National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for ga ia mi

  1. MI C H I GA N M E M O R I A L P H O E N I X PROJECT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    M M P P - N P C - I - 4 MI C H I GA N M E M O R I A L P H O E N I X PROJECT THE U N I V E R S I T Y OF MI CHI GAN Facsimile Price $ Ij) Microfilm Price $ y / Avoiloble from the O ffic e of Technical Services Department o f Commerce Washington 25, D. C. LATTICE W A VES, SPIN W AVES A N D NEUTRON SCATTERING By B. N . BROCKHOUSE CHALK RIVER PROJECT A T O M IC ENERGY O F C A N A D A LIMITED A PAPER BASED O N LECTURES PRESENTED AT THE NEUTRON PHYSICS CONFERENCE M A C K IN A C ISLAND, M IC H IG A N JU

  2. Role of <mi>Ce>4+ in the scintillation mechanism of codoped <mi>Gd>3<mi>Ga>3<mi>Al>2<mi mathvariant='normal'>Omi>12:<mi>Ce>

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Yuntao; Meng, Fang; Li, Qi; Koschan, Merry; Melcher, Charles L.

    2014-10-17

    To control the time-response performance of widely used cerium-activated scintillators in cutting-edge medical-imaging devices, such as time-of-flight positron-emission tomography, a comprehensive understanding of the role of Ce valence states, especially stable Ce4+, in the scintillation mechanism is essential. However, despite some progress made recently, an understanding of the physical processes involving Ce4+ is still lacking. The aim of this work is to clarify the role of Ce4+ in scintillators by studying Ca2+ codoped Gd3Ga3Al2O12?Ce?(GGAG?Ce). By using a combination of optical absorption spectra and x-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopies, the correlation between Ca2+codoping content and the Ce4+ fraction is seen. The energy-level diagrams of Ce3+ and Ce4+ in the Gd3Ga3Al2O12 host are established by using theoretical and experimental methods, which indicate a higher position of the 5d1 state of Ce4+ in the forbidden gap in comparison to that of Ce3+. Underlying reasons for the decay-time acceleration resulting from Ca2+ codoping are revealed, and the physical processes of the Ce4+-emission model are proposed and further demonstrated by temperature-dependent radioluminescence spectra under x-ray excitation.

  3. IA Experts Listing 2014 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    IA Experts Listing 2014 IA Experts Listing 2014 PDF icon IA Experts Listing January 2014 More Documents & Publications Office of International Affairs Organization Chart PI...

  4. Rolling Hills (IA) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Rolling Hills (IA) Jump to: navigation, search Name Rolling Hills (IA) Facility Rolling Hills (IA) Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service...

  5. Steamboat IA Geothermal Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    IA Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Steamboat IA Geothermal Facility General Information Name Steamboat IA Geothermal Facility...

  6. Analysis of natural gases, AL, AR, FL, GA, IL, IN, IA, KY, LA, MD, MI, MS, MO, NJ, NY, NC, OH, PA, TN, VA, and WV; 1951-1991 (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    The U.S. Bureau of Mines diskette contains analysis and related source data for 2,357 natural gas samples collected from miscellaneous states, which include the following states: Alabama, Arkansas (except Arkoma Basin), Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Michigan, Mississippi, Missouri, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Virginia, and West Virginia. All samples were obtained and analyzed as part of the Bureau's investigations of occurrences of helium in natural gases of countries with free market economies. The survey has been conducted since 1917. The analysis contained on the diskette contain the full range of component analysis data. Five files are on the diskette: READ.ME, MISC.TXT, MISC.DBF, USHEANAL.DBF, and BASINCDE.TXT.

  7. Defining photometric peculiar type Ia supernovae

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    González-Gaitán, S.; Pignata, G.; Förster, F.; Gutiérrez, C. P.; Bufano, F.; Galbany, L.; Hamuy, M.; De Jaeger, T.; Hsiao, E. Y.; Phillips, M. M.; Folatelli, G.; Anderson, J. P.

    2014-11-10

    We present a new photometric identification technique for SN 1991bg-like type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia), i.e., objects with light curve characteristics such as later primary maxima and the absence of a secondary peak in redder filters. This method is capable of selecting this sub-group from the normal type Ia population. Furthermore, we find that recently identified peculiar sub-types such as SNe Iax and super-Chandrasekhar SNe Ia have photometric characteristics similar to 91bg-like SNe Ia, namely, the absence of secondary maxima and shoulders at longer wavelengths, and can also be classified with our technique. The similarity of these different SN Ia sub-groups perhaps suggests common physical conditions. This typing methodology permits the photometric identification of peculiar SNe Ia in large upcoming wide-field surveys either to study them further or to obtain a pure sample of normal SNe Ia for cosmological studies.

  8. Category:Mason, IA | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Mason, IA Jump to: navigation, search Go Back to PV Economics By Location Media in category "Mason, IA" The following 16 files are in this category, out of 16 total....

  9. Measurement of the direct <mi>CP> -violating parameter <mi>Ami><mi>CP> in the decay <mi>D>+<mi>Kmi>-<mimi>+<mi>π>+

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agnew, J. P.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Borysova, M.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Buszello, C. P.; Camacho-Pérez, E.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Caughron, S.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M. -C.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Déliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Fauré, A.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garbincius, P. H.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; García-González, J. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Geng, W.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Gogota, O.; Golovanov, G.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J. -F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hogan, J.; Hohlfeld, M.; Holzbauer, J. L.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jeong, M. S.; Jesik, R.; Jiang, P.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Katsanos, I.; Kaur, M.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kiselevich, I.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurča, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Lammers, S.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lei, X.; Lellouch, J.; Li, D.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, H.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madar, R.; Magaña-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Mansour, J.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Nguyen, H. T.; Nunnemann, T.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Pétroff, P.; Pleier, M. -A.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Sajot, G.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Savitskyi, M.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shaw, S.; Shchukin, A. A.; Simak, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Sonnenschein, L.; Soustruznik, K.; Stark, J.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Suter, L.; Svoisky, P.; Titov, M.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Tsai, Y. -T.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Van Kooten, R.; van Leeuwen, W. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Vasilyev, I. A.; Verkheev, A. Y.; Vertogradov, L. S.; Verzocchi, M.; Vesterinen, M.; Vilanova, D.; Vokac, P.; Wahl, H. D.; Wang, M. H. L. S.; Warchol, J.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weichert, J.; Welty-Rieger, L.; Williams, M. R. J.; Wilson, G. W.; Wobisch, M.; Wood, D. R.; Wyatt, T. R.; Xie, Y.; Yamada, R.; Yang, S.; Yasuda, T.; Yatsunenko, Y. A.; Ye, W.; Ye, Z.; Yin, H.; Yip, K.; Youn, S. W.; Yu, J. M.; Zennamo, J.; Zhao, T. G.; Zhou, B.; Zhu, J.; Zielinski, M.; Zieminska, D.; Zivkovic, L.

    2014-12-01

    We measure the direct mi>Cmi>mi>P>-violating parameter mi>Ami>mi>Cmi>mi>Pmi> for the decay of the charged charm meson, mi>Dmi>+mi>Kmi>-mi>πmi>+mi>πmi>+ (and charge conjugate), using the full 10.4 mi>fbmi>-1 sample of mi>p>mi>p>¯ collisions at mi>smi>=1.96 mi>TeVmi> collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. We extract the raw reconstructed charge asymmetry by fitting the invariant mass distributions for the sum and difference of charge-specific samples. This quantity is then corrected for detector-related asymmetries using data-driven methods and for possible physics asymmetries (from mi>B>mi>D

  10. IA Blog Archive | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Blog Archive IA Blog Archive RSS May 31, 2016 IA Blog Archive Global Energy Leaders Gather in California to Drive Clean Energy Development and Deployment Goal of meetings will be to expand international collaboration in clean energy research, development, demonstration and deployment to combat climate change. May 18, 2016 IA Blog Archive 10 Ways the Clean Energy Ministerial Is Speeding Up the World's Clean Energy Revolution The world needs a lot more clean energy, and fast. Here are 10 ways the

  11. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Titus Metals - IA 04

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Titus Metals - IA 04 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: TITUS METALS ( IA.04 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Waterloo , Iowa IA.04-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 IA.04-2 Site Operations: Extruded uranium billets to produce fuel plates for the Argonaut reactor in June, 1956. IA.04-1 IA.04-2 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination considered remote based on the limited scope of activities at the site and results of

  12. New approaches for modeling type Ia supernovae (Conference) ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) are the largest thermonuclearexplosions in the Universe. Their light output can be seen across greatstances and has led to the discovery that the ...

  13. Constraining Cosmic Evolution of Type Ia Supernovae (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Constraining Cosmic Evolution of Type Ia Supernovae Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Constraining Cosmic Evolution of Type Ia Supernovae We present the first large-scale...

  14. ASTRONOMY AND ASTROPHYSICS Dark Energy, Type Ia supernovae, radiative

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of Oklahoma Univ. of Oklahoma 79 ASTRONOMY AND ASTROPHYSICS Dark Energy, Type Ia supernovae, radiative transfer, Dark Energy, Type Ia supernovae, radiative transfer, The...

  15. Type Ia Supernovae Project at NERSC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of star called a white dwarf. The majority of SN Ia explosions occur far away from our galaxy; yet, due to their enormous intrinsic brightness, outshining billions of stars, we can...

  16. IA Blog Archive | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    "always be five years away." For four key clean energy technologies, that clean energy future has already arrived. August 21, 2013 IA Blog Archive ActOnClimate: Secretary...

  17. Improved Distances to Type Ia Supernovae withMulticolor Light...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    We present an updated version of the Multicolor Light Curve Shape method to measure distances to type Ia supernovae (SN Ia), incorporating new procedures for K-correction and ...

  18. Ideal bandpasses for type Ia supernova cosmology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, Tamara M.; Schmidt, Brian P.; Kim, Alex G.

    2005-10-24

    To use type Ia supernovae as standard candles for cosmologywe need accurate broadband magnitudes. In practice the observed magnitudemay differ from the ideal magnitude-redshift relationship either throughintrinsic inhomogeneities in the type Ia supernova population or throughobservational error. Here we investigate how we can choose filterbandpasses to reduce the error caused by both these effects. We find thatbandpasses with large integral fluxes and sloping wings are best able tominimise several sources of observational error, and are also leastsensitive to intrinsic differences in type Ia supernovae. The mostimportant feature of a complete filter set for type Ia supernovacosmology is that each bandpass be a redshifted copy of the first. Wedesign practical sets of redshifted bandpasses that are matched totypical high resistivity CCD and HgCdTe infra-red detector sensitivities.These are designed to minimise systematic error in well observedsupernovae, final designs for specific missions should also considersignal-to-noise requirements and observing strategy. In addition wecalculate how accurately filters need to be calibrated in order toachieve the required photometric accuracy of future supernova cosmologyexperiments such as the SuperNova-Acceleration-Probe (SNAP), which is onepossible realisation of the Joint Dark-Energy mission (JDEM). We considerthe effect of possible periodic miscalibrations that may arise from theconstruction of an interference filter.

  19. A threat-based definition of IA- and IA-enabled products.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shakamuri, Mayuri; Schaefer, Mark A.; Campbell, Philip LaRoche

    2010-07-01

    This paper proposes a definition of 'IA and IA-enabled products' based on threat, as opposed to 'security services' (i.e., 'confidentiality, authentication, integrity, access control or non-repudiation of data'), as provided by Department of Defense (DoD) Instruction 8500.2, 'Information Assurance (IA) Implementation.' The DoDI 8500.2 definition is too broad, making it difficult to distinguish products that need higher protection from those that do not. As a consequence the products that need higher protection do not receive it, increasing risk. The threat-based definition proposed in this paper solves those problems by focusing attention on threats, thereby moving beyond compliance to risk management. (DoDI 8500.2 provides the definitions and controls that form the basis for IA across the DoD.) Familiarity with 8500.2 is assumed.

  20. A threat-based definition of IA and IA-enabled products.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shakamuri, Mayuri; Schaefer, Mark A.; Campbell, Philip LaRoche

    2010-09-01

    This paper proposes a definition of 'IA and IA-enabled products' based on threat, as opposed to 'security services' (i.e., 'confidentiality, authentication, integrity, access control or non-repudiation of data'), as provided by Department of Defense (DoD) Instruction 8500.2, 'Information Assurance (IA) Implementation.' The DoDI 8500.2 definition is too broad, making it difficult to distinguish products that need higher protection from those that do not. As a consequence the products that need higher protection do not receive it, increasing risk. The threat-based definition proposed in this paper solves those problems by focusing attention on threats, thereby moving beyond compliance to risk management. (DoDI 8500.2 provides the definitions and controls that form the basis for IA across the DoD.) Familiarity with 8500.2 is assumed.

  1. IA News Archive | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    News Archive IA News Archive RSS July 22, 2016 Energy Department Selects Argonne National Laboratory to Lead U.S. Consortium for New CERC Medium- and Heavy-Duty Truck Technical Track The New Consortium of University, Private Sector and National Laboratory Partners will Advance Collaboration between the U.S. and China on Truck Efficiency Technologies June 10, 2016 Energy Department Invests More than $10 Million in Efficient Lighting Research and Development New projects designed to save consumers

  2. Constraining Cosmic Evolution of Type Ia Supernovae

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foley, Ryan J.; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Aguilera, C.; Becker, A.C.; Blondin, S.; Challis, P.; Clocchiatti, A.; Covarrubias, R.; Davis, T.M.; Garnavich, P.M.; Jha, S.; Kirshner, R.P.; Krisciunas, K.; Leibundgut, B.; Li, W.; Matheson, T.; Miceli, A.; Miknaitis, G.; Pignata, G.; Rest, A.; Riess, A.G.; /UC, Berkeley, Astron. Dept. /Cerro-Tololo InterAmerican Obs. /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept. /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys. /Chile U., Catolica /Bohr Inst. /Notre Dame U. /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Texas A-M /European Southern Observ. /NOAO, Tucson /Fermilab /Chile U., Santiago /Harvard U., Phys. Dept. /Baltimore, Space Telescope Sci. /Johns Hopkins U. /Res. Sch. Astron. Astrophys., Weston Creek /Stockholm U. /Hawaii U. /Illinois U., Urbana, Astron. Dept.

    2008-02-13

    We present the first large-scale effort of creating composite spectra of high-redshift type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) and comparing them to low-redshift counterparts. Through the ESSENCE project, we have obtained 107 spectra of 88 high-redshift SNe Ia with excellent light-curve information. In addition, we have obtained 397 spectra of low-redshift SNe through a multiple-decade effort at Lick and Keck Observatories, and we have used 45 ultraviolet spectra obtained by HST/IUE. The low-redshift spectra act as a control sample when comparing to the ESSENCE spectra. In all instances, the ESSENCE and Lick composite spectra appear very similar. The addition of galaxy light to the Lick composite spectra allows a nearly perfect match of the overall spectral-energy distribution with the ESSENCE composite spectra, indicating that the high-redshift SNe are more contaminated with host-galaxy light than their low-redshift counterparts. This is caused by observing objects at all redshifts with similar slit widths, which corresponds to different projected distances. After correcting for the galaxy-light contamination, subtle differences in the spectra remain. We have estimated the systematic errors when using current spectral templates for K-corrections to be {approx}0.02 mag. The variance in the composite spectra give an estimate of the intrinsic variance in low-redshift maximum-light SN spectra of {approx}3% in the optical and growing toward the ultraviolet. The difference between the maximum-light low and high-redshift spectra constrain SN evolution between our samples to be < 10% in the rest-frame optical.

  3. CEPHEID CALIBRATIONS OF MODERN TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE: IMPLICATIONS...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    CEPHEID CALIBRATIONS OF MODERN TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE: IMPLICATIONS FOR THE HUBBLE CONSTANT ... Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 79 ASTROPHYSICS, ...

  4. Type Ia Supernova Hubble Residuals and Host-Galaxy Properties...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect Search Results Journal Article: Type Ia Supernova Hubble Residuals and ... as distinguished from previous works that use magnitude corrections as a ...

  5. Search for surviving companions in type Ia supernova remnants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pan, Kuo-Chuan; Ricker, Paul M.; Taam, Ronald E. E-mail: pmricker@illinois.edu E-mail: taam@asiaa.sinica.edu.tw

    2014-09-01

    The nature of the progenitor systems of type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) is still unclear. One way to distinguish between the single-degenerate scenario and double-degenerate scenario for their progenitors is to search for the surviving companions (SCs). Using a technique that couples the results from multi-dimensional hydrodynamics simulations with calculations of the structure and evolution of main-sequence- (MS-) and helium-rich SCs, the color and magnitude of MS- and helium-rich SCs are predicted as functions of time. The SC candidates in Galactic type Ia supernova remnants (Ia SNR) and nearby extragalactic Ia SNRs are discussed. We find that the maximum detectable distance of MS SCs (helium-rich SCs) is 0.6-4 Mpc (0.4-16 Mpc), if the apparent magnitude limit is 27 in the absence of extinction, suggesting that the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds and the Andromeda Galaxy are excellent environments in which to search for SCs. However, only five Ia SNRs have been searched for SCs, showing little support for the standard channels in the singe-degenerate scenario. To better understand the progenitors of SNe Ia, we encourage the search for SCs in other nearby Ia SNRs.

  6. THE ULTRAVIOLET BRIGHTEST TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA 2011de

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Peter J., E-mail: pbrown@physics.tamu.edu [George P. and Cynthia Woods Mitchell Institute for Fundamental Physics and Astronomy, Texas A and M University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, 4242 TAMU, College Station, TX 77843 (United States)

    2014-11-20

    We present and discuss the ultraviolet (UV)/optical photometric light curves and absolute magnitudes of the TypeIa supernova (SN Ia) 2011de from the Swift Ultraviolet/Optical Telescope. We find it to be the UV brightest SN Ia yet observedmore than a factor of 10 brighter than normal SNe Ia in the mid-ultraviolet. We find that the UV/optical brightness and broad light curve evolution can be modeled with additional flux from the shock of the ejecta hitting a relatively large red giant companion separated by 6 10{sup 13} cm. However, the post-maximum behavior of other UV-bright SNe Ia can also be modeled in a similar manner, including objects with UV spectroscopy or pre-maximum photometry which is inconsistent with this model. This suggests that similar UV luminosities can be intrinsic or caused by other forms of shock interaction. The high velocities reported for SN 2011de make it distinct from the UV-bright ''super-Chandrasekhar'' SNe Ia and the NUV-blue group of normal SNe Ia. SN 2011de is an extreme example of the UV variations in SNe Ia.

  7. DIVERSITY OF TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE IMPRINTED IN CHEMICAL ABUNDANCES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsujimoto, Takuji [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Mitaka-shi, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Shigeyama, Toshikazu, E-mail: taku.tsujimoto@nao.ac.jp [Research Center for the Early Universe, Graduate School of Science, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

    2012-12-01

    A time delay of Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) explosions hinders the imprint of their nucleosynthesis on stellar abundances. However, some occasional cases give birth to stars that avoid enrichment of their chemical compositions by massive stars and thereby exhibit an SN-Ia-like elemental feature including a very low [Mg/Fe] ( Almost-Equal-To - 1). We highlight the elemental feature of Fe-group elements for two low-Mg/Fe objects detected in nearby galaxies, and propose the presence of a class of SNe Ia that yield the low abundance ratios of [Cr, Mn, Ni/Fe]. Our novel models of chemical evolution reveal that our proposed class of SNe Ia (slow SNe Ia) is associated with ones exploding on a long timescale after their stellar birth and give a significant impact on the chemical enrichment in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). In the Galaxy, on the other hand, this effect is unseen due to the overwhelming enrichment by the major class of SNe Ia that explode promptly (prompt SNe Ia) and eject a large amount of Fe-group elements. This nicely explains the different [Cr, Mn, Ni/Fe] features between the two galaxies as well as the puzzling feature seen in the LMC stars exhibiting very low Ca but normal Mg abundances. Furthermore, the corresponding channel of slow SN Ia is exemplified by performing detailed nucleosynthesis calculations in the scheme of SNe Ia resulting from a 0.8 + 0.6 M{sub Sun} white dwarf merger.

  8. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Bendix Aviation Corp Pioneer Div - IA

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    05 Corp Pioneer Div - IA 05 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: BENDIX AVIATION CORP., PIONEER DIV. (IA.05 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: Pioneer Division, Bendix Aviation Corporation Bendix Aviation Corporation Bendix Pioneer Division IA.05-1 IA.05-2 IA.05-3 Location: Davenport , Iowa IA.05-1 Evaluation Year: 1990 IA.05-2 IA.05-4 Site Operations: Conducted studies to investigate the feasibility of using sonic cleaning equipment to

  9. Real-time sub-<mi>>ngstrom...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Real-time sub-<mi>>ngstrom imaging of reversible and irreversible conformations in rhodium catalysts and graphene Kisielowski, Christian; Wang,...

  10. Mi GmbH | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Mi GmbH Jump to: navigation, search Name: Mi GmbH Place: Switzerland Zip: CH-6340 Sector: Solar Product: Baar-based manufacturer and distributor of fruit juices. The firm is also...

  11. miRNAs in brain development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petri, Rebecca; Malmevik, Josephine; Fasching, Liana; Åkerblom, Malin; Jakobsson, Johan

    2014-02-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, non-coding RNAs that negatively regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. In the brain, a large number of miRNAs are expressed and there is a growing body of evidence demonstrating that miRNAs are essential for brain development and neuronal function. Conditional knockout studies of the core components in the miRNA biogenesis pathway, such as Dicer and DGCR8, have demonstrated a crucial role for miRNAs during the development of the central nervous system. Furthermore, mice deleted for specific miRNAs and miRNA-clusters demonstrate diverse functional roles for different miRNAs during the development of different brain structures. miRNAs have been proposed to regulate cellular functions such as differentiation, proliferation and fate-determination of neural progenitors. In this review we summarise the findings from recent studies that highlight the importance of miRNAs in brain development with a focus on the mouse model. We also discuss the technical limitations of current miRNA studies that still limit our understanding of this family of non-coding RNAs and propose the use of novel and refined technologies that are needed in order to fully determine the impact of specific miRNAs in brain development. - Highlights: • miRNAs are essential for brain development and neuronal function. • KO of Dicer is embryonically lethal. • Conditional Dicer KO results in defective proliferation or increased apoptosis. • KO of individual miRNAs or miRNA families is necessary to determine function.

  12. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Iowa Army Ammunition Plant - IA 02

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Army Ammunition Plant - IA 02 FUSRAP Considered Sites Iowa Army Ammunition Plant, IA Alternate Name(s): Burlington Ordnance Plant Iowa Ordnance Plant Silas Mason Company IA.02-3 Location: Located in Township 70 North, Range 3 West, Section 32, 5th Principal Meridian, Des Moines County, Burlington, Iowa IA.02-1 IA.02-5 Historical Operations: Assembled nuclear weapons, primarily high explosive components and conducted explosives testing using the high explosive components and depleted uranium. AEC

  13. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Michigan Velsicol Chemical Corp - MI

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    03 Michigan Velsicol Chemical Corp - MI 03 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: MICHIGAN [VELSICOL] CHEMICAL CORP. (MI.03 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: Velsicol Chemical Corp. MI.03-1 Location: St. Louis , Michigan MI.03-2 Evaluation Year: Circa 1987 MI.03-3 Site Operations: Rare earth processing facility. MI.03-2 Site Disposition: Eliminated - No Authority - NRC survey MI.03-3 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive

  14. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Star Cutter Corp - MI 15

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Star Cutter Corp - MI 15 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: STAR CUTTER CORP. (MI.15) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Farmington , Michigan MI.15-1 Evaluation Year: 1991 MI.15-2 Site Operations: Performed a one time uranium slug drilling operation test in 1956. MI.15-3 MI.15-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination considered remote based on limited scope and quantity of materials handled MI.15-2 Radioactive

  15. A STUDY OF CARBON FEATURES IN TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA SPECTRA (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    A STUDY OF CARBON FEATURES IN TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA SPECTRA Citation Details In-Document Search Title: A STUDY OF CARBON FEATURES IN TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA SPECTRA One of the major ...

  16. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Wolverine Tube Division - MI 05

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Wolverine Tube Division - MI 05 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Wolverine Tube Division (MI.05) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: Wolverine Tube Division of Calumet & Hecla Consolidated Copper Co. Star Tool Hermes Automotive Manufacturing Corporation MI.05-1 MI.05-2 Location: 1411 Central Avenue , Detroit , Michigan MI.05-3 Evaluation Year: 1990 MI.05-2 Site Operations: 1943 - Conducted research and development of methods for spinning

  17. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Adrian - MI 01

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Adrian - MI 01 FUSRAP Considered Sites Adrian, MI Alternate Name(s): Bridgeport Brass Co. Special Metals Extrusion Plant Bridgeport Brass Company General Motors General Motors Company, Adrian MI.01-1 Location: 1450 East Beecher Street, Adrian, Michigan MI.01-3 Historical Operations: Performed uranium extrusion research and development and metal fabrication work for the AEC using uranium, thorium, and plutonium. MI.01-2 Eligibility Determination: Eligible MI.01-1 Radiological Survey(s):

  18. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Carboloy Co - MI 12

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Carboloy Co - MI 12 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Carboloy Co. (MI.12 ) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP - AEC licensed facility Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: General Electric MI.12-1 Location: 11177 E. Eight Mile Road , Detroit , Michigan MI.12-1 MI.12-2 Evaluation Year: 1987-1991 MI.12-3 MI.12-4 MI.12-6 Site Operations: Turned-down the outer diameter of uranium metal slugs and conducted pilot plant scale operations for hot pressing uranium dioxide pellets

  19. An Analysis of Department of Defense Instruction 8500.2 'Information Assurance (IA) Implementation.'

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, Philip LaRoche

    2012-01-01

    The Department of Defense (DoD) provides its standard for information assurance in its Instruction 8500.2, dated February 6, 2003. This Instruction lists 157 'IA Controls' for nine 'baseline IA levels.' Aside from distinguishing IA Controls that call for elevated levels of 'robustness' and grouping the IA Controls into eight 'subject areas' 8500.2 does not examine the nature of this set of controls, determining, for example, which controls do not vary in robustness, how this set of controls compares with other such sets, or even which controls are required for all nine baseline IA levels. This report analyzes (1) the IA Controls, (2) the subject areas, and (3) the Baseline IA levels. For example, this report notes that there are only 109 core IA Controls (which this report refers to as 'ICGs'), that 43 of these core IA Controls apply without variation to all nine baseline IA levels and that an additional 31 apply with variations. This report maps the IA Controls of 8500.2 to the controls in NIST 800-53 and ITGI's CoBIT. The result of this analysis and mapping, as shown in this report, serves as a companion to 8500.2. (An electronic spreadsheet accompanies this report.)

  20. Type Ia Supernova Spectral Line Ratios as LuminosityIndicators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bongard, Sebastien; Baron, E.; Smadja, G.; Branch, David; Hauschildt, Peter H.

    2005-12-07

    Type Ia supernovae have played a crucial role in thediscovery of the dark energy, via the measurement of their light curvesand the determination of the peak brightness via fitting templates to theobserved lightcurve shape. Two spectroscopic indicators are also known tobe well correlated with peak luminosity. Since the spectroscopicluminosity indicators are obtained directly from observed spectra, theywill have different systematic errors than do measurements usingphotometry. Additionally, these spectroscopic indicators may be usefulfor studies of effects of evolution or age of the SNe~;Ia progenitorpopulation. We present several new variants of such spectroscopicindicators which are easy to automate and which minimize the effects ofnoise. We show that these spectroscopic indicators can be measured byproposed JDEM missions such as snap and JEDI.

  1. Next-Generation Petascale Simulations of Type Ia Supernovae | Argonne

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Leadership Computing Facility deflagration to detonation transition model Deflagration to detonation transition model. Min lOng, Dan van Rossum, Sean Couch, George Jordan, Brad Gallagher, Don Lamb, University of Chicago; Michael E. Papka, Argonne National Laboratory/University of Chicago Next-Generation Petascale Simulations of Type Ia Supernovae PI Name: Don Lamb PI Email: lamb@oddjob.uchicago.edu Institution: The University of Chicago Allocation Program: INCITE Allocation Hours at ALCF:

  2. Power-law cosmology, SN Ia, and BAO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dolgov, Aleksander; Halenka, Vitali; Tkachev, Igor E-mail: vithal@umich.edu

    2014-10-01

    We revise observational constraints on the class of models of modified gravity which at low redshifts lead to a power-law cosmology. To this end we use available public data on Supernova Ia and on baryon acoustic oscillations. We show that the expansion regime a(t)?t{sup ?} with ? close to 3/2 in a spatially flat universe is a good fit to these data.

  3. Microsoft PowerPoint - IEEE IAS PES 102313.pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DOE's ARRA Smart Grid Program Steve Bossart, Senior Energy Analyst IEEE IAS/PES Pittsburgh Section October 23, 2013 # Topics * OE ARRA Smart Grid Program * OE ARRA Smart Grid Progress * Results and Case Studies * Life After ARRA Smart Grid # DOE OE ARRA Smart Grid Program # American Recovery and Reinvestment Act ($4.5B) * Smart Grid Investment Grants (99 projects) - $3.4 billion Federal; $4.7 billion private sector - > 800 PMUs covering almost 100% of transmission - ~ 8000 distribution

  4. Signatures of a companion star in type Ia supernovae

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maeda, Keiichi; Kutsuna, Masamichi; Shigeyama, Toshikazu

    2014-10-10

    Although type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) have been used as precise cosmological distance indicators, their progenitor systems remain unresolved. One of the key questions is whether there is a nondegenerate companion star at the time of a thermonuclear explosion of a white dwarf. In this paper, we investigate whether an interaction between the SN ejecta and the companion star may result in observable footprints around the maximum brightness and thereafter, by performing multidimensional radiation transfer simulations based on hydrodynamic simulations of the interaction. We find that such systems result in variations in various observational characteristics due to different viewing directions, and the predicted behaviors (redder and fainter for the companion direction) are the opposite of what were suggested by the previous study. The variations are generally modest and within observed scatters. However, the model predicts trends between some observables different from those observationally derived, so a large sample of SNe Ia with small calibration errors may be used to constrain the existence of such a companion star. The variations in different colors in optical band passes can be mimicked by external extinctions, so such an effect could be a source of scatter in the peak luminosity and derived distance. After the peak, hydrogen-rich materials expelled from the companion will manifest themselves in hydrogen lines, but Hα is extremely difficult to identify. Alternatively, we find that P{sub β} in postmaximum near-infrared spectra can potentially provide a powerful diagnostic.

  5. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Oliver Corp - MI 11

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Oliver Corp - MI 11 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: OLIVER CORP. (MI.11 ) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP - Referred to NRC Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: Behnke Warehousing Incorporated MI.11-1 Location: 433 East Michigan Avenue , Battle Creek , Michigan MI.11-1 Evaluation Year: 1986 MI.11-4 Site Operations: Conducted production scale briquetting of green salt and magnesium blend under AEC license Nos. SNM-591, SUB-579, and C-3725. MI.11-1 MI.11-3 Site

  6. The NuMI Neutrino Beam

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adamson, P.; Anderson, K.; Andrews, M.; Andrews, R.; Anghel, I.; Augustine, D.; Aurisano, A.; Avvakumov, S.; Ayres, D. S.; Baller, B.; et al

    2015-10-20

    Our paper describes the hardware and operations of the Neutrinos at the Main Injector (NuMI) beam at Fermilab. It elaborates on the design considerations for the beam as a whole and for individual elements. The most important part of our design details pertaining to individual components is described. Beam monitoring systems and procedures, including the tuning and alignment of the beam and NuMI long-term performance, are also discussed.

