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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Microsoft Word - Coyote Crest Wind Integration CX.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

8, 2011 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Cherilyn Randall - TPC-TPP-4 Proposed Action: G0313 Coyote Crest Wind Park Interconnection Request...

2

Trapping Coyotes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the carcass but well away from it (several hundred yards to a half mile or more). Traps Avarietyoftrapsareavailable.Cagetrapsare generallyineffective.Themosteffectivetrapsare the number three or four double spring leghold with offset jaws (see Fig. 2). Coil... spring traps no smaller than a number three should be set for coyotes. Stakes or drags must be attached to the traps to anchor the trapped coyote. Staking the trap is accomplishedbyattachingan18-inchironrodby a swivel to the trap spring or base with about...

Texas Wildlife Services

2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

3

Controlling Coyotes With Snares  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, the swivelandlockingdevicecanberemovedandused on another snare. For more information and assistance, contact the nearest office of the Texas AgriLife Extension Service?Wildlife Services. Figure 3. Figure 2. front foot hind foot front foot hind foot Coyote Tracks Dog Tracks 2 1 ? 2 i n c h e...

Texas Wildlife Services

2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

4

Coping with Coyotes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of this publication was made possible by a grant from the Texas Sheep and Goat Commodity Board, whose mission is to finance programs to protect sheep and goats, fund research, and develop educational programs within the 111-county Referendum Area. The author extends.... Maurice Shelton, Allen Turner and Dr. Milo Shult. Dr. Connolly of USDA-APHIS Denver Wildlife Research Center graciously shared several photographs used herein. TEXAS SHEEP & GOAT COMMODITY BOARD 3 he coyote is as much a part of the Texas land- scape...

Rollins, Dale

1997-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

5

sanfranciscoestuaryinstitute//finalreport Coyote Creek/Coyote Valley  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Laguna Seca Coyote Creek Fisher Cr. #12;III - 49 sanfranciscoestuaryinstitute//finalreport Map 4B-ca.1800, green; project boundary, white (scale 1:40,000; 1"~3300'; 1 square inch ~250 acres; original photographs, with historicaL Landscape features overLay. Historical fluvial features in blue; other features, green; project

6

Microsoft Word - Coyote Creek CX.docx  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

of funds to acquire a conservation easement over the 310-acre Coyote Creek property. Fish and Wildlife Project No.: 2011-003-00, Contract BPA-006468 Categorical Exclusion...

7

Microsoft Word - CoyoteCreekNE_CX  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Project Manager - KEWM-4 Proposed Action: Coyote Creek Property Acquisition Funding Fish and Wildlife Project No.: 2011-003-00, Contract BPA-007521 Categorical Exclusion...

8

Can coyotes affect deer populations in Southeastern North America?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

ABSTRACT The coyote (Canis latrans) is a recent addition to the fauna of eastern North America, and in many areas coyote populations have been established for only a decade or two. Although coyotes are known predators of white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) in their historic range, effects this new predator may have on eastern deer populations have received little attention. We speculated that in the southeastern United States, coyotes may be affecting deer recruitment, and we present 5 lines of evidence that suggest this possibility. First, the statewide deer population in South Carolina has declined coincident with the establishment and increase in the coyote population. Second, data sets from the Savannah River Site (SRS) in South Carolina indicate a new mortality source affecting the deer population concurrent with the increase in coyotes. Third, an index of deer recruitment at SRS declined during the period of increase in coyotes. Fourth, food habits data from SRS indicate that fawns are an important food item for coyotes during summer. Finally, recent research from Alabama documented significant coyote predation on fawns there. Although this evidence does not establish cause and effect between coyotes and observed declines in deer recruitment, we argue that additional research should proactively address this topic in the region. We identified several important questions on the nature of the deer–coyote relationship in the East.

Kilgo, J., C.; Ray, H., Scott; Ruth, Charles; Miller, Karl, V.

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

EIS-0201: Coyote Springs Cogeneration Project Morrow Count, Oregon  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This environmental impact statement analyzes the protential impacts of the Coyote Springs Cogeneration Project, a proposed natural gas-fired cogeneration power plant near Boardman, Oregon. The proposed power plant would be built on a 22-acre site in the Port of Morrow Industrial Park. The plant would have two combustion turbines that would generate 440 average megawatts of energy when completed.

10

The influence of coyotes on an urban Canada goose population in the Chicago metropolitan area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Canada geese (Branta canadensis) have become common in many urban areas, often creating nuisance problems for human residents. The presence of urban geese has raised concerns about the spread of disease, increased erosion, excessive noise, eutrophication of waterways, and general nuisance problems. Goose populations have grown due to an increase in urbanization resulting in an abundance of high quality food (urban grass) and suitable nesting sites, as well as a decrease in some predators. I monitored nest predation in the Chicago suburbs during the 2004 and 2005 nesting seasons using 3 nest monitoring techniques to identify predators: video cameras, plasticine eggs, and sign from nest using a classification tree analysis. Of 58 nests monitored in 2004 and 286 in 2005, only raccoons (Procyon lotor) and coyotes (Canis latrans) were identified as nest predators. Raccoons were responsible for 22-25% of depredated nests, but were rarely capable of depredating nests that were actively defended by a goose. Coyotes were responsible for 75-78% of all Canada goose nest depredation and were documented killing one adult goose and feeding on several others. The coyote is a top-level predator that had increased in many metropolitan areas in recent years. To determine if coyotes were actively hunting geese or eggs during the nesting season, I analyzed coyote habitat selection between nesting and pre-nesting or post-nesting seasons. Coyote home ranges (95% Minimum Convex Polygon) were calculated for 19 coyotes to examine third order habitat selection related to goose nest abundance. A 100 m buffer (buffer habitat) was created and centered on each waterway edge and contained 90% of all nests. Coyotes showed selection for habitats during all seasons. Buffer habitat was the top ranked habitat in both pre-nesting and nesting seasons, but dropped to third ranked in post-nesting season. Habitat selection across seasons was compared using a repeated measures MANOVA. Habitat selection between pre-nesting and nesting seasons (P=0.72) were similar, while between post-nesting and nesting seasons there was a nearly significant difference (P=0.07). The insignificant change in habitat use across seasons suggests that coyotes did not switch habitat use to take advantage of goose nests. Alternatively, the change in ranking of buffer habitat across seasons suggests that coyotes may have switched habitat use to take advantage of goose nests. The results are not clear as large individual variation between coyotes due to differences in habitat availability, and social status interfere with the results of the analysis. Even though I failed to find strong support for coyotes actively hunting goose nests, they nevertheless were the primary nest predator in the area and may influence Canada goose populations. To determine the potential influence of coyotes on the Canada goose population, I created a Canada goose matrix population model that included variables such as coyote predation on adults and nests as well as coyote influence on nest desertion. Using the base population model I calculated the Canada goose population to be increasing with {lambda} = 1.055. The removal of all coyote influence on the goose population would allow {lambda} to increase to 1.214. Nest predation was the most important factor related to coyotes: the removal of coyote nest predation from the model resulted in a population growth rate {lambda} = 1.157. Modeling results suggest coyotes are serving as a limiting factor for the Canada goose population within the Chicago metropolitan area.

Brown, Justin L.; /Ohio State U.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Microsoft Word - CX-Coyote Springs - Slatt No 1_WEB.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

12, 2010 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Corinn Castro Project Manager - TELM-TPP-3 Proposed Action: Coyote Springs - Slatt No. 1 500-kV...

12

The effects of grazing regime on coyote-sheep relationships in southwest Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OF SCIENCE December T975 Major Subject: Wildlife and Fisheries Science THE EFFECTS OF GRAZING REGIME ON COYOTE-SHEEP RELATIONSHIPS IN SOUTHWEST TEXAS A Thesis by NIKHIL KRISHNAJIBAN SANYAL Approved as to style and content by: Chairman of Committee... (Head of Department ( Member ( Member December 1975 ABSTRACT The Effects of Grazing Regime on Coyote-Sheep Relationships In Southwest Texas. ( December 1975 ivikhil Krishnajiban Sanyal, B. Sc. (Honors) University of Gauhati Chairman of Advisory...

Sanyal, Nikhil Krishnajiban

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

CrestEnergy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentratingRenewable Solutions LLC Jump to:InformationCrandall, Texas:CreditCrestEnergy Jump

14

Crest, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin:EnergyWisconsin:2003) |Cordova39. ItCrest, California: Energy Resources Jump to:

15

Home Range, habitat use and survival of coyotes in Western South Carolina.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

ABSTRACT.—Home range size, habitat use and survival of coyotes are variable throughout their range. Because coyotes have recently become established in South Carolina, we investigated their spatial distribution, habitat use and mortality on the Savannah River Site (SRS) in western South Carolina, USA. Annual survival for adult coyotes on the SRS was 0.658. Off-site trapping and shooting accounted for 60% of mortality. Home ranges averaged 30.5 km2 and 31.85 km2 by the 95% minimum convex polygon and 95% fixed kernel methods, respectively. We detected no difference in home ranges size between males and females. Intraspecific home range overlap averaged 22.4%, excluding mated pair interactions, with 87.5% of coyotes sharing their home range with one or more individuals. Coyotes selected home ranges containing higher proportions of early successional habitat than was available on the landscape. Core areas likewise contained a greater proportion of early successional habitat than available in the animal’s home range.

Schrecengost, Joshua, D.; Kilgo, John, C.; Ray, H., Scott; Miller, Karl, V.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Seasonal food habits of the coyote in the South Carolina coastal plain.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Abstract - Spatial and temporal plasticity in Canis latrans (coyote) diets require regional studies to understand the ecological role of this omnivorous canid. Because coyotes have recently become established in South Carolina, we investigated their food habits by collecting 415 coyote scats on the Savannah River Site in western South Carolina from May 2005-July 2006. Seasonally available soft mast was the most common food item in 12 of the 15 months we sampled. Odocoileus virginianus (white-tailed deer) was the most common food item during December (40%) and March (37%). During May-June, fruits of Prunus spp. and Rubus spp. were the most commonly occurring food items. Fawns were the most common mammalian food item during May and June of both years despite low deer density.

Schrecengost, J., D.; Kilgo, J., C.; Mallard, D.; Ray, H., S.; Miller, K., V.

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Seasonal food habits of the coyote in the South Carolina coastal plain.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Spatial and temporal plasticity in Canis latrans (coyote) diets require regional studies to understand the ecological role of this omnivorous canid. Because coyotes have recently become established in South Carolina, we investigated their food habits by collecting 415 coyote scats on the Savannah River Site in western South Carolina from May 2005-July 2006. Seasonally available soft mast was the most common food item in 12 of the 15 months we sampled. Odocoileus virginianus (white-tailed deer) was the most common food item during December (40%) and March (37%). During May-June, fruits of Prunus spp. and Rubus spp. were the most commonly occurring food items. Fawns were the most common mammalian food item during May and June of both years despite low deer density.

Schrecengost, J., D.; Kilgo, J., C.; Mallard, D.; Ray, H., S.; Miller, K., V.

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Research Note Microsatellite Variation of Double-Crested Cormorant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environmental Impact Statement on double- crested cormorant management allowing more flexibility in control-crested cormorants roosting in the lower Mis- sissippi Valley appear to have minimal negative impact on sport fisheries, they may have a significant impact on commercial aquaculture production in this region (Glahn

Green, Clay - Department of Biology, Texas State University

19

COYOTE : a finite element computer program for nonlinear heat conduction problems. Part I, theoretical background.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The need for the engineering analysis of systems in which the transport of thermal energy occurs primarily through a conduction process is a common situation. For all but the simplest geometries and boundary conditions, analytic solutions to heat conduction problems are unavailable, thus forcing the analyst to call upon some type of approximate numerical procedure. A wide variety of numerical packages currently exist for such applications, ranging in sophistication from the large, general purpose, commercial codes, such as COMSOL, COSMOSWorks, ABAQUS and TSS to codes written by individuals for specific problem applications. The original purpose for developing the finite element code described here, COYOTE, was to bridge the gap between the complex commercial codes and the more simplistic, individual application programs. COYOTE was designed to treat most of the standard conduction problems of interest with a user-oriented input structure and format that was easily learned and remembered. Because of its architecture, the code has also proved useful for research in numerical algorithms and development of thermal analysis capabilities. This general philosophy has been retained in the current version of the program, COYOTE, Version 5.0, though the capabilities of the code have been significantly expanded. A major change in the code is its availability on parallel computer architectures and the increase in problem complexity and size that this implies. The present document describes the theoretical and numerical background for the COYOTE program. This volume is intended as a background document for the user's manual. Potential users of COYOTE are encouraged to become familiar with the present report and the simple example analyses reported in before using the program. The theoretical and numerical background for the finite element computer program, COYOTE, is presented in detail. COYOTE is designed for the multi-dimensional analysis of nonlinear heat conduction problems. A general description of the boundary value problems treated by the program is presented. The finite element formulation and the associated numerical methods used in COYOTE are also outlined. Instructions for use of the code are documented in SAND2010-0714.

Glass, Micheal W.; Hogan, Roy E., Jr.; Gartling, David K.

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Breeding biology and behavior of the Crested Caracara in Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) R. uglas Slack (member) Thomas L. Th u row (member) avid J. Schmidly ( ad of Departme t) August )990 ABSTRACT Brccding Biology and Behavior of thc Crested Ca raca ra in Texas. (August 1990) Vancssa Margaret Dickinson, H. g. , University ol... 2. 5 m in size. The 6 nests were l5 TEX A S Austin County CA cj ~c R~~ Colorado County 5 Attwater Prairie Chicken NWR 0 I km N Location of 6 Crested Caracara nests in Austin and Colorado Counties, Texas. 16 constructed in the tallest...

Dickinson, Vanessa Margaret

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "g0313 coyote crest" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Crested Butte, Colorado: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentratingRenewable Solutions LLC Jump to:InformationCrandall, Texas:CreditCrestEnergy

22

E-Print Network 3.0 - autologous iliac crest Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

University Collection: Biology and Medicine 6 Autologous Heart Valve Tissue Engineering CIP-DATA LIBRARY TECHNISCHE UNIVERSITEIT EINDHOVEN Summary: of the iliac crest representing...

23

E-Print Network 3.0 - affects neural crest Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

induction was discovered in 1924 Summary: identified a gene that when overexpressed expanded the neural plate at the expense of adjacent neural crest... ). This was...

24

East Hazel Crest, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address:011-DNA Jump37. It is classified asThis article is aAgHampton,Crest is a village in Cook

25

Wildwood Crest, New Jersey: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:SeadovCooperative Jump to:Westview,GeothermalHawaii:Sage grouse sitting inWildwood Crest,

26

Marine Ornithology 41: 4148 (2013) Bond et al.: Crested Auklet survival with Norway Rats 41  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Marine Ornithology 41: 41­48 (2013) Bond et al.: Crested Auklet survival with Norway Rats 41 in the Aleutians (Bailey 1993, Ebbert & Byrd 2002). Another introduced predator, the Norway rat Rattus norvegicus AND REPRODUCTIVE SUCCESS OF CRESTED AUKLETS AETHIA CRISTATELLA IN THE PRESENCE OF INTRODUCED NORWAY RATS RATTUS

Jones, Ian L.

27

Sixth CREST Conference: 'Ctrl, Alt, Delete: Re-booting the State via  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sixth CREST Conference: 'Ctrl, Alt, Delete: Re-booting the State via E-Government in Europe, Delete: Re-booting the State via E-Government in Europe' Convenors: Dr Liki Koutrakou, UEA and Dr Paul

Feigon, Brooke

28

Density of bunches of native bluebunch wheatgrass and alien crested wheatgrass  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The density of bunches of bluebunch wheatgrass in a natural undisturbed stand averaged 3.28 per m/sup 2/ as compared to 2.96 per m/sup 2/ for a nearby stand of crested wheatgrass that was planted 30 years ago. Bunch density was similar in both stands indicating that spacing is a response to an environment deficient in soil water. Bunches of crested wheatgrass on the average weighed 3.5 times more than bunches of bluebunch wheatgrass and they also produced a greater weight of seedheads.

Rickard, W.H.

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Identification of novel Hoxa1 downstream targets regulating hindbrain, neural crest and inner ear development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Identification of novel Hoxa1 downstream targets regulating hindbrain, neural crest and inner ear and heart in humans and mice; however, almost nothing is known about the molecular downstream targets regulated by Hox genes (Hueber and Lohmann, 2008). In this study, we set out to identify the downstream

Capecchi, Mario R.

30

Least and Crested Auklet productivity and survival in relation to introduced Norway  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Least and Crested Auklet productivity and survival in relation to introduced Norway Rats at Sirius and rats - Kiska 2004 2 Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus) were introduced to Kiska Island, western Aleutian was near normal (c. 50%) at Sirius Point in 2003 (Major and Jones 2003, Major 2004). Introduced Norway rats

Jones, Ian L.

31

Submeter bathymetric mapping of volcanic and hydrothermal features on the East Pacific Rise crest at 9500  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of bathymetric changes associated with active volcanic, hydrothermal and tectonic processes. Components: 15Submeter bathymetric mapping of volcanic and hydrothermal features on the East Pacific Rise crest to produce submeter resolution bathymetric maps of five hydrothermal vent areas at the East Pacific Rise (EPR

Whitcomb, Louis L.

32

Plant responses and cattle gains from different intensities of spring grazing on crested wheatgrass at two sites in northern New Mexico  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cebolla Mesa Yields, 1952-1958.... ....... ....... . 68 No Agua Yields, 1955-1958 ................. ........ 71 Pregrazing Yields .......... ............... . 75 Moisture Content of Crested Wheatgrass Herbage ...... 78 Herbage Yields at Other Sites... ............ ...... . 85 Utilization of Crested Wheatgrass ...................... 87 Cebolla Mesa, 1952-1958 ............................ 87 Page iv TABLE OF CONTENTS No Agua, 195>?-19f>8 ................ ........ ........ ...... 90 Variation in Utilization...

Springfield, H. W.

1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Microfluidics for Tissue and Cell Applications JST CREST, "Cell and Tissue Showcasing by Micro-Nano Integrated Devices" Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Microfluidics for Tissue and Cell Applications JST CREST, "Cell and Tissue Showcasing by Micro-Nano Integrated Devices" Project JST-VINNOVA/SSF SICP, "Microfluidic Cancer Diagnosis Platform" Project JST ERATO 2 : Prof. Shuichi Takayama (University of Michigan) "Microfluidic Tools to Model and Analyze

Tokyo, University of

34

Managing Suburban Coyotes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Extension cooperating with the United States Department of Agriculture? Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service?Wildlife Services. TCE?Wildlife Services P.O. Box 100410 ? San Antonio, Texas 78201-1710 1.2M,Reprint ...

Texas Wildlife Services

2007-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

35

Coyote named Scooter  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phases on &gamma;-Al2O3.

36

Signature of the coronal hole near the north crest equatorial anomaly over Egypt during the strong geomagnetic storm  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Signature of the coronal hole near the north crest equatorial anomaly over Egypt during the strong hole effect. We use multi-instruments as SCINDA-GPS station at Helwan, Egypt (29.86 N, 31.32 E) and ASW-MAGDAS station at Aswan, Egypt (23.59 N, 32.51 E) in the equatorial region. At the beginning of the storm our

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

37

Mandibular and Neural Crest Cell Deficits Seen in TsDn65 Down Syndrome Mouse Model Rescued By Green Tea Polyphenol, EGCG  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the mandibular deficit seen in E9.5 Ts65Dn embryos. We propose that EGCG, a green tea polyphenol, will inhibitMandibular and Neural Crest Cell Deficits Seen in TsDn65 Down Syndrome Mouse Model Rescued By Green Tea Polyphenol, EGCG Gracelyn C. Bose1 , Rachel A. Novack1 ,Danika M. Tumbleson1 , Alexis N. Chom1

Zhou, Yaoqi

38

Crime Alert: Theft of Cell Phone near Campus On November 8th, at about 4:00 pm, a student was walking on Blaine St, near Canyon Crest Drive  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Crime Alert: Theft of Cell Phone near Campus On November 8th, at about 4:00 pm, a student was walking on Blaine St, near Canyon Crest Drive listening to his iPhone on a pair of headphones. A subject approached him, asked to use his iPhone and when the victim refused, the suspect grabbed the phone and ran

39

Coyote Canyon Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin:EnergyWisconsin:2003) |Cordova39. It is classified asCowley County,(Redirected

40

Coyote Canyon Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentratingRenewable Solutions LLC Jump to:Information NewAdvisorsCosmosCoteCEQ's

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "g0313 coyote crest" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Coyote Canyon Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar Power Basics (The following text isRica NREL Cooperation NameCoulomb

42

CREST Cost of Renewable Energy Spreadsheet Tool: A Model for Developing Cost-Based Incentives in the United States; User Manual Version 4, August 2009 - March 2011 (Updated July 2013)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this document is to help model users understand how to use the CREST model to support renewable energy incentives, FITs, and other renewable energy rate-setting processes. This user manual will walk the reader through the spreadsheet tool, including its layout and conventions, offering context on how and why it was created. This user manual will also provide instructions on how to populate the model with inputs that are appropriate for a specific jurisdiction's policymaking objectives and context. Finally, the user manual will describe the results and outline how these results may inform decisions about long-term renewable energy support programs.

Gifford, J. S.; Grace, R. C.

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

CREST Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartmentAUDIT REPORTOpenWendeGuo FengBoulder, CO)Burundi:Sales Seventeen LLC Jump

44

CREST Solar | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartmentAUDIT REPORTOpenWendeGuo FengBoulder, CO)Burundi:Sales Seventeen LLC JumpSolar

45

CREST Wind | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartmentAUDIT REPORTOpenWendeGuo FengBoulder, CO)Burundi:Sales Seventeen LLC

46

Pacific Crest Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth'sOklahoma/GeothermalOrange County is aOrmesaPPT Research IncPaTu Wind Farm

47

Coyote Canyon Steam Plant Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin:EnergyWisconsin:2003) |Cordova39. It is classified asCowley

48

Crest Hill, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin:EnergyWisconsin:2003) |Cordova39. It

49

Green Harbor-Cedar Crest, Massachusetts: Energy Resources | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,Ohio: EnergyGrasslands RenewableGreatwood,Green Energy WorldHabits Jump

50

Cost of Renewable Energy Spreadsheet Tool (CREST) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar Power Basics (The following text is derivedCoReturnCooksonAfricaprojectRenewable

51

Cedar Crest, New Mexico: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin:Energy Information on PV Economics ByCavendish,County, Nebraska:

52

Field evaluation and improvement of a new system for delivering substances to coyotes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

layer partly peeled to expose the LDPE plastic bulb, and CLOD core made of polyester resin. 24 Fig. 5. CLOD cores (foreground) and stake. Fig. 6. Four CLOD designs tested in south Texas. 25 27 LIST OF TABLES Locations of CLOD tests, variation... was conducted inside a goat pen to assess relative risk of accidental poisoning to domestic goats. OBJECTIVES The purpose of this study was to expand upon the research of the CLOD delivery system, and develop an understanding of its potential in field...

Ebbert, Steven Michael

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Coyote-prey interactions on an intensively managed south Texas ranch  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

)dwes paZqStaM asaqq po1Jad SUTydwes qoea uyqqtg sqeos qqS))' Jo gnaws J 0 Jo he/ Ug sg )'nsa J Su/8 elq Su): p1'oAe oq pasn 8 aM Suj gqS'1 aM & s 11U, ' Qe os aqq go ZqSTaM fiJp aqua fiq payTdyq~w seM waqt poop uancS e uo spy( Ucd go quaoJad atU. '(bfi6...Tgtquapy aJaM geosysqcc(od OO( go yeqcq 8 pue ued wo 9c x Sg e U( paqnqyJqsgp lyuafia pue paxyw a JaM sguaquoo geog '(fg6 [ uasueH pue uosuqof 'f96 t xoG pue peJweq)) awe Jg quyod uyd-pL e Sursn paugwexa 8 JaM sqeos go squaZuo) 'adfiq fiaJd 8) Suts 8 go...

Drew, Gary Scott

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

The effectiveness of selected aversive agents in reducing coyote predation on sheep  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gier 1968, Kozicky and Henderson 1974 Gier 1968, Ellard 1973 Lantz 1905, Almirall 1926 Towne and Wentworth 1945, Wagner 1972 Hall 1946, Jobman 1972 Henderson and Craig 1932, Shelton 1973a, 1973b Henderson 1930, Howard 1974 Robinson 1943... of Nevada. Univ. of Calif. Press. Berkeley and Los Angeles, 710 pp. and K. R. Kelson, 1959. The masssals of North America. The Ronald Prese Co. , New York, 2 Vol. 1079 pp. 29 Henderson, J. and E. L. Craig. 1932. Economic mammalogy. Charles C. Thomas...

Ridlehuber, Kenneth Trice

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Coyotes, Jazz, and Creative Teams: Facing and Seeking Variance Russ Derickson  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

various domains. Recent reports of over reduction of variance through misuse of Six Sigma quality for their innovation entered into misapplication of Six-Sigma quality practices that severely diminished idea the apparent overuse of Six Sigma variance reduction in various enterprises, we present a systems model

Gordon, Scott

56

Nocturnal Movements and Distributions of Bobcats, Coyotes and Raccoons during Quail Nesting Season  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

habitat selectivity. I also measured the proximity of the mesopredators and quail nesting locations to roads, water and quail feeders on the ranch. I used fractal analysis to calculate length and tortuosity of nocturnal paths and assessed potential risk...

Jhala, Shesh

2013-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

57

Microsoft Word - CX-McNary-Coyote Springs_WEB.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

May 26, 2010 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Corinn Castro Project Manager - TELM-TPP-3 Proposed Action: Replace spacer dampers along the...

