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Sample records for g0313 coyote crest

  1. Coyote Contro BY MEANS OF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for them. They may consist of tracks, a well worn path leading to and from a den, or holes freshly cleaned out. Holes made by coyotes in digging out squirrels or rabbits should not be confused, however

  2. The coyote universe extended: Precision emulation of the matter...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The coyote universe extended: Precision emulation of the matter power spectrum Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The coyote universe extended: Precision emulation of the...

  3. Coyote Canyon Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar EnergyLawler,CoalConcordiaConsumerLEDS Tier ICowatec AG Jump to:Coyote Canyon

  4. Coyote Canyon Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company)|Alabama: Energy Resources JumpCoveOhio:Cowley County,Coyote

  5. EIS-0201: Coyote Springs Cogeneration Project, Morrow County, Oregon

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This environmental impact statement analyzes the protential impacts of the Coyote Springs Cogeneration Project, a proposed natural gas-fired cogeneration power plant near Boardman, Oregon. The proposed power plant would be built on a 22-acre site in the Port of Morrow Industrial Park. The plant would have two combustion turbines that would generate 440 average megawatts of energy when completed.

  6. Crest, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  7. Seasonal food habits of the coyote in the South Carolina coastal plain.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schrecengost, J., D.; Kilgo, J., C.; Mallard, D.; Ray, H., S.; Miller, K., V.

    2008-07-01

    Abstract - Spatial and temporal plasticity in Canis latrans (coyote) diets require regional studies to understand the ecological role of this omnivorous canid. Because coyotes have recently become established in South Carolina, we investigated their food habits by collecting 415 coyote scats on the Savannah River Site in western South Carolina from May 2005-July 2006. Seasonally available soft mast was the most common food item in 12 of the 15 months we sampled. Odocoileus virginianus (white-tailed deer) was the most common food item during December (40%) and March (37%). During May-June, fruits of Prunus spp. and Rubus spp. were the most commonly occurring food items. Fawns were the most common mammalian food item during May and June of both years despite low deer density.

  8. Summary and evaluation of the coyote control program on Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1, Kern County, California, 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scrivner, J.H.

    1987-09-01

    For the third consecutive year (1987) the US Department of Energy (DOE) funded a coyote (Canis latrans) control program in an attempt to reduce coyote predation on the endangered San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes macrotis mutica) on Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (NPR-1, Elk Hills) in Kern County, California. During approximately 8 weeks of control activities, personnel from the US Department of Agriculture, Division of Animal Damage Control (ADC), removed 16 adult coyotes: 14 were trapped, 2 were shot. Data were gathered on standard measurements, weights, ages, and reproductive condition. No kit foxes were accidently trapped. Based on the results of canid scent-station surveys, the coyote population on NPR-1 declined and the kit fox population was relatively stable. Recommendations were made to conduct the 1987/1988 coyote control program between December 1987 and February 1988, use helicopters for aerial gunning and locating coyote dens, and develop a cooperative agreement between DOE, ADC, US Fish and Wildlife Service, Bureau of Land Management, and the California Department of Fish and Game to conduct the coyote control program on lands surrounding NPR-1 owned by DOE and others. 8 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Predation by coyotes on White-Tailed Deer neonates in South Carolina.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kilgo, John, C.; Ray, Scott, H.; Vukovich, Mark; Goode, Mathew, J.; Ruth, Charles.

    2012-05-07

    Abstract: Coyotes (Canis latrans) are novel predators throughout the southeastern United States and their depredation of white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) neonates may explain observed declines in some deer populations in the region, but direct evidence for such a relationship is lacking. Our objective was to quantify neonate survival rates and causes of mortality at the United States Department of Energy's Savannah River Site (SRS), South Carolina to directly evaluate degree of predation in this deer population. From 2006 to 2009, we radio-monitored 91 neonates captured with the aid of vaginal implant transmitters in pregnant adult females and opportunistic searches. Overall Kaplan�¢����Meier survival rate to 16 weeks of age was 0.230 (95% CI = 0.155-0.328), and it varied little among years. Our best-fitting model estimated survival at 0.220 (95% CI = 0.144-0.320). This model included a quadratic time trend variable (lowest survival rate during the first week of life and increasing to near 1.000 around week 10), and Julian date of birth (survival probability declining as date of birth increased). Predation by coyotes was the most frequent cause of death among the 70 monitored neonates that died, definitively accounting for 37% of all mortalities and potentially accounting for as much as 80% when also including probable coyote predation. Predation by bobcats (Felis rufus) accounted for 7% (definitive) to 9% (including probable bobcat predation) of mortalities. The level of coyote-induced mortality we observed is consistent with the low recruitment rates exhibited in the SRS deer population since establishment of coyotes at the site. If representative of recruitment rates across South Carolina, current harvest levels appear unsustainable. This understanding is consistent with the recent declining trend in the statewide deer population. The effects of coyote predation on recruitment should be considered when setting harvest goals, regardless of whether local deer population size is currently above or below desired levels, because coyotes can substantially reduce fawn recruitment. Published 2012. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  10. East Hazel Crest, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, AlabamaETEC GmbH Jump to: navigation,Foothills, California:HamptonHazel Crest,

  11. Cedar Crest, New Mexico: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  12. Crested Butte, Colorado: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePower VenturesInformation EU-UNDP ClimatePublic SchoolsCrested Butte,

  13. Hematology, Parasitology, and Serology of Free-Ranging Coyotes (Canis latrans) from South Carolina.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Debra, Lee; Schrecengost, Joshua; Merrill, Anita; Kilgo, John; Ray, H., Scott; Karl V. Miller, Karl, V.; Baldwin, Charles, A.

    2009-07-01

    ABSTRACT: Blood and feces were collected from 34 adult (19 males, 15 females) and seven juvenile (three males, one female, three not reported) free-ranging coyotes (Canis latrans) on the US Department of Energy’s Savannah River Site (South Carolina, USA). Significant (P,0.05) hematologic differences by sex were noted for red blood cell counts, hemoglobin, and hematocrit. Biochemical differences by sex occurred only for albumen (P,0.05). Twentyone adults were antibody positive for at least one of four viruses: canine adenovirus type 1 (CAV-1; 68%), West Nile virus (WNV; 60%), Eastern equine encephalitis virus (EEEV; 38%), and Canine distemper virus (CDV; 15%). Of the seven Leptospira serovars tested for, seven (25%) of 28 adults were positive for one or more of five serovars: Pomona, Grippotyphosa, Icterohaemorrhagiae, Bratislava, and Autumnalis. Three (43%) of seven juveniles had seropositivity for a virus, one each for CDV, CAV-1, and WNV. No juveniles were seropositive for EEEV or any of the seven Leptospira serovars. Blood smears of 12 adults were positive for Dirofilaria immitis microfilaria, but blood smears from all juveniles were negative. Parvovirus was identified by electron microscopy from the feces of one adult. Ancylostoma spp., Trichuris spp., and Isospora spp. were observed in fecal samples. These data may aid in understanding the role of coyotes in disease ecology.

  14. The Coyote Universe II: Cosmological Models and Precision Emulation of the Nonlinear Matter Power Spectrum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heitmann, Katrin; Habib, Salman; Higdon, David; Williams, Brian J; White, Martin; Wagner, Christian

    2008-01-01

    The power spectrum of density fluctuations is a foundational source of cosmological information. Precision cosmological probes targeted primarily at investigations of dark energy require accurate theoretical determinations of the power spectrum in the nonlinear regime. To exploit the observational power of future cosmological surveys, accuracy demands on the theory are at the one percent level or better. Numerical simulations are currently the only way to produce sufficiently error-controlled predictions for the power spectrum. The very high computational cost of (precision) N-body simulations is a major obstacle to obtaining predictions in the nonlinear regime, while scanning over cosmological parameters. Near-future observations, however, are likely to provide a meaningful constraint only on constant dark energy equation of state 'wCDM' cosmologies. In this paper we demonstrate that a limited set of only 37 cosmological models -- the 'Coyote Universe' suite -- can be used to predict the nonlinear matter power spectrum at the required accuracy over a prior parameter range set by cosmic microwave background observations. This paper is the second in a series of three, with the final aim to provide a high-accuracy prediction scheme for the nonlinear matter power spectrum for wCDM cosmologies.

  15. Density of bunches of native bluebunch wheatgrass and alien crested wheatgrass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rickard, W.H.

    1985-10-01

    The density of bunches of bluebunch wheatgrass in a natural undisturbed stand averaged 3.28 per m/sup 2/ as compared to 2.96 per m/sup 2/ for a nearby stand of crested wheatgrass that was planted 30 years ago. Bunch density was similar in both stands indicating that spacing is a response to an environment deficient in soil water. Bunches of crested wheatgrass on the average weighed 3.5 times more than bunches of bluebunch wheatgrass and they also produced a greater weight of seedheads.

  16. CoyoteCreekwatershedhistoriCaleCologystudy e x e C u t i v e s u m m a r y //exeCutivesummary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to reduce flood risk. InfIltratIon Versus DraInage--reDesIgnIng tHe way water moVes tHrougH tHe Valley-scale infiltration projects will be important to both flood protection and water supply, especially given predicted the report: Coyote Creek Watershed Historical Ecology Study: Historical Condition, Landscape Change

  17. Anita. Behav.,1991,41, 367-369 Large male crests, an honest indicator of condition, are preferredby female

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Green, Andy J.

    - cal tail extension. Darwin (1871) proposed that the crest functions to attract females, but this has, newts were collected from seven Oxfordshire ponds, and the sexes kept separately in tanks of 62 · 31 x later transcribed to the nearest 0.1 s. I removed the newts and measured their snout-vent length, tail

  18. Microfluidics for Tissue and Cell Applications JST CREST, "Cell and Tissue Showcasing by Micro-Nano Integrated Devices" Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tokyo, University of

    Microfluidics for Tissue and Cell Applications JST CREST, "Cell and Tissue Showcasing by Micro-Nano Integrated Devices" Project JST-VINNOVA/SSF SICP, "Microfluidic Cancer Diagnosis Platform" Project JST ERATO 2 : Prof. Shuichi Takayama (University of Michigan) "Microfluidic Tools to Model and Analyze

  19. Erosion rates of moraine crests from in-situ and atmospheric cosmogenic nuclide accumulation in boulders and matrix

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zreda, Marek

    Erosion rates of moraine crests from in-situ and atmospheric cosmogenic nuclide accumulation to quantify erosion on various temporal and spatial scales. Those based on accumulation of cosmogenic nuclides the application of in-situ and atmospheric cosmogenic nuclides to determining erosion rates of moraines. It builds

  20. Field evidence for the upwind velocity shift at the crest of low dunes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Claudin; G. F. S. Wiggs; B. Andreotti

    2013-02-11

    Wind topographically forced by hills and sand dunes accelerates on the upwind (stoss) slopes and reduces on the downwind (lee) slopes. This secondary wind regime, however, possesses a subtle effect, reported here for the first time from field measurements of near-surface wind velocity over a low dune: the wind velocity close to the surface reaches its maximum upwind of the crest. Our field-measured data show that this upwind phase shift of velocity with respect to topography is found to be in quantitative agreement with the prediction of hydrodynamical linear analysis for turbulent flows with first order closures. This effect, together with sand transport spatial relaxation, is at the origin of the mechanisms of dune initiation, instability and growth.

  1. Field evidence for the upwind velocity shift at the crest of low dunes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Claudin, P; Andreotti, B

    2012-01-01

    Wind topographically forced by hills and sand dunes accelerates on the upwind (stoss) slopes and reduces on the downwind (lee) sides. This secondary wind regime, however, possesses a subtle effect, reported here for the first time from field measurements of near-surface wind velocity over a low dune: the wind velocity close to the surface reaches its maximum upwind of the crest. Our field-measured data show that this upwind phase shift of velocity with respect to topography is found to be in quantitative agreement with the prediction of hydrodynamical linear analysis for turbulent flows with first order closures. This effect, together with sand transport spatial relaxation, is at the origin of the dune instability mechanism.

  2. A Priori Estimates for Two-Dimensional Water Waves with Angled Crests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kinsey, Rafe H

    2014-01-01

    We consider the two-dimensional water wave problem in the case where the free interface of the fluid meets a vertical wall at a possibly non-right angle; our problem also covers interfaces with angled crests. We assume that the fluid is inviscid, incompressible, and irrotational, with no surface tension and with air density zero. We construct a low-regularity energy and prove a closed energy estimate for this problem. Our work differs from earlier work in that, in our case, only a degenerate Taylor stability criterion holds, with $-\\frac{\\partial P}{\\partial {\\bf n}} \\ge 0$, instead of the strong Taylor stability criterion $-\\frac{\\partial P}{\\partial {\\bf n}} \\ge c > 0$.

  3. McGuire and Garfinkel: Archaeological Investigations in the Southern Sierra Nevada: The Bear Mountain Segment of the Pacific Crest Trail

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moratto, Michael J

    1982-01-01

    along the 29-km. Bear Mountain segment of the Pacific CrestSierra Nevada: The Bear Mountain Seg- ment of the Pacifichistoric times. In the Bear Mountain vicinity, the Sierran

  4. Sex ratios, bill deformities, and PCBs in nestling double-crested cormorants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stromborg, K.L. [Fish and Wildlife Service, Green Bay, WI (United States); Sileo, L. [National Biological Service, Madison, WI (United States); Tuinen, P. van [Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Deformed double-crested cormorant (Phalacrocorax auritus) nestlings examined from 1988--1992 had a sex ratio highly skewed toward females (66 of 81) compared to normal nestlings (43 of 80) (P < 0.005). The collection site, Green Bay, WI, is heavily contaminated with PCBs and the possibility of gender alteration was investigated in a designed study by comparing the sex of nestling birds determined using three techniques. These nestlings were collected at five sites, both contaminated and uncontaminated. Genetic sex was determined by cytogenetic techniques and phenotypic sex was determined by macroscopic and histologic examination of gonads. Differences between techniques resulted in a few instances of classifying genetic males as females by one or the other gonadal examinations. Sex ratios of the nestlings from the five sites were compared to binomial distributions assuming equal probabilities of males and females. Sex ratios of normal nestlings were not different from expected regardless of sex determination technique (P > 0.10). Deformed nestlings sexed cytogenetically or histologically did not differ from expected (P > 0.40), but deformed nestlings tended to be classified , macroscopically as females at a higher rate than expected (P = 0.092). The observed sex ratios obtained by macroscopic techniques did not differ between the 1968--1992 observational study and the designed study (P > 0.50). Histologic examination suggested two explanations for the skewed sex ratio: nestlings with undeterminable macroscopic sex usually had testes and, some gonads which grossly resembled ovaries were, in fact, testes. If phenotypic gender alteration is present in these birds, it is more evident at the gross structural level than at the histologic level.

  5. Coyote named Scooter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    limited to travel within South Carolina. Albums 1st Year Photo Album 1st Year Video Album 2nd Year Photo Album 2nd Year Video Album 3rd Year Photo Album 3rd Year Video Album 4th...

  6. 2. ISOTOPE SYSTEMS Erosion rates of moraine crests from in-situ and atmospheric cosmogenic nuclide accumulation in boulders and matrix

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zreda, Marek

    2. ISOTOPE SYSTEMS Erosion rates of moraine crests from in-situ and atmospheric cosmogenic nuclide to the analytical uncertainties and due to possible differences in the retention of different nuclides in different to the systematics of cosmogenic nuclides in moraine deposits. Supported by: The David and Lucile Packard Foundation

  7. A blow-up criteria and the existence of 2d gravity water waves with angled crests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Sijue

    2015-01-01

    We consider the two dimensional gravity water wave equation in the regime that includes free surfaces with angled crests. We assume that the fluid is inviscid, incompressible and irrotational, the air density is zero, and we neglect the surface tension. In \\cite{kw} it was shown that in this regime, only a degenerate Taylor inequality $-\\frac{\\partial P}{\\partial\\bold{n}}\\ge 0$ holds, with degeneracy at the singularities; an energy functional $\\frak E$ was constructed and an aprori estimate was proved. In this paper we show that a (generalized) solution of the water wave equation with smooth data will remain smooth so long as $\\frak E(t)$ remains finite; and for any data satisfying $\\frak E(0)<\\infty$, the equation is solvable locally in time, for a period depending only on $\\frak E(0)$.

  8. CREST Cost of Renewable Energy Spreadsheet Tool: A Model for Developing Cost-Based Incentives in the United States; User Manual Version 4, August 2009 - March 2011 (Updated July 2013)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gifford, J. S.; Grace, R. C.

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this document is to help model users understand how to use the CREST model to support renewable energy incentives, FITs, and other renewable energy rate-setting processes. This user manual will walk the reader through the spreadsheet tool, including its layout and conventions, offering context on how and why it was created. This user manual will also provide instructions on how to populate the model with inputs that are appropriate for a specific jurisdiction's policymaking objectives and context. Finally, the user manual will describe the results and outline how these results may inform decisions about long-term renewable energy support programs.

  9. CREST Geothermal | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  10. CREST Solar | Open Energy Information

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  11. CREST Wind | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  12. Coyote Canyon Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  13. Anthracite-Crested butte folio, Colorado 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cross, Whitman, 1854-1949.; Eldridge, George Homans, 1854-1905.; Emmons, Samuel Franklin, 1841-1911.

    1894-01-01

    intake relationship to offspring age for black-tailed deer, elk, and white-tailed deer. 61 20 Scalar adjustment to milk energy concentration throughout lactation. 62 21 Scalar adjustment to milk production due to the milk requirement ratio. Milk... and likelihood of return at recreational areas (Swanson et al. 1989, Hastings 1986). Income from hunting operations is a major source of compensatory income for traditional farmers and ranchers (Haney 1983, Hill 1994). While deer are obviously an important...

  14. Crest Global Green Energy | Open Energy Information

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  15. CrestEnergy | Open Energy Information

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  16. Pacific Crest Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  17. The coyote universe III: simulation suite and precision emulator...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    suite and precision emulator for the nonlinear matter power spectrum Ongoing and future large scale structure surveys targeted at the investigation of dark energy will enter...

  18. Coyote Canyon Steam Plant Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company)|Alabama: Energy Resources JumpCoveOhio:Cowley

  19. The coyote universe extended: Precision emulation of the matter power

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail. (Conference)FeedbackProperties ofTheatmosphere (Journaltransmissionnonlinear

  20. "That's My Kind of Animal!" Designing and Assessing an Outdoor Science Education Program with Children's Megafaunaphilia in Mind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Migliarese, Nicole Lynne

    2011-01-01

    mammalian vertebrates combined: bear, mountain lion, coyote,treatment) combined: bear, mountain lion, coyote, porcupine,

  1. Wildwood Crest, New Jersey: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEtGeorgia: EnergyMaryland:MeadowWikiSysop's blog HomeWildlife and

  2. Green Harbor-Cedar Crest, Massachusetts: Energy Resources | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  3. Cost of Renewable Energy Spreadsheet Tool (CREST) | Open Energy Information

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  4. Himalayan Crest Power Pvt Ltd | Open Energy Information

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  5. Crest Hill, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company)|Alabama: EnergyPennsylvania: EnergyCounty,Cresson,

  6. Coyote-prey interactions on an intensively managed south Texas ranch 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drew, Gary Scott

    1988-01-01

    'sexaI 'fiquncg syTag wT(' uc pageoog 'ea~ qoJeasaH eqtdo) e) eq f60'l aqZ uo gg6i fiyn(' qSnoJqZ yS6( aunp woJg paxonpuoo seA& qoJeasag V3HV I((flIS PRECIPITATION IN CM CD l Dl CD 3 cD CD CD CD C p ~ CD Cl Dl O CD ~ Cn 4 O 0 3 CD C... Ch 'O CD O CD cn O 2 CD CD O O CJ D CD Cn CD ID CD 0 O T 0 n 0 0 0 D N 0 0 Z 0 CC 3 V 0 Il 0 0 IO n N 0 0 0 0 0 0 CL 0 CI 0 a~om r(ggeTgueZsqng 9S6 ( 'SuTunp auTT-souse Zsanqqnos aqq Suoge sseoueo go pasodsTp aneq o...

  7. Coyotes, Jazz, and Creative Teams: Facing and Seeking Variance Russ Derickson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gordon, Scott

    various domains. Recent reports of over reduction of variance through misuse of Six Sigma quality for their innovation entered into misapplication of Six-Sigma quality practices that severely diminished idea the apparent overuse of Six Sigma variance reduction in various enterprises, we present a systems model

  8. REVEGETATION ALONG COYOTE CREEK (SANTA CLARA COUNTY) AT TWO FREEWAY BRIDGES1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    fremontii), valley willow (Salix hind- siana), red willow (S. laevigata), and coast live oak (Quercus the reason for the relatively poor survival of Salix cuttings over the first month after planting. However

  9. Coyote Springs Cogeneration Project, Morrow County, Oregon: Draft Environmental Impact Statement.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1994-01-01

    BPA is considering whether to transfer (wheel) electrical power from a proposed privately-owned, combustion-turbine electrical generation plant in Oregon. The plant would be fired by natural gas and would use combined-cycle technology to generate up to 440 average megawatts (aMW) of energy. The plant would be developed, owned, and operated by Portland General Electric Company (PGE). The project would be built in eastern Oregon, just east of the City of Boardman in Morrow County. The proposed plant would be built on a site within the Port of Morrow Industrial Park. The proposed use for the site is consistent with the County land use plan. Building the transmission line needed to interconnect the power plant to BPA`s transmission system would require a variance from Morrow County. BPA would transfer power from the plant to its McNary-Slatt 500-kV transmission line. PGE would pay BPA for wheeling services. Key environmental concerns identified in the scoping process and evaluated in the draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) include these potential impacts: (1) air quality impacts, such as emissions and their contributions to the {open_quotes}greenhouse{close_quotes} effect; (2) health and safety impacts, such as effects of electric and magnetic fields, (3) noise impacts, (4) farmland impacts, (5) water vapor impacts to transportation, (6) economic development and employment impacts, (7) visual impacts, (8) consistency with local comprehensive plans, and (9) water quality and supply impacts, such as the amount of wastewater discharged, and the source and amount of water required to operate the plant. These and other issues are discussed in the DEIS. The proposed project includes features designed to reduce environmental impacts. Based on studies completed for the DEIS, adverse environmental impacts associated with the proposed project were identified, and no evidence emerged to suggest that the proposed action is controversial.

  10. Microsoft Word - XX 13 Coyote Creek land acquisition provides wildlife corridorSES.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines light on77 PAGE OFDetection ofOctober 28, 2014Wave Erosion6 Statement of36

  11. The coyote universe III: simulation suite and precision emulator for the

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail. (Conference)FeedbackProperties ofTheatmosphere (Journaltransmission

  12. The coyote universe III: simulation suite and precision emulator for the

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail. (Conference)FeedbackProperties ofTheatmosphere (Journaltransmissionnonlinear matter

  13. Fascin1-Dependent Filopodia are Required for Directional Migration of a Subset of Neural Crest Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boer, EF; Howell, ED; Schilling, TF; Jette, CA; Stewart, RA

    2015-01-01

    suggesting a primary defect in the directional migration ofmigration in a subset of NC streams As the antennae of the cell, the primary

  14. Accident causation study on roadways with limited sight distance crest vertical curves 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoddard, Angela May

    1994-01-01

    reflect the driver and vehicle population currently on the transportation network. An accident causation study was conducted to determine if roadways with limited stopping sight distance present a safety hazard for the transportation network. Rural two...

  15. Two developmentally distinct populations of neural crest cells contribute to the zebrafish heart

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cavanaugh, AM; Huang, J; Chen, JN

    2015-01-01

    3 identi?es a second heart ?eld in zeb- ra?sh. Nature 474,growth of the zebra?sh heart. Development 136, 1633–1641.layer regulates zebra?sh heart tube morphogenesis. Dev.

  16. The Role of Cardiac Neural Crest Cells in Zebrafish Heart Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cavanaugh, Ann

    2015-01-01

    from adult zebrafish hearts. Nat Protoc, 2013. 8(4): p. 800-dominant cardiomyocytes direct heart morphogenesis. Nature,to the zebrafish heart …………………………………………………………. ……………20 A.

  17. ral crest cells by surrounding tissues. In our experiments, the host environment may fa-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poremba, Amy Cox

    selection. References and Notes 1. C. Darwin, On the Origin of Species (Crowell-Collier, New York, 1859, Avian Anatomy: Integ- ument, Agricultural Handbook 362, USDA Agricultur- al Research Service (U.A.S.) and by NIDCR grants K02 DE 00421 and R29 DE12462-03 (J.A.H.). Supporting Online Material www

  18. Evaluation of design and operating speeds for crest vertical curves with limited sight distance 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Russell, Charles William

    1994-01-01

    are also being considered. A integrated reservoir characterization technique is used to integrate the geological, engineering, and reservoir performance data to describe the reservoir and to develop an appropriate reservoir management plan. We have...

