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1

Microsoft Word - Coyote Crest Wind Integration CX.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8, 2011 8, 2011 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Cherilyn Randall - TPC-TPP-4 Proposed Action: G0313 Coyote Crest Wind Park Interconnection Request Budget Information: Work Order # 213848, Task 01 Categorical Exclusions Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.7 "Acquisition, installation, operation, and removal of communication systems, data processing equipment, and similar electronic equipment." B4.6: "Additions or modifications to electric power transmission facilities that would not affect the environment beyond the previously developed facility area..." Location: Lewis County, Washington Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Description of the Proposed Action: In response to EverPower's interconnection request, BPA is

2

Managing Suburban Coyotes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Coyotes are increasingly found in suburban areas, where they may cause a variety of problems. One of the main concerns is the possible transfer of rabies from coyotes to people and pets. This publication explains coyote biology and ways to avoid problems with coyotes.

Texas Wildlife Services

2007-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

3

Coping with Coyotes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Coyotes are found throughout Texas. This publication describes their physical characteristics and behavior, as well as the signs that indicate coyote presence and damage to livestock. Suggestions on how to prevent damage are also given.

Rollins, Dale

1997-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

4

The Wily Coyote  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

also attract coyotes looking for easy prey. 4. Limit disposal of edible garbage in compost piles or other outside areas. Coyotes are opportunistic and will be attracted to such...

5

Coyotes in Cook County  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coyotes in Cook County Coyotes in Cook County Nature Bulletin No. 2 Forest Preserve District of Cook County -- July 31, 1969 George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Superintendent of Conversation COYOTES IN COOK COUNTY One winter night, a Forest Preserve Ranger heard the yapping howl of some animal that made his hair stand on end. A few days later, a farmer in the Sag valley saw what appeared to be a wolf lope across a road. Finally, the ranger, concealed within sight of a faint path apparently used by wild dogs or foxes, shot a coyote. The little bunch of black bristles at the base of its tail, covering a scent gland beneath the skin identified it as being of the wolf family. The animal was sent to the Illinois Natural History Survey, at Urbana, where it was pronounced to be a prairie wolf (also known as the "brush" wolf). In the west it is generally known by its Spanish name: coyote.

6

Pages that link to "Coyote Canyon Steam Plant Biomass Facility...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Pages that link to "Coyote Canyon Steam Plant Biomass Facility" Coyote Canyon Steam Plant Biomass Facility Jump to:...

7

Changes related to "Coyote Canyon Steam Plant Biomass Facility...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Changes related to "Coyote Canyon Steam Plant Biomass Facility" Coyote Canyon Steam Plant Biomass Facility Jump to:...

8

Coyote Canyon Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coyote Canyon Geothermal Project Coyote Canyon Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Development Project: Coyote Canyon Geothermal Project Project Location Information Coordinates 39.723055555556°, -118.08027777778° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.723055555556,"lon":-118.08027777778,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

9

Coyote Canyon Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coyote Canyon Geothermal Area Coyote Canyon Geothermal Area (Redirected from Coyote Canyon Geothermal Resource Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Coyote Canyon Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (6) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.927105,"lon":-117.927225,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

10

Microsoft Word - Coyote Creek CX.docx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3, 2013 3, 2013 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Dorie Welch Project Manager - KEWM-4 Proposed Action: Provision of funds to acquire a conservation easement over the 310-acre Coyote Creek property. Fish and Wildlife Project No.: 2011-003-00, Contract # BPA-006468 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.25 Real Property transfers for cultural protection, habitat preservation and wildlife management. Location: Veneta and West Eugene quadrangles, in Lane County, Oregon (near Eugene, Oregon). Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Description of the Proposed Action: The BPA is proposing to fund The Nature Conservancy's (Conservancy) purchase of the Coyote Creek property, a 310-acre parcel of land located just west of the

11

Coyote Canyon Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coyote Canyon Geothermal Area Coyote Canyon Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Coyote Canyon Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (6) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.927105,"lon":-117.927225,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

12

Crested Flycatcher Bird House  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Crested Flycatcher Bird House Name: kristin Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: What would be the best wood to use to build a house for a crested flycatcher? And what...

13

CX-005140: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

40: Categorical Exclusion Determination 40: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-005140: Categorical Exclusion Determination G0313 Coyote Crest Wind Park Interconnection Request CX(s) Applied: B1.7, B4.6 Date: 02/09/2011 Location(s): Lewis County, Washington Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration In response to EverPower?s interconnection request, Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is planning to integrate EverPower?s 120-megawatt Coyote Crest Wind Park project into its balancing authority (BA). The proposed point of interconnect is at Grays Harbor Public Utility District's (PUD?s) South Elma Substation. In order to integrate the proposed generation, BPA transmission services would install, own, and operate metering, telemetry, and Remedial Action Scheme equipment within EverPower's Coyote Crest Substation, Grays Harbor PUD's South Elma

14

Coyote Canyon Steam Plant Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Steam Plant Biomass Facility Steam Plant Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Coyote Canyon Steam Plant Biomass Facility Facility Coyote Canyon Steam Plant Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Orange County, California Coordinates 33.7174708°, -117.8311428° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.7174708,"lon":-117.8311428,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

15

CREST Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CREST Geothermal CREST Geothermal Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: CREST Geothermal Agency/Company /Organization: Sustainable Energy Advantage Partner: NREL Sector: Energy Focus Area: Geothermal Topics: Finance Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Spreadsheet Website: financere.nrel.gov/finance/webfm_send/41/NREL_CREST_Geothermal_version Country: United States RelatedTo: CREST Solar, CREST Wind Cost: Free UN Region: Northern America Coordinates: 37.09024°, -95.712891° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.09024,"lon":-95.712891,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

16

CREST Solar | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CREST Solar CREST Solar Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: CREST Solar Agency/Company /Organization: Sustainable Energy Advantage Partner: NREL Sector: Energy Focus Area: Solar Topics: Finance Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Spreadsheet Website: financere.nrel.gov/finance/webfm_send/43/NREL_CREST_Solar_version1.1_P Country: United States RelatedTo: CREST Wind, CREST Geothermal Cost: Free UN Region: Northern America Coordinates: 37.09024°, -95.712891° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.09024,"lon":-95.712891,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

17

CREST Wind | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CREST Wind CREST Wind Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: CREST Wind Agency/Company /Organization: Sustainable Energy Advantage Partner: NREL Sector: Energy Focus Area: Wind Topics: Finance Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Spreadsheet Website: financere.nrel.gov/finance/webfm_send/42/NREL_CREST_Wind_version1.1_Pr Country: United States RelatedTo: CREST Solar, CREST Geothermal Cost: Free UN Region: Northern America Coordinates: 37.09024°, -95.712891° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.09024,"lon":-95.712891,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

18

Home Range, habitat use and survival of coyotes in Western South Carolina.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ABSTRACT.Home range size, habitat use and survival of coyotes are variable throughout their range. Because coyotes have recently become established in South Carolina, we investigated their spatial distribution, habitat use and mortality on the Savannah River Site (SRS) in western South Carolina, USA. Annual survival for adult coyotes on the SRS was 0.658. Off-site trapping and shooting accounted for 60% of mortality. Home ranges averaged 30.5 km2 and 31.85 km2 by the 95% minimum convex polygon and 95% fixed kernel methods, respectively. We detected no difference in home ranges size between males and females. Intraspecific home range overlap averaged 22.4%, excluding mated pair interactions, with 87.5% of coyotes sharing their home range with one or more individuals. Coyotes selected home ranges containing higher proportions of early successional habitat than was available on the landscape. Core areas likewise contained a greater proportion of early successional habitat than available in the animals home range.

Schrecengost, Joshua, D.; Kilgo, John, C.; Ray, H., Scott; Miller, Karl, V.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

COYOTE : a finite element computer program for nonlinear heat conduction problems. Part I, theoretical background.  

SciTech Connect

The need for the engineering analysis of systems in which the transport of thermal energy occurs primarily through a conduction process is a common situation. For all but the simplest geometries and boundary conditions, analytic solutions to heat conduction problems are unavailable, thus forcing the analyst to call upon some type of approximate numerical procedure. A wide variety of numerical packages currently exist for such applications, ranging in sophistication from the large, general purpose, commercial codes, such as COMSOL, COSMOSWorks, ABAQUS and TSS to codes written by individuals for specific problem applications. The original purpose for developing the finite element code described here, COYOTE, was to bridge the gap between the complex commercial codes and the more simplistic, individual application programs. COYOTE was designed to treat most of the standard conduction problems of interest with a user-oriented input structure and format that was easily learned and remembered. Because of its architecture, the code has also proved useful for research in numerical algorithms and development of thermal analysis capabilities. This general philosophy has been retained in the current version of the program, COYOTE, Version 5.0, though the capabilities of the code have been significantly expanded. A major change in the code is its availability on parallel computer architectures and the increase in problem complexity and size that this implies. The present document describes the theoretical and numerical background for the COYOTE program. This volume is intended as a background document for the user's manual. Potential users of COYOTE are encouraged to become familiar with the present report and the simple example analyses reported in before using the program. The theoretical and numerical background for the finite element computer program, COYOTE, is presented in detail. COYOTE is designed for the multi-dimensional analysis of nonlinear heat conduction problems. A general description of the boundary value problems treated by the program is presented. The finite element formulation and the associated numerical methods used in COYOTE are also outlined. Instructions for use of the code are documented in SAND2010-0714.

Glass, Micheal W.; Hogan, Roy E., Jr.; Gartling, David K.

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Coyote Springs Cogeneration Project - Final Environmental Impact Statement and Record of Decision (DOE/EIS-0201)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Coyote Springs Cogeneration Project - Final Environmental Impact Statement Coyote Springs Cogeneration Project - Final Environmental Impact Statement Summary-1 Summary Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is a Federal power marketing agency in the U.S. Department of Energy. BPA is considering whether to transmit (wheel) electrical power from a proposed privately-owned, gas-fired combustion turbine power generation plant in Morrow County, Oregon. The proposed power plant would have two combustion turbines that would generate 440 average megawatts (aMW) of energy when completed. The proposed plant would be built in phases. The first combustion turbine would be built as quickly as possible. Timing for the second combustion turbine is uncertain. As a Federal agency subject to the Nation Environ- mental Policy Act, BPA must complete a review of environmental impacts before it makes a

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "g0313 coyote crest" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Microsoft Word - CX-Coyote Springs - Slatt No 1_WEB.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

12, 2010 12, 2010 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Corinn Castro Project Manager - TELM-TPP-3 Proposed Action: Coyote Springs - Slatt No. 1 500-kV Transmission Line Budget Information: Work Order # 00255064 PP&A Project No.: PP&A 1509 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.3, Routine maintenance activities for structures, rights-of-way, and infrastructures, (such as roads), that are required to maintain infrastructures in a condition suitable for a facility to be used for its designed purpose. Location: BPA proposes to replace spacer dampers along the Coyote Springs - Slatt No. 1 500-kV transmission line. The proposed project is located in Gilliam and Morrow Counties,

22

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

31 - 19640 of 26,764 results. 31 - 19640 of 26,764 results. Download CX-005262: Categorical Exclusion Determination Woodland and 148th Clearwire Wireless Communication Project CX(s) Applied: B1.7, B1.19 Date: 02/15/2011 Location(s): Pierce County, Washington Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-005262-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-005140: Categorical Exclusion Determination G0313 Coyote Crest Wind Park Interconnection Request CX(s) Applied: B1.7, B4.6 Date: 02/09/2011 Location(s): Lewis County, Washington Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-005140-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-005133: Categorical Exclusion Determination Geothermal Direct-Use Power Grant - City of Salida, Colorado

23

Pacific Crest Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pacific Crest Wind Farm Pacific Crest Wind Farm Facility Pacific Crest Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Caithness Developer NextEra Energy Resources Energy Purchaser Southern California Edison Co Location Tehachapi CA Coordinates 35.07665°, -118.25529° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.07665,"lon":-118.25529,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

24

Microsoft Word - CX-McNary-Coyote Springs_WEB.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

26, 2010 26, 2010 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Corinn Castro Project Manager - TELM-TPP-3 Proposed Action: Replace spacer dampers along the McNary-Coyote Springs No. 1 500-kV transmission line Budget Information: Work Order #00255064 PP&A Project No.: PP&A 1654 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.3, Routine maintenance activities...for structures, rights-of-way, infrastructures such as roads, equipment...routine maintenance activities, corrective....are required to maintain... infrastructures...in a condition suitable for a facility to be used for its designed purpose. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Location: The transmission line is located in Morrow and Umatilla counties, Oregon in BPA's

25

Cost of Renewable Energy Spreadsheet Tool (CREST) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cost of Renewable Energy Spreadsheet Tool (CREST) Cost of Renewable Energy Spreadsheet Tool (CREST) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Cost of Renewable Energy Spreadsheet Tool (CREST) Agency/Company /Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory Focus Area: Renewable Energy Topics: Policy, Deployment, & Program Impact Website: financere.nrel.gov/finance/content/CREST-model OpenEI Keyword(s): EERE tool, Cost of Renewable Energy Spreadsheet Tool, CREST Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/cost-renewable-energy-spreadsheet-too Language: English Policies: Regulations Regulations: Feed-in Tariffs Assess projects, design cost-based incentives (e.g., feed-in tariffs), and evaluate impacts of tax incentives and other support structures using this economic cash flow model.

