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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

P-type gallium nitride  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Several methods have been found to make p-type gallium nitride. P-type gallium nitride has long been sought for electronic devices. N-type gallium nitride is readily available. Discovery of p-type gallium nitride and the methods for making it will enable its use in ultraviolet and blue light-emitting diodes and lasers. pGaN will further enable blue photocathode elements to be made. Molecular beam epitaxy on substrates held at the proper temperatures, assisted by a nitrogen beam of the proper energy produced several types of p-type GaN with hole concentrations of about 5{times}10{sup 11} /cm{sup 3} and hole mobilities of about 500 cm{sup 2} /V-sec, measured at 250 K. P-type GaN can be formed of unintentionally-doped material or can be doped with magnesium by diffusion, ion implantation, or co-evaporation. When applicable, the nitrogen can be substituted with other group III elements such as Al. 9 figs.

Rubin, M.; Newman, N.; Fu, T.; Ross, J.; Chan, J.

1997-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

2

P-type gallium nitride  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Several methods have been found to make p-type gallium nitride. P-type gallium nitride has long been sought for electronic devices. N-type gallium nitride is readily available. Discovery of p-type gallium nitride and the methods for making it will enable its use in ultraviolet and blue light-emitting diodes and lasers. pGaN will further enable blue photocathode elements to be made. Molecular beam epitaxy on substrates held at the proper temperatures, assisted by a nitrogen beam of the proper energy produced several types of p-type GaN with hole concentrations of about 5.times.10.sup.11 /cm.sup.3 and hole mobilities of about 500 cm.sup.2 /V-sec, measured at 250.degree. K. P-type GaN can be formed of unintentionally-doped material or can be doped with magnesium by diffusion, ion implantation, or co-evaporation. When applicable, the nitrogen can be substituted with other group III elements such as Al.

Rubin, Michael (Berkeley, CA); Newman, Nathan (Montara, CA); Fu, Tracy (Berkeley, CA); Ross, Jennifer (Pleasanton, CA); Chan, James (Berkeley, CA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Distinctive Signature of Indium Gallium Nitride Quantum Dot Lasing in Microdisks Cavities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Low threshold lasers realized within compact, high quality optical cavities enable a variety of nanophotonics applications. Gallium nitride (GaN) materials containing indium gallium nitride (InGaN) quantum dots and quantum wells offer an outstanding platform to study light matter interactions and realize practical devices such as efficient light emitting diodes and nanolasers. Despite progress in the growth and characterization of InGaN quantum dots, their advantages as the gain medium in low threshold lasers have not been clearly demonstrated. This work seeks to better understand the reasons for these limitations by focusing on the simpler, limited-mode microdisk cavities, and by carrying out comparisons of lasing dynamics in those cavities using varying gain media including InGaN quantum wells, fragmented quantum wells, and a combination of fragmented quantum wells with quantum dots. For each gain medium, we utilize the distinctive, high quality (Q~5500) modes of the cavities, and the change in the highest ...

Woolf, Alexander; Aharanovich, Igor; Zhu, Tongtong; Niu, Nan; Wang, Danqing; Oliver, Rachel A; Hu, Evelyn L

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Au-free Ohmic Contacts to Gallium Nitride and Graphene  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This work deals with Au-free contact metallization schemes for gallium nitride (GaN) and graphene semiconductors. Graphene and gallium nitride are promising materials that can potentially be integrated together in the near future for high frequency...

Ravikirthi, Pradhyumna

2014-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

5

Characterizing organometallic-vapor-phase-epitaxy-grown indium gallium nitride islands on gallium nitride for light emitting diode applications.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The indium-gallium-nitride on gallium-nitride (InGaN/GaN) materials system is a promising candidate for providing a high intensity, high efficiency solution to the yet unsolved problem of… (more)

Anderson, Kathy Perkins Jenkins

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

IIl-nitride nanowires and heterostructures : growth and optical properties on nanoscale  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gallium nitride (GaN) and indium gallium nitride (InGaN) nanowires promise potential for further improving the electricity-to-light energy conversion efficiencies in light emitting diodes due to strain relaxation, reduced ...

Zhou, Xiang, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Gallium nitride junction field-effect transistor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An all-ion implanted gallium-nitride (GaN) junction field-effect transistor (JFET) and method of making the same. Also disclosed are various ion implants, both n- and p-type, together with or without phosphorous co-implantation, in selected III-V semiconductor materials.

Zolper, John C. (Albuquerque, NM); Shul, Randy J. (Albuquerque, NM)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Synthesis and characterization of visible emission from rare-earth doped aluminum nitride, gallium nitride and gallium aluminum nitride powders and thin films  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the Nitrides of Aluminum and Gallium," J. Electrochem.1) 24 (1962). G. Long and L. M. Foster, "Aluminum Nitride, aRefractory for Aluminum to 2000°C," J. Am. Ceram. Soc. ,

Tao, Jonathan Huai-Tse

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Neutron detection using boron gallium nitride semiconductor material  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this study, we developed a new neutron-detection device using a boron gallium nitride (BGaN) semiconductor in which the B atom acts as a neutron converter. BGaN and gallium nitride (GaN) samples were grown by metal organic vapor phase epitaxy, and their radiation detection properties were evaluated. GaN exhibited good sensitivity to ?-rays but poor sensitivity to ?-rays. Moreover, we confirmed that electrons were generated in the depletion layer under neutron irradiation. This resulted in a neutron-detection signal after ?-rays were generated by the capture of neutrons by the B atoms. These results prove that BGaN is useful as a neutron-detecting semiconductor material.

Atsumi, Katsuhiro [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Shizuoka University, 3-5-1 Johoku, Naka-ku, Hamamatsu 432-8561 (Japan); Inoue, Yoku; Nakano, Takayuki, E-mail: ttnakan@ipc.shizuoka.ac.jp [Department of Electrical and Materials Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Shizuoka University, 3-5-1 Johoku, Naka-ku, Hamamatsu 432-8561 (Japan); Mimura, Hidenori; Aoki, Toru [Research Institute of Electronics, Shizuoka University, 3-5-1 Johoku, Naka-ku, Hamamatsu 432-8011 (Japan)

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

arsenide gallium nitride: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Lundberga,*, J. Lua , A Abstract The diffusion of indium and gallium in polycrystalline thin film Cu(In,Ga)Se2 layers has been with a larger number of vacancies, that facilitates...

11

Strain relaxation of thick (11–22) semipolar InGaN layer for long wavelength nitride-based device  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this study, the properties of thick stress-relaxed (11–22) semipolar InGaN layers were investigated. Owing to the inclination of growth orientation, misfit dislocations (MDs) occurred at the heterointerface when the strain state of the (11–22) semipolar InGaN layers reached the critical point. We found that unlike InGaN layers based on polar and nonpolar growth orientations, the surface morphologies of the stress-relaxed (11–22) semipolar InGaN layers did not differ from each other and were similar to the morphology of the underlying GaN layer. In addition, misfit strain across the whole InGaN layer was gradually relaxed by MD formation at the heterointerface. To minimize the effect of surface roughness and defects in GaN layers on the InGaN layer, we conducted further investigation on a thick (11–22) semipolar InGaN layer grown on an epitaxial lateral overgrown GaN template. We found that the lateral indium composition across the whole stress-relaxed InGaN layer was almost uniform. Therefore, thick stress-relaxed (11–22) semipolar InGaN layers are suitable candidates for use as underlying layers in long-wavelength devices, as they can be used to control strain accumulation in the heterostructure active region without additional influence of surface roughness.

Kim, Jaehwan; Min, Daehong; Jang, Jongjin; Lee, Kyuseung; Chae, Sooryong; Nam, Okhyun, E-mail: ohnam@kpu.ac.kr [Advanced Photonics Research Center/LED Technology Center, Department of Nano-Optical Engineering, Korea Polytechnic University, 237, Sangidaehak-ro, Siheung-si, Gyeonggi-do 429-793 (Korea, Republic of)

2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

12

Advanced Epi Tools for Gallium Nitride Light Emitting Diode Devices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over the course of this program, Applied Materials, Inc., with generous support from the United States Department of Energy, developed a world-class three chamber III-Nitride epi cluster tool for low-cost, high volume GaN growth for the solid state lighting industry. One of the major achievements of the program was to design, build, and demonstrate the world’s largest wafer capacity HVPE chamber suitable for repeatable high volume III-Nitride template and device manufacturing. Applied Materials’ experience in developing deposition chambers for the silicon chip industry over many decades resulted in many orders of magnitude reductions in the price of transistors. That experience and understanding was used in developing this GaN epi deposition tool. The multi-chamber approach, which continues to be unique in the ability of the each chamber to deposit a section of the full device structure, unlike other cluster tools, allows for extreme flexibility in the manufacturing process. This robust architecture is suitable for not just the LED industry, but GaN power devices as well, both horizontal and vertical designs. The new HVPE technology developed allows GaN to be grown at a rate unheard of with MOCVD, up to 20x the typical MOCVD rates of 3{micro}m per hour, with bulk crystal quality better than the highest-quality commercial GaN films grown by MOCVD at a much cheaper overall cost. This is a unique development as the HVPE process has been known for decades, but never successfully commercially developed for high volume manufacturing. This research shows the potential of the first commercial-grade HVPE chamber, an elusive goal for III-V researchers and those wanting to capitalize on the promise of HVPE. Additionally, in the course of this program, Applied Materials built two MOCVD chambers, in addition to the HVPE chamber, and a robot that moves wafers between them. The MOCVD chambers demonstrated industry-leading wavelength yield for GaN based LED wafers and industry-leading uptime enabled in part by a novel in-situ cleaning process developed in this program.

Patibandla, Nag; Agrawal, Vivek

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Imaging the p-n junction in a gallium nitride nanowire with a scanning microwave microscope  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We used a broadband, atomic-force-microscope-based, scanning microwave microscope (SMM) to probe the axial dependence of the charge depletion in a p-n junction within a gallium nitride nanowire (NW). SMM enables the visualization of the p-n junction location without the need to make patterned electrical contacts to the NW. Spatially resolved measurements of S{sub 11}{sup ?}, which is the derivative of the RF reflection coefficient S{sub 11} with respect to voltage, varied strongly when probing axially along the NW and across the p-n junction. The axial variation in S{sub 11}{sup ?}? effectively mapped the asymmetric depletion arising from the doping concentrations on either side of the junction. Furthermore, variation of the probe tip voltage altered the apparent extent of features associated with the p-n junction in S{sub 11}{sup ?} images.

Imtiaz, Atif [Physical Measurement Laboratory, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, Colorado 80305 (United States); Department of Electrical, Computer, and Energy Engineering, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States); Wallis, Thomas M.; Brubaker, Matt D.; Blanchard, Paul T.; Bertness, Kris A.; Sanford, Norman A.; Kabos, Pavel, E-mail: kabos@boulder.nist.gov [Physical Measurement Laboratory, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, Colorado 80305 (United States); Weber, Joel C. [Physical Measurement Laboratory, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, Colorado 80305 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States); Coakley, Kevin J. [Information Technology Laboratory, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, Colorado 80305 (United States)

2014-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

14

More Efficient Power Conversion for EVs: Gallium-Nitride Advanced Power Semiconductor and Packaging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: Delphi is developing power converters that are smaller and more energy efficient, reliable, and cost-effective than current power converters. Power converters rely on power transistors which act like a very precisely controlled on-off switch, controlling the electrical energy flowing through an electrical circuit. Most power transistors today use silicon (Si) semiconductors. However, Delphi is using semiconductors made with a thin layer of gallium-nitride (GaN) applied on top of the more conventional Si material. The GaN layer increases the energy efficiency of the power transistor and also enables the transistor to operate at much higher temperatures, voltages, and power-density levels compared to its Si counterpart. Delphi is packaging these high-performance GaN semiconductors with advanced electrical connections and a cooling system that extracts waste heat from both sides of the device to further increase the device’s efficiency and allow more electrical current to flow through it. When combined with other electronic components on a circuit board, Delphi’s GaN power transistor package will help improve the overall performance and cost-effectiveness of HEVs and EVs.

None

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

The influence of random indium alloy fluctuations in indium gallium nitride quantum wells on the device behavior  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, we describe the influence of the intrinsic indium fluctuation in the InGaN quantum wells on the carrier transport, efficiency droop, and emission spectrum in GaN-based light emitting diodes (LEDs). Both real and randomly generated indium fluctuations were used in 3D simulations and compared to quantum wells with a uniform indium distribution. We found that without further hypothesis the simulations of electrical and optical properties in LEDs such as carrier transport, radiative and Auger recombination, and efficiency droop are greatly improved by considering natural nanoscale indium fluctuations.

Yang, Tsung-Jui; Wu, Yuh-Renn, E-mail: yrwu@ntu.edu.tw [Graduate Institute of Photonics and Optoelectronics and Department of Electrical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Shivaraman, Ravi; Speck, James S. [Department of Materials, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)

2014-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

16

E-Print Network 3.0 - adaptive nitride-based coatings Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

DELAUSANNE Summary: AND ELECTRONICS PROF. N. GRANDJEAN 33 III-NITRIDE BASED OPTOELECTRONIC DEVICES 34 GALLIUM NITRIDE-BASED 2D... FOR DIVERSE APPLICATIONS 84 HOLE ARRAY...

17

Low Cost Production of InGaN for Next-Generation Photovoltaic Devices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this project is to develop a low-cost and low-energy technology for production of photovoltaic devices based on InGaN materials. This project builds on the ongoing development by Structured Materials Industries (SMI), of novel thin film deposition technology for Group III-Nitride materials, which is capable of depositing Group-III nitride materials at significantly lower costs and significantly lower energy usage compared to conventional deposition techniques. During this project, SMI demonstrated deposition of GaN and InGaN films using metalorganic sources, and demonstrated compatibility of the process with standard substrate materials and hardware components.

Nick M. Sbrockey, Shangzhu Sun, Gary S. Tompa,

2012-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

18

Sandia National Laboratories: gallium nitride  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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19

Realizing InGaN monolithic solar-photoelectrochemical cells for artificial photosynthesis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

InGaN alloys are very promising for solar water splitting because they have direct bandgaps that cover almost the whole solar spectrum. The demonstration of direct solar-to-fuel conversion without external bias with the sunlight being the only energy input would pave the way for realizing photoelectrochemical (PEC) production of hydrogen by using InGaN. A monolithic solar-PEC cell based on InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells capable to directly generate hydrogen gas under zero bias via solar water splitting is reported. Under the irradiation by a simulated sunlight (1-sun with 100 mW/cm{sup 2}), a 1.5% solar-to-fuel conversion efficiency has been achieved under zero bias, setting a fresh benchmark of employing III-nitrides for artificial photosynthesis. Time dependent hydrogen gas production photocurrent measured over a prolonged period (measured for 7 days) revealed an excellent chemical stability of InGaN in aqueous solution of hydrobromic acid. The results provide insights into the architecture design of using InGaN for artificial photosynthesis to provide usable clean fuel (hydrogen gas) with the sunlight being the only energy input.

Dahal, R.; Pantha, B. N.; Li, J.; Lin, J. Y.; Jiang, H. X., E-mail: hx.jiang@ttu.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas 79409 (United States)

2014-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

20

Growth and optical characterization of multilayers of InGaN quantum dots  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

carried out using a two photon excitation technique employing a picosecond mode-locked Ti-sapphire laser emitting at 790 nm. Samples were mounted in a cold -finger cryostat that could be cooled down to 4.2 K and the laser was focused through a microscope... GaN quantum dots Article Type: Research Paper Section/Category: General subjects Keywords: B2. InGaN quantum dots; A1. Photoluminescence; B1. Nitrides; A3. Metal-organic vapour phase epitaxy Corresponding Author: Dr Tongtong Zhu, Ph...

Zhu, Tontong; El-Ella, Haitham; Reid, Benjamin; Holmes, Mark; Taylor, Robert; Kappers, Menno; Oliver, Rachel

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gallium nitride ingan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Electronic properties of gallium nitride nanowires  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis presents a systematic study of the electrical transport in GaN nanowires. Particularly, the effect of the surrounding dielectric on the conductivity of GaN nanowires is experimentally shown for the first time. ...

Yoon, Joonah

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Copper Indium Gallium Diselenide  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE-sponsored research on copper indium gallium diselenide [Cu(InxGa1-x)Se2], or CIGS, solar cells focuses on developing better film qualities, and thus, higher efficiencies. A list of current...

23

Group III-nitride thin films grown using MBE and bismuth  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention comprises growing gallium nitride films in the presence of bismuth using MBE at temperatures of about 1000 K or less. The present invention further comprises the gallium nitride films fabricated using the inventive fabrication method. The inventive films may be doped with magnesium or other dopants. The gallium nitride films were grown on sapphire substrates using a hollow anode Constricted Glow Discharge nitrogen plasma source. When bismuth was used as a surfactant, two-dimensional gallium nitride crystal sizes ranging between 10 .mu.m and 20 .mu.m were observed. This is 20 to 40 times larger than crystal sizes observed when GaN films were grown under similar circumstances but without bismuth. It is thought that the observed increase in crystal size is due bismuth inducing an increased surface diffusion coefficient for gallium. The calculated value of 4.7.times.10.sup.-7 cm.sup.2 /sec. reveals a virtual substrate temperature of 1258 K which is 260 degrees higher than the actual one.

Kisielowski, Christian K. (Peidmont, CA); Rubin, Michael (Berkeley, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Group III-nitride thin films grown using MBE and bismuth  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention comprises growing gallium nitride films in the presence of bismuth using MBE at temperatures of about 1000 K or less. The present invention further comprises the gallium nitride films fabricated using the inventive fabrication method. The inventive films may be doped with magnesium or other dopants. The gallium nitride films were grown on sapphire substrates using a hollow anode Constricted Glow Discharge nitrogen plasma source. When bismuth was used as a surfactant, two-dimensional gallium nitride crystal sizes ranging between 10 .mu.m and 20 .mu.m were observed. This is 20 to 40 times larger than crystal sizes observed when GaN films were grown under similar circumstances but without bismuth. It is thought that the observed increase in crystal size is due bismuth inducing an increased surface diffusion coefficient for gallium. The calculated value of 4.7.times.10.sup.-7 cm.sup.2 /sec. reveals a virtual substrate temperature of 1258 K which is 260 degrees higher than the actual one.

Kisielowski, Christian K. (Piedmont, CA); Rubin, Michael (Berkeley, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Nitrided Metallic Bipolar Plates  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

nitrided surface treatment. In this approach, an electrically-conductive and corrosion-resistant chromium-nitride surface layer is formed on the bipolar plate component by...

26

Gallium interactions with Zircaloy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of weapons-grade plutonium (WGPu) in the United States is the conversion of weapons-grade plutonium into mixed-oxide (MOX) reactor fuel. MOX fuel fabricated in this way must be compatible with currently used nuclear fuel components. Since US WGPu contains... that gallium may have on zircaloy cladding during reactor operation. As a result of the reprocessing of spent fuel used in European nuclear programs, many studies have been conducted on the production and behavior of MOX fuel in traditional reactors [5...

West, Michael Keith

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

27

Formation mechanisms of spatially-directed zincblende gallium nitride nanocrystals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report on the spatially selective formation of GaN nanocrystals embedded in GaAs. Broad-area N{sup +} implantation followed by rapid thermal annealing leads to the formation of nanocrystals at the depth of maximum ion damage. With additional irradiation using a Ga{sup +} focused ion beam, selective lateral positioning of the nanocrystals within the GaAs matrix is observed in isolated regions of increased vacancy concentration. Following rapid thermal annealing, the formation of zincblende GaN is observed in the regions of highest vacancy concentration. The nucleation of zincblende nanocrystals over the wurtzite phase of bulk GaN is consistent with the predictions of a thermodynamic model for the nanoscale size-dependence of GaN nucleation.

Wood, A. W. [Department of Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Collino, R. R. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Cardozo, B. L. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Naab, F. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Wang, Y. Q. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Los Alamos National Lab, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Goldman, R. S. [Department of Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

28

Neutron irradiation effects on metal-gallium nitride contacts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have measured the effect of fast and thermal neutrons on GaN Schottky barriers and ohmic contacts using current–voltage and transmission line method electrical techniques, optical, atomic force and scanning electron microscopy morphological techniques, and X-ray photoemission spectroscopy chemical techniques. These studies reveal a 10{sup 15}?n/cm{sup 2} neutron threshold for Schottky barrier ideality factor increases, a 10{sup 15}?n/cm{sup 2} fast plus thermal neutron threshold for ohmic contact sheet and contact resistance increases, and 10{sup 16}?n/cm{sup 2} neutron fluence threshold for major device degradation identified with thermally driven diffusion of Ga and N into the metal contacts and surface phase changes. These results demonstrate the need for protecting metal-GaN contacts in device applications subject to neutron radiation.

Katz, Evan J.; Lin, Chung-Han; Zhang, Zhichun [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Qiu, Jie; Cao, Lei [Nuclear Engineering Program, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Mishra, Umesh K. [Departments of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Materials Science and Engineering University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Brillson, Leonard J., E-mail: brillson.1@osu.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Department of Physics and Center for Materials Research, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)

2014-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

29

Neutron irradiation effects on gallium nitride-based Schottky diodes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Depth-resolved cathodoluminescence spectroscopy (DRCLS), time-resolved surface photovoltage spectroscopy, X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS), and current-voltage measurements together show that fast versus thermal neutrons differ strongly in their electronic and morphological effects on metal-GaN Schottky diodes. Fast and thermal neutrons introduce GaN displacement damage and native point defects, while thermal neutrons also drive metallurgical reactions at metal/GaN interfaces. Defect densities exhibit a threshold neutron fluence below which thermal neutrons preferentially heal versus create new native point defects. Scanning XPS and DRCLS reveal strong fluence- and metal-dependent electronic and chemical changes near the free surface and metal interfaces that impact diode properties.

Lin, Chung-Han; Katz, Evan J.; Zhang, Zhichun [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus Ohio 43210 (United States)] [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus Ohio 43210 (United States); Qiu, Jie; Cao, Lei [Nuclear Engineering Program, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)] [Nuclear Engineering Program, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Mishra, Umesh K. [Departments of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Materials Science and Engineering, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)] [Departments of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Materials Science and Engineering, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Brillson, Leonard J. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus Ohio 43210 (United States) [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus Ohio 43210 (United States); Department of Physics and Center for Materials Research, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)

2013-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

30

Electrochemical Solution Growth: Gallium Nitride Crystal Growth - Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing Zirconia Nanoparticles as Selective Sorbents . | EMSL forInnovation

31

High-Quality, Low-Cost Bulk Gallium Nitride Substrates  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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32

Light-Emitting Diodes on Semipolar Bulk Gallium Nitride Substrate |  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in3.pdfEnergy Health andofIanJenniferLeslie Pezzullo:

33

Gallium Safety in the Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A university laboratory experiment for the US Department of Energy magnetic fusion research program required a simulant for liquid lithium. The simulant choices were narrowed to liquid gallium and galinstan (Ga-In-Sn) alloy. Safety information on liquid gallium and galinstan were compiled, and the choice was made to use galinstan. A laboratory safety walkthrough was performed in the fall of 2002 to support the galinstan experiment. The experiment has been operating successfully since early 2002.

Lee C. Cadwallader

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Gallium Safety in the Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A university laboratory experiment for the US Department of Energy magnetic fusion research program required a simulant for liquid lithium. The simulant choices were narrowed to liquid gallium and galinstan (Ga-In-Sn) alloy. Safety information on liquid gallium and galinstan were compiled, and the choice was made to use galinstan. A laboratory safety walkthrough was performed in the fall of 2002 to support the galinstan experiment. The experiment has been operating successfully since early 2002.

Cadwallader, L.C.

2003-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

35

Nitride fuel performance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The purpose of this work was to assess the potential of nitride fuels in the current context of the nuclear industry. Nitride fuels systems have indeed been for the past decade the subject of new interest from the international community...

Reynaud, Sylvie Marie Aurel?ie

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Potential effects of gallium on cladding materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper identifies and examines issues concerning the incorporation of gallium in weapons derived plutonium in light water reactor (LWR) MOX fuels. Particular attention is given to the more likely effects of the gallium on the behavior of the cladding material. The chemistry of weapons grade (WG) MOX, including possible consequences of gallium within plutonium agglomerates, was assessed. Based on the calculated oxidation potentials of MOX fuel, the effect that gallium may have on reactions involving fission products and possible impact on cladding performance were postulated. Gallium transport mechanisms are discussed. With an understanding of oxidation potentials and assumptions of mechanisms for gallium transport, possible effects of gallium on corrosion of cladding were evaluated. Potential and unresolved issues and suggested research and development (R and D) required to provide missing information are presented.

Wilson, D.F.; Beahm, E.C.; Besmann, T.M.; DeVan, J.H.; DiStefano, J.R.; Gat, U.; Greene, S.R.; Rittenhouse, P.L.; Worley, B.A.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Synthesis, characterization, and biotemplated assembly of indium nitride and indium gallium nitride nanoparticles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A low-temperature, ambient pressure solution synthesis of colloidal InN nanoparticles is presented. This synthesis utilizes a previously dismissed precursor and results in individual, non-aggregated nanoparticles with ...

Hsieh, Jennifer Chia-Jen

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Remarkably reduced efficiency droop by using staircase thin InGaN quantum barriers in InGaN based blue light emitting diodes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The efficiency droop of InGaN/GaN(InGaN) multiple quantum well (MQW) light emitting diodes (LEDs) with thin quantum barriers (QB) is studied. With thin GaN QB (3?nm–6?nm thickness), the efficiency droop is not improved, which indicates that hole transport cannot be significantly enhanced by the thin GaN QBs. On the contrary, the efficiency droop was remarkably reduced by using a InGaN staircase QB (InGaN SC-QB) MQWs structure where InGaN SC-QBs lower the transport energy barrier of holes. The efficiency droop ratio was as low as 3.3% up to 200?A/cm{sup 2} for the InGaN SC-QB LED. By using monitoring QW with longer wavelength we observe a much uniform carrier distribution in the InGaN SC-QB LEDs, which reveals the mechanism of improvement in the efficiency droop.

Zhou, Kun; Ikeda, Masao, E-mail: mikeda2013@sinano.ac.cn, E-mail: jpliu2010@sinano.ac.cn; Liu, Jianping, E-mail: mikeda2013@sinano.ac.cn, E-mail: jpliu2010@sinano.ac.cn; Zhang, Shuming; Li, Deyao; Zhang, Liqun; Yang, Hui [Suzhou Institute of Nano-tech and Nano-bionics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Suzhou (China); Key Laboratory of Nanodevices and Applications, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Suzhou (China); Cai, Jin; Wang, Hui; Wang, H. B. [Suzhou Institute of Nano-tech and Nano-bionics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Suzhou (China); Key Laboratory of Nanodevices and Applications, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Suzhou (China); Suzhou Nanojoin Photonics Co., Ltd., Suzhou (China)

2014-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

39

Local environment and composition of magnesium gallium layered...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Local environment and composition of magnesium gallium layered double hydroxides determined from solid-state 1H and 71Ga NMR Local environment and composition of magnesium gallium...

40

Synthesis and characterization of visible emission from rare-earth doped aluminum nitride, gallium nitride and gallium aluminum nitride powders and thin films  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

74 (19) 2821 (1999). F. H. Spedding, Rare-earth Elements, inby the use of rare- earth elements as color emitters inpowders activated with rare-earth elements Eu 3+ , Tb 3+ ,

Tao, Jonathan Huai-Tse

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gallium nitride ingan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Synthesis and characterization of visible emission from rare-earth doped aluminum nitride, gallium nitride and gallium aluminum nitride powders and thin films  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

residential lighting using incandescent lights [2], as shownenergy used for the incandescent lamp is wasted as infraredlight source to replace incandescent lighting [1]. Figure

Tao, Jonathan Huai-Tse

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Superconducting structure with layers of niobium nitride and aluminum nitride  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A superconducting structure is formed by depositing alternate layers of aluminum nitride and niobium nitride on a substrate. Deposition methods include dc magnetron reactive sputtering, rf magnetron reactive sputtering, thin-film diffusion, chemical vapor deposition, and ion-beam deposition. Structures have been built with layers of niobium nitride and aluminum nitride having thicknesses in a range of 20 to 350 Angstroms. Best results have been achieved with films of niobium nitride deposited to a thickness of approximately 70 Angstroms and aluminum nitride deposited to a thickness of approximately 20 Angstroms. Such films of niobium nitride separated by a single layer of aluminum nitride are useful in forming Josephson junctions. Structures of 30 or more alternating layers of niobium nitride and aluminum nitride are useful when deposited on fixed substrates or flexible strips to form bulk superconductors for carrying electric current. They are also adaptable as voltage-controlled microwave energy sources.

Murduck, James M. (Lisle, IL); Lepetre, Yves J. (Lauris, FR); Schuller, Ivan K. (Woodridge, IL); Ketterson, John B. (Evanston, IL)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Superconducting structure with layers of niobium nitride and aluminum nitride  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A superconducting structure is formed by depositing alternate layers of aluminum nitride and niobium nitride on a substrate. Deposition methods include dc magnetron reactive sputtering, rf magnetron reactive sputtering, thin-film diffusion, chemical vapor deposition, and ion-beam deposition. Structures have been built with layers of niobium nitride and aluminum nitride having thicknesses in a range of 20 to 350 Angstroms. Best results have been achieved with films of niobium nitride deposited to a thickness of approximately 70 Angstroms and aluminum nitride deposited to a thickness of approximately 20 Angstroms. Such films of niobium nitride separated by a single layer of aluminum nitride are useful in forming Josephson junctions. Structures of 30 or more alternating layers of niobium nitride and aluminum nitride are useful when deposited on fixed substrates or flexible strips to form bulk superconductors for carrying electric current. They are also adaptable as voltage-controlled microwave energy sources. 8 figs.

Murduck, J.M.; Lepetre, Y.J.; Schuller, I.K.; Ketterson, J.B.

1989-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

44

Boron nitride nanotubes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Boron nitride nanotubes are prepared by a process which includes: (a) creating a source of boron vapor; (b) mixing the boron vapor with nitrogen gas so that a mixture of boron vapor and nitrogen gas is present at a nucleation site, which is a surface, the nitrogen gas being provided at a pressure elevated above atmospheric, e.g., from greater than about 2 atmospheres up to about 250 atmospheres; and (c) harvesting boron nitride nanotubes, which are formed at the nucleation site.

Smith, Michael W. (Newport News, VA); Jordan, Kevin (Newport News, VA); Park, Cheol (Yorktown, VA)

2012-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

45

Wavelength limits for InGaN quantum wells on GaN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The emission wavelength of coherently strained InGaN quantum wells (QW) is limited by the maximum thickness before relaxation starts. For high indium contents x>40% the resulting wavelength decreases because quantum confinement dominates. For low indium content x<40% the electron hole wave function overlap (and hence radiative emission) is strongly reduced with increasing QW thickness due to the quantum confined Stark effect and imposes another limit. This results in a maximum usable emission wavelength at around 600?nm for QWs with 40%-50% indium content. Relaxed InGaN buffer layers could help to push this further, especially on non- and semi-polar orientations.

Pristovsek, Markus, E-mail: markus@pristovsek.de [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, Pembroke Street, Cambridge CB2 3QZ (United Kingdom)] [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, Pembroke Street, Cambridge CB2 3QZ (United Kingdom)

2013-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

46

Recovery of gallium from aluminum industry residues  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A procedure is proposed to recover gallium from flue dust aluminum residues produced in plants by using solid-phase extraction with a commercial polyether-type polyurethane foam (PUF). Gallium can be separated from high concentrations of aluminum, iron, nickel, titanium, vanadium, copper, zinc, sulfate, fluoride, and chloride by extraction with PUF from 3 M sulfuric acid and 3 M sodium chloride concentration medium with at least a 92% efficiency. Gallium backextraction was fast and quantitative with ethanol solution. In all recovery steps commercial-grade reagents could be used, including tap water. The recovered gallium was precipitated with sodium hydroxide solution, purified by dissolution and precipitation, calcinated, and the final oxide was 98.6% pure.

Carvalho, M.S.; Neto, K.C.M.; Nobrega, A.W.; Medeiros, J.A.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Nitrided Metallic Bipolar Plates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives are: (1) Develop and optimize stainless steel alloys amenable to formation of a protective Cr-nitride surface by gas nitridation, at a sufficiently low cost to meet DOE targets and with sufficient ductility to permit manufacture by stamping. (2) Demonstrate capability of nitridation to yield high-quality stainless steel bipolar plates from thin stamped alloy foils (no significant stamped foil warping or embrittlement). (3) Demonstrate single-cell fuel cell performance of stamped and nitrided alloy foils equivalent to that of machined graphite plates of the same flow-field design ({approx}750-1,000 h, cyclic conditions, to include quantification of metal ion contamination of the membrane electrode assembly [MEA] and contact resistance increase attributable to the bipolar plates). (4) Demonstrate potential for adoption in automotive fuel cell stacks. Thin stamped metallic bipolar plates offer the potential for (1) significantly lower cost than currently-used machined graphite bipolar plates, (2) reduced weight/volume, and (3) better performance and amenability to high volume manufacture than developmental polymer/carbon fiber and graphite composite bipolar plates. However, most metals exhibit inadequate corrosion resistance in proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) environments. This behavior leads to high electrical resistance due to the formation of surface oxides and/or contamination of the MEA by metallic ions, both of which can significantly degrade fuel cell performance. Metal nitrides offer electrical conductivities up to an order of magnitude greater than that of graphite and are highly corrosion resistant. Unfortunately, most conventional coating methods (for metal nitrides) are too expensive for PEMFC stack commercialization or tend to leave pinhole defects, which result in accelerated local corrosion and unacceptable performance.

Brady, Michael P [ORNL; Tortorelli, Peter F [ORNL; Pihl, Josh A [ORNL; Toops, Todd J [ORNL; More, Karren Leslie [ORNL; Meyer III, Harry M [ORNL; Vitek, John Michael [ORNL; Wang, Heli [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); Turner, John [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); Wilson, Mahlon [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Garzon, Fernando [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Rockward, Tommy [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Connors, Dan [GenCell Corp; Rakowski, Jim [Allegheny Ludlum; Gervasio, Don [Arizona State University

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Cubic nitride templates  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A polymer-assisted deposition process for deposition of epitaxial cubic metal nitride films and the like is presented. The process includes solutions of one or more metal precursor and soluble polymers having binding properties for the one or more metal precursor. After a coating operation, the resultant coating is heated at high temperatures under a suitable atmosphere to yield metal nitride films and the like. Such films can be used as templates for the development of high quality cubic GaN based electronic devices.

Burrell, Anthony K; McCleskey, Thomas Mark; Jia, Quanxi; Mueller, Alexander H; Luo, Hongmei

2013-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

49

Surface plasmon enhanced InGaN light emitter Koichi Okamoto*a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is a very promising method for developing the super bright light emitting diodes (LEDs). Moreover, we foundGaN/GaN, light emitting diode, quantum well, internal quantum efficiency, solid-state light source 1. INTRODUCTION Since 1993, InGaN quantum wells (QW)-based light emitting diodes (LEDs) have been continuously

Okamoto, Koichi

50

Enhancement of Radiative Efficiency with Staggered InGaN Quantum Well Light Emitting Diodes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The technology on the large overlap InGaN QWs developed in this program is currently implemented in commercial technology in enhancing the internal quantum efficiency in major LED industry in US and Asia. The scientific finding from this work supported by the DOE enabled the implementation of this step-like staggered quantum well in the commercial LEDs.

Tansu, Nelson; Dierolf, Volkmar; Huang, Gensheng; Penn, Samson; Zhao, Hongping; Liu, Guangyu; Li, Xiaohang; Poplawsky, Jonathan

2011-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

51

Near-infrared InN quantum dots on high-In composition InGaN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report the growth of InN quantum dots (QDs) on thick InGaN layers with high In composition (>50%) by molecular beam epitaxy. Optimized growth conditions are identified for the InGaN layers at reduced growth temperature and increased active N flux resulting in minimized phase separation and defect generation. The InN QDs grown on top of the optimized InGaN layer exhibit small size, high density, and photoluminescence up to room temperature. The InN/InGaN QDs reveal excellent potential for intermediate band solar cells with the InGaN and InN QD bandgap energies tuned to the best match of absorption to the solar spectrum.

Soto Rodriguez, Paul E. D.; Gomez, Victor J.; Kumar, Praveen; Calleja, Enrique; Noetzel, Richard [Instituto de Sistemas Optoelectronicos y Microtecnologia (ISOM), Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Ciudad Universitaria s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain)] [Instituto de Sistemas Optoelectronicos y Microtecnologia (ISOM), Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Ciudad Universitaria s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

GALLIUM--2000 30.1 By Deborah A. Kramer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the largest application for gallium, with optoelectronic devices [mostly laser diodes and light-use application for gallium, with 63% of total consumption. Optoelectronic devices accounted for 32% of domestic% of the gallium consumed in the United States was in the form of GaAs. GaAs was manufactured into optoelectronic

53

GALLIUM--1998 29.1 By Deborah A. Kramer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

's) were the largest application for gallium, with optoelectronic devices [mostly laser diodes and light-use application for gallium, with 52% of total consumption. Optoelectronic devices accounted for 45% of domestic% of the gallium consumed in the United States was in the form of GaAs. GaAs was manufactured into optoelectronic

54

GALLIUM--1999 29.1 By Deborah A. Kramer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

circuits (IC's) were the largest application for gallium, with optoelectronic devices [mostly laser diodes-use application for gallium, with 52% of total consumption. Optoelectronic devices accounted for 42% of domestic% of the gallium consumed in the United States was in the form of GaAs. GaAs was manufactured into optoelectronic

55

High-Efficiency Nitride-Based Photonic Crystal Light Sources  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The University of California Santa Barbara (UCSB) is maximizing the efficiency of a white LED by enhancing the external quantum efficiency using photonic crystals to extract light that would normally be confined in a conventional structure. Ultimate efficiency can only be achieved by looking at the internal structure of light. To do this, UCSB is focusing on maximizing the light extraction efficiency and total light output from light engines driven by Gallium Nitride (GaN)-based LEDs. The challenge is to engineer large overlap (interaction) between modes and photonic crystals. The project is focused on achieving high extraction efficiency in LEDs, controlled directionality of emitted light, integrated design of vertical device structure, and nanoscale patterning of lateral structure.

56

Comparative study of polar and semipolar (112{sup ¯}2) InGaN layers grown by metalorganic vapour phase epitaxy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

InGaN layers were grown simultaneously on (112{sup ¯}2) GaN and (0001) GaN templates by metalorganic vapour phase epitaxy. At higher growth temperature (?750?°C), the indium content (<15%) of the (112{sup ¯}2) and (0001) InGaN layers was similar. However, for temperatures less than 750?°C, the indium content of the (112{sup ¯}2) InGaN layers (15%–26%) were generally lower than those with (0001) orientation (15%–32%). The compositional deviation was attributed to the different strain relaxations between the (112{sup ¯}2) and (0001) InGaN layers. Room temperature photoluminescence measurements of the (112{sup ¯}2) InGaN layers showed an emission wavelength that shifts gradually from 380?nm to 580?nm with decreasing growth temperature (or increasing indium composition). The peak emission wavelength of the (112{sup ¯}2) InGaN layers with an indium content of more than 10% blue-shifted a constant value of ?(50–60) nm when using higher excitation power densities. This blue-shift was attributed to band filling effects in the layers.

Dinh, Duc V., E-mail: vanduc.dinh@tyndall.ie, E-mail: peter.parbrook@tyndall.ie; Zubialevich, V. Z. [Tyndall National Institute, University College Cork, Lee Matltings, Dyke Parade, Cork (Ireland); Oehler, F.; Kappers, M. J.; Humphreys, C. J. [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy University of Cambridge, Pembroke Street, Cambridge CB2 3QZ (United Kingdom); Alam, S. N.; Parbrook, P. J., E-mail: vanduc.dinh@tyndall.ie, E-mail: peter.parbrook@tyndall.ie [Tyndall National Institute, University College Cork, Lee Matltings, Dyke Parade, Cork (Ireland); School of Engineering, University College Cork, Cork (Ireland); Caliebe, M.; Scholtz, F. [Institute of Optoelectronics, Ulm University, Ulm 89069 (Germany)

2014-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

57

Superplastic forging nitride ceramics  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention relates to producing relatively flaw free silicon nitride ceramic shapes requiring little or no machining by superplastic forging This invention herein was made in part under Department of Energy Grant DE-AC01-84ER80167, creating certain rights in the United States Government. The invention was also made in part under New York State Science and Technology Grant SB1R 1985-10.

Panda, Prakash C. (Ithaca, NY); Seydel, Edgar R. (Ithaca, NY); Raj, Rishi (Ithaca, NY)

1988-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

58

Observations of Rabi oscillations in a non-polar InGaN quantum dot  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experimental observation of Rabi rotations between an exciton excited state and the crystal ground state in a single non-polar InGaN quantum dot is presented. The exciton excited state energy is determined by photoluminescence excitation spectroscopy using two-photon excitation from a pulsed laser. The population of the exciton excited state is seen to undergo power dependent damped Rabi oscillations.

Reid, Benjamin P. L., E-mail: benjamin.reid@physics.ox.ac.uk; Chan, Christopher C. S.; Taylor, Robert A. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Kocher, Claudius [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Konstanz University, Konstanz (Germany); Zhu, Tongtong; Oehler, Fabrice; Emery, Robert; Oliver, Rachel A. [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, 27 Charles Babbage Road, Cambridge CB3 0FS (United Kingdom)

2014-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

59

Silicon nitride ceramic comprising samaria and ytterbia  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention relates to a sintered silicon nitride ceramic comprising samaria and ytterbia for enhanced toughness.

Yeckley, Russell L. (Oakham, MA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Functionalized boron nitride nanotubes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A plasma treatment has been used to modify the surface of BNNTs. In one example, the surface of the BNNT has been modified using ammonia plasma to include amine functional groups. Amine functionalization allows BNNTs to be soluble in chloroform, which had not been possible previously. Further functionalization of amine-functionalized BNNTs with thiol-terminated organic molecules has also been demonstrated. Gold nanoparticles have been self-assembled at the surface of both amine- and thiol-functionalized boron nitride Nanotubes (BNNTs) in solution. This approach constitutes a basis for the preparation of highly functionalized BNNTs and for their utilization as nanoscale templates for assembly and integration with other nanoscale materials.

Sainsbury, Toby; Ikuno, Takashi; Zettl, Alexander K

2014-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gallium nitride ingan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Vacancy-Induced Nanoscale Wire Structure in Gallium Selenide...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

(nanowires) in the compound gallium selenide. In short, ordered lines of structural vacancies in the material stimulate the growth of "one-dimensional" structures less than 1...

62

Photonuclear Reaction Cross Sections for Gallium Isotopes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The photon induced reactions which are named as photonuclear reactions have a great importance in many field of nuclear, radiation physics and related fields. Since we have planned to perform photonuclear reaction on gallium target with bremmstrahlung photons from clinical linear accelerator in the future, the cross-sections of neutron (photo-neutron ({\\gamma},xn)) and proton (photo-proton ({\\gamma},xn)) productions after photon activation have been calculated by using TALYS 1.2 computer code in this study. The target nucleus has been considered gallium which has two stable isotopes, 69Ga and 71Ga. According to the results, we have seen that the calculations are in harmony in the limited literature values. Furthermore, the pre-equilibrium and compound process contributions to the total cross-section have been investigated.

Serkan Akkoyun; Tuncay Bayram

2014-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

63

Temperature-dependent efficiency droop of blue InGaN micro-light emitting diodes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Temperature-dependent trends in radiative and Auger recombination coefficients have been determined at different injection carrier concentrations using InGaN micro-light emitting diodes 40 ?m in diameter. The differential lifetime was obtained first from the measured modulation bandwidth and was then employed to calculate the carrier concentration in the quantum well active region. When the temperature increases, the carrier concentration increases, but both the radiative and Auger recombination coefficients decrease. In addition, the temperature dependence of radiative and Auger recombination coefficients is weaker at a higher injection carrier concentration, which is strongly related to phase space filling.

Tian, Pengfei; McKendry, Jonathan J. D.; Herrnsdorf, Johannes; Ferreira, Ricardo; Watson, Ian M.; Gu, Erdan, E-mail: erdan.gu@strath.ac.uk; Dawson, Martin D. [Institute of Photonics, University of Strathclyde, 106 Rottenrow, Glasgow G4 0NW (United Kingdom); Watson, Scott; Kelly, Anthony E. [School of Engineering, University of Glasgow, James Watt South Building, Glasgow G12 8LT (United Kingdom)

2014-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

64

Internal efficiency of InGaN light-emitting diodes: Beyond a quasiequilibrium model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We propose a model to better investigate InGaN light-emitting diode (LED) internal efficiency by extending beyond the usual total carrier density rate equation approach. To illustrate its capability, the model is applied to study intrinsic performance differences between violet and green LEDs. The simulations show performance differences, at different current densities and temperatures, arising from variations in spontaneous emission and heat loss rates. By tracking the momentum-resolved carrier populations, these rate changes are, in turn, traced to differences in bandstructure and plasma heating. The latter leads to carrier distributions that deviate from the quasiequilibrium ones at lattice temperature.

Chow, Weng W.; Crawford, Mary H.; Tsao, Jeffrey Y.; Kneissl, Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Optical Constants ofOptical Constants of Uranium Nitride Thin FilmsUranium Nitride Thin Films  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optical Constants ofOptical Constants of Uranium Nitride Thin FilmsUranium Nitride Thin FilmsDelta--Beta Scatter Plot at 220 eVBeta Scatter Plot at 220 eV #12;Why Uranium Nitride?Why Uranium Nitride? UraniumUranium, uranium,Bombard target, uranium, with argon ionswith argon ions Uranium atoms leaveUranium atoms leave

Hart, Gus

66

Standard Reference Material 1751: Gallium Melting-Point Standard  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Standard Reference Material 1751: Gallium Melting-Point Standard Gregory F. Strouse NIST Special Publication 260-157 #12;#12;NIST Special Publication 260-157 XXXX Standard Reference Material 1751: Gallium Melting-Point Standard Gregory F. Strouse Chemical Science and Technology Laboratory Process Measurements

67

OPTIMIZATION OF GaN WINDOW LAYER FOR InGaN SOLAR CELLS USING POLARIZATION EFFECT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on the design of wide-band gap GaN window layers for InGaN solar cells. Window layers serve to passivate the top into account during design of the solar cell to improve its collection efficiency. Previously, we have. The present work is a subset of the design optimization process for such solar cells, where we focus

Honsberg, Christiana

68

Radiation-Hardened Gallium Nitride Detector and Arrays for Fusion Diagnostics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This poster reports testing to confirm that GaN devices exhibit the extreme radiation hardness needed for use at the NIF, functioning properly after 1x10{sup 12} protons/cm{sup 2} proton irradiation in one year.

Sun, K. X., and MacNeil, L.

2011-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

69

The equilibrium state of hydrogen in gallium nitride: Theory and experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Formation energies and vibrational frequencies for H in wurtzite GaN were calculated from density functional theory and used to predict equilibrium state occupancies and solid solubilities for p-type, intrinsic, and n-type material. The solubility of deuterium (D) was measured at 600--800 C as a function of D{sub 2} pressure and doping and compared with theory. Agreement was obtained by reducing the H formation energies 0.2 eV from ab-initio theoretical values. The predicted stretch-mode frequency for H bound to the Mg acceptor lies 5% above an observed infrared absorption attributed to this complex. It is concluded that currently recognized H states and physical processes account for the equilibrium behavior of H examined in this work.

MYERS JR.,SAMUEL M.; WRIGHT,ALAN F.; PETERSEN,GARY A.; SEAGER,CARLETON H.; WAMPLER,WILLIAM R.; CRAWFORD,MARY H.; HAN,JUNG

2000-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

70

Diffusion, Uptake and Release of Hydrogen in p-type Gallium Nitride: Theory and Experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The diffusion, uptake, and release of H in p-type GaN are modeled employing state energies from density-function theory and compared with measurements of deuterium uptake and release using nuclear-reaction analysis. Good semiquantitative agreement is found when account is taken of a surface permeation barrier.

MYERS JR.,SAMUEL M.; WRIGHT,ALAN F.; PETERSEN,GARY A.; WAMPLER,WILLIAM R.; SEAGER,CARLETON H.; CRAWFORD,MARY H.; HAN,JUNG

2000-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

71

Growth Kinetics and Doping of Gallium Nitride Grown by rf-Plasma Assisted Molecular Beam Epitaxy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thomas H. Myers, Ph.D., Chair Larry E. Halliburton, Ph.D. Nancy C. Giles, Ph.D. Charter D. Stinespring Giles, Dr. Charter Stinespring, Dr. Larry Halliburton, and Dr. Mohindar Seehra. In addition, I would

Myers, Tom

72

Commercialization of gallium nitride nanorod arrays on silicon for solid-state lighting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

One important component in energy usage is lighting, which is currently dominated by incandescent and fluorescent lamps. However, due to potentially higher efficiencies and thus higher energy savings, solid-state lighting ...

Wee, Qixun

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

High-Quality, Low-Cost Bulk Gallium Nitride Substrates | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana.ProgramJulietip sheetK-4In 2013 many| Department HIGHImageDepartmentEnergy

74

Effect of Gallium Nitride Template Layer Strain on the Growth of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed NewcatalystNeutronEnvironmentZIRKLE FRUITYear 1MATERIALSTiO2(110).

75

Silicon nitride/silicon carbide composite powders  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Prepare silicon nitride-silicon carbide composite powders by carbothermal reduction of crystalline silica powder, carbon powder and, optionally, crystalline silicon nitride powder. The crystalline silicon carbide portion of the composite powders has a mean number diameter less than about 700 nanometers and contains nitrogen. The composite powders may be used to prepare sintered ceramic bodies and self-reinforced silicon nitride ceramic bodies.