58

TESTING FOR WOLF-COYOTE HYBRIDIZATION IN THE ROCKY MOUNTAINS USING MITOCHONDRIAL DNA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mountain region is important for the eventual delisting of this endangered spe- cies, but introgressive

59

Coyote Springs Cogeneration Project, Morrow County, Oregon: Draft Environmental Impact Statement.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

BPA is considering whether to transfer (wheel) electrical power from a proposed privately-owned, combustion-turbine electrical generation plant in Oregon. The plant would be fired by natural gas and would use combined-cycle technology to generate up to 440 average megawatts (aMW) of energy. The plant would be developed, owned, and operated by Portland General Electric Company (PGE). The project would be built in eastern Oregon, just east of the City of Boardman in Morrow County. The proposed plant would be built on a site within the Port of Morrow Industrial Park. The proposed use for the site is consistent with the County land use plan. Building the transmission line needed to interconnect the power plant to BPA`s transmission system would require a variance from Morrow County. BPA would transfer power from the plant to its McNary-Slatt 500-kV transmission line. PGE would pay BPA for wheeling services. Key environmental concerns identified in the scoping process and evaluated in the draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) include these potential impacts: (1) air quality impacts, such as emissions and their contributions to the {open_quotes}greenhouse{close_quotes} effect; (2) health and safety impacts, such as effects of electric and magnetic fields, (3) noise impacts, (4) farmland impacts, (5) water vapor impacts to transportation, (6) economic development and employment impacts, (7) visual impacts, (8) consistency with local comprehensive plans, and (9) water quality and supply impacts, such as the amount of wastewater discharged, and the source and amount of water required to operate the plant. These and other issues are discussed in the DEIS. The proposed project includes features designed to reduce environmental impacts. Based on studies completed for the DEIS, adverse environmental impacts associated with the proposed project were identified, and no evidence emerged to suggest that the proposed action is controversial.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Microsoft Word - XX 13 Coyote Creek land acquisition provides wildlife corridorSES.docx  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment SurfacesResource Program Preliminary Needs535:UFC5, 2010UPDATES:3 13 BONNEVILLE

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "g0313 coyote crest" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

E-Print Network 3.0 - area middle fork Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: Middle Fork Coyote Creek (8286 Acres) Santa Clara County 2205300104 Kelly Cabin Canyon (4283 Acres... Berryessa EastForkCoyote Cow Calera Penitencia LasAnimas Arroyo...

62

kunks, opossum, raccoons, coyotes, deer, and elk often are lumped into the unofficial taxonomic family "nuisance wildlife." Actually,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with raccoons, skunks, opossum, and even bear can be solved by eliminating one thing from the general area with hanging scented soaps, human hair, and diesel- soaked rags on or near affected plants. More tempting areas

Tullos, Desiree

63

Evaluation of design and operating speeds for crest vertical curves with limited sight distance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Puerto Colon field is located in the Putumayo basin in southern Colombia, South America, and is operated by Empresa Colombiana de petroleos (ECOPETROL), which is the national oil company. The field produces from the Cretaceous sandstones...

Russell, Charles William

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

arginylation-dependent neural crest: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

discrimination of benign from malignant gastric neural network classifier, an efficient pattern recognition approach, is used to classify benign Likas, Aristidis 140 Deep...

65

Fourth CREST Conference: (In association with the Asia-Pacific Forum)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: the ASEAN-EU (ASEM Process); media representation, law and political economy, constructiosns of national in ASEAN and Spain in the European Union' Hidetoshi Nakamura: 'Regional Integration and National Identity

Feigon, Brooke

66

Anhydrite precipitation and the extent of hydrothermal recharge zones at ocean ridge crests  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) and hydrothermal processes; 8135 Tectonophysics: Hydrothermal systems (8424); 3035 Marine Geology and Geophysics: Midocean ridge processes; 4832 Oceanography: Biological and Chemical: Hydrothermal systems; KEYWORDS, and biological processes on Earth. Seafloor hydrothermal systems transport nearly 33% of the global oceanic heat

Manga, Michael

67

Characterization of an individual neural crest-like cell lineage in the invertebrate chordate Ciona intestinalis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Whittaker JR. 1973b. Tyrosinase in the presumptive pigmenth. MITF, 11.5 hpf; i. Tyrosinase, 11.5 hpf and j. Meis, 11.5ocellus (g), while MITF and Tyrosinase are expressed in both

Cone, Angela C.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Ascidian Neural Crest-Like Cells: Phylogenetic Distribution, Relationship to Larval Complexity,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for pigment development in diverse ascidian species. We surveyed HNK-1 expression and tyrosinase activity experiments indicated that HNK-1 and tyrosinase are expressed in the same subset of pigment-forming mesenchymal cells in species with complex or simple larvae. In addition, the absence of HNK-1 and tyrosinase

Jeffery, William R.

69

Preference and intake of feedstuff by crested porcupines (Hystrix brachyura) in captivity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

batatas) 300 g/d, fresh oil palm fruits (Elaeis guineensis) 400 g/d and commercial rabbit pellets ad.47 ± 0.65. The preferences for food were as follows ; sweet potato > oil palm fruits > kangkong > pellet.0 % and EE 1.0 %) and oil palm fruits (high EE 18.0 %, DM 42 %, CP 7.4 %, CF 19.1 % and NFE 53.5 %) than

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

70

Accident causation study on roadways with limited sight distance crest vertical curves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

reflect the driver and vehicle population currently on the transportation network. An accident causation study was conducted to determine if roadways with limited stopping sight distance present a safety hazard for the transportation network. Rural two...

Stoddard, Angela May

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

E-Print Network 3.0 - anterior iliac crest Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and inferior iliac spines, posterior... - anterior cranial fossa (frontal lobe cerebrum), middle cranial fossa (temporal lobe cerebrum), posterior... and transverse sinuses, ......

72

Magmatic subsidence of the East Pacific Rise (EPR) at S revealed through fault restoration of ridge crest  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and John Sinton Department of Geology and Geophysics, University of Hawaii, 2525 Correa Road Honolulu. Ryan, W. Jin, M.-H. Cormier, E. Bergmanis, J. Sinton, and S. White, Magmatic subsidence of the East

Carbotte, Suzanne

73

Safety evaluation of limited sight distance at crest vertical curves on two-lane rural roadways in Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

controlled database was used to test the hypothesis in order to discriminate between accidents possibly caused by limited sight distance and accidents caused by other geometric features. Multiple-factor analysis of variance was used to test the variation... of the accident rates under the various experimental conditions. The Bonferroni technique, which allows the user to control the maximum experimentwise error rate, was used to perform the multiple comparisons among three or more means. When appropriate, the t...

George, Karen Maria

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Comparison of crest height distributions of experimental and theoretical waves - a search for applicability of 2nd-order theory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study is focussed on investigating the applicability of the 2nd-order wave theory to different sea-states. The study was conducted by analyzing the experimental wave data and comparing the data with the 2nd-order wave theory. This helps...

Kumar, Amitabh

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

E-Print Network 3.0 - athens ga usa Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Chen, V... . Northrup Xerox Palo Alto Research Center, 3333 Coyote Hill Road, Palo Alto, California 94304 ... Source: Feenstra, Randall - Department of Physics, Carnegie...

76

E-Print Network 3.0 - analysis reveals foraging Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

such as Figure 2... An Elementary Social Information Foraging Model Peter Pirolli Palo Alto Research Center 3333 Coyote... phenomena in social information foraging and...

77

Collaborative Testing of Web Services Hong Zhu, Member, IEEE CS, and Yufeng Zhang  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to support various activi- ties in testing WS, such as Coyote [6], WS-FIT [7], TAXI [41], PLASTIC [42], LTSA

Zhu, Hong

78

Collaborative Testing of Web Services Hong Zhu, Member, IEEE CS, and Yufeng Zhang  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, such as Coyote [6], WS-FIT [7], TAXI [41], PLASTIC [42], LTSA-WS [32]; just to mention a few. However, despite

Zhu, Hong

79

Annotated Bibliography 1951-2001  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3122, 3123 Primus, Thomas M. 5182 Putman, Robert W. 2179dogs and coyotes is described. 5182. Primus, Thomas M. 2000.anticoagulants 5068, 5182 antihormones 1014 antipredator

Hopland Research & Extension Center

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

E-Print Network 3.0 - adrar mountains fishes Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Canyon Summary: Hills Grass Valley Black Mountain Cleghorn Lakes North Algodones Dunes Fish Creek Mountains Coyote... Crater Mountain Sheep Ridge White Mountains Great Falls Basin...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "g0313 coyote crest" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

american bison bison: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: habitat for mule deer, bighorn sheep, bison, wild horses, pronghorns, coyotes, bobcats, badgers the capability to generate power on the...

82

ILLUSTRATIONS. GOLDEN TROUT OF TilE SOUTHERN HIGH SIERRAS: Facing page.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

trout of Volcano Creek, Salmo roosevelt!................. 3 II. (1) Marble Fork of Kaweah River, (2 River. (5) First series of Ialls in Little Kern River. (6) Upper part of first series of falls in Little third falls. (18) Broder Falls, Coyote Creek. (19) Fonrth falls In Coyote Creek

83

Potential hazards of compound 1080 to selected nontarget wildlife when used in the toxic collar  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, coyotes were administered doses that simulated those a coyote could possibly receive from field use of 1080 as a predator control tool. Doses ranged from the equivalent of a single lethal dose (SLD) bait of 4 mg to two-thirds of a large (600 mg 1080...

Eastland, Warren George

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Wave represents displacement Wave represents pressure Source -Sound Waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wave represents displacement Wave represents pressure Source - Sound Waves Distance between crests is wavelength Number of crests passing a point in 1 second is frequency Wave represents pressure Target - Radio Waves Distance between crests is wavelength Number of crests passing a point in 1 second is frequency

Colorado at Boulder, University of

85

CX-001414: Categorical Exclusion Determination  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Coyote Springs-Slatt #1: Spacer Damper ReplacementsCX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 04/12/2010Location(s): Gilliam County, Oregon Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration

86

CX-002532: Categorical Exclusion Determination  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Spacer Damper Replacements on the McNary-Coyote Springs Number-1 Transmission LineCX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 05/26/2010Location(s): MorrowCounty, OregonOffice(s): Bonneville Power Administration

87

DOE Categorical Exclusion Determination Form  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

or Field Office: Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program Project Title CA-TRIBE-LOS COYOTES BAND OF CAHUILLA AND CUPENO INDIANS Location: Tribe CA-TRIBE-LOS...

88

Help me, I need to know roger d. applegaTe, Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency, P. O. Box 40747, Nashville, TN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, coyotes and black vultures (Coragyps atratus) depredating pets, eastern chipmunks (Tamias striatus) eating you search the Internet for information, you find that much is recycled from Timm (1983) and that very

89

2 6 IEEE Software March/ April 1998 0740-7459/98/$10.00 1998 IEEE ore than a decade ago Fred Brooks wrote, "The hardest single part of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Berry, Technion­Israel Institute of Technology Brian Lawrence, Coyote Valley Software Consulting and practice is no more evi- dent than in the field of re- quirementsengineering.2 We are happy to report now

Berry, Daniel M.

90

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Mexico, they are the cause of little concern. The areas now most heavily infested with wolves)een persistently hunted and trapped with crude methods. The steel trap, in sizes 3 and 4 for coyotes and sizes 4K

91

CX-009788: Categorical Exclusion Determination  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Provision of Funds to Acquire a Conservation Easement Over the 310-acre Coyote Creek property. CX(s) Applied: B1.25 Date: 01/23/2013 Location(s): Oregon Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

92

automated xml-based test: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Coyote: An XML-based framework for Web services testing CiteSeer Summary: Web services received significant attention recently...

93

METEOROLOGICAL Journal of Climate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for Coastal Research, GKSS Research Centre, Geesthacht, Germany y CREST, City College of New York, NY, USA z

Siebesma, Pier

94

Geothermal assessment of the MX deployment area in Nevada. Final report, April 1, 1981-April 30, 1982  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A preliminary geothermal resource assessment of the MX deployment area in Nevada focused on Coyote Spring Valley in southeastern Nevada. Initially, an extensive literature search was conducted and a bibliography consisting of 750 entries was compiled covering all aspects of geology pertaining to the study area. A structural study indicates that Coyote Spring Valley lies in a tectonically active area which is favorable for the discovery of geothermal resources. Hot water may be funneled to the near-surface along an extensive fracture and fault system which appears to underlie the valley, according to information gathered during the literature search and aerial photo survey. A total of 101 shallow temperature probes were emplanted in Coyote Spring Valley. Three anomalous temperature points all lying within the same vicinity were identified in the north-central portion of the valley near a fault. A soil-mercury study also identified one zone of anomalous mercury concentrations around the north end of the Arrow Canyon Range. A literature search covering regional fluid geochemistry indicated that the three fluid samples taken from Coyote Spring Valley have a higher concentration of Na + K. During field work, seven fluid samples were collected in Coyote Spring Valley which also appear to be derived from volcanic units due to the presence of Ca-Mg or Na-K carbonate-bicarbonate. A temperature gradient study of six test water wells indicates that only one geothermal well with a temperature of 35.5/sup 0/C (96/sup 0/F) exists in the central portion of the valley at the north end of Arrow Canyon Range near the zone of anomalous soil-mercury points. A cultural assessment of Coyote Spring Valley was performed prior to field work.

Trexler, D.T.; Bruce, J.L.; Cates, D.; Dolan, H.H.; Covington, C.H.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

E-Print Network 3.0 - accurately measuring lumbar Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the iliac crest) and a measure of lumbar ... Source: Ohio State University, Department of Industrial, Welding, and Systems Engineering, Biodynamics Laboratories Collection:...

96

automatic medical encoding: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Information Sciences Websites Summary: CREST Program, Japan Science & Technology Agency 5-3, Yonbancho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-8666 JAPAN Kazuo-8577, JAPAN ABSTRACT...

97

Airborne observations of the kinematics and statistics of breaking waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

v 3 Observations of wave breaking kinematics in fetch-crest length . . . . . C.6 Wave elevation . . . . . . . .breaking waves in the images . . . . . . . . . . . 3.3.3

Kleiss, Jessica M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

E-Print Network 3.0 - abdominal organ transplantation Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and heart. "Abdominal CT" scans from the dome of the liver to the iliac crests so as to image the ... Source: Jacob, Mathews - Departments of Biomedical Engineering & Electrical...

99

E-Print Network 3.0 - alamos crestone project Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

date. Watersheds; Los Alamos National Laboratory, RRES Remediation... Middle Los Alamos CanyonRoyal Crest Mobile Home Park TA-61 TA-60 TA-53 ... Source: Los Alamos...

100

E-Print Network 3.0 - accounting service denver Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Science. Colorado has Source: Pohl, Karsten - Department of Physics, University of New Hampshire Collection: Materials Science ; Physics 52 Forest service blocks Crested...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "g0313 coyote crest" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

mial Optimization Problems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

tially supported by the Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), the Core. Research of Evolutionary Science and Technology (CREST) Research Project.

2014-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

102

B-475 Lagrangian-Conic Relaxations, Part I: A Unified Framework ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

tially supported by the Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), the Core. Research of Evolutionary Science and Technology (CREST) Research Project.

2014-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

103

Push-to-Talk Social Talk ALLISON WOODRUFF & PAUL M. AOKI  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Push-to-Talk Social Talk ALLISON WOODRUFF & PAUL M. AOKI Palo Alto Research Center, 3333 Coyote Hill Road, Palo Alto, CA 94304, USA (E-mail: woodruff@acm.org, aoki@acm.org) Abstract. This paper within gelled social groups, especially those comprised of young adults. This population is interesting

Aoki, Paul M.

104

Private Social Network Analysis: How to Assemble Pieces of a Graph Privately  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

University 230 Kreger Hall Oxford, OH 45056 frikkekb@muohio.edu Philippe Golle Palo Alto Research Center 3333 Coyote Hill Rd Palo Alto, CA, 94304 pgolle@parc.com ABSTRACT Connections in distributed systems ACM 1-58113-968-3/06/0010 ...$5.00. population of users with connections defined, for example, by who

Golle, Philippe

105

The Future of Annotation in a Digital (Paper) World Catherine C. Marshall  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Future of Annotation in a Digital (Paper) World Catherine C. Marshall Xerox Palo Alto Research Center 3333 Coyote Hill Road Palo Alto, CA 94304 Presented at the 35th Annual GSLIS Clinic: Successes population.1 This paper describes three very different communities who might take advantage of new digital

Marshall, Cathy

106

How Push-To-Talk Makes Talk Less Pushy Allison Woodruff and Paul M. Aoki  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

How Push-To-Talk Makes Talk Less Pushy Allison Woodruff and Paul M. Aoki Palo Alto Research Center 3333 Coyote Hill Road Palo Alto, CA 94304 USA woodruff@acm.org, aoki@acm.org ABSTRACT This paper. This population is interesting to study because its members allocate a great deal of time to social communication

Aoki, Paul M.

107

The Singularity is Not Near: Slowing Growth of Wikipedia Bongwon Suh, Gregorio Convertino, Ed H. Chi, Peter Pirolli  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Chi, Peter Pirolli Palo Alto Research Center 3333 Coyote Hill Road, Palo Alto, CA, 94304 +1 (650 plateaued, indicating that it may have come against its limits to growth. We measure growth, population law, logistic model, Wikipedia, resistance, population 1. Introduction Many natural systems have

Chi, Ed Huai-hsin

108

Instant Messaging in Teen Life Rebecca E. Grinter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Instant Messaging in Teen Life Rebecca E. Grinter Palo Alto Research Center (PARC) 3333 Coyote Hill Road Palo Alto, CA 94304 beki@parc.com AIM: beki70 Leysia Palen Department of Computer Science. To that end, this paper reports findings from a qualitative study of IM use within this population

Grinter, Rebecca Elizabeth

109

The Abstract Task Graph: A Methodology for Architecture-Independent Programming of Networked Sensor Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Center 3333 Coyote Hill Road Palo Alto, CA 94304 USA jreich, larner @parc.com Abstract The Abstract Task-provided code that implements the actual information processing functions in the sys- tem. Appropriate numbers and network configuration, with each node incorporating the user-provided code, automatically gen- erated glue

Prasanna, Viktor K.

110

A Temporal Model for Multi-Level Undo and Redo W. Keith Edwards  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Temporal Model for Multi-Level Undo and Redo W. Keith Edwards Xerox PARC 3333 Coyote Hill Road Palo Alto, CA 94304 kedwards@parc.xerox.com Takeo Igarashi1 Brown University CS Dept., Box 1910 of the application as a whole can allow users to work locally on a document, project source code, et cetera

Edwards, Keith

111

LumberJack: Intelligent Discovery and Analysis of Web User Traffic Composition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rosien, Jeffrey Heer PARC (Palo Alto Research Center) 3333 Coyote Hill Road Palo Alto, CA 94304 {echi, arosien, jheer}@parc.com Abstract. Web Usage Mining enables new understanding of user goals on the Web into appropriate groupings. In this paper, we describe our prototype production system code-named Lumber- Jack

Chi, Ed Huai-hsin

112

From Local to Global Coordination: Lessons from Software Reuse  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

From Local to Global Coordination: Lessons from Software Reuse Rebecca E. Grinter Xerox PARC 3333 Coyote Hill Road Palo Alto, CA 94304 USA grinter@parc.xerox.com http://www.parc by making it possible to share code. However, software reuse in practice has proved much harder. This paper

Grinter, Rebecca Elizabeth

113

GraphBased Authentication of Digital Streams Sara Miner  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

@cs.ucsd.edu Jessica Staddon y Xerox Palo Alto Research Center 3333 Coyote Hill Road Palo Alto, CA 94304 jstaddon@parc the secret as a key for a message authentica­ tion code (MAC), then MAC the content in each packet

114

Using Threads in Interactive Systems: A Case Study Carl Hauser, Christian Jacobi, Marvin Theimer, Brent Welch and Mark Weiser  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Brent Welch and Mark Weiser Computer Science Laboratory Xerox PARC 3333 Coyote Hill Road Palo Alto of the microsecond spacing between thread events, and reading the implementation code. We identify ten different in unanticipated ways with other thread primitives and paradigms. Finally, we glean from the practices in this code

Brown, Angela Demke

115

RG: A Case-Study for Aspect-Oriented Programming Anurag Mendhekar, Gregor Kiczales, John Lamping  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to be sprinkled throughout the code, resulting in code that tangled the various performance issues along 3333 Coyote Hill Road, Palo Alto, CA 94304, USA. {anurag,gregor,lamping}@parc.xerox.com #12;22 Aspect-cutting issues. In AOP, code relating to cross-cutting issues, called aspects, can be written in a way that need

116

ArchitectureArchitecture--Independent Programming andIndependent Programming and SynthesisSynthesis of Networked Sensing Applicationsof Networked Sensing Applications Amol Bakshi, Viktor K. Prasanna  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Larner Palo Alto Research Center 3333 Coyote Hill Rd, Palo Alto CA larner@parc.com Fourth International by a runtime · Programmer does not write networking code · System-level optimizations can be performed without requiring rewrite of application-level code · Pros: Modularity, reusability, extensibility, low program

Hwang, Kai

117

HumanWildlife Conflicts 1(2):279, Fall 2007 A Tribute to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and reminisce Of our friends that's gone by The sheep herds move to higher ground With coyotes soon to follow'll cherish As we load the truck each morn' They're the ones we'll long for As we ride out in the storm Joseph

118

Comparing Two Types of Magnetically- Coupled Adjustable Speed Drives with Variable Frequency Drives in Pump and Fan Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper presents the results from laboratory tests on MagnaDrive Corporations fixed-magnet magnetically-coupled adjustable speed drive (MC-ASD) and Coyote Electronics electromagnetic MC-ASD as compared to a typical variable frequency drive (VFD...

Anderson, K. J.; Chvala, W. D.

119

Research Symposium January 2007  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in New York is to remove the offending coyote using lethal control. Non-lethal methods to prevent? Non-native invasive species are considered a serious ecological and economic threat. Because of this. However, little is known about the impact these organizations have on invasive plant populations

Walter, M.Todd

120

HOME GROUNDS & ANIMALS 2014 Other Animals: Vertebrates as Pests 8-1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

or endanger health and safety. At the same time, all animals have value, whether it is ecological, aesthetic starling, house sparrow, and rock pigeon to be "nuisance" birds; the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS as "nuisance species" in Virginia are the house mouse, Norway rat, black rat, coyote, feral hog, nutria

Liskiewicz, Maciej

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "g0313 coyote crest" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

A COMPARISON OF ATMS AND CSP TECHNIQUES Johan de Kleer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A COMPARISON OF ATMS AND CSP TECHNIQUES Johan de Kleer Xerox Palo Alto Research ~Jenter 3333 Coyote (CSP) techniques which evolved from vision tasks and assumption- based truth maintenance system (ATMS. This paper demonstrates that the intuitions underlying these refinements are essentially similar

de Kleer, Johan

122

Buckling of a stiff film bound to a compliant substrate (part III).  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

these crests and valleys from above are shown to be right angles under equi-biaxial loading, in agreement; in the experiments, the wavelength is instead selected by the history of applied load. Key words: Buckling, Plates known as chevrons; the crests and valleys of the herringbone follow zigzag paths. Herringbone patterns

Audoly, Basile

123

Supplementary data 2.xlsx SYMBOL p-value Fold-Change p-value Fold-Change Annotation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.66E-08 3.06 9.13E-08 2.89 neural crest Nr2f2 1.39E-04 3.02 4.46E-06 7.44 neural crest Ppl 2.05E-09 12

Winfree, Erik

124

On-Line Measurement and Tuning of Multi-Pass Recirculation Time in the CEBAF Linacs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On-Line Measurement and Tuning of Multi-Pass Recirculation Time in the CEBAF Linacs Michael, USA Abstract CEBAF is a CW, recirculating electron accelerator, us- ing on-crest RF acceleration the beam to drift off-crest with respect to the accelerating fields. Figure 1: Layout of CEBAF Accelerator

125

Lagrangian kinematics of steep waves up to the inception of a spilling breaker  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Horizontal Lagrangian velocities and accelerations at the surface of steep water-waves are studied by Particle Tracking Velocimetry (PTV) for gradually increasing crest heights up to the inception of a spilling breaker. Localized steep waves are excited using wavemaker-generated Peregrine breather-type wave trains. Actual crest and phase velocities are estimated from video recorded sequences of the instantaneous wave shape as well as from surface elevation measurements by wave gauges. Effects of nonlinearity and spectral width on phase velocity, as well as relation between the phase velocity and crest propagation speed are discussed. The inception of a spilling breaker is associated with the horizontal velocity of water particles at the crest attaining that of the crest, thus confirming the kinematic criterion for inception of breaking.

