National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for gain elevated privileges

  1. T-608: HP Virtual Server Environment Lets Remote Authenticated Users Gain Elevated Privileges

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A potential security vulnerability has been identified in HP Virtual Server Environment for Windows. The vulnerability could be exploited remotely to elevate privileges.

  2. T-567: Linux Kernel Buffer Overflow in ldm_frag_add() May Let Local Users Gain Elevated Privileges

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A vulnerability was reported in the Linux Kernel. A local user may be able to obtain elevated privileges on the target system. A physically local user can connect a storage device with a specially crafted LDM partition table to trigger a buffer overflow in the ldm_frag_add() function in 'fs/partitions/ldm.c' and potentially execute arbitrary code with elevated privileges.

  3. U-092: Sudo Format String Bug Lets Local Users Gain Elevated Privileges

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A local user can supply a specially crafted command line argument to trigger a format string flaw and execute arbitrary commands on the target system with root privileges.

  4. T-591: VMware vmrun Utility Lets Local Users Gain Elevated Privileges...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    privileges of the user running vmrun by causing the utility to load a malicious shared library. Impact: The following versions are affected: VMware VIX API for Linux 1.10.2 and...

  5. U-264: Apple OS X Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code and Local Users Gain Elevated Privileges

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Several vulnerabilities were reported in Apple OS X. A remote user can execute arbitrary code on the target system. A remote user can obtain a password hash in certain cases. A local user can obtain elevated privileges on the target system. A local user can obtain password keystrokes.

  6. U-193: NetBSD System Call Return Value Validation Flaw Lets Local Users Gain Elevated Privileges

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On Intel CPUs, the sysret instruction can be manipulated into returning to specific non-canonical addresses, which may yield a CPU reset. We cannot currently rule out with utter confidence that this vulnerability could not also be used to execute code with kernel privilege instead of crashing the system.

  7. U-112: PostgreSQL Bugs Let Remote Authenticated Users Gain Elevated...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2: PostgreSQL Bugs Let Remote Authenticated Users Gain Elevated Privileges, Inject SQL Commands, and Spoof Certificates U-112: PostgreSQL Bugs Let Remote Authenticated Users Gain...

  8. T-563: Red Hat Directory Server Bugs Let Local Users Gain Elevated...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    T-671: Red Hat system-config-firewall Lets Local Users Gain Root Privileges V-041: Red Hat CloudForms Multiple Vulnerabilities U-198: IBM Lotus Expeditor Multiple Vulnerabilities...

  9. T-591: VMware vmrun Utility Lets Local Users Gain Elevated Privileges |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergyPlan | Department ofSUPPLEMENTSwitzerland| Department of Energy

  10. V-115: Apple iOS Bugs Let Local Users Gain Elevated Privileges | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematics And Statistics » USAJobs Search USAJobs SearchWater-Savingof Energy 5: Apple iOS Bugs Let

  11. U-230: Sudo on Red Hat Enterprise Linux %postun Symlink Flaw Lets Local Users Gain Elevated Privileges

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    An updated sudo package that fixes one security issue and several bugs is now available for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5.

  12. U-086:Linux Kernel "/proc//mem" Privilege Escalation Vulnerability

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A vulnerability has been discovered in the Linux Kernel, which can be exploited by malicious, local users to gain escalated privileges.

  13. Lease of Power Privilege Flowchart: Lease of Power Privilege...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Lease of Power Privilege Flowchart: Lease of Power Privilege Contract through End of Construction Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Permitting...

  14. PRIVILEGED AND CONFIDENTIAL ATTORNEY-CLIENT COMMUNICATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PRIVILEGED AND CONFIDENTIAL ATTORNEY-CLIENT COMMUNICATION LEGAL SERVICES REQUEST FORM Date-2109 This request is a confidential communication and should be treated as such. Indicate "Confidential

  15. PRIVILEGED AND CONFIDENTIAL ATTORNEY-CLIENT COMMUNICATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    9/29/09 PRIVILEGED AND CONFIDENTIAL ATTORNEY-CLIENT COMMUNICATION LEGAL SERVICES REQUEST FORM`i 96822 Facsimile No.: (808) 956-2109 This request is a confidential communication and should be treated

  16. Lease of Power Privilege Flowchart: Award of Preliminary Lease...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Lease of Power Privilege Flowchart: Award of Preliminary Lease through Award of Lease of Power Privilege Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

  17. Diesel: Applying Privilege Separation to Database Adrienne Porter Felt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wagner, David

    Diesel: Applying Privilege Separation to Database Access Adrienne Porter Felt Matthew Finifter Joel to lists, requires prior specific permission. #12;Diesel: Applying Privilege Separation to Database Access and code reviewers. We design and construct a system called Diesel, which implements data separation

  18. Permit Types, Tiers, and Parking Privileges 2014-2015 Permit Type/Neighborhood Permit Tier Parking Privileges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Tsuhan

    Privileges A (North Campus A Lot) Outer A lot on North Campus AP (Accessible Campus-wide Parking) ValidPermit Types, Tiers, and Parking Privileges 2014-2015 Permit Type/Neighborhood Permit Tier Parking in all permit-restricted parking spaces except reserved. Not valid in MT spaces. Must comply with posted

  19. V-199: Solaris Bugs Let Local Users Gain Root Privileges, Remote...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    recommends applying July Critical Patch Update Addthis Related Articles V-181: Oracle Java SE Critical Patch Update Advisory - June 2013 V-051: Oracle Solaris Java Multiple...

  20. V-199: Solaris Bugs Let Local Users Gain Root Privileges, Remote and Local

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyThe U.S.Lacledeutilities. The Economics ofConductMultipleAccount PasswordFlaw

  1. T-565: Vulnerability in Microsoft Malware Protection Engine Could Allow Elevation of PrivilegeVulnerability

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Microsoft is releasing this security advisory to help ensure customers are aware that an update to the Microsoft Malware Protection Engine also addresses a security vulnerability reported to Microsoft.

  2. Diesel: Applying Privilege Separation to Database Access Adrienne Porter Felt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wagner, David

    Diesel: Applying Privilege Separation to Database Access Adrienne Porter Felt UC Berkeley apf reviewers. We construct a system called Diesel, which implements data sep- aration by intercepting database queries and applying mod- ules' restrictions to the queries. We evaluate Diesel on three widely

  3. Alumni Library Privileges Contract Paul V. Galvin Library

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heller, Barbara

    Alumni Library Privileges Contract Paul V. Galvin Library Illinois Institute of Technology 35 W. 33 of Technology code of conduct, the Acceptable Use Policy for Computing Resources, and the circulation policies fines or replacement costs incurred. Violation of these policies and/or procedures could result

  4. SW GAINES RD USVETERANSHOSPITALRD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapman, Michael S.

    SW 6TH AVE SW GAINES RD SW USVETERANSHOSPITALRD SW GAINES RD SW 11TH AVE SW USVETERANS HOSPITAL RD SWCAMPUSDR. SWCAMPUSDR. SWSAMJACKSONPARKRD. SW SAM JACKSON PARK RD. SW SAM JACKSON PARKRD. SWTERWILLIGERBLVD SW TERWILLIGER BLVDSW TERWILLIGER BLVD RV PARKING P96 P95 P94 P93 P92 P91 P83 P9 P8 P6 P5 P4 P3 P2 P

  5. Pressure-gain combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richards, G.A.; Yip, J.; Gemmen, R.S.; Janus, M.C.; Norton, T. [USDOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center, WV (United States); Rogers, W.A. [EG and G Washington Analytical Services Center, Inc., Morgantown, WV (United States)

    1993-11-01

    Pulse combustion has been proposed for gas turbine applications in many early articles and more recently has been demonstrated to produce so-called ``pressure-gain`` in a small gas turbine. The basic concept is that the oscillatory combustion occurs as a constant-volume process, producing a gain in the stagnation pressure of air flowing through the combustor, rather than the pressure loss associated with conventional, steady combustion. If properly utilized, this pressure-gain could enhance simple-cycle gas turbine efficiency several percent, depending on the operating conditions. In addition, pulse combustors have demonstrated relatively low NO{sub x} pollutant levels in some applications. The combined potential for higher cycle efficiency and lower pollutant levels is the basis for the present investigation. Tests in progress at the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) have considered a baseline pulse combustor configuration that has shown good oscillating performance, low NO{sub x} emissions, but disappointing results in terms of pressure-gain. However, a combination of numeric simulations and test data suggest that pressure-gain can be produced by a select combination of operating conditions and combustor geometry, but is especially sensitive to the combustor inlet geometry. Tests in progress will evaluate the effect of inlet geometry and operating pressure on both pollutant emissions and pressure-gain.

  6. V-235: Cisco Mobility Services Engine Configuration Error Lets...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Users Execute Arbitrary Code and Local Users Gain Elevated Privileges V-076: Cisco Wireless LAN Controller Bugs Let Remote Users Deny Service and Remote Authenticated Users...

  7. RBAC Driven Least Privilege Architecture For Control Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hull, Julie; Markham, Mark

    2014-01-25

    The concept of role based access control (RBAC) within the IT environment has been studied by researchers and was supported by NIST (circa 1992). This earlier work highlighted the benefits of RBAC which include reduced administrative workload and policies which are easier to analyze and apply. The goals of this research were to expand the application of RBAC in the following ways. • Apply RBAC to the control systems environment: The typical RBAC model within the IT environment is used to control a user’s access to files. Within the control system environment files are replaced with measurement (e.g., temperature) and control (e.g. valve) points organized as a hierarchy of control assets (e.g. a boiler, compressor, refinery unit). Control points have parameters (e.g., high alarm limit, set point, etc.) associated with them. The RBAC model is extended to support access to points and their parameters based upon roles while at the same time allowing permissions for the points to be defined at the asset level or point level directly. In addition, centralized policy administration with distributed access enforcement mechanisms was developed to support the distributed architecture of distributed control systems and SCADA. • Extend the RBAC model to include access control for software and devices: The established RBAC approach is to assign users to roles. This work extends that notion by first breaking the control system down into three layers 1) users, 2) software and 3) devices. An RBAC model is then created for each of these three layers. The result is that RBAC can be used to define machine-to-machine policy enforced via the IP security (IPsec) protocol. This highlights the potential to use RBAC for machine-to-machine connectivity within the internet of things. • Enable dynamic policy based upon the operating mode of the system: The IT environment is generally static with respect to policy. However, large cyber physical systems such as industrial controls have various operating modes (start-up, normal operation, emergency, shut-down and maintenance are typical). The policy enforcement architecture must be able to support changes in access permissions as the mode of the control system changes. For example an operator’s role may not allow the operator to shut down a pump during “normal operation” but that same operator role may be given permission to shut down the pump if the refinery transitions to “emergency” mode. The effectiveness of the approach was validated by applying it to the Experion Process Knowledge System. This is a large commercial industrial control system often used to control oil refineries and other assets within the oil and gas sector. As a by-product, other industries using Experion (Pharmaceuticals, Specialty Chemicals, etc.) also benefit from increased security. Policies representative of those that would be used within an oil refinery were created and validated against the RBAC model as implemented in the underlying SQL database. The administration of policy is simplified which in turn makes it practical for security administrators to specify policies which enforce least privilege. The result is a qualitative reduction in risk. The benefits of the enhanced RBAC model are clear and as a result. Honeywell is incorporating portions of the RBAC research into the 2014 release of Experion.

  8. AdDroid: Privilege Separation for Applications and Advertisers in Android

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wagner, David

    AdDroid: Privilege Separation for Applications and Advertisers in Android Paul Pearce, Adrienne University of California Berkeley daw@cs.berkeley.edu ABSTRACT Advertising is a critical part of the Android a study of the Android Market and found that 49% of Android applica- tions contain at least one

  9. Engineering Metal Complexes of Chiral Pentaazacrowns as Privileged Reverse-turn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marshall, Garland R.

    Engineering Metal Complexes of Chiral Pentaazacrowns as Privileged Reverse-turn Scaffolds Ye Che1 the potential of metal complexes of chiral pentaazacrowns con- ceptually derived by reduction of cyclic pentapep- tides as reverse-turn mimetics. The possible conformations of metal complexes of chiral penta- azacrown

  10. Resources and Privileges 1 1/2015 ROCHESTER INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salvaggio, Carl

    .............................................................................................................................................5 #12;Resources and Privileges 2 1/2015 RIT reserves the right to modify or terminate all or any including court supervision, termination of natural, parental rights, final adoption procedures and birth mother, including pre and postnatal care, obstetrical fees and related hospital charges. Full or partial

  11. Elevance Pilot-Scale Biorefinery

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Elevance biorefinery uses catalyst technology to produce fuels and chemicals from renewable, natural oils.

  12. T-563: Red Hat Directory Server Bugs Let Local Users Gain Elevated

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher iSlide 1 MoresteelmakingRenewableDepartment ofC:for AwardService|

  13. U-068:Linux Kernel SG_IO ioctl Bug Lets Local Users Gain Elevated

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCEDInstallers/ContractorsPhotovoltaicsStateof Energy TwoEvent at the Pu2:ServersVulnerability

  14. U-112: PostgreSQL Bugs Let Remote Authenticated Users Gain Elevated

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCEDInstallers/ContractorsPhotovoltaicsStateof Energy TwoEvent at theArbitraryDepartment

  15. V-093: Symantec PGP Desktop Buffer Overflows Let Local Users Gain Elevated

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematics And Statistics » USAJobs Search USAJobs SearchWater-Saving Projects1:Department of

  16. Actinide Thermodynamics at Elevated Temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friese, Judah I.; Rao, Linfeng; Xia, Yuanxian; Bachelor, Paula P.; Tian, Guoxin

    2007-11-16

    The postclosure chemical environment in the proposed Yucca Mountain repository is expected to experience elevated temperatures. Predicting migration of actinides is possible if sufficient, reliable thermodynamic data on hydrolysis and complexation are available for these temperatures. Data are scarce and scattered for 25 degrees C, and nonexistent for elevated temperatures. This collaborative project between LBNL and PNNL collects thermodynamic data at elevated temperatures on actinide complexes with inorganic ligands that may be present in Yucca Mountain. The ligands include hydroxide, fluoride, sulfate, phosphate and carbonate. Thermodynamic parameters of complexation, including stability constants, enthalpy, entropy and heat capacity of complexation, are measured with a variety of techniques including solvent extraction, potentiometry, spectrophotometry and calorimetry

  17. Insight Gained from Simplified Dynamic Analysis

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Insight Gained from Simplified Dynamic Analysis ... or Everything Old is New Again October 21, 2014 Greg Mertz Consultant

  18. APPLICATION FOR In-state tuition rates are a privilege authorized by the Connecticut General Statutes and are

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    APPLICATION FOR In-state tuition rates are a privilege authorized by the Connecticut General is eligible for in-state tuition emancipated student who is domiciled in Connecticut; (2) as an unemancipated student whose parents are domiciled in Connecticut; (3) as a Connecticut resident who attended four years

  19. Optimal Portfolio Management with Transactions Costs and Capital Gains Taxes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leland, Hayne E.

    1999-01-01

    with Transactions Costs and Capital Gains Taxes Hayne E.of Transactions Costs and Capital gains Taxes," SeptemberWITH TRANSACTIONS COSTS AND CAPITAL GAINS TAXES I.

  20. GaInNAs laser gain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CHOW,WENG W.; JONES,ERIC D.; MODINE,NORMAND A.; KURTZ,STEVEN R.; ALLERMAN,ANDREW A.

    2000-05-23

    The optical gain spectra for GaInNAs/GaAs quantum wells are computed using a microscopic laser theory. From these spectra, the peak gain and carrier radiative decay rate as functions of carrier density are determined. These dependences allow the study of the lasing threshold current density of GaInNAs/GaAs quantum well structures.

  1. Gaines County Solid Waste Management Act (Texas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Act establishes the Gaines County Solid Waste Management District, a governmental body to develop and carry out a regional water quality protection program through solid waste management and...

  2. Gain narrowing in few-atom systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tom Savels; Allard P. Mosk; Ad Lagendijk

    2006-05-31

    Using a density matrix approach, we study the simplest systems that display both gain and feedback: clusters of 2 to 5 atoms, one of which is pumped. The other atoms supply feedback through multiple scattering of light. We show that, if the atoms are in each other's near-field, the system exhibits large gain narrowing and spectral mode redistribution. The observed phenomena are more pronounced if the feedback is enhanced. Our system is to our knowledge the simplest exactly solvable microscopic system which shows the approach to laser oscillation.

  3. Superradiance and collective gain in multimode optomechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Kipf; G. S. Agarwal

    2014-10-21

    We present a description of a strongly driven multimode optomechanical system that shows the emergence of cooperative effects usually known from systems of atom-light interaction. Our calculations show that under application of a coherent pump field the system's response can be switched from a superradiant regime to a collective gain regime by varying the frequency detuning of the pump. In the superradiant regime, enhanced optical cooling of a single vibrational mode is possible, whereas the collective gain regime would potentially enable one to achieve almost thresholdless phonon laser action. The threshold pumping power scales as 1/N.

  4. RHP: HOW CLIMATE MODELS GAIN AND EXERCISE How Climate Models Gain and Exercise Authority

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hulme, Mike

    49 LHP: HULME RHP: HOW CLIMATE MODELS GAIN AND EXERCISE AUTHORITY 2 How Climate Models Gain and Exercise Authority Mike Hulme Introduction Numerical climate models have become central to the unfolding story of climate change. Climate models underpin the knowledge claims and risk assessments

  5. Enhancing optical gains in Si nanocrystals via hydrogenation...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    technique was used to obtain gains. At 0.3 Wcmsup 2 pumping power density of pulsed laser, net gains were observed together with gain enhancements after hydrogenation andor...

  6. Fast Light in Fully Coherent Gain Media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. D. Clader; Q-Han Park; J. H. Eberly

    2006-06-15

    We analyze the propagation of fast-light pulses through a finite-length resonant gain medium both analytically and numerically. We find that intrinsic instabilities can be avoided in attaining a substantial peak advance with an ultra-short rather than a long or adiabatic probe.

  7. Laser gain media based on nanocomposite materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyd, Robert W.

    19, 2007 A new way of controlling the laser properties of optical materials by designing compositeLaser gain media based on nanocomposite materials Ksenia Dolgaleva* and Robert W. Boyd The Institute of Optics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627, USA *Corresponding author: ksenia

  8. Pressure Gain Combustion Rotating Detonation Engines (RDE)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pressure Gain Combustion Rotating Detonation Engines (RDE) Dr. Chris Brophy, David Dausen, Lee Van Houtte Students LT Culwell, ENS Khol, Robert Wright, Andrew Chaves Rocket Propulsion & Combustion Lab-based combustion to extract increase thermodynamic cycle efficiency for work/thrust apps. · Higher Enthalpy

  9. PV ENERGY ROI Tracks Efficiency Gains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PV ENERGY ROI Tracks Efficiency Gains the state of PV today E nergy payback time (EPBT) is the time it takes for a photovoltaic (PV) system to produce all the energy used through- out its life cycle. A short, current com- mercial PV technologies "pay back" the energy used in only six months to two years (depending

  10. Beef Cattle Performance II. Selection Based on Gaining Ability. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, H. O.; Warwick, Bruce L.; Cartwright, T. C.

    1955-01-01

    of young cattle to grow and gain weight form one of the most important advances made in recent years. Gaining ability as a basis for selection is of major importance for efficient beef cattle' production. Selection for characteristics... sire's gaining ability record. On the average, high gaining sires pro- duce high gaining offspring. This is just an example, but it illustrates the findings of sta- tistical analyses. Beef Cattle Performance 12: Selection Based on Gaining Ability I...

  11. High-flux magnetorheology at elevated temperatures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ocalan, Murat

    Commercial applications of magnetorheological (MR) fluids often require operation at elevated temperatures as a result of surrounding environmental conditions or intense localized viscous heating. Previous experimental ...

  12. FEMA - National Flood Insurance Program Elevation Certificate...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Certificate and Instructions Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: FEMA - National Flood Insurance Program Elevation Certificate and...

  13. Open quantum systems with loss and gain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hichem Eleuch; Ingrid Rotter

    2015-04-13

    We consider different properties of small open quantum systems coupled to an environment and described by a non-Hermitian Hamilton operator. Of special interest is the non-analytical behavior of the eigenvalues in the vicinity of singular points, the so-called exceptional points (EPs), at which the eigenvalues of two states coalesce and the corresponding eigenfunctions are linearly dependent from one another. The phases of the eigenfunctions are not rigid in approaching an EP and providing therewith the possibility to put information from the environment into the system. All characteristic properties of non-Hermitian quantum systems hold true not only for natural open quantum systems that suffer loss due to their embedding into the continuum of scattering wavefunctions. They appear also in systems coupled to different layers some of which provide gain to the system. Thereby gain and loss, respectively, may be fixed inside every layer, i.e. characteristic of it.

  14. Compensated gain control circuit for buck regulator command charge circuit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barrett, David M. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1996-01-01

    A buck regulator command charge circuit includes a compensated-gain control signal for compensating for changes in the component values in order to achieve optimal voltage regulation. The compensated-gain control circuit includes an automatic-gain control circuit for generating a variable-gain control signal. The automatic-gain control circuit is formed of a precision rectifier circuit, a filter network, an error amplifier, and an integrator circuit.

  15. Compensated gain control circuit for buck regulator command charge circuit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barrett, D.M.

    1996-11-05

    A buck regulator command charge circuit includes a compensated-gain control signal for compensating for changes in the component values in order to achieve optimal voltage regulation. The compensated-gain control circuit includes an automatic-gain control circuit for generating a variable-gain control signal. The automatic-gain control circuit is formed of a precision rectifier circuit, a filter network, an error amplifier, and an integrator circuit. 5 figs.

  16. USENIX Association 10th USENIX Symposium on Operating Systems Design and Implementation (OSDI '12) 335 Dune: Safe User-level Access to Privileged CPU Features

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chase, Jeffrey S.

    ) 335 Dune: Safe User-level Access to Privileged CPU Features Adam Belay, Andrea Bittau, Ali Mashtizadeh, David Terei, David Mazi`eres, Christos Kozyrakis Stanford University Abstract Dune is a system, and tagged TLBs, while preserving the exist- ing OS interfaces for processes. Dune uses the virtualiza- tion

  17. Dune: Safe User-level Access to Privileged CPU Features Adam Belay, Andrea Bittau, Ali Mashtizadeh, David Terei, David Mazi`eres, Christos Kozyrakis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kozyrakis, Christos

    Dune: Safe User-level Access to Privileged CPU Features Adam Belay, Andrea Bittau, Ali Mashtizadeh, David Terei, David Mazi`eres, Christos Kozyrakis Stanford University Abstract Dune is a system, and tagged TLBs, while preserving the exist- ing OS interfaces for processes. Dune uses the virtualiza- tion

  18. Gain the most business value from implementing IBM Optim

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Services professionals Gain comprehensive project planning and execution, product education and on guide your decommissioning project. Optim makes decommissioning easier and safer by providing professionals for rapid implementation and reliable support. IBM Software Lab Services can help you gain

  19. Energy Gaining Windows for Residential Buildings Jesper Kragh, Assistant Professor,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Energy Gaining Windows for Residential Buildings Jesper Kragh, Assistant Professor, Department University of Denmark; ss@byg.dtu.dk, www.byg.dtu.dk/english.aspx KEYWORDS: Low- energy windows, slim frame profiles, solar gain, net energy gain, low energy houses SUMMARY: This paper presents some of the research

  20. A Frequency-Shift based CMOS Magnetic Biosensor with Spatially Uniform Sensor Transducer Gain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hajimiri, Ali

    the spatially uniform gain. II. SENSOR MECHANIMS AND SENSOR TRANSDUCER GAIN MODELING Magnetic biosensors

  1. Mechanism of the metallic metamaterials coupled to the gain material

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Huang, Zhixiang; Droulias, Sotiris; Koschny, Thomas; Soukoulis, Costas M.

    2014-10-11

    We present evidence of strong coupling between the gain material and the metallic metamaterials. It is of vital importance to understand the mechanism of the coupling of metamaterials with the gain medium. Using a four-level gain system, the numerical pump-probe experiments are performed in several configurations (split–ring resonators (SRRs), inverse SRRs and fishnets) of metamaterials, demonstrating reduction of the resonator damping in all cases and hence the possibility for loss compensation. We find that the differential transmittance ?T/T can be negative in different SRR configurations, such as SRRs on the top of the gain substrate, gain in the SRR gapmore »and gain covering the SRR structure, while in the fishnet metamaterial with gain ?T/T is positive.« less

  2. Mechanism of the metallic metamaterials coupled to the gain material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Zhixiang; Droulias, Sotiris; Koschny, Thomas; Soukoulis, Costas M.

    2014-10-11

    We present evidence of strong coupling between the gain material and the metallic metamaterials. It is of vital importance to understand the mechanism of the coupling of metamaterials with the gain medium. Using a four-level gain system, the numerical pump-probe experiments are performed in several configurations (split–ring resonators (SRRs), inverse SRRs and fishnets) of metamaterials, demonstrating reduction of the resonator damping in all cases and hence the possibility for loss compensation. We find that the differential transmittance ?T/T can be negative in different SRR configurations, such as SRRs on the top of the gain substrate, gain in the SRR gap and gain covering the SRR structure, while in the fishnet metamaterial with gain ?T/T is positive.

  3. Title: Canadian Digital Elevation Model (DEM) Data Creator /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Ontario, Prince Edward Island, Quebec, Saskatchewan, Yukon Keywords (Subject): Contours, Digital Elevation

  4. UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO WORKING AT ELEVATED PLACES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chan, Hue Sun

    in elevated locations at the University are faced with a potential risk of falling. Persons below these work areas may be at risk from falling objects. These hazards must be significantly reduced through the use including a site specific work plan; Provide notice to the Ontario Ministry of Labour of the nature

  5. Polyetheretherketone Membranes for Elevated Temperature PEMFCs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weidner, John W.

    Polyetheretherketone Membranes for Elevated Temperature PEMFCs Balasubramanian Lakshmanan exchange membrane fuel cells PEMFCs . For example, the current from a MEA made from PEEK membrane at 0.6 V, 2003. Proton exchange membrane fuel cells PEMFCs running on hy- drogen are an integral part

  6. Use of a photonic crystal for optical amplifier gain control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lin, Shawn-Yu (Albuquerque, NM); Fleming, James G. (Albuquerque, NM); El-Kady, Ihab (Albuquerque, NM)

    2006-07-18

    An optical amplifier having a uniform gain profile uses a photonic crystal to tune the density-of-states of a gain medium so as to modify the light emission rate between atomic states. The density-of-states of the gain medium is tuned by selecting the size, shape, dielectric constant, and spacing of a plurality of microcavity defects in the photonic crystal. The optical amplifier is particularly useful for the regeneration of DWDM signals in long optical fibers.

  7. ORISE: CDC Travelers' Health Mobile App, Designed by ORISE, Gains...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    This? Mobile App Helps International Travelers Make Safe Dining Choices CDC Travelers' Health app, designed by ORISE, gains attention on multiple websites How ORISE is Making a...

  8. Design of a variable gain amplifier for an ultrawideband receiver 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krishnanji, Sivasankari

    2005-11-01

    throughout the gain range to cater to the requirements of the ultra-wideband system. The noise-to-power ratio of the VGA is -23.9 dB for 1Vp-p differential input signal in the low gain setting, and the equivalent input referred noise is 1.01 V2 for the high...

  9. Gas-Alloy Interactions at Elevated Temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arroyave, Raymundo; Gao, Michael

    2012-12-01

    The understanding of the stability of metals and alloys against oxidation and other detrimental reactions, to the catalysis of important chemical reactions and the minimization of defects associated with processing and synthesis have one thing in common: At the most fundamental level, all these scientific/engineering problems involve interactions between metals and alloys (in the solid or liquid state) and gaseous atmospheres at elevated temperatures. In this special issue, we have collected a series of articles that illustrate the application of different theoretical, computational, and experimental techniques to investigate gas-alloy interactions.

  10. Achieving improved cycle efficiency via pressure gain combustors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gemmen, R.S.; Janus, M.C.; Richards, G.A.; Norton, T.S. [USDOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center, WV (United States); Rogers, W.A. [EG& G Technical Services of West Virginia, Morgantown, WV (United States)

    1995-04-01

    As part of the Department of Energy`s Advanced Gas Turbine Systems Program, an investigation is being performed to evaluate ``pressure gain`` combustion systems for gas turbine applications. This paper presents experimental pressure gain and pollutant emission data from such combustion systems. Numerical predictions for certain combustor geometries are also presented. It is reported that for suitable aerovalved pulse combustor geometries studied experimentally, an overall combustor pressure gain of nearly 1 percent can be achieved. It is also shown that for one combustion system operating under typical gas turbine conditions, NO{sub x} and CO emmissions, are about 30 ppmv and 8 ppmv, respectively.

  11. Multistage CSR microbunching gain development in transport or recirculation arcs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsai, Cheng-Ying; Li, Rui; Tennant, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) induced microbunching instability has been one of the most challenging issues in the design of modern accelerators. A linear Vlasov solver has been developed [1] and applied to investigate the physical processes of microbunching gain amplification for several example lattices [2]. In this paper, by further extending the concept of stage gain as proposed by Huang and Kim [3], we develop a method to characterize the microbunching development in terms of stage orders that allow the quantitative comparison of optics impacts on microbunching gain for different lattices. We find that the microbunching instability in our demonstrated arcs has a distinguishing feature of multistage amplification (e.g, up to 6th stage amplification for our example transport arcs, in contrast to two-stage amplification for a typical 4-dipole bunch compressor chicane). We also try to connect lattice optics pattern with the obtained stage gain functions by a physical interpretation. This Vlasov analys...

  12. FEL GAIN LENGTH AND TAPER MEASUREMENTS AT LCLS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ratner, D.

    2010-01-01

    taper mea- surements from LCLS. We ?nd gain lengths of ? 2.9AND TAPER MEASUREMENTS AT LCLS ? D. Ratner † , A. Brachmann,et al. , First Results of the LCLS Laser-Heater Sys- tem,

  13. FEL GAIN LENGTH AND TAPER MEASUREMENTS AT LCLS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ratner, D.

    2010-01-01

    more than double the coherent, FEL power over the satura-FEL GAIN LENGTH AND TAPER MEASUREMENTS AT LCLS ? D.Figure 11: Post-saturation FEL pulse energy for a taper with

  14. Review of health and productivity gains from better IEQ

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisk, William J.

    2000-08-01

    The available scientific data suggest that existing technologies and procedures can improve indoor environmental quality (IEQ) in a manner that significantly increases productivity and health. While there is considerable uncertainty in the estimates of the magnitudes of productivity gains that may be obtained, the projected gains are very large. For the U.S., the estimated potential annual savings and productivity gains are $6 to $14 billion from reduced respiratory disease, $2 to $4 billion from reduced allergies and asthma, $10 to $30 billion from reduced sick building syndrome symptoms, and $20 to $160 billion from direct improvements in worker performance that are unrelated to health. Productivity gains that are quantified and demonstrated could serve as a strong stimulus for energy efficiency measures that simultaneously improve the indoor environment.

  15. Traction sheave elevator, hoisting unit and machine space

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hakala, Harri (Hyvinkaa, FI); Mustalahti, Jorma (Hyvinkaa, FI); Aulanko, Esko (Kerava, FI)

    2000-01-01

    Traction sheave elevator consisting of an elevator car moving along elevator guide rails, a counterweight moving along counterweight guide rails, a set of hoisting ropes (3) on which the elevator car and counterweight are suspended, and a drive machine unit (6) driving a traction sheave (7) acting on the hoisting ropes (3) and placed in the elevator shaft. The drive machine unit (6) is of a flat construction. A wall of the elevator shaft is provided with a machine space with its open side facing towards the shaft, the essential parts of the drive machine unit (6) being placed in the space. The hoisting unit (9) of the traction sheave elevator consists of a substantially discoidal drive machine unit (6) and an instrument panel (8) mounted on the frame (20) of the hoisting unit.

  16. Elevated temperature forming method and preheater apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krajewski, Paul E; Hammar, Richard Harry; Singh, Jugraj; Cedar, Dennis; Friedman, Peter A; Luo, Yingbing

    2013-06-11

    An elevated temperature forming system in which a sheet metal workpiece is provided in a first stage position of a multi-stage pre-heater, is heated to a first stage temperature lower than a desired pre-heat temperature, is moved to a final stage position where it is heated to a desired final stage temperature, is transferred to a forming press, and is formed by the forming press. The preheater includes upper and lower platens that transfer heat into workpieces disposed between the platens. A shim spaces the upper platen from the lower platen by a distance greater than a thickness of the workpieces to be heated by the platens and less than a distance at which the upper platen would require an undesirably high input of energy to effectively heat the workpiece without being pressed into contact with the workpiece.

  17. Information Gain Based Dimensionality Selection for Classifying Text Documents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dumidu Wijayasekara; Milos Manic; Miles McQueen

    2013-06-01

    Selecting the optimal dimensions for various knowledge extraction applications is an essential component of data mining. Dimensionality selection techniques are utilized in classification applications to increase the classification accuracy and reduce the computational complexity. In text classification, where the dimensionality of the dataset is extremely high, dimensionality selection is even more important. This paper presents a novel, genetic algorithm based methodology, for dimensionality selection in text mining applications that utilizes information gain. The presented methodology uses information gain of each dimension to change the mutation probability of chromosomes dynamically. Since the information gain is calculated a priori, the computational complexity is not affected. The presented method was tested on a specific text classification problem and compared with conventional genetic algorithm based dimensionality selection. The results show an improvement of 3% in the true positives and 1.6% in the true negatives over conventional dimensionality selection methods.

  18. Development of a gain monitoring system for a neutron detector array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saskatchewan, University of

    Development of a gain monitoring system for a neutron detector array By Brian Bewer University gain monitoring system was created to find relative gains of the Blowfish detectors during experiment a reliable cross section calculation. #12;Gain Monitoring System · The gain monitor has four major components

  19. Pressure-gain combustion. Part 2: Experimental and model results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richards, G.A.; Gemmen, R.S. [Dept. of Energy, Morgantown, WV (United States). Morgantown Energy Technology Center

    1996-07-01

    An experimental investigation of aerovalve pulse combustion is presented. The experimental measurements compare favorably with model predictions from a control-volume analysis of the pulse combustor. Particular emphasis is placed on the mean pressure differences through the combustor as an indicator of the so-called pressure gain performance. Both the operating conditions and combustor geometry are investigated. It is shown that complex fluid/combustion interactions within the combustor make it difficult to isolate the effect of geometric changes. A scaling rule developed from the control-volume analysis is used to produce a combustor geometry capable of producing pressure gain.

  20. Importance of Elevation and Temperature Inversions for the Interpretat...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Importance of Elevation and Temperature Inversions for the Interpretation of Thermal Infrared Satellite Images Used in Geothermal Exploration Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI...

  1. I've had the privilege of serving as the Division Chair for Engineering and Applied Science since June 2000 and in that time I've developed a renewed appreciation of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;I've had the privilege of serving as the Division Chair for Engineering and Applied Science for education and research at Caltech is extraordinary, and the traditions of multi-disciplinary, basic research--aimed at changing the world around us--remain alive and well. Coupled with the enormous economic and intellectual

  2. Strontium sorption on hematite at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karasyova, O.N.; Ivanova, L.I.; Lakshtanov, L.Z.; Loevgren, L.

    1999-12-15

    Acid-base reactions and surface complexation of Sr(II) at the hematite/water interface have been studied by means of potentiometric titrations at three different temperatures: 25, 50, and 75 C. Equilibrium measurements were performed in 0.1 M NaCl. In the evaluation of equilibrium models for the acid-base reactions and complexation reactions in the three-component system H{sup +} -({triple{underscore}bond}FeOH)-Sr{sup 2+}, the constant capacitance model was applied. During the titrations with Sr, aliquots of the suspension were sampled at in several points. The aqueous concentrations of Sr were analyzed by atomic absorption spectrometry. Treatment of data included tests for formation of both inner-sphere and outer-sphere complexes of different stoichiometric composition. The proposed equilibrium model consists of the following surface complexes of inner sphere type: {triple{underscore}bond}FeOHSr{sup 2+} and {triple{underscore}bond}FeOSrOH. Besides the stability constants for the surface complexes, the thermodynamic parameters {Delta}H and {Delta}S were evaluated. The combined effect of a decrease in pH{sub pzc} with increasing temperature and positive enthalpies of surface complex formation favors adsorption of Sr at elevated temperatures.

  3. Impact of Solar Heat Gain on Radiant Floor Cooling System Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Jingjuan Dove; Schiavon, Stefano; Bauman, Fred

    2013-01-01

    Bauman F. 2013. Impact of Solar Heat Gain on Radiant FloorBauman F. 2013. Impact of Solar Heat Gain on Radiant FloorBauman F. 2013. Impact of Solar Heat Gain on Radiant Floor

  4. Performance of Hole-Coupling Resonator in the Presence of Asymmetric Modes and FEL Gain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, M.

    2011-01-01

    is derived in, K. -1. Kim, "FEL Gain Taking into Accountof Asymmetric Modes :1nd FEL Gain M. Xie and K. -J. KimOF ASYMMETRIC MODES AND FEL GAIN· Ming Xie and Kwang-Je Kim

  5. GAINFUL EMPLOYMENT DISCLOSURE SCHOOL OF LIBRARY AND INFORMATION SCIENCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cinabro, David

    GAINFUL EMPLOYMENT DISCLOSURE SCHOOL OF LIBRARY AND INFORMATION SCIENCE GRADUATE CERTIFICATE. · For additional program information: http://slis.wayne.edu/certificates/archival-administration.php Classification://nces.ed.gov/ipeds/cipcode/cipdetail.aspx?y=55&cipid=89431 STANDARDIZED OCCUPATIONAL CLASSIFICATION (SOC) CODES · 25-4013.00 Museum Technicians

  6. GAINFUL EMPLOYMENT DISCLOSURE SCHOOL OF LIBRARY AND INFORMATION SCIENCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cinabro, David

    GAINFUL EMPLOYMENT DISCLOSURE SCHOOL OF LIBRARY AND INFORMATION SCIENCE GRADUATE CERTIFICATE information: http://slis.wayne.edu/certificates/information-management.php Classification of Instructional://nces.ed.gov/ipeds/cipcode/cipdetail.aspx?y=55&cipid=89431 STANDARDIZED OCCUPATIONAL CLASSIFICATION (SOC) CODES · 11-9199.07 Security Managers

  7. Realized Gain from Breeding Eucalyptus grandis in Florida1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Realized Gain from Breeding Eucalyptus grandis in Florida1 George Meskimen2 A small but intense eucalyptus research effort began in Florida in 1961 with the private, non- profit Florida Forests Florida. By 1965 we had established numerous eucalyptus experiments, including 14 screening trials

  8. A Guide for International PhD Gain a Doctorate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schüler, Axel

    A Guide for International PhD Candidates Gain a Doctorate in Leipzig internationalCentre|AAA 1 #12;Contents page Why choose the Universität Leipzig for my PhD? 3 Application and Admission 4 Which PhD programme is right for me? 4 5 steps to a PhD 5 Research Academy Leipzig 8 Internationale

  9. Gain effect waveguide optical amplifiers for Si microphotonics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saini, Sajan, 1973-

    2004-01-01

    (cont.) Er-based gain. We reported the first infrared photoluminescence PL study of Er?O? and found a 7 ms lifetime at 4 K, attributed to a metastable FCC or HCP phase. We showed the thermodynamically stable BCC crystal ...

  10. 1 INTRODUCTION Alternative energy sources have increasingly gained

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandborn, Peter

    1 INTRODUCTION Alternative energy sources have increasingly gained the interest for governments it is required, is a major concern for alternative energy systems. Profits and environmental benefits, research institutes, academia, and industry in order to advance the penetration of sustainable energy

  11. Time to Go Solar with Solarize U Gain energy independence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Royer, Dana

    #12;Time to Go Solar with Solarize U · Gain energy independence · Have more disposable income for solar, insulation or other measures · Home Energy Solutions (HES) program offered through UI for solar For information on programs and financing to help you reduce energy use and save money, please

  12. Impact of Storm Water Recharge Practices on Boston Groundwater Elevations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vogel, Richard M.

    Impact of Storm Water Recharge Practices on Boston Groundwater Elevations Brian F. Thomas, S periodically experienced a decline in groundwater elevations and the associated deterioration of untreated wood a groundwater conservation overlay district enforced by city zoning boards to require storm water recharge

  13. Widespread foliage d15 N depletion under elevated CO2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, David D.

    Widespread foliage d15 N depletion under elevated CO2: inferences for the nitrogen cycle H O R M O an integrated assessment of the nitrogen (N) cycle and whether it is influenced by rising atmospheric CO2 concentration. We tested the hypothesis that elevated CO2 significantly changes foliage d15 N in a wide range

  14. Measuring solar reflectance Part I: Defining a metric that accurately predicts solar heat gain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levinson, Ronnen

    2010-01-01

    z = 60 ? ) based on prediction of annual peak solar heatgain, prediction of annual mean solar heat gain, andFirst criterion: prediction of annual peak solar heat gain.

  15. Representative Atmospheric Plume Development for Elevated Releases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eslinger, Paul W.; Lowrey, Justin D.; McIntyre, Justin I.; Miley, Harry S.; Prichard, Andrew W.

    2014-03-03

    An atmospheric explosion of a low-yield nuclear device will produce a large number of radioactive isotopes, some of which can be measured with airborne detection systems. However, properly equipped aircraft may not arrive in the region where an explosion occurred for a number of hours after the event. Atmospheric conditions will have caused the radioactive plume to move and diffuse before the aircraft arrives. The science behind predicting atmospheric plume movement has advanced enough that the location of the maximum concentrations in the plume can be determined reasonably accurately in real time, or near real time. Given the assumption that an aircraft can follow a plume, this study addresses the amount of atmospheric dilution expected to occur in a representative plume as a function of time past the release event. The approach models atmospheric transport of hypothetical releases from a single location for every day in a year using the publically available HYSPLIT code. The effective dilution factors for the point of maximum concentration in an elevated plume based on a release of a non-decaying, non-depositing tracer can vary by orders of magnitude depending on the day of the release, even for the same number of hours after the release event. However, the median of the dilution factors based on releases for 365 consecutive days at one site follows a power law relationship in time, as shown in Figure S-1. The relationship is good enough to provide a general rule of thumb for estimating typical future dilution factors in a plume starting at the same point. However, the coefficients of the power law function may vary for different release point locations. Radioactive decay causes the effective dilution factors to decrease more quickly with the time past the release event than the dilution factors based on a non-decaying tracer. An analytical expression for the dilution factors of isotopes with different half-lives can be developed given the power law expression for the non-decaying tracer. If the power-law equation for the median dilution factor, Df, based on a non-decaying tracer has the general form Df=a?×t?^(-b) for time t after the release event, then the equation has the form Df=e^(-?t)×a×t^(-b) for a radioactive isotope, where ? is the decay constant for the isotope.

  16. Quantum master equation with balanced gain and loss

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dennis Dast; Daniel Haag; Holger Cartarius; Günter Wunner

    2014-11-20

    We present a quantum master equation describing a Bose-Einstein condensate with particle loss on one lattice site and particle gain on the other lattice site whose mean-field limit is a non-Hermitian PT-symmetric Gross-Pitaevskii equation. It is shown that the characteristic properties of PT-symmetric systems, such as the existence of stationary states and the phase shift of pulses between two lattice sites, are also found in the many-particle system. Visualizing the dynamics on a Bloch sphere allows us to compare the complete dynamics of the master equation with that of the Gross-Pitaevskii equation. We find that even for a relatively small number of particles the dynamics are in excellent agreement and the master equation with balanced gain and loss is indeed an appropriate many-particle description of a PT-symmetric Bose-Einstein condensate.

  17. High gain preamplifier based on optical parametric amplification

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jovanovic, Igor; Bonner, Randal A.