Dunmead, Stephen D. (Midland, MI); Weimer, Alan W. (Midland, MI); Carroll, Daniel F. (Midland, MI); Eisman, Glenn A. (Midland, MI); Cochran, Gene A. (Midland, MI); Susnitzky, David W. (Midland, MI); Beaman, Donald R. (Midland, MI); Nilsen, Kevin J. (Midland, MI)

1996-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

76

Preparation and atomic structure of reconstructed (0001) InGaN surfaces  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The preparation and surface structure of high quality group-III-polar (0001) InGaN layers grown by metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy have been investigated. In order to obtain a clean and well-ordered surface we studied the preparation by annealing at various temperatures under ultra high vacuum and nitrogen-rich conditions in nitrogen-plasma. We show that different InGaN surface reconstructions such as (1 Multiplication-Sign 1), (1 + 1/6), (2 Multiplication-Sign 2), and ({radical}(3) Multiplication-Sign {radical}(3))R30 Degree-Sign can be obtained as observed by low energy electron diffraction. Dependent on the annealing temperature and nitrogen supply these surfaces exhibit significant differences in stoichiometry and morphology as determined by Auger electron spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy measurements. The (1 Multiplication-Sign 1), (2 Multiplication-Sign 2), and ({radical}(3) Multiplication-Sign {radical}(3))R30 Degree-Sign superstructures are terminated by single group-III-adatoms, whereas the (1 + 1/6) exhibits a incommensurate overlayer of group-III-atoms. We show that the (2 Multiplication-Sign 2) and ({radical}(3) Multiplication-Sign {radical}(3))R30 Degree-Sign an In depletion in the first group-III layer and In or Ga adatoms in ontop position. Strain-relaxation is suggested to explain this structure formation.

Friedrich, C.; Biermann, A.; Kneissl, M.; Vogt, P. [Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik EW6-1, Technische Universitaet Berlin, Hardenbergstr. 36, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Hoffmann, V. [Ferdinand-Braun-Institut, Leibniz-Institut fuer Hoechstfrequenztechnik, Gustav-Kirchhoff-Str. 4, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Esser, N. [Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik EW6-1, Technische Universitaet Berlin, Hardenbergstr. 36, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Leibniz-Institut fuer Analytische Wissenschaften - ISAS e.V., Albert-Einstein-Str. 9, 12489 Berlin (Germany)

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

(Data in kilograms of gallium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: No domestic primary (crude, unrefined) gallium was recovered in 2013. Globally,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

% of the gallium consumed was used in integrated circuits (ICs). Optoelectronic devices, which include laser diodes of the remaining gallium consumption. Optoelectronic devices were used in aerospace applications, consumer goods

78

InGaN: Direct correlation of nanoscopic morphology features with optical and structural properties  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A comprehensive study on the impact of growth modes on the structural and optical properties of thick InGaN layers suitable for photovoltaic application is presented. Samples grown by metalorganic vapour phase epitaxy with different growth rates and thicknesses have been analyzed. The application of slow growth rates result in smooth layers while higher growth rates induce a meandering surface morphology. Using low-temperature cathodoluminescence, a direct correlation of the morphology to local luminescent properties is obtained: the top of meandering structures reveals a spectrally red-shifted emission compared to the emission wavelength expected from the average indium content determined by X-ray diffraction. The origin of this shift is identified and explained by increased indium incorporation on top of the meander due to a spatially localized compositional pulling effect.

Koch, Holger, E-mail: holger.koch@osram-os.com [OSRAM Opto Semiconductors GmbH, Leibnizstr. 4, 93055 Regensburg (Germany); GaN Device Technology, RWTH Aachen University, Sommerfeldstraße 24, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Bertram, Frank; August, Olga; Christen, Jürgen [Institute of Experimental Physics, Otto-von-Guericke-University Magdeburg, Universitätsplatz 2, 39106 Magdeburg (Germany); Pietzonka, Ines; Ahl, Jan-Philipp; Strassburg, Martin; Lugauer, Hans-Jürgen [OSRAM Opto Semiconductors GmbH, Leibnizstr. 4, 93055 Regensburg (Germany); Kalisch, Holger; Vescan, Andrei [GaN Device Technology, RWTH Aachen University, Sommerfeldstraße 24, 52074 Aachen (Germany)

2014-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

79

Cavity optomechanics in gallium phosphide microdisks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We demonstrate gallium phosphide (GaP) microdisk optical cavities with intrinsic quality factors >2.8?×?10{sup 5} and mode volumes <10(?/n){sup 3}, and study their nonlinear and optomechanical properties. For optical intensities up to 8.0?×?10{sup 4} intracavity photons, we observe optical loss in the microcavity to decrease with increasing intensity, indicating that saturable absorption sites are present in the GaP material, and that two-photon absorption is not significant. We observe optomechanical coupling between optical modes of the microdisk around 1.5??m and several mechanical resonances, and measure an optical spring effect consistent with a theoretically predicted optomechanical coupling rate g{sub 0}/2??30?kHz for the fundamental mechanical radial breathing mode at 488?MHz.

Mitchell, Matthew; Barclay, Paul E., E-mail: pbarclay@ucalgary.ca [Institute for Quantum Science and Technology, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4 (Canada); National Institute for Nanotechnology, 11421 Saskatchewan Dr. NW, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2M9 (Canada); Hryciw, Aaron C. [National Institute for Nanotechnology, 11421 Saskatchewan Dr. NW, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2M9 (Canada)

2014-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

80

amorphous carbon nitride: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Si-rich nitride Er:SRN materials have 3 Carbon Nitride and Conjugated Polymer Composite Materials. Open Access Theses and Dissertations Summary: ??The semiconductor and...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gallium nitride ingan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Vacancies in fully hydrogenated boron nitride layer: implications...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Vacancies in fully hydrogenated boron nitride layer: implications for functional nanodevices. Vacancies in fully hydrogenated boron nitride layer: implications for functional...

82

Silicon nitride having a high tensile strength  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A ceramic body comprising at least about 80 w/o silicon nitride and having a mean tensile strength of at least about 800 MPa.

Pujari, Vimal K. (Northboro, MA); Tracey, Dennis M. (Medfield, MA); Foley, Michael R. (Oxford, MA); Paille, Norman I. (Oxford, MA); Pelletier, Paul J. (Sutton, MA); Sales, Lenny C. (Grafton, MA); Willkens, Craig A. (Worcester, MA); Yeckley, Russell L. (Latrobe, PA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Nanostructure, Chemistry and Crystallography of Iron Nitride...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Nanostructure, Chemistry and Crystallography of Iron Nitride Magnetic Materials by Ultra-High-Resolution Electron Microscopy and Related Methods Nanostructure, Chemistry and...

84

Application of ultrasound in solvent extraction of nickel and gallium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effects of ultrasound on the rate of solvent extraction of nickel with Lix 65N and Lix 70, and gallium with Kelex 100 were investigated. These solvent extraction systems are noted by their sluggish nature. Low frequency (20 kHz) ultrasound increased the rates of extraction of nickel by factors of four to seven. The ultrasound had no effect on the final chemical equilibrium. Gallium extraction rates were enhanced with the use of ultrasound by as much as a factor of 15. Again, the ultrasound had no effect on extraction equilibrium. For both nickel and gallium, the enhanced rates were attributed to increased interfacial surface area associated with ultrasonically induced cavitation and microdroplet formation. The stability of the microdroplets permitted intermittent application of ultrasound with corresponding decreases in ultrasonic energy requirements. The lowest energy consumption was observed with short (0.25 to 5 s) bursts of high power (41 to 61 W) ultrasonic inputs. The study also provided insight into the factors that affect the complex extraction of gallium from sodium aluminate solutions. The rate controlling step was found to be the dehydration of the gallate ion, Ga(OH)4, and the first complex formation between gallium and Kelex 100. Sodium was found to enhance the extraction rate up to a point, beyond which increased concentration was detrimental. Increasing aluminum concentration was found to slow extraction rates. Modifiers and diluents were shown to markedly affect extraction rates even without ultrasound. Ketone modifiers, particularly 2-undecanone, when used with Kermac 470B or Escaid 200 diluents enhanced extraction rates of gallium to the point that the use of ultrasound provided no additional benefits. The positive effects of ketone modifiers for the solvent extraction of gallium had not been previously reported.

Pesic, B.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Gallium based low-interaction anions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention provides: a composition of the formula M.sup.+x (Ga(Y).sub.4.sup.-).sub.x where M is a metal selected from the group consisting of lithium, sodium, potassium, cesium, calcium, strontium, thallium, and silver, x is an integer selected from the group consisting of 1 or 2, each Y is a ligand selected from the group consisting of aryl, alkyl, hydride and halide with the proviso that at least one Y is a ligand selected from the group consisting of aryl, alkyl and halide; a composition of the formula (R).sub.x Q.sup.+ Ga(Y).sub.4.sup.- where Q is selected from the group consisting of carbon, nitrogen, sulfur, phosphorus and oxygen, each R is a ligand selected from the group consisting of alkyl, aryl, and hydrogen, x is an integer selected from the group consisting of 3 and 4 depending upon Q, and each Y is a ligand selected from the group consisting of aryl, alkyl, hydride and halide with the proviso that at least one Y is a ligand selected from the group consisting of aryl, alkyl and halide; an ionic polymerization catalyst composition including an active cationic portion and a gallium based weakly coordinating anion; and bridged anion species of the formula M.sup.+x.sub.y [X(Ga(Y.sub.3).sub.z ].sup.-y.sub.x where M is a metal selected from the group consisting of lithium, sodium, potassium, magnesium, cesium, calcium, strontium, thallium, and silver, x is an integer selected from the group consisting of 1 or 2, X is a bridging group between two gallium atoms, y is an integer selected from the group consisting 1 and 2, z is an integer of at least 2, each Y is a ligand selected from the group consisting of aryl, alkyl, hydride and halide with the proviso that at least one Y is a ligand selected from the group consisting of aryl, alkyl and halide.

King, Wayne A. (Santa Fe, NM); Kubas, Gregory J. (Santa Fe, NM)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Process for forming pure silver ohmic contacts to N- and P-type gallium arsenide materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed is an improved process for manufacturing gallium arsenide semiconductor devices having as its components a n-type gallium arsenide substrate layer and a p-type gallium arsenide diffused layer. The improved process comprises forming a pure silver ohmic contact to both the diffuse layer and the substrate layer wherein the n-type layer comprises a substantially low doping carrier concentration.

Hogan, S.J.

1983-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

87

Method of preparation of uranium nitride  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Method for producing terminal uranium nitride complexes comprising providing a suitable starting material comprising uranium; oxidizing the starting material with a suitable oxidant to produce one or more uranium(IV)-azide complexes; and, sufficiently irradiating the uranium(IV)-azide complexes to produce the terminal uranium nitride complexes.

Kiplinger, Jaqueline Loetsch; Thomson, Robert Kenneth James

2013-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

88

Molten-Salt-Based Growth of Group III Nitrides  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for growing Group III nitride materials using a molten halide salt as a solvent to solubilize the Group-III ions and nitride ions that react to form the Group III nitride material. The concentration of at least one of the nitride ion or Group III cation is determined by electrochemical generation of the ions.

Waldrip, Karen E. (Albuquerque, NM); Tsao, Jeffrey Y. (Albuquerque, NM); Kerley, Thomas M. (Albuquerque, NM)

2008-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

89

Aluminum Nitride Micro-Channels Grown via Metal Organic Vapor Phase Epitaxy for MEMs Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Aluminum nitride (AlN) is a promising material for a number of applications due to its temperature and chemical stability. Furthermore, AlN maintains its piezoelectric properties at higher temperatures than more commonly used materials, such as Lead Zirconate Titanate (PZT) [1, 2], making AlN attractive for high temperature micro and nanoelectromechanical (MEMs and NEMs) applications including, but not limited to, high temperature sensors and actuators, micro-channels for fuel cell applications, and micromechanical resonators. This work presents a novel AlN micro-channel fabrication technique using Metal Organic Vapor Phase Epitaxy (MOVPE). AlN easily nucleates on dielectric surfaces due to the large sticking coefficient and short diffusion length of the aluminum species resulting in a high quality polycrystalline growth on typical mask materials, such as silicon dioxide and silicon nitride [3,4]. The fabrication process introduced involves partially masking a substrate with a silicon dioxide striped pattern and then growing AlN via MOVPE simultaneously on the dielectric mask and exposed substrate. A buffered oxide etch is then used to remove the underlying silicon dioxide and leave a free standing AlN micro-channel. The width of the channel has been varied from 5 ìm to 110 ìm and the height of the air gap from 130 nm to 800 nm indicating the stability of the structure. Furthermore, this versatile process has been performed on (111) silicon, c-plane sapphire, and gallium nitride epilayers on sapphire substrates. Reflection High Energy Electron Diffraction (RHEED), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), and Raman measurements have been taken on channels grown on each substrate and indicate that the substrate is influencing the growth of the AlN micro-channels on the SiO2 sacrificial layer.

Rodak, L.E.; Kuchibhatla, S.; Famouri, P.; Ting, L.; Korakakis, D.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Interaction of a Liquid Gallium Jet with ISTTOK Edge Plasmas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of liquid metals as plasma facing components in tokamaks has recently experienced a renewed interest stimulated by their advantages in the development of a fusion reactor. Liquid metals have been proposed to solve problems related to the erosion and neutronic activation of solid walls submitted to high power loads allowing an efficient heat exhaust from fusion devices. Presently the most promising candidate materials are lithium and gallium. However, lithium has a short liquid state range when compared, for example, with gallium that has essentially better thermal properties and lower vapor pressure. To explore further these properties, ISTTOK tokamak is being used to test the interaction of a free flying, fully formed liquid gallium jet with the plasma. The interacting, 2.3 mm diameter, jet is generated by hydrostatic pressure and has a 2.5 m/s flow velocity. The liquid metal injector has been build to allow the positioning of the jet inside the tokamak chamber, within a 13 mm range. This paper presents the first obtained experimental results concerning the liquid gallium jet-plasma interaction. A stable jet has been obtained, which was not noticeably affected by the magnetic field transients. ISTTOK has been successfully operated with the gallium jet without degradation of the discharge or a significant plasma contamination by liquid metal. This observation is supported by spectroscopic measurements showing that gallium radiation is limited to the region around the jet. Furthermore, the power deposited on the jet has been evaluated at different radial locations and the surface temperature increase estimated.

Gomes, R. B.; Fernandes, H.; Silva, C.; Pereira, T.; Figueiredo, J.; Carvalho, B.; Soares, A.; Duarte, P.; Varandas, C. [Associacao EURATOM/IST, Centro de Fusao Nuclear, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa, Porugal (Portugal); Sarakovskis, A.; Lielausis, O.; Klyukin, A.; Platacis, E.; Tale, I. [Association EURATOM/University of Latvia, Institute of Solid State Physics, 8 Kengaraga Str., LV-1063 Riga (Latvia)

2008-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

91

Synthesis of transition metal nitride by nitridation of metastable oxide precursor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Metastable transition metal oxides were used as precursors to synthesize transition metal nitrides at low temperature. Amorphous MoO{sub 2} was prepared by reduction of (NH{sub 4}){sub 6}Mo{sub 7}O{sub 24} solution with hydrazine. As-synthesized amorphous MoO{sub 2} was transformed into fcc {gamma}-Mo{sub 2}N at 400 Degree-Sign C and then into hexagonal {delta}-MoN by further increasing the temperature to 600 Degree-Sign C under a NH{sub 3} flow. The nitridation temperature employed here is much lower than that employed in nitridation of crystalline materials, and the amorphous materials underwent a unique nitridation process. Besides this, the bimetallic nitride Ni{sub 2}Mo{sub 3}N was also synthesized by nitridating amorphous bimetallic precursor. These results suggested that the nitridation of amorphous precursor possessed potential to be a general method for synthesizing many interstitial metallic compounds, such as nitrides and carbides at low temperature. - graphical abstract: Amorphous oxide was used as new precursor to prepare nitride at low temperature. Pure {gamma}-Mo{sub 2}N and {delta}-MoN were obtained at 400 Degree-Sign C and at 600 Degree-Sign C, respectively. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We bring out a new method to synthesize transition metal nitrides at low temperature. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both mono- and bimetallic molybdenum nitrides were synthesized at a mild condition. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The formation of two different molybdenum nitrides {gamma}-Mo{sub 2}N and {delta}-MoN can be controlled from the same metastable precursor. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The nitridation temperature was much lower than that reported from crystalline precursors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The metastable precursor had different reaction process in comparison with crystalline precursor.

Wang, Huamin; Wu, Zijie; Kong, Jing [Key Laboratory of Advanced Energy Materials Chemistry (MOE), College of Chemistry, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China)] [Key Laboratory of Advanced Energy Materials Chemistry (MOE), College of Chemistry, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Wang, Zhiqiang, E-mail: zqwang@mail.nankai.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Advanced Energy Materials Chemistry (MOE), College of Chemistry, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China) [Key Laboratory of Advanced Energy Materials Chemistry (MOE), College of Chemistry, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Tianjin Key Laboratory of Water Environment and Resources, Tianjin Normal University, No. 393 Binshui Road, Xiqing Dist., Tianjin 300387 (China); Zhang, Minghui, E-mail: zhangmh@nankai.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Advanced Energy Materials Chemistry (MOE), College of Chemistry, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China)] [Key Laboratory of Advanced Energy Materials Chemistry (MOE), College of Chemistry, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

92

Modeling of temperature and excitation dependences of efficiency in an InGaN light-emitting diode  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The changes in excitation dependence of efficiency with temperature is modeled for a wurtzite InGaN light-emitting diode. The model incorporates bandstructure changes with carrier density arising from screening of quantum-confined Stark effect. Bandstructure is computed by solving Poisson and k.p equations in the envelop approximation. The information is used in a dynamical model for populations in momentum-resolved electron and hole states. Application of the approach shows the interplay of quantum-well and barrier emissions giving rise to shape changes in efficiency versus current density with changing temperature, as observed in some experiments.

Chow, Weng W

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Influences of excitation-dependent bandstructure changes on InGaN light-emitting diode efficiency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bandstructure properties in wurtzite quantum wells can change appreciably with changing carrier density because of screening of quantum-confined Stark effect. An approach for incorporating these changes in an InGaN light-emitting-diode model is described. Bandstructure is computed for different carrier densities by solving Poisson and k\\cdotp equations in the envelop approximation. The information is used as input in a dynamical model for populations in momentum-resolved electron and hole states. Application of the approach is illustrated by modeling device internal quantum efficiency as a function of excitation.

Chow, Weng W

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

GALLIUM--1997 29.1 By Deborah A. Kramer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

As is manufactured into optoelectronic devices (LED's, laser diodes, photodetectors, and solar cells) and integrated consumption. Optoelectronic devices accounted for 44% of domestic consumption, and the remaining 7% was used by imports, primarily high-purity gallium from France and low-purity material from Russia. Optoelectronic

95

Self- and zinc diffusion in gallium antimonide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The technological age has in large part been driven by the applications of semiconductors, and most notably by silicon. Our lives have been thoroughly changed by devices using the broad range of semiconductor technology developed over the past forty years. Much of the technological development has its foundation in research carried out on the different semiconductors whose properties can be exploited to make transistors, lasers, and many other devices. While the technological focus has largely been on silicon, many other semiconductor systems have applications in industry and offer formidable academic challenges. Diffusion studies belong to the most basic studies in semiconductors, important from both an application as well as research standpoint. Diffusion processes govern the junctions formed for device applications. As the device dimensions are decreased and the dopant concentrations increased, keeping pace with Moore's Law, a deeper understanding of diffusion is necessary to establish and maintain the sharp dopant profiles engineered for optimal device performance. From an academic viewpoint, diffusion in semiconductors allows for the study of point defects. Very few techniques exist which allow for the extraction of as much information of their properties. This study focuses on diffusion in the semiconductor gallium antimonide (GaSb). As will become clear, this compound semiconductor proves to be a powerful one for investigating both self- and foreign atom diffusion. While the results have direct applications for work on GaSb devices, the results should also be taken in the broader context of III-V semiconductors. Results here can be compared and contrasted to results in systems such as GaAs and even GaN, indicating trends within this common group of semiconductors. The results also have direct importance for ternary and quaternary semiconductor systems used in devices such as high speed InP/GaAsSb/InP double heterojunction bipolar transistors (DHBT) [Dvorak, (2001)]. Many of the findings which will be reported here were previously published in three journal articles. Hartmut Bracht was the lead author on two articles on self-diffusion studies in GaSb [Bracht, (2001), (2000)], while this report's author was the lead author on Zn diffusion results [Nicols, (2001)]. Much of the information contained herein can be found in those articles, but a more detailed treatment is presented here.

Nicols, Samuel Piers

2002-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

96

Sputtering of tin and gallium-tin clusters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tin and gallium-tin clusters have been produced by 4 keV Ar{sup +} ion bombardment of polycrystalline tin and the gallium-tin eutectic alloy and analyzed by time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The sputtered neutral species were photoionized with 193 nm (6.4 eV) excimer laser light. Neutral tin clusters containing up to 10 atoms and mixed gallium-tin clusters Ga{sub (n-m)}Sn{sub m} with n {<=} 4 for the neutrals and N {<=} 3 for the sputtered ionic species have been detected. Laser power density dependent intensity measurements, relative yields, and kinetic energy distributions have been measured. The abundance distributions of the mixed clusters have been found to be nonstatistical due to significant differences in the ionization efficiencies for clusters with equal nuclearity but different number of tin atoms. The results indicate that Ga{sub 2}Sn and Ga{sub 3}Sn like the all-gallium clusters have ionization potentials below 6.4 eV. In the case of Sn{sub 5}, Sn{sub 6}, GaSn and Ga{sub (n-m)}Sn{sub m} clusters with n=2 to 4 and m>1, the authors detect species that have sufficient internal energy to be one photon ionized despite ionization potentials that are higher 6.4 eV. The tin atom signal that is detected can be attributed to photofragmentation of dimers for both sputtering from polycrystalline tin and from the gallium-tin eutectic alloy.

Lill, T.; Calaway, W.F.; Ma, Z.; Pellin, M.J.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Pair distribution function study on compression of liquid gallium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Integrating a hydrothermal diamond anvil cell (HDAC) and focused high energy x-ray beam from the superconductor wiggler X17 beamline at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), we have successfully collected high quality total x-ray scattering data of liquid gallium. The experiments were conducted at a pressure range from 0.1GPa up to 2GPa at ambient temperature. For the first time, pair distribution functions (PDF) for liquid gallium at high pressure were derived up to 10 {angstrom}. Liquid gallium structure has been studied by x-ray absorption (Di Cicco & Filipponi, 1993; Wei et al., 2000; Comez et al., 2001), x-ray diffraction studies (Waseda & Suzuki, 1972), and molecular dynamics simulation (Tsay, 1993; Hui et al., 2002). These previous reports have focused on the 1st nearest neighbor structure, which tells us little about the atomic arrangement outside the first shell in non- crystalline materials. This study focuses on the structure of liquid gallium and the atomic structure change due to compression. The PDF results show that the observed atomic distance of the first nearest neighbor at 2.78 {angstrom} (first G(r) peak and its shoulder at the higher Q position) is consistent with previous studies by x-ray absorption (2.76 {angstrom}, Comez et al., 2001). We have also observed that the first nearest neighbor peak position did not change with pressure increasing, while the farther peaks positions in the intermediate distance range decreased with pressure increasing. This leads to a conclusion of the possible existence of 'locally rigid units' in the liquid. With the addition of reverse Monte Carlo modeling, we have observed that the coordination number in the local rigit unit increases with pressure. The bulk modulus of liquid gallium derived from the volume compression curve at ambient temperature (300K) is 12.1(6) GPa.

Luo, Shengnian [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Yu, Tony [SUNY-SB; Chen, Jiuhua [SUNY-SB; Ehm, Lars [SUNY-SB; Guo, Quanzhong [SUNY-SB; Parise, John [SUNY-SB

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Method of nitriding refractory metal articles  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of nitriding a refractory-nitride forming metal or metalloid articles and composite articles. A consolidated metal or metalloid article or composite is placed inside a microwave oven and nitrogen containing gas is introduced into the microwave oven. The metal or metalloid article or composite is heated to a temperature sufficient to react the metal or metalloid with the nitrogen by applying a microwave energy within the microwave oven. The metal or metalloid article or composite is maintained at that temperature for a period of time sufficient to convert the article of metal or metalloid or composite to an article or composite of refractory nitride. In addition, a method of applying a coating, such as a coating of an oxide, a carbide, or a carbo-nitride, to an article of metal or metalloid by microwave heating.

Tiegs, Terry N. (Lenoir City, TN); Holcombe, Cressie E. (Knoxville, TN); Dykes, Norman L. (Oak Ridge, TN); Omatete, Ogbemi O. (Lagos, NG); Young, Albert C. (Flushing, NY)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Method of nitriding refractory metal articles  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of nitriding a refractory-nitride forming metal or metalloid articles and composite articles. A consolidated metal or metalloid article or composite is placed inside a microwave oven and nitrogen containing gas is introduced into the microwave oven. The metal or metalloid article or composite is heated to a temperature sufficient to react the metal or metalloid with the nitrogen by applying a microwave energy within the microwave oven. The metal or metalloid article or composite is maintained at that temperature for a period of time sufficient to convert the article of metal or metalloid or composite to an article or composite of refractory nitride. In addition, a method of applying a coating, such as a coating of an oxide, a carbide, or a carbo-nitride, to an article of metal or metalloid by microwave heating.

Tiegs, T.N.; Holcombe, C.E.; Dykes, N.L.; Omatete, O.O.; Young, A.C.

1994-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

100

Low temperature route to uranium nitride  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of preparing an actinide nitride fuel for nuclear reactors is provided. The method comprises the steps of a) providing at least one actinide oxide and optionally zirconium oxide; b) mixing the oxide with a source of hydrogen fluoride for a period of time and at a temperature sufficient to convert the oxide to a fluoride salt; c) heating the fluoride salt to remove water; d) heating the fluoride salt in a nitrogen atmosphere for a period of time and at a temperature sufficient to convert the fluorides to nitrides; and e) heating the nitrides under vacuum and/or inert atmosphere for a period of time sufficient to convert the nitrides to mononitrides.

Burrell, Anthony K. (Los Alamos, NM); Sattelberger, Alfred P. (Darien, IL); Yeamans, Charles (Berkeley, CA); Hartmann, Thomas (Idaho Falls, ID); Silva, G. W. Chinthaka (Las Vegas, NV); Cerefice, Gary (Henderson, NV); Czerwinski, Kenneth R. (Henderson, NV)

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gallium nitride ingan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Journal of Crystal Growth 310 (2008) 23202325 Self-assembled InGaN quantum dots on GaN emitting at 520 nm grown  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

materials, and intrinsic quantum mechanical energy loss of the wavelength conversion process via Stokes, Muhammad Jamil, Nelson Tansu Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Center for Optical. These results demonstrates that high In-content InGaN QDs can be grown by MOVPE, and can potentially be utilized

Gilchrist, James F.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Growths of staggered InGaN quantum wells light-emitting diodes emitting at 520525 nm employing graded growth-temperature profile  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Growths of staggered InGaN quantum wells light-emitting diodes emitting at 520­525 nm employing current spreading and light extraction in GaN-based light emitting diodes Appl. Phys. Lett. 100, 061107 (2012) Electrically driven nanopyramid green light emitting diode Appl. Phys. Lett. 100, 061106 (2012

Gilchrist, James F.

103

Corrosion behavior of mesoporous transition metal nitrides  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Transition metal nitrides (TMN) have many desirable characteristics such as high hardness and good thermal stability under reducing conditions. This work reports an initial survey of the chemical stability of mesoporous TMNs (TM=Nb, V, Cr and Ti) in water at 80 °C at neutral, acidic and alkaline pH. The mesoporous TMNs had specific surface areas of 25–60 m{sup 2}/g with average pore sizes ranging from 10 to 50 nm. The high surface areas of these materials enhance the rate of corrosion per unit mass over that of a bulk material, making detection of corrosion much easier. The products were characterized by Rietveld refinement of powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) patterns and by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Several nitrides have corrosion rates that are, within error, not distinguishable from zero (±1 Å/day). Of the nitrides examined, CrN appears to be the most corrosion resistant under acidic conditions. None of the nitrides studied are corrosion resistant under alkaline conditions. - Graphical abstract: Corrosion behavior of mesoporous transition metal nitrides (TM=Nb, V, Cr and Ti) in acidic and alkaline solutions at 80 °C for 2 weeks. Display Omitted - highlights: • Corrosion rates of mesoporous transition metal nitrides in aqueous solution is reported. • The mesoporous TMNs had surface areas of 25–60 m{sup 2}/g. • CrN is the most corrosion resistant under the conditions studied.

Yang, Minghui, E-mail: m.yang@cornell.edu [Department of Chemistry, Cornell University, Ithaca 14853-1301, NY (United States); Allen, Amy J.; Nguyen, Minh T. [Department of Chemistry, Cornell University, Ithaca 14853-1301, NY (United States); Ralston, Walter T. [College of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley 94720-1460, CA (United States); MacLeod, Michelle J. [Department of Chemistry, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge 02139-4307, MA (United States); DiSalvo, Francis J., E-mail: fjd3@cornell.edu [Department of Chemistry, Cornell University, Ithaca 14853-1301, NY (United States)

2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

104

The Nitrogen-Nitride Anode.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nitrogen gas N 2 can be reduced to nitride N -3 in molten LiCl-KCl eutectic salt electrolyte. However, the direct oxidation of N -3 back to N 2 is kinetically slow and only occurs at high overvoltage. The overvoltage for N -3 oxidation can be eliminated by coordinating the N -3 with BN to form the dinitridoborate (BN 2 -3 ) anion which forms a 1-D conjugated linear inorganic polymer with -Li-N-B-N- repeating units. This polymer precipitates out of solution as Li 3 BN 2 which becomes a metallic conductor upon delithiation. Li 3 BN 2 is oxidized to Li + + N 2 + BN at about the N 2 /N -3 redox potential with very little overvoltage. In this report we evaluate the N 2 /N -3 redox couple as a battery anode for energy storage.

Delnick, Frank M.

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Method of manufacture of atomically thin boron nitride  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention provides a method of fabricating at least one single layer hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN). In an exemplary embodiment, the method includes (1) suspending at least one multilayer boron nitride across a gap of a support structure and (2) performing a reactive ion etch upon the multilayer boron nitride to produce the single layer hexagonal boron nitride suspended across the gap of the support structure. The present invention also provides a method of fabricating single layer hexagonal boron nitride. In an exemplary embodiment, the method includes (1) providing multilayer boron nitride suspended across a gap of a support structure and (2) performing a reactive ion etch upon the multilayer boron nitride to produce the single layer hexagonal boron nitride suspended across the gap of the support structure.

Zettl, Alexander K

2013-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

106

E-Print Network 3.0 - arsenide- gallium instrument Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: of gallium arsenide, a semiconductor, which is used in advanced optoelectronics, lasers, microwave circuits... , and solar cells. To determine material...

107

E-Print Network 3.0 - aluminum gallium indium Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Physics, Portland State University Collection: Physics 2 Alternative Energy Technologies Solar Power Summary: CIGS - Copper - Indium - Gallium - diSelenide Cd-Te -- Cadmium...

108

Preparation Of Copper Indium Gallium Diselenide Films For Solar Cells  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

High quality thin films of copper-indium-gallium-diselenide useful in the production of solar cells are prepared by electrodepositing at least one of the constituent metals onto a glass/Mo substrate, followed by physical vapor deposition of copper and selenium or indium and selenium to adjust the final stoichiometry of the thin film to approximately Cu(In,Ga)Se.sub.2. Using an AC voltage of 1-100 KHz in combination with a DC voltage for electrodeposition improves the morphology and growth rate of the deposited thin film. An electrodeposition solution comprising at least in part an organic solvent may be used in conjunction with an increased cathodic potential to increase the gallium content of the electrodeposited thin film.

Bhattacharya, Raghu N. (Littleton, CO); Contreras, Miguel A. (Golden, CO); Keane, James (Lakewood, CO); Tennant, Andrew L. (Denver, CO), Tuttle, John R. (Denver, CO); Ramanathan, Kannan (Lakewood, CO); Noufi, Rommel (Golden, CO)

1998-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

109

Silicon nitride ceramic having high fatigue life and high toughness  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A sintered silicon nitride ceramic comprising between about 0.6 mol % and about 3.2 mol % rare earth as rare earth oxide, and between about 85 w/o and about 95 w/o beta silicon nitride grains, wherein at least about 20% of the beta silicon nitride grains have a thickness of greater than about 1 micron.

Yeckley, Russell L. (Oakham, MA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

The Mg impurity in nitride alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Although several magnetic resonance studies address the Mg acceptor in GaN, there are few reports on Mg doping in the alloys, where hole production depends strongly on the Al or In content. Our electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) measurements of the p-type alloys suggest that the Mg impurity retains the axial symmetry, characteristic of a p-type dopant in both alloys; however, In and Al produce additional, different characteristics of the acceptor. In InGaN, the behavior is consistent with a lowering of the acceptor level and increasing hole density as In concentration increases. For AlGaN, the amount of neutral Mg decreases with increasing Al content, which is attributed to different kinetics of hydrogen diffusion thought to occur in samples with higher Al mole fraction.

Zvanut, M. E.; Willoughby, W. R.; Sunay, U. R. [Department of Physics, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham AL (United States); Koleske, D. D.; Allerman, A. A. [Sandia National Laboratory, Albuquerque NM (United States); Wang, Ke; Araki, Tsutomu [Department of Photonics, Ritsumeikan University, Kusatsu, Shiga (Japan); Nanishi, Yasushi [Department of Photonics, Ritsumeikan University, Kusatsu, Shiga, Japan and WCU Program, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

2014-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

111

Evaluation of silicon-nitride ceramic valves.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Silicon-nitride ceramic valves can improve the performance of both light- and heavy-duty automotive engines because of the superior material properties of silicon nitrides over current metal alloys. However, ceramics are brittle materials that may introduce uncertainties in the reliability and durability of ceramic valves. As a result, the lifetime of ceramic valves are difficult to predict theoretically due to wide variations in the type and distribution of microstructural flaws in the material. Nondestructive evaluation (NDE) methods are therefore required to assess the quality and reliability of these valves. Because ceramic materials are optically translucent and the strength-limiting flaws are normally located near the valve surface, a laser-scatter method can be used for NDE evaluation of ceramic valves. This paper reviews the progress in the development of this NDE method and its application to inspect silicon-nitride ceramic valves at various stages of manufacturing and bench and engine tests.

Sun, J. G.; Zhang, J. M.; Andrews, M. J.; Tretheway, J. S.; Phillips, N. S .L.; Jensen, J. A.; Nuclear Engineering Division; Univ. of Texas; Caterpillar, Inc.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Enhancing the quantum efficiency of InGaN yellow-green light-emitting diodes by growth interruption  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We studied the effect of multiple interruptions during the quantum well growth on emission-efficiency enhancement of InGaN-based yellow-green light emitting diodes on c-plane sapphire substrate. The output power and dominant wavelength at 20?mA are 0.24 mW and 556.3?nm. High resolution x-ray diffraction, photoluminescence, and electroluminescence measurements demonstrate that efficiency enhancement could be partially attributed to crystal quality improvement of the active region resulted from reduced In clusters and relevant defects on the surface of InGaN layer by introducing interruptions. The less tilted energy band in the quantum well is also caused by the decrease of In-content gradient along c-axis resulted from In segregation during the interruptions, which increases spatial overlap of electron-hole wavefunction and thus the internal quantum efficiency. The latter also leads to smaller blueshift of dominant wavelength with current increasing.

Du, Chunhua; Ma, Ziguang; Zhou, Junming; Lu, Taiping; Jiang, Yang; Zuo, Peng; Jia, Haiqiang; Chen, Hong, E-mail: hchen@iphy.ac.cn [Key Laboratory for Renewable Energy, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing Key Laboratory for New Energy Materials and Devices, Beijing National Laboratory for Condense Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

2014-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

113

Comparative band alignment of plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposited high-k dielectrics on gallium nitride  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films, HfO{sub 2} films, and HfO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} stacked structures were deposited on n-type, Ga-face, GaN wafers using plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD). The wafers were first treated with a wet-chemical clean to remove organics and an in-situ combined H{sub 2}/N{sub 2} plasma at 650 Degree-Sign C to remove residual carbon contamination, resulting in a clean, oxygen-terminated surface. This cleaning process produced slightly upward band bending of 0.1 eV. Additional 650 Degree-Sign C annealing after plasma cleaning increased the upward band bending by 0.2 eV. After the initial clean, high-k oxide films were deposited using oxygen PEALD at 140 Degree-Sign C. The valence band and conduction band offsets (VBOs and CBOs) of the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/GaN and HfO{sub 2}/GaN structures were deduced from in-situ x-ray and ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy (XPS and UPS). The valence band offsets were determined to be 1.8 and 1.4 eV, while the deduced conduction band offsets were 1.3 and 1.0 eV, respectively. These values are compared with the theoretical calculations based on the electron affinity model and charge neutrality level model. Moreover, subsequent annealing had little effect on these offsets; however, the GaN band bending did change depending on the annealing and processing. An Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer was investigated as an interfacial passivation layer (IPL), which, as results suggest, may lead to improved stability, performance, and reliability of HfO{sub 2}/IPL/GaN structures. The VBOs were {approx}0.1 and 1.3 eV, while the deduced CBOs were 0.6 and 1.1 eV for HfO{sub 2} with respect to Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and GaN, respectively.

Yang Jialing; Eller, Brianna S.; Zhu Chiyu; England, Chris; Nemanich, Robert J. [Department of Physics, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287-1504 (United States)

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

DESIGN AND ANALYSIS OF AN INTEGRATED PULSE MODULATED S-BAND POWER AMPLIFIER IN GALLIUM NITRIDE PROCESS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The design of power amplifiers in any semi-conductor process is not a trivia exercise and it is often encountered that the simulated solution is qualitatively different than the results obtained. Phenomena such as oscillation occurring either in-band or out of band and sometimes at subharmonic intervals, continuous spectrum noticed in some frequency bands, often referred to as chaos, and jumps and hysteresis effects can all be encountered and render a design useless. All of these problems might have been identified through a more rigorous approach to stability analysis. Designing for stability is probably the one area of amplifier design that receives the least amount of attention but incurs the most catastrophic of effects if it is not performed properly. Other parameters such as gain, power output, frequency response and even matching may suitable mitigation paths. But the lack of stability in an amplifier has no mitigating path. In addition to of loss of the design completely there are the increased production cycle costs, costs involved with investigating and resolving the problem and the costs involved with schedule slips or delays resulting from it. The Linville or Rollett stability criteria that many microwave engineers follow and rely exclusively on is not sufficient by itself to ensure a stable and robust design. It will be shown that the universal belief that unconditional stability is obtained through an analysis of the scattering matrix S to determine if 1 and |{Delta}{sub S}| < 1 is only part of the procedure and other tools must be used to validate the criteria. The research shown contributes to the state of the art by developing a more thorough stability design technique for designing amplifiers of any class, whether that be current mode or switch mode, than is currently undertaken with the goal of obtaining first pass design success.

STEVE SEDLOCK

2012-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

115

GALLIUM NITRIDE INTEGRATED GAS/TEMPERATURE SENSORS FOR FUEL CELL SYSTEM MONITORING FOR HYDROGEN AND CARBON MONOXIDE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on field effect devices using catalytic metal gates on silicon carbide substrates has been reviewed (Spetz-10%) of transition metals such as copper, silver, and chromium (Feinstein et al 1997 and Pyke 1993). High temperature. Introduction Gas sensing and analysis based on gas adsorption on a catalytic metal surface has been extensively

116

Physics based analytical modelling of Gallium Nitride(GaN) MESFET considering different ion implantation energy with high temperature annealing.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??A physics based analytical model of ion implanted GaN MESFET has been presented considering high temperature annealing effects. Choosing appropriate activation energy of impurity atoms,… (more)

Raghavan, Vinay

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Nitride Fuel Development at the INL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new method for fabricating nitride-based fuels for nuclear applications is under development at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). A primary objective of this research is the development of a process that could be operated as an automated or semi-automated technique reducing costs, worker doses, and eventually improving the final product form. To achieve these goals the fabrication process utilizes a new cryo-forming technique to produce microspheres formed from sub-micron oxide powder to improve material handling issues, yield rapid kinetics for conversion to nitrides, and reduced material impurity levels within the nitride compounds. The microspheres are converted to a nitride form within a high temperature particle fluidizing bed using a carbothermic process that utilizes a hydrocarbon – hydrogen - nitrogen gas mixture. A new monitor and control system using differential pressure changes in the fluidizing gas allows for real-time monitoring and control of the spouted bed reactor during conversion. This monitor and control system can provide real-time data that is used to control the gas flow rates, temperatures, and gas composition to optimize the fluidization of the particle bed. The small size (0.5 µm) of the oxide powders in the microspheres dramatically increases the kinetics of the conversion process yielding reduced process times and temperatures. Initial studies using surrogate ZrO2 powder have yielded conversion efficiencies of 90 -95 % nitride formation with only small levels of oxide and carbide contaminants present. Further studies are being conducted to determine optimal gas mixture ratios, process time, and temperature range for providing complete conversion to a nitride form.

W.E. Windes

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Diffusion of indium and gallium in Cu(In,Ga)Se2 thin film solar cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Diffusion of indium and gallium in Cu(In,Ga)Se2 thin film solar cells O. Lundberga,*, J. Lua , A. Rockettb , M. Edoffa , L. Stolta a A°ngstro¨m Solar Center, Uppsala University, P.O. Box 534, SE-751 21 Abstract The diffusion of indium and gallium in polycrystalline thin film Cu(In,Ga)Se2 layers has been

Rockett, Angus

119

Two-photon photovoltaic effect in gallium arsenide Jeff Chiles,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Two-photon photovoltaic effect in gallium arsenide Jichi Ma,1 Jeff Chiles,1 Yagya D. Sharma,2 214669); published September 4, 2014 The two-photon photovoltaic effect is demonstrated in gallium; (230.0250) Optoelectronics; (040.5350) Photovoltaic; (130.4310) Nonlinear. http://dx.doi.org/10.1364/OL

Fathpour, Sasan

120

Gallium/aluminum nanocomposite material for nonlinear optics and nonlinear plasmonics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gallium/aluminum nanocomposite material for nonlinear optics and nonlinear plasmonics A. V penetration of gallium into an aluminum film. These composite films form mirrorlike interfaces with silica optics and active plasmonics. The material is a polycrystalline aluminum film on a silica sub- strate

Zheludev, Nikolay

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gallium nitride ingan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Synthesis and use of (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions of aluminum, gallium and indium  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Salts of (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions of aluminum, gallium, and indium are described. The (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions have the formula [ER'R"R'"F].sup..crclbar. wherein E is aluminum, gallium, or indium, wherein F is fluorine, and wherein R', R", and R'" is each a fluorinated phenyl, fluorinated biphenyl, or fluorinated polycyclic group.

Marks, Tobin J. (Evanston, IL); Chen, You-Xian (Midland, MI)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

IEEE JOURNAL OF PHOTOVOLTAICS, VOL. 2, NO. 2, APRIL 2012 123 Gallium Arsenide Solar Cell Absorption  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IEEE JOURNAL OF PHOTOVOLTAICS, VOL. 2, NO. 2, APRIL 2012 123 Gallium Arsenide Solar Cell Absorption--Gallium arsenide, nanospheres, photovoltaic systems, whispering gallery modes (WGMs). I. INTRODUCTION THE route as the active layer is thinned [2]. Thin-film photovoltaics offer the possibility to significantly reduce

Grandidier, Jonathan

123

Anisotropic Hexagonal Boron Nitride Nanomaterials - Synthesis and Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Boron nitride (BN) is a synthetic binary compound located between III and V group elements in the Periodic Table. However, its properties, in terms of polymorphism and mechanical characteristics, are rather close to those of carbon compared with other III-V compounds, such as gallium nitride. BN crystallizes into a layered or a tetrahedrally linked structure, like those of graphite and diamond, respectively, depending on the conditions of its preparation, especially the pressure applied. Such correspondence between BN and carbon readily can be understood from their isoelectronic structures [1, 2]. On the other hand, in contrast to graphite, layered BN is transparent and is an insulator. This material has attracted great interest because, similar to carbon, it exists in various polymorphic forms exhibiting very different properties; however, these forms do not correspond strictly to those of carbon. Crystallographically, BN is classified into four polymorphic forms: Hexagonal BN (h-BN) (Figure 1(b)); rhombohedral BN (r-BN); cubic BN (c-BN); and wurtzite BN (w-BN). BN does not occur in nature. In 1842, Balmain [3] obtained BN as a reaction product between molten boric oxide and potassium cyanide under atmospheric pressure. Thereafter, many methods for its synthesis were reported. h-BN and r-BN are formed under ambient pressure. c-BN is synthesized from h-BN under high pressure at high temperature while w-BN is prepared from h-BN under high pressure at room temperature [1]. Each BN layer consists of stacks of hexagonal plate-like units of boron and nitrogen atoms linked by SP{sup 2} hybridized orbits and held together mainly by Van der Waals force (Fig 1(b)). The hexagonal polymorph has two-layered repeating units: AA'AA'... that differ from those in graphite: ABAB... (Figure 1(a)). Within the layers of h-BN there is coincidence between the same phases of the hexagons, although the boron atoms and nitrogen atoms are alternatively located along the c-axis. The rhombohedral system consists of three-layered units: ABCABC..., whose honeycomb layers are arranged in a shifted phase, like as those of graphite. Reflecting its weak interlayer bond, the h-BN can be cleaved easily along its layers, and hence, is widely used as a lubricant material. The material is stable up to a high temperature of 2300 C before decomposition sets in [2] does not fuse a nitrogen atmosphere of 1 atm, and thus, is applicable as a refractory material. Besides having such properties, similar to those of graphite, the material is transparent, and acts as a good electric insulator, especially at high temperatures (10{sup 6} {Omega}m at 1000 C) [1]. c-BN and w-BN are tetrahedrally linked BN. The former has a cubic sphalerite-type structure, and the latter has a hexagonal wurtzite-type structure. c-BN is the second hardest known material (the hardest is diamond), the so-called white diamond. It is used mainly for grinding and cutting industrial ferrous materials because it does not react with molten iron, nickel, and related alloys at high temperatures whereas diamond does [1]. It displays the second highest thermal conductivity (6-9 W/cm.deg) after diamond. This chapter focuses principally upon information about h-BN nanomaterials, mainly BN nanotubes (BNNTs), porous BN, mono- and few-layer-BN sheets. There are good reviews book chapters about c-BN in [1, 4-6].

Han,W.Q.

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

High-Efficiency Nitride-Based Solid-State Lighting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this final technical progress report we summarize research accomplished during Department of Energy contract DE-FC26-01NT41203, entitled ''High-Efficiency Nitride-Based Solid-State Lighting''. Two teams, from the University of California at Santa Barbara (Principle Investigator: Dr. Shuji Nakamura) and the Lighting Research Center at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (led by Dr. N. Narendran), pursued the goals of this contract from thin film growth, characterization, and packaging/luminaire design standpoints. The UCSB team initially pursued the development of blue gallium nitride (GaN)-based vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers, as well as ultraviolet GaN-based light emitting diodes (LEDs). In Year 2, the emphasis shifted to resonant-cavity light emitting diodes, also known as micro-cavity LEDs when extremely thin device cavities are fabricated. These devices have very directional emission and higher light extraction efficiency than conventional LEDs. Via the optimization of thin-film growth and refinement of device processing, we decreased the total cavity thickness to less than 1 {micro}m, such that micro-cavity effects were clearly observed and a light extraction efficiency of over 10% was reached. We also began the development of photonic crystals for increased light extraction, in particular for so-called ''guided modes'' which would otherwise propagate laterally in the device and be re-absorbed. Finally, we pursued the growth of smooth, high-quality nonpolar a-plane and m-plane GaN films, as well as blue light emitting diodes on these novel films. Initial nonpolar LEDs showed the expected behavior of negligible peak wavelength shift with increasing drive current. M-plane LEDs in particular show promise, as unpackaged devices had unsaturated optical output power of {approx} 3 mW at 200 mA drive current. The LRC's tasks were aimed at developing the subcomponents necessary for packaging UCSB's light emitting diodes, and packaging them to produce a white light fixture. During the third and final year of the project, the LRC team investigated alternate packaging methods for the white LED device to achieve at least 25 percent more luminous efficacy than traditional white LEDs; conducted optical ray-tracing analyses and human factors studies to determine the best form factor for the white light source under development, in terms of high luminous efficacy and greater acceptance by subjects; and developed a new die encapsulant using silicone-epoxy resins that showed less yellowing and slower degradation. At the conclusion of this project, the LRC demonstrated a new packaging method, called scattered photon extraction (SPE), that produced an average luminous flux and corresponding average efficacy of 90.7 lm and 36.3 lm/W, respectively, compared with 56.5 lm and 22.6 lm/W for a similar commercial white LED package. At low currents, the SPE package emitted white light with an efficacy of over 80 lm/W and had chromaticity values very close to the blackbody locus. The SPE package showed an overall improvement of 61% for this particular comparison, exceeding the LRC's third-year goal of 25% improvement.

Paul T. Fini; Shuji Nakamura

2005-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

125

Titanium nitride electrodes for thermoelectric generators  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention is directed to a composite article suitable for use in thermoelectric generators. The article comprises a thin film of titanium nitride as an electrode deposited onto solid electrolyte. The invention is also directed to the method of making same.

Novak, Robert F. (Farmington Hills, MI); Schmatz, Duane J. (Dearborn Heights, MI); Hunt, Thomas K. (Ann Arbor, MI)

1987-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

126

Silicon nitride having a high tensile strength  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A silicon nitride ceramic comprising: a) inclusions no greater than 25 microns in length, b) agglomerates no greater than 20 microns in diameter, and c) a surface finish of less than about 8 microinches, said ceramic having a four-point flexural strength of at least about 900 MPa.

Pujari, Vimal K. (Northboro, MA); Tracey, Dennis M. (Medfield, MA); Foley, Michael R. (Oxford, MA); Paille, Norman I. (Oxford, MA); Pelletier, Paul J. (Millbury, MA); Sales, Lenny C. (Grafton, MA); Willkens, Craig A. (Sterling, MA); Yeckley, Russell L. (Oakham, MA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Photodetectors using III-V nitrides  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A bandpass photodetector using a III-V nitride and having predetermined electrical properties. The bandpass photodetector detects electromagnetic radiation between a lower transition wavelength and an upper transition wavelength. That detector comprises two low pass photodetectors. The response of the two low pass photodetectors is subtracted to yield a response signal.

Moustakas, Theodore D. (Dover, MA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Nitride-bonded silicon carbide composite filter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this program is to develop and demonstrate an advanced hot gas filter, using ceramic component technology, with enhanced durability to provide increased resistance to thermal fatigue and crack propagation. The material is silicon carbide fiber reinforced nitride bonded silicon carbide.

