THE RATES OF THE TRIPLE ALPHA AND {sup 12}C({alpha}, {gamma}){sup 16}O REACTIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have studied the sensitivity to variations in the triple alpha and {sup 12}C({alpha}, {gamma}){sup 16}O reaction rates of the production of {sup 26}Al, {sup 44}Ti, and {sup 60}Fe in core-collapse supernovae (SNe). We used the KEPLER code to model the evolution of 15 M {sub sun}, 20 M {sub sun}, and 25 M {sub sun} stars to the onset of core collapse and simulated the ensuing SN explosion using a piston model for the explosion and an explosion energy of 1.2 x 10{sup 51} erg. Calculations were performed for the Anders and Grevesse and Lodders abundances. Over a range of twice the experimental uncertainty, {sigma}, for each helium-burning rate, the production of {sup 26}Al, {sup 60}Fe, and their ratio vary by factors of 5 or more. For some species, similar variations were observed for much smaller rate changes, 0.5{sigma} or less. The production of {sup 44}Ti was less sensitive to changes in the helium-burning rates. Production of all three isotopes depended on the solar abundance set used for the initial stellar composition.

Tur, Clarisse; Austin, Sam M. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, 1 Cyclotron Laboratory, East Lansing, MI 48824-1321 (United States); Heger, Alexander, E-mail: tur@nscl.msu.ed, E-mail: austin@nscl.msu.ed, E-mail: alex@physics.umn.ed [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities, Minneapolis, MN 55455-0149 (United States)

2010-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

73

Gamma radiation field intensity meter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode. 4 figs.

Thacker, L.H.

1995-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

74

Gamma radiation field intensity meter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode. 4 figs.

Thacker, L.H.

1994-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

75

Gamma radiation field intensity meter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode.

Thacker, Louis H. (Knoxville, TN)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Gamma radiation field intensity meter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode.

Thacker, Louis H. (Knoxville, TN)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

The neutron-gamma Feynman variance to mean approach: gamma detection and total neutron-gamma detection (theory and practice)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Two versions of the neutron-gamma variance to mean (Feynman-alpha method or Feynman-Y function) formula for either gamma detection only or total neutron-gamma detection, respectively, are derived and compared in this paper. The new formulas have a particular importance for detectors of either gamma photons or detectors sensitive to both neutron and gamma radiation. If applied to a plastic or liquid scintillation detector, the total neutron-gamma detection Feynman-Y expression corresponds to a situation where no discrimination is made between neutrons and gamma particles. The gamma variance to mean formulas are useful when a detector of only gamma radiation is used or when working with a combined neutron-gamma detector at high count rates. The theoretical derivation is based on the Chapman-Kolmogorov equation with inclusion of general reactions and passage intensities for neutrons and gammas, but with the inclusion of prompt reactions only. A one energy group approximation is considered. The comparison of the two different theories is made by using reaction intensities obtained in MCNPX simulations with a simplified geometry for two scintillation detectors and a 252Cf-source enclosed in a steel container. In addition, the variance to mean ratios, neutron, gamma and total neutron-gamma, are evaluated experimentally for a weak 252Cf neutron-gamma source in a steel container, a 137Cs random gamma source and a 22Na correlated gamma source. Due to the focus being on the possibility of using neutron-gamma variance to mean theories for both reactor and safeguards applications, we limited the present study to the general analytical expressions for Feynman-Y formulas.

Dina Chernikova; Kåre Axell; Senada Avdic; Imre Pázsit; Anders Nordlund

2015-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

78

Population doses from environmental gamma radiation in Iraq  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The exposure rates due to external gamma radiation were measured in 11 Iraqi governerates. Measurements were performed with an Environmental Monitoring System (RSS-111) in open air 1 m above the ground. The average absorbed dose rate in each governerate was as follows (number x 10(-2) microGy h-1): Babylon (6.0), Kerbala (5.3), Al-Najaf (5.4), Al-Kadysia (6.5), Wasit (6.5), Diala (6.5), Al-Anbar (6.5), Al-Muthana (6.6), Maisan (6.8), Thee-Kar (6.6), and Al-Basrah (6.5). The collective doses to the population living in these governerates were 499, 187, 239, 269, 262, 458, 384, 153, 250, 450, and 419 person-Sv, respectively.

Marouf, B.A.; Mohamad, A.S.; Taha, J.S.; al-Haddad, I.K. (Iraq Atomic Energy Commission, Nuclear Research Center, Tuwaitha, Baghdad, (Iraq))

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Sandia National Laboratories: Research: Facilities: Gamma Irradiation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Gamma Irradiation Facility Gamma Irradiation Facility Photo of Gamma Irradiation Facility The Gamma Irradiation Facility (GIF) provides high-fidelity simulation of nuclear radiation environments for materials and component testing. The low-dose irradiation facility also offers an environment for long-duration testing of materials and electronic components. Such testing may take place over a number of months or even years. Research and other activities The single-structure GIF can house a wide variety of gamma irradiation experiments with various test configurations and at different dose and dose rate levels. Radiation fields at the GIF are produced by high-intensity gamma-ray sources. To induce ionizing radiation effects and damage in test objects, the objects are subjected to high-energy photons from gamma-source

80

Conservative constraints on dark matter annihilation into gamma rays  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using gamma-ray data from observations of the Milky Way, Andromeda (M31), and the cosmic background, we calculate conservative upper limits on the dark matter self-annihilation cross section to monoenergetic gamma rays, <{sigma}{sub A}v>{sub {gamma}}{sub {gamma}}, over a wide range of dark matter masses. (In fact, over most of this range, our results are unchanged if one considers just the branching ratio to gamma rays with energies within a factor of a few of the endpoint at the dark matter mass.) If the final-state branching ratio to gamma rays, Br({gamma}{gamma}), were known, then <{sigma}{sub A}v>{sub {gamma}}{sub {gamma}}/Br({gamma}{gamma}) would define an upper limit on the total cross section; we conservatively assume Br({gamma}{gamma}) > or approx. 10{sup -4}. An upper limit on the total cross section can also be derived by considering the appearance rates of any standard model particles; in practice, this limit is defined by neutrinos, which are the least detectable. For intermediate dark matter masses, gamma-ray-based and neutrino-based upper limits on the total cross section are comparable, while the gamma-ray limit is stronger for small masses and the neutrino limit is stronger for large masses. We comment on how these results depend on the assumptions about astrophysical inputs and annihilation final states, and how GLAST and other gamma-ray experiments can improve upon them.

Mack, Gregory D.; Yueksel, Hasan [Department of Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Center for Cosmology and Astro-Particle Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Jacques, Thomas D.; Bell, Nicole F. [School of Physics, The University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Beacom, John F. [Department of Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Center for Cosmology and Astro-Particle Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gamma exposure rate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

The neutron-gamma Feynman variance to mean approach: gamma detection and total neutron-gamma detection (theory and practice)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Two versions of the neutron-gamma variance to mean (Feynman-alpha method or Feynman-Y function) formula for either gamma detection only or total neutron-gamma detection, respectively, are derived and compared in this paper. The new formulas have a particular importance for detectors of either gamma photons or detectors sensitive to both neutron and gamma radiation. If applied to a plastic or liquid scintillation detector, the total neutron-gamma detection Feynman-Y expression corresponds to a situation where no discrimination is made between neutrons and gamma particles. The gamma variance to mean formulas are useful when a detector of only gamma radiation is used or when working with a combined neutron-gamma detector at high count rates. The theoretical derivation is based on the Chapman-Kolmogorov equation with inclusion of general reactions and passage intensities for neutrons and gammas, but with the inclusion of prompt reactions only. A one energy group approximation is considered. The comparison of the ...

Chernikova, Dina; Avdic, Senada; Pázsit, Imre; Nordlund, Anders

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Characterization of irradiation cell dose rates at the Nuclear Science Center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Watt level is the maximum currently allowed by operational procedures at the Nuclear Science Center for cell operations. Also, 300 watts is the lowest stable power level achievable. TLD measurements are presented for the 100 kW power level.... Gamma exposure rates in R/hr measured by high-range ionization detector, void can not utilized, measurement location A Power Level ( jKW) Core Location ?1 Ex osure Rate (R/hr) 0. 3 1. 0 3. 0 10. 0 30. 0 100. 0 21000 23500 30000 51750 120000...

Jeffords, Eugene Lamarr

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

83

Gamma Ray Bursts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Olson. “Observations of gamma-ray bursts of cosmic origin. ”E. Lingenfelter. “Gamma-ray bursts. ” Annual Review of652-654. Waxman, Eli. “Gamma-ray-burst afterglow: supporting

Stahl, Bennett

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

The Dose Rate Conversion Factors for Nuclear Fallout  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In a previous paper, the composite exposure rate conversion factor (ECF) for nuclear fallout was calculated using a simple theoretical photon-transport model. The theoretical model was used to fill in the gaps in the FGR-12 table generated by ORNL. The FGR-12 table contains the individual conversion factors for approximate 1000 radionuclides. However, in order to calculate the exposure rate during the first 30 minutes following a nuclear detonation, the conversion factors for approximately 2000 radionuclides are needed. From a human-effects standpoint, it is also necessary to have the dose rate conversion factors (DCFs) for all 2000 radionuclides. The DCFs are used to predict the whole-body dose rates that would occur if a human were standing in a radiation field of known exposure rate. As calculated by ORNL, the whole-body dose rate (rem/hr) is approximately 70% of the exposure rate (R/hr) at one meter above the surface. Hence, the individual DCFs could be estimated by multiplying the individual ECFs by 0.7. Although this is a handy rule-of-thumb, a more consistent (and perhaps, more accurate) method of estimating the individual DCFs for the missing radionuclides in the FGR-12 table is to use the linear relationship between DCF and total gamma energy released per decay. This relationship is shown in Figure 1. The DCFs for individual organs in the body can also be estimated from the estimated whole-body DCF. Using the DCFs given FGR-12, the ratio of the organ-specific DCFs to the whole-body DCF were plotted as a function of the whole-body DCF. From these plots, the asymptotic ratios were obtained (see Table 1). Using these asymptotic ratios, the organ-specific DCFs can be estimated using the estimated whole-body DCF for each of the missing radionuclides in the FGR-12 table. Although this procedure for estimating the organ-specific DCFs may over-estimate the value for some low gamma-energy emitters, having a finite value for the organ-specific DCFs in the table is probably better than having no value at all. A summary of the complete ECF and DCF values are given in Table 2.

Spriggs, G D

2009-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

85

Gamma–ray bursts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...R. Priest and N. O. Weiss Gamma-ray bursts Martin J. Rees Institute of...Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA, UK Gamma-ray bursts, an enigma for more than 25...gamma-rays|neutron stars| Gamma-ray bursts By Martin J. Rees Institute...

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Gamma ray generator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An embodiment of a gamma ray generator includes a neutron generator and a moderator. The moderator is coupled to the neutron generator. The moderator includes a neutron capture material. In operation, the neutron generator produces neutrons and the neutron capture material captures at least some of the neutrons to produces gamma rays. An application of the gamma ray generator is as a source of gamma rays for calibration of gamma ray detectors.

Firestone, Richard B; Reijonen, Jani

2014-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

87

AGATA - Advanced Gamma Tracking Array  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Advanced GAmma Tracking Array (AGATA) is a European project to develop and operate the next generation gamma-ray spectrometer. AGATA is based on the technique of gamma-ray energy tracking in electrically segmented high-purity germanium crystals. This technique requires the accurate determination of the energy, time and position of every interaction as a gamma ray deposits its energy within the detector volume. Reconstruction of the full interaction path results in a detector with very high efficiency and excellent spectral response. The realization of gamma-ray tracking and AGATA is a result of many technical advances. These include the development of encapsulated highly-segmented germanium detectors assembled in a triple cluster detector cryostat, an electronics system with fast digital sampling and a data acquisition system to process the data at a high rate. The full characterization of the crystals was measured and compared with detector-response simulations. This enabled pulse-shape analysis algorithms, to extract energy, time and position, to be employed. In addition, tracking algorithms for event reconstruction were developed. The first phase of AGATA is now complete and operational in its first physics campaign. In the future AGATA will be moved between laboratories in Europe and operated in a series of campaigns to take advantage of the different beams and facilities available to maximize its science output. The paper reviews all the achievements made in the AGATA project including all the necessary infrastructure to operate and support the spectrometer.

S. Akkoyun; A. Algora; B. Alikhani; F. Ameil; G. de Angelis; L. Arnold; A. Astier; A. Ataç; Y. Aubert; C. Aufranc; A. Austin; S. Aydin; F. Azaiez; S. Badoer; D. L. Balabanski; D. Barrientos; G. Baulieu; R. Baumann; D. Bazzacco; F. A. Beck; T. Beck; P. Bednarczyk; M. Bellato; M. A. Bentley; G. Benzoni; R. Berthier; L. Berti; R. Beunard; G. Lo Bianco; B. Birkenbach; P. G. Bizzeti; A. M. Bizzeti-Sona; F. Le Blanc; J. M. Blasco; N. Blasi; D. Bloor; C. Boiano; M. Borsato; D. Bortolato; A. J. Boston; H. C. Boston; P. Bourgault; P. Boutachkov; A. Bouty; A. Bracco; S. Brambilla; I. P. Brawn; A. Brondi; S. Broussard; B. Bruyneel; D. Bucurescu; I. Burrows; A. Bürger; S. Cabaret; B. Cahan; E. Calore; F. Camera; A. Capsoni; F. Carrió; G. Casati; M. Castoldi; B. Cederwall; J. -L. Cercus; V. Chambert; M. El Chambit; R. Chapman; L. Charles; J. Chavas; E. Clément; P. Cocconi; S. Coelli; P. J. Coleman-Smith; A. Colombo; S. Colosimo; C. Commeaux; D. Conventi; R. J. Cooper; A. Corsi; A. Cortesi; L. Costa; F. C. L. Crespi; J. R. Cresswell; D. M. Cullen; D. Curien; A. Czermak; D. Delbourg; R. Depalo; T. Descombes; P. Désesquelles; P. Detistov; C. Diarra; F. Didierjean; M. R. Dimmock; Q. T. Doan; C. Domingo-Pardo; M. Doncel; F. Dorangeville; N. Dosme; Y. Drouen; G. Duchêne; B. Dulny; J. Eberth; P. Edelbruck; J. Egea; T. Engert; M. N. Erduran; S. Ertürk; C. Fanin; S. Fantinel; E. Farnea; T. Faul; M. Filliger; F. Filmer; Ch. Finck; G. de France; A. Gadea; W. Gast; A. Geraci; J. Gerl; R. Gernhäuser; A. Giannatiempo; A. Giaz; L. Gibelin; A. Givechev; N. Goel; V. González; A. Gottardo; X. Grave; J. Gr?bosz; R. Griffiths; A. N. Grint; P. Gros; L. Guevara; M. Gulmini; A. Görgen; H. T. M. Ha; T. Habermann; L. J. Harkness; H. Harroch; K. Hauschild; C. He; A. Hernández-Prieto; B. Hervieu; H. Hess; T. Hüyük; E. Ince; R. Isocrate; G. Jaworski; A. Johnson; J. Jolie; P. Jones; B. Jonson; P. Joshi; D. S. Judson; A. Jungclaus; M. Kaci; N. Karkour; M. Karolak; A. Ka?ka?; M. Kebbiri; R. S. Kempley; A. Khaplanov; S. Klupp; M. Kogimtzis; I. Kojouharov; A. Korichi; W. Korten; Th. Kröll; R. Krücken; N. Kurz; B. Y. Ky; M. Labiche; X. Lafay; L. Lavergne; I. H. Lazarus; S. Leboutelier; F. Lefebvre; E. Legay; L. Legeard; F. Lelli; S. M. Lenzi; S. Leoni; A. Lermitage; D. Lersch; J. Leske; S. C. Letts; S. Lhenoret; R. M. Lieder; D. Linget; J. Ljungvall; A. Lopez-Martens; A. Lotodé; S. Lunardi; A. Maj; J. van der Marel; Y. Mariette; N. Marginean; R. Marginean; G. Maron; A. R. Mather; W. M?czy?ski; V. Mendéz; P. Medina; B. Melon; R. Menegazzo; D. Mengoni; E. Merchan; L. Mihailescu; C. Michelagnoli; J. Mierzejewski; L. Milechina; B. Million; K. Mitev; P. Molini; D. Montanari; S. Moon; F. Morbiducci; R. Moro; P. S. Morrall; O. Möller; A. Nannini; D. R. Napoli; L. Nelson; M. Nespolo; V. L. Ngo; M. Nicoletto; R. Nicolini; Y. Le Noa; P. J. Nolan; M. Norman; J. Nyberg; A. Obertelli; A. Olariu; R. Orlandi; D. C. Oxley; C. Özben; M. Ozille; C. Oziol; E. Pachoud; M. Palacz; J. Palin; J. Pancin; C. Parisel; P. Pariset; G. Pascovici; R. Peghin; L. Pellegri; A. Perego; S. Perrier; M. Petcu; P. Petkov; C. Petrache; E. Pierre; N. Pietralla; S. Pietri; M. Pignanelli; I. Piqueras; Z. Podolyak; P. Le Pouhalec; J. Pouthas; D. Pugnére; V. F. E. Pucknell; A. Pullia; B. Quintana; R. Raine; G. Rainovski; L. Ramina; G. Rampazzo; G. La Rana; M. Rebeschini; F. Recchia; N. Redon; M. Reese; P. Reiter; P. H. Regan; S. Riboldi; M. Richer; M. Rigato; S. Rigby; G. Ripamonti; A. P. Robinson; J. Robin; J. Roccaz; J. -A. Ropert; B. Rossé; C. Rossi Alvarez; D. Rosso; B. Rubio; D. Rudolph; F. Saillant; E. ?ahin; F. Salomon; M. -D. Salsac; J. Salt; G. Salvato; J. Sampson; E. Sanchis; C. Santos; H. Schaffner; M. Schlarb; D. P. Scraggs; D. Seddon; M. ?enyi?it; M. -H. Sigward; G. Simpson; J. Simpson; M. Slee; J. F. Smith; P. Sona; B. Sowicki; P. Spolaore; C. Stahl; T. Stanios; E. Stefanova; O. Stézowski; J. Strachan; G. Suliman; P. -A. Söderström; J. L. Tain; S. Tanguy; S. Tashenov; Ch. Theisen; J. Thornhill; F. Tomasi; N. Toniolo; R. Touzery; B. Travers; A. Triossi; M. Tripon; K. M. M. Tun-Lanoë; M. Turcato; C. Unsworth; C. A. Ur; J. J. Valiente-Dobon; V. Vandone; E. Vardaci; R. Venturelli; F. Veronese; Ch. Veyssiere; E. Viscione; R. Wadsworth; P. M. Walker; N. Warr; C. Weber; D. Weisshaar; D. Wells; O. Wieland; A. Wiens; G. Wittwer; H. J. Wollersheim; F. Zocca; N. V. Zamfir; M. Zi?bli?ski; A. Zucchiatti

2011-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

88

Mouse Strain-Dependent Variations in Sensitivity to Induction of Gamma-H2AX Foci after Continuous Low Dose-Rate Irradiation: The Atm-/- vs Atm +/+ genotypes on Balb/c, 129S6, C57BL/6J, and A/J inbred strains  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Mouse Strain-Dependent Variations in Sensitivity to Induction of Gamma-H2AX Foci Mouse Strain-Dependent Variations in Sensitivity to Induction of Gamma-H2AX Foci after Continuous Low Dose-Rate Irradiation: The Atm-/- vs Atm +/+ genotypes on Balb/c, 129S6, C57BL/6J, and A/J inbred strains. J.R.Brogan 1 , H. Nagasawa 1 , T.A Kato 1 , C.Fallgren 1 , T.Wade 1 . P.Genik 1 , J.B.Little 2 , J.S.Bedford 1 , and M.M.Weil 1 1 Department of Environmental and Radiological Health Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523; 2 Department of Genetics and Complex Diseases, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston MA 02115 We have recently developed a 'low dose rate' gamma-H2AX assay that is sufficiently sensitive to distinguish differences in response for cells from normal Atm +/+ (mouse) or ATM+/+ (human) and the phenotypes associated with the corresponding

89

Track 3: Exposure Hazards  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

ISM Workshop Presentations Knoxville Convention Center, Knoxville, TN August 2009 Track 3: Exposure Hazards

90

Observations of cosmic gamma ray sources and their contribution to the diffuse gamma ray background  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective is to study soft gamma ray emission in the 0.1 to 10 MeV energy band for selected active galactic nuclei and explore how much they contribute to the total diffuse gamma ray background. A series of imaging observations of extragalactic objects in the low energy gamma-ray region were carried out by the Coded Aperture Directional Gamma-ray Telescope (DGT). The DGT was successfully flown at stratospheric balloon altitudes, and observations were made of the Crab, NGC 1275, MKN 421, and NGC 4151. The measured Crab spectrum is consistent with a featureless power-law of the form. Significant emission was detected up to 500 keV from the Seyfert galaxy, NGC 4151. To increase the total sky exposure the extragalactic field images were analyzed, including the 3C 273 region, obtained by the DGT.

Bhattacharya, D.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

detonation rate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

detonation rate, detonation velocity, velocity of detonation, V.O.D., detonating velocity, rate of detonation, detonating rate ? Detonationsgeschwindigkeit f

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

DOE 2013 Occupational Radiation Exposure Report ALARA Activities...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

disconnection allows termination of correction elements to be conducted in a lower dose rate area and in less time. This innovation will greatly reduce radiation exposures to...

93

Gamma-Ray Shielding Effectiveness of Some Alloys for Fusion Reactor Design  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The gamma-ray shielding effectiveness of some oxide dispersion-strengthen (ODS) alloys by means of mass attenuation coefficients, mean free path, exposure buildup factors and energy absorption buildup factors hav...

Vishwanath P. Singh; M. E. Medhat; N. M. Badiger

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Gamma Ray Bursts with (and without) Supernova Fireworks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We review the observational status of the Supernova/Gamma?Ray Burst connection. Observations of long duration Gamma?ray bursts suggest that they are associated with bright SNe?Ic. However recent observations of GRB 060614 puzzle this scenario pointing out the existence of long?duration Gamma?ray Burst not accompanied by a bright supernova. Current estimates of the SN and GRB rates yield a ratio GRB/SNe?Ibc in the range ?0.4%–3%.

Massimo Della Valle

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Gamma Ray Bursts Sudden, intense flashes of gamma rays  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gamma Ray Bursts #12;The Case Sudden, intense flashes of gamma rays come from nowhere and disappear with out a trace. Incredibly powerful: A single gamma ray burst is hundreds of times brighter a supernova #12;Who Vela (1960's) Looking for arms testing, found gamma ray bursts Compton Gamma Ray Observatory

Washington at Seattle, University of - Department of Physics, Electroweak Interaction Research Group

96

Gamma ray burst positrons  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The international network of gamma ray burst detectors has provided redundant localizations for six gamma ray bursts with accuracies in the arcminute range. Catalog radio soft X?ray and optical searches have been performed for some of these events. The results of these searches are reviewed. Although radio X?ray and optical candidates are found in the error boxes no clear association between gamma ray bursts and other forms of emission has emerged to date. Optical radio searches are continuing.

K. Hurley

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Natural radioactivity and radiation exposure at the Minjingu phosphate mine in Tanzania  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper the results of studies on activity and ambient radiation background around the Minjingu phosphate mine in Tanzania are presented. The outdoor dose rate in air and the activity levels of samples from and outside the mine were determined by thermoluminiscent dosimeters and a gamma spectrometer system with a Hyper Pure germanium detector system respectively. The determination of activity was made for the 226 Ra, 228 Ra, 228 Th and 40 K radionuclides. High concentrations of radium-226 were observed in phosphate rock (5760±107 Bq kg-1 ), waste rock (4250±98 Bq kg-1 ), wild leaf vegetation (650±11 Bq kg-1 ), edible leaf vegetation (393±9 Bq kg-1 ), surface water (4.7±0.4 mBq l-1 ) and chicken feed (4±0.1 Bq kg-1 ) relative to selected control sites. These findings suggest a radiation health risk particularly when the samples are ingested, because the internal exposure may give rise to an effective dose exceeding 20 mSv which is the annual limit of intake of natural radionuclides recommended by the ICRP. On the other hand, the radiation dose from ambient air over five years at the phosphate mine ranges from 1375 to 1475 nGy h-1 with an average of 1415 nGy h-1 . The average is about 28 times that of the global average background radiation from terrestrial sources, and about 12 times the allowed average dose limit for public exposure over five consecutive years. Future investigations on the occupancy factor, external dose rate and radon and radon progeny exposure in drinking water, buildings and activity content in the locally grown foodstuffs are proposed, for the realistic quantification of the overall exposure of workers and public at Minjingu, and remedial measures for future radiation safety.

Firmi P Banzi; Leonard D Kifanga; Felician M Bundala

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Detection of pseudo gamma-ray bursts of long duration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is known that the counting rate of both Nai and Csi hard X-ray detectors can have intense enhancements of brief ... duration, which appear like very short cosmic gamma-ray bursts but probably are due to phosph...

F. Frontera; F. Fuligni; E. Morelli; G. Pizzichini…

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Optical gamma thermometer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An optical gamma thermometer includes a metal mass having a temperature proportional to a gamma flux within a core of a nuclear reactor, and an optical fiber cable for measuring the temperature of the heated metal mass. The temperature of the heated mass may be measured by using one or more fiber grating structures and/or by using scattering techniques, such as Raman, Brillouin, and the like. The optical gamma thermometer may be used in conjunction with a conventional reactor heat balance to calibrate the local power range monitors over their useful in-service life. The optical gamma thermometer occupies much less space within the in-core instrument tube and costs much less than the conventional gamma thermometer.

Koster, Glen Peter; Xia, Hua; Lee, Boon Kwee

2013-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

100

Gamma-ray binaries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent observations have shown that some compact stellar binaries radiate the highest energy light in the universe. The challenge has been to determine the nature of the compact object and whether the very high energy gamma-rays are ultimately powered by pulsar winds or relativistic jets. Multiwavelength observations have shown that one of the three gamma-ray binaries known so far, PSR B1259-63, is a neutron star binary and that the very energetic gamma-rays from this source and from another gamma-ray binary, LS I +61 303, may be produced by the interaction of pulsar winds with the wind from the companion star. At this time it is an open question whether the third gamma-ray binary, LS 5039, is also powered by a pulsar wind or a microquasar jet, where relativistic particles in collimated jets would boost the energy of the wind from the stellar companion to TeV energies.

I. F. Mirabel

2006-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gamma exposure rate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Exposure Evaluation Process  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

symptoms, further evaluation by HCP, and recommendations from evaluation by referral. It is a clinical judgment based on the history of the exposure, including what is...

102

Rate Schedules  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

One of the major responsibilities of Southeastern is to design, formulate, and justify rate schedules. Repayment studies prepared by the agency determine revenue requirements and appropriate rate...

103

Results of mobile gamma scanning activities in St. Louis, Missouri  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

From 1942 through approximately 1966, the Mallinckrodt Chemical Works operated four plants in St. Louis, Missouri, for the Manhattan Engineer District and the Atomic Energy Commission. A variety of production processes using uranium- and radium-bearing ore materials were performed at the plants. It is the policy of the DOE to verify that radiological conditions at such sites or facilities comply with current DOE guidelines. Guidelines for release and use of such sites have become more stringent as research has provided more information since previous cleanups. The Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) was established as part of that effort to confirm the closeout status of facilities under contract to agencies preceding DOE during early nuclear energy development. Under the FUSRAP program, the Mallinckrodt properties have been previously investigated to determine the extent of on-site radiological contamination. At the request of DOE, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) conducted a survey in May 1990, of public roadways and suspected haul routes between the Mallinckrodt plant and storage sites in St. Louis to ensure that no residual radioactive materials were conveyed off-site. A mobile gamma scanning van with an on-board computer system was used to identify possible anomalies. Suspect areas are those displaying measurements deviating from gamma exposure rates identified as typical for radiologically unenhanced areas in the vicinity of the areas of interest. The instrumentation highlighted three anomaly locations each of which measured less than 1m{sup 2} in size. None of the slightly elevated radiation levels originated from material associated with former AEC-related processing operations in the area. The anomalies resulted from elevated concentrations of radionuclides present in phosphate fertilizers, increased thorium in road-base gravel, and emanations from the radioactive storage site near the Latty Avenue airport. 9 refs., 3 figs.

Rodriguez, R E; Witt, D A; Cottrell, W D; Carrier, R F

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Avian inhalation exposure chamber  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An exposure system for delivering gaseous material ranging in particle size from 0.4 micrometers to 20.0 micrometers uniformly to the heads of experimental animals, primarily birds. The system includes a vertical outer cylinder and a central chimney with animal holding bottles connected to exposure ports on the vertical outer cylinder.

Briant, James K. (P.O. Box 999, Richland, WA 99352); Driver, Crystal J. (P.O. Box 999, Richland, WA 99352)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Avian inhalation exposure chamber  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An exposure system is designed for delivering gaseous material ranging in particle size from 0.4 micrometers to 20.0 micrometers uniformly to the heads of experimental animals, primarily birds. The system includes a vertical outer cylinder and a central chimney with animal holding bottles connected to exposure ports on the vertical outer cylinder. 2 figs.

Briant, J.K.; Driver, C.J.

1992-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

106

Gamma-ray Astronomy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The relevance of gamma-ray astronomy to the search for the origin of the galactic and, to a lesser extent, the ultra-high-energy cosmic rays has long been recognised. The current renaissance in the TeV gamma-ray field has resulted in a wealth of new data on galactic and extragalactic particle accelerators, and almost all the new results in this field were presented at the recent International Cosmic Ray Conference (ICRC). Here I summarise the 175 papers submitted on the topic of gamma-ray astronomy to the 30th ICRC in Merida, Mexico in July 2007.

Jim Hinton

2007-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

107

Rates - WAPA-137 Rate Order  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

WAPA-137 Rate Order WAPA-137 Rate Order 2009 CRSP Management Center Customer Rates Second Step Presentation from the June 25, 2009, Customer Meeting Handout Materials from the June 25, 2009, Customer Meeting Customer Comment Letters ATEA CREDA Farmington ITCA AMPUA Rate Adjustment Information The second step of WAPA-137 SLCA/IP Firm Power, CRSP Transmission and Ancillary Services rate adjustment. FERC Approval of Rate Order No. WAPA-137 Notice Of Filing for Rate Order No. WAPA-137 Published Final FRN for Rate Order No. WAPA-137 Letter to Customers regarding the published Notice of Extension of Public Process for Rate Order No. WAPA-137 Published Extension of Public Process for Rate Order No. WAPA-137 FRN Follow-up Public Information and Comment Forum Flier WAPA-137 Customer Meetings and Rate Adjustment Schedule

108

Gamma-Ray Bursts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gamma-ray bursts are the most luminous explosions in the Universe, and their origin and mechanism are the focus of intense research and debate. More than three decades after their discovery, and after pioneering breakthroughs from space and ground experiments, their study is entering a new phase with the recently launched Swift satellite. The interplay between these observations and theoretical models of the prompt gamma ray burst and its afterglow is reviewed.

P. Meszaros

2006-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

109

The Polarization Dependence of Gamma-Gamma Absorption - Implications for Gamma-Ray Bursts and Blazars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper presents an analysis of the dependence of the opacity for high-energy gamma-rays to gamma-gamma absorption by low-energy photons, on the polarization of the gamma-ray and target photons. This process has so far only been considered using the polarization-averaged gamma-gamma absorption cross section. It is demonstrated that in the case of polarized gamma-ray emission, subject to source-intrinsic gamma-gamma absorption by polarized target photons, this may lead to a slight over-estimation of the gamma-gamma opacity by up to ~ 10 % in the case of a perfectly ordered magnetic field. Thus, for realistic astrophysical scenarios with partially ordered magnetic fields, the use of the polarization-averaged gamma-gamma cross section is justified for practical purposes, such as estimates of minimum Doppler factors inferred for gamma-ray bursts and blazars, based on gamma-gamma transparency arguments, and this paper quantifies the small error incurred by the unpolarized-radiation approximation. Furthermore, i...

Boettcher, Markus

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

VOC Exposure Metrics  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

6 6 VOC Exposure Metrics ... and "Sick Building Syndrome" Figure1: The elevated odds ratios (above unity) in this figure suggest that exposures to VOCs from water-based points and solvents are associated with a variety of sick building symptions (* indicates the OR is significant at p < 0.05; ** for p < 0.01). The indoors is often regarded as safe haven from problems associated with outdoor air pollution, but a growing number of reports have suggested that exposures in indoor environments may lead to health problems. One area in which evidence has been accumulating is the relationship between working in office buildings (as opposed to industrial exposure conditions) and a variety of health effects, such as eye, nose, and throat irritation and

111

Microenvironmental Exposures to VOCs  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Microenvironmental Exposures to VOCs Microenvironmental Exposures to VOCs Speaker(s): Miranda Loh Date: February 1, 2006 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 The Boston Exposure Assessment in Microenvironments (BEAM) study was designed to examine the concentration distributions of VOCs in various microenvironments in and around Boston with the main objective of reducing the uncertainties in predicting exposure levels. A suite of VOC's with potential health effects including benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylenes, several chlorinated compounds and aldehydes were collected in all microenvironments. Phase I. BEAM examined common non-residential microenvironments that have not been extensively studied, in particular, dining, shopping, and transportation microenvironments. Sampling using scripted activities in these microenvironments. For some compounds,

112

Oriel UV Exposure Station  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and a mask holder for standard 5" x 5" optical masks. Capabilities: Light Source 1000 Watt Hg(Xe) lamp Wavelength range: 220-450 nm Digital timer for exposure control with...

113

Ultraviolet irradiation selectively disrupts the gamma-aminobutyric acid/benzodiazepine receptor-linked chloride ionophore  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ability of UV light to affect radioligand binding and 36Cl-uptake at the gamma-aminobutyric acidA (GABAA) receptor-chloride channel complex was examined. Exposure to 302 nm UV light produced a rapid (t1/2 = 4 min) reduction in (35S)t-butylbicyclo-phosphorothionate binding (assayed in the presence of 200 mM chloride) to sites associated with the GABAA receptor-coupled chloride ionophore. Saturation analysis revealed that this effect could be attributed entirely to a decrease in the maximum number of binding sites. Exposure to UV irradiation at lower (254 nm) and higher (366 nm) wavelengths also inhibited (35S)t-butylbicy-clophosphorothionate binding, but the respective rates of inactivation were 8- and 27-fold slower, compared with 302 nm. Other anion-dependent interactions at the GABAA receptor complex were disrupted in a similar manner. In the absence of permeant anion, (3H)flunitrazepam binding to benzodiazepine receptors was unaffected by 302 nm UV irradiation, whereas chloride-enhanced (3H)flunitrazepam binding was inhibited markedly. In the presence of 250-500 mM chloride, (3H)methyl-6,7-dimethoxy-4-ethyl-beta-carboline-3-carboxylate binding to benzodiazepine receptors was also inhibited after UV exposure. Basal 36Cl- uptake into synaptoneurosomes was nearly doubled after 15 min of exposure to 302 nm light, whereas pentobarbital- and muscimol-stimulated 36Cl- uptake were reduced significantly. UV irradiation at 302 nm appears to disrupt selectively the anion-dependent functional interactions at the GABAA receptor complex. The apparent wavelength specificity suggests that the gating structure (channel) may contain tryptophan and/or tyrosine residues vital to the regulation of anion movement through the ionophore portion of this supramolecular receptor-ion channel complex.

Evoniuk, G.; Moody, E.J.; Skolnick, P. (National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, Bethesda, MD (USA))

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Large-Scale Anisotropy of EGRET Gamma Ray Sources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the course of its operation, the EGRET experiment detected high-energy gamma ray sources at energies above 100 MeV over the whole sky. In this communication, we search for large-scale anisotropy patterns among the catalogued EGRET sources using an expansion in spherical harmonics, accounting for EGRET's highly non-uniform exposure. We find significant excess in the quadrupole and octopole moments. This is consistent with the hypothesis that, in addition to the galactic plane, a second mid-latitude (5^{\\circ} < |b| < 30^{\\circ}) population, perhaps associated with the Gould belt, contributes to the gamma ray flux above 100 MeV.

Luis Anchordoqui; Thomas McCauley; Thomas Paul; Olaf Reimer; Diego F. Torres

2005-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

115

Resonances and the thermonuclear reaction rate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present an approximate analytic expression for thermonuclear reaction rate of charged particles when the cross section contains a single narrow or wide resonance described by a Breit-Wigner shape. The resulting expression is uniformly valid as the effective energy and resonance energy coalesce. We use our expressions to calculate the reaction rate for $^{12}$C(p,$\\gamma$)$^{13}$N.