  7. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Detrex Corp - MI 10

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Detrex Corp - MI 10 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Detrex Corp. (MI.10 ) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Detroit , Michigan MI.10-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 MI.10-2 Site Operations: Conducted experimental runs relative to pickling/degreasing of one handful of uranium turnings MI.10-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination considered remote due to small quantity of material handled - There is no

  8. Type Ia Supernova Hubble Residuals and Host-Galaxy Properties (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Type Ia Supernova Hubble Residuals and Host-Galaxy Properties Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Type Ia Supernova Hubble Residuals and Host-Galaxy Properties Kim et al. (2013) [K13] introduced a new methodology for determining peak- brightness absolute magnitudes of type Ia supernovae from multi-band light curves. We examine the relation between their parameterization of light curves and Hubble residuals, based on photometry synthesized

  9. The Carnegie Supernova Project: Intrinsic colors of type Ia supernovae

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burns, Christopher R.; Persson, S. E.; Freedman, Wendy L.; Madore, Barry F. [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Stritzinger, Maximilian; Contreras, Carlos [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, Ny Munkegade 120, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Phillips, M. M.; Hsiao, E. Y.; Boldt, Luis; Campillay, Abdo; Castelln, Sergio; Morrell, Nidia; Salgado, Francisco [Carnegie Institution of Washington, Las Campanas Observatory, Colina El Pino, Casilla 601 (Chile); Folatelli, Gaston [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe, Todai Institutes for Advanced Study, the University of Tokyo, 277-8583 Kashiwa (Japan); Suntzeff, Nicholas B. [George P. and Cynthia Woods Mitchell Institute for Fundamental Physics and Astronomy, Texas A and M University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, College Station, TX 77843 (United States)

    2014-07-01

    We present an updated analysis of the intrinsic colors of Type Ia supernova (SNe Ia) using the latest data release of the Carnegie Supernova Project. We introduce a new light-curve parameter very similar to stretch that is better suited for fast-declining events, and find that these peculiar types can be seen as extensions to the population of 'normal' SNe Ia. With a larger number of objects, an updated fit to the Lira relation is presented along with evidence for a dependence on the late-time slope of the B V light-curves with stretch and color. Using the full wavelength range from u to H band, we place constraints on the reddening law for the sample as a whole and also for individual events/hosts based solely on the observed colors. The photometric data continue to favor low values of R{sub V} , though with large variations from event to event, indicating an intrinsic distribution. We confirm the findings of other groups that there appears to be a correlation between the derived reddening law, R{sub V} , and the color excess, E(B V), such that larger E(B V) tends to favor lower R{sub V} . The intrinsic u-band colors show a relatively large scatter that cannot be explained by variations in R{sub V} or by the Goobar power-law for circumstellar dust, but rather is correlated with spectroscopic features of the supernova and is therefore likely due to metallicity effects.

  10. THE HYBRID CONe WD + He STAR SCENARIO FOR THE PROGENITORS OF TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, B.; Meng, X.; Liu, D.-D.; Han, Z.; Liu, Z.-W.

    2014-10-20

    Hybrid CONe white dwarfs (WDs) have been suggested to be possible progenitors of type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). In this Letter, we systematically studied the hybrid CONe WD + He star scenario for the progenitors of SNe Ia, in which a hybrid CONe WD increases its mass to the Chandrasekhar mass limit by accreting He-rich material from a non-degenerate He star. We obtained the SN Ia birthrates and delay times for this scenario using to a series of detailed binary population synthesis simulations. The SN Ia birthrates for this scenario are ∼0.033-0.539 × 10{sup –3} yr{sup –1}, which roughly accounts for 1%-18% of all SNe Ia. The estimated delay times are ∼28 Myr-178 Myr, which makes these the youngest SNe Ia predicted by any progenitor model so far. We suggest that SNe Ia from this scenario may provide an alternative explanation for type Iax SNe. We also presented some properties of the donors at the point when the WDs reach the Chandrasekhar mass. These properties may be a good starting point for investigating the surviving companions of SNe Ia and for constraining the progenitor scenario studied in this work.

  11. Improved Dark Energy Constraints From ~ 100 New CfA Supernova Type Ia Light

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Curves (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Improved Dark Energy Constraints From ~ 100 New CfA Supernova Type Ia Light Curves Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Improved Dark Energy Constraints From ~ 100 New CfA Supernova Type Ia Light Curves We combine the CfA3 supernovae Type Ia (SN Ia) sample with samples from the literature to calculate improved constraints on the dark energy equation of state parameter, w. The CfA3 sample is added to the Union set of Kowalski et al. to form the

  12. Grouping normal type Ia supernovae by UV to optical color differences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milne, Peter A.; Brown, Peter J.; Roming, Peter W. A.; Bufano, Filomena; Gehrels, Neil

    2013-12-10

    Observations of many Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) for multiple epochs per object with the Swift Ultraviolet Optical Telescope instrument have revealed that there exists order to the differences in the UV-optical colors of optically normal supernovae (SNe). We examine UV-optical color curves for 23 SNe Ia, dividing the SNe into four groups, and find that roughly one-third of 'NUV-blue' SNe Ia have bluer UV-optical colors than the larger 'NUV-red' group. Two minor groups are recognized, 'MUV-blue' and 'irregular' SNe Ia. While we conclude that the latter group is a subset of the NUV-red group, containing the SNe with the broadest optical peaks, we conclude that the 'MUV-blue' group is a distinct group. Separating into the groups and accounting for the time evolution of the UV-optical colors lowers the scatter in two NUV-optical colors (e.g., u v and uvw1 v) to the level of the scatter in b v. This finding is promising for extending the cosmological utilization of SNe Ia into the NUV. We generate spectrophotometry of 33 SNe Ia and determine the correct grouping for each. We argue that there is a fundamental spectral difference in the 2900-3500 wavelength range, a region suggested to be dominated by absorption from iron-peak elements. The NUV-blue SNe Ia feature less absorption than the NUV-red SNe Ia. We show that all NUV-blue SNe Ia in this sample also show evidence of unburned carbon in optical spectra, whereas only one NUV-red SN Ia features that absorption line. Every NUV-blue event also exhibits a low gradient of the Si II ?6355 absorption feature. Many NUV-red events also exhibit a low gradient, perhaps suggestive that NUV-blue events are a subset of the larger low-velocity gradient group.

  13. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Naval Ordnance Plant - MI...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP - Referred to DoD for action Designated ... MI.0-03-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - No Authority - Referred to DoD MI.0-03-1 ...

  14. miR-132 and miR-212 are increased in pancreatic cancer and target the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Jong-Kook; Henry, Jon C.; Jiang, Jinmai; Esau, Christine; Gusev, Yuriy; Lerner, Megan R.; Postier, Russell G.; Brackett, Daniel J.; Schmittgen, Thomas D.

    2011-03-25

    Research highlights: {yields} The expression of miR-132 and miR-212 are significantly increased in pancreatic cancer. {yields} miR-132 and miR-212 target the tumor suppressor pRb, resulting in enhanced proliferation. {yields} miR-132 and miR-212 expression is increased by a {beta}2 adrenergic receptor agonist, suggesting a novel mechanism for pancreatic cancer progression. -- Abstract: Numerous microRNAs (miRNAs) are reported as differentially expressed in cancer, however the consequence of miRNA deregulation in cancer is unknown for many miRNAs. We report that two miRNAs located on chromosome 17p13, miR-132 and miR-212, are over-expressed in pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC) tissues. Both miRNAs are predicted to target the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor, Rb1. Validation of this interaction was confirmed by luciferase reporter assay and western blot in a pancreatic cancer cell line transfected with pre-miR-212 and pre-miR-132 oligos. Cell proliferation was enhanced in Panc-1 cells transfected with pre-miR-132/-212 oligos. Conversely, antisense oligos to miR-132/-212 reduced cell proliferation and caused a G{sub 2}/M cell cycle arrest. The mRNA of a number of E2F transcriptional targets were increased in cells over expressing miR-132/-212. Exposing Panc-1 cells to the {beta}2 adrenergic receptor agonist, terbutaline, increased the miR-132 and miR-212 expression by 2- to 4-fold. We report that over-expression of miR-132 and miR-212 result in reduced pRb protein in pancreatic cancer cells and that the increase in cell proliferation from over-expression of these miRNAs is likely due to increased expression of several E2F target genes. The {beta}2 adrenergic pathway may play an important role in this novel mechanism.

  15. THE BIRTH RATE OF SNe Ia FROM HYBRID CONe WHITE DWARFS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meng, Xiangcun [Yunnan Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650011 (China); Podsiadlowski, Philipp, E-mail: xiangcunmeng@ynao.ac.cn [Department of Astronomy, Oxford University, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom)

    2014-07-10

    Considering the uncertainties of the C-burning rate (CBR) and the treatment of convective boundaries, Chen et al. found that there is a regime where it is possible to form hybrid CONe white dwarfs (WDs), i.e., ONe WDs with carbon-rich cores. As these hybrid WDs can be as massive as 1.30 M {sub ?}, not much mass needs to be accreted for these objects to reach the Chandrasekhar limit and to explode as Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). We have investigated their contribution to the overall SN Ia birth rate and found that such SNe Ia tend to be relatively young with typical time delays between 0.1 and 1 Gyr, where some may be as young as 30 Myr. SNe Ia from hybrid CONe WDs may contribute several percent to all SNe Ia, depending on the common-envelope ejection efficiency and the CBR. We suggest that these SNe Ia may produce part of the 2002cx-like SN Ia class.

  16. Type Ia supernova rate studies from the SDSS-II Supernova Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dilday, Benjamin

    2008-08-01

    The author presents new measurements of the type Ia SN rate from the SDSS-II Supernova Survey. The SDSS-II Supernova Survey was carried out during the Fall months (Sept.-Nov.) of 2005-2007 and discovered ~ 500 spectroscopically confirmed SNe Ia with densely sampled (once every ~ 4 days), multi-color light curves. Additionally, the SDSS-II Supernova Survey has discovered several hundred SNe Ia candidates with well-measured light curves, but without spectroscopic confirmation of type. This total, achieved in 9 months of observing, represents ~ 15-20% of the total SNe Ia discovered worldwide since 1885. The author describes some technical details of the SN Survey observations and SN search algorithms that contributed to the extremely high-yield of discovered SNe and that are important as context for the SDSS-II Supernova Survey SN Ia rate measurements.

  17. “Nodal Gap” induced by the incommensurate diagonal spin density modulation in underdoped high- <mi>Tmi>c> superconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Tao; Gao, Yi; Zhu, Jian -Xin

    2015-03-07

    Recently it was revealed that the whole Fermi surface is fully gapped for several families of underdoped cuprates. The existence of the finite energy gap along the <mi>d>-wave nodal lines (nodal gap) contrasts the common understanding of the <mi>d>-wave pairing symmetry, which challenges the present theories for the high-<mi>Tmi><mi>c>superconductors. Here we propose that the incommensurate diagonal spin-density-wave order can account for the above experimental observation. The Fermi surface and the local density of states are also studied. Our results are in good agreement with many important experiments in high-<mi>Tmi><mi>c>superconductors.

  18. General Atomics (GA) | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    General Atomics (GA) Subscribe to RSS - General Atomics (GA) General Atomics Image: General Atomics (GA) The Scorpion's Strategy: "Catch and Subdue" Read more about The Scorpion's...

  19. Characterization of function and regulation of miR-24-1 and miR-31

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun Fenyong; Wang Jiayi; Pan Qiuhui; Yu Yongchun; Zhang Yue; Wan Yang; Wang Ju; Li Xiaoyan; Hong An

    2009-03-13

    To date, numerous microRNAs (miRNAs) have been discovered. However, the function of these miRNAs is largely unknown. While our knowledge of miRNA post-transcriptional processing has greatly expanded in recent years, we have a limited understanding of the regulation and transcription of miRNA genes. In this study, we characterized two BMP-2 upregulated miRNAs, miR-24-1 and miR-31, in mesenchymal stem cells and showed their opposing function in controlling cellular proliferation, and adipogenesis. Furthermore, we are the first to identify and characterize mouse intronic miR-23b{approx}27b{approx}24-1 and intergenic miR-31 genes. Moreover, we found that pri-miR-23b, pri-miR-27b, and pri-miR-24-1 are transcribed independently and their expression profiles are unique when cells are treated with BMP-2, even though they are located closely together.

  20. On silicon group elements ejected by supernovae type IA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De, Soma; Timmes, F. X. [School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ (United States); Brown, Edward F. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics, University of Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Calder, Alan C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY (United States); Townsley, Dean M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States); Athanassiadou, Themis [Swiss National Supercomputing Centre, Via Trevano 131, 6900 Lugano (Switzerland); Chamulak, David A. [Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (United States); Hawley, Wendy [Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille, Marseille cedex 13 F-13388 (France); Jack, Dennis, E-mail: somad@asu.edu [Departamento de Astronoma, Universidad de Guanajuato, Apartado Postal 144, 36000 Guanajuato (Mexico)

    2014-06-01

    There is evidence that the peak brightness of a Type Ia supernova is affected by the electron fraction Y {sub e} at the time of the explosion. The electron fraction is set by the aboriginal composition of the white dwarf and the reactions that occur during the pre-explosive convective burning. To date, determining the makeup of the white dwarf progenitor has relied on indirect proxies, such as the average metallicity of the host stellar population. In this paper, we present analytical calculations supporting the idea that the electron fraction of the progenitor systematically influences the nucleosynthesis of silicon group ejecta in Type Ia supernovae. In particular, we suggest the abundances generated in quasi-nuclear statistical equilibrium are preserved during the subsequent freeze-out. This allows potential recovery of Y {sub e} at explosion from the abundances recovered from an observed spectra. We show that measurement of {sup 28}Si, {sup 32}S, {sup 40}Ca, and {sup 54}Fe abundances can be used to construct Y {sub e} in the silicon-rich regions of the supernovae. If these four abundances are determined exactly, they are sufficient to recover Y {sub e} to 6%. This is because these isotopes dominate the composition of silicon-rich material and iron-rich material in quasi-nuclear statistical equilibrium. Analytical analysis shows the {sup 28}Si abundance is insensitive to Y {sub e}, the {sup 32}S abundance has a nearly linear trend with Y {sub e}, and the {sup 40}Ca abundance has a nearly quadratic trend with Y {sub e}. We verify these trends with post-processing of one-dimensional models and show that these trends are reflected in the model's synthetic spectra.

  1. CfA3: 185 TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA LIGHT CURVES FROM THE CfA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hicken, Malcolm; Challis, Peter; Kirshner, Robert P.; Bakos, Gaspar; Berlind, Perry; Brown, Warren R.; Caldwell, Nelson; Calkins, Mike; Cho, Richard; Contreras, Maria; Jha, Saurabh; Matheson, Tom; Modjaz, Maryam; Rest, Armin; Michael Wood-Vasey, W.; Barton, Elizabeth J.; Bragg, Ann; Briceno, Cesar; Ciupik, Larry; Dendy, Kristi-Concannon E-mail: kirshner@cfa.harvard.edu

    2009-07-20

    We present multiband photometry of 185 type-Ia supernovae (SNe Ia), with over 11,500 observations. These were acquired between 2001 and 2008 at the F. L. Whipple Observatory of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA). This sample contains the largest number of homogeneously observed and reduced nearby SNe Ia (z {approx}< 0.08) published to date. It more than doubles the nearby sample, bringing SN Ia cosmology to the point where systematic uncertainties dominate. Our natural system photometry has a precision of {approx}<0.02 mag in BVRIr'i' and {approx}<0.04 mag in U for points brighter than 17.5 mag. We also estimate a systematic uncertainty of 0.03 mag in our SN Ia standard system BVRIr'i' photometry and 0.07 mag for U. Comparisons of our standard system photometry with published SN Ia light curves and comparison stars, where available for the same SN, reveal agreement at the level of a few hundredths mag in most cases. We find that 1991bg-like SNe Ia are sufficiently distinct from other SNe Ia in their color and light-curve-shape/luminosity relation that they should be treated separately in light-curve/distance fitter training samples. The CfA3 sample will contribute to the development of better light-curve/distance fitters, particularly in the few dozen cases where near-infrared photometry has been obtained and, together, can help disentangle host-galaxy reddening from intrinsic supernova color, reducing the systematic uncertainty in SN Ia distances due to dust.

  2. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Dow Chemical Co - Midland - MI 06

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Midland - MI 06 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Dow Chemical Co. - Midland (MI.06 ) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Midland , Michigan MI.06-1 Evaluation Year: Circa 1987 MI.06-2 Site Operations: Conducted development work for production of magnesium-thorium alloys. MI.06-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - AEC licensed site MI.06-1 MI.06-2 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled:

  3. Type Ia supernovae yielding distances with 3-4% precision (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    A paper copy of this document is also available for sale to the public from the National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA at www.ntis.gov. The luminosities of Type Ia ...

  4. File:USDA-CE-Production-GIFmaps-IA.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    IA.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Iowa Ethanol Plant Locations Size of this preview: 776 600 pixels. Full resolution (1,650 1,275 pixels,...

  5. Low Mach Number Modeling of Type Ia Supernovae

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Almgren, Ann S.; Bell, John B.; Rendleman, Charles A.; Zingale,Michael

    2005-08-05

    We introduce a low Mach number equation set for the large-scale numerical simulation of carbon-oxygen white dwarfs experiencing a thermonuclear deflagration. Since most of the interesting physics in a Type Ia supernova transpires at Mach numbers from 0.01 to 0.1, such an approach enables both a considerable increase in accuracy and savings in computer time compared with frequently used compressible codes. Our equation set is derived from the fully compressible equations using low Mach number asymptotics, but without any restriction on the size of perturbations in density or temperature. Comparisons with simulations that use the fully compressible equations validate the low Mach number model in regimes where both are applicable. Comparisons to simulations based on the more traditional an elastic approximation also demonstrate the agreement of these models in the regime for which the anelastic approximation is valid. For low Mach number flows with potentially finite amplitude variations in density and temperature, the low Mach number model overcomes the limitations of each of the more traditional models and can serve as the basis for an accurate and efficient simulation tool.

  6. Cosmological parameter uncertainties from SALT-II type Ia supernova light curve models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mosher, J.; Sako, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, 209 South 33rd Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Guy, J.; Astier, P.; Betoule, M.; El-Hage, P.; Pain, R.; Regnault, N. [LPNHE, CNRS/IN2P3, Universit Pierre et Marie Curie Paris 6, Universi Denis Diderot Paris 7, 4 place Jussieu, F-75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Kessler, R.; Frieman, J. A. [Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics, University of Chicago, 5640 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Marriner, J. [Center for Particle Astrophysics, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, P.O. Box 500, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Biswas, R.; Kuhlmann, S. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Lemont, IL 60439 (United States); Schneider, D. P., E-mail: kessler@kicp.chicago.edu [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2014-09-20

    We use simulated type Ia supernova (SN Ia) samples, including both photometry and spectra, to perform the first direct validation of cosmology analysis using the SALT-II light curve model. This validation includes residuals from the light curve training process, systematic biases in SN Ia distance measurements, and a bias on the dark energy equation of state parameter w. Using the SN-analysis package SNANA, we simulate and analyze realistic samples corresponding to the data samples used in the SNLS3 analysis: ?120 low-redshift (z < 0.1) SNe Ia, ?255 Sloan Digital Sky Survey SNe Ia (z < 0.4), and ?290 SNLS SNe Ia (z ? 1). To probe systematic uncertainties in detail, we vary the input spectral model, the model of intrinsic scatter, and the smoothing (i.e., regularization) parameters used during the SALT-II model training. Using realistic intrinsic scatter models results in a slight bias in the ultraviolet portion of the trained SALT-II model, and w biases (w {sub input} w {sub recovered}) ranging from 0.005 0.012 to 0.024 0.010. These biases are indistinguishable from each other within the uncertainty; the average bias on w is 0.014 0.007.

  7. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- General Motors Co - Flint - MI 07

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Motors Co - Flint - MI 07 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: GENERAL MOTORS CO. (MI.07 ) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: A.C. Spark Plug Dort Highway Plant MI.07-1 MI.07-2 Location: Flint , Michigan MI.07-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 MI.07-3 Site Operations: Processed thorium oxide, uranium oxide, and beryllium oxide into crucibles for the Chicago Area. MI.07-3 MI.07-4 MI.07-5 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination

  8. MINOS Experiment and NuMI Beam Home Page

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages

    NuMI-MINOS Neutrino Logo NuMI Beamline and MINOS Experiment Neutrino Logo The MINOS Experiment and NuMI Beamline Fermilab Logo MINOS Experiment Links ◊ MINOS for the Public ◊ Scientific Results ◊ MINOS at Work ◊ NuMI at Work ◊ MINOS+ Experiment Fermilab Neutrino Links ◊ Neutrino FAQ ◊ MINOS Underground Areas at Fermilab ◊ PPD Intensity Frontier Dept Back to - - - ◊ Fermilab at Work ◊ Fermilab Home the MINOS Far Detector in the Soudan Mine MINOS collaborators assembling the

  9. Magnetocrystalline anisotropy in <mi>UMn>2<mi>Ge>2 and related Mn-based actinide ferromagnets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parker, David S.; Ghimire, Nirmal; Singleton, John; Thompson, J. D.; Bauer, Eric D.; Baumbach, Ryan; Mandrus, David; Li, Ling; Singh, David J.

    2015-05-04

    We present magnetization isotherms in pulsed magnetic fields up to 62 Tesla, supported by first principles calculations, demonstrating a huge uniaxial magnetocrystalline anisotropy energy - approximately 20 MJ/m3 - in <mi>UMn>2<mi>Ge>2. This large anisotropy results from the extremely strong spin-orbit coupling affecting the uranium 5 f electrons, which in the calculations exhibit a substantial orbital moment exceeding 2 μB. Finally, we also find from theoretical calculations that a number of isostructural Mn-actinide compounds are expected to have similarly large anisotropy.

  10. ,"Detroit, MI Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (MMcf...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Detroit, MI Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release...

  11. Investigation of the GaN-on-GaAs interface for vertical power device applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mreke, Janina Uren, Michael J.; Kuball, Martin; Novikov, Sergei V.; Foxon, C. Thomas; Hosseini Vajargah, Shahrzad; Wallis, David J.; Humphreys, Colin J.; Haigh, Sarah J.; Al-Khalidi, Abdullah; Wasige, Edward; Thayne, Iain

    2014-07-07

    GaN layers were grown onto (111) GaAs by molecular beam epitaxy. Minimal band offset between the conduction bands for GaN and GaAs materials has been suggested in the literature raising the possibility of using GaN-on-GaAs for vertical power device applications. I-V and C-V measurements of the GaN/GaAs heterostructures however yielded a rectifying junction, even when both sides of the junction were heavily doped with an n-type dopant. Transmission electron microscopy analysis further confirmed the challenge in creating a GaN/GaAs Ohmic interface by showing a large density of dislocations in the GaN layer and suggesting roughening of the GaN/GaAs interface due to etching of the GaAs by the nitrogen plasma, diffusion of nitrogen or melting of Ga into the GaAs substrate.

  12. Role for DNA methylation in the regulation of miR-200c and miR-141 expression in normal and cancer cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vrba, Lukas; Jensen, Taylor J.; Garbe, James C.; Heimark, Ronald L.; Cress, Anne E.; Dickinson, Sally; Stampfer, Martha R.; Futscher, Bernard W.

    2009-12-23

    BACKGROUND: The microRNA-200 family participates in the maintenance of an epithelial phenotype and loss of its expression can result in epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT). Furthermore, the loss of expression of miR-200 family members is linked to an aggressive cancer phenotype. Regulation of the miR-200 family expression in normal and cancer cells is not fully understood. METHODOLOGY/ PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Epigenetic mechanisms participate in the control of miR-200c and miR-141 expression in both normal and cancer cells. A CpG island near the predicted mir-200c/mir-141 transcription start site shows a striking correlation between miR-200c and miR-141 expression and DNA methylation in both normal and cancer cells, as determined by MassARRAY technology. The CpG island is unmethylated in human miR-200/miR-141 expressing epithelial cells and in miR-200c/miR-141 positive tumor cells. The CpG island is heavily methylated in human miR-200c/miR-141 negative fibroblasts and miR-200c/miR-141 negative tumor cells. Mouse cells show a similar inverse correlation between DNA methylation and miR-200c expression. Enrichment of permissive histone modifications, H3 acetylation and H3K4 trimethylation, is seen in normal miR-200c/miR-141-positive epithelial cells, as determined by chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled to real-time PCR. In contrast, repressive H3K9 dimethylation marks are present in normal miR-200c/miR-141-negative fibroblasts and miR-200c/miR-141 negative cancer cells and the permissive histone modifications are absent. The epigenetic modifier drug, 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine, reactivates miR-200c/miR-141 expression showing that epigenetic mechanisms play a functional role in their transcriptional control. CONCLUSIONS/ SIGNIFICANCE: We report that DNA methylation plays a role in the normal cell type-specific expression of miR-200c and miR-141 and this role appears evolutionarily conserved, since similar results were obtained in mouse. Aberrant DNA methylation of the

  13. GA SNC Solar | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GA-SNC Solar Place: Nevada Sector: Solar Product: Nevada-based PV project developer and joint venture of GA-Solar North America and Sierra Nevada Corp. References: GA-SNC...

  14. Type Ia supernovae from merging white dwarfs. II. Post-merger detonations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raskin, Cody; Kasen, Daniel; Moll, Rainer; Woosley, Stan; Schwab, Josiah

    2014-06-10

    Merging carbon-oxygen (CO) white dwarfs are a promising progenitor system for Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia), but the underlying physics and timing of the detonation are still debated. If an explosion occurs after the secondary star is fully disrupted, the exploding primary will expand into a dense CO medium that may still have a disk-like structure. This interaction will decelerate and distort the ejecta. Here we carry out multidimensional simulations of 'tamped' SN Ia models, using both particle and grid-based codes to study the merger and explosion dynamics and a radiative transfer code to calculate synthetic spectra and light curves. We find that post-merger explosions exhibit an hourglass-shaped asymmetry, leading to strong variations in the light curves with viewing angle. The two most important factors affecting the outcome are the scale height of the disk, which depends sensitively on the binary mass ratio, and the total {sup 56}Ni yield, which is governed by the central density of the remnant core. The synthetic broadband light curves rise and decline very slowly, and the spectra generally look peculiar, with weak features from intermediate mass elements but relatively strong carbon absorption. We also consider the effects of the viscous evolution of the remnant and show that a longer time delay between merger and explosion probably leads to larger {sup 56}Ni yields and more symmetrical remnants. We discuss the relevance of this class of aspherical 'tamped' SN Ia for explaining the class of 'super-Chandrasekhar' SN Ia.

  15. Ultraviolet observations of Super-Chandrasekhar mass type Ia supernova candidates with swift UVOT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Peter J.; Smitka, Michael T.; Krisciunas, Kevin; Wang, Lifan; Kuin, Paul; De Pasquale, Massimiliano; Scalzo, Richard; Holland, Stephen; Milne, Peter

    2014-05-20

    Among Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia), a class of overluminous objects exist whose ejecta mass is inferred to be larger than the canonical Chandrasekhar mass. We present and discuss the UV/optical photometric light curves, colors, absolute magnitudes, and spectra of three candidate Super-Chandrasekhar mass SNe—2009dc, 2011aa, and 2012dn—observed with the Swift Ultraviolet/Optical Telescope. The light curves are at the broad end for SNe Ia, with the light curves of SN 2011aa being among the broadest ever observed. We find all three to have very blue colors which may provide a means of excluding these overluminous SNe from cosmological analysis, though there is some overlap with the bluest of 'normal' SNe Ia. All three are overluminous in their UV absolute magnitudes compared to normal and broad SNe Ia, but SNe 2011aa and 2012dn are not optically overluminous compared to normal SNe Ia. The integrated luminosity curves of SNe 2011aa and 2012dn in the UVOT range (1600-6000 Å) are only half as bright as SN 2009dc, implying a smaller {sup 56}Ni yield. While it is not enough to strongly affect the bolometric flux, the early time mid-UV flux makes a significant contribution at early times. The strong spectral features in the mid-UV spectra of SNe 2009dc and 2012dn suggest a higher temperature and lower opacity to be the cause of the UV excess rather than a hot, smooth blackbody from shock interaction. Further work is needed to determine the ejecta and {sup 56}Ni masses of SNe 2011aa and 2012dn and to fully explain their high UV luminosities.

  16. miR-92a family and their target genes in tumorigenesis and metastasis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Molin; Guan, Xingfang; Sun, Yuqiang; Mi, Jun; Shu, Xiaohong; Liu, Fang; Li, Chuangang

    2014-04-15

    The miR-92a family, including miR-25, miR-92a-1, miR-92a-2 and miR-363, arises from three different paralog clusters miR-17-92, miR-106a-363, and miR-106b-25 that are highly conservative in the process of evolution, and it was thought as a group of microRNAs (miRNAs) correlated with endothelial cells. Aberrant expression of miR-92a family was detected in multiple cancers, and the disturbance of miR-92a family was related with tumorigenesis and tumor development. In this review, the progress on the relationship between miR-92a family and their target genes and malignant tumors will be summarized. - Highlights: Aberrant expression of miR-92a, miR-25 and miR-363 can be observed in many kinds of malignant tumors. The expression of miR-92a family is regulated by LOH, epigenetic alteration, transcriptional factors such as SP1, MYC, E2F, wild-type p53 etc. Roles of miR-92a family in tumorigenesis and development: promoting cell proliferation, invasion and metastasis, inhibiting cell apoptosis.

  17. GaInNAs laser gain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CHOW,WENG W.; JONES,ERIC D.; MODINE,NORMAND A.; KURTZ,STEVEN R.; ALLERMAN,ANDREW A.

    2000-05-23

    The optical gain spectra for GaInNAs/GaAs quantum wells are computed using a microscopic laser theory. From these spectra, the peak gain and carrier radiative decay rate as functions of carrier density are determined. These dependences allow the study of the lasing threshold current density of GaInNAs/GaAs quantum well structures.

  18. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Baker-Perkins Co - MI 13

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Baker-Perkins Co - MI 13 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Baker-Perkins Co (MI 13) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Saginaw , Michigan MI.13-1 Evaluation Year: 1991 MI.13-1 MI.13-2 Site Operations: Small scale oxide mixing demonstrations and testing in May, 1956. MI.13-2 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination remote based on limited scope of activities at the site MI.13-3 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes

  19. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Revere Copper and Brass Co - MI 04

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Revere Copper and Brass Co - MI 04 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: REVERE COPPER AND BRASS CO. ( MI.04 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: Revere Copper and Brass MI.04-1 Location: 5851 West Jefferson Street , Detroit , Michigan MI.04-1 Evaluation Year: 1990 MI.04-2 Site Operations: Extrusion of tuballoy rods, myrnalloy rods and beryllium shapes in the 1940s. MI.04-3 MI.04-4 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Radiation levels below criteria

  20. Strong near-infrared carbon in the Type Ia supernova iPTF13ebh

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hsiao, E. Y.; Burns, C. R.; Contreras, C.; Höflich, P.; Sand, D.; Marion, G. H.; Phillips, M. M.; Stritzinger, M.; González-Gaitán, S.; Mason, R. E.; Folatelli, G.; Parent, E.; Gall, C.; Amanullah, R.; Anupama, G. C.; Arcavi, I.; Banerjee, D. P. K.; Beletsky, Y.; Blanc, G. A.; Bloom, J. S.; Brown, P. J.; Campillay, A.; Cao, Y.; De Cia, A.; Diamond, T.; Freedman, W. L.; Gonzalez, C.; Goobar, A.; Holmbo, S.; Howell, D. A.; Johansson, J.; Kasliwal, M. M.; Kirshner, R. P.; Krisciunas, K.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Maguire, K.; Milne, P. A.; Morrell, N.; Nugent, P. E.; Ofek, E. O.; Osip, D.; Palunas, P.; Perley, D. A.; Persson, S. E.; Piro, A. L.; Rabus, M.; Roth, M.; Schiefelbein, J. M.; Srivastav, S.; Sullivan, M.; Suntzeff, N. B.; Surace, J.; Woźniak, P. R.; Yaron, O.

    2015-05-22

    We present near-infrared (NIR) time-series spectroscopy, as well as complementary ultraviolet (UV), optical, and NIR data, of the Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) iPTF13ebh, which was discovered within two days from the estimated time of explosion. The first NIR spectrum was taken merely 2.3 days after explosion and may be the earliest NIR spectrum yet obtained of a SN Ia. The most striking features in the spectrum are several NIR C I lines, and the C Iλ1.0693 μm line is the strongest ever observed in a SN Ia. Interestingly, no strong optical C II counterparts were found, even though the optical spectroscopic time series began early and is densely cadenced. Except at the very early epochs, within a few days from the time of explosion, we show that the strong NIR C I compared to the weaker optical C II appears to be general in SNe Ia. iPTF13ebh is a fast decliner with Δm15(B) = 1.79 ± 0.01, and its absolute magnitude obeys the linear part of the width-luminosity relation. It is therefore categorized as a “transitional” event, on the fast-declining end of normal SNe Ia as opposed to subluminous/91bg-like objects. iPTF13ebh shows NIR spectroscopic properties that are distinct from both the normal and subluminous/91bg-like classes, bridging the observed characteristics of the two classes. These NIR observations suggest that composition and density of the inner core are similar to that of 91bg-like events, and that it has a deep-reaching carbon burning layer that is not observed in more slowly declining SNe Ia. Furthermore, there is also a substantial difference between the explosion times inferred from the early-time light curve and the velocity evolution of the Si II λ0.6355 μm line, implying a long dark phase of ~4 days.