26

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- CREST Cost of Renewable Energy...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

CREST Cost of Renewable Energy Spreadsheet Tool: A Model for Developing Cost-Based Incentives in the United States; User Manual Version 4, August 2009 - March 2011 (Updated July...

27

Wave Crest Distributions: Observations and Second-Order Theory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many empirical and heuristic distribution functions for wave crest heights have been proposed, but their predictions differ considerably. Part of the lack of agreement is due to the difficulty of making measurements that accurately record the ...

George Z. Forristall

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Spume Drops Produced by the Wind Tearing of Wave Crests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The wind tearing of breaking wave crests produces spume drops. The authors report preliminary laboratory data from direct and unambiguous observation of this process under various wind conditions using a video imaging technique. Results include ...

Magdalena Anguelova; Richard P. Barber Jr.; Jin Wu

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Hazel Crest, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Crest, Illinois: Energy Resources Crest, Illinois: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.571701°, -87.6944915° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.571701,"lon":-87.6944915,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

30

Crest Hill, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Crest Hill, Illinois: Energy Resources Crest Hill, Illinois: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.554753°, -88.0986709° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.554753,"lon":-88.0986709,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

31

Wildwood Crest, New Jersey: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wildwood Crest, New Jersey: Energy Resources Wildwood Crest, New Jersey: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 38.9748351°, -74.8335015° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.9748351,"lon":-74.8335015,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

32

Crested Butte, Colorado: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Crested Butte, Colorado: Energy Resources Crested Butte, Colorado: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 38.8697146°, -106.9878231° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.8697146,"lon":-106.9878231,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

33

Green Harbor-Cedar Crest, Massachusetts: Energy Resources | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Harbor-Cedar Crest, Massachusetts: Energy Resources Harbor-Cedar Crest, Massachusetts: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 42.0765351°, -70.6603435° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.0765351,"lon":-70.6603435,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

34

Multivariate Ornstein--Uhlenbeck process in studies of home range. Technical report No. 2. [Radiotelemetry tracking of birds, deer, and coyotes  

SciTech Connect

In home range studies, the statistical analysis of radio telemetry data poses special problems due to lack of independence of successive observations along the sample path. Assuming, however, that such data is generated by a continuous, stationary, Gaussian process possessing the Markov property, then a multivariate Ornstein-Uhlenbeck diffusion process is necessarily the source and is proposed here to be a workable model. Its characterization is given in terms of the typical descriptive properties of home range such as center of activity, homing tendency, and confidence regions. Invariance of the model with respect to the choice of an observational coordinate system is established, while data for twin deer is used to illustrate the manner in which the model may be used for the study of territorial interaction. An approximate maximum likelihood procedure is proposed for estimation purposes, with results being reported for deer, coyote, and bird tracking data. Estimates based on the coyote tracking data are used to illustrate how the concept of statistical information may be utilized to examine various sampling strategies.

Dunn, J. E.

1976-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

35

A Fourier-Based Method for the Distribution of Breaking Crests from Video Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Fourier-based method is presented to process video observations of water waves and calculate the speed distribution of breaking crest lengths. The method has increased efficiency and robust statistics compared with conventional algorithms that ...

Jim Thomson; Andrew T. Jessup

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Fully Nonlinear Statistics of Wave Crest Elevation Calculated Using a Spectral Response Surface Method: Applications to Unidirectional Sea States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper concerns the calculation of the probability of exceedance of wave crest elevation. The statistics have been calculated for broadbanded, unidirectional, deep-water sea states by incorporating a fully nonlinear wave model into a spectral ...

R. S. Gibson; C. Swan; P. S. Tromans

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

e3_Coyote Case Study2000/L&J  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... graphic design technology; biotechnology; heat- ing, ventilating ... the local school districts and work ... HVAC Heating, Ventilating, and Air Conditioning ...

2013-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

38

Coyote (Canis latrans), 100+ Years in the East  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

suturalis Indonesia: Sumatra 3301 suturalis Indonesia: Sumatra 1259 suturalis Uzbekistan 148 suturalis Czech of the cicadas of Wallacea, New Guinea and the West Pacific: a geotectonic exploration. Palaeogeogr

39

CREST Cost of Renewable Energy Spreadsheet Tool: A Model for Developing Cost-Based Incentives in the United States; User Manual Version 4, August 2009 - March 2011 (Updated July 2013)  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this document is to help model users understand how to use the CREST model to support renewable energy incentives, FITs, and other renewable energy rate-setting processes. This user manual will walk the reader through the spreadsheet tool, including its layout and conventions, offering context on how and why it was created. This user manual will also provide instructions on how to populate the model with inputs that are appropriate for a specific jurisdiction's policymaking objectives and context. Finally, the user manual will describe the results and outline how these results may inform decisions about long-term renewable energy support programs.

Gifford, J. S.; Grace, R. C.

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Crest, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

7246205°, -120.3702222° 7246205°, -120.3702222° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.7246205,"lon":-120.3702222,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "g0313 coyote crest" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Strong Turbulence in the Wave Crest Region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-resolution vertical velocity profiles in the surface layer of a lake reveal the turbulence structure beneath strongly forced waves. Dissipation rates of turbulence kinetic energy are estimated based on centered second-order structure ...

Johannes Gemmrich

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Cultural Markings on the Landscape: The PCN Pecked Curvilinear Nucleated Tradition in the Northern Coastal Ranges of California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

historic Rock Art. In California, edited by R. F. Heizer,Coyote Press Archives of California Prehistory 7. Coyote1996 Further Notes on California Charmstones. Coyote Press

Gillette, Donna Lee

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Coyote Springs Cogeneration Project - Final Environmental Impact Statement and Record of Decision (DOE/EIS-0201)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

(152K) (152K) 1. 2. 3. S.l S.2 S.3 S.4 S.5 S.6 S.7 Table of Contents Page Purpose and Need ...................................................................................................................... S-1 Proposed Action ............................................................................................................................ S-2 No Action Alternative .................................................................................................................... S-2 Affected Environment .................................................................................................................... S-3 Environmental Consequences ........................................................................................................ S-6

44

Coyote Springs Cogeneration Project, Morrow County, Oregon: Draft Environmental Impact Statement.  

SciTech Connect

BPA is considering whether to transfer (wheel) electrical power from a proposed privately-owned, combustion-turbine electrical generation plant in Oregon. The plant would be fired by natural gas and would use combined-cycle technology to generate up to 440 average megawatts (aMW) of energy. The plant would be developed, owned, and operated by Portland General Electric Company (PGE). The project would be built in eastern Oregon, just east of the City of Boardman in Morrow County. The proposed plant would be built on a site within the Port of Morrow Industrial Park. The proposed use for the site is consistent with the County land use plan. Building the transmission line needed to interconnect the power plant to BPA`s transmission system would require a variance from Morrow County. BPA would transfer power from the plant to its McNary-Slatt 500-kV transmission line. PGE would pay BPA for wheeling services. Key environmental concerns identified in the scoping process and evaluated in the draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) include these potential impacts: (1) air quality impacts, such as emissions and their contributions to the {open_quotes}greenhouse{close_quotes} effect; (2) health and safety impacts, such as effects of electric and magnetic fields, (3) noise impacts, (4) farmland impacts, (5) water vapor impacts to transportation, (6) economic development and employment impacts, (7) visual impacts, (8) consistency with local comprehensive plans, and (9) water quality and supply impacts, such as the amount of wastewater discharged, and the source and amount of water required to operate the plant. These and other issues are discussed in the DEIS. The proposed project includes features designed to reduce environmental impacts. Based on studies completed for the DEIS, adverse environmental impacts associated with the proposed project were identified, and no evidence emerged to suggest that the proposed action is controversial.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Common Name Scientific Name Double-crested Cormorant Phalacrocorax auritus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Green-winged Teal Anas crecca Hooded Merganser Lophodytes cucullatus Common Merganser Mergus merganser Accipter striatus Cooper's Hawk Accipiter cooperii Northern Harrier Circus cyaneus Broad-winged Hawk Buteo platypterus Red-tailed Hawk Buteo jamaicensis Bald Eagle Haliaeetus leucocephalus American Kestrel Falco

Sharp, Kim

46

Cedar Crest, New Mexico: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1075459°, -106.3728019° 1075459°, -106.3728019° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.1075459,"lon":-106.3728019,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

47

Riding the Crest: A Tale of Two Wave Experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper gives a general overview of two ocean wave experiments. The experimental goals of the Surface Wave Processes Program (SWAPP) and of the Surface Wave Dynamics Experiment (SWADE) are quite different but complementary. In general terms, ...

R. A. Weller; M. A. Donelan; M. G. Briscoe; N. E. Huang

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

CREST Cost of Renewable Energy Spreadsheet Tool: A Model for...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the two DSCR tests have passed or failed. * Cubic foot - a unit of volume used to measure biogas * BTU - British Thermal Unit, a unit measuring the energy content of a fuel * Therm...

49

East Hazel Crest, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

464346° 464346° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.5736457,"lon":-87.6464346,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

50

Directionality and Crest Length Statistics of Steep Waves in Open Ocean Waters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new wavelet analysis methodology is applied to open ocean wave height data from the Southern Ocean Waves Experiment (1992) and from a field experiment conducted at Duck, North Carolina, in 1997 with the aim of estimating the directionality and ...

Nicholas Scott; Tetsu Hara; Paul A. Hwang; Edward J. Walsh

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Mixco: Killwa Texts: "When I Have Donned My Crest of Stars;" and Mixco: Killwa Dictionary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a strip of land lOUwa Dictionary. Mauricio J. Mixco. Uni- inand a lexicon or dictionary. With the from participants, aretexts include myths and dictionary), Mixco has discharged

Fowler, Catherine S

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Commissioning Scenario Without Initial Tritium Inventory for a Demonstration Reactor Demo-CREST  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Concept and Facility / Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Tritium Science and Technology

R. Hiwatari; K. Okano; Y. Ogawa

53

Barriers to technology diffusion of Solar Water Heaters (SWHs) in the City of Windhoek : the case of Rocky Crest Residents.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??ENGLISH ABSTRACT: Deforestation, increasing pollution levels, diminishing non-renewable energy reserves, the resulting global warming, and climate change are areas of concern to environmentalists and the (more)

Imene, Helena Ndeuza Kalihulu

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Barriers to technology diffusion of solar water heaters in the city of Windhoek : the case of Rocky Crest residents.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Deforestation, increasing pollution levels, diminishing non-renewable energy reserves, the resulting global warming, and climate change are areas of concern to environmentalists and the whole global (more)

Imene, Helena Ndeuza Kalihulu

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

DOE Categorical Exclusion Determination Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

U.S. Department of Energy Categorical Exclusion Determination Form Program or Field Office: Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program Project Title CA-TRIBE-LOS COYOTES BAND OF CAHUILLA AND CUPENO INDIANS Location: Tribe CA-TRIBE-LOS COYOTES BAND OF CAHUILLA AND CUPENO INDIANS CA American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Description The Los Coyotes Band of Cahuilla and Cupeno Indians of California proposes to replace tribal members'

56

Browse wiki | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Facebook icon Twitter icon Browse wiki Jump to: navigation, search Coyote Canyon Steam Plant Biomass Facility CommercialOnlineDate 1989 + Coordinates 33.7174708,...