Thomson, B.N.; DiPietro, S.G.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Vacancy-Induced Nanoscale Wire Structure in Gallium Selenide Layers  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism inS-4500II FieldVacancy-Induced Nanoscale Wire Structure in Gallium

130

Gallium phosphide high-temperature bipolar junction transistor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Preliminary results are reported on the development of a high-temperature (> 350/sup 0/C) gallium phosphide bipolar junction transistor (BJT) for goethermal and other energy applications. This four-layer p/sup +/n/sup -/pp/sup +/ structure was fromed by liquid phase epitaxy using a supercooling technique to insure uniform nucleation of the thin layers. Magnesium was used as the p-type dopant to avoid excessive out-diffusion into the lightly doped base. By appropriate choice of electrodes, the device may also be driven as an n-channel junction field-effect transistor. The gallium phosphide BJT is observed to have a common-emitter current gain peaking in the range of 6 to 10 (for temperatures from 20/sup 0/C to 400/sup 0/C) and a room-temperature, punchthrough-limited, collector-emitter breakdown voltage of approximately -6V. Other parameters of interest include an f/sub/ = 400 KHz (at 20/sup 0/C) and a collector base leakage current = 200 ..mu..A (at 350/sup 0/C).

Zipperian, T.E.; Dawson, L.R.; Caffin, R.J.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

aluminium nitrides: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

(more) Mutombo, Faustin Kalenda 2012-01-01 22 Carbon Nitride and Conjugated Polymer Composite Materials. Open Access Theses and Dissertations Summary: ??The semiconductor and...

132

americium nitrides: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

heterostructure Zhang, Hongtao 2006-01-01 19 Carbon Nitride and Conjugated Polymer Composite Materials. Open Access Theses and Dissertations Summary: ??The semiconductor and...

133

aligned carbon nitride: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Carbon Nitride and Conjugated Polymer Composite Materials. Open Access Theses and Dissertations Summary: ??The semiconductor and...

134

III-Nitride Nanowires: Emerging Materials for Lighting and Energy...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

building blocks in LEDs, lasers, sensors, photovoltaics, and high power and high speed electronics. Compared to planar films, III-nitride nanowires have several potential...

135

Method for locating metallic nitride inclusions in metallic alloy ingots  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of determining the location and history of metallic nitride and/or oxynitride inclusions in metallic melts. The method includes the steps of labeling metallic nitride and/or oxynitride inclusions by making a coreduced metallic-hafnium sponge from a mixture of hafnium chloride and the chloride of a metal, reducing the mixed chlorides with magnesium, nitriding the hafnium-labeled metallic-hafnium sponge, and seeding the sponge to be melted with hafnium-labeled nitride inclusions. The ingots are neutron activated and the hafnium is located by radiometric means. Hafnium possesses exactly the proper metallurgical and radiochemical properties for this use.

White, Jack C. (Albany, OR); Traut, Davis E. (Corvallis, OR); Oden, Laurance L. (Albany, OR); Schmitt, Roman A. (Corvallis, OR)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Specific interaction of fluoride ions with aluminum and gallium solvates in an ethylene glycol solutions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The interaction of aluminum chloride and gallium chloride with KF in ethylene glycol solutions with F:M/sup 3 +/ mole ratios approximately equal to 2 includes a step involving the formation of fluorine-containing species, in which the fluoride ions are held in the outer sphere of ethylene glycol solvates of aluminum and gallium. Complexes based on hexacoordinate solvates predominate in the solutions of aluminum, while in the case of gallium, in contrast to aluminum, the coexistence of tetra- and hexacoordinate complexes is characteristic. The configurational equilibrium in the solutions of gallium is one of the causes of the structurization of the solutions, i.e., polymerization due to the formation of H bonds between the fluoride ions and the coordinated ethylene glycol molecules.

Petrosyants, S.P.; Tsabel', E.R.; Buslaev, Yu.A.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

GALLIUM--2002 29.1 References that include a section mark () are found in the Internet  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

consumed in the United States was in the form of GaAs. GaAs was manufactured into optoelectronic devices application for gallium, with 46% of total consumption. Optoelectronic devices accounted for 42% of domestic

138

Fabrication of optoelectronic microwave linear and ring resonators on a gallium arsenide substrate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FABRICATION OF OPTOELECTRONIC MICROWAVE LINEAR AND RING RESONATORS ON A GALLIUM ARSENIDE SUBSTRATE A Thesis by CHUN-LIANG YEH Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1993 Major Subject: Electrical Engineering FABRICATION OF OPTOELECTRONIC MICROWAVE LINEAR AND RING RESONATORS ON A GALLIUM ARSENIDE SUBSTRATE A Thesis by CHUN-LIANG YEH Approved as to style and content by: Mark...

Yeh, Chun-Liang

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

First Results of the Testing of the Liquid Gallium Jet Limiter Concept for ISTTOK  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of liquid metals as plasma facing components in tokamaks has recently experienced a renewed interest stimulated by their advantages to the development of a fusion reactor. Liquid metals have been proposed to solve problems related to the erosion and neutronic activation of solid walls submitted to high power loads allowing an efficient heat exhaustion from fusion devices. Presently the most promising materials are Lithium and Gallium. ISTTOK, a small size tokamak, will be used to test the behavior of a liquid Gallium jet in the vacuum chamber and its influence on the plasma. This paper presents a description of the conceived setup as well as experimental results. The liquid Gallium jet is generated by hydrostatic pressure and injected in a radial position close to a moveable stainless steel limiter. Both the jet and the limiter positions are variable allowing for a controlled exposure of the liquid Gallium to the edge plasma. The main components of the Gallium loop are a MHD pump, the liquid metal injector and a filtering system. The MHD pump is of the induction type, based on rotating permanent magnets. The injector is build from a stainless steel pipe ended by a shaping nozzle. A setup has been developed to introduce oxide-free Gallium inside the loop's main supply tank. Raw liquid metal is placed inside a chamber heated and degassed under high vacuum while clean Gallium is extracted from the main body of the liquefied metal. Prior to installation on the tokamak, the experimental rig has been implemented using a Pyrex tube as test chamber to investigate the stability of the Gallium jet and its break-up length for several nozzle sizes. Results are presented in this paper. This rig was also useful to assess the behavior of the overall implemented apparatus.

Gomes, R. B.; Fernandes, H.; Silva, C.; Borba, D.; Carvalho, B.; Varandas, C. [Associacao EURATOM/IST, Centro de FuSao Nuclear, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal); Lielausis, O.; Klyukin, A.; Platacis, E.; Mikelsons, A.; Platnieks, I. [Association EURATOM/University of Latvia, Institute of Physics, 32 Miera Str., Salaspils, LV-2169 (Latvia)

2006-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

140

Study of Magnetohydrodynamic Surface Waves on Liquid Gallium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) surface waves on liquid gallium are studied theoretically and experimentally in the small magnetic Reynolds number limit. A linear dispersion relation is derived when a horizontal magnetic field and a horizontal electric current is imposed. No wave damping is found in the shallow liquid limit while waves always damp in the deep liquid limit with a magnetic field parallel to the propagation direction. When the magnetic field is weak, waves are weakly damped and the real part of the dispersion is unaffected, while in the opposite limit waves are strongly damped with shortened wavelengths. In a table-top experiment, planar MHD surface waves on liquid gallium are studied in detail in the regime of weak magnetic field and deep liquid. A non-invasive diagnostic accurately measures surface waves at multiple locations by reflecting an array of lasers off the surface onto a screen, which is recorded by an Intensified-CCD camera. The measured dispersion relation is consistent with the linear theory with a reduced surface tension likely due to surface oxidation. In excellent agreement with linear theory, it is observed that surface waves are damped only when a horizontal magnetic field is imposed parallel to the propagation direction. No damping is observed under a perpendicular magnetic field. The existence of strong wave damping even without magnetic field suggests the importance of the surface oxide layer. Implications to the liquid metal wall concept in fusion reactors, especially on the wave damping and a Rayleigh-Taylor instability when the Lorentz force is used to support liquid metal layer against gravity, are discussed.

Hantao Ji; William Fox; David Pace; H.L. Rappaport

2004-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gallium nitride ingan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Study of liquid gallium at high pressure using synchrotron x-ray  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Liquid gallium has been studied at high pressure up to 2 GPa and ambient temperature in a diamond anvil cell using high energy synchrotron x-ray beam. The total x-ray scattering data of liquid gallium were collected up to Q = 12 A{sup -1} and analyzed using pair distribution functions (PDF). The results indicate that the first nearest neighbor peak and second nearest neighbor (shoulder) peak of PDF in liquid gallium does not change with pressure, whereas the higher order (i.e., third and fourth) nearest neighbor peaks shift towards shorter distance with increasing pressure. Reverse Monte Carlo modeling based on the observed data shows that the coordination number in the liquid gallium increases with pressure from 10.5 at 0.3 GPa to 11.6 at 2 GPa. An atomic arrangement similar to the crystalline phase of Ga(II) with coordination number of 12 is proposed for the locally dense-packed rigid unit in liquid gallium. The volume compression data derived from the structure modeling yield a bulk modulus of 12.1(6) GPa for liquid gallium.

Yu, Tony; Guo Quanzhong; Parise, John [Department of Geosciences, Mineral Physics Institute, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York 11794-2100 (United States); Chen Jiuhua [Department of Geosciences, Mineral Physics Institute, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York 11794-2100 (United States); Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Center for the Study of Matters at Extreme Conditions, Florida International University, Miami, Florida 33199 (United States); Ehm, Lars [Department of Geosciences, Mineral Physics Institute, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York 11794-2100 (United States); National Synchrotron Light Source, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973-5000 (United States); Huang Shu [Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Center for the Study of Matters at Extreme Conditions, Florida International University, Miami, Florida 33199 (United States); Luo Shengnian [Physics Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

High-Temperature Decomposition of Brønsted Acid Sites in Gallium-Substituted Zeolites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The dehydroxylation of Broensted acid sites (BAS) in Ga-substituted zeolites was investigated at temperatures up to 850 C using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and mass spectrometry-temperature programmed desorption (MS-TPD). X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) revealed that the majority of gallium has tetrahedral coordination even after complete dehydroxylation. The interatomic gallium-oxygen distance and gallium coordination number determined by extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) are consistent with gallium in tetrahedral coordination at low T (< 550 C). Upon heating Ga-Beta and Ga-ZSM5 to 850 C, analysis of the EXAFS showed that 70 and 80% of the gallium was still in tetrahedral coordination. The remainder of the gallium was found to be in octahedral coordination. No trigonal Ga atoms were observed. FTIR measurements carried out at similar temperatures show that the intensity of the OH vibration due to BAS has been eliminated. MS-TPD revealed that hydrogen in addition to water evolved from the samples during dehydroxylation. This shows that dehydrogenation in addition to dehydration is a mechanism that contributes to BAS decomposition. Dehydrogenation was further confirmed by exposing the sample to hydrogen to regenerate some of the BAS as monitored by FTIR and MS-TPD.

K Al-majnouni; N Hould; W Lonergan; D Vlachos; R Lobo

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

143

Method for producing silicon nitride/silicon carbide composite  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Silicon carbide/silicon nitride composites are prepared by carbothermal reduction of crystalline silica powder, carbon powder and optionally crsytalline silicon nitride powder. The crystalline silicon carbide portion of the composite has a mean number diameter less than about 700 nanometers and contains nitrogen.

Dunmead, Stephen D. (Midland, MI); Weimer, Alan W. (Midland, MI); Carroll, Daniel F. (Midland, MI); Eisman, Glenn A. (Midland, MI); Cochran, Gene A. (Midland, MI); Susnitzky, David W. (Midland, MI); Beaman, Donald R. (Midland, MI); Nilsen, Kevin J. (Midland, MI)

1996-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

144

Process for making boron nitride using sodium cyanide and boron  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This a very simple process for making boron nitride by mixing sodium cyanide and boron phosphate and heating the mixture in an inert atmosphere until a reaction takes place. The product is a white powder of boron nitride that can be used in applications that require compounds that are stable at high temperatures and that exhibit high electrical resistance.

Bamberger, Carlos E. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Atomic Layer Deposition of Insulating Hafnium and Zirconium Nitrides  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

author. E-mail: gordon@chemistry.harvard.edu. (1) Toth, L. E. Transition Metal Carbides and Nitrides homoleptic tetrakis(dialkylamido)- metal(IV) complexes and ammonia at low substrate temperatures (150-250 °C). The precursor vapors were alternately pulsed into a heated reactor, yielding 1.15-1.20 � of metal nitride film

146

Oxidation Protection of Uranium Nitride Fuel using Liquid Phase Sintering  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two methods are proposed to increase the oxidation resistance of uranium nitride (UN) nuclear fuel. These paths are: (1) Addition of USi{sub x} (e.g. U3Si2) to UN nitride powder, followed by liquid phase sintering, and (2) 'alloying' UN nitride with various compounds (followed by densification via Spark Plasma Sintering or Liquid Phase Sintering) that will greatly increase oxidation resistance. The advantages (high thermal conductivity, very high melting point, and high density) of nitride fuel have long been recognized. The sodium cooled BR-10 reactor in Russia operated for 18 years on uranium nitride fuel (UN was used as the driver fuel for two core loads). However, the potential advantages (large power up-grade, increased cycle lengths, possible high burn-ups) as a Light Water Reactor (LWR) fuel are offset by uranium nitride's extremely low oxidation resistance (UN powders oxidize in air and UN pellets decompose in hot water). Innovative research is proposed to solve this problem and thereby provide an accident tolerant LWR fuel that would resist water leaks and high temperature steam oxidation/spalling during an accident. It is proposed that we investigate two methods to increase the oxidation resistance of UN: (1) Addition of USi{sub x} (e.g. U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}) to UN nitride powder, followed by liquid phase sintering, and (2) 'alloying' UN nitride with compounds (followed by densification via Spark Plasma Sintering) that will greatly increase oxidation resistance.

Dr. Paul A. Lessing

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Trade-off between morphology, extended defects, and compositional fluctuation induced carrier localization in high In-content InGaN films  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We elucidate the role of growth parameters (III/N flux ratio, temperature T{sub G}) on the morphological and structural properties, as well as compositional homogeneity and carrier localization effects of high In-content (x(In)?>?0.75) In–polar InGaN films grown by plasma–assisted molecular beam epitaxy (PAMBE). Variations in III/N flux ratio evidence that higher excess of In yields higher threading dislocation densities as well as larger compositional inhomogeneity as measured by x-ray diffraction. Most interestingly, by variation of growth temperature T{sub G} we find a significant trade-off between improved morphological quality and compositional homogeneity at low–T{sub G} (?450–550?°C) versus improved threading dislocation densities at high–T{sub G} (?600–630?°C), as exemplified for InGaN films with x(In)?=?0.9. The enhanced compositional homogeneity mediated by low–T{sub G} growth is confirmed by systematic temperature-dependent photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy data, such as lower PL peakwidths, >5× higher PL efficiency (less temperature-induced quenching) and a distinctly different temperature-dependent S-shape behavior of the PL peak energy. From these, we find that the carrier localization energy is as low as ?20?meV for low–T{sub G} grown films (T{sub G}?=?550?°C), while it rises to ?70?meV for high–T{sub G} grown films (T{sub G}?=?630?°C) right below the onset of In–N dissociation. These findings point out that for the kinetically limited metal-rich PAMBE growth of high In-content InGaN a III/N flux ratio of ?1 and low-to-intermediate T{sub G} are required to realize optically more efficient materials.

Ju, James; Loitsch, Bernhard; Stettner, Thomas; Schuster, Fabian; Stutzmann, Martin; Koblmüller, Gregor, E-mail: Gregor.Koblmueller@wsi.tum.de [Walter Schottky Institut and Physik Department, Technische Universität München, Garching 85748 (Germany)

2014-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

148

Monolithic integration of InGaN segments emitting in the blue, green, and red spectral range in single ordered nanocolumns  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This work reports on the selective area growth by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy and characterization of InGaN/GaN nanocolumnar heterostructures. The optimization of the In/Ga and total III/V ratios, as well as the growth temperature, provides control on the emission wavelength, either in the blue, green, or red spectral range. An adequate structure tailoring and monolithic integration in a single nanocolumnar heterostructure of three InGaN portions emitting in the red-green-blue colors lead to white light emission.

Albert, S.; Bengoechea-Encabo, A.; Sanchez-Garcia, M. A.; Calleja, E. [ISOM and Dept. Ingenieria Electronica, ETSI Telecomunicacion, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Ciudad Universitaria s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain)] [ISOM and Dept. Ingenieria Electronica, ETSI Telecomunicacion, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Ciudad Universitaria s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Kong, X.; Trampert, A. [Paul-Drude-Institut fuer Festkoeperelektronik, Hausvogteiplatz 5-7, 10117 Berlin (Germany)] [Paul-Drude-Institut fuer Festkoeperelektronik, Hausvogteiplatz 5-7, 10117 Berlin (Germany)

2013-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

149

Carrier redistribution between different potential sites in semipolar (202{sup ¯}1) InGaN quantum wells studied by near-field photoluminescence  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Scanning near-field photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy at different excitation powers was applied to study nanoscale properties of carrier localization and recombination in semipolar (202{sup ¯}1) InGaN quantum wells (QWs) emitting in violet, blue, and green-yellow spectral regions. With increased excitation power, an untypical PL peak energy shift to lower energies was observed. The shift was attributed to carrier density dependent carrier redistribution between nm-scale sites of different potentials. Near-field PL scans showed that in (202{sup ¯}1) QWs the in-plane carrier diffusion is modest, and the recombination properties are uniform, which is advantageous for photonic applications.

Marcinkevi?ius, S. [Department of Materials and Nano Physics, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Electrum 229, 16440 Kista (Sweden); Gelžinyt?, K. [Department of Materials and Nano Physics, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Electrum 229, 16440 Kista (Sweden); Institute of Applied Research, Vilnius University, Saul?tekio 9-3, 10222 Vilnius (Lithuania); Zhao, Y.; Nakamura, S.; DenBaars, S. P.; Speck, J. S. [Materials Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)

2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

150

JOURNAL OF MATERIALS SCIENCE 40 (2005) 2101 2103 LETTERS Pressureless sintering of silicon nitride/boron nitride  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907-2044, USA Silicon nitride (Si3N4) and boron nitride (BN) are ma- terials2O3 (Alcoa A- 16SG, 0.4 µm in diameter) and 4 wt% Y2O3 (Alfa Aesar REacton, 10 µm in diameter

Trice, Rodney W.

151

Nanowire-templated lateral epitaxial growth of non-polar group III nitrides  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for growing high quality, nonpolar Group III nitrides using lateral growth from Group III nitride nanowires. The method of nanowire-templated lateral epitaxial growth (NTLEG) employs crystallographically aligned, substantially vertical Group III nitride nanowire arrays grown by metal-catalyzed metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) as templates for the lateral growth and coalescence of virtually crack-free Group III nitride films. This method requires no patterning or separate nitride growth step.

Wang, George T. (Albuquerque, NM); Li, Qiming (Albuquerque, NM); Creighton, J. Randall (Albuquerque, NM)

2010-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

152

Hard and low friction nitride coatings and methods for forming the same  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved coating material possessing super-hard and low friction properties and a method for forming the same. The improved coating material includes the use of a noble metal or soft metal homogeneously distributed within a hard nitride material. The addition of small amounts of such metals into nitrides such as molybdenum nitride, titanium nitride, and chromium nitride results in as much as increasing of the hardness of the material as well as decreasing the friction coefficient and increasing the oxidation resistance.

Erdemir, Ali (Naperville, IL); Urgen, Mustafa (Istanbul, TR); Cakir, Ali Fuat (Istanbul, TR); Eryilmaz, Osman Levent (Bolingbrook, IL); Kazmanli, Kursat (Istanbul, TR); Keles, Ozgul (Istanbul, TR)

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

By Deborah A. Kramer No gallium production was reported in the McDonnell Douglas Corp. reportedly will world producers were Australia, Germany, and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

facility in optoelectronic devices [light-emitting diodes France from stockpiled crude gallium produced, and in 1994. Although the total quantity of gallium used in optoelectronic devices increased, its percentage

154

Synthesis, Crystal Structure, and Elastic Properties of Novel Tungsten Nitrides  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Among transition metal nitrides, tungsten nitrides possess unique and/or superior chemical, mechanical, and thermal properties. Preparation of these nitrides, however, is challenging because the incorporation of nitrogen into tungsten lattice is thermodynamically unfavorable at atmospheric pressure. To date, most materials in the W-N system are in the form of thin films produced by nonequilibrium processes and are often poorly crystallized, which severely limits their use in diverse technological applications. Here we report synthesis of tungsten nitrides through new approaches involving solid-state ion exchange and nitrogen degassing under pressure. We unveil a number of novel nitrides including hexagonal and rhombohedral W{sub 2}N{sub 3}. The final products are phase-pure and well-crystallized in bulk forms. For hexagonal W{sub 2}N{sub 3}, hexagonal WN, and cubic W3N4, they exhibit elastic properties rivaling or even exceeding cubic-BN. All four nitrides are prepared at a moderate pressure of 5 GPa, the lowest among high-pressure synthesis of transition metal nitrides, making it practically feasible for massive and industrial-scale production.

Wang, Shanmin; Yu, Xiaohui; Lin, Zhijun; Zhang, Ruifeng; He, Duanwei; Qin, Jiaqian; Zhu, Jinlong; Han, Jiantao; Wang, Lin; Mao, Ho-kwang; Zhang, Jianzhong; Zhao, Yusheng (UNLV); (Ehime U); (CIW); (Sichuan U.); (LANL)

2012-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

155

(Polyfluoroaryl) fluoroanions of aluminum, gallium, and indium of enhanced utility, uses thereof, and products based thereon  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions of aluminum, gallium, and indium are novel weakly coordinating anions which are highly fluorinated. (Polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions of one such type contain at least one ring substituent other than fluorine. These (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions of aluminum, gallium, and indium have greater solubility in organic solvents, or have a coordinative ability essentially equal to or less than that of the corresponding (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanion of aluminum, gallium, or indium in which the substituent is replaced by fluorine. Another type of new (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanion of aluminum, gallium, and indium have 1-3 perfluorinated fused ring groups and 2-0 perfluorophenyl groups. When used as a cocatalyst in the formation of novel catalytic complexes with d- or f-block metal compounds having at least one leaving group such as a methyl group, these anions, because of their weak coordination to the metal center, do not interfere in the ethylene polymerization process, while affecting the propylene process favorably, if highly isotactic polypropylene is desired. Thus, the (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions of aluminum, gallium, and indium of this invention are useful in various polymerization processes such as are described.

Marks, Tobin J. (Evanston, IL); Chen, You-Xian (Midland, MI)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

(Polyfluoroaryl) fluoroanions of aluminum, gallium, and indium of enhanced utility, uses thereof, and products based thereon  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions of aluminum, gallium, and indium are novel weakly coordinating anions which are highly fluorinated. (Polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions of one such type contain at least one ring substituent other than fluorine. These (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions of aluminum, gallium, and indium have greater solubility in organic solvents, or have a coordinative ability essentially equal to or less than that of the corresponding (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanion of aluminum, gallium, or indium in which the substituent is replaced by fluorine. Another type of new (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanion of aluminum, gallium, and indium have 1-3 perfluorinated fused ring groups and 2-0 perfluorophenyl groups. When used as a cocatalyst in the formation of novel catalytic complexes with d- or f-block metal compounds having at least one leaving group such as a methyl group, these anions, because of their weak coordination to the metal center, do not interfere in the ethylene polymerization process, while affecting the propylene process favorably, if highly isotactic polypropylene is desired. Thus, the (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions of aluminum, gallium, and indium of this invention are useful in various polymerization processes such as are described.

Marks, Tobin J. (Evanston, IL); Chen, You-Xian (Midland, MI)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

High efficiency III-nitride light-emitting diodes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Tailored doping of barrier layers enables balancing of the radiative recombination among the multiple-quantum-wells in III-Nitride light-emitting diodes. This tailored doping enables more symmetric carrier transport and uniform carrier distribution which help to reduce electron leakage and thus reduce the efficiency droop in high-power III-Nitride LEDs. Mitigation of the efficiency droop in III-Nitride LEDs may enable the pervasive market penetration of solid-state-lighting technologies in high-power lighting and illumination.

Crawford, Mary; Koleske, Daniel; Cho, Jaehee; Zhu, Di; Noemaun, Ahmed; Schubert, Martin F; Schubert, E. Fred

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

158

Silicon nitride protective coatings for silvered glass mirrors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A protective diffusion barrier for metalized mirror structures is provided by a layer or coating of silicon nitride which is a very dense, transparent, dielectric material that is impervious to water, alkali, and other impurities and corrosive substances that typically attack the metal layers of mirrors and cause degradation of the mirrors' reflectivity. The silicon nitride layer can be deposited on the substrate before metal deposition to stabilize the metal/substrate interface, and it can be deposited over the metal to encapsulate it and protect the metal from corrosion or other degradation. Mirrors coated with silicon nitride according to this invention can also be used as front surface mirrors.

Tracy, C. Edwin (Golden, CO); Benson, David K. (Golden, CO)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Conductive and robust nitride buffer layers on biaxially textured substrates  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates to epitaxial, electrically conducting and mechanically robust, cubic nitride buffer layers deposited epitaxially on biaxially textured substrates such as metals and alloys. The invention comprises of a biaxially textured substrate with epitaxial layers of nitrides. The invention also discloses a method to form such epitaxial layers using a high rate deposition method as well as without the use of forming gases. The invention further comprises epitaxial layers of oxides on the biaxially textured nitride layer. In some embodiments the article further comprises electromagnetic devices which may have superconducting properties.

Sankar, Sambasivan [Chicago, IL; Goyal, Amit [Knoxville, TN; Barnett, Scott A [Evanston, IL; Kim, Ilwon [Skokie, IL; Kroeger, Donald M [Knoxville, TN

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

160

Silicon nitride protective coatings for silvered glass mirrors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A protective diffusion barrier for metalized mirror structures is provided by a layer or coating of silicon nitride which is a very dense, transparent, dielectric material that is impervious to water, alkali, and other impurities and corrosive substances that typically attack the metal layers of mirrors and cause degradation of the mirrors' reflectivity. The silicon nitride layer can be deposited on the substrate prior to metal deposition thereon to stabilize the metal/substrate interface, and it can be deposited over the metal to encapsulate it and protect the metal from corrosion or other degradation. Mirrors coated with silicon nitride according to this invention can also be used as front surface mirrors.

Tracy, C.E.; Benson, D.K.

1984-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gallium nitride ingan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Vacancy Hardening and Softening in Transition Metal Carbides and Nitrides  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effects of vacancies on mechanical properties of the transition metal carbides and nitrides are studied using the ab initio pseudopotential approach. Calculated shear elastic stiffness and electronic structures show that the vacancy produces entirely different effects on the mechanical strength of groups IVb nitrides and Vb carbides. It is found that the occupation of shear-unstable metallic dd bonding states changes essentially in an opposite way for the carbides and nitrides in the presence of vacancies, resulting in different responses to shear stress. Our study provides an atomistic understanding of the anomaly in hardness for these substoichiometric materials.

Jhi, Seung-Hoon; Louie, Steven G.; Cohen, Marvin L.; Ihm, Jisoon

2001-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

162

Electron backscatter diffraction of plutonium-gallium alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At Los Alamos National Laboratory a recent experimental technique has been developed to characterize reactive metals, including plutonium arid cerium, using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). Microstructural characterization of plutonium and its alloys by EBSD had been previously elusive primarily because of the extreme toxicity and rapid surface oxidation rate associated with plutonium metal. The experimental techniques, which included ion-sputtering the metal surface using a scanning auger microprobe (SAM) followed by vacuum transfer of the sample from the SAM to the scanning electron microscope (SEM), used to obtain electron backscatter diffraction Kikuchi patterns (EBSPs) and orientation maps for plutonium-gallium alloys are described and the initial microstructural observations based on the analysis are discussed. Combining the SEM and EBSD observations, the phase transformation behavior between the {delta} and {var_epsilon} structures was explained. This demonstrated sample preparation and characterization technique is expected to be a powerful means to further understand phase transformation behavior, orientation relationships, and texlure in the complicated plutonium alloy systems.

Boehlert, C. J. (Carl J.); Zocco, T. G. (Thomas G.); Schulze, R. K. (Roland K.); Mitchell, J. N. (Jeremy N.); Pereyra, R. A. (Ramiro A.)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Hard Magnets I: 2-17, Nitrides, Carbides Frederick Pinkerton, Chairman Structure and magnetic properties of rare-earth iron nitrides, carbides  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hard Magnets I: 2-17, Nitrides, Carbides Frederick Pinkerton, Chairman Structure and magnetic properties of rare-earth iron nitrides, carbides and carbonitrides (invited) Z. Altounian, X. Chen, L. X develops for R=Sm upon nitriding/carbiding with an anisotropy field that is almost double the value for Nd

Ryan, Dominic

164

Iron-Nitride Alloy Magnets: Transformation Enabled Nitride Magnets Absent Rare Earths (TEN Mare)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

REACT Project: Case Western is developing a highly magnetic iron-nitride alloy to use in the magnets that power electric motors found in EVs and renewable power generators. This would reduce the overall price of the motor by eliminating the expensive imported rare earth minerals typically found in today’s best commercial magnets. The iron-nitride powder is sourced from abundant and inexpensive materials found in the U.S. The ultimate goal of this project is to demonstrate this new magnet system, which contains no rare earths, in a prototype electric motor. This could significantly reduce the amount of greenhouse gases emitted in the U.S. each year by encouraging the use of clean alternatives to oil and coal.

None

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Change in the current-carrier concentration upon doping PbTe with gallium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Upon doping PbTe with gallium, both high-resistivity samples with intrinsic conductivity and low-resistivity samples with electronic conductivity (n/sub e/ = 10/sup 18/ cm/sup -3/) are produced on the PbTe-GaTe section. A thorough investigation of the dependence of the thermo-emf of Pb/sub 1-x/Ga/sub x/Te on the excess Pb and Te side showed the presence of a wide region with intrinsic conductivity. The experimental data can be explained by the fact that impure gallium in PbTe has negative Hubbard energy and stabilizes the Fermi level almost at the center of the forbidden band. At high gallium concentrations, Ga/sub 2/Te/sub 3/ precipitates at first, and then GaTe precipitates as well. The lead forming in excess transforms Ga/sup 3 +/ to Ga/sup +/, which produces the electronic conductivity in the material.

Bushmarina, G.S.; Gruzinov, B.F.; Drabkin, I.A.; Lev, E.Ya.; Moizhes, B.Ya; Suprun, S.G.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Single-layer graphene on silicon nitride micromembrane resonators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Due to their low mass, high quality factor, and good optical properties, silicon nitride (SiN) micromembrane resonators are widely used in force and mass sensing applications, particularly in optomechanics. The metallization ...

Schmid, Silvan

167

aluminum nitride insulator: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

K-r grown by a modified Bridgman tech- nique,r6 Rollins, Andrew M. 27 Low-voltage organic thin film transistors with hydrophobic aluminum nitride film as gate insulator Materials...

168

Molybdenum enhanced low-temperature deposition of crystalline silicon nitride  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for chemical vapor deposition of crystalline silicon nitride is described which comprises the steps of: introducing a mixture of a silicon source, a molybdenum source, a nitrogen source, and a hydrogen source into a vessel containing a suitable substrate; and thermally decomposing the mixture to deposit onto the substrate a coating comprising crystalline silicon nitride containing a dispersion of molybdenum silicide. 5 figures.

Lowden, R.A.

1994-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

169

Apparatus for the production of boron nitride nanotubes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An apparatus for the large scale production of boron nitride nanotubes comprising; a pressure chamber containing; a continuously fed boron containing target; a source of thermal energy preferably a focused laser beam; a cooled condenser; a source of pressurized nitrogen gas; and a mechanism for extracting boron nitride nanotubes that are condensed on or in the area of the cooled condenser from the pressure chamber.

Smith, Michael W; Jordan, Kevin

2014-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

170

Percolation of gallium dominates the electrical resistance of focused ion beam deposited metals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Metal deposition through focused ion beam (FIB) based systems is thought to result in material composed of the primary metal from the metallo-organic precursor in addition to carbon, oxygen, and gallium. We determined, through electrical resistance and chemical composition measurements on a wide range of FIB deposited platinum and tungsten lines, that the gallium ion (Ga{sup +}) concentration in the metal lines plays the dominant role in controlling the electrical resistivity. Effective medium theory, based on McLachlan's formalisms, was used to describe the relationship between the Ga{sup +} concentration and the corresponding resistivity.

Faraby, H. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); DiBattista, M. [Qualcomm Technologies Incorporated, San Diego, California 92121 (United States); Bandaru, P. R., E-mail: pbandaru@ucsd.edu [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States)

2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

171

Results of the Gallium-Clad Phase 3 and Phase 4 tasks (canceled prior to completion)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of the Gallium-Clad interactions Phase 3 and 4 tasks. Both tasks were to involve examining the out-of-pile stability of residual gallium in short fuel rods with an imposed thermal gradient. The thermal environment was to be created by an electrical heater in the center of the fuel rod and coolant flow on the rod outer cladding. Both tasks were canceled due to difficulties with fuel pellet fabrication, delays in the preparation of the test apparatus, and changes in the Fissile Materials Disposition program budget.

Morris, R.N.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Process for preparing titanium nitride powder  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for making titanium nitride powder by reaction of titanium phosphates with sodium cyanide. The process of this invention may comprise mixing one or more phosphates of Ti with a cyanide salt in the absence of oxygen and heating to a temperature sufficient to cause reaction to occur. In the preferred embodiment the ratio of cyanide salt to Ti should be at least 2 which results in the major Ti-containing product being TiN rather than sodium titanium phosphate byproducts. The process is an improvement over prior processes since the byproducts are water soluble salts of sodium which can easily be removed from the preferred TiN product by washing. 2 tabs.

Bamberger, C.E.

1988-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

173

A boron nitride nanotube peapod thermal rectifier  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The precise guidance of heat from one specific location to another is paramount in many industrial and commercial applications, including thermal management and thermoelectric generation. One of the cardinal requirements is a preferential conduction of thermal energy, also known as thermal rectification, in the materials. This study introduces a novel nanomaterial for rectifying heat—the boron nitride nanotube peapod thermal rectifier. Classical non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations are performed on this nanomaterial, and interestingly, the strength of the rectification phenomenon is dissimilar at different operating temperatures. This is due to the contingence of the thermal flux on the conductance at the localized region around the scatterer, which varies with temperature. The rectification performance of the peapod rectifier is inherently dependent on its asymmetry. Last but not least, the favourable rectifying direction in the nanomaterial is established.

Loh, G. C., E-mail: jgloh@mtu.edu [Department of Physics, Michigan Technological University, Houghton, Michigan 49931 (United States); Institute of High Performance Computing, 1 Fusionopolis Way, #16-16 Connexis, Singapore 138632 (Singapore); Baillargeat, D. [CNRS-International-NTU-Thales Research Alliance (CINTRA), 50 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 637553 (Singapore)

2014-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

174

Millimeter wave ferromagnetic resonance in gallium-substituted ?-iron oxide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In millimeter wave frequency range, hexagonal ferrites with high uniaxial anisotropic magnetic fields are used as absorbers. These ferrites include M-type barium ferrite (BaFe{sub 12}O{sub 19}) and strontium ferrite (SrFe{sub 12}O{sub 19}), which have natural ferromagnetic resonant frequency range from 40 GHz to 60?GHz. However, the higher frequency range lacks suitable materials that support the higher frequency ferromagnetic resonance. A new series of gallium-substituted ?-iron oxides (?-Ga{sub x}Fe{sub 2?x}O{sub 3}) are synthesized which have ferromagnetic resonant frequencies appearing over the frequency range 30 GHz–150 GHz. The ?-Ga{sub x}Fe{sub 2?x}O{sub 3} is synthesized by the combination of reverse micelle and sol-gel techniques or the sol-gel method only. The particle sizes are observed to be smaller than 100 nm. In this paper, the free space magneto-optical approach has been employed to study these newly developed ?-Ga{sub x}Fe{sub 2?x}O{sub 3} particles in millimeter waves. This technique enables to obtain precise transmission spectra to determine the dielectric and magnetic properties of both isotropic and anisotropic ferrites in the millimeter wave frequency range from a single set of direct measurements. The transmittance and absorbance spectra of ?-Ga{sub x}Fe{sub 2?x}O{sub 3} are shown in this paper. Strong ferromagnetic resonances at different frequencies determined by the x parameter are found.

Chao, Liu, E-mail: liu.chao@tufts.edu; Afsar, Mohammed N. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Tufts University, Medford, Massachusetts 02155 (United States); Ohkoshi, Shin-ichi [Department of Chemistry, School of Science, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

175

Protective nitride formation on stainless steel alloys for proton exchange membrane fuel cell bipolar plates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gas nitridation has shown excellent promise to form dense, electrically conductive and corrosion-resistant Cr-nitride surface layers on Ni-Cr base alloys for use as proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) bipolar plates. Due to the high cost of nickel, Fe-base bipolar plate alloys are needed to meet the cost targets for many PEMFC applications. Unfortunately, nitridation of Fe-base stainless steel alloys typically leads to internal Cr-nitride precipitation rather than the desired protective surface nitride layer formation, due to the high permeability of nitrogen in these alloys. This paper reports the finding that it is possible to form a continuous, protective Cr-nitride (CrN and Cr{sub 2}N) surface layer through nitridation of Fe-base stainless steel alloys. The key to form a protective Cr-nitride surface layer was found to be the initial formation of oxide during nitridation, which prevented the internal nitridation typically observed for these alloys, and resulted in external Cr-nitride layer formation. The addition of V to the alloy, which resulted in the initial formation of V{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}, was found to enhance this effect, by making the initially formed oxide more amenable to subsequent nitridation. The Cr-nitride surface layer formed on model V-modified Fe-27Cr alloys exhibited excellent corrosion resistance and low interfacial contact resistance under simulated PEMFC bipolar plate conditions.

Yang, Bing [ORNL; Brady, Michael P [ORNL; Wang, Heli [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); Turner, John [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); More, Karren Leslie [ORNL; Young, David J [ORNL; Tortorelli, Peter F [ORNL; Payzant, E Andrew [ORNL; Walker, Larry R [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Adhesion improvement of electroless copper depositions on titanium nitride by low temperature annealing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

copper depositions onto titanium nitride, a diffusion barrier material. In particular, an effort is made to characterize the adhesion of the electronics copper deposit on titanium nitride and the improvement of the adhesion produced by low temperature...

Eiserer, Rex Anthony

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Synthesis of III-V nitride nanowires with controlled structure, morphology, and composition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The III-V nitride materials system offers tunable electronic and optical properties that can be tailored for specific electronic and optoelectronic applications by varying the (In,Ga,Al)N alloy composition. While nitride ...

Crawford, Samuel Curtis

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

E-Print Network 3.0 - amorphous tin nitride Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

TiN, are extensively used as wear... of transition metal nitrides (TiN, NbN) where reduction of the metal is necessary for the nitride formation... Layer Epitaxy in Deposition...

179

E-Print Network 3.0 - actinide nitrides phosphides Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

vacancy scattering and Hall constant... ) of 8.4 (i.e. ThCo.6No.4). In transition metal carbides and nitrides, a similar but more pronounced... carbides, nitride and...

180

Comparing directed efficiency of III-nitride nanowire light-emitting diodes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

III-nitride-based nanowires are a promising platform for solid-state lighting. III-nitride nanowires that act as natural waveguides to enhance directed extraction have previously been shown to be free of extended defects ...

Gradecak, Silvija

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gallium nitride ingan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Feasibility of breeding in hard spectrum boiling water reactors with oxide and nitride fuels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study assesses the neutronic, thermal-hydraulic, and fuel performance aspects of using nitride fuel in place of oxides in Pu-based high conversion light water reactor designs. Using the higher density nitride fuel ...

Feng, Bo, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Optical, electrical, and solar energy-conversion properties of gallium arsenide nanowire-array  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optical, electrical, and solar energy-conversion properties of gallium arsenide nanowire, and will aid in the design and optimization of nanowire-based systems for solar energy-conversion applications, and the photoelectrochemical energy-conversion properties of GaAs nanowire arrays were evaluated in contact with one

Zhou, Chongwu

183

GALLIUM--2003 28.1 References that include a section mark () are found in the Internet  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the United States was in the form of GaAs. GaAs was manufactured into optoelectronic devices (LEDs, laser diodes, photodetectors, and solar cells) and ICs. ICs and optoelectronic devices each accounted for 41) and optoelectronic devices [mostly laser diodes and light- emitting diodes (LEDs)]. Estimated crude gallium

184

SUBMILLIMETER OPTICAL PROPERTIES OF HEXAGONAL BORON NITRIDE A. J. Gatesman, R. H. Giles and J. Waldman  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

boron nitride was obtained in four grades (A, HP, M, M26) from The Carborundum Co. in Niagara Fall, NY

Massachusetts at Lowell, University of

185

Silicon nitride/silicon carbide composite densified materials prepared using composite powders  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Prepare silicon nitride-silicon carbide composite powders by carbothermal reduction of crystalline silica powder, carbon powder and, optionally, crystalline silicon nitride powder. The crystalline silicon carbide portion of the composite powders has a mean number diameter less than about 700 nanometers and contains nitrogen. The composite powders may be used to prepare sintered ceramic bodies and self-reinforced silicon nitride ceramic bodies.

Dunmead, S.D.; Weimer, A.W.; Carroll, D.F.; Eisman, G.A.; Cochran, G.A.; Susnitzky, D.W.; Beaman, D.R.; Nilsen, K.J.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

DETERMINING OPTICAL CONSTANTS OF URANIUM NITRIDE THIN FILMS IN THE EXTREME  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DETERMINING OPTICAL CONSTANTS OF URANIUM NITRIDE THIN FILMS IN THE EXTREME ULTRAVIOLET (1.6-35 NM deposition and characterization of reactively-sputtered uranium nitride thin films. I also report optical.1 Application 1 1.2 Optical Constants 2 1.3 Project Focus 7 2 Uranium Nitride Thin Films 8 2.1 Sputtering 8 2

Hart, Gus

187

Thermodynamic stability of oxide, nitride, and carbide coating materials in liquid Sn25Li  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thermodynamic stability of oxide, nitride, and carbide coating materials in liquid Sn­25Li S of various oxides, carbides, and nitrides in Sn­Li is estimated as a function of lithium composition K most of the studied nitrides, carbides, and some oxides were found to be stable (DrG > 0). However

Ghoniem, Nasr M.

188

Trends in elasticity and electronic structure of transition-metal nitrides and carbides from first principles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Trends in elasticity and electronic structure of transition-metal nitrides and carbides from first 2005 The elastic properties of selected transition-metal TM nitrides and carbides in B1 structure the transition-metal nitrides and carbides remain unclear and a challenge for engineering hard materials

Wu, Zhigang

189

Active Control of Nitride Plasmonic Dispersion in the Far Infrared.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigate plasmonic structures in nitride-based materials for far-infrared (IR) applications. The two dimensional electron gas (2DEG) in the GaN/AlGaN material system, much like metal- dielectric structures, is a patternable plasmonic medium. However, it also permits for direct tunability via an applied voltage. While there have been proof-of-principle demonstrations of plasma excitations in nitride 2DEGs, exploration of the potential of this material system has thus far been limited. We recently demonstrated coherent phenomena such as the formation of plasmonic crystals, strong coupling of tunable crystal defects to a plasmonic crystal, and electromagnetically induced transparency in GaAs/AlGaAs 2DEGs at sub-THz frequencies. In this project, we explore whether these effects can be realized in nitride 2DEG materials above 1 THz and at temperatures exceeding 77 K.

Shaner, Eric A.; Dyer, Gregory Conrad; Seng, William Francis; Bethke, Donald Thomas; Grine, Albert Dario,; Baca, Albert G.; Allerman, Andrew A.

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Characterization of nitrided silicon-silicon dioxide interfaces  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A newly-developed technique for the simultaneous characterization of the oxide-silicon interface properties and of bulk impurities was used for a systematic study of the nitridation process of thin oxides. This technique is based upon surface recombination velocity measurements, and does not require the formation of a capacitor structure, so it is very suitable for the characterization of as-grown interfaces. Oxides grown both in dry and in wet environments were considered, and nitridation processes in N{sub 2}O and in NO were compared to N{sub 2} annealing processes. The effect of nitridation temperature and duration were also studied, and RTO/RTN processes were compared to conventional furnace nitridation processes. Surface recombination velocity was correlated with nitrogen concentration at the oxide-silicon interface obtained by Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy (SIMS) measurements. Surface recombination velocity (hence surface state density) decreases with increasing nitrogen pile-up at the oxide-silicon interface, indicating that in nitrided interfaces surface state density is limited by nitridation. NO treatments are much more effective than N{sub 2}O treatments in the formation of nitrogen-rich interface layer and, as a consequence, in surface state reduction. Surface state density was measured in fully processed wafers before and after constant current stress. After a complete device process surface states are annealed out by hydrogen passivation, however they are reactivated by the electrical stress, and surface state results after stress were compared with data of surface recombination velocity in as-processed wafers.

Polignano, M.L.; Alessandri, M.; Brazzelli, D. [and others

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Structural studies of magnesium nitride fluorides by powder neutron diffraction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Samples of ternary nitride fluorides, Mg{sub 3}NF{sub 3} and Mg{sub 2}NF have been prepared by solid state reaction of Mg{sub 3}N{sub 2} and MgF{sub 2} at 1323-1423 K and investigated by powder X-ray and powder neutron diffraction techniques. Mg{sub 3}NF{sub 3} is cubic (space group: Pm3m) and has a structure related to rock-salt MgO, but with one cation site vacant. Mg{sub 2}NF is tetragonal (space group: I4{sub 1}/amd) and has an anti-LiFeO{sub 2} related structure. Both compounds are essentially ionic and form structures in which nitride and fluoride anions are crystallographically ordered. The nitride fluorides show temperature independent paramagnetic behaviour between 5 and 300 K. - Graphical abstract: Definitive structures of the ternary magnesium nitride fluorides Mg{sub 3}NF{sub 3} and the lower temperature polymorph of Mg{sub 2}NF have been determined from powder neutron diffraction data. The nitride halides are essentially ionic and exhibit weak temperature independent paramagnetic behaviour. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Definitive structures of Mg{sub 3}NF{sub 3} and Mg{sub 2}NF were determined by neutron diffraction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nitride and fluoride anions are crystallographically ordered in both structures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both compounds exhibit weak, temperature independent paramagnetic behaviour. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The compounds are essentially ionic with ionicity increasing with F{sup -} content.

Brogan, Michael A. [School of Chemistry, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Hughes, Robert W. [WestCHEM, School of Chemistry, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Smith, Ronald I. [ISIS Pulsed Neutron and Muon Source, Science and Technology Facilities Council, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Oxford, Didcot OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Gregory, Duncan H., E-mail: Duncan.Gregory@glasgow.ac.uk [WestCHEM, School of Chemistry, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

192

Process for synthesizing titanium carbide, titanium nitride and titanium carbonitride  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is disclosed for synthesizing titanium carbide, titanium nitride or titanium carbonitride. The process comprises placing particles of titanium, a titanium salt or titanium dioxide within a vessel and providing a carbon-containing atmosphere within the vessel. The vessel is heated to a pyrolysis temperature sufficient to pyrolyze the carbon to thereby coat the particles with a carbon coating. Thereafter, the carbon-coated particles are heated in an inert atmosphere to produce titanium carbide, or in a nitrogen atmosphere to produce titanium nitride or titanium carbonitride, with the heating being of a temperature and time sufficient to produce a substantially complete solid solution.

Koc, R.; Glatzmaier, G.C.

1995-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

193

Process for synthesizing titanium carbide, titanium nitride and titanium carbonitride  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for synthesizing titanium carbide, titanium nitride or titanium carbonitride. The process comprises placing particles of titanium, a titanium salt or titanium dioxide within a vessel and providing a carbon-containing atmosphere within the vessel. The vessel is heated to a pyrolysis temperature sufficient to pyrolyze the carbon to thereby coat the particles with a carbon coating. Thereafter, the carbon-coated particles are heated in an inert atmosphere to produce titanium carbide, or in a nitrogen atmosphere to produce titanium nitride or titanium carbonitride, with the heating being of a temperature and time sufficient to produce a substantially complete solid solution.

Koc, Rasit (Lakewood, CO); Glatzmaier, Gregory C. (Boulder, CO)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Process for producing wurtzitic or cubic boron nitride  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed is a process for producing wurtzitic or cubic boron nitride comprising the steps of: [A] preparing an intimate mixture of powdered boron oxide, a powdered metal selected from the group consisting of magnesium or aluminum, and a powdered metal azide; [B] igniting the mixture and bringing it to a temperature at which self-sustaining combustion occurs; [C] shocking the mixture at the end of the combustion thereof with a high pressure wave, thereby forming as a reaction product, wurtzitic or cubic boron nitride and occluded metal oxide; and, optionally [D] removing the occluded metal oxide from the reaction product. Also disclosed are reaction products made by the process described.

Holt, J.B.; Kingman, D.D.; Bianchini, G.M.

1992-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

195

Process for producing wurtzitic or cubic boron nitride  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed is a process for producing wurtzitic or cubic boron nitride comprising the steps of: [A] preparing an intimate mixture of powdered boron oxide, a powdered metal selected from the group consisting of magnesium or aluminum, and a powdered metal azide; [B] igniting the mixture and bringing it to a temperature at which self-sustaining combustion occurs; [C] shocking the mixture at the end of the combustion thereof with a high pressure wave, thereby forming as a reaction product, wurtzitic or cubic boron nitride and occluded metal oxide; and, optionally [D] removing the occluded metal oxide from the reaction product. Also disclosed are reaction products made by the process described.

Holt, J. Birch (San Jose, CA); Kingman, deceased, Donald D. (late of Danville, CA); Bianchini, Gregory M. (Livermore, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Synthesis and Optimization of the Sintering Kinetics of Actinide Nitrides  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research conducted for this NERI project has advanced the understanding and feasibility of nitride nuclear fuel processing. In order to perform this research, necessary laboratory infrastructure was developed; including basic facilities and experimental equipment. Notable accomplishments from this project include: the synthesis of uranium, dysprosium, and cerium nitrides using a novel, low-cost mechanical method at room temperature; the synthesis of phase pure UN, DyN, and CeN using thermal methods; and the sintering of UN and (Ux, Dy1-x)N (0.7 ? X ? 1) pellets from phase pure powder that was synthesized in the Advanced Materials Laboratory at Boise State University.