M. S. Hussein; M. Ueda; A. J. Sargeant; M. P. Pato

2003-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

116

Nano {gamma}'/{gamma}'' composite precipitates in Alloy 718  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nanoscale composite precipitates of Alloy 718 have been investigated with both high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy and phase field modeling. Chemical analysis via energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy allowed for the differentiation of {gamma}' and {gamma}'' particles, which is not otherwise possible through traditional Z-contrast methods. Phase field modeling was applied to determine the stress distribution and elastic interaction around and between the particles, respectively, and it was determined that a composite particle (of both {gamma}' and {gamma}'') has an elastic energy that is significantly lower than, for example, single {gamma}' and {gamma}'' precipitates which are non-interacting.

Phillips, P. J. [Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60607 (United States); McAllister, D.; Gao, Y.; Lv, D.; Williams, R. E. A.; Wang, Y.; Mills, M. J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Peterson, B. [Honeywell Aerospace, Phoenix, Arizona 85034 (United States)

2012-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

117

Rate schedule  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Firm Power Service Provided by Rate/Charges Firm Power Service Provided by Rate/Charges Rate/Charges Effective Through (or until superceded) Firm Sales (SLIP-F9) Composite Rate SLIP 29.62 mills/kWh 9/30/2015 Demand Charge SLIP $5.18/kW-month 9/30/2015 Energy Charge SLIP 12.19 mills/kWh 9/30/2015 Cost Recovery Charge (CRC) SLIP 0 mills/kWh 9/30/2015 Transmission Service Provided by Current Rates effective10/12 - 9/15 (or until superceded) Rate Schedule Effective Through Firm Point-to-Point Transmission (SP-PTP7) CRSP $1.14 per kW-month $13.69/kW-year $0.00156/kW-hour $0.04/kW-day $0.26/kW-week 10/1/2008-9/30/2015 Network Integration Transmission (SP-NW3) CRSP see rate schedule 10/1/2008-9/30/2015 Non-Firm Point-to-Point Transmission (SP-NFT6) CRSP see rate schedule 10/1/2008-9/30/2015 Ancillary Services Provided by Rate Rate Schedule

118

Gamma ray camera  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A gamma ray camera for detecting rays emanating from a radiation source such as an isotope. The gamma ray camera includes a sensor array formed of a visible light crystal for converting incident gamma rays to a plurality of corresponding visible light photons, and a photosensor array responsive to the visible light photons in order to form an electronic image of the radiation therefrom. The photosensor array is adapted to record an integrated amount of charge proportional to the incident gamma rays closest to it, and includes a transparent metallic layer, photodiode consisting of a p-i-n structure formed on one side of the transparent metallic layer, and comprising an upper p-type layer, an intermediate layer and a lower n-type layer. In the preferred mode, the scintillator crystal is composed essentially of a cesium iodide (CsI) crystal preferably doped with a predetermined amount impurity, and the p-type upper intermediate layers and said n-type layer are essentially composed of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H). The gamma ray camera further includes a collimator interposed between the radiation source and the sensor array, and a readout circuit formed on one side of the photosensor array.

Perez-Mendez, Victor (Berkeley, CA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Gamma ray camera  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A gamma ray camera is disclosed for detecting rays emanating from a radiation source such as an isotope. The gamma ray camera includes a sensor array formed of a visible light crystal for converting incident gamma rays to a plurality of corresponding visible light photons, and a photosensor array responsive to the visible light photons in order to form an electronic image of the radiation therefrom. The photosensor array is adapted to record an integrated amount of charge proportional to the incident gamma rays closest to it, and includes a transparent metallic layer, photodiode consisting of a p-i-n structure formed on one side of the transparent metallic layer, and comprising an upper p-type layer, an intermediate layer and a lower n-type layer. In the preferred mode, the scintillator crystal is composed essentially of a cesium iodide (CsI) crystal preferably doped with a predetermined amount impurity, and the p-type upper intermediate layers and said n-type layer are essentially composed of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H). The gamma ray camera further includes a collimator interposed between the radiation source and the sensor array, and a readout circuit formed on one side of the photosensor array. 6 figs.

Perez-Mendez, V.

1997-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

120

Herd immunity to filarial infection is a function of vector biting rate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...ingestion or dermal penetration, exposure to infection...mosquito biting rates, thereby also allowing...ingestion or dermal penetration, exposure to infection...mosquito biting rates, thereby also allowing...ingestion or dermal penetration, exposure to infection...mosquito biting rates, thereby also allowing...

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gamma exposure rate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Indoor and Outdoor in Situ High-Resolution Gamma Radiation Measurements in Urban Areas of Cyprus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In situ, high-resolution, gamma-ray spectrometry of a total number of 70 outdoor and 20 indoor representative measurements were performed in preselected, common locations of the main urban areas of Cyprus. Specific activities and gamma absorbed dose rates in air due to the naturally occurring radionuclides of Th-232 and U-238 series, and K-40 are determined and discussed. Effective dose rate to the Cyprus population due to terrestrial gamma radiation is derived directly from this work. The results obtained outdoors match very well with those derived previously by high-resolution gamma spectrometry of soil samples, which were collected from the main island bedrock surface. This implies that the construction and building materials in urban areas do not affect the external gamma dose rate; thus they are mostly of local origin. Finally, the indoor/outdoor gamma dose ratio was found to be 1.4 +- 0.5.

E. Svoukis; H. Tsertos

2006-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

122

Application of the gamma evaluation method in Gamma Knife film dosimetry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Gamma Knife (GK) radiosurgery is a minimally invasive surgical technique for the treatment of intracranial lesions. To minimize neurological deficits, submillimeter accuracy is required during treatment delivery. In this paper, the delivery accuracy of GK radiosurgery was assessed with the gamma evaluation method using planning dose distribution and film measurement data. Methods: Single 4, 8, and 16 mm and composite shot plans were developed for evaluation using the GK Perfexion (PFX) treatment planning system (TPS). The planning dose distributions were exported as digital image communications in medicine - radiation therapy (DICOM RT) files using a new function of GK TPS. A maximum dose of 8 Gy was prescribed for four test plans. Irradiation was performed onto a spherical solid water phantom using Gafchromic EBT2 films in the axial and coronal planes. The exposed films were converted to absolute dose based on a 4th-order polynomial calibration curve determined using ten calibration films. The film measurement results and planning dose distributions were registered for further analysis in the same Leksell coordinate using in-house software. The gamma evaluation method was applied to two dose distributions with varying spatial tolerance (0.3-2.0 mm) and dosimetric tolerance (0.3-2.0%), to verify the accuracy of GK radiosurgery. The result of gamma evaluation was assessed using pass rate, dose gamma index histogram (DGH), and dose pass rate histogram (DPH). Results: The 20, 50, and 80% isodose lines found in film measurements were in close agreement with the planning isodose lines, for all dose levels. The comparison of diagonal line profiles across the axial plane yielded similar results. The gamma evaluation method resulted in high pass rates of >95% within the 50% isodose line for 0.5 mm/0.5% tolerance criteria, in both the axial and coronal planes. They satisfied 1.0 mm/1.0% criteria within the 20% isodose line. Our DGH and DPH also showed that low isodose lines exhibited inferior gamma indexes and pass rates compared with higher isodose lines. Conclusions: The gamma evaluation method was applicable to GK radiosurgery. For all test plans, planning dose distribution and film measurement met the tolerance criteria of 0.5 mm/0.5% within the 50% isodose line which are used for marginal dose prescription.

Park, Jeong-Hoon; Han, Jung Ho; Kim, Chae-Yong; Oh, Chang Wan; Lee, Do-Heui; Suh, Tae-Suk; Gyu Kim, Dong; Chung, Hyun-Tai [Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam 463-707, Korea and Department of Biomedical Engineering, College of Medicine, Catholic University of Korea Seoul 137-701 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam 463-707, Korea and Department of Neurosurgery, College of Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul 110-799 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Neurosurgery, Asan Medical Center, College of Medicine, University of Ulsan, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Biomedical Engineering and Research Institute of Biomedical Engineering, College of Medicine, Catholic University of Korea, Seoul 137-701 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Neurosurgery, College of Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul 110-799 (Korea, Republic of)

2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

123

Penetration of 6-Mev Gamma Rays in Water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The penetration of 6-Mev gamma rays has been studied out to 190 cm in water. The dose rate has been measured with an anthracene scintillation detector as a function of the distance from the N16 source. The results agree closely out to 160 cm with the distribution calculated according to the theory of gamma-ray penetration as developed by Spencer and Fano.

P. A. Roys; K. Shure; J. J. Taylor

1954-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

124

Guidelines for Exposure Assessment  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Z-92/001 Z-92/001 May 1992 Guidelines for Exposure Assessment Published on May 29, 1992, Federal Register 57(104):22888-22938 These guidelines replace the previously issued final Guidelines for Estimating Exposures (September 24, 1986), Federal Register 51(185):34042-34054, and the Proposed Guidelines for Exposure-Related Measurements (December 2, 1988), Federal Register 53(232):48830- 48853. Risk Assessment Forum U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Washington, DC DISCLAIMER This document has been reviewed in accordance with U.S. Environmental Protection Agency policy and approved for publication. Mention of trade names or commercial products does not constitute endorsement or recommendation for use. Note: This document represents the final guidelines. A number of editorial corrections have

125

Americans' Average Radiation Exposure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We live with radiation every day. We receive radiation exposures from cosmic rays, from outer space, from radon gas, and from other naturally radioactive elements in the earth. This is called natural background radiation. It includes the radiation we get from plants, animals, and from our own bodies. We also are exposed to man-made sources of radiation, including medical and dental treatments, television sets and emission from coal-fired power plants. Generally, radiation exposures from man-made sources are only a fraction of those received from natural sources. One exception is high exposures used by doctors to treat cancer patients. Each year in the United States, the average dose to people from natural and man-made radiation sources is about 360 millirem. A millirem is an extremely tiny amount of energy absorbed by tissues in the body.

NA

2000-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

126

Gamma Ray Bursts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gamma-ray bursts have been detected at photon energies up to tens of GeV. We review some recent developments in the X-ray to GeV photon phenomenology in the light of Swift and Fermi observations, and some of the theoretical models developed to explain them, with a view towards implications for C.T.A.

Peter Mészáros

2012-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

127

Radiation Exposure Monitoring Systems Data Reporting Guide  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Instructions for preparing occupational exposure data for submittal to the Radiation Exposure Monitoring System (REMS) repository.

128

Gamma-ray burst models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...research-article Discussion Meeting Issue Gamma-ray bursts organized by Alan Wells, Ralph...J. Wijers and Martin Rees Gamma-ray burst models Andrew King * * ( ark...various possibilities for making gamma-ray bursts, particularly from close binaries...

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Gamma Irradiation | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Gamma Irradiation Gamma Irradiation Gamma Irradiation Facility Gamma irradiation chamber Gamma irradiation chamber. The HFIR Gamma Irradiation Facility is an experimental facility designed to irradiate materials with gamma radiation from spent fuel elements. The facility chamber is stainless steel and is made of 0.065-thick tubing to maximize the internal dimensions of the chamber. This allows for the largest samples possible that can still fit inside the cadmium post of the spent fuel loading station positions. The interior chamber is approximately 3.75 inches inside diameter and accommodates samples up to 25 inches long. There are two configurations for the chamber assembly, with the only difference being the plugs. The uninstrumented configuration has a top plug that is used for installation of the samples, to support the inert gas

130

E-Print Network 3.0 - annihilation gamma rays Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

32 3 grid 74 94 3.05 ora SPEC ray tracing 650 array elements... .0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 GammaGammaGammaGammaGammaGamma GammaGammaGammaGammaGammaGamma GammaGammaGamma...

131

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric gamma rays Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

32 3 grid 74 94 3.05 ora SPEC ray tracing 650 array elements... .0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 GammaGammaGammaGammaGammaGamma GammaGammaGammaGammaGammaGamma GammaGammaGamma...

132

Monte Carlo simulation of gamma ray scanning gauge  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A gamma ray scanning gauge was simulated with Monte Carlo to study the properties of gamma scanning gauges and to resolve the counts coming from a {sup 235}U source from those coming from a contaminant ({sup 232}U) whose daughters emit high energy gamma rays. The simulation has been used to infer the amount of the {sup 232}U contaminant in a {sup 235}U source to select the best size for the NaI(Tl) detector crystal to minimize the effect of the contaminant. The results demonstrate that Monte Carlo simulation provides a systematic tool for designing a gauge with desired properties and for estimating properties of the gamma source from measured count rates.

Hartfield, G.L.; Freeman, L.B.; Dei, D.E.; Emert, C.J.; Glickstein, S.S.; Kahler, A.C.; Niedzwecki, P.F.

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

133

LASER-PLASMA-ACCELERATOR-BASED GAMMA GAMMA COLLIDERS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LASER-PLASMA-ACCELERATOR-BASED ?? COLLIDERS ? C. B.linear col- lider based on laser-plasma-accelerators arediscussed, and a laser-plasma-accelerator-based gamma-

Schroeder, C. B.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Reports | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Reports Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Reports September 24, 2013 Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 2012 Report...

135

Occupational Radiation Exposure | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Radiation Exposure Welcome The Occupational Radiation Exposure Information page on this web page is intended to provide the latest available information on radiation exposure to...

136

The GAMMA-400 Space Mission  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GAMMA-400 is a new space mission which will be installed on board the Russian space platform Navigator. It is scheduled to be launched at the beginning of the next decade. GAMMA-400 is designed to study simultaneously gamma rays (up to 3 TeV) and cosmic rays (electrons and positrons from 1 GeV to 20 TeV, nuclei up to 10$^{15}$-10$^{16}$ eV). Being a dual-purpose mission, GAMMA-400 will be able to address some of the most impelling science topics, such as search for signatures of dark matter, cosmic-rays origin and propagation, and the nature of transients. GAMMA-400 will try to solve the unanswered questions on these topics by high-precision measurements of the Galactic and extragalactic gamma-ray sources, Galactic and extragalactic diffuse emission and the spectra of cosmic-ray electrons + positrons and nuclei, thanks to excellent energy and angular resolutions.

Cumani, P; Bonvicini, V; Topchiev, N P; Adriani, O; Aptekar, R L; Arkhangelskaja, I V; Arkhangelskiy, A I; Bergstrom, L; Berti, E; Bigongiari, G; Bobkov, S G; Boezio, M; Bogomolov, E A; Bonechi, S; Bongi, M; Bottai, S; Castellini, G; Cattaneo, P W; Dedenko, G L; De Donato, C; Dogiel, V A; Gorbunov, M S; Gusakov, Yu V; Hnatyk, B I; Kadilin, V V; Kaplin, V A; Kaplun, A A; Kheymits, M D; Korepanov, V E; Larsson, J; Leonov, A A; Loginov, V A; Longo, F; Maestro, P; Marrocchesi, P S; Menshenin, A L; Mikhailov, V V; Mocchiutti, E; Moiseev, A A; Mori, N; Moskalenko, I V; Naumov, P Yu; Papini, P; Pearce, M; Picozza, P; Popov, A V; Rappoldi, A; Ricciarini, S; Runtso, M F; Ryde, F; Serdin, O V; Sparvoli, R; Spillantini, P; Suchkov, S I; Tavani, M; Taraskin, A A; Tiberio, A; Tyurin, E M; Ulanov, M V; Vacchi, A; Vannuccini, E; Vasilyev, G I; Yurkin, Yu T; Zampa, N; Zirakashvili, V N; Zverev, V G

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

EFFECTS OF GAMMA IRRADIATION ON EPDM ELASTOMERS (REVISION 1)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two formulations of EPDM elastomer, one substituting a UV stabilizer for the normal antioxidant in this polymer, and the other the normal formulation, were synthesized and samples of each were exposed to gamma irradiation in initially pure deuterium gas to compare their radiation stability. Stainless steel containers having rupture disks were designed for this task. After 130 MRad dose of cobalt-60 radiation in the SRNL Gamma Irradiation Facility, a significant amount of gas was created by radiolysis; however the composition indicated by mass spectroscopy indicated an unexpected increase in the total amount deuterium in both formulations. The irradiated samples retained their ductility in a bend test. No change of sample weight, dimensions, or density was observed. No change of the glass transition temperature as measured by dynamic mechanical analysis was observed, and most of the other dynamic mechanical properties remained unchanged. There appeared to be an increase in the storage modulus of the irradiated samples containing the UV stabilizer above the glass transition, which may indicate hardening of the material by radiation damage. Revision 1 adds a comparison with results of a study of tritium exposed EPDM. The amount of gas produced by the gamma irradiation was found to be equivalent to about 280 days exposure to initially pure tritium gas at one atmosphere. The glass transition temperature of the tritium exposed EPDM rose about 10 ?C. over 280 days, while no glass transition temperature change was observed for gamma irradiated EPDM. This means that gamma irradiation in deuterium cannot be used as a surrogate for tritium exposure.

Clark, E.

2013-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

138

Gamma-ray burst populations.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Over the last fifty years the field of gamma-ray bursts has shown incredible growth, but the amassing of data has also left observers and theorists… (more)

Virgili, Francisco J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

EFFECTS OF GAMMA IRRADIATION ON EPDM ELASTOMERS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two formulations of EPDM elastomer, one substituting a UV stabilizer for the normal antioxidant in this polymer, and the other the normal formulation, were synthesized and samples of each were exposed to gamma irradiation in initially pure deuterium gas to compare their radiation stability. Stainless steel containers having rupture disks were designed for this task. After 130 MRad dose of cobalt-60 radiation in the SRNL Gamma Irradiation Facility, a significant amount of gas was created by radiolysis; however the composition indicated by mass spectroscopy indicated an unexpected increase in the total amount deuterium in both formulations. The irradiated samples retained their ductility in a bend test. No change of sample weight, dimensions, or density was observed. No change of the glass transition temperature as measured by dynamic mechanical analysis was observed, and most of the other dynamic mechanical properties remained unchanged. There appeared to be an increase in the storage modulus of the irradiated samples containing the UV stabilizer above the glass transition, which may indicate hardening of the material by radiation damage. Polymeric materials become damaged by exposure over time to ionizing radiation. Despite the limited lifetime, polymers have unique engineering material properties and polymers continue to be used in tritium handling systems. In tritium handling systems, polymers are employed mainly in joining applications such as valve sealing surfaces (eg. Stem tips, valve packing, and O-rings). Because of the continued need to employ polymers in tritium systems, over the past several years, programs at the Savannah River National Laboratory have been studying the effect of tritium on various polymers of interest. In these studies, samples of materials of interest to the SRS Tritium Facilities (ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMW-PE), polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE, Teflon{reg_sign}), Vespel{reg_sign} polyimide, and the elastomer ethylene propylene diene monomer (EPDM)) have been exposed in closed containers to tritium gas initially at 1 atmosphere pressure. These studies have demonstrated the degradation of properties when exposed to tritium gas. Also, the radiolytic production of significant amounts of hydrogen has been observed for UHMW-PE and EPDM. The study documented in this report exposes two similar formulations of EPDM elastomer to gamma irradiation in a closed container backfilled with deuterium. Deuterium is chemically identical to protium and tritium, but allows the identification of protium that is radiolytically produced from the samples. The goal of this program is to compare and contrast the response of EPDM exposure to two different types of ionizing radiation in a similar chemical environment.

Clark, E.

2011-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

140

Comparative investigations of sodium arsenite, arsenic trioxide and cadmium sulphate in combination with gamma-radiation on apoptosis, micronuclei induction and DNA damage in a human lymphoblastoid cell line  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the field of radiation protection the combined exposure to radiation and other toxic agents is recognised as an important research area. To elucidate the basic mechanisms of simultaneous exposure, the interaction of the carcinogens and environmental toxicants cadmium and two arsenic compounds, arsenite and arsenic trioxide, in combination with gamma-radiation in human lymphoblastoid cells (TK6) were investigated. Gamma-radiation induced significant genotoxic effects such as micronuclei formation, DNA damage and apoptosis, whereas arsenic and cadmium had no significant effect on these indicators of cellular damage at non-toxic concentrations. However, in combination with gamma-radiation arsenic trioxide induced a more than additive apoptotic rate compared to the sum of the single effects. Here, the level of apoptotic cells was increased, in a dose-dependent way, up to two-fold compared to the irradiated control cells. Arsenite did not induce a significant additive effect at any of the concentrations or radiation doses tested. On the other hand, arsenic trioxide was less effective than arsenite in the induction of DNA protein cross-links. These data indicate that the two arsenic compounds interact through different pathways in the cell. Cadmium sulphate, like arsenite, had no significant effect on apoptosis in combination with gamma-radiation at low concentrations and, at high concentrations, even reduced the radiation-induced apoptosis. An additive effect on micronuclei induction was observed with 1 ?M cadmium sulphate with an increase of up to 80% compared to the irradiated control cells. Toxic concentrations of cadmium and arsenic trioxide seemed to reduce micronuclei induction. The results presented here indicate that relatively low concentrations of arsenic and cadmium, close to those occuring in nature, may interfere with radiation effects. Differences in action of the two arsenic compounds were identified.

Sabine Hornhardt; Maria Gomolka; Linda Walsh; Thomas Jung

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gamma exposure rate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Gamma irradiation of the prenatal mouse dentition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as the dental lamina to the stage of the deposition of enamel and dentin. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of a continuous stress of gamma irradiation on the structure of the odontogenic cells, the relative size and rate of development... development. In 1927, Leist (9) made a study of the effect of X-rays on teeth, which was brought about by the following rase. A worker in a Roentgen tube factory was exposed daily to a considerable dose of X-irradiation. Sometime later he began to show...

Kerley, Michael Auston

1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Gamma-Ray Bursts from Neutron Star Mergers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Binary neutron stars merger (NS$^2$M) at cosmological distances is probably the only $\\gamma$-ray bursts model based on an independently observed phenomenon which is known to be taking place at a comparable rate. We describe this model, its predictions and some open questions.

T. Piran

1994-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

143

Did a gamma-ray burst initiate the late Ordovician mass extinction?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) produce a flux of radiation detectable across the observable Universe. A GRB within our own galaxy could do considerable damage to the Earth's biosphere; rate estimates suggest that a dangerously near GRB should occur...

Melott, Adrian L.; Lieberman, Bruce S.; Laird, C. M.; Martin, Larry D.; Medvedev, Mikhail V.; Thomas, B. C.; Cannizzo, J. K.; Gehrels, N.; Jackman, C. H.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Determining the Impact of Concrete Roadways on Gamma Ray Background Readings for Radiation Portal Monitoring Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

locations have reported abnormally high gamma background count rates. The higher background data has been attributed, in part, to the concrete surrounding the portal monitors. Higher background can ultimately lead to more material passing through the RPMs...

Ryan, Christopher Michael

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

145

Gamma Log | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gamma Log Gamma Log Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Gamma Log Details Activities (6) Areas (6) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Well Log Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Well Log Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: provides information on changes in rock type near the wellbore from changes in measured gamma radiation Stratigraphic/Structural: using multiple gamma logs over an area, the depth to the sandstone and shale layers can be correlated over larger areas Hydrological: Thermal: Cost Information Low-End Estimate (USD): 0.2525 centUSD 2.5e-4 kUSD 2.5e-7 MUSD 2.5e-10 TUSD / foot Median Estimate (USD): 0.3838 centUSD

146

Thermal Stability Enhancement of Polyethylene Separators by Gamma-ray Irradiation for Lithium Ion Batteries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The thermal stability of polyethylene (PE) separators irradiated by 50, 100, and 150 kGy dose gamma-rays is investigated when they are exposed to high-temperature environments. The gamma-ray irradiated separators have much lower Gurley numbers and higher ionic conductivity than a non-irradiated separator after storage at 100 and 120 °C. These results indicate that the thermal stability of PE separators can be drastically improved by gamma-ray irradiation. Even after storage at 120 °C for 1 h, the gamma-ray irradiated separator is maintaining its own structure. A cell assembled with a gamma-ray irradiated separator exhibits better rate-capability and cyclic performance than a pristine PE separator. The positive effects of gamma-ray irradiation are examined in detail with the purpose of improving battery performance.

Ki Jae Kim; Min-Sik Park; Hansu Kim; Young-Jun Kim

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Superfund Exposure Assessment Manual  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1-881001 1-881001 OSWER Directive 9285.5-1 April 1988 Superfund Exposure Assessment Manual U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Office of Remedial Response Washington, DC 20460 Notice This report was prepared under contract to an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any of its employees, contractors, subcontractors, or their employees makes any warranty, expressed or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for any third party' s use of or the results of such use of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed in this report, or represents that its use by such third party would not infringe on privately owned rights. ii Table of Contents Chapter Page List of Tables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

148

Neutron counting and gamma spectroscopy with PVT detectors.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radiation portals normally incorporate a dedicated neutron counter and a gamma-ray detector with at least some spectroscopic capability. This paper describes the design and presents characterization data for a detection system called PVT-NG, which uses large polyvinyl toluene (PVT) detectors to monitor both types of radiation. The detector material is surrounded by polyvinyl chloride (PVC), which emits high-energy gamma rays following neutron capture reactions. Assessments based on high-energy gamma rays are well suited for the detection of neutron sources, particularly in border security applications, because few isotopes in the normal stream of commerce have significant gamma ray yields above 3 MeV. Therefore, an increased count rate for high-energy gamma rays is a strong indicator for the presence of a neutron source. The sensitivity of the PVT-NG sensor to bare {sup 252}Cf is 1.9 counts per second per nanogram (cps/ng) and the sensitivity for {sup 252}Cf surrounded by 2.5 cm of polyethylene is 2.3 cps/ng. The PVT-NG sensor is a proof-of-principal sensor that was not fully optimized. The neutron detector sensitivity could be improved, for instance, by using additional moderator. The PVT-NG detectors and associated electronics are designed to provide improved resolution, gain stability, and performance at high-count rates relative to PVT detectors in typical radiation portals. As well as addressing the needs for neutron detection, these characteristics are also desirable for analysis of the gamma-ray spectra. Accurate isotope identification results were obtained despite the common impression that the absence of photopeaks makes data collected by PVT detectors unsuitable for spectroscopic analysis. The PVT detectors in the PVT-NG unit are used for both gamma-ray and neutron detection, so the sensitive volume exceeds the volume of the detection elements in portals that use dedicated components to detect each type of radiation.

Mitchell, Dean James; Brusseau, Charles A.

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

DOE 2012 Occupational Radiation Exposure October 2013  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Analysis within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) publishes the annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report to provide an overview of the status of radiation protection practices at DOE (including the National Nuclear Security Administration [NNSA]). The DOE 2012 Occupational Radiation Exposure Report provides an evaluation of DOE-wide performance regarding compliance with Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations (C.F.R.), Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection dose limits and as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) process requirements. In addition, the report provides data to DOE organizations responsible for developing policies for protection of individuals from the adverse health effects of radiation. The report provides a summary and an analysis of occupational radiation exposure information from the monitoring of individuals involved in DOE activities. Over the past 5-year period, the occupational radiation exposure information is analyzed in terms of aggregate data, dose to individuals, and dose by site. As an indicator of the overall amount of radiation dose received during the conduct of operations at DOE, the report includes information on collective total effective dose (TED). The TED is comprised of the effective dose (ED) from external sources, which includes neutron and photon radiation, and the internal committed effective dose (CED), which results from the intake of radioactive material into the body. The collective ED from photon exposure decreased by 23% between 2011 and 2012, while the neutron dose increased by 5%. The internal dose components of the collective TED decreased by 7%. Over the past 5-year period, 99.99% of the individuals receiving measurable TED have received doses below the 2 roentgen equivalent in man (rems) (20 millisievert [mSv]) TED administrative control level (ACL), which is well below the DOE regulatory limit of 5 rems (50 mSv) TED annually. The occupational radiation exposure records show that in 2012, DOE facilities continued to comply with DOE dose limits and ACLs and worked to minimize exposure to individuals. The DOE collective TED decreased 17.1% from 2011 to 2012. The collective TED decreased at three of the five sites with the largest collective TED. u Idaho Site – Collective dose reductions were achieved as a result of continuing improvements at the Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project (AMWTP) through the planning of drum movements that reduced the number of times a container is handled; placement of waste containers that created highradiation areas in a centralized location; and increased worker awareness of high-dose rate areas. In addition, Idaho had the largest decrease in the total number of workers with measurable TED (1,143 fewer workers). u Hanford Site (Hanford) – An overall reduction of decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) activities at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) and Transuranic (TRU) retrieval activities resulted in collective dose reductions. u Savannah River Site (SRS) – Reductions were achieved through ALARA initiatives employed site wide. The Solid Waste Management Facility used extended specialty tools, cameras and lead shield walls to facilitate removal of drums. These tools and techniques reduce exposure time through improved efficiency, increase distance from the source of radiation by remote monitoring, shield the workers to lower the dose rate, and reduce the potential for contamination and release of material through repacking of waste. Overall, from 2011 to 2012, there was a 19% decrease in the number of workers with measurable dose. Furthermore, due to a slight decrease in both the DOE workforce (7%) and monitored workers (10%), the ratio of workers with measurable doses to monitored workers decreased to 13%. Another primary indicator of the level of radiation exposure covered in this report is the average measurable dose, which normalizes the collective dose over the population of workers who actually received a measurable dose. The average measurable TED in

none,

2012-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

150

High energy cosmic-rays from gamma-ray burst sources: A stronger case  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The suggested association between the sources of gamma-ray bursts (GRB's) and the sources of ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECR's) is based on two arguments: (i) The average energy generation rate of UHECR's is similar to the gamma-ray generation rate of GRB's, and (ii) The constraints that UHECR sources must satisfy to allow proton acceleration to >10^{20} eV are similar to those inferred for GRB sources from gamma-ray observations. We show that recent GRB and UHECR observations strengthen both arguments, and hence strengthen the suggested association.

E. Waxman

2002-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

151

[sup 3]He neutron detector performance in mixed neutron gamma environments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A test program of the performance of 3He neutron proportional detectors with varying gas pressures, and their response to lligh level gamma-ray exposure in a mixed neutrodgamma environment, ha$ been performed Our intent was to identie the optimal gas pressure to reduce the gamma-ray sensitivity of these detectors. These detectors were manufxtured using materials to minimize their gamma response. Earlier work focused on 3He fill pressures of four atmospheres and above, whereas the present work focuses on a wider range of pressures. Tests have shown that reducing the .filling pressure will M e r increase the gamma-ray dose range in which the detectors can be operated.

Johnson, N. H. (Nathan H.); Beddingfield, D. H. (David H.)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Rates & Repayment  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Environmental Review-NEPA Financial Data Operations Planning & Projects Power Marketing Rates Rate Adjustments Transmission Ancillary Services Rates WAPA-137 Rate Order Environmental Review-NEPA Financial Data Operations Planning & Projects Power Marketing Rates Rate Adjustments Transmission Ancillary Services Rates WAPA-137 Rate Order Rates and Repayment Services Rates Current and Historical Rate Information Collbran Power Rates CRSP Power Rates CRSP Transmission System Rates CRSP Management Center interest rates Falcon-Amistad Power Rates Provo River Power Rates Rio Grande Power Rates Seedskadee Power Rates SLCA/IP Power Rates Rate Schedules & Supplemental Rate Information Current Rates for Firm Power, Firm & Non-firm Transmission Service, & Ancillary Services Current Transmission & Ancillary Services Rates Tariffs Components of the SLCA/IP Existing Firm Power Rate Cost Recovery Charge (CRC) Page MOA Concerning the Upper Colorado River Basin

153

Can UV Exposure Reduce Mortality?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...with cancer mortality, such as solar elastosis and serum vitamin...studies conducted on the role of solar UV exposure and melanoma etiology...27); increased DNA repair capacity (e.g, 28); as well as...Boscoe FP , Schymura MJ.Solar ultraviolet-B exposure and...

Marianne Berwick

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Gamma ray bursts ROBERT S MACKAY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gamma ray bursts ROBERT S MACKAY COLIN ROURKE We propose that a gamma ray burst is a kinematic Gamma ray bursts are intense flashes of electromagnetic radiation of cosmic origin lasting from ten accepted mechanism. We propose that a gamma ray burst is simply a kinematic effect, namely the effect

Rourke, Colin

155

Study Z gamma events and limits on anomalous ZZ gamma and Z gamma gamma couplings in pp(-) collisions at root s=1.96 Tev  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a measurement of the Z gamma production cross section and limits on anomalous ZZ gamma and Z gamma gamma couplings for form-factor scales of Lambda=750 and 1000 GeV. The measurement is based on 138 (152) candidates ...

Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Christofek, L.; Coppage, Don; Gardner, J.; Hensel, Carsten; Jabeen, S.; Wilson, Graham Wallace

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Modeling gamma-ray bursts.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Discovered serendipitously in the late 1960s, gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are huge explosions of energy that happen at cosmological distances. They provide a grand physical playground… (more)

Maxham, Amanda

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

On the possible effects of gluon number fluctuations on {gamma}{gamma} collisions at high energies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigate the effects of the fluctuations on the total {gamma}{gamma}, {gamma}*{gamma}* cross sections and the real photon structure function F{sup {gamma}}{sub 2}(x,Q{sup 2}), considering a saturation phenomenological model for the dipole-dipole cross section and scattering amplitude with fluctuations included.

Goncalves, V. P.; De Santana Amaral, J. T. [Instituto de Fisica e Matematica, Universidade Federal de Pelotas, Caixa Postal 354, 96010-900, Pelotas, RS (Brazil)

2013-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

158

Gamma-RayGamma-Ray Bursts: from SwiftBursts: from Swift  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gamma-RayGamma-Ray Bursts: from SwiftBursts: from Swift to GLASTto GLAST Bing ZhangBing ZhangGehrels, et al), et al) #12;Gamma-ray bursts: the mostGamma-ray bursts: the most violent explosions fireball central photosphere internal external shocks engine (shocks) (reverse) (forward) gamma-ray UV

California at Santa Cruz, University of

159

Comparison of the E(5) Critical Point Symmetry to the {gamma}-Rigid Solution of The Bohr Hamiltonian for {gamma} =30 deg  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A {gamma}-rigid solution of the Bohr Hamiltonian for {gamma}=30 deg. is derived. Bohr Hamiltonians {beta}-part being related to the second order Casimir operator of the Euclidean algebra E(4). The solution is called Z(4) since it is corresponds to the Z(5) model with the {gamma} variable ''frozen''. Parameter-free (up to overall scale factors) predictions for spectra and B(E2) transition rates are in close agreement to the E(5) critical point symmetry as well as to the experimental data in the Xe region around A=130.

Bonatsos, D.; Lenis, D.; Petrellis, D. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, National Center for Scientific Research 'Demokritos', GR-15310 Aghia Paraskevi, Attiki (Greece); Terziev, P. A. [Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 72 Tzarigrad Road, BG-1784 Sofia (Bulgaria); Yigitoglu, I. [Hasan Ali Yucel Faculty of Education, Istanbul University, TR-34470 Beyazit, Istanbul (Turkey)

2007-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

160

A Self-Consistent Model For The Long-Term Gamma-Ray Spectral Variability of Cygnus X-1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The long-term transitions of the black hole candidate Cygnus X-1 (between the states gamma_1, gamma_2, and gamma_3) include the occasional appearance of a strong ~ MeV bump (gamma_1), whose strength appears to be anti-correlated with the continuum flux (~ 400 keV) due to the Compton upscattering of cold disk photons by the inner, hot corona. We develop a self-consistent disk picture that accounts naturally for these transitions and their corresponding spectral variations. We argue that the bump is due to the self-Comptonization of bremsstrahlung photons emitted predominantly near the plane of the corona itself. Our results suggest that a decrease by a factor of approx 2 in the viscosity parameter alpha is responsible for quenching this bump and driving the system to the gamma_2 state, whereas a transition from gamma_2 to gamma_3 appears to be induced by an increase of about 25 % in the accretion rate Mdot. In view of the fact that most of the transitions observed in this source seem to be of the gamma_2 to gamma_3 variety, we conclude that much of the long term gamma-ray spectral variability in Cygnus X-1 is due to these small fluctuations in Mdot. The unusual appearance of the gamma_1 state apparently reflects a change in the dissipative processes within the disk.

Fulvio Melia; Ranjeev Misra

1993-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gamma exposure rate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

MAPPING CLIMATE CHANGE EXPOSURES, VULNERABILITIES,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MAPPING CLIMATE CHANGE EXPOSURES, VULNERABILITIES, AND ADAPTATION TO PUBLIC HEALTH RISKS's California Climate Change Center JULY 2012 CEC5002012041 Prepared for: California Energy Commission of California. #12; ii ABSTRACT This study reviewed first available frameworks for climate change adaptation

162

Can UV Exposure Reduce Mortality?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Cancer Center, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131-0001. Phone: 505-272-4369...Affiliation: University of New Mexico Cancer Center, Albuquerque, New Mexico A Swedish cohort analysis in...recommendations are based on minimal solar exposure (i.e., almost...