  1. Strong near-infrared carbon in the Type Ia supernova iPTF13ebh

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hsiao, E. Y.; Burns, C. R.; Contreras, C.; Höflich, P.; Sand, D.; Marion, G. H.; Phillips, M. M.; Stritzinger, M.; González-Gaitán, S.; Mason, R. E.; et al

    2015-05-22

    We present near-infrared (NIR) time-series spectroscopy, as well as complementary ultraviolet (UV), optical, and NIR data, of the Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) iPTF13ebh, which was discovered within two days from the estimated time of explosion. The first NIR spectrum was taken merely 2.3 days after explosion and may be the earliest NIR spectrum yet obtained of a SN Ia. The most striking features in the spectrum are several NIR C I lines, and the C Iλ1.0693 μm line is the strongest ever observed in a SN Ia. Interestingly, no strong optical C II counterparts were found, even though themore » optical spectroscopic time series began early and is densely cadenced. Except at the very early epochs, within a few days from the time of explosion, we show that the strong NIR C I compared to the weaker optical C II appears to be general in SNe Ia. iPTF13ebh is a fast decliner with Δm15(B) = 1.79 ± 0.01, and its absolute magnitude obeys the linear part of the width-luminosity relation. It is therefore categorized as a “transitional” event, on the fast-declining end of normal SNe Ia as opposed to subluminous/91bg-like objects. iPTF13ebh shows NIR spectroscopic properties that are distinct from both the normal and subluminous/91bg-like classes, bridging the observed characteristics of the two classes. These NIR observations suggest that composition and density of the inner core are similar to that of 91bg-like events, and that it has a deep-reaching carbon burning layer that is not observed in more slowly declining SNe Ia. Furthermore, there is also a substantial difference between the explosion times inferred from the early-time light curve and the velocity evolution of the Si II λ0.6355 μm line, implying a long dark phase of ~4 days.« less

  2. Strong near-infrared carbon in the Type Ia supernova iPTF13ebh

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hsiao, E. Y.; Burns, C. R.; Contreras, C.; Hflich, P.; Sand, D.; Marion, G. H.; Phillips, M. M.; Stritzinger, M.; Gonzlez-Gaitn, S.; Mason, R. E.; Folatelli, G.; Parent, E.; Gall, C.; Amanullah, R.; Anupama, G. C.; Arcavi, I.; Banerjee, D. P. K.; Beletsky, Y.; Blanc, G. A.; Bloom, J. S.; Brown, P. J.; Campillay, A.; Cao, Y.; De Cia, A.; Diamond, T.; Freedman, W. L.; Gonzalez, C.; Goobar, A.; Holmbo, S.; Howell, D. A.; Johansson, J.; Kasliwal, M. M.; Kirshner, R. P.; Krisciunas, K.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Maguire, K.; Milne, P. A.; Morrell, N.; Nugent, P. E.; Ofek, E. O.; Osip, D.; Palunas, P.; Perley, D. A.; Persson, S. E.; Piro, A. L.; Rabus, M.; Roth, M.; Schiefelbein, J. M.; Srivastav, S.; Sullivan, M.; Suntzeff, N. B.; Surace, J.; Wo?niak, P. R.; Yaron, O.

    2015-05-22

    We present near-infrared (NIR) time-series spectroscopy, as well as complementary ultraviolet (UV), optical, and NIR data, of the Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) iPTF13ebh, which was discovered within two days from the estimated time of explosion. The first NIR spectrum was taken merely 2.3 days after explosion and may be the earliest NIR spectrum yet obtained of a SN Ia. The most striking features in the spectrum are several NIR C I lines, and the C I?1.0693 ?m line is the strongest ever observed in a SN Ia. Interestingly, no strong optical C II counterparts were found, even though the optical spectroscopic time series began early and is densely cadenced. Except at the very early epochs, within a few days from the time of explosion, we show that the strong NIR C I compared to the weaker optical C II appears to be general in SNe Ia. iPTF13ebh is a fast decliner with ?m15(B) = 1.79 0.01, and its absolute magnitude obeys the linear part of the width-luminosity relation. It is therefore categorized as a transitional event, on the fast-declining end of normal SNe Ia as opposed to subluminous/91bg-like objects. iPTF13ebh shows NIR spectroscopic properties that are distinct from both the normal and subluminous/91bg-like classes, bridging the observed characteristics of the two classes. These NIR observations suggest that composition and density of the inner core are similar to that of 91bg-like events, and that it has a deep-reaching carbon burning layer that is not observed in more slowly declining SNe Ia. Furthermore, there is also a substantial difference between the explosion times inferred from the early-time light curve and the velocity evolution of the Si II ?0.6355 ?m line, implying a long dark phase of ~4 days.

  3. TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA COLORS AND EJECTA VELOCITIES: HIERARCHICAL BAYESIAN REGRESSION WITH NON-GAUSSIAN DISTRIBUTIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mandel, Kaisey S.; Kirshner, Robert P. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Foley, Ryan J., E-mail: kmandel@cfa.harvard.edu [Astronomy Department, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1002 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)

    2014-12-20

    We investigate the statistical dependence of the peak intrinsic colors of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) on their expansion velocities at maximum light, measured from the Si II ?6355 spectral feature. We construct a new hierarchical Bayesian regression model, accounting for the random effects of intrinsic scatter, measurement error, and reddening by host galaxy dust, and implement a Gibbs sampler and deviance information criteria to estimate the correlation. The method is applied to the apparent colors from BVRI light curves and Si II velocity data for 79 nearby SNe Ia. The apparent color distributions of high-velocity (HV) and normal velocity (NV) supernovae exhibit significant discrepancies for B V and B R, but not other colors. Hence, they are likely due to intrinsic color differences originating in the B band, rather than dust reddening. The mean intrinsic B V and B R color differences between HV and NV groups are 0.06 0.02 and 0.09 0.02 mag, respectively. A linear model finds significant slopes of 0.021 0.006 and 0.030 0.009 mag (10{sup 3} km s{sup 1}){sup 1} for intrinsic B V and B R colors versus velocity, respectively. Because the ejecta velocity distribution is skewed toward high velocities, these effects imply non-Gaussian intrinsic color distributions with skewness up to +0.3. Accounting for the intrinsic-color-velocity correlation results in corrections to A{sub V} extinction estimates as large as 0.12 mag for HV SNe Ia and +0.06 mag for NV events. Velocity measurements from SN Ia spectra have the potential to diminish systematic errors from the confounding of intrinsic colors and dust reddening affecting supernova distances.

  4. miR-17 inhibitor suppressed osteosarcoma tumor growth and metastasis via increasing PTEN expression

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Yong; Luo, Ling-hui; Li, Shuai; Yang, Cao

    2014-02-07

    Highlights: • miR-17 was increased in OS tissues and cell lines. • Inhibition of miR-17 suppressed OS cell proliferation. • Inhibition of miR-17 suppressed OS cell migration and invasion. • PTEN was a target of miR-17. • miR-17 was negatively correlated with PTEN in OS tissues. - Abstract: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play essential roles in cancer development and progression. Here, we investigated the role of miR-17 in the progression and metastasis of osteosarcoma (OS). miR-17 was frequently increased in OS tissues and cell lines. Inhibition of miR-17 in OS cell lines substantially suppressed cell proliferation, migration, and invasion. Phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) was identified as a target of miR-17, and ectopic expression of miR-17 inhibited PTEN by direct binding to its 3′-untranslated region (3′-UTR). Expression of miR-17 was negatively correlated with PTEN in OS tissues. Together, these findings indicate that miR-17 acts as an oncogenic miRNA and may contribute to the progression and metastasis of OS, suggesting miR-17 as a potential novel diagnostic and therapeutic target of OS.

  5. GaAs, AlGaAs and InGaP Tunnel Junctions for Multi-Junction Solar Cells Under Concentration: Resistance Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wheeldon, Jeffrey F.; Valdivia, Christopher E.; Walker, Alex; Kolhatkar, Gitanja; Hall, Trevor J.; Hinzer, Karin; Masson, Denis; Riel, Bruno; Fafard, Simon; Jaouad, Abdelatif; Turala, Artur; Ares, Richard; Aimez, Vincent

    2010-10-14

    The following four TJ designs, AlGaAs/AlGaAs, GaAs/GaAs, AlGaAs/InGaP and AlGaAs/GaAs are studied to determine minimum doping concentration to achieve a resistance of <10{sup -4} {omega}{center_dot}cm{sup 2} and a peak tunneling current suitable for MJ solar cells up to 1500-suns concentration (operating current of 21 A/cm{sup 2}). Experimentally calibrated numerical models are used to determine how the resistance changes as a function of doping concentration. The AlGaAs/GaAs TJ design is determined to require the least doping concentration to achieve the specified resistance and peak tunneling current, followed by the GaAs/GaAs, and AlGaAs/AlGaAs TJ designs. The AlGaAs/InGaP TJ design can only achieve resistances >5x10{sup -4} {omega}cm{sup 2}.

  6. Type Ia supernova rate measurements to redshift 2.5 from CANDELS: Searching for prompt explosions in the early universe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodney, Steven A.; Riess, Adam G.; Graur, Or; Jones, David O. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Strolger, Louis-Gregory; Dahlen, Tomas; Casertano, Stefano; Ferguson, Henry C.; Koekemoer, Anton M. [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Dickinson, Mark E. [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Garnavich, Peter [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Hayden, Brian [E.O. Lawrence Berkeley National Lab, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Jha, Saurabh W.; McCully, Curtis; Patel, Brandon [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Kirshner, Robert P. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Mobasher, Bahram [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States); Weiner, Benjamin J. [Department of Astronomy, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Cenko, S. Bradley [Astrophysics Science Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Mail Code 661, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Clubb, Kelsey I. [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); and others

    2014-07-01

    The Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey (CANDELS) was a multi-cycle treasury program on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) that surveyed a total area of ?0.25 deg{sup 2} with ?900 HST orbits spread across five fields over three years. Within these survey images we discovered 65 supernovae (SNe) of all types, out to z ? 2.5. We classify ?24 of these as Type Ia SNe (SNe Ia) based on host galaxy redshifts and SN photometry (supplemented by grism spectroscopy of six SNe). Here we present a measurement of the volumetric SN Ia rate as a function of redshift, reaching for the first time beyond z = 2 and putting new constraints on SN Ia progenitor models. Our highest redshift bin includes detections of SNe that exploded when the universe was only ?3 Gyr old and near the peak of the cosmic star formation history. This gives the CANDELS high redshift sample unique leverage for evaluating the fraction of SNe Ia that explode promptly after formation (<500 Myr). Combining the CANDELS rates with all available SN Ia rate measurements in the literature we find that this prompt SN Ia fraction is f{sub P} = 0.53{sub stat0.10}{sup 0.09}{sub sys0.26}{sup 0.10}, consistent with a delay time distribution that follows a simple t {sup 1} power law for all times t > 40 Myr. However, mild tension is apparent between ground-based low-z surveys and space-based high-z surveys. In both CANDELS and the sister HST program CLASH (Cluster Lensing And Supernova Survey with Hubble), we find a low rate of SNe Ia at z > 1. This could be a hint that prompt progenitors are in fact relatively rare, accounting for only 20% of all SN Ia explosionsthough further analysis and larger samples will be needed to examine that suggestion.

  7. MiR-218 Mediates tumorigenesis and metastasis: Perspectives and implications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Ying-fei; Zhang, Li; Waye, Mary Miu Yee; Fu, Wei-ming; Zhang, Jin-fang

    2015-05-15

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small non-coding RNAs that negatively regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. As a highly conserved miRNA across a variety of species, microRNA-218 (miR-218) was found to play pivotal roles in tumorigenesis and progression. A group of evidence has demonstrated that miR-218 acts as a tumor suppressor by targeting many oncogenes related to proliferation, apoptosis and invasion. In this review, we provide a complex overview of miR-218, including its regulatory mechanisms, known functions in cancer and future challenges as a potential therapeutic target in human cancers. - Highlights: • miR-218 is frequently down regulated in multiple cancers. • miR-218 plays pivotal roles in carcinogenesis. • miR-218 mediates proliferation, apoptosis, metastasis, invasion, etc. • miR-218 mediates tumorigenesis and metastasis via multiple pathways.

  8. Temperature coefficients for GaInP/GaAs/GaInNAsSb solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aho, Arto; Isoaho, Riku; Tukiainen, Antti; Polojärvi, Ville; Aho, Timo; Raappana, Marianna; Guina, Mircea

    2015-09-28

    We report the temperature coefficients for MBE-grown GaInP/GaAs/GaInNAsSb multijunction solar cells and the corresponding single junction sub-cells. Temperature-dependent current-voltage measurements were carried out using a solar simulator equipped with a 1000 W Xenon lamp and a three-band AM1.5D simulator. The triple-junction cell exhibited an efficiency of 31% at AM1.5G illumination and an efficiency of 37–39% at 70x real sun concentration. The external quantum efficiency was also measured at different temperatures. The temperature coefficients up to 80°C, for the open circuit voltage, the short circuit current density, and the conversion efficiency were determined to be −7.5 mV/°C, 0.040 mA/cm{sup 2}/°C, and −0.09%/°C, respectively.

  9. Intense terahertz emission from molecular beam epitaxy-grown GaAs/GaSb(001)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sadia, Cyril P.; Laganapan, Aleena Maria; Agatha Tumanguil, Mae; Estacio, Elmer; Somintac, Armando; Salvador, Arnel; Que, Christopher T.; Yamamoto, Kohji; Tani, Masahiko

    2012-12-15

    Intense terahertz (THz) electromagnetic wave emission was observed in undoped GaAs thin films deposited on (100) n-GaSb substrates via molecular beam epitaxy. GaAs/n-GaSb heterostructures were found to be viable THz sources having signal amplitude 75% that of bulk p-InAs. The GaAs films were grown by interruption method during the growth initiation and using various metamorphic buffer layers. Reciprocal space maps revealed that the GaAs epilayers are tensile relaxed. Defects at the i-GaAs/n-GaSb interface were confirmed by scanning electron microscope images. Band calculations were performed to infer the depletion region and electric field at the i-GaAs/n-GaSb and the air-GaAs interfaces. However, the resulting band calculations were found to be insufficient to explain the THz emission. The enhanced THz emission is currently attributed to a piezoelectric field induced by incoherent strain and defects.

  10. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Dow-Detroit Edison Project - MI 0-02

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Dow-Detroit Edison Project - MI 0-02 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Dow-Detroit Edison Project (MI.0-02 ) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Detroit , Michigan MI.0-02-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 MI.0-02-1 Site Operations: Performed reference design work for a special fast breeder type reactor. MI.0-02-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - No radioactive material handled at the site MI.0-02-1 Radioactive Materials Handled: No

  11. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Mitts-Merrill Co - MI 14

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Mitts-Merrill Co - MI 14 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: MITTS and MERRILL CO. (MI.14 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: Genessee Packing Co. MI.14-1 Location: Saginaw, Michigan MI.14-1 Evaluation Year: 1993 MI.14-2 Site Operations: Reduced thorium metal chunks into particle sized pieces on a small test scale during the mid-1950s. MI.14-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination considered remote based on limited quantity

  12. SNe Ia tests of quintessence tracker cosmology in an anisotropic background

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miranda, W.; Carneiro, S.; Pigozzo, C. E-mail: saulo.carneiro@pq.cnpq.br

    2014-07-01

    We investigate the observational effects of a quintessence model in an anisotropic spacetime. The anisotropic metric is a non-rotating particular case of a generalized Gödel's metric and is classified as Bianchi III. This metric is an exact solution of the Einstein-Klein-Gordon field equations with an anisotropic scalar field ψ, which is responsible for the anisotropy of the spacetime geometry. We test the model against observations of type Ia supernovae, analyzing the SDSS dataset calibrated with the MLCS2k2 fitter, and the results are compared to standard quintessence models with Ratra-Peebles potentials. We obtain a good agreement with observations, with best values for the matter and curvature density parameters Ω{sub M} = 0.29 and Ω{sub k}= 0.01 respectively. We conclude that present SNe Ia observations cannot, alone, distinguish a possible anisotropic axis in the cosmos.

  13. Comparing the host galaxies of type Ia, type II, and type Ibc supernovae

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shao, X.; Liang, Y. C.; Chen, X. Y.; Zhong, G. H.; Deng, L. C.; Zhang, B.; Shi, W. B.; Zhou, L.; Dennefeld, M.; Hammer, F.; Flores, H. E-mail: ycliang@bao.ac.cn

    2014-08-10

    We compare the host galaxies of 902 supernovae (SNe), including SNe Ia, SNe II, and SNe Ibc, which are selected by cross-matching the Asiago Supernova Catalog with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7. We selected an additional 213 galaxies by requiring the light fraction of spectral observations to be >15%, which could represent well the global properties of the galaxies. Among these 213 galaxies, 135 appear on the Baldwin-Phillips-Terlevich diagram, which allows us to compare the hosts in terms of whether they are star-forming (SF) galaxies, active galactic nuclei (AGNs; including composites, LINERs, and Seyfert 2s) or absorption-line galaxies (Absorps; i.e., their related emission lines are weak or non-existent). The diagrams related to the parameters D{sub n}(4000), H?{sub A}, stellar masses, star formation rates (SFRs), and specific SFRs for the SNe hosts show that almost all SNe II and most of the SNe Ibc occur in SF galaxies, which have a wide range of stellar masses and low D{sub n}(4000). The SNe Ia hosts as SF galaxies following similar trends. A significant fraction of SNe Ia occurs in AGNs and absorption-line galaxies, which are massive and have high D{sub n}(4000). The stellar population analysis from spectral synthesis fitting shows that the hosts of SNe II have a younger stellar population than hosts of SNe Ia. These results are compared with those of the 689 comparison galaxies where the SDSS fiber captures less than 15% of the total light. These comparison galaxies appear biased toward higher 12+log(O/H) (?0.1 dex) at a given stellar mass. Therefore, we believe the aperture effect should be kept in mind when the properties of the hosts for different types of SNe are discussed.

  14. THE EARLIEST NEAR-INFRARED TIME-SERIES SPECTROSCOPY OF A TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hsiao, E. Y.; Phillips, M. M.; Morrell, N.; Contreras, C.; Roth, M.; Marion, G. H.; Kirshner, R. P.; Burns, C. R.; Freedman, W. L.; Persson, S. E.; Winge, C.; Gerardy, C. L.; Hoeflich, P.; Im, M.; Jeon, Y.; Pignata, G.; Stanishev, V.; and others

    2013-04-01

    We present ten medium-resolution, high signal-to-noise ratio near-infrared (NIR) spectra of SN 2011fe from SpeX on the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) and Gemini Near-Infrared Spectrograph (GNIRS) on Gemini North, obtained as part of the Carnegie Supernova Project. This data set constitutes the earliest time-series NIR spectroscopy of a Type Ia supernova (SN Ia), with the first spectrum obtained at 2.58 days past the explosion and covering -14.6 to +17.3 days relative to B-band maximum. C I {lambda}1.0693 {mu}m is detected in SN 2011fe with increasing strength up to maximum light. The delay in the onset of the NIR C I line demonstrates its potential to be an effective tracer of unprocessed material. For the first time in a SN Ia, the early rapid decline of the Mg II {lambda}1.0927 {mu}m velocity was observed, and the subsequent velocity is remarkably constant. The Mg II velocity during this constant phase locates the inner edge of carbon burning and probes the conditions under which the transition from deflagration to detonation occurs. We show that the Mg II velocity does not correlate with the optical light-curve decline rate {Delta}m{sub 15}(B). The prominent break at {approx}1.5 {mu}m is the main source of concern for NIR k-correction calculations. We demonstrate here that the feature has a uniform time evolution among SNe Ia, with the flux ratio across the break strongly correlated with {Delta}m{sub 15}(B). The predictability of the strength and the onset of this feature suggests that the associated k-correction uncertainties can be minimized with improved spectral templates.

  15. miRNA-205 affects infiltration and metastasis of breast cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Zhouquan; Department of Tumor, SenGong Hospital of Shaanxi, Xian 710300 ; Liao, Hehe; Deng, Zhiping; Yang, Po; Du, Ning; Zhanng, Yunfeng; Ren, Hong

    2013-11-08

    Highlights: We detected expression of miR-205 in breast cancer cell lines and tissue samples. We suggest miR-205 is downregulated in human breast cancer tissues and MCF7 cells. We suggest the lower expression of miR-205 play a role in breast cancer onset. These data suggest that miR-205 directly targets HER3 in human breast cancer. -- Abstract: Background: An increasing number of studies have shown that miRNAs are commonly deregulated in human malignancies, but little is known about the function of miRNA-205 (miR-205) in human breast cancer. The present study investigated the influence of miR-205 on breast cancer malignancy. Methods: The expression level of miR-205 in the MCF7 breast cancer cell line was determined by quantitative (q)RT-PCR. We then analyzed the expression of miR-205 in breast cancer and paired non-tumor tissues. Finally, the roles of miR-205 in regulating tumor proliferation, apoptosis, migration, and target gene expression were studied by MTT assay, flow cytometry, qRT-PCR, Western blotting and luciferase assay. Results: miR-205 was downregulated in breast cancer cells or tissues compared with normal breast cell lines or non-tumor tissues. Overexpression of miR-205 reduced the growth and colony-formation capacity of MCF7 cells by inducing apoptosis. Overexpression of miR-205 inhibited MCF7 cell migration and invasiveness. By bioinformation analysis, miR-205 was predicted to bind to the 3? untranslated regions of human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER)3 mRNA, and upregulation of miR-205 reduced HER3 protein expression. Conclusion: miR-205 is a tumor suppressor in human breast cancer by post-transcriptional inhibition of HER3 expression.

  16. Optical and ultraviolet observations of the narrow-lined type Ia SN 2012fr in NGC 1365

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Ju-Jia; Bai, Jin-Ming; Wang, Bo; Liu, Zheng-Wei [Yunnan Observatories (YNAO), Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650011 (China); Wang, Xiao-Feng; Zhao, Xu-Lin; Chen, Jun-Cheng [Physics Department and Tsinghua Center for Astrophysics (THCA), Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Zhang, Tian-Meng, E-mail: jujia@ynao.ac.cn, E-mail: baijinming@ynao.ac.cn, E-mail: wang_xf@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn [National Astronomical Observatories of China (NAOC), Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China)

    2014-07-01

    Extensive optical and ultraviolet (UV) observations of the type Ia supernova (SN Ia) 2012fr are presented in this paper. It has a relatively high luminosity, with an absolute B-band peak magnitude of about 19.5 mag and a smaller post-maximum decline rate than normal SNe Ia (e.g., ?m {sub 15}(B) =0.85 0.05 mag). Based on the UV and optical light curves, we derived that a {sup 56}Ni mass of about 0.88 M {sub ?} was synthesized in the explosion. The earlier spectra are characterized by noticeable high-velocity features of Si II ?6355 and Ca II with velocities in the range of ?22, 000-25, 000 km s{sup 1}. At around the maximum light, these spectral features are dominated by the photospheric components which are noticeably narrower than normal SNe Ia. The post-maximum velocity of the photosphere remains almost constant at ?12,000 km s{sup 1} for about one month, reminiscent of the behavior of some luminous SNe Ia like SN 1991T. We propose that SN 2012fr may represent a subset of the SN 1991T-like SNe Ia viewed in a direction with a clumpy or shell-like structure of ejecta, in terms of a significant level of polarization reported in Maund et al. in 2013.

  17. NuMI Low Energy Flux Prediction Release

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NuMI Low Energy Flux Prediction Release Neutrino Flux Predictions for the NuMI Beam hep-ex/1607.00704 Data Ancillary data files for this result are available on arXiv at http://arxiv.org/src/1607.00704/anc.< /li> Among the available data files are: pdf file describing format of all the available files root file of all the available fluxes python code to read and process MINERvA's flux predictions Text Files of the flux, uncertainties, and covariance matrix, with units of neutrinos/m^2/POT,

  18. Port Huron, MI Liquefied Natural Gas Exports (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Port Huron, MI Liquefied Natural Gas Exports (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 1 2014 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 2015 1 1 1 1 1 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 08/31/2016 Next Release Date: 09/30/2016 Referring Pages: U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Exports by Point of Exit Port Huron, MI LNG Exports to All Countries

  19. Ground Motion Studies at NuMI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mayda M. Velasco; Michal Szleper

    2012-02-20

    Ground motion can cause significant deterioration in the luminosity of a linear collider. Vibration of numerous focusing magnets causes continuous misalignments, which makes the beam emittance grow. For this reason, understanding the seismic vibration of all potential LC sites is essential and related efforts in many sites are ongoing. In this document we summarize the results from the studies specific to Fermilab grounds as requested by the LC project leader at FNAL, Shekhar Mishra in FY04-FY06. The Northwestern group focused on how the ground motion effects vary with depth. Knowledge of depth dependence of the seismic activity is needed in order to decide how deep the LC tunnel should be at sites like Fermilab. The measurements were made in the NuMI tunnel, see Figure 1. We take advantage of the fact that from the beginning to the end of the tunnel there is a height difference of about 350 ft and that there are about five different types of dolomite layers. The support received allowed to pay for three months of salary of Michal Szleper. During this period he worked a 100% of his time in this project. That include one week of preparation: 2.5 months of data taking and data analysis during the full period of the project in order to guarantee that we were recording high quality data. We extended our previous work and made more systematic measurements, which included detailed studies on stability of the vibration amplitudes at different depths over long periods of time. As a consequence, a better control and more efficient averaging out of the daytime variation effects were possible, and a better study of other time dependences before the actual depth dependence was obtained. Those initial measurements were made at the surface and are summarized in Figure 2. All measurements are made with equipment that we already had (two broadband seismometers KS200 from GEOTECH and DL-24 portable data recorder). The offline data analysis took advantage of the full Fourier spectra

  20. New GaInP/GaAs/GaInAs, Triple-Bandgap, Tandem Solar Cell for High-Efficiency Terrestrial Concentrator Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurtz, S.; Wanlass, M.; Kramer, C.; Young, M.; Geisz, J.; Ward, S.; Duda, A.; Moriarty, T.; Carapella, J.; Ahrenkiel, P.; Emery. K.; Jones, K.; Romero, M.; Kibbler, A.; Olson, J.; Friedman, D.; McMahon, W.; Ptak, A.

    2005-11-01

    GaInP/GaAs/GaInAs three-junction cells are grown in an inverted configuration on GaAs, allowing high quality growth of the lattice matched GaInP and GaAs layers before a grade is used for the 1-eV GaInAs layer. Using this approach an efficiency of 37.9% was demonstrated.

  1. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Mitts-Merrel Co - MI 14

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    1993 MI.14-2 Site Operations: Reduced thorium metal chunks into particle sized pieces ... Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Thorium MI.14-1 Radiological Survey(s): Yes - ...

  2. MiR-125a TNF receptor-associated factor 6 to inhibit osteoclastogenesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Li-Juan; Liao, Lan; Yang, Li; Li, Yu; Jiang, Tie-Jian

    2014-02-15

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play important roles in osteoclastogenesis and bone resorption. In the present study, we found that miR-125a was dramatically down-regulated during macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) and receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL) induced osteoclastogenesis of circulating CD14+ peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Overexpression of miR-125a in CD14+ PBMCs inhibited osteoclastogenesis, while inhibition of miR-125a promoted osteoclastogenesis. TNF receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6), a transduction factor for RANKL/RANK/NFATc1 signal, was confirmed to be a target of miR-125a. EMSA and ChIP assays confirmed that NFATc1 bound to the promoter of the miR-125a. Overexpression of NFATc1 inhibited miR-125a transcription, and block of NFATc1 expression attenuated RANKL-regulated miR-125a transcription. Here, we reported that miR-125a played a biological function in osteoclastogenesis through a novel TRAF6/ NFATc1/miR-125a regulatory feedback loop. It suggests that regulation of miR-125a expression may be a potential strategy for ameliorating metabolic disease. - Highlights: • MiR-125a was significantly down-regulated in osteoclastogenesis of CD14+ PBMCs. • MiR-125a inhibited osteoclast differentiation by targeting TRAF6. • NFATc1 inhibited miR-125a transciption by binding to the promoter of miR-125a. • TRAF6/NFATc1 and miR-125a form a regulatory feedback loop in osteoclastogenesis.

  3. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Amex Specialty Metal Corp - MI 0-01

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Amex Specialty Metal Corp - MI 0-01 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Amex Specialty Metal Corp (MI.0-01 ) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Coldwater , Michigan MI.0-01-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 MI.0-01-1 Site Operations: No indication that AMEX performed work for MED or AEC activities. Originally included on FUSRAP list due to fact that AMEX purchased milling equipment from a company that had done uranium milling.

  4. MiR-145 functions as a tumor suppressor targeting NUAK1 in human intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiong, Xinkui; Sun, Daoyi; Chai, Hao; Shan, Wengang; Yu, Yue; Pu, Liyong; Cheng, Feng

    2015-09-18

    The dysregulation of micro (mi)RNAs is associated with cancer development. The miRNA miR-145 is downregulated in intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC); however, its precise role in tumor progression has not yet been elucidated. Novel (nua) kinase family (NUAK)1 functions as an oncogene in various cancers and is a putative target of miR-145 regulation. In this study, we investigated the regulation of NUAK1 by miR-145 in ICC. We found that miR-145 level was significantly decreased in ICC tissue and cell lines, which corresponded with an increase in NUAK1 expression. NUAK1 was found to be a direct target of miR-145 regulation. The overexpression of miR-145 in ICC cell lines inhibited proliferation, growth, and invasion by suppressing NUAK1 expression, which was associated with a decrease in Akt signaling and matrix metalloproteinase protein expression. Similar results were observed by inhibiting NUAK1 expression. These results demonstrate that miR-145 can prevent ICC progression by targeting NUAK1 and its downstream effectors, and can therefore be useful for clinical diagnosis and targeted therapy of ICC. - Highlights: • MiR-145 suppresses ICC proliferation and invasion abilities. • We demonstrated that miR-145 directly targets NUAK1 in ICC. • MiR-145 expression in ICC was associated with Akt signaling and MMPs expression.

  5. Neutron scattering study of spin ordering and stripe pinning in superconducting <mi>La>1.93<mi>Sr>0.07<mi>CuO>4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobsen, H.; Zaliznyak, I. A.; Savici, A. T.; Winn, B. L.; Chang, S.; Hücker, M.; Gu, G. D.; Tranquada, J. M.

    2015-11-20

    The relationships among charge order, spin fluctuations, and superconductivity in underdoped cuprates remain controversial. We use neutron scattering techniques to study these phenomena in <mi>La>1.93<mi>Sr>0.07<mi>CuO>4 a superconductor with a transition temperature of Tc = 20 K. At T<< Tc, we find incommensurate spin fluctuations with a quasielastic energy spectrum and no sign of a gap within the energy range from 0.2 to 15 meV. A weak elastic magnetic component grows below ~ 10 K, consistent with results from local probes. Regarding the atomic lattice, we have discovered unexpectedly strong fluctuations of the CuO6 octahedra about Cu-O bonds, which are associated with inequivalent O sites within the CuO2 planes. Moreover, we observed a weak elastic (3 30) superlattice peak that implies a reduced lattice symmetry. The presence of inequivalent O sites rationalizes various pieces of evidence for charge stripe order in underdoped La2-xSrxCuO4. The coexistence of superconductivity with quasi-static spin-stripe order suggests the presence of intertwined orders; however, the rotation of the stripe orientation away from the Cu-O bonds might be connected with evidence for a finite gap at the nodal points of the superconducting gap function.