  19. //exeCutivesummary This report synthesizes historical evidence into a picture of how Coyote Creek looked and functioned

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    South Babb Creek Laguna Socayre Norwood Creek Thompson Creek Upper Silver Creek Tulare Hill Laguna Seca

  20. Safety evaluation of limited sight distance at crest vertical curves on two-lane rural roadways in Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    George, Karen Maria

    1990-01-01

    reduction factors. These factors describe the hypothesized relation between accident rate and both the severity of the restriction and the presence of other confounding geometric features within the restriction. Neuman and Glennon's model ~26 included a... controlled database was used to test the hypothesis in order to discriminate between accidents possibly caused by limited sight distance and accidents caused by other geometric features. Multiple-factor analysis of variance was used to test the variation...

  1. Comparison of crest height distributions of experimental and theoretical waves - a search for applicability of 2nd-order theory 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, Amitabh

    2001-01-01

    This study is focussed on investigating the applicability of the 2nd-order wave theory to different sea-states. The study was conducted by analyzing the experimental wave data and comparing the data with the 2nd-order wave theory. This helps...

  2. Journal of Wildlife Diseases, 39(3), 2003, pp. 712717 Wildlife Disease Association 2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gompper, Matthew E.

    37996, USA; 3 New York State Museum, CEC 3140, Albany, New York 12230, USA; 4 Wildlife Conservation is important for understanding coyote pop- ulation limitation and understanding po- tential risks that coyote

  3. An Algorithm for Estimating the Parameters of Unrestricted I-Iidden

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -Free Grammars Julian Kupiec Xerox Palo Alto Research Center 3333 Coyote Itill Road Palo Alto, CA 94304 ABSTRACT

  4. Predicting Shoppers Interest from Social Interactions Using Sociometric Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coyote Hill Rd Palo Alto, CA 94303 USA maurice.chu@parc.com Oliver Brdiczka PARC 3333 Coyote Hill Rd Palo Alto, CA 94303 USA brdiczka@parc.com James "Bo" Begole PARC 3333 Coyote Hill Rd Palo Alto, CA 94303 USA as a collaborative decision making process. Ward [8] investigated decision making procedures for group purchases

  5. The Silent Bared-Teeth Face and the Crest-Raise of the Mandrill (Mandrillus sphinx): a Contextual Analysis of Signal Function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patricelli, Gail

    Analysis of Signal Function Mark E. Laidre & Jessica L. Yorzinski Department of Neurobiology and Behavior, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, USA Abstract The functions of two visual signals of the mandrill [silent, we analyzed them separately and together. We predicted that if they represent a single graded signal

  6. A CUDA SIMT Interpreter for Genetic Programming W. B. Langdon CREST centre, King's College, London, WC2R 2LS, UK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Thomas

    Vidia Tesla T10P. Using sub-machine code GP a sustain peak performance of 212 billion GP operations per second but interpreted code is slower than optimised compiler generated machine code. GPU interpreters typically gain sampling of test cases with a population of a quarter of a million programs a single T10P Tesla is able

  7. Plant responses and cattle gains from different intensities of spring grazing on crested wheatgrass at two sites in northern New Mexico 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Springfield, H. W.

    1959-01-01

    The physical plant director at Texas A&M University - Texarkana (TAMU-T) does a very good job of maintaining TAMU-T facilities and keeping expenses down. During our visit, however, we were able to identify several opportunities ...

  8. S u m m e r 2 0 1 5 g r o w 1FOXES, COYOTES AND BADGERS TURF SCIENCE AT WHISTLING STRAITS P, FROM POLLUTANT TO PRODUCT College of Agricultural & Life Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turner, Monica G.

    , FROM POLLUTANT TO PRODUCT College of Agricultural & Life Sciences UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN MADISON of biogas 12 Living Science Horticulture professor Irwin Goldman sparks a love of plants among students from of Energy, has been to realize the grand vision of a biorefinery--the bioenergy version of the petroleum

  9. Hanson's Cement Plant 0.02 0 Lower Guadalupe River 0.03 0

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanson's Cement Plant 0.02 0 Lower Guadalupe River 0.03 0 Mills Creek 0.06 0 Lower Coyote Creek 0PabloCk SanFelipeCk LowerWalkerCk MuddyHollow LagunitasCk MillsCk SimasCk LowerCoyoteCk LowerGuadalupeR Hanson'sCement

  10. The role of let-7 in human embryonic stem cell-derived neural precursor cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Connie

    2012-01-01

    L. (2010). Neural crest-derived stem cells. Stembook,A.V. (2011). Human ESC-derived neural crest model reveals ahuman embryonic stem cell-derived motoneurons. Stem Cell 25:

  11. MOLECULAR AND CELLULAR BIOLOGY, 0270-7306/99/$04.00 0

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McIntosh, Lawrence P.

    ) or pax-3 (splotch) gene result in the impaired development of the vertebral column or neural crest cell

  12. LA-UR-

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    fo r themet in cl usters, reducing costs and red ucing the number o f part . The motivation behind this project is a situation currentl y facing the Coyote s uper computer. It...

  13. Controlling Mole Damage 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas Wildlife Services

    2007-03-13

    of underground burrows,comingtothesurfaceonlyrarely,and then often by accident. Because of its secluded lifeunderground,themolehasonlyafewnatur- al enemies. Coyotes, dogs, badgers and skunks dig out a few of them, and occasionally a cat, hawk or owl surprises one...

  14. CX-001414: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Coyote Springs-Slatt #1: Spacer Damper ReplacementsCX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 04/12/2010Location(s): Gilliam County, Oregon Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  15. Development, Topography, and Identity: The Dougherty Valley and the New Suburban Metropolis [Research and Debate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davids, Rene'

    2008-01-01

    Creek Coyote Creek East Alamo Creek San Cantanio Creek SanCreek Tassajara Creek West Alamo Creek C RO W C AN YO N RDzone between branches of Alamo Creek and the foothills dem-

  16. Collaboration for Community and Forest Well-Being in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Belsky, Jill M.

    bears, mountain lion, elk, moose, deer, coyote, and cold-water fLh describe something of the ruggedness. The Mission Mountain and the Bob ikfarshall WiIdernessAreas, the Flathead National Forest, the PLum Creek

  17. DIETARY NICHE SEPARATION BETWEEN SYMPATRIC FREE-RANGING DOMESTIC DOGS AND INDIAN FOXES IN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gompper, Matthew E.

    al. 2001; Johnson et al. 1996; Palomares and Caro 1999). Interference competition, including; Palomares and Caro 1999; Polis et al. 1989). For example, coyotes (Canis latrans) compete for similar food

  18. Zigmond: Kawaiisu Mythology, An Oral Tradition of South-Central California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Helen

    1982-01-01

    along the 29-km. Bear Mountain segment of the Pacific CrestSierra Nevada: The Bear Mountain Seg- ment of the Pacific

  19. United States of Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Pacific Southwest Research Station General scientist with the Station's Wildland Recreation and Urban Cultures Research Unit, 4955 Canyon Crest Drive

  20. Direct evaluation of ballistic phonon transport in a multi-walled...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    also investigated. Authors: Hayashi, Hiroyuki 1 ; Takahashi, Koji, E-mail: takahashi@aero.kyushu-u.ac.jp 1 ; JST, CREST, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 819-0395 2 ;...

  1. Soil Resource Inventory of Sequoia National Park, Central Part, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huntington, Gordon L.; Akeson, Mark A.

    1987-01-01

    west of Elk Creek Trail on a steep, east facing hill slopeElk Creek Study Area, they are located on ridge crests or on hill

  2. Geothermal assessment of the MX deployment area in Nevada. Final report, April 1, 1981-April 30, 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trexler, D.T.; Bruce, J.L.; Cates, D.; Dolan, H.H.; Covington, C.H.

    1982-06-01

    A preliminary geothermal resource assessment of the MX deployment area in Nevada focused on Coyote Spring Valley in southeastern Nevada. Initially, an extensive literature search was conducted and a bibliography consisting of 750 entries was compiled covering all aspects of geology pertaining to the study area. A structural study indicates that Coyote Spring Valley lies in a tectonically active area which is favorable for the discovery of geothermal resources. Hot water may be funneled to the near-surface along an extensive fracture and fault system which appears to underlie the valley, according to information gathered during the literature search and aerial photo survey. A total of 101 shallow temperature probes were emplanted in Coyote Spring Valley. Three anomalous temperature points all lying within the same vicinity were identified in the north-central portion of the valley near a fault. A soil-mercury study also identified one zone of anomalous mercury concentrations around the north end of the Arrow Canyon Range. A literature search covering regional fluid geochemistry indicated that the three fluid samples taken from Coyote Spring Valley have a higher concentration of Na + K. During field work, seven fluid samples were collected in Coyote Spring Valley which also appear to be derived from volcanic units due to the presence of Ca-Mg or Na-K carbonate-bicarbonate. A temperature gradient study of six test water wells indicates that only one geothermal well with a temperature of 35.5/sup 0/C (96/sup 0/F) exists in the central portion of the valley at the north end of Arrow Canyon Range near the zone of anomalous soil-mercury points. A cultural assessment of Coyote Spring Valley was performed prior to field work.

  3. Limnol. Oceanogr., 44(3), 1999, 487493 1999, by the American Society of Limnology and Oceanography, Inc.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bohonak, Andrew J.

    , New York 14853; Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory, P.O. Box 519, Crested Butte, Colorado 81224-0009; Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory, P.O. Box 519, Crested Butte, Colorado 81224 Abstract The absence is not the proximate factor limiting distributions. We experimentally transplanted live egg-bearing females

  4. Steady water waves with multiple critical layers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mats Ehrnström; Joachim Escher; Erik Wahlén

    2011-04-01

    We construct small-amplitude periodic water waves with multiple critical layers. In addition to waves with arbitrarily many critical layers and a single crest in each period, two-dimensional sets of waves with several crests and troughs in each period are found. The setting is that of steady two-dimensional finite-depth gravity water waves with vorticity.

  5. On the local properties of highly nonlinear unsteady gravity water waves. Part 1. Slowdown, kinematics and energetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barthelemy, X; Peirson, W L; Dias, F; Allis, M

    2015-01-01

    The kinematic properties of unsteady highly non-linear 3D wave groups have been investigated using a numerical wave tank. Although carrier wave speeds based on zero-crossing analysis remain within +-7% of linear theory predictions, crests and troughs locally undertake a systematic cyclical leaning from forward to backward as the crests/troughs transition through their maximum amplitude. Consequently, both crests and troughs slow down by approximately 15% of the linear velocity, in sharp contrast to the predictions of finite amplitude Stokes steady wavetrain theory. Velocity profiles under the crest maximum have been investigated and surface values in excess of 1.8 times the equivalent Stokes velocity can be observed. Equipartitioning between depth-integrated kinetic and potential energy holds globally on the scale of the wave group. However, equipartitioning does not occur at crests and troughs (even for low amplitude Stokes waves), where the local ratio of potential to total energy varies systemically as a f...

  6. Boys 4-H Club-Hogs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01

    to document feed preference of white-tailed deer, feral hogs (Sus scrofa) and raccoons when given a choice of corn or whole cottonseed. Sweitzer et al. (2000) used automatic camera systems to monitor populations of feral swine in California. Foresman... (Neotoma, Peromyscus, Spermophilus), opossum, striped skunk, nine-banded armadillo, porcupine, badger, bobcat, coyote, feral hog, feral cat, and cows. 2...

  7. Comparing Two Types of Magnetically- Coupled Adjustable Speed Drives with Variable Frequency Drives in Pump and Fan Applications 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, K. J.; Chvala, W. D.

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents the results from laboratory tests on MagnaDrive Corporations fixed-magnet magnetically-coupled adjustable speed drive (MC-ASD) and Coyote Electronics electromagnetic MC-ASD as compared to a typical variable frequency drive (VFD...

  8. Restriction and Correspondence-based Translation Ronald M. Kaplan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Restriction and Correspondence-based Translation Ronald M. Kaplan Xerox Palo Alto Research Center 3333 Coyote Hill Road Palo Alto, California 94304 USA Kaplan.Parc@Xerox.Com Jiirgen Wedekind Institute@ims.uni-stuttgart.de Abstract Kaplan et al. (1989) present a framework for translation based on the description

  9. Intelligent Simulation Tools for Mining Large Scienti c Data Sets 1 Intelligent Simulation Tools for Mining

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bailey-Kellogg, Chris

    Intelligent Simulation Tools for Mining Large Scienti#12;c Data Sets 1 Intelligent Simulation Tools for Mining Large Scienti#12;c Data Sets Feng ZHAO Xerox Palo Alto Research Center 3333 Coyote Hill Road, Palo. Keywords Intelligent simulation, Scienti#12;c data mining, Qualitative reasoning, Reasoning about physical

  10. Actor-Oriented Control System Design Palo Alto Research Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    1 of 29 Actor-Oriented Control System Design Jie Liu Palo Alto Research Center 3333 Coyote Hill Rd}@eecs.berkeley.edu Abstract: Complex control systems are heterogeneous, in the sense of discrete computer-based con- trollers challenges for control system design technologies in terms of end-to-end control perfor- mance modeling

  11. 1Department of Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences, South Dakota State University, Box 2140B, Brookings, SD 57007. 2Present address: Bureau of Science Services, Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, 2801 Progress Road, Madison, WI 53716. E-mail

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) neonates (1 month old) by adult females (>18 months old) is well documented throughout the geographic range of defense of neonates against coyotes by male pronghorn. She reported 2 instances of adult male prong- horn. Our purpose was to report occurrences of antipredator defense of neonatal pronghorn (1 month old

  12. Multidimensional thermal-chemical cookoff modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baer, M.R.; Gross, R.J.; Gartling, D.K.; Hobbs, M.L.

    1994-08-01

    Multidimensional thermal/chemical modeling is an essential step in the development of a predictive capability for cookoff of energetic materials in systems subjected to abnormal thermal environments. COYOTE II is a state-of-the-art two- and three-dimensional finite element code for the solution of heat conduction problems including surface-to-surface thermal radiation heat transfer and decomposition chemistry. Multistep finite rate chemistry is incorporated into COYOTE II using an operator-splitting methodology; rate equations are solved element-by-element with a modified matrix-free stiff solver, CHEMEQ. COYOTE II is purposely designed with a user-oriented input structure compatible with the database, the pre-processing mesh generation, and the post-processing tools for data visualization shared with other engineering analysis codes available at Sandia National Laboratories. As demonstrated in a companion paper, decomposition during cookoff in a confined or semi-confined system leads to significant mechanical behavior. Although mechanical effect are not presently considered in COYOTE II, the formalism for including mechanics in multidimensions is under development.

  13. ECOLOGICAL BASES FOR SILVICULTURAL PRESCRIPTIONS FOR CONTROL OF DWARF MISTLETOEIN LODGEPOLE PINE-^

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the en- science of stand management resulted in some vironmental impact of such treatments. stand provides direction tionable and/or socially insensitive. for carrying out cultural treatments. 3 of the ef- Forest, Santa Fe, New Mexico, stationed in fectiveness of the cultural treat- Coyote, New Mexico

  14. Fully Programmable MEMS Ciliary Actuator Arrays for Micromanipulation Tasks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Donald, Bruce Randall

    Dartmouth ETH Zurich Stanford Coyote Hill Rd. El. Engineering El. Engineering Computer Science El. Engineering El. Engineering Palo Alto, CA Seattle, WA Seattle, WA Hanover, NH Zurich, CH Stanford, CA Abstract the actuators themselves are on a similar scale. Toward the realization of this goal, researchers have been

  15. Wideband Displays: Mitigating Multiple Monitor Seams Jock D. Mackinlay1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heer, Jeffrey

    3333 Coyote Hill Road Palo Alto, CA 94304 {mackinlay, jheer}@parc.com Jeffrey Heer1,2 2 Group for User and seven en years ago, our fathers Four score and seven years ago, our fathers brought Four score and seven en years ago, our fathers Four score and seven years ago, our fathers brought Figure 1: Computer view

  16. Wideband Displays: Mitigating Multiple Monitor Seams Jock D. Mackinlay1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    3333 Coyote Hill Road Palo Alto, CA 94304 {mackinlay, jheer}@parc.com Jeffrey Heer1,2 2 Group for User for complex multi- application computer tasks [1]. Four score and seven en years ago, our fathers Four score and seven years ago, our fathers brought Four score and seven en years ago, our fathers Four score and seven

  17. Geology and engineering geology of a Wilcox lignite deposit in northeastern Rusk County, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cole, William F.

    1980-01-01

    sheaz strength (Cu) for a 140 ft highwall. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86 37 Highwall height (H) vs factor of safety (F). 88 38 Highwall height (ft) vs horizontal distance (ft) from crest to toe of highwall, assuming the dragline is located 10...

  18. The effect of fluid acceleration on sediment transport in the surf zone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Durham, William McKinney

    2007-01-01

    The surf zone is defined by highly non-linear, breaking waves that have very different acceleration signatures beneath their respective crests and troughs. The consequences of this dissimilarity on sediment transport is ...

  19. Dial in number: 888-396-1320 Passcode: 9371952

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuligowski, Bob

    papers) (415 ­ 430 pm) 2 #12;City College of New York/CREST · Cordero · Hosannah · Nazari · Vant and Intensity" B. Vant-Hull, F. Autones, S. Mahaneh, R. Rabin, J. Mecikalski, R. Khanbilvardi · Convective

  20. Renewables Portfolio Standard phone: 415-703-3072

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Esyah Huynh (626) 302-4978 Bishop Tungsten Development, LLC Bishop Tungsten Small hydro 2011 Feed Hydroelectric Project LLC Isabella Fish Flow Small hydro 2011 Feed in Tariff -- CREST Category 1 Bundled

  1. Forensic Science T. A. Brettell*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toxicology, and BioTechniques as well as Chemical Abstracts Selects: Forensic Chemistry. Two new forensicForensic Science T. A. Brettell* Department of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Cedar Crest College

  2. Forensic Science T. A. Brettell*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    as Chemical Abstracts Selects: Forensic Chemistry. Our literature survey encompasses the period from JanuaryForensic Science T. A. Brettell* Department of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Cedar Crest College

  3. On a class of self-similar 2D surface water waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sijue Wu

    2012-06-11

    We construct a class of self-similar surface water waves and study its properties. This class of surface waves appears to be in very good agreement with a common type of wave crests in the ocean.

  4. Progress with persistent programming,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atkinson, M.; Bailey, P.; Chisholm, K.; Cockshott, P.; Morrison, R.; paper presented at the CREST course at the UEA Dept of Computing Science, University of Glasgow [More Details

    Atkinson,M. Bailey,P. Chisholm,K. Cockshott,P. Morrison,R. paper presented at the CREST course at the UEA Dept of Computing Science, University of Glasgow

  5. Neuronal Differentiation from Postmitotic Precursors in the Ciliary Ganglion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nishi, Rae

    placed in culture, nonneuronal cells acquired immunoreactivity for HuD, suggesting that they had; parasympathetic; neuronal differentiation; quail; Islet-1; HuD; transplantation; neurogen- esis; neural crest

  6. United States of Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of Agriculture DESIGN: A Program to Create Data Forest Service Entry Research Work Unit at the Station's Forest Fire Laboratory, 4955 Canyon Crest Drive, Riverside, CA 92507

  7. Chu, Locke, Browner Call for Comprehensive Energy Plan at Clean...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CA NRDC, FL Nth Power, CA Object Management Group, NJ Orbit Energy, Inc., NC Osage Bio Energy, VA Outpost Solar, TN Pacific Carbon Exchange, CA Pacific Crest Securities, OR...

  8. 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim 2999 www.advmat.de

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Zhong L.

    ),[5] and wave energy (1 000 W/cm of wave crest length)[6,7] can provide large- scale needs of power. However arrays to develop a nanogenerator technologies, who have demonstrated the feasibility using this type

  9. Evolution of the Galapagos Rise and the Bauer Microplate: implications for the Nazca plate 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Jennifer Catherine McGuire

    2006-04-12

    ). Magnetic lineations and depth trends across the Bauer Basin suggest that it was captured between the failing Galapagos Rise and the currently active EPR. Anomalously shallow ridge crests along the Galapagos Rise indicate that magmatic activity may have...

  10. Gamic Race: Logics of Difference in Videogame Culture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Higgin, Tanner

    2012-01-01

    for the first time as an Orc and seeing a Night Elf crest aexplicit racial choices like “Orc” or “Caucasian,” Miis, forto early portrayals of orc [sic] as bloodthirsty savages

  11. Impact loads and wave kinematics on a fixed truncated circular cylinder due to nonlinear waves in a 2-D tank 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zou, Jun

    1995-01-01

    . Simultaneous measurements of the particle velocities under the crest, the wave elevation at the energy concentrated location, the wave elevation on the cylinder surface, dynamic pressure distribution and impact force were performed to study the relationships...

  12. INTERDISCIPLINARY COLLABORATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schweik, Charles M.

    Polymer Science & Engineering Psychology Stockbridge School of Agriculture Veterinary & Animal Sciences Station funds. I Massachusetts Center for Renewable Science and Technology (MassCREST): focuses on interdisciplinary education and research in polymer science. I Nanoscale Science and Engineering Center

  13. Line and Net Pattern Segmentation Using Shape Modeling Adam Huanga

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : Image processing, image enhancement, image segmentation, feature extraction, matched filter, crest lines of blood vessels in retinal images: 1) Blood vessels usually have small curvatures and can be approximated

  14. Wildlife Services 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas Wildlife Services

    2007-05-23

    in large numbers may damage property and cause human health problems. ? Protecting crops, timber, rangeland and other natural resources from the damage caused by gophers, prairie dogs, feral hogs, raccoons, rabbits, coyotes, grackles, beavers and other... wildlife. When building dams, beavers may cause flooding of timber and pastureland and the loss of trees and field crops. Feral hogs damage field crops, pastures and riparian habitat by their feeding, trampling and rooting activities. ? Protecting livestock...

  15. Wildlife Photography for Fun and Profit: Constructing and Installing Wildlife Photography Blinds 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phillips, Miles

    2006-04-17

    . Occasionally, photographers would like to pho- tograph owls and hawks nesting. This requires an elevated blind. Archery tripod hunting stands work for this. Or, you could construct two or three sec- tions of scaffolding with a portable photo blind on top... in particular. Most photographers want to stay at the ranch or photography site and have the complete outdoor experience?ranch cooking, night sounds (owls, coyotes, paraques, etc.) and stargazing. They want a comfortable bed, a shower, air conditioning...

  16. Potential hazards of compound 1080 to selected nontarget wildlife when used in the toxic collar 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eastland, Warren George

    1983-01-01

    1080 (Ruckelshaus 1972). Primary poisoning results from an animal's exposure to unassimilated Compound 1080 (Kun 1980). Examples of primary hazards would include: Compound 1080 spilled on soil or vegetation, an animal's ingestion of vomitus from a... coyote that has ingested Compound 1080, or an animal's scavenging a livestock carcass with Compound 1080 spilled on it. Secondary poisoning results from exposure to assimilated Compound 1080 (Kun 1980), which would occur when an animal comes...

  17. Renewable Energy Cost Modeling: A Toolkit for Establishing Cost-Based Incentives in the United States; March 2010 -- March 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gifford, J. S.; Grace, R. C.; Rickerson, W. H.

    2011-05-01

    This report is intended to serve as a resource for policymakers who wish to learn more about establishing cost-based incentives. The report will identify key renewable energy cost modeling options, highlight the policy implications of choosing one approach over the other, and present recommendations on the optimal characteristics of a model to calculate rates for cost-based incentives, feed-in tariffs (FITs), or similar policies. These recommendations will be utilized in designing the Cost of Renewable Energy Spreadsheet Tool (CREST). Three CREST models will be publicly available and capable of analyzing the cost of energy associated with solar, wind, and geothermal electricity generators. The CREST models will be developed for use by state policymakers, regulators, utilities, developers, and other stakeholders to assist them in current and future rate-setting processes for both FIT and other renewable energy incentive payment structures and policy analyses.