Drryl P. Butt; Brian Jaques

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

197

Fast neutron scattering on Gallium target at 14.8 MeV  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Benchmarking of evaluated nuclear data libraries was performed for $\\sim 14.8$ MeV neutrons on Gallium targets. The experiments were performed at China Institute of Atomic Energy(CIAE). Solid samples of natural Gallium (3.2 cm and 6.4 cm thick) were bombarded by $\\sim 14.8$ MeV neutrons and leakage neutron energy spectra were measured at 60$^{\\circ}$ and 120$^{\\circ}$. The measured spectra are rather well reproduced by MCNP-4C simulations with the CENDL-3.1, ENDF/B-VII and JENDL-4.0 evaluated nuclear data libraries, except for the inelastic contributions around $E_{n} = 10-13$ MeV. All three libraries significantly underestimate the inelastic contributions. The inelastic contributions are further studied, using the Talys simulation code and the experimental spectra are reproduced reasonably well in the whole energy range by the Talys calculation, including the inelastic contributions.

R. Han; R. Wada; Z. Chen; Y. Nie; X. Liu; S. Zhang; P. Ren; B. Jia; G. Tian; F. Luo; W. Lin; J. Liu; F. Shi; M. Huang; X. Ruan; J. Ren; Z. Zhou; H. Huang; J. Bao; K. Zhang; B. Hu

2014-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

198

Fast neutron scattering on Gallium target at 14.8 MeV  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Benchmarking of evaluated nuclear data libraries was performed for $\\sim 14.8$ MeV neutrons on Gallium targets. The experiments were performed at China Institute of Atomic Energy(CIAE). Solid samples of natural Gallium (3.2 cm and 6.4 cm thick) were bombarded by $\\sim 14.8$ MeV neutrons and leakage neutron energy spectra were measured at 60$^{\\circ}$ and 120$^{\\circ}$. The measured spectra are rather well reproduced by MCNP-4C simulations with the CENDL-3.1, ENDF/B-VII and JENDL-4.0 evaluated nuclear data libraries, except for the inelastic contributions around $E_{n} = 10-13$ MeV. All three libraries significantly underestimate the inelastic contributions. The inelastic contributions are further studied, using the Talys simulation code and the experimental spectra are reproduced reasonably well in the whole energy range by the Talys calculation, including the inelastic contributions.

Han, R; Chen, Z; Nie, Y; Liu, X; Zhang, S; Ren, P; Jia, B; Tian, G; Luo, F; Lin, W; Liu, J; Shi, F; Huang, M; Ruan, X; Ren, J; Zhou, Z; Huang, H; Bao, J; Zhang, K; Hu, B

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Narrow energy band gap gallium arsenide nitride semi-conductors and an ion-cut-synthesis method for producing the same  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for forming a semi-conductor material is provided that comprises forming a donor substrate constructed of GaAs, providing a receiver substrate, implanting nitrogen into the donor substrate to form an implanted layer comprising GaAs and nitrogen. The implanted layer is bonded to the receiver substrate and annealed to form GaAsN and nitrogen micro-blisters in the implanted layer. The micro-blisters allow the implanted layer to be cleaved from the donor substrate.

Weng, Xiaojun; Goldman, Rachel S.

2006-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

200

Inversion by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition from N- to Ga-polar gallium nitride and its application to multiple quantum well light-emitting diodes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We demonstrate a metalorganic chemical vapor deposition growth approach for inverting N-polar to Ga-polar GaN by using a thin inversion layer grown with high Mg flux. The introduction of this inversion layer allowed us to grow p-GaN films on N-polar GaN thin film. We have studied the dependence of hole concentration, surface morphology, and degree of polarity inversion for the inverted Ga-polar surface on the thickness of the inversion layer. We then use this approach to grow a light emitting diode structure which has the MQW active region grown on the advantageous N-polar surface and the p-layer grown on the inverted Ga-polar surface.

Hosalli, A. M.; Van Den Broeck, D. M.; Bedair, S. M. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, NCSU, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States)] [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, NCSU, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States); Bharrat, D.; El-Masry, N. A. [Department of Material Science and Engineering, NCSU, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States)] [Department of Material Science and Engineering, NCSU, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States)

2013-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gallium nitride ingan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Cubic Lithium Nitride Amy Lazicki1,2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cubic Lithium Nitride to 200 GPa Amy Lazicki1,2 Choong-Shik Yoo1, Warren Pickett2, Richard electrolyte material for lithium-based batteries · possible hydrogen storage material Thrust of this research ­ differences between the XRS and PDOS are indications of the presence of core-hole interactions (excitons

Islam, M. Saif

202

Evaluation and silicon nitride internal combustion engine components  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The feasibility of silicon nitride (Si[sub 3]N[sub 4]) use in internal combustion engines was studied by testing three different components for wear resistance and lower reciprocating mass. The information obtained from these preliminary spin rig and engine tests indicates several design changes are necessary to survive high-stress engine applications. The three silicon nitride components tested were valve spring retainers, tappet rollers, and fuel pump push rod ends. Garrett Ceramic Components' gas-pressure sinterable Si[sub 3]N[sub 4] (GS-44) was used to fabricate the above components. Components were final machined from densified blanks that had been green formed by isostatic pressing of GS-44 granules. Spin rig testing of the valve spring retainers indicated that these Si[sub 3]N[sub 4] components could survive at high RPM levels (9,500) when teamed with silicon nitride valves and lower spring tension than standard titanium components. Silicon nitride tappet rollers showed no wear on roller O.D. or I.D. surfaces, steel axles and lifters; however, due to the uncrowned design of these particular rollers the cam lobes indicated wear after spin rig testing. Fuel pump push rod ends were successful at reducing wear on the cam lobe and rod end when tested on spin rigs and in real-world race applications.

Voldrich, W. (Allied-Signal Aerospace Co., Torrance, CA (United States). Garrett Ceramic Components Div.)

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Continuous Fiber Ceramic Composite (CFCC) Program: Gaseous Nitridation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Textron has developed a mature process for the fabrication of continuous fiber ceramic composite (CFCC) tubes for application in the aluminum processing and casting industry. The major milestones in this project are System Composition; Matrix Formulation; Preform Fabrication; Nitridation; Material Characterization; Component Evaluation

R. Suplinskas G. DiBona; W. Grant

2001-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

204

Polyorganosilazane preceramic binder development for reaction bonded silicon nitride composites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study has examined the use of two commercially available polyorganosilazanes for application as preceramic binders in a composite composed of silicon carbide fibers in a reaction bonded silicon nitride (RBSN) matrix. Ceramic monolithic and composite samples were produced. Density of monolithic and whisker reinforced RBSN samples containing the polysilazane binder was increased. Mercury intrusion porosimetry revealed a significant decrease in the pore sizes of samples containing a polyorganosilazane binder. Electron micrographs of samples containing the preceramic binder looked similar to control samples containing no precursor. Overall, incorporation of the polysilazane into monolithic and whisker reinforced samples resulted in significantly increased density and decreased porosity. Nitriding of the RBSN was slightly retarded by addition of the polysilazane binder. Samples with the preceramic binders contained increased contents of {alpha} versus {beta}-silicon nitride which may be due to interaction of hydrogen evolved from polysilazane pyrolysis with the nitriding process. Initial efforts to produce continuous fiber reinforced composites via this method have not realized the same improvements in density and porosity which have been observed for monolithic and whisker reinforced samples. Further, the addition of perceramic binder resulted in a more brittle fracture morphology as compared to similar composites made without the binder.

Mohr, D.L.; Starr, T.L. [Georgia Tech Research Inst., Atlanta, GA (United States)

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Polyorganosilazane preceramic binder development for reaction bonded silicon nitride composites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study has examined the use of two commercially available polyorganosilazanes for application as preceramic binders in a composite composed of silicon carbide fibers in a reaction bonded silicon nitride (RBSN) matrix. Ceramic monolithic and composite samples were produced. Density of monolithic and whisker reinforced RBSN samples containing the polysilazane binder was increased. Mercury intrusion porosimetry revealed a significant decrease in the pore sizes of samples containing a polyorganosilazane binder. Electron micrographs of samples containing the preceramic binder looked similar to control samples containing no precursor. Overall, incorporation of the polysilazane into monolithic and whisker reinforced samples resulted in significantly increased density and decreased porosity. Nitriding of the RBSN was slightly retarded by addition of the polysilazane binder. Samples with the preceramic binders contained increased contents of [alpha] versus [beta]-silicon nitride which may be due to interaction of hydrogen evolved from polysilazane pyrolysis with the nitriding process. Initial efforts to produce continuous fiber reinforced composites via this method have not realized the same improvements in density and porosity which have been observed for monolithic and whisker reinforced samples. Further, the addition of perceramic binder resulted in a more brittle fracture morphology as compared to similar composites made without the binder.

Mohr, D.L.; Starr, T.L. (Georgia Tech Research Inst., Atlanta, GA (United States))

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Methods for improved growth of group III nitride buffer layers  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods are disclosed for growing high crystal quality group III-nitride epitaxial layers with advanced multiple buffer layer techniques. In an embodiment, a method includes forming group III-nitride buffer layers that contain aluminum on suitable substrate in a processing chamber of a hydride vapor phase epitaxy processing system. A hydrogen halide or halogen gas is flowing into the growth zone during deposition of buffer layers to suppress homogeneous particle formation. Some combinations of low temperature buffers that contain aluminum (e.g., AlN, AlGaN) and high temperature buffers that contain aluminum (e.g., AlN, AlGaN) may be used to improve crystal quality and morphology of subsequently grown group III-nitride epitaxial layers. The buffer may be deposited on the substrate, or on the surface of another buffer. The additional buffer layers may be added as interlayers in group III-nitride layers (e.g., GaN, AlGaN, AlN).

Melnik, Yurity; Chen, Lu; Kojiri, Hidehiro

2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

207

(Polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions of aluminum, gallium, and indium of enhanced utility, uses thereof, and products based thereon  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions of aluminum, gallium, and indium are novel weakly coordinating anions which are are highly fluorinated. (Polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions of one such type contain at least one ring substituent other than fluorine. These (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions of aluminum, gallium, and indium have greater solubility in organic solvents, or have a coordinative ability essentially equal to or less than that of the corresponding (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanion of aluminum, gallium, or indium in which the substituent is replaced by fluorine. Another type of new (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanion of aluminum, gallium, and indium have 1-3 perfluorinated fused ring groups and 2-0 perfluorophenyl groups. When used as a cocatalyst in the formation of novel catalytic complexes with d- or f-block metal compounds having at least one leaving group such as a methyl group, these anions, because of their weak coordination to the metal center, do not interefere in the ethylene polymerization process, while affecting the the propylene process favorably, if highly isotactic polypropylene is desired. Thus, the (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions of aluminum, gallium, and indium of this invention are useful in various polymerization processes such as are described.

Marks, Tobin J. (Evanston, IL); Chen, You-Xian (Midland, MI)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Gallium Lighting, LLC, Accepts Inaugural Position on the Industry Advisory Board of UC-Light Center to Help Bring Wireless Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gallium Lighting, LLC, Accepts Inaugural Position on the Industry Advisory Board of UC-Light Center to Help Bring Wireless Data Communications Capabilities to LED Lights Fayetteville, GA ­ February 10, 2011 ­Gallium Lighting, LLC, announced today it has accepted an inaugural position

209

E-Print Network 3.0 - aluminum nitride films Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

6 CHARGE STABILITY IN LPCVD SILICON NITRIDE FOR SURFACE PASSIVATION OF SILICON SOLAR CELLS Summary: the distribution and stability of negative charge in silicon dioxide ...

210

Synthesis and Functionalization of Carbon and Boron Nitride Nanomaterials and Their Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon Nitrides for Hydrogen Storage. Adv. Funct. Mater.N compounds for chemical hydrogen storage. Chemical SocietyT. , High-Pressure Hydrogen Storage in Zeolite-Templated

Erickson, Kristopher John

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

amorphous carbon-nitride films: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in hard and elastic amorphous carbon nitride films investigated H NMR spectroscopy Materials Science Websites Summary: Received 14 February 2003; published 5 November 2003 The...

212

Method and apparatus for use of III-nitride wide bandgap semiconductors in optical communications  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present disclosure relates to the use of III-nitride wide bandgap semiconductor materials for optical communications. In one embodiment, an optical device includes an optical waveguide device fabricated using a III-nitride semiconductor material. The III-nitride semiconductor material provides for an electrically controllable refractive index. The optical waveguide device provides for high speed optical communications in an infrared wavelength region. In one embodiment, an optical amplifier is provided using optical coatings at the facet ends of a waveguide formed of erbium-doped III-nitride semiconductor materials.

Hui, Rongqing (Lenexa, KS); Jiang,Hong-Xing (Manhattan, KS); Lin, Jing-Yu (Manhattan, KS)

2008-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

213

E-Print Network 3.0 - aluminum nitride ceramics Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Emily Parker, Vanni Lughi, Noel C. MacDonald Summary: , biocompatibility, and high fracture toughness. As a piezoelectric ceramic, aluminum nitride is compatible... Aluminum...

214

E-Print Network 3.0 - aluminum nitride thin Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

thin Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: aluminum nitride thin Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Packaging Design for Lawrence Berkeley...

215

E-Print Network 3.0 - actinide bearing nitride Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

> >> 41 Electronic structure and pairwise interactions in substoichiometric transition metal carbides and nitrides Summary: ) of transition metals, rare earths and actinides in...

216

E-Print Network 3.0 - aluminum nitride coatings Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

nitride... was attributed to the formation of a layer of aluminum ... Source: zur Loye, Hans-Conrad - Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of South Carolina...

217

2009 Minerals Yearbook U.S. Department of the Interior  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

As and gallium nitride (GaN) and was used in integrated circuits (ICs) and optoelectronic devices [laser diodes

218

Purification of boron nitride nanotubes via polymer wrapping  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: ? Surface modification of boron nitride nanotubes using polymeric materials. ? Surface-modified BNNT was purified with a simple dilution-centrifugation step. ? Surface-modified BNNT can be directly used for polymer composite fabrication ? Degree of purification was analyzed by Raman spectroscopy. - Abstract: Boron nitride nanotubes (BNNT) synthesized by a ball milling-annealing were surface-modified using three different types of polymeric materials. Those materials were chosen depending on future applications especially in polymer nanocomposite fabrications. We found that the surface-modified BNNT can be purified with a simple dilution-centrifugation step, which would be suitable for large-scale purification. Degree of purification was monitored by means of the center peak position and FWHM of E{sub 2g} mode of BNNT in Raman spectra. As the purification of BNNT develops, the peak position was up-shifted while FWHM of the peak was narrowed.

Choi, Jin-Hyuk [Department of Nano Science and Technology, Sejong University, 98 Gunja, Gwangjin, Seoul 143-747 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jaewoo [Nuclear Materials Research Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 1045 Daedukdaero, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); WCI Quantum Beam based Radiation Research Center, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 1045 Daedukdaero, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Seo, Duckbong [Nuclear Materials Research Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 1045 Daedukdaero, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Seo, Young-Soo, E-mail: ysseo@sejong.ac.kr [Department of Nano Science and Technology, Sejong University, 98 Gunja, Gwangjin, Seoul 143-747 (Korea, Republic of)

2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

219

Chemical preparation and shock wave compression of carbon nitride precursors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two synthetic routes have been developed to produce high-molecular-weight organic precursors containing a high weight fraction of nitrogen. One of the precursors is a pyrolysis residue of melamine-formaldehyde resin. The second precursor is the byproduct of an unusual low-temperature combustion reaction of tetrazole and its sodium salt. These precursors have been shock compressed under typical conditions for diamond and wurtzite boron nitride synthesis in an attempt to recover a new ultrahard carbon nitride. The recovered material has been analyzed by X-ray diffraction, FTIR, and Raman microprobe analysis. Diamond is present in the recovered material. This diamond is well ordered relative to diamond shock synthesized from carbonaceous starting materials.

Wixon, M.R. (KMS Fusion, Inc., Ann Arbor, MI (USA))

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Electrically dependent bandgaps in graphene on hexagonal boron nitride  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present first-principles calculations on the bandgap of graphene on a layer of hexagonal boron nitride in three different stacking configurations. Relative stability of the configurations is identified and bandgap tunability is demonstrated through the application of an external, perpendicularly applied electric field. We carefully examine the bandgap's sensitivity to both magnitude of the applied field as well as separation between the graphene and hexagonal boron nitride layers. Features of the band structure are examined and configuration-dependent relationships between the field and bandgap are revealed and elucidated through the atom-projected density of states. These findings suggest the potential for opening and modulating a bandgap in graphene as high as several hundred meV.

Kaplan, D., E-mail: daniel.b.kaplan.civ@mail.mil; Swaminathan, V. [U.S. Army RDECOM-ARDEC, Fuze Precision Armaments and Technology Directorate, Picatinny Arsenal, New Jersey 07806 (United States); Recine, G. [Department of Applied Physics, Polytechnic Institute of New York University, Brooklyn, New York 11201 (United States); Department of Physics and Engineering Physics, Fordham University, Bronx, New York 10458 (United States)

2014-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gallium nitride ingan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Development of silicon nitride composites with continuous fiber reinforcement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The composites were fabricated using ultrafine Si powders prepared by attritor milling; the powders exhibits full conversion to Si nitride in < 3 h at {le} 1200 C (these conditions reduce degradation of the fibers compared to conventional). Effects of processing conditions on fiber properties and the use of fiber coatings to improve stability during processing as well as change the fiber-matrix interfacial properties were investigated. A duplex carbon-silicon carbide coating, deposited by CVD, reduced fiber degradation in processing, and it modified the fiber-matrix adhesion. Si nitride matrix composites were fabricated using reaction sintering, forming laminates, filament-wound plates, and tubes. In each case, an attritor milled Si powder slurry is infiltrated into ceramic fiber preforms or tows, which are then assembled to form a 3-D structure for reaction sintering. The resulting composites have properties comparable to chemical vapor infiltration densified composites, with reasonable strengths and graceful composite fracture behavior.

Starr, T.L.; Mohr, D.L.; Lackey, W.J.; Hanigofsky, J.A. [Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (United States). Georgia Technology Research Inst.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Study of nitrogen-rich titanium and zirconium nitride films  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thin titanium nitride (TiN) and zirconium nitride (ZrN) films containing excess nitrogen up to 59 and 63 at. % N, respectively, were deposited on austenitic stainless-steel substrates by reactive triode ion plating at about 823 K. The film structure and surface chemistry were studied using x-ray diffraction, scanning Auger spectroscopy, and electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS). In TiN films only the face-centered-cubic mononitride phase was detected. The lattice parameter of the stoichiometric TiN film was larger than the corresponding bulk value and it increased with increasing nitrogen content. The lattice parameter of overstoichiometric ZrN films showed abnormal behavior when calculated from different diffracting planes. This behavior together with the EELS and other measurements indicate that a dielectric Zr/sub 3/N/sub 4/ phase was formed at overstoichiometric compositions.

Ristolainen, E.O.; Molarius, J.M.; Korhonen, A.S.; Lindroos, V.K.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Charge carrier transport properties in layer structured hexagonal boron nitride  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Due to its large in-plane thermal conductivity, high temperature and chemical stability, large energy band gap (~ 6.4 eV), hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) has emerged as an important material for applications in deep ultraviolet photonic devices. Among the members of the III-nitride material system, hBN is the least studied and understood. The study of the electrical transport properties of hBN is of utmost importance with a view to realizing practical device applications. Wafer-scale hBN epilayers have been successfully synthesized by metal organic chemical deposition and their electrical transport properties have been probed by variable temperature Hall effect measurements. The results demonstrate that undoped hBN is a semiconductor exhibiting weak p-type at high temperatures (> 700?°K). The measured acceptor energy level is about 0.68 eV above the valence band. In contrast to the electrical transport properties of traditional III-nitride wide bandgap semiconductors, the temperature dependence of the hole mobility in hBN can be described by the form of ? ? (T/T{sub 0}){sup ??} with ? = 3.02, satisfying the two-dimensional (2D) carrier transport limit dominated by the polar optical phonon scattering. This behavior is a direct consequence of the fact that hBN is a layer structured material. The optical phonon energy deduced from the temperature dependence of the hole mobility is ?? = 192 meV (or 1546 cm{sup -1}), which is consistent with values previously obtained using other techniques. The present results extend our understanding of the charge carrier transport properties beyond the traditional III-nitride semiconductors.

Doan, T. C.; Li, J.; Lin, J. Y.; Jiang, H. X., E-mail: hx.jiang@ttu.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas 79409 (United States)

2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

224

Nitridation under ammonia of high surface area vanadium aerogels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Vanadium pentoxide gels have been obtained from decavanadic acid prepared by ion exchange on a resin from ammonium metavanadate solution. The progressive removal of water by solvent exchange in supercritical conditions led to the formation of high surface area V{sub 2}O{sub 5}, 1.6H{sub 2}O aerogels. Heat treatment under ammonia has been performed on these aerogels in the 450-900 deg. C temperature range. The oxide precursors and oxynitrides have been characterized by XRD, SEM, TGA, BET. Nitridation leads to divided oxynitride powders in which the fibrous structure of the aerogel is maintained. The use of both very low heating rates and high surface area aerogel precursors allows a higher rate and a lower threshold of nitridation than those reported in previous works. By adjusting the nitridation temperature, it has been possible to prepare oxynitrides with various nitrogen enrichment and vanadium valency states. Whatever the V(O,N) composition, the oxidation of the oxynitrides in air starts between 250 and 300 deg. C. This determines their potential use as chemical gas sensors at a maximum working temperature of 250 deg. C.

Merdrignac-Conanec, Odile [Laboratoire Verres et Ceramiques, UMR CNRS 6512, Institut de Chimie de Rennes, Universite de Rennes 1, Campus de Beaulieu, F-35042 Rennes Cedex (France)]. E-mail: odile.merdrignac@univ-rennes1.fr; El Badraoui, Khadija [Laboratoire Verres et Ceramiques, UMR CNRS 6512, Institut de Chimie de Rennes, Universite de Rennes 1, Campus de Beaulieu, F-35042 Rennes Cedex (France); L'Haridon, Paul [Laboratoire Verres et Ceramiques, UMR CNRS 6512, Institut de Chimie de Rennes, Universite de Rennes 1, Campus de Beaulieu, F-35042 Rennes Cedex (France)

2005-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

225

Dual operation characteristics of resistance random access memory in indium-gallium-zinc-oxide thin film transistors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this study, indium-gallium-zinc-oxide thin film transistors can be operated either as transistors or resistance random access memory devices. Before the forming process, current-voltage curve transfer characteristics are observed, and resistance switching characteristics are measured after a forming process. These resistance switching characteristics exhibit two behaviors, and are dominated by different mechanisms. The mode 1 resistance switching behavior is due to oxygen vacancies, while mode 2 is dominated by the formation of an oxygen-rich layer. Furthermore, an easy approach is proposed to reduce power consumption when using these resistance random access memory devices with the amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide thin film transistor.

Yang, Jyun-Bao; Chen, Yu-Ting; Chu, Ann-Kuo [Department of Photonics, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Chang, Ting-Chang, E-mail: tcchang@mail.phys.nsysu.edu.tw [Department of Photonics, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Department of Physics, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Advanced Optoelectronics Technology Center, National Cheng Kung University, Taiwan (China); Huang, Jheng-Jie; Chen, Yu-Chun; Tseng, Hsueh-Chih [Department of Physics, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Sze, Simon M. [Department of Physics, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Department of Electronics Engineering, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China)

2014-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

226

Synthesis of graphene nanoribbons from amyloid templates by gallium vapor-assisted solid-phase graphitization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Single- and double-layer graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) with widths of around 10?nm were synthesized directly onto an insulating substrate by solid-phase graphitization using a gallium vapor catalyst and carbon templates made of amyloid fibrils. Subsequent investigation revealed that the crystallinity, conductivity, and carrier mobility were all improved by increasing the temperature of synthesis. The carrier mobility of the GNR synthesized at 1050?°C was 0.83 cm{sup 2}/V?s, which is lower than that of mechanically exfoliated graphene. This is considered to be most likely due to electron scattering by the defects and edges of the GNRs.

Murakami, Katsuhisa, E-mail: k.murakami@bk.tsukuba.ac.jp; Dong, Tianchen; Kajiwara, Yuya; Takahashi, Teppei; Fujita, Jun-ichi [Institute of Applied Physics, Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8573 (Japan); Tsukuba Research Center for Interdisciplinary Materials Science, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8573 (Japan); Hiyama, Takaki; Takai, Eisuke; Ohashi, Gai; Shiraki, Kentaro [Institute of Applied Physics, Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8573 (Japan)

2014-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

227

Surface and Coatings Technology 102 (1998) 9096 Effects of argon irradiation on a plasma-nitrided carbon steel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-nitrided carbon steel G. Simon, M.A.Z. Vasconcellos, C.A. dos Santos * Instituto de Fisica -- UFRGS Av. Bento Gonc; accepted 20 October 1997 Abstract We report on the effects of Ar irradiation on a plasma-nitrided steel. Samples of AISI 1010 steel were nitrided in a mixture of H 2 -20% N 2 under a total pressure of 5 mbar

dos Santos, C.A.

228

Excitons in Boron Nitride Nanotubes: Dimensionality Effects Ludger Wirtz,1,2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Excitons in Boron Nitride Nanotubes: Dimensionality Effects Ludger Wirtz,1,2 Andrea Marini,3; published 30 March 2006) We show that the optical absorption spectra of boron nitride (BN) nanotubes are dominated by strongly bound excitons. Our first-principles calculations indicate that the binding energy

Marini, Andrea

229

MOVPE growth of semipolar III-nitride semiconductors on CVD graphene Priti Gupta n  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MOVPE growth of semipolar III-nitride semiconductors on CVD graphene Priti Gupta n , A.A. Rahman pressure metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy B1. Graphene B1. Nitrides B2. Semiconducting III­V materials a b on graphene grown by chemical vapour deposition. GaN, AlGaN alloys, and InN layers are grown using an Al

Deshmukh, Mandar M.

230

The effect of surface mechanical attrition treatment on low temperature plasma nitriding of an austenitic stainless  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of an austenitic stainless steel M. Chemkhi1 , D. Retraint1,* , A. Roos1 , C. Garnier1 , L. Waltz2 , C. Demangel3) followed by plasma nitriding on the mechanical properties of a medical grade austenitic stainless steel, nanocrystalline materials, plasma nitriding, austenitic steels 1. Introduction Austenitic stainless steel AISI 316

Boyer, Edmond

231

Microwave Nitridation of Sintered Reaction Bonded Silicon Parts for Natural Gas Fueled Diesel Engines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This cooperative project was a joint development program between Eaton Corporation and Lockheed Martin Energy Research (LMER). Cooperative work was of benefit to both parties. ORNL was able to assess up-scale of the microwave nitridation process using a more intricate-shaped part designed for application in advanced diesel engines. Eaton Corporation mined access to microwave facilities and expertise for the nitridation of SRBSN materials. The broad objective of the CRADA established with Eaton Corporation and ORNL was to develop cost-effective silicon nitride ceramics compared to the current materials available. The following conclusions can be made from the work performed under the CRADA: (1) Demonstrated that the binder burnout step can be incorporated into the SRBSN processing in the microwave furnace. (2) Scale-up of the microwave nitridation process using Eaton Corporation parts showed that the nitridation weight gains were essentially identical to those obtained by conventional heating. (3) Combined nitridation and sintering processes using silicon nitride beads as packing powders results in degradation of the mechanical properties. (4) Gelcasting of silicon nitride materials using Eaton Si mixtures was demonstrated.

Edler, J.; Kiggans, J.O.; Suman, A.W.; Tiegs, T.N.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Alternated high-and low-pressure nitriding of austenitic stainless steel: Mechanisms and results  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Alternated high- and low-pressure nitriding of austenitic stainless steel: Mechanisms and results G a gas mixture of (N2 /H2):(50/50) in pressure, was applied to stainless-steel AISI 304. In the first or plasma nitriding of metal parts, in par- ticular those made of steel and cast iron, is extensively ap

233

Tunneling characteristics in chemical vapor deposited graphene hexagonal boron nitride graphene junctions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Tunneling characteristics in chemical vapor deposited graphene ­ hexagonal boron nitride ­ graphene junctions T. Roy1 , L. Liu2 , S. de la Barrera,3 B. Chakrabarti1,4 , Z. R. Hesabi1 , C. A. Joiner1 Abstract: Large area chemical vapor deposited graphene and hexagonal boron nitride was used to fabricate

Feenstra, Randall

234

One step process for producing dense aluminum nitride and composites thereof  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A one step combustion process for the synthesis of dense aluminum nitride compositions is disclosed. The process comprises igniting pure aluminum powder in a nitrogen atmosphere at a pressure of about 1000 atmospheres or higher. The process enables the production of aluminum nitride bodies to be formed directly in a mold of any desired shape.

Holt, J. Birch (San Jose, CA); Kingman, Donald D. (Danville, CA); Bianchini, Gregory M. (Livermore, CA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Thermo-chemical Modelling of Uranium-free Nitride Fuels Mikael JOLKKONEN1;;y  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and accepted December 22, 2003) A production process for americium-bearing, uranium-free nitride fuels environments was also estimated. We show that sintering of nitride compounds containing americium should be performed under nitrogen atmosphere in order to the avoid the excessive losses of americium reported from

Haviland, David

236

carbides. The multiphase/polytypic region can be expected to occur also in the nitrides because  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in valence electron concentration where sev- eral phases of the 3d, 4d, and 5d transition metal carbides have, Transition Metal Carbides and Nitrides (Academic Press, New York, 1971). 6. C. Maerky, M.-O. Guillou, J. L is predicted to be substantially enhanced over that of traditional transition metal car- bide/nitride coatings

Shen, Guoyin

237

Single-Crystalline Mesoporous Molybdenum Nitride Nanowires with Improved Electrochemical Properties  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

process. I. Introduction TRANSITION -metal oxides, carbides, sulfides, and nitrides are extensively, and catalytic properties.1­4 Among the transition-metal com- pounds, transition-metal nitrides are regarded using transition-metal complex materials.16 However, the transi- tion-metal complex materials are lower

Cao, Guozhong

238

Hard superconducting nitrides Xiao-Jia Chen*, Viktor V. Struzhkin*, Zhigang Wu*, Maddury Somayazulu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(4). The refractory characteristics of these transition- metal nitrides and carbides have been, and hardness of selected superconducting transition-metal nitrides reveals inter- esting correlations among transition temperature (Tc) near 4 K when doped with boron (3). However, the transition-metal compounds

Wu, Zhigang

239

Large-scale well aligned carbon nitride nanotube films: Low temperature growth and electron field emission  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Large-scale well aligned carbon nitride nanotube films: Low temperature growth and electron field emission Dingyong Zhong, Shuang Liu, Guangyu Zhang, and E. G. Wanga) State Key Laboratory for Surface Received 2 January 2001; accepted for publication 13 March 2001 Large-scale well aligned carbon nitride

Zhang, Guangyu

240

Anionic Gallium-Based Metal;#8722;Organic Framework and Its Sorption and Ion-Exchange Properties  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A gallium-based metal-organic framework Ga{sub 6}(C{sub 9}H{sub 3}O{sub 6}){sub 8} {center_dot} (C{sub 2}H{sub 8}N){sub 6}(C{sub 3}H{sub 7}NO){sub 3}(H{sub 2}O){sub 26} [1, Ga{sub 6}(1,3,5-BTC){sub 8} {center_dot} 6DMA {center_dot} 3DMF {center_dot} 26H{sub 2}O], GaMOF-1; BTC = benzenetricarboxylate/trimesic acid and DMA = dimethylamine, with space group I{bar 4}3d, a = 19.611(1) {angstrom}, and V = 7953.4(6) {angstrom}{sup 3}, was synthesized using solvothermal techniques and characterized by synchrotron-based X-ray microcrystal diffraction. Compound 1 contains isolated gallium tetrahedra connected by the organic linker (BTC) forming a 3,4-connected anionic porous network. Disordered positively charged ions and solvent molecules are present in the pore, compensating for the negative charge of the framework. These positively charged molecules could be exchanged with alkali-metal ions, as is evident by an ICP-MS study. The H{sub 2} storage capacity of the parent framework is moderate with a H{sub 2} storage capacity of {approx}0.5 wt % at 77 K and 1 atm.

Banerjee, Debasis; Kim, Sun Jin; Wu, Haohan; Xu, Wenqian; Borkowski, Lauren A.; Li, Jing; Parise, John B. (Kwangju); (Rutgers); (SBU)

2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gallium nitride ingan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Dynamics of formation of photoresponse in a detector structure made of gallium arsenide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The influence of capture effects on the characteristics of detectors of the ionizing radiation based on semi-insulating gallium arsenide is considered. Generation of nonequilibrium electrons and holes along the entire thickness of the active region was performed under illumination with an infrared light-emitting diode with a wavelength of 0.9 {mu}m. In this case, the situation emerging in the device structure under the effect of X-ray radiation or a high-energy electron beam was simulated. It is shown that the variation in the shape of the output signal with time in this case is caused by variation in the electric field profile due to the capture of holes at deep centers in gallium arsenide. An absolutely different distribution of the electric field emerges in the structure under irradiation of a semitransparent cathode of the structure with a red light-emitting diode, emission of which penetrates into the active region for mere 1 {mu}m. In this case, the transformation of the electric field is caused by the capture of electrons. Under the prolonged effect of such radiation, a space-charge-limited current mode emerges in the device.

Ayzenshtat, G. I., E-mail: ayzen@mail.tomsknet.ru; Lelekov, M. A.; Tolbanov, O. P. [Tomsk State University (Russian Federation)

2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

242

Iron-based alloy and nitridation treatment for PEM fuel cell bipolar plates  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A corrosion resistant electrically conductive component that can be used as a bipolar plate in a PEM fuel cell application is composed of an alloy substrate which has 10-30 wt. % Cr, 0.5 to 7 wt. % V, and base metal being Fe, and a continuous surface layer of chromium nitride and vanadium nitride essentially free of base metal. A oxide layer of chromium vanadium oxide can be disposed between the alloy substrate and the continuous surface nitride layer. A method to prepare the corrosion resistant electrically conductive component involves a two-step nitridization sequence by exposing the alloy to a oxygen containing gas at an elevated temperature, and subsequently exposing the alloy to an oxygen free nitrogen containing gas at an elevated temperature to yield a component where a continuous chromium nitride layer free of iron has formed at the surface.

Brady, Michael P. (Oak Ridge, TN) [Oak Ridge, TN; Yang, Bing (Oak Ridge, TN) [Oak Ridge, TN; Maziasz, Philip J. (Oak Ridge, TN) [Oak Ridge, TN

2010-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

243

Simulation assisted design of a gallium phosphide np photovoltaic junction Charles R. Allen, Jong-Hyeok Jeon , Jerry M. Woodall  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

University, 1205 W State Street, West Lafayette, IN, USA a r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 27 February 2010 Keywords: Gallium phosphide Solar cell Multi-junction CPV Simulation a b s t r a c with measurements of the dark and light response. The light current was measured under an illumination of air mass

Woodall, Jerry M.

244

Formation of etch pits during carbon doping of gallium arsenide with carbon tetrachloride by metalorganic vapor-phase epitaxy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Formation of etch pits during carbon doping of gallium arsenide with carbon tetrachloride to examine the effects of carbon tetrachloride concentration and temperature on the morphology of carbon with increasing carbon tetrachloride concentration. Step bunching and pinning was observed at a IV/III ratio

Li, Lian

245

Synthesis of silicon nitride particles in pulsed Rf plasmas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Silicon nitride (hydrogenated) particles are synthesized using a pulsed 13.56 Mhz glow discharge. The plasma is modulated with a square-wave on/off cycle of varying period to study the growth kinetics. In situ laser light scattering and ex situ particle analysis are used to study the nucleation and growth. For SiH{sub 4}/Ar and SiH{sub 4}/NH{sub 3} plasmas, an initial very rapid growth phase is followed by slower growth, approaching the rate of thin film deposition on adjacent flat surfaces. The average particle size can be controlled in the 10-100 nm range by adjusting the plasma-on time. The size dispersion of the particles is large and is consistent with a process of continuous nucleation during the plasma-on period. The large polydispersity is also reported for silicon particles from silane and differs from that reported in other laboratories. The silicon nitride particle morphology is compared to that of silicon and silicon carbide particles generated by the same technique. Whereas Si particles appear as rough clusters of smaller subunits, the SiC particles are smooth spheres, and the Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} particles are smooth but non-spherical. Post-plasma oxidation kinetics of the particles are studied with FTIR and are consistent with a hydrolysis mechanism proposed in earlier work with continuous plasmas. Heat treatment of the powder in an ammonia atmosphere results in the elimination of hydrogen, rendering the silicon nitride resistant to atmospheric oxidation.

Buss, R.J.; Babu, S.V.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Boron nitride nanosheets as oxygen-atom corrosion protective coatings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The research of two-dimensional nanomaterials for anticorrosion applications is just recently burgeoning. Herein, we demonstrate the boron nitride nanosheets (BNNSs) coatings for protecting polymer from oxygen-atom corrosion. High-quality BNNSs, which are produced by an effective fluid dynamics method with multiple exfoliation mechanisms, can be assembled into coatings with controlled thickness by vacuum filtration. After exposed in atom oxygen, the naked polymer is severely corroded with remarkable mass loss, while the BNNSs-coated polymer remains intact. Barrier and bonding effects of the BNNSs are responsible for the coating's protective performance. These preliminary yet reproducible results pave a way for resisting oxygen-atom corrosion.

Yi, Min [Beijing Key Laboratory for Powder Technology Research and Development, Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Beijing 100191 (China); Plasma Laboratory, Ministry-of-Education Key Laboratory of Fluid Mechanics, Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Beijing 100191 (China); Shen, Zhigang, E-mail: shenzhg@buaa.edu.cn [Beijing Key Laboratory for Powder Technology Research and Development, Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Beijing 100191 (China); Plasma Laboratory, Ministry-of-Education Key Laboratory of Fluid Mechanics, Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Beijing 100191 (China); School of Material Science and Engineering, Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Beijing 100191 (China); Zhao, Xiaohu [Plasma Laboratory, Ministry-of-Education Key Laboratory of Fluid Mechanics, Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Beijing 100191 (China); Liang, Shuaishuai [Beijing Key Laboratory for Powder Technology Research and Development, Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Beijing 100191 (China); Liu, Lei [Beijing Key Laboratory for Powder Technology Research and Development, Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Beijing 100191 (China); School of Material Science and Engineering, Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Beijing 100191 (China)

2014-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

247

Excellent oxidation endurance of boron nitride nanotube field electron emitters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) are considered as a promising cold electron emission material owing to their negative electron affinity. BNNT field emitters show excellent oxidation endurance after high temperature thermal annealing of 600?°C in air ambient. There is no damage to the BNNTs after thermal annealing at a temperature of 600?°C and also no degradation of field emission properties. The thermally annealed BNNTs exhibit a high maximum emission current density of 8.39?mA/cm{sup 2} and show very robust emission stability. The BNNTs can be a promising emitter material for field emission devices under harsh oxygen environments.

Song, Yenan [Department of Micro/Nano Systems, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of); Sun, Yuning; Hoon Shin, Dong; Nam Yun, Ki [School of Electrical Engineering, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of); Song, Yoon-Ho [Nano Electron-Source Creative Research Center, Creative and Challenging Research Division, ETRI, Daejeon 305-700 (Korea, Republic of); Milne, William I. [Electrical Engineering Division, Engineering Department, Cambridge University, Cambridge CB3 0FA (United Kingdom); Jin Lee, Cheol, E-mail: cjlee@korea.ac.kr [Department of Micro/Nano Systems, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of); School of Electrical Engineering, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of)

2014-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

248

Method of nitriding niobium to form a superconducting surface  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of forming a delta niobium nitride .delta.-NbN layer on the surface of a niobium object including cleaning the surface of the niobium object; providing a treatment chamber; placing the niobium object in the treatment chamber; evacuating the chamber; passing pure nitrogen into the treatment chamber; focusing a laser spot on the niobium object; delivering laser fluences at the laser spot until the surface of the niobium object reaches above its boiling temperature; and rastering the laser spot over the surface of the niobium object.

Kelley, Michael J.; Klopf, John Michael; Singaravelu, Senthilaraja

2014-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

249

Aluminum nitride nanophotonic circuits operating at ultraviolet wavelengths  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Aluminum nitride (AlN) has recently emerged as a promising material for integrated photonics due to a large bandgap and attractive optical properties. Exploiting the wideband transparency, we demonstrate waveguiding in AlN-on-Insulator circuits from near-infrared to ultraviolet wavelengths using nanophotonic components with dimensions down to 40?nm. By measuring the propagation loss over a wide spectral range, we conclude that both scattering and absorption of AlN-intrinsic defects contribute to strong attenuation at short wavelengths, thus providing guidelines for future improvements in thin-film deposition and circuit fabrication.

Stegmaier, M.; Ebert, J.; Pernice, W. H. P., E-mail: wolfram.pernice@kit.edu [Institute of Nanotechnology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, 76133 Karlsruhe (Germany); Meckbach, J. M.; Ilin, K.; Siegel, M. [Institute of Micro- und Nanoelectronic Systems, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, 76187 Karlsruhe (Germany)

2014-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

250

Field emission characteristics from graphene on hexagonal boron nitride  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An attempt has been made to utilize uniquely high electron mobility of graphene on hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) to electron emitter. The field emission property of graphene/h-BN/Si structure has shown enhanced threshold voltage and emission current, both of which are key to develop novel vacuum nanoelectronics devices. The field emission property was discussed along with the electronic structure of graphene investigated by Fowler-Nordheim plot and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy. The result suggested that transferring graphene on h-BN modified its work function, which changed field emission mechanism. Our report opens up a possibility of graphene-based vacuum nanoelectronics devices with tuned work function.

Yamada, Takatoshi, E-mail: takatoshi-yamada@aist.go.jp [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8565 (Japan); Masuzawa, Tomoaki; Ebisudani, Taishi; Okano, Ken [International Christian University, 3-10-2 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8585 (Japan); Taniguchi, Takashi [National Institute for Material Science (NIMS), 1-1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba 305-0044 (Japan)

2014-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

251

Local environment and composition of magnesium gallium layered double hydroxides determined from solid-state 1H and 71Ga NMR spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ordering of gallium(III) in a series of magnesium gallium layered double hydroxides (LDH’s), [Mg1-xGax(OH)2(NO3)x yH2O], was determined using solid-state 1H and 71Ga NMR spectroscopy. Depletion of Ga in these LDH’s is demonstrated to be the result of soluble [Ga(OH)4]-complexes formed during synthesis.

Petersen, Line B.; Lipton, Andrew S.; Zorin, Vadim; Nielsen, Ulla Gro

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Nitride and Oxynitride Based Phosphors for Solid State Lighting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the project is to advance the technology of the Lightscape Materials Inc. (Lightscape) proprietary nitride and oxynitride phosphors for solid state lighting (SSL) from the current level of maturity of applied research to advanced engineering development. This objective will be accomplished by optimizing the novel nitride and oxynitride phosphors, whose formulations are listed in Table 1, and establishing cost-effective preparation processes for the phosphors. The target performances of the phosphors are: • High luminescence efficiency: Quantum Yield = 90%. • Superior thermal stability of luminescence: Thermal Quenching Loss <10% at 150 °C. • Superior environmental stability: Luminescence Maintenance >90% after 5,000 hours at 85 °C and 85% relative humidity. • Scattering loss <10%. • Cost-effective preparation processes. The resulting phosphor materials and their preparation processes are anticipated to be a drop-in component for product development paths undertaken by LED lamp makers in the SSL industry. Upon program completion, Lightscape will target market insertion that enables high efficacy, high color rendering index (CRI), high thermal stability and long lifetime LED-based lighting products for general illumination that realizes substantial energy savings.

Tian, Yongchi

2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

253

High upper critical field in disordered niobium nitride superconductor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Superconducting Niobium Nitride thin films have been deposited on glass, aluminum nitride buffered glass, and oxidized silicon substrates by reactive DC magnetron sputtering at ambient substrate temperatures. The crystal structure of these thin films has been determined to be cubic fcc B1 structure by Glancing Incidence X-Ray Diffraction analysis. The superconducting transition temperatures of the thin films were measured to be greater than 11.6?K with a maximum of 13.4?K. The negative temperature coefficient of resistance observed in these thin films indicates the presence of disorder. Magneto-resistance measurements have been carried out on these thin films patterned into standard four probe geometry upto a maximum magnetic field of 12?T for two films and upto 15?T for the other two films. The dependence of transition temperature on the applied field is analyzed to estimate the upper critical field. The upper critical field for most of the films was estimated to exceed 35?T, while one of the most disordered films had an estimated upper critical field greater than 70?T.

Baskaran, R., E-mail: baskaran@igcar.gov.in; Thanikai Arasu, A. V.; Amaladass, E. P.; Janawadkar, M. P. [Materials Science Group, IGCAR, Kalpakkam-603102 (India)

2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

254

Radiation tolerance of piezoelectric bulk single-crystal aluminum nitride  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For practical use in harsh radiation environments, we pose selection criteria for piezoelectric materials for nondestructive evaluation (NDE) and material characterization. Using these criteria, piezoelectric aluminum nitride is shown to be an excellent candidate. The results of tests on an aluminumnitride-based transducer operating in a nuclear reactor are also presented. We demonstrate the tolerance of single-crystal piezoelectric aluminum nitride after fast and thermal neutron fluences of 1.85 × 1018 neutron/cm2 and 5.8 × 1018 neutron/cm2, respectively, and a gamma dose of 26.8 MGy. The radiation hardness of AlN is most evident from the unaltered piezoelectric coefficient d33, which measured 5.5 pC/N after a fast and thermal neutron exposure in a nuclear reactor core for over 120 MWh, in agreement with the published literature value. The results offer potential for improving reactor safety and furthering the understanding of radiation effects on materials by enabling structural health monitoring and NDE in spite of the high levels of radiation and high temperatures, which are known to destroy typical commercial ultrasonic transducers.

David A. Parks; Bernhard R. Tittmann

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Catalytic and physicochemical properties of aluminoplatinum catalysts modified with indium and gallium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Aluminoplatinum catalysts (APC) are widely used in transformations of hydrocarbons, particularly in reforming of gasoline fractions and dehydrogenation of higher normal paraffins. Promotion of APC with indium and gallium increases their activity and stability in the dehydrogenation of paraffins. Introduction of group III elements in APC inhibits coke formation during dehydrogenation and prevents blocking of the surface of the Pt. The change in the catalytic properties of APC modified with In is due to the partial transfer of the electron density from Pt to In. Both APC with In and Ga additives and monometallic catalysts were studied in the present article by the methods of IR spectroscopy and adsorption. In addition to traditional transmission IR spectroscopy, IR spectroscopy in diffusely scattered light was used, which permits conducting both spectral and adsorption measurements on the same samples.

Zaitsev, A.V.; Tyupaev, A.P.; Borovkov, V.Yu.; Timofeeva, E.A.; Isatulyants, G.V.; Kazanskii, B.B.

1986-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

256

The status of the solar neutrino problem and the Russian-American gallium experiment (SAGE)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Perhaps the most outstanding discrepancy between prediction and measurements in current particle physics comes from the solar neutrino problem, in which a large deficit of high-energy solar neutrinos is observed. Many Nonstandard Solar Models have been invoked to try to reduce the predicted flux, but all have run into problems in trying to reproduce other measured parameters (e.g., the luminosity) of the Sun. Other explanations involving new physics such as neutrino decay and neutrino oscillations, etc. have also been proffered. Again, most of these explanations have been ruled out by either laboratory or astrophysical measurements. It appears that perhaps the most likely particle physics solution is that of matter enhanced neutrino oscillation, the Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein (MSW) oscillations. Two new radiochemical gallium experiments, which have a low enough threshold to be sensitive to the dominant flux of low-energy p-p neutrinos, now also report a deficit and also favor a particle physics solution.

Bowles, T.J.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Origin of deep subgap states in amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide: Chemically disordered coordination of oxygen  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The origin of the deep subgap states in amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide (a-IGZO), whether intrinsic to the amorphous structure or not, has serious implications for the development of p-type transparent amorphous oxide semiconductors. We report that the deep subgap feature in a-IGZO originates from local variations in the oxygen coordination and not from oxygen vacancies. This is shown by the positive correlation between oxygen composition and subgap intensity as observed with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. We also demonstrate that the subgap feature is not intrinsic to the amorphous phase because the deep subgap feature can be removed by low-temperature annealing in a reducing environment. Atomistic calculations of a-IGZO reveal that the subgap state originates from certain oxygen environments associated with the disorder. Specifically, the subgap states originate from oxygen environments with a lower coordination number and/or a larger metal-oxygen separation.

Sallis, S.; Williams, D. S. [Materials Science and Engineering, Binghamton University, Binghamton, New York 13902 (United States); Butler, K. T.; Walsh, A. [Center for Sustainable Technologies and Department of Chemistry, University of Bath, Claverton Down, Bath BA2 7AY (United Kingdom); Quackenbush, N. F. [Department of Physics, Applied Physics, and Astronomy, Binghamton University, Binghamton, New York 13902 (United States); Junda, M.; Podraza, N. J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Toledo, Toledo, Ohio 43606 (United States); Fischer, D. A.; Woicik, J. C. [Materials Science and Engineering Laboratory, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); White, B. E.; Piper, L. F. J., E-mail: lpiper@binghamton.edu [Department of Physics, Applied Physics, and Astronomy, Binghamton University, Binghamton, New York 13902 (United States); Materials Science and Engineering, Binghamton University, Binghamton, New York 13902 (United States)

2014-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

258

Structure and electrical characterization of gallium arsenide nanowires with different V/III ratio growth parameters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gallium arsenide (GaAs) nanowires were grown vertically on GaAs(111)B substrate by gold-assisted using metal-organic chemical vapour deposition. Field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and conductivity atomic force microscopy (CAFM) analysis were carried out to investigate the effects of V/III ratio on structural properties and current-voltage changes in the wires. Results show that GaAs NWs grow preferably in the wurtzite crystal structure than zinc blende crystal structure with increasing V/III ratio. Additionally, CAFM studies have revealed that zincblende nanowires indicate ohmic characteristic compared to oscillation current occurred for wurtzite structures. The GaAs NWs with high quality structures are needed in solar cells technology for trapping energy that directly converts of sunlight into electricity with maximum capacity.