Marianne Berwick

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Population Studies of Gamma Ray Sources Using Stacking Analysis at Low Galactic Latitudes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We studied the problem of the treatment of uncertainties in the diffuse gamma radiation apparent in stacking analysis of EGRET data at low Galactic latitudes for several classes of sources like PSRs. For those classes of sources we co-added maps of counts, exposure and diffuse background, and residuals, in varying numbers for different sub-categories. Finally we tested for gamma-ray excess emission in those maps and attempt to quantify the systematic biases in such approach. Such kinds of analysis will support and provide confidence in the classification processes of sources and source populations in the GLAST era.

Cillis, Analia N.; /NASA, Goddard; Reimer, Olaf; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Torres, Diego F.; /ICREA, Barcelona /Barcelona, Autonoma U.

2007-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

164

Assessment of Lifetime Cumulative Sun Exposure Using a Self-Administered Questionnaire: Reliability of Two Approaches  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...latitude influences outdoor temperatures, which to some extent, determines...Analysis Cumulative lifetime sun exposure during 9:00 a...averaged to give the rate of sun exposure (i.e., average...categories would have a similar distribution to the time-based response...

Chu-Ling Yu; Yan Li; D. Michal Freedman; Thomas R. Fears; Richard Kwok; Gabriel Chodick; Bruce Alexander; Michael G. Kimlin; Anne Kricker; Bruce K. Armstrong; and Martha S. Linet

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Optimal temperature pro les for post-exposure bake of photo-resist  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optimal temperature pro les for post-exposure bake of photo-resist Anders Hansson and Stephen Boyd how to compute optimal temperature pro les for post-exposure bake of photo-resist. The pro les are optimal in the sense that the worst case non-uniformity of the dissolution rate in the photo

166

Marginal costs of freeway traffic congestion with on-road pollution exposure externality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Traffic congestion On-road In-vehicle Pollution exposure Vehicle emissions a b s t r a c t The health cost improvements. When considering distinct vehicle classes, inclusion of on-road exposure costs greatly increases heavy-duty vehicle marginal costs because of their higher emissions rates and greater roadway capacity

Bertini, Robert L.

167

Determination of Cyclohexanol in Urine and Its Use in Environmental Monitoring of Cyclohexanone Exposure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......be applied for occupational health monitoring for exposure to...be used for occupa- tional health monitoring of low exposure...1980). 3. N.I. Sex. Dangerous properties of industrial materials...of urinary excretion rate. Health Physics, 12:843-50 (1966......

C.N. Ong; G.L. Sia; S.E. Chia; W.H. Phoon; K.T. Tan

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

DOE 2013 Occupational Radiation Exposure Report  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

available on the U.S. Department of Energy Radiation Exposure Monitoring System Program Web Site at: http:energy.govehssoccupational-radiation-exposure Foreword iii MATTHEW B....

169

Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 2008 Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The DOE 2008 Occupational Radiation Exposure Report analyzes occupational radiation exposures at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities during 2008.

170

Comparing Accelerated Testing and Outdoor Exposure | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Comparing Accelerated Testing and Outdoor Exposure Comparing Accelerated Testing and Outdoor Exposure Presented at the PV Module Reliability Workshop, February 26 - 27 2013,...

171

ANNUAL DOE OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION EXPOSURE | 2013 REPORT  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The DOE 2013 Occupational Radiation Exposure Report analyzes occupational radiation exposures at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities during 2013.

172

Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 2004 Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The DOE 2004 Occupational Radiation Exposure Report analyzes occupational radiation exposures at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities during 2004.

173

Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 2000 Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The DOE 2000 Occupational Radiation Exposure Report analyzes occupational radiation exposures at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities during 2000.

174

Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1999 Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report, 1999 reports occupational radiation exposures incurred by individuals at DOE facilities during the calendar year 1999.

175

Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1974 Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Seventh Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for AEC & AEC Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) and its contractor employees during 1974.

176

Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1997 Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report, 1997 reports occupational radiation exposures incurred by individuals at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities during the calendar year 1997.

177

Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1995 Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report, 1995 reports occupational radiation exposures incurred by individuals at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities during the calendar year 1995.

178

Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1996 Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report, 1996 reports occupational radiation exposures incurred by individuals at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities during the calendar year 1996.

179

Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1998 Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report, 1998 reports occupational radiation exposures incurred by individuals at DOE facilities during the calendar year 1998.

180

Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 2001 Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The DOE 2001 Occupational Radiation Exposure Report analyzes occupational radiation exposures at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities during 2001.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gamma exposure rate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

EFFECTS OF TRITIUM GAS EXPOSURE ON ELECTRICALLY CONDUCTING POLYMERS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Effects of beta (tritium) and gamma irradiation on the surface electrical conductivity of two types of conducting polymer films are documented to determine their potential use as a sensing and surveillance device for the tritium facility. It was shown that surface conductivity was significantly reduced by irradiation with both gamma and tritium gas. In order to compare the results from the two radiation sources, an approximate dose equivalence was calculated. The materials were also sensitive to small radiation doses (<10{sup 5} rad), showing that there is a measurable response to relatively small total doses of tritium gas. Spectroscopy was also used to confirm the mechanism by which this sensing device would operate in order to calibrate this sensor for potential use. It was determined that one material (polyaniline) was very sensitive to oxidation while the other material (PEDOT-PSS) was not. However, polyaniline provided the best response as a sensing material, and it is suggested that an oxygen-impermeable, radiation-transparent coating be applied to this material for future device prototype fabrication. A great deal of interest has developed in recent years in the area of conducting polymers due to the high levels of conductivity that can be achieved, some comparable to that of metals [Gerard 2002]. Additionally, the desirable physical and chemical properties of a polymer are retained and can be exploited for various applications, including light emitting diodes (LED), anti-static packaging, electronic coatings, and sensors. The electron transfer mechanism is generally accepted as one of electron 'hopping' through delocalized electrons in the conjugated backbone, although other mechanisms have been proposed based on the type of polymer and dopant [Inzelt 2000, Gerard 2002]. The conducting polymer polyaniline (PANi) is of particular interest because there are extensive studies on the modulation of the conductivity by changing either the oxidation state of the main backbone chain, or by protonation of the imine groups [de Acevedo, 1999]. There are several types of radiation sensors commercially available, including ionization chambers, geiger counters, proportional counters, scintillators and solid state detectors. Each type has advantages, although many of these sensors require expensive electronics for signal amplification, are large and bulky, have limited battery life or require expensive materials for fabrication. A radiation sensor constructed of a polymeric material could be flexible, light, and the geometry designed to suit the application. Very simple and inexpensive electronics would be necessary to measure the change in conductivity with exposure to radiation and provide an alarm system when a set change of conductivity occurs in the sensor that corresponds to a predetermined radiation dose having been absorbed by the polymer. The advantages of using a polymeric sensor of this type rather than those currently in use are the flexibility of sensor geometry and relatively low cost. It is anticipated that these sensors can be made small enough for glovebox applications or have the ability to monitor the air tritium levels in places where a traditional monitor cannot be placed. There have been a few studies on the changes in conductivity of polyaniline specifically for radiation detection [de Acevedo, 1999; Lima Pacheco, 2003], but there have been no reports on the effects of tritium (beta radiation) on conducting polymers, such as polyaniline or polythiophene. The direct implementation of conducting polymers as radiation sensor materials has not yet been commercialized due to differing responses with total dose, dose rate, etc. Some have reported a large increase in the surface conductivity with radiation dose while others report a marked decrease in conductive properties; these differing observations may reflect the competing mechanisms of chain scission and cross-linking. However, it is clear that the radiation dose effects on conducting polymers must be fully understood before these materials can be used

Kane, M.; Clark, E.; Lascola, R.

2009-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

182

Short Gamma Ray Bursts as possible electromagnetic counterpart of coalescing binary systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Coalescing binary systems, consisting of two collapsed objects, are among the most promising sources of high frequency gravitational waves signals detectable, in principle, by ground-based interferometers. Binary systems of Neutron Star or Black Hole/Neutron Star mergers should also give rise to short Gamma Ray Bursts, a subclass of Gamma Ray Bursts. Short-hard-Gamma Ray Bursts might thus provide a powerful way to infer the merger rate of two-collapsed object binaries. Under the hypothesis that most short Gamma Ray Bursts originate from binaries of Neutron Star or Black Hole/Neutron Star mergers, we outline here the possibility to associate short Gamma Ray Bursts as electromagnetic counterpart of coalescing binary systems.

S. Capozziello; M. De Laurentis; I. De Martino; M. Formisano

2010-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

183

Real time method and computer system for identifying radioactive materials from HPGe gamma-ray spectroscopy  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A real-time method and computer system for identifying radioactive materials which collects gamma count rates from a HPGe gamma-radiation detector to produce a high-resolution gamma-ray energy spectrum. A library of nuclear material definitions ("library definitions") is provided, with each uniquely associated with a nuclide or isotope material and each comprising at least one logic condition associated with a spectral parameter of a gamma-ray energy spectrum. The method determines whether the spectral parameters of said high-resolution gamma-ray energy spectrum satisfy all the logic conditions of any one of the library definitions, and subsequently uniquely identifies the material type as that nuclide or isotope material associated with the satisfied library definition. The method is iteratively repeated to update the spectrum and identification in real time.

Rowland, Mark S. (Alamo, CA); Howard, Douglas E. (Livermore, CA); Wong, James L. (Dublin, CA); Jessup, James L. (Tracy, CA); Bianchini, Greg M. (Livermore, CA); Miller, Wayne O. (Livermore, CA)

2007-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

184

Kidney cancer and hydrocarbon exposures among petroleum refinery workers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To evaluate the hypothesis of increased kidney cancer risk after exposure to hydrocarbons, especially those present in gasoline, we conducted a case-control study in a cohort of approximately 100,000 male refinery workers from five petroleum companies. A review of 18,323 death certificates identified 102 kidney cancer cases, to each of whom four controls were matched by refinery location and decade of birth. Work histories, containing an average of 15.7 job assignments per subject, were found for 98% of the cases and 94% of the controls. Tb each job, industrial hygienists assigned semiquantitative ratings for the intensity and frequency of exposures to three hydrocarbon categories: nonaromatic liquid gasoline distillates, aromatic hydrocarbons, and the more volatile hydrocarbons. Ratings of {open_quotes}present{close_quotes} or {open_quotes}absent{close_quotes} were assigned for seven additional exposures: higher boiling hydrocarbons, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, asbestos, chlorinated solvents, ionizing radiation, and lead. Each exposure had either no association or a weak association with kidney cancer. For the hydrocarbon category of principal a priori interest, the nonaromatic liquid gasoline distillates, the estimated relative risk (RR) for any exposure above refinery background was 1.0 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.5-1.9). Analyses of cumulative exposures and of exposures in varying time periods before kidney cancer occurrence also produced null or near-null results. In an analysis of the longest job held by each subject (average duration 9.2 years or 40% of the refiner&y work history), three groups appeared to be at increased risk: laborers (RR = 1.9,95% CI 1.0-3.9); workers in receipt, storage, and movements (RR = 2.5,95% CI 0.9-6.6); and unit cleaners (RR = 2.3, 95% CI 0.5-9.9). 53 refs., 7 tabs.

Poole, C.; Dreyer, N.A.; Satterfield, M.H. [Epidemiology Resources Inc., Newton Lower Falls, MA (United States); Levin, L. [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Gamma Industry Processing Alliance Overview | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Gamma Industry Processing Alliance Overview Gamma Industry Processing Alliance Overview Gamma Industry Processing Alliance Overview More Documents & Publications 2011 NTSF Meeting...

186

Gamma-ray lines from SN2014J  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On 21 January 2014, SN2014J was discovered in M82 and found to be the closest type Ia supernova (SN Ia) in the last four decades. INTEGRAL observed SN2014J from the end of January until late June for a total exposure time of about 7 Ms. SNe Ia light curves are understood to be powered by the radioactive decay of iron peak elements of which $^{56}$Ni is dominantly synthesized during the thermonuclear disruption of a CO white dwarf (WD). The measurement of $\\gamma$-ray lines from the decay chain $^{56}$Ni$\\rightarrow$$^{56}$Co$\\rightarrow$$^{56}$Fe provides unique information about the explosion in supernovae. Canonical models assume $^{56}$Ni buried deeply in the supernova cloud, absorbing most of the early $\\gamma$-rays, and only the consecutive decay of $^{56}$Co should become directly observable through the overlaying material several weeks after the explosion when the supernova envelope dilutes as it expands. Surprisingly, with the spectrometer on INTEGRAL, SPI, we detected $^{56}$Ni $\\gamma$-ray lines at ...

Siegert, Thomas

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Gamma doses from phospho-gypsum plaster-board  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of phospho-gypsum plaster-board and plaster cement in buildings as a substitute for natural gypsum may constitute an additional source of radiation exposure to both workers and members of the public, both from inhalation of radon progeny produced from radon which is exhaled from the plaster-board and from beta and gamma radiation produced by radioactive decay in the plaster-board. The calculations presented in this paper indicate that if phospho-gypsum sheets 1 cm thick containing a {sup 226}Ra concentration of 400 Bq kg{sup -1} are used to line the walls and ceiling of a room of dimensions up to 5 m {times} 5 m {times} 3 m, the annual effective dose from gamma radiation for a person continually occupying the room should not exceed approximately 0.13 mSv. This compares with a measured annual average effective dose from gamma radiation in Australian homes of 0.9 mSv. The annual effective dose from such thin sheets is directly proportional to the {sup 226}Ra concentration in the plaster-board. 13 refs., 6 figs.

O`Brien, R.S. [Australian Radiation Lab., Victoria (Australia)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Gamma ray bursts: The future  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Gamma-ray bursts are the most dramatic and powerful cosmic explosions known. They also continue to be the most puzzling. Thanks to breakthrough observations over the last decade however a picture has emerged of gamma-ray bursts being at cosmological distances and capable of releasing more than 10 51 ergs of energy within seconds. Despite the emergence of this picture the physical origin of bursts is still unknown and the classification of different types of bursts is still in its infancy. Further understanding of gamma-ray bursts requires the wise use of our current resources and the development of new observational capabilities. We outline the current state of our knowledge of bursts and describe the present and future instrumentation which will enable us to understand these baffling blasts.

N. Gehrels; D. Macomb

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

High-Power Laser Pulse Recirculation for Inverse Compton Scattering-Produced Gamma-Rays  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Inverse Compton scattering of high-power laser pulses on relativistic electron bunches represents an attractive method for high-brightness, quasi-monoenergetic {gamma}-ray production. The efficiency of {gamma}-ray generation via inverse Compton scattering is severely constrained by the small Thomson scattering cross section. Furthermore, repetition rates of high-energy short-pulse lasers are poorly matched with those available from electron accelerators, resulting in low repetition rates for generated {gamma}-rays. Laser recirculation has been proposed as a method to address those limitations, but has been limited to only small pulse energies and peak powers. Here we propose and experimentally demonstrate an alternative method for laser pulse recirculation that is uniquely capable of recirculating short pulses with energies exceeding 1 J. Inverse Compton scattering of recirculated Joule-level laser pulses has a potential to produce unprecedented peak and average {gamma}-ray brightness in the next generation of sources.

Jovanovic, I; Shverdin, M; Gibson, D; Brown, C

2007-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

190

Discovery of \\gamma-ray emission from a strongly lobe-dominated quasar 3C 275.1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We systematically analyze the 6-year Fermi/LAT data of the lobe-dominated quasars (LDQs) in the complete LDQ sample from 3CRR survey and report the discovery of high-energy \\gamma-ray emission from 3C 275.1. The \\gamma-ray emission likely associating with 3C 207 is confirmed and significant variability of the lightcurve is identified. We do not find statistically significant \\gamma-ray emission from other LDQs. 3C 275.1 is the known \\gamma-ray quasar with the lowest core dominance parameter (i.e., R=0.11). We also show that both the northern radio hotspot and parsec jet models provide acceptable descriptions to the \\gamma-ray data. Considering the potential \\gamma-ray variability at the timescale of months, the latter is probably more favorable. The number of \\gamma-ray LDQs would increase when the exposure accumulates and hence LDQs could be non-ignorable contributors for the extragalactic \\gamma-ray background.

Liao, Neng-Hui; Li, Shang; Jiang, Wei; Liang, Yun-Feng; Li, Xiang; Zhang, Peng-Fei; Chen, Liang; Bai, Jin-Ming; Fan, Yi-Zhong

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Gamma-emitting radionuclides in the shallow marine sediments off the Sindh coast, Arabian Sea  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Pakistan), the Bay of Bengal(18) and...absorbed gamma radiation outdoor dose rates (D...Norwegian Radiation Protection...estuary and the Bay of Bengal. Health...evaluation of the radiation hazard...Assessment of dose rate and...G. E. Estimation of radiation......

M. Akram; Riffat M. Qureshi; Nasir Ahmad; Tariq Jamal Solaija

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Natural gamma radioactivity in the villages of Kanyakumari District, Tamil Nadu, India  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Terrestrial gamma radiation dose rate is also an important...contribution to the average dose rate received by the...population(6,7). The estimation of radiation dose distribution is important...side (Gulf of Mannar/Bay of Bengal coast). The district......

Jeni Chandar Padua; M. R. Basil Rose

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Neutrinos from Gamma Ray Bursts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We show that the detection of neutrinos from a typical gamma ray burst requires a kilometer-scale detector. We argue that large bursts should be visible with the neutrino telescopes under construction. We emphasize the 3 techniques by which neutrino telescopes can perform this search: by triggering on i) bursts of muons from muon neutrinos, ii) muons from air cascades initiated by high energy gamma rays and iii) showers made by relatively low energy ($\\simeq 100\\,\\mev$) electron neutrinos. Timing of neutrino-photon coincidences may yield a measurement of the neutrino mass to order $10^{-5}$~eV, an interesting range in light of the solar neutrino anomaly.

F. Halzen; G. Jaczko

1996-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

194

sin 2 beta + gamma Measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

I report on the most recent measurements done to constrain sin(2{beta}+{gamma}) with neutral B mesons. Direct measurements of 2{beta} + {gamma} will provide a precise test of the standard model predictions with higher statistics. Present constraints come from studies of B {yields} D{sup (*){+-}}{pi}{sup {-+}}/{rho}{sup {-+}} decays done by BABAR and Belle collaborations with full and inclusive techniques to reconstruct B mesons. B {yields} D{sup 0(*)}K{sup 0} decays are also very promising but statistics are too low to give any constraint at the moment.

Therin, G; /Paris U., VI-VII

2005-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

195

Gamma-ray Imaging Methods  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this document we discuss specific implementations for gamma-ray imaging instruments including the principle of operation and describe systems which have been built and demonstrated as well as systems currently under development. There are several fundamentally different technologies each with specific operational requirements and performance trade offs. We provide an overview of the different gamma-ray imaging techniques and briefly discuss challenges and limitations associated with each modality (in the appendix we give detailed descriptions of specific implementations for many of these technologies). In Section 3 we summarize the performance and operational aspects in tabular form as an aid for comparing technologies and mapping technologies to potential applications.

Vetter, K; Mihailescu, L; Nelson, K; Valentine, J; Wright, D

2006-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

196

A Case Study Correlating Innovative Gamma Ray Scanning Detection Systems Data to Surface Soil Gamma Spectrometry Results - 13580  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

HydroGeoLogic (HGL), Inc. completed a United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) study to characterize radiological contamination at a site near Canoga Park, California. The characterized area contained 470 acres including the site of a prototype commercial nuclear reactor and other nuclear design, testing, and support operations from the 1950's until 1988 [1]. The site history included radiological releases during operation followed by D and D activities. The characterization was conducted under an accelerated schedule and the results will support the project remediation. The project has a rigorous cleanup to background agenda and does not allow for comparison to risk-based guidelines. To target soil sample locations, multiple lines of evidence were evaluated including a gamma radiation survey, geophysical surveys, historical site assessment, aerial photographs, and former worker interviews. Due to the time since production and decay, the primary gamma emitting radionuclide remaining is cesium-137 (Cs-137). The gamma ray survey covered diverse, rugged terrain using custom designed sodium iodide thallium-activated (NaI(Tl)) scintillation detection systems. The survey goals included attaining 100% ground surface coverage and detecting gamma radiation as sensitively as possible. The effectiveness of innovative gamma ray detection systems was tested by correlating field Cs-137 static count ratios to Cs-137 laboratory gamma spectrometry results. As a case study, the area encompassing the former location of the first nuclear power station in the U. S. was scanned, and second by second global positioning system (GPS)-linked gamma spectral data were evaluated by examining total count rate and nuclide-specific regions of interest. To compensate for Compton scattering from higher energy naturally occurring radionuclides (U-238, Th-232 and their progeny, and K-40), count rate ratios of anthropogenic nuclide-specific regions of interest to the total count rate were calculated. From the scanning data, locations with observed Cs-137 ratios exceeding six standard deviations above the mean ratio were mapped in high resolution [2]. Field teams returned to those locations to collect static count measurements using the same detection systems. Soil surface samples were collected at 30 locations and analyzed for Cs-137. An exponential correlation was identified between Cs-137 concentrations in surface soil and field-scanned Cs-137 ratios. The data indicate field minimum detectable concentration (MDC) of Cs-137 at 0.02 Bq/g (0.5 pCi/g) or lower depending on contaminant distribution in soil. (authors)

Thompson, Shannon; Rodriguez, Rene; Billock, Paul [HydroGeoLogic, Inc., 11107 Sunset Hills Road, Suite 400, Reston, VA 20190 (United States)] [HydroGeoLogic, Inc., 11107 Sunset Hills Road, Suite 400, Reston, VA 20190 (United States); Lit, Peter [Nomad Science Group, 7738 Nautilus Shell Street, Las Vegas, NV 89139 (United States)] [Nomad Science Group, 7738 Nautilus Shell Street, Las Vegas, NV 89139 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

TWO POPULATIONS OF GAMMA-RAY BURST RADIO AFTERGLOWS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The detection rate of gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows is ?30% at radio wavelengths, much lower than in the X-ray (?95%) or optical (?70%) bands. The cause of this low radio detection rate has previously been attributed to limited observing sensitivity. We use visibility stacking to test this idea, and conclude that the low detection rate is instead due to two intrinsically different populations of GRBs: radio-bright and radio-faint. We calculate that no more than 70% of GRB afterglows are truly radio-bright, leaving a significant population of GRBs that lack a radio afterglow. These radio-bright GRBs have higher gamma-ray fluence, isotropic energies, X-ray fluxes, and optical fluxes than the radio-faint GRBs, thus confirming the existence of two physically distinct populations. We suggest that the gamma-ray efficiency of the prompt emission is responsible for the difference between the two populations. We also discuss the implications for future radio and optical surveys.

Hancock, P. J.; Gaensler, B. M.; Murphy, T., E-mail: Paul.Hancock@Sydney.edu.au [Also at Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for All-sky Astrophysics (CAASTRO), The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia. (Australia)

2013-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

198

Gamma Ray Burst and Soft Gamma Repeaters. Spinning, Precessing Gamma Jets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gamma Ray Bursts as recent GRB990123 and GRB990510 are observed to occur in cosmic volumes with a corresponding output reaching, for isotropic explosions, energies as large as two solar masses annihilation. These energies are underestimated because of the neglected role of comparable ejected neutrinos bursts. These extreme power cannot be explained with any standard spherically symmetric Fireball model. A too heavy black hole or Star would be unable to coexist with the shortest millisecond time structure of Gamma ray Burst. Beaming of the gamma radiation may overcome the energy puzzle. However any mild explosive beam $(\\Omega > 10^{-2})$ should not solve the jet containment at those disruptive energies. Only extreme beaming $(\\Omega < 10^{-8})$, by a slow decaying, but long-lived precessing jet, it may coexist with characteristic Supernova energies, apparent GRBs output, statistics as well as their connection with older and nearer SGRs relics.

Daniele Fargion

1999-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

199

Essay on the gamma ray laser  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This work discusses the possibility of inducing the emission of gamma radiation from nuclear isomers by two-photon transitions, in the more general context of the problem of the amplification of gamma radiation.

Silviu Olariu

1999-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

200

Ecological Exposure Limits and Guidelines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Ecological exposure limits and guidelines represent the maximum level of a chemical substance that is considered to be safe or acceptable in environmental releases or compartments. The ecological exposure limits are established to protect the ecosystems and environmental resources and may refer to the emissions, e.g., effluents, atmospheric emissions or discharges, or to the final concentration in the receiving body, e.g., water, sediment, or soil. There are two main methods for setting these limits. One focuses on the identification of best available practices for different sectors and processes; the other is a particular case of risk assessment, named by some authors as reverse risk assessment, which establishes the maximum level in the emission or receiving compartment maintaining an acceptable level of risk. The term ‘exposure limit’ is rarely used in the ecological context; the most usual terms are criteria, standards, or objectives.

J.V. Tarazona

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gamma exposure rate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Chlorite Dissolution Rates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Spreadsheets provides measured chlorite rate data from 100 to 300C at elevated CO2. Spreadsheet includes derived rate equation.

Carroll, Susan

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Chlorite Dissolution Rates  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Spreadsheets provides measured chlorite rate data from 100 to 300C at elevated CO2. Spreadsheet includes derived rate equation.

Carroll, Susan

203

Measurements of B to V(Gamma) Decays  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The standard model has been highly successful at describing current experimental data. However, extensions of the standard model predict particles that have masses at energy scales that are above the electroweak scale. The flavor-changing neutral current processes of the B meson are sensitive to the influences of these new physics contributions. These processes proceed through loop diagrams, thus allowing new physics to enter at the same order as the standard model. New physics may contribute to the enhancement or suppression of rate asymmetries or the decay rates of these processes. The transition B {yields} V{gamma} (V = K*(892), {rho}(770), {omega}(782), {phi}(1020)) represents radiative decays of the B meson that proceed through penguin processes. Hadronic uncertainties limit the theoretical accuracy of the prediction of the branching fractions. However, uncertainties, both theoretical and experimental, are much reduced when considering quantities involving ratios of branching fractions, such as CP or isospin asymmetries. The most dominant exclusive radiative b {yields} s transition is B {yields} K*{gamma}. We present the best measurements of the branching fractions, direct CP, and isospin asymmetries of B {yields} K*{gamma}. The analogous b {yields} d transitions are B {yields} {rho}{gamma} and B {yields} {omega}{gamma}, which are suppressed by a factor of |V{sub td}/V{sub ts}|{sup 2} {approx} 0.04 relative to B {yields} K*{gamma}. A measurement of the branching fractions and isospin asymmetry of B{sup +} {yields} {rho}{sup +}{gamma} and B{sup 0} {yields} {rho}{sup 0}{gamma}, as well as a search for B {yields} {omega}{gamma}, are also given. These measurements are combined to calculate the ratio of CKM matrix elements |V{sub td}/V{sub ts}|, which corresponds to the length of one side of the unitary triangle. Finally, we present a search for the penguin annihilation process B {yields}{phi}{gamma}. We use a sample of 383 million B{bar B} events collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B factory for the analysis of B {yields} K*{gamma}. We measure the branching fractions {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} K*{sup 0}{gamma}) = (4.47 {+-} 0.10 {+-} 0.16) x 10{sup -5} and {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} K*{sup +}{gamma}) = (4.22 {+-} 0.14 {+-} 0.16) x 10{sup -5}. We measure the direct CP asymmetry to be -0.033 < {Alpha}{sub CP} (B {yields} K*{gamma}) < 0.028 and the isospin asymmetry to be 0.017 < {Delta}{sub 0-} < 0.116, where the limits are determined at the 90% C.L. and include both the statistical and systematic uncertainties. Using a sample of 347 million B{bar B} events, we measure the branching fractions {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {rho}{sup +}{gamma}) = (1.10{sub -0.33}{sup +0.37} {+-} 0.09) x 10{sup -6} and {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {rho}{sup 0}{gamma}) = (0.79{sub -0.20}{sup +0.22} {+-} 0.06) x 10{sup -6}, the isospin asymmetry {Delta} = -0.35 {+-} 0.27, and set a 90% C.L. upper limit {Beta}(B {yields} {omega}{gamma}) < 0.78 x 10{sup -6}. We also measure the isospin-averaged branching fraction {Beta}(B {yields} ({rho}/{omega}){gamma}) = (1.25{sub -0.24}{sup +0.25} {+-} 0.09) x 10{sup -6}, from which we determine |V{sub td}/V{sub ts}|= 0.200{sub -0.020}{sup +0.021} {+-} 0.015, where the first uncertainty is experimental and the second theoretical. Finally, a sample of 124 million B{bar B} events is used to set an upper limit of {Beta}(B {yields} {phi}{gamma}) < 8.5 x 10{sup -7} at the 90% C.L.

Yarritu, Aaron K.; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; ,

2010-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

204

The Diverse Environments of Gamma-Ray Bursts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Galaxies of Dark Gamma-Ray Bursts: Observational Constraintsof a Very Bright Gamma- Ray Burst in a Galactic Halo 3.11.3 Gamma-Ray Burst Classi?cation . . . . . . 1.4 Gamma-Ray

Perley, Daniel Alan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Pulsed Gamma-Ray-Burst Afterglows  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

provides a candidate for the central engine of the gamma-ray burst (GRB) mechanism, both long and short

J. Middleditch

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Light Curves of Swift Gamma Ray Bursts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent observations from the Swift gamma-ray burst mission indicate that a fraction of gamma ray bursts are characterized by a canonical behaviour of the X-ray afterglows. We present an effective theory which allows us to account for X-ray light curves of both (short - long) gamma ray bursts and X-ray rich flashes. We propose that gamma ray bursts originate from massive magnetic powered pulsars.

Paolo Cea

2006-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

207

Periodicities in gamma ray bursts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Gamma ray burst models based on magnetic neutron stars face a problem of account for the scarcity of observed periods. Both this scarcity and the typical period found when any is detected are explained if the neutron stars are accreting in binary systems

Kent S. Wood

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Gamma-ray events thunderclouds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

stage of rocket-triggered lightning #12;The gamma-ray flash occurred at the same time the upward leader radiation is also produced by natural lightning during the stepped leader phase. · Dwyer et al. 2003, 2004 found that x-rays are also produced by triggered lightning dart leaders. · At present, the only viable

California at Berkeley, University of

209

The Universe Viewed in Gamma-Rays 1 Properties of Gamma-ray Bursts Localized by  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Universe Viewed in Gamma-Rays 1 Properties of Gamma-ray Bursts Localized by the HETE-2 and localize Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) in wide field of view. HETE-2 have been localized about 20 GRBs per year hours after the burst. 1. The High Energy Transient Explorer 2 Gamma-ray burst (GRB) is the most

Enomoto, Ryoji

210

Very high-energy gamma rays from gamma-ray bursts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...research-article Discussion Meeting Issue Gamma-ray bursts organized by Alan Wells, Ralph...high-energy gamma rays from gamma-ray bursts Paula M Chadwick * * ( p.m...progress makes the detection of a gamma-ray burst at the highest energies much...

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Power Rate Cases (pbl/rates)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Choices (2003-06) Power Function Review (PFR) Firstgov Power Rate Cases BPA's wholesale power rates are set to recover its costs and repay the U.S. Treasury for the Federal...

212

EMDEX (Electric and Magnetic Field Digital EXposure) system manuals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The EPRI Electric and Magnetic Field Digital EXposure (EMDEX) system consists of hardware and software for characterizing electric and magnetic field exposures. The EMDEX meter is a computer-based portable unit that samples, at a user-programmable rate, the three vector components of magnetic flux density, a measure of the average electric field acting on the torso of the wearer (if an optional sensor is worn) and a measure of rotational motion of the meter in the earth's magnetic field. Modules of the DATACALC software package are used to program the EMDEX, retrieve data at the end of a measurement session, analyze EMDEX data, and prepare tabular and graphical data summaries. The User Manual is designed to provide instruction on the use of the exposure system hardware and software. The Technical Reference Manual provides additional, detailed descriptions of the hardware, software and methodologies used in the EMDEX system.

Not Available

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

A proof of the Gamma test  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...research-article Research Article A proof of the Gamma test Dafydd Evans Antonia J. Jones Department...dataset of input-output vectors, the Gamma test estimates the variance of the noise on...derivatives. We present a proof of the Gamma test under fairly weak hypotheses. nonlinear...

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Gamma-ray burst theory after Swift  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...research-article Discussion Meeting Issue Gamma-ray bursts organized by Alan Wells, Ralph...J. Wijers and Martin Rees Gamma-ray burst theory after Swift Tsvi Piran...relativistic blast wave model for gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Together with the...

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Gamma-ray bursts and cosmology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...research-article Discussion Meeting Issue Gamma-ray bursts organized by Alan Wells, Ralph...J. Wijers and Martin Rees Gamma-ray bursts and cosmology D.Q Lamb...current status of the use of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) as probes of the early...

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

E-Print Network 3.0 - accretion rate modulation Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

370, L61L65 (2006) doi:10.1111j.1745-3933.2006.00189.x The late time evolution of gamma-ray bursts: ending hyperaccretion Summary: role in determining the rate of accretion, and...

217

Neutron/gamma coupled library generation and gamma transport calculation with KARMA 1.2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

KAERI has developed a lattice transport calculation code KARMA and its multi-group cross section library generation system. Recently, the multi-group cross section library generation system has included a gamma cross section generation capability and KARMA also has been improved to include a gamma transport calculation module. This paper addresses the multi-group gamma cross section generation capability for the KARMA 1.2 code and the preliminary test results of the KARMA 1.2 gamma transport calculations. The gamma transport calculation with KARMA 1.2 gives the gamma flux, gamma smeared power, and gamma energy deposition distributions. The results of the KARMA gamma calculations were compared with those of HELIOS and they showed that KARMA 1.2 gives reasonable gamma transport calculation results. (authors)

Hong, S. G. [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Kyung Hee Univ., 446-701 Deogyeong-daero, GiHeung-gu, Yongin, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Kim, K. S.; Cho, J. Y.; Lee, K. H. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Inst., 305-353 Duckjin-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejon (Korea, Republic of)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Gamma ray bursts as probes of the first stars  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The redshift where the first stars formed is an important and unknown milestone in cosmological structure formation. The evidence linking gamma ray bursts (GRBs) with star formation activity implies that the first GRBs occurred shortly after the first stars formed. Gamma ray bursts and their afterglows may thus offer a unique probe of this epoch because they are bright from gamma ray to radio wavelengths and should be observable to very high redshift. Indeed our ongoing near-IR followup programs already have the potential to detect bursts at redshift z?10. In these proceedings we discuss two distinct ways of using GRBs to probe the earliest star formation. First direct GRB counts may be used as a proxy for star formation rate measurements. Second high energy cutoffs in the GeV spectra of gamma ray bursts due to pair production with high redshift optical and ultraviolet background photons contain information on early star formation history. The second method is observationally more demanding but also more rewarding because each observed pair creation cutoff in a high redshift GRB spectrum will tell us about the integrated star formation history prior to the GRB redshift.

James E. Rhoads

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Exposure of nuclear track emulsion to thermal neutrons, heavy ions and muons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Physical analysis of exposures of test samples of reproduced nuclear track emulsion (NTE) is presented. In boron enriched NTE the angular and energy correlations of products of the reaction induced by thermal neutrons n$_{th} + ^{10}B \\rightarrow ^{7}Li + (\\gamma) + \\alpha$ are studied. NTE was exposed to ions $^{86}Kr^{+17}$ and $^{124}Xe^{+26}$ of energy about 1.2 A MeV. Measurements of the heavy ion ranges of in NTE allowed one to determine their energy on a basis of the SRIM model. Nuclear stars of large multiplicity of target nuclei are observed in exposure of NTE to ultrarelativistic $\\mu$-mesons. The kinematical characteristics of the events of splitting of carbon nuclei into three $\\alpha$-particles studied in this exposure point to a nuclear diffractive mechanism of interactions.

D. A. Artemenkov; V. Bradnova; A. A. Zaitsev; P. I. Zarubin; I. G. Zarubina; R. R. Kattabekov; K. Z. Mamatkulov; V. V. Rusakova

2014-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

220

Definition: Gamma Log | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Gamma Log Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Gamma Log Gamma logging is a method of measuring naturally occurring gamma radiation to characterize the rock or sediment in a borehole or drill hole. It is a wireline logging method used in mining, mineral exploration, water-well drilling, for formation evaluation in oil and gas well drilling and for other related purposes. Different types of rock emit different amounts and different spectra of natural gamma radiation.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Gamma ray logging is a method of measuring naturally occurring gamma radiation to characterize the rock or sediment in a borehole or drill hole. It is a wireline logging method used in mining, mineral exploration,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gamma exposure rate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

RADIOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT OF BALLOD AND ASSOCIATES PROPERTY  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

and Quality Assurance With the exception of the exposure- and dose-rate conversion factors for portable survey gamma and beta-gamma meters, all survey and laboratory...