    2004-08-10

    A high-gain preamplifier based on optical parametric amplification. A first nonlinear crystal is operatively connected to a second nonlinear crystal. A first beam relay telescope is operatively connected to a second beam relay telescope, to the first nonlinear crystal, and to the second nonlinear crystal. A first harmonic beamsplitter is operatively connected to a second harmonic beamsplitter, to the first nonlinear crystal, to the second nonlinear crystal, to the first beam relay telescope, and to the second beam relay telescope.

  18. Gain-assisted superluminal light propagation via incoherent pump field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Mahmoudi; S. Worya Rabiei; L. Safari; M. Sahrai

    2008-08-03

    We investigate the dispersion and the absorption properties of a weak probe field in a three-level Lambda-type atomic system. We use just an incoherent field for controlling the group velocity of light. It is shown that the slope of dispersion changes from positive to negative just with changing the intensity of the indirect incoherent pumping field. Gain-assisted superluminal light propagation appears in this system. No laser field is used in the pumping processes.

  19. Work and energy gain of heat-pumped quantized amplifiers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Gelbwaser-Klimovsky; Robert Alicki; Gershon Kurizki

    2013-10-09

    We investigate heat-pumped single-mode amplifiers of quantized fields in high-Q cavities based on non-inverted two-level systems. Their power generation is shown to crucially depend on the capacity of the quantum state of the field to accumulate useful work. By contrast, the energy gain of the field is shown to be insensitive to its quantum state. Analogies and differences with masers are explored.

  20. Photosynthesis, Nitrogen, Their Adjustment and its Effects on Ecosystem Carbon Gain at Elevated CO{sub 2}l. A Comparison of Loblolly and Ponderosa Pines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ball, J. Timothy; Eichelmann, Hillar Y.; Tissue, David T.; Lewis, James D.; Picone, Johnn B.; Ross, Peter D.

    1996-12-01

    A functional understanding of terrestrial ecosystem carbon processes is essential for two reasons. First, carbon flow is a most fundamental aspects of ecosystem function as it mediates most of the energy flow in these systems. Second, carbon flow also mediates the majority of energy flow in the global economy and will do for the foreseeable future. The increased atmospheric carbon dioxide and its inevitable flow through global ecosystems will influence ecosystem processes. There is, of course, great interest in the potential of ecosystems to sequester some of the carbon being loaded into the atmosphere by economic activity.

  1. Structural Reliability of Bridges Elevated with Steel Pedestals 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bisadi, Vahid 1980-

    2012-09-19

    Overheight vehicle impact to bridge decks is a major problem in the transportation networks in the United States. An important factor that causes this problem is inadequate vertical clearance of bridges. Using steel pedestals to elevate bridge decks...

  2. Study of catalysis of coal gasification at elevated pressures...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Study of catalysis of coal gasification at elevated pressures. Evaluation of 20 compounds at 850sup 0C Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Study of catalysis of coal...

  3. Fresnel reflection from a cavity with net roundtrip gain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mansuripur, Tobias S

    2013-01-01

    A planewave incident on an active etalon with net roundtrip gain may be expected to diverge in field amplitude, yet Maxwell's equations admit only a convergent solution. By examining a Gaussian beam obliquely incident on such a cavity, we find that the "side-tail" of the beam leaks into the cavity and gives rise to a field that interferes with the main portion of the beam, which is ultimately responsible for the convergence of the field. This mechanism offers perspective for many phenomena, and we specifically discuss the implications for amplified total internal reflection.

  4. High target gain to ICF reactor - a problem of repetition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moses, G.A.

    1981-01-01

    The near term goal of the inertial confinement fusion (ICF) program in the United States is the demonstration of high target gain, where the thermonuclear energy released from the ICF target exceeds the driver energy input to the target by roughly a factor of one hundred or more. This paper briefly reviews the most notable published ICF conceptual reactor designs and then focuses on the engineering problems of commercial ICF reactors with emphasis on the problems associated with the high repetition frequency inherent in such systems.

  5. Scientists gain insight into origin of tungsten ditelluride's

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust, High-ThroughputUpcomingmagnetoresistance | Argonne National Laboratory gain insight

  6. "Elevated heat pump" hypothesis for the aerosolmonsoon hydroclimate link: "Grounded" in observations?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nigam, Sumant

    "Elevated heat pump" hypothesis for the aerosolmonsoon hydroclimate link: "Grounded April 2010; published 18 August 2010. [1] The viability of the elevated heat pump hypothesis, S., and M. Bollasina (2010), "Elevated heat pump" hypothesis for the aerosolmonsoon hydroclimate

  7. Performance of MOV Stem Lubricants at Elevated Temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeWall, Kevin George; Nitzel, Michael Everett; Watkins, John Clifford

    2001-07-01

    This paper documents the results of recent tests sponsored by the U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and performed by the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). These tests address the effectiveness of the lubricant used on the threaded portion of the valve stem, where the stem nut turns on the stem. Recent testing indicates that an elevated temperature environment can lead to significant increases in the friction coefficient at the stem/stem-nut interface. Most valve actuator qualification tests are performed at room temperature. Similarly, in-service tests are run at ambient plant temperatures, usually 70 to 100°F. Since design conditions can lead to valve operating temperatures in the 200 to 300°F range, it is important to know whether a temperature-induced increase in friction at the stem/stem-nut interface will prevent the required operation of critical valves. Lubricant aging is another phenomenon that might have deleterious effects on the thrust output of a valve actuator. Laboratory experience and field experience both indicate that after long periods in elevated temperature environments, the lubricants may lose their lubrication qualities. The scope of the current test program includes testing of five different lubricants on four different valve stems. Pending completion of the testing, results of the tests conducted using two of the four stems are discussed. The test series included collection of baseline data at room temperature, single step temperature tests where the temperature of the test setup was elevated directly to 250°F, and step testing where the temperature was elevated in steps to 130, 190, and 250°F, then returned to 70°F. All greases tested showed evidence of physical change after elevated temperature tests. Except for one particular lubricant, all of the greases tested showed increased coefficients of friction at elevated temperatures. Numerous other preliminary conclusions are presented. Recommendations for future research in the area of aged valve stem lubricant performance at elevated temperatures are also presented.

  8. Does low stomatal conductance or photosynthetic capacity enhance growth at elevated CO2 in Arabidopsis thaliana?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Easlon, Hsien M; Carlisle, Eli; McKay, John K; Bloom, Arnold J

    2015-01-01

    Does low g enhance growth at elevated CO 2 ? To whomEcophysiology and Sustainability Does low g enhance growthat elevated CO 2 ? Does low stomatal conductance or

  9. Fatigue of ceramics at elevated temperatures: Microstructural design for optimal performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritchie, R.O.; Chen, D.; Zhang, X.F.

    2000-01-01

    D IVISION FATIGUE OF CERAMICS AT ELEVATED TEMPERATURES:76SF00098. FATIGUE OF CERAMICS AT ELEVATED TEMPERATURES:silicon carbide (SiC) ceramics offer many advantages,

  10. Electrical and Optical Gain Lever Effects in InGaAs Double Quantum Well Diode Lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pocha, M D; Goddard, L L; Bond, T C; Nikolic, R J; Vernon, S P; Kallman, J S; Behymer, E M

    2007-01-03

    In multisection laser diodes, the amplitude or frequency modulation (AM or FM) efficiency can be improved using the gain lever effect. To study gain lever, InGaAs double quantum well (DQW) edge emitting lasers have been fabricated with integrated passive waveguides and dual sections providing a range of split ratios from 1:1 to 9:1. Both the electrical and the optical gain lever have been examined. An electrical gain lever with greater than 7 dB enhancement of AM efficiency was achieved within the range of appropriate DC biasing currents, but this gain dropped rapidly outside this range. We observed a 4 dB gain in the optical AM efficiency under non-ideal biasing conditions. This value agreed with the measured gain for the electrical AM efficiency under similar conditions. We also examined the gain lever effect under large signal modulation for digital logic switching applications. To get a useful gain lever for optical gain quenched logic, a long control section is needed to preserve the gain lever strength and a long interaction length between the input optical signal and the lasing field of the diode must be provided. The gain lever parameter space has been fully characterized and validated against numerical simulations of a semi-3D hybrid beam propagation method (BPM) model for the coupled electron-photon rate equation. We find that the optical gain lever can be treated using the electrical injection model, once the absorption in the sample is known.

  11. Linear Gain for the Microbunching Instability in an RF Compressor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venturini, M.; Migliorati, M.; Ronsivalle, C.; Vaccarezza, C.

    2009-05-01

    Velocity (or rf) compression has been suggested as a technique for bunch compression complementary to the more established technique involving magnetic chicanes and represents an important research item being investigated at the SPARC test facility. One of the aspects of this technique still not sufficiently understood is its possible impact on the microbunching instability. The purpose of this report is to present the analytical framework for investigating this instability in rf compressors. We use methods similar to those successfully applied to magnetic compressors and derive some integral equations yielding the gain for the instability in linear approximation. The focus here is on the derivation of the relevant equations. Although examples of solutions to these equations are provided we defer a more comprehensive discussion of their implication to a future report. The present study is part of a larger effort for a more comprehensive investigation that eventually will include macroparticle simulations and experiments.

  12. Development of a pressure gain combustor for improved cycle efficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gemmen, R.S.; Richards, G.A.; Janus, M.C.

    1994-09-01

    This paper presents results from an experimental research program attempting to improve the thermodynamic efficiencies of gas-turbine combustors. An elementary thermodynamic analysis shows that the thermodynamic cycle efficiencies of gas turbines can be significantly improved by using unsteady combustion that achieves quasi-constant-volume combustion. The ability to produce the so-called pressure gain via this process has already been demonstrated by others for pressures less than 3 atmospheres. This paper presents experimental results for pressures up to 11 atmospheres, compares certain process parameters to a numerical simulation, and briefly examines the problem of scale-up. Results of pollutant measurements over the 2--11 atmospheric range of operation are also included.

  13. Pressure-gain combustion. Part 1: Model development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Narayanaswami, L. [Embry-Riddle Aeronautical Univ., Daytona Beach, FL (United States); Richards, G.A. [Dept. of Energy, Morgantown, WV (United States). Morgantown Energy Technology Center

    1996-07-01

    A model for aerodynamically valved pulse combustion is presented. Particular emphasis is placed on using the model equations to identify characteristic length and time scales relevant to the design of pressure-gain combustors for gas turbine applications. The model is a control volume description of conservation laws for several regions of the pulse combustor. Combustion is modeled as a bimolecular reaction. Mixing between the fresh charge and the combustion products is modeled using a turbulent eddy time estimated from the combustor geometry and flow conditions. The model equations identify two characteristic lengths, which should be held constant during combustor scaleup, as well as certain exceptions to this approach. The effect of ambient operating pressure and inlet air temperature is also discussed.

  14. Relative Gain Monitoring of the GlueX Calorimeters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anassontzis, Efstratios G.; Kourkoumelis, C.; Vasileiadis, G.; Voulgaris, G.; Kappos, E.; Beattie, T.; Krueger, S.; Lolos, G. J.; Papandreou, Z.; Semenov, A. Yu.; Frye, John M.; Leckey, John P.; Shepherd, Matt; Bogart, T.; Smith, Elton S.

    2014-02-01

    The relative gain of the photodetectors for the GlueX Barrel and Forward calorimeters will be monitored using modular LED driver systems. The BCAL system consists of a global controller that feeds power, bias voltage and trigger signals to 96 local controllers situated at the ends of the 48 BCAL modules, which drive 40 LEDs associated with the 40 light guides at the end of each module. The FCAL system consists also of a global controller, a local controller for each acrylic quadrant covering the face of the FCAL, and ten 4-LED pulser boards per local controller connected in a star configuration along the edges of the acrylic panes. The respective systems are currently being installed on the detectors and their tested performance is presented herein.

  15. Progress on achieving the ICF conditions needed for high gain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindl, J.D.

    1988-12-23

    Progress during the past two years has moved us much closer to demonstrating the scientific and technological requirements for high gain ICF in the laboratory. This progress has been made possible by operating at the third harmonic of 1..mu..m light which dramatically reduces concern about hot electrons and by advances in diagnostics such as 100 ps x-ray framing cameras which greatly increase the data available from each experiment. Making use of many of these new capabilities, major improvements in confinement conditions have been achieved for ICF implosions. In particular, in an optimized hohlraum on Nova, radiation driven implosions with convergence ratio in excess of 30 (volume compression /approximately/3 /times/ 10/sup 4/) have performed essentially as predicted by spherical implosion calculations. This paper presents these results as well as examples of advances in several other areas and discusses the implications for the future of ICF with lasers and heavy ion beam drivers. 8 refs., 10 figs.

  16. Eigenmode analysis of a high-gain free-electron laser based on...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Eigenmode analysis of a high-gain free-electron laser based on a transverse gradient undulator Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Eigenmode analysis of a high-gain...

  17. Evaluation of the genetic gain in upland cotton during the twentieth century 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Brian Matthew

    2007-04-25

    Genetic gain studies in the past have been used to evaluate the historical improvement of different traits and give insight into what magnitudes of gain might be possible in the future. Additionally, they have been carried ...

  18. FEL Gain Taking into Account Diffraction and Electron Beam Emittance; Generalized Madey's Theorem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, K.-J.

    2011-01-01

    be published in the Proceedings FEL Gain Taking into AccountLBL--30628 DE92 002262 FEL Gain Taking into Accountfunction SF contains the FEL dynamics, and will be regarded

  19. Room temperature broadband terahertz gains in graphene heterostructures based on inter-layer radiative transitions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tang, Linlong [Key Laboratory of High Energy Density Physics and Technology, College of Physics and Technology, Sichuan University, Chengdu, 610064 (China); Chongqing institute of green and intelligent technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chongqing, 401122 (China); Du, Jinglei, E-mail: dujl@scu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of High Energy Density Physics and Technology, College of Physics and Technology, Sichuan University, Chengdu, 610064 (China); Shi, Haofei, E-mail: shi@cigit.ac.cn; Wei, Dongshan; Du, Chunlei, E-mail: cldu@cigit.ac.cn [Chongqing institute of green and intelligent technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chongqing, 401122 (China)

    2014-10-15

    We exploit inter-layer radiative transitions to provide gains to amplify terahertz waves in graphene heterostructures. This is achieved by properly doping graphene sheets and aligning their energy bands so that the processes of stimulated emissions can overwhelm absorptions. We derive an expression for the gain estimation and show the gain is insensitive to temperature variation. Moreover, the gain is broadband and can be strong enough to compensate the free carrier loss, indicating graphene based room temperature terahertz lasers are feasible.

  20. Development of a Gain Monitoring System for a Neutron Detector Array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saskatchewan, University of

    Development of a Gain Monitoring System for a Neutron Detector Array A Thesis Submitted the neutron detector array a gain monitoring system will be included. The new system will provide continuous conducted to determine the accuracy of the gain monitoring system. Three groups of trials focused

  1. Performance Impact of Solar Gain on Photovoltaic Inverters and Utility-Scale Energy Generation Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Performance Impact of Solar Gain on Photovoltaic Inverters and Utility-Scale Energy Generation of solar gain contributions. A novel solar gain utility-scale inverter model has been developed to characterize inverter efficiency with respect to solar resource, general ambient conditions and thermal system

  2. Author's personal copy On stairwell and elevator shaft pressurization for smoke control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Richard S.

    Author's personal copy On stairwell and elevator shaft pressurization for smoke control in tall Stairwell pressurization Elevator pressurization a b s t r a c t Elevator shaft and stairwell shaft is found to be completely feasible in the absence of elevator shaft pressurization. In contrast, coupled

  3. Melting Alpine Glaciers Enrich High-Elevation Lakes with Reactive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolfe, Alexander P.

    melt alone (SF lakes) and those fed by both glacial and snowpack meltwaters (GSF lakes). We foundMelting Alpine Glaciers Enrich High-Elevation Lakes with Reactive Nitrogen J A S M I N E E . S A R century in many regions of the world. Resulting changes in glacial runoff not only affect the hydrological

  4. Dramatically elevated rate of mitochondrial substitution in lice (Insecta: Phthiraptera)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clayton, Dale H.

    mitochondrial DNA, compared to comparable nuclear genes (Brown et al., 1979; Johnson and Clayton, 2000; MiyataDramatically elevated rate of mitochondrial substitution in lice (Insecta: Phthiraptera) Kevin P. Johnson,a,* Robert H. Cruickshank,b Richard J. Adams,c Vincent S. Smith,b Roderic D.M. Page,b and Dale H

  5. 2004-01-2299 Elevated Carbon Dioxide Alters Hydrocarbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paré, Paul W.

    2004-01-2299 Elevated Carbon Dioxide Alters Hydrocarbon Emissions and Flavor in Onion P. W. Paré, R of low-molecular-weight hydrocarbons and sulfur derivatives. Odd-chain ketones are emitted from onion-through chambers, volatile hydrocarbons from undamaged plants can be collected under different environmental

  6. Evidence for Stratospheric Downwelling Associated with High-Elevation Topography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Finkel, R

    2009-01-28

    The continued presence of elevated chlorine-36 in Sierra Nevada streams is commonly interpreted as residual nuclear fallout, but this prolonged storage contradicts accepted hydrologic models, which indicate much less short-term groundwater storage. Our hypothesis is that the chlorine-36 source is stratospheric downwelling during high-intensity storms by measuring beryllium-7 and -10, sodium-22, and chlorium-36 in precipitation, lake, and soil samples. These nuclides are produced in abundance in the stratosphere and, except for chlorine-36, did not occur as nuclear fallout. This project will either substantially change hydrologic models or reveal an unrecognized pathway for stratosphere-troposphere exchange. Either result will have substantial scientific impact. The test of the hypothesis is straightforward. If stratospheric downwelling occurs to the extent indicated by observed Sierran chlorine-36 levels, it should be detectable by elevated levels of beryllium-7 and -10, sodium-22, and chlorine-36 in storm precipitation. Samples will be collected from an established array of sampling locations. If elevated levels of these nuclides are not found, it would cast severe doubt on the hypothesis. In this case, Sierran hydrologic models will have to take into account high levels of long-term groundwater storage. If elevated levels of these nuclides are found in Sierran precipitation, it could only be from stratospheric input, both because nuclear fallout is no longer occurring and because beryllium-7 and -10 and sodium-22 are not produced by atmospheric nuclear tests.

  7. Lease of Power Privilege Flowchart: Lease of Power Privilege Contract

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas:Montezuma, Arizona: Energy ResourcesProjectMississippi:Learned,

  8. Corrosion resistant coatings suitable for elevated temperature application

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chan, Kwai S. (San Antonio, TX); Cheruvu, Narayana Sastry (San Antonio, TX); Liang, Wuwei (Austin, TX)

    2012-07-31

    The present invention relates to corrosion resistance coatings suitable for elevated temperature applications, which employ compositions of iron (Fe), chromium (Cr), nickel (Ni) and/or aluminum (Al). The compositions may be configured to regulate the diffusion of metals between a coating and a substrate, which may then influence coating performance, via the formation of an inter-diffusion barrier layer. The inter-diffusion barrier layer may comprise a face-centered cubic phase.

  9. Systems simulation of oil additives to grain at terminal elevators 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goforth, Kerry James

    1985-01-01

    Negligible colorless, odorless stable, inert From: McIlveen, 1984 12 Previous Research Dust suppression characteristics of mineral oil have been evaluated at the United States Grain Marketing Research Laboratory in Manhatten, Kansas. Lai et al. (1981... and are not separated out by normal grain inspection procedures. Foreign matter reductions of up to 1. 5 percent have been reported in informal experiments (Hegadorn, 1984). Country elevators that have no dust collection systems are realizing savings from oil...

  10. Does elevated CO2 alter silica uptake in trees?

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Fulweiler, Robinson W.; Maguire, Timothy J.; Carey, Joanna C.; Finzi, Adrien C.

    2015-01-13

    Human activities have greatly altered global carbon (C) and Nitrogen (N) cycling. In fact, atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO2) have increased 40% over the last century and the amount of N cycling in the biosphere has more than doubled. In an effort to understand how plants will respond to continued global CO2 fertilization, longterm free-air CO2 enrichment experiments have been conducted at sites around the globe. Here we examine how atmospheric CO2 enrichment and N fertilization affects the uptake of silicon (Si) in the Duke Forest, North Carolina, a stand dominated by Pinus taeda (loblolly pine), and five hardwoodmore »species. Specifically, we measured foliar biogenic silica concentrations in five deciduous and one coniferous species across three treatments: CO2 enrichment, N enrichment, and N and CO2 enrichment. We found no consistent trends in foliar Si concentration under elevated CO2, N fertilization, or combined elevated CO2 and N fertilization. However, two-thirds of the tree species studied here have Si foliar concentrations greater than well-known Si accumulators, such as grasses. Based on net primary production values and aboveground Si concentrations in these trees, we calculated forest Si uptake rates under control and elevated CO2 concentrations. Due largely to increased primary production, elevated CO2 enhanced the magnitude of Si uptake between 20 and 26%, likely intensifying the terrestrial silica pump. This uptake of Si by forests has important implications for Si export from terrestrial systems, with the potential to impact C sequestration and higher trophic levels in downstream ecosystems.« less

  11. caused by the wood-rotting basidiomycete fungus Heterobasidion annosum. This pathogen gains entry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    caused by the wood-rotting basidiomycete fungus Heterobasidion annosum. This pathogen gains entry viability and discourages germination while preventing the growth of other microorganisms. The concentrated

  12. Post-Genomics Nanotechnology Is Gaining Momentum: Nanoproteomics and Applications in Life Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tan, Weihong

    Post-Genomics Nanotechnology Is Gaining Momentum: Nanoproteomics and Applications in Life Sciences of nanotechnology applications, including nanoporous structures, functionalized nanoparticles, quantum dots

  13. Impact of Solar Heat Gain on Radiant Floor Cooling System Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Jingjuan Dove; Schiavon, Stefano; Bauman, Fred

    2013-01-01

    Radiant Heating and Cooling Systems, in, 2012. [15] F.Gain on Radiant Floor Cooling System Design. Proceedings ofof radiant floor cooling systems and their associated air

  14. Impact of Solar Heat Gain on Radiant Floor Cooling System Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Jingjuan Dove; Schiavon, Stefano; Bauman, Fred

    2013-01-01

    load and capacity; solar heat gain; Radiant design standardssignificance of solar radiation in the design process andthe magnitude of solar impacts under various design/control

  15. A near infrared organic photodiode with gain at low bias voltage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, Ian H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Crone, Brian K [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate an organic photodiode with near infrared optical response out to about 1100 run with a gain of {approx}10 at 1000 run under 5V reverse bias. The diodes employ a soluble naphthalocyanine with a peak absorption coefficient of {approx}10{sup 5} cm{sup -1} at 1000 nm. In contrast to most organic photodiodes, no exciton dissociating material is used. At zero bias, the diodes are inefficient with an external quantum efficiency of {approx} 10{sup -2}. In reverse bias, large gain occurs and is linear with bias voltage above 4V. The observed gain is consistent with a photoconductive gain mechanism.

  16. Post-diagnosis weight gain and breast cancer recurrence in women with early stage breast cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01

    1996): Nutrition and breast cancer. Cancer Causes Control 7:of premenopausal breast cancer. Cancer Epidemiol.BiomarkersDiagnosis Weight Gain and Breast Cancer Recurrence In Women

  17. The experience and image of American elevated railways : rapid transit infrastructure in the urban consciousness

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, Gordon Benedict

    2009-01-01

    At the turn of the twentieth century, elevated railways were built out of a practical need to literally "elevate" traffic above the street. In most cases, these lines served two distinct purposes. They served existing ...

  18. Estimated impacts of climate warming on California’s high-elevation hydropower

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Madani, Kaveh; Lund, Jay R.

    2010-01-01

    on high elevation hydropower generation in California’sCalifornia’s high-elevation hydropower Kaveh Madani · Jay R.Abstract California’s hydropower system is composed of high

  19. Glass Ceiling or Glass Elevator: Are Voters Biased in Favor of Women Candidates in California Elections?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abney, Ronni Marie; Peterson, Rolfe Daus

    2011-01-01

    10.2202/1944-4370.1103 Abney and Peterson: Glass Ceilingor Glass Elevator Table 7A. Positive Gender Bias ModelAbney and Peterson: Glass Ceiling or Glass Elevator Huddy,

  20. Estimated impacts of climate warming on California’s high-elevation hydropower

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Madani, Kaveh; Lund, Jay R.

    2010-01-01

    Cubed M (2005) Potential changes in hydropower productionpotential effects of climate warming on high-elevation hydropower

  1. Microstructural Stability and Oxidation Resistance of 9-12 Chromium Steels at Elevated Temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dogan, O.N.; Alman, D.E.; Jablonski, P.D.; Hawk, J.A.

    2006-05-01

    Various martensitic 9-12 Cr steels are utilized currently in fossil fuel powered energy plants for their good elevated temperature properties such as creep strength, steam side oxidation resistance, fire side corrosion resistance, and thermal fatigue resistance. Need for further improvements on the properties of 9-12 Cr steels for higher temperature (>600oC) use is driven by the environmental concerns (i.e., improve efficiency to reduce emissions and fossil fuel consumption). In this paper, we will discuss the results of the research done to explore new subsitutional solute solution and precipitate hardening mechanisms for improved strength of 9-12 Cr martensitic steels. Stability of the phases present in the steels will be evaluated for various temperature and time exposures. A comparison of microstructural properties of the experimental steels and commercial steels will also be presented.

    The influence of a Ce surface treatment on oxidation behavior of a commercial (P91) and several experimental steels containing 9 to 12 weight percent Cr was examined at 650ºC in flowing dry and moist air. The oxidation behavior of all the alloys without the Ce modification was significantly degraded by the presence of moisture in the air during testing. For instance the weight gain for P91 was two orders of magnitude greater in moist air than in dry air. This was accompanied by a change in oxide scale from the formation of Cr-based scales in dry air to the formation of Fe-based scales in moist air. The Ce surface treatment was very effective in improving the oxidation resistance of the experimental steels in both moist and dry air. For instance, after exposure to moist air at 650ºC for 2000 hours, an experimental alloy with the cerium surface modification had a weight gain three orders of magnitude lower than the alloy without the Ce modification and two orders of magnitude lower than P91. The Ce surface treatment suppressed the formation of Fe-based scales and promoted the formation of more protective Cr-based scales. However, the Ce surface treatment was not effective in improving the resistance of P91. The results are discussed in terms of synergistic effects of constituent alloying elements.

  2. Three-dimensional scapulothoracic motion during active and passive arm elevation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karduna, Andrew

    Three-dimensional scapulothoracic motion during active and passive arm elevation D. David Ebaugh a (active versus passive arm elevation) on three-dimensional scapulothoracic motion. Methods. Twenty during active and passive arm elevation. Muscle activity was recorded from surface electrodes over

  3. Effects of elevated CO2 , nitrogen deposition, and decreased species diversity on foliar fungal plant disease

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, David D.

    Effects of elevated CO2 , nitrogen deposition, and decreased species diversity on foliar fungal Three components of global change, elevated CO2 , nitrogen addition, and decreased plant species increasing more in pathogen load. Elevated CO2 increased pathogen load of C3 grasses, perhaps by decreasing

  4. Gaining Industrial Confidence for the Introduction of Domain-Specific Languages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hooman, Jozef

    Gaining Industrial Confidence for the Introduction of Domain-Specific Languages Arjan J. Mooij of using DSLs, in the industry there is also some reluctance against their introduction in product development. We address a number of issues that are important to gain industrial confidence

  5. SOLAR HEAT GAIN THROUGH FENESTRATION SYSTEMS CONTAINING SHADING: SUMMARY OF PROCEDURES FOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SOLAR HEAT GAIN THROUGH FENESTRATION SYSTEMS CONTAINING SHADING: SUMMARY OF PROCEDURES that with a drastic simplifying assumption these methods can be used to calculate system solar-optical properties and solar heat gain coefficients for arbitrary glazing systems, while requiring limited data about

  6. SOLAR HEAT GAIN THROUGH FENESTRATION SYSTEMS CONTAINING SHADING: PROCEDURES FOR ESTIMATING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SOLAR HEAT GAIN THROUGH FENESTRATION SYSTEMS CONTAINING SHADING: PROCEDURES FOR ESTIMATING that with a drastic simplifying assumption these methods can be used to calculate system solar-optical properties and solar heat gain coefficients for arbitrary glazing systems, while requiring limited data about

  7. Low Carbon Footprint and Ultra Low NOx Boilers through Efficiency Gain 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benz, R,; Staedter, M.

    2008-01-01

    -1 Low Carbon Footprint and Ultra Low NOx Boilers through Efficiency Gain Robert Benz Marcel Staedter President Project Manager... / Low Carbon, Ultra Low NOx through Efficiency Gain where y denotes the mole fraction of excess oxygen. The presence of nitrogen and excess oxygen radicals in this hot combustion environment promotes the formation...

  8. An LED, Fiber-Optic, Gain Monitoring System for a Segmented Scintillator Array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saskatchewan, University of

    An LED, Fiber-Optic, Gain Monitoring System for a Segmented Scintillator Array B.E. Bewera , R Science Place, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada, S7N 5E2 Abstract A gain monitoring system, which uses with a segmented, liquid scintillator neutron detector array. The system is designed to track neutron detector cell

  9. Dynamical mechanisms underlying contrast gain control in single neurons Yuguo Yu and Tai Sing Lee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Tai Sing

    to be adaptive to changes in the statistics of stimuli, in terms of both the average light intensity level see 3, they are adaptive to the contrast or the variance of time- varying input stimuli, exhibiting a contrast gain control threshold is shown to be a key factor underlying the adaptation of frequency tuning and amplitude gain

  10. Optical gain from the direct gap transition of Ge-on-Si at room temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Jifeng

    We report direct band gap optical gain of tensile strained n+ epitaxial Ge-on-Si at room temperature, which confirms that band-engineered Ge-on-Si is a promising gain medium for monolithic optical amplifiers and lasers on Si.

  11. THE INTEGRAL EQUATION FOR A HIGH GAIN FEL N. A. Vinokurov *

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kemner, Ken

    1 THE INTEGRAL EQUATION FOR A HIGH GAIN FEL N. A. Vinokurov * Introduction The theory of a high gain free electron laser (FEL) is now well developed (e.g., see [1]). In this paper I derive the equation for the electron distribution function, which is valid for FELs with a longitudinally

  12. HIGH GAIN FEL AMPLIFICATION OF CHARGE MODULATION CAUSED BY A HADRON *

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HIGH GAIN FEL AMPLIFICATION OF CHARGE MODULATION CAUSED BY A HADRON * Vladimir N. Litvinenko in a high gain FEL. The resulting amplified modulation of electron beam, its shape, form and its lethargy]). We also discuss the influence of the electron beam parameters on the FEL response. INTRODUCTION

  13. Gain-scheduling control of port-fuel-injection processes Andrew White a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, Jongeun

    of gasoline PFI and ethanol DI dual-fuel system to substantially increase gasoline engine efficiencyGain-scheduling control of port-fuel-injection processes Andrew White a , Jongeun Choi a,b,Ã, Ryozo: Engine control Port fuel injection Gain-scheduling control Linear parameter varying system LMI

  14. Gain-scheduled `1 -optimal control for boiler-turbine dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shamma, Jeff S.

    Gain-scheduled `1 -optimal control for boiler-turbine dynamics with actuator saturation Pang; accepted 2 June 2003 Abstract This paper presents a gain-scheduled approach for boiler-turbine controller the magnitude and rate saturation constraints on actuators. The nonlinear boiler-turbine dynamics is brought

  15. A low power, high dynamic-range, broadband variable gain amplifier for an ultra wideband receiver 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Lin

    2007-09-17

    is designed for high frequency and low power communication applications, such as an Ultra Wideband (UWB) receiver system. The gain can be programmed from 0dB to 42dB in 2dB increments with -3dB bandwidth greater than 425MHz for the entire range of gain. The 3...

  16. On Boiling of Crude Oil under Elevated Pressure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pimenova, Anastasiya V

    2015-01-01

    We construct a thermodynamic model for theoretical calculation of the boiling process of multicomponent mixtures of hydrocarbons (e.g., crude oil). The model governs kinetics of the mixture composition in the course of the distillation process along with the boiling temperature increase. The model heavily relies on the theory of dilute solutions of gases in liquids. Importantly, our results are applicable for modelling the process under elevated pressure (while the empiric models for oil cracking are not scalable to the case of extreme pressure), such as in an oil field heated by lava intrusions.

  17. On Boiling of Crude Oil under Elevated Pressure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anastasiya V. Pimenova; Denis S. Goldobin

    2015-10-08

    We construct a thermodynamic model for theoretical calculation of the boiling process of multicomponent mixtures of hydrocarbons (e.g., crude oil). The model governs kinetics of the mixture composition in the course of the distillation process along with the boiling temperature increase. The model heavily relies on the theory of dilute solutions of gases in liquids. Importantly, our results are applicable for modelling the process under elevated pressure (while the empiric models for oil cracking are not scalable to the case of extreme pressure), such as in an oil field heated by lava intrusions.

  18. Spring leaf flush in aspen (Populus tremuloides) clones is altered by long-term growth at elevated carbon dioxide and elevated ozone concentration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    carbon dioxide and elevated ozone concentration Justin M. McGrath a , David F. Karnosky b , Elizabeth A. In this study, we investigated spring leaf flush and how long-term growth at elevated carbon dioxide growth and produc- tivity are increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration ([CO2]) and increasing

  19. Stable gain-switched thulium fiber laser with 140 nm tuning range

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Fengqiu; Kelleher, Edmund; Guo, Guoxiang; Li, Yao; Xu, Yongbing; Zhu, Shining

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate a gain-switched thulium fiber laser that can be continuously tuned over 140 nm, while maintaining stable nanosecond single-pulse operation. To the best of our knowledge, this system represents the broadest tuning range for a gain-switched fiber laser. The system simplicity and wideband wavelength tunability combined with the ability to control the temporal characteristics of the gain-switched pulses mean this is a versatile source highly suited to a wide range of applications in the eye-safe region of the infrared, including spectroscopy, sensing and material processing, as well as being a practical seed source for pumping nonlinear processes.

  20. Microelectromechanical apparatus for elevating and tilting a platform

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miller, Samuel Lee; McWhorter, Paul Jackson; Rodgers, Murray Steven; Sniegowski, Jeffry J.; Barnes, Stephen M.

    2004-07-06

    A microelectromechanical (MEM) apparatus is disclosed which has a platform that can be elevated above a substrate and tilted at an arbitrary angle using a plurality of flexible members which support the platform and control its movement. Each flexible member is further controlled by one or more MEM actuators which act to bend the flexible member. The MEM actuators can be electrostatic comb actuators or vertical zip actuators, or a combination thereof. The MEM apparatus can include a mirror coating to form a programmable mirror for redirecting or switching one or more light beams for use in a projection display. The MEM apparatus with-the mirror coating also has applications for switching light beams between optical fibers for use in a local area fiber optic network, or for use in fiber optic telecommunications or data communications systems.

  1. Microelectromechanical apparatus for elevating and tilting a platform

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miller, Samuel Lee (Albuquerque, NM); McWhorter, Paul Jackson (Albuquerque, NM); Rodgers, Murray Steven (Albuquerque, NM); Sniegowski, Jeffry J. (Edgewood, NM); Barnes, Stephen M. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2003-04-08

    A microelectromechanical (MEM) apparatus is disclosed which has a platform that can be elevated above a substrate and tilted at an arbitrary angle using a plurality of flexible members which support the platform and control its movement. Each flexible member is further controlled by one or more MEM actuators which act to bend the flexible member. The MEM actuators can be electrostatic comb actuators or vertical zip actuators, or a combination thereof. The MEM apparatus can include a mirror coating to form a programmable mirror for redirecting or switching one or more light beams for use in a projection display. The MEM apparatus with the mirror coating also has applications for switching light beams between optical fibers for use in a local area fiber optic network, or for use in fiber optic telecommunications or data communications systems.

  2. Large inherent optical gain from the direct gap transition of Ge thin films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Xiaoxin

    The recent demonstration of Ge-on-Si diode lasers renews the interest in the unique carrier dynamics of Ge involving both direct (?) and indirect (L) valleys. Here, we report a large inherent direct gap optical gain ...

  3. Duct Systems in large commercial buildings: Physical characterization, air leakage, and heat conduction gains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisk, W.J.

    2011-01-01

    LBNL-42339 Duct Systems in Large Commercial Buildings:and conduction heat gains of duct systems. Different methodscompared. ELAs-of supply ducts ranged from 0.4 to 2.0 cm 2

  4. Apostles and brigadistas : industrial transformation with social gains in two Central American agro-industries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fuentes, Alberto (Alberto Jose)

    2014-01-01

    This dissertation offers an ideational account of the industrial transformation with social gains of two Central American agro-industries during the 1980s and 1990s, the Guatemalan sugar and Nicaraguan cheese industries. ...

  5. DOE Program Offers Participants Unique Opportunity to Gain Carbon Capture and Storage Knowledge

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Future leaders and innovators in the area of carbon capture and storage can gain a unique and intensive tutorial on the subject by participating in the U.S. Department of Energy’s Research Experience in Carbon Sequestration program.

  6. Spatially Similar Practice Immediately Following Motor Sequence Learning Eliminates Offline Gains 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Handa, Atul

    2012-11-30

    Robust offline performance gains, beyond those that would be anticipated by being exposed to additional physical practice, have been reported during procedural learning. However, practice of unrelated procedural task ...

  7. The impact of personal gains and losses on social identification processes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iuzzini, Jonathan Lawrence

    1998-01-01

    This thesis integrates a number of social ge Micrographics. psychological principles to study individual-level benefit (gain) and discrimination (loss) in a group setting. Using a variation of the minimal group paradigm, participants were assigned...

  8. High Gain Transformerless DC-DC Converters for Renewable Energy Sources 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denniston, Nicholas Aaron

    2011-08-08

    Renewable energy sources including photovoltaic cells, fuel cells, and wind turbines require converters with high voltage gain in order to interface with power transmission and distribution networks. These conversions are conventionally made using...

  9. Optical gain and lasing from band-engineered Ge-on-Si at room temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Jifeng

    We present theoretical modeling and experimental results of optical gain and lasing from tensile-strained, n[superscript +] Ge-on-Si at room temperature. Compatible with silicon CMOS, these devices are ideal for large-scale ...

  10. Oscillator Seeding of a High Gain Harmonic Generation FEL in a Radiator-First Configuration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gandhi, P.

    2014-01-01

    Proceedings of the 2010 FEL Conference, Malm¨o, Sweden,Proceedings of the 2010 FEL Conference, Malm¨o, Sweden,of a high gain harmonic generation FEL in a radiator-first

  11. Loss-Gain Equalized Reconfigurable Phaser for Dynamic Radio Analog Signal Processing (R-ASP)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zou, Lianfeng; Caloz, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    We present a loss-gain equalized reconfigurable phaser for dynamic radio analog signal processing (R-ASP). Such a phaser provides real-time tunable group delay response with all-pass transmission. We propose a lumped loss-gain implementation, where tuning and equalization are mostly easily achieved. A theoretical study derives the transfer function and the fundamental characteristics of the device. The phaser is finally experimentally demonstrated, first using a single loss-gain pair and finally a three cascaded loss-gain pair structure with full reconfigurability , where up-chirp and down-chirp group delays are shown for illustration. It is expected that this phaser will find wide applications in radio analog signal processing (R-ASP) systems requiring dynamic adaptability.

  12. CMOS Photodiodes with Substrate Openings for Higher Conversion Gain in Active Pixel Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hornsey, Richard

    . Lee, R. I. Hornsey Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Waterloo, Ontario by a source-follower; the capacitance of the device determines the conversion gain. In the case of CMOS active

  13. Complexity within the Air Force acquisition system gaining insight from a theory of collapse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marticello, Daniel Nicholas, Jr

    2012-01-01

    Joseph Tainter's theory of societal collapse is applied in an examination of the U.S. Air Force's aircraft acquisition system in order to gain insight into the enterprise's lagging performance. Theories of collapse at both ...

  14. NREL: News - NREL Solar Research Gains Two R&D 100 Awards

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Gains Two R&D 100 Awards July 17, 2008 An ultra-light, highly efficient solar cell and use of ink-jet printing to manufacture thin-film photovoltaics-both developed at...

  15. Gain media edge treatment to suppress amplified spontaneous emission in a high power laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hackel, Lloyd A. (Livermore, CA); Soules, Thomas F. (Livermore, CA); Fochs, Scott N. (Livermore, CA); Rotter, Mark D. (San Ramon, CA); Letts, Stephan A. (San Ramon, CA)

    2011-02-22

    A novel method and apparatus for suppressing ASE and/or parasitic oscillation modes in a laser is introduced. By roughening one or more peripheral edges of a solid-state crystal or ceramic laser gain media and by bonding such edges to a predetermined electromagnetic absorbing material arranged adjacent to the entire outer surface of the peripheral edges of the roughened laser gain media, ASE, parasitic oscillation modes and/or residual pump energy can be effectively suppressed.

  16. A circuit for gain measurement of frequency referenced digitally self tuned filters 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cook, Robert Wake

    1985-01-01

    A CIRCUIT FOR GAIN MEASUREMENT OF FREQUENCY REFERENCED DIGITALLY SELF TUNED FILTERS A Thesis by ROBERT WAKE COOK Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASSAM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE December 1985 Major Subject: Electrical Engineering A CIRCUIT FOR GAIN MEASUREMENT OF FREQUENCY REFERENCED DIGITALLY SELF TUNED FILTERS A Thesis bv ROl3ERT WAKE COOK Approved as to style and content by: Dr. Randal! L. Geiger (Chairman...

  17. Temperature dependent gain of the atomic xenon laser Gregory A. Hebne?)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kushner, Mark

    Temperature dependent gain of the atomic xenon laser Gregory A. Hebne?) Sandia National(3/2),-6p(5/2),] and 2.03 pm [5d(3/2)t- 6p( 3/2) t] atomic xenon transitions for gas temperatures/Xe, He/Ar/Xe, and Ne/Ar/Xe gas mixtures at a pump power of 8 W/cm3. For constant gas density, the gain

  18. Tuning gain and bandwidth of traveling wave tubes using metamaterial beam-wave interaction structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lipton, Robert Polizzi, Anthony

    2014-10-14

    We employ metamaterial beam-wave interaction structures for tuning the gain and bandwidth of short traveling wave tubes. The interaction structures are made from metal rings of uniform cross section, which are periodically deployed along the length of the traveling wave tube. The aspect ratio of the ring cross sections is adjusted to control both gain and bandwidth. The frequency of operation is controlled by the filling fraction of the ring cross section with respect to the size of the period cell.

  19. Hot-pressed ceramic Cr2+ :ZnSe gain-switched

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mirov, Sergey B.

    Hot-pressed ceramic Cr2+ :ZnSe gain-switched laser A. Gallian, V. V. Fedorov, and S. B. Mirov: The technology of hot-pressed Cr2+ :ZnSe ceramic preparation is reported. Comparative gain-switched lasing of hot­pressed ceramic and CVD grown Cr2+ :ZnSe samples with slope efficiencies up to 10 % and output energies up to 2 m

  20. Gain media edge treatment to suppress amplified spontaneous emission in a high power laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hackel, Lloyd A. (Livermore, CA); Soules, Thomas F. (Livermore, CA); Fochs, Scott N. (Livermore, CA); Rotter, Mark D. (San Ramon, CA); Letts, Stephan A. (San Ramon, CA)

    2008-12-09

    A novel method and apparatus for suppressing ASE and parasitic oscillation modes in a high average power laser is introduced. By roughening one or more peripheral edges of a solid-state crystal or ceramic laser gain media and by bonding such edges using a substantially high index bonding elastomer or epoxy to a predetermined electromagnetic absorbing arranged adjacent to the entire outer surface of the peripheral edges of the roughened laser gain media, ASE and parasitic oscillation modes can be effectively suppressed.