Muhammad, R.; Ahamad, R. [Sustainability Research Alliance, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 Skudai, Johor (Malaysia); Ibrahim, Z.; Othaman, Z. [Physic Department, Faculty of Science, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 Skudai, Johor (Malaysia)

2014-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

259

Outdoor Performance of a Thin-Film Gallium-Arsenide Photovoltaic Module  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We deployed a 855 cm2 thin-film, single-junction gallium arsenide (GaAs) photovoltaic (PV) module outdoors. Due to its fundamentally different cell technology compared to silicon (Si), the module responds differently to outdoor conditions. On average during the test, the GaAs module produced more power when its temperature was higher. We show that its maximum-power temperature coefficient, while actually negative, is several times smaller in magnitude than that of a Si module used for comparison. The positive correlation of power with temperature in GaAs is due to temperature-correlated changes in the incident spectrum. We show that a simple correction based on precipitable water vapor (PWV) brings the photocurrent temperature coefficient into agreement with that measured by other methods and predicted by theory. The low operating temperature and small temperature coefficient of GaAs give it an energy production advantage in warm weather.

Silverman, T. J.; Deceglie, M. G.; Marion, B.; Cowley, S.; Kayes, B.; Kurtz, S.

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Analysis of gallium arsenide deposition in a horizontal chemical vapor deposition reactor using massively parallel computations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A numerical analysis of the deposition of gallium from trimethylgallium (TMG) and arsine in a horizontal CVD reactor with tilted susceptor and a three inch diameter rotating substrate is performed. The three-dimensional model includes complete coupling between fluid mechanics, heat transfer, and species transport, and is solved using an unstructured finite element discretization on a massively parallel computer. The effects of three operating parameters (the disk rotation rate, inlet TMG fraction, and inlet velocity) and two design parameters (the tilt angle of the reactor base and the reactor width) on the growth rate and uniformity are presented. The nonlinear dependence of the growth rate uniformity on the key operating parameters is discussed in detail. Efficient and robust algorithms for massively parallel reacting flow simulations, as incorporated into our analysis code MPSalsa, make detailed analysis of this complicated system feasible.

Salinger, A.G.; Shadid, J.N.; Hutchinson, S.A. [and others

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gallium nitride ingan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Tunneling characteristics in chemical vapor deposited graphene–hexagonal boron nitride–graphene junctions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Large area chemical vapor deposited graphene and hexagonal boron nitride was used to fabricate graphene–hexagonal boron nitride–graphene symmetric field effect transistors. Gate control of the tunneling characteristics is observed similar to previously reported results for exfoliated graphene–hexagonal boron nitride–graphene devices. Density-of-states features are observed in the tunneling characteristics of the devices, although without large resonant peaks that would arise from lateral momentum conservation. The lack of distinct resonant behavior is attributed to disorder in the devices, and a possible source of the disorder is discussed.

Roy, T.; Hesabi, Z. R.; Joiner, C. A.; Vogel, E. M. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, 771 Ferst Drive, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); Liu, L.; Gu, G. [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of Tennessee, 1520 Middle Drive, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States); Barrera, S. de la; Feenstra, R. M. [Department of Physics, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Ave., Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); Chakrabarti, B. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, 771 Ferst Drive, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, 800 West Campbell Rd., Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States)

2014-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

262

Optoelectronic Properties in Monolayers of Hybridized Graphene and Hexagonal Boron Nitride  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We explain the nature of the electronic energy gap and optical absorption spectrum of carbon–boron-nitride (CBN) monolayers using density functional theory, GW and Bethe-Salpeter calculations. The band structure and the ...

Bernardi, Marco

263

E-Print Network 3.0 - argon nitrides Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

I?MAYR Sti+ng Institutfur Werkstofiechnik... ,Badgasteiner Str: 3, 2800Bremen 33, Germany Abstract Aluminium nitride (AlN) is a ve interestin ceramic because... the use %of...

264

Process for preparing transition metal nitrides and transition metal carbonitrides and their reaction intermediates  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for making ammonolytic precursors to nitride and carbonitride ceramics. Extreme reaction conditions are not required and the precursor is a powder-like substance that produces ceramics of improved purity and morphology upon pyrolysis.

Maya, Leon (Oak Ridge, TN)

1988-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

265

Precursors in the preparation of transition metal nitrides and transition metal carbonitrides and their reaction intermediates  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for making ammonolytic precursors to nitride and carbonitride ceramics. Extreme reaction conditions are not required and the precursor is a powder-like substance that produces ceramics of improved purity and morphology upon pyrolysis.

Maya, Leon (Oak Ridge, TN)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Method of nitriding, carburizing, or oxidizing refractory metal articles using microwaves  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of nitriding an article of refractory-nitride-forming metal or metalloids. A consolidated metal or metalloid article is placed inside a microwave oven and nitrogen containing gas is introduced into the microwave oven. The metal or metalloid article is heated to a temperature sufficient to react the metal or metalloid with the nitrogen by applying a microwave energy within the microwave oven. The metal or metalloid article is maintained at that temperature for a period of time sufficient to convert the article of metal or metalloid to an article of refractory nitride. in addition, a method of applying a coating, such as a coating of an oxide, a carbide, or a carbo-nitride, to an article of metal or metalloid by microwave heating.

Holcombe, C.E.; Dykes, N.L.; Tiegs, T.N.

1992-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

267

Method of nitriding, carburizing, or oxidizing refractory metal articles using microwaves  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of nitriding an article of refractory-nitride-forming metal or metalloids. A consolidated metal or metalloid article is placed inside a microwave oven and nitrogen containing gas is introduced into the microwave oven. The metal or metalloid article is heated to a temperature sufficient to react the metal or metalloid with the nitrogen by applying a microwave energy within the microwave oven. The metal or metalloid article is maintained at that temperature for a period of time sufficient to convert the article of metal or metalloid to an article of refractory nitride. in addition, a method of applying a coating, such as a coating of an oxide, a carbide, or a carbo-nitride, to an article of metal or metalloid by microwave heating.

Holcombe, Cressie E. (Knoxville, TN); Dykes, Norman L. (Oak Ridge, TN); Tiegs, Terry N. (Lenoir City, TN)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Electronic structure analyses and activation studies of a dinitrogen-derived terminal nitride of molybdenum  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 1: Complexes obtained by electrophilic attack on a dinitrogen-derived terminal molybdenum nitride: Electronic structure analysis by solid state CP/MAS ¹?N NMR in combination ... Chapter 2. Carbene chemistry in the ...

Sceats, Emma Louise, 1978-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Photon-induced tunneling in graphene-boron nitride-graphene heterostructures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Graphene is a material that has generated much interest due to its many unique electronic and optical properties. In this work, we present optoelectronic measurements performed on ultrathin graphene-boron nitride-graphene ...

Nair, Nityan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Method of enhancing the wettability of boron nitride for use as an electrochemical cell separator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A felt or other fabric of boron nitride suitable for use as an interelecte separator within an electrochemical cell is wetted with a solution containing a thermally decomposable organic salt of an alkaline earth metal. An aqueous solution of magnesium acetate is the preferred solution for this purpose. After wetting the boron nitride, the solution is dried by heating at a sufficiently low temperature to prevent rapid boiling and the creation of voids within the separator. The dried material is then calcined at an elevated temperature in excess of 400.degree. C. to provide a coating of an oxide of magnesium on the surface of the boron nitride fibers. A fabric or felt of boron nitride treated in this manner is easily wetted by molten electrolytic salts, such as the alkali metal halides or alkaline earth metal halides, that are used in high temperature, secondary electrochemical cells.

McCoy, Lowell R. (Woodland Hills, CA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Method of enhancing the wettability of boron nitride for use as an electrochemical cell separator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A felt or other fabric of boron nitride suitable for use as an interelectrode separator within an electrochemical cell is wetted with a solution containing a thermally decomposable organic salt of an alkaline earth metal. An aqueous solution of magnesium acetate is the preferred solution for this purpose. After wetting the boron nitride, the solution is dried by heating at a sufficiently low temperature to prevent rapid boiling and the creation of voids within the separator. The dried material is then calcined at an elevated temperature in excess of 400/sup 0/C to provide a coating of an oxide of magnesium on the surface of the boron nitride fibers. A fabric or felt of boron nitride treated in this manner is easily wetted by molten electrolytic salts, such as the alkali metal halides or alkaline earth metal halides, that are used in high temperature, secondary electrochemical cells.

McCoy, L.R.

1981-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

272

Aluminum nitride transitional layer for reducing dislocation density and cracking of AIGan epitaxial films  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A denticulated Group III nitride structure that is useful for growing Al.sub.xGa.sub.1-xN to greater thicknesses without cracking and with a greatly reduced threading dislocation (TD) density.

Allerman, Andrew A. (Tijeras, NM); Crawford, Mary H. (Albuquerque, NM); Koleske, Daniel D. (Albuquerque, NM); Lee, Stephen R. (Albuquerque, NM)

2011-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

273

Preparation of copper-indium-gallium-diselenide precursor films by electrodeposition for fabricating high efficiency solar cells  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A photovoltaic cell exhibiting an overall conversion efficiency of 13.6% is prepared from a copper-indium-gallium-diselenide precursor thin film. The film is fabricated by first simultaneously electrodepositing copper, indium, gallium, and selenium onto a glass/molybdenum substrate (12/14). The electrodeposition voltage is a high frequency AC voltage superimposed upon a DC voltage to improve the morphology and growth rate of the film. The electrodeposition is followed by physical vapor deposition to adjust the final stoichiometry of the thin film to approximately Cu(In.sub.1-n Ga.sub.x)Se.sub.2, with the ratio of Ga/(In+Ga) being approximately 0.39.

Bhattacharya, Raghu N. (Littleton, CO); Hasoon, Falah S. (Arvada, CO); Wiesner, Holm (Golden, CO); Keane, James (Lakewood, CO); Noufi, Rommel (Golden, CO); Ramanathan, Kannan (Golden, CO)

1999-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

274

Impurity-induced disorder in III-nitride materials and devices  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for impurity-induced disordering in III-nitride materials comprises growing a III-nitride heterostructure at a growth temperature and doping the heterostructure layers with a dopant during or after the growth of the heterostructure and post-growth annealing of the heterostructure. The post-growth annealing temperature can be sufficiently high to induce disorder of the heterostructure layer interfaces.

Wierer, Jr., Jonathan J; Allerman, Andrew A

2014-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

275

Use of additives to improve microstructures and fracture resistance of silicon nitride ceramics  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A high-strength, fracture-resistant silicon nitride ceramic material that includes about 5 to about 75 wt-% of elongated reinforcing grains of beta-silicon nitride, about 20 to about 95 wt-% of fine grains of beta-silicon nitride, wherein the fine grains have a major axis of less than about 1 micron; and about 1 to about 15 wt-% of an amorphous intergranular phase comprising Si, N, O, a rare earth element and a secondary densification element. The elongated reinforcing grains have an aspect ratio of 2:1 or greater and a major axis measuring about 1 micron or greater. The elongated reinforcing grains are essentially isotropically oriented within the ceramic microstructure. The silicon nitride ceramic exhibits a room temperature flexure strength of 1,000 MPa or greater and a fracture toughness of 9 MPa-m.sup.(1/2) or greater. The silicon nitride ceramic exhibits a peak strength of 800 MPa or greater at 1200 degrees C. Also included are methods of making silicon nitride ceramic materials which exhibit the described high flexure strength and fracture-resistant values.

Becher, Paul F. (Oak Ridge, TN); Lin, Hua-Tay (Oak Ridge, TN)

2011-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

276

High temperature mechanical performance of a hot isostatically pressed silicon nitride  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Silicon nitride ceramics are an attractive material of choice for designers and manufacturers of advanced gas turbine engine components for many reasons. These materials typically have potentially high temperatures of usefulness (up to 1400{degrees}C), are chemically inert, have a relatively low specific gravity (important for inertial effects), and are good thermal conductors (i.e., resistant to thermal shock). In order for manufacturers to take advantage of these inherent properties of silicon nitride, the high-temperature mechanical performance of the material must first be characterized. The mechanical response of silicon nitride to static, dynamic, and cyclic conditions at elevated temperatures, along with reliable and representative data, is critical information that gas turbine engine designers and manufacturers require for the confident insertion of silicon nitride components into gas turbine engines. This final report describes the high-temperature mechanical characterization and analyses that were conducted on a candidate structural silicon nitride ceramic. The high-temperature strength, static fatigue (creep rupture), and dynamic and cyclic fatigue performance were characterized. The efforts put forth were part of Work Breakdown Structure Subelement 3.2.1, {open_quotes}Rotor Data Base Generation.{close_quotes} PY6 is comparable to other hot isostatically pressed (HIPed) silicon nitrides currently being considered for advanced gas turbine engine applications.

Wereszczak, A.A.; Ferber, M.K.; Jenkins, M.G.; Lin, C.K.J. [and others] [and others

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Single-layer graphene on silicon nitride micromembrane resonators  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Due to their low mass, high quality factor, and good optical properties, silicon nitride (SiN) micromembrane resonators are widely used in force and mass sensing applications, particularly in optomechanics. The metallization of such membranes would enable an electronic integration with the prospect for exciting new devices, such as optoelectromechanical transducers. Here, we add a single-layer graphene on SiN micromembranes and compare electromechanical coupling and mechanical properties to bare dielectric membranes and to membranes metallized with an aluminium layer. The electrostatic coupling of graphene covered membranes is found to be equal to a perfectly conductive membrane, without significantly adding mass, decreasing the superior mechanical quality factor or affecting the optical properties of pure SiN micromembranes. The concept of graphene-SiN resonators allows a broad range of new experiments both in applied physics and fundamental basic research, e.g., for the mechanical, electrical, or optical characterization of graphene.

Schmid, Silvan; Guillermo Villanueva, Luis; Amato, Bartolo; Boisen, Anja [Department of Micro- and Nanotechnology, Technical University of Denmark, DTU Nanotech, Building 345 East, 2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Bagci, Tolga; Zeuthen, Emil; Sørensen, Anders S.; Usami, Koji; Polzik, Eugene S. [QUANTOP, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, 2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Taylor, Jacob M. [Joint Quantum Institute/NIST, College Park, Maryland 20899 (United States); Herring, Patrick K.; Cassidy, Maja C. [School of Engineering and Applied Science, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Marcus, Charles M. [Center for Quantum Devices, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, 2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Cheol Shin, Yong; Kong, Jing [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

2014-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

278

Role of defects in III-nitride based electronics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The LDRD entitled ``Role of Defects in III-Nitride Based Devices'' is aimed to place Sandia National Laboratory at the forefront of the field of GaN materials and devices by establishing a scientific foundation in areas such as material growth, defect characterization/modeling, and processing (metalization and etching) chemistry. In this SAND report the authors summarize their studies such as (1) the MOCVD growth and doping of GaN and AlGaN, (2) the characterization and modeling of hydrogen in GaN, including its bonding, diffusion, and activation behaviors, (3) the calculation of energetic of various defects including planar stacking faults, threading dislocations, and point defects in GaN, and (4) dry etching (plasma etching) of GaN (n- and p-types) and AlGaN. The result of the first AlGaN/GaN heterojunction bipolar transistor is also presented.

HAN,JUNG; MYERS JR.,SAMUEL M.; FOLLSTAEDT,DAVID M.; WRIGHT,ALAN F.; CRAWFORD,MARY H.; LEE,STEPHEN R.; SEAGER,CARLETON H.; SHUL,RANDY J.; BACA,ALBERT G.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Silver delafossite nitride, AgTaN{sub 2}?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new silver nitride, AgTaN{sub 2}, was synthesized from NaTaN{sub 2} by a cation-exchange reaction, using a AgNO{sub 3}-NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3} flux at 175 {sup o}C. Its crystal structure type is delafossite (R3-bar m) with hexagonal lattice parameters of a=3.141(3) A, c=18.81(2) A, in which silver is linearly coordinated to nitrogen. Energy dispersive X-ray analysis and combustion nitrogen/oxygen analysis gave a composition with atomic ratios of Ag:Ta:N:O as 1.0:1.2(1):2.1(1):0.77(4), which is somewhat Ta rich and indicates some oxide formation. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis showed a Ta- and O-rich surface and transmission electron microscope observation exhibited aggregates of ca. 4-5 nm-sized particles on the surface, which are probably related to the composition deviation from a AgTaN{sub 2}. The lattice parameters of stoichiometric AgTaN{sub 2} calculated by density functional theory agree with the experimental ones, but the possibility of some oxygen incorporation and/or silver deficiency is not precluded. -- Graphical abstract: A delafossite silver nitride, AgTaN{sub 2}, was synthesized from NaTaN{sub 2} by a cation-exchange reaction using a AgNO{sub 3}-NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3} flux. It contains N-Ag-N linear bonding. Display Omitted

Miura, Akira [Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, RWTH Aachen University, Landoltweg 1, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Baker Laboratory, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Lowe, Michael; Leonard, Brian M.; Subban, Chinmayee V. [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Baker Laboratory, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Masubuchi, Yuji; Kikkawa, Shinichi [Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, N13W8, Kita-ku Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan); Dronskowski, Richard [Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, RWTH Aachen University, Landoltweg 1, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Hennig, Richard G. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Abruna, Hector D. [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Baker Laboratory, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); DiSalvo, Francis J., E-mail: fjd3@cornell.ed [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Baker Laboratory, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

280

Biofuels production from hydrotreating of vegetable oil using supported noble metals, and transition metal carbide and nitride.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? The focus of this research is to prepare non-sulfided hydrotreating catalysts, supported noble metal and transition metal carbide/ nitride, and evaluate their hydrocracking activities… (more)

Wang, Huali

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gallium nitride ingan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Applicability of carbon and boron nitride nanotubes as biosensors: Effect of biomolecular adsorption on the transport properties of carbon and boron  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Applicability of carbon and boron nitride nanotubes as biosensors: Effect of biomolecular;Applicability of carbon and boron nitride nanotubes as biosensors: Effect of biomolecular adsorption University, Houghton, Michigan 49931, USA 2 US Army Research Laboratory, Weapons and Materials Research

Pandey, Ravi

282

Crystal structure and electron microprobe analyses of a lanthanum lutetium gallium garnet  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Single-crystal electron microprobe analysis of a lanthanum lutetium gallium garnet has resulted in a composition of La{sub 2.37}Nd{sub 0.07}Pb{sub 0.01}Lu{sub 2.54}Cr{sub 0.01} Ga{sub 3.00}O{sub 12}. This composition gives better agreement between observed and calculated total dielectric polarizabilities than previously reported compositions (La{sub 2.26--2.32}Nd{sub 0.04}Lu{sub 2.57--2.63}Ga{sub 3.07}O{sub 12} by x-ray fluorescence and La{sub 2.655}Nd{sub 0.027}Lu{sub 2.656}Ga{sub 2.655}O{sub 12} by inductively coupled plasma analyses), and does not imply the crystal-chemically improbable presence of Lu{sup 3+} in the tetrahedral site. X-ray and neutron crystal-structure analyses have confirmed that little or no Lu resides in this site.

Parise, J.B.; Harlow, R.L.; Shannon, R.D. (Central Research and Development Department, E. I. DuPont De Nemours and Co., Experimental Station, Wilmington, Delaware 19880-0228 (United States)); Kwei, G.H. (LANSCE, MS-H805, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)); Allik, T.H. (Science Applications International Corporation, 1710 Goodridge Dr., P.O. Box 1303, McLean, Virginia 22102 (United States)); Armstrong, J.T. (Department of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States))

1992-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

283

Investigation on properties of ultrafast switching in a bulk gallium arsenide avalanche semiconductor switch  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Properties of ultrafast switching in a bulk gallium arsenide (GaAs) avalanche semiconductor switch based on semi-insulating wafer, triggered by an optical pulse, were analyzed using physics-based numerical simulations. It has been demonstrated that when a voltage with amplitude of 5.2?kV is applied, after an exciting optical pulse with energy of 1??J arrival, the structure with thickness of 650??m reaches a high conductivity state within 110 ps. Carriers are created due to photons absorption, and electrons and holes drift to anode and cathode terminals, respectively. Static ionizing domains appear both at anode and cathode terminals, and create impact-generated carriers which contribute to the formation of electron-hole plasma along entire channel. When the electric field in plasma region increases above the critical value (?4?kV/cm) at which the electrons drift velocity peaks, a domain comes into being. An increase in carrier concentration due to avalanche multiplication in the domains reduces the domain width and results in the formation of an additional domain as soon as the field outside the domains increases above ?4?kV/cm. The formation and evolution of multiple powerfully avalanching domains observed in the simulations are the physical reasons of ultrafast switching. The switch exhibits delayed breakdown with the characteristics affected by biased electric field, current density, and optical pulse energy. The dependence of threshold energy of the exciting optical pulse on the biased electric field is discussed.

Hu, Long, E-mail: hulong-1226@126.com [Key Laboratory for Physical Electronics and Devices of the Ministry of Education, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an 710049 (China); Science and Technology on High Power Microwave Laboratory, Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, Xi'an 710024 (China); Su, Jiancang; Ding, Zhenjie; Hao, Qingsong; Yuan, Xuelin [Science and Technology on High Power Microwave Laboratory, Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, Xi'an 710024 (China)

2014-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

284

Electronic passivation of silicon surfaces by thin films of atomic layer deposited gallium oxide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper proposes the application of gallium oxide (Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3}) thin films to crystalline silicon solar cells. Effective passivation of n- and p-type crystalline silicon surfaces has been achieved by the application of very thin Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} films prepared by atomic layer deposition using trimethylgallium (TMGa) and ozone (O{sub 3}) as the reactants. Surface recombination velocities as low as 6.1?cm/s have been recorded with films less than 4.5?nm thick. A range of deposition parameters has been explored, with growth rates of approximately 0.2?Å/cycle providing optimum passivation. The thermal activation energy for passivation of the Si-Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} interface has been found to be approximately 0.5?eV. Depassivation of the interface was observed for prolonged annealing at increased temperatures. The activation energy for depassivation was measured to be 1.9?eV.

Allen, T. G., E-mail: thomas.allen@anu.edu.au; Cuevas, A. [Research School of Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra 0200 (Australia)

2014-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

285

Reaction injection molding of silicon nitride ceramics having crystallized grain boundary phases  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A reaction injection molding process is described for preparing a sintered, silicon nitride-containing ceramic article comprising; (1) injecting into a heated mold a fluid, nondilatant mixture comprising (a) at least 40% by volume of a powder mixture of (i) from about 20 wt.% to about 98 wt.% silicon nitride, (ii) from about 0.5 wt.% to about 20 wt.% of a silicate glass-forming sintering aid, and (iii) from about 0.001 wt.% to about 80 wt.% of a high metal content transition metal silicide or a transition metal or metal compound that forms a high metal content silicide with silicon nitride under the conditions defined in steps (2) or (3), and (b) a curable silicon nitride precursor binder that is a liquid below its curing temperature, to cure the binder and produce a hardened molded article, (2) heating the hardened mol suitable atmosphere to a temperature sufficient to convert the cured binder to a silicon nitride-containing ceramic, and (3) sintering the article by (i) heating at a temperature of 1,300 to 1,800 C until a silicate glass forms, and (ii) further heating at a temperature of 1,300 to 1,800 C under a vacuum until oxygen is removed from the silicate glass and the glass crystallizes.

Lukacs, A. III; Matsumoto, R.L.K.

1993-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

286

Process for producing silicon nitride based articles of high fracture toughness and strength  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for producing a silicon nitride-based article of improved fracture toughness and strength. The process involves densifying to at least 98% of theoretical density a mixture including (a) a bimodal silicon nitride powder blend consisting essentially of about 10-30% by weight of a first silicon nitride powder of an average particle size of about 0.2 .mu.m and a surface area of about 8-12 m.sup.2 /g, and about 70-90% by weight of a second silicon nitride powder of an average particle size of about 0.4-0.6 .mu.m and a surface area of about 2-4 m.sup.2 /g, (b) about 10-50 percent by volume, based on the volume of the densified article, of refractory whiskers or fibers having an aspect ratio of about 3-150 and having an equivalent diameter selected to produce in the densified article an equivalent diameter ratio of the whiskers or fibers to grains of silicon nitride of greater than 1.0, and (c) an effective amount of a suitable oxide densification aid. Optionally, the mixture may be blended with a binder and injection molded to form a green body, which then may be densified by, for example, hot isostatic pressing.

Huckabee, Marvin (Marlboro, MA); Buljan, Sergej-Tomislav (Acton, MA); Neil, Jeffrey T. (Acton, MA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Process for producing silicon nitride based articles of high fracture toughness and strength  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for producing a silicon nitride-based article of improved fracture toughness and strength is disclosed. The process involves densifying to at least 98% of theoretical density a mixture including (a) a bimodal silicon nitride powder blend consisting essentially of about 10-30% by weight of a first silicon nitride powder of an average particle size of about 0.2 [mu]m and a surface area of about 8-12 m[sup 2]/g, and about 70-90% by weight of a second silicon nitride powder of an average particle size of about 0.4-0.6 [mu]m and a surface area of about 2-4 m[sup 2]/g, (b) about 10-50 percent by volume, based on the volume of the densified article, of refractory whiskers or fibers having an aspect ratio of about 3-150 and having an equivalent diameter selected to produce in the densified article an equivalent diameter ratio of the whiskers or fibers to grains of silicon nitride of greater than 1.0, and (c) an effective amount of a suitable oxide densification aid. Optionally, the mixture may be blended with a binder and injection molded to form a green body, which then may be densified by, for example, hot isostatic pressing.

Huckabee, M.; Buljan, S.T.; Neil, J.T.

1991-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

288

Abstract--Titanium nitride (TiN) has been investigated as a material for MEMS hotplate heaters operating at high  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TiN Bond pad TiN Figure 1. Schematic cross section of the hotplate. Titanium Nitride for MEMSAbstract--Titanium nitride (TiN) has been investigated as a material for MEMS hotplate heaters boundaries start to diffuse above one- third of the melting point. As a result, residual stresses relax [3

Technische Universiteit Delft

289

Radial elasticity of multi-walled boron nitride nanotubes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigated the radial mechanical properties of multi-walled boron nitride nanotubes (MW-BNNTs) using atomic force microscopy. The employed MW-BNNTs were synthesized using pressurized vapor/condenser (PVC) methods and were dispersed in aqueous solution using ultrasonication methods with the aid of ionic surfactants. Our nanomechanical measurements reveal the elastic deformational behaviors of individual BNNTs with two to four tube walls in their transverse directions. Their effective radial elastic moduli were obtained through interpreting their measured radial deformation profiles using Hertzian contact mechanics models. Our results capture the dependences of the effective radial moduli of MW-BNNTs on both the tube outer diameter and the number of tube layers. The effective radial moduli of double-walled BNNTs are found to be several-fold higher than those of single-walled BNNTs within the same diameter range. Our work contributes directly to a complete understanding of the fundamental structural and mechanical properties of BNNTs and the pursuits of their novel structural and electronics applications.

Michael W. Smith, Cheol Park, Meng Zheng, Changhong Ke ,In-Tae Bae, Kevin Jordan

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Mechanical deformations of boron nitride nanotubes in crossed junctions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a study of the mechanical deformations of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) in crossed junctions. The structure and deformation of the crossed tubes in the junction are characterized by using atomic force microscopy. Our results show that the total tube heights are reduced by 20%–33% at the crossed junctions formed by double-walled BNNTs with outer diameters in the range of 2.21–4.67?nm. The measured tube height reduction is found to be in a nearly linear relationship with the summation of the outer diameters of the two tubes forming the junction. The contact force between the two tubes in the junction is estimated based on contact mechanics theories and found to be within the range of 4.2–7.6 nN. The Young's modulus of BNNTs and their binding strengths with the substrate are quantified, based on the deformation profile of the upper tube in the junction, and are found to be 1.07?±?0.11 TPa and 0.18–0.29 nJ/m, respectively. Finally, we perform finite element simulations on the mechanical deformations of the crossed BNNT junctions. The numerical simulation results are consistent with both the experimental measurements and the analytical analysis. The results reported in this paper contribute to a better understanding of the structural and mechanical properties of BNNTs and to the pursuit of their applications.

Zhao, Yadong; Chen, Xiaoming; Ke, Changhong, E-mail: cke@binghamton.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, State University of New York at Binghamton, Binghamton, New York 13902 (United States); Park, Cheol [NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia 23681 (United States); Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904 (United States); Fay, Catharine C. [NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia 23681 (United States); Stupkiewicz, Stanislaw [Institute of Fundamental Technological Research, Warsaw (Poland)

2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

291

HIGH-EFFICIENCY NITRIDE-BASED SOLID-STATE LIGHTING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this semiannual report we summarize the progress obtained in the first six months with the support of DoE contract No.DE-FC26-01NT41203, entitled ''High-Efficiency Nitride-Based Solid-State Lighting''. The two teams, from the University of California at Santa Barbara (Principle Investigator: Dr. Shuji Nakamura) and Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (led by Dr. N. Narendran), are pursuing the goals of this contract from thin film growth, characterization, and packaging standpoints. The UCSB team has made significant progress in the development of GaN vertical cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) as well as light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with AlGaN active regions emitting in the ultraviolet (UV). The Rensselaer team has developed target specifications for some of the key parameters for the proposed solid-state lighting system, including a luminous flux requirement matrix for various lighting applications, optimal spectral power distributions, and the performance characteristics of currently available commercial LEDs for eventual comparisons to the devices developed in the scope of this project.

Dr. Paul T. Fini; Prof. Shuji Nakamura

2002-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

292

HIGH-EFFICIENCY NITRIDE-BASED SOLID-STATE LIGHTING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this annual report we summarize the progress obtained in the first year with the support of DoE contract No.DE-FC26-01NT41203, entitled ''High-Efficiency Nitride-Based Solid-State Lighting''. The two teams, from the University of California at Santa Barbara (Principle Investigator: Dr. Shuji Nakamura) and Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (led by Dr. N. Narendran), are pursuing the goals of this contract from thin film growth, characterization, and packaging standpoints. The UCSB team has made significant progress in the development of GaN vertical cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) as well as light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with AlGaN active regions emitting in the ultraviolet (UV). The Rensselaer team has developed target specifications for some of the key parameters for the proposed solid-state lighting system, including a luminous flux requirement matrix for various lighting applications, optimal spectral power distributions, and the performance characteristics of currently available commercial LEDs for eventual comparisons to the devices developed in the scope of this project.

Dr. Paul T. Fini; Prof. Shuji Nakamura

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

SUMMARY ON TITANIUM NITRIDE COATING OF SNS RING VACUUM CHAMBERS.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The inner surfaces of the 248 m Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) accumulator ring vacuum chambers are coated with {approx}100nm of titanium nitride (TiN) to reduce the secondary electron yield (SEY) of the chamber walls. There are approximately 135 chambers and kicker modules, some up to 5m in length and 36cm in diameter, coated with TiN. The coating is deposited by means of reactive DC magnetron sputtering -using a - cylindrical cathode with internal permanent magnets. This cathode configuration generates a deposition-rate sufficient to meet the required production schedule and produces stoichiometric films with good adhesion, low SEY and acceptable outgassing. Moreover, the cathode magnet configuration allows for simple changes in length and has been adapted to coat the wide variety of chambers and components contained within the arcs, injection, extraction, collimation and RF straight sections. Chamber types and quantities as well as the cathode configurations are presented herein. The unique coating requirements of the injection kicker ceramic chambers and the extraction kicker ferrite surface will be emphasized. A brief summary of the salient coating properties is given including the interdependence of SEY as a function of surface roughness and its effect on outgassing.

TODD, R.; HE, P.; HSEUH, H.C.; WEISS, D.

2005-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

294

Shear strain mediated magneto-electric effects in composites of piezoelectric lanthanum gallium silicate or tantalate and ferromagnetic alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Shear strain mediated magneto-electric (ME) coupling is studied in composites of piezoelectric Y-cut lanthanum gallium silicate (LGS) or tantalate (LGT) and ferromagnetic Fe-Co-V alloys. It is shown that extensional strain does not result in ME effects in these layered composites. Under shear strain generated by an ac and dc bias magnetic fields along the length and width of the sample, respectively, strong ME coupling is measured at low-frequencies and at mechanical resonance. A model is discussed for the ME effects. These composites of Y-cut piezoelectrics and ferromagnetic alloys are of importance for shear strain based magnetic field sensors.

Sreenivasulu, G.; Piskulich, E.; Srinivasan, G., E-mail: srinivas@oakland.edu [Physics Department, Oakland University, Rochester, Michigan 48409 (United States); Qu, P.; Qu, Hongwei [Electrical and Computer Engineering, Oakland University, Rochester, Michigan 48309 (United States); Petrov, V. M. [Institute of Electronic Information Systems, Novgorod State University, Veliky Novgorod (Russian Federation); Fetisov, Y. K. [Moscow State Technical University of Radio Engineering, Electronics and Automation, Moscow 19454 (Russian Federation); Nosov, A. P. [Institute of Metal Physics, Ural Division of Russian Academy of Sciences, 18 S. Kovalevskaya St, Ekaterinburg 620990 (Russian Federation)

2014-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

295

The internal-nitriding behavior of Co-Fe-Al alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Co-10Fe, Co-20Fe, and Co-40Fe alloys containing 3 at.% Al were internally nitrided in NH{sub 3}/H{sub 2} mixtures over the range 700--1000 C. The kinetics of thickening of the internal-reaction zone followed the parabolic rate law, suggesting that solid-state diffusion was rate controlling. Nitrogen permeabilities were obtained for each alloy. AlN was the only nitride to form for all materials and at all temperatures. At high temperature, the nitride precipitates formed hexagonal plates near the surface, the precipitates becoming more blocky near the reaction front. Precipitate size increased with increasing depth in the alloy and increasing temperature, because of competition between nucleation and growth processes. Increasing iron content increased the reaction kinetics due to increased nitrogen solubility with increasing iron content.

Chen, I.C. [Raytheon Systems Co., El Segundo, CA (United States). Sensors and Electronics Systems] [Raytheon Systems Co., El Segundo, CA (United States). Sensors and Electronics Systems; Douglass, D.L. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States). Arizona Materials Labs.] [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States). Arizona Materials Labs.

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Formation of Protective Nitride Surfaces for PEM Fuel Cell Metallic Bipolar Plates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Selective gas nitridation of model Ni-base alloys was used to form dense, electrically-conductive and corrosion-resistant nitride surface layers, including TiN, VN, CrN, Cr2N, as well as a complex NiNbVN phase. Evaluation for use as a protective surface for metallic bipolar plates in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) indicated that CrN/Cr2N base surfaces hold promise to meet Department of Energy (DOE) performance goals for automotive applications. The thermally grown CrN/Cr2N surface formed on model Ni-Cr base alloys exhibited good stability and low electrical resistance in single-cell fuel cell testing under simulated drive-cycle conditions. Recent results indicate that similar protective Cr-nitride surfaces can be formed on less expensive Fe-Cr base alloys potentially capable of meeting DOE cost goals.

Brady, Michael P [ORNL; Yang, Bing [ORNL; Wang, Heli [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); Turner, John [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); More, Karren Leslie [ORNL; Wilson, Mahlon [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Garzon, Fernando [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Thermodynamic stability and unusual strength of ultra-incompressible rhenium nitrides  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report on a comprehensive study of thermodynamic and mechanical properties as well as a bond-deformation mechanism on ultra-incompressible Re{sub 2} N and Re{sub 3} N. The introduction of nitrogen into the rhenium lattice leads to thermodynamic instability in Re{sub 2} N at ambient conditions and enhanced incompressibility and strength for both rhenium nitrides. Rhenium nitrides, however, show substantially lower ideal shear strength than hard ReB{sub 2} and superhard c -BN, suggesting that they cannot be intrinsically superhard. An intriguing soft “ionic bond mediated plastic deformation” mechanism is revealed to underline the physical origin of their unusual mechanical strength. These results suggest a need to reformulate the design concept of intrinsically superhard transition-metal nitrides, borides, and carbides.

Zhang, R. F.; Lin, Zhijun; Mao, Ho-kwang; Zhao, Yusheng

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

The different adsorption mechanism of methane molecule onto a boron nitride and a graphene flakes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Graphene and single layer hexagonal boron-nitride are two newly discovered 2D materials with wonderful physical properties. Using density functional theory, we study the adsorption mechanism of a methane molecule over a hexagonal flake of single layer hexagonal boron-nitride (h-BN) and compare the results with those of graphene. We found that independent of the used functional in our ab-initio calculations, the adsorption energy in the h-BN flake is larger than that for graphene. Despite of the adsorption energy profile of methane over a graphene flake, we show that there is a long range behavior beyond minimum energy in the adsorption energy of methane over h-BN flake. This result reveals the higher sensitivity of h-BN sheet to the adsorption of a typical closed shell molecule with respect to graphene. The latter gives insight in the recent experiments of graphene over hexagonal boron nitride.

Seyed-Talebi, Seyedeh Mozhgan [Shahid Chamran University, Golestan boulevard, Ahvaz, Khouzestan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Neek-Amal, M., E-mail: neekamal@srttu.edu [Shahid Rajaee Teacher Training University, Lavizan, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2014-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

299

Electron/phonon coupling in group-IV transition-metal and rare-earth nitrides  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Transport electron/phonon coupling parameters and Eliashberg spectral functions ?{sub tr}{sup 2}F(??) are determined for group-IV transition-metal (TM) nitrides TiN, ZrN, and HfN, and the rare-earth (RE) nitride CeN using an inversion procedure based upon temperature-dependent (4 < T < 300 K) resistivity measurements of high-crystalline-quality stoichiometric epitaxial films grown on MgO(001) by magnetically-unbalanced reactive magnetron sputtering. Transport electron/phonon coupling parameters ?{sub tr} vary from 1.11 for ZrN to 0.82 for HfN, 0.73 for TiN, and 0.44 for CeN. The small variation in ?{sub tr} among the TM nitrides and the weak coupling in CeN are consistent with measured superconducting transition temperatures 10.4 (ZrN), 9.18 (HfN), 5.35 (TiN), and <4 K for CeN. The Eliashberg spectral function describes the strength and energy spectrum of electron/phonon coupling in conventional superconductors. Spectral peaks in ?{sup 2}F(??), corresponding to regions in energy-space for which electrons couple to acoustic ??{sub ac} and optical ??{sub op} phonon modes, are centered at ??{sub ac} = 33 and ??{sub op} = 57 meV for TiN, 25 and 60 meV for ZrN, 18 and 64 meV for HfN, and 21 and 39 meV for CeN. The acoustic modes soften with increasing cation mass; optical mode energies remain approximately constant for the TM nitrides, but are significantly lower for the RE nitride due to a lower interatomic force constant. Optical/acoustic peak-intensity ratios are 1.15 ± 0.1 for all four nitrides, indicating similar electron/phonon coupling strengths ?{sub tr}(??) for both modes.

Mei, A. B.; Rockett, A. [Departments of Materials Science, Physics, and the Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois, 104 South Goodwin, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)] [Departments of Materials Science, Physics, and the Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois, 104 South Goodwin, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Hultman, L. [Thin Film Physics Division, Department of Physics (IFM), Linköping University, SE-58183 Linköping (Sweden)] [Thin Film Physics Division, Department of Physics (IFM), Linköping University, SE-58183 Linköping (Sweden); Petrov, I.; Greene, J. E. [Departments of Materials Science, Physics, and the Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois, 104 South Goodwin, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States) [Departments of Materials Science, Physics, and the Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois, 104 South Goodwin, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Thin Film Physics Division, Department of Physics (IFM), Linköping University, SE-58183 Linköping (Sweden)

2013-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

300

Effects of surface grinding conditions on the reciprocating friction and wear behavior of silicon nitride  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The relationship between two significantly different surface grinding conditions and the reciprocating ball-on-flat friction and wear behavior of a high-quality, structural silicon nitride material (GS-44) was investigated. The slider materials were silicon nitride NBD 200 and 440C stainless steel. Two machining conditions were selected based on extensive machining and flexural strength test data obtained under the auspices of an international, interlaboratory grinding study. The condition categorized as {open_quotes}low strength{close_quote} grinding used a coarse 80 grit wheel and produced low flexure strength due to machining-induced flaws in the surface. The other condition, regarded as {open_quotes}high strength grinding,{close_quotes} utilized a 320 grit wheel and produced a flexural strength nearly 70% greater. Grinding wheel surface speeds were 35 and 47 m/s. Reciprocating sliding tests were conducted following the procedure described in a newly-published ASTM standard (G- 133) for linearly-reciprocating wear. Tests were performed in directions both parallel and perpendicular to the grinding marks (lay) using a 25 N load, 5 Hz reciprocating frequency, 10 mm stroke length, and 100 m of sliding at room temperature. The effects of sliding direction relative to the lay were more pronounced for stainless steel than for silicon nitride sliders. The wear of stainless steel was less than the wear of the silicon nitride slider materials because of the formation of transfer particles which covered the sharp edges of the silicon nitride grinding grooves and reduced abrasive contact. The wear of the GS-44 material was much greater for the silicon nitride sliders than for the stainless steel sliders. The causes for the effects of surface-grinding severity and sliding direction on friction and wear of GS-44 and its counterface materials are explained.

Blau, P.J.; Martin, R.L.; Zanoria, E.S.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gallium nitride ingan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Improved porous mixture of molybdenum nitride and tantalum oxide as a charge storage material  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High surface area {gamma}-molybdenum nitride has shown promise as a charge storage material. The addition of amorphous tantalum oxide to the molybdenum nitride system not only improves the film cohesion tremendously, but also widens the voltage stability window from 0.8 to 1.1 V. This occurs without adversely effecting the capacitance. Ultracapacitors, also called supercapacitors or electrochemical capacitors, are high power storage devices which have found application in products as diverse as cardiac pacemakers, cellular phones, electric vehicles, and air bags.

Deng, C.Z.; Pynenburg, R.A.J.; Tsai, K.C. [Pinnacle Research Inst., Inc., Los Gatos, CA (United States)

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Thermal conductivity of ultra-thin chemical vapor deposited hexagonal boron nitride films  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermal conductivity of freestanding 10?nm and 20?nm thick chemical vapor deposited hexagonal boron nitride films was measured using both steady state and transient techniques. The measured value for both thicknesses, about 100?±?10?W m{sup ?1} K{sup ?1}, is lower than the bulk basal plane value (390?W m{sup ?1} K{sup ?1}) due to the imperfections in the specimen microstructure. Impressively, this value is still 100 times higher than conventional dielectrics. Considering scalability and ease of integration, hexagonal boron nitride grown over large area is an excellent candidate for thermal management in two dimensional materials-based nanoelectronics.

Alam, M. T.; Haque, M. A., E-mail: mah37@psu.edu [Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); Bresnehan, M. S.; Robinson, J. A. [Materials Science and Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802, USA and The Center for Two-Dimensional and Layered Materials, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States)] [Materials Science and Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802, USA and The Center for Two-Dimensional and Layered Materials, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States)

2014-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

303

Efficient boron nitride nanotube formation via combined laser-gas flow levitation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for producing boron nitride nanotubes and/or boron-carbon-nitrogen nanotubes of the general formula B.sub.xC.sub.yN.sub.z. The process utilizes a combination of laser light and nitrogen gas flow to support a boron ball target during heating of the boron ball target and production of a boron vapor plume which reacts with nitrogen or nitrogen and carbon to produce boron nitride nanotubes and/or boron-carbon-nitrogen nanotubes of the general formula B.sub.xC.sub.yN.sub.z.

Whitney, R. Roy; Jordan, Kevin; Smith, Michael

2014-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

304

Microstructural characterization of silicon nitride ceramics processed by pressureless sintering, overpressure sintering, and sinter/HIP  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Silicon nitride ceramics of the same nominal sialon composition have been sintered under different conditions including atmospheric sintering, overpressure sintering, reaction bonded (nitrided pressureless sinter) and sinter/HIP cycles. The sintered ceramics, which exhibited dramatic differences in fracture toughness, have been characterized by x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, analytical transmission electron microscopy, and image analysis techniques. Fracture toughness data have been correlated to the microstructural and chemical analysis of the grain boundary phases. The microstructure was the strongest influencing factor on the observed fracture toughness difference. 5 refs., 5 tabs.

Selkregg, K.R. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); More, K.L.; Seshadri, S.G.; McMurtry, C.H. (Carborundum Co., Niagara Falls, NY (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Desorption and sublimation kinetics for fluorinated aluminum nitride surfaces  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The adsorption and desorption of halogen and other gaseous species from surfaces is a key fundamental process for both wet chemical and dry plasma etch and clean processes utilized in nanoelectronic fabrication processes. Therefore, to increase the fundamental understanding of these processes with regard to aluminum nitride (AlN) surfaces, temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) have been utilized to investigate the desorption kinetics of water (H{sub 2}O), fluorine (F{sub 2}), hydrogen (H{sub 2}), hydrogen fluoride (HF), and other related species from aluminum nitride thin film surfaces treated with an aqueous solution of buffered hydrogen fluoride (BHF) diluted in methanol (CH{sub 3}OH). Pre-TPD XPS measurements of the CH{sub 3}OH:BHF treated AlN surfaces showed the presence of a variety of Al-F, N-F, Al-O, Al-OH, C-H, and C-O surfaces species in addition to Al-N bonding from the AlN thin film. The primary species observed desorbing from these same surfaces during TPD measurements included H{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, HF, F{sub 2}, and CH{sub 3}OH with some evidence for nitrogen (N{sub 2}) and ammonia (NH{sub 3}) desorption as well. For H{sub 2}O, two desorption peaks with second order kinetics were observed at 195 and 460?°C with activation energies (E{sub d}) of 51?±?3 and 87?±?5?kJ/mol, respectively. Desorption of HF similarly exhibited second order kinetics with a peak temperature of 475?°C and E{sub d} of 110?±?5?kJ/mol. The TPD spectra for F{sub 2} exhibited two peaks at 485 and 585?°C with second order kinetics and E{sub d} of 62?±?3 and 270?±?10?kJ/mol, respectively. These values are in excellent agreement with previous E{sub d} measurements for desorption of H{sub 2}O from SiO{sub 2} and AlF{sub x} from AlN surfaces, respectively. The F{sub 2} desorption is therefore attributed to fragmentation of AlF{sub x} species in the mass spectrometer ionizer. H{sub 2} desorption exhibited an additional high temperature peak at 910?°C with E{sub d}?=?370?±?10?kJ/mol that is consistent with both the dehydrogenation of surface AlOH species and H{sub 2} assisted sublimation of AlN. Similarly, N{sub 2} exhibited a similar higher temperature desorption peak with E{sub d}?=?535?±?40?kJ/mol that is consistent with the activation energy for direct sublimation of AlN.

King, Sean W., E-mail: sean.king@intel.com; Davis, Robert F. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States); Nemanich, Robert J. [Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States)

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Formation of copper-indium-selenide and/or copper-indium-gallium-selenide films from indium selenide and copper selenide precursors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Liquid-based indium selenide and copper selenide precursors, including copper-organoselenides, particulate copper selenide suspensions, copper selenide ethylene diamine in liquid solvent, nanoparticulate indium selenide suspensions, and indium selenide ethylene diamine coordination compounds in solvent, are used to form crystalline copper-indium-selenide, and/or copper indium gallium selenide films (66) on substrates (52).

Curtis, Calvin J. (Lakewood, CO); Miedaner, Alexander (Boulder, CO); Van Hest, Maikel (Lakewood, CO); Ginley, David S. (Evergreen, CO); Nekuda, Jennifer A. (Lakewood, CO)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

307

The reaction of carbon tetrachloride with gallium arsenide ,,001... L. Li., S, Gan, B.-K. Han, H. Qi, and R. F. Hicksa)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The reaction of carbon tetrachloride with gallium arsenide ,,001... L. Li., S, Gan, B.-K. Han, H, California 90095 Received 26 June 1997; accepted for publication 30 December 1997 Carbon tetrachloride of steps during the vapor-phase epitaxial growth of III­V compound semiconductors.3,4 Carbon tetrachloride

Li, Lian

308

Formation of BN and AlBN during nitridation of sapphire using RF plasma sources[Radiofrequency  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Evidence is presented that nitrogen plasma sources utilizing a pyrolytic boron nitride liner may be a significant source of B contamination during growth and processing. Auger electron spectroscopy analysis performed during nitridation of sapphire indicate the resulting layers contain a significant amount of BN. The formation of Al{sub 1{minus}x}B{sub x}N would explain the observation of a lattice constant several percent smaller than AlN as measured by reflection high-energy electron diffraction. The presence of cubic inclusions in layers grown on such a surface may be related to the segregation of BN during the nitridation into its cubic phase.

Ptak, A.J.; Ziemer, K.S.; Holbert, L.J.; Stinespring, C.D.; Myers, T.H.

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Method for Improving Mg Doping During Group-III Nitride MOCVD  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for improving Mg doping of Group III-N materials grown by MOCVD preventing condensation in the gas phase or on reactor surfaces of adducts of magnesocene and ammonia by suitably heating reactor surfaces between the location of mixing of the magnesocene and ammonia reactants and the Group III-nitride surface whereon growth is to occur.

Creighton, J. Randall (Albuquerque, NM); Wang, George T. (Albuquerque, NM)

2008-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

310

Formation of Nickel Silicide from Direct-Liquid-Injection Chemical-Vapor-Deposited Nickel Nitride Films  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Published April 28, 2010. Metal silicides such as TiSi2 and CoSi2 have been commonly used as the contactsFormation of Nickel Silicide from Direct-Liquid-Injection Chemical-Vapor-Deposited Nickel Nitride as the intermediate for subsequent conversion into nickel silicide NiSi , which is a key material for source, drain

311

Characterization of multilayer nitride coatings by electron microscopy and modulus mapping  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper discusses multi-scale characterization of physical vapour deposited multilayer nitride coatings using a combination of electron microscopy and modulus mapping. Multilayer coatings with a triple layer structure based on TiAlN and nanocomposite nitrides with a nano-multilayered architecture were deposited by Cathodic arc deposition and detailed microstructural studies were carried out employing Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy, Electron Backscattered Diffraction, Focused Ion Beam and Cross sectional Transmission Electron Microscopy in order to identify the different phases and to study microstructural features of the various layers formed as a result of the deposition process. Modulus mapping was also performed to study the effect of varying composition on the moduli of the nano-multilayers within the triple layer coating by using a Scanning Probe Microscopy based technique. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first attempt on modulus mapping of cathodic arc deposited nitride multilayer coatings. This work demonstrates the application of Scanning Probe Microscopy based modulus mapping and electron microscopy for the study of coating properties and their relation to composition and microstructure. - Highlights: • Microstructure of a triple layer nitride coating studied at multiple length scales. • Phases identified by EDS, EBSD and SAED (TEM). • Nanolayered, nanocomposite structure of the coating studied using FIB and TEM. • Modulus mapping identified moduli variation even in a nani-multilayer architecture.