57

Section 3.5 of the In Search of Truth Project Environmental Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coyote & Fox in 2001. The areas surveyed were proposed locations for the food servicelaundry building, mechanical building, and the pipeline route (1,300 ft.) along the levee...

58

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

results. Download EIS-0201: Final Environmental Impact Statement Coyote Springs Cogeneration Project and Portland General Electric Company's Request for Transmission Service...

59

A Fresh Perspective for Managing Water in California: Insights from Applying the European Water Framework Directive to the Russian River  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

non-point source pollution from land use activities, whichdiffuse pollution sources from land use activities (agland use Coyote Dam Abstractions for agricultural water use; industrial and urban pollution

Grantham, Ted; Christian-Smith, Juliet; Kondolf, G. Mathias; Scheuer, Stefan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

SSRL HEADLINES December 2009  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(408) 918-4770. If you witness a coyote attack, dial 9-1-1. See the Stanford Community Crime Alerts website at: http:www.stanford.edugroupSUDPScrime-alert.shtml 9. Please...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "g0313 coyote crest" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Data 2012 Awards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

system (we have an early science project on Mira), and later on with data from JaguarTitan at ORNL. We will "seed" the project with current simulation results from our "Coyote...

62

DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2012-0051-EA | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

-EA -EA Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home NEPA Document Collection for: DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2012-0051-EA EA at Coyote Canyon Geothermal Area for Geothermal/Exploration Coyote Canyon South Geothermal Exploration Project General NEPA Document Info Energy Sector Geothermal energy Environmental Analysis Type EA Applicant Terra-Gen Power LLC Consultant EMPSi Geothermal Area Coyote Canyon Geothermal Area Project Location Churchill County, NV, Churchill County, NV Project Phase Geothermal/Exploration Techniques Exploratory Well Comments This EA covers an extension of a previously approved exploration project, "Coyote Canyon Geothermal Exploration Project." Exploration results indicated the resource may be to the south of the already approved area. The BLM determined that this new EA would be needed to cover this new land area proposed for disturbance.

63

May/June 2010 Clovertales  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/BROB White Crested Katie Kouril - BOB American Satin Chelsea Obermeier - BOB Teddy Amy Williams - BROB Teddy

Goodman, Robert M.

64

Property:OpenEI/Tool/RelatedTo | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

RelatedTo RelatedTo Jump to: navigation, search Property Name OpenEI/Tool/RelatedTo Property Type String Subproperties This property has the following 1 subproperty: C Community for Energy, Environment and Development (COMMEND) Pages using the property "OpenEI/Tool/RelatedTo" Showing 17 pages using this property. A Agriculture, Forestry and Other Land Use Mitigation Project Database + Mitigation of Climate Change in Agriculture (MICCA) Project + Applied Dynamic Analysis of the Global Economy (ADAGE) Model + Electricity Markets Analysis (EMA) Model + C COMcheck + REScheck + CREST Geothermal + CREST Solar, CREST Wind + CREST Solar + CREST Wind, CREST Geothermal + CREST Wind + CREST Solar, CREST Geothermal + ClimateTechWiki + [[Technology Needs Assessment Handbook]] +

65

EIS-0201: Final Environmental Impact Statement | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

201: Final Environmental Impact Statement 201: Final Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0201: Final Environmental Impact Statement Coyote Springs Cogeneration Project and Portland General Electric Company's Request for Transmission Service The Coyote Springs Cogeneration Project is a proposed natural gas-fired cogeneration power plant near Boardman, Oregon. The proposed power plant would be built on a g-hectare (22-acre) site in the Port of Morrow Industrial Park. The plant would have two combustion turbines that would generate 440 average megawatts of energy when completed. The proposed plant would be built in phases. EIS-0201-FEIS-Summary-1994_0.pdf DOE/EIS-0201, Bonneville Power Administration, Coyote Springs Cogeneration Project - Administrator's Record of Decision on Portland General Electric

66

EIS-0201: Final Environmental Impact Statement | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1: Final Environmental Impact Statement 1: Final Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0201: Final Environmental Impact Statement Coyote Springs Cogeneration Project and Portland General Electric Company's Request for Transmission Service The Coyote Springs Cogeneration Project is a proposed natural gas-fired cogeneration power plant near Boardman, Oregon. The proposed power plant would be built on a g-hectare (22-acre) site in the Port of Morrow Industrial Park. The plant would have two combustion turbines that would generate 440 average megawatts of energy when completed. The proposed plant would be built in phases. EIS-0201-FEIS-Summary-1994_0.pdf DOE/EIS-0201, Bonneville Power Administration, Coyote Springs Cogeneration Project - Administrator's Record of Decision on Portland General Electric

67

DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2011-0001-EA | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2011-0001-EA DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2011-0001-EA Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home NEPA Document Collection for: DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2011-0001-EA EA at Coyote Canyon Geothermal Area for Geothermal/Power Plant TGP Coyote Canyon Utilization Project General NEPA Document Info Energy Sector Geothermal energy Environmental Analysis Type EA Applicant Terra-Gen Power LLC Consultant CH2M Hill Ltd Geothermal Area Coyote Canyon Geothermal Area Project Location Churchill County, NV, Churchill County, NV Project Phase Geothermal/Power Plant Techniques Exploration Drilling, Observation Wells, Well Testing Techniques Comments Utilization Time Frame (days) NEPA Process Time 214 Participating Agencies Lead Agency BLM Funding Agency none provided Managing District Office Carson City

68

Geothermal assessment of the MX deployment area in Nevada. Final report, April 1, 1981-April 30, 1982  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A preliminary geothermal resource assessment of the MX deployment area in Nevada focused on Coyote Spring Valley in southeastern Nevada. Initially, an extensive literature search was conducted and a bibliography consisting of 750 entries was compiled covering all aspects of geology pertaining to the study area. A structural study indicates that Coyote Spring Valley lies in a tectonically active area which is favorable for the discovery of geothermal resources. Hot water may be funneled to the near-surface along an extensive fracture and fault system which appears to underlie the valley, according to information gathered during the literature search and aerial photo survey. A total of 101 shallow temperature probes were emplanted in Coyote Spring Valley. Three anomalous temperature points all lying within the same vicinity were identified in the north-central portion of the valley near a fault. A soil-mercury study also identified one zone of anomalous mercury concentrations around the north end of the Arrow Canyon Range. A literature search covering regional fluid geochemistry indicated that the three fluid samples taken from Coyote Spring Valley have a higher concentration of Na + K. During field work, seven fluid samples were collected in Coyote Spring Valley which also appear to be derived from volcanic units due to the presence of Ca-Mg or Na-K carbonate-bicarbonate. A temperature gradient study of six test water wells indicates that only one geothermal well with a temperature of 35.5/sup 0/C (96/sup 0/F) exists in the central portion of the valley at the north end of Arrow Canyon Range near the zone of anomalous soil-mercury points. A cultural assessment of Coyote Spring Valley was performed prior to field work.

Trexler, D.T.; Bruce, J.L.; Cates, D.; Dolan, H.H.; Covington, C.H.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

DOI-BLM-NV-CO1000-2010-0010-CX | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CX CX Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home NEPA Document Collection for: DOI-BLM-NV-CO1000-2010-0010-CX CX at Coyote Canyon Geothermal Area for Geothermal/Exploration {{{NEPA_Name}}} General NEPA Document Info Energy Sector Geothermal energy Environmental Analysis Type CX Applicant Terra-Gen Power LLC Geothermal Area Coyote Canyon Geothermal Area Project Location Churchill County, NV, Churchill County, NV Project Phase Geothermal/Exploration Techniques Electromagnetic Techniques Time Frame (days) Application Time 209 Participating Agencies Lead Agency BLM Funding Agency none provided Managing District Office Carson City Managing Field Office Stillwater Funding Agencies none provided Surface Manager BLM Mineral Manager BLM Selected Dates

70

Experimental Investigation of Wave Breaking Criteria Based on Wave Phase Speeds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Experiments were performed that test the kinematic breaking criterion, which states that the horizontal fluid particle velocity at the surface of a crest exceeds the local phase speed of the crest prior to breaking. Three different definitions of ...

Paul Stansell; Colin MacFarlane

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Spectrally Resolved Energy Dissipation Rate and Momentum Flux of Breaking Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Video observations of the ocean surface taken from aboard the Research Platform FLIP reveal the distribution of the along-crest length and propagation velocity of breaking wave crests that generate visible whitecaps. The key quantity assessed is ...

Johannes R. Gemmrich; Michael L. Banner; Chris Garrett

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

BMC Evolutionary Biology BioMed Central  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research article Unveiling an ancient biological invasion: molecular analysis of an old European alien, the crested porcupine (Hystrix cristata)

Emiliano Trucchi; Valerio Sbordoni

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

AquaticMammalsVolume33,Number4,2007 Aquatic Mammals, Volume 33, Number 4, 2007 ISSN 0167-5427  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of distributed generation ­ be it solar PV, wind turbines, or natural gas micro-turbines ­ and require investor marker, on November 19 2007. None made it through the selection phase. The third and fourth, respectively). In contrast, owls and Coyotes were generalists, with no single prey category comprising more

74

ALT AMONT BLU EBELL NATUR AL BU TT ES PLAT EAU CATHED RAL RED...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

DANFORT H HILL S WIN TER C AM P BIG RID GEC O DRY FORKC O DRY FORKC O PR ICKLY PEAR BOOK CLIFF S COYOTE BASIN COON H OLL OW DRY CR EEKUT WEAVER RID GE ASBUR Y CREEK SKIN NER...

75

Emerging factors associated with the decline of a gray fox population and multi-scale land cover associations of mesopredators in the Chicago metropolitan area.  