  18. On the local properties of highly nonlinear unsteady gravity water waves. Part 2. Dynamics and onset of breaking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barthelemy, X; Peirson, W L; Fedele, F; Allis, M; Dias, F

    2015-01-01

    We revisit the classical, but as yet unresolved problem of predicting the breaking onset of 2D and 3D irrotational gravity water waves. This study focuses on domains with flat bottom topography and conditions ranging from deep to intermediate depth (depth to wavelength ratio between 1 and 0.2). Using a fully-nonlinear boundary element model, our initial calculations investigated geometric, kinematic and energetic differences between maximally recurrent and marginally breaking waves in focusing wave groups. Maximallyrecurrent waves are clearly separated from marginally-breaking waves by their energy fluxes localized near the crest region. Specifically, tracking the local ratio of energy flux velocity to crest speed at the crest of the tallest wave in the evolving group provides a robust breaking onset threshold parameter. Warning of imminent breaking onset was found to depend on the strength of breaking, but was detectable only up to half a carrier wave period prior to a breaking event.

  19. Metallic nut for use with ceramic threads

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Norton, Paul F. (San Diego, CA); Shaffer, James E. (Maitland, FL)

    1996-01-01

    A nozzle guide vane assembly has ceramic components therein having a conventional thread thereon including a preestablished pitch and having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion. The nozzle guide vane assembly has a metallic components therein having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being greater that the rate of thermal expansion of the ceramic components is positioned in a gas turbine engine. The metallic component, a nut, has a thread therein including a plurality of crests being spaced on a pitch equal to that of the ceramic component and has a pair of contacting surfaces extending from the plurality of crests. A notch spirally extends intermediate adjacent ones of the plurality of crests and has a preestablished depth which is at least twice the size of the conventional pitch. Furthermore, the pair of contacting surfaces are in contact with only a portion of the threaded surface of the ceramic components.

  20. Use of incomplete energy recovery for the energy compression of large energy spread charged particle beams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Douglas, David R. (Newport News, VA); Benson, Stephen V. (Yorktown, VA)

    2007-01-23

    A method of energy recovery for RF-base linear charged particle accelerators that allows energy recovery without large relative momentum spread of the particle beam involving first accelerating a waveform particle beam having a crest and a centroid with an injection energy E.sub.o with the centroid of the particle beam at a phase offset f.sub.o from the crest of the accelerating waveform to an energy E.sub.full and then recovering the beam energy centroid a phase f.sub.o+Df relative to the crest of the waveform particle beam such that (E.sub.full-E.sub.o)(1+cos(f.sub.o+Df))>dE/2 wherein dE=the full energy spread, dE/2=the full energy half spread and Df=the wave form phase distance.

  1. Numerical calculation of wave refraction by digital computer 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Orr, Terry Edwin

    1969-01-01

    +~ with time. 20 22 22 25 28 WiL), H, H s o vs. F(i ), DL L 0 43 10 Refraction pattern for uniform slope 10 second p~riod 60 approach; numerical analysis solution 0 Refraction pattern for uniform slope 10 second period 120 approach; numerical... of varying radii (3) as shown in Figure l. It can be seen that the crest deforms and turns toward the segment of lowest celerity. Let M and N be two adjacent points along the crest separated by a distance An at time t (Figure 2a). The corresponding wave...

  2. The pressure in a deep-water Stokes wave of greatest height

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lyons, Tony

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the qualitative behaviour of the pressure function beneath an extreme Stokes wave over infinite depth. The presence of a stagnation point at the wave-crest of an extreme Stokes wave introduces a number of mathematical difficulties resulting in the irregularity of the free surface profile. It will be proven that the pressure decreases in the horizontal direction between a crest-line and subsequent trough-line, except along these lines themselves where the pressure is stationary with respect to the horizontal coordinate. In addition we will prove that the pressure strictly increases with depth throughout the fluid body.

  3. Geometric phases of water waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Francesco Fedele

    2014-08-08

    Recently, Banner et al. (2014) highlighted a new fundamental property of open ocean wave groups, the so-called crest slowdown. For linear narrowband waves, this is related to the geometric and dynamical phase velocities $U_d$ and $U_g$ associated with the parallel transport through the principal fiber bundle of the wave motion with $\\mathit{U}(1)$ symmetry. The theoretical predictions are shown to be in fair agreement with ocean field observations, from which the average crest speed $c=U_d+U_g$ with $c/U_d\\approx0.8$ and $U_{g}/U_d\\approx-0.2$.

  4. Helper's Network Gazette June - July 1994 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1994-01-01

    coyote feces Abortion Dubey JP et al 1980 Am J Vet Research 41 (7) July 1072-1076 Wa Toxoplasma gondii, goats (exper.)? abortion, clinical signs, and distribution in host tissues Abortion Dubey JP; Schmitz JA 1981 J Am Vet Med Ass 178 (7) Apr 1... Venez Puericult y Pediat 40 (2) July- Sept 265-288 Wm Ascaris lumbricoides, children, hepa ic ab- cesses, clinical aspects, treatment, 14 cases: Caracas Abscess, Amebic Abul-Khair ?? et al 1981 Ann Surg 193 (2) Feb 221-226 Wm Entamoeba histolytica...

  5. On the application of computational fluid dynamics codes for liquefied natural gas dispersion.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luketa-Hanlin, Anay Josephine; Koopman, Ronald P.; Ermak, Donald

    2006-02-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes are increasingly being used in the liquefied natural gas (LNG) industry to predict natural gas dispersion distances. This paper addresses several issues regarding the use of CFD for LNG dispersion such as specification of the domain, grid, boundary and initial conditions. A description of the k-{var_epsilon} model is presented, along with modifications required for atmospheric flows. Validation issues pertaining to the experimental data from the Burro, Coyote, and Falcon series of LNG dispersion experiments are also discussed. A description of the atmosphere is provided as well as discussion on the inclusion of the Coriolis force to model very large LNG spills.

  6. Sandia National Laboratories approach to emergency preparedness

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galegar, F.H.; Yourick, P.D.; Ross, S.A.

    1997-12-31

    Sandia National Laboratories is located on Kirtland AFB on Albuquerque, NM. The Air Force Base proper covers about 74 square miles in which SNL maintains 5 technical areas and the Coyote Test Field. These SNL areas add up to about 18,000 acres. However, SNL has other locations where we conduct corporate emergency planning: Kauai Test Facility (at Pacific Missile Range Facility in Kauai, Hawaii), and the Tonopah Test Range (Nevada). SNL/California located in Livermore has an independent emergency preparedness organization for their emergency planning activities.

  7. Cozad Board of Public Works | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar EnergyLawler,CoalConcordiaConsumerLEDS Tier ICowatec AG Jump to:Coyote

  8. 146 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON PLASMA SCIENCE, VOL. 27, NO. 1, FEBRUARY 1999 Video Imaging of Dust Acoustic Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merlino, Robert L.

    Acoustic Waves C. Thompson, A. Barkan, R. L. Merlino, and N. D'Angelo Fig. 1. Single video frame image of a dust acoustic wave. The bright vertical bands correspond to the wave crests (dust compressions "dust waves." A sample image of a dust acoustic wave is presented. Index Terms--Image analysis, plasma

  9. For Release: Wednesday, May 26, 2010 Landmark NIH Clinical Trial Comparing Two Stroke Prevention Procedures Shows Surgery and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bandettini, Peter A.

    , the third leading cause of death in the United States, is caused by an interruption in blood flow Revascularization Endarterectomy vs. Stenting Trial (CREST) took place at 117 centers in the United States-year rates of the study's endpoints ­ early stroke, heart attack, or death and later stroke - between

  10. Visualizing Cells and their Connectivity Graphs for CompuCell3D Randy Heiland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Indiana University

    Visualizing Cells and their Connectivity Graphs for CompuCell3D Randy Heiland CREST, Pervasive models that simulate the behavior of different types of interacting biological cells can be a very time consuming and er- ror prone task. CompuCell3D is an open source application that addresses this challenge

  11. Air pollution, precipitation chemistry and forest health in the Retezat Mountains,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Air pollution, precipitation chemistry and forest health in the Retezat Mountains, Southern Station, 4955 Canyon Crest Drive, Riverside, CA, USA b Forest Research and Management Institute, Bucharest, Romania c Forest Research and Management Institute, Simeria, Romania d USDA Forest Service, Rocky Mountain

  12. ``Plate-like'' subsidence of the East Pacific RiseSouth Pacific superswell system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watts, A. B. "Tony"

    ``Plate-like'' subsidence of the East Pacific Rise­­South Pacific superswell system J. K. Hillier significantly, the superswell appears to be part of a large-scale, ``plate-like,'' subsidence that extends to the EPR crest, rather than an isolated shallowing that reverses the subsidence and causes uplift. We

  13. EU Informal Competitiveness Council (Ian Lucas, Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Business and Regulatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to be strengthened and that the mandate of the Centre for Renewable Energy Systems Technology (CREST) advisory committee needed to give that body a more strategic role. Ministers also discussed expected cost overruns on the international ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) nuclear fusion facility. The UK stressed

  14. Wave represents displacement Wave represents pressure Source -Sound Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    is wavelength Number of crests passing a point in 1 second is frequency Wave represents pressure Target - Radio. The Sound Waves simulation becomes the source of an analogical mapping to Radio Waves. Concepts Radio Waves 1 - Sound Waves references water waves 2 - Water is analogy for Sound Waves 3 - Radio

  15. CIMEL: Constructive and Collaborative, Inquiry-based Multimedia E-Learning (Summary of NSF CRCD Sponsored Grant #0087977 for October 2002 PI Meeting)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pottenger, William M.

    school teacher and two minority students from a local high school, joined the CIMEL team to assess and Cedar Crest College (a historically black and a women's college, respectively) as well as a RET middle to investigate adapting the multimedia for use in secondary schools. · A public interface at cimel

  16. Morphological modeling of a nourished bayside beach with a low tide terrace

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirby, James T.

    of rapidly changing local wind con- ditions and sheltering of ocean waves from the bay entrances. Significant with the size of the bay and local wind strength and direction. The frequent occurrences of short, steep ero with sharp crests and flat troughs, which are responsible for the delivery of offshore sediments to beaches

  17. Red Mountain is one of several hundred cinder cones within a swath of volcanic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Red Mountain is one of several hundred cinder cones within a swath of volcanic landscape Mountain, whose tallest peak is 12,633 feet above sea level, the highest ele- vation in Arizona. Red Mountain rises about 1,000 feet above the surrounding landscape, and its crest is at 7,965 feet elevation

  18. Kinematics of extreme waves in deep water John Grue*, Didier Clamond, Morten Huseby, Atle Jensen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clamond, Didier

    Kinematics of extreme waves in deep water John Grue*, Didier Clamond, Morten Huseby, Atle Jensen fluid velocity, e ffiffiffiffi g=k p is then defined. Deep water waves with a fluid velocity up to 75 2004 Abstract The velocity profiles under crest of a total of 62 different steep wave events in deep

  19. An Introduction to Particle Methods with Financial Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Del Moral , Pierre

    ME (Finance for Energy Market Research Centre (Dauphine, CREST, EDF R&D)), e-mail: nadia.oudjane@edf.fr 1 #12 of probabilistic mod- Ren´e Carmona Bendheim Center for Finance, Dpt of Operations Research & Financial Engineering applied in several areas of finance. For instance, using the rare event interpretation of particle methods

  20. The Role of Artificial Intelligence in Software Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harman, Mark

    The Role of Artificial Intelligence in Software Engineering Mark Harman CREST Centre, University in the application of Artificial Intelligence (AI) techniques to Software Engineering (SE) problems. The work is typified by recent advances in Search Based Software Engineering, but also by long established work

  1. Not Going to Take This Anymore: Multi-objective Overtime Planning for Software Engineering Projects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harman, Mark

    Not Going to Take This Anymore: Multi-objective Overtime Planning for Software Engineering Projects University College London, CREST centre, London, WC1E 6BT, UK Abstract--Software Engineering and development engineers can better plan overtime. We evaluate our approach on 6 real world software projects, drawn from 3

  2. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. 104, NO. C9, PAGES 21,063-21,082, SEPTEMBER 15, 1999 Intermediate water in the Brazil-Malvinas Confluence Zone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Intermediate water in the Brazil-Malvinas Confluence Zone: A Lagrangian view Olaf Boebel,· Claudia Schmid,2 subtropicalregionsaroundthe Brazil-Malvinas(Falkland)ConfluenceZone is studied,usingdailyhydrographicand kinematicdata from-frontalprocesseswere observedcloseto meander crests.The limited numberof floatsof this studyand the complexstructureof the Brazil

  3. United States Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of Proceedings of the Agriculture Pacific Southwest Symposium on Social of Agriculture; 96 p. The growing demand for recreation at the wildland-urban interface throughout the United and the Urban Culture Research Unit headquartered at the Forest Fire Laboratory, 4955 Canyon Crest Dr

  4. Mouse and human phenotypes indicate a critical conserved role for ERK2 signaling in neural

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mouse and human phenotypes indicate a critical conserved role for ERK2 signaling in neural crest by the Editorial Board September 5, 2008 (received for review June 2, 2008) Disrupted ERK1/2 (MAPK3/MAPK1) MAPK signaling has been as- sociated with several developmental syndromes in humans; how- ever, mutations in ERK1

  5. Under very extreme conditions a flood that threatens to overtop a dam may be combined with strong winds that generate waves in the reservoir.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowles, David S.

    winds that generate waves in the reservoir. Prolonged wave overtopping or a combination of wave the actions of wind generated waves and wave overtopping. The uneven elevations of the dam crest method (Hungr 1987) Stability check near the flow entrance during Erosion Stage 3 Predict wind generated

  6. Slow light with low dispersion and nonlinear enhancement in a lattice-shifted

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baba, Toshihiko

    -on-insulator photonic crystal waveguide whose lattice is shifted along the wave- guide generates wideband, low and Computer Engineering, Yokohama National University, 79-5 Tokiwadai, Hodogaya-ku, Yokohama 240-8501, Japan 2 CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency, 5 Sanbancho, Chiyoda-ku Tokyo 102-0075, Japan *Corresponding

  7. Dynamic Rupture through a Branched Fault Configuration at Yucca Mountain, and Resulting Ground Motions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dynamic Rupture through a Branched Fault Configuration at Yucca Mountain, and Resulting Ground of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, a potential site for a high-level radioactive waste repository. The Solitario km away from the SCF beneath the crest of Yucca Mountain, causing the repository site to experience

  8. Simulation studies of a horizontal well producing from a thin oil-rim reservoir in the SSB1 field, Malaysia 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdul Hakim, Hazlan

    1995-01-01

    heterogeneity as deduced from logs. Simulation results indicate that gas and water cresting are inevitable even at low oil production rate of 100 STB/D because of the thin oil column of only 45 feet. Continued production under the current gas/oil ratio limit...

  9. Functional organization of PLC signaling microdomains in neurons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, David

    Functional organization of PLC signaling microdomains in neurons Patrick Delmas1 , Marcel Crest1 of phospholipase C (PLC) signaling. Supramolecular complexes organize the cor- rect repertoires of receptors of signal transduction events. However, not all PLC signals nucleate around scaffold proteins, although

  10. Kate Brodie & Nick Spore ERDC-CHL-COAB

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Kate Brodie & Nick Spore ERDC-CHL-COAB Coastal Sediments 2015 ­ San Diego, CA "Understanding-impact prediction models (e.g. Sallenger 2000, Stockdon et al. 2007) characterize dunes by: ­ Dune Toe ­ Dune Crest variations in morphology (Houser 2013) ­ Vegetation coverage, pore space and infiltration rate (Palmsten

  11. NUMERICAL PREDICTION OF FAULTING AND FRACTURING IN THE AHNET BASIN, ALGERIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beekman, Fred

    1 NUMERICAL PREDICTION OF FAULTING AND FRACTURING IN THE AHNET BASIN, ALGERIA Fred Beekman1 and natural fractures strongly depends on the material properties and on the structural position inside models predict rock fracturing to be initiated at shallow depths at the crest of the anticline, and under

  12. Dune field pattern formation and recent transporting winds in the Olympia Undae Dune Field, north polar region of Mars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bourke, Mary C.

    Dune field pattern formation and recent transporting winds in the Olympia Undae Dune Field, north dune crestlines, with apparent slipfaces on the primary crests, ubiquitous wind ripples, areas of coarsegrained wind ripples, and deflated interdune areas. Geomorphic evidence and dune field pattern analysis

  13. Molecular Markers Associated with Water Use Efficiency and Leaf Ash in Soybean M. A. R. Mian, M. A. Bailey, D. A. Ashley,* R. Wells, T. E. Carter, Jr.,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parrott, Wayne

    Molecular Markers Associated with Water Use Efficiency and Leaf Ash in Soybean M. A. R. Mian, M. A ash (LASH) generally related to WUE.A restriction fragmentlength polymorphism (RFLP)mapwas constructed. Maylandet al. (1993) found that ash concentration (leaf and stem) of crested wheatgrass [Agropyron

  14. Abstract--A high frequency AC current-sourcing driver that can feed electrical loads with a constant current that is

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    maintaining high efficiency and low output crest factor. The CCTC is realized, in present work, by a multi's efficiency [1] ­ [3]. For example, fluorescent lamps need to be driven by a source that features high output approach would be to generate high frequency signal by a switch mode resonant inverter (Fig. 1) since

  15. Water resources data for Louisiana, water year 1996. Water-data report (Annual), 1 October 1995-30 September 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garrison, C.R.; Lovelace, W.M.; Montgomery, P.A.

    1997-05-01

    The report contains records for water discharge at 64 gaging stations; stage only for 41 gaging stations and 5 lakes; water quality for 38 surface-water stations (including 22 gage stations) and 100 wells; and water levels for 235 observation wells. Also included are data for 117 crest-stage and flood-profile partial-record stations.

  16. AUSTIN: A tool for Search Based Software Testing for the C Language and its Evaluation on Deployed Automotive Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harman, Mark

    Automotive Systems Kiran Lakhotia King's College London, CREST, Strand, London, WC2R 2LS, U.K. kiran of eight non­trivial, real- world C functions drawn from three embedded automotive software modules' to real industrial code from the automotive industry (see Section V) as well as a number of open source

  17. Allowed and forbidden transitions in artificial hydrogen and helium atoms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zumbühl, Dominik

    , Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0R6, Canada CREST Interacting Carrier Electron Project, 4-1-8 Honmachi, Kawaguchi of the material6 . Here we report electrical pump-and-probe experi- ments that probe the allowed and `forbidden by tunnelling spectroscopy, in which a peak in the derivative of the (source­drain) current with respect

  18. Programming with Logical Links: Design of the LMNtal language

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ueda, Kazunori

    -ku, Tokyo 169-8555, Japan {ueda,n-kato}@ueda.info.waseda.ac.jp CREST, Japan Science and Technology and Norio Kato Also, through such uniformity and resource-consciousness implied by (a) and (b) above, LMNtal rewriting languages. Given these two extensions, a natural question arises as to whether (the multiset

  19. STATISTICAL AND 3D NONLINEAR FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS OF SCHLEGEIS DAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balaji, Rajagopalan

    STATISTICAL AND 3D NONLINEAR FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS OF SCHLEGEIS DAM VICTOR SAOUMA, ERIC HANSEN is composed of two parts. First a statistical analysis of the dam crest displacement is performed, along with a prediction for the years 2000-2001. Then a 3D finite element analysis of Schlegeis dam is performed using

  20. From One of the A. O. C. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-03-05

    TRANSCRIPTION; MESSAGE: Dear Wife; This is the kind of work the Army Ordinace Corps, do out at the front [and] the crest on front is exactly like my cap badge I will try and get you one if I can for the time I come home ...

  1. THE EMERGENCE OF COHERENT WAVE GROUPS IN DEEP-WATER CLAUDIO VIOTTI, DENYS DUTYKH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    THE EMERGENCE OF COHERENT WAVE GROUPS IN DEEP-WATER RANDOM SEA CLAUDIO VIOTTI, DENYS DUTYKH , JOHN M. DUDLEY, AND FR´ED´ERIC DIAS Abstract. Extreme surface waves in deep-water long-crested sea-focussing mechanism of surface waves in deep water, furthermore, we narrow our study to the case of two spatial

  2. Mechanism of air entrainment by a disturbed liquid jet C. D. Ohl,a)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohl, Claus-Dieter

    Mechanism of air entrainment by a disturbed liquid jet C. D. Ohl,a) H. N. Og~uz, and A disturbances on a falling jet are a powerful agent for air entrainment at the free surface of a liquid pool, rather than a crest. It is found that no air is entrained in this case. The paper concludes with some

  3. Center of Excellence WIRELESS AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    Center of Excellence WIRELESS AND INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY CALL FOR PAPERS INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON CUTTING EDGE WIRELESS AND IT TECHNOLOGIES CREST HOLLOW COUNTRY CLUB, Woodbury, New York November 9, 2004 This conference, organized by the Center of Excellence in Wireless and Information Technology (CEWIT), at Stony

  4. A useful resorting in surface wave method with the Autojuggie

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tian, Gang; Steeples, Don W.; Xia, Jianghai; Spikes, Kyle T.

    2003-11-01

    @ku.edu. c° 2003 Society of Exploration Geophysicists. All rights reserved. top of a dam with an autojuggie. A new resorting method, pseudorollaway geometry, was introduced for the autojuggie data to meet the required standard CMP roll-along acquisition... format. Two-dimensional S-wave velocity fields with different horizontal sampling intervals were generated for subsequent comparison. GEOLOGICAL SETTING The data were collected along the crest of a dam across the street from the Kansas Geological Survey...

  5. Accelerating observers measure the period of the oscillations taking place in an acoustic wave (non-longitudinal case)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefan Popescu; Bernhard Rothenstein

    2006-08-01

    We consider a scenario that involves a stationary source of acoustic waves located at the origin of the K(XOY) inertial reference frame and a receiver that performs the hyperbolic motion at a constant altitude. The observer measures the proper reception time of successive wave crests. We investigate its dependence on the propagation speed of the wave and on the altitude at which the motion takes place.

  6. Blood and water; the archaeological excavation and historical analysis of the Wreck of the Industry, a North-American transport sloop chartered by the British army at the end of the Seven Years' War: British colonial navigation and trade to supply Spanish Florida in the eighteenth century 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franklin, Marianne

    2006-04-12

    .................................... 102 7-3 Iron Swivel Gun 8SJ3478-39............................................................... 104 7-4 Lead Container 8SJ3478-36................................................................ 108 7-5 Wooden Crate 8SJ3478... single cannon was recovered from the site during the 1998 field season. After cleaning, the gun was identified as a British six-pounder, incised with a broad arrow signifying its status as government property, bearing the crest of King George II (1727...

  7. Associations in Cambridge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Macfarlane, Alan

    2013-08-07

    and sustain a sense of identity by the use of various symbols. Each College has a particular colour – King’s is royal purple for example. This colour is incorporated along with a crest (when appropriate) into various other symbols – flags, college ties... members. Most Cambridge Colleges have published histories and the larger ones have several. These describe their foundation and subsequent history, famous events and illustrious ancestors and explain their architecture. The longer histories...

  8. Brachiopod genus Enteletes in Pennsylvanian deposits of Kansas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haglund, W. M.

    1967-11-30

    , and 3) length-thickness ratio as expressed in the reduced major axes, both in slope and intercept. Internally, Enteletes is characterized by a prominent median septum, crura-like brachiophore process, and a trilobed cardinal process. Study of shell... of Enteletes which occur in Kansas are here redescribed, discussed, and illustrated with particular emphasis on the nature of the fold. The number of crests on a fold are considered to lack diagnostic significance and accord- ingly E. costidorsitriplicatus...

  9. Reservoir Outflow (RESOUT) Model 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Purvis, Stuart Travis

    1988-01-01

    rating tables for a comprehensive range of outlet structure types and configurations, simulating a dam breach, routing a hydrograph through the reservoir, and performing drawdown analyses. The thesis describes the basic equations and computational... of Rating Curves Rating Curves for Uncontrolled Ogee Spillways Rating Curves for Uncontrolled Broad-crested Spillways Rating Curves for Spillway Gates Rating Curves for Drop Inlet Spillways Rating Curves for Outlet Works Breach Simulation Storage...

  10. NEW PARABLASTOIDS FROM THE WESTERN UNITED STATES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sprinkle, James; Sumrall, Colin D.

    2008-12-01

    , fused, conical or cylindrical oral crest unlike the peristomial cover plates found in Eurekablastus and probably Parabolablastus. Key words: Blastozoa, Echinodermata, systematics, Rocky Mountains, early Paleozoic introDuction Parablastoids are a small... units in the western and southwestern United States. Previous investigations The ?rst triangular deltoid plates of parablastoids from the Rocky Mountains were reported by Ross (1949, 1951) and ?gured in Ross (1968) from the upper Garden City Formation...