Pemmasani, Sai Pramod [International Advanced Research Centre for Powder Metallurgy and New Materials (ARCI), Balapur P.O., Hyderabad — 500005 India (India); School of Engineering Sciences and Technology, University of Hyderabad, Gachibowli, Hyderabad — 500046 India (India); Rajulapati, Koteswararao V. [School of Engineering Sciences and Technology, University of Hyderabad, Gachibowli, Hyderabad — 500046 India (India); Ramakrishna, M.; Valleti, Krishna [International Advanced Research Centre for Powder Metallurgy and New Materials (ARCI), Balapur P.O., Hyderabad — 500005 India (India); Gundakaram, Ravi C., E-mail: ravi.gundakaram@arci.res.in [International Advanced Research Centre for Powder Metallurgy and New Materials (ARCI), Balapur P.O., Hyderabad — 500005 India (India); Joshi, Shrikant V. [International Advanced Research Centre for Powder Metallurgy and New Materials (ARCI), Balapur P.O., Hyderabad — 500005 India (India)

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

312

Numerical simulation of the heat transfer in amorphous silicon nitride membrane-based microcalorimeters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Numerical simulation of the heat transfer in amorphous silicon nitride membrane July 2003 Numerical simulations of the two-dimensional 2D heat flow in a membrane-based microcalorimeter have been performed. The steady-state isotherms and time-dependent heat flow have been calculated

Hellman, Frances

313

Silicon-doped boron nitride coated fibers in silicon melt infiltrated composites  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A fiber-reinforced silicon--silicon carbide matrix composite having improved oxidation resistance at high temperatures in dry or water-containing environments is produced. The invention also provides a method for protecting the reinforcing fibers in the silicon--silicon carbide matrix composites by coating the fibers with a silicon-doped boron nitride coating.

Corman, Gregory Scot (Ballston Lake, NY); Luthra, Krishan Lal (Schenectady, NY)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Silicon-doped boron nitride coated fibers in silicon melt infiltrated composites  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A fiber-reinforced silicon-silicon carbide matrix composite having improved oxidation resistance at high temperatures in dry or water-containing environments is produced. The invention also provides a method for protecting the reinforcing fibers in the silicon-silicon carbide matrix composites by coating the fibers with a silicon-doped boron nitride coating.

Corman, Gregory Scot (Ballston Lake, NY); Luthra, Krishan Lal (Schenectady, NY)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Line-source E beam crystallization of Si on silicon nitride layers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of a swept line-source electron beam is reported for liquid phase recrystallization of Si films on Si/sub 3/N/sub 4/ layers over Si substrates. For the case of 5000A of Si on 1000A of Si/sub 3/N/sub 4/ layers over Si the growth of Si crystalline regions as large as 0.5 x 5 mm of predominately (100) orientation normal to the film and (010) in the sweep direction has been demonstrated. The nucleation of grain growth for this case occurred at small defects in the nitride layer at the edge of the treated area, growing out as far as 500 ..mu..m over intact nitride. Thicker nitrides (2500A) remained intact at power densities useful for treating the Si film. For this thicker nitride non-seeded growth is demonstrated for single and repetitively melted Si. In all cases the surface morphology of the regrown regions is suggestive of rapid growth along <100> directions.

Knapp, J.A.; Picraux, S.T.; Lee, K.; Gibbons, J.F.; Sedgwick, T.O.; Depp, S.W.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

CHARGE STABILITY IN LPCVD SILICON NITRIDE FOR SURFACE PASSIVATION OF SILICON SOLAR CELLS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CHARGE STABILITY IN LPCVD SILICON NITRIDE FOR SURFACE PASSIVATION OF SILICON SOLAR CELLS Yongling Ren, Natalita M Nursam, Da Wang and Klaus J Weber Centre for Sustainable Energy Systems, College of Engineering and Computer Science, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200, Australia ABSTRACT

317

Disordered graphene and boron nitride in a microwave tight-binding analogue S. Barkhofen,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Disordered graphene and boron nitride in a microwave tight-binding analogue S. Barkhofen,1 M Sophia-Antipolis, 06108 Nice, France (Dated: December 20, 2012) Experiments on hexagonal graphene of the high flexibility of the discs positions, consequences of the disorder introduced in the graphene

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

318

Reversible Intercalation of Hexagonal Boron Nitride with Brnsted Nina I. Kovtyukhova,*,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

materials.1-3 Intercalation reactions are often used as the first step in exfoliation of lamellar crystals dichalogenides,10,12 and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN)13-15 can be mechanically exfoliated to form crystalline, several solution-based chem- ical approaches have been studied.10,16-22 Among these, only exfoliation

319

Effect of contact metals on the piezoelectric properties of aluminum nitride thin films  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The converse piezoelectric response of aluminum nitride evaluated using standard metal insulator semiconductor structures has been found to exhibit a linear dependence on the work function of the metal used as the top electrode. The apparent d33 of the 150–1100 nm films also depends on the dc bias applied to the samples.

Harman, J.P.; Kabulski, A. (West Virginia U., Morgantown, WV); Pagan, V.R. (West Virginia U., Morgantown, WV); Famouri, K. (West Virginia U., Morgantown, WV); Kasarla, K.R.; Rodak, L.E. (West Virginia U., Morgantown, WV); Hensel, J.P.; Korakakis, D.

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Tuning the optical properties of dilute nitride site controlled quantum dots  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We show that deterministic control of the properties of pyramidal site-controlled quantum dots (QD) could be achieved by exposing the QD layer to nitrogen precursor unsymmetrical dimethylhydrazine (UDMHy). The properties that could be tuned include an expected emission reduction in dilute nitride materials, excitonic pattern (biexciton binding energy) and improved carrier confinement potential symmetry (reduced fine-structure splitting)

Juska, G.; Dimastrodonato, V.; Mereni, L. O.; Gocalinska, A.; Pelucchi, E. [Tyndall National Institute, University College Cork, Lee Maltings, Cork (Ireland)

2013-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gallium nitride ingan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Characterization of the nitrogen split interstitial defect in wurtzite aluminum nitride using density functional theory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We carried out Heyd-Scuseria-Ernzerhof hybrid density functional theory plane wave supercell calculations in wurtzite aluminum nitride in order to characterize the geometry, formation energies, transition levels, and hyperfine tensors of the nitrogen split interstitial defect. The calculated hyperfine tensors may provide useful fingerprint of this defect for electron paramagnetic resonance measurement.

Szállás, A., E-mail: szallas.attila@wigner.mta.hu [Institute for Solid State Physics and Optics, Wigner Research Centre for Physics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 49, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); Szász, K. [Institute for Solid State Physics and Optics, Wigner Research Centre for Physics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 49, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); Institute of Physics, Eötvös University, Pázmány Péter sétány 1/A, H-1117 Budapest (Hungary); Trinh, X. T.; Son, N. T.; Janzén, E. [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linköping University, SE-581 83 Linköping (Sweden); Gali, A., E-mail: gali.adam@wigner.mta.hu [Institute for Solid State Physics and Optics, Wigner Research Centre for Physics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 49, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); Department of Atomic Physics, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Budafoki út 8, H-1111 Budapest (Hungary)

2014-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

322

Evaluation and silicon nitride internal combustion engine components. Final report, Phase I  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The feasibility of silicon nitride (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) use in internal combustion engines was studied by testing three different components for wear resistance and lower reciprocating mass. The information obtained from these preliminary spin rig and engine tests indicates several design changes are necessary to survive high-stress engine applications. The three silicon nitride components tested were valve spring retainers, tappet rollers, and fuel pump push rod ends. Garrett Ceramic Components` gas-pressure sinterable Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} (GS-44) was used to fabricate the above components. Components were final machined from densified blanks that had been green formed by isostatic pressing of GS-44 granules. Spin rig testing of the valve spring retainers indicated that these Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} components could survive at high RPM levels (9,500) when teamed with silicon nitride valves and lower spring tension than standard titanium components. Silicon nitride tappet rollers showed no wear on roller O.D. or I.D. surfaces, steel axles and lifters; however, due to the uncrowned design of these particular rollers the cam lobes indicated wear after spin rig testing. Fuel pump push rod ends were successful at reducing wear on the cam lobe and rod end when tested on spin rigs and in real-world race applications.

Voldrich, W. [Allied-Signal Aerospace Co., Torrance, CA (United States). Garrett Ceramic Components Div.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

LPCVD SILICON NITRIDE-ON-SILICON SPACER TECHNOLOGY H. W. van Zeijl, L.K. Nanver  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of obtaining self-aligned sub- lithographic dimensions. In many processes were spacers are applied to separate-etching affects the dimensions of the spacer which could lead to a lack of control over the spacer-related deviceLPCVD SILICON NITRIDE-ON-SILICON SPACER TECHNOLOGY H. W. van Zeijl, L.K. Nanver DIMES Delft

Technische Universiteit Delft

324

Base-contact proximity effects in bipolar transistors with nitride-spacer technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-lithographic dimensions. For example, in the double polysilicon bipolar transistor, spacers are used to separate the baseBase-contact proximity effects in bipolar transistors with nitride-spacer technology Henk van Zeijl-BJT's with spacer separated Al/Si emitter and base contacts are fabricated and characterized. Due to the proximity

Technische Universiteit Delft

325

Electronic structure and pairwise interactions in substoichiometric transition metal carbides and nitrides  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1001 Electronic structure and pairwise interactions in substoichiometric transition metal carbides observations expéri- mentales. Abstract 2014 In substoichiometric transition metal carbides and nitrides This paper is devoted to the study of the ordering processes in substoichiometric transition metal carbi- des

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

326

Compressibilities and phonon spectra of high-hardness transition metal-nitride materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report compressibilities measured by synchrotron X-ray diffraction and phonon spectra from Raman scattering at high pressure in the diamond anvil cell (DAC) for cubic transition metal nitrides TiN{sub 1-x}, {gamma}-Mo{sub 2}N and VN{sub x}. The high-hardness metal nitride compounds have large values of the bulk modulus. B1-structured nitrides normally have no allowed first-order Raman spectra. However, they exhibit broad bands that reflect the vibrational density of states g({omega}) associated with breakdown of q=0 selection rules because of the presence of N{sup 3-} vacancies on anion sites. Peaks in g({omega}) at low frequency are identified with the longitudinal and transverse acoustic (TA) branches. The maximum in the TA band is correlated with the superconducting transition temperature in these materials (T{sub c}). In situ Raman scattering measurements in the DAC thus permit predictions of the T{sub c} variation with pressure for cubic nitrides and isostructural carbide materials.

Shebanova, O.; Soignard, E.; Mcmillan, P.F. (ASU); (UCL)

2010-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

327

ORDER AND DISORDER IN CARBIDES AND NITRIDES Ch. H. DE NOVION and V. MAURICE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

transition metals, rare earths and actinides react with carbon and nitrogen to form metallic carbides experimental evidence for short and long-range ordering of point defects in metallic transition metal, rareCOMPOUNDS. ORDER AND DISORDER IN CARBIDES AND NITRIDES Ch. H. DE NOVION and V. MAURICE SESI, C

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

328

Effect of swift heavy ion irradiations in polycrystalline aluminum nitride J.C. Nappa,*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

conductivity, aluminum nitride may be a serious candidate as fuel coating for the Gas Fast Reactor. However.41.Bm, 78.60.Kn, 78.20.Ci 1. Introduction Gas Fast Reactor (GFR) is one of the six new systems is also studied in the framework of fusion reactors, in which this material, thanks to its high electrical

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

329

Graphene field-effect transistors based on boron nitride gate dielectrics Inanc Meric1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Graphene field-effect transistors based on boron nitride gate dielectrics Inanc Meric1 , Cory Dean1, 10027 Tel: (212) 854-2529, Fax: (212) 932-9421, Email: shepard@ee.columbia.edu Abstract Graphene field of graphene, as the gate dielectric. The devices ex- hibit mobility values exceeding 10,000 cm2 /V

Shepard, Kenneth

330

Compatibility/Stability Issues in the Use of Nitride Kernels in LWR TRISO Fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The stability of the SiC layer in the presence of free nitrogen will be dependent upon the operating temperatures and resulting nitrogen pressures whether it is at High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) temperatures of 1000-1400 C (coolant design dependent) or LWR temperatures that range from 500-700 C. Although nitrogen released in fissioning will form fission product nitrides, there will remain an overpressure of nitrogen of some magnitude. The nitrogen can be speculated to transport through the inner pyrolytic carbon layer and contact the SiC layer. The SiC layer may be envisioned to fail due to resulting nitridation at the elevated temperatures. However, it is believed that these issues are particularly avoided in the LWR application. Lower temperatures will result in significantly lower nitrogen pressures. Lower temperatures will also substantially reduce nitrogen diffusion rates through the layers and nitriding kinetics. Kinetics calculations were performed using an expression for nitriding silicon. In order to further address these concerns, experiments were run with surrogate fuel particles under simulated operating conditions to determine the resulting phase formation at 700 and 1400 C.

Armstrong, Beth L [ORNL; Besmann, Theodore M [ORNL

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Spontaneous Spatial Alignment of Polymer Cylindrical Nanodomains on Silicon Nitride Gratings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a simple method to align lying-down cylindrical domains of PS-b-PMMA in the trough regions of 555 nm deepSpontaneous Spatial Alignment of Polymer Cylindrical Nanodomains on Silicon Nitride Gratings Deepak to the orientation of the grating lines and essentially spans the width of the grating trough. The proposed mechanism

Sibener, Steven

332

Measurement of the solar neutrino capture rate with gallium metal, part III  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Russian-American experiment SAGE began to measure the solar neutrino capture rate with a target of gallium metal in December 1989. Measurements have continued with only a few brief interruptions since that time. In this article we present the experimental improvements in SAGE since its last published data summary in December 2001. Assuming the solar neutrino production rate was constant during the period of data collection, combined analysis of 168 extractions through December 2007 gives a capture rate of solar neutrinos with energy more than 233 keY of 65.4{sup +3.1}{sub 3.0} (stat) {sup +2.6}{sub -2.8} (syst) SNU. The weighted average of the results of all three Ga solar neUlrino experiments, SAGE, Gallex, and GNO, is now 66.1 {+-} 3.1 SNU, where statistical and systematic uncertainties have been combined in quadrature. During the recent period of data collection a new test of SAGE was made with a reactor-produced {sup 37}Ar neutrino source. The ratio of observed to calculated rates in this experiment, combined with the measured rates in the three prior {sup 51}Cr neutrino-source experiments with Ga, is 0.88 {+-} 0.05. A probable explanation for this low result is that the cross section for neutrino capture by the two lowest-lying excited states in {sup 71}Ge has been overestimated. If we assume these cross sections are zero, then the standard solar model including neutrino oscillations predicts a total capture rate in Ga in the range of 63--67 SNU with an uncertainly of about 5%, in good agreement with experiment. We derive the current value of the pp neutrino flux produced in the Sun to be {phi}{sup {circle_dot}}{sub pp} = (6.1 {+-} 0.8) x 10{sup 10}/(cm{sup 2} s), which agrees well with the flux predicted by the standard solar model. Finally, we make several tests and show that the data are consistent with the assumption that the solar neutrino production rate is constant in time.

Elliott, Steven Ray [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Process for preparing a densified beta-phase silicon nitride material having at least one densification aid, and the material resulting therefrom  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A process is described for preparing an alpha-phase silicon nitride material and thereafter sintering to a densified beta-phase silicon nitride material, comprising: (a) comminuting a slurry including a mixture of (i) silicon-containing powder, (ii) water, and (iii) at least one densification aid to aid in later densifying of the silicon nitride material, said comminuting being performed to form fresh, non-oxidized surfaces on the silicon powder and to allow substantial chemical reaction between the silicon and the water, said comminuting being performed to form fresh, non-oxidized surfaces on the silicon powder and to allow substantial chemical reaction between the silicon and the water, yielding a mass; (b) nitriding the mass by exposure to a sufficient amount of a nitriding gas including at least nitrogen at a sufficient temperature for a sufficient length of time to form a mass of substantially alpha-phase silicon nitride; and (c) sintering the resultant silicon nitride mass at a sintering holding temperature of from about 1,450 C to about 2,100 C for a sufficient length of time to convert the silicon nitride from a predominantly alpha-phase material to a predominantly densified beta phase silicon nitride material exhibiting a decrease in bulk volume of the silicon nitride due to the densification.

Edler, J.P.; Lisowsky, B.

1993-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

334

Additive-assisted synthesis of boride, carbide, and nitride micro/nanocrystals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

General and simple methods for the syntheses of borides, carbides and nitrides are highly desirable, since those materials have unique physical properties and promising applications. Here, a series of boride (TiB{sub 2}, ZrB{sub 2}, NbB{sub 2}, CeB{sub 6}, PrB{sub 6}, SmB{sub 6}, EuB{sub 6}, LaB{sub 6}), carbide (SiC, TiC, NbC, WC) and nitride (TiN, BN, AlN, MgSiN{sub 2}, VN) micro/nanocrystals were prepared from related oxides and amorphous boron/active carbon/NaN{sub 3} with the assistance of metallic Na and elemental S. In-situ temperature monitoring showed that the reaction temperature could increase quickly to {approx}850 Degree-Sign C, once the autoclave was heated to 100 Degree-Sign C. Such a rapid temperature increase was attributed to the intense exothermic reaction between Na and S, which assisted the formation of borides, carbides and nitrides. The as-obtained products were characterized by XRD, SEM, TEM, and HRTEM techniques. Results in this report will greatly benefit the future extension of this approach to other compounds. - Graphical abstract: An additive-assisted approach is successfully developed for the syntheses of borides, carbides and nitrides micro/nanocrystals with the assistance of the exothermic reaction between Na and S. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An additive-assisted synthesis strategy is developed for a number of borides, carbides and nitrides. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The reaction mechanism is demonstrated by the case of SiC nanowires. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The formation of SiC nanowires is initiated by the exothermic reaction of Na and S.

Chen, Bo [Key Laboratory of Colloid and Interface Chemistry (Shandong University), Ministry of Education, and Department of Chemistry, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China)] [Key Laboratory of Colloid and Interface Chemistry (Shandong University), Ministry of Education, and Department of Chemistry, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Yang, Lishan [Key Laboratory for Liquid-Solid Structural Evolution and Processing of Materials (Shandong University), Ministry of Education, and School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China)] [Key Laboratory for Liquid-Solid Structural Evolution and Processing of Materials (Shandong University), Ministry of Education, and School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China); Heng, Hua; Chen, Jingzhong; Zhang, Linfei; Xu, Liqiang [Key Laboratory of Colloid and Interface Chemistry (Shandong University), Ministry of Education, and Department of Chemistry, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China)] [Key Laboratory of Colloid and Interface Chemistry (Shandong University), Ministry of Education, and Department of Chemistry, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Qian, Yitai, E-mail: ytqian@sdu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Colloid and Interface Chemistry (Shandong University), Ministry of Education, and Department of Chemistry, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China)] [Key Laboratory of Colloid and Interface Chemistry (Shandong University), Ministry of Education, and Department of Chemistry, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Yang, Jian, E-mail: yangjian@sdu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Colloid and Interface Chemistry (Shandong University), Ministry of Education, and Department of Chemistry, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China)] [Key Laboratory of Colloid and Interface Chemistry (Shandong University), Ministry of Education, and Department of Chemistry, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

335

In situ chemical sensing in AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor metalorganic chemical vapor deposition process for real-time  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; accepted 14 June 2005; published 18 July 2005 Gallium nitride and its alloys promise to be key materials.1116/1.1993616 I. INTRODUCTION In recent years, gallium-nitride GaN - and aluminum- gallium-nitride AlGaN -based are grown at high temperatures e.g., up to 1100 °C using large concentrations of H2 carrier and NH3 N source

Rubloff, Gary W.

336

Aluminum nitride transitional layer for reducing dislocation density and cracking of AlGaN epitaxial films  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A denticulated Group III nitride structure that is useful for growing Al.sub.xGa.sub.1-xN to greater thicknesses without cracking and with a greatly reduced threading dislocation (TD) density.

Allerman, Andrew A.; Crawford, Mary H.; Lee, Stephen R.

2013-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

337

An experiment to test the viability of a gallium-arsenide cathode in a SRF electron gun  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Strained gallium arsenide cathodes are used in electron guns for the production of polarized electrons. In order to have a sufficient quantum efficiency lifetime of the cathode the vacuum in the gun must be 10{sup -11} Torr or better, so that the cathode is not destroyed by ion back bombardment or through contamination with residual gases. All successful polarized guns are DC guns, because such vacuum levels can not be obtained in normal conducting RF guns. A superconductive RF gun may provide a sufficient vacuum level due to cryo-pumping of the cavity walls. We report on the progress of our experiment to test such a gun with normal GaAs-Cs crystals.

Kewisch,J.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Rao, T.; Burrill, A.; Pate, D.; Wu, Q.; Todd, R.; Wang, E.; Bluem, H.; Holmes, D.; Schultheiss, T.

2009-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

338

Surface reactivity and oxygen migration in amorphous indium-gallium-zinc oxide films annealed in humid atmosphere  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An isotope tracer study, i.e., {sup 18}O/{sup 16}O exchange using {sup 18}O{sub 2} and H{sub 2}{sup 18}O, was performed to determine how post-deposition annealing (PDA) affected surface reactivity and oxygen diffusivity of amorphous indium–gallium–zinc oxide (a-IGZO) films. The oxygen tracer diffusivity was very high in the bulk even at low temperatures, e.g., 200?°C, regardless of PDA and exchange conditions. In contrast, the isotope exchange rate, dominated by surface reactivity, was much lower for {sup 18}O{sub 2} than for H{sub 2}{sup 18}O. PDA in a humid atmosphere at 400?°C further suppressed the reactivity of O{sub 2} at the a-IGZO film surface, which is attributable to –OH-terminated surface formation.

Watanabe, Ken, E-mail: Watanabe.Ken@nims.go.jp [International Center for Young Scientists (ICYS-MANA), National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba 305-0044 (Japan)] [International Center for Young Scientists (ICYS-MANA), National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba 305-0044 (Japan); Lee, Dong-Hee [Optical and Electronic Materials Unit, NIMS, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba 305-0044 (Japan) [Optical and Electronic Materials Unit, NIMS, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba 305-0044 (Japan); Materials and Structures Laboratory (MSL), Tokyo Institute of Technology, Mailbox R3-4, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-0026 (Japan); Sakaguchi, Isao; Haneda, Hajime [Optical and Electronic Materials Unit, NIMS, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba 305-0044 (Japan)] [Optical and Electronic Materials Unit, NIMS, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba 305-0044 (Japan); Nomura, Kenji [Frontier Research Center, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Mailbox S2-13, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-0026 (Japan)] [Frontier Research Center, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Mailbox S2-13, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-0026 (Japan); Kamiya, Toshio [Materials and Structures Laboratory (MSL), Tokyo Institute of Technology, Mailbox R3-4, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-0026 (Japan) [Materials and Structures Laboratory (MSL), Tokyo Institute of Technology, Mailbox R3-4, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-0026 (Japan); Materials Research Center for Element Strategy (MCES), Mailbox S2-13, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-0026 (Japan); Hosono, Hideo [Materials and Structures Laboratory (MSL), Tokyo Institute of Technology, Mailbox R3-4, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-0026 (Japan) [Materials and Structures Laboratory (MSL), Tokyo Institute of Technology, Mailbox R3-4, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-0026 (Japan); Frontier Research Center, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Mailbox S2-13, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-0026 (Japan); Materials Research Center for Element Strategy (MCES), Mailbox S2-13, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-0026 (Japan); Ohashi, Naoki, E-mail: Ohashi.Naoki@nims.go.jp [Optical and Electronic Materials Unit, NIMS, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba 305-0044 (Japan) [Optical and Electronic Materials Unit, NIMS, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba 305-0044 (Japan); Materials Research Center for Element Strategy (MCES), Mailbox S2-13, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-0026 (Japan)

2013-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

339

E-Print Network 3.0 - arsenide oxides sr2cro3feas Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Microstructures of gallium nitride nanowires synthesized by oxide-assisted method W.S. Shi, Y... synthesized using the recently developed oxide-assisted method by laser...

340

2012 Solid-State Lighting Manufacturing R&D Workshop Presentations...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Frank Cerio, Veeco Instruments Advanced Epi Tools for Gallium Nitride Light Emitting Diode Devices Vivek Agrawal, Applied Materials Driving Down HB-LED Costs:...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gallium nitride ingan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY CREE, INC. FOR AN ADVANCED...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

in the design and.manufacture of commercial semiconductor products utilizing silicon carbide and gallium nitride technologies. Cree states it is the owner or licensee to over 500...

342

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY CREE, INC. FOR AN ADVANCED...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

in the design and manufacture of commercial semiconductor products utilizing silicon carbide and gallium nitride technologies. In addition Cree has more than 300 domestic patents...

343

High Temperature, High Voltage Fully Integrated Gate Driver Circuit  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

temperature gate drive is being developed for use with future wide band gap (silicon carbide and gallium nitride) switching devices. * Universal drive that is capable of driving...

344

Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations ...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

- Bulk Gallium Nitride Substrates - Karen Waldrip, SNL.pdf More Documents & Publications Energy Storage & Power Electronics 2008 Peer Review - Power Electronics (PE) Systems...

345

Sandia National Laboratories: Sandia Develops a Synthesis of...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Materials Science, News, News & Events, Office of Science, Research & Capabilities, Solid-State Lighting White light-emitting diodes (LEDs) based on blue indium-gallium-nitride...

346

Diamonds are an Electronic Device's Best Friend | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

way to combine diamond films with two other materials important for advanced devices, graphene and gallium nitride. Graphene is a rising star of the materials science world, with...

347

Categorical Exclusion Determination Form  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

of SubMIC components, including the proprietary PolyStrata micro-coaxial transformer, Gallium Nitride integrated circuits, and Complementary Metal-Oxide Semiconductors,...

348

Characteristics of trap-filled gallium arsenide photoconductive switches used in high gain pulsed power applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The electrical properties of semi-insulating (SI) Gallium Arsenide (GaAs) have been investigated for some time, particularly for its application as a substrate in microelectronics. Of late this material has found a variety of applications other than as an isolation region between devices, or the substrate of an active device. High resistivity SI GaAs is increasingly being used in charged particle detectors and photoconductive semiconductor switches (PCSS). PCSS made from these materials operating in both the linear and non-linear modes have applications such as firing sets, as drivers for lasers, and in high impedance, low current Q-switches or Pockels cells. In the non-linear mode, it has also been used in a system to generate Ultra-Wideband (UWB) High Power Microwaves (HPM). The choice of GaAs over silicon offers the advantage that its material properties allow for fast, repetitive switching action. Furthermore photoconductive switches have advantages over conventional switches such as improved jitter, better impedance matching, compact size, and in some cases, lower laser energy requirement for switching action. The rise time of the PCSS is an important parameter that affects the maximum energy transferred to the load and it depends, in addition to other parameters, on the bias or the average field across the switch. High field operation has been an important goal in PCSS research. Due to surface flashover or premature material breakdown at higher voltages, most PCSS, especially those used in high power operation, need to operate well below the inherent breakdown voltage of the material. The lifetime or the total number of switching operations before breakdown, is another important switch parameter that needs to be considered for operation at high bias conditions. A lifetime of {approximately} 10{sup 4} shots has been reported for PCSS's used in UWB-HPM generation [5], while it has exceeded 10{sup 8} shots for electro-optic drivers. Much effort is currently being channeled in the study related to improvements of these two parameters high bias operation and lifetime improvement for switches used in pulsed power applications. The contact material and profiles are another important area of study. Although these problems are being pursued through the incorporation of different contact materials and introducing doping near contacts, it is important that the switch properties and the conduction mechanism in these switches be well understood such that the basic nature of the problems can be properly addressed. In this paper the authors report on these two basic issues related to the device operation, i.e., mechanisms for increasing the hold-off characteristics through neutron irradiation, and the analysis of transport processes at varying field conditions in trap dominated SI GaAs in order to identify the breakdown mechanism during device operation. It is expected that this study would result in a better understanding of photoconductive switches, specifically those used in high power operation.

ISLAM,N.E.; SCHAMILOGLU,E.; MAR,ALAN; LOUBRIEL,GUILLERMO M.; ZUTAVERN,FRED J.; JOSHI,R.P.

2000-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

349

Pulsed-ion-beam nitriding and smoothing of titanium surface in a vacuum  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Both nitriding and smoothing of titanium have been achieved under irradiation of intense pulsed ion beam in a vacuum of 2x10{sup -2} Pa. Applying a screening method, we find that medium ion-beam intensity and multi-shot irradiation are effective for the processing, where repetitive surface melting with limited ablation favored Ti nitride formation as well as surface smoothing. The present results demonstrate that ambient gas atoms/molecules can be efficiently incorporated in metal matrices to form compounds under the ion-beam irradiation. The finding is of great significance for extending application scope of the ion-beam technique in materials research and processing, combined with the recent success in introducing ambient gas into the processing chamber.

Zhu, X.P.; Suematsu, Hisayuki; Jiang Weihua; Yatsui, Kiyoshi; Lei, M.K. [Extreme Energy-Density Research Institute, Nagaoka University of Technology, 1603-1 Kamitomioka, Nagaoka, Niigata 940-2188 (Japan); Surface Engineering Laboratory, Department of Materials Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)

2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

350

Phase transformations of nano-sized cubic boron nitride to white graphene and white graphite  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report quantum-mechanical investigations that predict the formation of white graphene and nano-sized white graphite from the first-order phase transformations of nano-sized boron nitride thin-films. The phase transformations from the nano-sized diamond-like structure, when the thickness d?>?1.4?nm, to the energetically more stable nano-sized white graphite involve low activation energies of less than 1.0?eV. On the other hand, the diamond-like structure transforms spontaneously to white graphite when d???1.4?nm. In particular, the two-dimensional structure with single-layer boron nitride, the so-called white graphene, could be formed as a result of such transformation.

Dang, Hongli; Liu, Yingdi; Xue, Wenhua; Anderson, Ryan S.; Sewell, Cody R. [Department of Physics and Engineering Physics, The University of Tulsa, Tulsa, Oklahoma 74104 (United States); Xue, Sha; Crunkleton, Daniel W. [Department of Chemical Engineering, The University of Tulsa, Tulsa, Oklahoma 74104 (United States); Institute of Alternate Energy, The University of Tulsa, Tulsa, Oklahoma 74104 (United States); Shen, Yaogen [Department of Mechanical and Biomedical Engineering, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Wang, Sanwu, E-mail: sanwu-wang@utulsa.edu [Department of Physics and Engineering Physics, The University of Tulsa, Tulsa, Oklahoma 74104 (United States); Institute of Alternate Energy, The University of Tulsa, Tulsa, Oklahoma 74104 (United States)

2014-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

351

Nondestructive evaluation of silicon-nitride ceramic valves from engine duration test.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this study, we investigated impact and wear damage in silicon-nitride ceramic valves that were subjected to an engine duration test in a natural-gas engine. A high-speed automated laser-scattering system was developed for the nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of 10 SN235P silicon-nitride valves. The NDE system scans the entire valve surface and generates a two-dimensional scattering image that is used to identify location, size and relative severity of subsurface damage in the valves. NED imaging data were obtained at before and at 100 and 500 hours of the engine duration test. The NDE data were analyzed and compared with surface photomicrographs. Wear damage was found in the impact surface of all valves, expecially for exhaust valves. However, the NDE examination did not detect subsurface damage such as cracks or spalls in these engine-tested valves.

Sun, J. G.; Trethewey, J. S.; Vanderspiegle, N. N.; Jensen, J. A.; Nuclear Engineering Division; Caterpillar, Inc.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Thermal transport in boron nitride nanotorus—towards a nanoscopic thermal shield  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nanotori, or nanorings, are topological variants of nanotubes and are conceived to have different properties from their tubular form. In this study, the toroidal arrangement of boron nitride is introduced. Using classical molecular dynamics simulations, the thermal behaviour (thermal conductivity and thermal stability) of the boron nitride nanotorus and its relationship with the structural characteristics are investigated. Its circumferential thermal rectification strength displays a linear dependence on the bending coefficient of the nanostructure. Surface kinks are relatively inconsequential on its circumferential mode of conduction, as compared to its axial sense. The circumferential conductivity in the diffusive regime is calculated to be approximately 10?W/m K, while the axial conductivity is more than tenfold of this value. All nanotori with different toroidal characters show excellent thermal stability at extremely high temperatures approaching 3400?K. With consideration to its favourable properties, a thermal shield made up of a parallel row of nanotori is proposed as a nanoscale thermal insulation device.

Loh, G. C., E-mail: jgloh@mtu.edu [Institute of High Performance Computing, 1 Fusionopolis Way, 16-16 Connexis, Singapore 138632 (Singapore); Department of Physics, Michigan Technological University, Houghton, Michigan 49931 (United States); Baillargeat, D. [CNRS-International-NTU-Thales Research Alliance (CINTRA), 50 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 637553 (Singapore)

2013-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

353

Effects of plasma-deposited silicon nitride passivation on the radiation hardness of CMOS integrated circuits  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of plasma-deposited silicon nitride as a final passivation over metal-gate CMOS integrated circuits degrades the radiation hardness of these devices. The hardness degradation is manifested by increased radiation-induced threshold voltage shifts caused principally by the charging of new interface states and, to a lesser extent, by the trapping of holes created upon exposure to ionizing radiation. The threshold voltage shifts are a strong function of the deposition temperature, and show very little dependence on thickness for films deposited at 300/sup 0/C. There is some correlation between the threshold voltage shifts and the hydrogen content of the PECVD silicon nitride films used as the final passivation layer as a function of deposition temperature. The mechanism by which the hydrogen contained in these films may react with the Si/SiO/sub 2/ interface is not clear at this point.

Clement, J. J.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Heteroepitaxy of group IV-VI nitrides by atomic layer deposition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Heteroepitaxial growth of selected group IV-VI nitrides on various orientations of sapphire (?-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) is demonstrated using atomic layer deposition. High quality, epitaxial films are produced at significantly lower temperatures than required by conventional deposition methods. Characterization of electrical and superconducting properties of epitaxial films reveals a reduced room temperature resistivity and increased residual resistance ratio for films deposited on sapphire compared to polycrystalline samples deposited concurrently on fused quartz substrates.

Klug, Jeffrey A., E-mail: jklug@anl.gov; Groll, Nickolas R.; Pellin, Michael J.; Proslier, Thomas, E-mail: prolier@anl.gov [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)] [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Becker, Nicholas G.; Cao, Chaoyue; Zasadzinski, John F. [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States) [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Department of Physics, Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, Illinois 60616 (United States); Weimer, Matthew S. [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States) [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Department of Chemistry, Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, Illinois 60616 (United States)

2013-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

355

Ab initio study of phase transition of boron nitride between zinc-blende and rhombohedral structures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Boron nitride has polymorphs such as zinc-blende (c-BN), wurtzite (w-BN), rhombohedral (r-BN), and graphite-like (h-BN) forms. We simulate the direct conversion of r-BN to c-BN through electronic excitation. In our calculation, the conversion is made possible by increasing the hole concentration to over 0.06/atom. This conversion should be experimentally possible by hole-doping via an electric double layer transistor (EDLT) or capacitor.

Nishida, S.; Funashima, H.; Sato, K.; Katayama-Yoshida, H. [Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, 1-3 Machikaneyama, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan)

2013-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

356

Amber light-emitting diode comprising a group III-nitride nanowire active region  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A temperature stable (color and efficiency) III-nitride based amber (585 nm) light-emitting diode is based on a novel hybrid nanowire-planar structure. The arrays of GaN nanowires enable radial InGaN/GaN quantum well LED structures with high indium content and high material quality. The high efficiency and temperature stable direct yellow and red phosphor-free emitters enable high efficiency white LEDs based on the RGYB color-mixing approach.

Wang, George T.; Li, Qiming; Wierer, Jr., Jonathan J.; Koleske, Daniel

2014-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

357

Integrated rig for the production of boron nitride nanotubes via the pressurized vapor-condenser method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An integrated production apparatus for production of boron nitride nanotubes via the pressure vapor-condenser method. The apparatus comprises: a pressurized reaction chamber containing a continuously fed boron containing target having a boron target tip, a source of pressurized nitrogen and a moving belt condenser apparatus; a hutch chamber proximate the pressurized reaction chamber containing a target feed system and a laser beam and optics.

Smith, Michael W; Jordan, Kevin C

2014-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

358

An electrochemical method suitable for preparing nine metal-nitride powders  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present an electrochemical method that is suitable for the preparation of metal-nitride ceramic materials that is both simple and general. We begin with a single-compartment electrochemical cell containing suitable metal (M) anodes and cathodes (M=Al, Mo, Nb, Ni, Ti, V, W, Zn, or Zr) and a NH{sub 3}/NH{sub 4}X (X=Br or Cl) electrolyte solution. Application of a sufficiently high voltage results in oxidation and dissolution of M to M{sup n+} at the anode and reduction of NH{sub 3} to NH{sub 2}- at the cathode. When M=Al, this results in formation of an insoluble inorganic polymer, which can subsequently be calcined above 600{degrees}C to yield phase-pure AlN. For some of the other metals, a simple ammoniated metal ion is formed at the anode, but calcination of this material also leads to the corresponding metal nitride. The phases and morphologies of the powders depends strongly on the calcining conditions. The important point is that this method is general for the preparation of metal-nitride powders even though the pathway that leads to the powders is metal-dependent. This talk will focus primarily on the preparation of AlN, which is an important packaging material for the electronics industry, and NbN, which is a superconductor (T{sub c}{approximately}17 K) with important technological applications.

Wade, T.; Crooks, R.M. [Texas A& M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

359

Transmission electron microscopy investigation of acicular ferrite precipitation in {gamma}'-Fe{sub 4}N nitride  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Acicular-shaped crystals precipitate from {gamma}'-Fe{sub 4}N nitride in an iron-nitrogen alloy and were identified by electron microdiffraction as {alpha}-ferrite. Acicular ferrite develops both the Nishiyama-Wassermann and the Kurdjumov-Sachs orientation relationships with {gamma}'-Fe{sub 4}N nitride. These orientation relationships were discussed in terms of the symmetry theory. The driving force for acicular ferrite formation was related to the increasing nitrogen content of {gamma}'-Fe{sub 4}N, in equilibrium with {alpha}-ferrite, with decreasing temperature. The passage from lamellar to acicular structure in Fe-N system was proposed. - Research Highlights: {yields} Acicular crystals precipitate from pearlitic{gamma}'-Fe{sub 4}N nitride in an iron-nitrogen alloy and were identified by electron microdiffraction as acicular ferrite. {yields} The crystal structure, orientation relationships with the matrix and morphologies of acicular ferrite, were studied by transmission electron microscopy. {yields} The driving force for the formation of acicular ferrite is related to the temperature dependence of nitrogen content of {gamma}'-Fe{sub 4}N, in equilibrium with ferrite. {yields} The passage from the pearlitic structure to the acicular structure in the present iron-nitrogen alloy was proposed.

Xiong, X.C., E-mail: xiaochuan.xiong@sjtu.edu.cn [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Materials Laser Processing and Modification, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Institut Jean Lamour, UMR 7198 CNRS, Nancy-Universite, UPV-Metz, Ecole des Mines de Nancy, Parc de Saurupt CS 14234, F-54042 Nancy Cedex (France); Redjaimia, A. [Institut Jean Lamour, UMR 7198 CNRS, Nancy-Universite, UPV-Metz, Ecole des Mines de Nancy, Parc de Saurupt CS 14234, F-54042 Nancy Cedex (France); Goune, M. [Institut Jean Lamour, UMR 7198 CNRS, Nancy-Universite, UPV-Metz, Ecole des Mines de Nancy, Parc de Saurupt CS 14234, F-54042 Nancy Cedex (France); ArcelorMittal SA, Voie Romaine, BP 30320, F-57283 Maizieres-les-Metz (France)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

360

MOCVD synthesis of group III-nitride heterostructure nanowires for solid-state lighting.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solid-state lighting (SSL) technologies, based on semiconductor light emitting devices, have the potential to reduce worldwide electricity consumption by more than 10%, which could significantly reduce U.S. dependence on imported energy and improve energy security. The III-nitride (AlGaInN) materials system forms the foundation for white SSL and could cover a wide spectral range from the deep UV to the infrared. For this LDRD program, we have investigated the synthesis of single-crystalline III-nitride nanowires and heterostructure nanowires, which may possess unique optoelectronic properties. These novel structures could ultimately lead to the development of novel and highly efficient SSL nanodevice applications. GaN and III-nitride core-shell heterostructure nanowires were successfully synthesized by metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) on two-inch wafer substrates. The effect of process conditions on nanowire growth was investigated, and characterization of the structural, optical, and electrical properties of the nanowires was also performed.

Wang, George T.; Creighton, James Randall; Talin, Albert Alec

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gallium nitride ingan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Behavior of molybdenum nitrides as materials for electrochemical capacitors: Comparison with ruthenium oxide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ruthenium oxide (RuO{sub 2}), formed as a thin film on a Ru or Ti metal substrate, exhibits a large specific (cm{sup {minus}2}) and almost constant, electrochemical capacitance over a 1.35 V range in aqueous H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. This behavior has led to its investigation and use as a material for fabrication of supercapacitor devices. However, its cost has encouraged search for other materials exhibiting similar behavior. Work reported in the present paper evaluates two nitrides of Mo, Mo{sub 2}N and MoN, as substitutes for RuO{sub 2}. It is shown that very similar capacitance behavior to that of RuO{sub 2} films arises, e.g., in cyclic voltammetry and dc charging curves; in the former, almost mirror-image anodic and cathodic current-response profiles, characteristic of a capacitor, arise. However, the nitride materials have a substantially smaller voltage operating range of only some 0.7 V due to electrochemical decomposition above ca. 0.7 V vs. RHE. This limits their usefulness as a substitute for RuO{sub 2}. Of interest is that the nitride films exhibit potential-decay and potential-recovery on open circuit after respective charge and forced discharge. The decay and recovery processes are logarithmic in time, indicating the role of internal faradaic charge redistribution processes.

Liu, T.C.; Pell, W.G.; Conway, B.E. [Univ. of Ottawa, Ontario (Canada). Dept. of Chemistry; Roberson, S.L. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Analytical and experimental evaluation of joining silicon carbide to silicon carbide and silicon nitride to silicon nitride for advanced heat engine applications Phase 2. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of joining, Phase 2 was to develop joining technologies for HIP`ed Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} with 4wt% Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} (NCX-5101) and for a siliconized SiC (NT230) for various geometries including: butt joins, curved joins and shaft to disk joins. In addition, more extensive mechanical characterization of silicon nitride joins to enhance the predictive capabilities of the analytical/numerical models for structural components in advanced heat engines was provided. Mechanical evaluation were performed by: flexure strength at 22 C and 1,370 C, stress rupture at 1,370 C, high temperature creep, 22 C tensile testing and spin tests. While the silicon nitride joins were produced with sufficient integrity for many applications, the lower join strength would limit its use in the more severe structural applications. Thus, the silicon carbide join quality was deemed unsatisfactory to advance to more complex, curved geometries. The silicon carbide joining methods covered within this contract, although not entirely successful, have emphasized the need to focus future efforts upon ways to obtain a homogeneous, well sintered parent/join interface prior to siliconization. In conclusion, the improved definition of the silicon carbide joining problem obtained by efforts during this contract have provided avenues for future work that could successfully obtain heat engine quality joins.

Sundberg, G.J.; Vartabedian, A.M.; Wade, J.A.; White, C.S. [Norton Co., Northboro, MA (United States). Advanced Ceramics Div.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Boron nitride formation on magnesium studied by ab initio calculations S. Riikonen,1 A. S. Foster,1,2 A. V. Krasheninnikov,1,3 and R. M. Nieminen1,*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Boron nitride formation on magnesium studied by ab initio calculations S. Riikonen,1 A. S. Foster,1 of the art method for producing boron nitride nanotubes in which magnesium has been speculated to act boron and nitrogen containing molecules. We observe that magnesium promotes boron-nitride BN molecule

Krasheninnikov, Arkady V.

364

Power mixture and green body for producing silicon nitride base articles of high fracture toughness and strength  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A powder mixture and a green body for producing a silicon nitride-based article of improved fracture toughness and strength are disclosed. The powder mixture includes (a) a bimodal silicon nitride powder blend consisting essentially of about 10-30% by weight of a first silicon nitride powder of an average particle size of about 0.2 [mu]m and a surface area of about 8-12m[sup 2]g, and about 70-90% by weight of a second silicon nitride powder of an average particle size of about 0.4-0.6 [mu]m and a surface area of about 2-4 m[sup 2]/g, (b) about 10-50 percent by volume, based on the volume of the densified article, of refractory whiskers or fibers having an aspect ratio of about 3-150 and having an equivalent diameter selected to produce in the densified article an equivalent diameter ratio of the whiskers or fibers to grains of silicon nitride of greater than 1.0, and (c) an effective amount of a suitable oxide densification aid. The green body is formed from the powder mixture, an effective amount of a suitable oxide densification aid, and an effective amount of a suitable organic binder. No Drawings

Huckabee, M.L.; Buljan, S.T.; Neil, J.T.

1991-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

365

Process for the production of hydrogen and carbonyl sulfide from hydrogen sulfide and carbon monoxide using a metal boride, nitride, carbide and/or silicide catalyst  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydrogen and carbonyl sulfide are produced by a process comprising contacting gaseous hydrogen sulfide with gaseous carbon monoxide in the presence of a metal boride, carbide, nitride and/or silicide catalyst, such as titanium carbide, vanadium boride, manganese nitride or molybdenum silicide.

McGuiggan, M.F.; Kuch, P.L.

1984-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

366

Published in 'Silicon Carbide, III-Nitrides and Related Materials', Year: 1998, pp: 829-832 Periodical: Materials Science Forum Vols. 264-268  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Published in 'Silicon Carbide, III-Nitrides and Related Materials', Year: 1998, pp: 829@scientific.net © 1998 by Trans Tech Publications Ltd., Switzerland, http://www.ttp.net #12;Published in 'Silicon Carbide Publications Ltd., Switzerland, http://www.ttp.net #12;Published in 'Silicon Carbide, III-Nitrides and Related

Steckl, Andrew J.

367

Published in 'Silicon Carbide, III-Nitrides and Related Materials', Year: 1998, pp: 1149-1152 Periodical: Materials Science Forum Vols. 264-268  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Published in 'Silicon Carbide, III-Nitrides and Related Materials', Year: 1998, pp: 1149@scientific.net © 1998 by Trans Tech Publications Ltd., Switzerland, http://www.ttp.net #12;Published in 'Silicon Carbide Publications Ltd., Switzerland, http://www.ttp.net #12;Published in 'Silicon Carbide, III-Nitrides and Related

Steckl, Andrew J.

368

Aluminum Nitride Thin Films on Titanium for Piezoelectric MEMS Applications Seth Boeshore, Emily Parker, Vanni Lughi, Noel C. MacDonald  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aluminum Nitride Thin Films on Titanium for Piezoelectric MEMS Applications Seth Boeshore, Emily Parker, Vanni Lughi, Noel C. MacDonald University of California, Santa Barbara Highly­textured aluminum, biocompatibility, and high fracture toughness. As a piezoelectric ceramic, aluminum nitride is compatible

MacDonald, Noel C.

369

The near-edge structure in energy-loss spectroscopy: many-electron and magnetic effects in transition metal nitrides and carbides  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in transition metal nitrides and carbides This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down-loss spectroscopy: many-electron and magnetic effects in transition metal nitrides and carbides A T Paxton, M van energies are systematically overestimated by 4.22 ± 0.44 eV in twelve transition metal carbides

Paxton, Anthony T.

370

Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) on Mono-uranium Nitride Fuel Development for SSTAR and Space Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US National Energy Policy of 2001 advocated the development of advanced fuel and fuel cycle technologies that are cleaner, more efficient, less waste-intensive, and more proliferation resistant. The need for advanced fuel development is emphasized in on-going DOE-supported programs, e.g., Global Nuclear Energy Initiative (GNEI), Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI), and GEN-IV Technology Development. The Directorates of Energy & Environment (E&E) and Chemistry & Material Sciences (C&MS) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) are interested in advanced fuel research and manufacturing using its multi-disciplinary capability and facilities to support a design concept of a small, secure, transportable, and autonomous reactor (SSTAR). The E&E and C&MS Directorates co-sponsored this Laboratory Directed Research & Development (LDRD) Project on Mono-Uranium Nitride Fuel Development for SSTAR and Space Applications. In fact, three out of the six GEN-IV reactor concepts consider using the nitride-based fuel, as shown in Table 1. SSTAR is a liquid-metal cooled, fast reactor. It uses nitride fuel in a sealed reactor vessel that could be shipped to the user and returned to the supplier having never been opened in its long operating lifetime. This sealed reactor concept envisions no fuel refueling nor on-site storage of spent fuel, and as a result, can greatly enhance proliferation resistance. However, the requirement for a sealed, long-life core imposes great challenges to research and development of the nitride fuel and its cladding. Cladding is an important interface between the fuel and coolant and a barrier to prevent fission gas release during normal and accidental conditions. In fabricating the nitride fuel rods and assemblies, the cladding material should be selected based on its the coolant-side corrosion properties, the chemical/physical interaction with the nitride fuel, as well as their thermal and neutronic properties. The US NASA space reactor, the SP-100 was designed to use mono-uranium nitride fuel. Although the SP-100 reactor was not commissioned, tens of thousand of nitride fuel pellets were manufactured and lots of them, cladded in Nb-1-Zr had been irradiated in fast test reactors (FFTF and EBR-II) with good irradiation results. The Russian Naval submarines also use nitride fuel with stainless steel cladding (HT-9) in Pb-Bi coolant. Although the operating experience of the Russian submarine is not readily available, such combination of fuel, cladding and coolant has been proposed for a commercial-size liquid-metal cooled fast reactor (BREST-300). Uranium mono-nitride fuel is studied in this LDRD Project due to its favorable properties such as its high actinide density and high thermal conductivity. The thermal conductivity of mono-nitride is 10 times higher than that of oxide (23 W/m-K for UN vs. 2.3 W/m-K for UO{sub 2} at 1000 K) and its melting temperature is much higher than that of metal fuel (2630 C for UN vs. 1132 C for U metal). It also has relatively high actinide density, (13.51 gU/cm{sup 3} in UN vs. 9.66 gU/cm{sup 3} in UO{sub 2}) which is essential for a compact reactor core design. The objective of this LDRD Project is to: (1) Establish a manufacturing capability for uranium-based ceramic nuclear fuel, (2) Develop a computational capability to analyze nuclear fuel performance, (3) Develop a modified UN-based fuel that can support a compact long-life reactor core, and (4) Collaborate with the Nuclear Engineering Department of UC Berkeley on nitride fuel reprocessing and disposal in a geologic repository.