  1. The Effect of Elevated Temperature on Concrete Materials and Structures - a Literature Review.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naus, Dan J

    2006-03-01

    The objective of this limited study was to provide an overview of the effects of elevated temperature on the behavior of concrete materials and structures. In meeting this objective the effects of elevated temperatures on the properties of ordinary Portland cement concrete constituent materials and concretes are summarized. The effects of elevated temperature on high-strength concrete materials are noted and their performance compared to normal strength concretes. A review of concrete materials for elevated-temperature service is presented. Nuclear power plant and general civil engineering design codes are described. Design considerations and analytical techniques for evaluating the response of reinforced concrete structures to elevated-temperature conditions are presented. Pertinent studies in which reinforced concrete structural elements were subjected to elevated temperatures are described.

  2. Simple Formula for the Optimization of the FEL Gain Length Including the Effects of Emittance, Betatron Oscillations and Energy Spread

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chin, Y.H.

    2011-01-01

    for a quick estimate of the FEL parameters which minimizefor the Optimization of the FEL Gain Length Including thet h e Optimization o f the FEL Gain Length Including t h e

  3. Digital Elevation Model, 0.5-m, Barrow Environmental Observatory, Alaska, 2012

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Gangodagamage, Chandana; Wilson, Cathy; Rowland, Joel

    The dataset is a digital elevation model, DEM, of a 2km by 7km region in the vicinity of the Barrow Environmental Observatory near Barrow, Ak.

  4. Aerosol measurements at a high-elevation site: composition, size, and cloud condensation nuclei activity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Friedman, Beth

    Measurements of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentrations, single particle composition and size distributions at a high-elevation research site from March 2011 are presented.

  5. Digital Elevation Model, 0.5-m, Barrow Environmental Observatory, Alaska, 2012

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Wilson,Cathy; Rowland,Joel; Gangodagamage,Chandana

    2013-12-08

    The dataset is a digital elevation model, DEM, of a 2km by 7km region in the vicinity of the Barrow Environmental Observatory near Barrow, Ak.

  6. Gaining momentum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burr, M.T.

    1995-10-01

    Few regions of the world exemplify the variety of approaches to power sector reform as thoroughly as Latin America. At one end of the spectrum stands Chile, which has successfully restructured its electric power industry, privatizing a large share of its formerly state-owned utility assets. Of all power markets in Latin America, Chile`s is the most open to private developers, with transparent pricing policies and competitive procurement procedures. At the other end of the spectrum, Venezuela`s privatization program has stalled, and the power market has become less accessible to private investment than before the current administration was elected. Many Latin American countries share some important challenges. First, a lack of credit worthiness among electric utilities makes it difficult to finance power projects that rely on long-term power sales agreements. Second, lingering fallout from Mexico`s financial crisis continues to affect commercial lenders` confidence in Latin America in general. Third, efforts at privatization and power market liberalization have proceeded in fits and starts, with some countries seeming to take as many steps backwards as forward. Nevertheless, Latin America remains one of the most attractive regions of the world for independent power development. This paper examines recent developments in key markets.

  7. Plains Elevated Convection at Night (PECAN) Experiment Science Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, D; Parsons, D; Geerts, B

    2015-03-01

    The Plains Elevated Convection at Night (PECAN) experiment is a large field campaign that is being supported by the National Science Foundation (NSF) with contributions from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the National Atmospheric and Space Administration (NASA), and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The overarching goal of the PECAN experiment is to improve the understanding and simulation of the processes that initiate and maintain convection and convective precipitation at night over the central portion of the Great Plains region of the United States (Parsons et al. 2013). These goals are important because (1) a large fraction of the yearly precipitation in the Great Plains comes from nocturnal convection, (2) nocturnal convection in the Great Plains is most often decoupled from the ground and, thus, is forced by other phenomena aloft (e.g., propagating bores, frontal boundaries, low-level jets [LLJ], etc.), (3) there is a relative lack of understanding how these disturbances initiate and maintain nocturnal convection, and (4) this lack of understanding greatly hampers the ability of numerical weather and climate models to simulate nocturnal convection well. This leads to significant uncertainties in predicting the onset, location, frequency, and intensity of convective cloud systems and associated weather hazards over the Great Plains.

  8. Design and Fabrication of an Optimum Peripheral Region for Low Gain Avalanche Detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez-Martinez, Pablo; Hidalgo, Salvador; Greco, Virginia; Merlos, Angel; Pellegrini, Giulio; Quirion, David

    2015-01-01

    Low Gain Avalanche Detectors (LGAD) represent a remarkable advance in high energy particle detection, since they provide a moderate increase (gain ~10) of the collected charge, thus leading to a notable improvement of the signal-to-noise ratio, which largely extends the possible application of Silicon detectors beyond their present working field. The optimum detection performance requires a careful implementation of the multiplication junction, in order to obtain the desired gain on the read out signal, but also a proper design of the edge termination and the peripheral region, which prevents the LGAD detectors from premature breakdown and large leakage current. This work deals with the critical technological aspects when optimising the LGAD structure. The impact of several design strategies for the device periphery is evaluated with the aid of TCAD simulations, and compared with the experimental results obtained from the first LGAD prototypes fabricated at the IMB-CNM clean room. Solutions for the peripheral...

  9. Building accurate initial models using gain functions for waveform inversion in the Laplace domain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wansoo Ha; Changsoo Shin

    2014-08-20

    We suggest an initial model building technique using time gain functions in the Laplace domain. Applying the gain expressed as a power of time is equivalent to taking the partial derivative of the Laplace-domain wavefield with respect to a damping constant. We construct an objective function, which minimizes the logarithmic differences between the gained field data and the partial derivative of the modeled data with respect to the damping constant. We calculate the modeled wavefield, the partial derivative wavefield, and the gradient direction in the Laplace domain using the analytic Green's function starting from a constant velocity model. This is an efficient method to generate an accurate initial model for a following Laplace-domain inversion. Numerical examples using two marine field datasets confirm that a starting model updated once from a scratch using the gradient direction calculated with the proposed method can be successfully used for a subsequent Laplace-domain inversion.

  10. Microscopic model for intersubband gain from electrically pumped quantum-dot structures

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Michael, Stephan; Chow, Weng Wah; Schneider, Han Christian

    2014-10-03

    We study theoretically the performance of electrically pumped self-organized quantum dots as a gain material in the mid-IR range at room temperature. We analyze an AlGaAs/InGaAs based structure composed of dots-in-a-well sandwiched between two quantum wells. We numerically analyze a comprehensive model by combining a many-particle approach for electronic dynamics with a realistic modeling of the electronic states in the whole structure. We investigate the gain both for quasi-equilibrium conditions and current injection. Comparing different structures, we find that steady-state gain can only be realized by an efficient extraction process, which prevents an accumulation of electrons in continuum states, thatmore »make the available scattering pathways through the quantum dot active region too fast to sustain inversion.« less

  11. Adaptive fuzzy dynamic surface control for the chaotic permanent magnet synchronous motor using Nussbaum gain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo, Shaohua [School of Automation, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044, China and College of Mechanical Engineering, Hunan University of Arts and Science, Hunan 415000 (China)

    2014-09-01

    This paper is concerned with the problem of adaptive fuzzy dynamic surface control (DSC) for the permanent magnet synchronous motor (PMSM) system with chaotic behavior, disturbance and unknown control gain and parameters. Nussbaum gain is adopted to cope with the situation that the control gain is unknown. And the unknown items can be estimated by fuzzy logic system. The proposed controller guarantees that all the signals in the closed-loop system are bounded and the system output eventually converges to a small neighborhood of the desired reference signal. Finally, the numerical simulations indicate that the proposed scheme can suppress the chaos of PMSM and show the effectiveness and robustness of the proposed method.

  12. ORIGINAL PAPER Effects of elevated CO2 and soil water content on phytohormone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeLucia, Evan H.

    ORIGINAL PAPER Effects of elevated CO2 and soil water content on phytohormone transcript induction the abundance of SA compared with plants grown in ambient CO2. A mild reduction in soil water content had herbivory. When applied in combination, elevated CO2 and reduced soil water content suppressed

  13. Contracting Rail Freight Services for Country Elevators in the Texas Panhandle. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fuller, Stephen

    1984-01-01

    that of the 10 elevators to be up graded. The plant size cost model, which was most lik~ ~he bushel storage capacity of the upgraded facIhty, was selected for estimating elevator costs. Plant depreciation estimates of existing plants varied and in some cases... ............................................................................ 4 Wheat Supply and Farm Storage Capacity ..................................... 4 Farm Assembly Cost. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 4 Farm Storage Cost...

  14. EVIDENCE OF ELEVATED OZONE CONCENTRATIONS ON FORESTED SLOPES OF THE LOWER FRASER VALLEY, BRITISH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKendry, Ian

    EVIDENCE OF ELEVATED OZONE CONCENTRATIONS ON FORESTED SLOPES OF THE LOWER FRASER VALLEY, BRITISH, hourly average ozone concentrations were mea- sured at three sites of differing elevation (188, 588. Sites experienced ozone concentrations ranging from 0 to 88 ppb in 2001, and 0 to 96 ppb in 2002. Daily

  15. Evolution of resistance to white pine blister rust in high-elevation pines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tavener, Simon

    Evolution of resistance to white pine blister rust in high-elevation pines Mike Antolin, Stuart Station, USDA Forest Service Thanks: NSF award 0734267, USDA Forest Service Evolution of resistance ­ p. 1/74 #12;The basic ecology Evolution of resistance ­ p. 2/74 #12;High-elevation White Pines · Habitat: dry

  16. A Database of Herbaceous Vegetation Responses to Elevated Atmospheric CO2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Database of Herbaceous Vegetation Responses to Elevated Atmospheric CO2 ORNL/CDIAC-124 NDP-073/CDIAC-124 NDP-073 A DATABASE OF HERBACEOUS VEGETATION RESPONSES TO ELEVATED ATMOSPHERIC CO2 Contributed by Michael H. Jones Peter S. Curtis Department of Evolution, Ecology, and Organismal Biology The Ohio State

  17. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Elevator Drive Systems Energy Consumption Study Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Energy Consumption Study Report Benny ChunYin Chan University of British Columbia EECE 492 April 6th the current status of the subject matter of a project/report". #12;Elevator Drive Systems Energy Consumption Study Report April 2012 0 2012 Elevator Drive Systems Energy Consumption Study Report Benny CY Chan UBC

  18. PREDICTING THE PERFORMANCE OF AN ELEVATED WATER TABLE FOR PREVENTING ACID

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aubertin, Michel

    PREDICTING THE PERFORMANCE OF AN ELEVATED WATER TABLE FOR PREVENTING ACID MINE DRAINAGE M. The effectiveness of an elevated water table in preventing acid mine drainage (AMD) can be quantified using diffusion de l'oxygène en milieu quasi saturé. Cette efficacité à empêcher le drainage minier acide (DMA

  19. Physiological impacts of elevated carbon dioxide and ocean acidification Rachael M. Heuer* and Martin Grosell*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grosell, Martin

    Physiological impacts of elevated carbon dioxide and ocean acidification on fish Rachael M. Heuer, Grosell M. Physiological impacts of elevated carbon dioxide and ocean acidification on fish. Am J Physiol in dynamic regulation of acid-base transport pathways across species, exposure levels, and exposure duration

  20. Biomass and toxicity responses of poison ivy (Toxicodendron radicans) to elevated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohan, Jacqueline E.

    Biomass and toxicity responses of poison ivy (Toxicodendron radicans) to elevated atmospheric CO2 dioxide (CO2), but pre- vious work done in controlled growth chambers shows that other vines exhibit large growth enhancement from elevated CO2. Rising CO2 is potentially responsible for the increased vine

  1. The role of plant species in biomass production and response to elevated CO2 and N

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, David D.

    REPORT The role of plant species in biomass production and response to elevated CO2 and N Joseph M that factorially manipulated plant diversity, CO2, and N, we quantified the effects of the presence of species having less variation in biomass over time. The response of plant biomass to elevated N, but not CO2

  2. Elevated CO2 stimulates grassland soil respiration by increasing carbon inputs rather than by enhancing soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Elevated CO2 stimulates grassland soil respiration by increasing carbon inputs rather than It is not clear whether the consistent positive effect of elevated CO2 on soil respiration (soil carbon flux, SCF) results from increased plant and microbial activity due to (i) greater C availability through CO2-induced

  3. Fuel Cycle Analysis Framework Base Cases for the IAEA/INPRO GAINS Collaborative Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brent Dixon

    2012-09-01

    Thirteen countries participated in the Collaborative Project GAINS “Global Architecture of Innovative Nuclear Energy Systems Based on Thermal and Fast Reactors Including a Closed Fuel Cycle”, which was the primary activity within the IAEA/INPRO Program Area B: “Global Vision on Sustainable Nuclear Energy” for the last three years. The overall objective of GAINS was to develop a standard framework for assessing future nuclear energy systems taking into account sustainable development, and to validate results through sample analyses. This paper details the eight scenarios that constitute the GAINS framework base cases for analysis of the transition to future innovative nuclear energy systems. The framework base cases provide a reference for users of the framework to start from in developing and assessing their own alternate systems. Each base case is described along with performance results against the GAINS sustainability evaluation metrics. The eight cases include four using a moderate growth projection and four using a high growth projection for global nuclear electricity generation through 2100. The cases are divided into two sets, addressing homogeneous and heterogeneous scenarios developed by GAINS to model global fuel cycle strategies. The heterogeneous world scenario considers three separate nuclear groups based on their fuel cycle strategies, with non-synergistic and synergistic cases. The framework base case analyses results show the impact of these different fuel cycle strategies while providing references for future users of the GAINS framework. A large number of scenario alterations are possible and can be used to assess different strategies, different technologies, and different assumptions about possible futures of nuclear power. Results can be compared to the framework base cases to assess where these alternate cases perform differently versus the sustainability indicators.

  4. Dynamic power balance for nonlinear waves in unbalanced gain and loss landscapes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kominis, Yannis

    2015-01-01

    The presence of losses in nonlinear photonic structures is a crucial issue for modern applications. Active parts are introduced for wave power compensation resulting in unbalanced gain and loss landscapes where localized beam propagation is, in general, dynamically unstable. Here we provide generic sufficient conditions for the relation between the gain-loss and the refractive index profiles in order to ensure efficient wave trapping and stable propagation for a wide range of beam launching conditions such as initial power, angle of incidence and position. The stability is a consequence of an underlying dynamic power balance mechanism related to a conserved quantity of wave dynamics.

  5. High Average Power Laser Gain Medium With Low Optical Distortion Using A Transverse Flowing Liquid Host

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Comaskey, Brian J. (Walnut Creek, CA); Ault, Earl R. (Livermore, CA); Kuklo, Thomas C. (Oakdale, CA)

    2005-07-05

    A high average power, low optical distortion laser gain media is based on a flowing liquid media. A diode laser pumping device with tailored irradiance excites the laser active atom, ion or molecule within the liquid media. A laser active component of the liquid media exhibits energy storage times longer than or comparable to the thermal optical response time of the liquid. A circulation system that provides a closed loop for mixing and circulating the lasing liquid into and out of the optical cavity includes a pump, a diffuser, and a heat exchanger. A liquid flow gain cell includes flow straighteners and flow channel compression.

  6. FEL and Optical Klystron Gain for an Electron Beam with Oscillatory Energy Distribution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stupakov, G.; Ding, Y.; Huang, Z.; /SLAC

    2009-12-09

    If the energy spread of a beam is larger then the Pierce parameter, the FEL gain length increases dramatically and the FEL output gets suppressed. We show that if the energy distribution of such a beam is made oscillatory on a small scale, the gain length can be considerably decreased. Such an oscillatory energy distribution is generated by first modulating the beam energy with a laser via the mechanism of inverse FEL, and then sending it through a strong chicane. We show that this approach also works for the optical klystron enhancement scheme. Our analytical results are corroborated by numerical simulations.

  7. Impacts of Elevated Atmospheric CO2and O3on Paper Birch (Betula papyrifera): Reproductive Fitness

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Darbah, Joseph N. T.; Kubiske, Mark E.; Nelson, Neil; Oksanen, Elina; Vaapavuori, Elina; Karnosky, David F.

    2007-01-01

    Atmospheric CO2and tropospheric O3are rising in many regions of the world. Little is known about how these two commonly co-occurring gases will affect reproductive fitness of important forest tree species. Here, we report on the long-term effects of CO3and O3for paper birch seedlings exposed for nearly their entire life history at the Aspen FACE (Free Air Carbon Dioxide Enrichment) site in Rhinelander, WI. Elevated CO2increased both male and female flower production, while elevated O3increased female flower production compared to trees in control rings. Interestingly, very little flowering has yet occurred in combined treatment. Elevated CO2had significant positive effect on birchmore »catkin size, weight, and germination success rate (elevated CO2increased germination rate of birch by 110% compared to ambient CO2concentrations, decreased seedling mortality by 73%, increased seed weight by 17%, increased root length by 59%, and root-to-shoot ratio was significantly decreased, all at 3 weeks after germination), while the opposite was true of elevated O3(elevated O3decreased the germination rate of birch by 62%, decreased seed weight by 25%, and increased root length by 15%). Under elevated CO2, plant dry mass increased by 9 and 78% at the end of 3 and 14 weeks, respectively. Also, the root and shoot lengths, as well as the biomass of the seedlings, were increased for seeds produced under elevated CO2, while the reverse was true for seedlings from seeds produced under the elevated O3. Similar trends in treatment differences were observed in seed characteristics, germination, and seedling development for seeds collected in both 2004 and 2005. Our results suggest that elevated CO2and O3can dramatically affect flowering, seed production, and seed quality of paper birch, affecting reproductive fitness of this species.« less

  8. Sub-Poissonian shot noise of a high internal gain injection photon detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohseni, Hooman

    Jin,2 and Ilesanmi Adesida2 1 Bio-Inspired Sensors and Optoelectronics Laboratory, Dept. of Electrical.northwestern.edu Abstract: The noise performance of an infrared injection photon detector with very high internal gain was evaluated. The optical to electrical conversion factor and Fano factor were measured under increasing

  9. Effects of dietary calcium and cholecalciferol on weight gain and mineral composition of the blue tilapia 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Connell, John Patrick

    1993-01-01

    .09 g in 38-1 aquaria receiving water with 0.1 mg Ca/l for a period of 36 weeks. Significantly (P < 0.05) greater weight gain, bone and scale calcium, as well as bone and scale phosphorus values were observed for fish fed the calciumsupplemented diets...

  10. Efficacies of dexfenfluramine and fluoxetine in preventing weight gain after smoking cessation 1-4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurtman, Richard

    in metabolism and energy intake both appear to change energy balance. Some findings suggest that quitting metabolic rate (9), Heightened energy intake probably makes a larger contribution to weight gain, because energy intake increases by "'627-1463 kJ (150-350 kcal)/d after smoking cessation (I, 10-12). Energy

  11. Mobile Agent Gain Scheduler Control in Inter-Continental Intelligent Space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chow, Mo-Yuen

    other to provide intelligent services to inhabitants [1, 3]. The mobile agents have sensors andMobile Agent Gain Scheduler Control in Inter-Continental Intelligent Space Rangsarit - Intelligent Space (iSpace) is a space (room, corridor, or street), which has distributed sensory and mobile

  12. Switching Stabilization and l2 Gain Performance Controller Synthesis for Discrete-Time Switched Linear Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Antsaklis, Panos

    Switching Stabilization and l2 Gain Performance Controller Synthesis for Discrete-Time Switched Linear Systems Hai Lin and Panos J. Antsaklis Abstract-- In this paper, the switching controller synthesis problem for a class of discrete-time switched linear systems is considered. In particular, a state

  13. Brain Tissue Volume Changes Following Weight Gain in Adults with Anorexia Nervosa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brain Tissue Volume Changes Following Weight Gain in Adults with Anorexia Nervosa Christina A Disord 2011; 44:406­411) Introduction Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a serious psychiatric ill- ness, MD3 ABSTRACT Objective: To measure brain volume deficits among underweight patients with anorexia

  14. Canopy Carbon Gain and Water Use: Analysis of Old-growth Conifers in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    structure, species composition, and climate. Key words: biogenic carbon emissions; canopy processes; forest;to the global challenge of increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2). One approach for predictingCanopy Carbon Gain and Water Use: Analysis of Old-growth Conifers in the Pacific Northwest William

  15. Modeling Sleep Mode Gains in Energy-Aware Networks $ Luca Chiaraviglioa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    simulations, we consider simple models of networks in which devices (i.e., nodes and links) consume energy not consume energy propor- tionally to the work they sustain, but they consume much even when they are underModeling Sleep Mode Gains in Energy-Aware Networks $ Luca Chiaraviglioa , Delia Ciullob , Marco

  16. An ultra-low voltage high gain operational transconductance amplifier for biomedical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    An ultra-low voltage high gain operational transconductance amplifier for biomedical applications that work at ultra low voltage power supply. Moreover, low power dissipation is essential in these systems dissipation is also proposed in [5]. Differential pairs are commonly used as input stages, in an ultra-low

  17. An Active Gain-control System for Avalanche Photo-Diodes under Moderate Temperature Variations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Kataoka; R. Sato; T. Ikagawa; J. Kotoku; Y. Kuramoto; Y. Tsubuku; T. Saito; Y. Yatsu; N. Kawai; Y. Ishikawa; N. Kawabata

    2006-02-17

    Avalanche photodiodes (APDs) are promising light sensor for various fields of experimental physics. It has been argued, however, that variation of APD gain with temperature could be a serious problem preventing APDs from replacing traditional photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) in some applications. Here we develop an active gain-control system to keep the APD gain stable under moderate temperature variations. As a performance demonstration of the proposed system, we have tested the response of a scintillation photon detector consisting of a 5x5 mm^2 reverse-type APD optically coupled with a CsI(Tl) crystal. We show that the APD gain was successfully controlled under a temperature variation of DT = 20deg, within a time-cycle of 6000 sec. The best FWHM energy resolution of 6.1+-0.2 % was obtained for 662 keV gamma-rays, and the energy threshold was as low as 6.5 keV, by integrating data from +20deg - 0deg cycles. The corresponding values for -20deg - 0deg cycles were 6.9+-0.2 % and 5.2 keV, respectively. These results are comparable, or only slightly worse than that obtained at a fixed temperature. Our results suggest new potential uses for APDs in various space researches and nuclear physics. As examples, we briefly introduce the NeXT and Cute-1.7 satellite missions that will carry the APDs as scientific instruments for the first time.

  18. Reducing gains/loss asymmetry: A virtual reality choice experiment (VRCE)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bateman, Ian J.

    responses. Adapting such insights to the field of non-market valuation, for certain environmental goods approaches to conveying a land use change scenario (relying principally on numeric information that the gains/loss asymmetry is roughly twice as strong under a conventional numeric CE design than

  19. Category Theory in Ontology Research: Concrete Gain from an Abstract Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hitzler, Pascal

    with the challenge of integrating information from different distributed sources. In the first place, this requiresCategory Theory in Ontology Research: Concrete Gain from an Abstract Approach Markus Kr¨otzsch Pascal Hitzler Marc Ehrig York Sure Institute AIFB, University of Karlsruhe, Germany; {mak

  20. Current gain in bipolar transistors with a field plate over the base surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anantharam, Venkat

    the base surface and extending from the collector- base junction edge, on the current gain of vertical n-p. Abstract: Vertical n-p-n and lateral p-n-p transistor structures of an integrated circuit are studied using carriers into the base contact. This simulation study has also been adopted for the study of lateral p-n-p

  1. Beef feedlot cattle use individual feeding strategies to gain access to feed in a competitive environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farrell, Anthony P.

    i Beef feedlot cattle use individual feeding strategies to gain access to feed in a competitive August 2007 © Gosia Zobel, 2007 #12;ii ABSTRACT Cattle are social animals and frequently interact interest in the social behavior of cattle, no research has focused on assessing the relationship between

  2. OPTIMUM MORPHOLOGY AND PERFORMANCE GAINS OF ORGANIC SOLAR CELLS Biswajit Ray and Muhammad A. Alam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alam, Muhammad A.

    OPTIMUM MORPHOLOGY AND PERFORMANCE GAINS OF ORGANIC SOLAR CELLS Biswajit Ray and Muhammad A. Alam geometry. INTRODUCTION AND BACKGROUND Research in the area of organic photovoltaic (OPV) cell started higher recombination due to increased interfacial area. Thus even though BHJ solar cell has achieved

  3. Entanglement, EPR correlations, and mesoscopic quantum superposition by the high-gain quantum injected parametric amplification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roma "La Sapienza", Università di

    of bipartite entanglement of the output field generated by the quantum injected high-gain optical parametric then generates on the output cloning mode C M N copies, or clones of the input qubit . Moreover, in the case of mode-nondegenerate QIOPA, the device simulta- neously generates M-N states on the output anticlon- ing

  4. Discrete-time Lyapunov based small-gain theorem for parameterized interconnected ISS systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nesic, Dragan

    Discrete-time Lyapunov based small-gain theorem for parameterized interconnected ISS systems Dina via the Lyapunov method. In particular, an ISS Lyapunov function for the overall system is constructed from the ISS Lyapunov functions of the two subsystems. We consider parameterized families of discrete

  5. ANALYTIC MODEL OF HARMONIC GENERATION IN THE LOW-GAIN FEL REGIME

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurtele, Jonathan

    ANALYTIC MODEL OF HARMONIC GENERATION IN THE LOW-GAIN FEL REGIME G. Penn, M. Reinsch, J.S. Wurtele , LBNL, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA Abstract Harmonic generation using free electron lasers (FELs) requires with simulation results using the FEL code GENESIS, both for single stages of harmonic generation and for the LUX

  6. GAIN-SCHEDULED PID FOR IMBALANCE COMPENSATION OF A MAGNETIC BEARING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noll, Dominikus

    GAIN-SCHEDULED PID FOR IMBALANCE COMPENSATION OF A MAGNETIC BEARING Laleh Hosseini@yahoo.fr, noll@mip.ups-tlse.fr Keywords: Scheduled controller for magnetic bearing, H optimal decentralized PID of a magnetic bearing device is addressed by parameter varying control. Within the structure of decen- tralized

  7. Design and Performance Tradeoffs of High-Gain Observers with Applications to the Control of Smart

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tan, Xiaobo

    and Computer Engineering 2006 #12;ABSTRACT Design and Performance Tradeoffs of High-Gain Observers multirate output feedback scheme to a shape memory alloy actuated rotary joint by com- bining the observer with a hysteresis inversion controller. The rotary joint is modeled as a hysteresis operator of Preisach type

  8. Feature Shape and Elevation Based Road Classification and Extraction on High Spatial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carbonara, Joaquin

    Feature Shape and Elevation Based Road Classification and Extraction on High Spatial Resolution #12; 2 Abstract: Classification and extraction of geospatial features from high spatial resolution. However, the conventional method of human interpretation and digitizing cannot fulfill the requirements

  9. A User Guide for Marsh Analysis and Planning Tool Incorporating Tides and Elevations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ................... 18 3) Vertical Datum (VDatum) Transformation ....................... 20 c. Digital Elemation Models on a combination of a digital elevation model (DEM) derived from GPS observations, local tidal datums, and grass

  10. Electronic structure of perovskite oxide surfaces at elevated temperatures and its correlation with oxygen reduction reactivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Yan, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2014-01-01

    The objective is to understand the origin of the local oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity on the basis of the local electronic structure at the surface of transition metal oxides at elevated temperatures and in oxygen ...

  11. Systemic Elevation of PTEN Induces a Tumor-Suppressive Metabolic State

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garcia-Cao, Isabel

    Decremental loss of PTEN results in cancer susceptibility and tumor progression. PTEN elevation might therefore be an attractive option for cancer prevention and therapy. We have generated several transgenic mouse lines ...

  12. Carbon Dynamics in Aquatic Ecosystems in Response to Elevated Atmospheric CO2 and Altered Nutrients Availability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Song, Chao

    2011-04-26

    Aquatic ecosystems will experience altered inorganic carbon, nitrogen and phosphorous availability in the future due to elevated atmospheric CO2, stronger stratification and anthropogenic activities. Despite its importance in modulating global...

  13. Fine root dynamics along an elevational gradient in tropical Amazonian and Andean forests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malhi, Yadvinder

    synchronised to seasonality of solar radiation. Finally, we provide the first insights into root growth-level productivity is limited. To date, studies from only three elevational transects have provided data on fine root

  14. Effects of Vegetation Structure and Elevation on Lower Keys Marsh Rabbit Density 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dedrickson, Angela

    2012-02-14

    LKMR density on lands managed by the United States Navy, Naval Air Station Key West and evaluate how vegetation structure and patch elevation effect LKMR population density. I conducted fecal pellet counts to determine LKMR density, collected...

  15. MMPI-A: test of behavioral correlates associated with elevated scales in a sample of female juvenile delinquents 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefanov, Michael Lee

    2006-10-30

    probability of aggressive behavior. Behavioral correlates associated with elevated MMPI-A scale 9 are impulsive behaviors, grandiose self- perception, and insensitivity. Elevations on scales 4 and 9 are not the only elevated MMPI scales commonly.... Nonconformity, unconventional, and socially deviant Scale 9 1. Impulsivity and restlessness 2. Greater likelihood and delinquent behaviors Content Scales Adolescent-Anger 1. Irritability and physical aggressiveness Adolescent...

  16. Effects of plant diversity, N fertilization, and elevated carbon dioxide on grassland soil N cycling in a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, David D.

    Effects of plant diversity, N fertilization, and elevated carbon dioxide on grassland soil N evaluated how elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2), N fertilization, and plant species richness alter can limit the response of plant productivity to both elevated atmo- spheric carbon dioxide (CO2

  17. Abstract The results of published and unpublished ex-periments investigating the impacts of elevated [CO2] on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of elevated [CO2] on the chemistry of leaf litter and decomposition of plant tissues are summarized. The data plants under elevated [CO2] have an impact on decomposition processes. A meta-analysis of data from was 7.1% lower in elevated [CO2] compared to that in ambient [CO2]. This statistically significant

  18. Rhizodeposition-induced decomposition increases N availability to wild and cultivated wheat genotypes under elevated CO2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Kessel, Chris

    genotypes under elevated CO2 Marie-Anne de Graaff a,b,*, Chris Van Kessel a , Johan Six a a Department Available online 11 March 2009 Keywords: Elevated CO2 Rhizodeposition N mineralization 13 C 15 N Genotypes a b s t r a c t Elevated CO2 may increase nutrient availability in the rhizosphere bystimulating N

  19. Interannual climatic variation mediates elevated CO2 and O3 effects on forest growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ). For example, some include elevated [CO2] effects on photosynthesis to estimate the fraction of anthropo- genicInterannual climatic variation mediates elevated CO2 and O3 effects on forest growth M A R K E . K carbon dioxide ([CO2]; 518 lL LÀ1 ) and ozone concentrations ([O3]; 1.5 Â background of 30­40 nL LÀ1

  20. Elevated CO2 stimulates grassland soil respiration by increasing carbon inputs rather than by enhancing soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, David D.

    Elevated CO2 stimulates grassland soil respiration by increasing carbon inputs rather than by enhancing soil moisture E . C A R O L A D A I R * § , P E T E R B . R E I C H , J A R E D J . T R O It is not clear whether the consistent positive effect of elevated CO2 on soil respiration (soil carbon flux, SCF

  1. A bootstrapped, low-noise, and high-gain photodetector for shot noise measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Haijun; Yang, Wenhai; Li, Zhixiu; Li, Xuefeng; Zheng, Yaohui

    2014-01-15

    We presented a low-noise, high-gain photodetector based on the bootstrap structure and the L-C (inductance and capacitance) combination. Electronic characteristics of the photodetector, including electronic noise, gain and frequency response, and dynamic range, were verified through a single-frequency Nd:YVO{sub 4} laser at 1064 nm with coherent output. The measured shot noise of 50 ?W laser was 13 dB above the electronic noise at the analysis frequency of 2 MHz, and 10 dB at 3 MHz. And a maximum clearance of 28 dB at 2 MHz was achieved when 1.52 mW laser was illuminated. In addition, the photodetector showed excellent linearities for both DC and AC amplifications in the laser power range between 12.5 ?W and 1.52 mW.

  2. Turning low solar heat gain windows into energy savers in winter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feuermann, D.; Novoplansky, A. [Ben-Gurion Univ. of the Negev, Sede Boker (Israel). Jacob Blaustein Inst. for Desert Research

    1996-10-01

    The reduction in summer peak cooling loads of buildings with a large ratio of window to floor areas is often achieved by windows with a low solar heat gain coefficient (SHGC). These windows are typically double glazed with the exterior pane tinted or selectively absorbing. Absorbed solar radiation is rejected to the environment. This is undesirable in the cold season. The authors suggest that by turning south-facing windows by 180{degree} for the duration of the cold season, the solar heat gain of these windows can be increased significantly. By means of a computer simulation, they estimate seasonal energy savings for a model room in several climates. The effect of building heat capacity on the savings is also studied. Windows whose positions can be reversed for ease of cleaning are commercially available. This study shows that in a suitable climate the achievable savings easily compensate for the additional effort and possible investment over the lifetime of the window.

  3. Theory of high gain cavity-enhanced spontaneous parametric down-conversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joanna A. Zieli?ska; Morgan W. Mitchell

    2015-01-08

    We compute the output of multimode cavity-enhanced spontaneous parametric down-conversion (SPDC) for sub-threshold, but otherwise arbitrary, gain. We find analytic Bogoliubov transformations that allow us to calculate arbitrary field correlation functions, including the second-order intensity correlation function $G^{(2)}(T)$. The results show evidence of increased coherence due to stimulated SPDC. We extend an earlier model [Lu and Ou, Phys. Rev. A, 62, 033804 (2000)] to arbitrary gain and finesse, and show the extension gives accurate results in most scenarios. The results will allow simple, analytic description of cavity-based nonclassical light sources for quantum networking, quantum-enhanced sensing of atoms and generation of highly non-classical field states

  4. Reducing Thermal Losses and Gains With Buried and Encapsulated Ducts in Hot-Humid Climates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shapiro, C.; Magee, A.; Zoeller, W.

    2013-02-01

    The Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) monitored three houses in Jacksonville, FL, to investigate the effectiveness of encapsulated and encapsulated/buried ducts in reducing thermal losses and gains from ductwork in unconditioned attics. Burying ductwork beneath loose-fill insulation has been identified as an effective method of reducing thermal losses and gains from ductwork in dry climates, but it is not applicable in humid climates where condensation may occur on the outside of the duct jacket. By encapsulating the ductwork in closed cell polyurethane foam (ccSPF) before burial beneath loose-fill mineral fiber insulation, the condensation potential may be reduced while increasing the R-value of the ductwork.

  5. Robust random number generation using steady-state emission of gain-switched laser diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yuan, Z. L. Lucamarini, M.; Dynes, J. F.; Fröhlich, B.; Plews, A.; Shields, A. J.

    2014-06-30

    We demonstrate robust, high-speed random number generation using interference of the steady-state emission of guaranteed random phases, obtained through gain-switching a semiconductor laser diode. Steady-state emission tolerates large temporal pulse misalignments and therefore significantly improves the interference quality. Using an 8-bit digitizer followed by a finite-impulse-response unbiasing algorithm, we achieve random number generation rates of 8 and 20?Gb/s, for laser repetition rates of 1 and 2.5?GHz, respectively, with a ±20% tolerance in the interferometer differential delay. We also report a generation rate of 80?Gb/s using partially phase-correlated short pulses. In relation to the field of quantum key distribution, our results confirm the gain-switched laser diode as a suitable light source, capable of providing phase-randomized coherent pulses at a clock rate of up to 2.5?GHz.

  6. Measuring solar reflectance - Part I: Defining a metric that accurately predicts solar heat gain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levinson, Ronnen; Akbari, Hashem; Berdahl, Paul [Heat Island Group, Environmental Energy Technologies Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2010-09-15

    Solar reflectance can vary with the spectral and angular distributions of incident sunlight, which in turn depend on surface orientation, solar position and atmospheric conditions. A widely used solar reflectance metric based on the ASTM Standard E891 beam-normal solar spectral irradiance underestimates the solar heat gain of a spectrally selective ''cool colored'' surface because this irradiance contains a greater fraction of near-infrared light than typically found in ordinary (unconcentrated) global sunlight. At mainland US latitudes, this metric R{sub E891BN} can underestimate the annual peak solar heat gain of a typical roof or pavement (slope {<=} 5:12 [23 ]) by as much as 89 W m{sup -2}, and underestimate its peak surface temperature by up to 5 K. Using R{sub E891BN} to characterize roofs in a building energy simulation can exaggerate the economic value N of annual cool roof net energy savings by as much as 23%. We define clear sky air mass one global horizontal (''AM1GH'') solar reflectance R{sub g,0}, a simple and easily measured property that more accurately predicts solar heat gain. R{sub g,0} predicts the annual peak solar heat gain of a roof or pavement to within 2 W m{sup -2}, and overestimates N by no more than 3%. R{sub g,0} is well suited to rating the solar reflectances of roofs, pavements and walls. We show in Part II that R{sub g,0} can be easily and accurately measured with a pyranometer, a solar spectrophotometer or version 6 of the Solar Spectrum Reflectometer. (author)

  7. Measuring solar reflectance Part I: Defining a metric that accurately predicts solar heat gain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levinson, Ronnen; Akbari, Hashem; Berdahl, Paul

    2010-05-14

    Solar reflectance can vary with the spectral and angular distributions of incident sunlight, which in turn depend on surface orientation, solar position and atmospheric conditions. A widely used solar reflectance metric based on the ASTM Standard E891 beam-normal solar spectral irradiance underestimates the solar heat gain of a spectrally selective 'cool colored' surface because this irradiance contains a greater fraction of near-infrared light than typically found in ordinary (unconcentrated) global sunlight. At mainland U.S. latitudes, this metric RE891BN can underestimate the annual peak solar heat gain of a typical roof or pavement (slope {le} 5:12 [23{sup o}]) by as much as 89 W m{sup -2}, and underestimate its peak surface temperature by up to 5 K. Using R{sub E891BN} to characterize roofs in a building energy simulation can exaggerate the economic value N of annual cool-roof net energy savings by as much as 23%. We define clear-sky air mass one global horizontal ('AM1GH') solar reflectance R{sub g,0}, a simple and easily measured property that more accurately predicts solar heat gain. R{sub g,0} predicts the annual peak solar heat gain of a roof or pavement to within 2 W m{sup -2}, and overestimates N by no more than 3%. R{sub g,0} is well suited to rating the solar reflectances of roofs, pavements and walls. We show in Part II that R{sub g,0} can be easily and accurately measured with a pyranometer, a solar spectrophotometer or version 6 of the Solar Spectrum Reflectometer.

  8. Observation of transient gain without population inversion in a laser-cooled rubidium lambda system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. R. de Echaniz; Andrew D. Greentree; A. V. Durrant; D. M. Segal; J. P. Marangos; J. A. Vaccaro

    2001-05-17

    We have observed clear Rabi oscillations of a weak probe in a strongly driven three-level lambda system in laser-cooled rubidium for the first time. When the coupling field is non-adiabatically switched on using a Pockels cell, transient probe gain without population inversion is obtained in the presence of uncoupled absorptions. Our results are supported by three-state computations.

  9. Relationship of the serum protein-bound iodine to rates of gain in beef cattle 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stokes, David Kershaw

    1956-01-01

    HERITABILITY AND REPEATABILITY OF THE SERUM PROTEIN- BOUND IODINE IN IMMATURE BEEF CATTLE...................... 13 THE METHOD OF MEASUREMENT OF SERUM PROTEIN- BOUND IODINE............................................ 13 REPEATABILITY OF THE SERUM PBI LEVEL.................... 17 ESTIMATES OF HE RIT ABILITY OF THE SERUM PBI LEVEL IN IMMATURE BEEF CATTLE......................... 23 RELATIONSHIP OF THE SERUM PROTEIN-BOUND IODINE LEVELS TO RATES OF GAIN IN IMMATURE BEEF CATTLE......... 31 PROCEDURE...

  10. Prediction of internal temperature swings in direct-gain passive-solar buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balcomb, J.D.

    1983-01-01

    The diurnal heat capacity method is presented for estimating inside-temperature swings attributable to direct winter solar gain. The procedures are simplified to be suitable for hand analysis, aided by tables of diurnal heat capacity for various materials. The method has been spot checked against computer simulation and has been used successfully by a group of 20 builders in New Mexico to analyze whether temperature swings would be excessive in their designs.

  11. 9 GeV Energy Gain in a Beam-Driven Plasma Wakefield Accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Litos, M; Allen, J M; An, W; Clarke, C I; Corde, S; Clayton, C E; Frederico, J; Gessner, S J; Green, S Z; Hogan, M J; Joshi, C; Lu, W; Marsh, K A; Mori, W B; Schmeltz, M; Vafaei-Najafabadi, N; Yakimenko, V

    2015-01-01

    An electron beam has gained a maximum energy of 9 GeV per particle in a 1.3 m-long electron beam-driven plasma wakefield accelerator. The amount of charge accelerated in the spectral peak was 28.3 pC, and the root-mean-square energy spread was 5.0%. The mean accelerated charge and energy gain per particle of the 215 shot data set was 115 pC and 5.3 GeV, respectively, corresponding to an acceleration gradient of 4.0 GeV/m at the spectral peak. The mean energy spread of the data set was 5.1%. These results are consistent with the extrapolation of the previously reported energy gain results using a shorter, 36 cm-long plasma source to within 10%, evincing a non-evolving wake structure that can propagate distances of over a meter in length. Wake-loading effects were evident in the data through strong dependencies observed between various spectral properties and the amount of accelerated charge.

  12. Investigation of the electron trajectories and gain regimes of the whistler pumped free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jafarinia, F.; Jafari, S. [Department of Physics, University of Guilan, Rasht 41335-1914 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mehdian, H. [Department of Physics and Institute for Plasma Research, Tarbiat Moallem University, Tehran 15614 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-04-15

    A free-electron laser (FEL) scheme, which employs the whistler wave as a slow electromagnetic wave wiggler, was studied theoretically. Subjected to the transverse fields of whistler wave wiggler, the beam electrons are the source of the energy needed to produce electromagnetic radiation. The strength and the period of the wiggler field depend on the parameters of the magnetoplasma medium. This configuration has a higher tunability by controlling the plasma density, on top of the {gamma}-tunability of the conventional FELs. The theory of linear gain and electron trajectories was presented and four groups (I, II, III, and IV) of electron orbits were found in the presence of an axial guide magnetic field. Using perturbation analysis, it is found that these groups of orbits were stable except small regions of group I and IV orbits. The function {Phi} which determines the rate of change of axial velocity with beam energy was also derived. In the case in which {Phi}<0 represents a negative-mass regime in which the axial velocity accelerates as the electrons lose energy. Numerical solutions showed that by increasing the cyclotron frequency, the gain for group I and III orbits increased, while a gain decrement was obtained for group II and IV orbits.

  13. Interpreting gains and losses in conceptual test using Item Response Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lamine, Brahim

    2015-01-01

    Conceptual tests are widely used by physics instructors to assess students' conceptual understanding and compare teaching methods. It is common to look at students' changes in their answers between a pre-test and a post-test to quantify a transition in student's conceptions. This is often done by looking at the proportion of incorrect answers in the pre-test that changes to correct answers in the post-test -- the gain -- and the proportion of correct answers that changes to incorrect answers -- the loss. By comparing theoretical predictions to experimental data on the Force Concept Inventory, we shown that Item Response Theory (IRT) is able to fairly well predict the observed gains and losses. We then use IRT to quantify the student's changes in a test-retest situation when no learning occurs and show that $i)$ up to 25\\% of total answers can change due to the non-deterministic nature of student's answer and that $ii)$ gains and losses can go from 0\\% to 100\\%. Still using IRT, we highlight the conditions tha...

  14. Guaranteed stability regions of linear systems with actuator saturation using the low-and-high gain technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turner, Matthew C.