  11. Some criteria for the symmetry of stratified water waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Samuel Walsh

    2009-03-05

    This paper considers two-dimensional stably stratified steady periodic gravity water waves with surface profiles monotonic between crests and troughs. We provide sufficient conditions under which such waves are necessarily symmetric. This is done by first exploiting some elliptic structure in the governing equations to show that, in certain size regimes, a maximum principle holds. This then forms the basis for a method of moving planes argument.

  12. Optimization of condensing gas drive 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lofton, Larry Keith

    1977-01-01

    - cal, undersaturated reservoir with gas being injected into the crest and oil being produced from the base of the structure. Fractional oil re- covery at gas breakthrough proved to be less sensitive to changes in oil withdrawal rates as the gas... injection pressure was increased. The validity of the model was established by accurately simulating several low pressure gas drives conducted in the laboratory. Oil recoveries at gas breakthrough using the model compared closely with those recoveries...

  13. Coherent Structures in Turbulent Flow over Two-Dimensional River Dunes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Omidyeganeh, Mohammad

    2011-01-01

    We performed large-eddy simulations of the flow over a typical two-dimensional dune geometry at laboratory scale (the Reynolds number based on the average channel height and mean velocity is 18,900) using the Lagrangian dynamic eddy-viscosity subgrid-scale model. The flow separates at the dune crest and reattaches downstream on the bed (at x=5.7h). A favorable pressure gradient accelerates the flow over the stoss-side (the upward-sloping region for x > 8h) and an unfavorable gradient for x dune. Due to the separation of the flow, a shear layer is generated after the crest that expands in the wake region towards the next dune. The outer-layer turbulence structures are visualized through isosurfaces of pressure fluctuations colored by distance to the surface. Spanwise vortices are generated in the shear layer separating from the crest due to the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability. They are convected downstream and either interact with the wall or rise to the surfa...

  14. Belt conveyor apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Oakley, David J. (Richland, WA); Bogart, Rex L. (Kennewick, WA)

    1987-01-01

    A belt conveyor apparatus according to this invention defines a conveyance path including a first pulley and at least a second pulley. An endless belt member is adapted for continuous travel about the pulleys and comprises a lower portion which engages the pulleys and an integral upper portion adapted to receive objects therein at a first location on said conveyance path and transport the objects to a second location for discharge. The upper belt portion includes an opposed pair of longitudinally disposed crest-like members, biased towards each other in a substantially abutting relationship. The crest-like members define therebetween a continuous, normally biased closed, channel along the upper belt portion. Means are disposed at the first and second locations and operatively associated with the belt member for urging the normally biased together crest-like members apart in order to provide access to the continuous channel whereby objects can be received into, or discharged from the channel. Motors are in communication with the conveyance path for effecting the travel of the endless belt member about the conveyance path. The conveyance path can be configured to include travel through two or more elevations and one or more directional changes in order to convey objects above, below and/or around existing structures.

  15. Using the DuraCloud REST interface 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolton, Michael

    2015-10-01

    DI/HTFeed/ChkSums.pl ….. What are the Attributes curl -u ID:PSW https://?1898_Thesis_Ness_color.pdf HTTP/1.1 200 OK Server: Apache-Coyote/1.1 Set-Cookie: JSESSIONID=F3A…; Path=/durastore; Secure x-dura-meta-content-file-modified: 2012-10-12T...16:04:17.017 x-dura-meta-creator: mbolton Content-MD5: ceca17436c9184bc7a0852e51ae44c2a x-dura-meta-content-file-path: C:\\TDLDuraCloud\\1898_Thesis_Ness_color.pdf x-dura-meta-content-file-created: 2012-10-18T10:54:59.059 x-dura-meta...

  16. Low enthalpy convective system in Western Ohio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cannon, M.S.; Tabet, C.A.; Eckstein, Y.

    1980-01-01

    A distinct positive anomaly in the temperatures of the shallow (Pleistocene) aquifers along the Cincinnati-Findlay Arch in Western Ohio coincides with a low geothermal gradient. A conceptual model of convective currents associated with a tensional fault and/or fracture system along the crest of the Arch is suggested as an explanation of the anomaly. Hydrochemical information indicates that various quantities of warmer ground water, with the composition characteristics of deep bedrock aquifers, is present as an admixture in the shallow aquifers. This confirms the conceptual model of convection in fractures.

  17. What is Pseudonovibos spiralis?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Timm, Robert M.; Olson, Link E.; Brandt, John H.; Dioli, Maurizio

    2001-12-01

    ) pneumatization of the skull pronounced; (4) frontals flat and not enlarged, with posterior margin forming a ridge or crest between the horns. This combination of char- acters places the animal in the genus Bos following the definition provided by Groves (1981... molecularly inter- preted as being bogus, being derived from cow horns (Hassanin et al., 2001; Hassanin, submitted). (2) The five specimens identified as fakes (four de- scribed in the paper of Hassanin et al., 2001 and one in the paper of Kuznetsov et al...

  18. New hydrocracker complex: The master plan study report, volume 2. Export trade information

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-06-16

    The study, conducted by ABB Lummus Crest, was funded by the U.S. Trade and Development Agency. The purpose of the Master Plan is to aid in the implementation of the new hydrocracker complex at the Kirishi Refinery in Russia. The report contains financial information, including the project costs and the development of a financing plan. Also covered in the study is a marketing plan for both the domestic and export scenarios for products produced by the complex. This is Volume 2 of a three volume report and it is divided into the following sections: (2) Background and Introduction; (3) Project Profile; (4) Safety. Appendixes A and B follow.

  19. New hydrocracker complex: The master plan study report. Executive summary. Volume 1. Export trade information

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-06-16

    The study, conducted by ABB Lummus Crest, was funded by the U.S. Trade and Development Agency. The purpose of the Master Plan is to aid in the implementation of the new hydrocracker complex at the Kirishi Refinery in Russia. The report contains financial information, including the project costs and the development of a financing plan. Also covered in the study is a marketing plan for both the domestic and export scenarios for products produced by the complex. This is Volume 1 of a three volume report and it contains the Executive Summary.

  20. New hydrocracker complex: The master plan study report. Volume 3. Export trade information

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-06-16

    The study, conducted by ABB Lummus Crest, was funded by the U.S. Trade and Development Agency. The purpose of the Master Plan is to aid in the implementation of the new hydrocracker complex at the Kirishi Refinery in Kirishi, Russia. The report contains financial information, including the project costs and the development of a financing plan. Also covered in the study is a marketing plan for both the domestic and export scenarios for products produced by the complex. This is Volume 3 of a three volume report and is divided into the following sections: (5) Marketing Plan; (6) Project Costs and Economics; (7) Project Execution. Appendix C follows.

  1. Trimodal steady water waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mats Ehrnström; Erik Wahlén

    2013-10-31

    We construct three-dimensional families of small-amplitude gravity-driven rotational steady water waves on finite depth. The solutions contain counter-currents and multiple crests in each minimal period. Each such wave generically is a combination of three different Fourier modes, giving rise to a rich and complex variety of wave patterns. The bifurcation argument is based on a blow-up technique, taking advantage of three parameters associated with the vorticity distribution, the strength of the background stream, and the period of the wave.

  2. Traveling water waves with critical layers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ailo Aasen; Kristoffer Varholm

    2015-08-19

    We establish the existence of small-amplitude uni- and bimodal steady periodic gravity waves with an affine vorticity distribution. The solutions describe waves with critical layers and an arbitrary number of crests and troughs in each minimal period. Our bifurcation argument differs slightly from earlier theory, and under certain conditions we prove that the waves found are different from the ones in previous investigations. An important part of the analysis is a fairly complete description of the small-amplitude solutions. Finally, we investigate the asymptotic behavior of solutions on the local bifurcation set.

  3. The Biogeography of the Cloud Forest Herpetofauna of Middle America, with Special Reference to the Sierra de las Minas of Guatemala

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campbell, Jonathan A.

    1982-12-01

    Moctezuma. An extensive tract of cloud forest extends along the eastern slopes of the Sierra Madre Oriental from northeastern Hidalgo to the Teziutlan area of Puebla. The crest of the Sierra Madre Oriental swings eastward to the east of Teziutlan... and forms a spur known locally as the Sierra de Teziutlan. Because of the orientation of this portion of the massif to prevailing winds, as well as the effects of a rain-shadow caused by the highlands of the Volcan Cofre de Perote, a disjunction of cloud...

  4. A mathematical model for river delta development and its application to the new Brazos River delta at Freeport, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sealy, James Edward

    1974-01-01

    ?lacement by the longshore current 1s calculated using the assumntion that all of the wave energy dissipated in bottom friction is transferred into potent1al ener;y by causing the shore- ward movement of sed1ments. The result is later corre- lated with observed rate... orest of length b ( total energ y = . . '?, &:inca . '? 1: driven in ener?:~y per unit length of wave cre. , t) is now dif- fused alon', a crest of length bl (total ener y =- '&I!;"I). From this, b k: = t& Ei, thus '" ) ~ , 1n unit. of ener-y oer un1...

  5. The Polluter Pays Principle And The Remediation Of Land

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lees, Emma

    2015-01-01

    subparagraph of Article 174(2) EC and Article 15 of Directive 75/442 would be frustrated if such persons involved in causing waste escaped their financial obligations”.10 This must include those cases where another person in addition or instead of the causer... 13 EPA 1990, section 78F(3). 14 R (On the application of Crest Nicholson Residential Ltd) v Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs [2010] EWHC 1561 (Admin) [2011] Env. L.R. 1. See also Walker and Son (Hauliers) Ltd v Environment...

  6. War damages and reconstruction of Peruca dam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nonveiller, E.; Rupcic, J.; Sever, Z.

    1999-04-01

    The paper describes the heavy damages caused by blasting in the Peruca rockfill dam in Croatia in January 1993. Complete collapse of the dam by overtopping was prevented through quick action of the dam owner by dumping clayey gravel on the lowest sections of the dam crest and opening the bottom outlet of the reservoir, thus efficiently lowering the water level. After the damages were sufficiently established and alternatives for restoration of the dam were evaluated, it was decided to construct a diaphragm wall through the damaged core in the central dam part as the impermeable dam element and to rebuild the central clay core at the dam abutments. Reconstruction works are described.

  7. East Hemet, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, AlabamaETEC GmbH Jump to: navigation,Foothills, California:HamptonHazel Crest,Hemet,

  8. Crestline, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company)|Alabama: EnergyPennsylvania: EnergyCounty,Cresson,Crest,Ohio:

  9. Cedar Glen Lakes, New Jersey: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmentalBowerbank,CammackFLIR Jump to:RAPIDCavallo Energy Jump to:Iowa: EnergyCrest,

  10. Cedar Glen West, New Jersey: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmentalBowerbank,CammackFLIR Jump to:RAPIDCavallo Energy Jump to:Iowa: EnergyCrest,West, New

  11. Cedar Grove, New Jersey: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmentalBowerbank,CammackFLIR Jump to:RAPIDCavallo Energy Jump to:Iowa: EnergyCrest,West,

  12. Crestline, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePower VenturesInformation EU-UNDP ClimatePublic SchoolsCrested

  13. Criteria and Indicators for Sustainable Woodfuels | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePower VenturesInformation EU-UNDP ClimatePublic SchoolsCrestedCriteria and

  14. Criterion Wind Park | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePower VenturesInformation EU-UNDP ClimatePublic SchoolsCrestedCriteria

  15. Ionospheric total electron content, and far ultraviolet, near infrared oxygen emission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aghanajafi, C.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation is to calculate the total electron content and four oxygen emissions for solar cycle maximum at equinox season. The investigation shows that the total electron content reaches its maximum development at 2100 LT with the crest nearest to the equator being the greatest. This asymmetry reverses at 0200 LT when the crest farthest from the equator is smallest. In spite of the fact that while N{sub max} decreases at noon, and the layer becomes greater in altitude under the influence of the upward drift, the noon bite out occurs at the equator around 1200 Lt. The behavior of OI 6300 {angstrom}, the brightest dayglow source is investigated. The oxygen at 6300 {angstrom} is strongly a function of N{sub max} and h{sub max}. The data for the OI 6300 {angstrom} reveal that the latitudinal asymmetry is associated with the asymmetry in altitude of F{sub 2} peak. The maximum electron density height is strongly affected by vertical E {times} B drift velocity. The emission at 1356 {angstrom} and 7774 {angstrom} is calculated using the radiative recombination and ion-ion recombination processes. The ion-ion recombination has substantial effect in total emission rates. The intensity of OI 911 {angstrom} due to direct recombination to the ground state is obtained. These emissions can be used as a way of remotely sensing the F region and exosphere plasma properties, and the winds responsible for plasma transport.

  16. Wave breaking onset of two-dimensional deep-water wave groups in the presence and absence of wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saket, Arvin; Banner, Michael L; Barthelemy, Xavier; Allis, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    The criterion for the initiation of breaking demonstrated numerically by Barthelemy et al. (2015) has been investigated in the laboratory for unidirectional wave groups in deep-water and extended to include conditions of moderate wind forcing. Thermal Image Velocimetry was used to compare measurements of the crest surface water particle velocity (Us) with the wave crest velocity (C), as determined by an array of closely-spaced wave gauges. The energy flux ratio Bx = Us/C that distinguishes maximum recurrence from marginal breaking was found to be 0.840 $\\pm$ 0.016 in good agreement with the numerically determined value of 0.855. Further, the threshold was found to be robust for different classes of wave groups of distinct characteristic steepness at the breaking threshold. Increasing wind forcing from zero to U{\\lambda}/4/C0=1.42 increased this threshold by 2%. Increasing the spectral bandwidth (decreasing the Benjamin-Feir index from 0.39 to 0.31) systematically reduced the threshold by 1.5%.

  17. Vortices catapult droplets in atomization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jerome, J. John Soundar Zaleski, Stéphane; Hoepffner, Jérôme; Marty, Sylvain; Matas, Jean-Philippe

    2013-11-15

    A droplet ejection mechanism in planar two-phase mixing layers is examined. Any disturbance on the gas-liquid interface grows into a Kelvin-Helmholtz wave, and the wave crest forms a thin liquid film that flaps as the wave grows downstream. Increasing the gas speed, it is observed that the film breaks up into droplets which are eventually thrown into the gas stream at large angles. In a flow where most of the momentum is in the horizontal direction, it is surprising to observe these large ejection angles. Our experiments and simulations show that a recirculation region grows downstream of the wave and leads to vortex shedding similar to the wake of a backward-facing step. The ejection mechanism results from the interaction between the liquid film and the vortex shedding sequence: a recirculation zone appears in the wake of the wave and a liquid film emerges from the wave crest; the recirculation region detaches into a vortex and the gas flow over the wave momentarily reattaches due to the departure of the vortex; this reattached flow pushes the liquid film down; by now, a new recirculation vortex is being created in the wake of the wave—just where the liquid film is now located; the liquid film is blown up from below by the newly formed recirculation vortex in a manner similar to a bag-breakup event; the resulting droplets are catapulted by the recirculation vortex.

  18. Fault interaction near Hollister, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mavko, G.M.

    1982-09-10

    A numerical model is used to study fault stress slip near Hollister, California. The geometrically complex system of interacting faults, including the San Andreas, Calaveras, Sargent, and Busch faults, is approximated with a two-dimensional distribution of short planar fault segments in an elastic medium. The steady stress and slip rate are simulated by specifying frictional strength and stepping the remote stress ahead in time. The resulting computed fault stress is roughly proportional to the observed spatial density of small earthquakes, suggesting that the distinction between segments characterized by earthquakes and those with aseismic creep results, in part, from geometry. A nonsteady simulation is made by introducing, in addition, stress drops for individual moderate earthquakes. A close fit of observed creep with calculated slip on the Calaveras and San Andreas faults suggests that many changes in creep rate (averaged over several months) are caused by local moderate earthquakes. In particular, a 3-year creep lag preceding the August 6, 1979, Coyote Lake earthquake on the Calaveras fault seems to have been a direct result of the November 28, 1974, Thanksgiving Day earthquake on the Busch fault. Computed lags in slip rate preceding some other moderate earthquakes in the area are also due to earlier earthquakes. Although the response of the upper 1 km of the fault zone may cause some individual creep events and introduce delays in others, the long-term rate appears to reflect deep slip.

  19. Precision guided parachute LDRD final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilkey, J.C. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Aided Navigation and Remote Sensing Dept.

    1996-07-01

    This report summarizes the results of the Precision Guided Parachute LDRD, a two year program at Sandia National Laboratories which developed a Global Positioning System (GPS) guided parachute capable of autonomous flight and landings. A detailed computer model of a gliding parachute was developed for software only simulations. A hardware in-the-loop simulator was developed and used for flight package system integration and design validation. Initial parachute drop tests were conducted at Sandia`s Coyote Canyon Cable Facility, followed by a series of airdrops using Ross Aircraft`s Twin Otter at the Burris Ranch Drop Zone. Final flights demonstrated in-flight wind estimation and the capability to fly a commanded heading. In the past, the cost and logistical complexity of an initial navigation system ruled out actively guiding a parachute. The advent of the low-cost, light-weight Global Positioning System (GPS) has eliminated this barrier. By using GPS position and velocity measurements, a guided parachute can autonomously steer itself to a targeted point on the ground through the use of control drums attached to the control lanyards of the parachute. By actively correcting for drop point errors and wind drift, the guidance accuracy of this system should be on the order of GPS position errors. This would be a significant improvement over unguided airdrops which may have errors of a mile or more.

  20. A high-elevation, multi-proxy biotic and environmental record of MIS 6–4 from the Ziegler Reservoir fossil site, Snowmass Village, Colorado, USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ian M. Miller; Mitchell A. Plummer; Various Others

    2014-10-01

    In North America, terrestrial records of biodiversity and climate change that span Marine Oxygen Isotope Stage (MIS) 5 are rare. Where found, they provide insight into how the coupling of the ocean–atmosphere system is manifested in biotic and environmental records and how the biosphere responds to climate change. In 2010–2011, construction at Ziegler Reservoir near Snowmass Village, Colorado (USA) revealed a nearly continuous, lacustrine/wetland sedimentary sequence that preserved evidence of past plant communities between ~140 and 55 ka, including all of MIS 5. At an elevation of 2705 m, the Ziegler Reservoir fossil site also contained thousands of well-preserved bones of late Pleistocene megafauna, including mastodons, mammoths, ground sloths, horses, camels, deer, bison, black bear, coyotes, and bighorn sheep. In addition, the site contained more than 26,000 bones from at least 30 species of small animals including salamanders, otters, muskrats, minks, rabbits, beavers, frogs, lizards, snakes, fish, and birds. The combination of macro- and micro-vertebrates, invertebrates, terrestrial and aquatic plant macrofossils, a detailed pollen record, and a robust, directly dated stratigraphic framework shows that high-elevation ecosystems in the Rocky Mountains of Colorado are climatically sensitive and varied dramatically throughout MIS 5

  1. Endangered species and cultural resources program Naval petroleum Reserves in California. Annual report FY96

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-07-01

    In FY96, Enterprise Advisory Services, Inc. (EASI) continued to support efforts to protect endangered species and cultural resources at the Naval Petroleum Reserves in California (NPRC). These efforts are conducted to ensure NPRC compliance with regulations regarding the protection of listed species and cultural resources on federal properties. Population monitoring activities were conducted for San Joaquin kit foxes, giant kangaroo rats, blunt-nosed leopard lizards, and Hoover`s wooly-star. Kit fox abundance and distribution was assessed by live-trapping over a 329-km{sup 2} area. Kit fox reproduction and mortality were assessed by radiocollaring and monitoring 22 adults and two pups. Reproductive success and litter size were determined through live-trapping and den observations. Rates and sources of kit fox mortality were assessed by recovering dead radiocollared kit foxes and conducting necropsies to determine cause of death. Abundance of coyotes and bobcats, which compete with kit foxes, was determined by conducting scent station surveys. Kit fox diet was assessed through analysis of fecal samples collected from live-trapped foxes. Abundance of potential prey for kit foxes was determined by conducting transect surveys for lagornorphs and live-trapping small mammals.

  2. Renewable Energy Cost Modeling. A Toolkit for Establishing Cost-Based Incentives in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gifford, Jason S.; Grace, Robert C.; Rickerson, Wilson H.

    2011-05-01

    This report serves as a resource for policymakers who wish to learn more about levelized cost of energy (LCOE) calculations, including cost-based incentives. The report identifies key renewable energy cost modeling options, highlights the policy implications of choosing one approach over the other, and presents recommendations on the optimal characteristics of a model to calculate rates for cost-based incentives, FITs, or similar policies. These recommendations shaped the design of NREL's Cost of Renewable Energy Spreadsheet Tool (CREST), which is used by state policymakers, regulators, utilities, developers, and other stakeholders to assist with analyses of policy and renewable energy incentive payment structures. Authored by Jason S. Gifford and Robert C. Grace of Sustainable Energy Advantage LLC and Wilson H. Rickerson of Meister Consultants Group, Inc.

  3. Rheological study of polymer flow past rough surfaces with slip boundary conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anoosheh Niavarani; Nikolai V. Priezjev

    2008-08-11

    The slip phenomena in thin polymer films confined by either flat or periodically corrugated surfaces are investigated by molecular dynamics and continuum simulations. For atomically flat surfaces and weak wall-fluid interactions, the shear rate dependence of the slip length has a distinct local minimum which is followed by a rapid increase at higher shear rates. For corrugated surfaces with wavelength larger than the radius of gyration of polymer chains, the effective slip length decays monotonically with increasing corrugation amplitude. At small amplitudes, this decay is reproduced accurately by the numerical solution of the Stokes equation with constant and rate-dependent local slip length. When the corrugation wavelength is comparable to the radius of gyration, the continuum predictions overestimate the effective slip length obtained from molecular dynamics simulations. The analysis of the conformational properties indicates that polymer chains tend to stretch in the direction of shear flow above the crests of the wavy surface.

  4. Density waves in the shearing sheet I. Swing amplification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Fuchs

    2001-03-02

    The shearing sheet model of a galactic disk is studied anew. The theoretical description of its dynamics is based on three building blocks: Stellar orbits, which are described here in epicyclic approximation, the collisionless Boltzmann equation determining the distribution function of stars in phase space, and the Poisson equation in order to take account of the self-gravity of the disk. Using these tools I develop a new formalism to describe perturbations of the shearing sheet. Applying this to the unbounded shearing sheet model I demonstrate again how the disturbances of the disk evolve always into `swing amplified' density waves, i.e. spiral-arm like, shearing density enhancements, which grow and decay while the wave crests swing by from leading to trailing orientation. Several examples are given how such `swing amplification' events are incited in the shearing sheet.

  5. The challenge for the coiled-tubing industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blount, C.G.

    1994-05-01

    From Aug. 9 through 14, 1992, approximately 80 individuals from throughout the globe met in a seemingly remote area of the Colorado Rocky Mountains with one common bond: advancement of coiled-tubing (CT) technology. Numerous ideas and opinions were generated at the SPE Forum Series meeting to create a long list of areas with high leveraging potential (high return on investment) for an oil industry well below the crest of a boom'' cycle. However, from the master list, each individual was given the opportunity to vote for only three issues that they felt were the most pressing. The 17 items that survived the exercise are listed below, prioritized'' by this group's vote. A year and a half later, where do these leveraging ideas fit into the overall CT industry picture The paper reviews progress.

  6. Instability of large solitary water waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhiwu Lin

    2008-03-03

    We consider the linearized instability of 2D irrotational solitary water waves. The maxima of energy and the travel speed of solitary waves are not obtained at the highest wave, which has a 120 degree angle at the crest. Under the assumption of non-existence of secondary bifurcation which is confirmed numerically, we prove linear instability of solitary waves which are higher than the wave of maximal energy and lower than the wave of maximal travel speed. It is also shown that there exist unstable solitary waves approaching the highest wave. The unstable waves are of large amplitude and therefore this type of instability can not be captured by the approximate models derived under small amplitude assumptions. For the proof, we introduce a family of nonlocal dispersion operators to relate the linear instability problem with the elliptic nature of solitary waves. A continuity argument with a moving kernel formula is used to study these dispersion operators to yield the instability criterion.

  7. Water resources data for New Hampshire and Vermont, water year 1995. Water-data report (Annual), 1 October 1994-30 September 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hammond, R.E.; Coakley, M.F.; Keirstead, C.; Kiah, R.G.