SciTech Connect

Statewide surveys of furbearers in Illinois indicate gray (Urocyon cinereoargenteus) and red (Vulpes vulpes) foxes have experienced substantial declines in relative abundance, whereas other species such as raccoons (Procyon lotor) and coyotes (Canis latrans) have exhibited dramatic increases during the same time period. The cause of the declines of gray and red foxes has not been identified, and the current status of gray foxes remains uncertain. Therefore, I conducted a large-scale predator survey and tracked radiocollared gray foxes from 2004 to 2007 in order to determine the distribution, survival, cause-specific mortality sources and land cover associations of gray foxes in an urbanized region of northeastern Illinois, and examined the relationships between the occurrence of gray fox and the presence other species of mesopredators, specifically coyotes and raccoons. Although generalist mesopredators are common and can reach high densities in many urban areas their urban ecology is poorly understood due to their secretive nature and wariness of humans. Understanding how mesopredators utilize urbanized landscapes can be useful in the management and control of disease outbreaks, mitigation of nuisance wildlife issues, and gaining insight into how mesopredators shape wildlife communities in highly fragmented areas. I examined habitat associations of raccoons, opossums (Didelphis virginiana), domestic cats (Felis catus), coyotes, foxes (gray and red), and striped skunks (Mephitis mephitis) at multiple spatial scales in an urban environment. Gray fox occurrence was rare and widely dispersed, and survival estimates were similar to other studies. Gray fox occurrence was negatively associated with natural and semi-natural land cover types. Fox home range size increased with increasing urban development suggesting that foxes may be negatively influenced by urbanization. Gray fox occurrence was not associated with coyote or raccoon presence. However, spatial avoidance and mortality due to coyote predation was documented and disease was a major mortality source for foxes. The declining relative abundance of gray fox in Illinois is likely a result of a combination of factors. Assessment of habitat associations indicated that urban mesopredators, particularly coyotes and foxes, perceived the landscape as relatively homogeneous and that urban mesopredators interacted with the environment at scales larger than that accommodated by remnant habitat patches. Coyote and fox presence was found to be associated with a high degree of urban development at large and intermediate spatial scales. However, at a small spatial scale fox presence was associated with high density urban land cover whereas coyote presence was associated with urban development with increased forest cover. Urban habitats can offer a diversity of prey items and anthropogenic resources and natural land cover could offer coyotes daytime resting opportunities in urban areas where they may not be as tolerated as smaller foxes. Raccoons and opossums were found to utilize moderately developed landscapes with interspersed natural and semi-natural land covers at a large spatial scale, which may facilitate dispersal movements. At intermediate and small spatial scales, both species were found to utilize areas that were moderately developed and included forested land cover. These results indicated that raccoons and opossums used natural areas in proximity to anthropogenic resources. At a large spatial scale, skunk presence was associated with highly developed landscapes with interspersed natural and semi-natural land covers. This may indicate that skunks perceived the urban matrix as more homogeneous than raccoons or opossums. At an intermediate spatial scale skunks were associated with moderate levels of development and increased forest cover, which indicated that they might utilize natural land cover in proximity to human-dominated land cover. At the smallest spatial scale skunk presence was associated with forested land cover surrounded by a suburban matrix. Compared to raccoon

Willingham, Alison N.; /Ohio State U.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

DOI-BLM-NV-CO1000-2010-0021-CX | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

DOI-BLM-NV-CO1000-2010-0021-CX DOI-BLM-NV-CO1000-2010-0021-CX Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home NEPA Document Collection for: DOI-BLM-NV-CO1000-2010-0021-CX CX at Coyote Canyon Geothermal Area for Geothermal/Exploration, {{{NEPA_Name}}} General NEPA Document Info Energy Sector Geothermal energy Environmental Analysis Type CX Applicant TGP Dixie Development LLC Geothermal Area Coyote Canyon Geothermal Area Project Location Churchill County, NV, Churchill County, NV Project Phase Geothermal/Exploration Techniques Magnetotelluric Methods Time Frame (days) Participating Agencies Lead Agency BLM Funding Agency none provided Managing District Office Carson City Managing Field Office Stillwater Funding Agencies none provided Surface Manager Nevada Mineral Manager BLM

77

DOI-BLM-NV-CO1000-2010-0011-CX | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CO1000-2010-0011-CX CO1000-2010-0011-CX CX at Coyote Canyon Geothermal Area for Geothermal/Exploration {{{NEPA_Name}}} General NEPA Document Info Energy Sector Geothermal energy Environmental Analysis Type CX Applicant Terra-Gen Power LLC Geothermal Area Coyote Canyon Geothermal Area Project Location Churchill County, NV, Churchill County, NV Project Phase Geothermal/Exploration Techniques Electromagnetic Techniques Time Frame (days) Application Time 209 Participating Agencies Lead Agency BLM Funding Agency none provided Managing District Office Carson City Managing Field Office Stillwater Funding Agencies none provided Surface Manager BLM Mineral Manager BLM Selected Dates Application Date 6/30/2009 Decision Document Date 1/25/2010 Relevant Numbers Lead Agency Doc Number DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2010-0011-CX

78

DOI-BLM-NV-CO1000-2010-0022-CX | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

DOI-BLM-NV-CO1000-2010-0022-CX DOI-BLM-NV-CO1000-2010-0022-CX Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home NEPA Document Collection for: DOI-BLM-NV-CO1000-2010-0022-CX CX at Coyote Canyon Geothermal Area for Geothermal/Exploration, {{{NEPA_Name}}} General NEPA Document Info Energy Sector Geothermal energy Environmental Analysis Type CX Applicant Terra-Gen Power LLC Geothermal Area Coyote Canyon Geothermal Area Project Location Churchill County, NV, Churchill County, NV Project Phase Geothermal/Exploration Techniques Electromagnetic Techniques, Magnetotelluric Techniques, Seismic Techniques Time Frame (days) Application Time 213 Participating Agencies Lead Agency BLM Funding Agency none provided Managing District Office Carson City Managing Field Office Stillwater Funding Agencies none provided

79

CX-001414: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

414: Categorical Exclusion Determination 414: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-001414: Categorical Exclusion Determination Coyote Springs-Slatt #1: Spacer Damper Replacements CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 04/12/2010 Location(s): Gilliam County, Oregon Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration In order to provide continued system reliability, Bonneville Power Administration proposes to replace old and worn spacer dampers along approximately 28.1 miles of Coyote Springs-Slatt # 1 500-kilovolt transmission line. Manned aerial carts that ride on the transmission line conductors will be used to change out the spacers. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD CX-001414.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-001944: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-004257: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-002532

80

137 (2010/3/19) : IPSJ SIG Technical Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

[2009] HCI http://labs.moto.com/diy-touchscreen-analysis/ (JST) (CREST) #12;137 (2010/3/19) : IPSJ SIG

Nakakoji, Kumiyo

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "g0313 coyote crest" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY - NETL CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION (CX) DESIGNATIO...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

(CREST) Optimize catalysts used for conversion of southwestern lignite into synthetic crude oil that can be shipped to nearby TX refineries and power plants for devel of...

82

Fossil energy use in conventional and low-external-input cropping systems.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The production of fossil fuels will crest within the next decade and with reliance of modern conventional agriculture on fossil fuel energy inputs, food production (more)

Cruse, Michael James

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Steady water waves with multiple critical layers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We construct small-amplitude periodic water waves with multiple critical layers. In addition to waves with arbitrarily many critical layers and a single crest in each period, two-dimensional sets of waves with several crests and troughs in each period are found. The setting is that of steady two-dimensional finite-depth gravity water waves with vorticity.

Mats Ehrnstrm; Joachim Escher; Erik Wahln

2010-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

84

On-Line Measurement and Tuning of Multi-Pass Recirculation Time in the CEBAF Linacs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

On-Line Measurement and Tuning of Multi-Pass Recirculation Time in the CEBAF Linacs Michael, USA Abstract CEBAF is a CW, recirculating electron accelerator, us- ing on-crest RF acceleration the beam to drift off-crest with respect to the accelerating fields. Figure 1: Layout of CEBAF Accelerator

85

Lagrangian kinematics of steep waves up to the inception of a spilling breaker  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Horizontal Lagrangian velocities and accelerations at the surface of steep water-waves are studied by Particle Tracking Velocimetry (PTV) for gradually increasing crest heights up to the inception of a spilling breaker. Localized steep waves are excited using wavemaker-generated Peregrine breather-type wave trains. Actual crest and phase velocities are estimated from video recorded sequences of the instantaneous wave shape as well as from surface elevation measurements by wave gauges. Effects of nonlinearity and spectral width on phase velocity, as well as relation between the phase velocity and crest propagation speed are discussed. The inception of a spilling breaker is associated with the horizontal velocity of water particles at the crest attaining that of the crest, thus confirming the kinematic criterion for inception of breaking.

Shemer, Lev

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

On the application of computational fluid dynamics codes for liquefied natural gas dispersion.  

SciTech Connect

Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes are increasingly being used in the liquefied natural gas (LNG) industry to predict natural gas dispersion distances. This paper addresses several issues regarding the use of CFD for LNG dispersion such as specification of the domain, grid, boundary and initial conditions. A description of the k-{var_epsilon} model is presented, along with modifications required for atmospheric flows. Validation issues pertaining to the experimental data from the Burro, Coyote, and Falcon series of LNG dispersion experiments are also discussed. A description of the atmosphere is provided as well as discussion on the inclusion of the Coriolis force to model very large LNG spills.

Luketa-Hanlin, Anay Josephine; Koopman, Ronald P. (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA); Ermak, Donald (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA)

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

"1. Coal Creek","Coal","Great River Energy",1133 "2. Antelope Valley","Coal","Basin Electric Power Coop",900  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Dakota" Dakota" "1. Coal Creek","Coal","Great River Energy",1133 "2. Antelope Valley","Coal","Basin Electric Power Coop",900 "3. Milton R Young","Coal","Minnkota Power Coop, Inc",697 "4. Leland Olds","Coal","Basin Electric Power Coop",670 "5. Garrison","Hydroelectric","USCE-Missouri River District",508 "6. Coyote","Coal","Otter Tail Power Co",427 "7. Stanton","Coal","Great River Energy",202 "8. Tatanka Wind Power LLC","Other Renewables","Acciona Wind Energy USA LLC",180 "9. Langdon Wind LLC","Other Renewables","FPL Energy Langdon Wind LLC",159

88

DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2010-0010-EA | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

EA EA Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home NEPA Document Collection for: DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2010-0010-EA EA at Dixie Valley Geothermal Area for Geothermal/Exploration Coyote Canyon and Dixie Meadows Geothermal Exploration General NEPA Document Info Energy Sector Geothermal energy Environmental Analysis Type EA Applicant Terra-Gen Power LLC Consultant CH2M Hill Ltd Geothermal Area Dixie Valley Geothermal Area Project Location Nevada Project Phase Geothermal/Exploration Techniques Downhole Techniques, Drilling Techniques, Exploration Drilling, Well Testing Techniques Time Frame (days) Application Time 265 Participating Agencies Lead Agency BLM Funding Agency none provided Managing District Office Carson City Managing Field Office Stillwater

89

Salt Block I test: experimental details and comparison with theory. Final report  

SciTech Connect

A series of laboratory experiments has been completed at Sandia Laboratories to provide an understanding of the steady state and transient thermal response of a large salt block containing an internal heat source. In this report, details of the experimental program are presented along with results of related efforts, such as thermal conductivity experiments, done in support of the heater experiments (Salt Block I). Finite element temperature field predictions, both transient and steady state, are performed utilizing the COYOTE nonlinear heat conduction program. Comparisons of experimental and theoretical results are generally quite good.

Duffey, T.A.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Numerical simulation of the laminar diffusion flame in a simplified burner. Revision 1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The laminar ethylene-air diffusion flame in a simple laboratory burner was simulated with the COYOTE reactive flow program. This program predicts the flow field, transport, and chemistry for the purposes of code validation and providing physical understanding of the processes occurring in the flame. The authors show the results of numerical experiments to test the importance of several physical phenomena, including gravity, radiation, and differential diffusion. The computational results compare favorably with the experimental measurements, and all three phenomena are important to accurate simulations.

Cloutman, L.D.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Yucca Mountain | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Yucca Mountain Yucca Mountain Yucca Mountain Addthis Fuel assembly for production of nuclear power 1 of 13 Fuel assembly for production of nuclear power Nuclear fuel pellets 2 of 13 Nuclear fuel pellets Aerial view of north end of the Yucca Mountain crest in February 1993 3 of 13 Aerial view of north end of the Yucca Mountain crest in February 1993 View of the first curve in the main drift of the Exploratory Studies Facility in October 1995 4 of 13 View of the first curve in the main drift of the Exploratory Studies Facility in October 1995 Aerial view of the crest of Yucca Mountain 5 of 13 Aerial view of the crest of Yucca Mountain Location of Yucca Mountain, Nevada 6 of 13 Location of Yucca Mountain, Nevada A scientist uses ultra-violet light to study how fluids move through rock

92

Response of Water Vapor and CO2 Fluxes in Semiarid Lands to Seasonal and Intermittent Precipitation Pulses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Precipitation pulses are important in controlling ecological processes in semiarid ecosystems. The effects of seasonal and intermittent precipitation events on net water vapor and CO2 fluxes were determined for crested wheatgrass (Agropyron ...