Shemer, Lev

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Emerging factors associated with the decline of a gray fox population and multi-scale land cover associations of mesopredators in the Chicago metropolitan area.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Statewide surveys of furbearers in Illinois indicate gray (Urocyon cinereoargenteus) and red (Vulpes vulpes) foxes have experienced substantial declines in relative abundance, whereas other species such as raccoons (Procyon lotor) and coyotes (Canis latrans) have exhibited dramatic increases during the same time period. The cause of the declines of gray and red foxes has not been identified, and the current status of gray foxes remains uncertain. Therefore, I conducted a large-scale predator survey and tracked radiocollared gray foxes from 2004 to 2007 in order to determine the distribution, survival, cause-specific mortality sources and land cover associations of gray foxes in an urbanized region of northeastern Illinois, and examined the relationships between the occurrence of gray fox and the presence other species of mesopredators, specifically coyotes and raccoons. Although generalist mesopredators are common and can reach high densities in many urban areas their urban ecology is poorly understood due to their secretive nature and wariness of humans. Understanding how mesopredators utilize urbanized landscapes can be useful in the management and control of disease outbreaks, mitigation of nuisance wildlife issues, and gaining insight into how mesopredators shape wildlife communities in highly fragmented areas. I examined habitat associations of raccoons, opossums (Didelphis virginiana), domestic cats (Felis catus), coyotes, foxes (gray and red), and striped skunks (Mephitis mephitis) at multiple spatial scales in an urban environment. Gray fox occurrence was rare and widely dispersed, and survival estimates were similar to other studies. Gray fox occurrence was negatively associated with natural and semi-natural land cover types. Fox home range size increased with increasing urban development suggesting that foxes may be negatively influenced by urbanization. Gray fox occurrence was not associated with coyote or raccoon presence. However, spatial avoidance and mortality due to coyote predation was documented and disease was a major mortality source for foxes. The declining relative abundance of gray fox in Illinois is likely a result of a combination of factors. Assessment of habitat associations indicated that urban mesopredators, particularly coyotes and foxes, perceived the landscape as relatively homogeneous and that urban mesopredators interacted with the environment at scales larger than that accommodated by remnant habitat patches. Coyote and fox presence was found to be associated with a high degree of urban development at large and intermediate spatial scales. However, at a small spatial scale fox presence was associated with high density urban land cover whereas coyote presence was associated with urban development with increased forest cover. Urban habitats can offer a diversity of prey items and anthropogenic resources and natural land cover could offer coyotes daytime resting opportunities in urban areas where they may not be as tolerated as smaller foxes. Raccoons and opossums were found to utilize moderately developed landscapes with interspersed natural and semi-natural land covers at a large spatial scale, which may facilitate dispersal movements. At intermediate and small spatial scales, both species were found to utilize areas that were moderately developed and included forested land cover. These results indicated that raccoons and opossums used natural areas in proximity to anthropogenic resources. At a large spatial scale, skunk presence was associated with highly developed landscapes with interspersed natural and semi-natural land covers. This may indicate that skunks perceived the urban matrix as more homogeneous than raccoons or opossums. At an intermediate spatial scale skunks were associated with moderate levels of development and increased forest cover, which indicated that they might utilize natural land cover in proximity to human-dominated land cover. At the smallest spatial scale skunk presence was associated with forested land cover surrounded by a suburban matrix. Compared to raccoon

Willingham, Alison N.; /Ohio State U.; ,

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Photoperiodic induction of diapause in the pink bollworm, Pectinophora gossypiella (Saunders): photosensitivity and rate of diapause induction of various life history stages and spectral sensitivity of these stages.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is teottf?a. %4? ia offset ia ?osylataly ?yya?its ftss cha! Coyote?4 foe yl?ato ?hioh et? roy?et?4 to be s?s?itis? to tb? X?at?x w?e?i?sitho of 440 o?4 'IX oy glissthwieh s?4 Ie?4tiehs, '&44). %ho yes?os?o ef a ?swot?ibis yhotosoeeitiw? yi...

Berry, Edwin Clark

1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Plays in Performance, Letters, Book Reviews, Recent Publications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the stage whenever she took focus. A close second goes to Carola Summers as the lady coyote with the heart of gold. Another gem was Andy Herrera as the viejito who never uttered a single line but who spoke with his bones and sinews. We should be seeing..., Cuentas por cobrar; Carballido, R., Sombras ajenas; Argudín, Sueldo según capacidades; López, Cosas de muchachos; Ruvalcaba, La visita; Berthier, Romeo y Julieta; Berman, Bill; Espinoza, Hacer la calle; Liera, La fuerza del hombre; Campesino, Octubre...

Editors

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Imperial Reservoir KOFA NATIONAL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

247 79 79 7 115 62 72 78 79 86 115 163 18 72 74 78 115 18 62 95 371 95 94 247 Solar Energy Study Areas of 7/21/2009) Solar Energy Study Area (as of 6/5/2009) BLM Lands Being Analyzed for Solar Development Imperial Plaster City Live Oak Springs Seeley Coyote Wells El Centro Holtville Boulevard Campo Tecate Heber

Laughlin, Robert B.

130

Predator Control as a Tool in Wildlife Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the individual predator profiles beginning on page 11). For example, coyote scat is generally cigar shaped and smaller than that of a domestic dog. Game monitoring systems can be useful in studying game and predator species. Managers can view wildlife via video... containing chicken eggs) to measure depredation. Then a strategic predator management plan can be developed to address specific problems (for example, only raccoons) or areas (for example, around deer feeders). Camera systems range in price from about $200...

Rollins, Dale

2004-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

131

Proceedings of the Pronghorn Symposium, 2006  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by wolf predation) were allowed to expand in numbers and distribution. They are now the primary predator of pronghorns, followed by bobcats, eagles, and mountain lions. Unable to assume the long-distance-pursuit role of the wolf, coyotes have...............................................................................................................47 Pronghorn Numbers on Late and Mid Seral Chihuahuan Desert Rangelands F. Clemente, R. Valdez and J. Holechek..............................................................53 Restoration of the Duff Springs Riparian Area and the Associated...

Cearley, Kenneth A.

2006-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

132

ORNITOLOGIA NEOTROPICAL 18: 587602, 2007 The Neotropical Ornithological Society  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, AND PATAGONIA Mariana Bulgarella1 , Robert E. Wilson1 , Cecilia Kopuchian2 , Thomas H. Valqui3, 4 , & Kevin G los Andes centrales, Mendoza y Patagonia. ­ El Pato Crestón (Lophonetta specularioides) habita los. specularioides colectados en Patagonia (

McCracken, Kevin G.

133

Microsoft Word - Vol II_Att B_PCCIP.docx  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

at approximately 50-yard intervals, will be walked along the crest and side slopes. A search will be made for evidence of differential settling, subsidence, and cracks, if any....

134

Fernald Preserve, Fernald, Ohio Comprehensive Legacy  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

at approximately 50-yard intervals, will be walked along the crest and side slopes. A search will be made for evidence of differential settling, subsidence, and cracks, if any....

135

Observation of an enhanced AharonovBohm effect K. Kobayashia,*, H. Aikawaa  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

277-8581, Japan b CREST, Japan Science and Technology Corporation, Mejiro, Tokyo 171-0031, Japan account of the role played by the probe leads. This makes an essential distinction between mesoscopic

Katsumoto, Shingo

136

09:30~10:00 Reception 10:00~10:30 Opening Ceremony  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Tokyo, Japan 12) excitations of the incomplete f shell can lead to Cooper pair formation. There is by now strong evidence

Wu, Yih-Min

137

Gamic Race: Logics of Difference in Videogame Culture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the first time as an Orc and seeing a Night Elf crest aexplicit racial choices like “Orc” or “Caucasian,” Miis, forto early portrayals of orc [sic] as bloodthirsty savages

Higgin, Tanner

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Renewables Portfolio Standard phone: 415-703-3072  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Esyah Huynh (626) 302-4978 Bishop Tungsten Development, LLC Bishop Tungsten Small hydro 2011 Feed Hydroelectric Project LLC Isabella Fish Flow Small hydro 2011 Feed in Tariff -- CREST Category 1 Bundled

139

*Corresponding author: Email: tlakhankar@ccny.cuny.edu; British Journal of Environment & Climate Change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(4): .........., 2013 1. INTRODUCTION Snow is a key component of Earth's energy balance, climate, environment and Technology Center (NOAA-CREST), City College of New York, 160 Convent Ave, NY 10031.USA. 2 NOAA

Krakauer, Nir Y.

140

Synergistic Use of Remote Sensing for Snow Cover and Snow Water Equivalent Estimation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 #12;Snow is a key component of Earth's energy balance, climate NOAA-Cooperative Remote Sensing Science and Technology Center (NOAA-CREST), City College of New York

Krakauer, Nir Y.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "g0313 coyote crest" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

E-Print Network 3.0 - acoustic waves trapped Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

no internal waves so that the acoustic propagation is very clean.Travel times of the first... to the acoustic array. The dashed lines represent the crests of the waves with 160...

142

By Michael G. Loso, Robert S. Anderson, Daniel F. Doak, and Suzanne P. Anderson  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

hiking behind him as he crested a low pass and paused for his first look at the lake. In the foreground, muddy lakebed, disappearing in the far distance amidst a pile of heavy, dripping icebergs. The lake

Loso, Michael G.

143

A zebrafish screen for craniofacial mutants identifies wdr68as a highly conserved gene required for endothelin-1 expression  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Background: Craniofacial birth defects result from defects in cranial neural crest (NC) patterning and morphogenesis. The vertebrate craniofacial skeleton is derived from cranial NC cells and the patterning of these cells ...

Nissen, Robert M.

144

Patient 231  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

never hear anything about Arizona. That must mean it's safe. Bad things don't hap- pen there like they do in New York and Miami. O r Idaho. T o o dry, Sally says. A n d I don't want to live o n a desert and be eaten by coyotes. D o you want.... N o t altogether, but piece by piece. A n inch at a t ime, a part of the house falls o f f and floats away, taking pieces o f grandmother 's l ife—her dishes, her piano, the old love let- ters she thought she'd h idden well enough. Eventually...

Reed, Michelle

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

La cubanía: The Soul of Cuban Theatre in the Mid-1990s  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

not confine itself to dance are specific: la ruptura de los límites del movimiento; el manejo de la literalidad y la dramaturgia para la danza; la investigación cinética; la convivencia de diferentes lenguajes en el espectáculo coreográfico (postura... that led to difficulties in the fall of 1996. Varela finds his intertexts in the Bible, since Cuba is a society of collective sacrifice, and in Joseph Beuys' Operación Coyote for his notion of self-creation (del Campo 130). The play is about Cuba today...

Leonard, Candyce

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Enrichment Comparison Of African Painted Dogs (Lycaon pictus) Housed In U.S. AZA-Accredited Institutions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

reintroduction." Zoo Biology 31(4): 453-469. Cottle, L., et al. (2010). "Feeding Live Prey to Zoo Animals: Response of Zoo Visitors in Switzerland." Zoo Biology 29(3): 344-350. Courchamp, F. and D. W. Macdonald (2001). "Crucial importance of pack size...." African Journal of Ecology 50(4): 500-506. Gilbert-Norton, L. B., et al. (2009). "The effect of randomly altering the time and location of feeding on the behaviour of captive coyotes (Canis latrans)." Applied Animal Behaviour Science 120(3-4): 179...

Cloutier, Tammy L.

2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

147

Renewable Energy Cost Modeling: A Toolkit for Establishing Cost-Based Incentives in the United States; March 2010 -- March 2011  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is intended to serve as a resource for policymakers who wish to learn more about establishing cost-based incentives. The report will identify key renewable energy cost modeling options, highlight the policy implications of choosing one approach over the other, and present recommendations on the optimal characteristics of a model to calculate rates for cost-based incentives, feed-in tariffs (FITs), or similar policies. These recommendations will be utilized in designing the Cost of Renewable Energy Spreadsheet Tool (CREST). Three CREST models will be publicly available and capable of analyzing the cost of energy associated with solar, wind, and geothermal electricity generators. The CREST models will be developed for use by state policymakers, regulators, utilities, developers, and other stakeholders to assist them in current and future rate-setting processes for both FIT and other renewable energy incentive payment structures and policy analyses.

Gifford, J. S.; Grace, R. C.; Rickerson, W. H.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Use of incomplete energy recovery for the energy compression of large energy spread charged particle beams  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of energy recovery for RF-base linear charged particle accelerators that allows energy recovery without large relative momentum spread of the particle beam involving first accelerating a waveform particle beam having a crest and a centroid with an injection energy E.sub.o with the centroid of the particle beam at a phase offset f.sub.o from the crest of the accelerating waveform to an energy E.sub.full and then recovering the beam energy centroid a phase f.sub.o+Df relative to the crest of the waveform particle beam such that (E.sub.full-E.sub.o)(1+cos(f.sub.o+Df))>dE/2 wherein dE=the full energy spread, dE/2=the full energy half spread and Df=the wave form phase distance.

Douglas, David R. (Newport News, VA); Benson, Stephen V. (Yorktown, VA)

2007-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

149

Geomagnetic equatorial anomaly in zonal plasma flow  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors report here on the observation of a geomagnetic signature in the zonal eastward plasma flow, which is a striking feature of the equatorial ionosphere in the evening quadrant. These observations were derived from (E {times} B)/B{sup 2} measurements made with the cylindrical double floating probe experiment carried on the Dynamics Explorer 2 (DE 2) satellite. The signature consists of a crest-trough-crest effect in the latitude dependence of the eastward plasma flow with the crests at {plus minus}8{degree} dip latitude and the trough nearly centered at the dip equator at all geographic longitudes. This phenomenon can be readioly interpreted in terms of the altitude dependence of the F region dynamo electric field, and it is related to dip equator signatures in the plasma density and the magnetic declinatoin which have been reported earlier.

Aggson, T.L.; Herrero, F.A.; Mayr, H.G.; Brace, L.H. (NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States)); Maynard, N.C. (Air Force Geophysics, Hanscom AFB, MA (United States)); Liebrecht, M.C. (Science Applications Research, Inc., Lanham, MD (United States))

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Metallic nut for use with ceramic threads  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A nozzle guide vane assembly has ceramic components therein having a conventional thread thereon including a preestablished pitch and having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion. The nozzle guide vane assembly has a metallic components therein having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being greater that the rate of thermal expansion of the ceramic components is positioned in a gas turbine engine. The metallic component, a nut, has a thread therein including a plurality of crests being spaced on a pitch equal to that of the ceramic component and has a pair of contacting surfaces extending from the plurality of crests. A notch spirally extends intermediate adjacent ones of the plurality of crests and has a preestablished depth which is at least twice the size of the conventional pitch. Furthermore, the pair of contacting surfaces are in contact with only a portion of the threaded surface of the ceramic components.

Norton, Paul F. (San Diego, CA); Shaffer, James E. (Maitland, FL)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Numerical calculation of wave refraction by digital computer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

+~ with time. 20 22 22 25 28 WiL), H, H s o vs. F(i ), DL L 0 43 10 Refraction pattern for uniform slope 10 second p~riod 60 approach; numerical analysis solution 0 Refraction pattern for uniform slope 10 second period 120 approach; numerical... of varying radii (3) as shown in Figure l. It can be seen that the crest deforms and turns toward the segment of lowest celerity. Let M and N be two adjacent points along the crest separated by a distance An at time t (Figure 2a). The corresponding wave...

Orr, Terry Edwin

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

152

Vol. 11, No. 8/August 1994/J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 1367 Acoustic-wavenonlinearity in stimulated  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in liquids, and hence the compressed regions or crests of the mate- rial wave overtake the rarefied regions by Kuznetsov8 for problems in nonlinear acoustics. In addition to the non- linearity that arises from the sound speed's dependence on the instantaneous thermodynamic state, Kuznetsov's equation also includes

Coutsias, Evangelos

153

AUSTIN: A tool for Search Based Software Testing for the C Language and its Evaluation on Deployed Automotive Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Automotive Systems Kiran Lakhotia King's College London, CREST, Strand, London, WC2R 2LS, U.K. kiran of eight non­trivial, real- world C functions drawn from three embedded automotive software modules' to real industrial code from the automotive industry (see Section V) as well as a number of open source

Singer, Jeremy

154

Dynamic rupture through a branched fault2 configuration at Yucca Mountain and resulting3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dynamic rupture through a branched fault2 configuration at Yucca Mountain and resulting3 ground analyses. This is motivated by the normal faults in the vicinity10 of Yucca Mountain, NV, a potential site fault12 located approximately 1 km west of the crest of Yucca Mountain, is the13 most active

Dmowska, Renata

155

Dynamic Rupture through a Branched Fault Configuration at Yucca Mountain, and Resulting Ground Motions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dynamic Rupture through a Branched Fault Configuration at Yucca Mountain, and Resulting Ground of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, a potential site for a high-level radioactive waste repository. The Solitario km away from the SCF beneath the crest of Yucca Mountain, causing the repository site to experience

156

Kinematics measurements of regular, irregular, and rogue waves by PIV/LDV  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

waves. A series of experiments were conducted in a 2-D wave tank at Texas A&M University to measure wave velocities and accelerations using LDV and PIV systems. The wave crests of regular and rogue waves are the focus of this study. With the measured...

Choi, Hae-Jin

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

157

"The Arrow of Time" --It is widely believed that all  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

structure. Those who seek to harness the Sun's energy for synthetic molecular machines find that chemistry contracting circular waves of increasing amplitude. Moreover, immediately behind the highest wave crest as a possible classical process. (It would demand a vast number of distant coherent generators of waves the co

Cai, Long

158

Spin excitations of magnetic vortices in ferromagnetic nanodots V. Novosad,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Japan Science & Technology Corporation, CREST, Japan Received 23 February 2002; published 9 August 2002 Fisica, Universita di Ferrara, I-44100, Italy 4 RIKEN, Frontier Research System, Wako 351-0198, Japan 5 alignments usually lead to large demagnetizing fields that increase the magnetostatic energy and hence favors

Otani, Yoshichika

159

Physiologically realistic modelling of a mechanism for neural representation of intervals of time  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-8610, Japan c CREST, Japan Science and Technology (JST), Saitama 332-0012, Japan Abstract A model, Fuji Xerox Co. Ltd., 430 Sakai, Nakai-machi, Ashigarakami-gun, Kanagawa 259-0157, Japan b Department as well as the difference stated above, will lead us to the idea that an interval of time, T

Fukai, Tomoki

160

Current distribution inside Py/Cu lateral spin-valve devices J. Hamrle,1,2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198, Japan 2CREST, Japan Science & Technology Corporation, Japan 3ISSP, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa-shi, Chiba 277-8581, Japan 4RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198, Japan with- out the charge current, leading to the solution for the energy dissipation problem due to Joule

Otani, Yoshichika

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "g0313 coyote crest" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

PUBLISHED ONLINE: 9 JUNE 2013 | DOI: 10.1038/NPHYS2642 Charge-cluster glass in an organic conductor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Science and Technology Agency (JST), Tokyo 102-0076, Japan, 3RIKEN Center for Emergent Matter Science in charge ordering5,6 , potentially leading to unconventional electronic states without long-range order first-order 1Department of Applied Physics, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-8656, Japan, 2CREST, Japan

Loss, Daniel

162

October 2011 Logica 2011. All rights reserved  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) to develop precision landing techniques and technology for Mars · part of the CREST programme · Several of Japan's operational satellites rely on Logica pattern recognition software to detect surface features recognition in operational control systems builds on a world-leading heritage in medical, defence, industrial

Anand, Mahesh

163

PUBLISHED ONLINE: 12 JUNE 2011 | DOI: 10.1038/NMAT3046 Giant enhancement of spin accumulation and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577, Japan, 5CREST, Japan Science and Technology, Tokyo 102 efficient spin injection with high applied current density, which leads to the spin-valve voltage increasing in the electrochemical potential 1Advanced Science Institute, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako 351-0198, Japan, 2Department

Otani, Yoshichika

164

IPSJ Transactions on Advanced Computing Systems Vol.5 No.4 101111 (Aug. 2012) Regular Paper  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

their memory. This inherently leads to information leakage from the user VMs. 1 Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro, Tokyo 152­8552, Japan 2 Kyushu Institute of Technology, Iizuka, Fukuoka 820­8502, Japan 3 The University of Tokyo, Chiyoda, Tokyo 101­0021, Japan 4 Japan Science and Technology Agency, CREST, Chiyoda

Chiba, Shigeru

165

PUBLISHED ONLINE: 4 MARCH 2012 | DOI: 10.1038/NPHYS2250 Satellites and large doping and temperature  

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(NRI) RICS, AIST, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568, Japan, 5Japan Science and Technology Agency, CREST, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012, Japan, 6Japan Science and Technology Agency, TRIP, Chiyoda, Tokyo 102-energy exhibits an unusual square-root energy dependence, which leads to strong band renormalizations near

Loss, Daniel

166

Measuring and Improving Latency to Avoid Test Suite Wear Out Shin Yoo & Mark Harman  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Measuring and Improving Latency to Avoid Test Suite Wear Out Shin Yoo & Mark Harman King's College London Centre for Research on Evolution, Search & Testing (CREST) London, UK {shin.yoo, mark introduces the concept of test suite latency. The more latent a test suite, the more it is possible

Singer, Jeremy

167

Equilibrium pricing bounds on option prices Marie Chazala  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

probability measure that is equivalent to the historical one, and under which the discounted price processesEquilibrium pricing bounds on option prices Marie Chazala and Ely`es Jouinib a CREST, France price at maturity, we derive an upper bound on the call option price by putting two kind of restrictions

Boyer, Edmond

168

WORKING PAPER N 2007 -02 The rich in Argentina over the twentieth century  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WORKING PAPER N° 2007 - 02 The rich in Argentina over the twentieth century: From the conservative2011 #12;This version: October 2007 The Rich in Argentina during the Twentieth Century From of Economics and CREST Abstract This paper presents series of top income shares in Argentina from 1932 to 2004

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

169

COMPARISON OF CSS-CdTe AND PVD-CdTe WITH DIFFERENT ACTIVATION PROCESSES , G. Khrypunov2,4  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, 37134 Verona, Italy 4 Thin Film Physics Group, Laboratory for Solid State Physics, ETH (Swiss Federal- Physics Department, Parco Area delle Scienze, 7A-43100 Parma, Italy * also at CREST (Centre for Renewable Energy Systems and Technology), Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, Loughborough

Romeo, Alessandro

170

From One of the A. O. C.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TRANSCRIPTION; MESSAGE: Dear Wife; This is the kind of work the Army Ordinace Corps, do out at the front [and] the crest on front is exactly like my cap badge I will try and get you one if I can for the time I come home Good night Darling Arthur x x...

2012-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

171

Journal of Coastal Research 24 6 14501458 West Palm Beach, Florida November 2008 Assessing Anthropogenic and Natural Impacts on Ghost  

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. Closing the beach crest 24 hours a day may be the optimal solution for preservation of ghost crab), but juveniles and the occa- sional adult may be seen on the surface near their burrows during daylight hours burrow primarily during the daylight hours (WILLIAMS, 1984). They construct burrows 0.6 to 1.2 m long

Newman, Michael C.

172

Permeability changes due to mineral diagenesis in fractured crust: implications for hydrothermal circulation at  

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The hydrothermal processes at ridge crests have been extensively studied during the last two decades. NeverthelessPermeability changes due to mineral diagenesis in fractured crust: implications for hydrothermal, the reasons why hydrothermal fields are only occasionally found along some ridge segments remain a matter

Manga, Michael

173

NOAA NESDIS Cooperative Institutes (CI) Program August 24, 2009  

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. Corvallis, OR 973315503 5417373015 5417372064 Fax tstrub@coas.oregonstate.edu Dr. Graeme Stephens Director stephens@cira.colostate.edu Dr. Reza Khanbilvardi Director, CREST NOAA Cooperative Remote Sensing Science Fax tom.achtor@ssec.wisc.edu Admin. Contact Ms. Rosalie Jones Research Coordinator 3014058291

Kuligowski, Bob

174

Evaluating statistic appropriateness for Bayesian model choice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Evaluating statistic appropriateness for Bayesian model choice Jean-Michel Marin I3M, UMR CNRS 5149, Universit´e Montpellier 2. France. Natesh S. Pillai Department of Statistics, Harvard University, Cambridge Rousseau ENSAE and CREST, Paris, France. Summary. The choice of the summary statistics in Bayesian

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

175

E-Print Network 3.0 - alamos user manual Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ENIWETOK DR Summary: -21 TA-53 L O S A L A M O S T O W N S I T E Royal Crest Mobile Home Park TA-73 LOS ALAMOS MEDICAL... 7300 7200 7600 7200 7200 7100 720 0 7200 7300 7100 7300...

176

E-Print Network 3.0 - alamos team develops Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Los Alamos... -21 TA-53 L O S A L A M O S T O W N S I T E Royal Crest Mobile Home Park TA-73 LOS ALAMOS MEDICAL... 7300 7200 7600 7200 7200 7100 720 0 7200 7300 7100 7300...

177

HYDROLOGICAL PROCESSES Hydrol. Process. (in press)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of an investigation on the processes controlling heat transport in peat under a large bog in the Glacial Lake Agassiz cm within a vertical peat profile at the crest of the bog at sub-daily intervals. We also recorded air temperature 1 m above the peat surface. We calculate a peat thermal conductivity of 0Ð5 W m 1 °C 1

McKenzie, Jeffrey M.

178

HYDROLOGICAL PROCESSES Hydrol. Process. 21, 369378 (2007)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

report the results of an investigation on the processes controlling heat transport in peat under a large at 12 depth intervals from 0 to 400 cm within a vertical peat profile at the crest of the bog at sub-daily intervals. We also recorded air temperature 1 m above the peat surface. We calculate a peat thermal

Long, Bernard

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

SCALE 1:1 500 000 Albers Equal Area Projection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

0 51015 102030 1 Coast Range 1a Coastal Lowlands 1b Coastal Uplands 1d Volcanics 1f Willapa Hills 1g Portland/Vancouver Basin 3b Willamette River and Tributaries Gallery Forest 3c Prairie Terraces 3d Valley Cascade Crest Montane Forest 4d Cascade Subalpine/Alpine 4e High Southern Cascades Montane Forest 4f

Muir, Patricia

180

Tyrosinase-Related Protein 2 Promoter Targets Transgene Expression to Ocular and Neural  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tyrosinase-Related Protein 2 Promoter Targets Transgene Expression to Ocular and Neural Crest generated transgenic mice carrying the lacZ reporter gene linked to the tyrosinase-related protein 2 (TRP2 mutation. INTRODUCTION Tyrosinase-related protein 2 (TRP2) is an enzyme in- volved in an intermediate step

Cummings, Molly E.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "g0313 coyote crest" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Evolution of pigment cell regression in the cavefish Astyanax: a late step in melanogenesis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-dwelling form (cavefish). We show here that tyrosinase-positive melanoblasts are present in cavefish. Di supplied with the tyrosinase substrate L-dopa. DiI-tyrosinase double-labeling and neural keel explant experiments showed that the tyrosinase-positive cells are derived from the neural crest. The number

McCauley, David W.

182

Danish Atomic Energy Commission Research Establishment Ris  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, of steel pressure ves- sels for nuclear plants. During proof testing it is evident that the location This report was prepared for the Commission of European Commu- nities - Nuclear EnergyAgency (NEA - CREST in Nuclear Plants. It continues the report Risø-M-1429 under the same title. The present report is based

183

CH 5 MANAGEMENT PLAN.DOC 5-1 5 Management Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CH 5 MANAGEMENT PLAN.DOC 5-1 5 Management Plan 5.1 Vision The Willamette Subbasin Plan Oversight drafted the following vision: Willamette Basin citizens from all walks of life prize and enjoy a quilt-work of natural areas, working landscapes, and distinctive communities, from the crest of the Coast Range

184

CIMEL: Constructive and Collaborative, Inquiry-based Multimedia E-Learning (Summary of NSF CRCD Sponsored Grant #0087977 for October 2002 PI Meeting)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as well as dynamically mined material, answer typical questions and help construct annotated and Cedar Crest College (a historically black and a women's college, respectively) as well as a RET middle school teacher and two minority students from a local high school, joined the CIMEL team to assess

Pottenger, William M.