    1996-07-01

    Water-resources data for the 1995 water year for New Hampshire and Vermont consists of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; contents of lakes and reservoirs; and ground-water levels. The report contains discharge records for 72 gaging stations, stage records for 5 lakes, monthend contents for 23 lakes and reservoirs, water quality for 9 gaging stations and water levels for 26 observation wells. Also included are data for 18 crest-stage partial-record stations. Additional water data were collected at various sites, not part of the systematic data-collection program and are published as miscellaneous measurements. A few pertinent stations in bordering states are also included in the report. These data represent that portion of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in New Hampshire and Vermont.

  8. Geothermal Brief: Market and Policy Impacts Update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Speer, B.

    2012-10-01

    Utility-scale geothermal electricity generation plants have generally taken advantage of various government initiatives designed to stimulate private investment. This report investigates these initiatives to evaluate their impact on the associated cost of energy and the development of geothermal electric generating capacity using conventional hydrothermal technologies. We use the Cost of Renewable Energy Spreadsheet Tool (CREST) to analyze the effects of tax incentives on project economics. Incentives include the production tax credit, U.S. Department of Treasury cash grant, the investment tax credit, and accelerated depreciation schedules. The second half of the report discusses the impact of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Loan Guarantee Program on geothermal electric project deployment and possible reasons for a lack of guarantees for geothermal projects. For comparison, we examine the effectiveness of the 1970s DOE drilling support programs, including the original loan guarantee and industry-coupled cost share programs.

  9. Water resources data for Louisiana, water year 1995. Water data report (Annual), 1 October 1994-30 September 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garrison, C.R.; Lovelace, W.M.; Montgomery, P.A.

    1996-05-01

    Water resources data for the 1995 water year for Louisiana consists of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage, contents, and water quality of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality of ground water. This report contains records for water discharge at 65 gaging stations; stage only for 40 gaging stations and 6 lakes; water quality for 45 surface-water stations (including 23 gage stations) and 76 wells; and water levels for 217 observation wells. Also included are data for 113 crest-stage and flood-profile partial-record stations. Additional water data were collected at various sites not involved in the systematic data-collection program, and are published as miscellaneous measurements.

  10. Water resources data for Louisiana, water year 1994. Water-data report (Annual), 1 October 1993-30 September 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garrison, C.R.; Lovelace, W.M.; Montgomery, P.A.

    1995-03-01

    Water resources data for the 1994 water year for Louisiana consists of records for stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage, contents, and water quality of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality of ground water. This report contains records for water discharge at 64 gaging stations; stage only for 45 gaging stations and 6 lakes; water quality for 51 surface-water stations (including 24 gage stations) and 84 wells; and water levels for 209 observations wells. Also included are data for 115 crest-stage and flood-profile partial-record stations. Additional water data were collected at various sites not involved in the systematic data-collection program, and are published as miscellaneous measurements.

  11. Recuperator construction for a gas turbine engine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kang, Yungmo; McKeirnan, Jr., Robert D.

    2006-12-12

    A counter-flow recuperator formed from annular arrays of recuperator core segments. The recuperator core segments are formed from two opposing sheets of fin fold material coined to form a primary surface zone disposed between two flattened manifold zones. Each primary surface zone has undulating corrugations including a uniform, full height central portion and a transition zone disposed between the central portion and one of the manifold zones. Corrugations of the transition zone rise from zero adjacent to the manifold zone and increase along a transition length to full crest height at the central portion. The transition lengths increase in a direction away from an inner edge containing the air inlet so as to equalize air flow to the distal regions of the primary surface zone.

  12. Problems encountered in establishing a historical erosion-rate database for the Illinois coast of Lake Michigan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chrzastowski, M.J.; Erdmann, A.L.; Stohr, C.J. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States))

    1992-01-01

    Erosion rates for segments of the Lake Michigan coast at Lake County, Illinois were determined from historical maps prepared by the US Lake Survey and aerial photographs collected for the State of Illinois. Shorelines and blufflines were digitized at 1:20,000 scale for 1872--73, 1910--11, 1947, and 1987; these data were registered to 1:24,000-scale USGS digital line graphs. Erosion rates were calculated from temporal changes on shore-normal transects at 50-m spacing. Three major factors were identified pertinent to future digital mapping of historical coastal changes along similar Great Lakes coasts. (1) Ground-control points and points for rubber sheeting must be carefully selected to ensure these points were stable. For example, road intersections had changed position 15 m or more between early and late data sets. (2) Unlike US ocean coasts, the Great Lakes do not have a standard datum for shoreline mapping, and shorelines are commonly shown for the lake level at the time of the survey. Variation in historical, monthly mean lake level (1.9 m max. range for Lake Michigan) can cause significant shoreline differences between data sets. Shoreline translations of tens of meters may be needed to adjust to a common datum. (3) The bluff crest may not always be an ideal reference line for documenting rates of coastal change. Locally and temporally, recession of the bluff crest may be caused by a variety of slope processes that are independent of wave erosion. Along some bluff coasts, the bluff toe, if carefully defined, may be a more appropriate reference for calculating erosion rates strictly due to coastal processes.

  13. 100-N Area Strontium-90 Treatability Demonstration Project: Food Chain Transfer Studies for Phytoremediation Along the 100-N Columbia River Riparian Zone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fellows, Robert J.; Fruchter, Jonathan S.; Driver, Crystal J.

    2009-04-01

    Strontium-90 (90Sr) exceeds the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s drinking water standards for groundwater (8 picocuries/L) by as much as a factor of 1000 at several locations within the Hanford 100-N Area and along the 100-N Area Columbia River shoreline). Phytoextraction, a managed remediation technology in which plants or integrated plant/rhizosphere systems are employed to phytoextract and/or sequester 90Sr, is being considered as a potential remediation system along the riparian zone of the Columbia River as part of a treatment train that includes an apatite barrier to immobilize groundwater transport of 90Sr. Phytoextraction would employ coyote willow (Salix exigua) to extract 90Sr from the vadose zone soil and aquifer sediments (phytoextraction) and filter 90Sr (rhizofiltration) from the shallow groundwater along the riparian zone of the Columbia River. The stem and foliage of coyote willows accumulating 90Sr may present not only a mechanism to remove the contaminant but also can be viewed as a source of nutrition for natural herbivores, therefore becoming a potential pathway for the isotope to enter the riparian food chain. Engineered barriers such as large and small animal fencing constructed around the field plot will control the intrusion of deer, rodents, birds, and humans. These efforts, however, will have limited effect on mobile phytophagous insects. Therefore, this study was undertaken to determine the potential for food chain transfer by insects prior to placement of the remediation technology at 100-N. Insect types include direct consumers of the sap or liquid content of the plants vascular system (xylem and phloem) by aphids as well as those that would directly consume the plant foliage such as the larvae (caterpillars) of Lepidoptera species. Heavy infestations of aphids feeding on the stems and leaves of willows growing in 90Sr-contaminated soil can accumulate a small amount (~0.15 ± 0.06%) of the total label removed from the soil by the plant over a 17-day exposure period. The 90Sr in the exuded honeydew during this period amounted to 1.17 ± 0.28% of this total label. The honeydew would eventually be deposited into the soil at the base of the plant, but the activity would be so dispersed as to be undetectable. Moth larvae will consume 90Sr contaminated leaves but retain very little of the label (~0.02%) and only that contained in their digestive tracts. As the moths pupated and became adults, they contained no detectable amounts of 90Sr. Over the 10-day exposure period, ~4% of the phytoextracted 90Sr was lost from the plant as moth feces. However, like the honeydew, feces dispersed into the soil were undetectable. As the plant diminishes the content of 90Sr in the soil, the activity of the label in the leaves and new stems would also diminish. The results of these studies indicate that the risk for detectable transfer of 90Sr from willow trees growing in the contaminated soil along the 100-N shoreline through the food chain of herbivorous insects would be very slight to non-existent

  14. 100-N Area Strontium-90 Treatability Demonstration Project: Phytoextraction Along the 100-N Columbia River Riparian Zone – Field Treatability Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fellows, Robert J.; Fruchter, Jonathan S.; Driver, Crystal J.; Ainsworth, Calvin C.

    2010-01-11

    Strontium-90 (90Sr) is present both in the aquifer near the river and in the vadose and riparian zones of the river’s shore at 100-NR-2. Phytoextraction of 90Sr is being considered as a potential remediation system along the riparian zone of the Columbia River. Phytoextraction would employ coyote willow (Salix exigua). Past studies have shown that willow roots share uptake mechanisms for Sr with Ca, a plant macronutrient as well as no discrimination between Sr and 90Sr. Willow 90Sr concentration ratios [CR’s; (pCi 90Sr/g dry wt. of new growth tissue)/(pCi 90Sr/g soil porewater)] were consistently greater than 65 with three-quarters of the assimilated label partitioned into the above ground shoot. Insect herbivore experiments also demonstrated no significant potential for bioaccumulation or food chain transfer from their natural activities. The objectives of this field study were three-fold: (1) to demonstrate that a viable, “managed” plot of coyote willows can be established on the shoreline of the Columbia River that would survive the same microenvironment to be encountered at the 100-NR-2 shoreline; (2) to show through engineered barriers that large and small animal herbivores can be prevented from feeding on these plants; and (3) to show that once established, the plants will provide sufficient biomass annually to support the phytoextraction technology. A field treatability demonstration plot was established on the Columbia River shoreline alongside the 100-K West water intake at the end of January 2007. The plot was delimited by a 3.05 m high chain-link fence and was approximately 10 x 25 m in size. A layer of fine mesh metal small animal screening was placed around the plot at the base of the fencing to a depth of 45 cm. A total of sixty plants were placed in six slightly staggered rows with 1-m spacing between plants. The actual plot size was 0.00461 hectare (ha). At the time of planting (March 12, 2007), the plot was located about 10 m from the river’s edge. Less than two weeks later (March 21), the river began the spring rise. Periodic (daily) or continuous flooding occurred at the site over the next 3 to 4 months. River levels at times were over the top of the enclosure’s fence. This same pattern was repeated for the next 2 years. It was however evident that even submerged for part, or all of the day, that the plants continued to flourish. There were no indications of herbivory or animal tracks observed within the plot although animals were present in the area. Biomass production over the three years followed a typical growth curve with a yield of about 1 kg for the first year when the trees were establishing themselves, 4 kg for the second, and over 20 kg for the third when the trees were entering the exponential phase of growth. On a metric Ton per hectare (mT/ha) basis this would be 0.2 mT/ha in 2007, 0.87 mT/ha in 2008, and 4.3 mT/ha in 2009. Growth curve extrapolation predicts 13.2 mT/ha during a fourth year and potentially 29.5 mT/ha following a fifth year. Using the observed Ca and Sr concentrations found in the plant tissues, and Sr CR’s calculated from groundwater analysis, projected biomass yields suggest the trees could prove effective in removing the contaminant from the 100-NR-2 riparian zone.

  15. Sedimentological and geophysical studies of clastic reservoir analogs: Methods, applications and developments of ground-penetrating radar for determination of reservoir geometries in near-surface settings. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McMechan, G.A.; Soegaard, K.

    1998-05-25

    An integrated sedimentologic and GPR investigation has been carried out on a fluvial channel sandstone in the mid-Cretaceous Ferron Sandstone at Coyote Basin along the southwestern flank of the San Rafael Uplift in east-central Utah. This near-surface study, which covers a area of 40 {times} 16.5 meters to a depth of 15 meters, integrates detailed stratigraphic data from outcrop sections and facies maps with multi-frequency 3-D GPR surveys. The objectives of this investigation are two-fold: (1) to develop new ground-penetrating radar (GPR) technology for imaging shallow subsurface sandstone bodies, and (2) to construct an empirical three-dimensional sandstone reservoir model suitable for hydrocarbon flow-simulation by imaging near-surface sandstone reservoir analogs with the use of GPR. The sedimentological data base consists of a geologic map of the survey area and a detailed facies map of the cliff face immediately adjacent to the survey area. Five vertical sections were measured along the cliff face adjacent to the survey area. In addition, four wells were cored within the survey area from which logs were recorded. In the sections and well logs primary sedimentary structures were documented along with textural information and permeability data. Gamma-ray profiles were also obtained for all sections and core logs. The sedimentologic and stratigraphic information serves as the basis from which much of the processing and interpretation of the GPR data was made. Three 3-D GPR data sets were collected over the survey area at frequencies of 50 MHZ, 100 MHZ, and 200 MHZ.

  16. Hematologic values of the endangered San Joaquin kit fox, Vulpes macrotis mutica

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCue, P.M.; O'Farrell, T.P.

    1986-01-01

    Between 1981 and 1982 a total of 102 blood samples was collected from 91 San Joaquin kit foxes, Vulpes macrotis mutica, won the US Department of Energy's Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (Elk Hills), in western Kern County, California. The goal of the study was to establish normal blood parameters for this endangered species and to determine whether changes in them could be used to assess the possible effects of petroleum developments on foxes. Adult foxes had the following average hematological characteristics: RBC, 8.4 x 10/sup 6/ cells/..mu..l; Hb, 14.9 g/dl; PCV, 46.9%; MCV, 56.4 fl; MCH, 18.2 pg; MCHC, 32.0 g/dl; and WBC, 6900/..mu..l. None of the parameters differed significantly between the sexes. RBC, Hb, PCV, MCV, and MCHC varied as a function of age for puppies between three and six months of age. The highest values of MCV and MCH were obtained in summer, 1982, and the highest value of MCHC was obtained in winter, 1981-1982. These were the only parameters that appeared to change with season. None of the blood parameters appeared to be affected by petroleum developments. Hematological data for kit foxes, coyotes, and wolves confirmed a previously published observation that within mammalian families RBC is inversely correlated with body weight, and that MCV is directly correlated with body weight. It was speculated that it was an adaptive advantage for kit foxes having a high weight-specific metabolic rate to have evolved a high RBC and low MCV, allowing increased oxygen transport and exchange, while PCV was maintained relatively constant, avoiding hemoconcentration and increased viscosity of blood. 33 refs., 1 fig., 6 tabs.

  17. Biological assessment of the effects of petroleum production at maximum efficient rate, Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (Elk Hills), Kern County, California, on the endangered San Joaquin kit fox, Vulpes macrotis mutica

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Farrell, T.P.; Harris, C.E.; Kato, T.T.; McCue, P.M.

    1986-06-01

    Between 1980 and 1986 DOE sponsored field studies to gather sufficient information to determine the status of the species on Naval Petroleum Reserve-1 and to evaluate the possible effects of MER. Transect surveys were conducted in 1979 and 1984 to document the distribution and relative density of fox dens. Radiotelemetry studies were initiated to provide information on reproductive success, den use patterns, responses to petroleum field activities, food habits, movement patterns and home ranges, and sources and rates of mortality. Techniques for conducting preconstruction surveys to minimize possible negative effects of MER activities on foxes plus a habitat restoration program were developed and implemented. DOE determined during this biological assessment that the construction projects and operational activities necessary to achieve and sustain MER may have adversely affected the San Joaquin kit fox and its habitat. However, the direct, indirect, and cumulative effects of MER will not jeopardize the continued existence of the species because: (1) results of the extensive field studies did not provide evidence that MER effected negative changes in relative abundance, reproductive success, and dispersal of the species; (2) a successful policy of conducting preconstruction surveys to protect kit fox, their dens, and portions of their habitat was initiated; (3) the Secretary of the Interior did not designate critical habitat; (4) a habitat restoration plan was developed and implemented; (5) a monitoring program was implemented to periodically assess the status of kit fox; (6) a coyote control program was established with FWS to reduce predation on fox; and (7) administrative policies to reduce vehicle speeds, contain oil spills, restrict off-road vehicle (ORV) travel, and to prohibit hunting, trapping, livestock grazing, and agricultural activities, were maintained to protect kit fox.

  18. Endangered species and cultural resources program, Naval Petroleum Reserves in California: Annual report FY95

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-04-01

    In FY95, EG and G Energy Measurements, Inc. (EG and G/EM) continued to support efforts to protect endangered species and cultural resources at the Naval Petroleum Reserves in California (NPRC). These efforts are conducted to ensure NPRC compliance with regulations regarding the protection of listed species and cultural resources on Federal properties. Population monitoring activities are conducted annually for San Joaquin kit foxes, giant kangaroo rats, blunt-nosed leopard lizards, and Hoover`s wooly-star. To mitigate impacts of oil field activities on listed species, 674 preactivity surveys covering approximately 211 hectares (521 acres) were conducted in FY95. EG and G/EM also assisted with mitigating effects from third-party projects, primarily by conducting biological and cultural resource consultations with regulatory agencies. EG and G/EM has conducted an applied habitat reclamation program at NPRC since 1985. In FY95, an evaluation of revegetation rates on reclaimed and non-reclaimed disturbed lands was completed, and the results will be used to direct future habitat reclamation efforts at NPRC. In FY95, reclamation success was monitored on 50 sites reclaimed in 1985. An investigation of factors influencing the distribution and abundance of kit foxes at NPRC was initiated in FY94. Factors being examined include habitat disturbance, topography, grazing, coyote abundance, lagomorph abundance, and shrub density. This investigation continued in FY95 and a manuscript on this topic will be completed in FY96. Also, Eg and G/EM completed collection of field data to evaluate the effects of a well blow-out on plant and animal populations. A final report will be prepared in FY96. Finally, EG and G/EM completed a life table analysis on San Joaquin kit foxes at NPRC.

  19. An experimental investigation of the dynamics of submarine leveed channel initiation as sediment-laden density currents experience sudden unconfinement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rowland, Joel C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hilley, George E [STANFORD UNIV; Fildani, Andrea [CHEVRON ETC

    2009-01-01

    Leveed submarine channels play a critical role in the transfer of sediment from the upper continental slopes to interslope basins and ultimately deepwater settings. Despite a reasonable understanding of how these channels grow once established, how such channels initiate on previously unchannelized portions of the seafloor remains poorly understood. We conducted a series of experiments that elucidate the influence of excess density relative to flow velocity on the dynamics of, and depositional morphologies arising from, density currents undergoing sudden unconfinement across a sloped bed. Experimental currents transported only suspended sediment across a non-erodible substrate. Under flow conditions ranging from supercritical to subcritical (bulk Richardson numbers of 0.02 to 1.2) our experiments failed to produce deposits resembling or exhibiting the potential to evolve into self-formed leveed channels. In the absence of excess density, a submerged sediment-laden flow produced sharp crested lateral deposits bounding the margins of the flow for approximately a distance of two outlet widths down basin. These lateral deposits terminated in a centerline deposit that greatly exceeded marginal deposits in thickness. As excess density increased relative to the outlet velocity, the rate of lateral spreading of the flow increased relative to the downstream propagation of the density current, transitioning from a narrow flow aligned with the channel outlet to a broad radially expanding flow. Coincident with these changes in flow dynamics, the bounding lateral deposits extended for shorter distances, had lower, more poorly defined crests that were increasingly wider in separation than the initial outlet, and progressively became more oblong rather than linear. Based on our results, we conclude that leveed channels cannot initiate from sediment-laden density currents under strictly depositional conditions. Partial confinement of these currents appears to be necessary to establish the hydrodynamic conditions needed for sediment deposition along the margins of a density current which ultimately may evolve into confining levees. We suggest that erosion into a previously unchannelized substrate is the mostly likely source of this partial confinement.

  20. Geologic reconnaissance of natural fore-reef slope and a large submarine rockfall exposure, Enewetak Atoll

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halley, R.B.; Slater, R.A.

    1987-05-01

    In 1958 a submarine rockfall exposed a cross section through the reef and fore-reef deposits along the northwestern margin of Enewetak Atoll, Marshall Islands. Removal of more than 10/sup 8/ MT of rock left a cirque-shaped submarine scarp 220 m high, extending back 190 m into the modern reef, and 1000 m along the reef trend. The scarp exposed older, steeply dipping beds below 220 m along which the rockfall detached. They sampled this exposure and the natural fore-reef slope surrounding it in 1984 and 1985 using a manned submersible. The natural slope in this area is characterized by three zone: (1) the reef plate, crest, and near fore reef that extends from sea level to -16 m, with a slope of less than 10/sup 0/, (2) the bypass slope that extends from -16 to -275 m, with slopes of 55/sup 0/ decreasing to 35/sup 0/ near the base, and (3) a debris slope of less than 35/sup 0/ below -275 m. Vertical walls, grooves, and chutes, common on other fore-reef slopes, are sparse on the northwestern slope of Enewetak. The scarp exposes three stratigraphic units that are differentiated by surficial appearance: (1) a near-vertical wall from the reef crest to 76 m that appears rubbly, has occasional debris-covered ledges, and is composed mainly of coral; (2) a vertical to overhanging wall from -76 m to -220 m that is massive and fractured, and has smooth, blocky surfaces; and (3) inclined bedding below -220 m along which the slump block has fractured, exposing a dip slope of hard, dense, white limestone and dolomite that extends below -400 m. Caves occur in all three units. Open cement-lined fractures and voids layered with cements are most common in the middle unit, which now lies within the thermocline. Along the sides of the scarp are exposed fore-reef boulder beds dipping at 30/sup 0/ toward the open sea; the steeper (55/sup 0/) dipping natural surface truncates these beds, which gives evidence of the erosional nature of the bypass slope.

  1. Impact of 15 Jan 2010 annular solar eclipse on the equatorial and low latitude ionosphere over Indian region from Magnetometer, Ionosonde and GPS observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Panda, Sampad Kumar; Rajaram, Girija; Sripathi, Samireddipalle; Bhaskar, Ankush

    2015-01-01

    The annular eclipse of Jan 15, 2010 over southern India was studied with a network of multi-instrumental observations consisting magnetometer, ionosonde and GPS receivers. By selecting the day before and the normal EEJ days as the control days, it is intrinsically proved that the regular eastward electric field for the whole day at the equator was not just weakened but actually was flipped for several hours by the influence of tides related to the spectacular Sun-Moon-Earth alignment near the middle of the day. The effect of flipping the electric field was clearly seen in the equatorial ionosonde data and through the large array of GPS receivers that accomplished the TEC data. The main impact of the change in the electric field was the reduced EIA at all latitudes, with the anomaly crest that shifted towards the equator. The equatorial F-region density profile was also showing an enhanced F region peak in spite of a reduced VTEC. By comparison to the plasma density depletion associated with the temporary lack...

  2. Pool scrubbing under jet injection regime: An enhancement of the SPARC90 code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herranz, L. E. [Unit of Nuclear Safety Research, Div. of Nuclear Fission, CIEMAT, Avda.Complutense 40, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Berna, C.; Escriva, A.; Munoz-Cobo, J. L. [Instituto de Ingenieria Energetica, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia UPV, Camino de Vera 14, 46022 Valencia (Spain)

    2012-07-01

    The SPARC90 code was developed to calculate the aerosol pool trapping during vent discharge processes, at low gas velocities. However, there are accident sequences, like SGTR core meltdown sequences, at which particle laden gases reach the aqueous ponds at very high velocities and new particle removal mechanisms become effective right at the inlet. As a result of the shearing off of roll wave water crests, water droplets are entrained in the gas core and sweep out aerosol particles, mainly by inertial impaction and interception. This paper summarizes the update of the SPARC90 code based on state-of-the-art equations for jet hydrodynamics and aerosol removal. Equations for variables like droplets population, size and velocity have been implemented. Based on the anticipated conditions in case of an SGTR severe accident sequence, comparisons of estimates from this new version (SPAR90-Jet) and the original one are set in terms of decontamination factor. Even though further work is still ahead, this work highlights how substantial particle retention at the pool inlet can reach under jet regime and how different aerosol removal mechanisms are with respect to the globule injection regime. (authors)

  3. The use of balanced cross sections to design the Cymric/McKittrick area Tulare steamfloods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunn, J.F. (Chevron USA, Inc., Bakersfield, CA (United States))

    1991-02-01

    Recently developed techniques of cross section balancing by the kink method are being used to precisely define the structure of the Tulare Formation fold belt in one area of the Cymric/McKittrick Oil field, San joaquin Valley, California. The Tulare fold belt is a series of northeast-verging, fault-propagation folds that are detached near the base of the Tulare Formation. Good sand continuity and a detailed understanding of the reservoir structural geometry is necessary for successful steamflooding, requiring a rigorous method of structural interpretation to precisely define this highly-folded area. Because of reservoir depletion over the crest of anticlines in Cymric, experience has shown that the most successful steamflood configuration is a staggered line drive with both the producers and injectors located as close to the synclinal axes as possible. This promotes maximum heating and drainage of the reservoir. This configuration is most effective in steeply-dipping reservoirs, although producers downdip of injectors produce the most oil and experience the least amount of steam break-through even in fairly moderately dipping (20{degree}) reservoirs.