  6. Radiosensitizing Effects of Ectopic miR-101 on Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Cells Depend on the Endogenous miR-101 Level

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Susie; Wang Hongyan; Ng, Wooi Loon; Curran, Walter J.; Wang Ya

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: Previously, we showed that ectopic miR-101 could sensitize human tumor cells to radiation by targeting ATM and DNA-PK catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) to inhibit DNA repair, as the endogenous miR-101 levels are low in tumors in general. However, the heterogeneity of human cancers may result in an exception. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that a few tumor cell lines with a high level of endogenous miR-101 would prove less response to ectopic miR-101. Methods and Materials: Fourteeen non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines and one immortalized non-malignant lung epithelial cell line (NL20) were used for comparing endogenous miR-101 levels by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Based on the different miR-101 levels, four cell lines with different miR-101 levels were chosen for transfection with a green fluorescent protein-lentiviral plasmid encoding miR-101. The target protein levels were measured by using Western blotting. The radiosensitizing effects of ectopic miR-101 on these NSCLC cell lines were determined by a clonogenic assay and xenograft mouse model. Results: The endogenous miR-101 level was similar or lower in 13 NSCLC cell lines but was 11-fold higher in one cell line (H157) than in NL20 cells. Although ectopic miR-101 efficiently decreased the ATM and DNA-PKcs levels and increased the radiosensitization level in H1299, H1975, and A549 cells, it did not change the levels of the miR-101 targets or radiosensitivity in H157 cells. Similar results were observed in xenograft mice. Conclusions: A small number of NSCLC cell lines could have a high level of endogenous miR-101. The ectopic miR-101 was able to radiosensitize most NSCLC cells, except for the NSCLC cell lines that had a much higher endogenous miR-101 level. These results suggest that when we choose one miRNA as a therapeutic tool, the endogenous level of the miRNA in each tumor should be considered.

  7. InGaAsN/GaAs heterojunction for multi-junction solar cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kurtz, Steven R.; Allerman, Andrew A.; Klem, John F.; Jones, Eric D.

    2001-01-01

    An InGaAsN/GaAs semiconductor p-n heterojunction is disclosed for use in forming a 0.95-1.2 eV bandgap photodetector with application for use in high-efficiency multi-junction solar cells. The InGaAsN/GaAs p-n heterojunction is formed by epitaxially growing on a gallium arsenide (GaAs) or germanium (Ge) substrate an n-type indium gallium arsenide nitride (InGaAsN) layer having a semiconductor alloy composition In.sub.x Ga.sub.1-x As.sub.1-y N.sub.y with 0GaAs layer, with the InGaAsN and GaAs layers being lattice-matched to the substrate. The InGaAsN/GaAs p-n heterojunction can be epitaxially grown by either molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) or metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). The InGaAsN/GaAs p-n heterojunction provides a high open-circuit voltage of up to 0.62 volts and an internal quantum efficiency of >70%.

  8. Magnetism and transport properties of epitaxial Fe-Ga thin films on GaAs(001)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duong Anh Tuan; Shin, Yooleemi; Cho, Sunglae; Dang Duc Dung; Vo Thanh Son

    2012-04-01

    Epitaxial Fe-Ga thin films in disordered bcc {alpha}-Fe crystal structure (A2) have been grown on GaAs(001) by molecular beam epitaxy. The saturated magnetization (M{sub S}) decreased from 1371 to 1105 kA/m with increasing Ga concentration from 10.5 to 24.3 % at room temperature. The lattice parameter increased with the increase in Ga content because of the larger atomic radius of Ga atom than that of Fe. The increase in carrier density with Ga content caused in lower resistivity.

  9. Graphene induced remote surface scattering in graphene/AlGaN/GaN heterostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Xiwen; Li, Dan; Wang, Bobo; Liu, Bin; Chen, Famin; Jin, Guangri; Lu, Yanwu

    2014-10-20

    The mobilities of single-layer graphene combined with AlGaN/GaN heterostructures on two-dimensional electron gases in graphene/AlGaN/GaN double heterojunction are calculated. The impact of electron density in single-layer graphene is also studied. Remote surface roughness (RSR) and remote interfacial charge (RIC) scatterings are introduced into this heterostructure. The mobilities limited by RSR and RIC are an order of magnitude higher than that of interface roughness and misfit dislocation. This study contributes to designing structures for generation of higher electron mobility in graphene/AlGaN/GaN double heterojunction.

  10. Band Structure of Strain-Balanced GaAsBi/GaAsN Super-lattices on GaAs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hwang, J.; Phillips, J. D.

    2011-05-31

    GaAs alloys with dilute content of Bi and N provide a large reduction in band-gap energy with increasing alloy composition. GaAsBi/GaAsN heterojunctions have a type-II band alignment, where superlattices based on these materials offer a wide range for designing effective band-gap energy by varying superlattice period and alloy composition. The miniband structure and effective band gap for strain-balanced GaAsBi/GaAsN superlattices with effective lattice match to GaAs are calculated for alloy compositions up to 5% Bi and N using the kp method. The effective band gap for these superlattices is found to vary between 0.89 and 1.32 eV for period thickness ranging from 10 to 100 . The joint density of states and optical absorption of a 40/40 GaAs0.96Bi0.04/GaAs0.98N0.02 superlattice are reported demonstrating a ground-state transition at 1.005 eV and first excited transition at 1.074 eV. The joint density of states is similar in magnitude to GaAs, while the optical absorption is approximately one order of magnitude lower due to the spatially indirect optical transition in the type-II structure. The GaAsBi/GaAsN system may provide a new material system with lattice match to GaAs in a spectral range of high importance for optoelectronic devices including solar cells, photodetectors, and light emitters.

  11. A SUPER-EDDINGTON WIND SCENARIO FOR THE PROGENITORS OF TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, Xin; Chen, Xuefei; Chen, Hai-liang; Han, Zhanwen; Denissenkov, Pavel A. E-mail: cxf@ynao.ac.cn

    2013-12-01

    The accretion of hydrogen-rich material on to carbon-oxygen white dwarfs (CO WDs) is crucial for understanding Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) from the single-degenerate model, but this process has not been well understood due to the numerical difficulties in treating H and He flashes during the accretion. For CO WD masses from 0.5 to 1.378 M {sub ?} and accretion rates in the range from 10{sup 8} to 10{sup 5} M {sub ?} yr{sup 1}, we simulated the accretion of solar-composition material on to CO WDs using the state-of-the-art stellar evolution code of MESA. For comparison with steady-state models, we first ignored the contribution from nuclear burning to the luminosity when determining the Eddington accretion rate, and found that the properties of H burning in our accreting CO WD models are similar to those from the steady-state models, except that the critical accretion rates at which the WDs turn into red giants or H-shell flashes occur on their surfaces are slightly higher than those from the steady-state models. However, the super-Eddington wind is triggered at much lower accretion rates than previously thought, when the contribution of nuclear burning to the total luminosity is included. This super-Eddington wind naturally prevents the CO WDs with high accretion rates from becoming red giants, thus presenting an alternative to the optically thick wind proposed by Hachisu etal. Furthermore, the super-Eddington wind works in low-metallicity environments, which may explain SNe Ia observed at high redshifts.

  12. Optical and magnetotransport properties of InGaAs/GaAsSb/GaAs structures doped with a magnetic impurity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalentyeva, I. L. Zvonkov, B. N.; Vikhrova, O. V.; Danilov, Yu. A.; Demina, P. B.; Dorokhin, M. V.; Zdoroveyshchev, A. V.

    2015-11-15

    InGaAs/GaAsSb/GaAs bilayer quantum-well structures containing a magnetic-impurity δ-layer (Mn) at the GaAs/InGaAs interface are experimentally studied for the first time. The structures are fabricated by metal organic chemical-vapor deposition (MOCVD) and laser deposition on substrates of conducting (n{sup +}) and semi-insulating GaAs in a single growth cycle. The InGaAs-layer thickness is varied from 1.5 to 5 nm. The significant effect of a decrease in the InGaAs quantum-well thickness on the optical and magnetotransport properties of the structures under study is detected. Nonlinear magnetic-field dependence of the Hall resistance and negative magnetoresistance at temperatures of ≤30–40 K, circular polarization of the electroluminescence in a magnetic field, opposite behaviors of the photoluminescence and electroluminescence emission intensities in the structures, and an increase in the contribution of indirect transitions with decreasing InGaAs thickness are observed. Simulation shows that these effects can be caused by the influence of the δ-layer of acceptor impurity (Mn) on the band structure and the hole concentration distribution in the bilayer quantum well.

  13. SPECTROPOLARIMETRY OF THE TYPE Ia SN 2007sr TWO MONTHS AFTER MAXIMUM LIGHT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zelaya, P.; Quinn, J. R.; Clocchiatti, A.; Baade, D.; Patat, F.; Hoeflich, P.; Maund, J.; Wang, L.; Wheeler, J. C.

    2013-02-01

    We present late-time spectropolarimetric observations of SN 2007sr, obtained with the Very Large Telescope at the ESO Paranal Observatory when the object was 63 days after maximum light. The late-time spectrum displays strong line polarization in the Ca II absorption features. SN 2007sr adds to the case of some normal Type Ia supernovae that show high line polarization or repolarization at late times, a fact that might be connected with the presence of high-velocity features at early times.

  14. Degradation mechanisms of 2 MeV proton irradiated AlGaN/GaN HEMTs...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    irradiated AlGaNGaN HEMTs This content will become publicly available on August 26, 2016 Title: Degradation mechanisms of 2 MeV proton irradiated AlGaNGaN HEMTs Authors: ...

  15. AlGaAsSb/GaSb Distributed Bragg Reflectors Grown by Organometallic Vapor Phase Epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C.A. Wang; C.J. Vineis; D.R. Calawa

    2002-02-13

    The first AlGaAsSb/GaSb quarter-wave distributed Bragg reflectors grown by metallic vapor phase epitaxy are reported. The peak reflectance is 96% for a 10-period structure.

  16. (In,Ga)As/GaP electrical injection quantum dot laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heidemann, M. Höfling, S.; Kamp, M.

    2014-01-06

    The paper reports on the realization of multilayer (In,Ga)As/GaP quantum dot (QD) lasers grown by gas source molecular beam epitaxy. The QDs have been embedded in (Al,Ga)P/GaP waveguide structures. Laser operation at 710 nm is obtained for broad area laser devices with a threshold current density of 4.4 kA/cm{sup 2} at a heat-sink temperature of 80 K.

  17. Spectroscopic Determination of the Low Redshift Type Ia Supernova Rate from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krughoff, K. S.; Connolly, Andrew J.; Frieman, Joshua; SubbaRao, Mark; Kilper, Gary; Schneider, Donald P.

    2011-04-10

    Supernova rates are directly coupled to high mass stellar birth and evolution. As such, they are one of the few direct measures of the history of cosmic stellar evolution. In this paper we describe an probabilistic technique for identifying supernovae within spectroscopic samples of galaxies. We present a study of 52 type Ia supernovae ranging in age from -14 days to +40 days extracted from a parent sample of \\simeq 50,000 spectra from the SDSS DR5. We find a Supernova Rate (SNR) of 0.472^{+0.048}_{-0.039}(Systematic)^{+0.081}_{-0.071}(Statistical)SNu at a redshift of = 0.1. This value is higher than other values at low redshift at the 1{\\sigma}, but is consistent at the 3{\\sigma} level. The 52 supernova candidates used in this study comprise the third largest sample of supernovae used in a type Ia rate determination to date. In this paper we demonstrate the potential for the described approach for detecting supernovae in future spectroscopic surveys.

  18. TYCHO SN 1572: A NAKED Ia SUPERNOVA REMNANT WITHOUT AN ASSOCIATED AMBIENT MOLECULAR CLOUD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tian, W. W.; Leahy, D. A.

    2011-03-10

    The historical supernova remnant (SNR) Tycho SN 1572 originates from the explosion of a normal Type Ia supernova that is believed to have originated from a carbon-oxygen white dwarf in a binary system. We analyze the 21 cm continuum, H I, and {sup 12}CO-line data from the Canadian Galactic Plane Survey in the direction of SN 1572 and the surrounding region. We construct H I absorption spectra to SN 1572 and three nearby compact sources. We conclude that SN 1572 has no molecular cloud interaction, which argues against previous claims that a molecular cloud is interacting with the SNR. This new result does not support a recent claim that dust, newly detected by AKARI, originates from such an SNR-cloud interaction. We suggest that the SNR has a kinematic distance of 2.5-3.0 kpc based on a nonlinear rotational curve model. Very high energy {gamma}-ray emission from the remnant has been detected by the VERITAS telescope, so our result shows that its origin should not be an SNR-cloud interaction. Both radio and X-ray observations support that SN 1572 is an isolated Type Ia SNR.

  19. Spectroscopic Observations and Analysis of the Unusual Type Ia SN1999ac

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garavini, G.; Aldering, G.; Amadon, A.; Amanullah, R.; Astier,P.; Balland, C.; Blanc, G.; Conley, A.; Dahlen, T.; Deustua, S.E.; Ellis,R.; Fabbro, S.; Fadeyev, V.; Fan, X.; Folatelli, G.; Frye, B.; Gates,E.L.; Gibbons, R.; Goldhaber, G.; Goldman, B.; Goobar, A.; Groom, D.E.; Haissinski, J.; Hardin, D.; Hook, I.; Howell, D.A.; Kent, S.; Kim, A.G.; Knop, R.A.; Kowalski, M.; Kuznetsova, N.; Lee, B.C.; Lidman, C.; Mendez,J.; Miller, G.J.; Moniez, M.; Mouchet, M.; Mourao, A.; Newberg, H.; Nobili, S.; Nugent, P.E.; Pain, R.; Perdereau, O.; Perlmutter, S.; Quimby, R.; Regnault, N.; Rich, J.; Richards, G.T.; Ruiz-Lapuente, P.; Schaefer, B.E.; Schahmaneche, K.; Smith, E.; Spadafora, A.L.; Stanishev,V.; Thomas, R.C.; Walton, N.A.; Wang, L.; Wood-Vasey, W.M.

    2005-07-12

    The authors present optical spectra of the peculiar Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) 1999ac. The data extend from -15 to +42 days with respect to B-band maximum and reveal an event that is unusual in several respects. prior to B-band maximum, the spectra resemble those of SN 1999aa, a slowly declining event, but possess stronger Si II and Ca II signatures (more characteristic of a spectroscopically normal SN). Spectra after B-band maximum appear more normal. The expansion velocities inferred from the Iron lines appear to be lower than average; whereas, the expansion velocity inferred from Calcium H and K are higher than average. The expansion velocities inferred from the Iron lines appear to be lower than average; whereas, the expansion velocity inferred from Calcium H and K are higher than average. The expansion velocities inferred from Si II are among the slowest ever observed, though SN 1999ac is not particularly dim. The analysis of the parameters v{sub 10}(Si II), R(Si II), v, and {Delta}m{sub 15} further underlines the unique characteristics of SN 1999ac. They find convincing evidence of C II {lambda}6580 in the day -15 spectrum with ejection velocity v > 16,000 km s{sup -1}, but this signature disappears by day -9. This rapid evolution at early times highlights the importance of extremely early-time spectroscopy.

  20. Consistent use of type Ia supernovae highly magnified by galaxy clusters to constrain the cosmological parameters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zitrin, Adi [Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, MS 249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Redlich, Matthias [Universitt Heidelberg, Zentrum fr Astronomie, Institut fr Theoretische Astrophysik, Philosophenweg 12, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Broadhurst, Tom, E-mail: adizitrin@gmail.com [Department of Theoretical Physics, University of Basque Country UPV/EHU, Bilbao (Spain)

    2014-07-01

    We discuss how Type Ia supernovae (SNe) strongly magnified by foreground galaxy clusters should be self-consistently treated when used in samples fitted for the cosmological parameters. While the cluster lens magnification of a SN can be well constrained from sets of multiple images of various background galaxies with measured redshifts, its value is typically dependent on the fiducial set of cosmological parameters used to construct the mass model. In such cases, one should not naively demagnify the observed SN luminosity by the model magnification into the expected Hubble diagram, which would create a bias, but instead take into account the cosmological parameters a priori chosen to construct the mass model. We quantify the effect and find that a systematic error of typically a few percent, up to a few dozen percent per magnified SN may be propagated onto a cosmological parameter fit unless the cosmology assumed for the mass model is taken into account (the bias can be even larger if the SN is lying very near the critical curves). We also simulate how such a bias propagates onto the cosmological parameter fit using the Union2.1 sample supplemented with strongly magnified SNe. The resulting bias on the deduced cosmological parameters is generally at the few percent level, if only few biased SNe are included, and increases with the number of lensed SNe and their redshift. Samples containing magnified Type Ia SNe, e.g., from ongoing cluster surveys, should readily account for this possible bias.

  1. GaInP/GaAs/GaInAs Monolithic Tandem Cells for High-Performance Solar Concentrators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wanlass, M. W.; Ahrenkiel, S. P.; Albin, D. S.; Carapella, J. J.; Duda, A.; Emery, K.; Geisz, J. F.; Jones, K.; Kurtz, S.; Moriarty, T.; Romero, M. J.

    2005-08-01

    We present a new approach for ultra-high-performance tandem solar cells that involves inverted epitaxial growth and ultra-thin device processing. The additional degree of freedom afforded by the inverted design allows the monolithic integration of high-, and medium-bandgap, lattice-matched (LM) subcell materials with lower-bandgap, lattice-mismatched (LMM) materials in a tandem structure through the use of transparent compositionally graded layers. The current work concerns an inverted, series-connected, triple-bandgap, GaInP (LM, 1.87 eV)/GaAs (LM, 1.42 eV)/GaInAs (LMM, {approx}1 eV) device structure grown on a GaAs substrate. Ultra-thin tandem devices are fabricated by mounting the epiwafers to pre-metallized Si wafer handles and selectively removing the parent GaAs substrate. The resulting handle-mounted, ultra-thin tandem cells have a number of important advantages, including improved performance and potential reclamation/reuse of the parent substrate for epitaxial growth. Additionally, realistic performance modeling calculations suggest that terrestrial concentrator efficiencies in the range of 40-45% are possible with this new tandem cell approach. A laboratory-scale (0.24 cm2), prototype GaInP/GaAs/GaInAs tandem cell with a terrestrial concentrator efficiency of 37.9% at a low concentration ratio (10.1 suns) is described, which surpasses the previous world efficiency record of 37.3%.

  2. Toward Exascale Computing of Type Ia and Ib,c Supernovae: V&V of Current

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Models | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility Toward Exascale Computing of Type Ia and Ib,c Supernovae: V&V of Current Models PI Name: Don Lamb PI Email: lamb@oddjob.uchicago.edu Institution: University Of Chicago Allocation Program: INCITE Allocation Hours at ALCF: 40,000,000 Year: 2012 Research Domain: Physics This project continues a program of verification and validation of Type Ia supernova models. More 3-D simulations of the explosion phase will be performed, along with 2-D

  3. Metal-interconnection-free integration of InGaN/GaN light emitting diodes with AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Chao; Cai, Yuefei; Liu, Zhaojun; Ma, Jun; Lau, Kei May

    2015-05-04

    We report a metal-interconnection-free integration scheme for InGaN/GaN light emitting diodes (LEDs) and AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) by combining selective epi removal (SER) and selective epitaxial growth (SEG) techniques. SER of HEMT epi was carried out first to expose the bottom unintentionally doped GaN buffer and the sidewall GaN channel. A LED structure was regrown in the SER region with the bottom n-type GaN layer (n-electrode of the LED) connected to the HEMTs laterally, enabling monolithic integration of the HEMTs and LEDs (HEMT-LED) without metal-interconnection. In addition to saving substrate real estate, minimal interface resistance between the regrown n-type GaN and the HEMT channel is a significant improvement over metal-interconnection. Furthermore, excellent off-state leakage characteristics of the driving transistor can also be guaranteed in such an integration scheme.

  4. A hole modulator for InGaN/GaN light-emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Zi-Hui; Kyaw, Zabu; Liu, Wei; Ji, Yun; Wang, Liancheng; Tan, Swee Tiam; Sun, Xiao Wei E-mail: VOLKAN@stanfordalumni.org; Demir, Hilmi Volkan E-mail: VOLKAN@stanfordalumni.org

    2015-02-09

    The low p-type doping efficiency of the p-GaN layer has severely limited the performance of InGaN/GaN light-emitting diodes (LEDs) due to the ineffective hole injection into the InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well (MQW) active region. The essence of improving the hole injection efficiency is to increase the hole concentration in the p-GaN layer. Therefore, in this work, we have proposed a hole modulator and studied it both theoretically and experimentally. In the hole modulator, the holes in a remote p-type doped layer are depleted by the built-in electric field and stored in the p-GaN layer. By this means, the overall hole concentration in the p-GaN layer can be enhanced. Furthermore, the hole modulator is adopted in the InGaN/GaN LEDs, which reduces the effective valance band barrier height for the p-type electron blocking layer from ?332?meV to ?294?meV at 80?A/cm{sup 2} and demonstrates an improved optical performance, thanks to the increased hole concentration in the p-GaN layer and thus the improved hole injection into the MQWs.

  5. AlGaN/GaN heterostructure prepared on a Si (110) substrate via pulsed sputtering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watanabe, T.; Ohta, J.; Kondo, T.; Ohashi, M.; Ueno, K.; Kobayashi, A.; Fujioka, H.

    2014-05-05

    GaN films were grown on Si (110) substrates using a low-temperature growth technique based on pulsed sputtering. Reduction of the growth temperature suppressed the strain in the GaN films, leading to an increase in the critical thickness for crack formation. In addition, an AlGaN/GaN heterostructure with a flat heterointerface was prepared using this technique. Furthermore, the existence of a two dimensional electron gas at the heterointerface with a mobility of 1360 cm{sup 2}/Vs and a sheet carrier density of 1.3??10{sup 13}?cm{sup ?2} was confirmed. Finally, the use of the AlGaN/GaN heterostructure in a high electron mobility transistor was demonstrated. These results indicate that low-temperature growth via pulsed sputtering is quite promising for the fabrication of GaN-based electronic devices.

  6. F-1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Central West North Central East North Central Mountain AK WA MT WY ID NV UT CO AZ NM TX OK IA KS MO IL IN KY TN MS AL FL GA SC NC WV PA NJ MD DE NY CT VT ME RI MA NH VA WI MI OH...

  7. F-5 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Figure F4. Oil and Gas Supply Model Regions Atlantic WA MT WY ID NV UT CO AZ NM TX OK IA KS MO IL IN KY TN MS AL FL GA SC NC WV PA NJ MD DE NY CT ME RI MA NH VA WI MI OH NE...

  8. DLEU2, frequently deleted in malignancy, functions as a critical host gene of the cell cycle inhibitory microRNAs miR-15a and miR-16-1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lerner, Mikael; Harada, Masako; Loven, Jakob; Castro, Juan; Davis, Zadie; Oscier, David; Henriksson, Marie; Sangfelt, Olle; Grander, Dan; Corcoran, Martin M.

    2009-10-15

    The microRNAs miR-15a and miR-16-1 are downregulated in multiple tumor types and are frequently deleted in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), myeloma and mantle cell lymphoma. Despite their abundance in most cells the transcriptional regulation of miR-15a/16-1 remains unclear. Here we demonstrate that the putative tumor suppressor DLEU2 acts as a host gene of these microRNAs. Mature miR-15a/miR-16-1 are produced in a Drosha-dependent process from DLEU2 and binding of the Myc oncoprotein to two alterative DLEU2 promoters represses both the host gene transcript and levels of mature miR-15a/miR-16-1. In line with a functional role for DLEU2 in the expression of the microRNAs, the miR-15a/miR-16-1 locus is retained in four CLL cases that delete both promoters of this gene and expression analysis indicates that this leads to functional loss of mature miR-15a/16-1. We additionally show that DLEU2 negatively regulates the G1 Cyclins E1 and D1 through miR-15a/miR-16-1 and provide evidence that these oncoproteins are subject to miR-15a/miR-16-1-mediated repression under normal conditions. We also demonstrate that DLEU2 overexpression blocks cellular proliferation and inhibits the colony-forming ability of tumor cell lines in a miR-15a/miR-16-1-dependent way. Together the data illuminate how inactivation of DLEU2 promotes cell proliferation and tumor progression through functional loss of miR-15a/miR-16-1.

  9. EIS-0476: Vogtle Electric Generating Plant in Burke County, GA...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    6: Vogtle Electric Generating Plant in Burke County, GA EIS-0476: Vogtle Electric Generating Plant in Burke County, GA EIS-0476: Final Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0476: ...

  10. Genome-Wide Analysis of miRNA targets in Brachypodium and Biomass Energy Crops

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, Pamela J.

    2015-08-11

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) contribute to the control of numerous biological processes through the regulation of specific target mRNAs. Although the identities of these targets are essential to elucidate miRNA function, the targets are much more difficult to identify than the small RNAs themselves. Before this work, we pioneered the genome-wide identification of the targets of Arabidopsis miRNAs using an approach called PARE (German et al., Nature Biotech. 2008; Nature Protocols, 2009). Under this project, we applied PARE to Brachypodium distachyon (Brachypodium), a model plant in the Poaceae family, which includes the major food grain and bioenergy crops. Through in-depth global analysis and examination of specific examples, this research greatly expanded our knowledge of miRNAs and target RNAs of Brachypodium. New regulation in response to environmental stress or tissue type was found, and many new miRNAs were discovered. More than 260 targets of new and known miRNAs with PARE sequences at the precise sites of miRNA-guided cleavage were identified and characterized. Combining PARE data with the small RNA data also identified the miRNAs responsible for initiating approximately 500 phased loci, including one of the novel miRNAs. PARE analysis also revealed that differentially expressed miRNAs in the same family guide specific target RNA cleavage in a correspondingly tissue-preferential manner. The project included generation of small RNA and PARE resources for bioenergy crops, to facilitate ongoing discovery of conserved miRNA-target RNA regulation. By associating specific miRNA-target RNA pairs with known physiological functions, the research provides insights about gene regulation in different tissues and in response to environmental stress. This, and release of new PARE and small RNA data sets should contribute basic knowledge to enhance breeding and may suggest new strategies for improvement of biomass energy crops.

  11. Near-infrared line identification in type Ia supernovae during the transitional phase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friesen, Brian; Baron, E.; Wisniewski, John P.; Miller, Timothy R.; Parrent, Jerod T.; Thomas, R. C.; Marion, G. H.

    2014-09-10

    We present near-infrared synthetic spectra of a delayed-detonation hydrodynamical model and compare them to observed spectra of four normal Type Ia supernovae ranging from day +56.5 to day +85. This is the epoch during which supernovae are believed to be undergoing the transition from the photospheric phase, where spectra are characterized by line scattering above an optically thick photosphere, to the nebular phase, where spectra consist of optically thin emission from forbidden lines. We find that most spectral features in the near-infrared can be accounted for by permitted lines of Fe II and Co II. In addition, we find that [Ni II] fits the emission feature near 1.98 μm, suggesting that a substantial mass of {sup 58}Ni exists near the center of the ejecta in these objects, arising from nuclear burning at high density.

  12. LAX XXlCfl jX?iK, Idd+?KYLViG?IA

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    f , : I~&l, samtier cipwati8Aa CffUm - . Jiux.lCJ d,# 1754 - - _- - .- t :; . Jesse e. ahizmn*~*ter -2.' -------- - _ &tV' hi@A l f izau Bkteriala ;' . . 1 -7 I _' i' . Fpr&G& r&Q Q,&& fu &fI& L;&& -l&d 2;,i' iI,;/Qi' rIGN CQ&GgJy p;E& p;~p>gyf LAX XXlCfl jX?iK, Idd+?KYLViG?IA i-icfer~~o is &o ta yaw rwarandu3;: l P iimwmbec L?, 1953, reque&in~ a d&q.&ti of khority tA A&sister prog= for th+zz developmrrrl,

  13. miR-4295 promotes cell proliferation and invasion in anaplastic thyroid carcinoma via CDKN1A

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shao, Mingchen; Geng, Yiwei; Lu, Peng; Xi, Ying; Wei, Sidong; Wang, Liuxing; Fan, Qingxia; Ma, Wang

    2015-09-04

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play important roles in the pathogenesis of many types of cancers by negatively regulating gene expression at posttranscriptional level. However, the role of microRNAs in anaplastic thyroid carcinoma (ATC), has remained elusive. Here, we identified that miR-4295 promotes ATC cell proliferation by negatively regulates its target gene CDKN1A. In ATC cell lines, CCK-8 proliferation assay indicated that the cell proliferation was promoted by miR-4295, while miR-4295 inhibitor significantly inhibited the cell proliferation. Transwell assay showed that miR-4295 mimics significantly promoted the migration and invasion of ATC cells, whereas miR-4295 inhibitors significantly reduced cell migration and invasion. luciferase assays confirmed that miR-4295 directly bound to the 3'untranslated region of CDKN1A, and western blotting showed that miR-4295 suppressed the expression of CDKN1A at the protein levels. This study indicated that miR-4295 negatively regulates CDKN1A and promotes proliferation and invasion of ATC cell lines. Thus, miR-4295 may represent a potential therapeutic target for ATC intervention. - Highlights: • miR-4295 mimics promote the proliferation and invasion of ATC cells. • miR-4295 inhibitors inhibit the proliferation and invasion of ATC cells. • miR-4295 targets 3′UTR of CDKN1A in ATC cells. • miR-4295 negatively regulates CDKN1A in ATC cells.

  14. EARLY OBSERVATIONS AND ANALYSIS OF THE TYPE Ia SN 2014J IN M82

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marion, G. H.; Vinkó, J.; Sand, D. J.; Hsiao, E. Y.; Banerjee, D. P. K.; Joshi, V.; Venkataraman, V.; Ashok, N. M.; Valenti, S.; Howell, D. A.; Stritzinger, M. D.; Amanullah, R.; Johansson, J.; Binzel, R. P.; Bochanski, J. J.; Bryngelson, G. L.; Burns, C. R.; Drozdov, D.; Fieber-Beyer, S. K.; Graham, M. L.; and others

    2015-01-01

    We present optical and near infrared (NIR) observations of the nearby Type Ia SN 2014J. Seventeen optical and 23 NIR spectra were obtained from 10 days before (–10d) to 10 days after (+10d) the time of maximum B-band brightness. The relative strengths of absorption features and their patterns of development can be compared at one day intervals throughout most of this period. Carbon is not detected in the optical spectra, but we identify C I λ1.0693 in the NIR spectra. Mg II lines with high oscillator strengths have higher initial velocities than other Mg II lines. We show that the velocity differences can be explained by differences in optical depths due to oscillator strengths. The spectra of SN 2014J show that it is a normal SN Ia, but many parameters are near the boundaries between normal and high-velocity subclasses. The velocities for O I, Mg II, Si II, S II, Ca II, and Fe II suggest that SN 2014J has a layered structure with little or no mixing. That result is consistent with the delayed detonation explosion models. We also report photometric observations, obtained from –10d to +29d, in the UBVRIJH and K{sub s} bands. The template fitting package SNooPy is used to interpret the light curves and to derive photometric parameters. Using R{sub V} = 1.46, which is consistent with previous studies, SNooPy finds that A{sub V} = 1.80 for E(B – V){sub host} = 1.23 ± 0.06 mag. The maximum B-band brightness of –19.19 ± 0.10 mag was reached on February 1.74 UT ± 0.13 days and the supernova has a decline parameter, Δm {sub 15}, of 1.12 ± 0.02 mag.

  15. Microfluidic Molecular Assay Platform for the Detection of miRNAs...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Article: Microfluidic Molecular Assay Platform for the Detection of miRNAs, mRNAs, Proteins, and Post-translational Modifications at Single-cell Resolution. Citation Details...

  16. Carrier quenching in InGaP/GaAs double heterostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wells, Nathan P. Driskell, Travis U.; Hudson, Andrew I.; LaLumondiere, Stephen D.; Lotshaw, William T.; Forbes, David V.; Hubbard, Seth M.