185

Experimental Study of Electron Transport through Nanometer-Scale Metal-Oxide Junctions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-annealing. The resistive bistability effect has been observed for all these materials, with particularly high switching, crested barrier, rapid thermal annealing, endurance, resistive bistability, reproducibility. #12;v List properties of Nb/Al/Nb junctions fabricated using thermal oxidation or rf-plasma oxidation at various

186

JournalofGeophysicalResearch: EarthSurface RESEARCH ARTICLE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Hezi Yizhaq1 , Eli Zaady3 , and Yosef Ashkenazy1 1Department of Solar Energy and Environmental Physics disturbance area below which crust recovery is much faster · Sde-Hallamish sand dunes become more active of vegetation. In July 2008, 10 � 10 m plots on the four dune habitats (crest, interdune, north slope, and south

Ashkenazy, Yossi "Yosef"

187

National Aeronautics and Space Administration SERVIR: Connecting Space  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

serve" in Spanish--provides this critical information to help countries assess envi- ronmental threats the region's unique plants and animals. Climate Working in concert with the government of Bhutan, SERVIR, or CREST, model to estimate how hydroelectric power gen- eration in Bhutan's Wangchu Valley might

188

EU Informal Competitiveness Council (Ian Lucas, Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Business and Regulatory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. At the industry session on 15 October, the presidency hosted a discussion on eco-efficiency from a competitiveness suggested that EU member states should take a global lead in promoting growth and jobs through an eco-efficient to be strengthened and that the mandate of the Centre for Renewable Energy Systems Technology (CREST) advisory

189

BPM calibration: Test measurements of the electronics Calibration measurements for Q9ACC7 and Q9/10ACC4  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· BPM calibration: Test measurements of the electronics · Calibration measurements for Q9ACC7 and Q to correct the optics at off-crest operation (bunch compression) HOPE:HOPE: #12;BPM Calibration: Test of electronics · BPM response needs to be monitored: Response has not changed over the past 3 months · Find

190

From Proceedings, ICOSSAR 93 Innsbruck, AUSTRIA, 9-13 August 1993.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

structure problems are shown, including prediction of extreme wave crests and the base shear of a shallow- ment, and in the extreme dynamic response given the loading. Denoting the environmental variables a full, coupled environment-response model; i.e., the joint description fxxxxxx of all environmental

Sweetman, Bert

191

From Proceedings, ICOSSAR--93 Innsbruck, AUSTRIA, 913 August 1993.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

offshore structure problems are shown, including prediction of extreme wave crests and the base shear environ­ ment, and in the extreme dynamic response given the loading. Denoting the environmental variables this paper. First, Eq. 1 requires a full, coupled environment­response model; i.e., the joint description f

Sweetman, Bert

192

Structural Evolution and Alignment of Cylinder-Forming PS-b-PEP Thin Films in Confinement Studied by Time-Lapse Atomic Force Microscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ultimately lead to the essentially perfect alignment of cylindrical microdomains. INTRODUCTION The generation in trough 30 cylinders on crest 1 µm Figure 1. AFM image showing macroscopic alignment of in-plane cylindrical copolymer microdomains. In the thin film region, copolymers align inside nanochannels, whereas

Sibener, Steven

193

Functional organization of PLC signaling microdomains in neurons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Functional organization of PLC signaling microdomains in neurons Patrick Delmas1 , Marcel Crest1 of phospholipase C (PLC) signaling. Supramolecular complexes organize the cor- rect repertoires of receptors of signal transduction events. However, not all PLC signals nucleate around scaffold proteins, although

Brown, David

194

EN COTUTELLE INTERNATIONALE Pour obtenir le grade de  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

d'Abdou Moumouni Discipline: Sciences de la Vie Spécialité : Physiologie de la Nutrition Par, Université Abdou Moumouni (Niger), Président M. Marcel CREST Directeur de recherche, CNRS UMR 6150 (France Professeur, INSERM UMR U866 (France), Directeur de thèse M. Hassimi SADOU MCF, Université Abdou Moumouni

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

195

Under very extreme conditions a flood that threatens to overtop a dam may be combined with strong winds that generate waves in the reservoir.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Under very extreme conditions a flood that threatens to overtop a dam may be combined with strong winds that generate waves in the reservoir. Prolonged wave overtopping or a combination of wave the actions of wind generated waves and wave overtopping. The uneven elevations of the dam crest

Bowles, David S.

196

DISCOM2: Distance Computing the SP2 Pilot FY98 Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As a way to bootstrap the DISCOM(2) Distance Computing Program the SP2 Pilot Project was launched in March 1998. The Pilot was directed towards creating an environment to allow Sandia users to run their applications on the Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative's (ASCI) Blue Pacific computation platform, the unclassified IBM SP2 platform at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The DISCOM(2) Pilot leverages the ASCI PSE (Problem solving Environment) efforts in networking and services to baseline the performance of the current system. Efforts in the following areas of the pilot are documented: applications, services, networking, visualization, and the system model. It details not only the running of two Sandia codes CTH and COYOTE on the Blue Pacific platform, but also the buildong of the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) proxy environment of the RS6000 platforms to support the Sandia users.

Beiriger, Judy; Byers, Rupert K.; Ernest, Martha J.; Goudy, Sue P.; Noe, John P.; Pratt, Thomas J.; Shirley, David N.; Tarman, Thomas D.; VanDevender, Walter H.; Wiltzius, David P.

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

The effect of cellulases on the biodegradation and morphology of naturally colored cotton fibers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have investigated the effect of cellulases on the biodegradation and structure of natural colored cotton (Foxfibre{reg_sign}). Compared to the white cotton and palo verde (sage green) varieties, buffalo (mocha brown) and coyote (reddish brown) varieties were quite resistant to hydrolysis by Trichoderma reesei celluclast and purified cellobiohydrolase I (CBH I) under the conditions of the assay, but binding of CBH I to buffalo cotton was unaffected. Sodium hydroxide extracts of all the colored cotton varieties were found to be strong inhibitors of cellulase activity and the buffalo cotton was labile in that the inhibitory effect decreased over time in the presence of cellulase; incubation of {beta}-glucosidase with the extract also decreased the inhibition. The chemical composition of the inhibitor is currently under investigation. Atomic force microscopy of the colored cotton fibers with bound cellulase components should prove useful in the context of elucidating the effect of binding on the morphology of cellulose fibers.

Evans, B.R.; Lee, I.; Woodward, J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Fox, S.V. [Natural Cotton Colours, Inc., Wickenburg, AZ (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

198

Watching an uniformly moving source of light using a telescope and a frequency-meter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose a scenario that involves a stationary observer who detects a point like source of light moving with constant velocity at a constant altitude, using a telescope and a frequency-meter. We derive a formula for the angular velocity at which we should rotate the axis of the telescope and a formula that relates the proper period at which the source emits successive wave crests and the proper period at which the stationary observer receives them

Bernhard Rothenstein; Ioan Damian

2005-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

199

Short period fluctuations of sea level in the West Florida Keys  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Sea Level in the West Florida Keys (December, 1978) Sangem Hsu, B. S. , Taiwan Provincial College of Marine and Oceanic Technology. Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. Takashi Ichiye In addition to oscillations of astronomical origin, tidal... records often contain shorter or longer period oscillations. Short period oscillations usually have very small amplitudes and often cannot be recognized in the tidal records except near crests or troughs at days of calm weather. The purposes...

Hsu, Sangem

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Optimization of condensing gas drive  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- cal, undersaturated reservoir with gas being injected into the crest and oil being produced from the base of the structure. Fractional oil re- covery at gas breakthrough proved to be less sensitive to changes in oil withdrawal rates as the gas... injection pressure was increased. The validity of the model was established by accurately simulating several low pressure gas drives conducted in the laboratory. Oil recoveries at gas breakthrough using the model compared closely with those recoveries...

Lofton, Larry Keith

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "g0313 coyote crest" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Some criteria for the symmetry of stratified water waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper considers two-dimensional stably stratified steady periodic gravity water waves with surface profiles monotonic between crests and troughs. We provide sufficient conditions under which such waves are necessarily symmetric. This is done by first exploiting some elliptic structure in the governing equations to show that, in certain size regimes, a maximum principle holds. This then forms the basis for a method of moving planes argument.

Samuel Walsh

2009-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

202

Reservoir Outflow (RESOUT) Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

APPENDIX D: LISTING OF COMPUTER PROGRAM. - 98 116 148 161 VITA 194 V111 LIST OF FIGURES Figure 1. General Types of Dams Figure 2. Types of Spillway Crest Gates Figure 3. Types of Weirs Figure 4. Types of Orifices Figure 5. Flow over an Ogee... LIST OF TABLES Table 1. Submergence Coefficients Table 2. Manning Roughness Coefficient Range Table 3. Observed Values of Manning Roughness Coefficient Table 4. Conduit Roughness Coefficient Table 5. Entrance Loss Coefficient Table 6. Subroutines...

Purvis, Stuart Travis

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

203

Variations in Nearshore Bar Morphology: Implications for Rip Current Development at Pensacola Beach, Florida from 1951 to 2004  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

crest which creates an offshore-directed current also known as undertow (Ruessink et al., 1998; Plant et al., 2001). Onshore bar migration is caused by skewed incident waves which transport sediment landward causing the bar to migrate in the landward... increasing its forward velocity (Stive, 1986). This nearshore bar migration pattern is due in part to a net offshore migration of sediment in the cross-shore direction (Ruessink et al., 1998; 16 Plant et al., 2001). This positive feedback increases...

Barrett, Gemma Elizabeth

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

204

Development of a safety analysis system for the offshore personnel and equipment transfer process  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to coincide with the wave crest. Ferranti Offshore Systems, a crane manufacturer, markets a retrofittable system that has a hook-mounted control unit. This system has a rope hanging down for the personnel on the deck to control the heave compensation...DEVELOPMENT OF A SAFETY ANALYSIS SYSTEM FOR THE OFFSHORE PERSONNEL AND EQUIPMENT TRANSFER PROCESS A Thesis by MICHAEL GEORGE McKENNA Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment...

McKenna, Michael George

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

What Is Sound? Sound is a pressure wave which is  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

What Is Sound? Sound is a pressure wave which is created by a vibrating object. This vibrations set the medium. Since the particles are moving in parallel direction to the wave movement, the sound wave of a sine wave (C~crests, R~troughs) The speed of a sound pressure wave in air is 331.5+0.6Tc m/s , Tc

Toronto, University of

206

Crimson Renewable Energy LP | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin:EnergyWisconsin:2003) |Cordova39. ItCrest, California:

207

Crockett County, Tennessee: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin:EnergyWisconsin:2003) |Cordova39. ItCrest,

208

Devonian-Mississippian oil shale resources of Kentucky: a summary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Assessment of the oil shale resources in Kentucky has continued with 75 NX cores available where the oil shale crops out or is overlain by relatively thin cover in the area from Estill County westward to Bullitt County. In this 14 county area, the total black shale section thins across the crest of the Cincinnati arch and changes stratigraphically from that characteristic of the Ohio Shale in Estill County to that of the New Albany Shale in Bullitt County. Despite this stratigraphic transition the two high-carbon zones (greater than 8.0% carbon) can be traced across the arch. As the traverse is followed from the east, the intervening low-carbon zones thin such that at the crest of the arch, there are areas where the entire section of black shale contains more than 8% carbon. Then upon leaving the crest the two high-carbon zones separate again with one remaining at the very top of the section and one in the lower part. In the 14 county area, there are approximately 3.8 x 10/sup 5/ acres of oil shale outcrop and approximately 7.8 x 10/sup 5/ acres underlain by oil shale at relatively shallow depths.

Barron, L.S.; Robl, T.L.; Kung, J.; Obley, J.

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Bleaching of F-centers in sodium chloride at room temperature by electron tunneling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, ronhot, o- met, er f LL', ali 1161ido crvs~&1? shat have been exposed tc io1Q. cinT radia bioni snch as z "aPJi MkiLbit absorption bands in the visible and near ultraviolet, which sm attributed to "color centers" crested in the orris...'-sls by the radiation. The caLm' centew consisb of various combi- nations of pvsitiv'c and, no@at, ive ion-vacancies with electrons and electron holes i hose with which She present, work is concei'ned are shown in H. g. 1. below. The F-center is a negative ion...

Carroll, Herbert Burnett

1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Systematics, ecology, and life history of antrozous (Chiroptera: vespertilionidae)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of specimens from Big Bend, Texas (southern Brewster and Presidio counties) than in bats from Santa Cruz Island, California. This is understandable since specimens from Santa Cruz Island represent a single population, whereas the sample from Big Bend is a.... There is also some indication that pallid bats from western California. a have more prominent crests than specimens from most other geographic areas. 33 CO C E 5 Ptg * 6. v t t th gitt 1 f A. ullid Drawings 8 through G show that part of the skull...

Martin, Chester O

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Oxidation of sewage supernatant liquor by trickling filtration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

', '': . . 195~9 ":, ' '59 9- ", 19. , -: '; '; 15'F9-;: . :: 418 ?: 499'' ', , : P "-. 8'~5, . : ?. ;. 159 9 . -', ::". , $9-. -:. . . : P P$3I8. :;. "-, . -. , :s8138: '439, ": . ::"::14i:, 9', . ::-', , '-- 4N ' -", ';, '. , :" XL' ". . -:, ' 14..., -. ;;. , ';. ;. . . XiqnM, :or es. crest. sn4-;~ss od As jskNsi' ':5xo, nsg4j~s's1'nips ?', :; . , "::, ' ', : digssegos emik mme-, el@, -er&kling-;Blear srs -eaiu nnies=smpg+sk'in ehs bra semsne. ok' ehs 'soles~, shd erssemiame nf ehs 1@n$4, 'rsspsnei'vole A eriohlkng...

Styner, Pete

1956-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Seismic stratigraphy and the evolutionary history of Shatsky Plateau  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

evolutionary history of Shatsky Plateau. Location The Shatsky Plateau(formerly Shatsky Rise) is located in the Northwest Pacific Ocean basin between 30 and 38 N latitude, 151 ' and 163'E longitude (Plate 1) . It has an elongated trend in a NNE direction... 13. Fault structures observed in Profile E-F in the basin. Figure 14. Seismic profile across the crest of Shatsky plateau. . 48 Figure 15. Line drawing interpretation of Figure 14. . . . 49 LIST OF FIGURES (Continued) ~Pa e Figure 16. Line...

Chen, Yu-Hsin

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

An internship in the agricultural chemical industry: Miles Inc.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?' Mslonekg city 310 A Den? Dawso Aquise 6 ( Hubbard West, Mount 31 ~ Cal r Cocllda Elm MO Xv +PI iep iab 7886'% , CreSt ' Cc nea& art. parker I 0 knn Bkyrcr mT, uQ, Reer d Mart 4 ~ ~ C I 0 Ao er 148 Grays I 47 198 ? I M 3 72 Co I la I ttonwccd... B APPENDIX C APPENDIX D Daily Log of Activities . Territory Map . Internship Manual Outline Functional Linkages . . 10 21 22 24 . 25 DEFINITION OF TERMS SCOUTING: To examine a field for insects to determine the need for chemical...

Adams, Sharla K

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Physical activity and dietary behaviour in a population-based sample of British 10-year old children: the SPEEDY study (Sport, Physical activity and Eating behaviour: Environmental Determinants in Young people)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

crests, using a Seca 200 measuring tape. A third measurement was taken if a discrepancy of three or more centimetres was observed and an average was calculated. A 0.5 cm correc- tion was applied to account for clothing [28]. A non-seg- mental bio... habits in childhood have therefore been identified as targets for future public health policy [1,13]. To be able to effectively promote changes in these complex health behaviours, reliable and valid data are needed about current patterns...

van Sluijs, Esther M F; Skidmore, Paula M L; Mwanza, Kim; Jones, Andrew P; Callaghan, Alison M; Ekelund, Ulf; Harrison, Flo; Harvey, Ian; Panter, Jenna R; Wareham, Nicholas J; Cassidy, Aedin; Griffin, Simon J

2008-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

215

War damages and reconstruction of Peruca dam  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The paper describes the heavy damages caused by blasting in the Peruca rockfill dam in Croatia in January 1993. Complete collapse of the dam by overtopping was prevented through quick action of the dam owner by dumping clayey gravel on the lowest sections of the dam crest and opening the bottom outlet of the reservoir, thus efficiently lowering the water level. After the damages were sufficiently established and alternatives for restoration of the dam were evaluated, it was decided to construct a diaphragm wall through the damaged core in the central dam part as the impermeable dam element and to rebuild the central clay core at the dam abutments. Reconstruction works are described.

Nonveiller, E. [Univ. of Zagreb (Croatia). Faculty of Civil Engineering] [Univ. of Zagreb (Croatia). Faculty of Civil Engineering; Rupcic, J. [Univ. of Zagreb (Croatia). Faculty of Civil Engineering] [Univ. of Zagreb (Croatia). Faculty of Civil Engineering; [Elektroprojekt Consulting Engineering, Zagreb (Croatia); Sever, Z. [Elektroprojekt Consulting Engineering, Zagreb (Croatia)] [Elektroprojekt Consulting Engineering, Zagreb (Croatia)

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Laboratory Study Investigating the Three-dimensional Turbulence and Kinematic Properties Associated with a Breaking Solitary Wave  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, refraction, breaking, and turbulence, to name a few. Beginning offshore where the water depth is sufficiently deep and constant, waves are found to be symmetric with respect to the wave crest (Hsiao et al., 2008) before they began to deform due... to measure the free surface elevation, allowing the evolution of the solitary wave over the shallow water shelf and up the planar beach to be documented. To do this, two types of wave gauges were required due to the depth of water offshore and onshore...

Swigler, David Townley

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

217

Applications of TAP-NDE technique to non-contact ultrasonic inspection in tubulars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are used to get the dispersion as group velocity directly from the peaks of wavelet coefficients. Several methods have been developed for dispersion analysis. Those, which are intended for single or dual mode analysis 17, i.e. where a Phase Spectra..., the phase velocity (the rate of travel of a wave crest) and the group velocity (the velocity of a short pulse of waves) are the same. A schematic representation of particle motion on a steel surface due to such a Rayleigh wave is shown in figure 2...

Baltazar-Lopez, Martin Eduardo

2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

218

Crestline, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin:EnergyWisconsin:2003) |Cordova39. ItCrest, California: Energy Resources Jump

219

Creston, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

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220

Crestwood Village, New Jersey: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin:EnergyWisconsin:2003) |Cordova39. ItCrest, California: Energy ResourcesCrestwood

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "g0313 coyote crest" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Crestwood, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin:EnergyWisconsin:2003) |Cordova39. ItCrest, California: Energy

222

Crete, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin:EnergyWisconsin:2003) |Cordova39. ItCrest, California: Energy314312° Loading

223

Cridersville, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin:EnergyWisconsin:2003) |Cordova39. ItCrest, California: Energy314312°

224

Criehaven, Maine: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin:EnergyWisconsin:2003) |Cordova39. ItCrest, California: Energy314312°Criehaven,

225

Crisp County, Georgia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin:EnergyWisconsin:2003) |Cordova39. ItCrest, California:1.8875724°, -83.804868°

226

Crittenden County, Arkansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin:EnergyWisconsin:2003) |Cordova39. ItCrest, California:1.8875724°,

227

Crittenden County, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin:EnergyWisconsin:2003) |Cordova39. ItCrest, California:1.8875724°,Kentucky. Its

228

Crivello Group LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin:EnergyWisconsin:2003) |Cordova39. ItCrest, California:1.8875724°,Kentucky.

229

Croatia-Joint Programme on Resource Efficient and Cleaner Production (RECP)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin:EnergyWisconsin:2003) |Cordova39. ItCrest, California:1.8875724°,Kentucky.in

230

East Hemet, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address:011-DNA Jump37. It is classified asThis article is aAgHampton,Crest is a village in

231

East Hill-Meridian, Washington: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address:011-DNA Jump37. It is classified asThis article is aAgHampton,Crest is a village

232

East Islip, New York: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address:011-DNA Jump37. It is classified asThis article is aAgHampton,Crest is a villageEast Islip

233

East Kansas Agri Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address:011-DNA Jump37. It is classified asThis article is aAgHampton,Crest is a villageEast

234

East Kingston, New Hampshire: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address:011-DNA Jump37. It is classified asThis article is aAgHampton,Crest is a villageEastEast

235

East Kingston, New York: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address:011-DNA Jump37. It is classified asThis article is aAgHampton,Crest is a

236

East La Mirada, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address:011-DNA Jump37. It is classified asThis article is aAgHampton,Crest is aMirada,

237

East Lake-Orient Park, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address:011-DNA Jump37. It is classified asThis article is aAgHampton,Crest is

238

East Lansing, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address:011-DNA Jump37. It is classified asThis article is aAgHampton,Crest is69792°,

239

East Longmeadow, Massachusetts: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address:011-DNA Jump37. It is classified asThis article is aAgHampton,Crest is69792°,645396°,

240

East Los Angeles, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address:011-DNA Jump37. It is classified asThis article is aAgHampton,Crest

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "g0313 coyote crest" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Interaction of water waves with fluidized mud in a rectangular trench  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Calculation of shear rates for experimental conditions. . . . l28 5. 2. 3. Estimated viscosities corresponding to experimental conditions. . . . . 129 5. 4. 1. 5. 6. 1. Rates of upward entrainment. 148 Ratio of crest to trough amplitude at both antinodes.... This rotation is restrained by a torsion spring, and the torque transmitted by the spring to the cylindrical bob can be inferred from the reading of the angle of rotation of the bob on a thai, by the relation C = k8, where k is the spring constant, 0 the angle...

Lemasson, Wilfrid Joel Christian

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Confirming inextensional theory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mansfield exploits the analogy with Tension Field by devising wrinkled specimens of the same geometrical p tions and equivalent boundary conditions, where the highly visible outline of crests and troughs normal to wrinkles gives equivalent information... . On the extension and flexure of cylindrical and spherical thin elastic shells. Philos. Trans. R. Soc. London A 181, 433–480. Ben Amar, M., Pomeau, Y., 1997. Crumpled paper. Proc. R. Soc. London Ser. A 453, 729–755. Calladine, C.R., 1983. Theory of Shell Structures...

Seereeram, V. R.; Seffen, K. A.

2014-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

243

A high-elevation, multi-proxy biotic and environmental record of MIS 6–4 from the Ziegler Reservoir fossil site, Snowmass Village, Colorado, USA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In North America, terrestrial records of biodiversity and climate change that span Marine Oxygen Isotope Stage (MIS) 5 are rare. Where found, they provide insight into how the coupling of the ocean–atmosphere system is manifested in biotic and environmental records and how the biosphere responds to climate change. In 2010–2011, construction at Ziegler Reservoir near Snowmass Village, Colorado (USA) revealed a nearly continuous, lacustrine/wetland sedimentary sequence that preserved evidence of past plant communities between ~140 and 55 ka, including all of MIS 5. At an elevation of 2705 m, the Ziegler Reservoir fossil site also contained thousands of well-preserved bones of late Pleistocene megafauna, including mastodons, mammoths, ground sloths, horses, camels, deer, bison, black bear, coyotes, and bighorn sheep. In addition, the site contained more than 26,000 bones from at least 30 species of small animals including salamanders, otters, muskrats, minks, rabbits, beavers, frogs, lizards, snakes, fish, and birds. The combination of macro- and micro-vertebrates, invertebrates, terrestrial and aquatic plant macrofossils, a detailed pollen record, and a robust, directly dated stratigraphic framework shows that high-elevation ecosystems in the Rocky Mountains of Colorado are climatically sensitive and varied dramatically throughout MIS 5

Ian M. Miller; Mitchell A. Plummer; Various Others

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Precision guided parachute LDRD final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of the Precision Guided Parachute LDRD, a two year program at Sandia National Laboratories which developed a Global Positioning System (GPS) guided parachute capable of autonomous flight and landings. A detailed computer model of a gliding parachute was developed for software only simulations. A hardware in-the-loop simulator was developed and used for flight package system integration and design validation. Initial parachute drop tests were conducted at Sandia`s Coyote Canyon Cable Facility, followed by a series of airdrops using Ross Aircraft`s Twin Otter at the Burris Ranch Drop Zone. Final flights demonstrated in-flight wind estimation and the capability to fly a commanded heading. In the past, the cost and logistical complexity of an initial navigation system ruled out actively guiding a parachute. The advent of the low-cost, light-weight Global Positioning System (GPS) has eliminated this barrier. By using GPS position and velocity measurements, a guided parachute can autonomously steer itself to a targeted point on the ground through the use of control drums attached to the control lanyards of the parachute. By actively correcting for drop point errors and wind drift, the guidance accuracy of this system should be on the order of GPS position errors. This would be a significant improvement over unguided airdrops which may have errors of a mile or more.

Gilkey, J.C. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Aided Navigation and Remote Sensing Dept.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Vortices catapult droplets in atomization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A droplet ejection mechanism in planar two-phase mixing layers is examined. Any disturbance on the gas-liquid interface grows into a Kelvin-Helmholtz wave, and the wave crest forms a thin liquid film that flaps as the wave grows downstream. Increasing the gas speed, it is observed that the film breaks up into droplets which are eventually thrown into the gas stream at large angles. In a flow where most of the momentum is in the horizontal direction, it is surprising to observe these large ejection angles. Our experiments and simulations show that a recirculation region grows downstream of the wave and leads to vortex shedding similar to the wake of a backward-facing step. The ejection mechanism results from the interaction between the liquid film and the vortex shedding sequence: a recirculation zone appears in the wake of the wave and a liquid film emerges from the wave crest; the recirculation region detaches into a vortex and the gas flow over the wave momentarily reattaches due to the departure of the vortex; this reattached flow pushes the liquid film down; by now, a new recirculation vortex is being created in the wake of the wave—just where the liquid film is now located; the liquid film is blown up from below by the newly formed recirculation vortex in a manner similar to a bag-breakup event; the resulting droplets are catapulted by the recirculation vortex.