  4. Oil gravity distribution in the diatomite at South Belridge Field, Kern County, CA: Implications for oil sourcing and migration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hill, D.W.; Sande, J.J. [Shell Western E& P Inc., Bakersfield, CA (United States); Doe, P.H. [Shell Development Co., Houston, TX (United States)

    1995-04-01

    Understanding oil gravity distribution in the Belridge Diatomite has led to economic infill development and specific enhanced recovery methods for targeted oil properties. To date more than 100 wells have provided samples used to determining vertical and areal distribution of oil gravity in the field. Detailed geochemical analyses were also conducted on many of the oil samples to establish different oil types, relative maturities, and to identify transformed oils. The geochemical analysis also helped identify source rock expulsion temperatures and depositional environments. The data suggests that the Belridge diatomite has been charged by a single hydrocarbon source rock type and was generated over a relatively wide range of temperatures. Map and statistical data support two distinct oil segregation processes occurring post expulsion. Normal gravity segregation within depositional cycles of diatomite have caused lightest oils to migrate to the crests of individual cycle structures. Some data suggests a loss of the light end oils in the uppermost cycles to the Tulare Formation above, or through early biodegradation. Structural rotation post early oil expulsion has also left older, heavier oils concentrated on the east flank of the structure. With the addition of other samples from the south central San Joaquin area, we have been able to tie the Belridge diatomite hydrocarbon charge into a regional framework. We have also enhanced our ability to predict oil gravity and well primary recovery by unraveling some key components of the diatomite oil source and migration history.

  5. Dry Gas Zone, Elk Hills Field, Kern County, California: General reservoir study: Geologic text and tables: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-06-29

    The Dry Gas Zone was defined by US Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 Engineering Committee (1957) as ''/hor ellipsis/all sands bearing dry gas above the top of the Lower Scalez marker bed. The term is used to include the stratigraphic interval between the Scalez Sand Zone and the Tulare Formation - the Mya Sand Zone. The reservoirs in this upper zone are thin, lenticular, loosely cemented sandstones with relatively high permeabilities.'' Other than the limited Tulare production in the western part of the field, the Dry Gas Zone is the shallowest productive zone in the Elk Hills Reserve and is not included in the Shallow Oil Zone. It is Pliocene in age and makes up approximately eighty percent of the San Joaquin Formation as is summarized in Exhibit TL-1. The lithologic character of the zone is one of interbedded shales and siltstones with intermittent beds of various thickness sands. The stratigraphic thickness of the Dry Gas Zone ranges from 950 to 1150 feet with a general thickening along the flanks and thinning over the crests of the anticlines. The productive part of the Dry Gas Zone covers portions of 30 sections in an area roughly 10 miles long by 4 miles wide. 4 refs.

  6. Revealing pre-earthquake signatures in atmosphere and ionosphere associated with 2015 M7.8 and M7.3 events in Nepal. Preliminary results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ouzounov, Dimitar; Davidenko, Dmitry

    2015-01-01

    We analyze retrospectively/prospectively the transient variations of three different physical parameters of atmosphere during the time of M7.8 and M7.3 events in Nepal: outgoing earth radiation (OLR), GPS/TEC and the thermodynamic proprieties in the lower atmosphere. We found that in mid March 2015 a rapid augment of satellite observed earth radiation in atmosphere and the anomaly located in close vicinity to the future M7.8 epicenter reached the maximum on April 21-22. Our continuous satellite analysis revealed prospectively the new strong anomaly on May 3th, which was the reason to contemplate another large event in the area. On May 12, 2015 a large aftershock of M7.3 occurred. The analysis of air temperature from weather ground station near Katmandu shows analogous patterns with offset 1-2 days earlier to the satellite anomalies. The GPS/TEC data analysis indicates an augment and variation in electron density reaching a maximum value during April 22-24 period. A strong negative TEC anomaly in the crest of ...

  7. Direct Simulations of Wind-Driven Breaking Ocean Waves with Data Assimilation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dommermuth, Douglas G; Tran, Vu H; Valenciano, Miguel A

    2014-01-01

    A formulation is developed to assimilate ocean-wave data into the Numerical Flow Analysis (NFA) code. NFA is a Cartesian-based implicit Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) code with Volume of Fluid (VOF) interface capturing. The sequential assimilation of data into NFA permits detailed analysis of ocean-wave physics with higher bandwidths than is possible using either other formulations, such as High-Order Spectral (HOS) methods, or field measurements. A framework is provided for assimilating the wavy and vortical portions of the flow. Nudging is used to assimilate wave data at low wavenumbers, and the wave data at high wavenumbers form naturally through nonlinear interactions, wave breaking, and wind forcing. Similarly, the vertical profiles of the mean vortical flow in the wind and the wind drift are nudged, and the turbulent fluctuations are allowed to form naturally. As a demonstration, the results of a HOS of a JONSWAP wave spectrum are assimilated to study short-crested seas in equilibrium with the wind. Log pr...

  8. Nonlinear Wave-Currents interactions in shallow water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lannes, David

    2015-01-01

    We study here the propagation of long waves in the presence of vorticity. In the irrotational framework, the Green-Naghdi equations (also called Serre or fully nonlinear Boussinesq equations) are the standard model for the propagation of such waves. These equations couple the surface elevation to the vertically averaged horizontal velocity and are therefore independent of the vertical variable. In the presence of vorticity, the dependence on the vertical variable cannot be removed from the vorticity equation but it was however shown in [?] that the motion of the waves could be described using an extended Green-Naghdi system. In this paper we propose an analysis of these equations, and show that they can be used to get some new insight into wave-current interactions. We show in particular that solitary waves may have a drastically different behavior in the presence of vorticity and show the existence of solitary waves of maximal amplitude with a peak at their crest, whose angle depends on the vorticity. We als...

  9. Multipacting in a grooved choke joint at SRF gun for BNL ERL prototype

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, W.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Belomestnykh, S.; Burrill, A.; Holmes, D.; Kayran, D.; McIntyre, G.; Sheehy, B.

    2011-03-28

    The 703 MHz superconducting gun for BNL ERL prototype was tested at JLab with and without choke-joint and cathode stalk. Without choke-joint and cathode stalk, the gradient reached was 25 MV/m with Q{sup 0} {approx} 6E9. The gun cathode insertion port is equipped with a grooved choke joint for multipacting suppression. We carried out tests with choke-joint and cathode stalk. The test results show that there are at least two barriers at about 3.5 MV/m and 5 MV/m. We considered several possibilities and finally found that fine details of the grooved shape are important for multipacting suppression. A triangular groove with round crest may cause strong multipacting in the choke-joint at 3.5 MV/m, 5 MV/m and 10 MV/m. This paper presents the primary test results of the gun and discusses the multipacting analysis in the choke-joint. It also suggests possible solutions for the gun and multipacting suppressing for a similar structure.

  10. Turbulent mixing, diffusion and gravity in the formation of cosmological structures: the fluid mechanics of dark matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carl H. Gibson

    1999-04-18

    The theory of gravitational structure formation in astrophysics and cosmology is revised based on real fluid behavior and turbulent mixing theory. Gibson's 1996-1998 theory balances fluid mechanical forces with gravitational forces and density diffusivity with gravitational diffusivity at critical viscous, turbulent, magnetic, and diffusion length scales termed Schwarz scales L_SX. Condensation and void formation occurs on non-acoustic density nuclei produced by turbulent mixing for scales L>=L_SXmax rather than on sound wave crests and troughs for L>=L_J as required by Jeans's 1902 linear acoustic theory. Schwarz scales L_SX = L_SV, L_ST, L_SM, or L_SD may be smaller or larger than Jeans's scale L_J. Thus, a very different "nonlinear" cosmology emerges to replace the currently accepted "linear" cosmology. According to the new theory, most of the inner halo dark matter of galaxies consists of planetary mass objects that formed soon after the plasma to neutral gas transition 300,000 years after the Big Bang. These objects are termed primordial fog particles (PFPs) and provide an explanation for Schild's 1996 "rogue planets ... likely to be the missing mass" of his observed quasar-lens galaxy, inferred from the twinkling frequencies of both quasar images and their phased difference.

  11. Branch cuts of Stokes wave on deep water. Part I: Numerical solution and Pad\\'e approximation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dyachenko, S A; Korotkevich, A O

    2015-01-01

    Complex analytical structure of Stokes wave for two-dimensional potential flow of the ideal incompressible fluid with free surface and infinite depth is analyzed. Stokes wave is the fully nonlinear periodic gravity wave propagating with the constant velocity. Simulations with the quadruple and variable precisions are performed to find Stokes wave with high accuracy and study the Stokes wave approaching its limiting form with $2\\pi/3$ radians angle on the crest. A conformal map is used which maps a free fluid surface of Stokes wave into the real line with fluid domain mapped into the lower complex half-plane. The Stokes wave is fully characterized by the complex singularities in the upper complex half-plane. These singularities are addressed by rational (Pad\\'e) interpolation of Stokes wave in the complex plane. Convergence of Pad\\'e approximation to the density of complex poles with the increase of the numerical precision and subsequent increase of the number of approximating poles reveals that the only singu...

  12. RIVERTON DOME GAS EXPLORATION AND STIMULATION TECHNOLOGY DEMONSTRATION, WIND RIVER BASIN, WYOMING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronald C. Surdam; Zunsheng Jiao; Nicholas K. Boyd

    1999-11-01

    The new exploration technology for basin center gas accumulations developed by R.C. Surdam and Associates at the Institute for Energy Research, University of Wyoming, was applied to the Riverton Dome 3-D seismic area. Application of the technology resulted in the development of important new exploration leads in the Frontier, Muddy, and Nugget formations. The new leads are adjacent to a major north-south trending fault, which is downdip from the crest of the major structure in the area. In a blind test, the drilling results from six new Muddy test wells were accurately predicted. The initial production values, IP, for the six test wells ranged from < one mmcf/day to four mmcf/day. The three wells with the highest IP values (i.e., three to four mmcf/day) were drilled into an intense velocity anomaly (i.e., anomalously slow velocities). The well drilled at the end of the velocity anomaly had an IP value of one mmcf/day, and the two wells drilled outside of the velocity anomaly had IP values of < one mmcf/day and are presently shut in. Based on these test results, it is concluded that the new IER exploration strategy for detecting and delineating commercial, anomalously pressured gas accumulation is valid in the southwestern portions of the Wind River Basin, and can be utilized to significantly reduce exploration risk and to increase profitability of so-called basin center gas accumulations.

  13. ANS complex of St John's wort PR-10 protein with 28 copies in the asymmetric unit: A fiendish combination of pseudosymmetry with tetartohedral twinning

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sliwiak, Joanna; Dauter, Zbigniew; Kowiel, Marcin; McCoy, Airlie J.; Read, Randy J.; Jaskolski, Mariusz

    2015-03-26

    Hyp-1, a pathogenesis-related class 10 (PR-10) protein from St John's wort (Hypericum perforatum), was crystallized in complex with the fluorescent probe 8-anilino-1-naphthalene sulfonate (ANS). The highly pseudosymmetric crystal has 28 unique protein molecules arranged in columns with sevenfold translational noncrystallographic symmetry (tNCS) along c and modulated X-ray diffraction with intensity crests at l = 7n and l = 7n ± 3. The translational NCS is combined with pseudotetragonal rotational NCS. The crystal was a perfect tetartohedral twin, although detection of twinning was severely hindered by the pseudosymmetry. The structure determined at 2.4 Å resolution reveals that the Hyp-1 molecules (packedmore »as ?-sheet dimers) have three novel ligand-binding sites (two internal and one in a surface pocket), which was confirmed by solution studies. In addition to 60 Hyp-1-docked ligands, there are 29 interstitial ANS molecules distributed in a pattern that violates the arrangement of the protein molecules and is likely to be the generator of the structural modulation. In particular, whenever the stacked Hyp-1 molecules are found closer together there is an ANS molecule bridging them.« less

  14. Movement of tagged dredged sand at thalweg disposal sites in the Upper Mississippi River. Volume 3. Additional results at Gordon's Ferry and Whitney Island sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCown, D.L.; Paddock, R.A.

    1985-04-01

    During routine channel maintenance, hydraulically dredged sand was tagged with sand coated with fluorescent dye before being deposited as a pile in the thalweg at three sites on the Upper Mississippi River. As discussed in the first two volumes of this report, bathymetry was measured and surface sediments were sampled to study changes in the topography of the disposal pile and the downstream movement of the tagged sand. At all three sites, topographic evidence of the pile disappeared after the first period of high river flow, which was followed by redevelopment of dunes in the disposal area. The tagged sand did not migrate into nearby border areas, backwaters, or sloughs, remaining in the main channel as it moved downstream. This volume presents the results of additional surveys at the Gordon's Ferry and Whitney Island sites. At Gordon's Ferry, 25 bottom cores were taken to examine the three-dimensional distribution of tagged sand in the bottom sediments. The core analyses indicated that much of the tagged sand had been incorporated into the dune structure and that it resided primarily in the crests of the dunes.

  15. Particle dynamics of a cartoon dune

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher Groh; Ingo Rehberg; Christof A. Kruelle

    2009-11-04

    The spatio-temporal evolution of a downsized model for a desert dune is observed experimentally in a narrow water flow channel. A particle tracking method reveals that the migration speed of the model dune is one order of magnitude smaller than that of individual grains. In particular, the erosion rate consists of comparable contributions from creeping (low energy) and saltating (high energy) particles. The saltation flow rate is slightly larger, whereas the number of saltating particles is one order of magnitude lower than that of the creeping ones. The velocity field of the saltating particles is comparable to the velocity field of the driving fluid. It can be observed that the spatial profile of the shear stress reaches its maximum value upstream of the crest, while its minimum lies at the downstream foot of the dune. The particle tracking method reveals that the deposition of entrained particles occurs primarily in the region between these two extrema of the shear stress. Moreover, it is demonstrated that the initial triangular heap evolves to a steady state with constant mass, shape, velocity, and packing fraction after one turnover time has elapsed. Within that time the mean distance between particles initially in contact reaches a value of approximately one quarter of the dune basis length.

  16. Particle dynamics of a cartoon dune

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groh, Christopher; Kruelle, Christof A

    2009-01-01

    The spatio-temporal evolution of a downsized model for a desert dune is observed experimentally in a narrow water flow channel. A particle tracking method reveals that the migration speed of the model dune is one order of magnitude smaller than that of individual grains. In particular, the erosion rate consists of comparable contributions from creeping (low energy) and saltating (high energy) particles. The saltation flow rate is slightly larger, whereas the number of saltating particles is one order of magnitude lower than that of the creeping ones. The velocity field of the saltating particles is comparable to the velocity field of the driving fluid. It can be observed that the spatial profile of the shear stress reaches its maximum value upstream of the crest, while its minimum lies at the downstream foot of the dune. The particle tracking method reveals that the deposition of entrained particles occurs primarily in the region between these two extrema of the shear stress. Moreover, it is demonstrated that...

  17. The high conversion LC-Fining process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    VanDriesen, R.P.; Strangio, V.A.; Rhoe, A.; Kolstad, J.J.

    1986-01-01

    Residual oil hydrocracking has been practiced at moderate conversions for many years on a wide range of feedstocks. Processes utilizing expanded bed reactors have been proven to be effective in the hydrocracking of these heavy residual feedstocks. Conversions up to 60% vacuum bottoms to distillates were routinely obtained in several commercial units. More recently Amoco has been operating an LC-Fining unit in their Texas City refinery at conversions as high as 80%. Normal conversion in this plant however is 60-65%. LC-Fining is an expanded bed resid hydrocracking and hydrodesulfurization process developed by Cities Service and Lummus Crest. There are a number of factors which may limit the conversion in any given plant site. These include compatibility problems with the liquid product, settling out of heavy hydrocarbons in downstream equipment or fouling of the catalyst in the reactor which in the extreme results in coking of the catalyst bed. The operator of a residual hydrocracker maintains conversion at a sufficiently low level to avoid these problems. Recent advances in the LC-Fining technology have led to the development of the High Conversion LC-Fining Process which is capable of operation at conversions of 95% and higher without any of these problems.

  18. Direct numerical simulations of aeolian sand ripples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Orencio Duran; Philippe Claudin; Bruno Andreotti

    2014-11-07

    Aeolian sand beds exhibit regular patterns of ripples resulting from the interaction between topography and sediment transport. Their characteristics have been so far related to reptation transport caused by the impacts on the ground of grains entrained by the wind into saltation. By means of direct numerical simulations of grains interacting with a wind flow, we show that the instability turns out to be driven by resonant grain trajectories, whose length is close to a ripple wavelength and whose splash leads to a mass displacement towards the ripple crests. The pattern selection results from a compromise between this destabilizing mechanism and a diffusive downslope transport which stabilizes small wavelengths. The initial wavelength is set by the ratio of the sediment flux and the erosion/deposition rate, a ratio which increases linearly with the wind velocity. We show that this scaling law, in agreement with experiments, originates from an interfacial layer separating the saltation zone from the static sand bed, where momentum transfers are dominated by mid-air collisions. Finally, we provide quantitative support for the use the propagation of these ripples as a proxy for remote measurements of sediment transport.

  19. Recurrent faulting and petroleum accumulation, Cat Creek Anticline, central Montana

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, W.J. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign (United States))

    1991-06-01

    The Cat Creek anticline, scene of central Montana's first significant oil discovery, is underlain by a south-dipping high-angle fault (Cat Creek fault) that has undergone several episodes of movement with opposite sense of displacement. Borehole data suggest that the Cat Creek fault originated as a normal fault during Proterozoic rifting concurrent with deposition of the Belt Supergroup. Reverse faulting took place in Late Cambrian time, and again near the end of the Devonian Period. The Devonian episode, coeval with the Antler orogeny, raised the southern block several hundred feet. The southern block remained high through Meramecian time, then began to subside. Post-Atokan, pre-Middle Jurassic normal faulting lowered the southern block as much as 1,500 ft. During the Laramide orogeny (latest Cretaceous-Eocene) the Cat Creek fault underwent as much as 4,000 ft of reverse displacement and a comparable amount of left-lateral displacement. The Cat Creek anticline is a fault-propagation fold; en echelon domes and listric normal faults developed along its crest in response to wrenching. Oil was generated mainly in organic-rich shales of the Heath Formation (upper Chesterian Series) and migrated upward along tectonic fractures into Pennsylvanian, Jurassic, and Cretaceous reservoir rocks in structural traps in en echelon domes. Production has been achieved only from those domes where structural closure was retained from Jurassic through Holocene time.

  20. Shrub-Steppe Seasons A Natural History of the Mid-Columbia Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LE Rogers

    1995-08-01

    This book collects and updates a series of articles about the natural history of the Mid-Columbia region. The articles first appeared as a monthly column titled ''Natural History'' in the Tri-City Herald, beginning in May 1991. My approach has been to condense the best of what is known about the ecology of the region to a manageable length with little in the way of technical language and terms. Admittedly, there is a bias toward those topics and species on which I have either been personally involved or observed as part of the ecology research programs conducted on the Fitzner/Eberhardt Arid Lands Ecology (ALE) Reserve. The ALE Reserve is situated on the northeast-facing flank of the Rattlesnake Hills. Rattlesnake Mountain with a crest of over 3,600 feet is visible throughout much of the Mid-Columbia. Shrub-steppe grasslands once covered a large part of the western United States but most have been converted to other uses. The ALE site is the only remaining sizeable acreage (120 square miles) that is in near pristine condition and provides the only clear indication as to what the early trappers, traders, pioneers, and tribal members may have encountered in their day-to-day activities. In this respect, ALE provides a visible touchstone linking the past with the present for all of us.

  1. Quantum vacuum radiation in optical glass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefano Liberati; Angus Prain; Matt Visser

    2011-11-01

    A recent experimental claim of the detection of analogue Hawking radiation in an optical system [PRL 105 (2010) 203901] has led to some controversy [PRL 107 (2011) 149401, 149402]. While this experiment strongly suggests some form of particle creation from the quantum vacuum (and hence it is per se very interesting), it is also true that it seems difficult to completely explain all features of the observations by adopting the perspective of a Hawking-like mechanism for the radiation. For instance, the observed photons are emitted parallel to the optical horizon, and the relevant optical horizon is itself defined in an unusual manner by combining group and phase velocities. This raises the question: Is this really Hawking radiation, or some other form of quantum vacuum radiation? Naive estimates of the amount of quantum vacuum radiation generated due to the rapidly changing refractive index --- sometimes called the dynamical Casimir effect --- are not encouraging. However we feel that naive estimates could be misleading depending on the quantitative magnitude of two specific physical effects: "pulse steepening" and "pulse cresting". Plausible bounds on the maximum size of these two effects results in estimates much closer to the experimental observations, and we argue that the dynamical Casimir effect is now worth additional investigation.

  2. Non-Gaussian properties of second-order wave orbital velocity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alberello, Alberto; Gramstad, Odin; Babanin, Alexander V; Toffoli, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    A stochastic second-order wave model is applied to assess the statistical properties of wave orbital velocity in random sea states below the water surface. Directional spreading effects as well as the dependency of the water depth are investigated by means of a Monte-Carlo approach. Unlike for the surface elevation, sub-harmonics dominate the second-order contribution to orbital velocity. We show that a notable set-down occurs for the most energetic and steepest groups. This engenders a negative skewness in the temporal evolution of the orbital velocity. A substantial deviation of the upper and lower tails of the probability density function from the Gaussian distribution is noticed, velocities are faster below the wave trough and slower below the wave crest when compared with linear theory predictions. Second-order nonlinearity effects strengthen with reducing the water depth, while weaken with the broadening of the wave spectrum. The results are confirmed by laboratory data. Corresponding experiments have b...

  3. Evaluating Cumulative Ecosystem Response to Restoration Projects in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary, 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Gary E.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Borde, Amy B.; Bryson, Amanda J.; Cameron, April; Coleman, Andre M.; Corbett, C.; Dawley, Earl M.; Ebberts, Blaine D.; Kauffman, Ronald; Roegner, G. Curtis; Russell, Micah T.; Silva, April; Skalski, John R.; Thom, Ronald M.; Vavrinec, John; Woodruff, Dana L.; Zimmerman, Shon A.

    2010-10-26

    This is the sixth annual report of a seven-year project (2004 through 2010) to evaluate the cumulative effects of habitat restoration actions in the lower Columbia River and estuary (LCRE). The project, called the Cumulative Effects Study, is being conducted for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Portland District (USACE) by the Marine Sciences Laboratory of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), the Pt. Adams Biological Field Station of the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), the Columbia River Estuary Study Taskforce (CREST), and the University of Washington. The goal of the Cumulative Effects Study is to develop a methodology to evaluate the cumulative effects of multiple habitat restoration projects intended to benefit ecosystems supporting juvenile salmonids in the 235-km-long LCRE. Literature review in 2004 revealed no existing methods for such an evaluation and suggested that cumulative effects could be additive or synergistic. From 2005 through 2009, annual field research involved intensive, comparative studies paired by habitat type (tidal swamp versus marsh), trajectory (restoration versus reference site), and restoration action (tidegate replacement vs. culvert replacement vs. dike breach).

  4. Enigmatic compressional structures in an extensional province: Eku field, OML 67, offshore Nigeria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinones, M.; Evans, R. (Mobil Technology Co., Dallas, TX (United States)); Alofe, K.; Onyeise, B. (Mobil Producing Nigeria, Lagos (Nigeria))

    1996-01-01

    Acquisition of 3-D seismic data over OML 67-70 and a detailed reservoir description study done on the Eku field, have allowed identification of previously unrecognized compressional features. Situated within a depocenter between arcuate normal growth faults, the Eku structure consists of a shale-cored anticlinal fold and fold-and-thrust separated by a zone of lateral displacement. The crests of the folds have been eroded at a major unconformity at the base of the Qua Iboe shale (Early Pliocene). In the absence of definitive biostratigraphic data, correlations among the various fault-blocks are based on the character of sedimentary packages and sequences on wireline logs. Combined with analysis of the geometry of faults and folds, the correlations support a description of pulsatory movement of folding and faulting, that ultimately culminated in extensional reactivation of earlier regional extension and the not coincident. The effect of the anticipated reservoir sections, and deformation, both compressional, was gravity-driven and on shale detachments. A working hypothesis to explain the disparity in direction of earlier extension and subsequent compression is that thermal expansion that accompanied formation of the Cameroon volcanic line to the east of the Niger Delta in Miocene time, caused a change in the direction of structuring, allowing downslope gravity-driven compression to be superimposed on pre-existing extensional features.