    2015-08-14

    Photoluminescence measurements on a series of GaAs double heterostructures demonstrate a rapid quenching of carriers in the GaAs layer at irradiance levels below 0.1 W/cm{sup 2} in samples with a GaAs-on-InGaP interface. These results indicate the existence of non-radiative defect centers at or near the GaAs-on-InGaP interface, consistent with previous reports showing the intermixing of In and P when free As impinges on the InGaP surface during growth. At low irradiance, these defect centers can lead to sub-ns carrier lifetimes. The defect centers involved in the rapid carrier quenching can be saturated at higher irradiance levels and allow carrier lifetimes to reach hundreds of nanoseconds. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a nearly three orders of magnitude decrease in carrier lifetime at low irradiance in a simple double heterostructure. Carrier quenching occurs at irradiance levels near the integrated Air Mass Zero (AM0) and Air Mass 1.5 (AM1.5) solar irradiance. Additionally, a lower energy photoluminescence band is observed both at room and cryogenic temperatures. The temperature and time dependence of the lower energy luminescence is consistent with the presence of an unintentional InGaAs or InGaAsP quantum well that forms due to compositional mixing at the GaAs-on-InGaP interface. Our results are of general interest to the photovoltaic community as InGaP is commonly used as a window layer in GaAs based solar cells.

  17. Measurements of the Rate of Type Ia Supernovae at Redshift z < ~0.3 from the SDSS-II Supernova Survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dilday, Benjamin; Smith, Mathew; Bassett, Bruce; Becker, Andrew; Bender, Ralf; Castander, Francisco; Cinabro, David; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Frieman, Joshua A.; Galbany, Lluis; Garnavich, Peter M.; /Notre Dame U. /Stockholm U., OKC /Stockholm U.

    2010-01-01

    We present a measurement of the volumetric Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) rate based on data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey II (SDSS-II) Supernova Survey. The adopted sample of supernovae (SNe) includes 516 SNe Ia at redshift z {approx}< 0.3, of which 270 (52%) are spectroscopically identified as SNe Ia. The remaining 246 SNe Ia were identified through their light curves; 113 of these objects have spectroscopic redshifts from spectra of their host galaxy, and 133 have photometric redshifts estimated from the SN light curves. Based on consideration of 87 spectroscopically confirmed non-Ia SNe discovered by the SDSS-II SN Survey, we estimate that 2.04{sub -0.95}{sup +1.61}% of the photometric SNe Ia may be misidentified. The sample of SNe Ia used in this measurement represents an order of magnitude increase in the statistics for SN Ia rate measurements in the redshift range covered by the SDSS-II Supernova Survey. If we assume a SN Ia rate that is constant at low redshift (z < 0.15), then the SN observations can be used to infer a value of the SN rate of r{sub V} = (2.69{sub -0.30-0.01}{sup +0.34+0.21}) x 10{sup -5} SNe yr{sup -1} Mpc{sup -3} (H{sub 0}/(70 km s{sup -1} Mpc{sup -1})){sup 3} at a mean redshift of {approx} 0.12, based on 79 SNe Ia of which 72 are spectroscopically confirmed. However, the large sample of SNe Ia included in this study allows us to place constraints on the redshift dependence of the SN Ia rate based on the SDSS-II Supernova Survey data alone. Fitting a power-law model of the SN rate evolution, r{sub V} (z) = A{sub p} x ((1+z)/(1+z{sub 0})){sup {nu}}, over the redshift range 0.0 < z < 0.3 with z{sub 0} = 0.21, results in A{sub p} = (3.43{sub -0.15}{sup +0.15}) x 10{sup -5} SNe yr{sup -1} Mpc{sup -3} (H{sub 0}/(70 km s{sup -1} Mpc{sup -1})){sup 3} and {nu} = 2.04{sub -0.89}{sup +0.90}.

  18. Highly uniform, multi-stacked InGaAs/GaAs quantum dots embedded in a GaAs nanowire

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tatebayashi, J. Ota, Y.; Ishida, S.; Nishioka, M.; Iwamoto, S.; Arakawa, Y.

    2014-09-08

    We demonstrate a highly uniform, dense stack of In{sub 0.22}Ga{sub 0.78}As/GaAs quantum dot (QD) structures in a single GaAs nanowire (NW). The size (and hence emission energy) of individual QD is tuned by careful control of the growth conditions based on a diffusion model of morphological evolution of NWs and optical characterization. By carefully tailoring the emission energies of individual QD, dot-to-dot inhomogeneous broadening of QD stacks in a single NW can be as narrow as 9.3?meV. This method provides huge advantages over traditional QD stack using a strain-induced Stranski-Krastanow growth scheme. We show that it is possible to fabricate up to 200 uniform QDs in single GaAs NWs using this growth technique without degradation of the photoluminescence intensity.

  19. Oxidation of ultrathin GaSe

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Thomas Edwin Beechem; McDonald, Anthony E.; Ohta, Taisuke; Howell, Stephen W.; Kalugin, Nikolai G.; Kowalski, Brian M.; Brumbach, Michael T.; Spataru, Catalin D.; Pask, Jesse A.

    2015-10-26

    Oxidation of exfoliated gallium selenide (GaSe) is investigated through Raman, photoluminescence, Auger, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopies. Photoluminescence and Raman intensity reductions associated with spectral features of GaSe are shown to coincide with the emergence of signatures emanating from the by-products of the oxidation reaction, namely, Ga2Se3 and amorphous Se. Furthermore, photoinduced oxidation is initiated over a portion of a flake highlighting the potential for laser based patterning of two-dimensional heterostructures via selective oxidation.

  20. Oxidation of ultrathin GaSe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas Edwin Beechem; McDonald, Anthony E.; Ohta, Taisuke; Howell, Stephen W.; Kalugin, Nikolai G.; Kowalski, Brian M.; Brumbach, Michael T.; Spataru, Catalin D.; Pask, Jesse A.

    2015-10-26

    Oxidation of exfoliated gallium selenide (GaSe) is investigated through Raman, photoluminescence, Auger, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopies. Photoluminescence and Raman intensity reductions associated with spectral features of GaSe are shown to coincide with the emergence of signatures emanating from the by-products of the oxidation reaction, namely, Ga2Se3 and amorphous Se. Furthermore, photoinduced oxidation is initiated over a portion of a flake highlighting the potential for laser based patterning of two-dimensional heterostructures via selective oxidation.

  1. EVOLUTION OF POST-IMPACT REMNANT HELIUM STARS IN TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA REMNANTS WITHIN THE SINGLE-DEGENERATE SCENARIO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pan, Kuo-Chuan; Ricker, Paul M.; Taam, Ronald E. E-mail: pmricker@illinois.edu

    2013-08-10

    The progenitor systems of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) are still under debate. Based on recent hydrodynamics simulations, non-degenerate companions in the single-degenerate scenario (SDS) should survive the supernova (SN) impact. One way to distinguish between the SDS and the double-degenerate scenario is to search for the post-impact remnant stars (PIRSs) in SN Ia remnants. Using a technique that combines multi-dimensional hydrodynamics simulations with one-dimensional stellar evolution simulations, we have examined the post-impact evolution of helium-rich binary companions in the SDS. It is found that these helium-rich PIRSs (He PIRSs) dramatically expand and evolve to a luminous phase (L {approx} 10{sup 4} L{sub Sun }) about 10 yr after an SN explosion. Subsequently, they contract and evolve to become hot blue-subdwarf-like (sdO-like) stars by releasing gravitational energy, persisting as sdO-like stars for several million years before evolving to the helium red-giant phase. We therefore predict that a luminous OB-like star should be detectable within {approx}30 yr after the SN explosion. Thereafter, it will shrink and become an sdO-like star in the central regions of SN Ia remnants within star-forming regions for SN Ia progenitors evolved via the helium-star channel in the SDS. These He PIRSs are predicted to be rapidly rotating (v{sub rot} {approx}> 50 km s{sup -1}) and to have high spatial velocities (v{sub linear} {approx}> 500 km s{sup -1}). Furthermore, if SN remnants have diffused away and are not recognizable at a later stage, He PIRSs could be an additional source of single sdO stars and/or hypervelocity stars.

  2. Groundwater protection for the NuMI project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wehmann, A.; Smart, W.; Menary, S.; Hylen, J.; Childress, S.

    1997-10-01

    The physics requirements for the long base line neutrino oscillation experiment MINOS dictate that the NuMI beamline be located in the aquifer at Fermilab. A methodology is described for calculating the level of radioactivation of groundwater caused by operation of this beamline. A conceptual shielding design for the 750 meter long decay pipe is investigated which would reduce radioactivation of the groundwater to below government standards. More economical shielding designs to meet these requirements are being explored. Also, information on local geology, hydrogeology, government standards, and a glossary have been included.

  3. Synthesis, morphology and optical properties of GaN and AlGaN semiconductor nanostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuppulingam, B. Singh, Shubra Baskar, K.

    2014-04-24

    Hexagonal Gallium Nitride (GaN) and Aluminum Gallium Nitride (AlGaN) nanoparticles were synthesized by sol-gel method using Ethylene Diamine Tetra Acetic acid (EDTA) complex route. Powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) analysis confirms the hexagonal wurtzite structure of GaN and Al{sub 0.25}Ga{sub 0.75}N nanoparticles. Surface morphology and elemental analysis were carried out by Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). The room temperature Photoluminescence (PL) study shows the near band edge emission for GaN at 3.35 eV and at 3.59 eV for AlGaN nanoparticles. The Aluminum (Al) composition of 20% has been obtained from PL emission around 345 nm.

  4. High-performance InGaP/GaAs pnp {delta}-doped heterojunction bipolar transistor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsai, J.-H. Chiu, S.-Y.; Lour, W.-S.; Guo, D.-F.

    2009-07-15

    In this article, a novel InGaP/GaAs pnp {delta}-doped heterojunction bipolar transistor is first demonstrated. Though the valence band discontinuity at InGaP/GaAs heterojunction is relatively large, the addition of a {delta}-doped sheet between two spacer layers at the emitter-base (E-B) junction effectively eliminates the potential spike and increases the confined barrier for electrons, simultaneously. Experimentally, a high current gain of 25 and a relatively low E-B offset voltage of 60 mV are achieved. The offset voltage is much smaller than the conventional InGaP/GaAs pnp HBT. The proposed device could be used for linear amplifiers and low-power complementary integrated circuit applications.

  5. Zinc blende GaAs films grown on wurtzite GaN/sapphire templates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chaldyshev, V.V.; Nielsen, B.; Mendez, E.E.; Musikhin, Yu.G.; Bert, N.A.; Ma, Zh.; Holden, Todd

    2005-03-28

    1-{mu}m-thick zinc-blende GaAs (111) films were grown by molecular-beam epitaxy on wurtzite GaN/sapphire (0001) templates. In spite of a {approx}20% lattice mismatch, epitaxial growth was realized, so that the GaAs films showed good adhesion and their surface had a larger mirror-like area with an average surface roughness of 10 nm. Transmission electron microscopy revealed a flat and abrupt epitaxial GaAs/GaN interface with some nanocavities and a large number of dislocations. Reasonably good crystalline quality of the GaAs films was confirmed by Raman characterization. Spectroscopic ellipsometry showed sharp interference fringes and characteristic parameters in the range of 0.75-5.3 eV. Photoluminescence study revealed extended band tails and dominance of non-radiative carrier recombination.

  6. Princeton Plasma Physics Lab - General Atomics (GA)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    general-atomics-ga General Atomics en The Scorpion's Strategy: "Catch and Subdue" http:www.pppl.govnode1132

  7. Simplified 2DEG carrier concentration model for composite barrier AlGaN/GaN HEMT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Das, Palash Biswas, Dhrubes

    2014-04-24

    The self consistent solution of Schrodinger and Poisson equations is used along with the total charge depletion model and applied with a novel approach of composite AlGaN barrier based HEMT heterostructure. The solution leaded to a completely new analytical model for Fermi energy level vs. 2DEG carrier concentration. This was eventually used to demonstrate a new analytical model for the temperature dependent 2DEG carrier concentration in AlGaN/GaN HEMT.

  8. GaTe semiconductor for radiation detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Payne, Stephen A.; Burger, Arnold; Mandal, Krishna C.

    2009-06-23

    GaTe semiconductor is used as a room-temperature radiation detector. GaTe has useful properties for radiation detectors: ideal bandgap, favorable mobilities, low melting point (no evaporation), non-hygroscopic nature, and availability of high-purity starting materials. The detector can be used, e.g., for detection of illicit nuclear weapons and radiological dispersed devices at ports of entry, in cities, and off shore and for determination of medical isotopes present in a patient.

  9. Magnetic coupling in ferromagnetic semiconductor (Ga,Mn)As/(Al,Ga,Mn)As bilayers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, M.; Wadley, P.; Campion, R. P.; Rushforth, A. W.; Edmonds, K. W.; Gallagher, B. L.; Charlton, T. R.; Kinane, C. J.; Langridge, S.

    2015-08-07

    We report on a study of ferromagnetic semiconductor (Ga,Mn)As/(Al,Ga,Mn)As bilayers using magnetometry and polarized neutron reflectivity (PNR). From depth-resolved characterization of the magnetic structure obtained by PNR, we concluded that the (Ga,Mn)As and (Al,Ga,Mn)As layers have in-plane and perpendicular-to-plane magnetic easy axes, respectively, with weak interlayer coupling. Therefore, the layer magnetizations align perpendicular to each other under low magnetic fields and parallel at high fields.

  10. miR-129 suppresses tumor cell growth and invasion by targeting PAK5 in hepatocellular carcinoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhai, Jian; Qu, Shuping; Li, Xiaowei; Zhong, Jiaming; Chen, Xiaoxia; Qu, Zengqiang; Wu, Dong

    2015-08-14

    Emerging evidence suggests that microRNAs (miRNAs) play important roles in regulating HCC development and progression; however, the mechanisms by which their specific functions and mechanisms remained to be further explored. miR-129 has been reported in gastric cancers, lung cancer and colon cancer. In this study, we disclosed a new tumor suppresser function of miR-129 in HCC. We also found the downregulation of miR-129 occurred in nearly 3/4 of the tumors examined (56/76) compared with adjacent nontumorous tissues, which was more importantly, correlated to the advanced stage and vascular invasion. We then demonstrated that miR-129 overexpression attenuated HCC cells proliferation and invasion, inducing apoptosis in vitro. Moreover, we used miR-129 antagonist and found that anti-miR-129 promoted HCC cells malignant phenotypes. Mechanistically, our further investigations revealed that miR-129 suppressed cell proliferation and invasion by targeting the 3’-untranslated region of PAK5, as well as miR-129 silencing up-regulated PAK5 expression. Moreover, miR-129 expression was inversely correlated with PAK5 expression in 76 cases of HCC samples. RNA interference of PAK5 attenuated anti-miR-129 mediated cell proliferation and invasion in HCC cells. Taken together, these results demonstrated that miR-129 suppressed tumorigenesis and progression by directly targeting PAK5, defining miR-129 as a potential treatment target for HCC. - Highlights: • Decreased of miR-129 is found in HCC and associated with advanced stage and metastasis. • miR-129 suppresses proliferation and invasion of HCC cells. • miR-129 directly targets the 3′ UTR of PAK5 and diminishes PAK5 expression. • PAK5 is involved in miR-129 mediated suppression functions.

  11. MiR-153 inhibits migration and invasion of human non-small-cell lung cancer by targeting ADAM19

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shan, Nianxi; Shen, Liangfang; Wang, Jun; He, Dan; Duan, Chaojun

    2015-01-02

    Highlights: • Decreased miR-153 and up-regulated ADAM19 are correlated with NSCLC pathology. • MiR-153 inhibits the proliferation and migration and invasion of NSCLC cells in vitro. • ADAM19 is a direct target of miR-153. • ADAM19 is involved in miR-153-suppressed migration and invasion of NSCLC cells. - Abstract: MiR-153 was reported to be dysregulated in some human cancers. However, the function and mechanism of miR-153 in lung cancer cells remains unknown. In this study, we investigated the role of miR-153 in human non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Using qRT-PCR, we demonstrated that miR-153 was significantly decreased in clinical NSCLC tissues and cell lines, and downregulation of miR-153 was significantly correlated with lymph node status. We further found that ectopic expression of miR-153 significantly inhibited the proliferation and migration and invasion of NSCLC cells in vitro, suggesting that miR-153 may be a novel tumor suppressor in NSCLC. Further integrated analysis revealed that ADAM19 is as a direct and functional target of miR-153. Luciferase reporter assay demonstrated that miR-153 directly targeted 3′UTR of ADAM19, and correlation analysis revealed an inverse correlation between miR-153 and ADAM19 mRNA levels in clinical NSCLC tissues. Knockdown of ADAM19 inhibited migration and invasion of NSCLC cells which was similar with effects of overexpression of miR-153, while overexpression of ADAM19 attenuated the function of miR-153 in NSCLC cells. Taken together, our results highlight the significance of miR-153 and ADAM19 in the development and progression of NSCLC.

  12. Transcriptional regulation of miR-146b by C/EBPβ LAP2 in esophageal cancer cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Junxia; Shan, Fabo; Xiong, Gang; Wang, Ju-Ming; Wang, Wen-Lin; Xu, Xueqing; Bai, Yun

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • MiR-146b promotes esophageal cancer cell proliferation. • MiR-146b inhibits esophageal cancer cell apoptosis. • C/EBPβ directly binds to miR-146b promoter conserved region. • MiR-146b is up-regulated by C/EBPβ LAP2 transcriptional activation. - Abstract: Recent clinical study indicated that up-regulation of miR-146b was associated with poor overall survival of patients in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. However, the underlying mechanism of miR-146b dysregulation remains to be explored. Here we report that miR-146b promotes cell proliferation and inhibits cell apoptosis in esophageal cancer cell lines. Mechanismly, two C/EBPβ binding motifs are located in the miR-146b promoter conserved region. Among the three isoforms of C/EBPβ, C/EBPβ LAP2 positively regulated miR-146b expression and increases miR-146b levels in a dose-dependent manner through transcription activation of miR-146b gene. Together, these results suggest a miR-146b regulatory mechanism involving C/EBPβ, which may contribute to the up-regulation of miR-146b in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

  13. Accelerated aging of GaAs concentrator solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregory, P.E.

    1982-04-01

    An accelerated aging study of AlGaAs/GaAs solar cells has been completed. The purpose of the study was to identify the possible degradation mechanisms of AlGaAs/GaAs solar cells in terrestrial applications. Thermal storage tests and accelerated AlGaAs corrosion studies were performed to provide an experimental basis for a statistical analysis of the estimated lifetime. Results of this study suggest that a properly designed and fabricated AlGaAs/GaAs solar cell can be mechanically rugged and environmentally stable with projected lifetimes exceeding 100 years.

  14. miR-30a suppresses breast cancer cell proliferation and migration by targeting Eya2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fu, Jing; Xu, Xiaojie; Kang, Lei; Zhou, Liying; Wang, Shibin; Lu, Juming; Cheng, Long; Fan, Zhongyi; Yuan, Bin; Tian, Peirong; Zheng, Xiaofei; Yu, Chengze; Ye, Qinong; Lv, Zhaohui

    2014-03-07

    Highlights: • miR-30a represses Eya2 expression by binding to the 3′-untranslated region of Eya2. • The miR-30a/EYA2 axis regulates breast cancer cell proliferation and migration. • The miR-30a/EYA2 axis modulates G1/S cell cycle progression. • The miR-30a/EYA2 axis is dysregulated in breast cancer patients. - Abstract: Eye absent (Eya) proteins are involved in cell fate determination in a broad spectrum of cells and tissues. Aberrant expression of Eya2 has been documented in a variety of cancers and correlates with clinical outcome. However, whether microRNAs (miRNAs) can regulate Eya2 expression remains unknown. Here, we show that miR-30a represses Eya2 expression by binding to the 3′-untranslated region of Eya2. Overexpression of Eya2 in miR-30a-transfected breast cancer cells effectively rescued the inhibition of cell proliferation and migration caused by miR-30a. Knockdown of Eya2 by small-interfering RNA (siRNA) in breast cancer cells mimicked the effect induced by miR-30a and abolished the ability of miR-30a to regulate breast cancer cell proliferation and migration. The miR-30a/Eya2 axis could regulate G1/S cell cycle progression, accompanied by the modulation of expression of cell cycle-related proteins, including cyclin A, cyclin D1, cyclin E, and c-Myc. Moreover, miR-30a expression was downregulated in breast cancer patients, and negatively correlated with Eya2, which was upregulated in breast cancer patients. These data suggest that the miR-30a/Eya2 axis may play an important role in breast cancer development and progression and that miR-30a activation or Eya2 inhibition may be a useful strategy for cancer treatment.

  15. InGaN/GaN tunnel junctions for hole injection in GaN light emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krishnamoorthy, Sriram E-mail: rajan@ece.osu.edu; Akyol, Fatih; Rajan, Siddharth E-mail: rajan@ece.osu.edu

    2014-10-06

    InGaN/GaN tunnel junction contacts were grown using plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) on top of a metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD)-grown InGaN/GaN blue (450?nm) light emitting diode. A voltage drop of 5.3?V at 100?mA, forward resistance of 2 10{sup ?2} ? cm{sup 2}, and a higher light output power compared to the reference light emitting diodes (LED) with semi-transparent p-contacts were measured in the tunnel junction LED (TJLED). A forward resistance of 5??10{sup ?4} ? cm{sup 2} was measured in a GaN PN junction with the identical tunnel junction contact as the TJLED, grown completely by MBE. The depletion region due to the impurities at the regrowth interface between the MBE tunnel junction and the MOCVD-grown LED was hence found to limit the forward resistance measured in the TJLED.

  16. miR-92a is upregulated in cervical cancer and promotes cell proliferation and invasion by targeting FBXW7

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Chuanyi; Shen, Liangfang; Mao, Lei; Wang, Bing; Li, Yang; Yu, Huizhi

    2015-02-27

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are involved in the cervical carcinogenesis and progression. In this study, we investigated the role of miR-92a in progression and invasion of cervical cancer. MiR-92a was significantly upregulated in cervical cancer tissues and cell lines. Overexpression of miR-92a led to remarkably enhanced proliferation by promoting cell cycle transition from G1 to S phase and significantly enhanced invasion of cervical cancer cells, while its knockdown significantly reversed these cellular events. Bioinformatics analysis suggested F-box and WD repeat domain-containing 7 (FBXW7) as a novel target of miR-92a, and miR-92a suppressed the expression level of FBXW7 mRNA by direct binding to its 3′-untranslated region (3′UTR). Expression of miR-92a was negatively correlated with FBXW7 in cervical cancer tissues. Furthermore, Silencing of FBXW7 counteracted the effects of miR-92a suppression, while its overexpression reversed oncogenic effects of miR-92a. Together, these findings indicate that miR-92a acts as an onco-miRNA and may contribute to the progression and invasion of cervical cancer, suggesting miR-92a as a potential novel diagnostic and therapeutic target of cervical cancer. - Highlights: • miR-92a is elevated in cervical cancer tissues and cell lines. • miR-92a promotes cervical cancer cell proliferation, cell cycle transition from G1 to S phase and invasion. • FBXW7 is a direct target of miR-92a. • FBXW7 counteracts the oncogenic effects of miR-92a on cervical cancer cells.

  17. A Measurement of the Rate of Type Ia Supernovae in Galaxy Clusters from the SDSS-II Supernova Survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dilday, Benjamin; Bassett, Bruce; Becker, Andrew; Bender, Ralf; Castander, Francisco; Cinabro, David; Frieman, Joshua A.; Galbany, Lluis; Garnavich, Peter; Goobar, Ariel; Hopp, Ulrich; /Munich, Tech. U. /Munich U. Observ. /Tokyo U.

    2010-03-01

    We present measurements of the Type Ia supernova (SN) rate in galaxy clusters based on data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II (SDSS-II) Supernova Survey. The cluster SN Ia rate is determined from 9 SN events in a set of 71 C4 clusters at z {le} 0.17 and 27 SN events in 492 maxBCG clusters at 0.1 {le} z {le} 0.3. We find values for the cluster SN Ia rate of (0.37{sub -0.12-0.01}{sup +0.17+0.01}) SNur h{sup 2} and (0.55{sub -0.11-0.01}{sup +0.13+0.02}) SNur h{sup 2} (SNux = 10{sup -12}L{sub x{circle_dot}}{sup -1} yr{sup -1}) in C4 and maxBCG clusters, respectively, where the quoted errors are statistical and systematic, respectively. The SN rate for early-type galaxies is found to be (0.31{sub -0.12-0.01}{sup +0.18+0.01}) SNur h{sup 2} and (0.49{sub -0.11-0.01}{sup +0.15+0.02}) SNur h{sup 2} in C4 and maxBCG clusters, respectively. The SN rate for the brightest cluster galaxies (BCG) is found to be (2.04{sub -1.11-0.04}{sup +1.99+0.07}) SNur h{sup 2} and (0.36{sub -0.30-0.01}{sup +0.84+0.01}) SNur h{sup 2} in C4 and maxBCG clusters, respectively. The ratio of the SN Ia rate in cluster early-type galaxies to that of the SN Ia rate in field early-type galaxies is 1.94{sub -0.91-0.015}{sup +1.31+0.043} and 3.02{sub -1.03-0.048}{sup +1.31+0.062}, for C4 and maxBCG clusters, respectively. The SN rate in galaxy clusters as a function of redshift, which probes the late time SN Ia delay distribution, shows only weak dependence on redshift. Combining our current measurements with previous measurements, we fit the cluster SN Ia rate data to a linear function of redshift, and find r{sub L} = [(0.49{sub -0.14}{sup +0.15}) + (0.91{sub -0.81}{sup +0.85}) x z] SNuB h{sup 2}. A comparison of the radial distribution of SNe in cluster to field early-type galaxies shows possible evidence for an enhancement of the SN rate in the cores of cluster early-type galaxies. With an observation of at most 3 hostless, intra-cluster SNe Ia, we estimate the fraction of cluster SNe that are

  18. GaP ring-like nanostructures on GaAs (100) with In{sub 0.15}Ga{sub 0.85}As compensation layers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prongjit, Patchareewan Pankaow, Naraporn Boonpeng, Poonyasiri Thainoi, Supachok Panyakeow, Somsak Ratanathammaphan, Somchai

    2013-12-04

    We present the fabrication of GaP ring-like nanostructures on GaAs (100) substrates with inserted In{sub 0.15}Ga{sub 0.85}As compensation layers. The samples are grown by droplet epitaxy using solid-source molecular beam epitaxy. The dependency of nanostructural and optical properties of GaP nanostructures on In{sub 0.15}Ga{sub 0.85}As layer thickness is investigated by ex-situ atomic force microscope (AFM) and photoluminescence (PL). It is found that the characteristics of GaP ring-like structures on GaAs strongly depend on the In{sub 0.15}Ga{sub 0.85}As layer thickness.

  19. miR-182 targets CHL1 and controls tumor growth and invasion in papillary thyroid carcinoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, Hongling; Fang, Jin; Zhang, Jichen; Zhao, Zefei; Liu, Lianyong; Wang, Jingnan; Xi, Qian; Gu, Mingjun

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: miR-182 and CHL1 expression patterns are negatively correlated. CHL1 is a direct target of miR-182 in PTC cells. miR-182 suppression inhibits PTC cell growth and invasion. CHL1 is involved in miR-182-mediated cell behavior. - Abstract: In this study, we investigated the role and underlying mechanism of action of miR-182 in papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC). Bioinformatics analysis revealed close homolog of LI (CHL1) as a potential target of miR-182. Upregulation of miR-182 was significantly correlated with CHL1 downregulation in human PTC tissues and cell lines. miR-182 suppressed the expression of CHL1 mRNA through direct targeting of the 3?-untranslated region (3?-UTR). Downregulation of miR-182 suppressed growth and invasion of PTC cells. Silencing of CHL1 counteracted the effects of miR-182 suppression, while its overexpression mimicked these effects. Our data collectively indicate that miR-182 in PTC promotes cell proliferation and invasion through direct suppression of CHL1, supporting the potential utility of miR-182 inhibition as a novel therapeutic strategy against PTC.

  20. Lattice-matched epitaxial GaInAsSb/GaSb thermophotovoltaic devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, C.A.; Choi, H.K.; Turner, G.W.; Spears, D.L.; Manfra, M.J.; Charache, G.W.

    1997-05-01

    The materials development of Ga{sub 1{minus}x}In{sub x}As{sub y}Sb{sub 1{minus}y} alloys for lattice-matched thermophotovoltaic (TPV) devices is reported. Epilayers with cutoff wavelength 2--2.4 {micro}m at room temperature and lattice-matched to GaSb substrates were grown by both low-pressure organometallic vapor phase epitaxy and molecular beam epitaxy. These layers exhibit high optical and structural quality. For demonstrating lattice-matched thermophotovoltaic devices, p- and n-type doping studies were performed. Several TPV device structures were investigated, with variations in the base/emitter thicknesses and the incorporation of a high bandgap GaSb or AlGaAsSb window layer. Significant improvement in the external quantum efficiency is observed for devices with an AlGaAsSb window layer compared to those without one.

  1. Green cubic GaInN/GaN light-emitting diode on microstructured silicon (100)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stark, Christoph J. M.; Detchprohm, Theeradetch; Wetzel, Christian, E-mail: wetzel@ieee.org [Department of Physics, Applied Physics, and Astronomy, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States) [Department of Physics, Applied Physics, and Astronomy, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States); Future Chips Constellation, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 110 8th Street, Troy, New York 12180 (United States); Lee, S. C.; Brueck, S. R. J. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Center for High Technology Materials, University of New Mexico, 1313 Goddard SE, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87106 (United States)] [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Center for High Technology Materials, University of New Mexico, 1313 Goddard SE, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87106 (United States); Jiang, Y.-B. [Department of Earth and Planetary Science, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 (United States)] [Department of Earth and Planetary Science, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 (United States)

    2013-12-02

    GaInN/GaN light-emitting diodes free of piezoelectric polarization were prepared on standard electronic-grade Si(100) substrates. Micro-stripes of GaN and GaInN/GaN quantum wells in the cubic crystal structure were grown on intersecting (111) planes of microscale V-grooved Si in metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy, covering over 50% of the wafer surface area. Crystal phases were identified in electron back-scattering diffraction. A cross-sectional analysis reveals a cubic structure virtually free of line defects. Electroluminescence over 20 to 100??A is found fixed at 487?nm (peak), 516?nm (dominant). Such structures therefore should allow higher efficiency, wavelength-stable light emitters throughout the visible spectrum.

  2. Non-canonical microRNAs miR-320 and miR-702 promote proliferation in Dgcr8-deficient embryonic stem cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Byeong-Moo; Choi, Michael Y.

    2012-09-21

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) lacking non-canonical miRNAs proliferate slower. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-320 and miR-702 are two non-canonical miRNAs expressed in ESCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-320 and miR-702 promote proliferation of Dgcr8-deficient ESCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-320 targets p57 and helps to release Dgcr8-deficient ESCs from G1 arrest. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-702 targets p21 and helps to release Dgcr8-deficient ESCs from G1 arrest. -- Abstract: MicroRNAs are known to contribute significantly to stem cell phenotype by post-transcriptionally regulating gene expression. Most of our knowledge of microRNAs comes from the study of canonical microRNAs that require two sequential cleavages by the Drosha/Dgcr8 heterodimer and Dicer to generate mature products. In contrast, non-canonical microRNAs bypass the cleavage by the Drosha/Dgcr8 heterodimer within the nucleus but still require cytoplasmic cleavage by Dicer. The function of non-canonical microRNAs in embryonic stem cells (ESCs) remains obscure. It has been hypothesized that non-canonical microRNAs have important roles in ESCs based upon the phenotypes of ESC lines that lack these specific classes of microRNAs; Dicer-deficient ESCs lacking both canonical and non-canonical microRNAs have much more severe proliferation defect than Dgcr8-deficient ESCs lacking only canonical microRNAs. Using these cell lines, we identified two non-canonical microRNAs, miR-320 and miR-702, that promote proliferation of Dgcr8-deficient ESCs by releasing them from G1 arrest. This is accomplished by targeting the 3 Prime -untranslated regions of the cell cycle inhibitors p57 and p21 and thereby inhibiting their expression. This is the first report of the crucial role of non-canonical microRNAs in ESCs.