222

Joint US/Russian Studies of Population Exposures Resulting from Nuclear Production Activities in the Southern Urals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Beginning in 1948, the Soviet Union initiated a program for production of nuclear materials for a weapons program. The first facility for production of plutonium was constructed in the central portion of the country east of the southern Ural Mountains, about halfway between the major industrial cities of Ekaterinburg and Chelyabinsk. The facility now known as the Mayak Production Association and its associated town, now known as Ozersk, were built to irradiate uranium in reactors, separate the resulting plutonium in reprocessing plants, and prepare plutonium metal. The rush to production, coupled with inexperience in handling radioactive materials, lead to large radiation exposures, not only to the workers in the facilities, but also to the surrounding public. Fuel processing started with no controls on releases, and fuel dissolution and accidents in reactors resulted in release of about 37 PBq (1015 Bq) of 131I between 1948 and 1967. Designed disposals of low- and intermediate-level liquid radioactive wastes, and accidental releases via cooling water from tank farms of high-level liquid radioactive wastes, into the small Techa River caused significant contamination and exposures to residents of numerous small riverside villages downstream of the site. Discovery of the magnitude of the aquatic contamination in late 1951 caused revisions to the waste handling regimes, but not before over 200 PBq of radionuclides (with large contributions of 90Sr and 137Cs) were released. Liquid wastes were diverted to tiny Lake Karachay (which today holds over 4 EBq); cooling water was stopped in the tank farms. In 1957, one of the tanks in the tank farm overheated and exploded; over 70 PBq, disproportionately 90Sr, was blown over a large area to the northeast of the site; a large area was contaminated and many villages evacuated. This area today is known as the East Urals Radioactive Trace (EURT). Each of these releases was significant; together they have created a group of cohorts unrivaled in the world for their chronic, low-dose-rate radiation exposure. The 26,000 workers at Mayak were highly exposed to external gamma and inhaled plutonium. A cohort of individuals raised as children in Ozersk is under evaluation for their exposures to radioiodine. The Techa River Cohort consists of over 30,000 people who were born before the start of exposure in 1949 and lived along the Techa River. The Techa River Offspring Cohort consists of about 21,000 persons born to one or more exposed parents of this group - many of whom also lived along the contaminated river. The EURT Cohort consists of about 18,000 people who were evacuated from the EURT soon after the 1957 explosion and another 8000 who remained. These groups together are the focus of dose reconstruction and epidemiological studies funded by the US, Russia, and the European Union to address the question “Are doses delivered at low dose rates as effective in producing health effects as the same doses delivered at high dose rates?”

Napier, Bruce A.

2014-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

223

Simulated Irradiation of Samples in HFIR for use as Possible Test Materials in the MPEX (Material Plasma Exposure Experiment) Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The importance of Plasma Material Interaction (PMI) is a major concern in fusion reactor design and analysis. The Material-Plasma Exposure eXperiment (MPEX) facility will explore PMI under fusion reactor plasma conditions. Samples with accumulated displacements per atom (DPA) damage produced by irradiations in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) will be studied in the MPEX facility. The project presented in this paper involved performing assessments of the induced radioactivity and resulting radiation fields of a variety of potential fusion reactor materials. The scientific code packages MCNP and SCALE were used to simulate irradiation of the samples in HFIR; generation and depletion of nuclides in the material and the subsequent composition, activity levels, gamma radiation fields, and resultant dose rates as a function of cooling time. These state-of-the-art simulation methods were used in addressing the challenge of the MPEX project to minimize the radioactive inventory in the preparation of the samples for inclusion in the MPEX facility.

Ellis, Ronald James [ORNL; Rapp, Juergen [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Gamma Industry Processing Alliance Overview  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

NATIONAL NATIONAL STAKEHOLDERS TRANSPORTATION FORUM WHO IS GIPA? * Alliance made up of 15 companies from the Medical Device Manufacturers, Cobalt source , manufacturers and one industrial processing company Represents all the major gamma processing * Represents all the major gamma processing facilities within the US to the regulatory bodies such as the USNRC. * Member of International Irradiation Association (iiA) WHO IS GIPA? An alliance created to advocate the development of An alliance created to advocate the development of responsible regulations that enhance the safe and secure management of Cobalt-60 sources and related irradiation processing facilities related irradiation processing facilities. APRIL 15, 2010 PRESENTATION TITLE WORLD SUPPLIERS OF COBALT 60 COBALT 60 * Nordion Inc

225

Are gamma ray bursts nearby?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The possibility is considered that the intrinsic luminosity function of gamma ray bursters has sufficient scatter that the ln?N?ln?S relation of observed bursts not be dominated by geometric effects favoring large volumes but rather be dominated by nearby intrinsically faint bursts. It is shown that the distribution of bursts on the sky would be very granular with a significant fraction of them coming from the two or three nearest sources. Possible solutions and alternatives are briefly discussed.

David Eichler

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Gamma-ray burst afterglows  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Extended, fading emissions in multi-wavelength are observed following Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Recent broad-band observational campaigns led by the Swift Observatory reveal rich features of these GRB afterglows. Here we review the latest observational progress and discuss the theoretical implications for understanding the central engine, composition, and geometric configuration of GRB jets, as well as their interactions with the ambient medium.

Bing Zhang

2006-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

227

Neutrinos from Gamma Ray Bursts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The observed fluxes of cosmic rays and gamma rays are used to infer the maximum allowed high-energy neutrino flux allowed for Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) following Reference [1]. It is shown that if GRBs produce the ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays they should contribute (a) at least 10% of the extragalactic gamma ray background between 3 MeV and 30 GeV contrary to their observed energy flux which is only a minute fraction of this flux and (b) a cumulative neutrino flux a factor of 20 below the AMANDA-?2000 limit on isotropic neutrinos. This could have two implications either GRBs do not produce the ultrahigh energy cosmic rays [2 3] or that the GRBs are strongly beamed and emit most of their power at energies well above 100 GeV [4] implausibly increasing the energy requirements but consistent with the marginal detections of a few low-redshift GRBs by MILAGRITO [5] HEGRA-AIROBICC [6] and the Tibet-Array [7]. All crucial measurements to test the models will be available in the next few years. These are measurements of (i) high-energy neutrinos with AMANDA-ICECUBE or an enlarged ANTARES/NESTOR ocean detector (ii) GRB redshifts from HETE-2 follow-up studies and (iii) GRB spectra above 10 GeV with low-threshold imaging air Cherenkov telescopes such as MAGIC and the space telescopes AGILE and GLAST.

Karl Mannheim

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Neutrinos from Gamma Ray Bursts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The observed fluxes of cosmic rays and gamma rays are used to infer the maximum allowed high-energy neutrino flux allowed for Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs), following Mannheim, Protheroe, and Rachen (2000). It is shown that if GRBs produce the ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays, they should contribute (a) at least 10% of the extragalactic gamma ray background between 3 MeV and 30 GeV, contrary to their observed energy flux which is only a minute fraction of this flux, and (b) a cumulative neutrino flux a factor of 20 below the AMANDA (Neutrino 2000) limit on isotropic neutrinos. This could have two implications, either GRBs do not produce the ultrahigh energy cosmic rays or that the GRBs are strongly beamed and emit most of their power at energies well above 100 GeV implausibly increasing the energy requirements, but consistent with the marginal detections of a few low-redshift GRBs by MILAGRITO, HEGRA-AIROBICC, and the Tibet-Array. All crucial measurements to test the models will be available in the next few years. These are measurements of (i) high-energy neutrinos with AMANDA-ICECUBE or an enlarged ANTARES/NESTOR ocean detector, (ii) GRB redshifts from HETE-2 follow-up studies, and (iii) GRB spectra above 10 GeV with low-threshold imaging air Cherenkov telescopes such as MAGIC and the space telescopes AGILE and GLAST.

Karl Mannheim

2000-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

229

Long lived central engines in Gamma Ray Bursts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The central engine of Gamma Ray Bursts may live much longer than the duration of the prompt emission. Some evidence of it comes from the presence of strong precursors, post-cursors, and X-ray flares in a sizable fraction of bursts. Additional evidence comes from the fact that often the X-ray and the optical afterglow light curves do not track one another, suggesting that they are two different emission components. The typical "steep-flat-steep" behavior of the X-ray light curve can be explained if the same central engine responsible for the main prompt emission continues to be active for a long time, but with a decreasing power. The early X-ray "afterglow" emission is then the extension of the prompt emission, originating at approximately the same location, and is not due to forward shocks. If the bulk Lorentz factor Gamma is decreasing in time, the break ending the shallow phase can be explained, since at early times Gamma is large, and we see only a fraction of the emitting area. Later, when Gamma decreases, we see an increasing fraction of the emitting surface up to the time when Gamma ~ 1/theta_j. This time ends the shallow phase of the X-ray light curve. The origin of the late prompt emission can be the accretion of the fall-back material, with an accretion rate dot M proportional to t^(-5/3). The combination of this late prompt emission with the flux produced by the standard forward shock can explain the great diversity of the optical and the X-ray light curves.

G. Ghisellini

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Gamma Ray Mirrors for Direct Measurement of Spent Nuclear Fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Direct measurement of the amount of Pu and U in spent nuclear fuel represents a challenge for the safeguards community. Ideally, the characteristic gamma-ray emission lines from different isotopes provide an observable suitable for this task. However, these lines are generally lost in the fierce flux of radiation emitted by the fuel. The rates are so high that detector dead times limit measurements to only very small solid angles of the fuel. Only through the use of carefully designed view ports and long dwell times are such measurements possible. Recent advances in multilayer grazing-incidence gamma-ray optics provide one possible means of overcoming this difficulty. With a proper optical and coating design, such optics can serve as a notch filter, passing only narrow regions of the overall spectrum to a fully shielded detector that does not view the spent fuel directly. We report on the design of a mirror system and a number of experimental measurements.

Pivovaroff, Dr. Michael J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL)] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Ziock, Klaus-Peter [ORNL] [ORNL; Harrison, Mark J [ORNL] [ORNL; Soufli, Regina [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL)] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Assessing protection against radiation exposure after prostate 125I brachytherapy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

AbstractPurpose To expand the radiation dose rate measurement data set by measuring radiation under various prostate 125I brachytherapy situations. Methods and Materials Measurements were obtained from 63 consecutive unselected patients at Tokyo Medical Center, Japan. Differences in factors during measurements, such as body postures, distances from the skin surface, and measurement directions were considered. Furthermore, shielding effects of lead-lined underwear, consisting mainly of 0.1-mm thickness of lead, were also assessed. Results Radiation exposure varies according to the patient's body posture, with results differing as much as approximately 40.0% in measured radiation dose rates at 30 cm from the anterior skin surface. Weight, body mass index, and tissue thickness showed good correlations with measured radiation dose rates. The magnitude of radiation exposure attenuation by shielding was approximately 95.8%, similar to the attenuation ratio based on tissue measurements made in the lateral direction. The respective mean times required to reach 1 mSv were 1.2, 7.6, and 65.4 days in the standing position and 0.6, 4.6, and 40.4 days in the supine position at the site of contact, and at 30 and 100 cm from the anterior skin surface. Conclusions This study obtained supplemental information pertaining to radiological protection and confirmed that shielding can be an effective tool for reducing exposures.

Takashi Hanada; Atsunori Yorozu; Riki Kikumura; Toshio Ohashi; Naoyuki Shigematsu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1990 Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Twenty-third Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1990.

233

Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1991 Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Twenty-fourth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1991.

234

Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1989 Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Twenty-second Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1989.

235

Assessment of exposure to depleted uranium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Article Assessment of exposure to depleted uranium P. Roth V. Hollriegl E. Werner...for determining the amount of depleted uranium (DU) incorporated. The problems...Assessment of exposure to depleted uranium. | In most circumstances......

P. Roth; V. Höllriegl; E. Werner; P. Schramel

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1986 Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Nineteenth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1986.

237

Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1982 Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Fifteenth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1982.

238

Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1983 Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Sixteenth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1983.

239

Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1980 Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Thirteenth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1980.

240

Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1979 Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Twelfth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1979.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gamma exposure rate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1987 Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Twentieth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1987.

242

Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1985 Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Eighteenth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1985.

243

Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1984 Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Seventeenth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1984.

244

Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1981 Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Fourteenth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1981.

245

Digital discrimination of neutrons and gamma-rays in organic scintillation detectors using moment analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Digital discrimination of neutron and gamma-ray events in an organic scintillator has been investigated by moment analysis. Signals induced by an americium-beryllium (Am/Be) isotropic neutron source in a stilbene crystal detector have been sampled with a flash analogue-to-digital converter (ADC) of 1 GSamples/s sampling rate and 10-bit vertical resolution. Neutrons and gamma-rays have been successfully discriminated with a threshold corresponding to gamma-ray energy about 217 keV. Moment analysis has also been verified against the results assessed by a time-of-flight (TOF) measurement. It is shown that the classification of neutrons and gamma-rays afforded by moment analysis is consistent with that achieved by digital TOF measurement. This method has been applied to analyze the data acquired from the stilbene crystal detector in mixed radiation field of the HL-2A tokamak deuterium plasma discharges and the results are described.

Xie Xufei; Zhang Xing; Yuan Xi; Chen Jinxiang; Li Xiangqing; Zhang Guohui; Fan Tieshuan [School of Physics and State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing (China); Yuan Guoliang; Yang Jinwei; Yang Qingwei [Southwestern Institute of Physics, Chengdu (China)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

246

Modeling Residential Exposure to Secondhand Tobacco Smoke  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

transfer factors for air pollution health risk assessment.combustion, air pollution exposure, and health: The situa-

Klepeis, Neil E; Nazaroff, William W

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Uncertainty Analysis for Photovoltaic Degradation Rates (Poster)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dependable and predictable energy production is the key to the long-term success of the PV industry. PV systems show over the lifetime of their exposure a gradual decline that depends on many different factors such as module technology, module type, mounting configuration, climate etc. When degradation rates are determined from continuous data the statistical uncertainty is easily calculated from the regression coefficients. However, total uncertainty that includes measurement uncertainty and instrumentation drift is far more difficult to determine. A Monte Carlo simulation approach was chosen to investigate a comprehensive uncertainty analysis. The most important effect for degradation rates is to avoid instrumentation that changes over time in the field. For instance, a drifting irradiance sensor, which can be achieved through regular calibration, can lead to a substantially erroneous degradation rates. However, the accuracy of the irradiance sensor has negligible impact on degradation rate uncertainty emphasizing that precision (relative accuracy) is more important than absolute accuracy.

Jordan, D.; Kurtz, S.; Hansen, C.

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Characterization of guinea pig transfer factor collected by In vivo exposure to antilymphocyte gamma globulin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

but have found difficulties in the reliability of the ALS treatment. They have characterized their transfer factor-like material from the plasma of sensitive donors as dialyzable, having a 280nm/260nm absorbance ratio of 0. 71, and having electrophoretic..., at the same pH. The dialysis membrane tubing (Union Carbide Corp. ) was prepared for use by. boiling in a calcium carbonate solution for 5 min, rinsing in distilled water, and storing in 50) ethanol at 4 C. Prior to use~ the membrane tubing was thoroughly...

Stewart, Robert Stanley

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

249

Natural radioactivity and external gamma radiation exposure at the coastal Red Sea in Egypt  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......0.5 - 151 39 1.08 0.27 - (25) Sudan 29.6 6.02 158.4 4.09...Natural radioactivity in sand used in thermal therapy at the Red Sea Coast. J. Environ...in the Red Sea coastal environment of Sudan. Mar. Pollut. Bull. (1998) 36......

S. Harb

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Effect of Exposure to Gamma-Rays on the Hygroscopicity of Sitka Spruce Wood  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... , Hungate, R. E., Bryant, M. P., and Hall, E., Tappi (Tech. Assoc. Pulp and Paper Industry 34, 113A (Dec. 1951); Science ...

J. M. PATON; R. F. S. HEARMON

1957-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

251

Pulsed pyroelectric crystal-powered gamma source  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A compact pulsed gamma generator is being developed to replace radiological sources used in commercial, industrial and medical applications. Mono-energetic gammas are produced in the 0.4 - 1.0 MeV energy range using nuclear reactions such as {sup 9}Be(d,n{gamma}){sup 10}B. The gamma generator employs an RF-driven inductively coupled plasma ion source to produce deuterium ion current densities up to 2 mA/mm{sup 2} and ampere-level current pulses can be attained by utilizing an array extraction grid. The extracted deuterium ions are accelerated to approximately 300 keV via a compact stacked pyroelectric crystal system and then bombard the beryllium target to generate gammas. The resulting microsecond pulse of gammas is equivalent to a radiological source with curie-level activity.

Chen, A. X.; Antolak, A. J.; Leung, K.-N.; Raber, T. N.; Morse, D. H. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States)

2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

252

Demonstration of the Robotic Gamma Locating and Isotopic Identification Device  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United States Department of Energy (DOE) continually seeks safer and more cost-effective technologies for use in decontaminating and decommissioning nuclear facilities. To this end, the Deactivation and Decommissioning Focus Area of DOE's Office of Science and Technology sponsors Large-Scale Demonstration and Deployment Projects (LSDDP) to test new technologies. As part of these projects, developers and vendors showcase new products designed to decrease health and safety risks to personnel and the environment, increase productivity, and lower costs. As part of the FY 2000 and 2001 LSDDP, the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) collaborated with the Russian Research and Development Institute of Construction Technology (NIKIMT). This collaboration resulted in the development of the Robotic Gamma Locating and Isotopic Identification Device (RGL and IID) which integrated DOE Robotics Crosscutting (Rbx) technology with NIKIMT Russian gamma locating and isotopic identification technology. This paper will discuss the technologies involved in this integration and results from the demonstration including reduction of personnel exposure, increase in productivity, and reduced risk.

Anderson, M.O.; Conner, C.C.; Daniel, V.E.; McKay, M.D.; Yancey, N.A.

2002-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

253

Demonstration of the Robotic Gamma Locating and Isotopic Identification Device  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United States Department of Energy (DOE) continually seeks safer and more cost- effective technologies for use in decontaminating and decommissioning nuclear facilities. To this end, the Deactivation and Decommissioning Focus Area of DOE's Office of Science and Technology sponsors Large-Scale Demonstration and Deployment Projects (LSDDP) to test new technologies. As part of these projects, developers and vendors showcase new products designed to decrease health and safety risks to personnel and the environment, increase productivity, and lower costs. As part of the FY 2000 and 2001 LSDDP, the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) collaborated with the Russian Research and Development Institute of Construction Technology (NIKIMT). This collaboration resulted in the development of the Robotic Gamma Locating and Isotopic Identification Device (RGL&IID) which integrated DOE Robotics Crosscutting (Rbx) technology with NIKIMT Russian gamma locating and isotopic identification technology. This paper will discuss the technologies involved in this integration and results from the demonstration including reduction of personnel exposure, increase in productivity, and reduced risk.

Anderson, Matthew Oley; Conner, Craig C; Daniel, Vincent Elvernard; Mckay, Mark D; Yancey, Neal Adam

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Black Stars and Gamma Ray Bursts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stars that are collapsing toward forming a black hole but are frozen near the Schwarzschild horizon are termed ``black stars''. Collisions of black stars, in contrast to black hole collisions, may be sources of gamma ray bursts, whose basic parameters are estimated quite simply and are found to be consistent with observed gamma ray bursts. Black star gamma ray bursts should be preceded by gravitational wave emission similar to that from the coalescence of black holes.

Tanmay Vachaspati

2007-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

255

Interactive Effect of Chemical Substances and Occupational Electromagnetic Field Exposure on the Risk of Gliomas and Meningiomas in Swedish Men  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Area, National Center for Epidemiology...occupational codes and industrial activity. Relative...individual exposure assessments, and in experimental...occupational codes and industrial activity. Relative...individual exposure assessments, and in experimental...Area, National Center for Epidemiology...Probability Risk Assessment Survival Rate...

Ana Navas-Acién; Marina Pollán; Per Gustavsson; Birgitta Floderus; Nils Plato; and Mustafa Dosemeci

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Axion — Dilaton Coupling and Gamma — Ray Bursts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Axions emitted in supernovae are interesting candidates to account for Gamma-Ray Bursts provided their energy can be effectively converted...

O. Bertolami

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Gamma ray burst outflows and afterglows.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? We carry out a theoretical investigation of jet propagation in Gamma Ray Bursts and examine the jitter radiation mechanism as a means of producing… (more)

Morsony, Brian J.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Gamma Ray Burst Central Engines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I review aspects of the theory of long-duration gamma-ray burst (GRB) central engines. I focus on the requirements of any model; these include the angular momentum of the progenitor, the power, Lorentz factor, asymmetry, and duration of the flow, and both the association and the non-association with bright supernovae. I compare and contrast the collapsar and millisecond proto-magnetar models in light of these requirements. The ability of the latter model to produce a flow with Lorentz factor ~100 while simultaneously maintaining a kinetic luminosity of ~10^50 ergs/s for a timescale of ~10-100 s is emphasized.

Todd A. Thompson

2008-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

259

Gamma?ray burst spectroscopy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The statistics and physical properties of gamma ray burst spectral features are presented following a brief review of early theoretical predictions of and experimental searches for such emission. The ?100 observations of 50 keV absorption and 400 keV emission features constitute the largest data base on neutron star lines. Although the statistical significance of individual observations is often weak and interpretation of these features as cyclotron absorption and annihilation radiation poses some theoretical problems it is clear that future observations may have far?reaching implications.

K. Hurley

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Gamma Ray Burst Central Engines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

I review aspects of the theory of long?duration gamma?ray burst (GRB) central engines. I focus on requirements of any model; these include the angular momentum of the progenitor the power Lorentz factor asymmetry and duration of the flow and both the association and the non?association with bright supernovae. I compare and contrast the collapsar and millisecond proto?magnetar models in light of these requirements. The ability of the latter model to produce a flow with Lorentz factor ?100 while simultaneously maintaining a kinetic luminosity of ?10 50 ? ergs ? s ?1 for a timescale of ?10–100? s is emphasized.

Todd A. Thompson

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gamma exposure rate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Exposure Assessment for Bioaerosols in Health Studies  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Exposure Assessment for Bioaerosols in Health Studies Exposure Assessment for Bioaerosols in Health Studies Speaker(s): Carol Rao Date: July 9, 2004 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Mark Mendell Exposures to fungi have been linked with asthma, toxicoses, hypersensitivity pneumonitis, and a range of non-specific symptoms. Definitive associations between indoor fungal exposure and health effects in population-based exposure-response studies, however, have not been well established. Issues in exposure assessment methods, both in collection and analysis, are major limitations. Classic methods for assessing airborne fungi rely upon collecting and analyzing whole fungal spores by culture. However, quantifying whole fungal spores may not fully describe fungal exposures, especially for purposes of investigating adverse respiratory

262

Mouse Strain-Dependent Variations in Sensitivity to Induction of Gamma-H2AX  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Mouse Strain-Dependent Variations in Sensitivity to Induction of Gamma-H2AX Mouse Strain-Dependent Variations in Sensitivity to Induction of Gamma-H2AX Foci after Continuous Low Dose-Rate Irradiation: The Atm-/- vs Atm +/+ genotypes on Balb/c, 129S6, C57BL/6J, and A/J inbred strains J.R. Brogan Colorado State University Abstract We have recently developed a ‘low dose rate’ gamma-H2AX assay that is sufficiently sensitive to distinguish differences in response for cells from normal Atm +/+ (mouse) or ATM+/+ (human) and the phenotypes associated with the corresponding heterozygous genotypes(1, 2). The assay is also capable of distinguishing mild hypersensitivities for cells from an appreciable proportion of apparently normal individuals(3). We used this assay to determine whether the genetic background of four commonly used

263

rates | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

rates rates Dataset Summary Description This dataset, compiled by NREL and Ventyx, provides average residential, commercial and industrial electricity rates by zip code for both investor owned utilities (IOU) and non-investor owned utilities. Note: the file includes average rates for each utility, but not the detailed rate structure data found in the database available via the zip-code look-up feature on the OpenEI Utilities page (http://en.openei.org/wiki/Gateway:Utilities). The data was released by NREL/Ventyx in February 2011. Source NREL and Ventyx Date Released February 24th, 2012 (2 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords electric rates rates US utilities Data text/csv icon IOU rates by zipcode (csv, 1.7 MiB) text/csv icon Non-IOU rates by zipcode (csv, 2.1 MiB)

264

Gravitational Waves versus X and Gamma Ray Emission in a Short Gamma-Ray Burst  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The recent progress in the understanding the physical nature of neutron star equilibrium configurations and the first observational evidence of a genuinely short gamma-ray burst, GRB 090227B, allows to give an estimate of the gravitational waves versus the X and Gamma-ray emission in a short gamma-ray burst.

F. G. Oliveira; Jorge A. Rueda; Remo Ruffini

2014-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

265

Effects on chickens of continuous exposure to low level electromagnetic, electric, and magnetic fields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1972 Major Subjects Nuclear Engineering (Health Physics) EFFECTS ON CHI CKENS OF CONT INUOUS EXPOSURE TO LOW LEVEL ELECTRONAGNETIC, ELECTRIC, AND MAGNETIC 1 IELDS A Thesis by ROBERT SHERWOOD HOWELL Approved... exposure to ionizing radiation. The treated groups appear to have a significantly reduced growth rate and a slightly increased feed conversion ratio. The spleen weight in the 260 MHz {calculated average input power density of 0. 029 mW/cm ) group...

Howell, Robert Sherwood

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

CONSTRAINTS ON VERY HIGH ENERGY GAMMA-RAY EMISSION FROM GAMMA-RAY BURSTS R. Atkins,1,2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CONSTRAINTS ON VERY HIGH ENERGY GAMMA-RAY EMISSION FROM GAMMA-RAY BURSTS R. Atkins,1,2 W. Benbow,3 emission from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) during the prompt emission phase. Detection of >100 GeV counterparts on potential GRB models. Subject headinggs: gamma rays: bursts -- gamma rays: observations 1. INTRODUCTION

California at Santa Cruz, University of

267

Surreptitious Lead Exposure from an Asian Indian Medication  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......case-report Case Report Surreptitious Lead Exposure from an...during routine biological monitoring for lead exposure conducted...the general public. Surreptitious lead exposure from an...during routine biological monitoring for lead exposure conducted......

Leon A. Saryan

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Historical Interest Rates  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Current and Historical Interest Rates Current and Historical Interest Rates The table lists interest rates, from the project's inception through the present, for all projects with repayment supervised by the CRSP MC. The latest available interest rate is used for all future interest rate calculations. The Amistad-Falcon, Collbran, Provo River, and Rio Grande Projects are all assigned the average daily "Yield Rate" calculated by the U.S. Treasury, on an annual basis, for Treasury bonds having terms of 15 years or more remaining to maturity. The calculated yield rate is rounded to the nearest one-eighth of one percent. The yield rate is based upon the bond's interest rate, as well as its market value. The Colorado River Storage Project and its participating projects, Dolores and Seedskadee, are assigned the average daily "Coupon Rate," annualized for the same U.S. Treasury bonds used in "Yield Rate" calculations. The coupon rate is the interest rate that the bond carries upon its face.

269

Hazard of intermittent noise exposures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The chief shortcoming of the “equal energy” hypothesis—the notion that equal products of time and intensity provide equal hazard—is that the recuperative powers of the auditory system are essentially ignored. A single sustained stimulus is regarded as no more dangerous than an intermittent one of the same total energy. A two?year study of the effect of intermittency on the TTS produced in normal young adults by 6? or 8?h exposures to octave bands of noise whose center frequencies ranged from 250 to 4000 Hz indicates that even for the most hazardous noise (the 4000?Hz OB) cutting the cumulative exposure time in half by interjecting regular quiet periods will permit an increase in level of 5 dB for constant TTS at least up to about 100 dB SPL. At 1000 Hz the trading relation is 6–7 dB for halving time and at 250 Hz is even greater. Thus the 5?dBA?per?halving?time relation employed by the present OSHA standard is essentially correct for intermittent noise except perhaps above 100 to 105 dBA where the equal?energy hypothesis may be more appropriate for spectra with high?frequency dominance. A single 5?dBA “correction for intermittency” is an oversimplification. [Research supported by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health Public Health Service.

W. D. Ward

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Analysis Of Comptel Gamma-Ray Burst Locations And Spectra  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. In its first three years of operation, the COMPTEL instrument on the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory has measured the locations (mean accuracy ¸1 ffi ) and spectra (0.75--30 MeV) of 18 gamma-ray bursts and continues to observe new events at a rate of ¸1/month. With good angular resolution and sensitivity at MeV energies, the growing COMPTEL burst catalog is an important new piece of evidence in the on-going GRB mystery. The COMPTEL burst locations are consistent with an isotropic distribution of sources, yet the spatial coincidence of two of the bursts indicates the possibility of repetition. The COMPTEL burst spectra are in most cases consistent with a single power law model with spectral index in the range 2--3. However, two bursts show evidence of a spectral break in the MeV range. Measurement of rapid variability at MeV energies in the stronger bursts provides evidence that either the sources are nearby (within the Galaxy) or the gamma-ray emission is relativistically beamed. W...

Kippen Ryan; J. Ryan; A. Connors; M. Mcconnell; C. Winkler; L. O. Hanlon; J. Greiner; M. Varendorff; W. Collmar; W. Hermsen; L. Kuiper

271

INTERPLANETARY NETWORK LOCALIZATIONS OF KONUS SHORT GAMMA-RAY BURSTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Between the launch of the Global Geospace Science Wind spacecraft in 1994 November and the end of 2010, the Konus-Wind experiment detected 296 short-duration gamma-ray bursts (including 23 bursts which can be classified as short bursts with extended emission). During this period, the Interplanetary Network (IPN) consisted of up to 11 spacecraft, and using triangulation, the localizations of 271 bursts were obtained. We present the most comprehensive IPN localization data on these events. The short burst detection rate, {approx}18 yr{sup -1}, exceeds that of many individual experiments.

Pal'shin, V. D.; Svinkin, D. S.; Aptekar, R. L.; Golenetskii, S. V.; Frederiks, D. D.; Mazets, E. P.; Oleynik, P. P.; Ulanov, M. V. [Ioffe Physical Technical Institute, St. Petersburg, 194021 (Russian Federation); Hurley, K. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, 7 Gauss Way, Berkeley, CA 94720-7450 (United States); Cline, T.; Trombka, J.; McClanahan, T. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Mitrofanov, I. G.; Golovin, D. V.; Kozyrev, A. S.; Litvak, M. L.; Sanin, A. B. [Space Research Institute, 84/32, Profsoyuznaya, Moscow 117997 (Russian Federation); Boynton, W.; Fellows, C.; Harshman, K., E-mail: val@mail.ioffe.ru [Department of Planetary Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); and others

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

272

Cost Analysis Rate Settin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cost Analysis and Rate Settin for Animal Research Facilities #12;#12;Cost Analysis and Rate ... .. . ...................... . . . ................................. . .... 7 Chapter 2 Preparation for Cost Analysis ......................................................... 9 Chapter 3 Assignment of Costs to Animal Research Facility Cost Centers

Baker, Chris I.

273

Slow elimination of phosphorylated histone {gamma}-H2AX from DNA of terminally differentiated mouse heart cells in situ  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Phosphorylation of replacement histone H2AX occurs in megabase chromatin domains around double-strand DNA breaks (DSBs) and this modification (called {gamma}-H2AX) may serve as a useful marker of genome damage and repair in terminally differentiated cells. Here using immunohistochemistry we studied kinetics of {gamma}-H2AX formation and elimination in the X-irradiated mouse heart and renal epithelial tissues in situ. Unirradiated tissues have 3-5% {gamma}-H2AX-positive cells and in tissues fixed 1 h after X-irradiation {gamma}-H2AX-positive nuclei are induced in a dose-dependent manner approaching 20-30% after 3 Gy of IR. Analysis of mouse tissues at different times after 3 Gy of IR showed that maximal induction of {gamma}-H2AX in heart is observed 20 min after IR and then is decreased slowly with about half remaining 23 h later. In renal epithelium maximum of the {gamma}-H2AX-positive cells is observed 40 min after IR and then decreases to control values in 23 h. This indicates that there are significant variations between non-proliferating mammalian tissues in the initial H2AX phosphorylation rate as well as in the rate of {gamma}-H2AX elimination after X-irradiation, which should be taken into account in the analysis of radiation responses.

Gavrilov, Boris [Institute of Cytology, Russian Academy of Sciences, 194064 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Vezhenkova, Irina [Institute of Cytology, Russian Academy of Sciences, 194064 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Firsanov, Denis [Institute of Cytology, Russian Academy of Sciences, 194064 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Solovjeva, Liudmila [Institute of Cytology, Russian Academy of Sciences, 194064 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Svetlova, Maria [Institute of Cytology, Russian Academy of Sciences, 194064 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Mikhailov, Vyacheslav [Institute of Cytology, Russian Academy of Sciences, 194064 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Tomilin, Nikolai [Institute of Cytology, Russian Academy of Sciences, 194064 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)]. E-mail: nvtom@hotmail.com

2006-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

274

Radionuclide neutron sources in calibration laboratory—neutron and gamma doses and their changes in time  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......radiation require the determination of this component...been applied for the determination of neutron ambient...equivalent rate and for the determination of neutron and gamma...nominal decay of the main isotope. After 15-20 y...blocks, enclosing the boron or helium proportional......

K. Józefowicz; N. Golnik; P. Tulik; M. Zielczynski

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Observations of Gamma-Ray Bursts at Extreme Energies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Gamma-Ray Bursts . . . . . . . . . . . . . Redshift-CRUZ OBSERVATIONS OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS AT EXTREME ENERGIES AAncient Unvierse with Gamma-Ray Bursts, pages 330–333. AIP,

Aune, Taylor

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Recoilless Nuclear Resonance Absorption of Gamma Radiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...GAMMA-RAYS, ARKIV FOR FYSIK 6 : 49 ( 1953...OF GAMMA-RAYS - THEORY AND PRELIMINARY EXPERIMENTS...energy loss. The basic feature of this method...prediction of the theory was that the recoilless...formulation of the theory that the mo-mentum...Malmfors, Arkiv Fysik 6, 49 (1953...

Rudolf L. Mössbauer

1962-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

277

The GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope characteristics. Angular resolution and electrons/protons separation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The measurements of gamma-ray fluxes and cosmic-ray electrons and positrons in the energy range from 100 MeV to several TeV, which will be implemented by the specially designed GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope, concern with the following broad range of science topics. Searching for signatures of dark matter, surveying the celestial sphere in order to study gamma-ray point and extended sources, measuring the energy spectra of Galactic and extragalactic diffuse gamma-ray emission, studying gamma-ray bursts and gamma-ray emission from the Sun, as well as high precision measuring spectra of high-energy electrons and positrons, protons and nuclei up to the knee. To clarify these scientific problems with the new experimental data the GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope possesses unique physical characteristics comparing with previous and present experiments. For gamma-ray energies more than 100 GeV GAMMA-400 provides the energy resolution of ~1% and angular resolution better than 0.02 deg. The methods developed to reconstru...

Leonov, A A; Bonvicini, V; Topchiev, N P; Adriani, O; Aptekar, R L; Arkhangelskaja, I V; Arkhangelskiy, A I; Bergstrom, L; Berti, E; Bigongiari, G; Bobkov, S G; Boezio, M; Bogomolov, E A; Bonechi, S; Bongi, M; Bottai, S; Boyarchuk, K A; Castellini, G; Cattaneo, P W; Cumani, P; Dedenko, G L; De Donato, C; Dogiel, V A; Gorbunov, M S; Gusakov, Yu V; Hnatyk, B I; Kadilin, V V; Kaplin, V A; Kaplun, A A; Kheymits, M D; Korepanov, V E; Larsson, J; Loginov, V A; Longo, F; Maestro, P; Marrocchesi, P S; Mikhailov, V V; Mocchiutti, E; Moiseev, A A; Mori, N; Moskalenko, I V; Naumov, P Yu; Papini, P; Pearce, M; Picozza, P; Popov, A V; Rappoldi, A; Ricciarini, S; Runtso, M F; Ryde, F; Serdin, O V; Sparvoli, R; Spillantini, P; Suchkov, S I; Tavani, M; Taraskin, A A; Tiberio, A; Tyurin, E M; Ulanov, M V; Vacchi, A; Vannuccini, E; Vasilyev, G I; Yurkin, Yu T; Zampa, N; Zirakashvili, V N; Zverev, V G

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Thermal neutron capture gamma-rays  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The energy and intensity of gamma rays as seen in thermal neutron capture are presented. Only those (n,..cap alpha..), E = thermal, reactions for which the residual nucleus mass number is greater than or equal to 45 are included. These correspond to evaluations published in Nuclear Data Sheets. The publication source data are contained in the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF). The data presented here do not involve any additional evaluation. Appendix I lists all the residual nuclides for which the data are included here. Appendix II gives a cumulated index to A-chain evaluations including the year of publication. The capture gamma ray data are given in two tables - the Table 1 is the list of all gamma rays seen in (n,..gamma..) reaction given in the order of increasing energy; the Table II lists the gamma rays according to the nuclide.