    Introduction Over the past decade the low gain technique and its relation, the low-and-high gain (LHG et al. (2000)), inspired by the pseudo-scheduling ideas involved in the LHG technique but based interesting features of the LHG tech- nique were discussed. In particular, the work in Lin & Saberi (1995

  15. On the Duality between Outage Capacity and Multiuser Scheduling Gain for MIMO Systems and the Impact of Shadow Fading*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dai, Huaiyu

    On the Duality between Outage Capacity and Multiuser Scheduling Gain for MIMO Systems on individual link outage capacity and multiuser scheduling gain for MIMO systems are quantified, which admits fading, while significantly limits the channel outage capacity as expected, actually enhances

  16. An inverse method for calculation of thermal inertia and heat gain in air conditioning and refrigeration systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bahrami, Majid

    An inverse method for calculation of thermal inertia and heat gain in air conditioning for estimation of thermal inertia and heat gain in air conditioning and refrigeration systems using on Ltd. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction Heating, Ventilation, Air Conditioning, and Refrigeration

  17. 2530 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS, VOL. 6, NO. 7, JULY 2007 Maximizing Cooperative Diversity Energy Gain for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Xuemin "Sherman"

    diversity system to maximize the cooperative diversity energy gain in a ra- dio cell. The optimization in the matching algorithm, high cooperative diversity energy gain with moderate overhead is possible. In mobile2530 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS, VOL. 6, NO. 7, JULY 2007 Maximizing Cooperative

  18. An insider perspective on community gains: A subjective account of a Namibian rural communities' perception of a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blake, Edwin

    1 An insider perspective on community gains: A subjective account of a Namibian rural communities and marginalised rural communities' perspective. We have collected community viewpoints concurrently over the past Participatory Design, rural community, user gains, user involvement 1. Introduction The intent to enhance

  19. Realising high-current gain p-n-p transistors using a novel surface accumulation layer transistor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, M. Jagadesh

    of minority carrier transit time caused by the presence of the high-low junction[7]. While high gain lateral p-n-pRealising high-current gain p-n-p transistors using a novel surface accumulation layer transistor (SALTran) concept M. Jagadesh Kumar and V. Parihar Abstract: The authors report a new p-n-p surface

  20. Inelastic neutron and low-frequency Raman scattering in a niobium-phosphate glass for Raman gain applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schirmacher, Walter

    Inelastic neutron and low-frequency Raman scattering in a niobium-phosphate glass for Raman gain: Raman scattering; Neutron scattering; Raman gain; Boson peak We present measurements of the vibrational, extracted from specific-heat or neutron scattering measurements [7,8]. Only very recently two of the present

  1. PHOTOSYNTHESIS AND RESOURCE ALLOCATION OF THREE MOJAVE DESERT GRASSES IN RESPONSE TO ELEVATED ATMOSPHERIC CO2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. A. DEFALCO; C. K. IVANS; P. VIVIN; J. R. SEEMANN; R. S. NOWAK

    2004-01-01

    Gas exchange, biomass and N allocation were compared among three Mojave Desert grasses representing different functional types to determine if photosynthetic responses and the associated allocation of resources within the plant changed after prolonged exposure to elevated CO{sub 2}. Leaf gas exchange characteristics were measured for Bromus madritensis ssp. rubens (C{sub 3} invasive annual), Achnatherum hymenoides (C{sub 3} native perennial) and Pleuraphis rigida (C{sub 4} native perennial) exposed to 360 {micro}mol mol{sup -1} (ambient) and 1000 {micro}mol mol{sup -1} (elevated) CO{sub 2} concentrations in a glasshouse experiment, and tissue biomass and total N pools were quantified from three harvests during development. The maximum rate of carboxylation by the N-rich enzyme Rubisco (Vc{sub max}), which was inferred from the relationship between net CO{sub 2} assimilation (A{sub net}) and intracellular CO{sub 2} concentration (c{sub i}), declined in the C{sub 3} species Bromus and Achnatherum across all sampling dates, but did not change at elevated CO{sub 2} for the C{sub 4} Pleuraphis. Whole plant N remained the same between CO{sub 2} treatments for all species, but patterns of allocation differed for the short- and long-lived C{sub 3} species. For Bromus, leaf N used for photosynthesis was reallocated to reproduction at elevated CO{sub 2} as inferred from the combination of lower Vc{sub max} and N per leaf area (NLA) at elevated CO{sub 2}, but similar specific leaf area (SLA, cm{sup 2} g{sup -1}), and of greater reproductive effort (RE) for the elevated CO{sub 2} treatment. Vc{sub max}, leaf N concentration and NLA declined for the perennial Achnatherum at elevated CO{sub 2} potentially due to accumulation of carbohydrates or changes in leaf morphology inferred from lower SLA and greater total biomass at elevated CO{sub 2}. In contrast, Vc{sub max} for the C{sub 4} perennial Pleuraphis did not change at elevated CO{sub 2}, and tissue biomass and total N were the same between CO{sub 2} treatments. Adjustments in photosynthetic capacity at elevated CO{sub 2} may optimize N allocation of C{sub 3} species in the Mojave Desert, which may influence plant performance and plant-plant interactions of these co-occurring species.

  2. V-156: Linux Kernel Array Bounds Checking Flaw Lets Local Users Gain

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyThe U.S.Lacledeutilities. The Economics of ElectricScripting Attacks |Elevated

  3. Productive Energy of Some Feeds and Foods as Measured by Gains of Energy by Growing Chickens. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach); Carlyle, E. C. (Elmer Cardinal)

    1942-01-01

    STATION A B. CONNER, DIRECTOR, College Station, Texas BULLETIN NO. 625 DECEMBER 1942 PRODUCTIVE ENERGY OF SOME FEEDS AND FOODS AS MEASURED BY GAINS OF ENERGY BY GROWING CHICKENS G. S. FRAPS AND E. C. CARLYLE Division of Chemistry -* LIBRA RY... Aflculfural&~eetv~! ~~i\\~~~~~~~ - 601i~p7 ~faf>~ T kJ;:~: AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE OF' TEXAS T. 0. WALTON, President B-28-1242-6M-L180 - IC- - [Blank Page in Original Bulletin] The value of 62 feeds and foods for furnishing energy for growing...

  4. Method and system for modulation of gain suppression in high average power laser systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bayramian, Andrew James (Manteca, CA)

    2012-07-31

    A high average power laser system with modulated gain suppression includes an input aperture associated with a first laser beam extraction path and an output aperture associated with the first laser beam extraction path. The system also includes a pinhole creation laser having an optical output directed along a pinhole creation path and an absorbing material positioned along both the first laser beam extraction path and the pinhole creation path. The system further includes a mechanism operable to translate the absorbing material in a direction crossing the first laser beam extraction laser path and a controller operable to modulate the second laser beam.

  5. Possible energy gain for a plasma-liner-driven magneto-inertial fusion concept

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knapp, C. E.; Kirkpatrick, R. C.

    2014-07-15

    A one-dimensional parameter study of a Magneto-Inertial Fusion (MIF) concept indicates that significant gain may be achievable. This concept uses a dynamically formed plasma shell with inwardly directed momentum to drive a magnetized fuel to ignition, which in turn partially burns an intermediate layer of unmagnetized fuel. The concept is referred to as Plasma Jet MIF or PJMIF. The results of an adaptive mesh refinement Eulerian code (Crestone) are compared to those of a Lagrangian code (LASNEX). These are the first published results using the Crestone and LASNEX codes on the PJMIF concept.

  6. Frequency dependence of mass flow gain factor and cavitation compliance of cavitating inducers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Otsuka, S.; Tsujimoto, Yoshinobu [Osaka Univ. (Japan); Kamijo, Kenjiro [National Aerospace Lab., Kakuda, Miyagi (Japan). Kakuda Research Center; Furuya, O. [AMP Technologies, Osaka (Japan)

    1994-12-31

    Unsteady cavitation characteristics are analyzed based on a closed cavity model in which the length of the cavity is allowed to oscillate. It is shown that the present model blends smoothly into quasisteady calculations in the low frequency limit, unlike fixed cavity length models. Effects of incidence angle and cavitation number on cavitation compliance and mass flow gain factor are shown as functions of reduce frequency. The cavity volume is evaluated by three methods and the results were used to confirm the accuracy and adequacy of the numerical calculation. By comparison with experimental data on inducers, it was shown that the present model can simulate the characteristics of unsteady cavitation qualitatively.

  7. DC 12m telescope. Preliminary calculations. Investigation of elevation axis position.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guarino, V. J.; High Energy Physics

    2009-12-18

    This paper examines some simple calculations of a 2D model of a telescope in order to understand how different design parameters affect the design. For the design of a telescope it is assumed that they need a design that minimizes deflections of the dish and also minimizes the size of the motors and torques needed to rotate in elevation. A common belief is that a lighter dish and minimum counterweight is desirable. However, these calculations show this is not necessarily true. The torque needed for rotation depends on the moment of inertia and if the telescope is balanced about the elevation axis. A light dish with no CW requires that the elevation axis be several meters in front of the dish (8-9m) in order to be balanced. This is not practical from a structural point of view. If the elevation axis is only 2m in front of the dish and there is no counterweight then the telescope will be unbalanced and the toruqes required will be very high - much higher than the torques needed only to overcome inertia. A heavy dish though can act as its own counterweight and the elevation axis only has to be 2-3m in front of the dish in order to achieve a balanced telescope. Also the struts that support the camera from the dish place a load on the dish which will put a bending moment on the dish. This bending moment will deform the dish and require it to be stiffer. A counterweight structure performs two functions. First, it allows the telescope to be balanced about the elevation axis. Second, it applies a force on the dish that opposes the forces from the camera struts, thereby reducing the bending moment and deformations of the dish.

  8. A new method for predicting the solar heat gain of complex fenestration systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klems, J.H.; Warner, J.L.; Kelley, G.O.

    1995-03-01

    A new method of predicting the solar heat gain through complex fenestration systems involving nonspecular layers such as shades or blinds has been examined in a project jointly sponsored by ASHRAE and DOE. In this method, a scanning radiometer is used to measure the bidirectional radiative transmittance and reflectance of each layer of a fenestration system. The properties of systems containing these layers are then built up computationally from the measured layer properties using a transmission/multiple-reflection calculation. The calculation produces the total directional-hemispherical transmittance of the fenestration system and the layer-by-layer absorbances. These properties are in turn combined with layer-specific measurements of the inward-flowing fractions of absorbed solar energy to produce the overall solar heat gain coefficient. The method has been applied to one of the most optically complex systems in common use, a venetian blind in combination with multiple glazings. A comparison between the scanner-based calculation method and direct system calorimetric measurements made on the LBL MoWiTT facility showed good agreement, and is a significant validation of the method accuracy and feasibility.

  9. Quantum noise effects with Kerr nonlinearity enhancement in coupled gain-loss waveguides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bing He; Shu-Bin Yan; Jing Wang; Min Xiao

    2015-05-26

    It is generally difficult to study the dynamical properties of a quantum system with both inherent quantum noises and non-perturbative nonlinearity. Due to the possibly drastic intensity increase of an input coherent light in the gain-loss waveguide couplers with parity-time (PT) symmetry, the Kerr effect from a nonlinearity added into the systems can be greatly enhanced, and is expected to create the macroscopic entangled states of the output light fields with huge photon numbers. Meanwhile, the quantum noises also coexist with the amplification and dissipation of the light fields. Under the interplay between the quantum noises and nonlinearity, the quantum dynamical behaviors of the systems become rather complicated. However, the important quantum noise effects have been mostly neglected in the previous studies about nonlinear PT-symmetric systems. Here we present a solution to this non-perturbative quantum nonlinear problem, showing the real-time evolution of the system observables. The enhanced Kerr nonlinearity is found to give rise to a previously unknown decoherence effect that is irrelevant to the quantum noises, and imposes a limit on the emergence of macroscopic nonclassicality. In contrast to what happen in the linear systems, the quantum noises exert significant impact on the system dynamics, and can create the nonclassical light field states in conjunction with the enhanced Kerr nonlinearity. This first study on the noise involved quantum nonlinear dynamics of the coupled gain-loss waveguides can help to better understand the quantum noise effects in the broad nonlinear systems.

  10. A novel solution to the gated x-ray detector gain droop problem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oertel, J. A. Archuleta, T. N.

    2014-11-15

    Microchannel plate (MCP), microstrip transmission line based, gated x-ray detectors used at the premier ICF laser facilities have a drop in gain as a function of mircostrip length that can be greater than 50% over 40 mm. These losses are due to ohmic losses in a microstrip coating that is less than the optimum electrical skin depth. The electrical skin depth for a copper transmission line at 3 GHz is 1.2 ?m while the standard microstrip coating thickness is roughly half a single skin depth. Simply increasing the copper coating thickness would begin filling the MCP pores and limit the number of secondary electrons created in the MCP. The current coating thickness represents a compromise between gain and ohmic loss. We suggest a novel solution to the loss problem by overcoating the copper transmission line with five electrical skin depths (?6 ?m) of Beryllium. Beryllium is reasonably transparent to x-rays above 800 eV and would improve the carrier current on the transmission line. The net result should be an optically flat photocathode response with almost no measurable loss in voltage along the transmission line.

  11. Gains and losses in the eyes of the beholder: a comparative study of foreign policy decision making under risk 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Yi

    2006-04-12

    Prospect theory is a descriptive model of individual decision-making under risk (Kahneman and Tversky 1979). The central tenet of prospect theory posits that the risk orientation of decision-makers is affected by the gains vs. losses domains...

  12. Dietary, Physical Activity, and Sedentary Behaviors and Their Relationship to Weight Gain in a College Age Population 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Faegen Dillon

    2012-10-19

    the Council of Environment and Dietary Activity (CEDA) at Texas A&M University was examined and analyzed in order to understand how physical activity, sedentary behavior, and dietary activity affect weight gain or weight loss. The college population...

  13. Patterns and Implications of Gene Gain and Loss in the Evolution of Prochlorococcus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lapidus, Alla; Kettler, Gregory C.; Martiny, Adam C.; Huang, Katherine; Zucker, Jeremy; Coleman, Maureen L.; Rodrigue, Sebastien; Chen, Feng; Lapidus, Alla; Ferriera, Steven; Johnson, Justin; Steglich, Claudia; Church, George M.; Richardson, Paul; Chisholm, Sallie W.

    2007-07-30

    Prochlorococcus is a marine cyanobacterium that numerically dominates the mid-latitude oceans and is the smallest known oxygenic phototroph. Numerous isolatesfrom diverse areas of the world's oceans have been studied and shown to be physiologically and genetically distinct. All isolates described thus far can be assigned to either a tightly clustered high-light (HL)-adapted clade, or a more divergent low-light (LL)-adapted group. The 16S rRNA sequences of the entire Prochlorococcus group differ by at most 3percent, and the four initially published genomes revealed patterns of genetic differentiation that help explain physiological differences among the isolates. Here we describe the genomes of eight newly sequenced isolates and combine them with the first four genomes for a comprehensive analysis of the core (shared by all isolates) and flexible genes of the Prochlorococcus group, and the patterns of loss and gain of the flexible genes over the course of evolution. There are 1,273 genes that represent the core shared by all 12 genomes. They are apparently sufficient, according to metabolic reconstruction, to encode a functional cell. We describe a phylogeny for all 12 isolates by subjecting their complete proteomes to three different phylogenetic analyses. For each non-core gene, we used a maximum parsimony method to estimate which ancestor likely first acquired or lost each gene. Many of the genetic differences among isolates, especially for genes involved in outer membrane synthesis and nutrient transport, are found within the same clade. Nevertheless, we identified some genes defining HL and LL ecotypes, and clades within these broad ecotypes, helping to demonstrate the basis of HL and LL adaptations in Prochlorococcus. Furthermore, our estimates of gene gain events allow us to identify highly variable genomic islands that are not apparent through simple pairwise comparisons. These results emphasize the functional roles, especially those connected to outer membrane synthesis and transport that dominate the flexible genome and set it apart from the core. Besides identifying islands and demonstrating their role throughout the history of Prochlorococcus, reconstruction of past gene gains and losses shows that much of the variability exists at the"leaves of the tree," between the most closely related strains. Finally, the identification of core and flexible genes from this 12-genome comparison is largely consistent with the relative frequency of Prochlorococcus genes found in global ocean metagenomic databases, further closing the gap between our understanding of these organisms in the lab and the wild.

  14. Smaller cornu ammonis 2-3/dentate gyrus volumes and elevated cortisol in multiple sclerosis patients with depressive symptoms.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01

    and elevated cortisol in multiple sclerosis patients withNancy L Sicotte 1,2 Multiple Sclerosis Program, Departmentwords: relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis – depression –

  15. OPEN POSITION: Entomological Taxonomist and Research Associate Improving our understanding of the elevational biodiversity gradient of Rocky Mountain National Park

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishida, Yuko

    of the elevational biodiversity gradient of Rocky Mountain National Park: arthropod diversity and conservation Range, including from Rocky Mountain National Park. The taxonomic groups of most interest include

  16. Evidence that chytrids dominate fungal communities in high-elevation soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Steven K.

    - out the world. In a more focused study of our sites in Colorado, we show that carbon sources reservoirs of undocumented biodiversity (4, 5). High-elevation soils are unique and may be challenging never been characterized (9). A majority of molecular surveys of fungal community com- position have

  17. Combining satellite multispectral image data and a digital elevation model for mapping debris-covered glaciers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kääb, Andreas

    Combining satellite multispectral image data and a digital elevation model for mapping debris classification alone. Based on the observation of low slope angles for debris-covered glacier tongues, we of automated multispectral classification for clean glacier ice and vegetation with slope information derived

  18. ORIGINAL PAPER Effects of elevated CO2 and soil water content on phytohormone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeLucia, Evan H.

    ORIGINAL PAPER Effects of elevated CO2 and soil water content on phytohormone transcript induction CO2. A mild reduction in soil water content had no effect on leaf sugars but stimulated the induction and reduced soil water content suppressed the expression of transcripts related to JA and ET gene tran

  19. The earliest stages of ecosystem succession in high-elevation (5000 metres above

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    or vascular plants. Carbon analyses (pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy) of soil organic matter), recently deglaciated soils S. K. Schmidt1,*, , Sasha C. Reed1,2, , Diana R. Nemergut2,3 , A. Stuart Grandy4. The exposure of `new' soil is particularly apparent at high elevations (5000 metres above sea level

  20. Do fluctuating temperature environments elevate coral thermal T. A. Oliver S. R. Palumbi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palumbi, Stephen

    REPORT Do fluctuating temperature environments elevate coral thermal tolerance? T. A. Oliver · S. R fluctuating environments on coral thermal toler- ance. We experimentally heat-stressed Acropora hyacinthus, much research has focused on the capacity of corals to acclimatize and/or adapt to different thermal

  1. Elevated Trace Element Concentrations in Southern Toads, Bufo terrestris, Exposed to Coal Combustion Waste

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hopkins, William A.

    Elevated Trace Element Concentrations in Southern Toads, Bufo terrestris, Exposed to Coal, and behavioral abnormalities in amphibians to coal combustion wastes (coal ash). Few studies, however, have determined trace element concentrations in amphibians exposed to coal ash. In the current study we compare

  2. American Journal of Botany 92(8): 12641269. 2005. POLLINATION SUCCESS ACROSS AN ELEVATION AND SEX

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herrera, Carlos M.

    and ecological factors may influence these parameters. I analyzed the consequences of variation in population sex increased with elevation, suggesting that the higher availability of pollen due to the increased proportion in populations with a proportion of females 50%, although both pollination success and natural fruit set

  3. Forest Sensitivity to Elevated Atmospheric CO2 and its Relevance to Carbon Management Richard J. Norby

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the airborne fraction of CO2 from fossil fuel combustion, and, therefore, the rate of increase of CO2Forest Sensitivity to Elevated Atmospheric CO2 and its Relevance to Carbon Management Richard J the responses of forest trees to rising concentrations of atmospheric CO2 has for the past two decades been

  4. Stem respiration in tropical forests along an elevation gradient in the Amazon and Andes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malhi, Yadvinder

    Stem respiration in tropical forests along an elevation gradient in the Amazon and Andes A M A N D metabolism, resulting in the release of carbon dioxide as a by-product. Little is known of how autotrophic respiration components vary across environmental gradients, particularly in tropical ecosystems. Here, we

  5. Lecture 01 -Supplement: Examples of Modeling ## age elevation length mass sex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rotella, Jay J.

    .87701 9.21 5.3e-11 *** ## age 1.50580 0.05214 28.88 .93 9.2e-11 *** ## age 1.50638 0.05306 28.39 Lecture 01 - Supplement: Examples of Modeling Approaches A dataset head(d) ## age elevation length

  6. Near-Infrared Laser Absorption of Poly(vinyl chloride) at Elevated Temperatures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van de Ven, James D.

    Near-Infrared Laser Absorption of Poly(vinyl chloride) at Elevated Temperatures James D. Van de Ven, Arthur G. Erdman Mechanical Engineering Department, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55305 yields that little work has been done analyzing the relationship between light absorption and temperature

  7. Flow of Fiber-Reinforced Cement Slurries at Elevated Temperatures Y. Wang and C. Meyer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyer, Christian

    . Keywords: Non-Newtonian fluids; Fiber suspensions; Oil well cement slurries; Rheology 1. Problem Statement are used for the construction of oil wells as deep as 30,000 ft (9,000 m). The severe performanceFlow of Fiber-Reinforced Cement Slurries at Elevated Temperatures Y. Wang and C. Meyer Dept

  8. Mountain Peak Identification in Visual Content Based on Coarse Digital Elevation Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tagliasacchi, Marco

    Mountain Peak Identification in Visual Content Based on Coarse Digital Elevation Models Roman for the identification of mountain peaks in geo-tagged photos. The key tenet is to perform an edge- based matching of the position of mountain peaks with a coarse resolution DEM available in the corresponding ge- ographical area

  9. Polarization modulation infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy for heterogeneous catalytic applications at elevated pressures 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ozensoy, Emrah

    2005-08-29

    morphologies such as metal nanoparticles deposited on a metal-oxide thin film. In order to achieve a molecular understanding of the properties of CO+NO catalytic reaction at elevated temperatures and pressures on Pd based catalysts, adsorption trends of each...

  10. A Database of Herbaceous Vegetation Responses to Elevated Atmospheric CO2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Database of Herbaceous Vegetation Responses to Elevated Atmospheric CO2 ORNL/CDIAC-124 NDP-073, which may not be used without his written permission. #12;ORNL/CDIAC-124 NDP-073 A DATABASE Department of Evolution, Ecology, and Organismal Biology The Ohio State University Columbus, Ohio Prepared

  11. Elevated voltage level I.sub.DDQ failure testing of integrated circuits

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Righter, Alan W. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1996-01-01

    Burn in testing of static CMOS IC's is eliminated by I.sub.DDQ testing at elevated voltage levels. These voltage levels are at least 25% higher than the normal operating voltage for the IC but are below voltage levels that would cause damage to the chip.

  12. APPLICATION OF DIGITALMULTISPECTRAL IMAGERY TO LITTORAL ZONE SOIL AND ELEVATION MODELING-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabrizio, Mary C.

    . The two primary landform zones found within the study area include the coastal beach zone and the dune of longitudinally oriented upland, sandy dunes dissected by very wet marshes. This coastal geomorphology, common between vegetation, soil and elevation data. Upon review, statistics suggested there was association

  13. Catalytic oxidation of CO by platinum group metals: from ultrahigh vacuum to elevated pressures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodman, Wayne

    oxidation over platinum group metals has been investigated for some eight decades by many researchersCatalytic oxidation of CO by platinum group metals: from ultrahigh vacuum to elevated pressures A Catalytic oxidation of CO over platinum group metals (Pt, Ir, Rh and Pd) has been the subject of many

  14. Appending High-Resolution Elevation Data to GPS Speed Traces for Vehicle Energy Modeling and Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, E.; Burton, E.; Duran, A.; Gonder, J.

    2014-06-01

    Accurate and reliable global positioning system (GPS)-based vehicle use data are highly valuable for many transportation, analysis, and automotive considerations. Model-based design, real-world fuel economy analysis, and the growing field of autonomous and connected technologies (including predictive powertrain control and self-driving cars) all have a vested interest in high-fidelity estimation of powertrain loads and vehicle usage profiles. Unfortunately, road grade can be a difficult property to extract from GPS data with consistency. In this report, we present a methodology for appending high-resolution elevation data to GPS speed traces via a static digital elevation model. Anomalous data points in the digital elevation model are addressed during a filtration/smoothing routine, resulting in an elevation profile that can be used to calculate road grade. This process is evaluated against a large, commercially available height/slope dataset from the Navteq/Nokia/HERE Advanced Driver Assistance Systems product. Results will show good agreement with the Advanced Driver Assistance Systems data in the ability to estimate road grade between any two consecutive points in the contiguous United States.

  15. THE EFFECT OF WATER TABLE ELEVATION ON ACID MINE DRAINAGE FROM REACTIVE TAILINGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aubertin, Michel

    THE EFFECT OF WATER TABLE ELEVATION ON ACID MINE DRAINAGE FROM REACTIVE TAILINGS: A LABORATORY table can be very effective in reducing the production of acid mine drainage. ______________________ 1 Paper presented at the 7th International Conference on Acid Rock Drainage (ICARD), March 26-30, 2006, St

  16. An evaluation of the elevated water table concept using laboratory columns with sulphidic tailings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aubertin, Michel

    The elevated water table concept is a potentially effective means of reducing acid mine drainage from reactive for controlling acid mine drainage from mine tailings. The laboratory experiments used columns of tailings from acid mine drainage. RESUME La technique de la nappe surélevée est considérée comme un moyen efficace

  17. ORNL/TM-2005/553 The Effect of Elevated Temperature on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    .4) Prepared for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research Under Interagency for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research Under Interagency Agreement materials for elevated- temperature service is presented. Nuclear power plant and general civil engineering

  18. EVLA Memo # 136 EVLA Measurements Close to the Sun: Elevated System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groppi, Christopher

    EVLA Memo # 136 EVLA Measurements Close to the Sun: Elevated System Temperatures Catherine A ) measurements near the sun at 5 GHz with EVLA antennas. The purpose of the test measurements was to measure the solar contribution to the system temperature as a function of angular distance from the sun. At a given

  19. EVLA Memo # 136 EVLA Measurements Close to the Sun: Elevated System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groppi, Christopher

    EVLA Memo # 136 EVLA Measurements Close to the Sun: Elevated System Temperatures Catherine A) measurements near the sun at 5 GHz with EVLA antennas. The purpose of the test measurements was to measure the solar contribution to the system temperature as a function of angular distance from the sun. At a given

  20. Water Resource Topics (#1-2) 1. Changes in drought patterns with elevation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Water Resource Topics (#1-2) 1. Changes in drought patterns with elevation Background research. Upconing of salt water into drinking water wells Background research on analytical methods to assess upconing in unconfined and confined aquifers Identify aquifer sector, drinking water wells, and data

  1. Soil microbial activity and N availability with elevated CO2 in Mojave Desert soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Billings, Sharon A.; Schaeffer, Sean M.

    2004-01-01

    We examined the effects of elevated CO2 on soil nitrogen (N) dynamics in the Mojave Desert by measuring plant N isotope composition (?15N), soil microbial biomass N, soil respiration, resin-available N, and C and N dynamics during soil incubations...

  2. FUSION OF DIGITAL ELEVATION MODELS USING SPARSE REPRESENTATIONS H. Papasaika1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schindler, Konrad

    FUSION OF DIGITAL ELEVATION MODELS USING SPARSE REPRESENTATIONS H. Papasaika1 , E. Kokiopoulou2 , E Science and Engineering, EPFL, Switzerland Working Groups I/2, III/1, III/4, III/5 KEY WORDS: DEMs, fusion acquisition technology, the processing chain, and the characteristics of the terrain. DEM fusion aims

  3. Original Contribution Elevated Lung Cancer in Younger Adults and Low Concentrations of Arsenic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Original Contribution Elevated Lung Cancer in Younger Adults and Low Concentrations of Arsenic-term effects of arsenic. We performed a case-control study of lung cancer from 2007 to 2010 in areas or more years ago resulted in odds ratios for lung cancer of 1.00, 1.43 (90% confidence interval: 0.82, 2

  4. Icelandic rhythmics: Annual modulation of land elevation and plate spreading by snow load

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grapenthin, Ronni

    Icelandic rhythmics: Annual modulation of land elevation and plate spreading by snow load Ronni to annual snow load in Iceland. The load is modeled using Green's functions for an elastic halfspace and a simple sinusoidal load history on Iceland's four largest ice caps. We derive E = 40 ± 15 GPa as a minimum

  5. Volume and mass balance changes of ice caps in Iceland deduced from elevation data and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berthier, Etienne

    Volume and mass balance changes of ice caps in Iceland deduced from elevation data and in-situ mass Guðmundsson, Þórdís Högnadóttir Institute of Earth Sciences, University of Iceland (IES) Etienne Berthier LEGOS, Toulouse, France Tómas Jóhannesson, Oddur Sigurðsson, Þorsteinn Þorsteinsson The Icelandic

  6. Using satellites to investigate the sensitivity of longwave downward radiation to water vapor at high elevations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    at high elevations Catherine M. Naud,1 James R. Miller,2 and Chris Landry3 Received 22 September 2011 is insufficient to do so. Citation: Naud, C. M., J. R. Miller, and C. Landry (2012), Using satellites to climate change [e.g., Diaz and Bradley, 1997; Liu and Chen, 2000; Rangwala et al., 2009]. In some

  7. CARIBBEAN DIGITAL ELEVATION MODELS Coastal Models Supporting our Nation's Needs through Science and Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    natural resources. Data identified as coming from the NOAA National Geophysical Data Center are provided, coastal managers, and policy makers in effectively managing marine ecosystems and coastal resources;DIGITAL ELEVATION MODEL PuertoRicoIsland #12;http://www.ngdc.noaa.gov/mgg/coastal/ dem.info

  8. Author's personal copy Antioxidant capacity reduced in scallions grown under elevated CO2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paré, Paul W.

    Author's personal copy Antioxidant capacity reduced in scallions grown under elevated CO2 was used as a model plant to study the impact of a range of CO2 concentrations and light intensities in controlled environmental chambers under a combination of 3 CO2 concentrations of 400, 1200 and 4000 lmol mol

  9. Elevated CO2 levels affect development, motility, and fertility and extend life

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morimoto, Richard

    Elevated CO2 levels affect development, motility, and fertility and extend life span August 5, 2008) Hypercapnia (high CO2 levels) occurs in a number of lung diseases and it is associated the response to nonanesthetic CO2 levels and show that levels exceeding 9% induce aberrant motility

  10. Control of resistive wall modes in a cylindrical tokamak with plasma rotation and complex gain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brennan, D P

    2014-01-01

    Feedback stabilization of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modes is studied in a cylindrical model for a tokamak with resistivity, viscosity and toroidal rotation. The control is based on a linear combination of the normal and tangential components of the magnetic field just inside the resistive wall. The feedback includes complex gain, for both the normal and for the tangential components, and the imaginary part of the feedback for the former is equivalent to plasma rotation. The work includes (1) analysis with a reduced resistive MHD model for a tokamak with finite \\beta and with stepfunction current density and pressure profiles, and (2) computations with full compressible visco-resistive MHD and smooth decreasing profiles of current density and pressure. The equilibria are stable for \\beta=0 and the marginal stability values $\\beta_{rp,rw}\\beta_{rp,iw}$ regime is presented.

  11. CSR induced microbunching gain estimation including transient effects in transport and recirculation arcs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsai, Cheng; Douglas, David R.; Li, Rui

    2015-09-01

    The coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) of a high brightness electron beam traversing a series of dipoles, such as transport or recirculation arcs, may result in the microbunching instability (?BI). To accurately quantify the direct consequence of this effect, we further extend our previously developed semi-analytical Vlasov solver to include more relevant coherent radiation models than the steady-state free-space CSR impedance, such as the entrance and exit transient effects derived from upstream beam entering to and exiting from individual dipoles. The resultant microbunching gain functions and spectra for our example lattices are presented and compared with particle tracking simulation. Some underlying physics with inclusion of these effects are also discussed.

  12. Atomic loss and gain as a resource for non-equilibrium phase transitions in optical lattices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Everest, Ben; Lesanovsky, Igor

    2015-01-01

    Recent breakthroughs in the experimental manipulation of strongly interacting atomic Rydberg gases in lattice potentials have opened a new avenue for the study of many-body phenomena. Considerable efforts are currently being undertaken to achieve clean experimental settings that show a minimal amount of noise and disorder and are close to zero temperature. A complementary direction investigates the interplay between coherent and dissipative processes. Recent experiments have revealed a first glimpse into the emergence of a rich non-equilibrium behavior stemming from the competition of laser excitation, strong interactions and radiative decay of Rydberg atoms. The aim of the present theoretical work is to show that local incoherent loss and gain of atoms can in fact be the source of interesting out-of-equilibrium dynamics. This perspective opens new paths for the exploration of non-equilibrium critical phenomena and, more generally, phase transitions, some of which so far have been rather difficult to study. T...

  13. Linear Vlasov solver for microbunching gain estimation with inclusion of CSR, LSC and linac geometric impedances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsai, Cheng-Ying; Li, Rui; Tennant, Chris

    2015-01-01

    As is known, microbunching instability (MBI) has been one of the most challenging issues in designs of magnetic chicanes for short-wavelength free-electron lasers or linear colliders, as well as those of transport lines for recirculating or energy recovery linac machines. To more accurately quantify MBI in a single-pass system and for more complete analyses, we further extend and continue to increase the capabilities of our previously developed linear Vlasov solver [1] to incorporate more relevant impedance models into the code, including transient and steady-state free-space and/or shielding coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) impedances, the longitudinal space charge (LSC) impedances, and the linac geometric impedances with extension of the existing formulation to include beam acceleration [2]. Then, we directly solve the linearized Vlasov equation numerically for microbunching gain amplification factor. In this study we apply this code to a beamline lattice of transport arc [3] following an upstream linac...

  14. Non-OPEC oil supply gains to outpace demand in 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beck, R.J.

    1997-01-27

    Rising oil supplies in 1997 will relax some of the market tightness that drove up crude prices last year. Worldwide demand for petroleum products in 1996 rose faster than anticipated and faster than supply from outside the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries. This increased demand for OPEC oil and pushed up prices for crude. At year end, the world export price of crude was up more than 25% from the same period a year earlier. Market conditions will change in 1997. While worldwide economic growth will continue to boost demand for energy and petroleum, non-OPEC petroleum supply will grow even more. Increases in North Sea and Latin American production will help boost non-OPEC output by 1.9 million b/d. And revenues from 1996 production gains will make additional investment possible in exploration and production. The paper discusses world economic growth, world oil demand, worldwide supply, supply outlook, prices and international drilling.

  15. Large gain quantum-limited qubit measurement using a two-mode nonlinear cavity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saeed Khan; R. Vijay; I. Siddiqi; Aashish A. Clerk

    2014-12-05

    We provide a thorough theoretical analysis of qubit state measurement in a setup where a driven, parametrically-coupled cavity system is directly coupled to the qubit, with one of the cavities having a weak Kerr nonlinearity. Such a system could be readily realized using circuit QED architectures. We demonstrate that this setup is capable in the standard linear-response regime of both producing a highly amplified output signal while at the same time achieving near quantum-limited performance: the measurement backaction on the qubit is near the minimal amount required by the uncertainty principle. This setup thus represents a promising route for performing efficient large-gain qubit measurement that is completely on-chip, and that does not rely on the use of circulators or complex non-reciprocal amplifiers.

  16. Driving high-gain shock-ignited inertial confinement fusion targets by green laser light

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atzeni, Stefano; Marocchino, Alberto; Schiavi, Angelo [Dipartimento SBAI, Universita di Roma 'La Sapienza' and CNISM, Via A. Scarpa 14-16, I-00161 Roma (Italy)

    2012-09-15

    Standard direct-drive inertial confinement fusion requires UV light irradiation in order to achieve ignition at total laser energy of the order of 1 MJ. The shock-ignition approach opens up the possibility of igniting fusion targets using green light by reducing the implosion velocity and laser-driven ablation pressure. An analytical model is derived, allowing to rescale UV-driven targets to green light. Gain in the range 100-200 is obtained for total laser energy in the range 1.5-3 MJ. With respect to the original UV design, the rescaled targets are less sensitive to irradiation asymmetries and hydrodynamic instabilities, while operating in the same laser-plasma interaction regime.

  17. Diurnal heat storage in direct-gain passive-solar buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balcomb, J.D.; Neeper, D.A.

    1983-01-01

    This paper presents a simplified method for predicting temperature swings in direct-gain buildings. It is called the DHC method due to the use of a diurnal heat capacity (DHC). Diurnal heat capacity is a measure of the effective amount of heat stored during a sunny day and then released at night - the typical 24-hour diurnal cycle. This enables prediction of the maximum temperature swings experienced in the building and can be calculated using a single 24-hour harmonic. The advantage is that closed-form analytic solutions can be obtained for a variety of simple and layered-wall configurations. Higher harmonic components are accounted for by a correction factor. The method is suitable for us by hand or on a programmable calculator.

  18. Hodges residence: performance of a direct gain passive solar home in Iowa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hodges, L.

    1980-01-01

    Results are presented for the performance of the Hodges residence, a 2200-square-foot earth-sheltered direct gain passive solar home in Ames, Iowa, during the 1979-80 heating season, its first occupied season. No night insulation was used on its 500 square feet of double-pane glass. Total auxiliary heat required was 43 GJ (41 MBtu) gross and 26 GJ (25 MBtu) net, amounting, respectively, to 60 and 36 kJ/C/sup 0/-day-m/sup 2/ (2.9 and 1.8 Btu/F/sup 0/-day-ft/sup 2/). The heating season was unusually cloudy and included the cloudiest January in the 21 years of Ames insolation measurements. Results are also presented for the performance of the hollowcore floor which serves as the main storage mass and for the comfort range in the house.

  19. Hodges residence: performance of a direct gain passive solar home in Iowa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hodges, L.

    1980-01-01

    Results are presented for the performance of the Hodges Residence, a 2200-square-foot earth-sheltered direct gain passive solar home in Ames, Iowa, during the 1979-80 heating season, its first occupied season. No night insulation was used on its 500 square feet of double-pane glass. Total auxiliary heat required was 43 GJ (41 MBTU) gross and 26 GJ (25 MBTU) net, amounting, respectively, to 60 and 36 kJ/C/sup 0/-day-m/sup 2/ (2.9 and 1.8 BTU/F/sup 0/-day-ft/sup 2/). The heating season was unusually cloudy and included the cloudiest January in the 21 years of Ames insolation measurements. Results are also presented for the performance of the hollow-core floor which serves as the main storage mass and for the comfort range in the house.

  20. Method for increasing the rate of compressive strength gain in hardenable mixtures containing fly ash

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liskowitz, J.W.; Wecharatana, M.; Jaturapitakkul, C.; Cerkanowicz, A.E.

    1997-10-28

    The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction. The invention provides a method for increasing the rate of strength gain of a hardenable mixture containing fly ash by exposing the fly ash to an aqueous slurry of calcium oxide (lime) prior to its incorporation into the hardenable mixture. The invention further relates to such hardenable mixtures, e.g., concrete and mortar, that contain fly ash pre-reacted with calcium oxide. In particular, the fly ash is added to a slurry of calcium oxide in water, prior to incorporating the fly ash in a hardenable mixture. The hardenable mixture may be concrete or mortar. In a specific embodiment, mortar containing fly ash treated by exposure to an aqueous lime slurry are prepared and tested for compressive strength at early time points. 2 figs.

  1. Method for increasing the rate of compressive strength gain in hardenable mixtures containing fly ash

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liskowitz, John W. (Belle Mead, NJ); Wecharatana, Methi (Parsippany, NJ); Jaturapitakkul, Chai (Bangkok, TH); Cerkanowicz, deceased, Anthony E. (late of Livingston, NJ)

    1997-01-01

    The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction. The invention provides a method for increasing the rate of strength gain of a hardenable mixture containing fly ash by exposing the fly ash to an aqueous slurry of calcium oxide (lime) prior to its incorporation into the hardenable mixture. The invention further relates to such hardenable mixtures, e.g., concrete and mortar, that contain fly ash pre-reacted with calcium oxide. In particular, the fly ash is added to a slurry of calcium oxide in water, prior to incorporating the fly ash in a hardenable mixture. The hardenable mixture may be concrete or mortar. In a specific embodiment, mortar containing fly ash treated by exposure to an aqueous lime slurry are prepared and tested for compressive strength at early time points.

  2. EFFECTS OF ELEVATED CO2 ON ROOT FUNCTION AND SOIL RESPIRATION IN A MOJAVE DESERT ECOSYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nowak, Robert S.

    2007-12-19

    Increases in atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration during the last 250 years are unequivocal, and CO{sub 2} will continue to increase at least for the next several decades (Houghton et al. 2001, Keeling & Whorf 2002). Arid ecosystems are some of the most important biomes globally on a land surface area basis, are increasing in area at an alarming pace (Dregne 1991), and have a strong coupling with regional climate (Asner & Heidebrecht 2005). These water-limited ecosystems also are predicted to be the most sensitive to elevated CO{sub 2}, in part because they are stressful environments where plant responses to elevated CO{sub 2} may be amplified (Strain & Bazzaz 1983). Indeed, all C{sub 3} species examined at the Nevada Desert FACE Facility (NDFF) have shown increased A{sub net} under elevated CO{sub 2} (Ellsworth et al. 2004, Naumburg et al. 2003, Nowak et al. 2004). Furthermore, increased shoot growth for individual species under elevated CO{sub 2} was spectacular in a very wet year (Smith et al. 2000), although the response in low to average precipitation years has been smaller (Housman et al. 2006). Increases in perennial cover and biomass at the NDFF are consistent with long term trends in the Mojave Desert and elsewhere in the Southwest, indicating C sequestration in woody biomass (Potter et al. 2006). Elevated CO{sub 2} also increases belowground net primary production (BNPP), with average increases of 70%, 21%, and 11% for forests, bogs, and grasslands, respectively (Nowak et al. 2004). Although detailed studies of elevated CO{sub 2} responses for desert root systems were virtually non-existent prior to our research, we anticipated that C sequestration may occur by desert root systems for several reasons. First, desert ecosystems exhibit increases in net photosynthesis and primary production at elevated CO{sub 2}. If large quantities of root litter enter the ecosystem at a time when most decomposers are inactive, significant quantities of carbon may be stored belowground in relatively recalcitrant forms. Indeed, a model-based analysis predicted that the arid/semiarid southwestern bioclimatic region had one of the highest rates of net carbon storage in the United States over the past century (Schimel et al. 2000). Second, root systems of desert plants are often extensive (Foxx et al. 1984, Hartle et al. 2006) with relatively large proportions of roots deep in the soil (Schenk & Jackson 2002). Thus, an understanding of belowground processes in desert ecosystems provides information on the potential for terrestrial carbon sequestration in desert ecosystems.

  3. When and how does a prominence-like jet gain kinetic energy?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Jiajia; Liu, Rui; Zhang, Quanhao; Liu, Kai; Shen, Chenglong; Wang, S.; Wang, Yuming

    2014-02-20

    A jet is a considerable amount of plasma being ejected from the chromosphere or lower corona into the higher corona and is a common phenomenon. Usually, a jet is triggered by a brightening or a flare, which provides the first driving force to push plasma upward. In this process, magnetic reconnection is thought to be the mechanism to convert magnetic energy into thermal, nonthermal, and kinetic energies. However, most jets could reach an unusual high altitude and end much later than the end of its associated flare. This fact implies that there is another way to continuously transfer magnetic energy into kinetic energy even after the reconnection. The picture described above is well known in the community, but how and how much magnetic energy is released through a way other than reconnection is still unclear. By studying a prominence-like jet observed by SDO/AIA and STEREO-A/EUVI, we find that the continuous relaxation of the post-reconnection magnetic field structure is an important process for a jet to climb up higher than it could through only reconnection. The kinetic energy of the jet gained through the relaxation is 1.6 times that gained from the reconnection. The resultant energy flux is hundreds of times larger than the flux required for the local coronal heating, suggesting that such jets are a possible source to keep the corona hot. Furthermore, rotational motions appear all the time during the jet. Our analysis suggests that torsional Alfvén waves induced during reconnection could not be the only mechanism to release magnetic energy and drive jets.