Jerome, J. John Soundar, E-mail: soundar@dalembert.upmc.fr; Zaleski, Stéphane; Hoepffner, Jérôme [Institut Jean Le Rond d'Alembert, UPMC Univ. Paris 06 and CNRS-UMR 7190, F-75005 Paris (France)] [Institut Jean Le Rond d'Alembert, UPMC Univ. Paris 06 and CNRS-UMR 7190, F-75005 Paris (France); Marty, Sylvain; Matas, Jean-Philippe [Laboratoire des Écoulements Géophysiques et Industriels (LEGI), Univ. Grenoble Alpes and CNRS - UMR 5519, F-38000 Grenoble (France)] [Laboratoire des Écoulements Géophysiques et Industriels (LEGI), Univ. Grenoble Alpes and CNRS - UMR 5519, F-38000 Grenoble (France)

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

246

Deep Vs Profiling Along the Top of Yucca Mountain Using a Vibroseis Source and Surface Waves  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Yucca Mountain, Nevada, was approved as the site for development of the geologic repository for high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel in the United States. The U.S. Department of Energy has been conducting studies to characterize the site and assess its future performance as a geologic repository. As part of these studies, a program of deep seismic profiling, to depths of 200 m, was conducted along the top of Yucca Mountain to evaluate the shear-wave velocity (V{sub s}) structure of the repository block. The resulting V{sub s} data were used as input into the development of ground motions for the preclosure seismic design of the repository and for postclosure performance assessment. The noninvasive spectral-analysis-of-surface-waves (SASW) method was employed in the deep profiling. Field measurements involved the use of a modified Vibroseis as the seismic source. The modifications allowed the Vibroseis to be controlled by a signal analyzer so that slow frequency sweeps could be performed while simultaneous narrow-band filtering was performed on the receiver outputs. This process optimized input energy from the source and signal analysis of the receiver outputs. Six deep V{sub s} profiles and five intermediate-depth (about 100 m) profiles were performed along the top of Yucca Mountain over a distance of about 5 km. In addition, eleven shallower profiles (averaging about 45-m deep) were measured using a bulldozer source. The shallower profiles were used to augment the deeper profiles and to evaluate further the near-surface velocity structure. The V{sub s} profiles exhibit a strong velocity gradient within 5 m of the surface, with the mean V{sub s} value more than doubling. Below this depth, V{sub s} gradually increases from a mean value of about 900 to 1000 m/s at a depth of 150 m. Between the depths of 150 and 210 m, V{sub s} increases more rapidly to about 1350 m/s, but this trend is based on limited data. At depths less than 50 m, anisotropy in V{sub s} was measured for surveys conducted parallel and perpendicular to the mountain crest, with the velocity parallel to the crest about 200 m/s higher. In the 5- to 50-m depth range, the average coefficient of variation (COV) of all data is about 0.25. Below 75 m, where the data set is smaller and includes measurements only parallel to the crest, the average COV decreases to a value of about 0.11.

K. Stokoe; B. Rosenblad; I. Wong; J. Bay; P. Thomas; W. Silva

2004-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

247

100-N Area Strontium-90 Treatability Demonstration Project: Food Chain Transfer Studies for Phytoremediation Along the 100-N Columbia River Riparian Zone  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Strontium-90 (90Sr) exceeds the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s drinking water standards for groundwater (8 picocuries/L) by as much as a factor of 1000 at several locations within the Hanford 100-N Area and along the 100-N Area Columbia River shoreline). Phytoextraction, a managed remediation technology in which plants or integrated plant/rhizosphere systems are employed to phytoextract and/or sequester 90Sr, is being considered as a potential remediation system along the riparian zone of the Columbia River as part of a treatment train that includes an apatite barrier to immobilize groundwater transport of 90Sr. Phytoextraction would employ coyote willow (Salix exigua) to extract 90Sr from the vadose zone soil and aquifer sediments (phytoextraction) and filter 90Sr (rhizofiltration) from the shallow groundwater along the riparian zone of the Columbia River. The stem and foliage of coyote willows accumulating 90Sr may present not only a mechanism to remove the contaminant but also can be viewed as a source of nutrition for natural herbivores, therefore becoming a potential pathway for the isotope to enter the riparian food chain. Engineered barriers such as large and small animal fencing constructed around the field plot will control the intrusion of deer, rodents, birds, and humans. These efforts, however, will have limited effect on mobile phytophagous insects. Therefore, this study was undertaken to determine the potential for food chain transfer by insects prior to placement of the remediation technology at 100-N. Insect types include direct consumers of the sap or liquid content of the plants vascular system (xylem and phloem) by aphids as well as those that would directly consume the plant foliage such as the larvae (caterpillars) of Lepidoptera species. Heavy infestations of aphids feeding on the stems and leaves of willows growing in 90Sr-contaminated soil can accumulate a small amount (~0.15 ± 0.06%) of the total label removed from the soil by the plant over a 17-day exposure period. The 90Sr in the exuded honeydew during this period amounted to 1.17 ± 0.28% of this total label. The honeydew would eventually be deposited into the soil at the base of the plant, but the activity would be so dispersed as to be undetectable. Moth larvae will consume 90Sr contaminated leaves but retain very little of the label (~0.02%) and only that contained in their digestive tracts. As the moths pupated and became adults, they contained no detectable amounts of 90Sr. Over the 10-day exposure period, ~4% of the phytoextracted 90Sr was lost from the plant as moth feces. However, like the honeydew, feces dispersed into the soil were undetectable. As the plant diminishes the content of 90Sr in the soil, the activity of the label in the leaves and new stems would also diminish. The results of these studies indicate that the risk for detectable transfer of 90Sr from willow trees growing in the contaminated soil along the 100-N shoreline through the food chain of herbivorous insects would be very slight to non-existent

Fellows, Robert J.; Fruchter, Jonathan S.; Driver, Crystal J.

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Endangered species and cultural resources program, Naval Petroleum Reserves in California: Annual report FY95  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In FY95, EG and G Energy Measurements, Inc. (EG and G/EM) continued to support efforts to protect endangered species and cultural resources at the Naval Petroleum Reserves in California (NPRC). These efforts are conducted to ensure NPRC compliance with regulations regarding the protection of listed species and cultural resources on Federal properties. Population monitoring activities are conducted annually for San Joaquin kit foxes, giant kangaroo rats, blunt-nosed leopard lizards, and Hoover`s wooly-star. To mitigate impacts of oil field activities on listed species, 674 preactivity surveys covering approximately 211 hectares (521 acres) were conducted in FY95. EG and G/EM also assisted with mitigating effects from third-party projects, primarily by conducting biological and cultural resource consultations with regulatory agencies. EG and G/EM has conducted an applied habitat reclamation program at NPRC since 1985. In FY95, an evaluation of revegetation rates on reclaimed and non-reclaimed disturbed lands was completed, and the results will be used to direct future habitat reclamation efforts at NPRC. In FY95, reclamation success was monitored on 50 sites reclaimed in 1985. An investigation of factors influencing the distribution and abundance of kit foxes at NPRC was initiated in FY94. Factors being examined include habitat disturbance, topography, grazing, coyote abundance, lagomorph abundance, and shrub density. This investigation continued in FY95 and a manuscript on this topic will be completed in FY96. Also, Eg and G/EM completed collection of field data to evaluate the effects of a well blow-out on plant and animal populations. A final report will be prepared in FY96. Finally, EG and G/EM completed a life table analysis on San Joaquin kit foxes at NPRC.

NONE

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Estimating Radiological Doses to Predators Foraging in a Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since 1957, Los Alamos National Laboratory has operated Area G as its low-level, solid radioactive waste management and disposal area. Although the waste management area is developed, plants, small mammals, and avian and mammalian predators still occupy the less disturbed and revegetated portions of the land. For almost a decade, we have monitored the concentrations of selected radionuclides in soils, plants, and small mammals at Area G. The radionuclides tritium, plutonium-238, and plutonium-239 are regularly found at levels above regional background in all three media. Based on radionuclide concentrations in mice collected from 1994 to 1999, we calculated doses to higher trophic levels (owl, hawk, kestrel, and coyote) that forage on the waste management area. These predators play important functions in the regional ecosystems and are an important part of local Native American traditional tales that identify the uniqueness of their culture. The estimated doses are compared to Department of Energy's interim limit of 0.1 rad/day for the protection of terrestrial wildlife. We used exposure parameters that were derived from the literature for each receptor, including Environmental Protection Agency's exposure factors handbook. Estimated doses to predators ranged from 9E-06 to 2E-04 rad/day, assuming that they forage entirely on the waste management area. These doses are greater than those calculated for predators foraging exclusively in reference areas, but are still well below the interim dose limit. We believe that these calculated doses represent upper-bound estimates of exposure for local predators because the larger predators forage over areas that are much greater than the 63-acre waste management area. Based on these results, we concluded that predators foraging on this area do not face a hazard from radiological exposure under current site conditions.

L.Soholt; G.Gonzales; P.Fresquez; K.Bennett; E.Lopez

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Heat Transfer Analysis and Assessment of Kinetics Systems for PBX 9501  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The study of thermal decomposition in high explosive (HE) charges has been an ongoing process since the early 1900s. This work is specifically directed towards the analysis of PBX 9501. In the early 1970s, Dwight Jaeger of Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) developed a single-step, two-species kinetics system that was used in the development of one of the first finite element codes for thermal analyses known as EXPLO. Jaeger's research focused on unconfined spherical samples of HE charges to determine if varied heating ramps would cause detonation or deflagration. Tarver and McGuire of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) followed soon after with a three-step, four-species kinetics system that was developed for confined spheres under relatively fast heating conditions. Peter Dickson et al. of LANL then introduced a kinetics system with four steps and five species that included bimolecular products to capture the effects of the endothermic phase change that the HE undergoes. The results of four experiments are examined to study the effectiveness of these kinetics systems. The experiments are: (1) The LLNL scaled thermal explosion (STEX) experiments on confined cylindrical charges with long heating ramps in the range of 90 hours. (2) The LLNL one-dimensional time to explosion (ODTX) experiments on spherical charges that include confined, partially confined, and aged HE experiments. (3) The LANL unconfined one-dimensional experiments for small spheres. (4) The Naval Air Warfare Center Weapons Division at China Lake experiments on small confined cylinders. The three kinetics systems are applied to each of the four experiments with the use of the finite element analysis (FEA) heat conduction solver COYOTE. The numerical results using the kinetics systems are compared to each other and to the experimental data to determine which kinetics systems are best suited for analyzing conditions such as time to ignition, containment, heating time, and location of ignition.

Jeffrey W. Jorenby

2006-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

251

Single-cycle nonlinear optics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nonlinear optics plays a central role in the advancement of optical science and laser-based technologies. We report on the confinement of the nonlinear interaction of light with matter to a single wave cycle and demonstrate its utility for time-resolved and strong-field science. The electric field of 3.3-femtosecond, 0.72-micron laser pulses with a controlled and measured waveform ionizes atoms near the crests of the central wave cycle, with ionization being virtually switched off outside this interval. Isolated sub-100-attosecond pulses of extreme ultraviolet light (photon energy {approx} 80 electron volts), containing {approx} 0.5 nanojoule of energy, emerge from the interaction with a conversion efficiency of {approx} 10{sup -6}. These tools enable the study of the precision control of electron motion with light fields and electron-electron interactions with a resolution approaching the atomic unit of time ({approx} 24 attoseconds).

Max-Planck-Institut fur Quantenoptik; Goulielmakis, E.; Schultze, M.; Hofstetter, M.; Yakovlev, V. S.; Gagnon, J.; Uiberacker, M.; Aquila, A. L.; gullikson, E. M.; attwood, D. T.; Kienberger, R.; Krausz, F.; Kleineberg, U.

2008-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

252

LCLS LLRF Upgrades to the SLAC Linac  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at SLAC will be the brightest X-ray laser in the world when it comes on line. In order to achieve the brightness a 200fS length electron bunch is passed through an undulator. To create the 200fS, 3kA bunch, a 10pS electron bunch, created from a photo cathode in an RF gun, is run off crest on the RF to set up a position to energy correlation. The bunch is then compressed by chicanes. The stability of the RF system is critical in setting up the position to energy correlation. Specifications derived from simulations require the RF system to be stable to below 200fS in several critical injector stations and the last kilometer of linac. The SLAC linac RF system is being upgraded to meet these requirements.

Akre, R.; Dowell, D.; Emma, P.; Frisch, J.; Hong, B.; Kotturi, K.; Krejcik, P.; Wu, J.; /SLAC; Byrd, J.; /LBL, Berkeley

2007-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

253

Rossby wave radiation by an eddy on the polar beta-plane  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Results from the laboratory experiments on the evolution of vortices (eddies) generated in a rotating tank with topographic beta-effect are presented. The surface elevation and velocity fields are measured by the Altimetric Imaging Velocimetry. The experiments are supplemented by shallow water numerical simulations as well as a linear theory which describes the Rossby wave radiation by travelling vortices. The cyclonic vortices observed in the experiments travel to the northwest and continuously radiate Rossby waves. Measurements show that initially axisymmetric vortices develop a dipolar component which enables them to perform translational motion. A pattern of alternating zonal jets to the west of the vortex is created by Rossby waves with approximately zonal crests. Energy spectra of the flows in the wavenumber space indicate that a wavenumber similar to that introduced by Rhines for turbulent flows on the beta-plane can be introduced here. The wavenumber is based on the translational speed of a vortex rat...

Zhang, Yang

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Water resources data for Hawaii and other Pacific areas, water year 1989. Volume 2. Guam, Northern Mariana Islands, federated states of Micronesia, Palau, and American Samoa. Water-data report (Annual), 1 October 1988-30 September 1989  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Water-resources data for the 1989 water year for other Pacific areas consist of records of discharge, and water quality of streams and stage of a lake and reservoir; water levels and water quality in wells; stage in a tide gage; and rainfall. This report volume 2 contains discharge records for 26 gaging stations; stage only for 2 gaging stations; water quality at 11 gaging stations, one streamflow partial record station, and 54 wells; water levels for 28 observations wells; and tide stages for one tide gage station. Also included are 2 crest-stage partial record stations, 4 miscellaneous partial-record stations, 15 low-flow partial-record stations, and 19 rainfall stations.

Fontaine, R.A.; Kunishige, V.E.; Lum, M.G.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Density waves in the shearing sheet I. Swing amplification  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The shearing sheet model of a galactic disk is studied anew. The theoretical description of its dynamics is based on three building blocks: Stellar orbits, which are described here in epicyclic approximation, the collisionless Boltzmann equation determining the distribution function of stars in phase space, and the Poisson equation in order to take account of the self-gravity of the disk. Using these tools I develop a new formalism to describe perturbations of the shearing sheet. Applying this to the unbounded shearing sheet model I demonstrate again how the disturbances of the disk evolve always into `swing amplified' density waves, i.e. spiral-arm like, shearing density enhancements, which grow and decay while the wave crests swing by from leading to trailing orientation. Several examples are given how such `swing amplification' events are incited in the shearing sheet.

B. Fuchs

2001-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

256

Cheap Artificial AB-Mountains, Extraction of Water and Energy from Atmosphere and Change of Regional Climate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Author suggests and researches a new revolutionary method for changing the climates of entire countries or portions thereof, obtaining huge amounts of cheap water and energy from the atmosphere. In this paper is presented the idea of cheap artificial inflatable mountains, which may cardinally change the climate of a large region or country. Additional benefits: The potential of tapping large amounts of fresh water and energy. The mountains are inflatable semi-cylindrical constructions from thin film (gas bags) having heights of up to 3 - 5 km. They are located perpendicular to the main wind direction. Encountering these artificial mountains, humid air (wind) rises to crest altitude, is cooled and produces rain (or rain clouds). Many natural mountains are sources of rivers, and other forms of water and power production - and artificial mountains may provide these services for entire nations in the future. The film of these gasbags is supported at altitude by small additional atmospheric overpressure and may be...

Bolonkin, Alexander

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Geothermal Brief: Market and Policy Impacts Update  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Utility-scale geothermal electricity generation plants have generally taken advantage of various government initiatives designed to stimulate private investment. This report investigates these initiatives to evaluate their impact on the associated cost of energy and the development of geothermal electric generating capacity using conventional hydrothermal technologies. We use the Cost of Renewable Energy Spreadsheet Tool (CREST) to analyze the effects of tax incentives on project economics. Incentives include the production tax credit, U.S. Department of Treasury cash grant, the investment tax credit, and accelerated depreciation schedules. The second half of the report discusses the impact of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Loan Guarantee Program on geothermal electric project deployment and possible reasons for a lack of guarantees for geothermal projects. For comparison, we examine the effectiveness of the 1970s DOE drilling support programs, including the original loan guarantee and industry-coupled cost share programs.

Speer, B.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Compact light source performance in recessed type luminaires  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Photometric comparisons were made with an indoor, recessed, type luminaire using incandescent, high intensity discharge and compact fluorescent lamps. The test results show substantial performance advantages, as expected, for the discharge light sources where the efficacy gains can be in the order for 400% even when including the ballast losses associated with the discharge lamps. The candlepower distribution patterns emerging from these luminaries are also different from those associated with the baseline incandescent lamps, and which are in some ways, even more desirable from a uniformity of illuminance perspective. A section on fluorescent lamp starting is also included which describes a system having excellent starting characteristics in terms of electrode starting temperature (RH/RC technique), proper operating frequency to minimize unwanted IR interactions, and satisfactory current crest factor values to help insure life performance.

Hammer, E.E.

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Nonlinear dust acoustic waves and shocks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We describe experiments on (1) nonlinear dust acoustic waves and (2) dust acoustic shocks performed in a direct current (DC) glow discharge dusty plasma. First, we describe experiments showing nonlinear dust acoustic waves characterized by waveforms of the dust density that are typically sharper in the wave crests and flatter in the wave troughs (compared to sinusoidal waves), indicating the development of wave harmonics. We discuss this behavior in terms of a second-order fluid theory for dust acoustic waves. Second, experimental observations of the propagation and steepening of large-amplitude dust acoustic waves into dust acoustic shock waves are presented. The observed shock wave evolution is compared with numerical calculations based on the Riemann solution of the fully nonlinear fluid equations for dust acoustic waves.

Merlino, R. L.; Heinrich, J. R.; Hyun, S.-H.; Meyer, J. K. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

260

Nanoscale compositional banding in binary thin films produced by ion-assisted deposition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the ion-assisted deposition of a binary material, the ion beam can induce the formation of nanoscale ripples on the surface of the growing thin film and compositional banding within its bulk. We demonstrate that this remains true even if the curvature dependence of the sputter yields and ballistic mass redistribution are negligible, and the two atomic species are completely miscible. The concentration of the species with the lower of the two sputter yields is higher at the crests of the ripples than at their troughs. Depending on the angles of incidence of the two atomic species, the incident flux of atoms with the higher sputter yield can either stabilize or destabilize the initially flat surface of the thin film.

Mark Bradley, R. [Department of Physics, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado 80523 (United States)] [Department of Physics, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado 80523 (United States)

2013-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "g0313 coyote crest" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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261

Refinery and petrochemical complex: The master plan study report. Volumes 1-4. Export trade information  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The study, conducted by ABB Lummus Crest, was funded by the U.S. Trade and Development Agency. The report focuses on the modernization and upgrading of the Angarsk Petrochemical Company. The Master Plan addresses the need of modernization to make the refinery and petrochemical complex more in line with western standards and products produced. The plan also defines a proposed configuration implementation and schedule consistent with APCC strategic objectives. This is the first of two volumes and it contains volumes 1-4 of the Master Plan. It is divided into the following sections: (1) Volume 1: Executive Summary; (2) Volume 2: Introduction and Background; (3) Volume 3: Analysis of Product Markets; (4) Volume 4: Refinery Study.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Refinery and petrochemical complex: The master plan study report. Volumes 5-9. Export trade information  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The study, conducted by ABB Lummus Crest, was funded by the U.S. Trade and Development Agency. The report focuses on the modernization and upgrading of the Angarsk Petrochemical Company. The Master Plan addresses the need of modernization to make the refinery and petrochemical complex more in line with western standards and products produced. The plan also defines a proposed configuration implementation and schedule consistent with APCC strategic objectives. This is the second of two volumes and it contains volumes 5-9 of the Master Plan. It is divided into the following sections: (5) Volume 5: Petrochemical Complex Study; (6) Volume 6: Cost Estimates and Implementation Schedules; (7) Volume 7: Economic Analysis & Overall Project Implementation (8) Volume 8: Linear Program Study; (9) Volume 9: Local Conditions Examination Summary.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Recuperator construction for a gas turbine engine  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A counter-flow recuperator formed from annular arrays of recuperator core segments. The recuperator core segments are formed from two opposing sheets of fin fold material coined to form a primary surface zone disposed between two flattened manifold zones. Each primary surface zone has undulating corrugations including a uniform, full height central portion and a transition zone disposed between the central portion and one of the manifold zones. Corrugations of the transition zone rise from zero adjacent to the manifold zone and increase along a transition length to full crest height at the central portion. The transition lengths increase in a direction away from an inner edge containing the air inlet so as to equalize air flow to the distal regions of the primary surface zone.

Kang, Yungmo; McKeirnan, Jr., Robert D.

2006-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

264

Ancestral Nesson anticline and associated geothermal anomalies: Enhanced hydrocarbon generation controlled by crustal structure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydrocarbon generation in the Williston basin is influenced by crustal motions and geothermal gradient anomalies associated with the ancestral Nesson anticline, a long-lived crustal structure located along 103{degree} longitude. This structure and its effects are particularly important in Canada where most petroleum source rocks were not sufficiently buried to have generated hydrocarbons in a normal geothermal gradient environment. High geothermal gradients associated with this structure raise the oil window and expand the region of source rock thermal maturity. Ancestral Nesson structure subsided differentially throughout the Phanerozoic, controlling paleobathymetry and facies over its crest. During the Upper Ordovician the structure was positive; rich potential petroleum source rocks were deposited on the western flank of the structure, generally excluding them from the zone of elevated heat flows. The total petroleum potential of this oil-source system exceeds 5.5 billion bbl of oil equivalent in Canada alone. Unfortunately, its exclusion from the maturation anomaly results in no more than 200 million bbl of oil being expelled from these sources. During the Middle Devonian, the structure was a negative feature that formed a starved subbasin separating the Winnipegosis and Elm Point carbonate shelves. Rich potential petroleum source rocks that accumulated on the crest of the structure at that time now overlie the region of elevated heat that flows and enhanced hydrocarbon maturation. Two billion barrels of oil are estimated to have been expelled from this source rock. Understanding the history and tectonics of the ancestral Nesson anticline is fundamental to a correct appraisal of hydrocarbon resources in the Williston basin.

Osadetz, K.G.; Snowdon, L.R. (Geological Survey of Canada, Calgary, Alberta (Canada))

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

CPUF - a chemical-structure-based polyurethane foam decomposition and foam response model.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Chemical-structure-based PolyUrethane Foam (CPUF) decomposition model has been developed to predict the fire-induced response of rigid, closed-cell polyurethane foam-filled systems. The model, developed for the B-61 and W-80 fireset foam, is based on a cascade of bondbreaking reactions that produce CO2. Percolation theory is used to dynamically quantify polymer fragment populations of the thermally degrading foam. The partition between condensed-phase polymer fragments and gas-phase polymer fragments (i.e. vapor-liquid split) was determined using a vapor-liquid equilibrium model. The CPUF decomposition model was implemented into the finite element (FE) heat conduction codes COYOTE and CALORE, which support chemical kinetics and enclosure radiation. Elements were removed from the computational domain when the calculated solid mass fractions within the individual finite element decrease below a set criterion. Element removal, referred to as ?element death,? creates a radiation enclosure (assumed to be non-participating) as well as a decomposition front, which separates the condensed-phase encapsulant from the gas-filled enclosure. All of the chemistry parameters as well as thermophysical properties for the CPUF model were obtained from small-scale laboratory experiments. The CPUF model was evaluated by comparing predictions to measurements. The validation experiments included several thermogravimetric experiments at pressures ranging from ambient pressure to 30 bars. Larger, component-scale experiments were also used to validate the foam response model. The effects of heat flux, bulk density, orientation, embedded components, confinement and pressure were measured and compared to model predictions. Uncertainties in the model results were evaluated using a mean value approach. The measured mass loss in the TGA experiments and the measured location of the decomposition front were within the 95% prediction limit determined using the CPUF model for all of the experiments where the decomposition gases were vented sufficiently. The CPUF model results were not as good for the partially confined radiant heat experiments where the vent area was regulated to maintain pressure. Liquefaction and flow effects, which are not considered in the CPUF model, become important when the decomposition gases are confined.