Choi, J; Ebbinghaus, B; Meiers, T; Ahn, J

2006-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

371

Role of silicon excess in Er-doped silicon-rich nitride light emitting devices at 1.54??m  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Erbium-doped silicon-rich nitride electroluminescent thin-films emitting at 1.54??m have been fabricated and integrated within a metal-oxide-semiconductor structure. By gradually varying the stoichiometry of the silicon nitride, we uncover the role of silicon excess on the optoelectronic properties of devices. While the electrical transport is mainly enabled in all cases by Poole-Frenkel conduction, power efficiency and conductivity are strongly altered by the silicon excess content. Specifically, the increase in silicon excess remarkably enhances the conductivity and decreases the charge trapping; however, it also reduces the power efficiency. The main excitation mechanism of Er{sup 3+} ions embedded in silicon-rich nitrides is discussed. The optimum Si excess that balances power efficiency, conductivity, and charge trapping density is found to be close to 16%.

Ramírez, J. M., E-mail: jmramirez@el.ub.edu; Berencén, Y.; Garrido, B. [MIND-IN2UB, Department Electrònica, Universitat de Barcelona, Martí i Franquès 1, Barcelona 08028 (Spain); Cueff, S. [Institut des Nanotechnologies de Lyon, École Centrale de Lyon, Écully 69134 (France); Labbé, C. [Centre de Recherche sur les Ions, les Matériaux et la Photonique (CIMAP), UMR 6252 CNRS/CEA/Ensicaen/UCBN, Caen 14050 (France)

2014-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

372

Photon self-induced spin-to-orbital conversion in a terbium-gallium-garnet crystal at high laser power  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, we present experimental evidence of a third-order nonlinear optical process, self-induced spin-to-orbital conversion (SISTOC) of the photon angular momentum. This effect is the physical mechanism at the origin of the depolarization of very intense laser beams propagating in isotropic materials. The SISTOC process, like self-focusing, is triggered by laser heating leading to a radial temperature gradient in the medium. In this work we tested the occurrence of SISTOC in a terbium-gallium-garnet rod for an impinging laser power of about 100 W. To study the SISTOC process we used different techniques: polarization analysis, interferometry, and tomography of the photon orbital angular momentum. Our results confirm, in particular, that the apparent depolarization of the beam is due to the occurrence of maximal entanglement between the spin and orbital angular momentum of the photons undergoing the SISTOC process. This explanation of the true nature of the depolarization mechanism could be of some help in finding novel methods to reduce or to compensate for this usually unwanted depolarization effect in all cases where very high laser power and good beam quality are required.

Mosca, S.; De Rosa, R.; Milano, L. [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Universita di Napoli 'Federico II', Complesso Universitario di Monte S. Angelo, 80126 Napoli (Italy); INFN Sezione di Napoli, Complesso Universitario di Monte S. Angelo, 80126 Napoli (Italy); Canuel, B.; Genin, E. [EGO, European Gravitational Observatory, Via E. Amaldi, 56021 S. Stefano a Macerata, Cascina (Italy); Karimi, E. [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Universita di Napoli 'Federico II', Complesso Universitario di Monte S. Angelo, 80126 Napoli (Italy); Piccirillo, B.; Santamato, E. [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Universita di Napoli 'Federico II', Complesso Universitario di Monte S. Angelo, 80126 Napoli (Italy); CNISM-Consorzio Nazionale Interuniversitario per le Scienze Fisiche della Materia, Napoli (Italy); Marrucci, L. [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Universita di Napoli 'Federico II', Complesso Universitario di Monte S. Angelo, 80126 Napoli (Italy); CNR-INFM Coherentia, Complesso Universitario di Monte S. Angelo, 80126 Napoli (Italy)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

373

CO{sub 2} laser-based dispersion interferometer utilizing orientation-patterned gallium arsenide for plasma density measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A dispersion interferometer based on the second-harmonic generation of a carbon dioxide laser in orientation-patterned gallium arsenide has been developed for measuring electron density in plasmas. The interferometer includes two nonlinear optical crystals placed on opposite sides of the plasma. This instrument has been used to measure electron line densities in a pulsed radio-frequency generated argon plasma. A simple phase-extraction technique based on combining measurements from two successive pulses of the plasma has been used. The noise-equivalent line density was measured to be 1.7 × 10{sup 17} m{sup ?2} in a detection bandwidth of 950 kHz. One of the orientation-patterned crystals produced 13 mW of peak power at the second-harmonic wavelength from a carbon dioxide laser with 13 W of peak power. Two crystals arranged sequentially produced 58 mW of peak power at the second-harmonic wavelength from a carbon dioxide laser with 37 W of peak power.

Bamford, D. J.; Cummings, E. A.; Panasenko, D. [Physical Sciences Inc., 6652 Owens Drive, Pleasanton, California 94588 (United States)] [Physical Sciences Inc., 6652 Owens Drive, Pleasanton, California 94588 (United States); Fenner, D. B.; Hensley, J. M. [Physical Sciences Inc., 20 New England Business Center, Andover, Massachusetts 01810 (United States)] [Physical Sciences Inc., 20 New England Business Center, Andover, Massachusetts 01810 (United States); Boivin, R. L.; Carlstrom, T. N.; Van Zeeland, M. A. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186 (United States)] [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186 (United States)

2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

374

Electrical Bias as an Alternate Method for Reproducible Measurement of Copper Indium Gallium Diselenide (CIGS) Photovoltaic Modules: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Light-to-dark metastable changes in thin-film photovoltaic (PV) modules can introduce uncertainty when measuring module performance on indoor flash testing equipment. This study describes a method to stabilize module performance through forward-bias current injection rather than light exposure. Measurements of five pairs of thin-film copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS) PV modules indicate that forward-bias exposure maintained the PV modules at a stable condition (within 1%) while the unbiased modules degraded in performance by up to 12%. It was additionally found that modules exposed to forward bias exhibited stable performance within about 3% of their long-term outdoor exposed performance. This carrier-injection method provides a way to reduce uncertainty arising from fast transients in thin-film module performance between the time a module is removed from light exposure and when it is measured indoors, effectively simulating continuous light exposure by injecting minority carriers that behave much as photocarriers do. This investigation also provides insight into the initial light-induced transients of thin-film modules upon outdoor deployment.

Deline, C.; Stokes, A.; Silverman, T. J.; Rummel, S.; Jordan, D.; Kurtz, S.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Saddle-like deformation in a dielectric elastomer actuator embedded with liquid-phase gallium-indium electrodes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We introduce a dielectric elastomer actuator (DEA) composed of liquid-phase Gallium-Indium (GaIn) alloy electrodes embedded between layers of poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) and examine its mechanics using a specialized elastic shell theory. Residual stresses in the dielectric and sealing layers of PDMS cause the DEA to deform into a saddle-like geometry (Gaussian curvature K<0). Applying voltage ? to the liquid metal electrodes induces electrostatic pressure (Maxwell stress) on the dielectric and relieves some of the residual stress. This reduces the longitudinal bending curvature and corresponding angle of deflection ?. Treating the elastomer as an incompressible, isotropic, NeoHookean solid, we develop a theory based on the principle of minimum potential energy to predict the principal curvatures as a function of ?. Based on this theory, we predict a dependency of ? on ? that is in strong agreement with experimental measurements performed on a GaIn-PDMS composite. By accurately modeling electromechanical coupling in a soft-matter DEA, this theory can inform improvements in design and fabrication.

Wissman, J., E-mail: jwissman@andrew.cmu.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); Finkenauer, L. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); Deseri, L. [DICAM, Department of Mechanical, Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Trento, via Mesiano 77 38123 Trento (Italy); TMHRI-Department of Nanomedicine, The Methodist Hospital Research Institute, 6565 Fannin St., MS B-490 Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Mechanics, Materials and Computing Center, CEE and ME-CIT, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); Majidi, C. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); Robotics Institute and Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States)

2014-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

376

Very long single- and few-walled boron nitride nanotubes via the pressurized vapor/condenser method  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) are desired for their exceptional mechanical, electronic, thermal, structural, textural, optical, and quantum properties. A new method for producing long, small-diameter, single- and few-walled, boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) in macroscopic quantities is reported. The pressurized vapor/condenser (PVC) method produces, without catalysts, highly crystalline, very long, small-diameter, BNNTs. Palm-sized, cotton-like masses of BNNT raw material were grown by this technique and spun directly into centimeters-long yarn. Nanotube lengths were observed to be 100 times that of those grown by the most closely related method. Self-assembly and growth models for these long BNNTs are discussed.

Michael W. Smith, Kevin Jordan, Cheol Park, Jae-Woo Kim, Peter Lillehei, Roy Crooks, Joycelyn Harrison

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Influence of process parameters on properties of reactively sputtered tungsten nitride thin films  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tungsten nitride (WN{sub x}) thin films were produced by reactive dc magnetron sputtering of tungsten in an Ar-N{sub 2} gas mixture. The influence of the deposition power on the properties of tungsten nitride has been analyzed and compared with that induced by nitrogen content variation in the sputtering gas. A combined analysis of structural, electrical and optical properties on thin WN{sub x} films obtained at different deposition conditions has been performed. It was found that at an N{sub 2} content of 14% a single phase structure of W{sub 2}N films was formed with the highest crystalline content. This sputtering gas composition was subsequently used for fabricating films at different deposition powers. Optical analysis showed that increasing the deposition power created tungsten nitride films with a more metallic character, which is confirmed with resistivity measurements. At low sputtering powers the resulting films were crystalline whereas, with an increase of power, an amorphous phase was also present. The incorporation of an excess of nitrogen atoms resulted in an expansion of the W{sub 2}N lattice and this effect was more pronounced at low deposition powers. Infrared analysis revealed that in WN{sub x} films deposited at low power, chemisorbed N{sub 2} molecules did not behave as ligands whereas at high deposition power they clearly appeared as ligands around metallic tungsten. In this study, the influence of the most meaningful deposition parameters on the phase transformation reaction path was established and deposition conditions suitable for producing thermally stable and highly crystalline W{sub 2}N films were found.

Addonizio, Maria L.; Castaldo, Anna; Antonaia, Alessandro; Gambale, Emilia; Iemmo, Laura [ENEA, Portici Research Centre, Piazzale E. Fermi 1, I-80055, Portici (Italy)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

378

The development of a porous silicon nitride crossflow filter; Final report, September 1988--September 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the work performed in developing a permeable form of silicon nitride for application to ceramic crossflow filters for use in advanced coal-fired electric power plants. The program was sponsored by the Department of Energy Morgantown Energy Technology Center and consisted of a design analysis and material development phase and a filter manufacture and demonstration phase. The crossflow filter design and operating requirements were defined. A filter design meeting the requirements was developed and thermal and stress analyses were performed. Material development efforts focused initially on reaction-bonded silicon nitride material. This approach was not successful, and the materials effort was refocused on the development of a permeable form of sintered silicon nitride (SSN). This effort was successful. The SSN material was used for the second phase of the program, filter manufacture and evaluation. Four half-scale SAN filter modules were fabricated. Three of the modules were qualified for filter performance tests. Tests were performed on two of the three qualified modules in the High-Temperature, High-Pressure facility at the Westinghouse Science and Technology Center. The first module failed on test when it expanded into the clamping device, causing dust leakage through the filter. The second module performed well for a cumulative 150-hr test. It displayed excellent filtration capability during the test. The blowback pulse cleaning was highly effective, and the module apparently withstood the stresses induced by the periodic pulse cleaning. Testing of the module resumed, and when the flow of combustion gas through the filter was doubled, cracks developed and the test was concluded.

NONE

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

High performance vertical tunneling diodes using graphene/hexagonal boron nitride/graphene hetero-structure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A tunneling rectifier prepared from vertically stacked two-dimensional (2D) materials composed of chemically doped graphene electrodes and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) tunneling barrier was demonstrated. The asymmetric chemical doping to graphene with linear dispersion property induces rectifying behavior effectively, by facilitating Fowler-Nordheim tunneling at high forward biases. It results in excellent diode performances of a hetero-structured graphene/h-BN/graphene tunneling diode, with an asymmetric factor exceeding 1000, a nonlinearity of ?40, and a peak sensitivity of ?12?V{sup ?1}, which are superior to contending metal-insulator-metal diodes, showing great potential for future flexible and transparent electronic devices.

Hwan Lee, Seung; Lee, Jia; Ho Ra, Chang; Liu, Xiaochi; Hwang, Euyheon [Samsung-SKKU Graphene Center (SSGC), Sungkyunkwan University, 2066, Seobu-ro, Jangan-gu, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Nano Science and Technology, SKKU Advanced Institute of Nano-Technology (SAINT), Sungkyunkwan University, 2066, Seobu-ro, Jangan-gu, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Sup Choi, Min [Department of Nano Science and Technology, SKKU Advanced Institute of Nano-Technology (SAINT), Sungkyunkwan University, 2066, Seobu-ro, Jangan-gu, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Center for Human Interface Nano Technology (HINT), Sungkyunkwan University, 2066, Seobu-ro, Jangan-gu, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Hee Choi, Jun [Frontier Research Laboratory, Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology, Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd., Yongin, Gyeonggi-do 446-711 (Korea, Republic of); Zhong, Jianqiang; Chen, Wei [Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, 2 Science Drive 3, Singapore 117542 (Singapore); Department of Chemistry, National University of Singapore, 3 Science Drive 3, Singapore 117543 (Singapore); Jong Yoo, Won, E-mail: yoowj@skku.edu [Samsung-SKKU Graphene Center (SSGC), Sungkyunkwan University, 2066, Seobu-ro, Jangan-gu, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Nano Science and Technology, SKKU Advanced Institute of Nano-Technology (SAINT), Sungkyunkwan University, 2066, Seobu-ro, Jangan-gu, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Center for Human Interface Nano Technology (HINT), Sungkyunkwan University, 2066, Seobu-ro, Jangan-gu, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

2014-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

380

Strength and fatigue of NT551 silicon nitride and NT551 diesel exhaust valves  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The content of this report is excerpted from Mark Andrew's Ph.D. Thesis (Andrews, 1999), which was funded by a DOE/OTT High Temperature Materials Laboratory Graduate Fellowship. It involves the characterization of NT551 and valves fabricated with it. The motivations behind using silicon nitride (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) as an exhaust valve for a diesel engine are presented in this section. There are several economic factors that have encouraged the design and implementation of ceramic components for internal combustion (IC) engines. The reasons for selecting the diesel engine valve for this are also presented.

Andrews, M.J.; Werezczak, A.A.; Kirkland, T.P.; Breder, K.

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gallium nitride ingan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Fast pick up technique for high quality heterostructures of bilayer graphene and hexagonal boron nitride  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a fast method to fabricate high quality heterostructure devices by picking up crystals of arbitrary sizes. Bilayer graphene is encapsulated with hexagonal boron nitride to demonstrate this approach, showing good electronic quality with mobilities ranging from 17?000 cm{sup 2} V{sup ?1} s{sup ?1} at room temperature to 49?000 cm{sup 2} V{sup ?1} s{sup ?1} at 4.2?K, and entering the quantum Hall regime below 0.5?T. This method provides a strong and useful tool for the fabrication of future high quality layered crystal devices.

Zomer, P. J., E-mail: pj.zomer@gmail.com; Guimarães, M. H. D.; Brant, J. C.; Tombros, N.; Wees, B. J. van [Physics of Nanodevices, Zernike Institute for Advanced Materials, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)

2014-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

382

Mechanical Instability and Ideal Shear Strength of Transition Metal Carbides and Nitrides  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ideal shear strength of transition metal carbides and nitrides is calculated with the use of the ab initio pseudopotential density functional method. The microscopic mechanism that limits the ideal strength is studied using full atomic and structural relaxation and the results of electronic structure calculations. It is shown that plasticity in perfect crystals can be triggered by electronic instabilities at finite strains. Our study explicitly demonstrates that the ideal strength in these materials is limited by the elastic instability which is in turn initiated by electronic instabilities. The potential application of alloy hardening due to the onset of instabilities at different strains is also discussed.

Jhi, Seung-Hoon; Louie, Steven G.; Cohen, Marvin L.; Morris, J. W.

2001-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

383

Rf-plasma synthesis of nanosize silicon carbide and nitride. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A pulsed rf plasma technique is capable of generating ceramic particles of 10 manometer dimension. Experiments using silane/ammonia and trimethylchlorosilane/hydrogen gas mixtures show that both silicon nitride and silicon carbide powders can be synthesized with control of the average particle diameter from 7 to 200 nm. Large size dispersion and much agglomeration appear characteristic of the method, in contrast to results reported by another research group. The as produced powders have a high hydrogen content and are air and moisture sensitive. Post-plasma treatment in a controlled atmosphere at elevated temperature (800{degrees}C) eliminates the hydrogen and stabilizes the powder with respect to oxidation or hydrolysis.

Buss, R.J.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Control of interface fracture in silicon nitride ceramics: influence of different rare earth elements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The toughness of self-reinforced silicon nitride ceramics is improved by enhancing crack deflection and crack bridging mechanisms. Both mechanisms rely on the interfacial debonding process between the elongated {Beta}-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} grains and the intergranular amorphous phases. The various sintering additives used for densification may influence the interfacial debonding process by modifying the thermal and mechanical properties of the intergranular glasses, which will result in different residual thermal expansion mismatch stresses; and the atomic bonding structure across the {Beta}-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} glass interface. Earlier studies indicated that self-reinforced silicon nitrides sintered with different rare earth additives and/or different Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}:AI{sub 2}0{sub 3} ratios could exhibit different fracture behavior that varied from intergranular to transgranular fracture. No studies have been conducted to investigate the influence of sintering additives on the interfacial fracture in silicon nitride ceramics. Because of the complexity of the material system and the extremely small scale, it is difficult to conduct quantitative analyses on the chemistry and stress states of the intergranular glass phases and to relate the results to the bulk properties. The influence of different sintering additives on the interfacial fracture behavior is assessed using model systems in which {Beta}-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}whiskers are embedded in SIAIRE (RE: rare-earth) oxynitride glasses. By systematically varying the glass composition, the role of various rare-earth additives on interfacial fracture has been examined. Specifically, four different additives were investigated: Al{sub 2}0{sub 3}, Y{sub 2}0{sub 3}, La{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and Yb{sub 2}O{sub 3}. In addition, applying the results from the model systems, the R- curve behavior of self-reinforced silicon nitride ceramics sintered with different Y{sub 2}0{sub 3}:AI{sub 2}0{sub 3} ratios was characterized.

Sun, E.Y.; Becher, P.F.; Waters, S.B.; Hsueh, Chun-Hway; Plucknett, K.P. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Hoffmann, M.J. [Karlsruhe Univ. (T.H.) (Germany). Inst. fuer Keramik im Maschinenbau

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Multi-scale modelling of III-nitrides: from dislocations to the electronic structure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

or public lighting nowadays use GaN-based LEDs. Significant effort is being invested in development of efficient and reliable LEDs which emit comfort- able white light, as there is a huge market potential for replacing bulbs and fluorescent tubes currently... of wurtzite forms of the III-nitrides. The range of the visible spectrum is shown on the wavelength axis. GaN and its alloys with aluminium or indium are in their stable form, wurtzite direct band gap semicon- ductors that have become the most important since...

Holec, David

386

CX-010895: Categorical Exclusion Determination  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Development and Industrialization of Indium Gallium Nitride/Gallium Nitride (InGaN/GaN) Light Emitting Diodes LEDs on Patterned Sapphire Substrate (PSS) for Low Cost Emitter Architecture CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 06/27/2013 Location(s): California Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

387

Hort-Range Wetting at Liquid Gallium-Bismuth Alloy Surfaces: X-ray Measurements and Square-Gradient Theory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present an x-ray reflectivity study of wetting at the free surface of the binary liquid metal alloy gallium-bismuth (Ga-Bi) in the region where the bulk phase separates into Bi-rich and Ga-rich liquid phases. The measurements reveal the evolution of the microscopic structure of the wetting films of the Bi-rich, low-surface-tension phase along several paths in the bulk phase diagram. The wetting of the Ga-rich bulk's surface by a Bi-rich wetting film, the thickness of which is limited by gravity to only 50 Angstroms, creates a Ga-rich/Bi-rich liquid/liquid interface close enough to the free surface to allow its detailed study by x rays. The structure of the interface is determined with Angstromsngstrem resolution, which allows the application of a mean-field square gradient model extended by the inclusion of capillary waves as the dominant thermal fluctuations. The sole free parameter of the gradient model, the influence parameter K, that characterizes the influence of concentration gradients on the interfacial excess energy, is determined from our measurements. This, in turn, allows a calculation of the liquid/liquid interfacial tension, and a separation of the intrinsic and capillary wave contributions to the interfacial structure. In spite of expected deviations from MF behavior, based on the upper critical dimensionality (Du = 3 ) of the bulk, we find that the capillary wave excitations only marginally affect the short-range complete wetting behavior. A critical wetting transition that is sensitive to thermal fluctuations appears to be absent in this binary liquid-metal alloy.

Huber, P.; Shpyrko, O; Pershan, P; Ocko, B; DiMasi, E; Deutsch, M

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Ferromagnetism in Doped Thin-Film Oxide and Nitride Semiconductors and Dielectrics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The principal goal in the field of high-Tc ferromagnetic semiconductors is the synthesis, characterization and utilization of semiconductors which exhibit substantial carrier spin polarization at and above room temperature. Such materials are of critical importance in the emerging field of semiconductor spintronics. The interaction leading to carrier spin polarization, exchange coupling between the dopant spins and the valence or conduction band, is known to be sufficiently weak in conventional semiconductors, such as GaAs and Si, that magnetic ordering above cryogenic temperatures is essentially impossible. Since the provocative theoretical predictions of Tc above ambient in p-Mn:ZnO and p-Mn:GaN (T. Dietl et al., Science 287 1019 (2000)), and the observation of room-temperature ferromagnetism in Co:TiO2 anatase (Y. Matsumoto et al., Science 291 854 (2001)), there has been a flurry of work in oxides and nitrides doped with transition metals with unpaired d electrons. It has even been claimed that room-temperature ferromagnetism can be obtained in certain d0 transition metals oxides without a dopant. In this Report, the field of transition metal doped oxides and nitrides is critically reviewed and assessed from a materials science perspective. Since much of the field centers around thin film growth, this Report focuses on films prepared not only by conventional vacuum deposition methods, but also by spin coating colloidal nanoparticles.

Chambers, Scott A.

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Contact fatigue behavior and gas cell thermal wave NDE of sintered reaction bonded silicon nitride  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Silicon nitride is being evaluated for potential applications as structural components subjected to contact fatigue loading. A new testing and evaluation methodology for evaluation of Hertzian contact fatigue damage in ceramic materials has been developed and is described. Contact fatigue damage is induced in three test specimens simultaneously. The material investigated is Eaton Corporation`s low cost E - Process Silicon Nitride. Tests were conducted at several Hertzian stress levels to evaluate contact fatigue damage behavior. Gas cell thermal wave NDE was employed to study the induced subsurface damage. Damage behavior was also investigated using optical microscopy. Two specimens were evaluated in detail; one that was tested for 17,400 cycles, P{sub max} = 2700 N and one that was tested for 1 x 10{sup 6} cycles, P{sub max} = 1800 N. The 2700 N specimen has a partial cone crack and contains a small concentration of vertical and shallow horizontal cracks. No evidence of a cone crack was detected on the 1800 N specimen. However, a larger concentration of horizontal microcracks at and just below the surface is present in this specimen, with particle debris in and around the surface contact area. Correlation of the optical microscopy observations with gas cell thermal wave NDE of the subsurface damage in these two specimens is discussed.

Barla, J.R.; Edler, J.P.; Lin, H. [Eaton Corp. R & D, Southfield, MI (United States)] [and others

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

390

Thickness limitations in carbon nanotube reinforced silicon nitride coatings synthesized by vapor infiltration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chemical vapor infiltration is a convenient method for synthesizing carbon nanotube (CNT)-reinforced ceramic coatings. The thickness over which infiltration is relatively uniform is limited by gas phase diffusion in the pore structure. These effects were investigated in two types of silicon nitride matrix composites. With CNTs that were distributed uniformly on the substrate surface dense coatings were limited to thicknesses of several microns. With dual structured CNT arrays produced by photolithography coatings up to 400 gm thick were obtained with minimal residual porosity. Gas transport into these dual structured materials was facilitated by creating micron sized channels between "CNT pillars" (i.e. each pillar consisted of a large number of individual CNTs). The experimental results are consistent with basic comparisons between the rates of gas diffusion and silicon nitride growth in porous structures. This analysis also provides a general insight into optimizing infiltration conditions during the fabrication of thick CNT-reinforced composite coatings. (C) 2012 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Eres, Gyula [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Theoretical study on interaction of hydrogen with single-walled boron nitride nanotubes. II. Collision, storage, and adsorption  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of a true hydrogen storage capacity, thus it would be also true that some results of rather high storage storage material or not. Our previous study6 showed that the pristine CNT is not an effective hydrogenTheoretical study on interaction of hydrogen with single-walled boron nitride nanotubes. II

Goddard III, William A.

392

Energy transfer and 1.54 m emission in amorphous silicon nitride films S. O. Kucheyev,2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

spectrometry RBS and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy HRTEM to quantify the amount of Si, NEnergy transfer and 1.54 m emission in amorphous silicon nitride films S. Yerci,1 R. Li,1 S. O a broad energy spectrum and attributed to disorder-induced localized transitions in amorphous Er

393

Power mixture and green body for producing silicon nitride base & articles of high fracture toughness and strength  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A powder mixture and a green body for producing a silicon nitride-based article of improved fracture toughness and strength. The powder mixture includes 9a) a bimodal silicon nitride powder blend consisting essentially of about 10-30% by weight of a first silicon mitride powder of an average particle size of about 0.2 .mu.m and a surface area of about 8-12m.sup.2 g, and about 70-90% by weight of a second silicon nitride powder of an average particle size of about 0.4-0.6 .mu.m and a surface area of about 2-4 m.sup.2 /g, (b) about 10-50 percent by volume, based on the volume of the densified article, of refractory whiskers or fibers having an aspect ratio of about 3-150 and having an equivalent diameter selected to produce in the densified articel an equivalent diameter ratio of the whiskers or fibers to grains of silicon nitride of greater than 1.0, and (c) an effective amount of a suitable oxide densification aid. The green body is formed from the powder mixture, an effective amount of a suitable oxide densification aid, and an effective amount of a suitable organic binder.

Huckabee, Marvin L. (Marlboro, MA); Buljan, Sergej-Tomislav (Acton, MA); Neil, Jeffrey T. (Acton, MA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

First-Principles Study of MetalCarbide/Nitride Adhesion: Al/VC vs. Al/VN Donald J. Siegel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-oxide ce- ramics. Within this class, the transition metal carbides and ni- trides are a particularly knowledge, there have been only three studies of adhesion between metals and transition metal carbidesFirst-Principles Study of Metal­Carbide/Nitride Adhesion: Al/VC vs. Al/VN Donald J. Siegel

Adams, James B

395

Effective Control of the Charge and Magnetic States of Transition-Metal Atoms on Single-Layer Boron Nitride  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nitride Bing Huang,1 Hongjun Xiang,2 Jaejun Yu,3 and Su-Huai Wei1 1 National Renewable Energy LaboratoryEffective Control of the Charge and Magnetic States of Transition-Metal Atoms on Single-Layer Boron devices but is still challenging. Here we suggest that the magnetic and charge states of transition

Gong, Xingao

396

The electroluminescence mechanism of Er{sup 3+} in different silicon oxide and silicon nitride environments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Rare earth doped metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) structures are of great interest for Si-based light emission. However, several physical limitations make it difficult to achieve the performance of light emitters based on compound semiconductors. To address this point, in this work the electroluminescence (EL) excitation and quenching mechanism of Er-implanted MOS structures with different designs of the dielectric stack are investigated. The devices usually consist of an injection layer made of SiO{sub 2} and an Er-implanted layer made of SiO{sub 2}, Si-rich SiO{sub 2}, silicon nitride, or Si-rich silicon nitride. All structures implanted with Er show intense EL around 1540?nm with EL power efficiencies in the order of 2?×?10{sup ?3} (for SiO{sub 2}:Er) or 2?×?10{sup ?4} (all other matrices) for lower current densities. The EL is excited by the impact of hot electrons with an excitation cross section in the range of 0.5–1.5?×?10{sup ?15?}cm{sup ?2}. Whereas the fraction of potentially excitable Er ions in SiO{sub 2} can reach values up to 50%, five times lower values were observed for other matrices. The decrease of the EL decay time for devices with Si-rich SiO{sub 2} or Si nitride compared to SiO{sub 2} as host matrix implies an increase of the number of defects adding additional non-radiative de-excitation paths for Er{sup 3+}. For all investigated devices, EL quenching cross sections in the 10{sup ?20} cm{sup 2} range and charge-to-breakdown values in the range of 1–10 C cm{sup ?2} were measured. For the present design with a SiO{sub 2} acceleration layer, thickness reduction and the use of different host matrices did not improve the EL power efficiency or the operation lifetime, but strongly lowered the operation voltage needed to achieve intense EL.

Rebohle, L., E-mail: l.rebohle@hzdr.de; Wutzler, R.; Braun, M.; Helm, M.; Skorupa, W. [Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden - Rossendorf, Bautzner Landstraße 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany); Berencén, Y.; Ramírez, J. M.; Garrido, B. [Dept. Electrònica, Martí i Franquès 1, Universitat de Barcelona, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Hiller, D. [IMTEK, Faculty of Engineering, Albert-Ludwigs-University Freiburg, Georges-Köhler-Allee 103, 79110 Freiburg (Germany)

2014-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

397

Low-temperature CVD of iron, cobalt, and nickel nitride thin films from bis[di(tert-butyl)amido]metal(II) precursors and ammonia  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thin films of late transition metal nitrides (where the metal is iron, cobalt, or nickel) are grown by low-pressure metalorganic chemical vapor deposition from bis[di(tert-butyl)amido]metal(II) precursors and ammonia. These metal nitrides are known to have useful mechanical and magnetic properties, but there are few thin film growth techniques to produce them based on a single precursor family. The authors report the deposition of metal nitride thin films below 300?°C from three recently synthesized M[N(t-Bu){sub 2}]{sub 2} precursors, where M?=?Fe, Co, and Ni, with growth onset as low as room temperature. Metal-rich phases are obtained with constant nitrogen content from growth onset to 200?°C over a range of feedstock partial pressures. Carbon contamination in the films is minimal for iron and cobalt nitride, but similar to the nitrogen concentration for nickel nitride. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicates that the incorporated nitrogen is present as metal nitride, even for films grown at the reaction onset temperature. Deposition rates of up to 18?nm/min are observed. The film morphologies, growth rates, and compositions are consistent with a gas-phase transamination reaction that produces precursor species with high sticking coefficients and low surface mobilities.

Cloud, Andrew N.; Abelson, John R., E-mail: abelson@illinois.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 201 Materials Science and Engineering Building, 1304 W. Green St., Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Davis, Luke M.; Girolami, Gregory S., E-mail: girolami@scs.illinois.edu [School of Chemical Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 600 S. Mathews Ave., Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

398

Thermally Nitrided Stainless Steels for Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cell Bipolar Plates: Part 1 Model Ni-50Cr and Austenitic 349TM alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermal nitridation of a model Ni-50Cr alloy at 1100 C for 2 h in pure nitrogen resulted in the formation of a continuous, protective CrN/Cr{sub 2}N surface layer with a low interfacial contact resistance. Application of similar nitridation parameters to an austenitic stainless steel, 349{sup TM}, however, resulted in a discontinuous mixture of discrete CrN, Cr{sub 2}N and (Cr,Fe){sub 2}N{sub 1-x} (x = 0--0.5) phase surface particles overlying an exposed {gamma} austenite-based matrix, rather than a continuous nitride surface layer. The interfacial contact resistance of the 349{sup TM} was reduced significantly by the nitridation treatment. However, in the simulated PEMFC environments (1 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} + 2 ppm F{sup -} solutions at 70 C sparged with either hydrogen or air), very high corrosion currents were observed under both anodic and cathodic conditions. This poor behavior was linked to the lack of continuity of the Cr-rich nitride surface formed on 349{sup TM} Issues regarding achieving continuous, protective Cr-nitride surface layers on stainless steel alloys are discussed.

Wang, Heli [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); Brady, Michael P [ORNL; Turner, John [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Transient fission-gas behavior in uranium nitride fuel under proposed space applications. Doctoral thesis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In order to investigate whether fission gas swelling and release would be significant factors in a space based nuclear reactor operating under the Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI) program, the finite element program REDSTONE (Routine For Evaluating Dynamic Swelling in Transient Operational Nuclear Environments) was developed to model the 1-D, spherical geometry diffusion equations describing transient fission gas behavior in a single uranium nitride fuel grain. The equations characterized individual bubbles, rather than bubble groupings. This limits calculations to those scenarios where low temperatures, low burnups, or both were present. Instabilities in the bubble radii calculations forced the implementation of additional constraints limiting the bubble sizes to minimum and maximum (equilibrium) radii. The validity of REDSTONE calculations were checked against analytical solutions for internal consistency and against experimental studies for agreement with swelling and release results.

Deforest, D.L.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

The structural distortion of the anti-perovskite nitride Ca sub 3 AsN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The structure of the distorted anti-perovskite nitride Ca{sub 3}AsN has been studied both by neutron powder diffraction at 305 and 15 K and by X-ray powder diffraction at room temperature. Ca{sub 3}AsN is distorted to an orthorhombic cell with a and b {approximately} {radical}2a{prime} and c{approximately}2a{prime}, where a{prime} is the lattice constant of the ideal undistorted cubic anti-perovskite. The distortion is produced by tilting of octahedra of Ca{sub 6}N and results in six short and six long bond distances of the twelvefold coordinated As atom by Ca atoms.

Chern, M.Y.; DiSalvo, F.J. (Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)); Parise, J.B. (State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook, NY (United States)); Goldstone, J.A. (Los Alamos National lab., NM (United States))

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gallium nitride ingan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Steel bonded dense silicon nitride compositions and method for their fabrication  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A two-stage bonding technique for bonding high density silicon nitride and other ceramic materials to stainless steel and other hard metals, and multilayered ceramic-metal composites prepared by the technique are disclosed. The technique involves initially slurry coating a surface of the ceramic material at about 1500/sup 0/C in a vacuum with a refractory material and the stainless steel is then pressure bonded to the metallic coated surface by brazing it with nickel-copper-silver or nickel-copper-manganese alloys at a temperature in the range of about 850/sup 0/ to 950/sup 0/C in a vacuum. The two-stage bonding technique minimizes the temperature-expansion mismatch between the dissimilar materials.

Landingham, R.L.; Shell, T.E.

1985-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

402

Plasma-enriched chemical vapor deposition of silicon nitride on silicon carbide fibers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Near stoichiometric Si:N coatings were deposited by means of PECVD on SCS-6 SiC fibers which contained a carbon-rich coating. Weight loss associated with oxidation of the outer carbon-rich coating of the as-received SiC fibers was greatly reduced for the Si:N coated SiC fibers even after 10 h heat-treatment in oxygen at 800{degrees}C. Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES) was used to obtain elemental compositions of the as-received and Si:N coated SiC fibers after heat-treatment. Negligible amounts of oxygen were found at the carbon-rich coating of the heat-treated Si:N coated SiC fiber. These results clearly prove the effectiveness of PECVD silicon nitride coating as an oxygen diffusion barrier.

Stinespring, C.D.; Collazos, D.F.; Gupta, R.K. [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States)] [and others

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

403

Internal Oxidation-Nitridation of Ferritic Fe(Al) Alloys in Air  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Exposure of undoped Fe(Al) and Fe(Al)+Cr ferritic alloys in laboratory air at 900-1,000 C resulted in significant internal attack after 5,000 h, including oxides and underlying nitrides. In the most severely attacked alloys, kinetics based on mass gain and maximum penetration depth were linear; also, the deepest penetrations were a significant fraction of the specimen thickness, and were thickness-dependent. Little internal attack was observed at 700-800 C where these compositions may be used as coatings. The extent of internal attack did not decrease with increasing Al or Cr content which may indicate that rather than classical internal oxidation this attack is related to the permeation of N through a defective external scale. No internal attack was observed in alloys doped with Y, Zr, Hf or Ti where the substrate-alumina scale interface was flatter.

Pint, Bruce A [ORNL; Dwyer, Matthew J [Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA; Deacon, Ryan M [Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

III-nitride nanowires : novel materials for solid-state lighting.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Although planar heterostructures dominate current solid-state lighting architectures (SSL), 1D nanowires have distinct and advantageous properties that may eventually enable higher efficiency, longer wavelength, and cheaper devices. However, in order to fully realize the potential of nanowire-based SSL, several challenges exist in the areas of controlled nanowire synthesis, nanowire device integration, and understanding and controlling the nanowire electrical, optical, and thermal properties. Here recent results are reported regarding the aligned growth of GaN and III-nitride core-shell nanowires, along with extensive results providing insights into the nanowire properties obtained using cutting-edge structural, electrical, thermal, and optical nanocharacterization techniques. A new top-down fabrication method for fabricating periodic arrays of GaN nanorods and subsequent nanorod LED fabrication is also presented.

Wang, George T.; Upadhya, Prashanth C. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM); Prasankumar, Rohit P. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM); Armstrong, Andrew M.; Huang, Jian Yu; Li, Qiming; Talin, Albert Alec (NIST, Gaithersburg, MD)

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Energy transfer and 1.54 {mu}m emission in amorphous silicon nitride films  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Er-doped amorphous silicon nitride films with various Si concentrations (Er:SiN{sub x}) were fabricated by reactive magnetron cosputtering followed by thermal annealing. The effects of Si concentrations and annealing temperatures were investigated in relation to Er emission and excitation processes. Efficient excitation of Er ions was demonstrated within a broad energy spectrum and attributed to disorder-induced localized transitions in amorphous Er:SiN{sub x}. A systematic optimization of the 1.54 {mu}m emission was performed and a fundamental trade-off was discovered between Er excitation and emission efficiency due to excess Si incorporation. These results provide an alternative approach for the engineering of sensitized Si-based light sources and lasers.

Yerci, S.; Li, R. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Boston University, 8 Saint Mary's Street, Boston, Massachusetts 02215-2421 (United States); Kucheyev, S. O.; Buuren, T. van [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Basu, S. N. [Division of Materials Science and Engineering, Boston University, 15 Saint Mary's Street, Brookline, Massachusetts 02446 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Boston University, 110 Cummington Street, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 (United States); Dal Negro, L. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Boston University, 8 Saint Mary's Street, Boston, Massachusetts 02215-2421 (United States); Division of Materials Science and Engineering, Boston University, 15 Saint Mary's Street, Brookline, Massachusetts 02446 (United States)

2009-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

406

Dilute Group III-V nitride intermediate band solar cells with contact blocking layers  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An intermediate band solar cell (IBSC) is provided including a p-n junction based on dilute III-V nitride materials and a pair of contact blocking layers positioned on opposite surfaces of the p-n junction for electrically isolating the intermediate band of the p-n junction by blocking the charge transport in the intermediate band without affecting the electron and hole collection efficiency of the p-n junction, thereby increasing open circuit voltage (V.sub.OC) of the IBSC and increasing the photocurrent by utilizing the intermediate band to absorb photons with energy below the band gap of the absorber layers of the IBSC. Hence, the overall power conversion efficiency of a IBSC will be much higher than an conventional single junction solar cell. The p-n junction absorber layers of the IBSC may further have compositionally graded nitrogen concentrations to provide an electric field for more efficient charge collection.

Walukiewicz, Wladyslaw (Kensington, CA); Yu, Kin Man (Lafayette, CA)

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

407

Polarization doping and the efficiency of III-nitride optoelectronic devices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The intrinsic polarization is generally considered a nuisance in III-nitride devices, but recent studies have shown that it can be used to enhance p- and n-type conductivity and even to replace impurity doping. We show by numerical simulations that polarization-doped light-emitting diode (LED) structures have a significant performance advantage over conventional impurity-doped LED structures. Our results indicate that polarization doping decreases electric fields inside the active region and potential barriers in the depletion region, as well as the magnitude of the quantum-confined Stark effect. The simulations also predict at least an order of magnitude increase in the current density corresponding to the maximum efficiency (i.e., smaller droop) as compared to impurity-doped structures. The obtained high doping concentrations could also enable, e.g., fabrication of III-N resonant tunneling diodes and improved ohmic contacts.

Kivisaari, Pyry; Oksanen, Jani; Tulkki, Jukka [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Computational Science, Aalto University, P.O. Box 12200, FI-00076 Aalto (Finland)] [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Computational Science, Aalto University, P.O. Box 12200, FI-00076 Aalto (Finland)

2013-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

408

Graphene on boron-nitride: Moiré pattern in the van der Waals energy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The spatial dependence of the van der Waals (vdW) energy between graphene and hexagonal boron-nitride (h-BN) is investigated using atomistic simulations. The van der Waals energy between graphene and h-BN shows a hexagonal superlattice structure identical to the observed Moiré pattern in the local density of states, which depends on the lattice mismatch and misorientation angle between graphene and h-BN. Our results provide atomistic features of the weak van der Waals interaction between graphene and BN which are in agreement with experiment and provide an analytical expression for the size of the spatial variation of the weak van der Waals interaction. We also found that the A-B-lattice symmetry of graphene is broken along the armchair direction.

Neek-Amal, M. [Department of Physics, University of Antwerpen, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerpen (Belgium); Department of Physics, Shahid Rajaee University, Lavizan, Tehran 16788 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Peeters, F. M. [Department of Physics, University of Antwerpen, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerpen (Belgium)

2014-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

409

A cohesive law for interfaces in graphene/hexagonal boron nitride heterostructure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Graphene/hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) heterostructure has showed great potential to improve the performance of graphene device. We have established the cohesive law for interfaces between graphene and monolayer or multi-layer h-BN based on the van der Waals force. The cohesive energy and cohesive strength are given in terms of area density of atoms on corresponding layers, number of layers, and parameters in the van der Waals force. It is found that the cohesive law in the graphene/multi-layer h-BN is dominated by the three h-BN layers which are closest to the graphene. The approximate solution is also obtained to simplify the expression of cohesive law. These results are very useful to study the deformation of graphene/h-BN heterostructure, which may have significant impacts on the performance and reliability of the graphene devices especially in the areas of emerging applications such as stretchable electronics.

Zhang, Chenxi [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Miami, Coral Gables, Florida 33146 (United States); Lou, Jun [Department of Materials Science and NanoEngineering, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77251 (United States); Song, Jizhou, E-mail: jzsong@gmail.com [Department of Engineering Mechanics and Soft Matter Research Center, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China)

2014-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

410

Thermal interface conductance across a graphene/hexagonal boron nitride heterojunction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We measure thermal transport across a graphene/hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) interface by electrically heating the graphene and measuring the temperature difference between the graphene and BN using Raman spectroscopy. Because the temperature of the graphene and BN are measured optically, this approach enables nanometer resolution in the cross-plane direction. A temperature drop of 60?K can be achieved across this junction at high electrical powers (14 mW). Based on the temperature difference and the applied power data, we determine the thermal interface conductance of this junction to be 7.4?×?10{sup 6}?Wm{sup ?2}K{sup ?1}, which is below the 10{sup 7}–10{sup 8}?Wm{sup ?2}K{sup ?1} values previously reported for graphene/SiO{sub 2} interface.

Chen, Chun-Chung; Li, Zhen; Cronin, Stephen B. [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089 (United States); Shi, Li [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Texas Materials Institute, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)

2014-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

411

SREELS analysis of oxygen-rich inversion domain boundaries in aluminum nitride  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Spatially resolved electron energy loss spectroscopy analysis has been conducted on planar inversion domain boundaries in aluminum nitride. The defects were found to contain 1.5 monolayers of oxygen, in agreement with the most recent structural model of Westwood. From variations in near-edge structure, the local atomic environments of both oxygen and aluminum are compared with {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and {gamma}-AlON standards. Based upon this study the structure of the inversion domain boundary is found to resemble that of the cubic {gamma}-AlON spinel, and eliminates from consideration those structural models based upon {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Furthermore, quantification of the shape resonances provided Al-O bond-length data from the inversion domain boundary interface. These distances closely agree with the Youngman Model that has recently been further refined by Westwood et al.

Bruley, J.; Zhao, J.C.; Notis, M.R. [Lehigh Univ. Bethlehem, PA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Westwood, A.D. [IBM T.J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, NY (United States); Youngman, R.A. [Carborundum Co., Phoenix, AZ (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

The cost of silicon nitride powder: What must it be to compete?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ability of advanced ceramic components to compete with similar metallic parts will depend in part on current and future efforts to reduce the cost of ceramic parts. This paper examines the potential reductions in part cost that could result from the development of less expensive advanced ceramic powders. The analysis focuses specifically on two silicon nitride engine components -- roller followers and turbocharger rotors. The results of the process-cost models developed for this work suggest that reductions in the cost of advanced silicon nitride powder from its current level of about $20 per pound to about $5 per pound will not in itself be sufficient to lower the cost of ceramic parts below the current cost of similar metallic components. This work also examines if combinations of lower-cost powders and further improvements in other key technical parameters to which costs are most sensitive could push the cost of ceramics below the cost of metallics. Although these sensitivity analyses are reflective of technical improvements that are very optimistic, the resulting part costs are estimated to remain higher than similar metallic parts. Our findings call into question the widely-held notion that the cost of ceramic components must not exceed the cost of similar metallic parts if ceramics are to be competitive. Economic viability will ultimately be decided not on the basis of which part is less costly, but on an assessment of the marginal costs and benefits provided by ceramics and metallics. This analysis does not consider the benefits side of the equation. Our findings on the cost side of the equation suggest that the competitiveness of advanced ceramics will ultimately be decided by our ability to evaluate and communicate the higher benefits that advanced ceramic parts may offer.

Das, S.; Curlee, T.R.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

The cost of silicon nitride powder: What must it be to compete  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ability of advanced ceramic components to compete with similar metallic parts will depend in part on current and future efforts to reduce the cost of ceramic parts. This paper examines the potential reductions in part cost that could result from the development of less expensive advanced ceramic powders. The analysis focuses specifically on two silicon nitride engine components -- roller followers and turbocharger rotors. The results of the process-cost models developed for this work suggest that reductions in the cost of advanced silicon nitride powder from its current level of about $20 per pound to about $5 per pound will not in itself be sufficient to lower the cost of ceramic parts below the current cost of similar metallic components. This work also examines if combinations of lower-cost powders and further improvements in other key technical parameters to which costs are most sensitive could push the cost of ceramics below the cost of metallics. Although these sensitivity analyses are reflective of technical improvements that are very optimistic, the resulting part costs are estimated to remain higher than similar metallic parts. Our findings call into question the widely-held notion that the cost of ceramic components must not exceed the cost of similar metallic parts if ceramics are to be competitive. Economic viability will ultimately be decided not on the basis of which part is less costly, but on an assessment of the marginal costs and benefits provided by ceramics and metallics. This analysis does not consider the benefits side of the equation. Our findings on the cost side of the equation suggest that the competitiveness of advanced ceramics will ultimately be decided by our ability to evaluate and communicate the higher benefits that advanced ceramic parts may offer.

Das, S.; Curlee, T.R.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Vibronic fine structure in high-resolution x-ray absorption spectra from ion-bombarded boron nitride nanotubes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors have applied high-resolution near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure measurements around the nitrogen K-edge to study the effects of ion-bombardment on near-surface properties of boron nitride nanotubes. A notable difference has been observed between surface sensitive partial electron yield (PEY) and bulk sensitive total electron yield (TEY) fine-structure measurements. The authors assign the PEY fine structure to the coupling of excited molecular vibrational modes to electronic transitions in NO molecules trapped just below the surface. Oxidation resistance of the boron nitride nanotubes is significantly reduced by low energy ion bombardment, as broken B-N bonds are replaced by N-O bonds involving oxygen present in the surface region. In contrast to the PEY spectra, the bulk sensitive TEY measurements on as-grown samples do not exhibit any fine structure while the ion-bombarded samples show a clear vibronic signature of molecular nitrogen.

Petravic, Mladen; Peter, Robert; Varasanec, Marijana [Department of Physics and Center for Micro and Nano Sciences and Technologies, University of Rijeka, 51000 Rijeka (Croatia); Li Luhua; Chen Ying [Institute for Technology Research and Innovation, Deakin University, Geelong Waurn Ponds Campus, 3217 (Australia); Cowie, Bruce C. C. [Australian Synchrotron, Clayton VIC 3168 (Australia)

2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

415

Spin-dependent processes in amorphous silicon-rich silicon-nitride S.-Y. Lee,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

diodes9 and a-Si:H solar cells.10 Fol- lowing coherent manipulation of paramagnetic centers, tran- sient-band , TSAMPLE=15 K. Dark and illuminated IV curves of the p-i-n devices were measured at room temperature and T amorphous silicon nitride a-SiNx:H has been used widely as a dielectric for thin-film transistors,1 solar

McCamey, Dane

416

Final LDRD report : the physics of 1D and 2D electron gases in III-nitride heterostructure NWs.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The proposed work seeks to demonstrate and understand new phenomena in novel, freestanding III-nitride core-shell nanowires, including 1D and 2D electron gas formation and properties, and to investigate the role of surfaces and heterointerfaces on the transport and optical properties of nanowires, using a combined experimental and theoretical approach. Obtaining an understanding of these phenomena will be a critical step that will allow development of novel, ultrafast and ultraefficient nanowire-based electronic and photonic devices.