  4. An LED, fiber optic, gain monitoring system for a segmented scintillator array B.E. Bewer, R.E. Pywell , R. Igarashi 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saskatchewan, University of

    An LED, fiber optic, gain monitoring system for a segmented scintillator array B.E. Bewer, R Keywords: Scintillator Gain monitor Fiber optics LED a b s t r a c t A gain monitoring system, which uses with a segmented, liquid scintillator neutron detector array. The system is designed to track neutron detector cell

  5. Laser Gain and Threshold Properties in Compressive-Strained and Lattice-Matched GaInNAs/GaAs Quantum Wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chow, W.W.; Jones, E.D.; Modine, N.A.; Allerman, A.A.; Kurtz, S.R.

    1999-08-04

    The optical gain spectra for compressive-strained and lattice-matched GaInNAs/GaAs quantum wells are computed using a microscopic laser theory. From these spectra, the peak gain and carrier radiative decay rate as functions of carrier density are determined. These dependences allow the study of lasing threshold current density for different GAInNAs/GaAs laser structures.

  6. Overstory community composition and elevated atmospheric CO2 and O3 modify understory biomass production and nitrogen acquisition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    understood, although evidence suggests that elevated CO2 will alleviate some of the negative effects. Our objective was to document the effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 and O3 on understory species biomass was harvested in June of 2004 for productivity, N, and 15N measurements, and photosynthetically

  7. Environmental effects on distributions of culturable soil oligotrophic bacteria along an elevational gradient in the Chihuahuan Desert

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strauss, Richard E.

    an elevational gradient in the Chihuahuan Desert James H. Campbell*, John C. Zak, Randall M. Jeter, Richard E from five sites along an elevational and vegetational gradient within Big Bend National Park during the first stressors to be investigated. Microbes capable of metabolism at low concentra- tions of carbon

  8. An experimental and kinetic study of syngas/air combustion at elevated temperatures and the effect of water addition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiao, Li

    . Introduction Synthetic gas (syngas) is a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen in various compositionsAn experimental and kinetic study of syngas/air combustion at elevated temperatures and the effect 20 December 2011 Keywords: Syngas combustion Elevated temperatures Water addition Laminar flame speed

  9. Vegetation patterns of Pine Canyon, Big Bend National Park, Texas, in relation to elevation and slope aspect 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Bryan Joseph

    1997-01-01

    Data on the woody vegetation of Pine Canyon, Big Bend National Park, Texas was gathered on an elevational gradient from 1250 m to 2000 m elevation using the point-centered quarter method. Sampling was conducted at 12 sites at 1250 m, 1500 m, 1625 m...

  10. Effect of elevated CO2 and N fertilisation on soil nematode abundance and diversity in a wheat field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neher, Deborah A.

    Author's personal copy Effect of elevated CO2 and N fertilisation on soil nematode abundance). The soil food chain response to elevated CO2 can indicate the changes in soil ecological processes s t r a c t An experimental platform of free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) was established in mid June

  11. Inter and intra-specific variation in photosynthetic acclimation response to long term exposure of elevated carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilkinson, M. [Univ. of Essex, Colchester (United Kingdom); [Writtle Coll. (United Kingdom)

    1996-08-01

    The response of intra and interspecific variation in photosynthetic acclimation to growth at elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration (600{micro}mol mol-l) in six important grassland species was investigated. Plants were grown in a background sward of Lolium perenne and measurements were made after four years of growth at elevated C{sub a}. Elevated CO{sub 2} was maintained using a FACE (Free-Air Carbon Enrichment) system. Significant intra and interspecific variation in acclimation response was demonstrated. The response of adaxial and abaxial stomatal conductance to elevated CO{sub 2} was also investigated. The stomatal conductance of both the adaxial and abaxial leaf surfaces was found to be reduced by elevated C{sub a}. Significant asymmetric responses in stomatal conductance was demonstrated in D. glomerata and T. pratense. Analysis of stomatal indices and densities indicated that the observed reductions in stomatal conductance were probably the result of changes in stomatal aperture.

  12. Comparative performance of geopolymers made with metakaolin and fly ash after exposure to elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kong, Daniel L.Y.; Sanjayan, Jay G. Sagoe-Crentsil, Kwesi

    2007-12-15

    This paper presents the results of a study on the effect of elevated temperatures on geopolymers manufactured using metakaolin and fly ash of various mixture proportions. Both types of geopolymers (metakaolin and fly ash) were synthesized with sodium silicate and potassium hydroxide solutions. The strength of the fly ash-based geopolymer increased after exposure to elevated temperatures (800 deg. C). However, the strength of the corresponding metakaolin-based geopolymer decreased after similar exposure. Both types of geopolymers were subjected to thermogravimetric, scanning electron microscopy and mercury intrusion porosimetry tests. The paper concludes that the fly ash-based geopolymers have large numbers of small pores which facilitate the escape of moisture when heated, thus causing minimal damage to the geopolymer matrix. On the other hand, metakaolin geopolymers do not possess such pore distribution structures. The strength increase in fly ash geopolymers is also partly attributed to the sintering reactions of un-reacted fly ash particles.

  13. Sun-relative pointing for dual-axis solar trackers employing azimuth and elevation rotations.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riley, Daniel M.; Hansen, Clifford W.

    2014-04-01

    Dual axis trackers employing azimuth and elevation rotations are common in the field of photovoltaic (PV) energy generation. Accurate sun-tracking algorithms are widely available. However, a steering algorithm has not been available to accurately point the tracker away from the sun such that a vector projection of the sun beam onto the tracker face falls along a desired path relative to the tracker face. We have developed an algorithm which produces the appropriate azimuth and elevation angles for a dual axis tracker when given the sun position, desired angle of incidence, and the desired projection of the sun beam onto the tracker face. Development of this algorithm was inspired by the need to accurately steer a tracker to desired sun-relative positions in order to better characterize the electro-optical properties of PV and CPV modules.

  14. Microsecond gain-switched master oscillator power amplifier (1958 nm) with high pulse energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ke Yin; Weiqiang Yang; Bin Zhang; Ying Li; Jing Hou [College of Opto-electric Science and Engineering, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073, Hunan (China)

    2014-02-28

    An all-fibre master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) emitting high-energy pulses at 1958 nm is presented. The seed laser is a microsecond gain-switched thulium-doped fibre laser (TDFL) pumped with a commercial 1550-nm pulsed fibre laser. The TDFL operates at a repetition rate f in the range of 10 to 100 kHz. The two-stage thulium-doped fibre amplifier is built to scale the energy of the pulses generated by the seed laser. The maximum output pulse energy higher than 0.5 mJ at 10 kHz is achieved which is comparable with the theoretical maximum extractable pulse energy. The slope efficiency of the second stage amplifier with respect to the pump power is 30.4% at f = 10 kHz. The wavelength of the output pulse laser is centred near 1958 nm at a spectral width of 0.25 nm after amplification. Neither nonlinear effects nor significant amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) is observed in the amplification experiments. (lasers)

  15. Gain and tuning characteristics of mid-infrared InSb quantum dot diode lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Q.; Zhuang, Q.; Hayton, J.; Yin, M.; Krier, A.

    2014-07-21

    There have been relatively few reports of lasing from InSb quantum dots (QDs). In this work, type II InSb/InAs QD laser diodes emitting in the mid-infrared at 3.1??m have been demonstrated and characterized. The gain was determined to be 2.9?cm{sup ?1} per QD layer, and the waveguide loss was ?15?cm{sup ?1} at 4?K. Spontaneous emission measurements below threshold revealed a blue shift of the peak wavelength with increasing current, indicating filling of ground state heavy hole levels in the QDs. The characteristic temperature, T{sub 0}?=?101?K below 50?K, but decreased to 48?K at higher temperatures. The emission wavelength of these lasers showed first a blue shift followed by a red shift with increasing temperature. A hybrid structure was used to fabricate the laser by combining a liquid phase epitaxy grown p-InAs{sub 0.61}Sb{sub 0.13}P{sub 0.26} lower cladding layer and an upper n{sup +} InAs plasmon cladding layer which resulted in a maximum operating temperature (T{sub max}) of 120?K in pulsed mode, which is the highest reported to date.

  16. Doped Contacts for High-Longevity Optically Activated, High Gain GaAs Photoconductive Semiconductor Switches

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MAR,ALAN; LOUBRIEL,GUILLERMO M.; ZUTAVERN,FRED J.; O'MALLEY,MARTIN W.; HELGESON,WESLEY D.; BROWN,DARWIN JAMES; HJALMARSON,HAROLD P.; BACA,ALBERT G.; THORNTON,R.L.; DONALDSON,R.D.

    1999-12-17

    The longevity of high gain GaAs photoconductive semiconductor switches (PCSS) has been extended to over 100 million pulses. This was achieved by improving the ohmic contacts through the incorporation of a doped layer that is very effective in the suppression of filament formation, alleviating current crowding. Damage-free operation is now possible with virtually infinite expected lifetime at much higher current levels than before. The inherent damage-free current capacity of the bulk GaAs itself depends on the thickness of the doped layers and is at least 100A for a dopant diffusion depth of 4pm. The contact metal has a different damage mechanism and the threshold for damage ({approx}40A) is not further improved beyond a dopant diffusion depth of about 2{micro}m. In a diffusion-doped contact switch, the switching performance is not degraded when contact metal erosion occurs, unlike a switch with conventional contacts. This paper will compare thermal diffusion and epitaxial growth as approaches to doping the contacts. These techniques will be contrasted in terms of the fabrication issues and device characteristics.

  17. An experimental comparison of current viscoplastic constitutive models at elevated temperature 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James, George Henry

    1986-01-01

    AN EXPERIMENTAL COMPARISON OF CURRENT VISCOPLASTIC CONSTITUTIVE MODELS AT ELEVATED TEMPERATURE A Thesis by GEORGE HENRY JAMES III Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements..., And Rhode's Model. Bodner's Anisotropic Model. Miller's Model. Walker's Exponential Model. APPENDIX C - AUXILIARY MODEL RESULTS. APPENDIX D EXPERIMENTAL COMPUTER PROGRAMS. VITA. 127 137 137 139 143 144 147 154 176 217 LIST OF TABLES Table...

  18. Spatial disaggregation of satellite-derived irradiance using a high-resolution digital elevation model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruiz-Arias, Jose A.; Tovar-Pescador, Joaquin; Cebecauer, Tomas; Suri, Marcel

    2010-09-15

    Downscaling of the Meteosat-derived solar radiation ({proportional_to}5 km grid resolution) is based on decomposing the global irradiance and correcting the systematic bias of its components using the elevation and horizon shadowing that are derived from the SRTM-3 digital elevation model (3 arc sec resolution). The procedure first applies the elevation correction based on the difference between coarse and high spatial resolution. Global irradiance is split into direct, diffuse circumsolar and diffuse isotropic components using statistical models, and then corrections due to terrain shading and sky-view fraction are applied. The effect of reflected irradiance is analysed only in the theoretical section. The method was applied in the eastern Andalusia, Spain, and the validation was carried out for 22 days on April, July and December 2006 comparing 15-min estimates of the satellite-derived solar irradiance and observations from nine ground stations. Overall, the corrections of the satellite estimates in the studied region strongly reduced the mean bias of the estimates for clear and cloudy days from roughly 2.3% to 0.4%. (author)

  19. Sling-on-a-Ring: Structure for an elevator to LEO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrew Meulenberg; Timothy Poston

    2015-04-22

    Various proposed space elevators may bypass the financial and environmental limits on rocket technology, but all have their own problems. A Low-Earth-Orbit, LEO, rotovator-based space-elevator version called 'sling-on-a-ring' may overcome them. This mass-lifting system uses the spatial stability of an orbital ring, accessorized for transfer and storage of momentum and electrical power. A high-tensile-strength equatorial circum-terra loop of colossal-carbon tube, CCT, fiber has solar-power and station-keeping units and rotating sling modules. Long sling assemblies, ~600 km, periodically descend into the atmosphere to ~13 km. At perigee, the sling rotational tip velocity almost cancels the orbital-ring velocity relative to Earth surface. Split-second timing detaches a ~10 ton payload from an ordinary aircraft and jerks it into space by sling momentum, with the proven specific strength of CCTs now under development. This system eliminates the immense mass in space of other space-elevator systems, but needs extremely long (~100km) compressive members. Conceptual analysis for mass reduction of these structures is the subject of this paper.

  20. Sling-on-a-Ring: Structure for an elevator to LEO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meulenberg, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Various proposed space elevators may bypass the financial and environmental limits on rocket technology, but all have their own problems. A Low-Earth-Orbit, LEO, rotovator-based space-elevator version called 'sling-on-a-ring' may overcome them. This mass-lifting system uses the spatial stability of an orbital ring, accessorized for transfer and storage of momentum and electrical power. A high-tensile-strength equatorial circum-terra loop of colossal-carbon tube, CCT, fiber has solar-power and station-keeping units and rotating sling modules. Long sling assemblies, ~600 km, periodically descend into the atmosphere to ~13 km. At perigee, the sling rotational tip velocity almost cancels the orbital-ring velocity relative to Earth surface. Split-second timing detaches a ~10 ton payload from an ordinary aircraft and jerks it into space by sling momentum, with the proven specific strength of CCTs now under development. This system eliminates the immense mass in space of other space-elevator systems, but needs extre...

  1. V-220: Juniper Security Threat Response Manager Lets Remote Authentica...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    commands to execute arbitrary operating system commands with the privileges of the target web service. This can be exploited to gain shell access on the target device. IMPACT:...

  2. Comparison of experimental and theoretical gain-current relations in GaInP quantum well lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smowton, P.M.; Chow, W.W.; Blood, P.

    2000-01-10

    The authors compare the results of a microscopic laser theory with gain and recombination currents obtained from experimental spontaneous emission spectra. The calculated absorption spectrum is first matched to that measured on a laser, ensuring that the quasi-Fermi levels for the calculation and the experiment (spontaneous emission and gain) are directly related. This allows one to determine the inhomogeneous broadening in their experimental samples. The only other inputs to the theory are literature values of the bulk material parameter. The authors then estimate the non-radiative recombination current associated with the well and wave-guide core from a comparison of measured and calculated recombination currents.

  3. Observation of spectral gain narrowing in a high-order harmonic seeded soft-x-ray amplifier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tissandier, F.; Sebban, S.; Ribiere, M.; Gautier, J.; Zeitoun, Ph.; Lambert, G.; Barszczak Sardinha, A.; Goddet, J.-Ph.; Burgy, F.; Lefrou, T.; Valentin, C.; Rousse, A.; Guilbaud, O.; Klisnick, A.; Nejdl, J.; Mocek, T.; Maynard, G. [Laboratoire d'Optique Appliquee, ENSTA Paristech/Ecole Polytechnique/CNRS UMR 7639, F-91761 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Laboratoire d'Interaction du Rayonnement X Avec la Matiere, Universite Paris Sud/CNRS UMR 8624, F-91495 Orsay Cedex (France); Department of X-ray Lasers, Institute of Physics, Na Slovance 2, CZ-182 21 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Laboratoire de Physique des Gaz et des Plasmas, Universite Paris Sud/CNRS UMR 8578, F-91405 Orsay Cedex (France)

    2010-06-15

    We report an observation of spectral gain narrowing of a high-order harmonic amplified by a soft-x-ray optical-field-ionized plasma. The temporal coherence and spectral linewidth of both the seeded and unseeded soft-x-ray lasers were experimentally measured using a varying-path-difference interferometer. The results showed that the high-order harmonic is subject to a strong spectral narrowing during its propagation in the plasma amplifier without rebroadening at saturation. This is in good agreement with a radiative transfer calculation including gain narrowing and saturation rebroadening.

  4. Impact of elevated CO2 on a Florida Scrub-oak Ecosystems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drake, Bert G

    2013-01-01

    Since May of 1996, we have conducted an experiment in Florida Scrub Oak to determine the impact of elevated atmospheric CO2 and climate change on carbon, water, and nutrient cycling in this important terrestrial ecosystem. Florida scrub oak is the name for a collective of species occupying much of the Florida peninsula. The dominant tree species are oaks and the dwarf structure of this community makes it an excellent system in which to test hypotheses regarding the potential capacity of woody ecosystems to assimilate and sequester anthropogenic carbon. Scrub oak is fire dependent with a return cycle of 10-15 years, a time which would permit an experiment to follow the entire cycle. Our site is located on Cape Canaveral at the Kennedy Space Center, Florida. After burning in 1995, we built 16 open top chambers, half of which have been fumigated with pure CO2 sufficient to raise the concentration around the plants to 350 ppm above ambient. In the intervening 10 years we have non destructively measured biomass of shoots and roots, ecosystem gas exchange using chambers and eddy flux, leaf photosynthesis and respiration, soil respiration, and relevant environmental factors such as soil water availability, temperature, light, etc. The overwhelming result from analysis of our extensive data base is that elevated CO2 has had a profound impact on this ecosystem that, overall, has resulted in increased carbon accumulation in plant shoots, roots and litter. Our measurements of net ecosystem gas exchange also indicate that the ecosystem has accumulated carbon much in excess of the increased biomass or soil carbon suggesting a substantial export of carbon through the porous, sandy soil into the water table several meters below the surface. A major discovery is the powerful interaction between the stimulation of growth, photosynthesis, and respiration by elevated CO2 and other environmental factors particularly precipitation and nitrogen. Our measurements focused attention on: stimulation of ecosystem gas exchange by elevated atmospheric CO2; the architecture and distribution of coarse roots using the novel approach of ground penetrating radar; mechanisms for the disturbance of soil carbon pools via the "priming" effect; and how interannual and seasonal variation in precipitation alters the physiological response of key species to elevated CO2. This project was a collaboration between research groups at the Smithsonian Institution, NASA, the Dynamac Corporation, Northern Arizona University, and Old Dominion University in Norfolk, Virginia.

  5. Abstract--Health management systems have been gaining substantial attentions in power engineering areas in recent years

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chow, Mo-Yuen

    , knowledge of the managed system is the most crucial aspect [1]. Data mining, also called Knowledge Discovery and nuclear power plant showed great interest in health management systems since the failuresAbstract--Health management systems have been gaining substantial attentions in power engineering

  6. Preprint version of Nicholson, S. & Stanton, J. (2003). Gaining strategic advantage through bibliomining: Data mining for management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicholson, Scott

    2003-01-01

    to improve customer service, manage acquisition budgets, or influence strategic decision-making about usesPreprint version of Nicholson, S. & Stanton, J. (2003). Gaining strategic advantage through bibliomining: Data mining for management decisions in corporate, special, digital, and traditional libraries

  7. Directional Sensor Control for Maximizing Information Gain Shankarachary Ragia, Hans D. Mittelmannb, and Edwin K. P. Chonga

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mittelmann, Hans D.

    , infrared sensors, and ultrasound sensors. These sensors are becoming increasingly important due to a wide locations are evaluated. Our goal is to assign each sensor to a particular direction such that the overallDirectional Sensor Control for Maximizing Information Gain Shankarachary Ragia, Hans D. Mittelmannb

  8. Energy gain spectroscopic study of Ar{sup q+}-Ar collisions at 40 qeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vancura, J.; Kostroun, V.O.

    1992-12-31

    Energy gain spectra of Ar{sup q+}(8 {le} q {le} 16) on Ar at 40 qeV collision energy and 0.4 qeV energy resolution are presented. Capture into definite states of the projectile is observed which seems to exhibit a definite even-odd projectile charge state dependence.

  9. DFIG-Based Wind Turbine Robust Control Using High-Order Sliding Modes and a High Gain Observer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brest, Université de

    DFIG-Based Wind Turbine Robust Control Using High-Order Sliding Modes and a High Gain Observer with the power generation control in variable speed wind turbines. In this context, a control strategy is proposed to ensure power extraction optimization of a DFIG- based wind turbine. The proposed control

  10. Common Base Amplifier with 7-dB gain at 176 GHz in InP mesa DHBT Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodwell, Mark J. W.

    power gain at 150.2 GHz. Index Terms -- InP heterojunction bipolar transistor, millimeter-wave amplifier Barbara, CA 93106, USA A. Fung, L. Samoska California Institute of Technology Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA 91109, USA Abstract -- We report common base power amplifiers designed for 140-220-GHz

  11. Tunable millimeter-wave generation with subharmonic injection locking in two-section strongly gain-coupled DFB lasers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Jin; Hui, Rongqing

    2000-05-01

    Using two-section dual-mode strongly gain-coupled (SGC) distributed feedback (DFB) lasers, tunable millimeter-wave (mm-wave) generation from 18 to 40 GHz can be achieved under CW bias conditions, Due to its high speed and excellent dynamic single...

  12. Self-Tuning PI TCP Flow Controller for AQM Routers With Interval Gain and Phase Margin Assignment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Changcheng

    -tuning proportional-integral (PI) controller for Active Queue Management (AQM) in the Internet. Classical control to achieve good AQM performance while adapting the AQM control system to great traffic load changes very well Queue Management, PI Control, Gain Margin, Phase Margin, Self-Tune 1. INTRODUCTION Congestion control

  13. Aalborg Universitet Fuzzy-Logic-Based Gain-Scheduling Control for State-of-Charge Balance of Distributed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vasquez, Juan Carlos

    nature of renewable energy sources and changes of load demand. Apart from that, the use of distributed of Distributed Energy Storage Systems for DC Microgrids Aldana, Nelson Leonardo Diaz; Dragicevic, Tomislav-Logic-Based Gain-Scheduling Control for State-of-Charge Balance of Distributed Energy Storage Systems for DC

  14. A Study of the Generalized Input-to-State L2-Gain of Discrete-Time Switched Linear Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Jinglai

    of switched linear systems under average dwell time constraints were given in [8]. The design of switching is proposed to study the stability of autonomous switched linear systems. These functions are power seriesA Study of the Generalized Input-to-State L2-Gain of Discrete-Time Switched Linear Systems Vamsi

  15. 1356 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON COMMUNICATIONS, VOL. 50, NO. 8, AUGUST 2002 Antenna Gain Against Interference in CDMA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yanikomeroglu, Halim

    communications. I. INTRODUCTION THE CDMA1 reverse-link capacity of a network of antenna elements (AEs) is investigated in [1]. It is reported there that the capacity increases linearly with the number of AEs and it is further stated that this linear gain is valid irrespective of the user2 and AE positions (as long

  16. Control of linear modes in cylindrical resistive magnetohydrodynamics with a resistive wall, plasma rotation, and complex gain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brennan, D. P. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Finn, J. M. [Applied Mathematics and Plasma Physics, Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2014-10-15

    Feedback stabilization of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modes in a tokamak is studied in a cylindrical model with a resistive wall, plasma resistivity, viscosity, and toroidal rotation. The control is based on a linear combination of the normal and tangential components of the magnetic field just inside the resistive wall. The feedback includes complex gain, for both the normal and for the tangential components, and it is known that the imaginary part of the feedback for the former is equivalent to plasma rotation [J. M. Finn and L. Chacon, Phys. Plasmas 11, 1866 (2004)]. The work includes (1) analysis with a reduced resistive MHD model for a tokamak with finite ? and with stepfunction current density and pressure profiles, and (2) computations with a full compressible visco-resistive MHD model with smooth decreasing profiles of current density and pressure. The equilibria are stable for ??=?0 and the marginal stability values ?{sub rp,rw}?gain with normal sensors or plasma rotation stabilizes below ?{sub rp,iw} because rotation suppresses the diffusion of flux from the plasma out through the wall and, more surprisingly, (b) rotation or imaginary gain with normal sensors destabilizes above ?{sub rp,iw} because it prevents the feedback flux from entering the plasma through the resistive wall to form a virtual wall. A method of using complex gain G{sub i} to optimize in the presence of rotation in this regime with ??>??{sub rp,iw} is presented. The effect of imaginary gain with tangential sensors is more complicated but essentially destabilizes above and below ?{sub rp,iw}.

  17. Impact of elevated nitrate on sulfate-reducing bacteria: A comparative study of Desulfovibrio vulgaris

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    He, Q.; He, Z.; Joyner, D.C.; Joachimiak, M.; Price, M.N.; Yang, Z.K.; Yen, H.-C. B.; Hemme, C. L.; Chen, W.; Fields, M.; Stahl, D. A.; Keasling, J. D.; Keller, M.; Arkin, A. P.; Hazen, T. C.; Wall, J. D.; Zhou, J.

    2010-07-15

    Sulfate-reducing bacteria have been extensively studied for their potential in heavy-metal bioremediation. However, the occurrence of elevated nitrate in contaminated environments has been shown to inhibit sulfate reduction activity. Although the inhibition has been suggested to result from the competition with nitrate-reducing bacteria, the possibility of direct inhibition of sulfate reducers by elevated nitrate needs to be explored. Using Desulfovibrio vulgaris as a model sulfate-reducing bacterium, functional genomics analysis reveals that osmotic stress contributed to growth inhibition by nitrate as shown by the upregulation of the glycine/betaine transporter genes and the relief of nitrate inhibition by osmoprotectants. The observation that significant growth inhibition was effected by 70 mM NaNO{sub 3} but not by 70 mM NaCl suggests the presence of inhibitory mechanisms in addition to osmotic stress. The differential expression of genes characteristic of nitrite stress responses, such as the hybrid cluster protein gene, under nitrate stress condition further indicates that nitrate stress response by D. vulgaris was linked to components of both osmotic and nitrite stress responses. The involvement of the oxidative stress response pathway, however, might be the result of a more general stress response. Given the low similarities between the response profiles to nitrate and other stresses, less-defined stress response pathways could also be important in nitrate stress, which might involve the shift in energy metabolism. The involvement of nitrite stress response upon exposure to nitrate may provide detoxification mechanisms for nitrite, which is inhibitory to sulfate-reducing bacteria, produced by microbial nitrate reduction as a metabolic intermediate and may enhance the survival of sulfate-reducing bacteria in environments with elevated nitrate level.

  18. Reply to comment by K. M. Lau and K. M. Kim on "`Elevated heat pump' hypothesis for the aerosolmonsoon hydroclimate link

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nigam, Sumant

    Reply to comment by K. M. Lau and K. M. Kim on "`Elevated heat pump' hypothesis for the aerosol. Bollasina (2011), Reply to comment by K. M. Lau and K. M. Kim on "`Elevated heat pump' hypothesis.1029/2010JD015246. [1] Lau and Kim's [2011] (hereinafter LK11) defense of the elevated heat pump (EHP

  19. Photosynthesis, carboxylation and leaf nitrogen responses of 16 species to elevated pCO2 across four free-air CO2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, David D.

    Photosynthesis, carboxylation and leaf nitrogen responses of 16 species to elevated pCO2 across four free-air CO2 enrichment experiments in forest, grassland and desert D AV I D S . E L L S W O R T H species under long-term elevated CO2 exposure (elevated pCa) directly impacts ecosystem CO2 assimilation

  20. Note: A method for minimizing oxide formation during elevated temperature nanoindentation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, I. C.; Hodge, A. M., E-mail: ahodge@usc.edu [Department of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering, University of Southern California, 3650 McClintock Avenue OHE430, Los Angeles, California 90089 (United States); Garcia-Sanchez, E. [Department of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering, University of Southern California, 3650 McClintock Avenue OHE430, Los Angeles, California 90089 (United States); Facultad de Ingeniería Mecánica y Eléctrica, Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, Av. Universidad S/N, San Nicolás de los Garza, NL 66450 (Mexico)

    2014-09-15

    A standardized method to protect metallic samples and minimize oxide formation during elevated-temperature nanoindentation was adapted to a commercial instrument. Nanoindentation was performed on Al (100), Cu (100), and W (100) single crystals submerged in vacuum oil at 200 °C, while the surface morphology and oxidation was carefully monitored using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results were compared to room temperature and 200 °C nanoindentation tests performed without oil, in order to evaluate the feasibility of using the oil as a protective medium. Extensive surface characterization demonstrated that this methodology is effective for nanoscale testing.

  1. Synthesis of Scrub-Oak Ecosystem Responses to Elevated CO2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hungate, Bruce

    2014-11-07

    This report summarizes a synthesis project of a long-term global change experiment conducted at the Kennedy Space Center, Florida, investigating how increasing concentrations of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) influences the functioning of a fire-dominated scrub-oak ecosystem. The experiment began in 1996 and ended in 2007. Results presented here summarize the effects of elevated CO2 on plant growth, soil processes, carbon and nutrient cycling, and other responses. Products include archived data from the experiment, as well as six publications in the peer-reviewed literature.

  2. Elevated-Temperature Ferritic and Martensitic Steels and Their Application to Future Nuclear Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klueh, RL

    2005-01-31

    In the 1970s, high-chromium (9-12% Cr) ferritic/martensitic steels became candidates for elevated-temperature applications in the core of fast reactors. Steels developed for conventional power plants, such as Sandvik HT9, a nominally Fe-12Cr-1Mo-0.5W-0.5Ni-0.25V-0.2C steel (composition in wt %), were considered in the United States, Europe, and Japan. Now, a new generation of fission reactors is in the planning stage, and ferritic, bainitic, and martensitic steels are again candidates for in-core and out-of-core applications. Since the 1970s, advances have been made in developing steels with 2-12% Cr for conventional power plants that are significant improvements over steels originally considered. This paper will review the development of the new steels to illustrate the advantages they offer for the new reactor concepts. Elevated-temperature mechanical properties will be emphasized. Effects of alloying additions on long-time thermal exposure with and without stress (creep) will be examined. Information on neutron radiation effects will be discussed as it applies to ferritic and martensitic steels.

  3. Elevated temperature load-order effects on austenitic steel life predictions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weiner, E.O.

    1989-03-01

    The design of nuclear pressure vessel components may typically involve a few hundred or more cyclic thermal loadings of various levels coupled with steady mechanical loads. Ordering of these loading events may not be detailed in the design specification. Thermal loading usually implies plastic deformation, and elevated temperature design must consider creep deformation and damage. Plastic creep solutions are history dependent. Even if some ordering is given in a design specification, practical cost considerations of inelastic analysis may impose a need to group transients. The analyst is frequently faced with the task of showing that his choice of load sequence in an elevated temperature design analysis is a conservative one. In facing such a task, the inelastic strain accumulation and creep-fatigue interaction criteria of the ASME N-47 (ASME 1986) Code Case usually govern. An effort associated with the Fast Flux Test Facility was to study the effects of load ordering the light of these criteria. The effects of a seismic disturbance were included. An additional interest was the effect of the alpha reset hardening modification (Corum, 1987), which prevents undue drift of the yield surface. An effect of reverse plasticity on subsequent creep, the beta effect, was also used. About two hundred inelastic analyses of a thin cylinder were carried out. The scope of work reported in this paper includes a study by J. Phillips (Phillips, 1982), extended with damage calculations. 4 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Elevated expression of ERK 2 in human tumor cells chronically treated with PD98059

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kanda, Shigeru [Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, Division of Endothelial Cell Biology, Nagasaki University Graduate School of Biomedical Science, Nagasaki (Japan)]. E-mail: skanda-jua@umin.net; Kanetake, Hiroshi [Department of Urology, Nagasaki University Graduate School of Biomedical Science, Nagasaki (Japan); Miyata, Yasuyoshi [Department of Urology, Nagasaki University Graduate School of Biomedical Science, Nagasaki (Japan)

    2006-07-14

    We examined the effect of chronic exposure of tumor cells to a mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) kinase inhibitor, PD98059, on cell proliferation was investigated. Human renal carcinoma cells (ACHN) and prostatic carcinoma cells (DU145) were cultured in the presence of PD98059 for more than 4 weeks (denoted ACHN (PD) cells and DU145 (PD) cells, respectively) and proliferation and signal transduction pathways were examined. PD98059 significantly inhibited the proliferation of parental cells. However, PD98059 failed to inhibit proliferation of ACHN (PD) and DU145 (PD) cells significantly. Expression of ERK 1 and 2 was elevated in these cells. These phenotypes were reversible. Downregulation of ERK 2, but not ERK 1, by small interfering RNA significantly inhibited the proliferation of ACHN (PD) and DU145 (PD) cells. Taken together, chronic exposure of tumor cells to PD98059 induced elevated expression of ERK 2, which was associated with decreased sensitivity of cellular proliferation to PD98059.

  5. Effects of elevated CO{sub 2} on Chesapeake Bay wetlands. [Progress report, 1988--1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drake, B.G.; Arp, W.J.; Balduman, L.

    1990-12-31

    Research during 1988--89 focused on several new aspects of the response of the salt marsh ecosystem to elevated CO{sub 2}. In previous years we gave highest priority to studies of the effect of CO{sub 2} on biomass production into above and below-ground tissues, nitrogen content, light response of photosynthesis of single leaves, leaf water potential and carbon dioxide and water vapor exchange between the plant canopy and the ambient air. Result from the work in 87 and 88 had shown that the C3 plant, Scirpus olneyi, responded vigorously to elevated CO{sub 2} but the two C4 species, Spartina patens and Distichlis spicata did not. The responses of photosynthesis were also reflected in the canopy and ecosystem processes. Thus our emphasis shifted from determining the growth responses to exploring photosynthesis in greater detail. The main questions were: does acclimation to high CO{sub 2} involve reduction of some aspect of photosynthesis either at the single leaf level or in canopy structure? How much more carbon will be accumulated in a high CO{sub 2} than under present CO{sub 2} concentration? Our results give us partial answers to these questions but since the long term aspect of CO{sub 2} stimulation remains the most important one, it is unlikely that we can do more than add some pieces of data to a continuing debate in the ecological community regarding the eventual effect of CO{sub 2} on ecosystems.

  6. Biochemical studies concerning the relationship of various blood and urine constituents to rate of gain in young beef animals 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ware, James Harold

    1951-01-01

    of gain in beef animals~ it seeesg XogLoal thai the Xoeele af aortain nutrient blocaL ocaayoneccte shouM be ~sureiL in tbe Xabesatory in this search for a gsoeth incLm, eLnoe these bloog eaterials sores as tbe buUcLing stones fcn groeth anc...LNaLLeae NLe14eLLeal eeelyreLe eae ayykh4 Le eD data ebLaLee4 La %a abeea 4eLeeaLIaaLeae La aa aeLeeLA ee ~L? aey et 4h~ btee4 eeaeLL|eeaLe eLLb eaLe et NsLa et ebe ~i StcaKes bass been oocduotcd oonoercdng possible correlations between rate of gain in bsof...

  7. High magnetic shear gain in a liquid sodium stable couette flow experiment A prelude to an alpha - omega dynamo

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colgate, Stirling [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Li, Jui [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Finn, John [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pariev, Vladimir [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Beckley, Howard [NM INSTIT. OF MINING AND TECH; Si, Jiahe [NM INSTIT. OF MINING AND TECH.; Martinic, Joe [NM INSTIT. OF MINING AND TECH.; Westpfahl, David [NM INSTIT. OF TECH.; Slutz, James [NM INSTIT. OF MINING AND TECH.; Westrom, Zeb [NM INSTIT. OF TECH.; Klein, Brianna [NM INSTIT. OF MINING AND TECH.

    2010-11-08

    The {Omega}-phase of the liquid sodium {alpha}-{Omega} dynamo experiment at NMIMT in cooperation with LANL has successfully demonstrated the production of a high toroidal field, B{sub {phi}} {approx_equal} 8 x B{sub r} from the radial component of an applied poloidal magnetic field, B{sub r}. This enhanced toroidal field is produced by rotational shear in stable Couette Row within liquid sodium at Rm {approx_equal} 120. The small turbulence in stable Taylor-Couette Row is caused by Ekman Row where ({delta}v/v){sup 2} {approx} 10{sup -3}. This high {Omega}-gain in low turbulence flow contrasts with a smaller {Omega}-gain in higher turbulence, Helmholtz-unstable shear flows. This result supports the ansatz that large scale astrophysical magnetic fields are created within semi-coherent large scale motions in which turbulence plays a diffusive role that enables magnetic flux linkage.

  8. Stimulated emission and optical gain in AlGaN heterostructures grown on bulk AlN substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Wei, E-mail: wguo2@ncsu.edu; Bryan, Zachary; Kirste, Ronny; Bryan, Isaac; Hussey, Lindsay; Bobea, Milena; Haidet, Brian; Collazo, Ramón; Sitar, Zlatko [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695-7919 (United States); Xie, Jinqiao; Mita, Seiji [HexaTech, Inc., 991 Aviation Pkwy, Suite 800, Morrisville, North Carolina 27560 (United States); Gerhold, Michael [Engineering Science Directorate, Army Research Office, P.O. BOX 12211, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina 27703 (United States)

    2014-03-14

    Optical gain spectra for ?250?nm stimulated emission were compared in three different AlGaN-based structures grown on single crystalline AlN substrates: a single AlGaN film, a double heterostructure (DH), and a Multiple Quantum Well (MQW) structure; respective threshold pumping power densities of 700, 250, and 150?kW/cm{sup 2} were observed. Above threshold, the emission was transverse-electric polarized and as narrow as 1.8?nm without a cavity. The DH and MQW structures showed gain values of 50–60?cm{sup ?1} when pumped at 1?MW/cm{sup 2}. The results demonstrated the excellent optical quality of the AlGaN-based heterostructures grown on AlN substrates and their potential for realizing electrically pumped sub-280?nm laser diodes.

  9. On the Fielding of a High Gain, Shock-Ignited Target on the National Ignitiion Facility in the Near Term

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perkins, L J; Betti, R; Schurtz, G P; Craxton, R S; Dunne, A M; LaFortune, K N; Schmitt, A J; McKenty, P W; Bailey, D S; Lambert, M A; Ribeyre, X; Theobald, W R; Strozzi, D J; Harding, D R; Casner, A; Atzemi, S; Erbert, G V; Andersen, K S; Murakami, M; Comley, A J; Cook, R C; Stephens, R B

    2010-04-12

    Shock ignition, a new concept for igniting thermonuclear fuel, offers the possibility for a near-term ({approx}3-4 years) test of high gain inertial confinement fusion on the National Ignition Facility at less than 1MJ drive energy and without the need for new laser hardware. In shock ignition, compressed fusion fuel is separately ignited by a strong spherically converging shock and, because capsule implosion velocities are significantly lower than those required for conventional hotpot ignition, fusion energy gains of {approx}60 may be achievable on NIF at laser drive energies around {approx}0.5MJ. Because of the simple all-DT target design, its in-flight robustness, the potential need for only 1D SSD beam smoothing, minimal early time LPI preheat, and use of present (indirect drive) laser hardware, this target may be easier to field on NIF than a conventional (polar) direct drive hotspot ignition target. Like fast ignition, shock ignition has the potential for high fusion yields at low drive energy, but requires only a single laser with less demanding timing and spatial focusing requirements. Of course, conventional symmetry and stability constraints still apply. In this paper we present initial target performance simulations, delineate the critical issues and describe the immediate-term R&D program that must be performed in order to test the potential of a high gain shock ignition target on NIF in the near term.

  10. Computational fluid dynamics simulations of oxy-coal combustion for carbon capture at atmospheric and elevated pressures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Lei, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2013-01-01

    Oxy-fuel combustion of solid fuels, often performed in a mixture of oxygen and wet or dry recycled carbon dioxide, has gained significant interest in the last two decades as one of the leading carbon capture technologies ...

  11. Structural characteristics and elevated temperature mechanical properties of AJ62 Mg alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kubásek, J., E-mail: Jiri.Kubasek@vscht.cz; Vojt?ch, D.; Martínek, M.

    2013-12-15

    Structure and mechanical properties of the novel casting AJ62 (Mg–6Al–2Sr) alloy developed for elevated temperature applications were studied. The AJ62 alloy was compared to commercial casting AZ91 (Mg–9Al–1Zn) and WE43 (Mg–4Y–3RE) alloys. The structure was examined by scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction and energy dispersive spectrometry. Mechanical properties were characterized by Viskers hardness measurements in the as-cast state and after a long-term heat treatment at 250 °C/150 hours. Compressive mechanical tests were also carried out both at room and elevated temperatures. Compressive creep tests were conducted at a temperature of 250 °C and compressive stresses of 60, 100 and 140 MPa. The structure of the AJ62 alloy consisted of primary ?-Mg dendrites and interdendritic nework of the Al{sub 4}Sr and massive Al{sub 3}Mg{sub 13}Sr phases. By increasing the cooling rate during solidification from 10 and 120 K/s the average dendrite arm thickness decreased from 18 to 5 ?m and the total volume fraction of the interdendritic phases from 20% to 30%. Both factors slightly increased hardness and compressive strength. The room temperature compressive strength and hardness of the alloy solidified at 30 K/s were 298 MPa and 50 HV 5, i.e. similar to those of the as-cast WE43 alloy and lower than those of the AZ91 alloy. At 250 °C the compressive strength of the AJ62 alloy decreased by 50 MPa, whereas those of the AZ91 and WE43 alloys by 100 and 20 MPa, respectively. The creep rate of the AJ62 alloy was higher than that of the WE43 alloy, but significantly lower in comparison with the AZ91 alloy. Different thermal stabilities of the alloys were discussed and related to structural changes during elevated temperature expositions. - Highlights: • Small effect of cooling rate on the compressive strength and hardness of AJ 62 • A bit lower compressive strength of AJ 62 compared to AZ91 at room temperature • Higher resistance of the AJ 62 alloy to the creep process in compression compared to AZ91 • Excellent thermal stability and creep resistance of the alloy WE 43 • Improved thermal stability and creep resistance in order WE43 > AJ62 >> AZ91.

  12. Digital Elevation Model, 0.25 m, Barrow Environmental Observatory, Alaska, 2013

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Cathy Wilson; Garrett Altmann

    2015-11-20

    This 0.25m horizontal resolution digital elevation model, DEM, was developed from Airborne Laser Altimetry flown by Aerometric Inc, now known as Quantum Spatial, Inc. on 12 July, 2013. One Mission was flown and the data jointly processed with LANL personnel to produce a 0.25m DEM covering a region approximately 2.8km wide and 12.4km long extending from the coast above North Salt Lagoon to south of Gas Well Road. This DEM encompasses a diverse range of hydrologic, geomorphic, geophysical and biological features typical of the Barrow Peninsula. Vertical accuracy at the 95% confidence interval was computed as 0.143m. The coordinate system, datum, and geoid for this DEM are UTM Zone 4N, NAD83 (2011), NAVD88 (GEOID09).

  13. Gas diffusion electrode setup for catalyst testing in concentrated phosphoric acid at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiberg, Gustav K. H. E-mail: m.arenz@chem.ku.dk; Fleige, Michael; Arenz, Matthias E-mail: m.arenz@chem.ku.dk

    2015-02-15

    We present a detailed description of the construction and testing of an electrochemical cell setup allowing the investigation of a gas diffusion electrode containing carbon supported high surface area catalysts. The setup is designed for measurements in concentrated phosphoric acid at elevated temperature, i.e., very close to the actual conditions in high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cells (HT-PEMFCs). The cell consists of a stainless steel flow field and a PEEK plastic cell body comprising the electrochemical cell, which exhibits a three electrode configuration. The cell body and flow field are braced using a KF-25 vacuum flange clamp, which allows an easy assembly of the setup. As demonstrated, the setup can be used to investigate temperature dependent electrochemical processes on high surface area type electrocatalysts, but it also enables quick screening tests of HT-PEMFC catalysts under realistic conditions.

  14. Elevated Temperature Primary Load Design Method Using Pseudo Elastic-Perfectly Plastic Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carter, Peter [Stress Engineering Services Inc.] [Stress Engineering Services Inc.; Sham, Sam [ORNL] [ORNL; Jetter, Robert I [Consultant] [Consultant

    2012-01-01

    A new primary load design method for elevated temperature service has been developed. Codification of the procedure in an ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section III Code Case is being pursued. The proposed primary load design method is intended to provide the same margins on creep rupture, yielding and creep deformation for a component or structure that are implicit in the allowable stress data. It provides a methodology that does not require stress classification and is also applicable to a full range of temperature above and below the creep regime. Use of elastic-perfectly plastic analysis based on allowable stress with corrections for constraint, steady state stress and creep ductility is described. This approach is intended to ensure that traditional primary stresses are the basis for design, taking into account ductility limits to stress re-distribution and multiaxial rupture criteria.