Fletcher, Thomas H. (Brigham Young University, Provo, UT); Thompson, Kyle Richard; Erickson, Kenneth L.; Dowding, Kevin J.; Clayton, Daniel (Brigham Young University, Provo, UT); Chu, Tze Yao; Hobbs, Michael L.; Borek, Theodore Thaddeus III

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

An experimental investigation of the dynamics of submarine leveed channel initiation as sediment-laden density currents experience sudden unconfinement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Leveed submarine channels play a critical role in the transfer of sediment from the upper continental slopes to interslope basins and ultimately deepwater settings. Despite a reasonable understanding of how these channels grow once established, how such channels initiate on previously unchannelized portions of the seafloor remains poorly understood. We conducted a series of experiments that elucidate the influence of excess density relative to flow velocity on the dynamics of, and depositional morphologies arising from, density currents undergoing sudden unconfinement across a sloped bed. Experimental currents transported only suspended sediment across a non-erodible substrate. Under flow conditions ranging from supercritical to subcritical (bulk Richardson numbers of 0.02 to 1.2) our experiments failed to produce deposits resembling or exhibiting the potential to evolve into self-formed leveed channels. In the absence of excess density, a submerged sediment-laden flow produced sharp crested lateral deposits bounding the margins of the flow for approximately a distance of two outlet widths down basin. These lateral deposits terminated in a centerline deposit that greatly exceeded marginal deposits in thickness. As excess density increased relative to the outlet velocity, the rate of lateral spreading of the flow increased relative to the downstream propagation of the density current, transitioning from a narrow flow aligned with the channel outlet to a broad radially expanding flow. Coincident with these changes in flow dynamics, the bounding lateral deposits extended for shorter distances, had lower, more poorly defined crests that were increasingly wider in separation than the initial outlet, and progressively became more oblong rather than linear. Based on our results, we conclude that leveed channels cannot initiate from sediment-laden density currents under strictly depositional conditions. Partial confinement of these currents appears to be necessary to establish the hydrodynamic conditions needed for sediment deposition along the margins of a density current which ultimately may evolve into confining levees. We suggest that erosion into a previously unchannelized substrate is the mostly likely source of this partial confinement.

Rowland, Joel C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hilley, George E [STANFORD UNIV; Fildani, Andrea [CHEVRON ETC

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Evolution of the Cerro Prieto geothermal system as interpreted from vitrinite reflectance under isothermal conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Temperature estimates from reflectance data in the Cerro Prieto system correlate with modern temperature logs and temperature estimates from fluid inclusion and oxygen isotope geothermometry indicating that the temperature in the central portion of the Cerro Prieto System is now at its historical maximum. Isoreflectance lines formed by contouring vitrinite reflectance data for a given isothermal surface define an imaginary surface that indicates an apparent duration of heating in the system. The 250/sup 0/C isothermal surface has a complex dome-like form suggesting a localized heat source that has caused shallow heating in the central portion of this system. Isoreflectance lines relative to this 250/sup 0/C isothermal surface define a zone of low reflectance roughly corresponding to the crest of the isothermal surface. Comparison of these two surfaces suggest that the shallow heating in the central portion of Cerro Prieto is young relative to the heating (to 250/sup 0/C) on the system margins. Laboratory and theoretical models of hydrothermal convection cells suggest that the form of the observed 250/sup 0/C isothermal surface and the reflectance surface derived relative to it results from the convective rise of thermal fluids under the influence of a regional hydrodynamic gradient that induces a shift of the hydrothermal heating effects to the southwest.

Barker, C.E. (US Geological Survey, Denver, CO); Pawlewicz, M.J.; Bostick, N.H.; Elders, W.A.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Mixed fluvial systems of Messak Sandstone, a deposit of Nubian lithofacies, southwestern Libya  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Messak Sandstone is a coarse to pebbly, tabular cross-bedded, Lower Cretaceous deposit of the widespread Nubian lithofacies. It was deposited at the northern edge of the Murzuq basin in southwestern Libya. Although the sedimentary record is predominantly one of braided fluvial systems, a common subfacies within the formation is interpreted to record the passage of straight-crested sand waves across laterally migrating point bars in sinuous rivers, similar to the pattern documented by Singh and Kumar on the modern Ganga and Yamuna Rivers. Because the sand waves were larger on the lower parts of the point bars, lateral migration created diagnostic thinning-upward, unidirectional cosets of tabular cross-beds as well as fining-upward, grain-size trends. Common, thick, interbedded claystones, deposited in associated paludal and lacustrine environments, and high variance in cross-bed dispersion patterns also suggest the local presence of sinuous fluvial systems within the overall braided regime. The Messak Sandstone contains some of the features that led Harms et al to propose an unconventional low-sinuosity fluvial environment for the Nubian lithofacies in Egypt, and the continuously high water levels of this model may explain channel-scale clay drapes and overturned cross-beds in the Messak. However, most of the Messak characteristics are incompatible with the low-sinuosity model, suggesting instead that the fluvial channels in the Murzuq basin alternated between braided and high-sinuosity patterns.

Lorenz, J.C.

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

RIVERTON DOME GAS EXPLORATION AND STIMULATION TECHNOLOGY DEMONSTRATION, WIND RIVER BASIN, WYOMING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The new exploration technology for basin center gas accumulations developed by R.C. Surdam and Associates at the Institute for Energy Research, University of Wyoming, was applied to the Riverton Dome 3-D seismic area. Application of the technology resulted in the development of important new exploration leads in the Frontier, Muddy, and Nugget formations. The new leads are adjacent to a major north-south trending fault, which is downdip from the crest of the major structure in the area. In a blind test, the drilling results from six new Muddy test wells were accurately predicted. The initial production values, IP, for the six test wells ranged from < one mmcf/day to four mmcf/day. The three wells with the highest IP values (i.e., three to four mmcf/day) were drilled into an intense velocity anomaly (i.e., anomalously slow velocities). The well drilled at the end of the velocity anomaly had an IP value of one mmcf/day, and the two wells drilled outside of the velocity anomaly had IP values of < one mmcf/day and are presently shut in. Based on these test results, it is concluded that the new IER exploration strategy for detecting and delineating commercial, anomalously pressured gas accumulation is valid in the southwestern portions of the Wind River Basin, and can be utilized to significantly reduce exploration risk and to increase profitability of so-called basin center gas accumulations.

Ronald C. Surdam; Zunsheng Jiao; Nicholas K. Boyd

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Evaluating Cumulative Ecosystem Response to Restoration Projects in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary, 2009  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the sixth annual report of a seven-year project (2004 through 2010) to evaluate the cumulative effects of habitat restoration actions in the lower Columbia River and estuary (LCRE). The project, called the Cumulative Effects Study, is being conducted for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Portland District (USACE) by the Marine Sciences Laboratory of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), the Pt. Adams Biological Field Station of the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), the Columbia River Estuary Study Taskforce (CREST), and the University of Washington. The goal of the Cumulative Effects Study is to develop a methodology to evaluate the cumulative effects of multiple habitat restoration projects intended to benefit ecosystems supporting juvenile salmonids in the 235-km-long LCRE. Literature review in 2004 revealed no existing methods for such an evaluation and suggested that cumulative effects could be additive or synergistic. From 2005 through 2009, annual field research involved intensive, comparative studies paired by habitat type (tidal swamp versus marsh), trajectory (restoration versus reference site), and restoration action (tidegate replacement vs. culvert replacement vs. dike breach).

Johnson, Gary E.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Borde, Amy B.; Bryson, Amanda J.; Cameron, April; Coleman, Andre M.; Corbett, C.; Dawley, Earl M.; Ebberts, Blaine D.; Kauffman, Ronald; Roegner, G. Curtis; Russell, Micah T.; Silva, April; Skalski, John R.; Thom, Ronald M.; Vavrinec, John; Woodruff, Dana L.; Zimmerman, Shon A.

2010-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

271

Energy Efficiency Strategies for Municipal Wastewater Treatment Facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Water and wastewater systems are significant energy consumers with an estimated 3%-4% of total U.S. electricity consumption used for the movement and treatment of water and wastewater. Water-energy issues are of growing importance in the context of water shortages, higher energy and material costs, and a changing climate. In this economic environment, it is in the best interest for utilities to find efficiencies, both in water and energy use. Performing energy audits at water and wastewater treatment facilities is one way community energy managers can identify opportunities to save money, energy, and water. In this paper the importance of energy use in wastewater facilities is illustrated by a case study of a process energy audit performed for Crested Butte, Colorado's wastewater treatment plant. The energy audit identified opportunities for significant energy savings by looking at power intensive unit processes such as influent pumping, aeration, ultraviolet disinfection, and solids handling. This case study presents best practices that can be readily adopted by facility managers in their pursuit of energy and financial savings in water and wastewater treatment. This paper is intended to improve community energy managers understanding of the role that the water and wastewater sector plays in a community's total energy consumption. The energy efficiency strategies described provide information on energy savings opportunities, which can be used as a basis for discussing energy management goals with water and wastewater treatment facility managers.

Daw, J.; Hallett, K.; DeWolfe, J.; Venner, I.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Turbulent mixing, diffusion and gravity in the formation of cosmological structures: the fluid mechanics of dark matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The theory of gravitational structure formation in astrophysics and cosmology is revised based on real fluid behavior and turbulent mixing theory. Gibson's 1996-1998 theory balances fluid mechanical forces with gravitational forces and density diffusivity with gravitational diffusivity at critical viscous, turbulent, magnetic, and diffusion length scales termed Schwarz scales L_SX. Condensation and void formation occurs on non-acoustic density nuclei produced by turbulent mixing for scales L>=L_SXmax rather than on sound wave crests and troughs for L>=L_J as required by Jeans's 1902 linear acoustic theory. Schwarz scales L_SX = L_SV, L_ST, L_SM, or L_SD may be smaller or larger than Jeans's scale L_J. Thus, a very different "nonlinear" cosmology emerges to replace the currently accepted "linear" cosmology. According to the new theory, most of the inner halo dark matter of galaxies consists of planetary mass objects that formed soon after the plasma to neutral gas transition 300,000 years after the Big Bang. These objects are termed primordial fog particles (PFPs) and provide an explanation for Schild's 1996 "rogue planets ... likely to be the missing mass" of his observed quasar-lens galaxy, inferred from the twinkling frequencies of both quasar images and their phased difference.

Carl H. Gibson

1999-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

273

SLAC low emittance accelerator test facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

SLAC is proposing to build a new Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) capable of producing a 50 MeV electron beam with an extremely low geometric tranverse emittance (1.5 x 10/sup -10/ rad.m) for the purpose of testing new methods of acceleration. The low emittance will be achieved by assembling a linear accelerator using one standard SLAC three-meter section and a 400 kV electron gun with a very small photocathode (40 microns in diameter). The photocathode will be illuminated from the back by short bursts (on the order of 6 ps) of visible laser light which will produce bunches of about 10/sup 5/ electrons. Higher currents could be obtained by illuminating the cathode from the front. The gun will be mounted directly against the accelerator section. Calculations show that in the absence of an rf buncher, injection of these 400 keV small radius electron bunches roughly 30/sup 0/ ahead of crest produces negligible transverse emittance growth due to radial rf forces. Acceleration of the electrons up to 50 MeV followed by collimation, energy slits and focusing will provide a 3.2 mm long waist of under 1.5 ..mu..m in diameter where laser acceleration and other techniques can be tested.

Loew, G.A.; Miller, R.H.; Sinclair, C.K.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Quality assurance project plan for the Chestnut Ridge Fly Ash Pond Stabilization Project at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Chestnut Ridge Fly Ash Pond Stabilization (CRFAPS) Project will stabilize a 19-m-high (62-ft-high) earthen embankment across Upper McCoy Branch situated along the southern slope of Chestnut Ridge. This task will be accomplished by raising the crest of the embankment, reinforcing the face of the embankment, removing trees from the face and top of the embankment, and repairing the emergency spillway. The primary responsibilities of the team members are: Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc., (Energy Systems) will be responsible for project integration, technical support, Title 3 field support, environmental oversight, and quality assurance (QA) oversight of the project; Foster Wheeler Environmental Corporation (FWENC) will be responsible for design and home office Title 3 support; MK-Ferguson of Oak Ridge Company (MK-F) will be responsible for health and safety, construction, and procurement of construction materials. Each of the team members has a QA program approved by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Operations. This project-specific QA project plan (QAPP), which is applicable to all project activities, identifies and integrates the specific QA requirements from the participant`s QA programs that are necessary for this project.

NONE

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Geologic technical assessment of the Chacahoula Salt Dome, Louisiana, for potential expansion of the U.S. strategic petroleum reserve.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Chacahoula salt dome, located in southern Louisiana, approximately 66 miles southwest of New Orleans, appears to be a suitable site for a 160-million-barrel-capacity expansion facility for the U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve, comprising sixteen 10-million barrel underground storage caverns. The overall salt dome appears to cover an area of some 1800 acres, or approximately 2.8 square miles, at a subsea elevation of 2000 ft, which is near the top of the salt stock. The shallowest known salt is present at 1116 ft, subsea. The crest of the salt dome is relatively flatlying, outward to an elevation of -4000 ft. Below this elevation, the flanks of the dome plunge steeply in all directions. The dome appears to comprise two separate spine complexes of quasi-independently moving salt. Two mapped areas of salt overhang, located on the eastern and southeastern flanks of the salt stock, are present below -8000 ft. These regions of overhang should present no particular design issues, as the conceptual design SPR caverns are located in the western portion of the dome. The proposed cavern field may be affected by a boundary shear zone, located between the two salt spines. However, the large size of the Chacahoula salt dome suggests that there is significant design flexibility to deal with such local geologic issues.

Snider, Anna C.; Rautman, Christopher Arthur; Looff, Karl M. (Geologic Consultant, Lovelady, TX)

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Eder Acquisition 2007 Habitat Evaluation Procedures Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A habitat evaluation procedures (HEP) analysis was conducted on the Eder acquisition in July 2007 to determine how many protection habitat units to credit Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for providing funds to acquire the project site as partial mitigation for habitat losses associated with construction of Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Dams. Baseline HEP surveys generated 3,857.64 habitat units or 1.16 HUs per acre. HEP surveys also served to document general habitat conditions. Survey results indicated that the herbaceous plant community lacked forbs species, which may be due to both livestock grazing and the late timing of the surveys. Moreover, the herbaceous plant community lacked structure based on lower than expected visual obstruction readings (VOR); likely a direct result of livestock impacts. In addition, introduced herbaceous vegetation including cultivated pasture grasses, e.g. crested wheatgrass and/or invader species such as cheatgrass and mustard, were present on most areas surveyed. The shrub element within the shrubsteppe cover type was generally a mosaic of moderate to dense shrubby areas interspersed with open grassland communities while the 'steppe' component was almost entirely devoid of shrubs. Riparian shrub and forest areas were somewhat stressed by livestock. Moreover, shrub and tree communities along the lower reaches of Nine Mile Creek suffered from lack of water due to the previous landowners 'piping' water out of the stream channel.

Ashley, Paul R.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Cheap Artificial AB-Mountains, Extraction of Water and Energy from Atmosphere and Change of Regional Climate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Author suggests and researches a new revolutionary method for changing the climates of entire countries or portions thereof, obtaining huge amounts of cheap water and energy from the atmosphere. In this paper is presented the idea of cheap artificial inflatable mountains, which may cardinally change the climate of a large region or country. Additional benefits: The potential of tapping large amounts of fresh water and energy. The mountains are inflatable semi-cylindrical constructions from thin film (gas bags) having heights of up to 3 - 5 km. They are located perpendicular to the main wind direction. Encountering these artificial mountains, humid air (wind) rises to crest altitude, is cooled and produces rain (or rain clouds). Many natural mountains are sources of rivers, and other forms of water and power production - and artificial mountains may provide these services for entire nations in the future. The film of these gasbags is supported at altitude by small additional atmospheric overpressure and may be connected to the ground by thin cables. The author has shown (in previous works about the AB-Dome) that this closed AB-Dome allows full control of the weather inside the Dome (the day is always fine, the rain is only at night, no strong winds) and influence to given region. This is a realistic and cheap method of economical irrigation, getting energy and virtual weather control on Earth at the current time.

Alexander Bolonkin

2008-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

278

Shrub-Steppe Seasons A Natural History of the Mid-Columbia Basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This book collects and updates a series of articles about the natural history of the Mid-Columbia region. The articles first appeared as a monthly column titled ''Natural History'' in the Tri-City Herald, beginning in May 1991. My approach has been to condense the best of what is known about the ecology of the region to a manageable length with little in the way of technical language and terms. Admittedly, there is a bias toward those topics and species on which I have either been personally involved or observed as part of the ecology research programs conducted on the Fitzner/Eberhardt Arid Lands Ecology (ALE) Reserve. The ALE Reserve is situated on the northeast-facing flank of the Rattlesnake Hills. Rattlesnake Mountain with a crest of over 3,600 feet is visible throughout much of the Mid-Columbia. Shrub-steppe grasslands once covered a large part of the western United States but most have been converted to other uses. The ALE site is the only remaining sizeable acreage (120 square miles) that is in near pristine condition and provides the only clear indication as to what the early trappers, traders, pioneers, and tribal members may have encountered in their day-to-day activities. In this respect, ALE provides a visible touchstone linking the past with the present for all of us.

LE Rogers

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Mississippian Ratcliffe and Nesson reservoirs, Rosebud field, Williams County, North Dakota  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Rosebud is a Ratcliffe and Nesson field, located in the central part of the Williston basin. The field has five producing wells, but is not completely defined. Rosebud field may have 5 to 15 additional locations and the potential for recoverable reserves in excess of one million barrels of oil. Production is controlled by a combination of structure and stratigraphic pinchout of porosity. Ratcliffe production is from an algal buildup and is the primary reservoir in the field. Nesson production is from a carbonate shoal facies. Rosebud field is located on an east plunging structural nose with 13 ft of closure at the Nesson level. Both Ratcliffe and Nesson porosity are best developed along the crest of the structure. A fairway of Ratcliffe algal buildups and Nesson shoals offer additional exploration opportunities in a relatively undrilled area of the Williston basin. The purpose of this paper is to describe some of the characteristics related to production in Rosebud field and to suggest that similar fields may be discovered by exploration of the surrounding area.

Dean, K.

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Productivity and Injectivity of Horizontal Wells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A general wellbore flow model is presented to incorporate not only frictional, accelerational and gravitational pressure drops, but also the pressure drop caused by inflow. Influence of inflow or outflow on the wellbore pressure drop is analyzed. New friction factor correlations accounting for both inflow and outflow are also developed. The greatest source of uncertainty is reservoir description and how it is used in simulators. Integration of data through geostatistical techniques leads to multiple descriptions that all honor available data. The reality is never known. The only way to reduce this uncertainty is to use more data from geological studies, formation evaluation, high resolution seismic, well tests and production history to constrain stochastic images. Even with a perfect knowledge about reservoir geology, current models cannot do routine simulations at a fine enough scale. Furthermore, we normally don't know what scale is fine enough. Upscaling introduces errors and masks some of the physical phenomenon that we are trying to model. The scale at which upscaling is robust is not known and it is probably smaller in most cases than the scale actually used for predicting performance. Uncertainties in the well index can cause errors in predictions that are of the same magnitude as those caused by reservoir heterogeneities. Simplified semi-analytical models for cresting behavior and productivity predictions can be very misleading.

Khalid Aziz; Sepehr Arababi; Thomas A. Hewett

1997-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "g0313 coyote crest" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Differences in Bone Quality between High versus Low Turnover Renal Osteodystrophy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Abnormal bone turnover is common in chronic kidney disease (CKD), but its effects on bone quality remain unclear. This study sought to quantify the relationship between abnormal bone turnover and bone quality. Iliac crest bone biopsies were obtained from CKD-5 patients on dialysis with low (n=18) or high (n=17) turnover, and from volunteers (n=12) with normal turnover and normal kidney function. Histomorphometric methods were used to quantify the microstructural parameters; Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and nanoindentation were used to quantify the material and mechanical properties in bone. Reduced mineral-to-matrix ratio, mineral crystal size, stiffness and hardness were observed in bone with high turnover compared to bone with normal or low turnover. Decreased cancellous bone volume and trabecular thickness were seen in bone with low turnover compared to bone with normal or high turnover. Bone quality, as defined by its microstructural, material, and mechanical properties, is related to bone turnover. These data suggest that turnover related alterations in bone quality may contribute to the known diminished mechanical competence of bone in CKD patients, albeit from different mechanisms for bone with high (material abnormality) vs. low (microstructural alteration) turnover. The present findings suggest that improved treatments for renal osteodystrophy should seek to avoid low or high bone turnover and aim for turnover rates as close to normal as possible.

Porter, Daniel S. [University of Kentucky, Lexington; Pienkowski, David [University of Kentucky, Lexington; Faugere, Marie-Claude [Albert B. Chandler Medical Center; Malluche, Hartmut H. [Albert B. Chandler Medical Center

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Dynamic context discrimination : psychological evidence for the Sandia Cognitive Framework.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Human behavior is a function of an iterative interaction between the stimulus environment and past experience. It is not simply a matter of the current stimulus environment activating the appropriate experience or rule from memory (e.g., if it is dark and I hear a strange noise outside, then I turn on the outside lights and investigate). Rather, it is a dynamic process that takes into account not only things one would generally do in a given situation, but things that have recently become known (e.g., there have recently been coyotes seen in the area and one is known to be rabid), as well as other immediate environmental characteristics (e.g., it is snowing outside, I know my dog is outside, I know the police are already outside, etc.). All of these factors combine to inform me of the most appropriate behavior for the situation. If it were the case that humans had a rule for every possible contingency, the amount of storage that would be required to enable us to fluidly deal with most situations we encounter would rapidly become biologically untenable. We can all deal with contingencies like the one above with fairly little effort, but if it isn't based on rules, what is it based on? The assertion of the Cognitive Systems program at Sandia for the past 5 years is that at the heart of this ability to effectively navigate the world is an ability to discriminate between different contexts (i.e., Dynamic Context Discrimination, or DCD). While this assertion in and of itself might not seem earthshaking, it is compelling that this ability and its components show up in a wide variety of paradigms across different subdisciplines in psychology. We begin by outlining, at a high functional level, the basic ideas of DCD. We then provide evidence from several different literatures and paradigms that support our assertion that DCD is a core aspect of cognitive functioning. Finally, we discuss DCD and the computational model that we have developed as an instantiation of DCD in more detail. Before commencing with our overview of DCD, we should note that DCD is not necessarily a theory in the classic sense. Rather, it is a description of cognitive functioning that seeks to unify highly similar findings across a wide variety of literatures. Further, we believe that such convergence warrants a central place in efforts to computationally emulate human cognition. That is, DCD is a general principle of cognition. It is also important to note that while we are drawing parallels across many literatures, these are functional parallels and are not necessarily structural ones. That is, we are not saying that the same neural pathways are involved in these phenomena. We are only saying that the different neural pathways that are responsible for the appearance of these various phenomena follow the same functional rules - the mechanisms are the same even if the physical parts are distinct. Furthermore, DCD is not a causal mechanism - it is an emergent property of the way the brain is constructed. DCD is the result of neurophysiology (cf. John, 2002, 2003). Finally, it is important to note that we are not proposing a generic learning mechanism such that one biological algorithm can account for all situation interpretation. Rather, we are pointing out that there are strikingly similar empirical results across a wide variety of disciplines that can be understood, in part, by similar cognitive processes. It is entirely possible, even assumed in some cases (i.e., primary language acquisition) that these more generic cognitive processes are complemented and constrained by various limits which may or may not be biological in nature (cf. Bates & Elman, 1996; Elman, in press).

Speed, Ann Elizabeth

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Geologyy of the Yucca Mountain Site Area, Southwestern Nevada, Chapter in Stuckless, J.S., ED., Yucca Mountain, Nevada - A Proposed Geologic Repository for High-Level Radioactive Waste (Volume 1)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Yucca Mountain in southwestern Nevada is a prominent, irregularly shaped upland formed by a thick apron of Miocene pyroclastic-flow and fallout tephra deposits, with minor lava flows, that was segmented by through-going, large-displacement normal faults into a series of north-trending, eastwardly tilted structural blocks. The principal volcanic-rock units are the Tiva Canyon and Topopah Spring Tuffs of the Paintbrush Group, which consist of volumetrically large eruptive sequences derived from compositionally distinct magma bodies in the nearby southwestern Nevada volcanic field, and are classic examples of a magmatic zonation characterized by an upper crystal-rich (> 10% crystal fragments) member, a more voluminous lower crystal-poor (< 5% crystal fragments) member, and an intervening thin transition zone. Rocks within the crystal-poor member of the Topopah Spring Tuff, lying some 280 m below the crest of Yucca Mountain, constitute the proposed host rock to be excavated for the storage of high-level radioactive wastes. Separation of the tuffaceous rock formations into subunits that allow for detailed mapping and structural interpretations is based on macroscopic features, most importantly the relative abundance of lithophysae and the degree of welding. The latter feature, varying from nonwelded through partly and moderately welded to densely welded, exerts a strong control on matrix porosities and other rock properties that provide essential criteria for distinguishing hydrogeologic and thermal-mechanical units, which are of major interest in evaluating the suitability of Yucca Mountain to host a safe and permanent geologic repository for waste storage. A thick and varied sequence of surficial deposits mantle large parts of the Yucca Mountain site area. Mapping of these deposits and associated soils in exposures and in the walls of trenches excavated across buried faults provides evidence for multiple surface-rupturing events along all of the major faults during Pleistocene and Holocene times; these paleoseismic studies form the basis for evaluating the potential for future earthquakes and fault displacements. Thermoluminescence and U-series analyses were used to date the surficial materials involved in the Quaternary faulting events. The rate of erosional downcutting of bedrock on the ridge crests and hillslopes of Yucca Mountain, being of particular concern with respect to the potential for breaching of the proposed underground storage facility, was studied by using rock varnish cation-ratio and {sup 10}Be and {sup 36}Cl cosmogenic dating methods to determine the length of time bedrock outcrops and hillslope boulder deposits were exposed to cosmic rays, which then served as a basis for calculating long-term erosion rates. The results indicate rates ranging from 0.04 to 0.27 cm/k.y., which represent the maximum downcutting along the summit of Yucca Mountain under all climatic conditions that existed there during most of Quaternary time. Associated studies include the stratigraphy of surficial deposits in Fortymile Wash, the major drainage course in the area, which record a complex history of four to five cut-and-fill cycles within the channel during middle to late Quaternary time. The last 2 to 4 m of incision probably occurred during the last pluvial climatic period, 22 to 18 ka, followed by aggradation to the present time.