Sasha Ivans; Lawrence Hipps; A. Joshua Leffler; Carolyn Y. Ivans

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

CX-002303: Categorical Exclusion Determination  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Center for Renewable Energy Science and Technology (CREST)CX(s) Applied: B3.6, A11Date: 05/17/2010Location(s): Arlington, TexasOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

94

Capital Markets and Sustainable Forestry: Opportunities for Investment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Trends Contributing Authors: Abraham Guillen, Smartwood International Donald J. Hoffman, The CREST. With the assistance of Abraham Guillen, we undertook research to describe the profile of more than two dozen

95

The Time-Dependent Hydraulic Flow and Dissipation over the Still of Observatory Inlet  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The time-dependent hydraulic flow over the sill of a tidally energetic fjord, Observatory Inlet, British Columbia, is studied. Acoustic observations of streamlines and velocity were made near the sill crest during the summer of 1982, a time when ...

Michael W. Stacey; Len J. Zedel

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

The effect of fluid acceleration on sediment transport in the surf zone  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The surf zone is defined by highly non-linear, breaking waves that have very different acceleration signatures beneath their respective crests and troughs. The consequences of this dissimilarity on sediment transport is ...

Durham, William McKinney

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Second-Order Theory and Setup in Surface Gravity Waves: A Comparison with Experimental Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The second-order, three-dimensional, finite-depth wave theory is here used to investigate the statistical properties of the surface elevation and wave crests of field data from Lake George, Australia. A direct comparison of experimental and ...

A. Toffoli; J. Monbaliu; M. Onorato; A. R. Osborne; A. V. Babanin; E. Bitner-Gregersen

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Semidiurnal Baroclinic Wave Momentum Fluxes at Kaena Ridge, Hawaii  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Kaena Ridge, Hawaii, is a site of energetic conversion of the semidiurnal barotropic tide. Diffuse baroclinic wave beams emanate from the critical-slope regions near the ridge crest, directed upward and southward from the north flank of the ridge ...

Robert Pinkel; Luc Rainville; Jody Klymak

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

The Analysis of Sea Surface Imagery for Whitecap Kinematics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Visible sea surface images are analyzed to determine the distribution of the average length of breaking crests per unit sea surface area per unit speed increment ?(c). The ?(c) distribution offers a scale-dependent description of wave breaking ...

Jessica M. Kleiss; W. Kendall Melville

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Application of Categorical Exclusions (1021.410) Disagree Agree...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 FT LENGTH 80 FT CREST WIDTH 3 FT SLOPE 2H : 1V FLOW CLEARING LIMITS (TYP) LOW WATER CROSSING RIPRAP STREAMBED & APPROACHES WESTERN AREA POWER ADMINISTRATION DESERT...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "g0313 coyote crest" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

OpenEI/Tool/Keyword EERE tool | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Agent-Based Model + Cost of Renewable Energy Spreadsheet Tool (CREST) + DOE-2 Building Energy Use and Cost Analysis Software + EnergyPlus 7.0 + Facility Energy Decision System +...

102

Expected Structure of Extreme Waves in a Gaussian Sea. Part I: Theory and SWADE Buoy Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper is concerned with the expected configuration in space and time surrounding extremely high crests in a random wave field, or, equivalently, the mean configuration averaged over realizations of extreme events. A simple, approximate ...

O. M. Phillips; Daifang Gu; Mark Donelan

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Microsoft Word - Vol II_Att B_PCCIP.docx  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

at approximately 50-yard intervals, will be walked along the crest and side slopes. A search will be made for evidence of differential settling, subsidence, and cracks, if any....

104

NREL: Energy Analysis - Wind Technology Analysis Models and Tools  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

design cost-based incentives (e.g., feed-in tariffs), and evaluate the impact of tax incentives or other support structures. CREST is a suite of three analytic tools, for...

105

NREL: Energy Analysis - Vehicles and Fuels Research Analysis...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

design cost-based incentives (e.g., feed-in tariffs), and evaluate the impact of tax incentives or other support structures. CREST is a suite of three analytic tools, for...

106

the continental crust or the over-lying sediments. Microorganisms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-floor hot springs dotting the ridge crests in 1979, microbes were obviously a crucial part of it. More oceanographer put it. On closer inspection, microbiologist Craig Taylor of Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Lovley, Derek

107

Renewable Energy Cost Modeling: A Toolkit for Establishing Cost-Based Incentives in the United States; March 2010 -- March 2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is intended to serve as a resource for policymakers who wish to learn more about establishing cost-based incentives. The report will identify key renewable energy cost modeling options, highlight the policy implications of choosing one approach over the other, and present recommendations on the optimal characteristics of a model to calculate rates for cost-based incentives, feed-in tariffs (FITs), or similar policies. These recommendations will be utilized in designing the Cost of Renewable Energy Spreadsheet Tool (CREST). Three CREST models will be publicly available and capable of analyzing the cost of energy associated with solar, wind, and geothermal electricity generators. The CREST models will be developed for use by state policymakers, regulators, utilities, developers, and other stakeholders to assist them in current and future rate-setting processes for both FIT and other renewable energy incentive payment structures and policy analyses.

Gifford, J. S.; Grace, R. C.; Rickerson, W. H.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

DEVELOPMENT AND DISEASE An Fgf8 mouse mutant phenocopies human 22q11 deletion syndrome  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

microdeletion detected in humans, is associated with a lifethreatening array of birth defects. Although 90 % of affected individuals share the same three megabase deletion, their phenotype is highly variable and includes craniofacial and cardiovascular anomalies, hypoplasia or aplasia of the thymus with associated deficiency of T cells, hypocalcemia with hypoplasia or aplasia of the parathyroids, and a variety of central nervous system abnormalities. Because ablation of neural crest in chicks produces many features of the deletion 22q11 syndrome, it has been proposed that haploinsufficiency in this region impacts neural crest function during cardiac and pharyngeal arch development. Few factors required for migration, survival, proliferation and subsequent differentiation of pharyngeal arch neural crest and

Deborah U. Frank; Lori K. Fotheringham; Judson A. Brewer; Louis J. Muglia; Martin Tristani-firouzi; Mario R. Capecchi; Anne M. Moon

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Metallic nut for use with ceramic threads  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nozzle guide vane assembly has ceramic components therein having a conventional thread thereon including a preestablished pitch and having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion. The nozzle guide vane assembly has a metallic components therein having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being greater that the rate of thermal expansion of the ceramic components is positioned in a gas turbine engine. The metallic component, a nut, has a thread therein including a plurality of crests being spaced on a pitch equal to that of the ceramic component and has a pair of contacting surfaces extending from the plurality of crests. A notch spirally extends intermediate adjacent ones of the plurality of crests and has a preestablished depth which is at least twice the size of the conventional pitch. Furthermore, the pair of contacting surfaces are in contact with only a portion of the threaded surface of the ceramic components.

Norton, Paul F. (San Diego, CA); Shaffer, James E. (Maitland, FL)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Carter Co. Harding Co. Perkins Co. Dunn Co. Dawson Co. Fallon Co.  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

PENNEL PENNEL BUFFALO LITTLE KNIFE FRYBURG MONDAK PLEVNA LOOKOUT BUTTE E ELKHORN RANCH DICKINSON CADY CREEK MEDICINE POLE HILLS BICENTENNIAL ROOSEVELT BIG STICK ROUGH RIDER MONARCH TREE TOP LOOKOUT BUTTE BUCKHORN MEDORA FLAT TOP BUTTE ELAND DEMORES ASH COULEE WHISKEY JOE GAS CITY DAVIS CREEK WINDY RIDGE POKER JIM PLEVNA S KNUTSON STATE LINE BELL BEAR CREEK ELKHORN RANCH N PIERRE CREEK LONE BUTTE ZENITH MANNING SQUAW GAP AMOR STADIUM HEART S HILINE ASH MARY GAYLORD BULL CREEK HALEY SHORT PINE HILLS W CABIN CREEK GASLIGHT CUPTON DEVILS PASS LITTLE MISSOURI LITTLE BEAVER COOKS PEAK LITTLE BEAVER E CORAL CREEK BEAVER CREEK MORGAN DRAW WATERHOLE CREEK DEER CREEK GRASSY BUTTE CROOKED CREEK CINNAMON CREEK HORSE CREEK KILLDEER SQUARE BUTTE GRAND RIVER RIDER ROCKY RIDGE FOUR EYES TRACY MOUNTAIN COYOTE CREEK HAY DRAW SAND CREEK ROCKY HILL

111

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

11 - 20020 of 28,905 results. 11 - 20020 of 28,905 results. Download CX-002532: Categorical Exclusion Determination Spacer Damper Replacements on the McNary-Coyote Springs Number-1 Transmission Line CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 05/26/2010 Location(s): MorrowCounty, Oregon Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-002532-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-005204: Categorical Exclusion Determination Renewable Energy Research and Development CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 02/16/2011 Location(s): Nevada Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-005204-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-004009: Categorical Exclusion Determination Field Demonstration of Carbon Dioxide Capture from Coal-Derived Syngas

112

NVN-086892 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » NVN-086892 Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home BLM Geothermal Case: NVN-086892 Case Data Survey Type All (section) Case Status Authorized Case Type GEO_LSE_COMP_POST_2005 Total Acreage 640 Bid Price/Acre Managing Field Office none provided Surface Manager BUREAU OF LAND MGMT Lessee 1 TGP COYOTE CANYON LLC Lessee 2 none provided Effective Date 9/1/2009 Expire Date Held By Production (HBP) HBP Date RoyaltyRate Most Recent Action EFFECTIVE DATE Most Recent Action Date 9/1/2009 Location Information Geothermal Resource Area Meridian 21 State(s) Nevada Township 0240N Range 0360E Section 21 Aliquot all Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=NVN-086892&oldid=664342"

113

Carter Co. Harding Co. Perkins Co. Dunn Co. Dawson Co. Fallon Co.  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

PENNEL PENNEL BUFFALO LITTLE KNIFE FRYBURG MONDAK PLEVNA LOOKOUT BUTTE E ELKHORN RANCH DICKINSON CADY CREEK MEDICINE POLE HILLS BICENTENNIAL ROOSEVELT BIG STICK ROUGH RIDER MONARCH TREE TOP LOOKOUT BUTTE BUCKHORN MEDORA FLAT TOP BUTTE ELAND DEMORES ASH COULEE WHISKEY JOE GAS CITY DAVIS CREEK WINDY RIDGE POKER JIM PLEVNA S KNUTSON STATE LINE BELL BEAR CREEK ELKHORN RANCH N PIERRE CREEK LONE BUTTE ZENITH MANNING SQUAW GAP AMOR STADIUM HEART S HILINE ASH MARY GAYLORD BULL CREEK HALEY SHORT PINE HILLS W CABIN CREEK GASLIGHT CUPTON DEVILS PASS LITTLE MISSOURI LITTLE BEAVER COOKS PEAK LITTLE BEAVER E CORAL CREEK BEAVER CREEK MORGAN DRAW WATERHOLE CREEK DEER CREEK GRASSY BUTTE CROOKED CREEK CINNAMON CREEK HORSE CREEK KILLDEER SQUARE BUTTE GRAND RIVER RIDER ROCKY RIDGE FOUR EYES TRACY MOUNTAIN COYOTE CREEK HAY DRAW SAND CREEK ROCKY HILL

114

Nature Bulletin Table of Contents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Table of Contents: Table of Contents: Here is our table of contents for the Forset Preserve District of Cook Country Nature Bulletins. To search, go to the Natuere Bulletin's Search Engine and type in your topic. You can also use your browser's "FIND" command to search the 750+ article titles here for a specific subject! Fish Smother Under Ice Coyotes in Cook County Tough Times for the Muskrats Wild Geese and Ducks Fly North Squirrels Spring Frogs Snapping Turtles A Phenomenal Spring Good People Do Not Pick Wildflowers Fire is the Enemy of Field and Forest Crows Earthworms Bees Crayfish Floods Handaxes and Knives in the Forest Preserves Ant Sanctuary Conservation Mosquitoes More About Mosquitoes Fishing in the Forest Preserve Our River Grasshoppers Chiggers Ticks Poison Ivy Fireflies