  5. Geologic technical assessment of the Chacahoula Salt Dome, Louisiana, for potential expansion of the U.S. strategic petroleum reserve.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snider, Anna C.; Rautman, Christopher Arthur; Looff, Karl M.

    2006-03-01

    The Chacahoula salt dome, located in southern Louisiana, approximately 66 miles southwest of New Orleans, appears to be a suitable site for a 160-million-barrel-capacity expansion facility for the U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve, comprising sixteen 10-million barrel underground storage caverns. The overall salt dome appears to cover an area of some 1800 acres, or approximately 2.8 square miles, at a subsea elevation of 2000 ft, which is near the top of the salt stock. The shallowest known salt is present at 1116 ft, subsea. The crest of the salt dome is relatively flatlying, outward to an elevation of -4000 ft. Below this elevation, the flanks of the dome plunge steeply in all directions. The dome appears to comprise two separate spine complexes of quasi-independently moving salt. Two mapped areas of salt overhang, located on the eastern and southeastern flanks of the salt stock, are present below -8000 ft. These regions of overhang should present no particular design issues, as the conceptual design SPR caverns are located in the western portion of the dome. The proposed cavern field may be affected by a boundary shear zone, located between the two salt spines. However, the large size of the Chacahoula salt dome suggests that there is significant design flexibility to deal with such local geologic issues.

  6. Eder Acquisition 2007 Habitat Evaluation Procedures Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashley, Paul R.

    2008-01-01

    A habitat evaluation procedures (HEP) analysis was conducted on the Eder acquisition in July 2007 to determine how many protection habitat units to credit Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for providing funds to acquire the project site as partial mitigation for habitat losses associated with construction of Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Dams. Baseline HEP surveys generated 3,857.64 habitat units or 1.16 HUs per acre. HEP surveys also served to document general habitat conditions. Survey results indicated that the herbaceous plant community lacked forbs species, which may be due to both livestock grazing and the late timing of the surveys. Moreover, the herbaceous plant community lacked structure based on lower than expected visual obstruction readings (VOR); likely a direct result of livestock impacts. In addition, introduced herbaceous vegetation including cultivated pasture grasses, e.g. crested wheatgrass and/or invader species such as cheatgrass and mustard, were present on most areas surveyed. The shrub element within the shrubsteppe cover type was generally a mosaic of moderate to dense shrubby areas interspersed with open grassland communities while the 'steppe' component was almost entirely devoid of shrubs. Riparian shrub and forest areas were somewhat stressed by livestock. Moreover, shrub and tree communities along the lower reaches of Nine Mile Creek suffered from lack of water due to the previous landowners 'piping' water out of the stream channel.

  7. Relationship between alveolar bone measured by /sup 125/I absorptiometry with analysis of standardized radiographs: 2. Bjorn technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ortman, L.F.; McHenry, K.; Hausmann, E.

    1982-05-01

    The Bjorn technique is widely used in periodontal studies as a standardized measure of alveolar bone. Recent studies have demonstrated the feasibility of using /sup 125/I absorptiometry to measure bone mass. The purpose of this study was to compare /sup 125/I absorptiometry with the Bjorn technique in detecting small sequential losses of alveolary bone. Four periodontal-like defects of incrementally increasing size were produced in alveolar bone in the posterior segment of the maxilla of a human skull. An attempt was made to sequentially reduce the amount of bone in 10% increments until no bone remained, a through and through defect. The bone remaining at each step was measured using /sup 125/I absorptiometry. At each site the /sup 125/I absorptiometry measurements were made at the same location by fixing the photon source to a prefabricated precision-made occlusal splint. This site was just beneath the crest and midway between the borders of two adjacent teeth. Bone loss was also determined by the Bjorn technique. Standardized intraoral films were taken using a custom-fitted acrylic clutch, and bone measurements were made from the root apex to coronal height of the lamina dura. A comparison of the data indicates that: (1) in early bone loss, less than 30%, the Bjorn technique underestimates the amount of loss, and (2) in advanced bone loss, more than 60% the Bjorn technique overestimates it.

  8. Cheap Artificial AB-Mountains, Extraction of Water and Energy from Atmosphere and Change of Regional Climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Bolonkin

    2008-05-11

    Author suggests and researches a new revolutionary method for changing the climates of entire countries or portions thereof, obtaining huge amounts of cheap water and energy from the atmosphere. In this paper is presented the idea of cheap artificial inflatable mountains, which may cardinally change the climate of a large region or country. Additional benefits: The potential of tapping large amounts of fresh water and energy. The mountains are inflatable semi-cylindrical constructions from thin film (gas bags) having heights of up to 3 - 5 km. They are located perpendicular to the main wind direction. Encountering these artificial mountains, humid air (wind) rises to crest altitude, is cooled and produces rain (or rain clouds). Many natural mountains are sources of rivers, and other forms of water and power production - and artificial mountains may provide these services for entire nations in the future. The film of these gasbags is supported at altitude by small additional atmospheric overpressure and may be connected to the ground by thin cables. The author has shown (in previous works about the AB-Dome) that this closed AB-Dome allows full control of the weather inside the Dome (the day is always fine, the rain is only at night, no strong winds) and influence to given region. This is a realistic and cheap method of economical irrigation, getting energy and virtual weather control on Earth at the current time.

  9. Regional setting of Niobrara Formation in Northern Great Plains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shurr, G.W.

    1984-05-01

    Natural gas is currently produced from the Upper Cretaceous Niobrara Formation in northeastern Colorado, northwestern Kansas, and several small fields in Nebraska. As a part of studies of low-permeability gas reservoirs in the northern Great Plains, the regional geologic setting of the Niobrara has been investigated in North Dakota, South Dakota, and Nebraska. Structural contours of the Ardmore Bentonite Bed suggest that the area of thin Niobrara strata presently approximates the south flank of the Williston basin and north flank of the Denver and Kennedy basins. Chalk tongues are interpreted as low-angle shelf surfaces, known as carbonate ramps, which sloped gently to the northwest and southeast off a paleotectonic high. The paleotectonic high cut obliquely across the seaway and was close to the position of the Transcontinental arch that influenced Paleozoic sedimentation. As a result, the present-day stratigraphy and structural setting of the Niobrara are different north and south of the arch crest. 58 references, 13 figures, 1 table.

  10. Center for Renewable Energy Science and Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Billo, Richard; Rajeshwar, Krishnan

    2013-01-15

    The CREST research team conducted research that optimized catalysts used for the conversion of southwestern lignite into synthetic crude oil that can be shipped to nearby Texas refineries and power plants for development of transportation fuels and power generation. Research was also undertaken to convert any potential by-products of this process such as CO2 to useful chemicals and gases which could be recycled and used as feedstock to the synthetic fuel process. These CO2 conversion processes used light energy to drive the endogonic reduction reactions involved. The project was divided into two tasks: A CO2 Conversion Task, and a Catalyst Optimization Task. The CO2 Conversion task was aimed at developing molecular and solid state catalysts for the thermal, electro- and photocatalytic reduction of CO2 to reduced products such as simple feedstock compounds (e.g. CO, H2, CHOOH, CH2O, CH3OH and CH4). For example, the research team recycled CO that was developed from this Task and used it as a feedstock for the production of synthetic crude in the Catalyst Optimization Task. In the Catalyst Optimization Task, the research team conducted bench-scale experiments with the goal of reducing overall catalyst cost in support of several synthetic crude processes that had earlier been developed. This was accomplished by increasing the catalyst reactivity thus reducing required concentrations or by using less expensive metals. In this task the team performed parametric experiments in small scale batch reactors in an effort to improve catalyst reactivity and to lower cost. They also investigated catalyst robustness by testing lignite feedstocks that vary in moisture, h, and volatile content.

  11. South Belridge fields, Borderland basin, U. S. , San Joaquin Valley

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, D.D. (Mobil Exploration and Producing U.S., Inc., Denver, CO (United States)); McPherson, J.G. (Mobil Research and Development Corp., Dallas, TX (United States))

    1991-03-01

    South Belridge is a giant field in the west San Joaquin Valley, Kern County. Cumulative field production is approximately 700 MMBO and 220 BCFG, with remaining recoverable reserves of approximately 500 MMBO. The daily production is nearly 180 MBO from over 6100 active wells. The focus of current field development and production is the shallow Tulare reservoir. Additional probable diatomite reserves have been conservatively estimated at 550 MMBO and 550 BCFG. South Belridge field has two principal reservoir horizons; the Mio-Pliocene Belridge diatomite of the upper Monterey Formation, and the overlying Plio-Pleistocene Tulare Formation. The field lies on the crest of a large southeast-plunging anticline, sub-parallel to the nearby San Andreas fault system. The reservoir trap in both the Tulare and diatomite reservoir horizons is a combination of structure, stratigraphic factors, and tar seals; the presumed source for the oil is the deeper Monterey Formation. The diatomite reservoir produces light oil (20-32{degree} API gravity) form deep-marine diatomite and diatomaceous shales with extremely high porosity (average 60%) and low permeability (average 1 md). In contrast, the shallow ({lt}1000 ft (305 m) deep) overlying Tulare reservoir produces heavy oil (13-14{degree} API gravity) from unconsolidated, arkosic, fluviodeltaic sands of high porosity (average 35%) and permeability (average 3000 md). The depositional model is that of a generally prograding fluviodeltaic system sourced in the nearby basin-margin highlands. More than 6000 closely spaced, shallow wells are the key to steamflood production from hundreds of layered and laterally discontinuous reservoir sands which create laterally and vertically discontinuous reservoir flow units.

  12. Mapping and Assessment of the United States Ocean Wave Energy Resource

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul T. Jacobson; George Hagerman; George Scott

    2011-12-01

    This project estimates the naturally available and technically recoverable U.S. wave energy resources, using a 51-month Wavewatch III hindcast database developed especially for this study by National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration�¢����s (NOAA�¢����s) National Centers for Environmental Prediction. For total resource estimation, wave power density in terms of kilowatts per meter is aggregated across a unit diameter circle. This approach is fully consistent with accepted global practice and includes the resource made available by the lateral transfer of wave energy along wave crests, which enables wave diffraction to substantially reestablish wave power densities within a few kilometers of a linear array, even for fixed terminator devices. The total available wave energy resource along the U.S. continental shelf edge, based on accumulating unit circle wave power densities, is estimated to be 2,640 TWh/yr, broken down as follows: 590 TWh/yr for the West Coast, 240 TWh/yr for the East Coast, 80 TWh/yr for the Gulf of Mexico, 1570 TWh/yr for Alaska, 130 TWh/yr for Hawaii, and 30 TWh/yr for Puerto Rico. The total recoverable wave energy resource, as constrained by an array capacity packing density of 15 megawatts per kilometer of coastline, with a 100-fold operating range between threshold and maximum operating conditions in terms of input wave power density available to such arrays, yields a total recoverable resource along the U.S. continental shelf edge of 1,170 TWh/yr, broken down as follows: 250 TWh/yr for the West Coast, 160 TWh/yr for the East Coast, 60 TWh/yr for the Gulf of Mexico, 620 TWh/yr for Alaska, 80 TWh/yr for Hawaii, and 20 TWh/yr for Puerto Rico.

  13. Estuarine Habitats for Juvenile Salmon in the Tidally-Influenced Lower Columbia River and Estuary : Reporting Period September 15, 2008 through May 31, 2009.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baptista, António M. [Oregon Health & Science University, Science and Technology Center for Coastal Margin Observation and Prediction

    2009-08-02

    This work focuses on the numerical modeling of Columbia River estuarine circulation and associated modeling-supported analyses conducted as an integral part of a multi-disciplinary and multi-institutional effort led by NOAA's Northwest Fisheries Science Center. The overall effort is aimed at: (1) retrospective analyses to reconstruct historic bathymetric features and assess effects of climate and river flow on the extent and distribution of shallow water, wetland and tidal-floodplain habitats; (2) computer simulations using a 3-dimensional numerical model to evaluate the sensitivity of salmon rearing opportunities to various historical modifications affecting the estuary (including channel changes, flow regulation, and diking of tidal wetlands and floodplains); (3) observational studies of present and historic food web sources supporting selected life histories of juvenile salmon as determined by stable isotope, microchemistry, and parasitology techniques; and (4) experimental studies in Grays River in collaboration with Columbia River Estuary Study Taskforce (CREST) and the Columbia Land Trust (CLT) to assess effects of multiple tidal wetland restoration projects on various life histories of juvenile salmon and to compare responses to observed habitat-use patterns in the mainstem estuary. From the above observations, experiments, and additional modeling simulations, the effort will also (5) examine effects of alternative flow-management and habitat-restoration scenarios on habitat opportunity and the estuary's productive capacity for juvenile salmon. The underlying modeling system is part of the SATURN1coastal-margin observatory [1]. SATURN relies on 3D numerical models [2, 3] to systematically simulate and understand baroclinic circulation in the Columbia River estuary-plume-shelf system [4-7] (Fig. 1). Multi-year simulation databases of circulation are produced as an integral part of SATURN, and have multiple applications in understanding estuary/plume variability, the role of the estuary and plume on salmon survival, and functional changes in the estuary-plume system in response to climate and human activities.

  14. In-Situ Sampling and Characterization of Naturally Occurring Marine Methane Hydrate Using the D/V JOIDES Resolution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rack, Frank; Storms, Michael; Schroeder, Derryl; Dugan, Brandon; Schultheiss, Peter

    2002-12-31

    The primary accomplishments of the JOI Cooperative Agreement with DOE/NETL in this quarter were (1) the preliminary postcruise evaluation of the tools and measurement systems that were used during ODP Leg 204 to study hydrate deposits on Hydrate Ridge, offshore Oregon from July through September 2002; and (2) the preliminary study of the hydrate-bearing core samples preserved in pressure vessels and in liquid nitrogen cryofreezers, which are now stored at the ODP Gulf Coast Repository in College Station, TX. During ODP Leg 204, several newly modified downhole tools were deployed to better characterize the subsurface lithologies and environments hosting microbial populations and gas hydrates. A preliminary review of the use of these tools is provided herein. The DVTP, DVTP-P, APC-methane, and APC-Temperature tools (ODP memory tools) were used extensively and successfully during ODP Leg 204 aboard the D/V JOIDES Resolution. These systems provided a strong operational capability for characterizing the in situ properties of methane hydrates in subsurface environments on Hydrate Ridge during ODP Leg 204. Pressure was also measured during a trial run of the Fugro piezoprobe, which operates on similar principles as the DVTP-P. The final report describing the deployments of the Fugro Piezoprobe is provided in Appendix A of this report. A preliminary analysis and comparison between the piezoprobe and DVTP-P tools is provided in Appendix B of this report. Finally, a series of additional holes were cored at the crest of Hydrate Ridge (Site 1249) specifically geared toward the rapid recovery and preservation of hydrate samples as part of a hydrate geriatric study partially funded by the Department of Energy (DOE). In addition, the preliminary results from gamma density non-invasive imaging of the cores preserved in pressure vessels are provided in Appendix C of this report. An initial visual inspection of the samples stored in liquid nitrogen is provided in Appendix D of this report.

  15. Lunette dunes and yardangs of the Carson desert, Nevada: Implications for Holocene eolian activity in the northern Great Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lancaster, N. (Desert Research Inst., Reno, NV (United States). Quaternary Sciences Center)

    1993-04-01

    A large complex of lunette dunes consisting of two and locally three ridges up to 40 m high occurs on the northeast margin of the Carson Sink playa. The outer, or north-easterly, ridge consists of a core of fine and coarse and partially cemented by saline clay and silt (Unit 1) with avalanche face cross-beds dipping to the north-east at 25--30[degree], as well as planar sets of wind ripple laminae with dips to both the northeast and west at 2--5[degree]. Overlying this unit on the crest and lee side of the ridge is 2--5 m of mobile poorly sorted, very fine and coarse sand that forms an active avalanche face up to 25 m high on the east side of the ridge (Unit 3). At a number of localities, the indurated core of the larger dune ridge is carved into yardanges, or streamlined small hills with a lemniscate shape that result from wind erosion of homogeneous sediments. The dunes overlie, with an erosional contact, Late Pleistocene saline lacustrine clays of paleolake Lahontan. They represent at least two episodes of mid- to late-Holocene deflation of sediments from the Carson Sink playa. Erosion of the dunes and yardang formation suggests: (1) termination of sediment supply from the playa as a result of reduced sediment supply and runoff from the Carson River, (2) cementation of the dunes by clay and silt accumulation, and (3) modern eolian erosion through flow acceleration on dune windward slopes.

  16. Habitat of oil in the Lindsborg field, Salina basin, north-central Kansas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newell, K.D. )

    1991-03-01

    The Lindsborg field was discovered in 1938, and is now 14 mi in length and 1-2 mi in width. It has a projected ultimate recovery of 16 MMBO. Three pay zones (5-20 ft thick) produce in the field. The Simpson pay zone (Middle Ordovician) is a well-rounded, quartzitic sandstone that is interpreted to be a paralic, high-energy shelf deposit. The Viola pay (Middle Ordovician) appears to be a dolomitic, lime grainstone but no cores are available to confirm this. The uppermost pay zone, the Upper Ordovician Maquoketa, is a finely laminated, vuggy, cherry dolomite interpreted to have been deposited as a subtidal lime mudstone in a restricted lagoon. The Simpson and Viola pays are structurally trapped in culminations along the crest of the Lindsborg anticline. Although the Maquoketa pay is structurally trapped with the other pay zones in the southern half of the field, its locus of production in the north half of the fields extends 100 ft vertically down the western flank of the anticline. The trapping mechanism is unclear due to lack of core control and modern logging suites, but it may be subtle updip diagenetic change from vuggy to nonvuggy dolomite. The Simpson and Maquoketa oils are geochemically distinct. Both may reflect efficient local source-to-reservoir migration from originally rich but marginally mature Ordovician and Devonian shales that contact each pay zone. If oil in the Lindsborg field is locally generated, the prospectivity of the relatively unproductive and underexplored Salina basin may be enhanced.

  17. Wadter Resources Data Ohio: Water year 1994. Volume 2, St. Lawrence River Basin and Statewide Project Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-12-31

    The Water Resources Division of the US Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with State agencies, obtains a large amount of data each water year (a water year is the 12-month period from October 1 through September 30 and is identified by the calendar year in which it ends) pertaining to the water resources of Ohio. These data, accumulated during many years, constitute a valuable data base for developing an improved understanding of the water resources of the State. To make these data readily available to interested parties outside the USGS, they are published annually in this report series entitled ``Water Resources Data--Ohio.`` This report (in two volumes) includes records on surface water and ground water in the State. Specifically, it contains: (1) Discharge records for streamflow-gaging stations, miscellaneous sites, and crest-stage stations; (2) stage and content records for streams, lakes, and reservoirs; (3) water-quality data for streamflow-gaging stations, wells, synaptic sites, and partial-record sites; and (4) water-level data for observation wells. Locations of lake- and streamflow-gaging stations, water-quality stations, and observation wells for which data are presented in this volume are shown in figures ga through 8b. The data in this report represent that part of the National Water Data System collected by the USGS and cooperating State and Federal agencies in Ohio. This series of annual reports for Ohio began with the 1961 water year with a report that contained only data relating to the quantities of surface water. For the 1964 water year, a similar report was introduced that contained only data relating to water quality. Beginning with the 1975 water year, the report was changed to present (in two to three volumes) data on quantities of surface water, quality of surface and ground water, and ground-water levels.

  18. Water Resources Data Ohio: Water year 1994. Volume 1, Ohio River Basin excluding Project Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-12-31

    The Water Resources Division of the US Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with State agencies, obtains a large amount of data each water year (a water year is the 12-month period from October 1 through September 30 and is identified by the calendar year in which it ends) pertaining to the water resources of Ohio. These data, accumulated during many years, constitute a valuable data base for developing an improved understanding of the water resources of the State. To make these data readily available to interested parties outside the USGS, they are published annually in this report series entitled ``Water Resources Data--Ohio.`` This report (in two volumes) includes records on surface water and ground water in the State. Specifically, it contains: (1) Discharge records for streamflow-gaging stations, miscellaneous sites, and crest-stage stations; (2) stage and content records for streams, lakes, and reservoirs; (3) water-quality data for streamflow-gaging stations, wells, synoptic sites, and partial-record sit -aid (4) water-level data for observation wells. Locations of lake-and streamflow-gaging stations, water-quality stations, and observation wells for which data are presented in this volume are shown in figures 8a through 8b. The data in this report represent that part of the National Water Data System collected by the USGS and cooperating State and Federal agencies in Ohio. This series of annual reports for Ohio began with the 1961 water year with a report that contained only data relating to the quantities of surface water. For the 1964 water year, a similar report was introduced that contained only data relating to water quality. Beginning with the 1975 water year, the report was changed to present (in two or three volumes) data on quantities of surface water, quality of surface and ground water, and ground-water levels.

  19. Source of the tsunami associated with the Kalapana (Hawaii) earthquake of November 1975

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cox, D.C.

    1980-12-01

    The travel times of the tsunami generated on 29 November 1975 off the Kau-Puna coast of Hawaii to the tide gages at Hilo, Kahului, Honolulu, and Nawiliwili have been calculated from the arrival times indicated on the tide-gage records, applying gage-time corrections, assuming that the tsunami was generated at the time of the earthquake it accompanied. Travel times have also been calculated similarly to other places on the coast of Hawaii where arrival times of the tsunami were reported, and to Johnston Atoll. Inverse tsunami refraction diagrams have been constructed by graphical means for the path of the tsunami between the vicinity of its source and the places of known arrival times. The isochrones of the refraction diagrams corresponding to the respective calculated travel times for the tsunami front have been used to define the boundary of the area of upward sea-floor displacement from which the tsunami propagated. This area is about 15 or 20 miles long (parallel to the southeast coast of Hawaii) and on the order of 14 or 15 miles wide, considerably smaller than the area earlier considered the tsunami source. Coastal subsidence measured soon after the earthquake indicates that the area of initial upward displacement was separated from the coast by a narrow belt of downward displacement. Comparisons between the crest arrival times and the travel times indicated by the inverse refraction diagrams indicate a lag of about four minutes between the time of the earthquake and the accomplishment of the maximum upward displacement. Accuracies of estimation are insufficient to determine whether the maximum upward displacement occurred within the area of initial displacement or seaward of it within a distance of about 15 miles. Displacement resulting from a mega-landslide cannot be distinguished from strictly tectonic displacement by the comparison of arrival times and travel times. 14 references, 19 figures, 8 tables.

  20. Deep structure of the Texas Gulf passive margin and its Ouachita-Precambrian basement: Results of the COCORP San Marcos arch survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Culotta, R.; Latham, T.; Oliver, J.; Brown, L.; Kaufman, S. (Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)); Sydow, M. (Pennzoil, Houston, TX (United States))

    1992-02-01

    This COCORP deep seismic survey provides a comprehensive image of the southeast-Texas part of the Gulf passive margin and its accreted Ouachita arc foundation. Beneath the updip limit of the Cenozoic sediment wedge, a prominent antiformal structure is imaged within the interior zone of the buried late Paleozoic Ouachita orogen. The structure appears to involve Precambrian Grenville basement. The crest of the antiform is coincident with the Cretaceous-Tertiary Luling-Mexia-Talco fault zone. Some of these faults dip to the northwest, counter to the general regional pattern of down-to-the-basin faulting, and appear to sole into the top of the antiform, suggesting that the Ouachita structure has been reactivated as a hingeline to the subsiding passive margin. The antiform may be tied via this fault system and the Ouachita gravity gradient to the similar Devils River, Waco, and Benton uplifts, interpreted as Precambrian basement-cored massifs. Above the Paleozoic sequence, a possible rift-related graben is imaged near the updip limit of Jurassic salt. Paleoshelf edges of the major Tertiary depositional sequences are marked by expanded sections disrupted by growth faults and shale diapirs. Within the Wilcox Formation, the transect crosses the mouth of the 900-m-deep Yoakum Canyon, a principal pathway of sediment delivery from the Laramide belt to the Gulf. Beneath the Wilcox, the Comanchean (Lower Cretaceous) shelf edge, capped by the Stuart City reef, is imaged as a pronounced topographic break onlapped by several moundy sediment packages. Because this segment of the line parallels strike, the topographic break may be interpreted as a 2,000-m-deep embayment in the Cretaceous shelf-edge, and possibly a major submarine canyon older and deeper than the Yoakum Canyon.