W.R. Keefer; J.W. Whitney; D.C. Buesch

2006-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

284

In-Situ Sampling and Characterization of Naturally Occurring Marine Methane Hydrate Using the D/V JOIDES Resolution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary accomplishments of the JOI Cooperative Agreement with DOE/NETL in this quarter were (1) the preliminary postcruise evaluation of the tools and measurement systems that were used during ODP Leg 204 to study hydrate deposits on Hydrate Ridge, offshore Oregon from July through September 2002; and (2) the preliminary study of the hydrate-bearing core samples preserved in pressure vessels and in liquid nitrogen cryofreezers, which are now stored at the ODP Gulf Coast Repository in College Station, TX. During ODP Leg 204, several newly modified downhole tools were deployed to better characterize the subsurface lithologies and environments hosting microbial populations and gas hydrates. A preliminary review of the use of these tools is provided herein. The DVTP, DVTP-P, APC-methane, and APC-Temperature tools (ODP memory tools) were used extensively and successfully during ODP Leg 204 aboard the D/V JOIDES Resolution. These systems provided a strong operational capability for characterizing the in situ properties of methane hydrates in subsurface environments on Hydrate Ridge during ODP Leg 204. Pressure was also measured during a trial run of the Fugro piezoprobe, which operates on similar principles as the DVTP-P. The final report describing the deployments of the Fugro Piezoprobe is provided in Appendix A of this report. A preliminary analysis and comparison between the piezoprobe and DVTP-P tools is provided in Appendix B of this report. Finally, a series of additional holes were cored at the crest of Hydrate Ridge (Site 1249) specifically geared toward the rapid recovery and preservation of hydrate samples as part of a hydrate geriatric study partially funded by the Department of Energy (DOE). In addition, the preliminary results from gamma density non-invasive imaging of the cores preserved in pressure vessels are provided in Appendix C of this report. An initial visual inspection of the samples stored in liquid nitrogen is provided in Appendix D of this report.

Frank Rack; Michael Storms; Derryl Schroeder; Brandon Dugan; Peter Schultheiss; ODP Leg 204 Shipboard Scientific Party

2002-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

285

Geology of the Wallula Gap Area, Washington. [Grande Ronde, Wanapum, and Saddle Mountains basalts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study focuses on the structure and stratigraphy of an 80-km/sup 2/ area at the southern margin of the Pasco Basin in Wallula Gap. Field stratigraphy, petrography, natural remanent magnetism, and major-element chemistry indicate that the tholeiitic basalt flows of the Wallula Gap area correlate with units of the Grande Ronde, Wanapum, and Saddle Mountains Formations of the Yakima Subgroup of the Columbia River Basalt Group. Flows of the Frenchman Springs, Umatilla, Pomona, Elephant Mountain, and Ice Harbor Mmebers are present in the area. The Frenchman Springs Member exposed in the Wallula Gap is more than 185 m thick and consists of eight to nine flows. Its thickness and possible contemporaneous structural deformation apparently prevented emplacement of both the Roza and Priest Rapids Members at this locality. Structural uplift of the Horse Heaven Hills began prior to extrusion of the Pomona flow. Both the Pomona and Elephant Mountain Members thin and pinch out over the crest of the uplift near Mound Pond. The Ice Harbor flow was apparently confined to the basin north of the Horse Heaven uplift, but an exposure at Mound Pond suggests it flowed through Wallula Gap as an intracanyon flow. The Wallula Gap fault zone trends N65/sup 0/W and can be traced for at least 11 km along the north flank of the Horse Heaven Hills uplift. Where the fault intersects the Olympic-Wallowa Lineament at Van Sycle Canyon 8 km east of Wallula Gap, it is a broad zone of normal faulting, 300 m wide, with as much as 310 m of displacement of the basalt stratigraphy. Two faults occur in the northern portion of Van Sycle Canyon and define a graben trending N45/sup 0/W. A third fault, roughly parallel to the Wallula Gap fault, transects the The Nub and offsets 14 m of Ice Harbor basalt.

Gardner, J.N.; Snow, M.G.; Fecht, K.R.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Mapping and Assessment of the United States Ocean Wave Energy Resource  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project estimates the naturally available and technically recoverable U.S. wave energy resources, using a 51-month Wavewatch III hindcast database developed especially for this study by National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration�¢����s (NOAA�¢����s) National Centers for Environmental Prediction. For total resource estimation, wave power density in terms of kilowatts per meter is aggregated across a unit diameter circle. This approach is fully consistent with accepted global practice and includes the resource made available by the lateral transfer of wave energy along wave crests, which enables wave diffraction to substantially reestablish wave power densities within a few kilometers of a linear array, even for fixed terminator devices. The total available wave energy resource along the U.S. continental shelf edge, based on accumulating unit circle wave power densities, is estimated to be 2,640 TWh/yr, broken down as follows: 590 TWh/yr for the West Coast, 240 TWh/yr for the East Coast, 80 TWh/yr for the Gulf of Mexico, 1570 TWh/yr for Alaska, 130 TWh/yr for Hawaii, and 30 TWh/yr for Puerto Rico. The total recoverable wave energy resource, as constrained by an array capacity packing density of 15 megawatts per kilometer of coastline, with a 100-fold operating range between threshold and maximum operating conditions in terms of input wave power density available to such arrays, yields a total recoverable resource along the U.S. continental shelf edge of 1,170 TWh/yr, broken down as follows: 250 TWh/yr for the West Coast, 160 TWh/yr for the East Coast, 60 TWh/yr for the Gulf of Mexico, 620 TWh/yr for Alaska, 80 TWh/yr for Hawaii, and 20 TWh/yr for Puerto Rico.

Paul T. Jacobson; George Hagerman; George Scott

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Wadter Resources Data Ohio: Water year 1994. Volume 2, St. Lawrence River Basin and Statewide Project Data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Water Resources Division of the US Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with State agencies, obtains a large amount of data each water year (a water year is the 12-month period from October 1 through September 30 and is identified by the calendar year in which it ends) pertaining to the water resources of Ohio. These data, accumulated during many years, constitute a valuable data base for developing an improved understanding of the water resources of the State. To make these data readily available to interested parties outside the USGS, they are published annually in this report series entitled ``Water Resources Data--Ohio.`` This report (in two volumes) includes records on surface water and ground water in the State. Specifically, it contains: (1) Discharge records for streamflow-gaging stations, miscellaneous sites, and crest-stage stations; (2) stage and content records for streams, lakes, and reservoirs; (3) water-quality data for streamflow-gaging stations, wells, synaptic sites, and partial-record sites; and (4) water-level data for observation wells. Locations of lake- and streamflow-gaging stations, water-quality stations, and observation wells for which data are presented in this volume are shown in figures ga through 8b. The data in this report represent that part of the National Water Data System collected by the USGS and cooperating State and Federal agencies in Ohio. This series of annual reports for Ohio began with the 1961 water year with a report that contained only data relating to the quantities of surface water. For the 1964 water year, a similar report was introduced that contained only data relating to water quality. Beginning with the 1975 water year, the report was changed to present (in two to three volumes) data on quantities of surface water, quality of surface and ground water, and ground-water levels.

NONE

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

288

Water Resources Data Ohio: Water year 1994. Volume 1, Ohio River Basin excluding Project Data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Water Resources Division of the US Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with State agencies, obtains a large amount of data each water year (a water year is the 12-month period from October 1 through September 30 and is identified by the calendar year in which it ends) pertaining to the water resources of Ohio. These data, accumulated during many years, constitute a valuable data base for developing an improved understanding of the water resources of the State. To make these data readily available to interested parties outside the USGS, they are published annually in this report series entitled ``Water Resources Data--Ohio.`` This report (in two volumes) includes records on surface water and ground water in the State. Specifically, it contains: (1) Discharge records for streamflow-gaging stations, miscellaneous sites, and crest-stage stations; (2) stage and content records for streams, lakes, and reservoirs; (3) water-quality data for streamflow-gaging stations, wells, synoptic sites, and partial-record sit -aid (4) water-level data for observation wells. Locations of lake-and streamflow-gaging stations, water-quality stations, and observation wells for which data are presented in this volume are shown in figures 8a through 8b. The data in this report represent that part of the National Water Data System collected by the USGS and cooperating State and Federal agencies in Ohio. This series of annual reports for Ohio began with the 1961 water year with a report that contained only data relating to the quantities of surface water. For the 1964 water year, a similar report was introduced that contained only data relating to water quality. Beginning with the 1975 water year, the report was changed to present (in two or three volumes) data on quantities of surface water, quality of surface and ground water, and ground-water levels.

NONE

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

289

Exploration model for unconformity-related hydrocarbon accumulations in Cherokee Group for western Kansas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The sandstones of the Desmoinesian Cherokee Group in western Kansas are important hydrocarbon producers. The Start oil field in Rush and Ness Counties is an example of an unconformity-related Cherokee accumulation from which an exploration model can be made. In this field, the upper Cherokee member is economically important and is interpreted to be a marine unit deposited on the distal portion of an alluvial plain. Traps and reservoirs in this unit were formed by winnowing of clay and silt-sized material from sediments deposited on the crests of paleohighs. Four maps are useful in exploring for upper Cherokee hydrocarbon accumulations such as Start. An isopach map of the Cherokee group is useful for locating thins that coincide with paleohighs on the basal Pennsylvanian unconformity. An isopach map from the Cherokee Group is useful for locating thins that coincide with paleohighs on the basal Pennsylvanian unconformity. An isopach map from the Cherokee top down to the first sandstone porosity is useful. Thins of this interval define areas where wave and current action have winnowed finer material from sands. Closed anticlines on a Cherokee structure map are areas where Cherokee reservoirs are likely to be oil bearing rather than water bearing. An isopach map from the Cimarronian stone Corral anhydrite top down to the Missourian Lansing Group top is also useful. Thins of this interval correspond to paleohighs on the basal Pennsylvanian unconformity. This interval can be picked from seismic records. Prospective areas occur where isopach thins of Stone Corral to Lansing, of Cherokee Group, and of Cherokee top to first sandstone porosity coincide with Cherokee anticlinal structure.

Bieber, D.W.

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Site Selection for DOE/JIP Gas Hydrate Drilling in the Northern Gulf of Mexico  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the late spring of 2008, the Chevron-led Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrate Joint Industry Project (JIP) expects to conduct an exploratory drilling and logging campaign to better understand gas hydrate-bearing sands in the deepwater Gulf of Mexico. The JIP Site Selection team selected three areas to test alternative geological models and geophysical interpretations supporting the existence of potential high gas hydrate saturations in reservoir-quality sands. The three sites are near existing drill holes which provide geological and geophysical constraints in Alaminos Canyon (AC) lease block 818, Green Canyon (GC) 955, and Walker Ridge (WR) 313. At the AC818 site, gas hydrate is interpreted to occur within the Oligocene Frio volcaniclastic sand at the crest of a fold that is shallow enough to be in the hydrate stability zone. Drilling at GC955 will sample a faulted, buried Pleistocene channel-levee system in an area characterized by seafloor fluid expulsion features, structural closure associated with uplifted salt, and abundant seismic evidence for upward migration of fluids and gas into the sand-rich parts of the sedimentary section. Drilling at WR313 targets ponded sheet sands and associated channel/levee deposits within a minibasin, making this a non-structural play. The potential for gas hydrate occurrence at WR313 is supported by shingled phase reversals consistent with the transition from gas-charged sand to overlying gas-hydrate saturated sand. Drilling locations have been selected at each site to 1) test geological methods and models used to infer the occurrence of gas hydrate in sand reservoirs in different settings in the northern Gulf of Mexico; 2) calibrate geophysical models used to detect gas hydrate sands, map reservoir thicknesses, and estimate the degree of gas hydrate saturation; and 3) delineate potential locations for subsequent JIP drilling and coring operations that will collect samples for comprehensive physical property, geochemical and other analyses.

Hutchinson, D.R. (USGS); Shelander, D. (Schlumberger, Houston, TX); Dai, J. (Schlumberger, Hoston, TX); McConnell, D. (AOA Geophysics, Inc., Houston, TX); Shedd, W. (Minerals Management Service); Frye, M. (Minerals Management Service); Ruppel, C. (USGS); Boswell, R.; Jones, E. (Chevron Energy Technology Corp., Houston, TX); Collett, T.S. (USGS); Rose, K.; Dugan, B. (Rice Univ., Houston, TX); Wood, W. (U.S. Naval Research Laboratory); Latham, T. (Chevron Energy Technology Corp., Houston, TX)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Center for Renewable Energy Science and Technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The CREST research team conducted research that optimized catalysts used for the conversion of southwestern lignite into synthetic crude oil that can be shipped to nearby Texas refineries and power plants for development of transportation fuels and power generation. Research was also undertaken to convert any potential by-products of this process such as CO2 to useful chemicals and gases which could be recycled and used as feedstock to the synthetic fuel process. These CO2 conversion processes used light energy to drive the endogonic reduction reactions involved. The project was divided into two tasks: A CO2 Conversion Task, and a Catalyst Optimization Task. The CO2 Conversion task was aimed at developing molecular and solid state catalysts for the thermal, electro- and photocatalytic reduction of CO2 to reduced products such as simple feedstock compounds (e.g. CO, H2, CHOOH, CH2O, CH3OH and CH4). For example, the research team recycled CO that was developed from this Task and used it as a feedstock for the production of synthetic crude in the Catalyst Optimization Task. In the Catalyst Optimization Task, the research team conducted bench-scale experiments with the goal of reducing overall catalyst cost in support of several synthetic crude processes that had earlier been developed. This was accomplished by increasing the catalyst reactivity thus reducing required concentrations or by using less expensive metals. In this task the team performed parametric experiments in small scale batch reactors in an effort to improve catalyst reactivity and to lower cost. They also investigated catalyst robustness by testing lignite feedstocks that vary in moisture, h, and volatile content.

Billo, Richard; Rajeshwar, Krishnan

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

292

Hydrodynamic force characteristics in the splash zone  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A comprehensive experimental study concerned with the hydrodynamic force characteristics of both rigid and compliant surface piercing cylinders, with a major focus on the local nature of these characteristics as realized in the splash zone and in the fully submerged zone immediately below this region, has been in progress at the University of Melbourne for the last three years. This paper concentrates on a portion of this study associated with uni-directional regular wave inputs with wave steepness (H/{lambda}) in the range 0.0005--0.1580 and Keulegan-Carpenter (KC) numbers in the range 2--15 which encompasses inertia force dominant (KC<5) to drag force significant conditions (5crest to trough region were measured during the tests. The measured wave forces at different elevations have been interpreted using the Morison equation to determine experimental values of force coefficients C{sub D} and C{sub M}. The results in hand suggest that both C{sub D} and C{sub M} values in the splash zone are higher and exhibit a mild frequency dependence in comparison with their corresponding counterparts for the fully submerged segments. For weakly nonlinear waves (H/{lambda}<0.1) only wave fluctuation is found to be important and any mild nonlinearities do not significantly affect the test model force response and consequently the force coefficient values. However, for relatively nonlinear waves (0.1

Daliri, M.R.; Haritos, N. [Univ. of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria (Australia). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

293

Estuarine Habitats for Juvenile Salmon in the Tidally-Influenced Lower Columbia River and Estuary : Reporting Period September 15, 2008 through May 31, 2009.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This work focuses on the numerical modeling of Columbia River estuarine circulation and associated modeling-supported analyses conducted as an integral part of a multi-disciplinary and multi-institutional effort led by NOAA's Northwest Fisheries Science Center. The overall effort is aimed at: (1) retrospective analyses to reconstruct historic bathymetric features and assess effects of climate and river flow on the extent and distribution of shallow water, wetland and tidal-floodplain habitats; (2) computer simulations using a 3-dimensional numerical model to evaluate the sensitivity of salmon rearing opportunities to various historical modifications affecting the estuary (including channel changes, flow regulation, and diking of tidal wetlands and floodplains); (3) observational studies of present and historic food web sources supporting selected life histories of juvenile salmon as determined by stable isotope, microchemistry, and parasitology techniques; and (4) experimental studies in Grays River in collaboration with Columbia River Estuary Study Taskforce (CREST) and the Columbia Land Trust (CLT) to assess effects of multiple tidal wetland restoration projects on various life histories of juvenile salmon and to compare responses to observed habitat-use patterns in the mainstem estuary. From the above observations, experiments, and additional modeling simulations, the effort will also (5) examine effects of alternative flow-management and habitat-restoration scenarios on habitat opportunity and the estuary's productive capacity for juvenile salmon. The underlying modeling system is part of the SATURN1coastal-margin observatory [1]. SATURN relies on 3D numerical models [2, 3] to systematically simulate and understand baroclinic circulation in the Columbia River estuary-plume-shelf system [4-7] (Fig. 1). Multi-year simulation databases of circulation are produced as an integral part of SATURN, and have multiple applications in understanding estuary/plume variability, the role of the estuary and plume on salmon survival, and functional changes in the estuary-plume system in response to climate and human activities.

Baptista, António M. [Oregon Health & Science University, Science and Technology Center for Coastal Margin Observation and Prediction

2009-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

294

Research, Monitoring, and Evaluation of Avian Predation on Salmonid Smolts in the Lower and Mid-Columbia River, 2008 Draft Season Summary.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes investigations into predation by piscivorous colonial waterbirds on juvenile salmonids (Oncorhynchus spp.) from throughout the Columbia River basin during 2008. East Sand Island in the Columbia River estuary again supported the largest known breeding colony of Caspian terns (Hydroprogne caspia) in the world (approximately 10,700 breeding pairs) and the largest breeding colony of double-crested cormorants (Phalacrocorax auritus) in western North America (approximately 10,950 breeding pairs). The Caspian tern colony increased from 2007, but not significantly so, while the double-crested cormorant colony experienced a significant decline (20%) from 2007. Average cormorant nesting success in 2008, however, was down only slightly from 2007, suggesting that food supply during the 2008 nesting season was not the principal cause of the decline in cormorant colony size. Total consumption of juvenile salmonids by East Sand Island Caspian terns in 2008 was approximately 6.7 million smolts (95% c.i. = 5.8-7.5 million). Caspian terns nesting on East Sand Island continued to rely primarily on marine forage fishes as a food supply. Based on smolt PIT tag recoveries on the East Sand Island Caspian tern colony, predation rates were highest on steelhead in 2008; minimum predation rates on steelhead smolts detected passing Bonneville Dam averaged 8.3% for wild smolts and 10.7% for hatchery-raised smolts. In 2007, total smolt consumption by East Sand Island double-crested cormorants was about 9.2 million juvenile salmonids (95% c.i. = 4.4-14.0 million), similar to or greater than that of East Sand Island Caspian terns during that year (5.5 million juvenile salmonids; 95% c.i. = 4.8-6.2 million). The numbers of smolt PIT tags recovered on the cormorant colony in 2008 were roughly proportional to the relative availability of PIT-tagged salmonids released in the Basin, suggesting that cormorant predation on salmonid smolts in the estuary was less selective than tern predation. Cormorant predation rates in excess of 30%, however, were observed for some groups of hatchery-reared fall Chinook salmon released downstream of Bonneville Dam. Implementation of the federal plan 'Caspian Tern Management to Reduce Predation of Juvenile Salmonids in the Columbia River Estuary' was initiated in 2008 with construction by the Corps of Engineers of two alternative colony sites for Caspian terns in interior Oregon: a 1-acre island on Crump Lake in the Warner Valley and a 1-acre island on Fern Ridge Reservoir near Eugene. We deployed Caspian tern social attraction (decoys and sound systems) on these two islands and monitored for Caspian tern nesting. Caspian terns quickly colonized the Crump Lake tern island; about 430 pairs nested there, including 5 terns that had been banded at the East Sand Island colony in the Columbia River estuary, over 500 km to the northwest. No Caspian terns nested at the Fern Ridge tern island in 2008, but up to 9 Caspian terns were recorded roosting on the island after the nesting season. There were two breeding colonies of Caspian terns on the mid-Columbia River in 2008: (1) about 388 pairs nested at the historical colony on Crescent Island in the McNary Pool and (2) about 100 pairs nested at a relatively new colony site on Rock Island in the John Day Pool. Nesting success at the Crescent Island tern colony was only 0.28 young fledged per breeding pair, the lowest nesting success recorded at that colony since monitoring began in 2000, while only three fledglings were raised at the Rock Island tern colony. The diet of Crescent Island Caspian terns consisted of 68% salmonid smolts; total smolt consumption was estimated at 330,000. Since 2004, total smolt consumption by Crescent Island terns has declined by 34%, due mostly to a decline in colony size, while steelhead consumption has increased 10% during this same period. In 2008, approximately 64,000 steelhead smolts were consumed by Caspian terns nesting at Crescent Island. Based on smolt PIT tag recoveries on the Crescent Island Caspian tern colony, the average

Roby, Daniel D. [USGS - Oregon Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit, Department of Fisheries and Wildlife, Oregon State University; Collis, Ken [Real Time Research, Inc.; Lyons, Donald E. [USGS - Oregon Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit, Oregon State University

2009-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

295

Remedial Investigation Report on Chestnut Ridge Operable Unit 2 (Filled Coal Ash Pond/Upper McCoy Branch) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 1. Main Text  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is a report on the remedial investigation (RI) of Chestnut Ridge Operable Unit (OU) 2 at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. Chestnut Ridge OU 2 consists of Upper McCoy Branch (UMB), the Filled Coal Ash Pond (FCAP), and the area surrounding the Sluice Channel formerly associated with coal ash disposal in the FCAP. Chestnut Ridge OU 2 is located within the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Oak Ridge Reservation in Anderson County, Tennessee, approximately 24 miles west of Knoxville. The pond is an 8.5-acre area on the southern slope of Chestnut Ridge, 0.5 mile south of the main Y-12 Plant and geographically separated from the Y-12 Plant by Chestnut Ridge. The elevation of the FCAP is {approximately} 950 ft above mean sea level (msl), and it is relatively flat and largely vegetated. Two small ponds are usually present at the northeast and northwest comers of the FCAP. The Sluice Channel Area extends {approximately}1000 ft from the northern margin of the FCAP to the crest of Chestnut Ridge, which has an elevation of {approximately}1100 ft above msl. The Sluice Channel Area is largely vegetated also. McCoy Branch runs from the top of Chestnut Ridge across the FCAP into Rogers Quarry and out of the quarry where it runs a short distance into Milton Hill Lake at McCoy Embayment, termed UMB. The portion south of Rogers Quarry, within Chestnut Ridge OU 4, is termed Lower McCoy Branch. The DOE Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant disposed of coal ash from its steam plant operations as a slurry that was discharged into an ash retention impoundment; this impoundment is the FCAP. The FCAP was built in 1955 to serve as a settling basin after coal ash slurried over Chestnut Ridge from the Y-12 Plant. The FCAP was constructed by building an earthen dam across the northern tributary of McCoy Branch. The dam was designed to hold 20 years of Y-12 steam plant ash. By July 1967, ash had filled up the impoundment storage behind the dam to within 4 ft of the top.

Not Available

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Cycloidal Wave Energy Converter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This program allowed further advancing the development of a novel type of wave energy converter, a Cycloidal Wave Energy Converter or CycWEC. A CycWEC consists of one or more hydrofoils rotating around a central shaft, and operates fully submerged beneath the water surface. It operates under feedback control sensing the incoming waves, and converts wave power to shaft power directly without any intermediate power take off system. Previous research consisting of numerical simulations and two dimensional small 1:300 scale wave flume experiments had indicated wave cancellation efficiencies beyond 95%. The present work was centered on construction and testing of a 1:10 scale model and conducting two testing campaigns in a three dimensional wave basin. These experiments allowed for the first time for direct measurement of electrical power generated as well as the interaction of the CycWEC in a three dimensional environment. The Atargis team successfully conducted two testing campaigns at the Texas A&M Offshore Technology Research Center and was able to demonstrate electricity generation. In addition, three dimensional wave diffraction results show the ability to achieve wave focusing, thus increasing the amount of wave power that can be extracted beyond what was expected from earlier two dimensional investigations. Numerical results showed wave cancellation efficiencies for irregular waves to be on par with results for regular waves over a wide range of wave lengths. Using the results from previous simulations and experiments a full scale prototype was designed and its performance in a North Atlantic wave climate of average 30kW/m of wave crest was estimated. A full scale WEC with a blade span of 150m will deliver a design power of 5MW at an estimated levelized cost of energy (LCOE) in the range of 10-17 US cents per kWh. Based on the new results achieved in the 1:10 scale experiments these estimates appear conservative and the likely performance at full scale will exceed this initial performance estimates. In advancing the Technology Readiness Level (TRL) of this type of wave energy converter from 3 to 4, we find the CycWEC to exceed our initial estimates in terms of hydrodynamic performance. Once fully developed and optimized, it has the potential to not just outperform all other WEC technologies, but to also deliver power at a lower LCOE than competing conventional renewables like wind and solar. Given the large wave power resource both domestically and internationally, this technology has the potential to lead to a large improvement in our ability to produce clean electricity at affordable cost.

Stefan G. Siegel, Ph.D.

2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

297

Oil and gas basins in the former Soviet Union  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Pripyat basin is a Late Devonian rift characterized by a typical fault-block structure. Two synrift salt formations separate the Devonian stratigraphic succession into the subsalt, intersalt, and postsalt sections. Oil is produced from carbonate reservoirs of the subsalt and intersalt sections. Traps are controlled by crests of tilted fault blocks. We analyzed 276 shale and carbonate-rock samples and 21 oils to determine oil-source bed relationships in the basin. Maturities of the oils are from very immature, heavy (9[degrees] API), to very mature, light (42[degrees] API). All fields are in a narrow band on the north side of the basin, and only shows of immature, heavy oil have been obtained from the rest of the basin. Three genetic oil types are identified. Oil type A has high pristane/phytane ratios (>1.0), high amounts of C[sub 29] 18[alpha] (H) trisnorneohopane, and [delta]13C of hydrocarbons in the range of -31 to -27%. Oil types B and C contain very high amounts of gammacerane, which suggests that the oils were derived from carbonate-evaporite source facies. Type B oils are isotopically similar to type A, whereas type C oils are isotopically light (about -33%). Organic carbon content is as much as 5%, and kerogen types range from I to IV. Our data indicate that rocks within the intersalt carbonate formation are the source of the type B oils of low maturity. Thermally mature rocks that might be the source for the mature oils have not been found. Such rocks may occur in depressions adjacent to tilted fault blocks. Higher levels of thermal maturity on the north part of the basin in the vicinity of the most mature oils may be related to higher heat flow during and soon after rifting or to a suspected recently formed magmatic body in the crust below the northern zone. Present-day high temperatures in parts of the northern zone may support the latter alternative.