Tuli, J.K.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

RAPID TeV GAMMA-RAY FLARING OF BL LACERTAE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report on the detection of a very rapid TeV gamma-ray flare from BL Lacertae on 2011 June 28 with the Very Energetic Radiation Imaging Telescope Array System (VERITAS). The flaring activity was observed during a 34.6 minute exposure, when the integral flux above 200 GeV reached (3.4 {+-} 0.6) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6} photons m{sup -2} s{sup -1}, roughly 125% of the Crab Nebula flux measured by VERITAS. The light curve indicates that the observations missed the rising phase of the flare but covered a significant portion of the decaying phase. The exponential decay time was determined to be 13 {+-} 4 minutes, making it one of the most rapid gamma-ray flares seen from a TeV blazar. The gamma-ray spectrum of BL Lacertae during the flare was soft, with a photon index of 3.6 {+-} 0.4, which is in agreement with the measurement made previously by MAGIC in a lower flaring state. Contemporaneous radio observations of the source with the Very Long Baseline Array revealed the emergence of a new, superluminal component from the core around the time of the TeV gamma-ray flare, accompanied by changes in the optical polarization angle. Changes in flux also appear to have occurred at optical, UV, and GeV gamma-ray wavelengths at the time of the flare, although they are difficult to quantify precisely due to sparse coverage. A strong flare was seen at radio wavelengths roughly four months later, which might be related to the gamma-ray flaring activities. We discuss the implications of these multiwavelength results.

Arlen, T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Aune, T.; Bouvier, A. [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics and Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)] [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics and Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Beilicke, M.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Dickherber, R. [Department of Physics, Washington University, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States)] [Department of Physics, Washington University, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States); Benbow, W. [Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Amado, AZ 85645 (United States)] [Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Amado, AZ 85645 (United States); Cesarini, A.; Connolly, M. P. [School of Physics, National University of Ireland Galway, University Road, Galway (Ireland)] [School of Physics, National University of Ireland Galway, University Road, Galway (Ireland); Ciupik, L. [Astronomy Department, Adler Planetarium and Astronomy Museum, Chicago, IL 60605 (United States)] [Astronomy Department, Adler Planetarium and Astronomy Museum, Chicago, IL 60605 (United States); Cui, W.; Feng, Q.; Finley, J. P. [Department of Physics, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States)] [Department of Physics, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Dumm, J.; Fortson, L. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States)] [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Errando, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Barnard College, Columbia University, NY 10027 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Barnard College, Columbia University, NY 10027 (United States); Falcone, A. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 525 Davey Lab, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)] [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 525 Davey Lab, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Federici, S. [DESY, Platanenallee 6, D-15738 Zeuthen (Germany)] [DESY, Platanenallee 6, D-15738 Zeuthen (Germany); Finnegan, G., E-mail: qfeng@purdue.edu, E-mail: cui@purdue.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Collaboration: VERITAS Collaboration; and others

2013-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

280

First Direct Measurement of the 17F(p,gamma)18Ne Cross Section  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The rate of the {sup 17}F(p,{gamma}){sup 18}Ne reaction is of significant importance in astrophysical events like novae and x-ray bursts. The decay of {sup 17}F is thought to help drive the expansion of the nova envelope, and the {sup 17}F(p,{gamma}){sup 18}Ne reaction affects the production of {sup 18}F, a target of gamma-ray astronomy, as well as being an important link in the ({alpha},p) reaction chain during the ignition phase of x-ray bursts. A 3{sup +} state in {sup 18}Ne predicted to dominate the rate was found at 599.8 keV using the {sup 17}F(p,p){sup 17}F reaction [1], but the resonance strength was unknown. For the first time, the {sup 17}F(p,{gamma}){sup 18}Ne reaction has been measured directly with the Daresbury Recoil Separator, using a mixed beam of radioactive {sup 17}F and stable {sup 17}O from the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. A {gamma} width was found for the 599.8 keV resonance in {sup 18}Ne, and an upper limit on the direct capture S factor was determined at an intermediate energy of 800 keV.

Chipps, Kelly A [ORNL; Bardayan, Daniel W [ORNL; Blackmon, Jeff C [ORNL; Chae, K. Y. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Greife, U. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden; Hatarik, Robert [Rutgers University; Kozub, R. L. [Tennessee Technological University; Matei, Catalin [Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU); Moazen, Brian [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Nesaraja, Caroline D [ORNL; Pain, Steven D [ORNL; Peters, W. A. [Rutgers University; Pittman, S. T. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); ShrinerJr., J. F. [Tennessee Technological University; Smith, Michael Scott [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gamma exposure rate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Electric and magnetic field exposure associated with electric blankets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

electric blankets may be important contributors to the public's overall exposure to 60 Hz electric and magnetic fields (EMFs) since they are common appliances that are used close to the body for long periods of time. This report describes a series of experimental and computer analyses characterizing various aspects of EMF exposure from electric blankets in use prior to Fall 1990. Almost of electric blankets were found to use on/off controllers with cycle periods of minutes. Calculations of magnetic fields within the body show that, when blankets are heating, flux densities averaged over the whole body range from 15--33 mG during the on'' cycle with typical values of 22 mG. Duty cycles are predicted to vary widely from user-to-user, with typical values of perhaps 40%. Given typical blanket usage patterns, the long-term body-averaged magnetic field exposure from blankets is expected to be comparable to that form other EMF sources for a significant fraction of the blanket-using population. No significant differences were found between time-averaged magnetic field exposures from blankets with metal alloy and plastic polymer heating elements. Blankets with alloy and polymer heating elements did differ significantly in electric field exposure. Calculations show that the unperturbed field 5 cm above flat blankets range from 60--150 V/m for alloy heating cables and unperturbed field 5 cm above flat blankets range from 60--150 V/m for alloy heating cables and 10--40 V/m polymer cables. Starting in Fall 1990, electric blanket manufactures introduced new designs that produce much smaller magnetic fields. These are expected to replace the current in-use stock at a rate of 10--15% per year.

Florig, H.K.; Hoburg, J.F. (Carnegie-Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Dept. of Engineering and Public Policy)

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Nickel-based superalloy operating temperature determination via analysis of gamma/gamma' microstructure and coating/base material interdiffusion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The average operating temperature of RENÉ N5® high pressure turbine blades was evaluated via [gamma]/[gamma]' microstructure and coating/base metal interdiffusion methods. The [gamma]' volume fraction was measured by point ...

Ham, Wendy D. (Wendy Decker)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Y-12 Uranium Exposure Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Following the recent restart of operations at the Y-12 Plant, the Radiological Control Organization (RCO) observed that the enriched uranium exposures appeared to involve insoluble rather than soluble uranium that presumably characterized most earlier Y-12 operations. These observations necessitated changes in the bioassay program, particularly the need for routine fecal sampling. In addition, it was not reasonable to interpret the bioassay data using metabolic parameter values established during earlier Y-12 operations. Thus, the recent urinary and fecal bioassay data were interpreted using the default guidance in Publication 54 of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP); that is, inhalation of Class Y uranium with an activity median aerodynamic diameter (AMAD) of 1 {micro}m. Faced with apparently new workplace conditions, these actions were appropriate and ensured a cautionary approach to worker protection. As additional bioassay data were accumulated, it became apparent that the data were not consistent with Publication 54. Therefore, this study was undertaken to examine the situation.

Eckerman, K.F.; Kerr, G.D.

1999-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

284

Neutron And Gamma Detector Using An Ionization Chamber With An...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Neutron And Gamma Detector Using An Ionization Chamber Neutron And Gamma Detector Using An Ionization Chamber With An Integrated Body And Moderator A detector for detecting...

285

In-cell reaction rate distributions and cell-average reaction rates in fast critical assemblies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Measurements are described for determining average values of fission rates in /sup 235/U, /sup 238/U and /sup 239/Pu and capture rates in /sup 238/U for heterogeneous cells used to construct fast critical assemblies. The measurements are based on irradiations of foils of /sup 238/U, /sup 235/U and /sup 239/Pu with counting of fission and capture products using gamma-ray spectroscopy. Both plate and pin cells are considered. Procedures are described for inferring cell-average reaction rate values from a single foil location based on a cell using a quantity called a cell factor. Cell factors are determined from special measurements in which several foils are irradiated within a cell. Comparisons are presented between cell factors determined by measurements and by Monte Carlo calculations which lend credibility to the measurement procedures.

Brumbach, S.B.; Gasidlo, J.M.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Gamma-insensitive optical sensor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An ultra-violet/visible/infra-red gamma-insensitive gas avalanche focal plane array comprising a planar photocathode and a planar anode pad array separated by a gas-filled gap and across which is applied an electric potential. Electrons ejected from the photocathode are accelerated sufficiently between collisions with the gas molecules to ionize them, forming an electron avalanche. The gap acts like a proportional counter. The array of anode pad are mounted on the front of an anode plate and are connected to matching contact pads on the back of the anode via feed through wires. Connection of the anode to signal processing electronics is made from the contact pads using standard indium bump techniques, for example.

Kruger, Hans W. (Walnut Creek, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Gamma-insensitive optical sensor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An ultraviolet/visible/infrared gamma-insensitive gas avalanche focal plane array is described comprising a planar photocathode and a planar anode pad array separated by a gas-filled gap and across which is applied an electric potential. Electrons ejected from the photocathode are accelerated sufficiently between collisions with the gas molecules to ionize them, forming an electron avalanche. The gap acts like a proportional counter. The array of anode pad are mounted on the front of an anode plate and are connected to matching contact pads on the back of the anode via feed through wires. Connection of the anode to signal processing electronics is made from the contact pads using standard indium bump techniques, for example. 6 figures.

Kruger, H.W.

1994-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

288

Radionuclides in the adriatic sea and related dose-rate assessment for marine biota  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......radiation and dose rate investigations...Smodis B. Estimation of sedimentation...ionizing radiation on plants...the Great Bay. J. Environ...Norwegian Radiation Protection...water of the Bay of Bengal. Radiat...P. Gamma radiation measurements and dose rate in the......

Branko Petrinec; Marko Strok; Zdenko Franic; Borut Smodis; Dijana Pavicic-Hamer

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Gamma Irradiation Facility at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico. Final environmental assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) on the proposed construction and operation of a new Gamma Irradiation Facility (GIF) at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM). This facility is needed to: enhance capabilities to assure technical excellence in nuclear weapon radiation environments testing, component development, and certification; comply with all applicable ES and H safeguards, standards, policies, and regulations; reduce personnel radiological exposure to comply with ALARA limits in accordance with DOE orders and standards; consolidate major gamma ray sources into a central, secured area; and reduce operational risks associated with operation of the GIF and LICA in their present locations. This proposed action provides for the design, construction, and operation of a new GIF located within TA V and the removal of the existing GIF and Low Intensity Cobalt Array (LICA). The proposed action includes potential demolition of the gamma shield walls and removal of equipment in the existing GIF and LICA. The shielding pool used by the existing GIF will remain as part of the ACRR facility. Transportation of the existing {sup 60}Co sources from the existing LICA and GIF to the new facility is also included in the proposed action. Relocation of the gamma sources to the new GIF will be accomplished by similar techniques to those used to install the sources originally.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Determination of the asymptotic normalization coefficients for 14C + n <--> 15C, the 14C(n, gamma)15C reaction rate, and evaluation of a new method to determine spectroscopic factors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 14C + n <--> 15C system has been used as a test case in the evaluation of a new method to determine spectroscopic factors that uses the asymptotic normalization coefficient (ANC). The method proved to be unsuccessful for this case. As part of this experimental program, the ANCs for the 15C ground state and first excited state were determined using a heavy-ion neutron transfer reaction as well as the inverse kinematics (d,p) reaction, measured at the Texas A&M Cyclotron Institute. The ANCs were used to evaluate the astrophysical direct neutron capture rate on 14C, which was then compared with the most recent direct measurement and found to be in good agreement. A study of the 15C SF via its mirror nucleus 15F and a new insight into deuteron stripping theory are also presented.

McCleskey, M. [Texas A and M Univ., Cyclotron Inst., TX (United States); Mukhamedzhanov, A. M. [Texas A and M Univ., Cyclotron Inst., TX (United States); Trache, L. [Texas A and M Univ., Cyclotron Inst., TX (United States); Tribble, R. E. [Texas A and M Univ., Cyclotron Inst., TX (United States); Banu, A. [Texas A and M Univ., Cyclotron Inst., TX (United States); Eremenko, V. [Texas A and M Univ., Cyclotron Inst., TX (United States); Goldberg, V. Z. [Texas A and M Univ., Cyclotron Inst., TX (United States); Lui, Y. W. [Texas A and M Univ., Cyclotron Inst., TX (United States); McCleskey, E. [Texas A and M Univ., Cyclotron Inst., TX (United States); Roeder, B. T. [Texas A and M Univ., Cyclotron Inst., TX (United States); Spiridon, A. [Texas A and M Univ., Cyclotron Inst., TX (United States); Carstoiu, F. [National Inst. for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Burjan, V. [Nuclear Physics Inst., Czech Academy of Sciences, Prague (Czech Republic); Hons, Z. [Nuclear Physics Inst., Czech Academy of Sciences, Prague (Czech Republic); Thompson, I. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

2014-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

291

The Third IBIS/ISGRI Soft Gamma-Ray Survey Catalog  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper we report on the third soft gamma-ray source catalog obtained with the IBIS/ISGRI gamma-ray imager on board the INTEGRAL satellite. The scientific data set is based on more than 40 Ms of high-quality observations performed during the first 3.5 yr of Core Program and public IBIS/ISGRI observations. Compared to previous IBIS/ISGRI surveys, this catalog includes a substantially increased coverage of extragalactic fields, and comprises more than 400 high-energy sources detected in the energy range 17-100 keV, including both transients and faint persistent objects that can only be revealed with longer exposure times.

A. J. Bird; A. Malizia; A. Bazzano; E. J. Barlow; L. Bassani; A. B. Hill; G. Bélanger; F. Capitanio; D. J. Clark; A. J. Dean; M. Fiocchi; D. Götz; F. Lebrun; M. Molina; N. Produit; M. Renaud; V. Sguera; J. B. Stephen; R. Terrier; P. Ubertini; R. Walter; C. Winkler; J. Zurita

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

About the Ratings  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2008 Ratings Changes 2008 Ratings Changes EPA's "New" Fuel Economy Ratings Video about EPA's New Fuel Economy Ratings Windows Media Video (6.8 MB) Quicktime Video (7.8 MB) Text Version EPA changed the way it estimates fuel economy starting with the 2008 model year. This "new" way of estimating fuel economy supplements the previous method by incorporating the effects of Faster speeds and acceleration Air conditioner use Colder outside temperatures What else do I need to know about the "new" ratings? The tests lower MPG estimates for most vehicles. View old/new MPG ratings for a specific vehicle The actual mileage you get will still vary based on your driving habits, traffic conditions, and other factors. All MPG estimates in Find-a-Car have been converted to the new

293

An Exactly Separable {gamma}-Rigid Version of The X(5) Critical Point Symmetry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A {gamma}-rigid version (with {gamma}=0) of the X(5) critical point symmetry is constructed. The model, to be called X(3) since it is proved to cointain three degrees of freedom, utilizes an infinite well potential, is based on exact separation of variables, and leads to parameter free (up to overall scale factors) predictions for spectra and B(E2) transition rates, which are in good agreement with existing experimental data for Os and Pt. An unexpected similarity of the {beta}1 bands of the X(5) nuclei 150Nd, 152Sm, 154Gd, and 156Dy to the X(3) predictions is observed.

Bonatsos, D.; Lenis, D.; Petrellis, D. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, National Center for Scientific Research 'Demokritos', GR-15310 Aghia Paraskevi, Attiki (Greece); Terziev, P. A. [Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 72 Tzarigrad Road, BG-1784 Sofia (Bulgaria); Yigitoglu, I. [Hasan Ali Yucel Faculty of Education, Istanbul University, TR-34470 Beyazit, Istanbul (Turkey)

2007-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

294

Effective Rate Period  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Fiscal Year 2014 Fiscal Year 2014 Effective Rate Period As of Beginning of the FY 10/01/2013 - 09/30/2014 Mid-Year Changes (if applicable) 10/01/2013 - 09/30/2014 Power Rates Annual Revenue Requirement Rate Schedule Power Revenue Requirement $73,441,557 CV-F13 Base Resource Revenue Requirement $69,585,875 First Preference Revenue Requirement $3,855,682

295

LCC Guidance Rates  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Notepad text file provides the LCC guidance rates in a numbered format for the various regions throughout the U.S.

296

Draft Tiered Rate Methodology  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

year's weather and other specific factors are removed from the loads of irrigated agriculture. ( ) "Irrigation Rate Mitigation" means the form of a discount by BPA to...

297

Heart Rate Artifact Suppression.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Motion artifact strongly corrupts heart rate measurements in current pulse oximetry systems. In many, almost any motion will greatly diminish the system’s ability to extract… (more)

Dickson, Christopher

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Residential Solar Valuation Rates  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Residential Solar Valuation Rates Karl R. Rbago Rbago Energy LLC 1 The Ideal Residential Solar Tariff Fair to the utility and non-solar customers Fair compensation to...

299

Gamma-Ray Bursts and Particle Astrophysics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gamma-ray bursts are violent events occurring randomly in the sky. In this review, I will present the fireball model, proposed to explain the phenomenon of gamma-ray bursts. This model has important consequences for the production and observation at Earth of gravitational waves, high energy neutrinos, cosmic rays and high energy photons, and the second part of this review will be focused on these aspects. A last section will briefly discuss the topic of the use of gamma-ray bursts as standard candles and possible cosmological studies.

B. Gendre

2008-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

300

Gamma-Ray Burst Early Afterglows  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The successful launch and operation of NASA's Swift Gamma-Ray Burst Explorer open a new era for the multi-wavelength study of the very early afterglow phase of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). GRB early afterglow information is essential to explore the unknown physical composition of GRB jets, the link between the prompt gamma-ray emission and the afterglow emission, the GRB central engine activity, as well as the immediate GRB environment. Here I review some of the recent theoretical efforts to address these problems and describe how the latest Swift data give answers to these outstanding questions.

Bing Zhang

2005-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gamma exposure rate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Exposure assessment in ergonomic epidemiology Is there something specific to the assessment of biomechanical exposures?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Exposure assessment in ergonomic epidemiology Is there something specific to the assessment.leclerc@st-maurice.inserm.fr Key words : ergonomics, work, exposure, cancer In this issue of the Journal the authors of two articles in "ergonomic epidemiology" stress several necessary qualities of exposure data: they must

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

302

Silent Victims — An Epidemic of Childhood Exposure to Domestic Violence  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Since August 2012, the Affordable Care Act has required private insurance companies to cover routine screening and counseling for intimate partner violence (IPV) as an essential health service for women at no additional cost to the patient. This requirement reflects recent, evidence-based... More than 15 million U.S. children live in families affected by intimate partner violence; about 7 million witness severe violence, such as the assault of one parent by another. Exposure to such violence has been linked to higher rates of physical health problems.

Bair-Merritt M.Zuckerman B.Augustyn M.Cronholm P.F.

2013-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

303

Exposure Control Plan Bloodborne Pathogen Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) will review and revise the Plan annually in accordance with the current OSHA BBP Standard. 2. OCCUPATIONAL. The Standard requires employers to develop and implement a written Exposure Control Plan (the "Plan"). The Plan provisions of the Standard. The Exposure Control Plan is contained in the Laboratory Safety Manual

Natelson, Douglas

304

Environmental Health Formaldehyde Exposure in Homes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environmental Health Formaldehyde Exposure in Homes: A Reference for State Officials to Use in Decision-making Background The issue of formaldehyde exposure in homes is long-standing and has been other construction components. In the past, formaldehyde was also used in insulation of many homes

305

A Search for the Rare Decay $B\\rightarrow\\gamma\\gamma$  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report the result of a search for the rare decay B{sup 0} {yields} {gamma}{gamma} in 426 fb{sup -1} of data, corresponding to 226 million B{sup 0}{bar B}{sup 0} pairs, collected on the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} collider using the BABAR detector. We use a maximum likelihood fit to extract the signal yield and observe 21{sub -12}{sup +13} signal events with a statistical signficance of 1.9 {sigma}. This corresponds to a branching fraction {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {gamma}{gamma}) = (1.7 {+-} 1.1(stat.) {+-} 0.2(syst.)) x 10{sup -7}. Based on this result, we set a 90% confidence level upper limit of {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {gamma}{gamma}) < 3.2 x 10{sup -7}.

del Amo Sanchez, P.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; /INFN, Bari /Bari U.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; /Bergen U.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Hooberman, B.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I.L.; Tanabe, T.; /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Southern Methodist U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas Nuclear Corp., Austin /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

2011-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

306

Estimating exposure of terrestrial wildlife to contaminants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes generalized models for the estimation of contaminant exposure experienced by wildlife on the Oak Ridge Reservation. The primary exposure pathway considered is oral ingestion, e.g. the consumption of contaminated food, water, or soil. Exposure through dermal absorption and inhalation are special cases and are not considered hereIN. Because wildlife mobile and generally consume diverse diets and because environmental contamination is not spatial homogeneous, factors to account for variation in diet, movement, and contaminant distribution have been incorporated into the models. To facilitate the use and application of the models, life history parameters necessary to estimate exposure are summarized for 15 common wildlife species. Finally, to display the application of the models, exposure estimates were calculated for four species using data from a source operable unit on the Oak Ridge Reservation.

Sample, B.E.; Suter, G.W. II

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Advertising Rate Information  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Advertising Rate Information ... ACS MEMBER RATES "Situations Wanted" advertisements will be classified by the chemical held designated by the members. ... State ACS membership status and mail advertisements to: Chemical & Engineering News, Classified Advertising, 676 East Swedesford Road, Suite 202, Wayne, PA 19087-1612. ...

2000-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

308

Advertising Rate Information  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Advertising Rate Information ... ACS MEMBER RATES "Situations Wanted" advertisements will be classified by the chemical field designated by the members. ... State ACS membership status and mail advertisements to: Chemical & Engineering News, Classified Advertising, 676 East Swedesford Road, Suite 202, Wayne, PA 19087-1612. ...

1997-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

309

Viability of primordial black holes as short period gamma-ray bursts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It has been proposed that the short period gamma-ray bursts, which occur at a rate of ?10?yr-1, may be evaporating primordial black holes (PBHs). Calculations of the present PBH evaporation rate have traditionally assumed that the PBH mass function varies as MBH-5/2. This mass function only arises if the density perturbations from which the PBHs form have a scale invariant power spectrum. It is now known that for a scale invariant power spectrum, normalized to COBE on large scales, the PBH density is completely negligible, so that this mass function is cosmologically irrelevant. For non-scale-invariant power spectra, if all PBHs which form at a given epoch have a fixed mass then the PBH mass function is sharply peaked around that mass, while if the PBH mass depends on the size of the density perturbation from which it forms, as is expected when critical phenomena are taken into account, then the PBH mass function will be far broader than MBH-5/2. In this paper we calculate the present day PBH evaporation rate, using constraints from the diffuse gamma-ray background, for both of these mass functions. If the PBH mass function has a significant finite width, as recent numerical simulations suggest, then it is not possible to produce a present day PBH evaporation rate comparable with the observed short period gamma-ray burst rate. This could also have implications for other attempts to detect evaporating PBHs.

Anne M. Green

2001-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

310

Ambient air pollution exposure and the incidence of related health effects among racial/ethnic minorities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Differences among racial and ethnic groups in morbidity and mortality rates for diseases, including diseases with environmental causes, have been extensively documented. However, documenting the linkages between environmental contaminants, individual exposures, and disease incidence has been hindered by difficulties in measuring exposure for the population in general and for minority populations in particular. After briefly discussing research findings on associations of common air pollutants with disease incidence, the authors summarize recent studies of radial/ethnic subgroup differences in incidence of these diseases in the US. They then present evidence of both historic and current patterns of disproportionate minority group exposure to air pollution as measured by residence in areas where ambient air quality standards are violated. The current indications of disproportionate potential exposures of minority and low-income populations to air pollutants represent the continuation of a historical trend. The evidence of linkage between disproportionate exposure to air pollution of racial/ethnic minorities and low-income groups and their higher rates of some air pollution-related diseases is largely circumstantial. Differences in disease incidence and mortality rates among racial/ethnic groups are discussed for respiratory diseases, cancers, and lead poisoning. Pollutants of concern include CO, Pb, SO{sub 2}, O{sub 3}, and particulates.

Nieves, L.A.; Wernette, D.R.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Gravitational waves and gamma-ray bursts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gamma-Ray Bursts are likely associated with a catastrophic energy release in stellar mass objects. Electromagnetic observations provide important, but indirect information on the progenitor. On the other hand, gravitational waves emitted from the central source, carry direct information on its nature. In this context, I give an overview of the multi-messenger study of gamma-ray bursts that can be carried out by using electromagnetic and gravitational wave observations. I also underline the importance of joint electromagnetic and gravitational wave searches, in the absence of a gamma-ray trigger. Finally, I discuss how multi-messenger observations may probe alternative gamma-ray burst progenitor models, such as the magnetar scenario.

Alessandra Corsi; for the LIGO Scientific Collaboration; for the Virgo Collaboration

2012-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

312

Studying Gamma Ray Bursts from a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Studying Gamma Ray Bursts from a new perspective! {... Unraveling some mysteries and adding new Radio Op0cal X-ray Short ( energy -ray photons... ... accompained by a considerable long las0ng emission

Â?umer, Slobodan

313

Can gamma-ray bursts constrain quintessence?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using the narrow clustering of the geometrically corrected gamma-ray energies released by gamma-ray bursts, we investigate the possibility of using these sources as standard candles to probe cosmological parameters such as the matter density Omega_m and the cosmological constant energy density Omega_Lambda. By simulating different samples of gamma-ray bursts, we find that Omega_m can be determined with accuracy ~7% with data from 300 sources. We also show that, if Omega = 1 is due to a quintessence field, some of the models proposed in the literature may be discriminated from a Universe with cosmological constant, by a similar-sized sample of gamma-ray bursts.

T. Di Girolamo; R. Catena; M. Vietri; G. Di Sciascio

2005-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

314

Gravitational waves and short gamma ray bursts.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Short hard gamma-ray bursts (GRB) are believed to be produced by compact binary coalescences (CBC) { either double neutron stars or neutron star{black hole binaries.… (more)

Predoi, Valeriu

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Gamma-Ray Pulsar Studies With GLAST  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Some pulsars have their maximum observable energy output in the gamma-ray band, offering the possibility of using these high-energy photons as probes of the particle acceleration and interaction processes in pulsar magnetospheres. After an extended hiatus between satellite missions, the recently-launched AGILE mission and the upcoming Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) Large Area Telescope (LAT) will allow gamma-ray tests of the theoretical models developed based on past discoveries. With its greatly improved sensitivity, better angular resolution, and larger energy reach than older instruments, GLAST LAT should detect dozens to hundreds of new gamma-ray pulsars and measure luminosities, light curves, and phase-resolved spectra with unprecedented resolution. It will also have the potential to find radio-quiet pulsars like Geminga, using blind search techniques. Cooperation with radio and X-ray pulsar astronomers is an important aspect of the LAT team's planning for pulsar studies.

Thompson, D.J.; /NASA, Goddard

2011-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

316

Gamma Log At Fort Bliss Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fort Bliss Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) Fort Bliss Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gamma Log At Fort Bliss Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) Exploration Activity Details Location Fort Bliss Area Exploration Technique Gamma Log Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Three principal types of data were obtained from this drilling project: core samples of the lithology penetrated by the holes, records of drilling behavior (such as water level in the hole, changes in rate of penetration etc.), and multiple temperature logs (both during and after drilling) in each well. A suite of geophysical logs (gamma ray, neutron, sonic, and resistivity) was also run after completion of drilling. References Jim Combs, John T. Finger, Colin Goranson, Charles E. Hockox Jr.,

317

Flares in Gamma Ray Bursts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The flare activity that is observed in GRBs soon after the prompt emission with the XRT (0.3–10 KeV) instrument on Board of the Swift satellite is leading to important clues in relation to the physical characteristics of the mechanism generating the emission of energy in Gamma Ray Bursts. We will briefly refer to the results obtained with the recent analysis [1] and [2] and discuss the preliminary results we obtained with a new larger sample of GRBs [limited to early flares] based on fitting of the flares using the Norris 2005 profile. We find in agreement with previous results that XRT flares follow the main characteristics observed in [3] for the prompt emission spikes. The estimate of the flare energy for the subsample with redshift is rather robust and an attempt is made using the redshisft sample to estimate how the energy emitted in flares depends on time. We used a H 0 ?=?70?km/s/Mpc ? ? ?=?0.7 ? m ?=?0.3 cosmology.

G. Chincarini; J. Mao; F. Pasotti; R. Margutti; C. Guidorzi; M. G. Bernardini; Swfit Italian team

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Statistical Methods for Thermonuclear Reaction Rates and Nucleosynthesis Simulations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rigorous statistical methods for estimating thermonuclear reaction rates and nucleosynthesis are becoming increasingly established in nuclear astrophysics. The main challenge being faced is that experimental reaction rates are highly complex quantities derived from a multitude of different measured nuclear parameters (e.g., astrophysical S-factors, resonance energies and strengths, particle and gamma-ray partial widths). We discuss the application of the Monte Carlo method to two distinct, but related, questions. First, given a set of measured nuclear parameters, how can one best estimate the resulting thermonuclear reaction rates and associated uncertainties? Second, given a set of appropriate reaction rates, how can one best estimate the abundances from nucleosynthesis (i.e., reaction network) calculations? The techniques described here provide probability density functions that can be used to derive statistically meaningful reaction rates and final abundances for any desired coverage probability. Examples ...

Iliadis, Christian; Coc, Alain; Timmes, F X; Champagne, Art E

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

The gamma?ray burst capabilities of BATSE and the Gamma Ray Observatory  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO) scheduled for launch in 1990 will provide new and enhanced capabilities for the study of gamma?ray bursts. These include higher sensitivity increased time resolution broader energy coverage rapid burst data dissemination and burst location by a single spacecraft. All four of the GRO instruments have burst capabilities however the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) is designed primarily for the study of gamma?ray bursts. The capabilities of BATSE and the GRO for gamma?ray burst studies are described.

G. J. Fishman

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Coal deposit characterization by gamma-gamma density/percent dry ash relationships  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: pb = C + Va(pa) Equation 3 where C is a constant. Ash content can therefore be geophysically determined as variations In log-derived bulk density measurements are in direct response to variations in ash content. However, when any of the above... by applying the relationships between geophysi cally-derived gamma-gamma density and laboratory-derived percent dry ash. The linear gamma-gamma density/percent dry ash relationship is dependent upon a constant fuel ratio (percent fixed carbon...

Wright, David Scott

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gamma exposure rate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Gamma Ray Bursts from Ordinary Cosmic Strings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We give an upper estimate for the number of gamma ray bursts from ordinary (non-superconducting) cosmic strings expected to be observed at terrestrial detectors. Assuming that cusp annihilation is the mechanism responsible for the bursts we consider strings arising at a GUT phase transition and compare our estimate with the recent BATSE results. Further we give a lower limit for the effective area of future detectors designed to detect the cosmic string induced flux of gamma ray bursts.

R. H. Brandenberger; A. T. Sornborger; M. Trodden

1993-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

322

Gamma Ray Bursts as cosmological tools  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The use of Gamma Ray Bursts as ``standard candles'' has been made possible by the recent discovery of a very tight correlation between their rest frame intrinsic properties. This correlation relates the GRB prompt emission peak spectral energy E_peak to the energy E_gamma corrected for the collimation angle theta_jet of these sources. The possibility to use GRBs to constrain the cosmological parameters and to study the nature of Dark Energy are very promising.

G. Ghirlanda; G. Ghisellini; L. Nava; C. Firmani

2005-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

323

Neutrinos and Gamma Rays from Galaxy Clusters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The next generation of neutrino and gamma-ray detectors should provide new insights into the creation and propagation of high-energy protons within galaxy clusters, probing both the particle physics of cosmic rays interacting with the background medium and the mechanisms for high-energy particle production within the cluster. In this paper we examine the possible detection of gamma-rays (via the GLAST satellite) and neutrinos (via the ICECUBE and Auger experiments) from the Coma cluster of galaxies, as well as for the gamma-ray bright clusters Abell 85, 1758, and 1914. These three were selected from their possible association with unidentified EGRET sources, so it is not yet entirely certain that their gamma-rays are indeed produced diffusively within the intracluster medium, as opposed to AGNs. It is not obvious why these inconspicuous Abell-clusters should be the first to be seen in gamma-rays, but a possible reason is that all of them show direct evidence of recent or ongoing mergers. Their identification with the EGRET gamma-ray sources is also supported by the close correlation between their radio and (purported) gamma-ray fluxes. Under favorable conditions (including a proton spectral index of 2.5 in the case of Abell 85, and sim 2.3 for Coma, and Abell 1758 and 1914), we expect ICECUBE to make as many as 0.3 neutrino detections per year from the Coma cluster of galaxies, and as many as a few per year from the Abell clusters 85, 1758, and 1914. Also, Auger may detect as many as 2 events per decade at ~ EeV energies from these gamma-ray bright clusters.

Brandon Wolfe; Fulvio Melia; Roland M. Crocker; Raymond R. Volkas

2008-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

324

AC field exposure study: human exposure to 60-Hz electric fields  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to develop a method of estimating human exposure to the 60 Hz electric fields created by transmission lines. The Activity Systems Model simulates human activities in a variety of situations where exposure to electric fields is possible. The model combines maps of electric fields, activity maps, and experimentally determined activity factors to provide histograms of time spent in electric fields of various strengths in the course of agricultural, recreational, and domestic activities. For corroboration, the study team measured actual human exposure at locations across the United States near transmission lines ranging in voltage from 115 to 1200 kV. The data were collected with a specially designed vest that measures exposure. These data demonstrate the accuracy of the exposure model presented in this report and revealed that most exposure time is spent in fields of magnitudes similar to many household situations. The report provides annual exposure estimates for human activities near transmission lines and in the home and compares them with exposure data from typical laboratory animal experiments. For one exposure index, the cumulative product of time and electric field, exposure during some of the laboratory animal experiments is two to four orders of magnitude greater than cumulative exposure for a human during one year of outdoor work on a farm crossed by a transmission line.

Silva, J.M.

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

2007-2009 Power Rate Adjustments (pbl/rates)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Function Review (PFR) Firstgov FY 2007 2009 Power Rate Adjustments BPA's 2007-2009 Wholesale Power Rate Schedules and General Rate Schedule Provisions (GRSPs) took effect on...

326

The Universe Viewed in Gamma-Rays 1 Toward Ultra Short Gamma Ray Burst Ground Based De-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Universe Viewed in Gamma-Rays 1 Toward Ultra Short Gamma Ray Burst Ground Based De- tection- liminary data taking started in November 2002. 1. Introduction Gamma-ray bursts observed with space Tcherenkovlightfromoneshower Few 100MeV gamma-rays Fig. 1. In an imaging telescope, -ray bursts should appear as a Cherenkov

Enomoto, Ryoji

327

EFFECTS OF TRITIUM EXPOSURE ON UHMW-PE, PTFE, AND VESPEL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Samples of three polymers, Ultra-High Molecular Weight Polyethylene (UHMW-PE), polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE, also known as Teflon{reg_sign}), and Vespel{reg_sign} polyimide were exposed to 1 atmosphere of tritium gas at ambient temperature for varying times up to 2.3 years in closed containers. Sample mass and size measurements (to calculate density), spectra-colorimetry, dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA), and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) were employed to characterize the effects of tritium exposure on these samples. Changes of the tritium exposure gas itself were characterized at the end of exposure by measuring total pressure and by mass spectroscopic analysis of the gas composition. None of the polymers exhibited significant changes of density. The color of initially white UHMW-PE and PTFE dramatically darkened to the eye and the color also significantly changed as measured by colorimetry. The bulk of UHMW-PE darkened just like the external surfaces, however the fracture surface of PTFE appeared white compared to the PTFE external surfaces. The white interior could have been formed while the sample was breaking or could reflect the extra tritium dose at the surface directly from the gas. The dynamic mechanical response of UHMW-PE was typical of radiation effects on polymers- an initial stiffening (increased storage modulus) and reduction of viscous behavior after three months exposure, followed by lowering of the storage modulus after one year exposure and longer. The storage modulus of PTFE increased through about nine months tritium exposure, then the samples became too weak to handle or test using DMA. Characterization of Vespel{reg_sign} using DMA was problematic--sample-to-sample variations were significant and no systematic change with tritium exposure could be discerned. Isotopic exchange and incorporation of tritium into UHMW-PE (exchanging for protium) and into PTFE (exchanging for fluorine) was observed by FT-IR using an attenuated total reflectance method. No significant change in the Vespel{reg_sign} infrared spectrum was observed after three months exposure. Protium significantly pressurized the UHMW-PE containers during exposure to about nine atmospheres (the initial pressure was one atmosphere of tritium). This is consistent with the well-known production of hydrogen by irradiation of polyethylene by ionizing radiation. The total pressure in the PTFE containers decreased, and a mass balance reveals that the observed decrease is consistent with the formation of small amounts of {sup 3}HF, which is condensed at ambient temperature. No significant change of pressure occurred in the Vespel{reg_sign} containers; however the composition of the gas became about 50% protium, showing that Vespel{reg_sign} interacted with the tritium gas atmosphere to some degree. The relative resistance to degradation from tritium exposure is least for PTFE, more for UHMW-PE, and the most for Vespel{reg_sign}, which is consistent with the known relative resistance of these polymers to gamma irradiation. This qualitatively agrees with the concept of equivalent effects for equivalent absorbed doses of radiation damage of polymers. Some of the changes of different polymers are qualitatively similar; however each polymer exhibited unique property changes when exposed to tritium. Information from this study that can be applied to a tritium facility is: (1) the relative resistance to tritium degradation of the three polymers studied is the same as the relative resistance to gamma irradiation in air (so relative rankings of polymer resistance to ionizing radiation can be used as a relative ranking for assessing tritium compatibility and polymer selection); and (2) all three polymers changed the gas atmosphere during tritium exposure--UHMW-PE and Vespel{reg_sign} exposed to tritium formed H{sub 2} gas (UHMW-PE much more so), and PTFE exposed to tritium formed {sup 3}HF. This observation of forming {sup 3}HF supports the general concept of minimizing chlorofluorocarbon polymers in tritium systems.