  1. Remedial Investigation Report on Chestnut Ridge Operable Unit 2 (Filled Coal Ash Pond/Upper McCoy Branch) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 1. Main Text

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    This document is a report on the remedial investigation (RI) of Chestnut Ridge Operable Unit (OU) 2 at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. Chestnut Ridge OU 2 consists of Upper McCoy Branch (UMB), the Filled Coal Ash Pond (FCAP), and the area surrounding the Sluice Channel formerly associated with coal ash disposal in the FCAP. Chestnut Ridge OU 2 is located within the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Oak Ridge Reservation in Anderson County, Tennessee, approximately 24 miles west of Knoxville. The pond is an 8.5-acre area on the southern slope of Chestnut Ridge, 0.5 mile south of the main Y-12 Plant and geographically separated from the Y-12 Plant by Chestnut Ridge. The elevation of the FCAP is {approximately} 950 ft above mean sea level (msl), and it is relatively flat and largely vegetated. Two small ponds are usually present at the northeast and northwest comers of the FCAP. The Sluice Channel Area extends {approximately}1000 ft from the northern margin of the FCAP to the crest of Chestnut Ridge, which has an elevation of {approximately}1100 ft above msl. The Sluice Channel Area is largely vegetated also. McCoy Branch runs from the top of Chestnut Ridge across the FCAP into Rogers Quarry and out of the quarry where it runs a short distance into Milton Hill Lake at McCoy Embayment, termed UMB. The portion south of Rogers Quarry, within Chestnut Ridge OU 4, is termed Lower McCoy Branch. The DOE Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant disposed of coal ash from its steam plant operations as a slurry that was discharged into an ash retention impoundment; this impoundment is the FCAP. The FCAP was built in 1955 to serve as a settling basin after coal ash slurried over Chestnut Ridge from the Y-12 Plant. The FCAP was constructed by building an earthen dam across the northern tributary of McCoy Branch. The dam was designed to hold 20 years of Y-12 steam plant ash. By July 1967, ash had filled up the impoundment storage behind the dam to within 4 ft of the top.

  2. Testing of GFL Geosiphon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steimke, J.L.

    2001-07-10

    A full-scale, transparent replica of a GeoSiphon was constructed in the TFL to test a new concept, using a solar powered vacuum pump to remove accumulated gases from the air chamber. It did not have a treatment cell containing iron filings as do the actual TNX GeoSiphons in the field, but it was accurate in all other respects. The gas generation that is observed in an actual GeoSiphon was simulated by air injection at the inlet of the TFL GeoSiphon. After facility shakedown, three stages of testing were conducted: verification testing, parametric testing and long term testing. In verification testing, the TFL GeoSiphon was used to reproduce a particular test at TNX in which the water flowrate decreased gradually as the result of air accumulation at the crest of a siphon without an air chamber. For this test the vacuum pump was not used and the air chamber was initially filled with air rather than water. Agreement between data from the TNX GeoSiphon and the TFL GeoSiphon was good, which gave confidence that the TFL GeoSiphon was a good hydraulic representation of the TNX GeoSiphon. For the remaining tests, the solar powered vacuum pump and air chamber were used. In parametric testing, steady state runs were made for water flowrates ranging from 1 gpm to 19 gpm, air injection rates ranging from 0 to 77 standard cc/min and outfall line angles ranging from vertical to 60 degrees from vertical. In all cases, the air chamber and vacuum pump removed nearly all of the air and the GeoSiphon operated without problems. In long term testing, the GeoSiphon was allowed to run continuously for 21 days at one set of conditions. During this time the solar cell kept the storage battery fully charged at all times and the control circuit for the vacuum pump operated reliably. The solar panel was observed to have a large excess capacity when used with the vacuum pump. With two changes, the concept of using a solar powered vacuum pump attached to an air chamber should be ready for long term use in the field. Those changes are to insulate the air chamber of the GeoSiphon so it will not freeze in the winter and to make the tank from steel rather than transparent plastic.

  3. Cycloidal Wave Energy Converter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stefan G. Siegel, Ph.D.

    2012-11-30

    This program allowed further advancing the development of a novel type of wave energy converter, a Cycloidal Wave Energy Converter or CycWEC. A CycWEC consists of one or more hydrofoils rotating around a central shaft, and operates fully submerged beneath the water surface. It operates under feedback control sensing the incoming waves, and converts wave power to shaft power directly without any intermediate power take off system. Previous research consisting of numerical simulations and two dimensional small 1:300 scale wave flume experiments had indicated wave cancellation efficiencies beyond 95%. The present work was centered on construction and testing of a 1:10 scale model and conducting two testing campaigns in a three dimensional wave basin. These experiments allowed for the first time for direct measurement of electrical power generated as well as the interaction of the CycWEC in a three dimensional environment. The Atargis team successfully conducted two testing campaigns at the Texas A&M Offshore Technology Research Center and was able to demonstrate electricity generation. In addition, three dimensional wave diffraction results show the ability to achieve wave focusing, thus increasing the amount of wave power that can be extracted beyond what was expected from earlier two dimensional investigations. Numerical results showed wave cancellation efficiencies for irregular waves to be on par with results for regular waves over a wide range of wave lengths. Using the results from previous simulations and experiments a full scale prototype was designed and its performance in a North Atlantic wave climate of average 30kW/m of wave crest was estimated. A full scale WEC with a blade span of 150m will deliver a design power of 5MW at an estimated levelized cost of energy (LCOE) in the range of 10-17 US cents per kWh. Based on the new results achieved in the 1:10 scale experiments these estimates appear conservative and the likely performance at full scale will exceed this initial performance estimates. In advancing the Technology Readiness Level (TRL) of this type of wave energy converter from 3 to 4, we find the CycWEC to exceed our initial estimates in terms of hydrodynamic performance. Once fully developed and optimized, it has the potential to not just outperform all other WEC technologies, but to also deliver power at a lower LCOE than competing conventional renewables like wind and solar. Given the large wave power resource both domestically and internationally, this technology has the potential to lead to a large improvement in our ability to produce clean electricity at affordable cost.

  4. Producing Light Oil from a Frozen Reservoir: Reservoir and Fluid Characterization of Umiat Field, National Petroleum Reserve, Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanks, Catherine

    2012-12-31

    Umiat oil field is a light oil in a shallow, frozen reservoir in the Brooks Range foothills of northern Alaska with estimated oil-in-place of over 1 billion barrels. Umiat field was discovered in the 1940’s but was never considered viable because it is shallow, in the permafrost, and far from any transportation infrastructure. The advent of modern drilling and production techniques has made Umiat and similar fields in northern Alaska attractive exploration and production targets. Since 2008 UAF has been working with Renaissance Alaska Inc. and, more recently, Linc Energy, to develop a more robust reservoir model that can be combined with rock and fluid property data to simulate potential production techniques. This work will be used to by Linc Energy as they prepare to drill up to 5 horizontal wells during the 2012-2013 drilling season. This new work identified three potential reservoir horizons within the Cretaceous Nanushuk Formation: the Upper and Lower Grandstand sands, and the overlying Ninuluk sand, with the Lower Grandstand considered the primary target. Seals are provided by thick interlayered shales. Reserve estimates for the Lower Grandstand alone range from 739 million barrels to 2437 million barrels, with an average of 1527 million bbls. Reservoir simulations predict that cold gas injection from a wagon-wheel pattern of multilateral injectors and producers located on 5 drill sites on the crest of the structure will yield 12-15% recovery, with actual recovery depending upon the injection pressure used, the actual Kv/Kh encountered, and other geologic factors. Key to understanding the flow behavior of the Umiat reservoir is determining the permeability structure of the sands. Sandstones of the Cretaceous Nanushuk Formation consist of mixed shoreface and deltaic sandstones and mudstones. A core-based study of the sedimentary facies of these sands combined with outcrop observations identified six distinct facies associations with distinctive permeability trends. The Lower Grandstand sand consists of two coarsening-upward shoreface sands sequences while the Upper Grandstand consists of a single coarsening-upward shoreface sand. Each of the shoreface sands shows a distinctive permeability profile with high horizontal permeability at the top getting progressively poorer towards the base of the sand. In contrast, deltaic sandstones in the overlying Ninuluk are more permeable at the base of the sands, with decreasing permeability towards the sand top. These trends impart a strong permeability anisotropy to the reservoir and are being incorporated into the reservoir model. These observations also suggest that horizontal wells should target the upper part of the major sands. Natural fractures may superimpose another permeability pattern on the Umiat reservoir that need to be accounted for in both the simulation and in drilling. Examination of legacy core from Umiat field indicate that fractures are present in the subsurface, but don't provide information on their orientation and density. Nearby surface exposures of folds in similar stratigraphy indicate there are at least three possible fracture sets: an early, N/S striking set that may predate folding and two sets possibly related to folding: an EW striking set of extension fractures that are parallel to the fold axes and a set of conjugate shear fractures oriented NE and NW. Analysis of fracture spacing suggests that these natural fractures are fairly widely spaced (25-59 cm depending upon the fracture set), but could provide improved reservoir permeability in horizontal legs drilled perpendicular to the open fracture set. The phase behavior of the Umiat fluid needed to be well understood in order for the reservoir simulation to be accurate. However, only a small amount of Umiat oil was available; this oil was collected in the 1940’s and was severely weathered. The composition of this ‘dead’ Umiat fluid was characterized by gas chromatography. This analysis was then compared to theoretical Umiat composition derived using the Pedersen method with original Umiat

  5. Parameter Selection and Longitudinal Phase Space Simulation for a Single Stage X-Band FEL Driver at 250 MeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Yipeng; Raubenheimer, Tor; Wu, Juhao; ,

    2011-08-19

    Hard x-ray Free electron lasers (FEL) are being built or proposed at many accelerator laboratories as it supports wide range of applications in many aspects. Most of the hard x-ray FEL design is similar with the SLAC Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), which features a two (or multiple) stage bunch compression. For the first stage of the bunch compression, usually the beam is accelerated in a lower-frequency RF section (such as S-band for LCLS), and then the longitudinal phase space is linearized by a higher-frequency RF section (harmonic RF, such as X-band for LCLS). In this paper, a compact hard x-ray FEL design is proposed, which is based on X-band RF acceleration and eliminating the need of a harmonic RF. The parameter selection and relation is discussed, and the longitudinal phase space simulation is presented. The FEL coherence condition of the electron beam in the undulators requires a large charge density, a small emittance and small energy spread. The RMS electron bunch length from the injector is in the ps scale, with a bunch charge in the range of hundreds pC to several nC, which means that the current is roughly 0.1 kA. According to the requirement from soft x-ray lasing and hard x-ray lasing, a peak current of 1 kA and 3 kA is needed respectively. Thus the bunch has to be compressed. Usually a two stage bunch compression or multipole stage bunch compression is adopted. The z-correlated energy chirp is normally established by letting the beam pass through a section of RF cavities, with a RF phase off crest. As stated above, S-band RF (3 GHz) acceleration could be applied in this section. Due to the nature of RF acceleration wave, the chirp on the bunch is not linear, but has the RF curvature on it. In order to linearize the energy chirp, a harmonic RF section with higher frequency is needed. For LCLS a short X-band RF section (12 GHz) is used which is a fourth order harmonic. The linearized bunch is then passing by a dispersive region, in which the particles with different energy have different path length. A four dipole chicane is the natural choice for the dispersive region. As the example illustrated in Figure 1, the head of the bunch has smaller energy, and gets a stronger bending kick from the dipole magnet, then has a longer path length in the dispersive region. Similarly, the tail of the bunch has larger energy and shorter path length in the dispersive region. At the exit of the dispersive region, the relative longitudinal position of the head and tail of the bunch both move to the center of the bunch, so the bunch length will be shorter.

  6. A Systems Approach to Identifying Exploration and Development Opportunities in the Illinois Basin: Digital Portifolio of Plays in Underexplored Lower Paleozoic Rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beverly Seyler; David Harris; Brian Keith; Bryan Huff; Yaghoob Lasemi

    2008-06-30

    This study examined petroleum occurrence in Ordovician, Silurian and Devonian reservoirs in the Illinois Basin. Results from this project show that there is excellent potential for additional discovery of petroleum reservoirs in these formations. Numerous exploration targets and exploration strategies were identified that can be used to increase production from these underexplored strata. Some of the challenges to exploration of deeper strata include the lack of subsurface data, lack of understanding of regional facies changes, lack of understanding the role of diagenetic alteration in developing reservoir porosity and permeability, the shifting of structural closures with depth, overlooking potential producing horizons, and under utilization of 3D seismic techniques. This study has shown many areas are prospective for additional discoveries in lower Paleozoic strata in the Illinois Basin. This project implemented a systematic basin analysis approach that is expected to encourage exploration for petroleum in lower Paleozoic rocks of the Illinois Basin. The study has compiled and presented a broad base of information and knowledge needed by independent oil companies to pursue the development of exploration prospects in overlooked, deeper play horizons in the Illinois Basin. Available geologic data relevant for the exploration and development of petroleum reservoirs in the Illinois Basin was analyzed and assimilated into a coherent, easily accessible digital play portfolio. The primary focus of this project was on case studies of existing reservoirs in Devonian, Silurian, and Ordovician strata and the application of knowledge gained to future exploration and development in these underexplored strata of the Illinois Basin. In addition, a review of published reports and exploration in the New Albany Shale Group, a Devonian black shale source rock, in Illinois was completed due to the recent increased interest in Devonian black shales across the United States. The New Albany Shale is regarded as the source rock for petroleum in Silurian and younger strata in the Illinois Basin and has potential as a petroleum reservoir. Field studies of reservoirs in Devonian strata such as the Geneva Dolomite, Dutch Creek Sandstone and Grassy knob Chert suggest that there is much additional potential for expanding these plays beyond their current limits. These studies also suggest the potential for the discovery of additional plays using stratigraphic concepts to develop a subcrop play on the subkaskaskia unconformity boundary that separates lower Devonian strata from middle Devonian strata in portions of the basin. The lateral transition from Geneva Dolomite to Dutch Creek Sandstone also offers an avenue for developing exploration strategies in middle Devonian strata. Study of lower Devonian strata in the Sesser Oil Field and the region surrounding the field shows opportunities for development of a subcrop play where lower Devonian strata unconformably overlie Silurian strata. Field studies of Silurian reservoirs along the Sangamon Arch show that opportunities exist for overlooked pays in areas where wells do not penetrate deep enough to test all reservoir intervals in Niagaran rocks. Mapping of Silurian reservoirs in the Mt. Auburn trend along the Sangamon Arch shows that porous reservoir rock grades laterally to non-reservoir facies and several reservoir intervals may be encountered in the Silurian with numerous exploration wells testing only the uppermost reservoir intervals. Mapping of the Ordovician Trenton and shallower strata at Centralia Field show that the crest of the anticline shifted through geologic time. This study illustrates that the axes of anticlines may shift with depth and shallow structure maps may not accurately predict structurally favorable reservoir locations at depth.

  7. Increasing the efficiency of organic solar cells by photonic and electrostatic-field enhancements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nalwa, Kanwar

    2012-11-03

    Organic photovoltaic (OPV) technology is an attractive solar-electric conversion paradigm due to the promise of low cost roll-to-roll production and amenability to flexible substrates. Power conversion efficiency (PCE) exceeding 7% has recently been achieved. OPV cells suffer from low charge carrier mobilities of polymers, leading to recombination losses, higher series resistances and lower fill-factors. Thus, it is imperative to develop fabrication methodologies that can enable efficient optical absorption in films thinner than optical absorption length. Active layers conformally deposited on light-trapping, microscale textured, grating-type surfaces is one possible approach to achieve this objective. In this study, 40% theoretical increase in photonic absorption over flat OPVs is shown for devices with textured geometry by the simulation results. For verifying this theoretical result and improving the efficiency of OPVs by light trapping, OPVs were fabricated on grating-type textured substrates possessing t pitch and -coat PV active-layer on these textured substrates led to over filling of the valleys and shunts at the crest, which severely affected the performance of the resultant PV devices. Thus, it is established that although the optical design is important for OPV performance but the potential of light trapping can only be effectively tapped if the textures are amenable for realizing a conformal active layer. It is discovered that if the height of the underlying topographical features is reduced to sub-micron regime (e.g. 300 nm) and the pitch is increased to more than a micron (e.g. 2 ?m), the textured surface becomes amenable to coating a conformal PV active-layer. The resultant PV cells showed 100% increase in average light absorption near the band edge due to trapping of higher wavelength photons, and 20% improvement in power conversion efficiency as compared with the flat PV cell. Another factor that severely limits the performance of OPVs is recombination of charge carriers. Thus it becomes imperative to understand the effect of processing conditions such as spin coating speed and drying rate on defect density and hence induced carrier recombination mechanism. In this study, It is shown that slow growth (longer drying time) of the active-layer leads to reduction of sub-bandgap traps by an order of magnitude as compared to fast grown active-layer. By coupling the experimental results with simulations, it is demonstrated that at one sun condition, slow grown device has bimolecular recombination as the major loss mechanism while in the fast grown device with high trap density, the trap assisted recombination dominates. It has been estimated that non-radiative recombination accounts nearly 50% of efficiency loss in modern OPVs. Generally, an external bias (electric field) is required to collect all the photogenerated charges and thus prevent their recombination. The motivation is to induce additional electric field in otherwise low mobility conjugated polymer based active layer by incorporating ferroelectric dipoles. This is expected to facilitate singlet exciton dissociation in polymer matrix and impede charge transfer exciton (CTE) recombination at polymer:fullerene interface. For the first time, it is shown that the addition of ferroelectric dipoles to modern bulk heterojunction (BHJ) can significantly improve exciton dissociation, resulting in a ~50% enhancement of overall solar cell efficiency. The devices also exhibit the unique ferroelectric-photovoltaic effect with polarization-controlled power conversion efficiency.

  8. Heat Flow and Gas Hydrates on the Continental Margin of India: Building on Results from NGHP Expedition 01

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trehu, Anne; Kannberg, Peter

    2011-06-30

    The Indian National Gas Hydrate Program (NGHP) Expedition 01 presented the unique opportunity to constrain regional heat flow derived from seismic observations by using drilling data in three regions on the continental margin of India. The seismic bottom simulating reflection (BSR) is a well-documented feature in hydrate bearing sediments, and can serve as a proxy for apparent heat flow if data are available to estimate acoustic velocity and density in water and sediments, thermal conductivity, and seafloor temperature. Direct observations of temperature at depth and physical properties of the sediment obtained from drilling can be used to calibrate the seismic observations, decreasing the uncertainty of the seismically-derived estimates. Anomalies in apparent heat flow can result from a variety of sources, including sedimentation, erosion, topographic refraction and fluid flow. We constructed apparent heat flow maps for portions of the Krishna-Godavari (K-G) basin, the Mahanadi basin, and the Andaman basin and modeled anomalies using 1-D conductive thermal models. Apparent heat flow values in the Krishna-Godavari (K-G) basin and Mahanadi basin are generally 0.035 to 0.055 watts per square meter (W/m2). The borehole data show an increase in apparent heat flow as water depth increases from 900 to 1500 m. In the SW part of the seismic grid, 1D modeling of the effect of sedimentation on heat flow shows that ~50% of the observed increase in apparent heat flow with increasing water depth can be attributed to trapping of sediments behind a "toe-thrust" ridge that is forming along the seaward edge of a thick, rapidly accumulating deltaic sediment pile. The remainder of the anomaly can be explained either by a decrease in thermal conductivity of the sediments filling the slope basin or by lateral advection of heat through fluid flow along stratigraphic horizons within the basin and through flexural faults in the crest of the anticline. Such flow probably plays a role in bringing methane into the ridge formed by the toe-thrust. Because of the small anomaly due to this process and the uncertainty in thermal conductivity, we did not model this process explicitly. In the NE part of the K-G basin seismic grid, a number of local heat flow lows and highs are observed, which can be attributed to topographic refraction and to local fluid flow along faults, respectively. No regional anomaly can be resolved. Because of lack of continuity between the K-G basin sites within the seismic grid and those ~70 km to the NE in water depths of 1200 to 1500 m, we do not speculate on the reason for higher heat flow at these depths. The Mahanadi basin results, while limited in geographic extent, are similar to those for the KG basin. The Andaman basin exhibits much lower apparent heat flow values, ranging from 0.015 to 0.025 W/m2. Heat flow here also appears to increase with increasing water depth. The very low heat flow here is among the lowest heat flow observed anywhere and gives rise to a very thick hydrate stability zone in the sediments. Through 1D models of sedimentation (with extremely high sedimentation rates as a proxy for tectonic thickening), we concluded that the very low heat flow can probably be attributed to the combined effects of high sedimentation rate, low thermal conductivity, tectonic thickening of sediments and the cooling effect of a subducting plate in a subduction zone forearc. Like for the K-G basin, much of the local variability can be attributed to topography. The regional increase in heat flow with water depth remains unexplained because the seismic grid available to us did not extend far enough to define the local tectonic setting of the slope basin controlling this observational pattern. The results are compared to results from other margins, both active and passive. While an increase in apparent heat flow with increasing water depth is widely observed, it is likely a result of different processes in different places. The very low heat flow due to sedimentation and tectonics in the Andaman basin is at the low end of glob

  9. Heat Flow and Gas Hydrates on the Continental Margin of India: Building on Results from NGHP Expedition 01

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anne Trehu; Peter Kannberg

    2011-06-30

    The Indian National Gas Hydrate Program (NGHP) Expedition 01 presented the unique opportunity to constrain regional heat flow derived from seismic observations by using drilling data in three regions on the continental margin of India. The seismic bottom simulating reflection (BSR) is a well-documented feature in hydrate bearing sediments, and can serve as a proxy for apparent heat flow if data are available to estimate acoustic velocity and density in water and sediments, thermal conductivity, and seafloor temperature. Direct observations of temperature at depth and physical properties of the sediment obtained from drilling can be used to calibrate the seismic observations, decreasing the uncertainty of the seismically-derived estimates. Anomalies in apparent heat flow can result from a variety of sources, including sedimentation, erosion, topographic refraction and fluid flow. We constructed apparent heat flow maps for portions of the Krishna-Godavari (K-G) basin, the Mahanadi basin, and the Andaman basin and modeled anomalies using 1-D conductive thermal models. Apparent heat flow values in the Krishna-Godavari (K-G) basin and Mahanadi basin are generally 0.035 to 0.055 watts per square meter (W/m{sup 2}). The borehole data show an increase in apparent heat flow as water depth increases from 900 to 1500 m. In the SW part of the seismic grid, 1D modeling of the effect of sedimentation on heat flow shows that {approx}50% of the observed increase in apparent heat flow with increasing water depth can be attributed to trapping of sediments behind a 'toe-thrust' ridge that is forming along the seaward edge of a thick, rapidly accumulating deltaic sediment pile. The remainder of the anomaly can be explained either by a decrease in thermal conductivity of the sediments filling the slope basin or by lateral advection of heat through fluid flow along stratigraphic horizons within the basin and through flexural faults in the crest of the anticline. Such flow probably plays a role in bringing methane into the ridge formed by the toe-thrust. Because of the small anomaly due to this process and the uncertainty in thermal conductivity, we did not model this process explicitly. In the NE part of the K-G basin seismic grid, a number of local heat flow lows and highs are observed, which can be attributed to topographic refraction and to local fluid flow along faults, respectively. No regional anomaly can be resolved. Because of lack of continuity between the K-G basin sites within the seismic grid and those {approx}70 km to the NE in water depths of 1200 to 1500 m, we do not speculate on the reason for higher heat flow at these depths. The Mahanadi basin results, while limited in geographic extent, are similar to those for the K-G basin. The Andaman basin exhibits much lower apparent heat flow values, ranging from 0.015 to 0.025 W/m{sup 2}. Heat flow here also appears to increase with increasing water depth. The very low heat flow here is among the lowest heat flow observed anywhere and gives rise to a very thick hydrate stability zone in the sediments. Through 1D models of sedimentation (with extremely high sedimentation rates as a proxy for tectonic thickening), we concluded that the very low heat flow can probably be attributed to the combined effects of high sedimentation rate, low thermal conductivity, tectonic thickening of sediments and the cooling effect of a subducting plate in a subduction zone forearc. Like for the K-G basin, much of the local variability can be attributed to topography. The regional increase in heat flow with water depth remains unexplained because the seismic grid available to us did not extend far enough to define the local tectonic setting of the slope basin controlling this observational pattern. The results are compared to results from other margins, both active and passive. While an increase in apparent heat flow with increasing water depth is widely observed, it is likely a result of different processes in different places. The very low heat flow due to sedimentation and tectonics in the Andaman basi