  3. PRODUCTION OF THE p-PROCESS NUCLEI IN THE CARBON-DEFLAGRATION MODEL FOR TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kusakabe, Motohiko; Iwamoto, Nobuyuki; Nomoto, Ken'ichi E-mail: iwamoto.nobuyuki@jaea.go.jp

    2011-01-01

    We calculate the nucleosynthesis of proton-rich isotopes in the carbon-deflagration model for Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). The seed abundances are obtained by calculating the s-process nucleosynthesis that is expected to occur in the repeating helium shell flashes on the carbon-oxygen (CO) white dwarf (WD) during mass accretion from a binary companion. When the deflagration wave passes through the outer layer of the CO WD, p-nuclei are produced by photodisintegration reactions on s-nuclei in a region where the peak temperature ranges from 1.9 to 3.6 x 10{sup 9} K. We confirm the sensitivity of the p-process on the initial distribution of s-nuclei. We show that the initial C/O ratio in the WD does not affect much the yield of p-nuclei. On the other hand, the abundance of {sup 22}Ne left after s-processing has a large influence on the p-process via the {sup 22}Ne({alpha},n) reaction. We find that about 50% of p-nuclides are co-produced when normalized to their solar abundances in all adopted cases of seed distribution. Mo and Ru, which are largely underproduced in Type II supernovae (SNe II), are produced more than in SNe II although they are underproduced with respect to the yield levels of other p-nuclides. The ratios between p-nuclei and iron in the ejecta are larger than the solar ratios by a factor of 1.2. We also compare the yields of oxygen, iron, and p-nuclides in SNe Ia and SNe II and suggest that SNe Ia could make a larger contribution than SNe II to the solar system content of p-nuclei.

  4. The crossing statistic: dealing with unknown errors in the dispersion of Type Ia supernovae

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shafieloo, Arman; Clifton, Timothy; Ferreira, Pedro E-mail: tclifton@astro.ox.ac.uk

    2011-08-01

    We propose a new statistic that has been designed to be used in situations where the intrinsic dispersion of a data set is not well known: The Crossing Statistic. This statistic is in general less sensitive than χ{sup 2} to the intrinsic dispersion of the data, and hence allows us to make progress in distinguishing between different models using goodness of fit to the data even when the errors involved are poorly understood. The proposed statistic makes use of the shape and trends of a model's predictions in a quantifiable manner. It is applicable to a variety of circumstances, although we consider it to be especially well suited to the task of distinguishing between different cosmological models using type Ia supernovae. We show that this statistic can easily distinguish between different models in cases where the χ{sup 2} statistic fails. We also show that the last mode of the Crossing Statistic is identical to χ{sup 2}, so that it can be considered as a generalization of χ{sup 2}.

  5. FIRST EVIDENCE OF GLOBULAR CLUSTER FORMATION FROM THE EJECTA OF PROMPT TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsujimoto, Takuji [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Mitaka-shi, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Bekki, Kenji, E-mail: taku.tsujimoto@nao.ac.jp [ICRAR, M468, The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia)

    2012-06-01

    Recent spectroscopic observations of globular clusters (GCs) in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) have discovered that one of the intermediate-age GCs, NGC 1718, with [Fe/H] = -0.7 has an extremely low [Mg/Fe] ratio of {approx}-0.9. We propose that NGC 1718 was formed from the ejecta of Type Ia supernovae mixed with very metal-poor ([Fe/H] <-1.3) gas about {approx}2 Gyr ago. The proposed scenario is shown to be consistent with the observed abundances of Fe-group elements such as Cr, Mn, and Ni. In addition, compelling evidence for asymptotic giant branch stars playing a role in chemical enrichment during this GC formation is found. We suggest that the origin of the metal-poor gas is closely associated with efficient gas transfer from the outer gas disk of the Small Magellanic Cloud to the LMC disk. We anticipate that the outer part of the LMC disk contains field stars exhibiting significantly low [Mg/Fe] ratios, formed through the same process as NGC 1718.

  6. NuMI proton kicker extraction magnet termination resistor system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reeves, S.R.; Jensen, C.C.; /Fermilab

    2005-05-01

    The temperature stability of the kicker magnet termination resistor assembly directly affects the field flatness and amplitude stability. Comprehensive thermal enhancements were made to the existing Main Injector resistor assembly design to satisfy NuMI performance specifications. Additionally, a fluid-processing system utilizing Fluorinert{reg_sign} FC-77 high-voltage dielectric was built to precisely control the setpoint temperature of the resistor assembly from 70 to 120F, required to maintain constant resistance during changing operational modes. The Fluorinert{reg_sign} must be continually processed to remove hazardous breakdown products caused by radiation exposure to prevent chemical attack of system components. Design details of the termination resistor assembly and Fluorinert{reg_sign} processing system are described. Early performance results will be presented.

  7. Metabolomic profiling of the nectars of Aquilegia pubescens and <i>A. Canadensis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noutsos, Christos; Perera, Ann M.; Nikolau, Basil J.; Seaver, Samuel M. D.; Ware, Doreen H.; Motta, Andrea

    2015-05-01

    To date, variation in nectar chemistry of flowering plants has not been studied in detail. Such variation exerts considerable influence on pollinator–plant interactions, as well as on flower traits that play important roles in the selection of a plant for visitation by specific pollinators. Over the past 60 years the Aquilegia genus has been used as a key model for speciation studies. In this study, we defined the metabolomic profiles of flower samples of two Aquilegia species, <i>A. Canadensis and <i>A. pubescens. We identified a total of 75 metabolites that were classified into six main categories: organic acids, fatty acids, amino acids, esters, sugars, and unknowns. The mean abundances of 25 of these metabolites were significantly different between the two species, providing insights into interspecies variation in floral chemistry. Using the PlantSEED biochemistry database, we found that the majority of these metabolites are involved in biosynthetic pathways. Finally, we explored the annotated genome of <i>A. coerulea, using the PlantSEED pipeline and reconstructed the metabolic network of Aquilegia. This network, which contains the metabolic pathways involved in generating the observed chemical variation, is now publicly available from the DOE Systems Biology Knowledge Base (KBase; http://kbase.us).

  8. Spectroscopic Properties of Star-Forming Host Galaxies and Type Ia Supernova Hubble Residuals in a Nearly Unbiased Sample

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D'Andrea, Chris B.; et al.

    2011-12-20

    We examine the correlation between supernova host galaxy properties and their residuals on the Hubble diagram. We use supernovae discovered during the Sloan Digital Sky Survey II - Supernova Survey, and focus on objects at a redshift of z < 0.15, where the selection effects of the survey are known to yield a complete Type Ia supernova sample. To minimize the bias in our analysis with respect to measured host-galaxy properties, spectra were obtained for nearly all hosts, spanning a range in magnitude of -23 < M_r < -17. In contrast to previous works that use photometric estimates of host mass as a proxy for global metallicity, we analyze host-galaxy spectra to obtain gas-phase metallicities and star-formation rates from host galaxies with active star formation. From a final sample of ~ 40 emission-line galaxies, we find that light-curve corrected Type Ia supernovae are ~ 0.1 magnitudes brighter in high-metallicity hosts than in low-metallicity hosts. We also find a significant (> 3{\\sigma}) correlation between the Hubble residuals of Type Ia supernovae and the specific star-formation rate of the host galaxy. We comment on the importance of supernova/host-galaxy correlations as a source of systematic bias in future deep supernova surveys.

  9. Constraints on the progenitor system of the type Ia supernova 2014J from pre-explosion Hubble space telescope imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelly, Patrick L.; Fox, Ori D.; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Shen, Ken J.; Zheng, WeiKang; Graham, Melissa L.; Tucker, Brad E.; Cenko, S. Bradley; Schaefer, Gail

    2014-07-20

    We constrain the properties of the progenitor system of the highly reddened Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) 2014J in Messier 82 (M82; d ? 3.5 Mpc). We determine the supernova (SN) location using Keck-II K-band adaptive optics images, and we find no evidence for flux from a progenitor system in pre-explosion near-ultraviolet through near-infrared Hubble Space Telescope (HST) images. Our upper limits exclude systems having a bright red giant companion, including symbiotic novae with luminosities comparable to that of RS Ophiuchi. While the flux constraints are also inconsistent with predictions for comparatively cool He-donor systems (T ? 35,000 K), we cannot preclude a system similar to V445 Puppis. The progenitor constraints are robust across a wide range of R{sub V} and A{sub V} values, but significantly greater values than those inferred from the SN light curve and spectrum would yield proportionally brighter luminosity limits. The comparatively faint flux expected from a binary progenitor system consisting of white dwarf stars would not have been detected in the pre-explosion HST imaging. Infrared HST exposures yield more stringent constraints on the luminosities of very cool (T < 3000 K) companion stars than was possible in the case of SN Ia 2011fe.

  10. A POSSIBLE EVOLUTIONARY SCENARIO OF HIGHLY MAGNETIZED SUPER-CHANDRASEKHAR WHITE DWARFS: PROGENITORS OF PECULIAR TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Das, Upasana; Mukhopadhyay, Banibrata; Rao, A. R. E-mail: bm@physics.iisc.ernet.in

    2013-04-10

    Several recently discovered peculiar Type Ia supernovae seem to demand an altogether new formation theory that might help explain the puzzling dissimilarities between them and the standard Type Ia supernovae. The most striking aspect of the observational analysis is the necessity of invoking super-Chandrasekhar white dwarfs having masses {approx}2.1-2.8 M{sub Sun }, M{sub Sun} being the mass of Sun, as their most probable progenitors. Strongly magnetized white dwarfs having super-Chandrasekhar masses have already been established as potential candidates for the progenitors of peculiar Type Ia supernovae. Owing to the Landau quantization of the underlying electron degenerate gas, theoretical results yielded the observationally inferred mass range. Here, we sketch a possible evolutionary scenario by which super-Chandrasekhar white dwarfs could be formed by accretion on to a commonly observed magnetized white dwarf, invoking the phenomenon of flux freezing. This opens multiple possible evolution scenarios ending in supernova explosions of super-Chandrasekhar white dwarfs having masses within the range stated above. We point out that our proposal has observational support, such as the recent discovery of a large number of magnetized white dwarfs by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey.

  11. Downregulation of miRNA-30c and miR-203a is associated with hepatitis C virus core protein-induced epithelial–mesenchymal transition in normal hepatocytes and hepatocellular carcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Dongjing; Wu, Jilin; Liu, Meizhou; Yin, Hui; He, Jiantai; Zhang, Bo

    2015-09-04

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) Core protein has been demonstrated to induce epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) and is associated with cancer progression of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, how the Core protein regulates EMT is still unclear. In this study, HCV Core protein was overexpressed by an adenovirus. The protein levels of EMT markers were measured by Western blot. The xenograft animal model was established by inoculation of HepG2 cells. Results showed that ectopic expression of HCV core protein induced EMT in L02 hepatocytes and HepG2 tumor cells by upregulating vimentin, Sanl1, and Snal2 expression and downregulating E-cadherin expression. Moreover, Core protein downregulated miR-30c and miR-203a levels in L02 and HepG2 cells, but artificial expression of miR-30c and miR-203a reversed Core protein-induced EMT. Further analysis showed that ectopic expression of HCV core protein stimulated cell proliferation, inhibited apoptosis, and increased cell migration, whereas artificial expression of miR-30c and miR-203a significantly reversed the role of Core protein in these cell functions in L02 and HepG2 cells. In the HepG2 xenograft tumor models, artificial expression of miR-30c and miR-203a inhibited EMT and tumor growth. Moreover, L02 cells overexpressing Core protein can form tumors in nude mice. In HCC patients, HCV infection significantly shortened patients' survival time, and loss of miR-30c and miR-203 expression correlated with poor survival. In conclusion, HCV core protein downregulates miR-30c and miR-203a expression, which results in activation of EMT in normal hepatocytes and HCC tumor cells. The Core protein-activated-EMT is involved in the carcinogenesis and progression of HCC. Loss of miR-30c and miR-203a expression is a marker for the poor prognosis of HCC. - Highlights: • HCV core protein downregulates miR-30c and miR-203a expression. • Downregulation of miR-30c and miR-203a activates EMT. • Activated-EMT is involved in the

  12. Radiogenic p-isotopes from type Ia supernova, nuclear physics uncertainties, and galactic chemical evolution compared with values in primitive meteorites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Travaglio, C.; Gallino, R.; Rauscher, T.; Dauphas, N.; Rpke, F. K.; Hillebrandt, W. E-mail: claudia.travaglio@b2fh.org

    2014-11-10

    The nucleosynthesis of proton-rich isotopes is calculated for multi-dimensional Chandrasekhar-mass models of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) with different metallicities. The predicted abundances of the short-lived radioactive isotopes {sup 92}Nb, {sup 97,} {sup 98}Tc, and {sup 146}Sm are given in this framework. The abundance seeds are obtained by calculating s-process nucleosynthesis in the material accreted onto a carbon-oxygen white dwarf from a binary companion. A fine grid of s-seeds at different metallicities and {sup 13}C-pocket efficiencies is considered. A galactic chemical evolution model is used to predict the contribution of SN Ia to the solar system p-nuclei composition measured in meteorites. Nuclear physics uncertainties are critical to determine the role of SNe Ia in the production of {sup 92}Nb and {sup 146}Sm. We find that, if standard Chandrasekhar-mass SNe Ia are at least 50% of all SN Ia, they are strong candidates for reproducing the radiogenic p-process signature observed in meteorites.

  13. miR-128 and its target genes in tumorigenesis and metastasis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Molin, E-mail: molin_li@hotmail.com [Dalian Medical University, Dalian 116044 (China); Fu, Weiming [Center for Food Safety and Environmental Technology, Guangzhou Institute of Advanced Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 511458 (China); Wo, Lulu; Shu, Xiaohong [Dalian Medical University, Dalian 116044 (China); Liu, Fang [The second affiliated hospital of Dalian Medical University, Dalian 116023 (China); Li, Chuangang, E-mail: li_chuangang@sina.com [The second affiliated hospital of Dalian Medical University, Dalian 116023 (China)

    2013-12-10

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of endogenous, non-coding, 1824 nucleotide length single-strand RNAs that could modulate gene expression at post-transcriptional level. Previous studies have shown that miR-128 enriched in the brain plays an important role in the development of nervous system and the maintenance of normal physical functions. Aberrant expression of miR-128 has been detected in many types of human tumors and its validated target genes are involved in cancer-related biological processes such as cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. In this review, we will summarize the roles of miR-128 and its target genes in tumorigenesis and metastasis. - Highlights: Aberrant expression of miR-128 can be observed in many kinds of malignant tumors. The molecular mechanisms regulating miR-128 expression are elucidated. Roles of miR-128 and its target genes in tumorigenesis and metastasis are summarized.

  14. miR-125b inhibits osteoblastic differentiation by down-regulation of cell proliferation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mizuno, Yosuke; Yagi, Ken; Tokuzawa, Yoshimi; Kanesaki-Yatsuka, Yukiko; Suda, Tatsuo; Katagiri, Takenobu; Fukuda, Toru; Maruyama, Masayoshi; Okuda, Akihiko; Amemiya, Tomoyuki; Kondoh, Yasumitsu; Tashiro, Hideo; Okazaki, Yasushi

    2008-04-04

    Although various microRNAs regulate cell differentiation and proliferation, no miRNA has been reported so far to play an important role in the regulation of osteoblast differentiation. Here we describe the role of miR-125b in osteoblastic differentiation in mouse mesenchymal stem cells, ST2, by regulating cell proliferation. The expression of miR-125b was time-dependently increased in ST2 cells, and the increase in miR-125b expression was attenuated in osteoblastic-differentiated ST2 cells induced by BMP-4. The transfection of exogenous miR-125b inhibited proliferation of ST2 cells and caused inhibition of osteoblastic differentiation. In contrast, when the endogenous miR-125b was blocked by transfection of its antisense RNA molecule, alkaline phosphatase activity after BMP-4 treatment was elevated. These results strongly suggest that miR-125b is involved in osteoblastic differentiation through the regulation of cell proliferation.

  15. GaN: Defect and Device Issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pearton, S.J.; Ren, F.; Shul, R.J.; Zolper, J.C.

    1998-11-09

    The role of extended and point defects, and key impurities such as C, O and H, on the electrical and optical properties of GaN is reviewed. Recent progress in the development of high reliability contacts, thermal processing, dry and wet etching techniques, implantation doping and isolation and gate insulator technology is detailed. Finally, the performance of GaN-based electronic and photonic devices such as field effect transistors, UV detectors, laser diodes and light-emitting diodes is covered, along with the influence of process-induced or grown-in defects and impurities on the device physics.

  16. GaAs photoconductive semiconductor switch

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Loubriel, G.M.; Baca, A.G.; Zutavern, F.J.

    1998-09-08

    A high gain, optically triggered, photoconductive semiconductor switch (PCSS) implemented in GaAs as a reverse-biased pin structure with a passivation layer above the intrinsic GaAs substrate in the gap between the two electrodes of the device is disclosed. The reverse-biased configuration in combination with the addition of the passivation layer greatly reduces surface current leakage that has been a problem for prior PCSS devices and enables employment of the much less expensive and more reliable DC charging systems instead of the pulsed charging systems that needed to be used with prior PCSS devices. 5 figs.

  17. GaAs photoconductive semiconductor switch

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Loubriel, Guillermo M.; Baca, Albert G.; Zutavern, Fred J.

    1998-01-01

    A high gain, optically triggered, photoconductive semiconductor switch (PCSS) implemented in GaAs as a reverse-biased pin structure with a passivation layer above the intrinsic GaAs substrate in the gap between the two electrodes of the device. The reverse-biased configuration in combination with the addition of the passivation layer greatly reduces surface current leakage that has been a problem for prior PCSS devices and enables employment of the much less expensive and more reliable DC charging systems instead of the pulsed charging systems that needed to be used with prior PCSS devices.

  18. Enhanced thermoelectric transport in modulation-doped GaN/AlGaN core/shell nanowires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Song, Erdong; Li, Qiming; Swartzentruber, Brian; Pan, Wei; Wang, George T.; Martinez, Julio A.

    2015-11-25

    The thermoelectric properties of unintentionally n-doped core GaN/AlGaN core/shell N-face nanowires are reported. We found that the temperature dependence of the electrical conductivity is consistent with thermally activated carriers with two distinctive donor energies. The Seebeck coefficient of GaN/AlGaN nanowires is more than twice as large as that for the GaN nanowires alone. However, an outer layer of GaN deposited onto the GaN/AlGaN core/shell nanowires decreases the Seebeck coefficient at room temperature, while the temperature dependence of the electrical conductivity remains the same. We attribute these observations to the formation of an electron gas channel within the heavily-doped GaN core of the GaN/AlGaN nanowires. The room-temperature thermoelectric power factor for the GaN/AlGaN nanowires can be four times higher than the GaN nanowires. As a result, selective doping in bandgap engineered core/shell nanowires is proposed for enhancing the thermoelectric power.

  19. Enhanced thermoelectric transport in modulation-doped GaN/AlGaN core/shell nanowires

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Song, Erdong; Li, Qiming; Swartzentruber, Brian; Pan, Wei; Wang, George T.; Martinez, Julio A.

    2015-11-25

    The thermoelectric properties of unintentionally n-doped core GaN/AlGaN core/shell N-face nanowires are reported. We found that the temperature dependence of the electrical conductivity is consistent with thermally activated carriers with two distinctive donor energies. The Seebeck coefficient of GaN/AlGaN nanowires is more than twice as large as that for the GaN nanowires alone. However, an outer layer of GaN deposited onto the GaN/AlGaN core/shell nanowires decreases the Seebeck coefficient at room temperature, while the temperature dependence of the electrical conductivity remains the same. We attribute these observations to the formation of an electron gas channel within the heavily-doped GaN coremore » of the GaN/AlGaN nanowires. The room-temperature thermoelectric power factor for the GaN/AlGaN nanowires can be four times higher than the GaN nanowires. As a result, selective doping in bandgap engineered core/shell nanowires is proposed for enhancing the thermoelectric power.« less

  20. InGaAs/GaAs quantum dot interdiffiusion induced by cap layer overgrowth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jasinski, J.; Babinski, A.; Czeczott, M.; Bozek, R.

    2000-06-28

    The effect of thermal treatment during and after growth of InGaAs/GaAs quantum dot (QD) structures was studied. Transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy confirmed the presence of interacting QDs, as was expected from analysis of temperature dependence of QD photoluminescence (PL) peak. The results indicate that the effect of post-growth annealing can be similar to the effect of elevated temperature of capping layer growth. Both, these thermal treatments can lead to a similar In and Ga interdiffiusion resulting in a similar blue-shift of QD PL peak.

  1. Optical spectroscopy of quantum confined states in GaAs/AlGaAs quantum well tubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shi, Teng; Fickenscher, Melodie; Smith, Leigh; Jackson, Howard; Yarrison-Rice, Jan; Gao, Qiang; Tan, Hoe; Jagadish, Chennupati; Etheridge, Joanne; Wong, Bryan M.

    2013-12-04

    We have investigated the quantum confinement of electronic states in GaAs/Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1?x}As nanowire heterostructures which contain radial GaAs quantum wells of either 4nm or 8nm. Photoluminescence and photoluminescence excitation spectroscopy are performed on single nanowires. We observed emission and excitation of electron and hole confined states. Numerical calculations of the quantum confined states using the detailed structural information on the quantum well tubes show excellent agreement with these optical results.

  2. Structural and optical properties of InGaN--GaN nanowire heterostructures grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Limbach, F.; Gotschke, T.; Stoica, T.; Calarco, R.; Sutter, E.; Ciston, J.; Cusco, R.; Artus, L.; Kremling, S.; Hofling, S.; et al

    2011-01-01

    InGaN/GaN nanowire (NW) heterostructures grown by plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy were studied in comparison to their GaN and InGaN counterparts. The InGaN/GaN heterostructure NWs are composed of a GaN NW, a thin InGaN shell, and a multifaceted InGaN cap wrapping the top part of the GaN NW. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) images taken from different parts of a InGaN/GaN NW show a wurtzite structure of the GaN core and the epitaxial InGaN shell around it, while additional crystallographic domains are observed whithin the InGaN cap region. Large changes in the lattice parameter along the wire, from pure GaNmore » to higher In concentration demonstrate the successful growth of a complex InGaN/GaN NW heterostructure. Photoluminescence (PL) spectra of these heterostructure NW ensembles show rather broad and intense emission peak at 2.1 eV. However, μ-PL spectra measured on single NWs reveal a reduced broadening of the visible luminescence. The analysis of the longitudinal optical phonon Raman peak position and its shape reveal a variation in the In content between 20% and 30%, in agreement with the values estimated by PL and HRTEM investigations. The reported studies are important for understanding of the growth and properties of NW heterostructures suitable for applications in optoelectronics and photovoltaics.« less

  3. Structural and optical properties of InGaN--GaN nanowire heterostructures grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Limbach, F.; Gotschke, T.; Stoica, T.; Calarco, R.; Sutter, E.; Ciston, J.; Cusco, R.; Artus, L.; Kremling, S.; Hofling, S.; Worschech, L.; Grutzmacher, D.

    2011-01-01

    InGaN/GaN nanowire (NW) heterostructures grown by plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy were studied in comparison to their GaN and InGaN counterparts. The InGaN/GaN heterostructure NWs are composed of a GaN NW, a thin InGaN shell, and a multifaceted InGaN cap wrapping the top part of the GaN NW. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) images taken from different parts of a InGaN/GaN NW show a wurtzite structure of the GaN core and the epitaxial InGaN shell around it, while additional crystallographic domains are observed whithin the InGaN cap region. Large changes in the lattice parameter along the wire, from pure GaN to higher In concentration demonstrate the successful growth of a complex InGaN/GaN NW heterostructure. Photoluminescence (PL) spectra of these heterostructure NW ensembles show rather broad and intense emission peak at 2.1 eV. However, μ-PL spectra measured on single NWs reveal a reduced broadening of the visible luminescence. The analysis of the longitudinal optical phonon Raman peak position and its shape reveal a variation in the In content between 20% and 30%, in agreement with the values estimated by PL and HRTEM investigations. The reported studies are important for understanding of the growth and properties of NW heterostructures suitable for applications in optoelectronics and photovoltaics.

  4. Structural and optical properties of InGaNGaN nanowire heterostructures grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Limbach, F.; Gotschke, T.; Stoica, T.; Calarco, R.; Sutter, E.; Ciston, J.; Cusco, R.; Artus, L.; Kremling, S.; Ho?fling, S.; et al

    2011-01-01

    InGaN/GaN nanowire (NW) heterostructures grown by plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy were studied in comparison to their GaN and InGaN counterparts. The InGaN/GaN heterostructure NWs are composed of a GaN NW, a thin InGaN shell, and a multifaceted InGaN cap wrapping the top part of the GaN NW. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) images taken from different parts of a InGaN/GaN NW show a wurtzite structure of the GaN core and the epitaxial InGaN shell around it, while additional crystallographic domains are observed whithin the InGaN cap region. Large changes in the lattice parameter along the wire, from pure GaNmoreto higher In concentration demonstrate the successful growth of a complex InGaN/GaN NW heterostructure. Photoluminescence (PL) spectra of these heterostructure NW ensembles show rather broad and intense emission peak at 2.1 eV. However, ?-PL spectra measured on single NWs reveal a reduced broadening of the visible luminescence. The analysis of the longitudinal optical phonon Raman peak position and its shape reveal a variation in the In content between 20% and 30%, in agreement with the values estimated by PL and HRTEM investigations. The reported studies are important for understanding of the growth and properties of NW heterostructures suitable for applications in optoelectronics and photovoltaics.less

  5. Investigation of surface-plasmon coupled red light emitting InGaN/GaN multi-quantum well with Ag nanostructures coated on GaN surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Yi; Liu, Bin E-mail: rzhang@nju.edu.cn; Zhang, Rong E-mail: rzhang@nju.edu.cn; Xie, Zili; Zhuang, Zhe; Dai, JiangPing; Tao, Tao; Zhi, Ting; Zhang, Guogang; Chen, Peng; Ren, Fangfang; Zhao, Hong; Zheng, Youdou

    2015-04-21

    Surface-plasmon (SP) coupled red light emitting InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well (MQW) structure is fabricated and investigated. The centre wavelength of 5-period InGaN/GaN MQW structure is about 620?nm. The intensity of photoluminescence (PL) for InGaN QW with naked Ag nano-structures (NS) is only slightly increased due to the oxidation of Ag NS as compared to that for the InGaN QW. However, InGaN QW with Ag NS/SiO{sub 2} structure can evidently enhance the emission efficiency due to the elimination of surface oxide layer of Ag NS. With increasing the laser excitation power, the PL intensity is enhanced by 25%53% as compared to that for the SiO{sub 2} coating InGaN QW. The steady-state electric field distribution obtained by the three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain method is different for both structures. The proportion of the field distributed in the Ag NS for the GaN/Ag NS/SiO{sub 2} structure is smaller as compared to that for the GaN/naked Ag NS structure. As a result, the energy loss of localized SP modes for the GaN/naked Ag NS structure will be larger due to the absorption of Ag layer.

  6. Strain-compensated (Ga,In)N/(Al,Ga)N/GaN multiple quantum wells for improved yellow/amber light emission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lekhal, K.; Damilano, B. De Mierry, P.; Venngus, P.; Ngo, H. T.; Rosales, D.; Gil, B.; Hussain, S.

    2015-04-06

    Yellow/amber (570600?nm) emitting In{sub x}Ga{sub 1?x}N/Al{sub y}Ga{sub 1?y}N/GaN multiple quantum wells (QWs) have been grown by metal organic chemical vapor deposition on GaN-on- sapphire templates. When the (Al,Ga)N thickness of the barrier increases, the room temperature photoluminescence is red-shifted while its yield increases. This is attributed to an increase of the QW internal electric field and an improvement of the material quality due to the compensation of the compressive strain of the In{sub x}Ga{sub 1?x}N QWs by the Al{sub y}Ga{sub 1?y}N layers, respectively.

  7. THE DETONATION MECHANISM OF THE PULSATIONALLY ASSISTED GRAVITATIONALLY CONFINED DETONATION MODEL OF Type Ia SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jordan, G. C. IV; Graziani, C.; Weide, K.; Norris, J.; Hudson, R.; Lamb, D. Q.; Fisher, R. T.; Townsley, D. M.; Meakin, C.; Reid, L. B.

    2012-11-01

    We describe the detonation mechanism composing the 'pulsationally assisted' gravitationally confined detonation (GCD) model of Type Ia supernovae. This model is analogous to the previous GCD model reported in Jordan et al.; however, the chosen initial conditions produce a substantively different detonation mechanism, resulting from a larger energy release during the deflagration phase. The resulting final kinetic energy and {sup 56}Ni yields conform better to observational values than is the case for the 'classical' GCD models. In the present class of models, the ignition of a deflagration phase leads to a rising, burning plume of ash. The ash breaks out of the surface of the white dwarf, flows laterally around the star, and converges on the collision region at the antipodal point from where it broke out. The amount of energy released during the deflagration phase is enough to cause the star to rapidly expand, so that when the ash reaches the antipodal point, the surface density is too low to initiate a detonation. Instead, as the ash flows into the collision region (while mixing with surface fuel), the star reaches its maximally expanded state and then contracts. The stellar contraction acts to increase the density of the star, including the density in the collision region. This both raises the temperature and density of the fuel-ash mixture in the collision region and ultimately leads to thermodynamic conditions that are necessary for the Zel'dovich gradient mechanism to produce a detonation. We demonstrate feasibility of this scenario with three three-dimensional (3D), full star simulations of this model using the FLASH code. We characterized the simulations by the energy released during the deflagration phase, which ranged from 38% to 78% of the white dwarf's binding energy. We show that the necessary conditions for detonation are achieved in all three of the models.

  8. Persistent C II absorption in the normal type Ia supernova 2002fk

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cartier, Rgis; Zelaya, Paula [Millennium Institute of Astrophysics, Casilla 36-D, Santiago (Chile); Hamuy, Mario; Maza, Jos; Gonzlez, Luis; Huerta, Leonor [Departamento de Astronoma, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 36-D, Santiago (Chile); Pignata, Giuliano [Departamento Ciencias Fisicas, Universidad Andres Bello, Av. Repblica 252, Santiago (Chile); Frster, Francisco [Center for Mathematical Modelling, Universidad de Chile, Avenida Blanco Encalada 2120, Piso 7, Santiago (Chile); Folatelli, Gaston [Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (IPMU), University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan); Phillips, Mark M.; Morrell, Nidia; Contreras, Carlos; Roth, Miguel; Gonzlez, Sergio [Carnegie Institution of Washington, Las Campanas Observatory, Colina el Pino s/n, Casilla 601 (Chile); Krisciunas, Kevin; Suntzeff, Nicholas B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A and M University, 4242 TAMU, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Clocchiatti, Alejandro [Departamento de Astronoma y Astrofsica, Pontificia Universidad Catlica de Chile, Casilla 306, Santiago (Chile); Coppi, Paolo [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520-8101 (United States); Koviak, Kathleen, E-mail: rcartier@das.uchile.cl [Carnegie Institution of Washington, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 911901 (United States)

    2014-07-01

    We present well-sampled UBVRIJHK photometry of SN 2002fk starting 12 days before maximum light through 122 days after peak brightness, along with a series of 15 optical spectra from 4 to +95 days since maximum. Our observations show the presence of C II lines in the early-time spectra of SN 2002fk, expanding at 11,000 km s{sup 1} and persisting until 8 days past maximum light with a velocity of ?9000 km s{sup 1}. SN 2002fk is characterized by a small velocity gradient of v-dot {sub Si} {sub II}=26 km s{sup 1} day{sup 1}, possibly caused by an off-center explosion with the ignition region oriented toward the observer. The connection between the viewing angle of an off-center explosion and the presence of C II in the early-time spectrum suggests that the observation of C II could be also due to a viewing angle effect. Adopting the Cepheid distance to NGC 1309 we provide the first H {sub 0} value based on near-infrared (near-IR) measurements of a Type Ia supernova (SN) between 63.0 0.8 (3.4 systematic) and 66.7 1.0 (3.5 systematic) km s{sup 1} Mpc{sup 1}, depending on the absolute magnitude/decline rate relationship adopted. It appears that the near-IR yields somewhat lower (6%-9%) H {sub 0} values than the optical. It is essential to further examine this issue by (1) expanding the sample of high-quality near-IR light curves of SNe in the Hubble flow, and (2) increasing the number of nearby SNe with near-IR SN light curves and precise Cepheid distances, which affords the promise to deliver a more precise determination of H {sub 0}.