Clark, E; Kirk Shanahan, K

2006-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

328

RADIOLYTIC GAS PRODUCTION RATES OF POLYMERS EXPOSED TO TRITIUM GAS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Data from previous reports on studies of polymers exposed to tritium gas is further analyzed to estimate rates of radiolytic gas production. Also, graphs of gas release during tritium exposure from ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMW-PE), polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE, a trade name is Teflon®), and Vespel® polyimide are re-plotted as moles of gas as a function of time, which is consistent with a later study of tritium effects on various formulations of the elastomer ethylene-propylene-diene monomer (EPDM). These gas production rate estimates may be useful while considering using these polymers in tritium processing systems. These rates are valid at least for the longest exposure times for each material, two years for UHMW-PE, PTFE, and Vespel®, and fourteen months for filled and unfilled EPDM. Note that the production “rate” for Vespel® is a quantity of H{sub 2} produced during a single exposure to tritium, independent of length of time. The larger production rate per unit mass for unfilled EPDM results from the lack of filler- the carbon black in filled EPDM does not produce H{sub 2} or HT. This is one aspect of how inert fillers reduce the effects of ionizing radiation on polymers.

Clark, E.

2013-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

329

50--500 MeV. gamma. -ray emission in the early phase of SN1987A  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

SN1987A was observed on 19th April 1987 with a combined high energy ..gamma..-ray and hard x-ray payload, flown on a stratospheric balloon from Alice Springs, Australia. The ..gamma..-ray detector, sensitive in the energy range 50--500 MeV, was an optical spark chamber with 400cm/sup 2/ area, a field of view of 60/sup 0/ FWHM and a time resolution of 10 ..mu..s. The counting rate profile at approx.2.2 mb float altitude has lead to a 3sigma upper limit to the steady ..gamma..-ray flux of 7 x 10/sup -4/ ph cm/sup -2/ s/sup -1/ in the 50--500 MeV range. This upper limit is compared to our predictions for the time profile of ..gamma..-ray emission from SN1987A resulting from pulsar acceleration of particles to cosmic ray energies.

Sood, R.K.; Thomas, J.A.; Waldron, L.; Manchanda, R.K.; Ubertini, P.; Bazzano, A.; La Padula, C.D.; Rochester, G.K.; Sumner, T.J.; Frye, G.; and others

1988-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

330

OpenEI - rates  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

U.S. Electric Utility U.S. Electric Utility Companies and Rates: Look-up by Zipcode (Feb 2011) http://en.openei.org/datasets/node/899 This dataset, compiled by NREL and Ventyx, provides average residential, commercial and industrial electricity rates by zip code for both investor owned utilities (IOU) and non-investor owned utilities. Note: the file includes average rates for each utility, but not the detailed rate structure data found in the database available via the zip-code look-up feature on the OpenEI Utilities page (http://en.openei.org/wiki/Gateway:Utilities). The data was released by NREL/Ventyx in February 2011.

331

Water Rate Escalations  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Federal agencies need accurate water cost escalation rates to perform life cycle cost analyses for water efficiency projects to meet Executive Order 13514 and Energy Independence and Security Act...

332

Before a Rate Case  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

is made up of two processes. The first part of the IBR is the Integrated Program Review (IPR), which will address proposed program costs prior to their inclusion in a rate case,...

333

Advertising Rate Information  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Advertising Rate Information ... "Situations Wanted "advertisements will be classified by the chemical field designated by the members. ... State ACS membership status and mail advertisements to: Chemical & Engineering News, Classified Advertising, 676 East Swedesford Road, Suite 202. ...

2002-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

334

Tiered Rate Methodology  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Rate Period limit. This 23 exception is limited for the duration of this TRM to the first ten requesting utilities that 24 BP-12-A-03 Section 4 Page 46 meet the size threshold and...

335

Dermal Exposure Assessment: Principles and Applications  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Health and Health and EPA/600/8-91/011B Environmental Protection Environmental Assessment January 1992 Agency Washington, DC 20460 Interim Report Research and Development Dermal Exposure Assessment: Principles and Applications EPA/600/8 -91/OllB January 1992 Interim Report DERMAL EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT: PRINCIPLES AND APPLICATIONS Exposure Assessment Group Office of Health and Environmental Assessment U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Washington, D.C. 20460 DISCLAIMER This document is an interim report subject to review by the Science Advisory Board. Mention of trade names or commercial products does not constitute endorsement or recommendation for use. Tables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . viii

336

Stocking Rate Decisions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to predict potential forage shortfalls, determine the im- pact of the decision on finances and other ranch re- sources, and make any necessary adjustments before the forage resource is harmed or financial problems occur. Through adequate planning and periodic... rates with limited knowledge of future forage and market conditions. But they can use past records, experience and range surveys to make realistic projections of forage and market conditions (Figure 3). Then, the planned stock- ing rate should...

White, Larry D.; McGinty, Allan

1999-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

337

On Thermonuclear Reaction Rates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nuclear reactions govern major aspects of the chemical evolution od galaxies and stars. Analytic study of the reaction rates and reaction probability integrals is attempted here. Exact expressions for the reaction rates and reaction probability integrals for nuclear reactions in the case of nonresonant, modified nonresonant, screened nonresonant and resonant cases are given. These are expressed in terms of H-functions, G-functions and in computable series forms. Computational aspects are also discussed.

H. J. Haubold; A. M. Mathai

1996-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

338

On Gamma-Ray Bursts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(Shortened) We show by example how the uncoding of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) offers unprecedented possibilities to foster new knowledge in fundamental physics and in astrophysics. After recalling some of the classic work on vacuum polarization in uniform electric fields by Klein, Sauter, Heisenberg, Euler and Schwinger, we summarize some of the efforts to observe these effects in heavy ions and high energy ion collisions. We then turn to the theory of vacuum polarization around a Kerr-Newman black hole, leading to the extraction of the blackholic energy, to the concept of dyadosphere and dyadotorus, and to the creation of an electron-positron-photon plasma. We then present a new theoretical approach encompassing the physics of neutron stars and heavy nuclei. It is shown that configurations of nuclear matter in bulk with global charge neutrality can exist on macroscopic scales and with electric fields close to the critical value near their surfaces. These configurations may represent an initial condition for the process of gravitational collapse, leading to the creation of an electron-positron-photon plasma: the basic self-accelerating system explaining both the energetics and the high energy Lorentz factor observed in GRBs. We then turn to recall the two basic interpretational paradigms of our GRB model. [...] We then turn to the special role of the baryon loading in discriminating between "genuine" short and long or "fake" short GRBs [...] We finally turn to the GRB-Supernova Time Sequence (GSTS) paradigm: the concept of induced gravitational collapse. [...] We then present some general conclusions.

Remo Ruffini; Maria Grazia Bernardini; Carlo Luciano Bianco; Letizia Caito; Pascal Chardonnet; Christian Cherubini; Maria Giovanna Dainotti; Federico Fraschetti; Andrea Geralico; Roberto Guida; Barbara Patricelli; Michael Rotondo; Jorge Armando Rueda Hernandez; Gregory Vereshchagin; She-Sheng Xue

2008-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

339

Cat Heart Rate Monitoring  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Cat Heart Rate Monitoring Cat Heart Rate Monitoring Name: Shakti Status: student Grade: 9-12 Location: TX Country: USA Date: Summer 2010 Question: What is the best way to find a cat's heart rate using a stethoscope? Because I have tried to hear their heart beat but their purring is all I can hear. If I shouldn't use a stethoscope, then what should I use? Replies: Hi Shakti! If you want to use a stethoscope, the trick is to get your cat to stop purring. Two good ways that I have found to help stop the purring 1. Cover their nose (generally cats don't like this and will stop purring) or 2. Put on the tap to drip or lightly stream water (also, they generally don't like this and will stop purring). Alternatively, you can get their heart rate from feeling their pulse. A good place to try to feel a pulse is right where the leg attaches to the abdomen - in an area called the inguinal region. Now granted there are some heart conditions that will cause an animals pulse and their heart rates don't match up, and it's hard to feel if you have a fat cat, but it's a good place to try if you are really trying to get a heart rate in a healthy kitty!

340

October 2001 - September 2006 Wholesale Power Rates (rates/previous...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

October 2001 - September 2006 The 2002 Wholesale Power Rate Schedules (base rates) for the FY 2002-2006 rate period were originally established in May 2000 during the WP-02 Rate...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gamma exposure rate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

ALARA and de minimis concepts in regulation of personnel exposure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ALARA process should not be limited by a de minimis level on either collective or individual dose, but should be limited or defined by an acceptable discount-rate on future costs and effects, and a monetary value for detriment, to be used in cost-effectiveness or cost-benefit calculations at dose levels well below the regulatory limits. This approach would provide the desired benefit of simplifying the decision process, it makes it more cost effective, and would avoid the inconsistencies of limits on only one of the four parameters of importance in the optimization process. These are average individual effective dose equivalent rate, number of individuals to be included in the summation, years of exposure, and costs, which include costs of analysis to reduce the exposure. This approach emphasizes that these doses to an individual may not be considered trivial by society when given to a very large population, especially if they could easily be avoided. 32 refs., 2 tabs.

Baum, J.W.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Protocols of radiocontaminant air monitoring for inhalation exposure estimates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Monitoring the plutonium and americium particle emissions from soils contaminated during atmospheric nuclear testing or due to accidental releases is important for several reasons. First, it is important to quantify the extent of potential human exposure from inhalation of alpha-emitting particles, which is the major exposure pathway from transuranic radionuclides. Second, the information provided by resuspension monitoring is the basis of criteria that determine the target soil concentrations for management and cleanup of contaminated soil sites. There are other radioactive aerosols, such as the fission products (cesium and strontium) and neutron-activation products (europium isotopes), which may be resuspended and therefore necessary to monitor as well. This Standard Protocol (SP) provides the method used for radiocontaminant air monitoring by the Health and Ecological Assessment Division (formerly Environmental Sciences Division), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, as developed and tested at Nevada Test Site (NTS) and in the Marshall Islands. The objective of this SP is to document the applications and methods of monitoring of all the relevant variables. This protocol deals only with measuring air concentrations of radionuclides and total suspended particulates (TSP, or {open_quotes}dust{close_quotes}). A separate protocol presents the more difficult measurements required to determine transuranic aerosol emission rates, or {open_quotes}resuspension rate{close_quotes}.

Shinn, J.H.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Ultraviolet Exposure and Mortality among Women in Sweden  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts;6Department of Etiological...association between mortality and solar and artificial UV exposure...a solarium. Conclusions: Solar UV exposure was associated...between UV exposure, be it solar or artificial, and the risk...

Ling Yang; Marie Lof; Marit Bragelien Veierød; Sven Sandin; Hans-Olov Adami; and Elisabete Weiderpass

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Health-exposure modeling and the ecological fallacy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......components of (3.8) (the health and exposure models) takes an...computation of the exposure and health models, but is dangerous since the errors-in-variables...three-stage model: Stage 1, Health model. Stage 2, Exposure model......

Jon Wakefield; Gavin Shaddick

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

The Excitation of Solar Oscillations \\Gamma\\GammaObservations and Simulations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Excitation of Solar Oscillations \\Gamma\\GammaObservations and Simulations Philip R. Goode Big Bear Solar Observatory, New Jersey Institute of Technology, Big Bear City, CA 92314 Louis H. Strous Big Bear Solar Observatory, New Jersey Institute of Technology, Big Bear City, CA 92314 Lockheed

Stein, Robert

346

Very high-energy gamma rays from gamma-ray bursts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...which means that the energy thresholds of such...detecting gamma rays with energies as low as 30GeV...there have been two solar arrays in operation: STACEE in New Mexico (Hanna et al. 2002...not based around a solar array, employs rather...airshower arrays If the energy of the incoming gamma...

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Dual Gamma Neutron Directional Elpasolite Detector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Some applications, particularly in homeland security, require detection of both neutron and gamma radiation. Typically, this is accomplished with a combination of two detectors registering neutrons and gammas separately. We have investigated a new type of neutron/gamma (n/?) directional detection capability. We explored a new class of scintillator, cerium (Ce)-doped Elpasolites such as Cs2LiYCl6:Ce (CLYC), Cs2LiLaCl6 (CLLC), Cs2LiLaBr6:Ce (CLLB), or Cs2LiYBr6:Ce (CLYB). These materials are capable of providing energy resolution as good as 2.9% at 662 keV (FWHM), which is better than that of NaI:Tl. Because they contain 6Li, Elpasolites can also detect thermal neutrons. In the energy spectra, the full energy thermal neutron peak appears near or above 3 GEEn MeV. Thus, very effective pulse height discrimination is possible. In addition, the core-to-valence luminescence (CVL) provides Elpasolites with different temporal responses under gamma and neutron excitation, and, therefore, may be exploited for effective pulse shape discrimination. For instance, the CLLC emission consists of two main components: (1) CVL spanning from 220 nm to 320 nm and (2) Ce emission found in the range of 350 to 500 nm. The former emission is of particular interest because it appears only under gamma excitation. It is also very fast, decaying with a 2 ns time constant. The n/? discrimination capability of Elpasolite detectors may be optimized by tuning the cerium doping content for maximum effect on n/? pulse shape differences. The resulting Elpasolite detectors have the ability to collect neutron and gamma data simultaneously, with excellent discrimination. Further, an array of four of these Elpasolites detectors will perform directional detection in both the neutron and gamma channels simultaneously.

Guss, P. P.; Mukhopadhyay, S.

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Gamma-Ray Studies in Boron-10  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Gamma rays emanating from the 7.56-Mev level of B10 were analyzed with a five-crystal pair spectrometer. Cascade gamma rays were investigated by recording the spectra in coincidence with the 2.40, 0.72, 2.15, and 5.41-Mev gamma-ray transitions. The branching ratios for the decay of the 7.56-Mev level were found to be 76%, 9%, and 15% for 6.84, 5.41, and 2.40-Mev gamma rays, respectively. For the 2.15-Mev level, the respective branching ratios for 2.15, 1.43, and 0.41-Mev gamma rays were shown to be 16%, 29%, and 55%. The partial width for the 3.01-Mev transition was found to be less than 1% of the total width of the 5.16-Mev state in B10. Combining this result with the data of Meyer-Schützmeister and Hanna, the gamma-ray width of the 5.16-Mev level was found to be 0.51 ev and the alpha width 32gamma-ray widths may be resolved if the 5.16-Mev state in B10 is assumed to be a doublet.

Esther L. Sprenkel and James W. Daughtry

1961-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

ORISE: DOE's Radiation Exposure Monitoring System (REMS)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Monitoring System (REMS) Monitoring System (REMS) ORISE maintains large database of radition exposure records for the U.S. Department of Energy ORISE staff monitoring radiation data for DOE Rule 10 CFR 835 establishes the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) occupational protection rule and requires assessment and recording of radiation doses to individuals who are exposed to sources of radiation or contamination. The Radiation Exposure Monitoring System (REMS) database is the radiation exposure data repository for all monitored DOE employees, contractors, subcontractors and members of the public. REMS maintains dose records for all monitored individuals dating back to 1969. Aggregated, site-specific data are available on the Radiation Exposure Monitoring System website for all years since 1986. Currently,

350

Diesel exhaust exposure and bladder cancer risk  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A total of 136 cases of men with urinary bladder cancer and 272 matched hospital controls were examined for potential exposure to diesel exhaust. A lifetime occupational history was obtained for ... in the study ...

V. Iyer; R. E. Harris; E. L. Wynder

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Radiation Exposure from CT Examinations in Japan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Computed tomography (CT) is the largest source of medical radiation exposure to the general population, and is ... assess the current situation of CT use in Japan, and to investigate variations in radiation expos...

Yoshito Tsushima; Ayako Taketomi-Takahashi; Hiroyuki Takei…

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Assessment of exposure to depleted uranium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......ingestion of natural uranium in food and drink, and...for the measurement of uranium in urine samples, DU...respect to potential health hazards can be detected...Assessment of exposure to depleted uranium. | In most circumstances......

P. Roth; V. Höllriegl; E. Werner; P. Schramel

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Real time chemical exposure and risk monitor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The apparatus of the present invention is a combination of a breath interface and an external exposure dosimeter interface to a chemical analysis device, all controlled by an electronic processor for quantitatively analyzing chemical analysis data from both the breath interface and the external exposure dosimeter for determining internal tissue dose. The method of the present invention is a combination of steps of measuring an external dose, measuring breath content, then analyzing the external dose and breath content and determining internal tissue dose.

Thrall, Karla D. (3804 Alder Lake Ct., West Richland, WA 99353); Kenny, Donald V. (6947 Sparrow La., Worthington, OH 43235); Endres, George W. R. (2112 Briarwood Ct., Richland, WA 99352); Sisk, Daniel R. (1211 Marshall Ave., Richland, WA 99352)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Characterization of the unfolding, refolding, and aggregation pathways of two protein implicated in cataractogenesis : human gamma D and human gamma S crystallin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Human [gamma]D crystallin (H[gamma]D-Crys) and human [gamma]S crystallin (H[gamma]S-Crys), are major proteins of the human eye lens and are components of cataracts. H[gamma]D-Crys is expressed early in life in the lens ...

Kosinski-Collins, Melissa Sue, 1978-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Genetic Factors Affecting Susceptibility to Low Dose & Low Dose-Rate Radiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Our laboratory has, among other things, developed and used the gamma H2AX focus assay and other chromosomal and cell killing assays to show that differences in this DNA double strand break (dsb) related response can be clearly and distinctly demonstrated for cells which are mildly hyper-radiosensitive such as those associated with A-T heterozygosity. We have found this level of mild hypersensitivity for cells from some 20 to 30 % of apparently normal individuals and from apparently normal parents of Retinoblastoma patients. We found significant differences in gene expression in somatic cells from unaffected parents of Rb patients as compared with normal controls, suggesting that these parents may harbor some as yet unidentified genetic abnormality. In other experiments we sought to determine the extent of differences in normal human cellular reaponses to radiation depending on their irradiation in 2D monolayer vs 3D organized acinar growth conditions. We exmined cell reproductive death, chromosomal aberration induction, and the levels of ?-H2AX foci in cells after single acute gamma-ray doses and immediately after 20 hours of irradiation at a dose rate of 0.0017 Gy/min. We found no significant differences in the dose-responses of these cells under the 2D or 3D growth conditions. While this does not mean such differences cannot occur in other situations, it does mean that they do not generally or necessarily occur. In another series of studies in collaboration with Dr Chuan Li, with supprt from this current grant. We reported a role for apoptotic cell death in promoting wound healing and tissue regeneration in mice. Apoptotic cells released growth signals that stimulated the proliferation of progenitor or stem cells. In yet another collaboration with Dr, B. Chen with funds from this grant, the relative radiosensitivity to cell killing as well as chromosomal instability of 13 DNA-PKcs site-directed mutant cell lines (defective at phosphorylation sites or kinase activity) were examined after exposure of synchronized G1 cells to 137Cs c rays. DNA-PKcs mutant cells defective in phosphorylation at multiple sites withinthe T2609 cluster or within the PI3K domain displayed extreme radiosensitivity. Cells defective at the S2056 cluster or T2609 single site alone were only mildly radiosensitive, but cells defective at even one site in both the S2056 and T2609 clusters were maximally radiosensitive. Thus a synergism between the capacity for phosphorylation at the S2056 and T2609 clusterswas found to be critical for induction of radiosensitivity.

Bedford, Joel

2014-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

356

Upper Great Plains Rates information  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Rates and Repayment Services Rates and Repayment Services Rates 2010 Firm Power Rate (effective January 1, 2010) Rate Adjustments 2010 Firm Power Rate Adjustment 2009 Firm Power Rate Adjustment IS Rate Adjustments Rate Adjustment Process Rate Orders Signed, December 23, 2009 (16kb pdf) Announcements Firm Electric Service Customer Letter - Preliminary Review of Drought Adder Component, June 27, 2013 (74kb pdf) Customer Letter - Final Notice of Drought Adder Component, October 2, 2013 (68kb pdf) Integrated System (IS) Rates 2014 IS Rates Customer Information Meeting Presentation, October 15, 2013 (611kb pdf) Customer Letter - Notification of 2014 Rates, September 13, 2013 (160kb pdf) 2014 Transmission and Ancillary Services Rate Calculation and 2012 Rate True-up Calculation (4.9mb pdf) 2013 IS Rates

357

Custom Device for Low-Dose Gamma Irradiation of Biological Samples  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, the structural material is efficient to absorb most of the cosmic-ray energy and reduce the interior dose rate to below 1.2 mGy per day. However, the biological effects of prolonged exposure to low-dose radiation are not well understood. The purpose...

Bi, Ruoming

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

358

Accessing the population of high redshift Gamma Ray Bursts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) are a powerful probe of the high redshift Universe. We present a tool to estimate the detection rate of high-z GRBs by a generic detector with defined energy band and sensitivity. We base this on a population model that reproduces the observed properties of GRBs detected by Swift, Fermi and CGRO in the hard X-ray and gamma-ray bands. We provide the expected cumulative distributions of the flux and fluence of simulated GRBs in different energy bands. We show that scintillator detectors, operating at relatively high energies (e.g. tens of keV to the MeV), can detect only the most luminous GRBs at high redshifts due to the link between the peak spectral energy and the luminosity (Ep-Liso) of GRBs. We show that the best strategy for catching the largest number of high-z bursts is to go softer (e.g. in the soft X-ray band) but with a very high sensitivity. For instance, an imaging soft X-ray detector operating in the 0.2-5 keV energy band reaching a sensitivity, corresponding to a fluence o...

Ghirlanda, G; Ghisellini, G; Mereghetti, S; Tagliaferri, G; Campana, S; Osborne, J P; O'Brien, P; Tanvir, N; Willingale, R; Amati, L; Basa, S; Bernardini, M G; Burlon, D; Covino, S; D'Avanzo, P; Frontera, F; Gotz, D; Melandri, A; Nava, L; Piro, L; Vergani, S D

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

The SKA view of Gamma-ray Bursts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are some of the most extreme events in the Universe. As well as providing a natural laboratory for investigating fundamental physical processes, they might trace the cosmic star formation rate up to extreme redshifts and probe the composition of the intergalactic medium over most of the Universe's history. Radio observations of GRBs play a key part in determining their physical properties, but currently they are largely limited to follow-up observations of $\\gamma$-ray-detected objects. The SKA will significantly increase our ability to study GRB afterglows, following up several hundred objects in the high frequency bands already in the "early science" implementation of the telescope. SKA1-MID Bands 4 (4 GHz) and 5 (9.2 GHz) will be particularly suited to the detection of these transient phenomena. The SKA will trace the peak of the emission, sampling the thick-to-thin transition of the evolving spectrum, and follow-up the afterglow down to the time the ejecta slow down to non-relativi...

Burlon, Davide; van der Horst, Alexander; Murphy, Tara; Wijers, Ralph; Gaensler, Bryan; Ghisellini, Gabriele; Prandoni, Isabella

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Probing Massive Stars Around Gamma-Ray Burst Progenitors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Long Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) are produced by ultra-relativistic jets launched from core collapse of massive stars. Most massive stars form in binaries and/or in star clusters, which means that there may be a significant external photon field (EPF) around the GRB progenitor. We calculate the inverse-Compton scattering of EPF by the hot electrons in the GRB jet. Three possible cases of EPFs are considered: the progenitor is (I) in a massive binary system, (II) surrounded by a Wolf-Rayet-star wind, and (III) in a dense star cluster. Typical luminosities of 10^47 - 10^50 erg/s in the 10 - 100 GeV band are expected, depending on the stellar luminosity, binary separation (I), wind mass loss rate (II), stellar number density (III), etc. We calculate the lightcurve and spectrum in each case, taking fully into account the equal-arrival time surfaces and possible pair-production absorption with the prompt gamma-rays. Observations can put constraints on the existence of such EPFs (and hence on the nature of GRB progenit...

Lu, Wenbin; Smoot, George F

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gamma exposure rate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

BCP Annual Rate Process  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2013 BCP Annual Rate Process 2013 BCP Annual Rate Process Informal Process Rate Activity Schedule (doc) Informal Customer Meeting Thursday March 6, 2013 at 10:30 A.M. Conf Rms 3&4 Informal Customer Meeting Presentation (Pdf) PRS Executive Summary (Mar 07, 2013) (Pdf) FY2014 Final Ten Year Operating Plan PRS Executive Summary (PDF) FORM for Foreign Visits (doc) Formal Process Initial Federal Register Notice (pdf) Public Information Forum March 27,2013 at 10:30 A.M. Conf Rms3&4 Customer Meeting Presentation PIF Presentation (PPT) Presentation Details (pdf) Reclamation Fund Status Report PIF PRS Executive Summary (pdf) PIF Transcripts (PDF) Visitor Center Cost Analysis Questions - Responses Public Comment Forum April 10, 2013 at 10:30 A.M. Conf Rms3&4 PCF Transcripts Customer Letters

362

Multiple System Rate Process  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

DSW Multiple System Transmission Rate Process DSW Multiple System Transmission Rate Process Federal Register Notice Withdrawing Rate Proposal (PDF) Formal Process Extension Federal Register Notice (PDF) Customer Savings Under Various MSTR (XLS) Public Information Forum March 29, 2005 Customer Meeting Overview (Power Point) Customer Meeting Overview (PDF) Customer Meeting Transcript (PDF) Public Comment Forum April 6, 2005 Customer Meeting Transcript (PDF) Response Letter 5-17-05 (PDF) Customer Letters Tonopah ID-5/25/05 (PDF) APS-5/26/05 (PDF) SRP-5/27/05 (PDF) RSLynch-6/1/05 (PDF) KRSaline-6/1/05 (PDF) Formal Process Federal Register Notice (Word) Federal Register Notice (PDF) Brochure (Word) Appendices to Brochure: A B C D E1 E2 F1 F2 GH Public Information Forum July 14, 2004 Customer Meeting Overview (Power Point)

363

High spins in gamma-soft nuclei  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nuclei which are soft with respect to the ..gamma.. shape degree of freedom are expected to have many different structures coexisting in the near-yrast regime. In particular, the lowest rotational quasi-particle in a high-j shell exerts a strong polarizing effect on ..gamma... The ..gamma.. to which it drives is found to vary smoothly over a 180/sup 0/ range as the position of the Fermi level varies. This simple rule is seen to have a direct connection with the energy staggering of alternate spin states in rotational bands. A diagram is presented which provides a general theoretical reference for experimental tests of the relation between ..gamma.., spin staggering, configuration, and nucleon number. In a quasicontinuum spectrum, the coexistence of different structures are expected to make several unrelated features appear within any one slice of sum energy and multiplicity. However, it is also seen that the in-band moment of inertia may be similar for many bands of different ..gamma...

Leander, G.A.; Frauendorf, S.; May, F.R.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Air Distribution Effectiveness for Residential Mechanical Ventilation: Simulation and Comparison of Normalized Exposures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of ventilation is to dilute indoor contaminants that an occupant is exposed to. Even when providing the same nominal rate of outdoor air, different ventilation systems may distribute air in different ways, affecting occupants' exposure to household contaminants. Exposure ultimately depends on the home being considered, on source disposition and strength, on occupants' behavior, on the ventilation strategy, and on operation of forced air heating and cooling systems. In any multi-zone environment dilution rates and source strengths may be different in every zone and change in time, resulting in exposure being tied to occupancy patterns.This paper will report on simulations that compare ventilation systems by assessing their impact on exposure by examining common house geometries, contaminant generation profiles, and occupancy scenarios. These simulations take into account the unsteady, occupancy-tied aspect of ventilation such as bathroom and kitchen exhaust fans. As most US homes have central HVAC systems, the simulation results will be used to make appropriate recommendations and adjustments for distribution and mixing to residential ventilation standards such as ASHRAE Standard 62.2.This paper will report on work being done to model multizone airflow systems that are unsteady and elaborate the concept of distribution matrix. It will examine several metrics for evaluating the effect of air distribution on exposure to pollutants, based on previous work by Sherman et al. (2006).

Petithuguenin, T.D.P.; Sherman, M.H.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

The Correlation of Sperm Chromatin Decondensation Following In Vitro Exposure to Heparin and Sperm Penetration Rates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Methods: Twenty-two donors of known fertility and 105 patients undergoing evaluation at an andrology laboratory were evaluated by standard World Health Organization semen analysis...

Douglas T. Carrell; Benjamin R. Emery…

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

R1S-M-2322 TABLE OF EXPOSURE RATE CONSTANTS AND DOSE EQUIVALENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a point source . 4 5. DOSE BUILD-UP FACTORS 7 6. MASS ENERGY ABSORPTION COEFFICIENTS AND LINEAR in units of MeV/photon , (pen/p)air in cm2 /g gives r in R»m2 /Ci«h if the following conversion factors, the contributions from photon energies below 30 keV and X-rays are omitted. (Continue on next page) December 1982

367

Re-evaluation of the reference dose for methylmercury and assessment of current exposure levels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Methylmercury (Me-Hg) is widely distributed through freshwater and saltwater food chains and human consumption of fish and shellfish has lead to widespread exposure. Both the US EPA Reference Dose (0.3 [mu]g/kg/day) and the FAO/WHO Permissible Tolerable Weekly Intake (3.3 [mu]g/kg/week) are currently based on the prevention of paraesthesia in adult and older children. However, Me-Hg exposure in utero is known to result in a range of developmental neurologic effects including clinical CNS symptoms and delayed onset of walking. Based on a critical review of development toxicity data from human and animal studies, it is concluded that current guidelines for the prevention of paraesthesia are not adequate to address developmental effects. A dose of 0.07 [mu]g/kg/day is suggested as the best estimate of a potential reference dose for developmental effects. Data on nationwide fish consumption rates and Me-Hg levels in fish/seafood weighted by proportion of the catch intended for human consumption are analyzed in a Monte Carlo simulation to derive a probability distribution of background Me-Hg exposure. While various uncertainties in the toxicologic and exposure data limit the precision with which health risk can be estimated, this analysis suggests that at current levels of Me-Hg exposure, a significant fraction of women of childbearing age have exposures above this suggested reference dose.

Stern, A.H. (New Jersey Dept. of Environmental Protection and Energy, Trenton (United States))

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Observation of the Crab Nebula in Soft Gamma Rays with the Nuclear Compton Telescope  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gamma-ray bursts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.268] G. J. Fishman. The gamma-ray burst capabilities of BATSEOlson. Observations of Gamma- Ray Bursts of Cosmic Origin.

Bandstra, Mark ShenYu

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Studying Gamma-Ray Blazars With the GLAST-LAT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thanks to its sensitivity (4 10{sup -9} ph (E> 100 MeV) cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} for one year of observation), the GLAST LAT should detect many more (over a thousand) gamma-ray blazars than currently known. This large blazar sample will enable detailed population studies to be carried out. Moreover, the LAT large field-of-view combined with the scanning mode will provide a very uniform exposure over the sky, allowing a constant monitoring of several tens of blazars and flare alerts to be issued. This poster presents the LAT performance relevant to blazar studies, more particularly related to timing and spectral properties. Major specific issues regarding the blazar phenomenon that the LAT data should shed light on thanks to these capabilities will be discussed, as well as the different approaches foreseen to address them. The associated data required in other bands, to be collected in contemporaneous/simultaneous multiwavelength campaigns are mentioned as well.

Lott, B.; /CENBG, Gradignan /Bordeaux U. /SLAC; Carson, J.; Madejski, G.; /SLAC; Ciprini, S.; /INFN, Perugia; Dermer, C.D.; /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C.; Giommi, P.; /ASDC, Frascati; Lonjou, V.; /CENBG, Gradignan /Bordeaux U.; Reimer, A.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park

2007-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

370

NMIS With Gamma Spectrometry for Attributes of Pu and HEU, Explosives and Chemical Agents  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The concept for the system described herein is an active/passive Nuclear Materials Identification System{sup 2} (NMIS) that incorporates gamma ray spectrometry{sup 3}. This incorporation of gamma ray spectrometry would add existing capability into this system. This Multiple Attribute System can determine a wide variety of attributes for Pu and highly enriched uranium (HEU) of which a selected subset could be chosen. This system can be built using commercial off the shelf (COTS) components. NMIS systems are at All-Russian Scientific Research Institute of Experimental Physics (VNIIEF) and Russian Federal Nuclear Center Institute of Technical Physics, (VNIITF) and measurements with Pu have been performed at VNIIEF and analyzed successfully for mass and thickness of Pu. NMIS systems are being used successfully for HEU at the Y-12 National Security Complex. The use of active gamma ray spectrometry for high explosive HE and chemical agent detection is a well known activation analysis technique, and it is incorporated here. This report describes the system, explains the attribute determination methods for fissile materials, discusses technical issues to be resolved, discusses additional development needs, presents a schedule for building from COTS components, and assembly with existing components, and discusses implementation issues such as lack of need for facility modification and low radiation exposure.

Mihalczo, J. T.; Mattingly, J. K.; Mullens, J. A.; Neal, J. S.

2002-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

371

Gamma-ray Spectral Evolution of NGC1275 Observed with Fermi-LAT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report on a detailed investigation of the high-energy gamma-ray emission from NGC\\,1275, a well-known radio galaxy hosted by a giant elliptical located at the center of the nearby Perseus cluster. With the increased photon statistics, the center of the gamma-ray emitting region is now measured to be separated by only 0.46' from the nucleus of NGC1275, well within the 95% confidence error circle with radius ~1.5'. Early Fermi-LAT observations revealed a significant decade-timescale brightening of NGC1275 at GeV photon energies, with a flux about seven times higher than the one implied by the upper limit from previous EGRET observations. With the accumulation of one-year of Fermi-LAT all-sky-survey exposure, we now detect flux and spectral variations of this source on month timescales, as reported in this paper. The average >100 MeV gamma-ray spectrum of NGC1275 shows a possible deviation from a simple power-law shape, indicating a spectral cut-off around an observed photon energy of E = 42.2+-19.6 GeV, with...

Kataoka, J; Cheung, C C; Tosti, G; Cavazzuti, E; Celotti, A; Nishino, S; Fukazawa, Y; Thompson, D J; McConville, W F

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Chance Estimations for Detecting Gravitational Waves with LIGO/Virgo Associated with Gamma Ray Bursts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Short Gamma Ray Bursts (SGRB) are believed to originate from the merger of two compact objects. If this scenario is correct, SGRB will be accompanied by the emission of strong gravitational waves, detectable by current or planned GW detectors, such as LIGO and Virgo. No detection of a gravitational wave has been made up to date. In this paper I will use a set of SGRB with observed redshifts to fit a model describing the cumulative number of SGRB as a function of redshift, to determine the rate of such merger events in the nearby universe. These estimations will be used to make probability statements about detecting a gravitational wave associated with a short gamma ray burst during the latest science run of LIGO/Virgo. Chance estimations for the enhanced and advanced detectors will also be made, and a comparison between the rates deduced from this work will be compared to the existing literature.