115

NVN-017282 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

82 82 Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home BLM Geothermal Case: NVN-017282 Case Data Survey Type All (section) Case Status Authorized Case Type GEO_LEASE_COMPETITIVE Total Acreage 2560 Bid Price/Acre Managing Field Office none provided Surface Manager BUREAU OF LAND MGMT Lessee 1 TGP COYOTE CANYON LLC Lessee 2 none provided Effective Date 11/1/1977 Expire Date Held By Production (HBP) HELD BY LOCATION IN A PRODUCING UNIT HBP Date 6/14/1987 RoyaltyRate 1.75% - 3.5% Most Recent Action ROYALTY RATE -1 Most Recent Action Date 11/1/1977 Location Information Geothermal Resource Area Meridian 21 State(s) Nevada Township 0240N Range 0360E Section 11 Aliquot all Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=NVN-017282&oldid=668280

116

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

61 - 10970 of 28,905 results. 61 - 10970 of 28,905 results. Download EIS-0201: Final Environmental Impact Statement Coyote Springs Cogeneration Project and Portland General Electric Company's Request for Transmission Service http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/eis-0201-final-environmental-impact-statement Download EIS-0407: Final Environmental Impact Statement Abengoa Biorefinery Project near Hugoton, Stevens County, Kansas http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/eis-0407-final-environmental-impact-statement Download EA-0845: Final Environmental Assessment Expansion of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Research Center http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/ea-0845-final-environmental-assessment Download Vulnerability Analysis of Energy Delivery Control Systems The Vulnerability Analysis of Energy Delivery Control Systems report,

117

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: American Recovery and Reinvestment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2, 2010 2, 2010 CX-003184: Categorical Exclusion Determination Washoe Wisk'e'em Project CX(s) Applied: B3.1 Date: 07/22/2010 Location(s): Nevada Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy July 22, 2010 CX-003182: Categorical Exclusion Determination Los Coyotes Band of Cahuilla and Cupeno Indians CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B2.5, B5.1 Date: 07/22/2010 Location(s): California Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy July 22, 2010 CX-003181: Categorical Exclusion Determination Habematolel Pomo of Upper Lake CX(s) Applied: B2.5, B5.1 Date: 07/22/2010 Location(s): Upper Lake, California Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy July 22, 2010 CX-003180: Categorical Exclusion Determination Manchester Band of Pomo Indians of the Manchester-Point Arena Rancheria,

118

NEWTON, Ask a Scientist at Argonne National Labs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Owl Predators Owl Predators Name: Mia Status: student Grade: K-3 Location: MN Country: USA Date: Winter 2011-2012 Question: What are the predators of a owl? Replies: Mia: Our largest adult owls have few predators. Smaller owls may be prey of other owls, long-eared owls are sometimes eaten by great horned owls, for example. Ground nesting owls, like short-eared owls, and especially nestlings, may be hunted by many predators, coyotes and other hawks and owls most likely. Nestlings of all birds, including owls may be hunted by other birds, raccoons, snakes and other animals that can climb trees. J. Elliott Hi Mia Predators of owls include: Opossums Racoons Hawks, Eagles and other raptors Other owls House cats Snakes that raid nests Accidents such as falling out of a nest, colliding with a tree, and electric power lines also contribute to owl mortality.

119

CX-003343: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

43: Categorical Exclusion Determination 43: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-003343: Categorical Exclusion Determination Recovery Act: Experiment-Based Model for the Chemical Interactions between Geothermal Rocks, Supercritical Carbon Dioxide and Water CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 08/05/2010 Location(s): Palo Alto, California Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office Palo Alto Research Center, Incorporated (PARC) would design and develop a geochemical model that stimulates an Enhanced Geothermal System reservoir. The model would develop a foundation in theory and measurement of physical and chemical interactions between minerals, rocks, supercritical carbon dioxide, and water. The work would take place at the existing PARC facility located at 3333 Coyote Hill Road, Palo Alto, California 94304.

120

NVN-017283A | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NVN-017283A NVN-017283A Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home BLM Geothermal Case: NVN-017283A Case Data Survey Type Aliquot Part (40 Acres) Case Status Authorized Case Type GEO_LEASE_COMPETITIVE Total Acreage 640 Bid Price/Acre Managing Field Office none provided Surface Manager BUREAU OF LAND MGMT Lessee 1 TGP COYOTE CANYON LLC Lessee 2 none provided Effective Date 11/1/1977 Expire Date Held By Production (HBP) HELD BY LOCATION IN A PRODUCING UNIT HBP Date 6/14/1988 RoyaltyRate Most Recent Action EFFECTIVE DATE Most Recent Action Date 11/1/1977 Location Information Geothermal Resource Area Meridian 21 State(s) Nevada Township 0240N Range 0360E Section 22 Aliquot all Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=NVN-017283A&oldid=668997"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "g0313 coyote crest" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2013-0026-DNA | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2013-0026-DNA DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2013-0026-DNA Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home NEPA Document Collection for: DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2013-0026-DNA DNA at Dixie Valley Geothermal Area for Geothermal/Well Field, Above ground drilling water pipeline (temporary) General NEPA Document Info Energy Sector Geothermal energy Environmental Analysis Type DNA Applicant TGP Coyote Canyon LLC Geothermal Area Dixie Valley Geothermal Area Project Location Nevada Project Phase Geothermal/Well Field Techniques Production Wells Time Frame (days) Application Time 56 Participating Agencies Lead Agency BLM Funding Agency none provided Managing District Office Carson City Managing Field Office Stillwater Funding Agencies none provided Surface Manager BLM Mineral Manager BLM

122

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Error message Error message The page you requested does not exist. For your convenience, a search was performed using the query Flash2009 19. You are here Home » Page not found Page not found Oops! The page you are looking for doesn't seem to be available. Did you find a broken link? Tell us and we'll fix it. Or maybe you meant to go somewhere else? Use the search box or links below to help guide you. Enter terms Flash2009 19 Search Showing 911 - 920 of 9,640 results. Download CX-002532: Categorical Exclusion Determination Spacer Damper Replacements on the McNary-Coyote Springs Number-1 Transmission Line CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 05/26/2010 Location(s): MorrowCounty, Oregon Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-002532-categorical-exclusion-determination

123

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

31 - 19540 of 26,764 results. 31 - 19540 of 26,764 results. Download CX-003181: Categorical Exclusion Determination Habematolel Pomo of Upper Lake CX(s) Applied: B2.5, B5.1 Date: 07/22/2010 Location(s): Upper Lake, California Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-003181-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-003182: Categorical Exclusion Determination Los Coyotes Band of Cahuilla and Cupeno Indians CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B2.5, B5.1 Date: 07/22/2010 Location(s): California Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-003182-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-003187: Categorical Exclusion Determination Pueblo of San Idelfonso CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 07/22/2010 Location(s): San Idelfonso, New Mexico

124

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

91 - 1600 of 8,172 results. 91 - 1600 of 8,172 results. Download CX-002532: Categorical Exclusion Determination Spacer Damper Replacements on the McNary-Coyote Springs Number-1 Transmission Line CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 05/26/2010 Location(s): MorrowCounty, Oregon Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-002532-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-006145: Categorical Exclusion Determination The Painesville Municipal Power Vanadium Redox Battery Demonstration Program CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 07/14/2011 Location(s): Painesville, Ohio Office(s): Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, National Energy Technology Laboratory http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-006145-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-001457: Categorical Exclusion Determination

125

Carter Co. Harding Co. Perkins Co. Dunn Co. Dawson Co. Fallon Co.  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

BUFFALO BUFFALO PENNEL LITTLE KNIFE FRYBURG MONDAK PLEVNA LOOKOUT BUTTE E ELKHORN RANCH DICKINSON CADY CREEK BICENTENNIAL MEDICINE POLE HILLS BIG STICK ROOSEVELT ROUGH RIDER MONARCH TREE TOP LOOKOUT BUTTE BUCKHORN MEDORA FLAT TOP BUTTE ELAND DEMORES ASH COULEE WHISKEY JOE GAS CITY DAVIS CREEK WINDY RIDGE POKER JIM PLEVNA S KNUTSON BELL STATE LINE BEAR CREEK ELKHORN RANCH N PIERRE CREEK LONE BUTTE ZENITH MANNING SQUAW GAP AMOR HEART S STADIUM HILINE ASH MARY LAKE ILO GAYLORD BULL CREEK HALEY BULLY SHORT PINE HILLS W CABIN CREEK GASLIGHT CUPTON DEVILS PASS LITTLE MISSOURI LITTLE BEAVER COOKS PEAK LITTLE BEAVER E CORAL CREEK BEAVER CREEK MORGAN DRAW WATERHOLE CREEK DEER CREEK GRASSY BUTTE CROOKED CREEK CINNAMON CREEK HORSE CREEK KILLDEER SQUARE BUTTE GRAND RIVER RIDER ROCKY RIDGE TRACY MOUNTAIN FOUR EYES COYOTE CREEK HAY DRAW SAND CREEK

126

CX-003238: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

238: Categorical Exclusion Determination 238: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-003238: Categorical Exclusion Determination Purchase of Trimble Creek (Doramus) Property CX(s) Applied: B1.25 Date: 07/16/2010 Location(s): Pend Oreille County, Washington Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposed to fund the acquisition of the of the 72.75 Doramus property by the Kalispel. BPA will be granted a perpetual conservation easement over the entire property as a condition of funding the acquisition. The property is being acquired because of its outstanding riparian and floodplain natural resource values. The acquisition is an opportunity to enhance, restore, and manage habitat associated with Trimble Creek for Canada goose, mallard, Savannah sparrow, Lincoln sparrow, bobolink, white-tailed deer, elk, and coyote; and other

127

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

81 - 7990 of 29,416 results. 81 - 7990 of 29,416 results. Download CX-002429: Categorical Exclusion Determination Echo Lake-Monroe Spacer-Damper Replacements CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 05/17/2010 Location(s): King County, Washington Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-002429-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-001414: Categorical Exclusion Determination Coyote Springs-Slatt #1: Spacer Damper Replacements CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 04/12/2010 Location(s): Gilliam County, Oregon Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-001414-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-004077: Categorical Exclusion Determination Replacement of a Relay/Transfer Trip Rack at Redmond Substation and a Transfer Trip Panel at LaPine Substation

128

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

01 - 14510 of 28,560 results. 01 - 14510 of 28,560 results. Download Slide 1 http://energy.gov/downloads/slide-1-38 Download CX-001413: Categorical Exclusion Determination Control House Seismic Upgrades - Allston, Keeler, Ostrander, and Marion Substations CX(s) Applied: B1.16, B1.3 Date: 04/12/2010 Location(s): Columbia, Oregon Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-001413-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-001414: Categorical Exclusion Determination Coyote Springs-Slatt #1: Spacer Damper Replacements CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 04/12/2010 Location(s): Gilliam County, Oregon Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-001414-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-000267: Categorical Exclusion Determination

129

EA-1603: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Final Environmental Assessment Final Environmental Assessment EA-1603: Final Environmental Assessment Expansion of Permitted Land and Operations at the 9940 Complex and Thunder Range at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico Under the Proposed Action, the 9940 Complex and Thunder Range expansion would include approximately 1,680 acres of US Air Force-owned land located in the southwest corner of the Coyote Test Field, adjacent to TA-III. DOE/EA-1603: Final Environmental Assessment for the Expansion of Permitted Land and Operations at the 9940 Complex and Thunder Range at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (April 2008) More Documents & Publications EIS-0281: Draft Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0281: Final Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement EA-1603: Finding of No Significant Impact

130

Accelerations in Steep Gravity Waves. II: Subsurface Accelerations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is shown that the vertical acceleration of a particle beneath the crest of a step gravity wave does not always decrease monotonically with depth in the fluid. When the wave steepness ak exceeds 0.4, the acceleration at first increases with ...

M. S. Longuet-Higgins

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Indian Institute of Astrophysics Bangalore 560034  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of galaxies, active-galactic nuclei, quasars, gamma-ray bursts. Theoretical Astrophysics and related Physics satellite link. A recent addition is the High Altitude GAmma Ray (HAGAR) array comprising of seven with the HCT. The High Altitude GAmma Ray (HAGAR) array, Hanle. CREST campus: The campus houses the control

Udgaonkar, Jayant B.