Clayton, J. (Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States))

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

A Systems Approach to Identifying Exploration and Development Opportunities in the Illinois Basin: Digital Portifolio of Plays in Underexplored Lower Paleozoic Rocks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study examined petroleum occurrence in Ordovician, Silurian and Devonian reservoirs in the Illinois Basin. Results from this project show that there is excellent potential for additional discovery of petroleum reservoirs in these formations. Numerous exploration targets and exploration strategies were identified that can be used to increase production from these underexplored strata. Some of the challenges to exploration of deeper strata include the lack of subsurface data, lack of understanding of regional facies changes, lack of understanding the role of diagenetic alteration in developing reservoir porosity and permeability, the shifting of structural closures with depth, overlooking potential producing horizons, and under utilization of 3D seismic techniques. This study has shown many areas are prospective for additional discoveries in lower Paleozoic strata in the Illinois Basin. This project implemented a systematic basin analysis approach that is expected to encourage exploration for petroleum in lower Paleozoic rocks of the Illinois Basin. The study has compiled and presented a broad base of information and knowledge needed by independent oil companies to pursue the development of exploration prospects in overlooked, deeper play horizons in the Illinois Basin. Available geologic data relevant for the exploration and development of petroleum reservoirs in the Illinois Basin was analyzed and assimilated into a coherent, easily accessible digital play portfolio. The primary focus of this project was on case studies of existing reservoirs in Devonian, Silurian, and Ordovician strata and the application of knowledge gained to future exploration and development in these underexplored strata of the Illinois Basin. In addition, a review of published reports and exploration in the New Albany Shale Group, a Devonian black shale source rock, in Illinois was completed due to the recent increased interest in Devonian black shales across the United States. The New Albany Shale is regarded as the source rock for petroleum in Silurian and younger strata in the Illinois Basin and has potential as a petroleum reservoir. Field studies of reservoirs in Devonian strata such as the Geneva Dolomite, Dutch Creek Sandstone and Grassy knob Chert suggest that there is much additional potential for expanding these plays beyond their current limits. These studies also suggest the potential for the discovery of additional plays using stratigraphic concepts to develop a subcrop play on the subkaskaskia unconformity boundary that separates lower Devonian strata from middle Devonian strata in portions of the basin. The lateral transition from Geneva Dolomite to Dutch Creek Sandstone also offers an avenue for developing exploration strategies in middle Devonian strata. Study of lower Devonian strata in the Sesser Oil Field and the region surrounding the field shows opportunities for development of a subcrop play where lower Devonian strata unconformably overlie Silurian strata. Field studies of Silurian reservoirs along the Sangamon Arch show that opportunities exist for overlooked pays in areas where wells do not penetrate deep enough to test all reservoir intervals in Niagaran rocks. Mapping of Silurian reservoirs in the Mt. Auburn trend along the Sangamon Arch shows that porous reservoir rock grades laterally to non-reservoir facies and several reservoir intervals may be encountered in the Silurian with numerous exploration wells testing only the uppermost reservoir intervals. Mapping of the Ordovician Trenton and shallower strata at Centralia Field show that the crest of the anticline shifted through geologic time. This study illustrates that the axes of anticlines may shift with depth and shallow structure maps may not accurately predict structurally favorable reservoir locations at depth.

Beverly Seyler; David Harris; Brian Keith; Bryan Huff; Yaghoob Lasemi

2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

299

Acoustic Camera Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Approach and Fate at Surface Flow Outlets of Two Hydropower Dams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to estimate and compare fate probabilities for juvenile salmon approaching two surface flow outlets (SFOs) to identify effective design characteristics. The SFOs differed principally in forebay location, depth, discharge, and water velocity over a sharp-crested weir. Both outlets were about 20 ft wide. The 22-ft deep Bonneville Powerhouse 2 Corner Collector (B2CC) was located in the southwest corner of the forebay and passed 5,000 ft3/s of water at normal-pool elevation. In contrast, The Dalles Dam ice and trash sluiceway outlet above Main Unit 1-3 (TDITC) was not located in a forebay corner, was only 7-ft deep, and discharged about 933 ft3/s at normal-pool elevation. The linear velocity of water over the weir was about 15 ft/s at the B2CC and 5 ft/s at the TDITC. We used a Dual-Frequency Identification Sonar (DIDSON) to record movements of fish within about 65 ft of the B2CC and within 35 ft of the TDITC. We actively tracked fish by manually adjusting pan and tilt rotator angles to keep targets in view. Contrary to expectations, active tracking did not provide a predominance of long tracks that clearly indicated fish fate because most tracks were incomplete. Active tracking did increase error in fish-position estimation, which complicated data processing, so we plan to sample multiple fixed zones in the future. The probability of fish entering each SFO was estimated by a Markov chain analysis, which did not require complete fish tracks. At the B2CC, we tracked 7,943 juvenile salmonids and most of them entered the B2CC. Fish moving south 40 to 60 ft upstream of the dam face were more likely to enter the eddy at the south end of the powerhouse than to enter the B2CC. At the TDITC, we tracked 2,821 smolts. Fish movement was complex with active swimming toward and away from the entrance. The high entrance probability zone (EPZ), where over 90% of tracked fish entered the SFO, extended 32 ft out at the B2CC and only 8 ft out at the TDITC. Greater discharge at the B2CC pushed the entrainment zone (EZ - where flow exceeded 7 ft/s) upstream from the entrance so that fish were entrained before they began to struggle against the flow. The high EPZ also was extended by flow along the powerhouse face at both sites, but more at the B2CC (about 450 ft) than at the TDITC (about 50 ft). Fish entering the large south eddy that circulated past the B2CC entrance were provided multiple opportunities to discover and enter. In contrast, fish moving past the sampled TDITC entrance either entered adjacent sluiceway openings or moved west to the spillway because there was no eddy to provide additional opportunities. Information from our study should be useful to fisheries managers and engineers seeking to transfer SFO technologies from one site to another. There are two important components to designing SFOs, the location within the forebay to take advantage of forebay circulation and specific entrance characteristics such as discharge and depth which affect the size and shape of the EZ and the high EPZ. Providing SFOs with an EZ extending upstream of structure could reduce entrance rejection, decrease forebay residence time and risk of predation, and increase passage of schools of smolts.

Ploskey, Gene R.; Johnson, Gary E.; Weiland, Mark A.; Khan, Fenton; Mueller, Robert P.; Serkowski, John A.; Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Hedgepeth, J.; Skalski, John R.; Ebberts, Blaine D.; Klatte, Bernard A.

2006-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

300

INTEGRATED GEOLOGIC-ENGINEERING MODEL FOR REEF AND CARBONATE SHOAL RESERVOIRS ASSOCIATED WITH PALEOHIGHS: UPPER JURASSIC SMACKOVER FORMATION, NORTHEASTERN GULF OF MEXICO  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The University of Alabama, in cooperation with Texas A&M University, McGill University, Longleaf Energy Group, Strago Petroleum Corporation, and Paramount Petroleum Company, has undertaken an integrated, interdisciplinary geoscientific and engineering research project. The project is designed to characterize and model reservoir architecture, pore systems and rock-fluid interactions at the pore to field scale in Upper Jurassic Smackover reef and carbonate shoal reservoirs associated with varying degrees of relief on pre-Mesozoic basement paleohighs in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico. The project effort includes the prediction of fluid flow in carbonate reservoirs through reservoir simulation modeling which utilizes geologic reservoir characterization and modeling and the prediction of carbonate reservoir architecture, heterogeneity and quality through seismic imaging. The primary goal of the project is to increase the profitability, producibility and efficiency of recovery of oil from existing and undiscovered Upper Jurassic fields characterized by reef and carbonate shoals associated with pre-Mesozoic basement paleohighs. Geoscientific reservoir property, geophysical seismic attribute, petrophysical property, and engineering property characterization has shown that reef (thrombolite) and shoal reservoir lithofacies developed on the flanks of high-relief crystalline basement paleohighs (Vocation Field example) and on the crest and flanks of low-relief crystalline basement paleohighs (Appleton Field example). The reef thrombolite lithofacies have higher reservoir quality than the shoal lithofacies due to overall higher permeabilities and greater interconnectivity. Thrombolite dolostone flow units, which are dominated by dolomite intercrystalline and vuggy pores, are characterized by a pore system comprised of a higher percentage of large-sized pores and larger pore throats. Rock-fluid interactions (diagenesis) studies have shown that although the primary control on reservoir architecture and geographic distribution of Smackover reservoirs is the fabric and texture of the depositional lithofacies, diagenesis (chiefly dolomitization) is a significant factor that preserves and enhances reservoir quality. The evaporative pumping mechanism is favored to explain the dolomitization of the thrombolite doloboundstone and dolostone reservoir flow units at Appleton and Vocation Fields. Geologic modeling, reservoir simulation, and the testing and applying the resulting integrated geologic-engineering models have shown that little oil remains to be recovered at Appleton Field and a significant amount of oil remains to be recovered at Vocation Field through a strategic infill drilling program. The drive mechanisms for primary production in Appleton and Vocation Fields remain effective; therefore, the initiation of a pressure maintenance program or enhanced recovery project is not required at this time. The integrated geologic-engineering model developed for a low-relief paleohigh (Appleton Field) was tested for three scenarios involving the variables of present-day structural elevation and the presence/absence of potential reef thrombolite lithofacies. In each case, the predictions based upon the model were correct. From this modeling, the characteristics of the ideal prospect in the basement ridge play include a low-relief paleohigh associated with dendroidal/chaotic thrombolite doloboundstone and dolostone that has sufficient present-day structural relief so that these carbonates rest above the oil-water contact. Such a prospect was identified from the modeling, and it is located northwest of well Permit No. 3854B (Appleton Field) and south of well No. Permit No.11030B (Northwest Appleton Field).

Ernest A. Mancini

2004-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "g0313 coyote crest" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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301

Producing Light Oil from a Frozen Reservoir: Reservoir and Fluid Characterization of Umiat Field, National Petroleum Reserve, Alaska  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Umiat oil field is a light oil in a shallow, frozen reservoir in the Brooks Range foothills of northern Alaska with estimated oil-in-place of over 1 billion barrels. Umiat field was discovered in the 1940’s but was never considered viable because it is shallow, in the permafrost, and far from any transportation infrastructure. The advent of modern drilling and production techniques has made Umiat and similar fields in northern Alaska attractive exploration and production targets. Since 2008 UAF has been working with Renaissance Alaska Inc. and, more recently, Linc Energy, to develop a more robust reservoir model that can be combined with rock and fluid property data to simulate potential production techniques. This work will be used to by Linc Energy as they prepare to drill up to 5 horizontal wells during the 2012-2013 drilling season. This new work identified three potential reservoir horizons within the Cretaceous Nanushuk Formation: the Upper and Lower Grandstand sands, and the overlying Ninuluk sand, with the Lower Grandstand considered the primary target. Seals are provided by thick interlayered shales. Reserve estimates for the Lower Grandstand alone range from 739 million barrels to 2437 million barrels, with an average of 1527 million bbls. Reservoir simulations predict that cold gas injection from a wagon-wheel pattern of multilateral injectors and producers located on 5 drill sites on the crest of the structure will yield 12-15% recovery, with actual recovery depending upon the injection pressure used, the actual Kv/Kh encountered, and other geologic factors. Key to understanding the flow behavior of the Umiat reservoir is determining the permeability structure of the sands. Sandstones of the Cretaceous Nanushuk Formation consist of mixed shoreface and deltaic sandstones and mudstones. A core-based study of the sedimentary facies of these sands combined with outcrop observations identified six distinct facies associations with distinctive permeability trends. The Lower Grandstand sand consists of two coarsening-upward shoreface sands sequences while the Upper Grandstand consists of a single coarsening-upward shoreface sand. Each of the shoreface sands shows a distinctive permeability profile with high horizontal permeability at the top getting progressively poorer towards the base of the sand. In contrast, deltaic sandstones in the overlying Ninuluk are more permeable at the base of the sands, with decreasing permeability towards the sand top. These trends impart a strong permeability anisotropy to the reservoir and are being incorporated into the reservoir model. These observations also suggest that horizontal wells should target the upper part of the major sands. Natural fractures may superimpose another permeability pattern on the Umiat reservoir that need to be accounted for in both the simulation and in drilling. Examination of legacy core from Umiat field indicate that fractures are present in the subsurface, but don't provide information on their orientation and density. Nearby surface exposures of folds in similar stratigraphy indicate there are at least three possible fracture sets: an early, N/S striking set that may predate folding and two sets possibly related to folding: an EW striking set of extension fractures that are parallel to the fold axes and a set of conjugate shear fractures oriented NE and NW. Analysis of fracture spacing suggests that these natural fractures are fairly widely spaced (25-59 cm depending upon the fracture set), but could provide improved reservoir permeability in horizontal legs drilled perpendicular to the open fracture set. The phase behavior of the Umiat fluid needed to be well understood in order for the reservoir simulation to be accurate. However, only a small amount of Umiat oil was available; this oil was collected in the 1940’s and was severely weathered. The composition of this ‘dead’ Umiat fluid was characterized by gas chromatography. This analysis was then compared to theoretical Umiat composition derived using the Pedersen method with original Umiat

Hanks, Catherine

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

302

Increasing the efficiency of organic solar cells by photonic and electrostatic-field enhancements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Organic photovoltaic (OPV) technology is an attractive solar-electric conversion paradigm due to the promise of low cost roll-to-roll production and amenability to flexible substrates. Power conversion efficiency (PCE) exceeding 7% has recently been achieved. OPV cells suffer from low charge carrier mobilities of polymers, leading to recombination losses, higher series resistances and lower fill-factors. Thus, it is imperative to develop fabrication methodologies that can enable efficient optical absorption in films thinner than optical absorption length. Active layers conformally deposited on light-trapping, microscale textured, grating-type surfaces is one possible approach to achieve this objective. In this study, 40% theoretical increase in photonic absorption over flat OPVs is shown for devices with textured geometry by the simulation results. For verifying this theoretical result and improving the efficiency of OPVs by light trapping, OPVs were fabricated on grating-type textured substrates possessing t pitch and -coat PV active-layer on these textured substrates led to over filling of the valleys and shunts at the crest, which severely affected the performance of the resultant PV devices. Thus, it is established that although the optical design is important for OPV performance but the potential of light trapping can only be effectively tapped if the textures are amenable for realizing a conformal active layer. It is discovered that if the height of the underlying topographical features is reduced to sub-micron regime (e.g. 300 nm) and the pitch is increased to more than a micron (e.g. 2 ?m), the textured surface becomes amenable to coating a conformal PV active-layer. The resultant PV cells showed 100% increase in average light absorption near the band edge due to trapping of higher wavelength photons, and 20% improvement in power conversion efficiency as compared with the flat PV cell. Another factor that severely limits the performance of OPVs is recombination of charge carriers. Thus it becomes imperative to understand the effect of processing conditions such as spin coating speed and drying rate on defect density and hence induced carrier recombination mechanism. In this study, It is shown that slow growth (longer drying time) of the active-layer leads to reduction of sub-bandgap traps by an order of magnitude as compared to fast grown active-layer. By coupling the experimental results with simulations, it is demonstrated that at one sun condition, slow grown device has bimolecular recombination as the major loss mechanism while in the fast grown device with high trap density, the trap assisted recombination dominates. It has been estimated that non-radiative recombination accounts nearly 50% of efficiency loss in modern OPVs. Generally, an external bias (electric field) is required to collect all the photogenerated charges and thus prevent their recombination. The motivation is to induce additional electric field in otherwise low mobility conjugated polymer based active layer by incorporating ferroelectric dipoles. This is expected to facilitate singlet exciton dissociation in polymer matrix and impede charge transfer exciton (CTE) recombination at polymer:fullerene interface. For the first time, it is shown that the addition of ferroelectric dipoles to modern bulk heterojunction (BHJ) can significantly improve exciton dissociation, resulting in a ~50% enhancement of overall solar cell efficiency. The devices also exhibit the unique ferroelectric-photovoltaic effect with polarization-controlled power conversion efficiency.

Nalwa, Kanwar

2012-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

303

THE INFLUENCE OF FOLD AND FRACTURE DEVELOPMENT ON RESERVOIR BEHAVIOR OF THE LISBURNE GROUP OF NORTHERN ALASKA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Lisburne Group is a major carbonate reservoir unit in northern Alaska. The Lisburne is detachment folded where it is exposed throughout the northeastern Brooks Range, but is relatively undeformed in areas of current production in the subsurface of the North Slope. The objectives of this study are to develop a better understanding of four major aspects of the Lisburne: (1) The geometry and kinematics of detachment folds and their truncation by thrust faults. (2) The influence of folding and lithostratigraphy on fracture patterns. (3) Lithostratigraphy and its influence on folding, faulting, fracturing, and reservoir characteristics. (4) The influence of lithostratigraphy and deformation on fluid flow. The results of field work during the summer of 1999 offer some preliminary insights: The Lisburne Limestone displays a range of symmetrical detachment fold geometries throughout the northeastern Brooks Range. The variation in fold geometry suggests a generalized progression in fold geometry with increasing shortening: Straight-limbed, narrow-crested folds at low shortening, box folds at intermediate shortening, and folds with a large height-to-width ratio and thickened hinges at high shortening. This sequence is interpreted to represent a progressive change in the dominant shortening mechanism from flexural-slip at low shortening to bulk strain at higher shortening. Structural variations in bed thickness occur throughout this progression. Parasitic folding accommodates structural thickening at low shortening and is gradually succeeded by penetrative strain as shortening increases. The amount of structural thickening at low to intermediate shortening may be inversely related to the local amount of structural thickening of the Kayak Shale, the incompetent unit that underlies the Lisburne. The Lisburne Limestone displays a different structural style in the south, across the boundary between the northeastern Brooks Range and the main axis of the Brooks Range fold-and-thrust belt. The steep forelimbs of angular asymmetrical folds typically have been cut and displaced by thrust faults, resulting in superposition of a fault-bend fold geometry on the truncated folds. Remnant uncut folds within trains of thrust-truncated folds and the predominance of detachment folds to the north suggest that these folds originated as detachment folds. Fold asymmetry and a more uniformly competent Lisburne Limestone may have favored accommodation of a significant proportion of shortening by thrust faulting, in contrast with the dominance of fold shortening to the north. Two dominant sets of fractures are present in the least deformed Lisburne Limestone: Early extension fractures normal to the regional fold trend and late extension and shear fractures parallel to the regional fold trend. These two major fracture sets remain as deformation increases, but they are more variable in orientation, character, and relative age. Compared to fold limbs, the fold hinges display greater density and extent of fractures, more conjugate and shear fractures, and more evidence of penetrative strain. This suggests that hinges remained fixed during fold growth. Late extension fractures normal to the fold axis are common even where penetrative strain is greatest. Fracture density is greater in fine-grained carbonates than in coarse-grained carbonates over the entire spectrum of deformation.

Wesley K. Wallace; Catherine L. Hanks; Michael T. Whalen; Jerry Jensen; Paul K. Atkinson; Joseph S. Brinton

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Heat Flow and Gas Hydrates on the Continental Margin of India: Building on Results from NGHP Expedition 01  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Indian National Gas Hydrate Program (NGHP) Expedition 01 presented the unique opportunity to constrain regional heat flow derived from seismic observations by using drilling data in three regions on the continental margin of India. The seismic bottom simulating reflection (BSR) is a well-documented feature in hydrate bearing sediments, and can serve as a proxy for apparent heat flow if data are available to estimate acoustic velocity and density in water and sediments, thermal conductivity, and seafloor temperature. Direct observations of temperature at depth and physical properties of the sediment obtained from drilling can be used to calibrate the seismic observations, decreasing the uncertainty of the seismically-derived estimates. Anomalies in apparent heat flow can result from a variety of sources, including sedimentation, erosion, topographic refraction and fluid flow. We constructed apparent heat flow maps for portions of the Krishna-Godavari (K-G) basin, the Mahanadi basin, and the Andaman basin and modeled anomalies using 1-D conductive thermal models. Apparent heat flow values in the Krishna-Godavari (K-G) basin and Mahanadi basin are generally 0.035 to 0.055 watts per square meter (W/m{sup 2}). The borehole data show an increase in apparent heat flow as water depth increases from 900 to 1500 m. In the SW part of the seismic grid, 1D modeling of the effect of sedimentation on heat flow shows that {approx}50% of the observed increase in apparent heat flow with increasing water depth can be attributed to trapping of sediments behind a 'toe-thrust' ridge that is forming along the seaward edge of a thick, rapidly accumulating deltaic sediment pile. The remainder of the anomaly can be explained either by a decrease in thermal conductivity of the sediments filling the slope basin or by lateral advection of heat through fluid flow along stratigraphic horizons within the basin and through flexural faults in the crest of the anticline. Such flow probably plays a role in bringing methane into the ridge formed by the toe-thrust. Because of the small anomaly due to this process and the uncertainty in thermal conductivity, we did not model this process explicitly. In the NE part of the K-G basin seismic grid, a number of local heat flow lows and highs are observed, which can be attributed to topographic refraction and to local fluid flow along faults, respectively. No regional anomaly can be resolved. Because of lack of continuity between the K-G basin sites within the seismic grid and those {approx}70 km to the NE in water depths of 1200 to 1500 m, we do not speculate on the reason for higher heat flow at these depths. The Mahanadi basin results, while limited in geographic extent, are similar to those for the K-G basin. The Andaman basin exhibits much lower apparent heat flow values, ranging from 0.015 to 0.025 W/m{sup 2}. Heat flow here also appears to increase with increasing water depth. The very low heat flow here is among the lowest heat flow observed anywhere and gives rise to a very thick hydrate stability zone in the sediments. Through 1D models of sedimentation (with extremely high sedimentation rates as a proxy for tectonic thickening), we concluded that the very low heat flow can probably be attributed to the combined effects of high sedimentation rate, low thermal conductivity, tectonic thickening of sediments and the cooling effect of a subducting plate in a subduction zone forearc. Like for the K-G basin, much of the local variability can be attributed to topography. The regional increase in heat flow with water depth remains unexplained because the seismic grid available to us did not extend far enough to define the local tectonic setting of the slope basin controlling this observational pattern. The results are compared to results from other margins, both active and passive. While an increase in apparent heat flow with increasing water depth is widely observed, it is likely a result of different processes in different places. The very low heat flow due to sedimentation and tectonics in the Andaman basi

Anne Trehu; Peter Kannberg

2011-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

305

Heat Flow and Gas Hydrates on the Continental Margin of India: Building on Results from NGHP Expedition 01  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Indian National Gas Hydrate Program (NGHP) Expedition 01 presented the unique opportunity to constrain regional heat flow derived from seismic observations by using drilling data in three regions on the continental margin of India. The seismic bottom simulating reflection (BSR) is a well-documented feature in hydrate bearing sediments, and can serve as a proxy for apparent heat flow if data are available to estimate acoustic velocity and density in water and sediments, thermal conductivity, and seafloor temperature. Direct observations of temperature at depth and physical properties of the sediment obtained from drilling can be used to calibrate the seismic observations, decreasing the uncertainty of the seismically-derived estimates. Anomalies in apparent heat flow can result from a variety of sources, including sedimentation, erosion, topographic refraction and fluid flow. We constructed apparent heat flow maps for portions of the Krishna-Godavari (K-G) basin, the Mahanadi basin, and the Andaman basin and modeled anomalies using 1-D conductive thermal models. Apparent heat flow values in the Krishna-Godavari (K-G) basin and Mahanadi basin are generally 0.035 to 0.055 watts per square meter (W/m2). The borehole data show an increase in apparent heat flow as water depth increases from 900 to 1500 m. In the SW part of the seismic grid, 1D modeling of the effect of sedimentation on heat flow shows that ~50% of the observed increase in apparent heat flow with increasing water depth can be attributed to trapping of sediments behind a "toe-thrust" ridge that is forming along the seaward edge of a thick, rapidly accumulating deltaic sediment pile. The remainder of the anomaly can be explained either by a decrease in thermal conductivity of the sediments filling the slope basin or by lateral advection of heat through fluid flow along stratigraphic horizons within the basin and through flexural faults in the crest of the anticline. Such flow probably plays a role in bringing methane into the ridge formed by the toe-thrust. Because of the small anomaly due to this process and the uncertainty in thermal conductivity, we did not model this process explicitly. In the NE part of the K-G basin seismic grid, a number of local heat flow lows and highs are observed, which can be attributed to topographic refraction and to local fluid flow along faults, respectively. No regional anomaly can be resolved. Because of lack of continuity between the K-G basin sites within the seismic grid and those ~70 km to the NE in water depths of 1200 to 1500 m, we do not speculate on the reason for higher heat flow at these depths. The Mahanadi basin results, while limited in geographic extent, are similar to those for the KG basin. The Andaman basin exhibits much lower apparent heat flow values, ranging from 0.015 to 0.025 W/m2. Heat flow here also appears to increase with increasing water depth. The very low heat flow here is among the lowest heat flow observed anywhere and gives rise to a very thick hydrate stability zone in the sediments. Through 1D models of sedimentation (with extremely high sedimentation rates as a proxy for tectonic thickening), we concluded that the very low heat flow can probably be attributed to the combined effects of high sedimentation rate, low thermal conductivity, tectonic thickening of sediments and the cooling effect of a subducting plate in a subduction zone forearc. Like for the K-G basin, much of the local variability can be attributed to topography. The regional increase in heat flow with water depth remains unexplained because the seismic grid available to us did not extend far enough to define the local tectonic setting of the slope basin controlling this observational pattern. The results are compared to results from other margins, both active and passive. While an increase in apparent heat flow with increasing water depth is widely observed, it is likely a result of different processes in different places. The very low heat flow due to sedimentation and tectonics in the Andaman basin is at the low end of glob

Trehu, Anne; Kannberg, Peter

2011-06-30T23:59:59.000Z