  15. Temperature elevation by HIFU in ex vivo porcine muscle: MRI measurement and simulation study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solovchuk, Maxim A., E-mail: solovchuk@gmail.com [Center for Advanced Study in Theoretical Sciences (CASTS), National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Hwang, San Chao; Chang, Hsu [Medical Engineering Research Division, National Health Research Institute, Miaoli 35053, Taiwan (China)] [Medical Engineering Research Division, National Health Research Institute, Miaoli 35053, Taiwan (China); Thiriet, Marc [Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, UMR 7598, Laboratoire Jacques-Louis Lions, F-75005, Paris (France)] [Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, UMR 7598, Laboratoire Jacques-Louis Lions, F-75005, Paris (France); Sheu, Tony W. H., E-mail: twhsheu@ntu.edu.tw [Department of Engineering Science and Ocean Engineering, National Taiwan University, No. 1, Sec. 4, Roosevelt Road, Taipei 10617, Taiwan, Republic of China and Center for Advanced Study in Theoretical Sciences (CASTS), National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Engineering Science and Ocean Engineering, National Taiwan University, No. 1, Sec. 4, Roosevelt Road, Taipei 10617, Taiwan, Republic of China and Center for Advanced Study in Theoretical Sciences (CASTS), National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China)

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: High-intensity focused ultrasound is a rapidly developing medical technology with a large number of potential clinical applications. Computational model can play a pivotal role in the planning and optimization of the treatment based on the patient's image. Nonlinear propagation effects can significantly affect the temperature elevation and should be taken into account. In order to investigate the importance of nonlinear propagation effects, nonlinear Westervelt equation was solved. Weak nonlinear propagation effects were studied. The purpose of this study was to investigate the correlation between the predicted and measured temperature elevations and lesion in a porcine muscle. Methods: The investigated single-element transducer has a focal length of 12 cm, an aperture of 8 cm, and frequency of 1.08 MHz. Porcine muscle was heated for 30 s by focused ultrasound transducer with an acoustic power in the range of 24–56 W. The theoretical model consists of nonlinear Westervelt equation with relaxation effects being taken into account and Pennes bioheat equation. Results: Excellent agreement between the measured and simulated temperature rises was found. For peak temperatures above 85–90?°C “preboiling” or cavitation activity appears and lesion distortion starts, causing small discrepancy between the measured and simulated temperature rises. From the measurements and simulations, it was shown that distortion of the lesion was caused by the “preboiling” activity. Conclusions: The present study demonstrated that for peak temperatures below 85–90?°C numerical simulation results are in excellent agreement with the experimental data in three dimensions. Both temperature rise and lesion size can be well predicted. Due to nonlinear effect the temperature in the focal region can be increased compared with the linear case. The current magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) resolution is not sufficient. Due to the inevitable averaging the measured temperature can be 10–30?°C lower than the peak temperature. Computational fluid dynamics can provide additional important information that is lost using a state of the art MRI device.

  16. Elevated lactate dehydrogenase activity and increased cardiovascular mortality in the arsenic-endemic areas of southwestern Taiwan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liao, Ya-Tang; Graduate Institute of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, College of Public Health, National Taiwan University, Taiwan; Genomics Research Center, Academia Sinica, Taiwan ; Chen, Chien-Jen; Genomics Research Center, Academia Sinica, Taiwan ; Li, Wan-Fen; Hsu, Ling-I; Tsai, Li-Yu; Huang, Yeou-Lih; Sun, Chien-Wen; Chen, Wei J.; Wang, Shu-Li; Department of Public Health, College of Public Health, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan

    2012-08-01

    Arsenic ingestion has been linked to increasing global prevalence of and mortality from cardiovascular disease (CVD); arsenic can be removed from drinking water to reduce related health effects. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) is used for the evaluation of acute arsenic toxicity in vivo and in vitro, but it is not validated for the evaluation of long-term, chronic arsenic exposure. The present study examined the long-term effect of chronic arsenic exposure on CVD and serum LDH levels, after consideration of arsenic metabolism capacity. A total of 380 subjects from an arseniasis-endemic area and 303 from a non-endemic area of southwestern Taiwan were recruited in 2002. Various urinary arsenic species were analyzed using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and hydride generation systems. Fasting serum was used for quantitative determination of the total LDH activity. A significant dose–response relationship was observed between arsenic exposure and LDH elevation, independent of urinary arsenic profiles (P < 0.001). Furthermore, abnormal LDH elevation was associated with CVD mortality after adjustment for Framingham risk scores for 10-year CVD and arsenic exposure (hazard ratio, 3.98; 95% confidence interval, 1.07–14.81). LDH was elevated in subjects with arsenic exposure in a dose-dependent manner. LDH is a marker of arsenic toxicity associated with CVD mortality. Results of this study have important implications for use in ascertaining long-term arsenic exposure risk of CVD. -- Highlights: ? We showed that arsenic exposure was correlated with LDH elevation. ? LDH elevation was related to arsenic methylation capacity. ? Abnormal LDH elevation can be a marker of susceptibility to CVD mortality.

  17. Fidelity criterion for quantum-domain transmission and storage of coherent states beyond unit-gain constraint

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryo Namiki; Masato Koashi; Nobuyuki Imoto

    2008-08-11

    We generalize the experimental success criterion for quantum teleportation/memory in continuous-variable quantum systems to be suitable for non-unit-gain condition by considering attenuation/amplification of the coherent-state amplitude. The new criterion can be used for a non-ideal quantum memory and long distance quantum communication as well as quantum devices with amplification process. It is also shown that the framework to measure the average fidelity is capable of detecting all Gaussian channels in quantum domain.

  18. Modeling of optical amplifier waveguide based on silicon nanostructures and rare earth ions doped silica matrix gain media by a finite-difference time-domain method: comparison of achievable gain with Er3+ or Nd3+ ions dopants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cardin, Julien; Dufour, Christian; Gourbilleau, Fabrice

    2015-01-01

    A comparative study of the gain achievement is performed in a waveguide optical amplifier whose active layer is constituted by a silica matrix containing silicon nanograins acting as sensitizer of either neodymium ions (Nd 3+) or erbium ions (Er 3+). Due to the large difference between population levels characteristic times (ms) and finite-difference time step (10 --17 s), the conventional auxiliary differential equation and finite-difference time-domain (ADE-FDTD) method is not appropriate to treat such systems. Consequently, a new two loops algorithm based on ADE-FDTD method is presented in order to model this waveguide optical amplifier. We investigate the steady states regime of both rare earth ions and silicon nanograins levels populations as well as the electromagnetic field for different pumping powers ranging from 1 to 10 4 mW.mm-2. Furthermore, the three dimensional distribution of achievable gain per unit length has been estimated in this pumping range. The Nd 3+ doped waveguide shows a higher gross...

  19. High gain, low noise, fully complementary logic inverter based on bi-layer WSe{sub 2} field effect transistors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Das, Saptarshi; Roelofs, Andreas; Dubey, Madan

    2014-08-25

    In this article, first, we show that by contact work function engineering, electrostatic doping and proper scaling of both the oxide thickness and the flake thickness, high performance p- and n-type WSe{sub 2} field effect transistors (FETs) can be realized. We report record high drive current of 98??A/?m for the electron conduction and 110 ?A/?m for the hole conduction in Schottky barrier WSe{sub 2} FETs. Then, we combine high performance WSe{sub 2} PFET with WSe{sub 2} NFET in double gated transistor geometry to demonstrate a fully complementary logic inverter. We also show that by adjusting the threshold voltages for the NFET and the PFET, the gain and the noise margin of the inverter can be significantly enhanced. The maximum gain of our chemical doping free WSe{sub 2} inverter was found to be ?25 and the noise margin was close to its ideal value of ?2.5?V for a supply voltage of V{sub DD}?=?5.0?V.

  20. Propagation of trembling aspen and hybrid poplar for agroforestry: potential benefits of elevated CO2 in the greenhouse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Macdonald, Ellen

    CO2 in the greenhouse Kendall A. Tupker, Barb R. Thomas* and S. Ellen Macdonald Department the usefulness of elevated CO2 in the greenhouse to aid in early selection of genotypes and in the propagation and reclamation across Canada. Introduction Understanding the effects of greenhouse propagation methods

  1. Impacts of Climate Change and Elevated CO2 on Sugar Beet Production in Northern and Central Italy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    above and below-ground crop growth and yield, soil water movement, and the effects of elevated CO2 and increased precipitation regimes were sufficient to overcome the negative effects on crop yields linked and harvest yields globally. However, the increases in temperature and changes in precipitation as- sociated

  2. Fire Safety Journal 41 (2006) 349363 On the trajectories of embers initially elevated or lofted by small scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tse, Stephen D.

    2006-01-01

    Fire Safety Journal 41 (2006) 349­363 On the trajectories of embers initially elevated or lofted by small scale ground fire plumes in high winds$ Ralph A. Antheniena,Ã, Stephen D. Tseb , A. Carlos are destroyed annually by wildfires. With many of these fires extending long distances due to spotting, detailed

  3. Impacts of elevated CO2 and O3 on aspen leaf litter chemistry and earthworm and springtail productivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Impacts of elevated CO2 and O3 on aspen leaf litter chemistry and earthworm and springtail few studies have considered how CO2- and O3-induced changes in litter quality will affect decomposition. Although the fraction of litter carbon respired by soil invertebrates is fairly small

  4. Root responses along a subambient to elevated CO2 gradient in a C3C4 grassland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Robert B.

    Root responses along a subambient to elevated CO2 gradient in a C3­C4 grassland L A U R E L J . A N C3­C4 grassland exposed to a gradient of Ca from preglacial to future levels (230­550 lmol molÀ1 studies have docu- mented increases in belowground plant productivity and metabolism with increased

  5. Snow water equivalent along elevation gradients in the Merced and Tuolumne River basins of the Sierra Nevada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Jeff

    Snow water equivalent along elevation gradients in the Merced and Tuolumne River basins fractional snow-covered area (SCA) at 500 m resolution to estimate snow water equivalent (SWE) across) blending the fractional SCA with SWE interpolated from snow-pillow measurements; and (2) retrospectively

  6. Fracture and Fatigue Behavior at Ambient and Elevated Temperatures of Alumina Bonded with Copper/Niobium/Copper Interlayers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritchie, Robert

    Fracture and Fatigue Behavior at Ambient and Elevated Temperatures of Alumina Bonded with Copper and Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 Interfacial fracture toughness and cyclic temperatures, and assessed in terms of interfacial chemistry and microstructure. The mean interfacial fracture

  7. Numerical and experimental study of soot formation in laminar diffusion flames burning simulated biogas fuels at elevated pressures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gülder, Ömer L.

    biogas fuels at elevated pressures Marc R.J. Charest , Ömer L. Gülder, Clinton P.T. Groth University 18 April 2014 Available online 2 June 2014 Keywords: Soot formation High pressure combustion Biogas, and other chemical species that are harmful to human health and the environment. Gaseous biofuels, or biogas

  8. Summary Elevated concentrations of atmospheric carbon dioxide ([CO2]) and tropospheric ozone ([O3]) have the poten-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Summary Elevated concentrations of atmospheric carbon dioxide ([CO2]) and tropospheric ozone ([O3 gases (greenhouse gases) altered by human activities (IPCC 2007), only carbon dioxide (CO2 vegeta- tion properties affect local and regional climate, as well as how atmospheric forcing

  9. Bayesian models for elevated disease risk due to exposure to uranium mine and mill waste on the Navajo Nation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huerta, Gabriel

    ForReview Only Bayesian models for elevated disease risk due to exposure to uranium mine and mill of Pharmacy, Community Environmental Health Program Keywords: abandoned uranium mines, conditionally specified to ex- posure to uranium mine and mill waste on the Navajo Nation Glenn A. Stark University of New

  10. ICELANDIC RHYTHMICS: ANNUAL MODULATION OF LAND ELEVATION AND PLATE SPREADING BY SNOW LOAD (AGU G33B-0055)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grapenthin, Ronni

    ICELANDIC RHYTHMICS: ANNUAL MODULATION OF LAND ELEVATION AND PLATE SPREADING BY SNOW LOAD (AGU ­ G Volcanological Center, Institute of Earth Sciences, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland 2 Icelandic Meteorological Office, Reykjavik, Iceland 3 IRD, UMR5559, Laboratoire de Geophysique Interne et Tectonophysique

  11. PUBLISHED ONLINE: 2 NOVEMBER 2014 | DOI: 10.1038/NGEO2284 Plant growth enhancement by elevated CO2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, David D.

    by elevated CO2 eliminated by joint water and nitrogen limitation Peter B. Reich1,2 *, Sarah E. Hobbie3 and Tali D. Lee4 Rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations can fertilize plant growth. The resulting increased plant uptake of CO2 could, in turn, slow increases in atmospheric CO2 levels and associated climate

  12. Electrochemical and physical analysis of a Li-ion cell cycled at elevated temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shim, Joongpyo; Kostecki, Robert; Richardson, Thomas; Song, Xiangyun; Striebel, Kathryn A.

    2002-06-21

    Laboratory-size LiNi0.8Co0.15Al0.05O2/graphite lithium-ion pouch cells were cycled over 100 percent DOD at room temperature and 60 degrees C in order to investigate high-temperature degradation mechanisms of this important technology. Capacity fade for the cell was correlated with that for the individual components, using electrochemical analysis of the electrodes and other diagnostic techniques. The high-temperature cell lost 65 percent of its initial capacity after 140 cycles at 60 degrees C compared to only 4 percent loss for the cell cycled at room temperature. Cell ohmic impedance increased significantly with the elevated temperature cycling, resulting in some of loss of capacity at the C/2 rate. However, as determined with slow rate testing of the individual electrodes, the anode retained most of its original capacity, while the cathode lost 65 percent, even when cycled with a fresh source of lithium. Diagnostic evaluation of cell components including XRD, Raman, CSAFM and suggest capacity loss occurs primarily due to a rise in the impedance of the cathode, especially at the end-of-charge. The impedance rise may be caused in part by a loss of the conductive carbon at the surface of the cathode and/or by an organic film on the surface of the cathode that becomes non-ionically conductive at low lithium content.

  13. Soot surface temperature measurements in pure and diluted flames at atmospheric and elevated pressures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berry Yelverton, T.L.; Roberts, W.L. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Campus Box 7910, North Carolina State University, 3211 Broughton Hall, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States)

    2008-10-15

    Soot surface temperature was measured in laminar jet diffusion flames at atmospheric and elevated pressures. The soot surface temperature was measured in flames at one, two, four, and eight atmospheres with both pure and diluted (using helium, argon, nitrogen, or carbon dioxide individually) ethylene fuels with a calibrated two-color soot pyrometry technique. These two dimensional temperature profiles of the soot aid in the analysis and understanding of soot production, leading to possible methods for reducing soot emission. Each flame investigated was at its smoke point, i.e., at the fuel flow rate where the overall soot production and oxidation rates are equal. The smoke point was chosen because it was desirable to have similar soot loadings for each flame. A second set of measurements were also taken where the fuel flow rate was held constant to compare with earlier work. These measurements show that overall flame temperature decreases with increasing pressure, with increasing pressure the position of peak temperature shifts to the tip of the flame, and the temperatures measured were approximately 10% lower than those calculated assuming equilibrium and neglecting radiation. (author)

  14. CHARACTERIZATION OF ELEVATED TEMPERATURE PROPERTIES OF HEAT EXCHANGER AND STEAM GENERATOR ALLOYS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.K. Wright; L.J. Carroll; C.J. Cabet; T. Lillo; J.K. Benz; J.A. Simpson; A. Chapman; R.N. Wright

    2012-10-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant project is considering Alloy 800H and Alloy 617 for steam generator and intermediate heat exchangers. It is envisioned that a steam generator would operate with reactor outlet temperatures from 750 to 800 C, while an intermediate heat exchanger for primary to secondary helium would operate up to an outlet temperature of 950 C. Although both alloys are of interest due in part to their technical maturity, a number of specific properties require further characterization for design of nuclear components. Strain rate sensitivity of both alloys has been characterized and is found to be significant above 600 C. Both alloys also exhibit dynamic strain aging, characterized by serrated flow, over a wide range of temperatures and strain rates. High temperature tensile testing of Alloy 617 has been conducted over a range of temperatures. Dynamic strain aging is a concern for these materials since it is observed to result in reduced ductility for many solid solution alloys. Creep, fatigue, and creep-fatigue properties of Alloy 617 have been measured as well, with the goal of determining the influence of the temperature, strain rate and atmosphere on the creep fatigue life of Alloy 617. Elevated temperature properties and implications for codification of the alloys will be described.

  15. Processes regulating progressive nitrogen limitation under elevated carbon dioxide: a meta-analysis

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Liang, J.; Qi, X.; Souza, L.; Luo, Y.

    2015-10-20

    Nitrogen (N) cycle has the potential to regulate climate change through its influence on carbon (C) sequestration. Although extensive researches have been done to explore whether or not progressive N limitation (PNL) occurs under CO2 enrichment, a comprehensive assessment of the processes that regulate PNL is still lacking. Here, we quantitatively synthesized the responses of all major processes and pools in terrestrial N cycle with meta-analysis of CO2 experimental data available in the literature. The results showed that CO2 enrichment significantly increased N sequestration in plant and litter pools but not in soil pool. Thus, the basis of PNL occurrencemore »partially exists. However, CO2 enrichment also significantly increased the N influx via biological N fixation, but decreased the N efflux via leaching. In addition, no general diminished CO2 fertilization effect on plant growth over time was observed. Overall, our analyses suggest that the extra N supply by the increased biological N fixation and decreased leaching may potentially alleviate PNL under elevated CO2 conditions. Moreover, our synthesis showed that CO2 enrichment increased soil ammonium (NH4+) but decreased nitrate (NO3-). The different responses of NH4+ and NO3-, and the consequent biological processes, may result in changes in soil microenvironment, community structures and above-belowground interactions, which could potentially affect the terrestrial biogeochemical cycles and the feedback to climate change.« less

  16. “The Sun Do Move” Lloyd Gaines and Lucile Bluford—Interconnected Histories of the NAACP’s Campaign for Educational Equality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, James Spence

    2015-05-31

    This thesis develops the two, interconnected narratives of two African Americans, Lloyd Lionel Gaines and Lucile Harris Bluford. Specifically, the work explores the two plaintiffs’ attempts for admission to the University ...

  17. Reconnaissance Estimates of Recharge Based on an Elevation-dependent Chloride Mass-balance Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Charles E. Russell; Tim Minor

    2002-08-31

    Significant uncertainty is associated with efforts to quantity recharge in arid regions such as southern Nevada. However, accurate estimates of groundwater recharge are necessary to understanding the long-term sustainability of groundwater resources and predictions of groundwater flow rates and directions. Currently, the most widely accepted method for estimating recharge in southern Nevada is the Maxey and Eakin method. This method has been applied to most basins within Nevada and has been independently verified as a reconnaissance-level estimate of recharge through several studies. Recharge estimates derived from the Maxey and Eakin and other recharge methodologies ultimately based upon measures or estimates of groundwater discharge (outflow methods) should be augmented by a tracer-based aquifer-response method. The objective of this study was to improve an existing aquifer-response method that was based on the chloride mass-balance approach. Improvements were designed to incorporate spatial variability within recharge areas (rather than recharge as a lumped parameter), develop a more defendable lower limit of recharge, and differentiate local recharge from recharge emanating as interbasin flux. Seventeen springs, located in the Sheep Range, Spring Mountains, and on the Nevada Test Site were sampled during the course of this study and their discharge was measured. The chloride and bromide concentrations of the springs were determined. Discharge and chloride concentrations from these springs were compared to estimates provided by previously published reports. A literature search yielded previously published estimates of chloride flux to the land surface. {sup 36}Cl/Cl ratios and discharge rates of the three largest springs in the Amargosa Springs discharge area were compiled from various sources. This information was utilized to determine an effective chloride concentration for recharging precipitation and its associated uncertainty via Monte Carlo simulations. Previously developed isohyetal maps were utilized to determine the mean and standard deviation of precipitation within the area. A digital elevation model was obtained to provide elevation information. A geologic model was obtained to provide the spatial distribution of alluvial formations. Both were used to define the lower limit of recharge. In addition, 40 boreholes located in alluvial sediments were drilled and sampled in an attempt to support the argument that the areal distribution of alluvial sediments can be used to define a zone of negligible recharge. The data were compiled in a geographic information system and used in a Monte Carlo analysis to determine recharge occurring within the study area. Results of the analysis yielded estimates of the mean and standard deviation of recharge occurring within the study area (28.168 x 10{sup 6} m{sup 3} yr{sup -1} and 7.008 x 10{sup 6} m{sup 3} yr{sup -1}, and 26.838 x 10{sup 6} m{sup 3} yr{sup -1} and 6.928 x 10{sup 6} m{sup 3} yr{sup -1}) for two sets of simulations using alternate definitions of the lower limit of recharge. A sensitivity analysis determined the recharge estimates were most sensitive to uncertainty associated with the chloride concentration of the spring discharge. The second most sensitive parameter was the uncertainty associated with the mean precipitation within the recharge areas. Comparison of the analysis to previously published estimates of recharge revealed mixed results with the recharge estimates derived during the course of this project generally greater relative to previously published estimates.

  18. Summary We examined the effects of elevated carbon diox-ide concentration ([CO2]) on the relationship between light-sat-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeLucia, Evan H.

    carbon dioxide con- centration ([CO2]) increase in complexity, from single plants in pots to intactSummary We examined the effects of elevated carbon diox- ide concentration ([CO2 to showastrongstimulationof photosynthesisbyelevated[CO2]. Keywords: elevated CO2, foliar nitrogen, Free Air Carbon En

  19. Analysis of wear track and debris of stir cast LM13/Zr composite at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Panwar, Ranvir Singh, E-mail: ranvir.panwar@thapar.edu; Pandey, O.P., E-mail: oppandey@thapar.edu

    2013-01-15

    Particulate reinforced aluminum metal matrix composite is in high demand in automobile industry where the operational conditions vary from low to high temperature. In order to understand the wear mode at elevated temperature, this study was planned. For this purpose we developed a metal matrix composite containing aluminum alloy (LM13) as matrix and zircon sand as particulate reinforcement by stir casting process. Different amounts of zircon sand (5, 10, 15 and 20 wt.%) were incorporated in the matrix to study the effect of reinforcement on the wear resistance. Dispersion of zircon sand particles in the matrix was confirmed by using optical microscopy. Sliding wear tests were done to study the durability of the composite with respect to the base alloy. The effects of load and temperature on wear behavior from room temperature to 300 Degree-Sign C were studied to understand the wear mechanism deeply. Surface morphology of the worn surfaces after the wear tests as well as wear debris was observed under scanning electron microscope. Mild to severe wear transition was noticed in tests at high temperature and high load. However, there is interesting change in wear behavior of the composite near the critical temperature of the composite. All the observed behavior has been explained with reference to the observed microstructure of the wear track and debris. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Good interfacial bonding between zircon sand particles and Al matrix was observed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effect of temperature on the wear behavior of LM13/Zr composites was studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Wear resistance of the composite was improved with addition of zircon sand. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Transition temperature from mild to severe wear also improved in composite. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SEM analysis of the tracks and debris was done to establish wear mechanism.

  20. Gaining a World View 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2007-01-01

    -edge technology.? Hartley, whose home is near Galveston on Texas? coast, said he was particularly interested in this project because of the damage of Hurricane Katrina in 2005. ?Observing this project has reassured me that once people put their minds...

  1. Export markets gain strength

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fiscor, S.

    2008-02-15

    The prices for internally traded coal in the USA have reached record levels and the future market fundamentals look very good. This is mainly due to Asian demand. The article discusses recent markets for US coal and summarizes findings of a recent study by Hill & Associates entitled 'International coal trade - supply, demand and prices to 2025'. 1 ref., 2 tabs.

  2. Gaining Experience Experiential Learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Shin-Tson

    us.org/ UCF Arboretum http://www.arboretum.ucf.edu/ UCF Sustainability http://energy://www.ecojobs.com/environmental- internships.htm Florida Dept. of Environmental Protection http://www.dep.state.fl.us/careers/ careers://www.orangecountyfl.net/ Environment.aspx UCF Sustainability http://www.sustainable.ucf.edu/ UCF Environmental Health and Safety http

  3. Gain Sharing.PDF

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,Executive Compensation References: FARWashers | GSATransmissionSE DOE/IG-480 I

  4. The effects of digital elevation model resolution on the calculation and predictions of topographic wetness indices.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drover, Damion, Ryan

    2011-12-01

    One of the largest exports in the Southeast U.S. is forest products. Interest in biofuels using forest biomass has increased recently, leading to more research into better forest management BMPs. The USDA Forest Service, along with the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, University of Georgia and Oregon State University are researching the impacts of intensive forest management for biofuels on water quality and quantity at the Savannah River Site in South Carolina. Surface runoff of saturated areas, transporting excess nutrients and contaminants, is a potential water quality issue under investigation. Detailed maps of variable source areas and soil characteristics would therefore be helpful prior to treatment. The availability of remotely sensed and computed digital elevation models (DEMs) and spatial analysis tools make it easy to calculate terrain attributes. These terrain attributes can be used in models to predict saturated areas or other attributes in the landscape. With laser altimetry, an area can be flown to produce very high resolution data, and the resulting data can be resampled into any resolution of DEM desired. Additionally, there exist many maps that are in various resolutions of DEM, such as those acquired from the U.S. Geological Survey. Problems arise when using maps derived from different resolution DEMs. For example, saturated areas can be under or overestimated depending on the resolution used. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of DEM resolution on the calculation of topographic wetness indices used to predict variable source areas of saturation, and to find the best resolutions to produce prediction maps of soil attributes like nitrogen, carbon, bulk density and soil texture for low-relief, humid-temperate forested hillslopes. Topographic wetness indices were calculated based on the derived terrain attributes, slope and specific catchment area, from five different DEM resolutions. The DEMs were resampled from LiDAR, which is a laser altimetry remote sensing method, obtained from the USDA Forest Service at Savannah River Site. The specific DEM resolutions were chosen because they are common grid cell sizes (10m, 30m, and 50m) used in mapping for management applications and in research. The finer resolutions (2m and 5m) were chosen for the purpose of determining how finer resolutions performed compared with coarser resolutions at predicting wetness and related soil attributes. The wetness indices were compared across DEMs and with each other in terms of quantile and distribution differences, then in terms of how well they each correlated with measured soil attributes. Spatial and non-spatial analyses were performed, and predictions using regression and geostatistics were examined for efficacy relative to each DEM resolution. Trends in the raw data and analysis results were also revealed.

  5. Health and productivity gains from better indoor environments and their implications for the U.S. Department of Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisk, William J.

    2000-10-01

    A substantial portion of the US population suffers frequently from communicable respiratory illnesses, allergy and asthma symptoms, and sick building syndrome symptoms. We now have increasingly strong evidence that changes in building design, operation, and maintenance can significantly reduce these illnesses. Decreasing the prevalence or severity of these health effects would lead to lower health care costs, reduced sick leave, and shorter periods of illness-impaired work performance, resulting in annual economic benefits for the US in the tens of billions of dollars. Increasing the awareness of these potential health and economic gains, combined with other factors, could help bring about a shift in the way we design, construct, operate, and occupy buildings. The current goal of providing marginally adequate indoor environments could be replaced by the goal of providing indoor environments that maximize the health, satisfaction, and performance of building occupants. Through research and technology transfer, DOE and its contractors are well positioned to help stimulate this shift in practice and, consequently, improve the health and economic well-being of the US population. Additionally, DOE's energy-efficiency interests would be best served by a program that prepares for the potential shift, specifically by identifying and promoting the most energy-efficient methods of improving the indoor environment. The associated research and technology transfer topics of particular relevance to DOE are identified and discussed.

  6. Experimental study of a modulated beam AlGaAs/GaAs diode amplifier operating in the highly saturated gain regime

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D'yachkov, N V; Bogatov, A P; Gushchik, T I; Drakin, A E [P N Lebedev Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2014-11-30

    The variation in the modulation parameters of an optical signal in a diode power amplifier has been studied experimentally. The experimental data obtained agree well with theory that takes into account nonlinear interaction between fields in the gain medium of a laser through inversion beating. It is shown that the dominant type of output signal modulation is phase modulation, whose depth depends on the amplitude – phase coupling coefficient of the gain medium of the amplifier and the nature of the modulation (the phase relationships between the spectral components) of the output signal. (lasers)

  7. Site Suitability Assessment for Irrigating Urban Landscapes with Water of Elevated Salinity in the Southwest. Consolidated Final Report. Part 1. Water Quality and Plant Tolerance 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miyamoto, S.

    With increasing population and the demand for potable water, water with elevated salinity and reclaimed water are now commonly used for irrigating urban landscape in many communities in the arid Southwest. It not only saves potable water, but also...

  8. Regional Impact of an Elevated Heat Source: The Zagros Plateau of Iran BENJAMIN F. ZAITCHIK, JASON P. EVANS, AND RONALD B. SMITH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Jason

    Regional Impact of an Elevated Heat Source: The Zagros Plateau of Iran BENJAMIN F. ZAITCHIK, JASON in the north, the Taurus Moun- tains of Turkey, and the Zagros Plateau in Iran. Inter- secting atmospheric

  9. Elevated levels of somatic mutation of the glycophorin A locus in cancer patients: Relevance for incidence of secondary cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grant, S.G.; Bigbee, W.L. [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1994-09-01

    The glycophorin A (GPA)-based human in vivo somatic mutation assay was used to survey a large number of newly diagnosed cancer patients presenting with a variety of solid tumors. This cancer patient population was sampled pre-therapy and frequencies of two types of variant cells determined: allele loss segregants arising by mutation, deletion, chromosome loss or gene inactivation, and allele loss and duplication segregants arising by chromosome missegregation, mitotic recombination and possibly gene conversion. When compared with matched controls, the cancer patient population exhibited significantly elevated frequencies of both types of segregants. Cancer patients undergoing genotoxic therapy with chemicals and/or ionizing radiation were then examined, yielding variable results depending on the particular agent. In patients receiving localized high dose radiotherapy there was no response with either endpoint. In most cases involving chemotherapy, a significant elevation in the frequency of allele loss variants was observed within one month of the initiation of therapy which persisted at least one erythrocyte lifetime ({approximately}4 months) post therapy. In a subset of these cases, specifically, involving the known stem cell mutagen cis-platinum, the allele loss variant cell frequency remained significantly elevated up to 7 years after treatment. These results indicate that individuals with cancer have inherently higher levels of somatic mutation and segregation, due to genetic predisposition or exposure to environmental genotoxicants, or both, and that certain types of cancer therapy add significantly to the burden of mutation. These data provide a molecular rationale for the increased frequency of secondary malignancy observed in primary cancer patients: they are at increased risk of already having or easily acquiring the necessary carcinogenic events implicated in the progression of multi-step oncogenesis.

  10. Scientific Breakeven for Fusion Energy For the past 40 years, the IFE fusion research community has adopted: achieving a fusion gain of 1 as

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scientific Breakeven for Fusion Energy For the past 40 years, the IFE fusion research community has as fusion energy produced divided the external energy incident on the fusion reaction chamber. Typical fusion power plant design concepts require a fusion gain of 30 for MFE and 70 for IFE. Fusion energy

  11. Design of Mixed-mode Adaptive Loop Gain Bang-Bang Clock and Data Recovery and Process-Variation-Resilient Current Mode Logic 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeon, Hyung-Joon

    2013-03-19

    -nonlinearity of the Bang-Bang Phase Detector (BBPD), the CDR loop gain is adaptively adjusted based on a posteriori jitter spectrum estimation. Maximizing advantages of analog and digital implementations, the proposed mixed-mode technique achieves PVT insensitive and power...

  12. The Patient Portal is not intended for use in emergencies. If you require urgent or immediate medical care, call 911. To gain access to our secure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Patient Portal is not intended for use in emergencies. If you require urgent or immediate medical care, call 911. To gain access to our secure server on Patient Portal and become web your portal! https://health.eclinicalworks.com/IUPUICampusHealth IUPUI Campus Health is now offering

  13. GLOBAL GAIN-SCHEDULING CONTROL FOR VARIABLE SPEED WIND TURBINES W. E. Leithead, D. J. Leith, F. Hardan, H.Markou

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffy, Ken

    1 GLOBAL GAIN-SCHEDULING CONTROL FOR VARIABLE SPEED WIND TURBINES W. E. Leithead, D. J. Leith, F wind turbines exhibit a separability property similar to that previously established for constant speed wind turbines. The importance of this result is that it establishes that from a control viewpoint

  14. The University of Edinburgh is a charitable body, registered in Scotland, with registration number SC005336. Page 1 of 2 How to gain access to internal vacancies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edinburgh, University of

    SC005336. Page 1 of 2 How to gain access to internal vacancies As a current University employee, you. To register as an internal applicant, log in to the University's jobs website. If you do not already have University of Edinburgh is a charitable body, registered in Scotland, with registration number SC005336. Page

  15. Daily Gazette, Schenectady NY Letters to the Editor for Thursday, July 10, 2008 Nothing to fear, and much to gain, from waste-to-energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    , and much to gain, from waste-to-energy Schenectady is one of those misguided cities that sends its global warming and pollution of our environment. Waste-to-energy (WTE) is safe. I advised the Israel telling its public officials that WTE with modern, multi-stage air pollution controls is safe and has

  16. Generation of ultrahigh-speed tunable-rate optical pulses using strongly gain-coupled dual-wavelength DFB laser diodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hui, Rongqing; Zhu, B.; Demarest, Kenneth; Allen, Christopher Thomas; Hong, Jin

    1999-05-01

    A novel and simple method to generate a variable-rate, ultrahigh-speed optical pulse train is demonstrated using a dual-wavelength, strongly gain-coupled distributed-feedback laser diode, The repetition rate of the optical pulse train...

  17. VISA IB: ULTRA-HIGH BANDWIDTH, HIGH GAIN SASE FEL G. Andonian, A. Murokh, R. Agustsson, C. Pellegrini, S. Reiche, J. B. Rosenzweig, and G. Travish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brookhaven National Laboratory

    VISA IB: ULTRA-HIGH BANDWIDTH, HIGH GAIN SASE FEL G. Andonian, A. Murokh, R. Agustsson, C spread SASE FEL experiment, the intermediary experiment linking the VISA I and VISA II projects. A highly-election lasers (SASE FEL) promises to be an invalu- able tool for the scientific community. There are current

  18. Master-Oscillator-Power-Amplifier (MOPA) Laser Sources Used as Drive Lasers for Photoinjectors for High-Gain, Free Electron Lasers (FELs)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anlage, Steven

    Master-Oscillator-Power-Amplifier (MOPA) Laser Sources Used as Drive Lasers for Photoinjectors Milchberg #12;- 1 - Abstract The realization of extremely high gain, and high power in Free Electron Lasers critically on the power and phase stability of the cathode drive laser, and conversely the type of FEL output

  19. Apparatus and method for direct measurement of coal ash sintering and fusion properties at elevated temperatures and pressures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Khan, M. Rashid (Morgantown, WV)

    1990-01-01

    A high-pressure microdilatometer is provided for measuring the sintering and fusion properties of various coal ashes under the influence of elevated pressures and temperatures in various atmospheres. Electrical resistivity measurements across a sample of coal ash provide a measurement of the onset of the sintering and fusion of the ash particulates while the contraction of the sample during sintering is measured with a linear variable displacement transducer for detecting the initiation of sintering. These measurements of sintering in coal ash at different pressures provide a mechanism by which deleterious problems due to the sintering and fusion of ash in various combustion systems can be minimized or obviated.

  20. Elev. Elev. 1st Floor, Building 51

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaji, Hajime

    undergrad, 1st year master's and 1st ~ 2nd year doctroal students University Clinic Nishi-Waseda Office 4th year undergrad, 2nd year master's and 3rd year doctoral students Automatic Certificate-Issuing Macine Next to the Stairs Mon.~Sat.: 9:00~21:00 Locations Issuing Medical Certificates 1st ~ 3rd year

  1. Design and synthesis of privileged scaffolds for targeting RNA /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rynearson, Kevin D.

    2014-01-01

    Kr-402151) n.a. n.a. (Kr-402428) n.a. n.a. EC 50 is theamino)propane-nitrile (KR- 402428). Spectrum 4.42: Hydrogenamino)propane-nitrile (KR-402428). Spectrum 4.43: Crystal

  2. The Design and Use of Limited Access Privilege Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ­ Office of Policy From technical contributions by the editors and: Soren Anderson; Mark Fina; Adam Tromble. NOAA Technical Memorandum NMFS-F/SPO-86 November 2007 U.S. Department of Commerce Carlos M, North Pacific Fishery Management Council staff; Adam Issenberg, NOAA General Counsel for Fisheries

  3. RBAC POLICIES IN XML FOR X.509 BASED PRIVILEGE MANAGEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kent, University of

    management infrastructures where the roles are stored as X.509 Attribute Certificates in an LDAP directory inheritance. Role hierarchies can be defined, e.g. Director > Manager > Employee, in which the superior roles

  4. The Fine Print of State Environmental Audit Privileges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stensvaag, John-Mark

    1997-01-01

    underground storage facili- ties, 37 hazardous waste management, 13 hazardous waste cleanup, 39 solid waste management, 40 state dams,

  5. PASSPORTS TO PRIVILEGE: THE ENGLISH-MEDIUM SCHOOLS IN PAKISTAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rahman, Tariq

    2005-01-01

    IN PAKISTAN TARIQ RAHMAN _____________________________________________________________________ ABSTRACT Based on two recent surveys of some selected urban areas of Pakistan, the author draws interesting conclusions in this article about the English... -medium schools in Pakistan. The elites of the country have long realized the power of the English language and have even institutionalized the process of acquiring the same. As seen elsewhere in South Asia, the English-speaking elites of the country profess...

  6. Crete: Endowed by Nature, Privileged by Geography, Threatened by Tourism?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zaferatos, Nicholas C.

    caused several unwanted economic, environmental and sociocultural impacts and, currently, it appears to threaten the island's sustainability. The principal goal of official development plans is the achievement of sustainable development and the promotion of tourismin the island. To make realisticsuggestions

  7. Arizona Department of Revenue Transaction Privilege Tax Exemption Certificate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ziurys, Lucy M.

    course of business. 2. Tangible personal property to be leased or rented in the ordinary course or valves four inches in diameter or greater to be used for transportation of oil, natural gas, artificial

  8. Lease of Power Privilege Flowchart: Award of Preliminary Lease through

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas:Montezuma, Arizona: Energy ResourcesProjectMississippi:Learned, Mississippi:Award of

  9. Lease of Power Privilege Flowchart: Dam Request Through Award of

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas:Montezuma, Arizona: Energy ResourcesProjectMississippi:Learned, Mississippi:Award

  10. Lease of Power Privilege Flowchart: Reserved Work Conduit Request Through

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas:Montezuma, Arizona: Energy ResourcesProjectMississippi:Learned,Award of Preliminary

  11. Lease of Power Privilege Flowchart: Transferred Work Conduit Request

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas:Montezuma, Arizona: Energy ResourcesProjectMississippi:Learned,Award of

  12. Development and evaluation of a HEPA filter for increased strength and resistance to elevated temperature. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilbert, H.; Bergman, W.; Fretthold, J.K.

    1993-01-01

    We have completed a preliminary study of an improved HEPA filter for increased strength and resistance to elevated temperature to improve the reliability of the standard deep pleated HEPA filter under accident conditions. The improvements to the HEPA filter consist of a silicone rubber sealant and a new HEPA medium reinforced with a glass cloth. Three prototype filters were built and evaluated for temperature and pressure resistance and resistance to rough handling. The temperature resistance test consisted of exposing the HEPA filter to 1,000 scan (1,700 m{sup 3}/hr) at 700{degrees}F (371{degrees}C) for five minutes.The pressure resistance test consisted of exposing the HEPA filter to a differential pressure of 10 in. w.g. (2.5 kPa) using a water saturated air flow at 95{degrees}F (35{degrees}C). For the rough handling test, we used a vibrating machine designated the Q110. DOP filter efficiency tests were performed before and after each of the environmental tests. In addition to following the standard practice of using a separate new filter for each environmental test, we also subjected the same filter to the elevated temperature test followed by the pressure resistance test. The efficiency test results show that the improved HEPA filter is significantly better than the standard HEPA filter. Further studies are recommended to evaluate the improved HEPA filter and to assess its performance under more severe accident conditions.

  13. Elevated concentrations of U and co-occurring metals in abandoned mine wastes in a northeastern Arizona Native American community

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Blake, Johanna M.; Avasarala, Sumant; Artyushkova, Kateryna; Ali, Abdul -Mehdi S.; Brearley, Adrian J.; Shuey, Christopher; Robinson, Wm. Paul; Nez, Christopher; Bill, Sadie; Lewis, Johnnye; et al

    2015-07-09

    The chemical interactions of U and co-occurring metals in abandoned mine wastes in a Native American community in northeastern Arizona were investigated using spectroscopy, microscopy and aqueous chemistry. The concentrations of U (67–169 ?g L–1) in spring water samples exceed the EPA maximum contaminant limit of 30 ?g L–1. Elevated U (6,614 mg kg–1), V (15,814 mg kg–1), and As (40 mg kg–1) concentrations were detected in mine waste solids. Spectroscopy (XPS and XANES) solid analyses identified U (VI), As (-I and III) and Fe (II, III). Linear correlations for the release of U vs V and As vs Femore »were observed for batch experiments when reacting mine waste solids with 10 mM ascorbic acid (~pH 3.8) after 264 h. The release of U, V, As, and Fe was at least 4-fold lower after reaction with 10 mM bicarbonate (~pH 8.3). These results suggest that U–V mineral phases similar to carnotite [K2(UO2)2V2O8] and As–Fe-bearing phases control the availability of U and As in these abandoned mine wastes. Elevated concentrations of metals are of concern due to human exposure pathways and exposure of livestock currently ingesting water in the area. This study contributes to understanding the occurrence and mobility of metals in communities located close to abandoned mine waste sites.« less

  14. Sonic hedgehog stimulates the proliferation of rat gastric mucosal cells through ERK activation by elevating intracellular calcium concentration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Osawa, Hiroyuki [Department of Gastroenterology, Jichi Medical School, Tochigi 329-0498 (Japan); Ohnishi, Hirohide [Department of Gastroenterology, Jichi Medical School, Tochigi 329-0498 (Japan)]. E-mail: hohnishi@jichi.ac.jp; Takano, Koji [Department of Nephrology and Endocrinology, University of Tokyo School of Medicine, Tokyo 113-8655 (Japan); Noguti, Takasi [Department of Nephrology and Endocrinology, University of Tokyo School of Medicine, Tokyo 113-8655 (Japan); Mashima, Hirosato [Department of Gastroenterology, University of Tokyo School of Medicine, Tokyo 113-8655 (Japan); Hoshino, Hiroko [Department of Gastroenterology, Jichi Medical School, Tochigi 329-0498 (Japan); Kita, Hiroto [Department of Gastroenterology, Jichi Medical School, Tochigi 329-0498 (Japan); Sato, Kiichi [Department of Gastroenterology, Jichi Medical School, Tochigi 329-0498 (Japan); Matsui, Hirofumi [Division of Gastroenterology, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8576 (Japan); Sugano, Kentaro [Department of Gastroenterology, Jichi Medical School, Tochigi 329-0498 (Japan)

    2006-06-02

    Sonic Hedgehog (Shh), a member of hedgehog peptides family, is expressed in gastric gland epithelium. To elucidate Shh function to gastric mucosal cells, we examined the effect of Shh on the proliferation of a rat normal gastric mucosal cell line, RGM-1. RGM-1 cells express essential components of Shh receptor system, patched-1, and smoothened. Shh enhanced DNA synthesis in RGM-1 cells and elevated intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}). In addition, Shh as well as calcium ionophore A32187 rapidly activated ERK. However, Shh failed to activate ERK under calcium-free culture condition. Pretreatment of cells with PD98059 attenuated the DNA synthesis promoted by Shh. Moreover, when cells were pretreated with cyclopamine, Shh could not elevate [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}, activate ERK or promote DNA synthesis. On the other hand, although Shh induced Gli-1 nuclear accumulation in RGM-1 cells, Shh activated ERK even in cells pretreated with actinomycin D. These results indicate that Shh promotes the proliferation of RGM-1 cells through an intracellular calcium- and ERK-dependent but transcription-independent pathway via Patched/Smoothened receptor system.