132

Compiling for time predictability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Within the T-CREST project we work on hardware/software architectures and code-generation strategies for time-predictable embedded and cyber-physical systems. In this paper we present the single-path code generation approach that we plan to explore and ... Keywords: compilers, real-time systems, time predictability, worst-case execution-time analysis

Peter Puschner; Raimund Kirner; Benedikt Huber; Daniel Prokesch

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Surface-to-tunnel seismic tomography studies at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dynamic Rupture through a Branched Fault Configuration at Yucca Mountain, and Resulting Ground of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, a potential site for a high-level radioactive waste repository. The Solitario km away from the SCF beneath the crest of Yucca Mountain, causing the repository site to experience

Korneev, Valeri A.

134

Upper Middle Mainstem Columbia River Subbasin Fish and Wildlife  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Brown Bat Pied-billed Grebe Turkey Vulture Blue Grouse Black Bear Red-necked Grebe Gadwall Bobcat Black Brewer's Sparrow Black-billed Magpie Clark's Grebe Blue-winged Teal Brown-headed Cowbird Black-capped Chickadee Double-crested Cormorant Green-winged Teal #12;Shrubsteppe Riparian Wetlands Herbaceous Wetlands

135

Appendix 16 Listed Species and Species of Concern by Agency for the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. CommonName Blue Red Threatened Endangered Speciesof Concern Speciesof Concern-Rare Threatened Endangered-tailed Hummingbird 1 1 Broad-winged Hawk 1 1 California Gull 1 1 Canyon Wren 1 1 Cascade Golden-mantled Ground Double-crested Cormorant 1 1 #12;CommonName Blue Red Threatened Endangered Speciesof Concern Speciesof

136

Submit this form and associated sheets ONLY if you do not use  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

___ Ludwig's Bustard0218 2 ___ Karoo Korhaan0220 2 ___ Red-crested Korhaan0224 3 ___ African Jacana0228 8-toed Rock-Thrush0561 3 ___ Mountain Wheatear0564 9 ___ Karoo Chat0566 5 ___ Capped Wheatear0568 2 ___ African Stonechat0576 3 ___ Cape Robin-Chat0581 7 ___ White-throated Robin-Chat0582 9 ___ Karoo Scrub

de Villiers, Marienne

137

Reserves Project Breeding information is important  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

...... Karoo Korhaan 02202 ...... Red-crested Korhaan 02243 ...... African Jacana 02288 ...... Greater Painted-toed Rock-Thrush 05613 ...... Mountain Wheatear 05649 ...... Karoo Chat 05665 ...... Capped Wheatear 05682 05763 ...... Cape Robin-Chat 05817 ...... White-throated Robin-Chat 05829 ...... Karoo Scrub-Robin 05838

de Villiers, Marienne

138

Fractional Fourier approximations for potential gravity waves on deep water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the framework of the canonical model of hydrodynamics, where fluid is assumed to be ideal and incompressible, waves are potential, two-dimensional, and symmetric, the authors have recently reported the existence of a new type of gravity waves on deep water besides well studied Stokes waves (Phys. Rev. Lett., 2002, v. 89, 164502). The distinctive feature of these waves is that horizontal water velocities in the wave crests exceed the speed of the crests themselves. Such waves were found to describe irregular flows with stagnation point inside the flow domain and discontinuous streamlines near the wave crests. Irregular flows produce a simple model for describing the initial stage of the formation of spilling breakers when a localized jet is formed at the crest following by generating whitecaps. In the present work, a new highly efficient method for computing steady potential gravity waves on deep water is proposed to examine the above results in more detail. The method is based on the truncated fractional a...

Lukomsky, V P; Lukomsky, Vasyl P.; Gandzha, Ivan S.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Estimation of the Sea-State Bias in Radar Altimeter Geosat Data from Examination of Frontal Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The sea-state bias is the deviation of the sea surface height as seen by a satellite altimeter due to differential scattering by the crest and troughs of waves and to oversimplification of the radar waveform algorithms that calculate this height. ...

J. F. Minster; D. Jourdan; Ch Boissier; P. Midol-Monnet

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Book reviews, Fall 2011 Christian P. Robert  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Book reviews, Fall 2011 Christian P. Robert Universit´e Paris-Dauphine, CEREMADE, IUF, and CREST of three book reviews of Lange (2010), Vasishth and Broe (2011), and Stephenson (2008), respectively is irrelevant." (page iii) I had missed the first edition of this book and thus I started reading

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "g0313 coyote crest" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Towards Molecular Programming Masami Hagiya  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Towards Molecular Programming Masami Hagiya JST CREST and Department of Computer Science, Graduate research in the field of DNA and molecular computing by summarizing a recent international confer- ence and biotechnology, and the principles and methods for designing molecular systems with information

Hagiya, Masami

142

CGI2012 -Bournemouth, UK (author's version)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to be at the crest of a wave is computed as Iwc = ( ~i · vn i , min wc , max wc ). Energy. In fluid dynamics, we relate the amount of diffuse material generated by a fluid par- ticle to its kinetic energy are generated, advected and dissolved (top right). For rendering, the fluid's surface is triangulated neglecting

Teschner, Matthias

143

Aircraft Measurements of Nitrogen and Phosphorus in and around the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A N J . D I X O N , A N D C O R T A N A S T A S I O * Atmospheric Science Program, Department of Land in a relatively small bowl-shaped basin near the crest of the Sierra Nevada (39°N, 120°W, elevation 1898 m; Figure

Zhang, Qi

144

Wave Kinematics at High Sea States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurements of currents close to the ocean surface and within the crests of large, steep waves have been acquired with an incoherent bistatic sonar mounted on the seafloor. The sonar uses a single narrow-beam transmitter/receiver and three fan-...

David Farmer; Li Ding; Donald Booth; Martin Lohmann

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

HATCHERY AND GENETIC MANAGEMENT PLAN Hatchery Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

dam Height: 96 m Length: 472 m Dam crest elevation: EL.181.0 m Type: concrete gravity dam 3Effect of Flow Pulses on Degradation Downstream of Hapcheon Dam, South Korea Young Ho Shin1 and Pierre Y. Julien, M.ASCE2 Abstract: The changes in channel geometry downstream of Hapcheon Dam, South

146

Historical record of data on flood control  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Last year (1948) during the flood period the flow at Grand Coulee fluctuated widely. 2 PM, June 8, 543000 c.f.s.; 4 AM, June 9, 568000 c.f s.; 2 PM, June 9, 543000 c.f.s.; 2 AM, June 10, 573000 c.f.s. A total instantaneous fluctuations of 37,500 c.f.s. was reported. Now there is installed a new control. This control can keep downstream variation within 500 c.f.s. By lowering the lake level prior to the crest period, the drum gates could be used as flood control (1948 high water basis) the drum gate control plus the water turbine discharge (if the lake level had been reduced) could have dropped the crest at Richland three feet. a. Drop in crest at Richland one foot: Electrical loss nominal, b. Drop in crest at Richland two feet: Electrical loss 1 megawatt/foot for six generators. Loss Max possible 13,310 KW each generator, 79,860 KW total (7 days). Capacity 1,170,000 KW Max Loss 6.8% for 7 days to 10 days. c. Drop in crest at Richland three feet: Electrical loss 1 megawatt/foot for 6 generators Max possible 30,100 KW each generator 180,600 KW total 8 days. Capacity 1,170,000 KW Maximum loss 15.4% for 8 to 12 days. Actual loss, we believe is much less: For an eleven foot drop actual capacity dropped from 1,170,000 KW to 1,137,000 KW during the present winter. Contacts were re-established with Grand Coulee Control Engineers with whom we had dealt in the 1948 flood. We indicated to Grand Coulee Management, Mr. Bates, Mr. Newberry, etc., that careless control and lack of cooperation between Coulee and Hanford could be harmful and at times disastrous.

Kramer, H.A.

1959-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

147

PowerPoint Presentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

project was authorized by the Flood Control Act approved 18 project was authorized by the Flood Control Act approved 18 August 1941 (Public No. 228, 77 th Congress, 1 st Session). Construction of the access road began in April 1946. Construction of Narrows Dam started in May 1947 and the structure was essentially completed by July 1950. Commercial operation began May 1950 on Units #1 and #2. Commercial operation began September 1969 on Unit #3. The Narrow Dam is located on the Little Missouri River, a tributary of the Ouachita River near Murfreesboro in Pike County, Arkansas. It is a multi-purpose project for flood and power generation. Maximum Pool 7,260 Acres Shoreline 134 Miles Type Concrete Gravity Crest Elevation 581 Feet,msl Spillway Type Concrete, Uncontrolled Spillway Crest Elevation 563 Feet,msl Number of Units

148

Peak Oil Food Network | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Network Network Jump to: navigation, search Name Peak Oil Food Network Place Crested Butte, Colorado Zip 81224 Website http://www.PeakOilFoodNetwork. References Peak Oil Food Network[1] LinkedIn Connections This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. The Peak Oil Food Network is a networking organization located in Crested Butte, Colorado, and is open to the general public that seeks to promote the creation of solutions to the challenge of food production impacted by the peak phase of global oil production. Private citizens are encouraged to join and contribute by adding comments, writing blog posts or adding to discussions about food and oil related topics. Peak Oil Food Network can be followed on Twitter at: http://www.Twitter.com/PeakOilFoodNtwk Peak Oil Food Network on Twitter

149

On the role of the Jeffreys'sheltering mechanism in the sustain of extreme water waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The effect of the wind on the sustain of extreme water waves is investigated experimentally and numerically. A series of experiments conducted in the Large Air-Sea Interactions Facility (LASIF) showed that a wind blowing over a strongly nonlinear short wave group due to the linear focusing of a modulated wave train may increase the life time of the extreme wave event. The expriments suggested that the air flow separation that occurs on the leeward side of the steep crests may sustain longer the maximum of modulation of the focusing-defocusing cycle. Based on a Boundary-Integral Equation Method and a pressure distribution over the steep crests given by the Jeffreys'sheltering theory, similar numerical simulations have confirmed the experimental results

Giovanangeli, J P; Touboul, J; Giovanangeli, Jean-Paul; Kharif, Christian; Touboul, Julien

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Current-source charge-pump power-factor-correction electronic ballast  

SciTech Connect

A current-source charge-pump power-factor-correction (CS-CPPFC) electronic ballast is presented in this paper. Unity-power-factor condition and principle of operation using the CP concept are derived and analyzed. Based on the steady-state analysis, the design considerations are discussed in detail. It is shown that the power switch only deals with the resonant load current, which is the same as in the two-stage approach so that small-current rating devices can be used. The developed CS-CPPFC electronic ballast can save one inductor and has a potentially low cost. The CS-CP electronic ballast with switching frequency modulation to improve crest factor is developed, implemented, and tested. It is shown that 0.99 power factor, 11.3% total harmonic distortion (THD), and 1.54 crest factor can be achieved for 85-W fluorescent lamps.

Qian, J.; Lee, F.C.Y. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States); Yamauchi, Tokushi [Matsushita Electric Works, Inc., Woburn, MA (United States)

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Hierarchical extraction of critical area for shorts in very large ICs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes an algorithm for efficiently extracting critical area in large VLSI circuits. The algorithm, implemented to handle shorts between electrical nets, takes advantage of the available hierarchy in the layout description in order to speed-up ... Keywords: CREST software, IC design, VLSI, circuit layout CAD, critical area extraction, hierarchical extraction, integrated circuit layout, large VLSI circuits, layout description, shorts, very large ICs

P. K. Nag; W. Maly

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

ELECTRONIC MULTIPLIER  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

S>An electronic multiplier is described for use in analog computers. Two electrical input signals are received; one controls the slope of a saw-tooth voltage wave while the other controls the time duration of the wave. A condenser and diode clamps are provided to sustain the crest voltage reached by the wave, and for storing that voltage to provide an output signal which is a steady d-c voltage.

Collier, D.M.; Meeks, L.A.; Palmer, J.P.