Alexander Dietz

2009-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

373

Fermi Observations of Gamma-ray Bursts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The gamma-ray emission mechanism of Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are still unknown. Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope successfully detected high-energy (> 100 MeV) emission from 17 GRBs since its launch. Fermi revealed the distinct temporal behaviors and extra spectral component from high-energy emission. These new observational results are driving many theoretical implications, such as leptonic, hadronic and afterglow origin. The highest energy photon detected by Fermi gives a constraint on the bulk Lorentz factor of the ultra-relativistic jets of GRBs. The impact of the Fermi GRB observations extends not only to the GRB-related issues but also to the outside GRB physics, such as quantum gravity and model of the extra galactic background light.

Ohno, Masanori [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, JAXA, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

374

Phenomenology of Gamma-Ray Jets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss some phenomenological aspects of $\\gamma$-ray emitting jets. In particular, we present calculations of the $\\gamma$-sphere and $\\pi$-sphere for various target photon fields, and employ them to demonstrate how $\\gamma$-ray observations at very high energies can be used to constraint the Doppler factor of the emitting plasma and the production of VHE neutrinos. We also consider the implications of the rapid TeV variability observed in M87 and the TeV blazars, and propose a model for the very rapid TeV flares observed with HESS and MAGIC in some blazars,that accommodates the relatively small Doppler factors inferred from radio observations. Finally, we briefly discuss the prospects for detecting VHE neutrinos from relativistic jets.

Amir Levinson

2007-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

375

Pressurised xenon as scintillator for gamma spectroscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Detectors based on liquid or gas xenon have been used and are in use for a number of applications, in particular for the detection of gamma rays. Xenon is a well-suited medium for gamma spectroscopy thanks to its high atomic number and, consequently, large cross-section for photo-electric absorption. This paper presents experimental studies of high pressure xenon as a scintillator, with the aim of developing a gamma ray detector for the detection of Special Nuclear Materials (SNM). The first goal was to study the dependence of the light yield and of the energy resolution on the thermodynamic conditions. We present preliminary results from an optimised version of the detector.

Resnati, F

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Apparatus and method for detecting gamma radiation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A high efficiency radiation detector is disclosed for measuring X-ray and gamma radiation from small-volume, low-activity liquid samples with an overall uncertainty better than 0.7% (one sigma SD). The radiation detector includes a hyperpure germanium well detector, a collimator, and a reference source. The well detector monitors gamma radiation emitted by the reference source and a radioactive isotope or isotopes in a sample source. The radiation from the reference source is collimated to avoid attenuation of reference source gamma radiation by the sample. Signals from the well detector are processed and stored, and the stored data is analyzed to determine the radioactive isotope(s) content of the sample. Minor self-attenuation corrections are calculated from chemical composition data. 4 figures.

Sigg, R.A.

1994-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

377

Obsidian Hydration Rates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...OBSIDIAN HYDRATION RATE FOR KLAMATH BASIN OF CALIFORNIA AND OREGON...as the material is excreted, falls through the air, and dries...Friedman. Table 1 presents two new groups of hydra-tion readings for...the true age is believed to fall (3). The Snaketown age is...

Clement W. Meighan

1970-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

378

Advertising Rate Information  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Advertising Rate Information ... "Situations Wanted" advertisements will be classified by the chemical field designated by the members. ... State ACS membership status and mail advertisements to: Chemical & Engineering News, Classified Advertising, 676 East Swedesford Road, Suite 202, Wayne, PA 19087-1612. ...

2002-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

379

Advertising Rate Information  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Advertising Rate Information ... "Situations Wanted" advertisements will be classified by the chemical field designated by the members. ... State ACS membership status and mail advertisements to: Chemical & Engineering News, Classified Advertising, 676 East Swedesford Road, Suite 202, Wayne, PA 19087-1612. ...

1999-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

380

Advertising Rate Information  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Advertising Rate Information ... "Situations Wanted"advertisements will be classified by the chemical field designated by the members. ... State ACS membership status and mail advertisements to: Chemical & Engineering News, Classified Advertising, 676 East Swedesford Road, Suite 202, Wayne, PA 19087-1612. ...

2002-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gamma exposure rate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Advertising Rate Information  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Advertising Rate Information ... "Situations Wanted" advertisements will be classified by the chemical field designated by the members. ... State ACS membership status and mail advertisements to: Chemical & Engineering News, Classified Advertising, 676 East Swedesford Road, Suite 202, Wayne, PA 19067-1612. ...

1997-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

382

Advertising Rate Information  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Advertising Rate Information ... "Situations Wanted" advertisements wilt be classified by the chemical field designated by the members. ... State ACS membership status and mail advertisements to: Chemical & Engineering News, Classified Advertising, 676 East Swedesford Road, Suite 202, Wayne, PA 19087-1612. ...

2003-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

383

Advertising Rate Information  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Advertising Rate Information ... "Situations Wanted"advertisements will be classified by the chemical field designated by the members. ... State ACS membership status and mail advertisements to: Chemical & Engineering News, Classified Advertising, 676 East Swedesford Road, Suite 202, Wayne, PA 19087-1612. ...

2002-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

384

Advertising Rate Information  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Advertising Rate Information ... "Situations Wanted" advertisements will be classified by the chemical field designated by the members. ... State ACS membership status and mail advertisements to: Chemical & Engineering News, Classified Advertising, 676 East Swedesford Road, Suite 202, Wayne, PA 19087-1612. ...

1999-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

385

Advertising Rate Information  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Advertising Rate Information ... "Situations Wanted" advertisements will be classified by the chemical field designated by the members. ... State ACS membership status and mail advertisements to: Chemical & Engineering News, Classified Advertising, 676 East Swedesford Road, Suite 202, Wayne, PA 19087-1612. ...

2000-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

386

Advertising Rate Information  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Advertising Rate Information ... "Situations Wanted"advertisements wilt be classified by the chemical field designated by the members, if not designated, placement will be determined by the first word of the text submitted. ... State ACS membership status and mail advertisements to: Chemical & Engineering News, Classified Advertising, 676 East Swedesford Road, Suite 202, Wayne, PA 19087-1612. ...

2002-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

387

Advertising Rate Information  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Advertising Rate Information ... "Situations Wanted" advertisements will be classified by the chemical field designated by the members. ... State ACS membership status and mail advertisements to: Chemical & Engineering News, Classified Advertising, 676 East Swedesford Koad, Suite 202, Wayne, PA 19087-1612. ...

1998-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

388

Polarized Gravitational Waves from Gamma-Ray Bursts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Significant gravitational wave emission is expected from gamma-ray bursts arising from compact stellar mergers, and possibly also from bursts associated with fast-rotating massive stellar core collapses. These models have in common a high angular rotation rate, and observations provide evidence for jet collimation of the photon emission, with properties depending on the polar angle, which may also be of relevance for X-ray flashes. Here we consider the gravitational wave emission and its polarization as a function of angle which is expected from such sources. We discuss possible correlations between the burst photon luminosity, or the delay between gravitational wave bursts and X-ray flashes, and the polarization degree of the gravitational waves.

Shiho Kobayashi; Peter Meszaros

2003-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

389

General Relativistic Binary Merger Simulations and Short Gamma Ray Bursts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The recent localization of some short-hard gamma ray bursts (GRBs) in galaxies with low star formation rates has lent support to the suggestion that these events result from compact object binary mergers. We discuss how new simulations in general relativity are helping to identify the central engine of short-hard GRBs. Motivated by our latest relativistic black hole-neutron star merger calculations, we discuss a scenario in which these events may trigger short-hard GRBs, and compare this model to competing relativistic models involving binary neutron star mergers and the delayed collapse of hypermassive neutron stars. Distinguishing features of these models may help guide future GRB and gravitational wave observations to identify the nature of the sources.

Joshua A. Faber; Thomas W. Baumgarte; Stuart L. Shapiro; Keisuke Taniguchi

2006-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

390

Cosmological Parameters From Supernovae Associated With Gamma-ray Bursts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report estimates of the cosmological parameters $\\Omega_m$ and $\\Omega_{\\Lambda}$ obtained using supernovae (SNe) associated with gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) at redshifts up to 0.606. Eight high-fidelity GRB-SNe with well-sampled light curves across the peak are used. We correct their peak magnitudes for a luminosity-decline rate relation to turn them into accurate standard candles with dispersion $\\sigma = 0.18$ mag. We also estimate the peculiar velocity of the host galaxy of SN 1998bw, using constrained cosmological simulations. In a flat universe, the resulting Hubble diagram leads to best-fit cosmological parameters of $(\\Omega_m, \\Omega_{\\Lambda}) = (0.52^{+0.34}_{-0.31},0.48^{+0.31}_{-0.34})$. This exploratory study suggests that GRB-SNe can potentially be used as standardizable candles to high redshifts to measure distances in the universe and constrain cosmological parameters.

Li, Xue; Wojtak, Rados?aw

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Gamma-ray bursts and terrestrial planetary atmospheres  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We describe results of modeling the effects on Earth-like planets of long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) within a few kiloparsecs. A primary effect is generation of nitrogen oxide compounds which deplete ozone. Ozone depletion leads to an increase in solar UVB radiation at the surface, enhancing DNA damage, particularly in marine microorganisms such as phytoplankton. In addition, we expect increased atmospheric opacity due to buildup of nitrogen dioxide produced by the burst and enhanced precipitation of nitric acid. We review here previous work on this subject and discuss recent developments, including further discussion of our estimates of the rates of impacting GRBs and the possible role of short-duration bursts.

Brian C. Thomas; Adrian L. Melott

2006-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

392

Pile-up recovery in gamma-ray detection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Count rates in gamma-ray detectors are fundamentally limited at the high end by the physics of the detection process but should not be limited further by the design of read-out. Using intense stimuli, such as the ELI, it is desirable to extract the full wealth of information flow that sensors can deliver. We discuss the photon-statistical limitations of scintillation systems and charge-collection issues of solid-state detectors. With high-speed digitizing in particular, two promising approach architectures are those of posterior list mode corrections and of time-domain adaptive filters, introducing a 'rich list mode with uncertainties' and thus a somewhat different look at experimental spectra. Real-time performance is also considered.

Vencelj, Matjaz; Likar, Andrej; Loeher, Bastian; Miklavec, Mojca; Novak, Roman; Pietralla, Norbert; Savran, Deniz [Jozef Stefan Instute, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Jozef Stefan Instute, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana, Slovenia and FMF, Univ. of Ljubljana, Jadranska 19, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); ExtreMe Matter Institute EMMI, GSI, Planckstr. 1, D-64291 Darmstadt, Germany and Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, Ruth-Moufang-Str. 1, D-60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Jozef Stefan Instute, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); IKP, TU Darmstadt, Schlossgartenstrasse 9, D-64289 Darmstadt (Germany); ExtreMe Matter Institute EMMI, GSI, Planckstr. 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany) and Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, Ruth-Moufang-Str. 1, D-60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

2012-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

393

Human exposure to mercury: A critical assessment of the evidence of adverse health effects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ubiquitous nature of mercury in the environment, its global atmospheric cycling, and its toxicity to humans at levels that are uncomfortably close to exposures experienced by a proportion of the population are some of the current concerns associated with this pollutant. The purpose of this review is to critically evaluate the scientific quality of published reports involving human exposures to mercury and associated health outcomes as an aid in the risk evaluation of this chemical. A comprehensive review of the scientific literature involving human exposures to mercury was performed and each publication evaluated using a defined set of criteria that are considered standards in epidemiologic and toxicologic research. Severe, sometimes fatal, effects of mercury exposure at high levels were primarily reported as case studies. The disasters in Minamata, Japan, in the 1950s and in Iraq in 1971-1972 clearly demonstrated neurologic effects associated with ingestion of methylmercury both in adults and in infants exposed in utero. The effects were convincingly Associated with methylmercury ingestion, despite limitations of the study design. Several well-conducted studies have investigated the effects of methylmercury at levels below those in the Iraq incident but have not provided clear evidence of an effect. The lower end of the dose-response curve constructed from the Iraq data therefore still needs to be confirmed. The studies of mercury exposure in the workplace were mainly of elemental or inorganic mercury, and effects that were observed at relatively low exposure levels were primarily neurologic and renal. Several studies have investigated effects associated with dental amalgam but have been rated as inconclusive because of methodologic deficiencies. In our overall evaluation, 29 of 110 occupational studies and 20 of 54 studies where exposure occurred in the natural environment provided at least suggestive evidence of an exposure-related effect. 259 refs., 4 tabs.

Ratcliffe, H.E.; Swanson, G.M.; Fischer, L.J. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)

1996-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

394

PLANNING TOOLS FOR ESTIMATING RADIATION EXPOSURE AT THE NATIONAL IGNITION FACILITY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A set of computational tools was developed to help estimate and minimize potential radiation exposure to workers from material activation in the National Ignition Facility (NIF). AAMI (Automated ALARA-MCNP Interface) provides an efficient, automated mechanism to perform the series of calculations required to create dose rate maps for the entire facility with minimal manual user input. NEET (NIF Exposure Estimation Tool) is a web application that combines the information computed by AAMI with a given shot schedule to compute and display the dose rate maps as a function of time. AAMI and NEET are currently used as work planning tools to determine stay-out times for workers following a given shot or set of shots, and to help in estimating integrated doses associated with performing various maintenance activities inside the target bay. Dose rate maps of the target bay were generated following a low-yield 10{sup 16} D-T shot and will be presented in this paper.

Verbeke, J; Young, M; Brereton, S; Dauffy, L; Hall, J; Hansen, L; Khater, H; Kim, S; Pohl, B; Sitaraman, S

2010-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

395

{gamma}-ray measurements and neutron sensitivity in a fusion environment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A system based on a LaBr{sub 3}(Ce) scintillator and digital data acquisition is discussed in view of {gamma}-ray spectroscopy measurements on a fusion burning plasma. High energy resolution and high rate capability of the system are demonstrated in laboratory tests and in dedicated experiments at nuclear accelerators. Preliminary results on sensitivity of the detector to 14 MeV neutrons are presented.

Nocente, M.; Angelone, M.; Blanchard, P. [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma, EURATOM-ENEA-CNR Association, Milan (Italy); Associazione EURATOM-ENEA sulla Fusione, Frascati (Italy); and others

2012-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

396

A supersymmetric model of gamma ray bursts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose a model for gamma ray bursts in which a star subject to a high level of fermion degeneracy undergoes a phase transition to a supersymmetric state. The burst is initiated by the transition of fermion pairs to sfermion pairs which, uninhibited by the Pauli exclusion principle, can drop to the ground state of minimum momentum through photon emission. The jet structure is attributed to the Bose statistics of sfermions whereby subsequent sfermion pairs are preferentially emitted into the same state (sfermion amplification by stimulated emission). Bremsstrahlung gamma rays tend to preserve the directional information of the sfermion momenta and are themselves enhanced by stimulated emission.

L. Clavelli; G. Karatheodoris

2005-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

397

Redshift indicators for gamma-ray bursts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The measure of the distances and luminosities of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) led to the discovery that many GRB properties are strongly correlated with their intrinsic luminosity, leading to the construction of reliable luminosity indicators. These GRB luminosity indicators have quickly found applications, like the construction of 'pseudo-redshifts', or the measure of luminosity distances, which can be computed independently of the measure of the redshift. In this contribution I discuss various issues connected with the construction of luminosity-redshift indicators for gamma-ray bursts.

J-L. Atteia

2005-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

398

A review of gamma ray bursts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Gamma-ray bursts have continued to puzzle astronomers since their discovery thirty years ago. The sources and emission mechanisms are still uncertain. The instruments on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory most notably BATSE have produced a revolution in our understanding of bursts. BATSE found that the burst spatial distribution was isotropic but inhomogeneous a result inconsistent with any disk population of sources. The currently favored model is one in which the sources lie at cosmological distances. Recent apparent successes in the detection of X-ray and optical counterparts have generated renewed excitement.

Charles Meegan; Kevin Hurley; Alanna Connors; Brenda Dingus; Steven Matz

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Open-source hardware and software and web application for gamma dose rate network operation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......the public telephone network, GSM or public authorities intranet to the respective measuring and service centre. Redundant...interface can easily be configured to support different network characteristics, including maps of the country where the network is implemented......

R. Luff; M. Zähringer; W. Harms; M. Bleher; B. Prommer; U. Stöhlker

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Open-source hardware and software and web application for gamma dose rate network operation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......protocols for data transfer are...where no fixed line telephone or...radioactive plume. The data logger generates...during power outages and is only used...analogue data transmission. DATA LOGGER SOFTWARE...long-term power outages (low battery......

R. Luff; M. Zähringer; W. Harms; M. Bleher; B. Prommer; U. Stöhlker

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gamma exposure rate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Precision X-Band Linac Technologies for Nuclear Photonics Gamma-Ray Sources  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nuclear photonics is an emerging field of research requiring new tools, including high spectral brightness, tunable gamma-ray sources; high photon energy, ultrahigh-resolution crystal spectrometers; and novel detectors. This presentation focuses on the precision linac technology required for Compton scattering gamma-ray light sources, and on the optimization of the laser and electron beam pulse format to achieve unprecedented spectral brightness. Within this context, high-gradient X-band technology will be shown to offer optimal performance in a compact package, when used in conjunction with the appropriate pulse format, and photocathode illumination and interaction laser technologies. The nascent field of nuclear photonics is enabled by the recent maturation of new technologies, including high-gradient X-band electron acceleration, robust fiber laser systems, and hyper-dispersion CPA. Recent work has been performed at LLNL to demonstrate isotope-specific detection of shielded materials via NRF using a tunable, quasi-monochromatic Compton scattering gamma-ray source operating between 0.2 MeV and 0.9 MeV photon energy. This technique is called Fluorescence Imaging in the Nuclear Domain with Energetic Radiation (or FINDER). This work has, among other things, demonstrated the detection of {sup 7}Li shielded by Pb, utilizing gamma rays generated by a linac-driven, laser-based Compton scattering gamma-ray source developed at LLNL. Within this context, a new facility is currently under construction at LLNL, with the goal of generating tunable {gamma}-rays in the 0.5-2.5 MeV photon energy range, at a repetition rate of 120 Hz, and with a peak brightness in the 10{sup 20} photons/(s x mm{sup 2} x mrad{sup 2} x 0.1% bw).

Hartemann, F V; Albert, F; Anderson, S G; Bayramian, A J; Cross, R R; Ebbers, C A; Gibson, D J; Houck, T L; Marsh, R A; Messerly, M J; Siders, C W; McNabb, D P; Barty, C J; Adolphsen, C E; Chu, T S; Jongewaard, E N; Tantawi, S G; Vlieks, A E; Wang, F; Wang, J W; Raubenheimer, T O; Ighigeanu, D; Toma, M; Cutoiu, D

2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

402

Millimetric Properties of Gamma Ray Burst Host Galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present millimetre (mm) and submillimetre (submm) photometry of a sample of host galaxies of Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs), obtained using the MAMBO2 and SCUBA bolometer arrays respectively. These observations were obtained as part of an ongoing project to investigate the status of GRBs as indicators of star formation. Our targets include two of the most unusual GRB host galaxies, selected as likely candidate submm galaxies: the extremely red (R-K approx 5) host of GRB 030115, and the extremely faint (R>29.5) host of GRB 020124. Neither of these galaxies is detected, but the deep upper limits for GRB 030115 impose constraints on its spectral energy distribution. As a framework for interpreting these data, and for predicting the results of forthcoming submm surveys of Swift-derived host samples, we model the expected flux and redshift distributions based on luminosity functions of both submm galaxies and GRBs, assuming a direct proportionality between the GRB rate density and the global star formation rate density. We derive the effects of possible sources of uncertainty in these assumptions, including an anticorrelation between GRB rate and the global average metallicity.

R. S. Priddey; N. R. Tanvir; A. J. Levan; A. S. Fruchter; C. Kouveliotou; I. A. Smith; R. A. M. J. Wijers

2006-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

403

Ultrahigh Energy Cosmic Rays and Prompt TeV Gamma Rays from Gamma Ray Bursts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) have been proposed as one {\\it possible} class of sources of the Ultrahigh Energy Cosmic Ray (UHECR) events observed up to energies $\\gsim10^{20}\\ev$. The synchrotron radiation of the highest energy protons accelerated within the GRB source should produce gamma rays up to TeV energies. Here we briefly discuss the implications on the energetics of the GRB from the point of view of the detectability of the prompt TeV gamma rays of proton-synchrotron origin in GRBs in the up-coming ICECUBE muon detector in the south pole.

Pijushpani Bhattacharjee; Nayantara Gupta

2003-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

404

Magnetic field exposure among utility workers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Electric and Magnetic Field Measurement Project for Utilities -- the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Electric and Magnetic Field Digital Exposure (EMDEX) Project (the EPRI EMDEX Project) -- was a multifaceted project that entailed technology transfer, measurement protocol design, data management, and exposure assessment analyses. This paper addresses one specific objective of the project: the collection, analysis, and documentation of power-frequency magnetic filed exposures for a diverse population of utility employees at 59 sites in four countries between September, 1988, and September, 1989. Specially designed sampling procedures and data collection protocols were used to ensure uniform implementation across sites. Volunteers within 13 job classifications recorded which of eight work or three nonwork environments they occupied while wearing an EMDEX meter. Approximately 50,000 hours of magnetic field exposure records taken at 10 s intervals were obtained, about 70% of which were from work environments. Exposures and time spent in environments were analyzed by primary work environment, by occupied environment, and by job classification.

Bracken, T.D.; Senior, R.S. [T. Dan Bracken, Inc., Portland, OR (United States); Rankin, R.F. [Applied Research Services, Inc., Lake Oswego, OR (United States); Alldredge, J.R. [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States); Sussman, S.S. [Electric Power Research Institute, Palo Alto, CA (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Cosmic Gamma-Ray Bursts as a Probe of Star Formation History  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The cosmic gamma-ray burst (GRB) formation rate, as derived from the variability-luminosity relation for long-duration GRBs, is compared with the cosmic star formation rate. If GRBs are related to the collapse of massive stars, one expects the GRB rate to be approximately proportional to the star formation rate. We found that these two rates have similar slopes at low redshift. This suggests that GRBs do indeed track the star formation rate of the Universe, which in turn implies that the formation rate of massive stars that produce GRBs is proportional to the total star formation rate. It also implies that we might be able to use GRBs as a probe of the cosmic star formation rate at high redshift. We find that the cosmic star formation rate inferred from the variability-luminosity relation increases steeply with redshift at z > 3. This is in apparent contrast to what is derived from measurements of the cosmic star formation rate at high redshift from optical observations of field galaxies, suggesting that much high-z star formation is being missed in the optical surveys, even after corrections for dust extinction have been made.

Enrico Ramirez-Ruiz; Edward E. Fenimore; Neil Trentham

2000-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

406

Rail Coal Transportation Rates  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

reports reports Coal Transportation Rates to the Electric Power Sector With Data through 2010 | Release Date: November 16, 2012 | Next Release Date: December 2013 | Correction Previous editions Year: 2011 2004 Go Figure 1. Deliveries from major coal basins to electric power plants by rail, 2010 Background In this latest release of Coal Transportation Rates to the Electric Power Sector, the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) significantly expands upon prior versions of this report with the incorporation of new EIA survey data. Figure 1. Percent of total U.S. rail shipments represented in data figure data Previously, EIA relied solely on data from the U.S. Surface Transportation Board (STB), specifically their confidential Carload Waybill Sample. While valuable, due to the statistical nature of the Waybill data,

407

Plant Tumor Growth Rates  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Plant Tumor Growth Rates Plant Tumor Growth Rates Name: Gina and Maria Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: We are doing a science fair project on if B. Carotene, Green tea, and Grape Seed Extract helps plants against the crown gall disease. We injected sunflowers with agrobacterium tum. one week ago (Sun. Feb. 27, 2000). Our questions is how long will it take for the tumors to grow? We scratched the surface of the stems and injected the agrobacterium in the wound. Also which do you think, in your opinion, will do the best, if any? Our science fair is April 13, do you think we'll have growth before then, atleast enough time to do our conclusion and results? Thank you, any information you forward will be very helpful. Replies: Sunflowers form galls relatively quickly. I usually get them in two weeks at least. Good luck.

408

Adjusted Growth Rates*  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Jan. '99 to Feb. '99: -1.7% Feb. '98 to Feb. '99: +19.8% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +15.0% 4,100 4,400 4,700 5,000 5,300 5,600 5,900 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons U.S. Distillate Fuel Sales 2011 2012 2013 Adjusted Growth Rates* Jul '13 to Aug '13: 2.5% Aug '12 to Aug '13: -1.3% YTD '12 to YTD '13: 1.5% 300 400 500 600 700 800 900 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 2011 2012 2013 Adjusted Growth Rates* Jul '13 to Aug '13: -0.8%

409

Personal/Mobile Exposure Monitors D K Arvind & Michael Walters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Personal/Mobile Exposure Monitors D K Arvind & Michael Walters School of Informatics dka · Personal/Mobile Exposure Monitoring · Mapping the public space using numerous personal/mobile exposure per second) #12;Mobile Exposure Monitor · 16-bin (PM10 ­ PM1.0) Optical Particle Counter (Alphasense

410

Health effects assessment of exposure to particles from wood  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Health effects assessment of exposure to particles from wood smoke Elsa Nielsen, Marianne Dybdahl HUMAN EXPOSURE TO PARTICLES FROM WOOD SMOKE 7 HUMAN HEALTH EFFECTS 8 Human non-cancer health effects from exposure to particles from wood smoke 8 Human carcinogenic effects from exposure to particles from

411

Adjusted Growth Rates* Jan.  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Adjusted Adjusted Growth Rates* Jan. '99 to Feb. '99: -1.7% Feb. '98 to Feb. '99: +19.8% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +15.0% U.S. Distillate Fuel Sales 3,000 3,500 4,000 4,500 5,000 5,500 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1998 1999 2000 Adjusted Growth Rates* Dec '99 to Jan '00: -7.4% Jan '99 to Jan '00: -0.1% YTD '99 to YTD '00: -0.1% U.S. Motor Gasoline Sales 8,000 9,000 10,000 11,000 12,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1998 1999 2000 Adjusted Growth Rates* Dec '99 to Jan '00: -16.8% Jan '99 to Jan '00: -3.2% YTD '99 to YTD '00: -3.2% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1998 1999 2000 Adjusted Growth Rates* Dec '99 to Jan '00: -9.3% Jan '99 to Jan '00: +3.5% YTD '99 to YTD '00: +3.5% U.S. Propane Sales 600 800 1,000 1,200 1,400 1,600 1,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul

412

Measurements of the CKM Angle Gamma at BaBar  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a short review of the measurements of the CKM angle {gamma} performed by the BABAR experiment. We focus on methods using charged B decays, which give a direct access to {gamma} and provide the best constraints so far.

Latour, Emmanuel; /Ecole Polytechnique

2007-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

413

Mono-Energetic Gamma-ray (MEGa-ray)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

(MeV) spectral range. MEGa-ray Rendering In the mono-energetic gamma-ray (MEGA-ray) device, electrons and laser photons crash head-on, creating a backscatter of gamma...

414

Rate Adjustments and Public Involvement  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Rate Adjustments and Public Involvement Documents Rate Adjustments and Public Involvement Documents CRSP Transmission 9/16/2013 WAPA-161 FRN, CRSP transmission and ancillary services rates extension Letter announcing two-year extension to CRSP transmission and ancillary services rates Letter announcing revised CRSP transmission rates for FY 2014 Accompanying calculation table for FY 2014 CRSP transmission rate letter Letter announcing revised CRSP transmission rates for FY 2013 Letter announcing revised CRSP transmission rates for FY 2012 Letter announcing revised CRSP transmission rates for FY 2011 Letter announcing revised CRSP transmission rates for FY 2010 SLCA/IP 9/16/2013 WAPA-161 FRN, SLCA/IP firm power rate extension Letter announcing two-year extension to SLCA/IP firm power rate SLCA/IP Tentative Rate Adjustment Schedule

415

Adjusted Growth Rates*  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

June '99 to July '99: -5.4% June '99 to July '99: -5.4% July '98 to July '99: +3.3% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +6.3% U.S. Motor Gasoline Sales 8,000 9,000 10,000 11,000 12,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1997 1998 1999 Adjusted Growth Rates* June '99 to July '99: -0.5% July '98 to July '99: -0.4% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +1.1% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1997 1998 1999 Adjusted Growth Rates* June '99 to July '99: +0.5% July '98 to July '99: +1.0% YTD '98 to YTD '99: -0.3% U.S. Propane Sales 600 800 1,000 1,200 1,400 1,600 1,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1997 1998 1999 Adjusted Growth Rates* June '99 to July '99: +1.5% July '98 to July '99: +10.2% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +7.2%

416

Adjusted Growth Rates*  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nov '99 to Dec '99: +5.3% Nov '99 to Dec '99: +5.3% Dec '98 to Dec '99: +8.7% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +5.0% U.S. Motor Gasoline Sales 8,000 9,000 10,000 11,000 12,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1997 1998 1999 Adjusted Growth Rates* Nov '99 to Dec '99: +6.0% Dec '98 to Dec '99: +4.5% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +1.3% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1997 1998 1999 Adjusted Growth Rates* Nov '99 to Dec '99: +2.4% Dec '98 to Dec '99: +3.0% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +0.9% U.S. Propane Sales 600 800 1,000 1,200 1,400 1,600 1,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1997 1998 1999 Adjusted Growth Rates* Nov '99 to Dec '99: +32.3% Dec '98 to Dec '99: +2.0% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +5.5%

417

Adjusted Growth Rates*  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

July '99 to Aug. '99: +4.7% July '99 to Aug. '99: +4.7% Aug. '98 to Aug. '99: +1.3% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +4.7% U.S. Motor Gasoline Sales 8,000 9,000 10,000 11,000 12,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1997 1998 1999 Adjusted Growth Rates* July '99 to Aug. '99: -1.9% Aug. '98 to Aug. '99: -0.4% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +0.9% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1997 1998 1999 Adjusted Growth Rates* July '99 to Aug. '99: -0.1% Aug. '98 to Aug. '99: -1.4% YTD '98 to YTD '99: -0.7% U.S. Propane Sales 600 800 1,000 1,200 1,400 1,600 1,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1997 1998 1999 Adjusted Growth Rates* July '99 to Aug. '99: +22.3% Aug. '98 to Aug. '99: +21.1%

418

Adjusted Growth Rates*  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Aug '99 to Sep '99: +4.9% Aug '99 to Sep '99: +4.9% Sep '98 to Sep '99: +4.7% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +4.7% U.S. Motor Gasoline Sales 8,000 9,000 10,000 11,000 12,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1997 1998 1999 Adjusted Growth Rates* Aug '99 to Sep '99: -2.4% Sep '98 to Sep '99: +0.4% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +1.3% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1997 1998 1999 Adjusted Growth Rates* Aug '99 to Sep '99: -2.1% Sep '98 to Sep '99: +4.6% YTD '98 to YTD '99: 0.0% U.S. Propane Sales 600 800 1,000 1,200 1,400 1,600 1,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1997 1998 1999 Adjusted Growth Rates* Aug '99 to Sep '99: +7.3% Sep '98 to Sep '99: +8.4% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +8.3%

419

Adjusted Growth Rates*  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Oct '99 to Nov '99: +0.1% Oct '99 to Nov '99: +0.1% Nov '98 to Nov '99: +5.5% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +4.5% U.S. Motor Gasoline Sales 8,000 9,000 10,000 11,000 12,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1997 1998 1999 Adjusted Growth Rates* Oct '99 to Nov '99: -0.7% Nov '98 to Nov '99: +1.7% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +1.1% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1997 1998 1999 Adjusted Growth Rates* Oct '99 to Nov '99: +2.5% Nov '98 to Nov '99: +6.0% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +0.8% U.S. Propane Sales 600 800 1,000 1,200 1,400 1,600 1,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1997 1998 1999 Adjusted Growth Rates* Oct '99 to Nov '99: +9.7% Nov '98 to Nov '99: +2.2% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +6.2%

420

Adjusted Growth Rates*  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Sep '99 to Oct '99: +3.9% Sep '99 to Oct '99: +3.9% Oct '98 to Oct '99: +2.3% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +4.4% U.S. Motor Gasoline Sales 8,000 9,000 10,000 11,000 12,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1997 1998 1999 Adjusted Growth Rates* Sep '99 to Oct '99: -0.2% Oct '98 to Oct '99: -0.9% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +1.0% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1997 1998 1999 Adjusted Growth Rates* Sep '99 to Oct '99: -1.9% Oct '98 to Oct '99: -0.7% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +0.4% U.S. Propane Sales 600 800 1,000 1,200 1,400 1,600 1,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1997 1998 1999 Adjusted Growth Rates* Sep '99 to Oct '99: -2.1% Oct '98 to Oct '99: -6.4% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +6.6%

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gamma exposure rate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Transportation Rates For Fishery Products  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

express (Railway Express Agency), and motor carriers. Air transporta- tion and water transportation 2 Rail-freight rates 2 Rail-express rates 3 Motor-carrier rates 3 Protective-service charges 4 used in sample 7 2. Rail-express rate index: Routes used in sample 7 3. Motor-carrier rate index

422

E-Print Network 3.0 - augments gamma ray-induced Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Collection: Mathematics 52 Interesting Interesting Summary: 5 10 15 20 25 (4S) Dataset: ffl 3.3 M B B ffl 4.8 M c c ffl 3.9 M + Gamma Gamma GammaGamma......

423

E-Print Network 3.0 - anti-fc gamma receptor Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Information Sciences 53 Interesting Interesting Summary: 5 10 15 20 25 (4S) Dataset: ffl 3.3 M B B ffl 4.8 M c c ffl 3.9 M + Gamma Gamma GammaGamma......

424

Ultra-accelerated natural sunlight exposure testing  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Process and apparatus for providing ultra accelerated natural sunlight exposure testing of samples under controlled weathering without introducing unrealistic failure mechanisms in exposed materials and without breaking reciprocity relationships between flux exposure levels and cumulative dose that includes multiple concurrent levels of temperature and relative humidity at high levels of natural sunlight comprising: a) concentrating solar flux uniformly; b) directing the controlled uniform sunlight onto sample materials in a chamber enclosing multiple concurrent levels of temperature and relative humidity to allow the sample materials to be subjected to accelerated irradiance exposure factors for a sufficient period of time in days to provide a corresponding time of about at least a years worth of representative weathering of the sample materials.

Jorgensen, Gary J. (Pine, CO); Bingham, Carl (Lakewood, CO); Goggin, Rita (Englewood, CO); Lewandowski, Allan A. (Evergreen, CO); Netter, Judy C. (Westminster, CO)

2000-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

425

October 1996 - September 2001 Wholesale Power Rates (rates/previous...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

affecting a specific power purchase. For more specific information see: 1996 Final Wholesale Power and Transmission Rate Schedules: Power Rates (PDF, 84 pages, 188 kb) Ancillary...

426

A Gamma-Ray Bursts ’ Fluence-Duration Correlation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

durations of gamma-ray bursts, and provide arguments that this reflects a correlation between the total

István Horváth; Lajos G. Balázs; Peter Mészáros; Zsolt Bagoly

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

HYPERNUCLEAR STRUCTURE FROM GAMMA-RAY SPECTROSCOPY.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The energies of p-shell hypernuclear {gamma} rays obtained from recent experiments using the Hyperball at BNL and KEK are used to constrain the YN interaction which enters into shell-model calculations which include both {Lambda} and {Sigma} configurations.

MILLENER,D.J.

2003-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

428

Laser Electron Gamma Source. Biennial progress report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The LEGS facility provides intense, polarized, monochromatic {gamma}-ray beams by Compton backscattering laser light from relativistic electrons circulating in the X-Ray storage ring of the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. With the start of ring operations at 2.8 GeV, LEGS {gamma}-ray energies now extend to 370 MeV. Considerable progress has been made in the development of a new laser system that will increase the beam energies to 470 MeV, and this system is expected to come into operation before the next biennial report. The total flux is administratively held at 6 {times} 10{sup 6} s{sup {minus}1}. The {gamma}-ray energy is determined, with a resolution of 5.5 MeV, by detecting the scattering electrons in a magnetic spectrometer. This spectrometer can `tag` all {gamma}-rays with energies from 185 MeV up to the Compton edge. The beam spot size at the target position is 8 mm (V) {times} 18 mm (H), FWHM. For a single laser wavelength, the linear polarization of the beam is 98% at the Compton edge and decreases to 50% at about 1/2 the energy of the edge. By choosing the laser wavelengths appropriately the polarization can be maintained above 85% throughout the tagging range. During the last two years, experimental running at LEGS occupied an average of 3000 hours annually. Highlights of some of the programs are discussed below.

Sandorfi, A.M. [ed.; Caracappa, A.; Kuczewski, A.; Kistner, O.C.; Lincoln, F.; Miceli, L.; Thorn, C.E. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Hoblit, S. [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States). Dept. of Physics; Khandaker, M. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)]|[Virginia Polytechnic Institute & State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States). Dept. of Physics

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Gamma-Ray Bursts: Restarting the Engine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recent gamma-ray burst observations have revealed late-time, highly energetic events that deviate from the simplest expectations of the standard fireball picture. Instead, they may indicate that the central engine is active or restarted at late times. We suggest that fragmentation and subsequent accretion during the collapse of a rapidly rotating stellar core offers a natural mechanism for this.