Armstrong, Andrew M.; Arslan, Ilke (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Upadhya, Prashanth C. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM); Morales, Eugenia T. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Leonard, Francois Leonard (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Li, Qiming; Wang, George T.; Talin, Albert Alec (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Prasankumar, Rohit P. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM); Lin, Yong

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Application of Self-Propagating High Temperature Synthesis to the Fabrication of Actinide Bearing Nitride and Other Ceramic Nuclear Fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The high vapor pressures of americium (Am) and americium nitride (AmN) are cause for concern in producing nitride ceramic nuclear fuel that contains Am. Along with the problem of Am retention during the sintering phases of current processing methods, are additional concerns of producing a consistent product of desirable homogeneity, density and porosity. Similar difficulties have been experienced during the laboratory scale process development stage of producing metal alloys containing Am wherein compact powder sintering methods had to be abandoned. Therefore, there is an urgent need to develop a low-temperature or low–heat fuel fabrication process for the synthesis of Am-containing ceramic fuels. Self-propagating high temperature synthesis (SHS), also called combustion synthesis, offers such an alternative process for the synthesis of Am nitride fuels. Although SHS takes thermodynamic advantage of the high combustion temperatures of these exothermic SHS reactions to synthesize the required compounds, the very fast heating, reaction and cooling rates can kinetically generate extremely fast reaction rates and facilitate the retention of volatile species within the rapidly propagating SHS reaction front. The initial objective of the research program is to use Mn as the surrogate for Am to synthesize a reproducible, dense, high quality Zr-Mn-N ceramic compound. Having determined the fundamental SHS reaction parameters and optimized SHS processing steps using Mn as the surrogate for Am, the technology will be transferred to Idaho National Laboratory to successfully synthesize a high quality Zr-Am-N ceramic fuel.

John J. Moore, Douglas E. Burkes, Collin D. Donohoue, Marissa M. Reigel, J. Rory Kennedy

2009-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

418

Pre-Oxidized and Nitrided Stainless Steel Foil for Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Bipolar Plates: Part 2- Single-Cell Fuel Cell Evaluation of Stamped Plates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermal (gas) nitridation of stainless steel alloys can yield low interfacial contact resistance (ICR), electrically conductive and corrosion-resistant nitride containing surface layers (Cr{sub 2}N, CrN, TiN, V{sub 2}N, VN, etc.) of interest for fuel cells, batteries, and sensors. This paper presents results of proton exchange membrane (PEM) single-cell fuel cell studies of stamped and pre-oxidized/nitrided developmental Fe-20Cr-4V weight percent (wt.%) and commercial type 2205 stainless steel alloy foils. The single-cell fuel cell behavior of the stamped and pre-oxidized/nitrided material was compared to as-stamped (no surface treatment) 904L, 2205, and Fe-20Cr-4V stainless steel alloy foils and machined graphite of similar flow field design. The best fuel cell behavior among the alloys was exhibited by the pre-oxidized/nitrided Fe-20Cr-4V, which exhibited {approx}5-20% better peak power output than untreated Fe-20Cr-4V, 2205, and 904L metal stampings. Durability was assessed for pre-oxidized/nitrided Fe-20Cr-4V, 904L metal, and graphite plates by 1000+ h of cyclic single-cell fuel cell testing. All three materials showed good durability with no significant degradation in cell power output. Post-test analysis indicated no metal ion contamination of the membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) occurred with the pre-oxidized and nitrided Fe-20Cr-4V or graphite plates, and only a minor amount of contamination with the 904L plates.

Toops, Todd J [ORNL; Brady, Michael P [ORNL; Tortorelli, Peter F [ORNL; Pihl, Josh A [ORNL; EstevezGenCell, Francisco [GenCell Corp; Connors, Dan [GenCell Corp; Garzon, Fernando [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Rockward, Tommy [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Gervasio, Don [Arizona State University; Kosaraju, S.H. [Arizona State University

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Nanostructural engineering of nitride nucleation layers for GaN substrate dislocation reduction.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With no lattice matched substrate available, sapphire continues as the substrate of choice for GaN growth, because of its reasonable cost and the extensive prior experience using it as a substrate for GaN. Surprisingly, the high dislocation density does not appear to limit UV and blue LED light intensity. However, dislocations may limit green LED light intensity and LED lifetime, especially as LEDs are pushed to higher current density for high end solid state lighting sources. To improve the performance for these higher current density LEDs, simple growth-enabled reductions in dislocation density would be highly prized. GaN nucleation layers (NLs) are not commonly thought of as an application of nano-structural engineering; yet, these layers evolve during the growth process to produce self-assembled, nanometer-scale structures. Continued growth on these nuclei ultimately leads to a fully coalesced film, and we show in this research program that their initial density is correlated to the GaN dislocation density. In this 18 month program, we developed MOCVD growth methods to reduce GaN dislocation densities on sapphire from 5 x 10{sup 8} cm{sup -2} using our standard delay recovery growth technique to 1 x 10{sup 8} cm{sup -2} using an ultra-low nucleation density technique. For this research, we firmly established a correlation between the GaN nucleation thickness, the resulting nucleation density after annealing, and dislocation density of full GaN films grown on these nucleation layers. We developed methods to reduce the nuclei density while still maintaining the ability to fully coalesce the GaN films. Ways were sought to improve the GaN nuclei orientation by improving the sapphire surface smoothness by annealing prior to the NL growth. Methods to eliminate the formation of additional nuclei once the majority of GaN nuclei were developed using a silicon nitride treatment prior to the deposition of the nucleation layer. Nucleation layer thickness was determined using optical reflectance and the nucleation density was determined using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Nomarski microscopy. Dislocation density was measured using X-ray diffraction and AFM after coating the surface with silicon nitride to delineate all dislocation types. The program milestone of producing GaN films with dislocation densities of 1 x 10{sup 8} cm{sup -2} was met by silicon nitride treatment of annealed sapphire followed by the multiple deposition of a low density of GaN nuclei followed by high temperature GaN growth. Details of this growth process and the underlying science are presented in this final report along with problems encountered in this research and recommendations for future work.

Koleske, Daniel David; Lee, Stephen Roger; Lemp, Thomas Kerr; Coltrin, Michael Elliott; Cross, Karen Charlene; Thaler, Gerald

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Methods for and products of processing nanostructure nitride, carbonitride and oxycarbonitride electrode power materials by utilizing sol gel technology for supercapacitor applications  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Metal nitride, carbonitride, and oxycarbonitride powder with high surface area (up to 150 m.sup.2 /g) is prepared by using sol-gel process. The metal organic precursor, alkoxides or amides, is synthesized firstly. The metal organic precursor is modified by using unhydrolyzable organic ligands or templates. A wet gel is formed then by hydrolysis and condensation process. The solvent in the wet gel is then be removed supercritically to form porous amorphous hydroxide. This porous hydroxide materials is sintered to 725.degree. C. under the ammonia flow and porous nitride powder is formed. The other way to obtain high surface area nitride, carbonitride, and oxycarbonitride powder is to pyrolyze polymerized templated metal amides aerogel in an inert atmosphere. The electrochemical capacitors are prepared by using sol-gel prepared nitride, carbonitride, and oxycarbonitride powder. Two methods are used to assemble the capacitors. Electrode is formed either by pressing the mixture of nitride powder and binder to a foil, or by depositing electrode coating onto metal current collector. The binder or coating is converted into a continuous network of electrode material after thermal treatment to provide enhanced energy and power density. Liquid electrolyte is soaked into porous electrode. The electrochemical capacitor assembly further has a porous separator layer between two electrodes/electrolyte and forming a unit cell.

Huang, Yuhong (West Hills, CA); Wei, Oiang (West Hills, CA); Chu, Chung-tse (Chatsworth, CA); Zheng, Haixing (Oak Park, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gallium nitride ingan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Synthesis of nanostructured materials in supercritical ammonia: nitrides, metals and oxides Desmoulins-Krawiec S., Aymonier C., Loppinet-Serani A., Weill F., Grosse S., Etourneau J., Cansell F.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

N in supercritical cryogenic nitrogen by self-propagating-high- temperature synthesis (6.21 MPa, ­141 °C);19 (ii) GaSynthesis of nanostructured materials in supercritical ammonia: nitrides, metals and oxides. Abstract : In this study, the synthesis of nanostructured particles of nitrides (Cr2N, Co2N, Fe4N, Cu3N, Ni

Boyer, Edmond

422

In situ formation of tin nanocrystals embedded in silicon nitride matrix  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tin (Sn) nanocrystals (NCs) embedded in a silicon nitride (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) matrix have been fabricated in a cosputtering process employing low temperature (100 deg. C) substrate heating. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed the formation of uniformly sized Sn NCs of 5.2+-0.9 nm evenly distributed in the Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} matrix. Both TEM and x-ray diffraction measurements showed that the Sn NCs adopted the semimetallic tetragonal beta-Sn structure rather than the cubic semiconducting alpha-Sn structure. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed that the semimetallic state (Sn{sup 0}) is the major component of Sn in the sample films. Our investigation demonstrates a pronounced effect of the substrate temperature on the formation of Sn NCs. The mechanism of in situ formation of Sn NCs is discussed. We suggest that the formation of uniformly sized Sn NCs is correlated with lowering the surface mobility of the nuclei due to the presence of the cosputtered Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}.

Huang Shujuan; So, Yong Heng; Conibeer, Gavin; Green, Martin A. [ARC Photovoltaics Centre of Excellence, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales 2052 (Australia)

2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

423

Resistive switching phenomena of tungsten nitride thin films with excellent CMOS compatibility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The resistive switching characteristics of WN{sub x} thin films. • Excellent CMOS compatibility WN{sub x} films as a resistive switching material. • Resistive switching mechanism revealed trap-controlled space charge limited conduction. • Good endurance and retention properties over 10{sup 5} cycles, and 10{sup 5} s, respectively - Abstract: We report the resistive switching (RS) characteristics of tungsten nitride (WN{sub x}) thin films with excellent complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) compatibility. A Ti/WN{sub x}/Pt memory cell clearly shows bipolar RS behaviors at a low voltage of approximately ±2.2 V. The dominant conduction mechanisms at low and high resistance states were verified by Ohmic behavior and trap-controlled space-charge-limited conduction, respectively. A conducting filament model by a redox reaction explains the RS behavior in WN{sub x} films. We also demonstrate the memory characteristics during pulse operation, including a high endurance over >10{sup 5} cycles and a long retention time of >10{sup 5} s.

Hong, Seok Man; Kim, Hee-Dong; An, Ho-Myoung; Kim, Tae Geun, E-mail: tgkim1@korea.ac.kr

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

424

Characterization of two-dimensional hexagonal boron nitride using scanning electron and scanning helium ion microscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Characterization of the structural and physical properties of two-dimensional (2D) materials, such as layer number and inelastic mean free path measurements, is very important to optimize their synthesis and application. In this study, we characterize the layer number and morphology of hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) nanosheets on a metallic substrate using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and scanning helium ion microscopy (HIM). Using scanning beams of various energies, we could analyze the dependence of the intensities of secondary electrons on the thickness of the h-BN nanosheets. Based on the interaction between the scanning particles (electrons and helium ions) and h-BN nanosheets, we deduced an exponential relationship between the intensities of secondary electrons and number of layers of h-BN. With the attenuation factor of the exponential formula, we calculate the inelastic mean free path of electrons and helium ions in the h-BN nanosheets. Our results show that HIM is more sensitive and consistent than FE-SEM for characterizing the number of layers and morphology of 2D materials.

Guo, Hongxuan, E-mail: Guo.hongxuan@nims.go.jp, E-mail: msxu@zju.edu.cn [Global Research Center for Environment and Energy Based on Nanomaterials Science National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS) 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Gao, Jianhua; Ishida, Nobuyuki [International Center for Young Scientists, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Xu, Mingsheng, E-mail: Guo.hongxuan@nims.go.jp, E-mail: msxu@zju.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials, Key Laboratory of Macromolecular Synthesis and Functionalization, Department of Polymer Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Fujita, Daisuke [Advanced Key Technologies Division, Global Research Center for Environment and Energy Based on Nanomaterials Science, and International Center for Young Scientists, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan)

2014-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

425

High Temperature Annealing Studies on the Piezoelectric Properties of Thin Aluminum Nitride Films  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Rapid Thermal Annealing (RTA) system was used to anneal sputtered and MOVPE-grown Aluminum Nitride (AlN) thin films at temperatures up to 1000°C in ambient and controlled environments. According to Energy Dispersive X-Ray Analysis (EDAX), the films annealed in an ambient environment rapidly oxidize after five minutes at 1000°C. Below 1000°C the films oxidized linearly as a function of annealing temperature which is consistent with what has been reported in literature [1]. Laser Doppler Vibrometry (LDV) was used to measure the piezoelectric coefficient, d33, of these films. Films annealed in an ambient environment had a weak piezoelectric response indicating that oxidation on the surface of the film reduces the value of d33. A high temperature furnace has been built that is capable of taking in-situ measurements of the piezoelectric response of AlN films. In-situ d33 measurements are recorded up to 300°C for both sputtered and MOVPE-grown AlN thin films. The measured piezoelectric response appears to increase with temperature up to 300°C possibly due to stress in the film.

Farrell, R.; Pagan, V.R.; Kabulski, A.; Kuchibhatla, S.; Harman, J.; Kasarla, K.R.; Rodak, L.E.; Hensel, J.P.; Famouri, P.; Korakakis, D.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Antifuse with a single silicon-rich silicon nitride insulating layer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An antifuse is disclosed which has an electrically-insulating region sandwiched between two electrodes. The electrically-insulating region has a single layer of a non-hydrogenated silicon-rich (i.e. non-stoichiometric) silicon nitride SiN.sub.X with a nitrogen content X which is generally in the range of 0

Habermehl, Scott D.; Apodaca, Roger T.

2013-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

427

Layered insulator hexagonal boron nitride for surface passivation in quantum dot solar cell  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Single crystalline, two dimensional (2D) layered insulator hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), is demonstrated as an emerging material candidate for surface passivation on mesoporous TiO{sub 2}. Cadmium selenide (CdSe) quantum dot based bulk heterojunction (BHJ) solar cell employed h-BN passivated TiO{sub 2} as an electron acceptor exhibits photoconversion efficiency ?46% more than BHJ employed unpassivated TiO{sub 2}. Dominant interfacial recombination pathways such as electron capture by TiO{sub 2} surface states and recombination with hole at valence band of CdSe are efficiently controlled by h-BN enabled surface passivation, leading to improved photovoltaic performance. Highly crystalline, confirmed by transmission electron microscopy, dangling bond-free 2D layered h-BN with self-terminated atomic planes, achieved by chemical exfoliation, enables efficient passivation on TiO{sub 2}, allowing electronic transport at TiO{sub 2}/h-BN/CdSe interface with much lower recombination rate compared to an unpassivated TiO{sub 2}/CdSe interface.

Shanmugam, Mariyappan; Jain, Nikhil; Jacobs-Gedrim, Robin; Yu, Bin, E-mail: byu@albany.edu [College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering, State University of New York, Albany, New York 12203 (United States)] [College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering, State University of New York, Albany, New York 12203 (United States); Xu, Yang [Institute of Microelectronics and Optoelectronics, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China)] [Institute of Microelectronics and Optoelectronics, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China)

2013-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

428

Carbide/nitride grain refined rare earth-iron-boron permanent magnet and method of making  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of making a permanent magnet wherein 1) a melt is formed having a base alloy composition comprising RE, Fe and/or Co, and B (where RE is one or more rare earth elements) and 2) TR (where TR is a transition metal selected from at least one of Ti, Zr, Hf, V, Nb, Ta, Cr, Mo, W, and Al) and at least one of C and N are provided in the base alloy composition melt in substantially stoichiometric amounts to form a thermodynamically stable compound (e.g. TR carbide, nitride or carbonitride). The melt is rapidly solidified in a manner to form particulates having a substantially amorphous (metallic glass) structure and a dispersion of primary TRC, TRN and/or TRC/N precipitates. The amorphous particulates are heated above the crystallization temperature of the base alloy composition to nucleate and grow a hard magnetic phase to an optimum grain size and to form secondary TRC, TRN and/or TRC/N precipitates dispersed at grain boundaries. The crystallized particulates are consolidated at an elevated temperature to form a shape. During elevated temperature consolidation, the primary and secondary precipitates act to pin the grain boundaries and minimize deleterious grain growth that is harmful to magnetic properties.

McCallum, R. William (Ames, IA); Branagan, Daniel J. (Ames, IA)

1996-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

429

Carbide/nitride grain refined rare earth-iron-boron permanent magnet and method of making  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of making a permanent magnet is disclosed wherein (1) a melt is formed having a base alloy composition comprising RE, Fe and/or Co, and B (where RE is one or more rare earth elements) and (2) TR (where TR is a transition metal selected from at least one of Ti, Zr, Hf, V, Nb, Ta, Cr, Mo, W, and Al) and at least one of C and N are provided in the base alloy composition melt in substantially stoichiometric amounts to form a thermodynamically stable compound (e.g. TR carbide, nitride or carbonitride). The melt is rapidly solidified in a manner to form particulates having a substantially amorphous (metallic glass) structure and a dispersion of primary TRC, TRN and/or TRC/N precipitates. The amorphous particulates are heated above the crystallization temperature of the base alloy composition to nucleate and grow a hard magnetic phase to an optimum grain size and to form secondary TRC, TRN and/or TRC/N precipitates dispersed at grain boundaries. The crystallized particulates are consolidated at an elevated temperature to form a shape. During elevated temperature consolidation, the primary and secondary precipitates act to pin the grain boundaries and minimize deleterious grain growth that is harmful to magnetic properties. 33 figs.

McCallum, R.W.; Branagan, D.J.

1996-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

430

Strong, Tough Ceramics Containing Microscopic Reinforcements: Tailoring In-Situ Reinforced Silicon Nitride Ceramics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ceramics with their hardness, chemical stability, and refractoriness could be used to design more efficient energy generation and conversion systems as well as numerous other applications. However, we have needed to develop a fundamental understanding of how to tailor ceramics to improve their performance, especially to overcome their brittle nature. One of the advances in this respect was the incorporation of very strong microscopic rod-like reinforcements in the form of whiskers that serve to hold the ceramic together making it tougher and resistant to fracture. This microscopic reinforcement approach has a number of features that are similar to continuous fiber-reinforced ceramics; however, some of the details are modified. For instance, the strengths of the microscopic reinforcements must be higher as they typically have much stronger interfaces. For instance, single crystal silicon carbide whiskers can have tensile strengths in excess of {ge}7 GPa or >2 times that of continuous fibers. Furthermore, reinforcement pullout is limited to lengths of a few microns in the case of microscopic reinforcement due as much to the higher interfacial shear resistance as to the limit of the reinforcement lengths. On the other hand, the microscopic reinforcement approach can be generated in-situ during the processing of ceramics. A remarkable example of this is found in silicon nitride ceramics where elongated rod-like shape grains can be formed when the ceramic is fired at elevated temperatures to form a dense component.

Becher, P.F.

1999-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

431

Interlayer coupling enhancement in graphene/hexagonal boron nitride heterostructures by intercalated defects or vacancies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hexagonal boron nitride (hBN), a remarkable material with a two-dimensional atomic crystal structure, has the potential to fabricate heterostructures with unusual properties. We perform first-principles calculations to determine whether intercalated metal atoms and vacancies can mediate interfacial coupling and influence the structural and electronic properties of the graphene/hBN heterostructure. Metal impurity atoms (Li, K, Cr, Mn, Co, and Cu), acting as extrinsic defects between the graphene and hBN sheets, produce n-doped graphene. We also consider intrinsic vacancy defects and find that a boron monovacancy in hBN acts as a magnetic dopant for graphene, whereas a nitrogen monovacancy in hBN serves as a nonmagnetic dopant for graphene. In contrast, the smallest triangular vacancy defects in hBN are unlikely to result in significant changes in the electronic transport of graphene. Our findings reveal that a hBN layer with some vacancies or metal impurities enhances the interlayer coupling in the graphene/hBN heterostructure with respect to charge doping and electron scattering.

Park, Sohee [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Changwon [Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)] [Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Kim, Gunn, E-mail: gunnkim@sejong.ac.kr [Department of Physics and Graphene Research Institute, Sejong University, Seoul 143-747 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Physics and Graphene Research Institute, Sejong University, Seoul 143-747 (Korea, Republic of)

2014-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

432

Electronic properties of III-nitride semiconductors: A first-principles investigation using the Tran-Blaha modified Becke-Johnson potential  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this work, we use density functional theory to investigate the influence of semilocal exchange and correlation effects on the electronic properties of III-nitride semiconductors considering zinc-blende and wurtzite crystal structures. We find that the inclusion of such effects through the use of the Tran-Blaha modified Becke-Johnson potential yields an excellent description of the electronic structures of these materials giving energy band gaps which are systematically larger than the ones obtained with standard functionals such as the generalized gradient approximation. The discrepancy between the experimental and theoretical band gaps is then significantly reduced with semilocal exchange and correlation effects. However, the effective masses are overestimated in the zinc-blende nitrides, but no systematic trend is found in the wurtzite compounds. New results for energy band gaps and effective masses of zinc-blende and wurtzite indium nitrides are presented.

Araujo, Rafael B., E-mail: rafaelbna@gmail.com; Almeida, J. S. de, E-mail: jailton-almeida@hotmail.com; Ferreira da Silva, A. [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal da Bahia, Campus Universitário de Ondina, 40210-340 Salvador, Bahia (Brazil)

2013-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

433

Influence of interlayer trapping and detrapping mechanisms on the electrical characterization of hafnium oxide/silicon nitride stacks on silicon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Al/HfO{sub 2}/SiN{sub x}:H/n-Si metal-insulator-semiconductor capacitors have been studied by electrical characterization. Films of silicon nitride were directly grown on n-type silicon substrates by electron cyclotron resonance assisted chemical vapor deposition. Silicon nitride thickness was varied from 3 to 6.6 nm. Afterwards, 12 nm thick hafnium oxide films were deposited by the high-pressure sputtering approach. Interface quality was determined by using current-voltage, capacitance-voltage, deep-level transient spectroscopy (DLTS), conductance transients, and flatband voltage transient techniques. Leakage currents followed the Poole-Frenkel emission model in all cases. According to the simultaneous measurement of the high and low frequency capacitance voltage curves, the interface trap density obtained for all the samples is in the 10{sup 11} cm{sup -2} eV{sup -1} range. However, a significant increase in this density of about two orders of magnitude was obtained by DLTS for the thinnest silicon nitride interfacial layers. In this work we probe that this increase is an artifact that must be attributed to traps existing at the HfO{sub 2}/SiN{sub x}:H intralayer interface. These traps are more easily charged or discharged as this interface comes near to the substrate, that is, as thinner the SiN{sub x}:H interface layer is. The trapping/detrapping mechanism increases the capacitance transient and, in consequence, the DLTS measurements have contributions not only from the insulator/substrate interface but also from the HfO{sub 2}/SiN{sub x}:H intralayer interface.

Garcia, H.; Duenas, S.; Castan, H.; Gomez, A.; Bailon, L. [Departamento de Electricidad y Electronica, E.T.S.I. Telecomunicacion, Universidad de Valladolid, Campus 'Miguel Delibes', 47011 Valladolid (Spain); Toledano-Luque, M.; Prado, A. del; Martil, I.; Gonzalez-Diaz, G. [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada III (Electricidad y Electronica), Facultad de Ciencias Fisicas, Universidad Complutense, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Effects of the amorphous oxide intergranular layer structure and bonding on the fracture toughness of a high purity silicon nitride  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The microstructural evolution and structural characteristics and transitions in the thin grain-boundary oxide films in a silicon nitride ceramic, specifically between two adjacent grains and not the triple junctions, are investigated to find their effect on the macroscopic fracture properties. It is found that by heat treating a model Si3N4-2wt percent Y2O3 ceramic for {approx}200 hr at 1400 degrees C in air, the fracture toughness can be increased by {approx}100 percent, coincident with a change in fracture mechanism from transgranular to intergranular.

Ziegler, A.; Kisielowski, C.; Hoffmann, M.J.; Ritchie, R.O.

2002-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

435

Application of Self-Propagating High Temperature Synthesis to the Fabrication of Actinide Bearing Nitride and Other Ceramic Nuclear Fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The project uses an exothermic combustion synthesis reaction, termed self-propagating high-temperature synthesis (SHS), to produce high quality, reproducible nitride fuels and other ceramic type nuclear fuels (cercers and cermets, etc.) in conjunction with the fabrication of transmutation fuels. The major research objective of the project is determining the fundamental SHS processing parameters by first using manganese as a surrogate for americium to produce dense Zr-Mn-N ceramic compounds. These fundamental principles will then be transferred to the production of dense Zr-Am-N ceramic materials. A further research objective in the research program is generating fundamental SHS processing data to the synthesis of (i) Pu-Am-Zr-N and (ii) U-Pu-Am-N ceramic fuels. In this case, Ce will be used as the surrogate for Pu, Mn as the surrogate for Am, and depleted uranium as the surrogate for U. Once sufficient fundamental data has been determined for these surrogate systems, the information will be transferred to Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for synthesis of Zr-Am-N, Pu-Am-Zr-N and U-Pu-Am-N ceramic fuels. The high vapor pressures of americium (Am) and americium nitride (AmN) are cause for concern in producing nitride ceramic nuclear fuel that contains Am. Along with the problem of Am retention during the sintering phases of current processing methods, are additional concerns of producing a consistent product of desirable homogeneity, density and porosity. Similar difficulties have been experienced during the laboratory scale process development stage of producing metal alloys containing Am wherein compact powder sintering methods had to be abandoned. Therefore, there is an urgent need to develop a low-temperature or low–heat fuel fabrication process for the synthesis of Am-containing ceramic fuels. Self-propagating high temperature synthesis (SHS), also called combustion synthesis, offers such an alternative process for the synthesis of Am nitride fuels. Although SHS takes thermodynamic advantage of the high combustion temperatures of these exothermic SHS reactions to synthesize the required compounds, the very fast heating, reaction and cooling rates can kinetically generate extremely fast reaction rates and facilitate the retention of volatile species within the rapidly propagating SHS reaction front. The initial objective of the research program is to use Mn as the surrogate for Am to synthesize a reproducible, dense, high quality Zr-Mn-N ceramic compound. Having determined the fundamental SHS reaction parameters and optimized SHS processing steps using Mn as the surrogate for Am, the technology will be transferred to Idaho National Laboratory to successfully synthesize a high quality Zr-Am-N ceramic fuel.

John J. Moore, Marissa M. Reigel, Collin D. Donohoue

2009-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

436

Formation of Nickel Silicide from Direct-liquid-injection Chemical-vapor-deposited Nickel Nitride Films  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Smooth, continuous, and highly conformal nickel nitride (NiN{sub x}) films were deposited by direct liquid injection (DLI)-chemical vapor deposition (CVD) using a solution of bis(N,N{prime}-di-tert-butylacetamidinato)nickel(II) in tetrahydronaphthalene as the nickel (Ni) source and ammonia (NH{sub 3}) as the coreactant gas. The DLI-CVD NiNx films grown on HF-last (100) silicon and on highly doped polysilicon substrates served as the intermediate for subsequent conversion into nickel silicide (NiSi), which is a key material for source, drain, and gate contacts in microelectronic devices. Rapid thermal annealing in the forming gas of DLI-CVD NiNx films formed continuous NiSi films at temperatures above 400 C. The resistivity of the NiSi films was 15{mu}{Omega} cm, close to the value for bulk crystals. The NiSi films have remarkably smooth and sharp interfaces with underlying Si substrates, thereby producing contacts for transistors with a higher drive current and a lower junction leakage. Resistivity and synchrotron X-ray diffraction in real-time during annealing of NiNx films showed the formation of a NiSi film at about 440 C, which is morphologically stable up to about 650 C. These NiSi films could find applications in future nanoscale complementary metal oxide semiconductor devices or three-dimensional metal-oxide-semiconductor devices such as Fin-type field effect transistors for the 22 nm technology node and beyond.

Li, Z.; Gordon, R; Li, H; Shenai, D; Lavoie, C

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Thermal oxidation of polycrystalline and single crystalline aluminum nitride wafers (Prop 2003-054)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two types of aluminum nitride (AlN) samples were oxidized in flowing oxygen between 900 C and 1150 C for up to 6 h - highly (0001) textured polycrystalline AlN wafers and low defect density AlN single crystals. The N-face consistently oxidized at a faster rate than the Al-face. At 900 C and 1000 C after 6 h, the oxide was 15% thicker on the N-face than on the Al-face of polycrystalline AlN. At 1100 C and 1150 C, the oxide was only 5% thicker on the N-face, as the rate-limiting step changed from kinetically-controlled to diffusion-controlled with the oxide thickness. A linear parabolic model was established for the thermal oxidation of polycrystalline AlN on both the Al- and N-face. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) confirmed the formation of a thicker crystalline oxide film on the N-face than on the Al-face, and established the crystallographic relationship between the oxide film and substrate. The oxidation of high-quality AlN single crystals resulted in a more uniform colored oxide layer compared to polycrystalline AlN. The aluminum oxide layer was crystalline with a rough AlN/oxide interface. The orientation relationship between AlN and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} was (0001) AlN//(10{bar 1}0) Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and (1{bar 1}00) AlN//(01{bar 1}2) Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}.

Speakman, Scott A [ORNL; Gu, Z [Kansas State University; Edgar, J H [Kansas State University; Blom, Douglas Allen [ORNL; Perrin, J [Kansas State University; Chaudhuri, J [Kansas State University

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Performance improvement of silicon nitride ball bearings by ion implantation. CRADA final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The present report summarizes technical results of CRADA No. ORNL 92-128 with the Pratt and Whitney Division of United Technologies Corporation. The stated purpose of the program was to assess the 3effect of ion implantation on the rolling contact performance of engineering silicon nitride bearings, to determine by post-test analyses of the bearings the reasons for improved or reduced performance and the mechanisms of failure, if applicable, and to relate the overall results to basic property changes including but not limited to swelling, hardness, modulus, micromechanical properties, and surface morphology. Forty-two control samples were tested to an intended runout period of 60 h. It was possible to supply only six balls for ion implantation, but an extended test period goal of 150 h was used. The balls were implanted with C-ions at 150 keV to a fluence of 1.1 {times} 10{sup 17}/cm{sup 2}. The collection of samples had pre-existing defects called C-cracks in the surfaces. As a result, seven of the control samples had severe spalls before reaching the goal of 60 h for an unacceptable failure rate of 0.003/sample-h. None of the ion-implanted samples experienced engineering failure in 150 h of testing. Analytical techniques have been used to characterize ion implantation results, to characterize wear tracks, and to characterize microstructure and impurity content. In possible relation to C-cracks. It is encouraging that ion implantation can mitigate the C-crack failure mode. However, the practical implications are compromised by the fact that bearings with C-cracks would, in no case, be acceptable in engineering practice, as this type of defect was not anticipated when the program was designed. The most important reason for the use of ceramic bearings is energy efficiency.

Williams, J.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Miner, J. [United Technologies Corp., West Palm Beach, FL (United States). Pratt and Whitney Div.

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Preliminary design study of small long life boiling water reactor (BWR) with tight lattice thorium nitride fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Neutronic performance of small long-life boiling water reactors (BWR) with thorium nitride based fuel has been performed. A recent study conducted on BWR in tight lattice environments (with a lower moderator percentage) produces small power reactor which has some specifications, i.e. 10 years operation time, power density of 19.1 watt/cc and maximum excess reactivity of about 4%. This excess reactivity value is smaller than standard reactivity of conventional BWR. The use of hexagonal geometry on the fuel cell of BWR provides a substantial effect on the criticality of the reactor to obtain a longer operating time. Supported by a tight concept lattice where the volume fraction of the fuel is greater than the moderator and fuel, Thorium Nitride give good results for fuel cell design on small long life BWR. The excess reactivity of the reactor can be reduced with the addition of gadolinium as burnable poisons. Therefore the hexagonal tight lattice fuel cell design of small long life BWR that has a criticality more than 20 years of operating time has been obtained.

Trianti, Nuri, E-mail: nuri.trianti@gmail.com, E-mail: szaki@fi.itba.c.id; Su'ud, Zaki, E-mail: nuri.trianti@gmail.com, E-mail: szaki@fi.itba.c.id; Arif, Idam, E-mail: nuri.trianti@gmail.com, E-mail: szaki@fi.itba.c.id [Nuclear Physics and Biophysics Research Group, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Science, Bandung Institute of Technology (Ganesha 10 Bandung, Indonesia) (Indonesia); Riyana, EkaSapta [Nuclear Energy Regulatory Agency (BAPETEN) (Indonesia)

2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

440

A Tungsten(VI) Nitride Having a W2(-N)2 Core Zachary J. Tonzetich, Richard R. Schrock,* Keith M. Wampler, Brad C. Bailey,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Tungsten(VI) Nitride Having a W2(µ-N)2 Core Zachary J. Tonzetich, Richard R. Schrock,* Keith M-331, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 Received September 27, 2007 The tungsten that the tungsten alkylidyne species W(C-t-Bu)(CH2-t-Bu)(OAr)2 (Ar ) 2,6-diisopropylphenyl) can be prepared readily

Müller, Peter

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gallium nitride ingan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

[1] P. Schwarzkopf, R. Kieffer, Refractory Hard Metals: Borides, Car-bides, Nitrides and Silicides, MacMillan, New York 1953.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

± [1] P. Schwarzkopf, R. Kieffer, Refractory Hard Metals: Borides, Car- bides, Nitrides and Silicides, MacMillan, New York 1953. [2] E. Fryt, Solid State Ionics 1997, 101±103, 437. [3] N. Durlu, J. Metal catalysts, such as gold[1,4,8] and tin[5,9,10] have been employed in the synthesis to align

Wang, Zhong L.

442

C. Wetzel et al MRS Internet J. Nitride Semicond. Res. 10, 2 (2005) 1 Development of High Power Green Light Emitting Diode Chips  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Power Green Light Emitting Diode Chips C. Wetzel and T. Detchprohm Future Chips Constellation Abstract The development of high emission power green light emitting diodes chips using GaInN/GaN multi production-scale implementation of this green LED die process. Keywords: nitrides, light emitting diode

Wetzel, Christian M.

443

Hydrogen storage in carbon nitride nanobells X. D. Bai, Dingyong Zhong, G. Y. Zhang, X. C. Ma, Shuang Liu, and E. G. Wanga)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrogen storage in carbon nitride nanobells X. D. Bai, Dingyong Zhong, G. Y. Zhang, X. C. Ma as hydrogen adsorbent. A hydrogen storage capacity up to 8 wt % was achieved reproducibly under ambient pressure and at temperature of 300 °C. The high hydrogen storage capacity under the moderate conditions

Zhang, Guangyu

444

Applied Materials Develops an Advanced Epitaxial Growth System to Bring Down LED Costs  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

With the help of DOE funding, Applied Materials has developed an advanced epitaxial growth system for gallium nitride (GaN) LED devices that decreases operating costs, increases internal quantum efficiency, and improves binning yields.

445

A compact transport and charge model for GaN-based high electron mobility transistors for RF applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gallium Nitride (GaN)-based high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) are rapidly emerging as front-runners in high-power mm-wave circuit applications. For circuit design with current devices and to allow sensible future ...

Radhakrishna, Ujwal

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Calendar | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Application Center 2014-10-16 13:32 Advanced Epi Tools for Gallium Nitride Light Emitting Diode Devices 2014-10-16 13:32 CHEMICAL ANALYSIS OF SIMULATED HIGH LEVEL WASTE...

447

CX-004937: Categorical Exclusion Determination  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Transphorm, Inc. -High Performance Gallium Nitride High Electron Mobility Transistor Modules for Agile Power ElectronicsCX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 08/05/2010Location(s): CaliforniaOffice(s): Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy

448

Device-level thermal analysis of GaN-based electronics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gallium nitride (GaN)-based microelectronics are one of the most exciting semiconductor technologies for high power density and high frequency electronics. The excellent electrical properties of GaN and its related alloys ...

Bagnall, Kevin Robert

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

CX-010873: Categorical Exclusion Determination  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Ammonothermal Bulk Gallium Nitride Crystal Growth for Energy Efficient Lightning and Power Electronics CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 05/22/2013 Location(s): California Offices(s): Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy

450

Hetero-junctions of Boron Nitride and Carbon Nanotubes: Synthesis and Characterization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hetero-junctions of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are expected to have appealing new properties that are not available from pure BNNTs and CNTs. Theoretical studies indicate that BNNT/CNT junctions could be multifunctional and applicable as memory, spintronic, electronic, and photonics devices with tunable band structures. This will lead to energy and material efficient multifunctional devices that will be beneficial to the society. However, experimental realization of BNNT/CNT junctions was hindered by the absent of a common growth technique for BNNTs and CNTs. In fact, the synthesis of BNNTs was very challenging and may involve high temperatures (up to 3000 degree Celsius by laser ablation) and explosive chemicals. During the award period, we have successfully developed a simple chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique to grow BNNTs at 1100-1200 degree Celsius without using dangerous chemicals. A series of common catalyst have then been identified for the synthesis of BNNTs and CNTs. Both of these breakthroughs have led to our preliminary success in growing two types of BNNT/CNT junctions and two additional new nanostructures: 1) branching BNNT/CNT junctions and 2) co-axial BNNT/CNT junctions, 3) quantum dots functionalized BNNTs (QDs-BNNTs), 4) BNNT/graphene junctions. We have started to understand their structural, compositional, and electronic properties. Latest results indicate that the branching BNNT/CNT junctions and QDs-BNNTs are functional as room-temperature tunneling devices. We have submitted the application of a renewal grant to continue the study of these new energy efficient materials. Finally, this project has also strengthened our collaborations with multiple Department of Energy�s Nanoscale Science Research Centers (NSRCs), including the Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences (CNMS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies (CINTs) at Sandia National Laboratories and Los Alamos National Laboratory. Results obtained during the current funding period have led to the publication of twelve peer reviewed articles, three review papers, two book and one encyclopedia chapters, and thirty eight conference/seminar presentation. One US provisional patent and one international patent have also been filed.

Yap, Yoke Khin

2013-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

451

Dual mechanical behaviour of hydrogen in stressed silicon nitride thin films  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the present article, we report a study on the mechanical behaviour displayed by hydrogen atoms and pores in silicon nitride (SiN) films. A simple three-phase model is proposed to relate the physical properties (stiffness, film stress, mass density, etc.) of hydrogenated nanoporous SiN thin films to the volume fractions of hydrogen and pores. This model is then applied to experimental data extracted from films deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition, where hydrogen content, stress, and mass densities range widely from 11% to 30%, ?2.8 to 1.5?GPa, and 2.0 to 2.8?g/cm{sup 3}, respectively. Starting from the conventional plotting of film's Young's modulus against film porosity, we first propose to correct the conventional calculation of porosity volume fraction with the hydrogen content, thus taking into account both hydrogen mass and concentration. The weight of this hydrogen-correction is found to evolve linearly with hydrogen concentration in tensile films (in accordance with a simple “mass correction” of the film density calculation), but a clear discontinuity is observed toward compressive stresses. Then, the effective volume occupied by hydrogen atoms is calculated taking account of the bond type (N-H or Si-H bonds), thus allowing a precise extraction of the hydrogen volume fraction. These calculations applied to tensile films show that both volume fractions of hydrogen and porosity are similar in magnitude and randomly distributed against Young's modulus. However, the expected linear dependence of the Young's modulus is clearly observed when both volume fractions are added. Finally, we show that the stiffer behaviour of compressive films cannot be only explained on the basis of this (hydrogen?+?porosity) volume fraction. Indeed this stiffness difference relies on a dual mechanical behaviour displayed by hydrogen atoms against the film stress state: while they participate to the stiffness in compressive films, hydrogen atoms mainly behave like pores in tensile films where they do not participate to the film stiffness.

Volpi, F., E-mail: fabien.volpi@simap.grenoble-inp.fr; Braccini, M.; Pasturel, A. [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, SIMAP, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CNRS, SIMAP, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Devos, A. [IEMN, UMR 8520 CNRS, Avenue Poincarré - CS 60069 - 59652 Villeneuve d'Ascq Cedex (France); Raymond, G. [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, SIMAP, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CNRS, SIMAP, F-38000 Grenoble (France); STMicroelectronics, 850 rue Jean Monnet, 38926 Crolles Cedex (France); Morin, P. [STMicroelectronics, 850 rue Jean Monnet, 38926 Crolles Cedex (France)

2014-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

452

Electronic stiffness of a superconducting niobium nitride single crystal under pressure Xiao-Jia Chen, Viktor V. Struzhkin, Zhigang Wu, Ronald E. Cohen, Simon Kung,* Ho-kwang Mao, and Russell J. Hemley  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electronic stiffness of a superconducting niobium nitride single crystal under pressure Xiao report a quantitative study of pressure effects on the superconducting transition temperature Tc transition temperatures Tc's of materials, pur- suing new classes of superconductors and shedding light

Wu, Zhigang

453

Excitation wavelength dependence of water-window line emissions from boron-nitride laser-produced plasmas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigated the effects of laser excitation wavelength on water-window emission lines of laser-produced boron-nitride plasmas. Plasmas are produced by focusing 1064 nm and harmonically generated 532 and 266 nm radiation from a Nd:YAG laser on BN target in vacuum. Soft x-ray emission lines in the water-window region are recorded using a grazing-incidence spectrograph. Filtered photodiodes are used to obtain complementary data for water-window emission intensity and angular dependence. Spectral emission intensity changes in nitrogen Ly-{alpha} and He-{alpha} are used to show how laser wavelength affects emission. Our results show that the relative intensity of spectral lines is laser wavelength dependent, with the ratio of Ly-{alpha} to He-{alpha} emission intensity decreasing as laser wavelength is shortened. Filtered photodiode measurements of angular dependence showed that 266 and 532 nm laser wavelengths produce uniform emission.

Crank, M.; Harilal, S. S.; Hassan, S. M.; Hassanein, A. [Center for Materials Under Extreme Environment, School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

The method of general dimensional analysis applied to the determination of the parameters of the process of nitriding  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the field of process characteristics for thermochemical treatments there is a contradiction between the great number of the parameters, that the experiment pointed out as determinants of the acquired results, and the small number of such kind of parameters that the Fick`s analytical laws can correlate. It can be ascertained that, a great deal of the complexity of diffusion processes is focused on the diffusion constant, as in the case of convection, where the coefficient of convection reflects the complexity of the process. The general dimensional analysis, created by the Romanian School of Experimental Physics as a development on a superior level of Rayleigh and Buckingham`s methods, can gather without exception, in analytical relations, all the parameters of the process of diffusion. The authors apply the method in the case of nitriding in nitrogen atmosphere with addition of ammonia.

Samoila, C.; Bot, D. [Transilvania-Univ. of Brasov (Romania)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

455

Controlled polarity of sputter-deposited aluminum nitride on metals observed by aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The polarity determination process of sputter-deposited aluminum nitride (AlN) on metals has been analyzed using aberration corrected atomic resolution scanning transmission electron microscope. Direct growth of c-axis orientated AlN on face centered cubic metals (fcc) (111) with the local epitaxy has been observed, and the polarity was determined at the AlN/metal interface. We found that the AlN polarity can be controlled by the base metal layer: N-polarity AlN grows on Pt(111) while Al-polarity AlN forms on Al(111). Based on these results, the growth mechanism of AlN on metals is discussed.

Harumoto, T. [Department of Metallurgy and Ceramics Science, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1-S8-6 O-okayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8552 (Japan); Department of Materials Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Science, 2641 Yamazaki, Noda, Chiba 278-8510 (Japan); Sannomiya, T.; Matsukawa, Y.; Muraishi, S.; Shi, J.; Nakamura, Y. [Department of Metallurgy and Ceramics Science, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1-S8-6 O-okayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8552 (Japan); Sawada, H. [Japan Electron Optics Laboratory (JEOL) Ltd., 3-1-2 Musashino, Akishima, Tokyo 196-8558 (Japan); Tanaka, T.; Tanishiro, Y.; Takayanagi, K. [Department of Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1-H-51 O-okayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan)

2013-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

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High-Speed Electro-Optic Modulator Integrated with Graphene-Boron Nitride Heterostructure and Photonic Crystal Nanocavity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nanoscale and power-efficient electro-optic (EO) modulators are essential components for optical interconnects that are beginning to replace electrical wiring for intra- and inter-chip communications. Silicon-based EO modulators show sufficient figures of merits regarding device footprint, speed, power consumption and modulation depth. However, the weak electro-optic effect of silicon still sets a technical bottleneck for these devices, motivating the development of modulators based on new materials. Graphene, a two-dimensional carbon allotrope, has emerged as an alternative active material for optoelectronic applications owing to its exceptional optical and electronic properties. Here, we demonstrate a high-speed graphene electro-optic modulator based on a graphene-boron nitride (BN) heterostructure integrated with a silicon photonic crystal nanocavity. Strongly enhanced light-matter interaction of graphene in a submicron cavity enables efficient electrical tuning of the cavity reflection. We observe a modul...

Gao, Yuanda; Gan, Xuetao; Li, Luozhou; Peng, Cheng; Meric, Inanc; Wang, Lei; Szep, Attila; Walker, Dennis; Hone, James; Englund, Dirk

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

The Tunable Hybrid Surface Phonon and Plasmon Polariton Modes in Boron Nitride Nanotube and Graphene Monolayer Heterostructures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The hybrid modes incorporating surface phonon polariton (SPhP) modes in boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) and surface plasmon polariton (SPP) modes in graphene monolayers are theoretically studied. The combination of the 1D BNNTs and 2D graphene monolayer further improves the modal characteristics with electrical tunability. Superior to the graphene monolayers, the proposed heterostructures supports single mode transmission with lateral optical confinement. The modal characteristics can be shifted from SPP-like toward SPhP-like. Both the figure of merit and field enhancement of hybrid modes are improved over 3 times than those of BNNT SPhP modes, which may further enable sub-wavelength mid-infrared applications.

Sun, Yu; Cheng, Jiangtao; Liu, Jiansheng

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Effects of boron-nitride substrates on Stone-Wales defect formation in graphene: An ab initio molecular dynamics study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations are performed to investigate the effects of a boron nitride (BN) substrate on Stone-Wales (SW) defect formation and recovery in graphene. It is found that SW defects can be created by an off-plane recoil atom that interacts with the BN substrate. A mechanism with complete bond breakage for formation of SW defects in suspended graphene is also revealed for recoils at large displacement angles. In addition, further irradiation can result in recovery of the SW defects through a bond rotation mechanism in both graphene and graphene/BN, and the substrate has little effect on the recovery process. This study indicates that the BN substrate enhances the irradiation resistance of graphene.

Jin, K.; Xiao, H. Y. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States); Zhang, Y. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States); Weber, W. J., E-mail: wjweber@utk.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States); Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)

2014-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

459

Effects of ternary mixed crystal and size on optical phonons in wurtzite nitride core-shell nanowires  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Within the framework of dielectric continuum and Loudon's uniaxial crystal models, existence conditions dependent on components and frequencies for optical phonons in wurtzite nitride core-shell nanowires (CSNWs) are discussed to obtain dispersion relations and electrostatic potentials of optical phonons in In{sub x}Ga{sub 1?x}N/GaN CSNWs. The results show that there may be four types of optical phonons in In{sub x}Ga{sub 1?x}N/GaN CSNWs for a given ternary mixed crystal (TMC) component due to the phonon dispersion anisotropy. This property is analogous to wurtzite planar heterojunctions. Among the optical phonons, there are two types of quasi-confined optical (QCO) phonons (named, respectively, as QCO-A and QCO-B), one type of interface (IF) phonons and propagating (PR) phonons existing in certain component and frequency domains while the dispersion relations and electrostatic potentials of same type of optical phonons vary with components. Furthermore, the size effect on optical phonons in CSNWs is also discussed. The dispersion relations of IF and QCO-A are independent of the boundary location of CSNWs. Meanwhile, dispersion relations and electrostatic potentials of QCO-B and PR phonons vary obviously with size, especially, when the ratio of a core radius to a shell radius is small, and dispersion relation curves of PR phonons appear to be close to each other, whereas, this phenomenon disappears when the ratio becomes large. Based on our conclusions, one can further discuss photoelectric properties in nitride CSNWs consisting of TMCs associated with optical phonons.

Li, J.; Guan, J. Y.; Zhang, S. F.; Ban, S. L.; Qu, Y., E-mail: quyuan@imu.edu.cn [School of Physical Science and Technology, Inner Mongolia University, Hohhot 010021 (China)

2014-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

460

Size dependent optical properties of Si quantum dots in Si-rich nitride/Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} superlattice synthesized by magnetron sputtering  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A spectroscopic ellipsometry compatible approach is reported for the optical study of Si quantum dots (QDs) in Si-rich nitride/silicon nitride (SRN/Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) superlattice, which based on Tauc-Lorentz model and Bruggeman effective medium approximation. It is shown that the optical constants and dielectric functions of Si QDs are strongly size dependent. The suppressed imaginary dielectric function of Si QDs exhibits a single broad peak analogous to amorphous Si, which centered between the transition energies E{sub 1} and E{sub 2} of bulk crystalline Si and blue shifted toward E{sub 2} as the QD size reduced. A bandgap expansion observed by the TL model when the size of Si QD reduced is in good agreement with the PL measurement. The bandgap expansion with the reduction of Si QD size is well supported by the first-principles calculations based on quantum confinement.

So, Yong-Heng; Huang, Shujuan; Conibeer, Gavin; Green, Martin A. [ARC Photovoltaics Centre of Excellence, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales 2052 (Australia); Gentle, Angus [Physics and Advanced Materials, University of Technology Sydney, P. O. Box 123, Broadway, New South Wales 2007 (Australia)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

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461

Review of corrosion behavior of ceramic heat exchanger materals: Corrosion characteristics of silicon carbide and silicon nitride. Final report, September 11, 1992--March 11, 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The present work is a review of the substantial effort that has been made to measure and understand the effects of corrosion with respect to the properties, performance, and durability of various forms of silicon carbide and silicon nitride. The review encompasses corrosion in diverse environments, usually at temperatures of 1000C or higher. The environments include dry and moist oxygen, mixtures of hot gaseous vapors, molten salts, molten metals, and complex environments pertaining to coal ashes and slags.

Munro, R.G.; Dapkunas, S.J.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

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