  15. Laboratory Constraints on the Stability of Petroleum at Elevated Temperatures: Implications for the Origin of Natural Gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seewald, Jeffrey, S.

    2011-03-14

    Results of prior DOE supported research conducted at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution have demonstrated the participation of sedimentary minerals and water as reactants and catalysts in chemical transformations associated with the degradation of oil and the formation of low molecular weight organic compounds. The occurrence of such processes in natural environments can be difficult to recognize because the composition of organic alteration products may not be substantially different than those produced by thermal cracking. The goals of this study were the development of diagnostic tools based on hydrogen and carbon isotopes that can be used to identify geochemical processes responsible for the formation of thermogenic natural gas. In addition, our activities were expanded to include experimental investigation of CO2 reduction in aqueous systems at elevated temperature and pressures and an assessment of microbial activity in relatively low temperature (<70°C) natural gas reservoirs in southeastern Oklahoma. Specific objectives included: ? A laboratory investigation of geochemical processes that regulate the hydrogen isotope composition of low molecular weight hydrocarbons in natural gas at elevated temperatures and pressures. ? A laboratory investigation of factors that regulate the carbon isotope composition of organic acids in basinal brines. ? A laboratory assessment of the role of methanol during reduction of CO2 to CH4 under hydrothermal conditions. ? Characterization of microbial ecosystems in coproduced fluids from the Potato Hills gas field to assess the role of microbes in the generation of natural gas.

  16. Home / Privileged partnership with Japan to be explored on ITER: Privileged partnership with Japan to be explored on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to this strategy, by setting out a European roadmap that will describe the scientific needs for research

  17. How do elevated [CO2], warming, and reduced precipitation interact to affect soil moisture and LAI in an old field ecosystem?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dermody, Orla [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Weltzin, Jake [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Engel, Elizabeth C. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Allen, Phillip [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Norby, Richard J [ORNL

    2007-01-01

    Soil moisture content and leaf area index (LAI) are properties that will be particularly important in mediating whole system responses to the combined effects of elevated atmospheric [CO2], warming and altered precipitation. Warming and drying will likely reduce soil moisture, and this effect may be exacerbated when these factors are combined. However, elevated [CO2] may increase soil moisture contents and when combined with warming and drying may partially compensate for their effects. The response of LAI to elevated [CO2] and warming will be closely tied to soil moisture status and may mitigate or exacerbate the effects of global change on soil moisture. Using open-top chambers (4-m diameter), the interactive effects of elevated [CO2], warming, and differential irrigation on soil moisture availability were examined in the OCCAM (Old-Field Community Climate and Atmospheric Manipulation) experiment at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in eastern Tennessee. Warming consistently reduced soil moisture contents and this effect was exacerbated by reduced irrigation. However, elevated [CO2] partially compensated for the effects of warming and drying on soil moisture. Changes in LAI were closely linked to soil moisture status. LAI was determined using an AccuPAR ceptometer and both the leaf area duration (LAD) and canopy size were increased by irrigation and elevated [CO2]. The climate of the southeastern United States is predicted to be warmer and drier in the future. This research suggests that although elevated [CO2] will partially ameliorate the effects of warming and drying, losses of soil moisture will increase from old field ecosystems in the future.

  18. Abstract-A programmable gain and bandwidth first-order low-pass Gm-C filter is proposed, designed, and simulated.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rincon-Mora, Gabriel A.

    Abstract- A programmable gain and bandwidth first-order low-pass Gm-C filter is proposed, designed resulted in an input-referred offset of less than 0.5 mV and hand-over glitches below 5 mV. Keywords: Gm. Programmability A system-level schematic of the proposed monolithic Gm-C filter is shown in Fig. 1. The underlying

  19. Channel-capacity gain in entanglement-assisted communication protocols based exclusively on linear optics, single-photon inputs, and coincidence photon counting

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lougovski, P.; Uskov, D. B.

    2015-08-04

    Entanglement can effectively increase communication channel capacity as evidenced by dense coding that predicts a capacity gain of 1 bit when compared to entanglement-free protocols. However, dense coding relies on Bell states and when implemented using photons the capacity gain is bounded by 0.585 bits due to one's inability to discriminate between the four optically encoded Bell states. In this research we study the following question: Are there alternative entanglement-assisted protocols that rely only on linear optics, coincidence photon counting, and separable single-photon input states and at the same time provide a greater capacity gain than 0.585 bits? In thismore »study, we show that besides the Bell states there is a class of bipartite four-mode two-photon entangled states that facilitate an increase in channel capacity. We also discuss how the proposed scheme can be generalized to the case of two-photon N-mode entangled states for N=6,8.« less

  20. Evaluation of pore structures and cracking in cement paste exposed to elevated temperatures by X-ray computed tomography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Kwang Yeom, E-mail: kimky@kict.re.kr [Korea Institute of Construction Technology, 283 Goyangdae-ro, Ilsanseo-gu, Goyang 411-712 (Korea, Republic of); Yun, Tae Sup, E-mail: taesup@yonsei.ac.kr [School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Yonsei University, 50 Yonsei-ro, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Kwang Pil, E-mail: bamtol97@kict.re.kr [Korea Institute of Construction Technology, 283 Goyangdae-ro, Ilsanseo-gu, Goyang 411-712 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-08-15

    When cement-based materials are exposed to the high temperatures induced by fire, which can rapidly cause temperatures of over 1000 °C, the changes in pore structure and density prevail. In the present study, mortar specimens were subjected to a series of increasing temperatures to explore the temperature-dependent evolution of internal pore structure. High-performance X-ray computed tomography (CT) was used to observe the evolution of temperature-induced discontinuities at the sub-millimeter level. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were employed to investigate the cause of physical changes in the heated mortar specimens. Results exhibit the changes in pore structure caused by elevated temperatures, and thermally induced fractures. We discuss the progressive formation of thermally induced fracture networks, which is a prerequisite for spalling failure of cement-based materials by fire, based on visual observations of the 3D internal structures revealed by X-ray CT.

  1. Elevated air temperature alters an old-field insect community in a multi-factor climate change experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Villalpando, Sean [Appalachian State University; Williams, Ray [ORNL; Norby, Richard J [ORNL

    2009-01-01

    To address how multiple, interacting climate drivers may affect plant-insect community associations, we sampled the insect community from a constructed old-field plant community grown under simultaneous [CO2], temperature, and water manipulation. Insects were identified to morphospecies, assigned to feeding guilds and abundance, richness and evenness quantified. Warming significantly increased Order Thysanoptera abundance and reduced overall morphospecies richness and evenness. Non-metric multidimensional scaling clearly supported the effect of warming on insect community composition. Reductions in richness for herbivores and parasitoids suggest trophic-level effects within the insect community. Analysis of dominant insects demonstrated the effects of warming were limited to a relatively small number of morphospecies. Reported reductions in whole-community foliar N at elevated [CO2] unexpectedly did not result in any effects on herbivores. These results demonstrate climatic warming may alter certain insect communities via effects on insect species most responsive to higher temperature, contributing to a change in community structure.

  2. Micro-structural optimization of polybenzimidazole-based membranes for H2/CO2 separation at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, Rajinder P; Li, Xin; Dudeck, Kevin W; Benicewicz, Brian C; Berchtold, Kathryn A

    2012-06-12

    There is compelling need to develop novel separation methods to improve the energy efficiency of synthesis (syn) gas processing operations including H{sub 2} and H{sub 2}/CO production to meet power, chemicals, and fuel producer needs, as well as carbon capture and removal of other undesirable syngas impurities. To be technically and economically viable, a successful separation method must be applicable to industrially relevant gas streams at realistic process conditions and compatible with large gas volumes. H{sub 2} selective membrane technology is a promising method for syngas separations at elevated temperatures (>150 C) that could be positioned upstream or downstream of one or more of the water-gas-shift reactors (WGSRs) or integrated with a WGSR depending on application specific syngas processing. Polybenzimidazole (PBI)-based polymer chemistries are exceptional candidates for H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} separations at elevated temperatures. In general, these materials possess excellent chemical resistance, very high glass transition temperatures (> 400 C), good mechanical properties, and an appropriate level of processability. Although commercially available PBI polymers have demonstrated commercially attractive H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} selectivity, their H{sub 2} permeability is low. Our team s employing structural and chemical manipulations to tailor the polymer free-volume achitecture with the ultimate goal of enhancing H{sub 2} permselectivity while retaining the inherent hermochemical stability characteristics of PBI. We will discuss our synthetic approaches and their influences on the gas transport behavior of these PBI-based materials. In general, a decrease in H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} selectivity was observed with an increase in H{sub 2} permeability. H{sub 2} permeability and H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} selectivity at 250 C ranged from 50 to 1000 barrer and 5 to 45, respectively.

  3. IMPACTS OF INTERACTING ELEVATED ATMOSPHERIC CO2 AND O3 ON THE STRUCTURE AND FUNCTIONING OF A NORTHERN FOREST ECOSYSTEM: OPERATING AND DECOMMISSIONING THE ASPEN FACE PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burton, Andrew J.; Zak, Donald R.; Kubiske, Mark E.; Pregitzer, Kurt S.

    2014-06-30

    Two of the most important and pervasive greenhouse gases driving global change and impacting forests in the U.S. and around the world are atmospheric CO2 and tropospheric O3. As the only free air, large-scale manipulative experiment studying the interaction of elevated CO2 and O3 on forests, the Aspen FACE experiment was uniquely designed to address the long-term ecosystem level impacts of these two greenhouse gases on aspen-birch-maple forests, which dominate the richly forested Lake States region. The project was established in 1997 to address the overarching scientific question: “What are the effects of elevated [CO2] and [O3], alone and in combination, on the structure and functioning of northern hardwood forest ecosystems?” From 1998 through the middle of the 2009 growing season, we examined the interacting effects of elevated CO2 and O3 on ecosystem processes in an aggrading northern forest ecosystem to compare the responses of early-successional, rapid-growing shade intolerant trembling aspen and paper birch to those of a late successional, slower growing shade tolerant sugar maple. Fumigations with elevated CO2 (560 ppm during daylight hours) and O3 (approximately 1.5 x ambient) were conducted during the growing season from 1998 to 2008, and in 2009 through harvest date. Response variables quantified during the experiment included growth, competitive interactions and stand dynamics, physiological processes, plant nutrient status and uptake, tissue biochemistry, litter quality and decomposition rates, hydrology, soil respiration, microbial community composition and respiration, VOC production, treatment-pest interactions, and treatment-phenology interactions. In 2009, we conducted a detailed harvest of the site. The harvest included detailed sampling of a subset of trees by component (leaves and buds, fine branches, coarse branches and stem, coarse roots, fine roots) and excavation of soil to a depth of 1 m. Throughout the experiment, aspen and birch photosynthesis increased with elevated CO2 and tended to decrease with elevated O3, compared to the control. In contrast to aspen and birch, maple photosynthesis was not enhanced by elevated CO2. Elevated O3 did not cause significant reductions in maximum photosynthesis in birch or maple. In addition, photosynthesis in ozone sensitive clones was affected to a much greater degree than that in ozone tolerant aspen clones. Treatment effects on photosynthesis contributed to CO2 stimulation of aboveground and belowground growth that was species and genotype dependent, with birch and aspen being most responsive and maple being least responsive. The positive effects of elevated CO2 on net primary productivity NPP were sustained through the end of the experiment, but negative effects of elevated O3 on NPP had dissipated during the final three years of treatments. The declining response to O3 over time resulted from the compensatory growth of O3-tolerant genotypes and species as the growth of O3-sensitive individuals declined over time. Cumulative NPP over the entire experiment was 39% greater under elevated CO2 and 10% lower under elevated O3. Enhanced NPP under elevated CO2 was sustained by greater root exploration of soil for growth-limiting N, as well as more rapid rates of litter decomposition and microbial N release during decay. Results from Aspen FACE clearly indicate that plants growing under elevated carbon dioxide, regardless of community type or ozone level, obtained significantly greater amounts of soil N. These results indicate that greater plant growth under elevated carbon dioxide has not led to “progressive N limitation”. If similar forests growing throughout northeastern North America respond in the same manner, then enhanced forest NPP under elevated CO2 may be sustained for a longer duration than previously thought, and the negative effect of elevated O3 may be diminished by compensatory growth of O3-tolerant plants as they begin to dominate forest communities. By the end of the experiment, elevated CO2 increased ecosystem C content by 11%, whereas

  4. Quantifying the Behavioral Response of Spawning Chum Salmon to Elevated Discharges from Bonneville Dam, Columbia River : Annual Report 2005-2006.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tiffan, Kenneth F.; Haskell, Craig A.; Kock, Tobias J.

    2008-12-01

    In unimpounded rivers, Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) typically spawn under relatively stable stream flows, with exceptions occurring during periodic precipitation events. In contrast, hydroelectric development has often resulted in an artificial hydrograph characterized by rapid changes in discharge and tailwater elevation that occur on a daily, or even an hourly basis, due to power generation (Cushman 1985; Moog 1993). Consequently, populations of Pacific salmon that are known to spawn in main-stem habitats below hydroelectric dams face the risks of changing habitat suitability, potential redd dewatering, and uncertain spawning success (Hamilton and Buell 1976; Chapman et al. 1986; Dauble et al. 1999; Garland et al. 2003; Connor and Pflug 2004; McMichael et al. 2005). Although the direct effects of a variable hydrograph, such as redd dewatering are apparent, specific effects on spawning behavior remain largely unexplored. Chum salmon (O. keta) that spawn below Bonneville Dam on the Columbia River are particularly vulnerable to the effects of water level fluctuations. Although chum salmon generally spawn in smaller tributaries (Johnson et al. 1997), many fish spawn in main-stem habitats below Bonneville Dam near Ives Island (Tomaro et al. 2007; Figure 1). The primary spawning area near Ives Island is shallow and sensitive to changes in water level caused by hydroelectric power generation at Bonneville Dam. In the past, fluctuating water levels have dewatered redds and changed the amount of available spawning habitat (Garland et al. 2003). To minimize these effects, fishery managers attempt to maintain a stable tailwater elevation at Bonneville Dam of 3.5 m (above mean sea level) during spawning, which ensures adequate water is provided to the primary chum salmon spawning area below the mouth of Hamilton Creek (Figure 1). Given the uncertainty of winter precipitation and water supply, this strategy has been effective at restricting spawning to a specific riverbed elevation and providing minimum spawning flows that have the greatest chance of being maintained through egg incubation and fry emergence. However, managing the lower Columbia River for a stable tailwater elevation does not provide much operational flexibility at Bonneville Dam, which has little storage capacity. When river discharges increase due to rain events, the traditional approach has been to pass excess water at night to maintain stable tailwater elevations during the daytime. The underlying assumption of this strategy, referred to as reverse load following, is that fish do not spawn at night. However, Tiffan et al. (2005) showed that this assumption is false by documenting nighttime spawning by chum salmon in the Ives Island area. Similarly, McMichael et al. (2005) reported nighttime spawning by Chinook salmon (O. tshawytscha) in the Columbia River, indicating that diel spawning may be a common occurrence in Pacific salmon. During the latter portion of the chum spawning period in December 2003 and 2004, discharges from Bonneville Dam increased from an average of 3,398 m3/s (tailwater elevation {approx} 3.5 m above mean sea level) during the day to over 5,664 m3/s (tailwater elevation {approx} 5.1 m) at night, with peak discharges of 7,080 m{sup 3}/s (tailwater elevation {approx} 6.1 m). This caused concern among fishery managers regarding the potential effects of these high discharges on this population of spawning chum salmon, which is listed under the Endangered Species Act (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 1999). We hypothesized that increased water velocities associated with elevated tailwaters might alter chum salmon spawning behavior if water velocities at redd locations increased beyond the range of suitability (>0.8 m/s; Salo 1991). In 2005, we investigated the movement and behavioral responses of spawning chum salmon at Ives Island to increased tailwater elevations at Bonneville Dam. We used acoustic telemetry to determine if the higher velocities associated with increased tailwater elevations caused fish to leave their re

  5. Surface dust wipes are the best predictors of blood leads in young children with elevated blood lead levels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gulson, Brian, E-mail: brian.gulson@mq.edu.au [Graduate School of the Environment, Macquarie University, North Ryde NSW 2109 (Australia) [Graduate School of the Environment, Macquarie University, North Ryde NSW 2109 (Australia); CSIRO Earth Science and Resource Engineering, North Ryde NSW 2113 (Australia); Anderson, Phil [Information and Statistics Group, Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, Canberra ACT 2601 (Australia) [Information and Statistics Group, Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, Canberra ACT 2601 (Australia); Faculty of Health, University of Canberra, Canberra ACT 2601 (Australia); Taylor, Alan [Department of Psychology, Macquarie University, Sydney NSW 2109 (Australia)] [Department of Psychology, Macquarie University, Sydney NSW 2109 (Australia)

    2013-10-15

    Background: As part of the only national survey of lead in Australian children, which was undertaken in 1996, lead isotopic and lead concentration measurements were obtained from children from 24 dwellings whose blood lead levels were ?15 µg/dL in an attempt to determine the source(s) of their elevated blood lead. Comparisons were made with data for six children with lower blood lead levels (<10 µg/dL). Methods: Thermal ionisation and isotope dilution mass spectrometry were used to determine high precision lead isotopic ratios ({sup 208}Pb/{sup 206}Pb, {sup 207}Pb/{sup 206}Pb and {sup 206}Pb/{sup 204}Pb) and lead concentrations in blood, dust from floor wipes, soil, drinking water and paint (where available). Evaluation of associations between blood and the environmental samples was based on the analysis of individual cases, and Pearson correlations and multiple regression analyses based on the whole dataset. Results and discussion: The correlations showed an association for isotopic ratios in blood and wipes (r=0.52, 95% CI 0.19–0.74), blood and soil (r=0.33, 95% CI ?0.05–0.62), and blood and paint (r=0.56, 95% CI 0.09–0.83). The regression analyses indicated that the only statistically significant relationship for blood isotopic ratios was with dust wipes (B=0.65, 95% CI 0.35–0.95); there were no significant associations for lead concentrations in blood and environmental samples. There is a strong isotopic correlation of soils and house dust (r=0.53, 95% CI 0.20–0.75) indicative of a common source(s) for lead in soil and house dust. In contrast, as with the regression analyses, no such association is present for bulk lead concentrations (r=?0.003, 95% CI ?0.37–0.36), the most common approach employed in source investigations. In evaluation of the isotopic results on a case by case basis, the strongest associations were for dust wipes and blood. -- Highlights: • Children with elevated blood lead ?15 µg/dL compared with a group with <10 µg/dL. • High precision lead isotopic ratios in blood, house dust wipes, soil, water, paint. • Associations for isotopic measures of blood and dust, blood and soil, blood and paint. • Regressions gave significance for isotopic measures of blood/dust and dust/soil.

  6. Elevated levels of plasma Big endothelin-1 and its relation to hypertension and skin lesions in individuals exposed to arsenic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hossain, Ekhtear; Islam, Khairul; Yeasmin, Fouzia [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Rajshahi University, Rajshahi-6205 (Bangladesh)] [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Rajshahi University, Rajshahi-6205 (Bangladesh); Karim, Md. Rezaul [Department of Applied Nutrition and Food Technology, Islamic University, Kushtia-7003 (Bangladesh)] [Department of Applied Nutrition and Food Technology, Islamic University, Kushtia-7003 (Bangladesh); Rahman, Mashiur; Agarwal, Smita; Hossain, Shakhawoat; Aziz, Abdul; Al Mamun, Abdullah; Sheikh, Afzal; Haque, Abedul; Hossain, M. Tofazzal [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Rajshahi University, Rajshahi-6205 (Bangladesh)] [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Rajshahi University, Rajshahi-6205 (Bangladesh); Hossain, Mostaque [Department of Medicine, Bangladesh Institute of Research and Rehabilitation in Diabetes, Endocrine and Metabolic Disorders (BIRDEM), Dhaka (Bangladesh)] [Department of Medicine, Bangladesh Institute of Research and Rehabilitation in Diabetes, Endocrine and Metabolic Disorders (BIRDEM), Dhaka (Bangladesh); Haris, Parvez I. [Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, De Montfort University, Leicester, LE1 9BH (United Kingdom)] [Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, De Montfort University, Leicester, LE1 9BH (United Kingdom); Ikemura, Noriaki; Inoue, Kiyoshi; Miyataka, Hideki; Himeno, Seiichiro [Laboratory of Molecular Nutrition and Toxicology, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Tokushima Bunri University, Tokushima 770–8514 (Japan)] [Laboratory of Molecular Nutrition and Toxicology, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Tokushima Bunri University, Tokushima 770–8514 (Japan); Hossain, Khaled, E-mail: khossain69@yahoo.com [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Rajshahi University, Rajshahi-6205 (Bangladesh)] [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Rajshahi University, Rajshahi-6205 (Bangladesh)

    2012-03-01

    Chronic arsenic (As) exposure affects the endothelial system causing several diseases. Big endothelin-1 (Big ET-1), the biological precursor of endothelin-1 (ET-1) is a more accurate indicator of the degree of activation of the endothelial system. Effect of As exposure on the plasma Big ET-1 levels and its physiological implications have not yet been documented. We evaluated plasma Big ET-1 levels and their relation to hypertension and skin lesions in As exposed individuals in Bangladesh. A total of 304 study subjects from the As-endemic and non-endemic areas in Bangladesh were recruited for this study. As concentrations in water, hair and nails were measured by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy (ICP-MS). The plasma Big ET-1 levels were measured using a one-step sandwich enzyme immunoassay kit. Significant increase in Big ET-1 levels were observed with the increasing concentrations of As in drinking water, hair and nails. Further, before and after adjusting with different covariates, plasma Big ET-1 levels were found to be significantly associated with the water, hair and nail As concentrations of the study subjects. Big ET-1 levels were also higher in the higher exposure groups compared to the lowest (reference) group. Interestingly, we observed that Big ET-1 levels were significantly higher in the hypertensive and skin lesion groups compared to the normotensive and without skin lesion counterpart, respectively of the study subjects in As-endemic areas. Thus, this study demonstrated a novel dose–response relationship between As exposure and plasma Big ET-1 levels indicating the possible involvement of plasma Big ET-1 levels in As-induced hypertension and skin lesions. -- Highlights: ? Plasma Big ET-1 is an indicator of endothelial damage. ? Plasma Big ET-1 level increases dose-dependently in arsenic exposed individuals. ? Study subjects in arsenic-endemic areas with hypertension have elevated Big ET-1 levels. ? Study subjects with arsenic-induced skin lesions show elevated plasma Big ET-1 levels. ? Arsenic-induced hypertension and skin lesions may be linked to plasma Big ET-1 levels.

  7. SU-E-T-342: Use of Patient Geometry Measurements to Predict Dosimetric Gain with VMAT Over 3D for Chestwall and Regional Nodal Radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dumane, V; Knoll, M; Green, S; Bakst, R [The Mount Sinai Medical Center, NY, NY (United States); Hunt, M [Mem Sloan-Kettering Cancer Ctr, NY, NY (United States); Steinberger, E [The Mount Sinai School of Medicine, NY, NY (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To predict the dosimetric gain of VMAT over 3D for the treatment ofchestwall/IMN/supraclavicular nodes using geometric parameters acquired during simulation Methods: CT scans for 20 left and 20 right sided patients were retrospectively analyzed toobtain percent ipsilateral lung volume included in the PWT and supraclavicular fields, central lung depth (CLD), maximum lung depth (MLD), separation, chestwall concavity (defined here as the product of CLD and separation) and the maximum heart depth (MHD). VMAT, PWT and P/E plans were done for each case. The ipsilateral lung V20 Gy and mean, total lung V20 Gy and mean, heart V25 Gy and mean were noted for each plan. Correlation coefficients were obtained and linear regression models were built using data from the above training set of patients and then tested on 4 new patients. Results: The decrease in ipsilateral lung V20 Gy, total lung V20 Gy, ipsilateral lung mean and total lung mean with VMAT over PWT significantly (p<0.05) correlated with the percent volume of ipsilateral lung included in the PWT and supraclavicular fields with correlation coefficient values of r = 0.83, r = 0.77, r = 0.78 and r = 0.75 respectively. Significant correlations were also found between MHD and the decrease in heart V25 Gy and mean of r = 0.77 and r = 0.67 respectively. Dosimetric improvement with VMAT over P/E plans showed no correlation to any of the geometric parameters investigated in this study. The dosimetric gain predicted for the 4 test cases by the linear regression models given their respective percent ipsilateral lung volumes fell within the 95% confidence intervals around the best regression fit. Conclusion: The percent ipsilateral lung volume appears to be a strong predictor of the dosimetric gain on using VMAT over PWT apriori.

  8. Efficient Excitation of Gain-Saturated Sub-9-nm-Wavelength Tabletop Soft-X-Ray Lasers and Lasing Down to 7.36 nm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alessi, David [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Wang, Yong [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Luther, Brad [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Yin, Liang [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Martz, Dale [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Woolston, Mark [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Liu, Yanwei [University of California, Berkeley & LBNL; Berrill, Mark A [ORNL; Jorge, Rocca [Colorado State University, Fort Collins

    2011-01-01

    We have demonstrated the efficient generation of sub-9-nm-wavelength picosecond laser pulses of microjoule energy at 1-Hz repetition rate with a tabletop laser. Gain-saturated lasing was obtained at =8.85 nm in nickel-like lanthanum ions excited by collisional electron-impact excitation in a precreated plasma column heated by a picosecond optical laser pulse of 4-J energy. Furthermore, isoelectronic scaling along the lanthanide series resulted in lasing at wavelengths as short as =7.36 nm. Simulations show that the collisionally broadened atomic transitions in these dense plasmas can support the amplification of subpicosecond soft-x-ray laser pulses.

  9. Enhancements of a Combustion Vessel to Determine Laminar Flame Speeds of Hydrocarbon Blends with Helium Dilution at Elevated Temperatures and Pressures 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plichta, Drew

    2013-04-03

    speeds were those of methane, ethane, and propane fuel blends, as well as pure methane, at an elevated pressure of 5 atm and temperatures of 298 and 473 K, using a constant-volume, cylindrical combustion vessel. The current Aramco mechanism developed...

  10. Soybean leaf hydraulic conductance does not acclimate to growth at elevated [CO2] or temperature in growth chambers or in the field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sack, Lawren

    Soybean leaf hydraulic conductance does not acclimate to growth at elevated [CO2] or temperature Leaf hydraulic properties are strongly linked with transpiration and photosynthesis in many species. However, it is not known if gas exchange and hydraulics will have co-ordinated responsesto climate change

  11. Simulating the growth response of aspen to elevated ozone: a mechanistic approach to scaling a leaf-level model of ozone effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simulating the growth response of aspen to elevated ozone: a mechanistic approach to scaling a leaf-level model of ozone effects on photosynthesis to a complex canopy architecture§ M.J. Martina, *, G.E. Hosta; accepted 17 July 2001 ``Capsule'': A process model is described that predicts the relative effects of ozone

  12. Elevated CO2 increases tree-level intrinsic water use efficiency: insights from carbon and oxygen isotope analyses in tree rings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - see, USA) sites, to cover the entire life of the trees. We used d13 C to assess carbon isotopeElevated CO2 increases tree-level intrinsic water use efficiency: insights from carbon and oxygen intrinsic water use efficiency (WUEi) of forests, but the magnitude of this effect and its interaction

  13. Autoignited laminar lifted flames of methane, ethylene, ethane, and n-butane jets in coflow air with elevated temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, B.C.; Chung, S.H.

    2010-12-15

    The autoignition characteristics of laminar lifted flames of methane, ethylene, ethane, and n-butane fuels have been investigated experimentally in coflow air with elevated temperature over 800 K. The lifted flames were categorized into three regimes depending on the initial temperature and fuel mole fraction: (1) non-autoignited lifted flame, (2) autoignited lifted flame with tribrachial (or triple) edge, and (3) autoignited lifted flame with mild combustion. For the non-autoignited lifted flames at relatively low temperature, the existence of lifted flame depended on the Schmidt number of fuel, such that only the fuels with Sc > 1 exhibited stationary lifted flames. The balance mechanism between the propagation speed of tribrachial flame and local flow velocity stabilized the lifted flames. At relatively high initial temperatures, either autoignited lifted flames having tribrachial edge or autoignited lifted flames with mild combustion existed regardless of the Schmidt number of fuel. The adiabatic ignition delay time played a crucial role for the stabilization of autoignited flames. Especially, heat loss during the ignition process should be accounted for, such that the characteristic convection time, defined by the autoignition height divided by jet velocity was correlated well with the square of the adiabatic ignition delay time for the critical autoignition conditions. The liftoff height was also correlated well with the square of the adiabatic ignition delay time. (author)

  14. Deformation mechanisms in a precipitation-strengthened ferritic super alloy revealed by in situ neutron dffraction studies at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Shenyan; Gao, Yanfei; An, Ke; Zheng, Lili; Teng, Zhenke; Wu, Wei; Liaw, Peter K.

    2015-01-01

    The ferritic superalloy Fe–10Ni–6.5Al–10Cr–3.4Mo strengthened by ordered (Ni,Fe)AlB2-type precipitates is a candidate material for ultra-supercritical steam turbine applications above 923 K. Despite earlier success in improving its room-temperature ductility, the creep resistance of this material at high temperatures needs to be further improved, which requires a fundamental understanding of the high-temperature deformation mechanisms at the scales of individual phases and grains. In situ neutron diffraction has been utilized to investigate the lattice strain evolution and the microscopic load-sharing mechanisms during tensile deformation of this ferritic superalloy at elevated temperatures. Finite-element simulations based on the crystal plasticity theory are employed and compared with the experimental results, both qualitatively and quantitatively. Based on these interphase and intergranular load-partitioning studies, it is found that the deformation mechanisms change from dislocation slip to those related to dislocation climb, diffusional flow and possibly grain boundary sliding, below and above 873 K, respectively. Insights into microstructural design for enhancing creep resistance are also discussed.

  15. Dirac point and transconductance of top-gated graphene field-effect transistors operating at elevated temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hopf, T.; Vassilevski, K. V., E-mail: k.vasilevskiy@ncl.ac.uk; Escobedo-Cousin, E.; King, P. J.; Wright, N. G.; O'Neill, A. G.; Horsfall, A. B.; Goss, J. P. [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne NE1 7RU (United Kingdom); Wells, G. H.; Hunt, M. R. C. [Department of Physics, Durham University, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom)

    2014-10-21

    Top-gated graphene field-effect transistors (GFETs) have been fabricated using bilayer epitaxial graphene grown on the Si-face of 4H-SiC substrates by thermal decomposition of silicon carbide in high vacuum. Graphene films were characterized by Raman spectroscopy, Atomic Force Microscopy, Scanning Tunnelling Microscopy, and Hall measurements to estimate graphene thickness, morphology, and charge transport properties. A 27?nm thick Al?O? gate dielectric was grown by atomic layer deposition with an e-beam evaporated Al seed layer. Electrical characterization of the GFETs has been performed at operating temperatures up to 100?°C limited by deterioration of the gate dielectric performance at higher temperatures. Devices displayed stable operation with the gate oxide dielectric strength exceeding 4.5 MV/cm at 100?°C. Significant shifting of the charge neutrality point and an increase of the peak transconductance were observed in the GFETs as the operating temperature was elevated from room temperature to 100?°C.

  16. Elevated carbon dioxide is predicted to promote coexistence among competing species in a trait-based model

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ali, Ashehad A.; Medlyn, Belinda E.; Aubier, Thomas G.; Crous, Kristine Y.; Reich, Peter B.

    2015-10-06

    Differential species responses to atmospheric CO2 concentration (Ca) could lead to quantitative changes in competition among species and community composition, with flow-on effects for ecosystem function. However, there has been little theoretical analysis of how elevated Ca (eCa) will affect plant competition, or how composition of plant communities might change. Such theoretical analysis is needed for developing testable hypotheses to frame experimental research. Here, we investigated theoretically how plant competition might change under eCa by implementing two alternative competition theories, resource use theory and resource capture theory, in a plant carbon and nitrogen cycling model. The model makes several novelmore »predictions for the impact of eCa on plant community composition. Using resource use theory, the model predicts that eCa is unlikely to change species dominance in competition, but is likely to increase coexistence among species. Using resource capture theory, the model predicts that eCa may increase community evenness. Collectively, both theories suggest that eCa will favor coexistence and hence that species diversity should increase with eCa. Our theoretical analysis leads to a novel hypothesis for the impact of eCa on plant community composition. In this study, the hypothesis has potential to help guide the design and interpretation of eCa experiments.« less

  17. Long-term performance of ceramic matrix composites at elevated temperatures: Modelling of creep and creep rupture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curtin, W.A.; Fabeny, B.; Ibnabdeljalil, M.; Iyengar, N.; Reifsnider, K.L.

    1996-07-31

    The models developed, contain explicit dependences on constituent material properties and their changes with time, so that composite performance can be predicted. Three critical processes in ceramic composites at elevated temperatures have been modeled: (1) creep deformation of composite vs stress and time-dependent creep of fibers and matrix, and failure of these components; (2) creep deformation of ``interface`` around broken fibers; and (3) lifetime of the composite under conditions of fiber strength loss over time at temperature. In (1), general evolution formulas are derived for relaxation time of matrix stresses and steady-state creep rate of composite; the model is tested against recent data on Ti-MMCs. Calculations on a composite of Hi-Nicalon fibers in a melt-infiltrated SiC matrix are presented. In (2), numerical simulations of composite failure were made to map out time-to-failure vs applied load for several sets of material parameters. In (3), simple approximate relations are obtained between fiber life and composite life that should be useful for fiber developers and testers. Strength degradation data on Hi-Nicalon fibers is used to assess composite lifetime vs fiber lifetime for Hi-Nicalon fiber composites.

  18. How elevated is the dynamical-to-stellar mass ratio of the ultra-compact dwarf S999?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Janz, Joachim; Norris, Mark A; Strader, Jay; Penny, Samantha J; Fagioli, Martina; Romanowsky, Aaron J

    2015-01-01

    Here we present new Keck ESI high-resolution spectroscopy and deep archival HST/ACS imaging for S999, an ultra-compact dwarf in the vicinity of M87, which was claimed to have an extremely high dynamical-to-stellar mass ratio. Our data increase the total integration times by a factor of 5 and 60 for spectroscopy and imaging, respectively. This allows us to constrain the stellar population parameters for the first time (simple stellar population equivalent age $=7.6^{+2.0}_{-1.6}$ Gyr; $[Z/\\textrm{H}]=-0.95^{+0.12}_{-0.10}$; $[\\alpha/\\textrm{Fe}]=0.34^{+0.10}_{-0.12}$). Assuming a Kroupa stellar initial mass function, the stellar population parameters and luminosity ($M_{F814W}=-12.13\\pm0.06$ mag) yield a stellar mass of $M_*=3.9^{+0.9}_{-0.6}\\times10^6 M_{\\odot}$, which we also find to be consistent with near-infrared data. Via mass modelling, with our new measurements of velocity dispersion ($\\sigma_{ap}=27\\pm2$ km s$^{-1}$) and size ($R_e=20.9\\pm1.0$ pc), we obtain an elevated dynamical-to-stellar mass ratio...

  19. MODELING THE IMPACT OF ELEVATED MERCURY IN DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY MELTER FEED ON THE MELTER OFF-GAS SYSTEM - PRELIMINARY REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zamecnik, J.; Choi, A.

    2009-03-25

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is currently evaluating an alternative Chemical Process Cell (CPC) flowsheet to increase throughput. It includes removal of the steam-stripping step, which would significantly reduce the CPC processing time and lessen the sampling needs. However, its downside would be to send 100% of the mercury that come in with the sludge straight to the melter. For example, the new mercury content in the Sludge Batch 5 (SB5) melter feed is projected to be 25 times higher than that in the SB4 with nominal steam stripping of mercury. This task was initiated to study the impact of the worst-case scenario of zero-mercury-removal in the CPC on the DWPF melter off-gas system. It is stressed that this study is intended to be scoping in nature, so the results presented in this report are preliminary. In order to study the impact of elevated mercury levels in the feed, it is necessary to be able to predict how mercury would speciate in the melter exhaust under varying melter operating conditions. A homogeneous gas-phase oxidation model of mercury by chloride was developed to do just that. The model contains two critical parameters pertaining to the partitioning of chloride among HCl, Cl, Cl{sub 2}, and chloride salts in the melter vapor space. The values for these parameters were determined at two different melter vapor space temperatures by matching the calculated molar ratio of HgCl (or Hg{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}) to HgCl{sub 2} with those measured during the Experimental-Scale Ceramic Melter (ESCM) tests run at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The calibrated model was then applied to the SB5 simulant used in the earlier flowsheet study with an assumed mercury stripping efficiency of zero; the molar ratio of Cl-to-Hg in the resulting melter feed was only 0.4, compared to 12 for the ESCM feeds. The results of the model run at the indicated melter vapor space temperature of 650 C (TI4085D) showed that due to excessive shortage of chloride, only 6% of the mercury fed is expected to get oxidized, mostly as HgCl, while the remaining mercury would exist either as elemental mercury vapor (90%) or HgO (4%). Noting that the measured chloride level in the SB5 qualification sample was an order of magnitude lower than that used in the SB5 simulant, the degree of chloride shortage will be even greater. As a result, the projected level of HgCl in the actual SB5 melter exhaust will be even lower than 6% of the total mercury fed, while that of elemental mercury is likely to be greater than 90%. The homogeneous oxidation of mercury in the off-gas was deemed to be of primary importance based on the postulation that mercury and other volatile salts form submicron sized aerosols upon condensation and thus remain largely in the gas stream downstream of the quencher where they can deposit in the off-gas lines, Steam-Atomized Scrubbers (SAS), and High-Efficiency Mist Eliminator (HEME). Formation of these submicron semi-volatile salts in the condensate liquid is considered to be unlikely, so the liquid phase reactions were considered to be less important. However, subsequent oxidation of mercury in the liquid phase in the off-gas system was examined in a simplified model of the off-gas condensate. It was found that the condensate chemistry was consistent with further oxidation of elemental mercury to Hg{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} and conversion of HgO to chlorides. The results were consistent with the available experimental data. It should also be noted that the model predictions presented in this report do not include any physically entrained solids, which typically account for much of the off-gas carryover on a mass basis. The high elemental mercury vapor content predicted at the DWPF Quencher inlet means that physically entrained solids could provide the necessary surface onto which elemental mercury vapor could condense, thereby coating the solids as well as the internal surfaces of the off-gas system with mercury. Clearly, there are many process benefits to be gained by removing the steam-stripping step from the CPC c

  20. MODELING THE IMPACT OF ELEVATED MERCURY IN DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY MELTER FEED ON THE MELTER OFF-GAS SYSTEM-PRELIMINARY REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zamecnik, J.; Choi, A.

    2010-08-18

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is currently evaluating an alternative Chemical Process Cell (CPC) flowsheet to increase throughput. It includes removal of the steam-stripping step, which would significantly reduce the CPC processing time and lessen the sampling needs. However, its downside would be to send 100% of the mercury that comes in with the sludge straight to the melter. For example, the new mercury content in the Sludge Batch 5 (SB5) melter feed is projected to be 25 times higher than that in the SB4 with nominal steam stripping of mercury. This task was initiated to study the impact of the worst-case scenario of zero-mercury-removal in the CPC on the DWPF melter offgas system. It is stressed that this study is intended to be scoping in nature, so the results presented in this report are preliminary. In order to study the impact of elevated mercury levels in the feed, it is necessary to be able to predict how mercury would speciate in the melter exhaust under varying melter operating conditions. A homogeneous gas-phase oxidation model of mercury by chloride was developed to do just that. The model contains two critical parameters pertaining to the partitioning of chloride among HCl, Cl, Cl{sub 2}, and chloride salts in the melter vapor space. The values for these parameters were determined at two different melter vapor space temperatures by matching the calculated molar ratio of HgCl (or Hg{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}) to HgCl{sub 2} with those measured during the Experimental-Scale Ceramic Melter (ESCM) tests run at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The calibrated model was then applied to the SB5 simulant used in the earlier flowsheet study with an assumed mercury stripping efficiency of zero; the molar ratio of Cl-to-Hg in the resulting melter feed was only 0.4, compared to 12 for the ESCM feeds. The results of the model run at the indicated melter vapor space temperature of 650 C (TI4085D) showed that due to excessive shortage of chloride, only 6% of the mercury fed is expected to get oxidized, mostly as HgCl, while the remaining mercury would exist either as elemental mercury vapor (90%) or HgO (4%). Noting that the measured chloride level in the SB5 qualification sample was an order of magnitude lower than that used in the SB5 simulant, the degree of chloride shortage will be even greater. As a result, the projected level of HgCl in the actual SB5 melter exhaust will be even lower than 6% of the total mercury fed, while that of elemental mercury is likely to be greater than 90%. The homogeneous oxidation of mercury in the off-gas was deemed to be of primary importance based on the postulation that mercury and other volatile salts form submicron sized aerosols upon condensation and thus remain largely in the gas stream downstream of the quencher where they can deposit in the off-gas lines, Steam-Atomized Scrubbers (SAS), and High-Efficiency Mist Eliminator (HEME). Formation of these submicron semi-volatile salts in the condensate liquid is considered to be unlikely, so the liquid phase reactions were considered to be less important. However, subsequent oxidation of mercury in the liquid phase in the off-gas system was examined in a simplified model of the off-gas condensate. It was found that the condensate chemistry was consistent with further oxidation of elemental mercury to Hg{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} and conversion of HgO to chlorides. The results were consistent with the available experimental data. It should also be noted that the model predictions presented in this report do not include any physically entrained solids, which typically account for much of the off-gas carryover on a mass basis. The high elemental mercury vapor content predicted at the DWPF Quencher inlet means that physically entrained solids could provide the necessary surface onto which elemental mercury vapor could condense, thereby coating the solids as well as the internal surfaces of the off-gas system with mercury. Clearly, there are many process benefits to be gained by removing the steam-stripping step from the CPC c

  1. DOES CRITICAL MASS DECREASE AS TEMPERATURE INCREASES: A REVIEW OF FIVE BENCHMARK EXPERIMENTS THAT SPAN A RANGE OF ELEVATED TEMPERATURES AND CRITICAL CONFIGURATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yates, K.

    2009-06-10

    Five sets of benchmark experiments are reviewed herein that cover a diverse set of fissile system configurations. The review specifically focused on the change in critical mass of these systems at elevated temperatures and the temperature reactivity coefficient ({alpha}{sub T}) on the system. Because plutonium-based critical benchmark experiments at varying temperatures were not found at the time this review was prepared, only uranium-based systems are included, as follows: (1) HEU-SOL-THERM-010 - UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} solutions with high U{sup 235} enrichment; (2) HEU-COMP-THERM-016 - uranium-graphite blocks with low U concentration; (3) LEU-COMP-THERM-032 - water moderated lattices of UO{sub 2} with stainless steel cladding, and intermediate U{sup 235} enrichment; (4) IEU-COMP-THERM-002 - water moderated lattices of annular UO{sub 2} with/without absorbers, and intermediate U{sup 235} enrichment; and (5) LEU-COMP-THERM-026 - water moderated lattices of UO{sub 2} at different pitches, and low U{sup 235} enrichment. In three of the five benchmarks (1, 3 and 5), modeling of the critical system at room temperature is conservative compared to modeling the system at elevated temperatures, i.e., a greater fissile mass is required at elevated temperature. In one benchmark (4), there was no difference in the fissile mass between the room temperature system and the system at the examined elevated temperature. In benchmark (2), the system clearly had a negative temperature reactivity coefficient. Some of the high temperature benchmark experiments were treated with appropriate (and comprehensive) adjustments to the cross section sets and thermal expansion coefficients, while other experiments were treated with partial adjustments. Regardless of the temperature treatment, modeling the systems at room temperature was found to be conservative for the examined systems, i.e., a smaller critical mass was obtained. While the five benchmarks presented herein demonstrate that, for the conditions examined, modeling of the systems at room temperature is conservative as compared to modeling the systems at elevated temperatures, it is possible to design a system in which the critical mass at room temperature is non-conservative compared to a system at elevated temperatures. As the temperature of the systems evaluated in this review was increased, the system's overall {alpha}{sub T} was negative at elevated temperatures. Furthermore, the review demonstrates that to accurate asses the effect of increased temperature on a system's k{sub eff}, changes in fissile, moderator, cladding, and, in some cases, structural material cross sections must be combined with other factors that influence reactivity, such as volumetric thermal expansion of fissile, moderating, reflector, and other interacting media. Altering the microscopic cross sections of fissile and moderating regions for temperature changes, without adjusting the corresponding densities at elevated temperatures can lead to an incorrect assessment of the impact of elevated temperature on a fissile system.