  9. Overexpression of miR-206 suppresses glycolysis, proliferation and migration in breast cancer cells via PFKFB3 targeting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ge, Xin; Lyu, Pengwei; Cao, Zhang; Li, Jingruo; Guo, Guangcheng; Xia, Wanjun; Gu, Yuanting

    2015-08-07

    miRNAs, sorting as non-coding RNAs, are differentially expressed in breast tumor and act as tumor promoters or suppressors. miR-206 could suppress the progression of breast cancer, the mechanism of which remains unclear. The study here was aimed to investigate the effect of miR-206 on human breast cancers. We found that miR-206 was down-regulated while one of its predicted targets, 6-Phosphofructo-2-kinase (PFKFB3) was up-regulated in human breast carcinomas. 17β-estradiol dose-dependently decreased miR-206 expression as well as enhanced PFKFB3 mRNA and protein expression in estrogen receptor α (ERα) positive breast cancer cells. Furthermore, we identified that miR-206 directly interacted with 3′-untranslated region (UTR) of PFKFB3 mRNA. miR-206 modulated PFKFB3 expression in MCF-7, T47D and SUM159 cells, which was influenced by 17β-estradiol depending on ERα expression. In addition, miR-206 overexpression impeded fructose-2,6-bisphosphate (F2,6BP) production, diminished lactate generation and reduced cell proliferation and migration in breast cancer cells. In conclusion, our study demonstrated that miR-206 regulated PFKFB3 expression in breast cancer cells, thereby stunting glycolysis, cell proliferation and migration. - Highlights: • miR-206 was down-regulated and PFKFB3 was up-regulated in human breast carcinomas. • 17β-estradiol regulated miR-206 and PFKFB3 expression in ERα+ cancer cells. • miR-206directly interacted with 3′-UTR of PFKFB3 mRNA. • miR-206 fructose-2,6-bisphosphate (F2,6BP) impeded production and lactate generation. • miR-206 reduced cell proliferation and migration in breast cancer cells.

  10. Composition profiling of GaAs/AlGaAs quantum dots grown by droplet epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bocquel, J.; Koenraad, P. M.; Giddings, A. D.; Prosa, T. J.; Larson, D. J.; Mano, T.

    2014-10-13

    Droplet epitaxy (DE) is a growth method which can create III-V quantum dots (QDs) whose optoelectronic properties can be accurately controlled through the crystallisation conditions. In this work, GaAs/AlGaAs DE-QDs have been analyzed with the complimentary techniques of cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy and atom probe tomography. Structural details and a quantitative chemical analysis of QDs of different sizes are obtained. Most QDs were found to be pure GaAs, while a small proportion exhibited high intermixing caused by a local etching process. Large QDs with a high aspect ratio were observed to have an Al-rich crown above the GaAs QD. This structure is attributed to differences in mobility of the cations during the capping phase of the DE growth.

  11. High-field quasi-ballistic transport in AlGaN/GaN heterostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Danilchenko, B. A.; Tripachko, N. A.; Belyaev, A. E.; Vitusevich, S. A. Hardtdegen, H.; Lth, H.

    2014-02-17

    Mechanisms of electron transport formation in 2D conducting channels of AlGaN/GaN heterostructures in extremely high electric fields at 4.2?K have been studied. Devices with a narrow constriction for the current flow demonstrate high-speed electron transport with an electron velocity of 6.8??10{sup 7}?cm/s. Such a velocity is more than two times higher than values reported for conventional semiconductors and about 15% smaller than the limit value predicted for GaN. Superior velocity is attained in the channel with considerable carrier reduction. The effect is related to a carrier runaway phenomenon. The results are in good agreement with theoretical predictions for GaN-based materials.

  12. On strongly GA-convex functions and stochastic processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bekar, Nurgl Okur; Akdemir, Hande Gnay; ??can, ?mdat

    2014-08-20

    In this study, we introduce strongly GA-convex functions and stochastic processes. We provide related well-known Kuhn type results and Hermite-Hadamard type inequality for strongly GA-convex functions and stochastic processes.

  13. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATlON OF CONTRACT MI54 I See...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    MI54 I See Block 16C I REQ. NO. Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Pantex, LLC PO Box 30020 Amarillo, TX 79120 2. AMENDMENTIMODIFICATION NO. 1 3. EFFECTIVE DATE 1 4. ...

  14. File:USDA-CE-Production-GIFmaps-MI.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    MI.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Michigan Ethanol Plant Locations Size of this preview: 463 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 600 pixels. Full...

  15. On-sun concentrator performance of GaInP/GaAs tandem cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friedman, D.J.; Kurtz, S.R.; Sinha, K.; McMahon, W.E.; Olson, J.M.

    1996-05-01

    The GaInP/GaAs concentrator device has been adapted for and tested in a prototype {open_quotes}real-world{close_quotes} concentrator power system. The device achieved an on-sun efficiency of 28% {+-} 1% in the range of approximately 200-260 suns with device operating temperatures of 38{degrees}C to 42{degrees}C. The authors discuss ways of further improving this performance for future devices.

  16. InGaAs/GaAs (110) quantum dot formation via step meandering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diez-Merino, Laura; Tejedor, Paloma

    2011-07-01

    InGaAs (110) semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) offer very promising prospects as a material base for a new generation of high-speed spintronic devices, such as single electron transistors for quantum computing. However, the spontaneous formation of InGaAs QDs is prevented by two-dimensional (2D) layer-by-layer growth on singular GaAs (110) substrates. In this work we have studied, by using atomic force microscopy and photoluminescence spectroscopy (PL), the growth of InGaAs/GaAs QDs on GaAs (110) stepped substrates by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE), and the modification of the adatom incorporation kinetics to surface steps in the presence of chemisorbed atomic hydrogen. The as-grown QDs exhibit lateral dimensions below 100 nm and emission peaks in the 1.35-1.37 eV range. It has been found that a step meandering instability derived from the preferential attachment of In adatoms to [110]-step edges relative to [11n]-type steps plays a key role in the destabilization of 2D growth that leads to 3D mound formation on both conventional and H-terminated vicinal substrates. In the latter case, the driving force for 3D growth via step meandering is enhanced by H-induced upward mass transport in addition to the lower energy cost associated with island formation on H-terminated substrates, which results in a high density array of InGaAs/GaAs dots selectively nucleated on the terrace apices with reduced lateral dimensions and improved PL efficiency relative to those of conventional MBE-grown samples.

  17. Sheet resistance under Ohmic contacts to AlGaN/GaN heterostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hajłasz, M.; Donkers, J. J. T. M.; Sque, S. J.; Heil, S. B. S.; Gravesteijn, D. J.; Rietveld, F. J. R.; Schmitz, J.

    2014-06-16

    For the determination of specific contact resistance in semiconductor devices, it is usually assumed that the sheet resistance under the contact is identical to that between the contacts. This generally does not hold for contacts to AlGaN/GaN structures, where an effective doping under the contact is thought to come from reactions between the contact metals and the AlGaN/GaN. As a consequence, conventional extraction of the specific contact resistance and transfer length leads to erroneous results. In this Letter, the sheet resistance under gold-free Ti/Al-based Ohmic contacts to AlGaN/GaN heterostructures on Si substrates has been investigated by means of electrical measurements, transmission electron microscopy, and technology computer-aided design simulations. It was found to be significantly lower than that outside of the contact area; temperature-dependent electrical characterization showed that it exhibits semiconductor-like behavior. The increase in conduction is attributed to n-type activity of nitrogen vacancies in the AlGaN. They are thought to form during rapid thermal annealing of the metal stack when Ti extracts nitrogen from the underlying semiconductor. The high n-type doping in the region between the metal and the 2-dimensional electron gas pulls the conduction band towards the Fermi level and enhances horizontal electron transport in the AlGaN. Using this improved understanding of the properties of the material underneath the contact, accurate values of transfer length and specific contact resistance have been extracted.

  18. AlGaAs/GaAs photovoltaic converters for high power narrowband radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khvostikov, Vladimir; Kalyuzhnyy, Nikolay; Mintairov, Sergey; Potapovich, Nataliia; Shvarts, Maxim; Sorokina, Svetlana; Andreev, Viacheslav; Luque, Antonio

    2014-09-26

    AlGaAs/GaAs-based laser power PV converters intended for operation with high-power (up to 100 W/cm{sup 2}) radiation were fabricated by LPE and MOCVD techniques. Monochromatic (? = 809 nm) conversion efficiency up to 60% was measured at cells with back surface field and low (x = 0.2) Al concentration 'window'. Modules with a voltage of 4 V and the efficiency of 56% were designed and fabricated.

  19. Lateral and Vertical Transistors Using the AlGaN/GaN Heterostructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chowdhury, S; Mishra, UK

    2013-10-01

    Power conversion losses are endemic in all areas of electricity consumption, including motion control, lighting, air conditioning, and information technology. Si, the workhorse of the industry, has reached its material limits. Increasingly, the lateral AlGaN/GaN HEMT based on gallium nitride (GaN-on-Si) is becoming the device of choice for medium power electronics as it enables high-power conversion efficiency and reduced form factor at attractive pricing for wide market penetration. The reduced form factor enabled by high-efficiency operation at high frequency further enables significant system price reduction because of savings in bulky extensive passive elements and heat sink costs. The high-power market, however, still remains unaddressed by lateral GaN devices. The current and voltage demand for high power conversion application makes the chip area in a lateral topology so large that it becomes more difficult to manufacture. Vertical GaN devices would play a big role alongside of silicon carbide (SiC) to address the high power conversion needs. In this paper, the development, performance, and status of lateral and vertical GaN devices are discussed.

  20. GaNPAs Solar Cells Lattice-Matched To GaP: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geisz, J. F.; Friedman, D. J.; Kurtz, S.

    2002-05-01

    This conference paper describes the III-V semiconductors grown on silicon substrates are very attractive for lower-cost, high-efficiency multijunction solar cells, but lattice-mismatched alloys that result in high dislocation densities have been unable to achieve satisfactory performance. GaNxP1-x-yAsy is a direct-gap III-V alloy that can be grown lattice-matched to Si when y= 4.7x - 0.1. We propose the use of lattice-matched GaNPAs on silicon for high-efficiency multijunction solar cells. We have grown GaNxP1-x-yAsy on GaP (with a similar lattice constant to silicon) by metal-organic chemical vapor phase epitaxy with direct band-gaps in the range of 1.5 to 2.0 eV. We demonstrate the performance of single-junction GaNxP1-x-yAsy solar cells grown on GaP substrates and discuss the prospects for the development of monolithic high-efficiency multijunction solar cells based on silicon substrates.

  1. Climate Action Champions: Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians, MI |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians, MI Climate Action Champions: Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians, MI The Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians is a 44,000-strong federally recognized Indian tribe that is an economic, social and cultural force in its community across the eastern Upper Peninsula counties of Chippewa, Luce, Mackinac, Schoolcraft, Alger, Delta and Marquette, with housing and tribal centers, casinos, and other enterprises that employ

  2. MID-IR SPECTRA OF TYPE Ia SN 2014J IN M82 SPANNING THE FIRST 4 MONTHS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Telesco, Charles M.; Li, Dan; Barnes, Peter J.; Mariñas, Naibí; Zhang, Han; Höflich, Peter; Álvarez, Carlos; Fernández, Sergio; Rebolo, Rafael; Hough, James H.; Levenson, N. A.; Pantin, Eric; Roche, Patrick E-mail: phoeflich77@gmail.com

    2015-01-10

    We present a time series of 8-13 μm spectra and photometry for SN 2014J obtained 57, 81, 108, and 137 days after the explosion using CanariCam on the Gran Telescopio Canarias. This is the first mid-IR time series ever obtained for a Type Ia supernova (SN Ia). These observations can be understood within the framework of the delayed detonation model and the production of ∼0.6 M {sub ☉} of {sup 56}Ni, consistent with the observed brightness, the brightness decline relation, and the γ-ray fluxes. The [Co III] line at 11.888 μm is particularly useful for evaluating the time evolution of the photosphere and measuring the amount of {sup 56}Ni and thus the mass of the ejecta. Late-time line profiles of SN 2014J are rather symmetric and not shifted in the rest frame. We see argon emission, which provides a unique probe of mixing in the transition layer between incomplete burning and nuclear statistical equilibrium. We may see [Fe III] and [Ni IV] emission, both of which are observed to be substantially stronger than indicated by our models. If the latter identification is correct, then we are likely observing stable Ni, which might imply central mixing. In addition, electron capture, also required for stable Ni, requires densities larger than ∼1 × 10{sup 9} g cm{sup –3}, which are expected to be present only in white dwarfs close to the Chandrasekhar limit. This study demonstrates that mid-IR studies of SNe Ia are feasible from the ground and provide unique information, but it also indicates the need for better atomic data.

  3. Systematic uncertainties associated with the cosmological analysis of the first Pan-STARRS1 type Ia supernova sample

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scolnic, D.; Riess, A.; Brout, D.; Rodney, S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Rest, A. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Huber, M. E.; Tonry, J. L. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Foley, R. J.; Chornock, R.; Berger, E.; Soderberg, A. M.; Stubbs, C. W.; Kirshner, R. P.; Challis, P.; Czekala, I.; Drout, M. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Narayan, G. [Department of Physics, Harvard University, 17 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Smartt, S. J.; Botticella, M. T. [Astrophysics Research Centre, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queens University Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Schlafly, E. [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Konigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); and others

    2014-11-01

    We probe the systematic uncertainties from the 113 Type Ia supernovae (SN Ia) in the Pan-STARRS1 (PS1) sample along with 197 SN Ia from a combination of low-redshift surveys. The companion paper by Rest et al. describes the photometric measurements and cosmological inferences from the PS1 sample. The largest systematic uncertainty stems from the photometric calibration of the PS1 and low-z samples. We increase the sample of observed Calspec standards from 7 to 10 used to define the PS1 calibration system. The PS1 and SDSS-II calibration systems are compared and discrepancies up to ?0.02 mag are recovered. We find uncertainties in the proper way to treat intrinsic colors and reddening produce differences in the recovered value of w up to 3%. We estimate masses of host galaxies of PS1 supernovae and detect an insignificant difference in distance residuals of the full sample of 0.037 0.031 mag for host galaxies with high and low masses. Assuming flatness and including systematic uncertainties in our analysis of only SNe measurements, we find w =?1.120{sub ?0.206}{sup +0.360}(Stat){sub ?0.291}{sup +0.269}(Sys). With additional constraints from Baryon acoustic oscillation, cosmic microwave background (CMB) (Planck) and H {sub 0} measurements, we find w=?1.166{sub ?0.069}{sup +0.072} and ?{sub m}=0.280{sub ?0.012}{sup +0.013} (statistical and systematic errors added in quadrature). The significance of the inconsistency with w = 1 depends on whether we use Planck or Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe measurements of the CMB: w{sub BAO+H0+SN+WMAP}=?1.124{sub ?0.065}{sup +0.083}.

  4. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5. Coal Consumers in the Manufacturing and Coke Sectors, 2014 Company Name Plant Location Top Ten Manufacturers American Crystal Sugar Co MN, ND Archer Daniels Midland IA, IL, MN, NE Carmeuse Lime Stone Inc AL, IN, KY, MI, OH, PA, TN, WI Cemex Inc AL, CA, CO, FL, GA, KY, OH, TN, TX Dakota Gasification Company ND Eastman Chemical Company TN Georgia-Pacific Consumer Products LP AL, GA, OK, VA, WI Holcim (US) Inc AL, CO, MD, MO, MT, OK, SC, TX, UT NewPage Corporation MD, MI, WI U S Steel

  5. Nearby Supernova Factory Observations of SN 2005gj: Another TypeIa Supernova in a Massive Circumstellar Envelope

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aldering, G.; Antilogus, P.; Bailey, S.; Baltay, C.; Bauer, A.; Blanc, N.; Bongard, S.; Copin, Y.; Gangler, E.; Gilles, S.; Kessler, R.; Kocevski, D.; Lee, B.C.; Loken, S.; Nugent, P.; Pain, R.; Pecontal, E.; Pereira, R.; Perlmutter, S.; Rabinowitz, D.; Rigaudier, G.; Scalzo, R.; Smadja, G.; Thomas, R.C.; Wang, L.; Weaver, B.A.; Rabinowitz, D.; Bauer, A.

    2006-06-01

    We report the independent discovery and follow-up observations of supernova 2005gj by the Nearby Supernova Factory. This is the second confirmed case of a ''hybrid'' Type Ia/IIn supernova, which like the prototype SN 2002ic, we interpret as the explosion of a white dwarf interacting with a circumstellar medium. Our early-phase photometry of SN 2005gj shows that the strength of the interaction between the supernova ejecta and circumstellar material is much stronger than for SN 2002ic. Our .rst spectrum shows a hot continuum with broad and narrow H{alpha} emission. Later spectra, spanning over 4 months from outburst, show clear Type Ia features combined with broad and narrow H{gamma}, H{beta},H{alpha} and He I {lambda}{lambda}5876,7065 in emission. At higher resolution, P Cygni profiles are apparent. Surprisingly, we also observe an inverted P Cygni profile for [O III] {lambda}5007. We find that the lightcurve and measured velocity of the unshocked circumstellar material imply mass loss as recently as 8 years ago. This is in contrast to SN 2002ic, for which an inner cavity in the circumstellar material was inferred. Within the context of the thin-shell approximation, the early lightcurve is well-described by a flat radial density profile for the circumstellar material. However, our decomposition of the spectra into Type Ia and shock emission components allows for little obscuration of the supernova, suggesting an aspherical or clumpy distribution for the circumstellar material. We suggest that the emission line velocity profiles arise from electron scattering rather than the kinematics of the shock. This is supported by the inferred high densities, and the lack of evidence for evolution in the line widths. Ground- and space-based photometry, and Keck spectroscopy, of the host galaxy are used to ascertain that the host galaxy has low metallicity (Z/Z{sub {circle_dot}} < 0.3; 95% confidence) and that this galaxy is undergoing a significant star formation event that

  6. DISPLAYING THE HETEROGENEITY OF THE SN 2002cx-LIKE SUBCLASS OF TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE WITH OBSERVATIONS OF THE Pan-STARRS-1 DISCOVERED SN 2009ku

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Narayan, G.; Foley, R. J.; Berger, E.; Chornock, R.; Rest, A.; Soderberg, A. M.; Kirshner, R. P.; Botticella, M. T.; Smartt, S.; Valenti, S.; Huber, M. E.; Scolnic, D.; Grav, T.; Burgett, W. S.; Chambers, K. C.; Flewelling, H. A.; Gates, G.; Kaiser, N.; Magnier, E. A.; Morgan, J. S. E-mail: rfoley@cfa.harvard.edu

    2011-04-10

    SN 2009ku, discovered by Pan-STARRS-1, is a Type Ia supernova (SN Ia), and a member of the distinct SN 2002cx-like class of SNe Ia. Its light curves are similar to the prototypical SN 2002cx, but are slightly broader and have a later rise to maximum in g. SN 2009ku is brighter ({approx}0.6 mag) than other SN 2002cx-like objects, peaking at M{sub V} = -18.4 mag, which is still significantly fainter than typical SNe Ia. SN 2009ku, which had an ejecta velocity of {approx}2000 km s{sup -1} at 18 days after maximum brightness, is spectroscopically most similar to SN 2008ha, which also had extremely low-velocity ejecta. However, SN 2008ha had an exceedingly low luminosity, peaking at M{sub V} = -14.2 mag, {approx}4 mag fainter than SN 2009ku. The contrast of high luminosity and low ejecta velocity for SN 2009ku is contrary to an emerging trend seen for the SN 2002cx class. SN 2009ku is a counterexample of a previously held belief that the class was more homogeneous than typical SNe Ia, indicating that the class has a diverse progenitor population and/or complicated explosion physics. As the first example of a member of this class of objects from the new generation of transient surveys, SN 2009ku is an indication of the potential for these surveys to find rare and interesting objects.

  7. Lattice-Mismatched GaAs/InGaAs Two-Junction Solar Cells by Direct Wafer Bonding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tanabe, K.; Aiken, D. J.; Wanlass, M. W.; Morral, A. F.; Atwater, H. A.

    2006-01-01

    Direct bonded interconnect between subcells of a lattice-mismatched III-V compound multijunction cell would enable dislocation-free active regions by confining the defect network needed for lattice mismatch accommodation to tunnel junction interfaces, while metamorphic growth inevitably results in less design flexibility and lower material quality than is desirable. The first direct-bond interconnected multijunction solar cell, a two-terminal monolithic GaAs/InGaAs two-junction solar cell, is reported and demonstrates viability of direct wafer bonding for solar cell applications. The tandem cell open-circuit voltage was approximately the sum of the subcell open-circuit voltages. This achievement shows direct bonding enables us to construct lattice-mismatched III-V multijunction solar cells and is extensible to an ultrahigh efficiency InGaP/GaAs/InGaAsP/InGaAs four-junction cell by bonding a GaAs-based lattice-matched InGaP/GaAs subcell and an InP-based lattice-matched InGaAsP/InGaAs subcell. The interfacial resistance experimentally obtained for bonded GaAs/InP smaller than 0.10 Ohm-cm{sup 2} would result in a negligible decrease in overall cell efficiency of {approx}0.02%, under 1-sun illumination.

  8. Hybrid type-I InAs/GaAs and type-II GaSb/GaAs quantum dot structure with enhanced photoluminescence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ji, Hai-Ming; Liang, Baolai Simmonds, Paul J.; Juang, Bor-Chau; Yang, Tao; Young, Robert J.; Huffaker, Diana L.

    2015-03-09

    We investigate the photoluminescence (PL) properties of a hybrid type-I InAs/GaAs and type-II GaSb/GaAs quantum dot (QD) structure grown in a GaAs matrix by molecular beam epitaxy. This hybrid QD structure exhibits more intense PL with a broader spectral range, compared with control samples that contain only InAs or GaSb QDs. This enhanced PL performance is attributed to additional electron and hole injection from the type-I InAs QDs into the adjacent type-II GaSb QDs. We confirm this mechanism using time-resolved and power-dependent PL. These hybrid QD structures show potential for high efficiency QD solar cell applications.

  9. Properties of (Ga,Mn)As codoped with Li

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miyakozawa, Shohei; Chen, Lin; Matsukura, Fumihiro; Ohno, Hideo

    2014-06-02

    We grow Li codoped (Ga,Mn)As layers with nominal Mn composition up to 0.15 by molecular beam epitaxy. The layers before and after annealing are characterized by x-ray diffraction, transport, magnetization, and ferromagnetic resonance measurements. The codoping with Li reduces the lattice constant and electrical resistivity of (Ga,Mn)As after annealing. We find that (Ga,Mn)As:Li takes similar Curie temperature to that of (Ga,Mn)As, but with pronounced magnetic moments and in-plane magnetic anisotropy, indicating that the Li codoping has nontrivial effects on the magnetic properties of (Ga,Mn)As.

  10. miR-196a targets netrin 4 and regulates cell proliferation and migration of cervical cancer cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Jie; Zheng, Fangxia; Yu, Gang; Yin, Yanhua; Lu, Qingyang

    2013-11-01

    Highlights: miR-196a was overexpressed in cervical cancer tissue compared to normal tissue. miR-196a expression elevated proliferation and migration of cervical cancer cells. miR-196a inhibited NTN4 expression by binding 3?-UTR region of NTN4 mRNA. NTN4 inversely correlated with miR-196a expression in cervical tissue and cell line. NTN4 expression was low in cervical cancer tissue compared to normal tissue. -- Abstract: Recent research has uncovered tumor-suppressive and oncogenic potential of miR-196a in various tumors. However, the expression and mechanism of its function in cervical cancer remains unclear. In this study, we assess relative expression of miR-196a in cervical premalignant lesions, cervical cancer tissues, and four cancer cell lines using quantitative real-time PCR. CaSki and HeLa cells were treated with miR-196a inhibitors, mimics, or pCDNA/miR-196a to investigate the role of miR-196a in cancer cell proliferation and migration. We demonstrated that miR-196a was overexpressed in cervical intraepithelial neoplasia 23 and cervical cancer tissue. Moreover, its expression contributes to the proliferation and migration of cervical cancer cells, whereas inhibiting its expression led to a reduction in proliferation and migration. Five candidate targets of miR-196a chosen by computational prediction and Cervical Cancer Gene Database search were measured for their mRNA in both miR-196a-overexpressing and -depleted cancer cells. Only netrin 4 (NTN4) expression displayed an inverse association with miR-196a. Fluorescent reporter assays revealed that miR-196a inhibited NTN4 expression by targeting one binding site in the 3?-untranslated region (3?-UTR) of NTN4 mRNA. Furthermore, qPCR and Western blot assays verified NTN4 expression was downregulated in cervical cancer tissues compared to normal controls, and in vivo mRNA level of NTN4 inversely correlated with miR-196a expression. In summary, our findings provide new insights about the functional role of

  11. Study of the effects of GaN buffer layer quality on the dc characteristics of AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ahn, Shihyun; Zhu, Weidi; Dong, Chen; Le, Lingcong; Hwang, Ya-Hsi; Kim, Byung-Jae; Ren, Fan; Pearton, Stephen J.; Lind, Aaron G.; Jones, Kevin S.; et al

    2015-04-21

    Here we studied the effect of buffer layer quality on dc characteristics of AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility (HEMTs). AlGaN/GaN HEMT structures with 2 and 5 μm GaN buffer layers on sapphire substrates from two different vendors with the same Al concentration of AlGaN were used. The defect densities of HEMT structures with 2 and 5 μm GaN buffer layer were 7 × 109 and 5 × 108 cm₋2, respectively, as measured by transmission electron microscopy. There was little difference in drain saturation current or in transfer characteristics in HEMTs on these two types of buffer. However, there was no dispersionmore » observed on the nonpassivated HEMTs with 5 μm GaN buffer layer for gate-lag pulsed measurement at 100 kHz, which was in sharp contrast to the 71% drain current reduction for the HEMT with 2 μm GaN buffer layer.« less

  12. Reactive codoping of GaAlInP compound semiconductors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hanna, Mark Cooper; Reedy, Robert

    2008-02-12

    A GaAlInP compound semiconductor and a method of producing a GaAlInP compound semiconductor are provided. The apparatus and method comprises a GaAs crystal substrate in a metal organic vapor deposition reactor. Al, Ga, In vapors are prepared by thermally decomposing organometallic compounds. P vapors are prepared by thermally decomposing phospine gas, group II vapors are prepared by thermally decomposing an organometallic group IIA or IIB compound. Group VIB vapors are prepared by thermally decomposing a gaseous compound of group VIB. The Al, Ga, In, P, group II, and group VIB vapors grow a GaAlInP crystal doped with group IIA or IIB and group VIB elements on the substrate wherein the group IIA or IIB and a group VIB vapors produced a codoped GaAlInP compound semiconductor with a group IIA or IIB element serving as a p-type dopant having low group II atomic diffusion.

  13. Three-junction solar cells comprised of a thin-film GaInP/GaAs tandem cell mechanically stacked on a Si cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yazawa, Y.; Tamura, K.; Watahiki, S.; Kitatani, T.; Ohtsuka, H.; Warabisako, T.

    1997-12-31

    Three-junction tandem solar cells were fabricated by mechanical stacking of a thin-film GaInP/GaAs monolithic tandem cell and a Si cell. The epitaxial lift-off (ELO) technique was used for the thinning of GaInP/GaAs tandem cells. Both spectral responses of the GaInP top cell and the GaAs middle cell in the thin-film GaInP/GaAs monolithic tandem cell were conserved. The Si cell performance has been improved by reducing the absorption loss in the GaAs substrate.

  14. Chemical beam epitaxy growth of AlGaAs/GaAs tunnel junctions using trimethyl aluminium for multijunction solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paquette, B.; DeVita, M.; Turala, A.; Kolhatkar, G.; Boucherif, A.; Jaouad, A.; Aimez, V.; Ars, R.; Wilkins, M.; Wheeldon, J. F.; Walker, A. W.; Hinzer, K.; Fafard, S.

    2013-09-27

    AlGaAs/GaAs tunnel junctions for use in high concentration multijunction solar cells were designed and grown by chemical beam epitaxy (CBE) using trimethyl aluminium (TMA) as the p-dopant source for the AlGaAs active layer. Controlled hole concentration up to 4?10{sup 20} cm{sup ?3} was achieved through variation in growth parameters. Fabricated tunnel junctions have a peak tunneling current up to 6140 A/cm{sup 2}. These are suitable for high concentration use and outperform GaAs/GaAs tunnel junctions.

  15. 0.7-eV GaInAs Junction for a GaInP/GaAs/GaInAs(1eV)/GaInAs(0.7eV) Four-Junction Solar Cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friedman, D. J.; Geisz, J. F.; Norman, A. G.; Wanlass, M. W.; Kurtz, S. R.

    2006-01-01

    We discuss recent developments in III-V multijunction solar cells, focusing on adding a fourth junction to the Ga{sub 0.5}In{sub 0.5} P/GaAs/Ga{sub 0.75}In{sub 0.25}As inverted three-junction cell. This cell, grown inverted on GaAs so that the lattice-mismatched Ga{sub 0.75}In{sub 0.25}As third junction is the last one grown, has demonstrated 38% efficiency, and 40% is likely in the near future. To achieve still further gains, a lower-bandgap Ga{sub x}In{sub 1-x}As fourth junction could be added to the three-junction structure for a four-junction cell whose efficiency could exceed 45% under concentration. Here, we present the initial development of the Ga{sub x}In{sub 1-x}As fourth junction. Junctions of various bandgaps ranging from 0.88 to 0.73 eV were grown, in order to study the effect of the different amounts of lattice mismatch. At a bandgap of 0.88 eV, junctions were obtained with very encouraging {approx}80% quantum efficiency, 57% fill factor, and 0.36 eV open-circuit voltage. The device performance degrades with decreasing bandgap (i.e., increasing lattice mismatch). We model the four-junction device efficiency vs. fourth junction bandgap to show that an 0.7-eV fourth-junction bandgap, while optimal if it could be achieved in practice, is not necessary; an 0.9-eV bandgap would still permit significant gains in multijunction cell efficiency while being easier to achieve than the lower-bandgap junction.

  16. miR-214 promotes the proliferation and invasion of osteosarcoma cells through direct suppression of LZTS1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Zhengyu; Wang, Tao

    2014-06-27

    Highlights: • miR-214 is upregulated in human OS tissues and inversely correlated with LZTS1 expression. • miR-214 directly targets LZTS1 by binding to its 3′-UTR. • miR-214 promotes OS cell proliferation, invasion and tumor growth. • Overexpression of LZTS1 reverses miR-214-induced proliferation and invasion of OS cells. - Abstract: Previous studies have shown that miR-214 functions either as an oncogene or a tumor suppressor in various human cancer types. The role of this microRNA in osteosarcoma (OS) is presently unclear. Here, we demonstrated that miR-214 is frequently upregulated in OS specimens, compared with noncancerous bone tissues. Bioinformatics analysis further revealed leucine zipper, putative tumor suppressor 1 (LZTS1) as a potential target of miR-214. Expression patterns of miR-214 were inversely correlated with those of LZTS1 mRNA and protein in OS tissues. Data from reporter assays showed that miR-214 directly binds to the 3′-untranslated region (3′-UTR) of LZTS1 mRNA and suppresses expression at both transcriptional and translational levels. In functional assays, miR-214 promoted OS cell proliferation, invasion and tumor growth in nude mice, which could be reversed by overexpression of LZTS1. Taken together, our data provide compelling evidence that miR-214 functions as an onco-miRNA in OS, and its oncogenic effects are mediated chiefly through downregulation of LZTS1.

  17. Integrating AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor with Si: A comparative study of integration schemes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohan, Nagaboopathy; Raghavan, Srinivasan; Manikant,; Soman, Rohith

    2015-10-07

    AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor stacks deposited on a single growth platform are used to compare the most common transition, AlN to GaN, schemes used for integrating GaN with Si. The efficiency of these transitions based on linearly graded, step graded, interlayer, and superlattice schemes on dislocation density reduction, stress management, surface roughness, and eventually mobility of the 2D-gas are evaluated. In a 500 nm GaN probe layer deposited, all of these transitions result in total transmission electron microscopy measured dislocations densities of 1 to 3 × 10{sup 9}/cm{sup 2} and <1 nm surface roughness. The 2-D electron gas channels formed at an AlGaN-1 nm AlN/GaN interface deposited on this GaN probe layer all have mobilities of 1600–1900 cm{sup 2}/V s at a carrier concentration of 0.7–0.9 × 10{sup 13}/cm{sup 2}. Compressive stress and changes in composition in GaN rich regions of the AlN-GaN transition are the most effective at reducing dislocation density. Amongst all the transitions studied the step graded transition is the one that helps to implement this feature of GaN integration in the simplest and most consistent manner.