Andrew King; Paul T. O'Brien; Michael R. Goad; Julian Osborne; Emma Olsson; Kim Page

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Neutrino Balls and Gamma-Ray Bursts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose a mechanism by which the neutrino emission from a supernova-type explosion can be converted into a gamma-ray burst of total energy $\\sim 10^{50}$ ergs. This occurs naturally if the explosion is situated inside a ball of trapped neutrinos, which in turn may lie at a galactic core. There are possible unique signatures of this scenario.

B. Holdom; R. A. Malaney

1993-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

431

Multiple gamma lines from semi-annihilation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hints in the Fermi data for a 130 GeV gamma line from the galactic center have ignited interest in potential gamma line signatures of dark matter. Explanations of this line based on dark matter annihilation face a parametric tension since they often rely on large enhancements of loop-suppressed cross sections. In this paper, we pursue an alternative possibility that dark matter gamma lines could arise from ''semi-annihilation'' among multiple dark sector states. The semi-annihilation reaction ?{sub i}?{sub j} ? ?{sub k}? with a single final state photon is typically enhanced relative to ordinary annihilation ?{sub i}?-bar {sub i} ? ?? into photon pairs. Semi-annihilation allows for a wide range of dark matter masses compared to the fixed mass value required by annihilation, opening the possibility to explain potential dark matter signatures at higher energies. The most striking prediction of semi-annihilation is the presence of multiple gamma lines, with as many as order N{sup 3} lines possible for N dark sector states, allowing for dark sector spectroscopy. A smoking gun signature arises in the simplest case of degenerate dark matter, where a strong semi-annihilation line at 130 GeV would be accompanied by a weaker annihilation line at 173 GeV. As a proof of principle, we construct two explicit models of dark matter semi-annihilation, one based on non-Abelian vector dark matter and the other based on retrofitting Rayleigh dark matter.

D'Eramo, Francesco [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); McCullough, Matthew; Thaler, Jesse, E-mail: fraderamo@berkeley.edu, E-mail: mccull@mit.edu, E-mail: jthaler@mit.edu [Center for Theoretical Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Gamma-emitting Materials for Industry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... , p. 717). A paper dealing with the supply and uses of radium and radon for industry is now being distributed by the Ministry to trade associations, professional institutes ... Points of interest arising from this paper are the different physical properties of radium and radon. Though they both emit gamma-rays of identical quality, the radiation of the former ...

1949-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

433

Gamma Ray Imaging for Environmental Remediation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This program is the development of germanium strip detectors for environmental remediation. It is a collaboration between the Naval Research Laboratory and Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. The goal is to develop detectors that are simultaneously capable of excellent spectroscopy and imaging of gamma radiation.

B.F. Philips; R.A. Kroeger: J.D. Kurfess: W.N. Johnson; E.A. Wulf; E. I. Novikova

2004-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

434

Gamma-Ray Bursts, Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays, and Cosmic Gamma-Ray Background  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We argue that gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) may be the origin of the cosmic gamma-ray background radiation observed in GeV range. It has theoretically been discussed that protons may carry a much larger amount of energy than electrons in GRBs, and this large energy can be radiated in TeV range by synchrotron radiation of ultra-high-energy protons (\\sim 10^{20} eV). The possible detection of GRBs above 10 TeV suggested by the Tibet and HEGRA groups also supports this idea. If this is the case, most of TeV gamma-rays from GRBs are absorbed in intergalactic fields and eventually form GeV gamma-ray background, whose flux is in good agreement with the recent observation.

Tomonori Totani

1998-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

435

Measuring the charged pion polarizability in the gamma gamma -> pi+pi- reaction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Development has begun of a new experiment to measure the charged pion polarizability $\\alpha_{\\pi}-\\beta_{\\pi}$. The charged pion polarizability ranks among the most important tests of low-energy QCD presently unresolved by experiment. Analogous to precision measurements of $\\pi^{\\circ}\\rightarrow\\gamma\\gamma$ that test the intrinsic odd-parity (anomalous) sector of QCD, the pion polarizability tests the intrinsic even-parity sector of QCD. The measurement will be performed using the $\\gamma\\gamma\\rightarrow\\pi^{+{}}\\pi^{-{}}$ cross section accessed via the Primakoff mechanism on nuclear targets using the GlueX detector in Hall D at Jefferson Lab. The linearly polarized photon source in Hall-D will be utilized to separate the Primakoff cross-section from coherent $\\rho^{\\circ}$ production.

Lawrence, David W. [JLAB; Miskimen, Rory A. [University of Massachusetts, Amherst; Mushkarenkov, Alexander Nikolaevich [University of Massachusetts, Amherst; Smith, Elton S. [JLAB

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

The Biggest Bangs The Mystery of Gamma-Ray Bursts,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Biggest Bangs The Mystery of Gamma-Ray Bursts, The Most Violent Explosions in The Universe J. I. Did a Gamma-Ray Burst Kill the Dinosaurs? Will a Burst Kill Us? #15; Glossary #15; Sources #15; Index. On January 23, 1999, one of these four cameras recorded visible light from a gamma-ray burst

Katz, Jonathan I.

437

The Biggest Bangs The Mystery of Gamma-Ray Bursts,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Biggest Bangs The Mystery of Gamma-Ray Bursts, The Most Violent Explosions in The Universe J. I a Gamma-Ray Burst Kill the Dinosaurs? Will a Burst Kill Us? · Glossary · Sources · Index viii #12;Chapter of these four cameras recorded visible light from a gamma-ray burst as it was happening, which had been the holy

Katz, Jonathan I.

438

Gamma-Ray Bursts Nuclear Test Ban Treaty, 1963  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lecture 18 Gamma-Ray Bursts #12;Nuclear Test Ban Treaty, 1963 First Vela satellite pair launched and their predecessors, Vela 4, discovered the first gamma-ray bursts. The discovery was announced by Klebesadel, Strong, and Olson (ApJ, 182, 85) in 1973. #12;First Gamma-Ray Burst The Vela 5 satellites functioned from July, 1969

Harrison, Thomas

439

Gamma ray bursts observed with WATCH?EURECA  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The WATCH wide field x?ray monitor has the capability of independently locating bright Gamma Ray Bursts to 1° accuracy. We report the preliminary positions of 12 Gamma Ray Bursts observed with the WATCH monitor flown on the ES spacecraft EURECA during its 11 month mission. Also the recurrence of the Soft Gamma Repeater SGR 1900+14 in 1992 is verified.

S. Brandt; N. Lund; A. J. Castro?Tirado

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Observation of the radiative decay D*+-> D+gamma  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have observed a signal for the decay D*(+) --> D(+)gamma at a significance of 4 standard deviations. From the measured branching ratio B(D*(+) --> D(+)gamma)/B(D*(+) --> D(+)pi(0)) = 0.055 +/- 0.014 +/- 0.010 we find B(D*(+) --> D(+)gamma) = 0...

Ammar, Raymond G.; Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Besson, David Zeke; Coppage, Don; Darling, C.; Davis, Robin E. P.; Kotov, S.; Kravchenko, I.; Kwak, Nowhan; Zhou, L.

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gamma exposure rate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

A complete sample of long bright Swift gamma ray bursts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...complete sample of long bright Swift gamma ray bursts Gianpiero Tagliaferri 1 Ruben...subsample of Swift long bright gamma ray bursts (GRBs). The sample, made...correlations and the nature of dark bursts. gamma ray bursts|complete sample|luminosity...

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Gamma-ray bursts spectral correlations and their cosmological use  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...research-article Discussion Meeting Issue Gamma-ray bursts organized by Alan Wells, Ralph...J. Wijers and Martin Rees Gamma-ray bursts spectral correlations and their...correlations involving the long-gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) prompt emission energy...

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Gamma-ray bursts, QSOs and active galaxies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...research-article Discussion Meeting Issue Gamma-ray bursts organized by Alan Wells, Ralph...J. Wijers and Martin Rees Gamma-ray bursts, QSOs and active galaxies Geoffrey...of the absorption spectra of gamma-ray burst (GRB) sources or afterglows...

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Short gamma-ray bursts near and far  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...research-article Discussion Meeting Issue Gamma-ray bursts organized by Alan Wells, Ralph...Wijers and Martin Rees Short gamma-ray bursts near and far Andrew J Levan...understanding the nature of short gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) has been rapid since...

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

TERRESTRIAL GAMMA-RAY FLASH PRODUCTION BY LIGHTNING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TERRESTRIAL GAMMA-RAY FLASH PRODUCTION BY LIGHTNING A DISSERTATION SUBMITTED TO THE DEPARTMENT gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) are brief flashes of gamma-rays originating in the Earth's atmosphere) that extends from below 25 keV to above 20 MeV. When good lightning data exists, TGFs are closely associated

446

Branching fraction and photon energy spectrum for b -> s gamma  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

theory corrections. We obtain first and second moments of the photon energy spectrum above 2.0 GeV, (E gamma) = 2.346 +/- 0.032 +/- 0.011 GeV, and (E-gamma(2)) - (E-gamma)(2) = 0.0226 +/- 0.0066 +/- 0.0020 GeV2, where the errors are statistical...

Ammar, Raymond G.; Bean, Alice; Besson, David Zeke; Zhao, X.

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Evolving Adjustments to External (Gamma) Slope Factors for CERCLA Risk and Dose Assessments - 12290  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To model the external exposure pathway in risk and dose assessments of radioactive contamination at Superfund sites, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) uses slope factors (SFs), also known as risk coefficients, and dose conversion factors (DCFs). Without any adjustment these external radiation exposure pathways effectively assumes that an individual is exposed to a source geometry that is effectively an infinite slab. The concept of an 'infinite slab' means that the thickness of the contaminated zone and its aerial extent are so large that it behaves as if it were infinite in its physical dimensions. EPA has been making increasingly complex adjustments to account for the extent of the contamination and its corresponding radiation field to provide more accurate risk and dose assessment modeling when using its calculators. In most instances, the more accurate modeling results derived from these gamma adjustments are less conservative. The notable exception are for some radionuclides in rooms with contaminated walls, ceiling, and floors, and the receptor is in location of the room with the highest amount of radiation exposure, usually the corner of small rooms and the center of large conference rooms. (authors)

Walker, Stuart [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Tier 2 Vintage Rate Workshop  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

4 Tier 2 Rate Alternatives Tier 2 Rate Alternatives Load Growth Rate BPA commits to meet Load Following customers' load growth placed on BPA for the term of the commitment period...

449

ADVANCED X-BAND TEST ACCELERATOR FOR HIGH BRIGHTNESS ELECTRON AND GAMMA RAY BEAMS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In support of Compton scattering gamma-ray source efforts at LLNL, a multi-bunch test stand is being developed to investigate accelerator optimization for future upgrades. This test stand will enable work to explore the science and technology paths required to boost the current 10 Hz monoenergetic gamma-ray (MEGa-Ray) technology to an effective repetition rate exceeding 1 kHz, potentially increasing the average gamma-ray brightness by two orders of magnitude. Multiple bunches must be of exceedingly high quality to produce narrow-bandwidth gamma-rays. Modeling efforts will be presented, along with plans for a multi-bunch test stand at LLNL. The test stand will consist of a 5.5 cell X-band rf photoinjector, single accelerator section, and beam diagnostics. The photoinjector will be a high gradient standing wave structure, featuring a dual feed racetrack coupler. The accelerator will increase the electron energy so that the emittance can be measured using quadrupole scanning techniques. Multi-bunch diagnostics will be developed so that the beam quality can be measured and compared with theory. Design will be presented with modeling simulations, and layout plans.

Marsh, R A; Anderson, S G; Barty, C P; Chu, T S; Ebbers, C A; Gibson, D J; Hartemann, F V; Adolphsen, C; Jongewaard, E N; Raubenheimer, T; Tantawi, S G; Vlieks, A E; Wang, J W

2010-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

450

Magnetic Flux of Progenitor Stars Sets Gamma-ray Burst Luminosity and Variability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are thought to come from the core-collapse of Wolf-Rayet stars. Whereas their stellar masses $M_*$ have a rather narrow distribution, the population of GRBs is very diverse, with gamma-ray luminosities $L_\\gamma$ spanning several orders of magnitude. This suggests the existence of a "hidden" stellar variable whose burst-to-burst variation leads to a spread in $L_\\gamma$. Whatever this hidden variable is, its variation should not noticeably affect the shape of GRB lightcurves, which display a constant luminosity (in a time-average sense) followed by a sharp drop at the end of the burst seen with Swift/XRT. We argue that such a hidden variable is progenitor star's large-scale magnetic flux. Shortly after the core collapse, most of stellar magnetic flux accumulates near the black hole (BH) and remains there. The flux extracts BH rotational energy and powers jets of roughly a constant luminosity, $L_j$. However, once BH mass accretion rate $\\dot M$ falls below $\\sim L_j/c^2$,...

Tchekhovskoy, Alexander

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Advanced X-Band Test Accelerator for High Brightness Electron and Gamma Ray Beams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In support of Compton scattering gamma-ray source efforts at LLNL, a multi-bunch test stand is being developed to investigate accelerator optimization for future upgrades. This test stand will enable work to explore the science and technology paths required to boost the current 10 Hz monoenergetic gamma-ray (MEGa-Ray) technology to an effective repetition rate exceeding 1 kHz, potentially increasing the average gamma-ray brightness by two orders of magnitude. Multiple bunches must be of exceedingly high quality to produce narrow-bandwidth gamma-rays. Modeling efforts will be presented, along with plans for a multi-bunch test stand at LLNL. The test stand will consist of a 5.5 cell X-band rf photoinjector, single accelerator section, and beam diagnostics. The photoinjector will be a high gradient standing wave structure, featuring a dual feed racetrack coupler. The accelerator will increase the electron energy so that the emittance can be measured using quadrupole scanning techniques. Multi-bunch diagnostics will be developed so that the beam quality can be measured and compared with theory. Design will be presented with modeling simulations, and layout plans.

Marsh, Roark; /LLNL, Livermore; Anderson, Scott; /LLNL, Livermore; Barty, Christopher; /LLNL, Livermore; Chu, Tak Sum; /LLNL, Livermore; Ebbers, Chris; /LLNL, Livermore; Gibson, David; /LLNL, Livermore; Hartemann, Fred; /LLNL, Livermore; Adolphsen, Chris; /SLAC; Jongewaard, Erik; /SLAC; Raubenheimer, Tor; /SLAC; Tantawi, Sami; /SLAC; Vlieks, Arnold; /SLAC; Wang, Juwen; /SLAC

2012-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

452

Plasma Adiabatic Lapse Rate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The plasma analog of an adiabatic lapse rate (or temperature variation with height) in atmospheric physics is obtained. A new source of plasma temperature gradient in a binary ion species mixture is found that is proportional to the concentration gradient ??? and difference in average ionization states Z2-Z1. Application to inertial-confinement-fusion implosions indicates a potentially strong effect in plastic (CH) ablators that is not modeled with mainline (single-fluid) simulations. An associated plasma thermodiffusion coefficient is derived, and charge-state diffusion in a single-species plasma is also predicted.

Peter Amendt; Claudio Bellei; Scott Wilks

2012-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

453

Analyses Of Two End-User Software Vulnerability Exposure Metrics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The risk due to software vulnerabilities will not be completely resolved in the near future. Instead, putting reliable vulnerability measures into the hands of end-users so that informed decisions can be made regarding the relative security exposure incurred by choosing one software package over another is of importance. To that end, we propose two new security metrics, average active vulnerabilities (AAV) and vulnerability free days (VFD). These metrics capture both the speed with which new vulnerabilities are reported to vendors and the rate at which software vendors fix them. We then examine how the metrics are computed using currently available datasets and demonstrate their estimation in a simulation experiment using four different browsers as a case study. Finally, we discuss how the metrics may be used by the various stakeholders of software and to software usage decisions.

Jason L. Wright; Miles McQueen; Lawrence Wellman

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

MilagroA TeV Observatory for Gamma Ray Bursts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Milagro­A TeV Observatory for Gamma Ray Bursts B.L. Dingus and the Milagro Collaboration Los energy gamma-rays from gamma-ray bursts. The highest energy gamma rays supply very strong constraints on the nature of gamma-ray burst sources as well as fundamental physics. Because the highest energy gamma-rays

California at Santa Cruz, University of

455

Imaginary-time method for radiative capture reaction rate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose a new computational method for astrophysical reaction rate of radiative capture process. In the method, an evolution of a wave function is calculated along the imaginary-time axis which is identified as the inverse temperature. It enables direct evaluation of reaction rate as a function of temperature without solving any scattering problem. The method is tested for two-body radiative capture reaction, ${^{16}{\\rm O}}(\\alpha,\\gamma){^{20}{\\rm Ne}}$, showing that it gives identical results to that calculated by the ordinary procedure. The new method will be suited for calculation of triple-alpha radiative capture rate for which an explicit construction of the scattering solution is difficult.

Kazuhiro Yabana; Yasuro Funaki

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

456

Effective Helium Burning Rates and the Production of the Neutrino Nuclei  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effective values for the key helium burning reaction rates, triple-alpha and 12C(alpha,gamma)16O, are obtained by adjusting their strengths so as to obtain the best match with the solar abundance pattern of isotopes uniquely or predominately made in core collapse supernovae. These effective rates are then used to determine the production of the neutrino isotopes. The use of effective rates considerably reduces the uncertainties in the production factors arising from uncertainties in the helium burning rates, and improves our ability to use the production of 11B to constrain the neutrino emission from supernovae.

Sam M. Austin; Christopher West; Alexander Heger

2014-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

457

Effective Helium Burning Rates and the Production of the Neutrino Nuclei  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effective values for the key helium burning reaction rates, triple-alpha and 12C(alpha,gamma)16O, are obtained by adjusting their strengths so as to obtain the best match with the solar abundance pattern of isotopes uniquely or predominately made in core collapse supernovae. These effective rates are then used to determine the production of the neutrino isotopes. The use of effective rates considerably reduces the uncertainties in the production factors arising from uncertainties in the helium burning rates, and improves our ability to use the production of 11B to constrain the neutrino emission from supernovae.

Austin, Sam M; Heger, Alexander

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

The characteristics of a low background germanium gamma ray spectrometer at China JinPing underground Laboratory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A low background germanium gamma ray spectrometer, GeTHU, has been installed at China JinPing underground Laboratory. The integral background count rate between 40 and 2700 keV was 0.6 cpm, and the origin was studied by Monte Carlo simulation. Detection limits and efficiencies were calculated for selected gamma peaks. Boric acid and silica sand samples were measured and 137Cs contamination was found in boric acid. GeTHU will be mainly used to measure environmental samples and screen materials in dark matter experiments.

Yuhao Mi; Hao Ma; Zhi Zeng; Jianping Cheng; Jian Su; Qian Yue

2014-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

459

Statistical Exposure Estimation Spatial Confounding Bias  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and 3 Account for spatial correlation in the health outcome data. Applications include air pollution Epidemiology Estimates of chronic health effects of air pollution are identified from cross-sectional (i Exposure Estimation Methods for Air Pollution Often researchers estimate ambient concentrations and use

Paciorek, Chris

460

INSTRUCTION CONCERNING PRENATAL RADIATION EXPOSURE A. INTRODUCTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/fetus exposed to radiation, a dose limit for the embryo/fetus, and suggestions for reducing radiation exposure and the Radiation Control Officer in writing that she is pregnant and the estimated date of conception.311, FAC, places different radiation dose limits on declared pregnant workers than on adult workers

Slatton, Clint

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gamma exposure rate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

FINAL REPORT EXPOSURE SCENARIOS FOR USE IN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FINAL REPORT EXPOSURE SCENARIOS FOR USE IN ESTIMATING RADIATION DOSES TO THE PUBLIC FROM HISTORICAL for use in the estimation of doses to reference individuals due to atmospheric releases of radionuclides). This report was prepared in response to Task 3 of the INEL dose reconstruction study commissioned

462

Pollutant exposures from unvented gas cooking burners: A simulation-based  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Pollutant exposures from unvented gas cooking burners: A simulation-based Pollutant exposures from unvented gas cooking burners: A simulation-based assessment for Southern California Title Pollutant exposures from unvented gas cooking burners: A simulation-based assessment for Southern California Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2013 Authors Logue, Jennifer M., Neil E. Klepeis, Agnes B. Lobscheid, and Brett C. Singer Journal Environmental Health Perspectives Date Published 11/2013 Abstract Background: Residential natural gas cooking burners (NGCBs) can emit substantial quantities of pollutants and they are typically used without venting. Objective: Quantify pollutant concentrations and occupant exposures resulting from NGCB use in California homes. Methods: A mass balance model was applied to estimate time-dependent pollutant concentrations throughout homes and the "exposure concentrations" experienced by individual occupants. The model was applied to estimate nitrogen dioxide (NO2), carbon monoxide (CO), and formaldehyde (HCHO) concentrations for one week each in summer and winter for a representative sample of Southern California homes. The model simulated pollutant emissions from NGCBs, NO2 and CO entry from outdoors, dilution throughout the home, and removal by ventilation and deposition. Residence characteristics and outdoor concentrations of CO and NO2 were obtained from available databases. Ventilation rates, occupancy patterns, and burner use were inferred from household characteristics. Proximity to the burner(s) and the benefits of using venting range hoods were also explored. Replicate model executions using independently generated sets of stochastic variable values yielded estimated pollutant concentration distributions with geometric means varying less than 10%.

463

Analysis of radiation exposure for troop observers, Exercise Desert Rock VI, Operation Teapot. Final report 1 Mar-15 Jul 80  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The radiation doses to troop observers and volunteer observers for Exercise Desert Rock VI are reconstructed for each applicable shot of Operation Teapot (1955). Initial neutron and gamma radiation doses are determined from transport codes ATR4 and ATR4.1. Residual radiation contours and decay rates are established through a new automated procedure that utilizes raw data in regression analysis to fit space-time models. Troop operations data are combined with the radiological data to determine integrated dose. Uncertainties are calculated for each parameter. The volunteers received the highest observer--1.6 rem gamma and 4.5 rem neutron. The highest dose received by troop observers was 1.4 rem gamma and 1.4 rem neutron at Shot Tesla.

Goetz, J.; McGahan, J.; Kaul, D.; Weitz, R.; Klemm, J.

1980-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

464

Redshifts of the Long Gamma-Ray Bursts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The low energy spectra of some gamma-ray bursts' show excess components beside the power-law dependence. The consequences of such a feature allows to estimate the gamma photometric redshift of the long gamma-ray bursts in the BATSE Catalog. There is good correlation between the measured optical and the estimated gamma photometric redshifts. The estimated redshift values for the long bright gamma-ray bursts are up to z=4, while for the the faint long bursts - which should be up to z=20 - the redshifts cannot be determined unambiguously with this method. The redshift distribution of all the gamma-ray bursts with known optical redshift agrees quite well with the BATSE based gamma photometric redshift distribution.

Z. Bagoly; I. Csabai; A. Meszaros; P. Meszaros; I. Horvath; L. G. Balazs; R. Vavrek

2007-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

465

Rate types for stream programs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We introduce RATE TYPES, a novel type system to reason about and optimize data-intensive programs. Built around stream languages, RATE TYPES performs static quantitative reasoning about stream rates -- the frequency of data items in a stream being ... Keywords: data processing rates, data throughput, performance reasoning, stream programming, type systems

Thomas W. Bartenstein, Yu David Liu

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

A Retrospective Review of Supratherapeutic Modafinil Exposures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as a heart rate >100 bpm, and hypertension was defined as aand ranged from 101 to 168 bpm. Hypertension occurred in sixrevealed a heart rate of 64 bpm and blood pressure of 137/78

Carstairs, Shaun D.; Urquhart, Andrew; Hoffman, Justin; Clark, Richard F.; Cantrell, F. Lee

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

RADIONUCLIDE DISPERSION RATES BY AEOLIAN, FLUVIAL, AND POROUS MEDIA TRANSPORT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radionuclide transport was measured from high grade uranium ore boulders near the Nopal I Site, Chihuahua, Mexico. High grade uranium ore boulders were left behind after removal of a uranium ore stockpile at the Prior High Grade Stockpile (PHGS). During the 25 years when the boulder was present, radionuclides were released and transported by sheetflow during precipitation events, wind blown resuspension, and infiltration into the unsaturated zone. In this study, one of the boulders was removed, followed by grid sampling of the surrounding area. Measured gamma radiation levels in three dimensions were used to derive separate dispersion rates by the three transport mechanisms.

J. Walton; P. Goodell; C. Brashears; D. French; A. Kelts

2005-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

468

Test results of a new detector system for gamma ray isotopic measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new type of gamma-ray detector system for isotopic measurements has been developed. This new system, a ``Duo detector`` array, consists of two intrinsic germanium detectors, a planar followed by a coaxial mounted on the same axis within a single cryostat assembly. This configuration allows the isotopic analysis system to take advantage of spectral data results that are collected simultaneously from different gamma-ray energy regimes. Princeton Gamma Tech (PGT) produced several prototypes of this Duo detector array which were then tested by Rocky Flats personnel until the design was optimized. An application for this detector design is in automated, roboticized NDA systems such as those being developed at the Los Alamos TA-55 Plutonium Facility. The Duo detector design reduces the space necessary for the isotopic instrument by a factor of two (only one liquid nitrogen dewar is needed), and also reduces the complexity of the mechanical systems and controlling software. Data will be presented on measurements of nuclear material with a Duo detector for a wide variety of matrices. Results indicate that the maximum count rate can be increased up to 100,000 counts per second yet maintaining excellent resolution and energy rate product.

Malcom, J.E.; Bonner, C.A.; Hurd, J.R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Fleissner, [EG and G Rocky Flats, Inc., Golden, CO (United States)

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays and Gamma Ray Bursts from Axion Stars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose a model in which ultra high energy cosmic rays and gamma ray bursts are produced by collisions between neutron stars and axion stars. The acceleration of such a cosmic ray is made by the electric field, $\\sim 10^{15} (B/10^{12} {G}) {eV} {cm}^{-1}$, which is induced in an axion star by relatively strong magnetic field $B>10^{12}$ G of a neutron star. On the other hand, similar collisions generate gamma ray bursts when magnetic field is relatively small, e.g. $\\leq 10^{10}$ G. Assuming that the axion mass is $\\sim 10^{-9}$ eV, we can explain huge energies of the gamma ray bursts $\\sim 10^{54}$ erg as well as the ultra high energies of the cosmic rays $\\sim 10^{20}$ eV. We estimate rate of energy release in the collisions and we find that the rate roughly agrees with observations. In addition, we show that these axion stars are plausible candidates for MACHOs. Since the axion star induces oscillating electric current under the magnetic field, observable monochromatic radiations are emitted.

Aiichi Iwazaki

2000-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

470

Who is stressed? A pilot study of salivary cortisol and alpha-amylase concentrations in agoraphobic patients and their novice therapists undergoing in vivo exposure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In cognitive behavioural therapy of phobic anxiety, in vivo exposure is considered as an effective treatment strategy. Apparently, it involves the experience of stress and anxiety in patients. Given the therapist's role during exposure sessions, it is conceivable that the performance is also accompanied with the experience of stress in therapists, especially when unversed in conducting psychotherapy. Studies confirmed that cognitive behavioural therapists tend to avoid therapist-guided in vivo exposure. The objective of this study was the simultaneous investigation of therapist's and patient's stress response during in vivo exposure. Therefore, 23 agoraphobic patients and their 23 treating therapists in training provided five saliva samples during an in vivo exposure and five samples during an ordinary therapy session. Before and during exposure session, subjective evaluations of stress and anxiety were assessed. Results suggested that therapists reported similar levels of perceived stress as patients before exposure. Both groups displayed significantly elevated salivary cortisol (sC) levels during exposure compared to the control session and a trend for alterations in salivary alpha-amylase (sAA) activity was found. Therapists reached peak concentrations of sC before start of the intervention followed by a decline during exposure, while patients displayed peak levels of cortisol secretion after 60 min of exposure. In vivo exposure seems to be a demanding intervention not only for the patient, but also for therapists in training. However, it was also demonstrated that physiological and subjective stress rather decrease during the intervention and that both groups rated exposure to be substantially successful. Based on the presented results, another potential factor contributing to the under-usage of exposure treatment is conceivable and needs to be addressed in future research.

Sarah Schumacher; Katharina Gaudlitz; Jens Plag; Robert Miller; Clemens Kirschbaum; Lydia Fehm; Thomas Fydrich; Andreas Ströhle

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

SuperAGILE and Gamma Ray Bursts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The solid-state hard X-ray imager of AGILE gamma-ray mission -- SuperAGILE -- has a six arcmin on-axis angular resolution in the 15-45 keV range, a field of view in excess of 1 steradian. The instrument is very light: 5 kg only. It is equipped with an on-board self triggering logic, image deconvolution, and it is able to transmit the coordinates of a GRB to the ground in real-time through the ORBCOMM constellation of satellites. Photon by photon Scientific Data are sent to the Malindi ground station at every contact. In this paper we review the performance of the SuperAGILE experiment (scheduled for a launch in the middle of 2006), after its first onground calibrations, and show the perspectives for Gamma Ray Bursts.

Pacciani, Luigi; Costa, Enrico; Del Monte, Ettore; Donnarumma, Immacolata; Evangelista, Yuri; Feroci, Marco; Frutti, Massimo; Lazzarotto, Francesco; Lapshov, Igor; Rubini, Alda; Soffitta, Paolo; Tavani, Marco [IASF-INAF Rome (Italy); Barbiellini, Guido [INFN Trieste (Italy); Mastropietro, Marcello [CNR Montelibretti (Italy); Morelli, Ennio [IASF-INAF-Bologna (Italy); Rapisarda, Massimo [ENEA Frascati (Italy)

2006-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

472

Factorization in B ---> V gamma decays  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The factorization properties of the radiative decays B {yields} V{gamma} are analyzed at leading order in 1/m{sub b} using the soft-collinear effective theory. It is shown that the decay amplitudes can be expressed in terms of a B {yields} V form factor evaluated at q{sup 2} = 0, light-cone distribution amplitudes of the B and V mesons, and calculable hard-scattering kernels. The renormalization-group equations in the effective theory are solved to resum perturbative logarithms of the different scales in the decay process. Phenomenological implications for the B {yields} K*{gamma} branching ratio, isospin asymmetry, and CP asymmetries are discussed, with particular emphasis on possible effects from physics beyond the Standard Model.

Becher, Thomas; /Fermilab; Hill, Richard J.; /SLAC; Neubert, Matthias; /Cornell U., LEPP

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Lorentz violation from gamma-ray bursts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The constancy of light speed is a basic assumption in Einstein's special relativity, and consequently the Lorentz invariance is a fundamental symmetry of space-time in modern physics. However, it is speculated that the speed of light becomes energy-dependent due to the Lorentz invariance violation~(LV) in various new physics theories. We analyse the data of the energetic photons from the gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) by the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope, and find more events to support the energy dependence in the light speed with both linear and quadratic form corrections. We provide two scenarios to understand all the new-released Pass~8 data of bright GRBs by the Fermi-LAT Collaboration, with predictions from such scenarios being testable by future detected GRBs.

Shu Zhang; Bo-Qiang Ma

2014-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

474

Gamma ray bursts: A 1983 overview  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Gamma?ray burst observations are reviewed with mention of new gamma?ray and optical transient measurements and with discussions of the controversial contradictory and unresolved issues that have recently emerged: burst spectra appear to fluctuate in time as rapidly as they are measured implying that any one spectrum may be incorrect; energy spectra can be obligingly fitted to practically any desired shape implying in effect that no objective spectral resolution exists at all; burst fluxes and temporal quantities including the total event energy are characterized very differently with differing instruments implying that even elementary knowledge of their properties is instrumentally subjective; finally the log N?log S determinations are deficient in the weak bursts while there is no detection of a source direction anisotropy implying that Ptolemy was right or that burst source distance estimates are basically guesswork. These issues may remain unsolved until vastly improved instruments are flown.

T. L. Cline

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Compositions containing poly ([gamma]glutamylcysteinyl)glycines  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of removing heavy metals from aqueous solution, a composition of matter used in effecting the removal, and the apparatus used in effecting the removal are described. One or more of the polypeptides, poly ([gamma]glutamylcysteinyl)glycines, is immobilized on an inert material in particulate form. Upon contact with an aqueous solution containing heavy metals, the polypeptides sequester the metals, removing them from the solution. There is selectivity of poly ([gamma]glutamylcysteinyl)glycines having a particular number of monomer repeat units for particular metals. The polypeptides are easily regenerated by contact with a small amount of an organic acid, so that they can be used again to remove heavy metals from solution. This also results in the removal of the metals from the column in a concentrated form. 1 figs.

Jackson, P.J.; Delhaize, E.; Robinson, N.J.; Unkefer, C.J.; Furlong, C.

1992-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

476

Real time gamma-ray signature identifier  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A real time gamma-ray signature/source identification method and system using principal components analysis (PCA) for transforming and substantially reducing one or more comprehensive spectral libraries of nuclear materials types and configurations into a corresponding concise representation/signature(s) representing and indexing each individual predetermined spectrum in principal component (PC) space, wherein an unknown gamma-ray signature may be compared against the representative signature to find a match or at least characterize the unknown signature from among all the entries in the library with a single regression or simple projection into the PC space, so as to substantially reduce processing time and computing resources and enable real-time characterization and/or identification.

Rowland, Mark (Alamo, CA); Gosnell, Tom B. (Moraga, CA); Ham, Cheryl (Livermore, CA); Perkins, Dwight (Livermore, CA); Wong, James (Dublin, CA)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

477

Neutron-driven gamma-ray laser  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A lasing cylinder emits laser radiation at a gamma-ray wavelength of 0.87 .ANG. when subjected to an intense neutron flux of about 400 eV neutrons. A 250 .ANG. thick layer of Be is provided between two layers of 100 .ANG. thick layer of .sup.57 Co and these layers are supported on a foil substrate. The coated foil is coiled to form the lasing cylinder. Under the neutron flux .sup.57 Co becomes .sup.58 Co by neutron absorption. The .sup.58 Co then decays to .sup.57 Fe by 1.6 MeV proton emission. .sup.57 Fe then transitions by mesne decay to a population inversion for lasing action at 14.4 keV. Recoil from the proton emission separates the .sup.57 Fe from the .sup.57 Co and into the Be, where Mossbauer emission occurs at a gamma-ray wavelength.

Bowman, Charles D. (Los Alamos, NM)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Factorization in B to V gamma Decays  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The factorization properties of the radiative decays B {yields} V{gamma} are analyzed at leading order in 1/mb using the soft-collinear effective theory. It is shown that the decay amplitudes can be expressed in terms of a B {yields} V form factor evaluated at q{sup 2} = 0, light-cone distribution amplitudes of the B and V mesons, and calculable hard-scattering kernels. The renormalization-group equations in the effective theory are solved to resume perturbative logarithms of the different scales in the decay process. Phenomenological implications for the B {yields} K*{gamma} branching ratio, isospin asymmetry, and CP asymmetries are discussed, with particular emphasis on possible effects from physics beyond the Standard Model.

Becher, T

2005-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

479

Gamma irradiation effects in W films  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using the van Der Pauw methodology, the surface resistivity of irradiated tungsten films deposited on Silicon substrate was measured. The films were exposed to {gamma} radiation using a isotopic {sup 60}Co source in three irradiation stages attaining 40.35 kGy in total dose. The obtained results for superficial resistivity display a time annealing features and their values are proportional to the total dose.

Claro, Luiz H. [Instituto de Estudos Avancados - IEAv, Rod. dos Tamoios, km 5,5, CEP: 12228-840, Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil) and Faculdade de Tecnologia Sao Francisco - FATESF, Av. Siqueira Campos, 1174, CEP: 12207-000, Jacarei (Brazil); Santos, Ingrid A. [Instituto de Estudos Avancados - IEAv, Rod. dos Tamoios, km 5,5, CEP: 12228-840, Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Silva, Cassia F. [Faculdade de Tecnologia Sao Francisco - FATESF, Av. Siqueira Campos, 1174, CEP: 12207-000, Jacarei, SP (Brazil)

2013-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

480

Gamma Ray Bursts as Cosmological Tools  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The use of Gamma Ray Bursts as “standard candles” has been made possible by the recent discovery of a very tight correlation between their rest frame intrinsic properties. This correlation relates the GRB prompt emission peak spectral energy E peak to the energy E ? corrected for the collimation angle ?jet of these sources. The possibility to use GRBs to constrain the cosmological parameters and to study the nature of Dark Energy are very promising.

G. Ghirlanda; G. Ghisellini; L. Nava; C. Firmani

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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