  2. Creep-fatigue criteria and inelastic behavior of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel at elevated temperatures. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruggles, M.B. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Ogata, T. [Central Research Inst. of Electric Power Industry, Tokyo (Japan). Komae Research Lab.

    1994-02-01

    The ever increasing demand for safety requires that stringent and conservative methodology be developed for design and analysis of reactor components. At present modified 9Cr-1Mo steel is a candidate material for construction of steam generators in fast breeder reactors. Therefore high-temperature material properties and extensive insight into deformation behavior and creep-fatigue life are required to develop design guidelines for use of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel in actual plant components. However, existing information on creep-fatigue and deformation response of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel is insufficient, and further experimental and modeling efforts are needed. A joint effort between the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) in the United States and the Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI) in Japan was started in 1991 to investigate the inelastic behavior of and to develop creep-fatigue criteria for modified 9Cr-1Mo steel at elevated temperatures. The current program focuses on uniaxial and biaxial fatigue, creep, and creep-fatigue tests. Results of this effort are presented in this report. Section 2 introduces the test material and experimental arrangement. Uniaxial exploratory deformation tests and unified constitutive equations for inelastic analysis of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel are presented in Sections 3 and 4, respectively. Axial fatigue and creep-fatigue test results are discussed in Section 5. Section 6 is devoted to constant stress creep tests. Biaxial fatigue and creep-fatigue tests are described in Section 7. Progress in creep-fatigue life evaluation is reported in Section 8.

  3. Final Technical Report: Response of Mediterranean-Type Ecosystems to Elevated Atmospheric CO2 and Associated Climate Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oechel, Walter C

    2002-08-15

    This research incorporated an integrated hierarchical approach in space, time, and levels of biological/ecological organization to help understand and predict ecosystem response to elevated CO{sub 2} and concomitant environmental change. The research utilized a number of different approaches, and collaboration of both PER and non-PER investigators to arrive at a comprehensive, integrative understanding. Central to the work were the CO{sub 2}-controlled, ambient Lit, Temperature controlled (CO{sub 2}LT) null-balance chambers originally developed in the arctic tundra, which were re-engineered for the chaparral with treatment CO{sub 2} concentrations of from 250 to 750 ppm CO{sub 2} in 100 ppm increments, replicated twice to allow for a regression analysis. Each chamber was 2 meters on a side and 2 meters tall, which were installed over an individual shrub reprouting after a fire. This manipulation allowed study of the response of native chaparral to varying levels of CO{sub 2}, while regenerating from an experimental burn. Results from these highly-controlled manipulations were compared against Free Air CO{sub 2} Enrichment (FACE) manipulations, in an area adjacent to the CO{sub 2}LT null balance greenhouses. These relatively short-term results (5-7 years) were compared to long-term results from Mediterranean-type ecosystems (MTEs) surrounding natural CO{sub 2} springs in northern Italy, near Laiatico, Italy. The springs lack the controlled experimental rigor of our CO{sub 2}LT and FACE manipulation, but provide invaluable validation of our long-term predictions.

  4. A study of some macro-faunal associates of oysters, Crassostrea virginica Gmelin in an area of low salinity and artificially elevated temperatures 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turk, Philip Ernest

    1974-01-01

    not cause the immediate death of oysters, and therefore the damage they cause is more diffi- cult to quantify. lbring Sponges Korringa (1951) notes that, according to fishermen, entire oys- ter beds along the French coast have been rendered worthless...STUDY OF SOME MACRO ? FAUNAL ASSOCIATES OF OYSTERS, Cra sostrea virginica GMELIN IN AN AREA OF LOW SALINITY AND ARTIFICIALLY ELEVATED TEMPERATURES A Thesis by PHILIP ERNEST TURK Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University...

  5. Elevated CO2 increases tree-level intrinsic water use efficiency: insights from carbon and oxygen isotope analyses in tree rings across three forest FACE sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Battipaglia, Giovanna [Second University of Naples; Saurer, Matthias [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen, Switzerland; Cherubini, Paulo [WSL Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research; Califapietra, Carlo [University of Tuscia; McCarthy, Heather R [Duke University; Norby, Richard J [ORNL; Cotrufo, M. Francesca [Colorado State University, Fort Collins

    2013-01-01

    Elevated CO2 increases intrinsic water use efficiency (WUEi) of forests, but the magnitude of this effect and its interaction with climate is still poorly understood. We combined tree ring analysis with isotope measurements at three Free Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE, POP-EUROFACE, in Italy; Duke FACE in North Carolina and ORNL in Tennessee, USA) sites, to cover the entire life of the trees. We used 13C to assess carbon isotope discrimination ( 13C ci/ca) and changes in WUEi, while direct CO2 effects on stomatal conductance were explored using 18O as a proxy. Across all the sites, elevated CO2 increased 13C-derived WUEi on average by 73% for Liquidambar styraciflua, 77% for Pinus taeda and 75% for Populus sp., but through different ecophysiological mechanisms. Our findings provide a robust means of predicting WUEi responses from a variety of tree species exposed to variable environmental conditions over time, and species-specific relationships that can help modeling elevated CO2 and climate impacts on forest productivity, carbon and water balances.

  6. Results of the measurement survey of elevation and environmental media in surface impoundments 3513 (B) and 3524 (A) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murray, M.E.; Rose, D.A.; Brown, K.S.; Coe, R.H.C. III; Lawrence, J.D.; Winton, W.

    1998-07-01

    A measurement survey of the elevation and environmental media in impoundments 3513 (B) and 3524 (A) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was conducted during April 1998. The investigation was performed by the Measurement Applications and Development Group of the Life Sciences Division of ORNL at the request of Bechtel Jacobs Company. Measurement activities were conducted at selected locations in order to determine the depth and appearance of the sediment and describe the clay underlying the impoundments prior to remediation. The survey was a follow-up to a previous elevation survey. The survey included the following: collection of sediment/clay cores from selected locations in each impoundment; measurement and documentation of the elevation at the water surface, at the top of sediment, at the top of clay, and at the bottom of each core; visual inspection of each core by a soil scientist to confirm the presence of clay and not material such as fly ash and soda lime compacted over the last 50 years; measurement and documentation of the background beta-gamma radiation level at the time and location of collection of each core, the highest beta-gamma level along the sediment portion of each core, and the highest beta-gamma level along the clay portion of each core; measurement and documentation of the length of the clay and of the sediment portion of each core; photographic documentation of each core; and replacement of each core in the impoundment.

  7. First elevated-temperature performance testing of coated particle fuel compacts from the AGR-1 irradiation experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Charles A. Baldwin; John D. Hunn; Robert N. Morris; Fred C. Montgomery; Chinthaka M. Silva; Paul A. Demkowicz

    2014-05-01

    In the AGR-1 irradiation experiment, 72 coated-particle fuel compacts were taken to a peak burnup of 19.5% fissions per initial metal atom with no in-pile failures. This paper discusses the first post-irradiation test of these mixed uranium oxide/uranium carbide fuel compacts at elevated temperature to examine the fuel performance under a simulated depressurized conduction cooldown event. A compact was heated for 400 h at 1600 degrees C. Release of 85Kr was monitored throughout the furnace test as an indicator of coating failure, while other fission product releases from the compact were periodically measured by capturing them on exchangeable, water-cooled deposition cups. No coating failure was detected during the furnace test, and this result was verified by subsequent electrolytic deconsolidation and acid leaching of the compact, which showed that all SiC layers were still intact. However, the deposition cups recovered significant quantities of silver, europium, and strontium. Based on comparison of calculated compact inventories at the end of irradiation versus analysis of these fission products released to the deposition cups and furnace internals, the minimum estimated fractional losses from the compact during the furnace test were 1.9 x 10-2 for silver, 1.4 x 10-3 for europium, and 1.1 x 10-5 for strontium. Other post-irradiation examination of AGR-1 compacts indicates that similar fractions of europium and silver may have already been released by the intact coated particles during irradiation, and it is therefore likely that the detected fission products released from the compact in this 1600 degrees C furnace test were from residual fission products in the matrix. Gamma analysis of coated particles deconsolidated from the compact after the heating test revealed that silver content within each particle varied considerably; a result that is probably not related to the furnace test, because it has also been observed in other as-irradiated AGR-1 compacts. X-ray imaging of selected particles was performed to examine the internal microstructure. This examination revealed variable irradiation performance of the coating layers, but sufficient statistical sampling is not yet available to identify any possible correlation to variation in individual particle fission product retention.

  8. Managers spur productivity gains. [USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brezovec, D.

    1981-12-01

    Output per worker hour grows at U.S. coal mines as management gears training programs and operating practices to fight falling productivity.

  9. NOx Reduction through Efficiency Gain 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benz, R.; Thompson, R.; Staedter, M.

    2007-01-01

    . Moreover, possible changes in fuel type (in dual fire applications), the introduction of Flue Gas Recirculation and system characteristics such as burner properties introduce further nonlinearities to the air/fuel ratio. Since these system... reactions. Additional tuning parameters include separate behavior management for different fuels in dual fuel applications, incorporation of multiple fans, and control of any dampers that might remain in the system. Human Machine Interface...

  10. Lot sizing with inventory gains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-11-23

    feasible schedule that minimizes the fixed setup costs and per unit production and inventory costs. ...... Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology. Wolsey, L.

  11. Linda Gaines | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACTThousand CubicResourcelogo and-E C H2015Tray and| NationalLinacLinda

  12. A high-elevation, multi-proxy biotic and environmental record of MIS 6–4 from the Ziegler Reservoir fossil site, Snowmass Village, Colorado, USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ian M. Miller; Mitchell A. Plummer; Various Others

    2014-10-01

    In North America, terrestrial records of biodiversity and climate change that span Marine Oxygen Isotope Stage (MIS) 5 are rare. Where found, they provide insight into how the coupling of the ocean–atmosphere system is manifested in biotic and environmental records and how the biosphere responds to climate change. In 2010–2011, construction at Ziegler Reservoir near Snowmass Village, Colorado (USA) revealed a nearly continuous, lacustrine/wetland sedimentary sequence that preserved evidence of past plant communities between ~140 and 55 ka, including all of MIS 5. At an elevation of 2705 m, the Ziegler Reservoir fossil site also contained thousands of well-preserved bones of late Pleistocene megafauna, including mastodons, mammoths, ground sloths, horses, camels, deer, bison, black bear, coyotes, and bighorn sheep. In addition, the site contained more than 26,000 bones from at least 30 species of small animals including salamanders, otters, muskrats, minks, rabbits, beavers, frogs, lizards, snakes, fish, and birds. The combination of macro- and micro-vertebrates, invertebrates, terrestrial and aquatic plant macrofossils, a detailed pollen record, and a robust, directly dated stratigraphic framework shows that high-elevation ecosystems in the Rocky Mountains of Colorado are climatically sensitive and varied dramatically throughout MIS 5

  13. We are looking for Medical Scribe candidates who are looking to gain valuable experience by working closely with physicians as a Medical Scribe for Essia Health. Our Medical Scribes assist directly with a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    each year. Essia Health is looking to hire and train Medical Scribes to work in Bel Air and Havre deWe are looking for Medical Scribe candidates who are looking to gain valuable experience by working closely with physicians as a Medical Scribe for Essia Health. Our Medical Scribes assist directly

  14. The marketing concentration provides students with many opportunities to gain experience in developing marketing strategies and tactics. The curriculum provides flexibility for each student to select marketing electives that align with his or her career i

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The marketing concentration provides students with many opportunities to gain experience in developing marketing strategies and tactics. The curriculum provides flexibility for each student to select marketing electives that align with his or her career interests. What Do Professionals in Marketing Do

  15. The Mickey Leland Energy Fellowship (MLEF) Program provides college students with an opportunity to gain and develop research skills with the Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy for 10 weeks over the summer. This program is designed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, Gus

    The Mickey Leland Energy Fellowship (MLEF) Program provides college students with an opportunity to gain and develop research skills with the Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy for 10 weeks the DOE is working to meet the energy challenges of the future. · Receive a stipend. Some participants may

  16. Determination of the origin of elevated uranium at a Former Air Force Landfill using non-parametric statistics analysis and uranium isotope ratio analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weismann, J.; Young, C.; Masciulli, S.; Caputo, D.

    2007-07-01

    Lowry Air Force Base (Lowry) was closed in September 1994 as part of the Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) program and the base was transferred to the Lowry Redevelopment Authority in 1995. As part of the due diligence activities conducted by the Air Force, a series of remedial investigations were conducted across the base. A closed waste landfill, designated Operable Unit 2 (OU 2), was initially assessed in a 1990 Remedial Investigation (RI; [1]). A Supplemental Remedial Investigation was conducted in 1995 [2] and additional studies were conducted in a 1998 Focused Feasibility Study. [3] The three studies indicated that gross alpha, gross beta, and uranium concentrations were consistently above regulatory standards and that there were detections of low concentrations other radionuclides. Results from previous investigations at OU 2 have shown elevated gross alpha, gross beta, and uranium concentrations in groundwater, surface water, and sediments. The US Air Force has sought to understand the provenance of these radionuclides in order to determine if they could be due to leachates from buried radioactive materials within the landfill or whether they are naturally-occurring. The Air Force and regulators agreed to use a one-year monitoring and sampling program to seek to explain the origins of the radionuclides. Over the course of the one-year program, dissolved uranium levels greater than the 30 {mu}g/L Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) were consistently found in both up-gradient and down-gradient wells at OU 2. Elevated Gross Alpha and Gross Beta measurements that were observed during prior investigations and confirmed during the LTM were found to correlate with high dissolved uranium content in groundwater. If Gross Alpha values are corrected to exclude uranium and radon contributions in accordance with US EPA guidance, then the 15 pCi/L gross alpha level is not exceeded. The large dataset also allowed development of gross alpha to total uranium correlation factors so that gross alpha action levels can be applied to future long-term landfill monitoring to track radiological conditions at lower cost. Ratios of isotopic uranium results were calculated to test whether the elevated uranium displayed signatures indicative of military use. Results of all ratio testing strongly supports the conclusion that the uranium found in groundwater, surface water, and sediment at OU 2 is naturally-occurring and has not undergone anthropogenic enrichment or processing. U-234:U-238 ratios also show that a disequilibrium state, i.e., ratio greater than 1, exists throughout OU 2 which is indicative of long-term aqueous transport in aged aquifers. These results all support the conclusion that the elevated uranium observed at OU 2 is due to the high concentrations in the regional watershed. Based on the results of this monitoring program, we concluded that the elevated uranium concentrations measured in OU 2 groundwater, surface water, and sediment are due to the naturally-occurring uranium content of the regional watershed and are not the result of waste burials in the former landfill. Several lines of evidence indicate that natural uranium has been naturally concentrated beneath OU 2 in the geologic past and the higher of uranium concentrations in down-gradient wells is the result of geochemical processes and not the result of a uranium ore disposal. These results therefore provide the data necessary to support radiological closure of OU 2. (authors)

  17. Fatty acid synthase plays a role in cancer metabolism beyond providing fatty acids for phospholipid synthesis or sustaining elevations in glycolytic activity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hopperton, Kathryn E.; Duncan, Robin E.; Bazinet, Richard P.; Archer, Michael C.

    2014-01-15

    Fatty acid synthase is over-expressed in many cancers and its activity is required for cancer cell survival, but the role of endogenously synthesized fatty acids in cancer is unknown. It has been suggested that endogenous fatty acid synthesis is either needed to support the growth of rapidly dividing cells, or to maintain elevated glycolysis (the Warburg effect) that is characteristic of cancer cells. Here, we investigate both hypotheses. First, we compared utilization of fatty acids synthesized endogenously from {sup 14}C-labeled acetate to those supplied exogenously as {sup 14}C-labeled palmitate in the culture medium in human breast cancer (MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231) and untransformed breast epithelial cells (MCF-10A). We found that cancer cells do not produce fatty acids that are different from those derived from exogenous palmitate, that these fatty acids are esterified to the same lipid and phospholipid classes in the same proportions, and that their distribution within neutral lipids is not different from untransformed cells. These results suggest that endogenously synthesized fatty acids do not fulfill a specific function in cancer cells. Furthermore, we observed that cancer cells excrete endogenously synthesized fatty acids, suggesting that they are produced in excess of requirements. We next investigated whether lipogenic activity is involved in the maintenance of high glycolytic activity by culturing both cancer and non-transformed cells under anoxic conditions. Although anoxia increased glycolysis 2–3 fold, we observed no concomitant increase in lipogenesis. Our results indicate that breast cancer cells do not have a specific qualitative or quantitative requirement for endogenously synthesized fatty acids and that increased de novo lipogenesis is not required to sustain elevations in glycolytic activity induced by anoxia in these cells. - Highlights: • Fatty acid synthase (FASN) is over-expressed in cancer but its function is unknown. • We compare utilization of fatty acids produced by FASN to those derived exogenously. • Cancer cells do not have a specific requirement for fatty acids produced by FASN. • Fatty acids produced by FASN are in excess of cell requirements and are excreted. • Increased FASN activity is not required to sustain elevations in glycolysis.

  18. Responses of soil respiration to elevated CO2, air warming, and changing soil water availability in an old-field grassland

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wan, Shiqiang [Chinese Academy of Sciences; Norby, Richard J [ORNL; Childs, Joanne [ORNL; Weltzin, Jake [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

    2007-01-01

    Responses of soil respiration to atmospheric and climatic change will have profound impacts on ecosystem and global C cycling in the future. This study was conducted to examine effects on soil respiration of the concurrent driving factors of elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration, rising temperature, and changing precipitation in a constructed old-field grassland in eastern Tennessee, USA. Model ecosystems of seven old-field species in 12 open-top chambers (4 m in diameter) were treated with two CO2 (ambient and ambient plus 300 ppm) and two temperature (ambient and ambient plus 3 C) levels. Two split plots with each chamber were assigned with high and low soil moisture levels. During the 19-month experimental period from June 2003 to December 2004, higher CO2 concentration and soil water availability significantly increased mean soil respiration by 35.8% and 15.7%, respectively. The effects of air warming on soil respiration varied seasonally from small reductions to significant increases to no response, and there was no significant main effect. In the wet side of elevated CO2 chambers, air warming consistently caused increases in soil respiration, whereas in other three combinations of CO2 and water treatments, warming tended to decrease soil respiration over the growing season but increase it over the winter. There were no interactive effects on soil respiration among any two or three treatment factors irrespective of testing time period. Temperature sensitivity of soil respiration was reduced by air warming, lower in the wet than the dry side, and not affected by CO2 treatment. Variations of soil respiration responses with soil temperature and soil moisture ranges could be primarily attributable to the seasonal dynamics of plant growth and its responses to the three treatments. Using a conceptual model to interpret the significant relationships of treatment-induced changes in soil respiration with changes in soil temperature and moisture observed in this study, we conclude that elevated CO2, air warming, and changing soil water availability had both direct and indirect effects on soil respiration via changes in the three controlling factors: soil temperature, soil moisture, and C substrate. Our results demonstrate that the response of soil respiration to climatic warming should not be represented in models as a simple temperature response function. A more mechanistic understanding of the direct and indirect impacts of concurrent global change drivers on soil respiration is needed to facilitate the interpretation and projection of ecosystem and global C cycling in response to atmospheric and climate change.

  19. A Comparison of the Corrosion Resistance of Iron-Based Amorphous Metals and Austenitic Alloys in Synthetic Brines at Elevated Temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farmer, J C

    2008-11-25

    Several hard, corrosion-resistant and neutron-absorbing iron-based amorphous alloys have now been developed that can be applied as thermal spray coatings. These new alloys include relatively high concentrations of Cr, Mo, and W for enhanced corrosion resistance, and substantial B to enable both glass formation and neutron absorption. The corrosion resistances of these novel alloys have been compared to that of several austenitic alloys in a broad range of synthetic brines, with and without nitrate inhibitor, at elevated temperature. Linear polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy have been used for in situ measurement of corrosion rates for prolonged periods of time, while scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (EDAX) have been used for ex situ characterization of samples at the end of tests. The application of these new coatings for the protection of spent nuclear fuel storage systems, equipment in nuclear service, steel-reinforced concrete will be discussed.

  20. Properties of yttria-tetragonal zirconia polycrystal (Y-TZP) materials after long-term exposure to elevated temperatures. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swab, J.J.

    1989-03-01

    Due to an unusual combination of high strength and toughness, tetragonal zirconia polycrystal (TZP) materials are candidates for use in advanced heat engines. The properties of these materials stem from the stress-assisted transformation of metastable tetragonal zirconia particles. However, after long times at elevated temperatures, this class of materials is susceptible to properties degradation due to the undesirable transformation of tetragonal zirconia to monoclinic zirconia upon cooling. Accordingly, a task was initiated to examine the extent and magnitude of this phenomenon's effect on the properties. Seven commercially available yttria-tetragonal polycrystal (Y-TZP) materials were evaluated. Room-temperature properties were measured before and after heat treatments at 1000 C. Microstructure and phase stability were also examined. In all but one case, the Y-TZPs showed very little change in room temperature properties after long times at this temperature.

  1. NS1-binding protein abrogates the elevation of cell viability by the influenza A virus NS1 protein in association with CRKL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miyazaki, Masaya [Department of Cancer Pathology, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, N15W7, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8638 (Japan)] [Department of Cancer Pathology, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, N15W7, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8638 (Japan); Nishihara, Hiroshi, E-mail: hnishihara@med.hokudai.ac.jp [Department of Translational Pathology, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, N15W7, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8638 (Japan)] [Department of Translational Pathology, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, N15W7, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8638 (Japan); Hasegawa, Hideki [Department of Pathology, National Institute of Infectious Diseases, Sinjuku-ku, Tokyo (Japan)] [Department of Pathology, National Institute of Infectious Diseases, Sinjuku-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Tashiro, Masato [Influenza Virus Research Center, National Institute of Infectious Diseases, Sinjuku-ku, Tokyo (Japan)] [Influenza Virus Research Center, National Institute of Infectious Diseases, Sinjuku-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Wang, Lei [Department of Translational Pathology, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, N15W7, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8638 (Japan)] [Department of Translational Pathology, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, N15W7, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8638 (Japan); Kimura, Taichi; Tanino, Mishie; Tsuda, Masumi [Department of Cancer Pathology, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, N15W7, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8638 (Japan)] [Department of Cancer Pathology, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, N15W7, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8638 (Japan); Tanaka, Shinya [Department of Cancer Pathology, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, N15W7, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8638 (Japan) [Department of Cancer Pathology, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, N15W7, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8638 (Japan); Department of Translational Pathology, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, N15W7, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8638 (Japan)

    2013-11-29

    Highlights: •NS1 induced excessive phosphorylation of ERK and elevated cell viability. •NS1-BP expression and CRKL knockdown abolished survival effect of NS1. •NS1-BP and NS1 formed the complex through the interaction with CRKL-SH3(N). -- Abstract: The influenza A virus non-structural protein 1 (NS1) is a multifunctional virulence factor consisting of an RNA binding domain and several Src-homology (SH) 2 and SH3 binding motifs, which promotes virus replication in the host cell and helps to evade antiviral immunity. NS1 modulates general host cell physiology in association with various cellular molecules including NS1-binding protein (NS1-BP) and signaling adapter protein CRK-like (CRKL), while the physiological role of NS1-BP during influenza A virus infection especially in association with NS1 remains unclear. In this study, we analyzed the intracellular association of NS1-BP, NS1 and CRKL to elucidate the physiological roles of these molecules in the host cell. In HEK293T cells, enforced expression of NS1 of A/Beijing (H1N1) and A/Indonesia (H5N1) significantly induced excessive phosphorylation of ERK and elevated cell viability, while the over-expression of NS1-BP and the abrogation of CRKL using siRNA abolished such survival effect of NS1. The pull-down assay using GST-fusion CRKL revealed the formation of intracellular complexes of NS1-BP, NS1 and CRKL. In addition, we identified that the N-terminus SH3 domain of CRKL was essential for binding to NS1-BP using GST-fusion CRKL-truncate mutants. This is the first report to elucidate the novel function of NS1-BP collaborating with viral protein NS1 in modulation of host cell physiology. In addition, an alternative role of adaptor protein CRKL in association with NS1 and NS1-BP during influenza A virus infection is demonstrated.

  2. Elevated extracellular calcium increases expression of bone morphogenetic protein-2 gene via a calcium channel and ERK pathway in human dental pulp cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tada, Hiroyuki [Division of Periodontology and Endodontology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Dentistry, Sendai 980-8575 (Japan)] [Division of Periodontology and Endodontology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Dentistry, Sendai 980-8575 (Japan); Nemoto, Eiji, E-mail: e-nemoto@umin.ac.jp [Division of Periodontology and Endodontology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Dentistry, Sendai 980-8575 (Japan)] [Division of Periodontology and Endodontology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Dentistry, Sendai 980-8575 (Japan); Kanaya, Sousuke; Hamaji, Nozomu; Sato, Hisae; Shimauchi, Hidetoshi [Division of Periodontology and Endodontology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Dentistry, Sendai 980-8575 (Japan)] [Division of Periodontology and Endodontology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Dentistry, Sendai 980-8575 (Japan)

    2010-04-16

    Dental pulp cells, which have been shown to share phenotypical features with osteoblasts, are capable of differentiating into odontoblast-like cells and generating a dentin-like mineral structure. Elevated extracellular Ca{sup 2+}Ca{sub o}{sup 2+} has been implicated in osteogenesis by stimulating the proliferation and differentiation of osteoblasts; however, the role of Ca{sub o}{sup 2+} signaling in odontogenesis remains unclear. We found that elevated Ca{sub o}{sup 2+} increases bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2 gene expression in human dental pulp cells. The increase was modulated not only at a transcriptional level but also at a post-transcriptional level, because treatment with Ca{sup 2+} increased the stability of BMP-2 mRNA in the presence of actinomycin D, an inhibitor of transcription. A similar increase in BMP-2 mRNA level was observed in other human mesenchymal cells from oral tissue; periodontal ligament cells and gingival fibroblasts. However, the latter cells exhibited considerably lower expression of BMP-2 mRNA compared with dental pulp cells and periodontal ligament cells. The BMP-2 increase was markedly inhibited by pretreatment with an extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) inhibitor, PD98059, and partially inhibited by the L-type Ca{sup 2+} channels inhibitor, nifedipine. However, pretreatment with nifedipine had no effect on ERK1/2 phosphorylation triggered by Ca{sup 2+}, suggesting that the Ca{sup 2+} influx from Ca{sup 2+} channels may operate independently of ERK signaling. Dental pulp cells do not express the transcript of Ca{sup 2+}-sensing receptors (CaSR) and only respond slightly to other cations such as Sr{sup 2+} and spermine, suggesting that dental pulp cells respond to Ca{sub o}{sup 2+} to increase BMP-2 mRNA expression in a manner different from CaSR and rather specific for Ca{sub o}{sup 2+} among cations.

  3. The PIKfyve–ArPIKfyve–Sac3 triad in human breast cancer: Functional link between elevated Sac3 phosphatase and enhanced proliferation of triple negative cell lines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ikonomov, Ognian C. Filios, Catherine Sbrissa, Diego Chen, Xuequn Shisheva, Assia

    2013-10-18

    Highlights: •We assess PAS complex proteins and phosphoinositide levels in breast cancer cells. •Sac3 and ArPIKfyve are markedly elevated in triple-negative breast cancer cells. •Sac3 silencing inhibits proliferation in triple-negative breast cancer cell lines. •Phosphoinositide profiles are altered in breast cancer cells. •This is the first evidence linking high Sac3 with breast cancer cell proliferation. -- Abstract: The phosphoinositide 5-kinase PIKfyve and 5-phosphatase Sac3 are scaffolded by ArPIKfyve in the PIKfyve–ArPIKfyve–Sac3 (PAS) regulatory complex to trigger a unique loop of PtdIns3P–PtdIns(3,5)P{sub 2} synthesis and turnover. Whereas the metabolizing enzymes of the other 3-phosphoinositides have already been implicated in breast cancer, the role of the PAS proteins and the PtdIns3P–PtdIns(3,5)P{sub 2} conversion is unknown. To begin elucidating their roles, in this study we monitored the endogenous levels of the PAS complex proteins in cell lines derived from hormone-receptor positive (MCF7 and T47D) or triple-negative breast cancers (TNBC) (BT20, BT549 and MDA-MB-231) as well as in MCF10A cells derived from non-tumorigenic mastectomy. We report profound upregulation of Sac3 and ArPIKfyve in the triple negative vs. hormone-sensitive breast cancer or non-tumorigenic cells, with BT cell lines showing the highest levels. siRNA-mediated knockdown of Sac3, but not that of PIKfyve, significantly inhibited proliferation of BT20 and BT549 cells. In these cells, knockdown of ArPIKfyve had only a minor effect, consistent with a primary role for Sac3 in TNBC cell proliferation. Intriguingly, steady-state levels of PtdIns(3,5)P{sub 2} in BT20 and T47D cells were similar despite the 6-fold difference in Sac3 levels between these cell lines. However, steady-state levels of PtdIns3P and PtdIns5P, both regulated by the PAS complex, were significantly reduced in BT20 vs. T47D or MCF10A cell lines, consistent with elevated Sac3 affecting directly or indirectly the homeostasis of these lipids in TNBC. Together, our results uncover an unexpected role for Sac3 phosphatase in TNBC cell proliferation. Database analyses, discussed herein, reinforce the involvement of Sac3 in breast cancer pathogenesis.

  4. Sept.. 1060 HYDROGENS O R P T I O N O X GRAPHITEAT E L E V A T E D TEMPERATURES 1093 HYDROGEN SORPTIOK ON GRAPHITE AT ELEVATED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sept.. 1060 HYDROGENS O R P T I O N O X GRAPHITEAT E L E V A T E D TEMPERATURES 1093 HYDROGEN SORPTIOK ON GRAPHITE AT ELEVATED BYJ. P. REDMONDAND 1'. L. W..ZLHER,JR. Lkpaitmcnt of Fuel Technology does n>toccur. Introduction drtificial graphite of use in graphite-moderated nuclear reactors

  5. In situ soft XAS study on nickel-based layered cathode material at elevated temperatures: A novel approach to study thermal stability

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yoon, Won -Sub; Yang, Xiao -Qing; Haas, Otto; Muhammad, Shoaib; Kim, Hyunchul; Lee, Wontae; Kim, Donghwi; Fischer, Daniel A.; Jaye, Cherno; Balasubramanian, Mahalingam; et al

    2014-10-29

    Tracking thermally induced reactions has always been challenging for electrode materials of electrochemical battery systems. Traditionally, a variety of calorimetric techniques and in situ XRD at elevated temperatures has been used to evaluate the thermal stability of electrode materials. These techniques are capable of providing variations in heat capacity, mass and average bulk composition of materials only. Herein, we report investigation of thermal characteristics of Li0.33Ni0.8Co0.15Al0.05O2 by using in situ soft XAS measurements in combination with XRD. Fluorescence yield and partial electron yield measurements are used simultaneously to obtain element selective surface and bulk information. Fluorescence yield measurements reveal nomore »energy change of the absorption peak and thus no valence state change in the bulk. However, electron yield measurements indicate that NiO-type rock salt structure is formed at the surface at temperatures above 200°C while no evidence for a surface reaction near Co sites in investigated temperature range is found. These results clearly show that in situ soft XAS can give a unique understanding of the role of each element in the structural transformation under thermal abuse offering a useful guidance in developing new battery system with improved safety performance.« less

  6. In situ soft XAS study on nickel-based layered cathode material at elevated temperatures: A novel approach to study thermal stability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoon, Won -Sub; Yang, Xiao -Qing; Haas, Otto; Muhammad, Shoaib; Kim, Hyunchul; Lee, Wontae; Kim, Donghwi; Fischer, Daniel A.; Jaye, Cherno; Balasubramanian, Mahalingam; Nam, Kyung -Wan

    2014-10-29

    Tracking thermally induced reactions has always been challenging for electrode materials of electrochemical battery systems. Traditionally, a variety of calorimetric techniques and in situ XRD at elevated temperatures has been used to evaluate the thermal stability of electrode materials. These techniques are capable of providing variations in heat capacity, mass and average bulk composition of materials only. Herein, we report investigation of thermal characteristics of Li0.33Ni0.8Co0.15Al0.05O2 by using in situ soft XAS measurements in combination with XRD. Fluorescence yield and partial electron yield measurements are used simultaneously to obtain element selective surface and bulk information. Fluorescence yield measurements reveal no energy change of the absorption peak and thus no valence state change in the bulk. However, electron yield measurements indicate that NiO-type rock salt structure is formed at the surface at temperatures above 200°C while no evidence for a surface reaction near Co sites in investigated temperature range is found. These results clearly show that in situ soft XAS can give a unique understanding of the role of each element in the structural transformation under thermal abuse offering a useful guidance in developing new battery system with improved safety performance.

  7. Tracking Elevated Pollution Layers with a Newly Developed Hyperspectral Sun/Sky Spectrometer (4STAR): Results from the TCAP 2012 and 2013 Campaigns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Segal Rozenhaimer, Michal; Russell, P. B.; Schmid, Beat; Redemann, Jens; Livingston, J. M.; Flynn, Connor J.; Johnson, Roy R.; Dunagan, Stephen; Shinozuka, Yohei; Herman, J. R.; Cede, A.; Abuhassan, N.; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Hubbe, John M.; Zelenyuk, Alla; Wilson, Jacqueline M.

    2014-03-16

    Total columnar amounts of water vapor, nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and ozone (O3) are derived from a newly developed, hyperspectral airborne sun-sky spectrometer (4STAR) for the first time during the two intensive phases of the Two Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) in summer 2012 and winter 2013 aboard the DOE G-1 aircraft. We compare results with coincident measurements. We find 0.045 g/cm2 (4.2%) negative bias and 0.28 g/cm2 (26.3%) root-mean-square (RMS) difference in water vapor layer comparison with in-situ hygrometer, and an overall RMS difference of 1.28 g/m3 (38%) water vapor amount in profile by profile comparisons, with differences distributed evenly around zero in most cases. The RMS differences for O3 values average to 3%, with a 1% negative bias for 4STAR compared with the spaceborne Ozone Measuring Instrument (OMI) along the aircraft flight-track for 14 flights during both TCAP phases. Ground-based comparisons with the Pandora spectrometer system at the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), Greenbelt, Maryland showed excellent agreement between the instruments for both O3 and NO2, further emphasizing 4STAR’s new capabilities. During the summer phase, we have succeeded in identifying variations in elevated pollution layers corresponding to urban pollution outflow and transported biomass burning. This was done using clustering analysis of the retrieved products (e.g. Ångstrom exponent, NO2 and columnar water vapor), and was confirmed by aerosol type identification by HSRL2 aboard the NASA B-200 aircraft. These newly demonstrated 4STAR capabilities are expected to be instrumental in improving our understanding of atmospheric composition variability and aerosol-trace-gas interactions; they open new horizons and opportunities in airborne sunphotometry.

  8. 5-1 (5/20/14) RIGHTS, PRIVILEGES AND BENEFITS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , engage in scholarly activity, conduct research, and publish or disseminate the results of such work. All for liability insurance provided through the State Office of Risk Management, which CSM is required by law of Teaching Assistant Professor or higher may not work toward degrees in their own department at CSM. The Dean

  9. "I Never Thought It Would Happen Here": White Privilege and Assumptions of Safety 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Varela, Kay S

    2014-05-03

    levels of fear of crime (Hale 1996; Cheurprakobkit 2006; Fishman 1978; Pain 2000; Pager 2007). However, research on fear of crime, safety, and risk assessment has primarily been quantitative, most conducted through the use of surveys (Carvalho and Lewis... in three areas: 1) neighborhood contextualization; 2) safety concern of the article; and 3) how the incident being reported on is described and understood in terms of locality. My analysis highlights the white supremacist logic found and upheld in newspaper...

  10. Privilege as a Function of Profit: Network Neutrality and the Digital Public Sphere 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wardlaw, Brandon

    2011-08-08

    This paper seeks to evaluate the role that Network Neutrality policies play in terms of access to knowledge in the public sphere, as well as the role that approaches to distributive justice might play in offering justification ...

  11. U-253: Citrix XenServer Denial of Service and Privilege Escalation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCEDInstallers/ContractorsPhotovoltaicsStateof Energy| Department of

  12. V-128: Xen Event Channel Tracking Pointer Bug Local Privilege Escalation |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematics And Statistics » USAJobs Search USAJobs SearchWater-Savingof Energy 5:

  13. Geotech Smart24 data acquisition system input terminated noise seismic response adjusted test : StreckeisenSTS2-low and high gain, Guralp CMG3T and Geotech GS13 seismometers.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rembold, Randy Kai; Hart, Darren M.; Harris, James Mark

    2008-08-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has tested, evaluated and reported on the Geotech Smart24 data acquisition system with active Fortezza crypto card data signing and authentication in SAND2008-. One test, Input Terminated Noise, allows us to characterize the self-noise of the Smart24 system. By computing the power spectral density (PSD) of the input terminated noise time series data set and correcting for the instrument response of different seismometers, the resulting spectrum can be compared to the USGS new low noise model (NLNM) of Peterson (1996), and determine the ability of the matched system of seismometer and Smart24 to be quiet enough for any general deployment location. Four seismometer models were evaluated: the Streckeisen STS2-Low and High Gain, Guralp CMG3T and Geotech GS13 models. Each has a unique pass-band as defined by the frequency band of the instrument corrected noise spectrum that falls below the new low-noise model.

  14. Microstructure and Property Evolution in Advanced Cladding and Duct Materials Under Long-Term and Elevated Temperature Irradiation: Modeling and Experimental Investigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wirth, Brian; Morgan, Dane; Kaoumi, Djamel; Motta, Arthur

    2013-12-01

    The in-service degradation of reactor core materials is related to underlying changes in the irradiated microstructure. During reactor operation, structural components and cladding experience displacement of atoms by collisions with neutrons at temperatures at which the radiation-induced defects are mobile, leading to microstructure evolution under irradiation that can degrade material properties. At the doses and temperatures relevant to fast reactor operation, the microstructure evolves by dislocation loop formation and growth, microchemistry changes due to radiation-induced segregation, radiation-induced precipitation, destabilization of the existing precipitate structure, and in some cases, void formation and growth. These processes do not occur independently; rather, their evolution is highly interlinked. Radiationinduced segregation of Cr and existing chromium carbide coverage in irradiated alloy T91 track each other closely. The radiation-induced precipitation of Ni-Si precipitates and RIS of Ni and Si in alloys T91 and HCM12A are likely related. Neither the evolution of these processes nor their coupling is understood under the conditions required for materials performance in fast reactors (temperature range 300-600°C and doses beyond 200 dpa). Further, predictive modeling is not yet possible as models for microstructure evolution must be developed along with experiments to characterize these key processes and provide tools for extrapolation. To extend the range of operation of nuclear fuel cladding and structural materials in advanced nuclear energy and transmutation systems to that required for the fast reactor, the irradiation-induced evolution of the microstructure, microchemistry, and the associated mechanical properties at relevant temperatures and doses must be understood. Predictive modeling relies on an understanding of the physical processes and also on the development of microstructure and microchemical models to describe their evolution under irradiation. This project will focus on modeling microstructural and microchemical evolution of irradiated alloys by performing detailed modeling of such microstructure evolution processes coupled with well-designed in situ experiments that can provide validation and benchmarking to the computer codes. The broad scientific and technical objectives of this proposal are to evaluate the microstructure and microchemical evolution in advanced ferritic/martensitic and oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloys for cladding and duct reactor materials under long-term and elevated temperature irradiation, leading to improved ability to model structural materials performance and lifetime. Specifically, we propose four research thrusts, namely Thrust 1: Identify the formation mechanism and evolution for dislocation loops with Burgers vector of a<100> and determine whether the defect microstructure (predominately dislocation loop/dislocation density) saturates at high dose. Thrust 2: Identify whether a threshold irradiation temperature or dose exists for the nucleation of growing voids that mark the beginning of irradiation-induced swelling, and begin to probe the limits of thermal stability of the tempered Martensitic structure under irradiation. Thrust 3: Evaluate the stability of nanometer sized Y- Ti-O based oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) particles at high fluence/temperature. Thrust 4: Evaluate the extent to which precipitates form and/or dissolve as a function of irradiation temperature and dose, and how these changes are driven by radiation induced segregation and microchemical evolutions and determined by the initial microstructure.

  15. Financing Renewable Energy- No Pain, No Gain

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Community Renewable Energy Success Stories Webinar series presentation by Rob Holden, New Resource Bank, on financing renewable energy systems from a banker’s perspective.

  16. Africa gaining importance in world LPG trade

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haun, R.R.; Otto, K.W.; Whitley, S.C.

    1997-05-12

    Major LPG projects planned or under way in Africa will increase the importance of that region`s presence in world LPG trade. Supplies will nearly double between 1995 and 2005, at which time they will remain steady for at least 10 years. At the same time that exports are leveling, however, increasing domestic demand for PG is likely to reduce export-market participation by Algeria, Nigeria, Egypt, and Libya. The growth of Africa`s participation in world LPG supply is reflected in comparisons for the next 15--20 years. Total world supply of LPG in 1995 was about 165 million metric tons (tonnes), of which Africans share was 7.8 million tonnes. By 2000, world supply will grow to slightly more than 200 million tonnes, with Africa`s share expected to increase to 13.2 million tonnes (6.6%). And by 2005, world LPG supply will reach nearly 230 million tonnes; Africa`s overall supply volumes by that year will be nearly 16.2 million tonnes (7%). World LPG supply for export in 1995 was on order of 44 million tonnes with Africa supply about 4 million tonnes (9%). By 2005, world export volumes of LPG will reach nearly 70 million tonnes; Africa`s share will have grown by nearly 10 million tonnes (14.3%).

  17. Discovering the Value of "Gaining Through Training" 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, R. C.; Hahn, G. E.

    1995-01-01

    of facilities. The following examples prove that training should not conclude at the end of classroom instruction. Validation and verification becomes an important part of any class conducted or solution created. The examples used show that there is a definite...

  18. Verification of the gain switching threshold

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sopková, Filoména

    2015-01-01

    Using the fit of the ramps from special calibration runs preliminary values of switching thresholds have been computed and compared with those in the data base.

  19. Plasma Control on Existing Devices Experience Gained

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    · Control of the steady state plasma density profile using a gas valve #12;Jo Lister, CRPP-EPFL, ITPA St state in a finite time"....and less formally..... "Changing the parameters from their natural values · Preprogrammed vertical field and transformer current, gas pre-fill Problem, hitting the wall when parameters

  20. Observational Astronomy Gain of a CCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harrington, J. Patrick

    . The electronics cart will be set up nearby. Locate the battery power-pack and plug in the lamp. Turn it up so you. A centered and well-focused image is very important. · Flip the mirror out of the optical path, turn down the lamp brightness, and take some practice images of the step wedge. Adjust the brightness of the lamp