  18. Electron tunneling spectroscopy study of electrically active traps in AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Jie Cui, Sharon; Ma, T. P.; Hung, Ting-Hsiang; Nath, Digbijoy; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Rajan, Siddharth

    2013-11-25

    We investigate the energy levels of electron traps in AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors by the use of electron tunneling spectroscopy. Detailed analysis of a typical spectrum, obtained in a wide gate bias range and with both bias polarities, suggests the existence of electron traps both in the bulk of AlGaN and at the AlGaN/GaN interface. The energy levels of the electron traps have been determined to lie within a 0.5?eV band below the conduction band minimum of AlGaN, and there is strong evidence suggesting that these traps contribute to Frenkel-Poole conduction through the AlGaN barrier.

  19. Efficiency enhancement of InGaN/GaN solar cells with nanostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bai, J.; Yang, C. C.; Athanasiou, M.; Wang, T.

    2014-02-03

    We demonstrate InGaN/GaN multi-quantum-well solar cells with nanostructures operating at a wavelength of 520?nm. Nanostructures with a periodic nanorod or nanohole array are fabricated by means of modified nanosphere lithography. Under 1 sun air-mass 1.5 global spectrum illumination, a fill factor of 50 and an open circuit voltage of 1.9?V are achieved in spite of very high indium content in InGaN alloys usually causing degradation of crystal quality. Both the nanorod array and the nanohole array significantly improve the performance of solar cells, while a larger enhancement is observed for the nanohole array, where the conversion efficiency is enhanced by 51%.

  20. Electrical compensation by Ga vacancies in Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korhonen, E.; Tuomisto, F.; Gogova, D.; Wagner, G.; Baldini, M.; Galazka, Z.; Schewski, R.; Albrecht, M.

    2015-06-15

    The authors have applied positron annihilation spectroscopy to study the vacancy defects in undoped and Si-doped Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} thin films. The results show that Ga vacancies are formed efficiently during metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy growth of Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} thin films. Their concentrations are high enough to fully account for the electrical compensation of Si doping. This is in clear contrast to another n-type transparent semiconducting oxide In{sub 2}O{sub 3}, where recent results show that n-type conductivity is not limited by cation vacancies but by other intrinsic defects such as O{sub i}.

  1. Graphene in ohmic contact for both n-GaN and p-GaN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhong, Haijian; Liu, Zhenghui; Shi, Lin; Xu, Gengzhao; Fan, Yingmin; Huang, Zengli; Wang, Jianfeng; Ren, Guoqiang; Xu, Ke

    2014-05-26

    The wrinkles of single layer graphene contacted with either n-GaN or p-GaN were found both forming ohmic contacts investigated by conductive atomic force microscopy. The local IV results show that some of the graphene wrinkles act as high-conductive channels and exhibiting ohmic behaviors compared with the flat regions with Schottky characteristics. We have studied the effects of the graphene wrinkles using density-functional-theory calculations. It is found that the standing and folded wrinkles with zigzag or armchair directions have a tendency to decrease or increase the local work function, respectively, pushing the local Fermi level towards n- or p-type GaN and thus improving the transport properties. These results can benefit recent topical researches and applications for graphene as electrode material integrated in various semiconductor devices.

  2. A InGaN/GaN quantum dot green ({lambda}=524 nm) laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang Meng; Banerjee, Animesh; Lee, Chi-Sen; Hinckley, John M.; Bhattacharya, Pallab

    2011-05-30

    The characteristics of self-organized InGaN/GaN quantum dot lasers are reported. The laser heterostructures were grown on c-plane GaN substrates by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy and the laser facets were formed by focused ion beam etching with gallium. Emission above threshold is characterized by a peak at 524 nm (green) and linewidth of 0.7 nm. The lowest measured threshold current density is 1.2 kA/cm{sup 2} at 278 K. The slope and wall plug efficiencies are 0.74 W/A and {approx}1.1%, respectively, at 1.3 kA/cm{sup 2}. The value of T{sub 0}=233 K in the temperature range of 260-300 K.

  3. Raman spectroscopy of InGaAs/GaAs nanoheterostructures δ-doped with Mn

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Plankina, S. M.; Vikhrova, O. V.; Danilov, Yu. A.; Zvonkov, B. N.; Kalentyeva, I. L.; Nezhdanov, A. V.; Chunin, I. I.; Yunin, P. A.

    2015-01-15

    The results of complex studies of InGaAs/GaAs nanoheterostructures δ-doped with Mn are reported. The structures are grown by metal-organic vapor-phase epitaxy in combination with laser deposition. By confocal Raman spectroscopy, it is shown that the low-temperature δ-doped GaAs cap layers are of higher crystal quality compared to uniformly doped layers. Scattering of light in the coupled phonon-plasmon mode is observed. The appearance of this mode is conditioned by the diffusion of manganese from the δ-layer. The thickness of the cap layer is found to be d{sub c} ≈ 9–20 nm, optimal for attainment of the highest photoluminescence intensity of the quantum well and the highest layer concentration of holes by doping with manganese.

  4. Photocapacitance study of type-II GaSb/GaAs quantum ring solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagener, M. C.; Botha, J. R.; Carrington, P. J.; Krier, A.

    2014-01-07

    In this study, the density of states associated with the localization of holes in GaSb/GaAs quantum rings are determined by the energy selective charging of the quantum ring distribution. The authors show, using conventional photocapacitance measurements, that the excess charge accumulated within the type-II nanostructures increases with increasing excitation energies for photon energies above 0.9?eV. Optical excitation between the localized hole states and the conduction band is therefore not limited to the ?(k?=?0) point, with pseudo-monochromatic light charging all states lying within the photon energy selected. The energy distribution of the quantum ring states could consequently be accurately related from the excitation dependence of the integrated photocapacitance. The resulting band of localized hole states is shown to be well described by a narrow distribution centered 407?meV above the GaAs valence band maximum.

  5. miR-421 induces cell proliferation and apoptosis resistance in human nasopharyngeal carcinoma via downregulation of FOXO4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Liang; Department of Otolaryngology, Guangzhou General Hospital of PLA Guangzhou Command, Guangzhou 510010 ; Tang, Yanping; Wang, Jian; Yan, Zhongjie; Xu, Ruxiang

    2013-06-14

    Highlights: •miR-421 is upregulated in nasopharyngeal carcinoma. •miR-421 induces cell proliferation and apoptosis resistance. •FOXO4 is a direct and functional target of miR-421. -- Abstract: microRNAs have been demonstrated to play important roles in cancer development and progression. Hence, identifying functional microRNAs and better understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms would provide new clues for the development of targeted cancer therapies. Herein, we reported that a microRNA, miR-421 played an oncogenic role in nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Upregulation of miR-421 induced, whereas inhibition of miR-421 repressed cell proliferation and apoptosis resistance. Furthermore, we found that upregulation of miR-421 inhibited forkhead box protein O4 (FOXO4) signaling pathway following downregulation of p21, p27, Bim and FASL expression by directly targeting FOXO4 3′UTR. Additionally, we demonstrated that FOXO4 expression is critical for miR-421-induced cell growth and apoptosis resistance. Taken together, our findings not only suggest that miR-421 promotes nasopharyngeal carcinoma cell proliferation and anti-apoptosis, but also uncover a novel regulatory mechanism for inactivation of FOXO4 in nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

  6. Analysis of defects in GaAsN grown by chemical beam epitaxy on high index GaAs substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bouzazi, Boussairi; Kojima, Nobuaki; Ohshita, Yoshio; Yamaguchi, Masafumi

    2013-09-27

    The lattice defects in GaAsN grown by chemical beam epitaxy on GaAs 311B and GaAs 10A toward [110] were characterized and discussed by using deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) and on the basis of temperature dependence of the junction capacitances (C{sub J}). In one hand, GaAsN films grown on GaAs 311B and GaAs 10A showed n-type and p-type conductivities, respectively although the similar and simultaneous growth conditions. This result is indeed in contrast to the common known effect of N concentration on the type of conductivity, since the surface 311B showed a significant improvement in the incorporation of N. Furthermore, the temperature dependence of C{sub J} has shown that GaAs 311B limits the formation of N-H defects. In the other hand, the energy states in the forbidden gap of GaAsN were obtained. Six electron traps, E1 to E6, were observed in the DLTS spectrum of GaAsN grown on GaAs 311B, with apparent activation energies of 0.02, 0.14, 0.16, 0.33, 0.48, and 0.74 eV below the bottom edge of the conduction band, respectively. In addition, four hole traps, H1 to H4, were observed in the DLTS spectrum of GaAsN grown on GaAs 10A, with energy depths of 0.13, 0.20, 0.39, and 0.52 eV above the valence band maximum of the alloy, respectively. Hence, the surface morphology of the GaAs substrate was found to play a key factor role in clarifying the electrical properties of GaAsN grown by CBE.

  7. Refractive index of erbium doped GaN thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alajlouni, S.; Sun, Z. Y.; Li, J.; Lin, J. Y.; Jiang, H. X.; Zavada, J. M.

    2014-08-25

    GaN is an excellent host for erbium (Er) to provide optical emission in the technologically important as well as eye-safe 1540 nm wavelength window. Er doped GaN (GaN:Er) epilayers were synthesized on c-plane sapphire substrates using metal organic chemical vapor deposition. By employing a pulsed growth scheme, the crystalline quality of GaN:Er epilayers was significantly improved over those obtained by conventional growth method of continuous flow of reaction precursors. X-ray diffraction rocking curve linewidths of less than 300 arc sec were achieved for the GaN (0002) diffraction peak, which is comparable to the typical results of undoped high quality GaN epilayers and represents a major improvement over previously reported results for GaN:Er. Spectroscopic ellipsometry was used to determine the refractive index of the GaN:Er epilayers in the 1540 nm wavelength window and a linear dependence on Er concentration was found. The observed refractive index increase with Er incorporation and the improved crystalline quality of the GaN:Er epilayers indicate that low loss GaN:Er optical waveguiding structures are feasible.

  8. Origins of ion irradiation-induced Ga nanoparticle motion on GaAs surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kang, M.; Wu, J. H.; Chen, H. Y.; Thornton, K.; Goldman, R. S. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2136 (United States)] [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2136 (United States); Sofferman, D. L. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2136 (United States) [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2136 (United States); Department of Physics, Adelphi University, Garden City, New York 11530-0701 (United States); Beskin, I. [Department of Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-1040 (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-1040 (United States)

    2013-08-12

    We have examined the origins of ion irradiation-induced nanoparticle (NP) motion. Focused-ion-beam irradiation of GaAs surfaces induces random walks of Ga NPs, which are biased in the direction opposite to that of ion beam scanning. Although the instantaneous NP velocities are constant, the NP drift velocities are dependent on the off-normal irradiation angle, likely due to a difference in surface non-stoichiometry induced by the irradiation angle dependence of the sputtering yield. It is hypothesized that the random walks are initiated by ion irradiation-induced thermal fluctuations, with biasing driven by anisotropic mass transport.

  9. Temperature dependency of the emission properties from positioned In(Ga)As/GaAs quantum dots

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Braun, T.; Schneider, C.; Maier, S.; Forchel, A.; Höfling, S.; Kamp, M.; Igusa, R.; Iwamoto, S.; Arakawa, Y.

    2014-09-15

    In this letter we study the influence of temperature and excitation power on the emission linewidth from site-controlled InGaAs/GaAs quantum dots grown on nanoholes defined by electron beam lithography and wet chemical etching. We identify thermal electron activation as well as direct exciton loss as the dominant intensity quenching channels. Additionally, we carefully analyze the effects of optical and acoustic phonons as well as close-by defects on the emission linewidth by means of temperature and power dependent micro-photoluminescence on single quantum dots with large pitches.

  10. Photoluminescence studies of individual and few GaSb/GaAs quantum rings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, M. P.; Woodhead, C. S.; Roberts, J.; Noori, Y. J.; Noble, M. T.; Krier, A.; Hayne, M.; Young, R. J.; Smakman, E. P.; Koenraad, P. M.

    2014-11-15

    We present optical studies of individual and few GaSb quantum rings embedded in a GaAs matrix. Contrary to expectation for type-II confinement, we measure rich spectra containing sharp lines. These lines originate from excitonic recombination and are observed to have resolution-limited full-width at half maximum of 200 ?eV. The detail provided by these measurements allows the characteristic type-II blueshift, observed with increasing excitation power, to be studied at the level of individual nanostructures. These findings are in agreement with hole-charging being the origin of the observed blueshift.

  11. Application of the ASME code in the design of the GA-4 and GA-9 casks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mings, W.J. ); Koploy, M.A. )

    1992-01-01

    General Atomics (GA) is developing two spent fuel shipping casks for transport by legal weight truck (LWT). The casks are designed to the loading, environmental conditions and safety requirements defined in Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Part 71 (10CFR71). To ensure that all components of the cask meet the 10CFR71 rules, GA established structural design criteria for each component based on NRC Regulatory Guides and the American Society of Mechanical Engineers Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (ASME Code). This paper discusses the criteria used for different cask components, how they were applied and the conservatism and safety margins built into the criteria and assumption.

  12. Application of the ASME code in the design of the GA-4 and GA-9 casks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mings, W.J.; Koploy, M.A.

    1992-08-01

    General Atomics (GA) is developing two spent fuel shipping casks for transport by legal weight truck (LWT). The casks are designed to the loading, environmental conditions and safety requirements defined in Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Part 71 (10CFR71). To ensure that all components of the cask meet the 10CFR71 rules, GA established structural design criteria for each component based on NRC Regulatory Guides and the American Society of Mechanical Engineers Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (ASME Code). This paper discusses the criteria used for different cask components, how they were applied and the conservatism and safety margins built into the criteria and assumption.

  13. Roles of miRNAs in microcystin-LR-induced Sertoli cell toxicity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Yuan; Wang, Hui; Wang, Cong; Qiu, Xuefeng; Benson, Mikael; Yin, Xiaoqin; Xiang, Zou; Li, Dongmei; and others

    2015-08-15

    Microcystin (MC)-LR, a cyclic heptapeptide, is a potent reproductive system toxin. To understand the molecular mechanisms of MC-induced reproductive system cytotoxicity, we evaluated global changes of miRNA and mRNA expression in mouse Sertoli cells following MC-LR treatment. Our results revealed that the exposure to MC-LR resulted in an altered miRNA expression profile that might be responsible for the modulation of mRNA expression. Bio-functional analysis indicated that the altered genes were involved in specific cellular processes, including cell death and proliferation. Target gene analysis suggested that junction injury in Sertoli cells exposed to MC-LR might be mediated by miRNAs through the regulation of the Sertoli cell-Sertoli cell pathway. Collectively, these findings may enhance our understanding on the modes of action of MC-LR on mouse Sertoli cells as well as the molecular mechanisms underlying the toxicity of MC-LR on the male reproductive system. - Highlights: • miRNAs were altered in Sertoli cells exposed to MC-LR. • Alerted genes were involved in different cell functions including the cell morphology. • MC-LR adversely affected Sertoli cell junction formation through the regulating miRNAs.

  14. GaP/Si heterojunction Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saive, R.; Chen, C.; Emmer, H.; Atwater, H.

    2015-05-11

    Improving the efficiency of solar cells requires the introduction of novel device concepts. Recent developments have shown that in Si solar cell technology there is still room for tremendous improvement. Using the heterojunction with intrinsic thin layer (HIT) approach 25.6 % power conversion efficiency was achieved. However, a-Si as a window and passivation layer comes with disadvantages as a-Si shows low conductivity and high parasitic absorption. Therefore, it is likely that using a crystalline material as window layer with high band gab and high mobility can further improve efficiency. We have studied GaP grown by MOCVD on Si with (001) and (112) orientation. We obtained crystalline layers with carrier mobility around 100 cm2/Vs and which passivate Si as confirmed by carrier lifetime measurements. We performed band alignment studies by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy yielding a valence band offset of 0.3 eV. Comparing this value with the Schottky-model leads to an interface dipole of 0.59 eV. The open circuit voltage increases with increasing doping and is consistent with the theoretical open circuit voltage deduced from work function difference and interface dipole. We obtain an open circuit voltage of 0.38 V for n-doped GaP with doping levels in the order of 10^17 1/cm^3. In our next steps we will increase the doping level further in order to gain higher open circuit voltage. We will discuss the implications of these findings for GaP/Si heterojunction solar cells.

  15. Ionizing Radiation–Inducible miR-27b Suppresses Leukemia Proliferation via Targeting Cyclin A2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Bo; Li, Dongping; Kovalchuk, Anna; Litvinov, Dmitry; Kovalchuk, Olga

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: Ionizing radiation is a common carcinogen that is important for the development of leukemia. However, the underlying epigenetic mechanisms remain largely unknown. The goal of the study was to explore microRNAome alterations induced by ionizing radiation (IR) in murine thymus, and to determine the role of IR-inducible microRNA (miRNA/miR) in the development of leukemia. Methods and Materials: We used the well-established C57BL/6 mouse model and miRNA microarray profiling to identify miRNAs that are differentially expressed in murine thymus in response to irradiation. TIB152 human leukemia cell line was used to determine the role of estrogen receptor–α (ERα) in miR-27b transcription. The biological effects of ectopic miR-27b on leukemogenesis were measured by western immunoblotting, cell viability, apoptosis, and cell cycle analyses. Results: Here, we have shown that IR triggers the differential expression of miR-27b in murine thymus tissue in a dose-, time- and sex-dependent manner. miR-27b was significantly down-regulated in leukemia cell lines CCL119 and TIB152. Interestingly, ERα was overexpressed in those 2 cell lines, and it was inversely correlated with miR-27b expression. Therefore, we used TIB152 as a model system to determine the role of ERα in miR-27b expression and the contribution of miR-27b to leukemogenesis. β-Estradiol caused a rapid and transient reduction in miR-27b expression reversed by either ERα-neutralizing antibody or ERK1/2 inhibitor. Ectopic expression of miR-27b remarkably suppressed TIB152 cell proliferation, at least in part, by inducing S-phase arrest. In addition, it attenuated the expression of cyclin A2, although it had no effect on the levels of PCNA, PPARγ, CDK2, p21, p27, p-p53, and cleaved caspase-3. Conclusion: Our data reveal that β-estradiol/ERα signaling may contribute to the down-regulation of miR-27b in acute leukemia cell lines through the ERK1/2 pathway, and that miR-27b may function as a tumor

  16. miR-208-3p promotes hepatocellular carcinoma cell proliferation and invasion through regulating ARID2 expression

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Peng; Wu, Dingguo; You, Yu; Sun, Jing; Lu, Lele; Tan, Jiaxing; Bie, Ping

    2015-08-15

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that negatively regulate gene expression at post-transcriptional level. miRNA dysregulation plays a causal role in cancer progression. In this study, miR-208-3p was highly expressed and directly repressed ARID2 expression. As a result, ARID2 expression in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) was decreased. In vitro, miR-208-3p down-regulation and ARID2 over-expression elicited similar inhibitory effects on HCC cell proliferation and invasion. In vivo test results revealed that miR-208-3p down-regulation inhibited HCC tumorigenesis in Hep3B cells. Moreover, ARID2 was possibly a downstream element of transforming growth factor beta1 (TGFβ1)/miR-208-3p/ARID2 regulatory pathway. These findings suggested that miR-208-3p up-regulation is associated with HCC cell progression and may provide a new target for liver cancer treatment. - Highlights: • miR-208-3p was highly expressed and directly repressed the expression of ARID2 in HCC. • miR-208-3p contributed to HCC cell progression both in vitro and in vivo. • Over-expression of ARID2 inhibited the HCC cell proliferation and invasion. • Restoration of ARID2 partly reversed the the effect of miR-208-3p down-regulation on HCC cells. • Newly regulatory pathway: miR-208-3p mediated the repression of ARID2 by TGFβ1 in HCC cells.

  17. Curcumin inhibits oral squamous cell carcinoma SCC-9 cells proliferation by regulating miR-9 expression

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiao, Can; Wang, Lili; Zhu, Lifang; Zhang, Chenping; Zhou, Jianhua

    2014-11-28

    Highlights: • miR-9 expression level was significantly decreased in OSCC tissues. • Curcumin significantly inhibited SCC-9 cells proliferation. • miR-9 mediates the inhibition of SCC-9 proliferation by curcumin. • Curcumin suppresses Wnt/β-catenin signaling in SCC-9 cells. • miR-9 mediates the suppression of Wnt/β-catenin signaling by curcumin. - Abstract: Curcumin, a phytochemical derived from the rhizome of Curcuma longa, has shown anticancer effects against a variety of tumors. In the present study, we investigated the effects of curcumin on the miR-9 expression in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and explored the potential relationships between miR-9 and Wnt/β-catenin pathway in curcumin-mediated OSCC inhibition in vitro. As the results shown, the expression levels of miR-9 were significantly lower in clinical OSCC specimens than those in the adjacent non-tumor tissues. Furthermore, our results indicated that curcumin inhibited OSCC cells (SCC-9 cells) proliferation through up-regulating miR-9 expression, and suppressing Wnt/β-catenin signaling by increasing the expression levels of the GSK-3β, phosphorylated GSK-3β and β-catenin, and decreasing the cyclin D1 level. Additionally, the up-regulation of miR-9 by curcumin in SCC-9 cells was significantly inhibited by delivering anti-miR-9 but not control oligonucleotides. Downregulation of miR-9 by anti-miR-9 not only attenuated the growth-suppressive effects of curcumin on SCC-9 cells, but also re-activated Wnt/β-catenin signaling that was inhibited by curcumin. Therefore, our findings would provide a new insight into the use of curcumin against OSCC in future.

  18. miR-339-5p inhibits alcohol-induced brain inflammation through regulating NF-κB pathway

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Yu; Wei, Guangkuan; Di, Zhiyong; Zhao, Qingjie

    2014-09-26

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Alcohol upregulates miR-339-5p expression. • miR-339-5p inhibits the NF-kB pathway. • miR-339-5p interacts with and blocks activity of IKK-beat and IKK-epsilon. • miR-339-5p modulates IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α. - Abstract: Alcohol-induced neuroinflammation is mediated by the innate immunesystem. Pro-inflammatory responses to alcohol are modulated by miRNAs. The miRNA miR-339-5p has previously been found to be upregulated in alcohol-induced neuroinflammation. However, little has been elucidated on the regulatory functions of this miRNA in alcohol-induced neuroinflammation. We investigated the function of miR-339-5p in alcohol exposed brain tissue and isolated microglial cells using ex vivo and in vitro techniques. Our results show that alcohol induces transcription of miR 339-5p, IL-6, IL-1β and TNF-α in mouse brain tissue and isolated microglial cells by activating NF-κB. Alcohol activation of NF-κB allows for nuclear translocation of the NF-κB subunit p65 and expression of pro-inflammatory mediators. miR-339-5p inhibited expression of these pro-inflammatory factors through the NF-κB pathway by abolishing IKK-β and IKK-ε activity.

  19. Distributed bragg reflector using AIGaN/GaN

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Waldrip, Karen E.; Lee, Stephen R.; Han, Jung

    2004-08-10

    A supported distributed Bragg reflector or superlattice structure formed from a substrate, a nucleation layer deposited on the substrate, and an interlayer deposited on the nucleation layer, followed by deposition of (Al,Ga,B)N layers or multiple pairs of (Al,Ga,B)N/(Al,Ga,B)N layers, where the interlayer is a material selected from AlN, Al.sub.x Ga.sub.1-x N, and AlBN with a thickness of approximately 20 to 1000 angstroms. The interlayer functions to reduce or eliminate the initial tensile growth stress, thereby reducing cracking in the structure. Multiple interlayers utilized in an AlGaN/GaN DBR structure can eliminate cracking and produce a structure with a reflectivity value greater than 0.99.

  20. High-Efficiency GaInP/GaAs Tandem Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bertness, K. A.; Friedman, D. J.; Kurtz, S. R.; Kibbler, A. E.; Cramer, C.; Olson, J. M.

    1996-09-01

    GaInP/GaAs tandem solar cells have achieved efficiencies between 25.7-30.2%, depending on illumination conditions. The efficiencies are the highest confirmed two-terminal values measured for any solar cell within each standard illumination category. The monolithic, series-connected design of the tandem cells allows them to be substituted for silicon or gallium arsenide cells in photovoltaic panel systems with minimal design changes. The advantages of using GaInP/GaAs tandem solar cells in space and terrestrial applications are discussed primarily in terms of the reduction in balance-of-system costs that accrues when using a higher efficiency cell. The new efficiency values represent a significant improvement over previous efficiencies for this materials system, and we identify grid design, back interface passivation, and top interface passivation as the three key factors leading to this improvement. In producing the high-efficiency cells, we have addressed nondestructive diagnostics and materials growth reproducibility as well as peak cell performance.

  1. High-efficiency GaInP/GaAs tandem solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bertness, K.A.; Friedman, D.J.; Kurtz, S.R.; Kibbler, A.E.; Kramer, C.; Olson, J.M.

    1994-12-01

    GaInP/GaAs tandem solar cells have achieved new record efficiencies, specifically 25.7% under air-mass 0 (AM0) illumination, 29.5% under AM 1.5 global (AM1.5G) illumination, and 30.2% at 140-180x concentration under AM 1.5 direct (AM1.5D) illumination. These values are the highest two-terminal efficiencies achieved by any solar cell under these illumination conditions. The monolithic, series-connected design of the tandem cells allows them to be substituted for silicon or gallium arsenide cells in photovoltaic panel systems with minimal design changes. The advantages of using GaInP/GaAs tandem solar cells in space and terrestrial applications are discussed primarily in terms of the reduction in balance-of-system costs that accrues when using a higher efficiency cell. The new efficiency values represent a significant improvement over previous efficiencies for this materials system, and we identify grid design, back interface passivation, and top interface passivation as the three key factors leading to this improvement. In producing the high-efficiency cells, we have addressed nondestructive diagnostics and materials growth reproducibility as well as peak cell performance. 31 refs.

  2. AlGaAs/InGaAlP tunnel junctions for multijunction solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SHARPS,P.R.; LI,N.Y.; HILLS,J.S.; HOU,H.; CHANG,PING-CHIH; BACA,ALBERT G.

    2000-05-16

    Optimization of GaInP{sub 2}/GaAs dual and GaInP{sub 2}/GaAs/Ge triple junction cells, and development of future generation monolithic multi-junction cells will involve the development of suitable high bandgap tunnel junctions. There are three criteria that a tunnel junction must meet. First, the resistance of the junction must be kept low enough so that the series resistance of the overall device is not increased. For AMO, 1 sun operation, the tunnel junction resistance should be below 5 x 10{sup {minus}2} {Omega}-cm. Secondly, the peak current density for the tunnel junction must also be larger than the J{sub sc} of the cell so that the tunnel junction I-V curve does not have a deleterious effect on the I-V curve of the multi-junction device. Finally, the tunnel junction must be optically transparent, i.e., there must be a minimum of optical absorption of photons that will be collected by the underlying subcells. The paper reports the investigation of four high bandgap tunnel junctions grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition.

  3. Localized corrosion of GaAs surfaces and formation of porous GaAs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmuki, P.; Vitus, C.M.; Isaacs, H.S.; Fraser, J.; Graham, M.J.

    1995-12-01

    The present work deals with pitting corrosion of p- and n-type GaAs (100). Pit growth can be electrochemically initiated on both conduction types in chloride-containing solutions and leads after extended periods of time to the formation of a porous GaAs structure. In the case of p-type material, localized corrosion is only observed if a passivating film is present on the surface, otherwise -- e.g. in acidic solutions -- the material suffers from a uniform attack (electropolishing) which is independent of the anion present. In contrast, pitting corrosion of n-type material can be triggered independent of the presence of an oxide film. This is explained in terms of the different current limiting factor for the differently doped materials (oxide film in the case of the p- and a space charge layer in the case of the n-GaAs). The porous structure was characterized by SEM, EDX and AES, and consists mainly of GaAs. From scratch experiments it is clear that the pit initiation process is strongly influenced by surface defects. For n-type material, AFM investigations show that light induced roughening of the order of several hundred nm occurs under non-passivating conditions. This nm- scale roughening however does not affect the pitting process.

  4. TJ Solar Cell (GaInP/GaAs/Ge Ultrahigh-Efficiency Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friedman, Daniel

    2002-04-17

    This talk will discuss recent developments in III-V multijunction photovoltaic technology which have led to the highest-efficiency solar cells ever demonstrated. The relationship between the materials science of III-V semiconductors and the achievement of record solar cell efficiencies will be emphasized. For instance, epitaxially-grown GAInP has been found to form a spontaneously-ordered GaP/InP (111) superlattice. This ordering affects the band gap of the material, which in turn affects the design of solar cells which incorporate GaInP. For the next generation of ultrahigh-efficiency III-V solar cells, we need a new semiconductor which is lattice-matched to GaAs, has a band gap of 1 eV, and has long minority-carrier diffusion lengths. Out of a number of candidate materials, the recently-discovered alloy GaInNAs appears to have the greatest promise. This material satisfies the first two criteria, but has to date shown very low diffusion lengths, a problem which is our current focus in the development of these next-generation cells.

  5. Multijunction GaInP/GaInAs/Ge solar cells with Bragg reflectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Emelyanov, V. M. Kalyuzhniy, N. A.; Mintairov, S. A.; Shvarts, M. Z.; Lantratov, V. M.

    2010-12-15

    Effect of subcell parameters on the efficiency of GaInP/Ga(In)As/Ge tandem solar cells irradiated with 1-MeV electrons at fluences of up to 3 x 10{sup 15} cm{sup -2} has been theoretically studied. The optimal thicknesses of GaInP and GaInAs subcells, which provide the best photocurrent matching at various irradiation doses in solar cells with and without built-in Bragg reflectors, were determined. The dependences of the photoconverter efficiency on the fluence of 1-MeV electrons and on the time of residence in the geostationary orbit were calculated for structures optimized to the beginning and end of their service lives. It is shown that the optimization of the subcell heterostructures for a rated irradiation dose and the introduction of Bragg reflectors into the structure provide a 5% overall increase in efficiency for solar cells operating in the orbit compared with unoptimized cells having no Bragg reflector.

  6. Inverse spin Hall effect in Pt/(Ga,Mn)As

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakayama, H.; Chen, L.; Chang, H. W.; Ohno, H.; Matsukura, F.

    2015-06-01

    We investigate dc voltages under ferromagnetic resonance in a Pt/(Ga,Mn)As bilayer structure. A part of the observed dc voltage is shown to originate from the inverse spin Hall effect. The sign of the inverse spin Hall voltage is the same as that in Py/Pt bilayer structure, even though the stacking order of ferromagnetic and nonmagnetic layers is opposite to each other. The spin mixing conductance at the Pt/(Ga,Mn)As interface is determined to be of the order of 10{sup 19 }m{sup −2}, which is about ten times greater than that of (Ga,Mn)As/p-GaAs.

  7. fe0013961-GaTech | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Performer Georgia Tech Research Corporation, Atlanta GA 30332 Background While earlier research focused on the properties of the hydrate mass per se (Sloan Jr and Koh 2007), ...

  8. Photoluminescence from GaAs nanodisks fabricated by using combination...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    GaAs nanodisks fabricated by using combination of neutral beam etching and atomic hydrogen-assisted molecular beam epitaxy regrowth Citation Details In-Document Search Title:...

  9. Port Huron, MI Liquefied Natural Gas Exports to Canada (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    to Canada (Million Cubic Feet) Port Huron, MI Liquefied Natural Gas Exports to Canada (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 1 2014 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 2015 1 1 1 1 1 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 08/31/2016 Next Release Date: 09/30/2016 Referring Pages: U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Exports by Point of Exit Port Huron, MI Natural Gas Exports to Canad

  10. Post Mortem of 120k mi Light-Duty Urea SCR and DPF System | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Post Mortem of 120k mi Light-Duty Urea SCR and DPF System Post Mortem of 120k mi Light-Duty Urea SCR and DPF System Presentation given at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007). 13-16 August, 2007, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (OFCVT). deer07_lambert.pdf (649.68 KB) More Documents & Publications Urea SCR and DPF System for Tier 2 Diesel Light-Duty