1961-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

153

Cambridge Homes Increases Energy Efficiency in a Mix of Housing Types  

SciTech Connect

New houses designed by Cambridge Homes in Crest Hill, Illinois, with technical support from the U.S. Department of Energy's Building America Program, save their homeowners money by applying the principles of ''whole-building'' design to the entire home product line. Regardless of the model chosen, home buyers can enjoy consistently high levels of comfort and performance with the added benefit of reduced operating costs.

Poole, L.; Anderson, R.

2001-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

154

Watching an uniformly moving source of light using a telescope and a frequency-meter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose a scenario that involves a stationary observer who detects a point like source of light moving with constant velocity at a constant altitude, using a telescope and a frequency-meter. We derive a formula for the angular velocity at which we should rotate the axis of the telescope and a formula that relates the proper period at which the source emits successive wave crests and the proper period at which the stationary observer receives them

Bernhard Rothenstein; Ioan Damian

2005-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

155

Fluid flow release regulating device, ERIP {number_sign}624: Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

DOE/ERIP project {number_sign}624 ``Fluid Flow Release Regulating Device`` designed, constructed, tested, and installed a rubber crest gate for regulating water levels at an impoundment such as a hydroelectric dam. A 92 foot long by 27 inch high rubber panel was installed in January 1997. Initial results were good until fabric degradation internal to the rubber caused loss of stiffness. Substitutes for the failed fabric are being tested. The project will continue after DOE participation terminates.

NONE

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Bubble study could improve industrial splash control | Argonne National  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The evolution process during drop impact: inertial retraction of an air film, contraction of the top air surface into a toroidbubble, and pinch-off of a daughter droplet in the bubble. The solid-line arrows denote the propagation of capillary waves, and the dashed-line arrow indicates the contact between the crest and the substrate. To view a larger version of the image, click on it. The evolution process during drop impact: inertial retraction of an air film, contraction of the top air surface into a toroidbubble, and pinch-off of a daughter droplet in the bubble. The solid-line arrows denote the propagation of capillary waves, and the dashed-line arrow indicates the contact between the crest and the substrate. To view a larger version of the image, click on it. The evolution process during drop impact: inertial retraction of an air film, contraction of the top air surface into a toroidbubble, and pinch-off of a daughter droplet in the bubble. The solid-line arrows denote the propagation of capillary waves, and the dashed-line arrow indicates the contact between the crest and the substrate. To view a larger version of the image, click on it.

157

Property:NEPA Decision | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Decision Decision Jump to: navigation, search Property Name NEPA Decision Property Type Page Description Files documenting decisions on NEPA Docs This is a property of type Page. Pages using the property "NEPA Decision" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) B BLM-NV-WN-ES-08-01-1310, NV-020-08-01 + BLM-NV-WN-ES-08-01-1310 EA DR and FONSI.pdf + D DOE-EA-1621 + CX-001816.pdf + DOE-EA-1733 + CX-002924.pdf + DOE-EA-1961 + Kalispell-Kerr EA Determination Memo.pdf + DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2010-0006-EA + DOI-BLM-NV-W030-2010-0006-EA DECISION.pdf +, DOI-BLM-NV-W030-2010-0006-EA CONDITIONS.pdf + DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2011-0001-EA + Coyote Canyon Decision Record March 2011.pdf + DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2011-0514-EA + DOI-BLM-C010-2011-0514-EA-DR.pdf + DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2011-0516-EA + DixieMeadows DecisionRecord 01 17 12.pdf +

158

File:CCS EA 2012 Web-ready.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CCS EA 2012 Web-ready.pdf CCS EA 2012 Web-ready.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Metadata File:CCS EA 2012 Web-ready.pdf Size of this preview: 463 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 × 600 pixels. Go to page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 Go! next page → next page → Full resolution ‎(1,275 × 1,650 pixels, file size: 3.74 MB, MIME type: application/pdf, 77 pages) Summary Coyote Canyon South Geothermal Exploration EA from 2012 Licensing PD This file has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. This applies worldwide.

159

Illinois Foxes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Foxes Foxes Nature Bulletin No. 700 January 12, 1963 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Seymour Simon, President David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist ILLINOIS FOXES The Red Fox and the Gray Fox are the only common wild relatives of the dog in the Chicago region. Another, the coyote, if present at all in recent years, is very scarce, Both foxes have long pointed faces, large ears, long legs, long bushy tails and weigh only about ten pounds. The red fox is reddish yellow with a white tip on the tail and has black stockings on its feet and legs. The gray fox has a grizzled gray back with rusty yellow on the throat, sides, feet and legs. The tip of its tail is black. In Illinois the red fox is most at home in farmlands, open country and the borders of woodlands where it has held its own and thrived over the years in spite of hunters, trappers and the disturbances of its habitat by man. The less common gray is a shy forest animal that has increased in wildlife sanctuaries. However, the total fox population of the Cook County forest preserves is probably little different from that of other areas of similar size in Illinois.

160

(Great Plains Coal Gasification Project): Quarterly environmental, safety, and medical report, first quarter 1988  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The following brief synopsis is provided of the status of Environmental, Safety and Medical Programs described in the First Quarter 1988 Report. Tabular summaries of environmental QA/QC results and planned next quarter activities are presented in Sections 2.0 and 3.0, respectively. ANG continued permitting activity during the reporting period. These activities include reviewing the revised RCRA Part B application; receiving approval to discharge high temperature, low pressure steam condensate to the stormwater system; receiving approval to expand the current gasifier ash pit; submitting the results of the EPA laboratory audit samples; finalizing the contract for the Deepwell No. 1 and No. 2 work to comply with UIC-101; monitoring the progress of the cooling tower surge pond B liner leaks; receiving approval to delete several parameters in the Interim Groundwater Monitoring Plan; responding to an EPA Hazardous Waste Questionnaire and a CERCLA site assessment for DOE; submitting the DOE-assigned section for the Modified Permit Application; and submitting the first annual chemical inventory report to comply with Section 312 of SARA. ANG conducted eight monitoring programs in the vicinity of the Great Plains facility. The RAMP network consists of five monitoring sites, and it is designed to monitor meteorology and air quality in the vicinity of the Great Plains facility and the Antelope Valley and Coyote electric generating stations. ANG conducts ambient monitoring for H/sub 2/S at one site in the vicinity of the Great Plains facility. 15 figs., 49 tabs.

Not Available

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "g0313 coyote crest" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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161

A comparison between direct spark ignition and prechamber ignition in an internal combustion engine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We simulated the flow field and flame propagation near top dead center in a generic large-bore internal combustion engine using the COYOTE computer program, which is based on the full Navier-Stokes equations for a fluid mixture. The combustion chamber is a right circular cylinder, and the main charge is uniformly premixed. The calculations are axisymmetric. The results illustrate the differences in flow patterns, flame propagation, and thermal NO production between ignition with a spark plug and with a small prechamber. In the spark-ignited case, the flame propagates away from the spark plug approximately as a segment of a spherical surface, just as expected. With the prechamber, a high speed jet of hot combustion products shoots into the main chamber, quickly producing a large flame sheet that spreads along the piston face. The prechamber run consumes all of the fuel in half the time required by the spark-ignited case. The two cases produce comparable amounts of thermal NO at the end of fuel combustion.

Cloutman, L.D.

1993-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

162

OpenEI:Old Geothermal Gateway | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gateway Gateway Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Geothermalpower.jpg GeoInfo.png Geothermal Information Geothermal Energy Overview Types of Geothermal Resources Energy Conversion Technologies Cooling Technologies Exploration Techniques Reference Materials GeoModels.png Geothermal Models & Tools GETEM SAM Geothermal Prospector Exploration Cost and Time Metric Georesource.png Resource Assessments USGS Maps (2008) Geothermal Resource Potential Map Geothermal Areas Geothermal Regions Installed.png Installed & Planned Capacity Geothermal Generation Installed Capacity Planned Capacity Geofinancing.png Geothermal Financing Developers' Financing Handbook RE Project Finance CREST HOMER REFTI GeoR&D.png Geothermal RD&D Enhanced Geothermal Systems

163

DOE Office of Indian Energy Foundational Course: Assessing Energy Needs and Resources  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Assessing Energy Needs & Resources Presented by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory Course Outline What we will cover...  About the DOE Office of Indian Energy Education Initiative  Course Introduction  Resource Mapping  Tools to Evaluate Costs and Resources - PVWatts; IMBY; SAM; CREST; OpenPV; Solar Prospector - OpenEI; Transparent Cost Database; JEDI  Data Challenges & Solutions: Information Sharing  Additional Information & Resources 2 Introduction The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Indian Energy Policy & Programs is responsible for assisting Tribes with energy planning and development, infrastructure, energy costs, and electrification of Indian lands and homes. As part of this commitment and on behalf of

164

OpenEI:OldGeoGateway | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Project page Project page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » OpenEI:OldGeoGateway Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Geothermalpower.jpg GeoInfo.png Geothermal Information Geothermal Energy Overview Types of Geothermal Resources Energy Conversion Technologies Cooling Technologies Exploration Techniques Reference Materials GeoModels.png Geothermal Models & Tools GETEM SAM Geothermal Prospector Exploration Cost and Time Metric Georesource.png Resource Assessments USGS Maps (2008) Geothermal Resource Potential Map Geothermal Areas Geothermal Regions Installed.png Installed & Planned Capacity Geothermal Generation Installed Capacity Planned Capacity Geofinancing.png Geothermal Financing Developers' Financing Handbook RE Project Finance CREST

165

Trimodal steady water waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We construct three-dimensional families of small-amplitude gravity-driven rotational steady water waves on finite depth. The solutions contain counter-currents and multiple crests in each minimal period. Each such wave generically is a combination of three different Fourier modes, giving rise to a rich and complex variety of wave patterns. The bifurcation argument is based on a blow-up technique, taking advantage of three parameters associated with the vorticity distribution, the strength of the background stream, and the period of the wave.

Mats Ehrnstrm; Erik Wahln

2013-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

166

Petrology and stable isotope geochemistry of three wells in the Buttes area of the Salton Sea Geothermal Field, Imperial Valley, California, USA  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A detailed investigation is reported of cuttings recovered from three wells in the Salton Sea geothermal field located at the southeast end of the Salton Sea, California. The wells, Magmamax No. 2, Magmamax No. 3, and Woolsey No. 1 penetrate 1340 m, 1200 m, and 730 m, respectively, of altered sandstones, siltstones, and shales of the Colorado River delta. The wells are located at the crest of a thermal anomaly, reach a maximum of 320/sup 0/C at 1070 m, and produce a brine containing approximately 250,000 mg/1 of dissolved solids.

Kendall, C.

1976-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Analysis and experimental results of a single-stage high-power-factor electronic ballast based on flyback converter  

SciTech Connect

A new single-stage high-power-factor electronic ballast based on a flyback converter is presented in this paper. The ballast is able to supply a fluorescent lamp assuring a high-input power factor for the utility line. Other features are lamp power regulation against line voltage variations and low lamp current crest factor, both assuring long lamp life. The ballast is analyzed at steady-state operation, and design equations and characteristics are obtained. Also, a procedure for the ballast design is presented. Finally, simulation and experimental results from a laboratory prototype are shown.

Calleja, A.J.; Alonso, J.M.; Lopez, E.; Ribas, J.; Martinez, J.A.; Rico-Secades, M.

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

An improved charge pump power factor correction electronic ballast  

SciTech Connect

An improved charge pump power factor correction (CPPFC) electronic ballast using the charge pump concept is proposed in this paper. Circuit derivation, principle of operation, and the conditions for achieving unity power factor are discussed. The proposed electronic ballast is implemented and tested with two 40-W fluorescent lamps. It is shown that 84% of overall efficiency and 1.6 of crest factor can be achieved with 200-V line input voltage. The measured line input current harmonics satisfy IEC 1000-3-2 Class C requirements. The lamp power variation range is automatically limited within {+-}15% for {+-}10% line input voltage variation without feedback control.

Qian, J.; Lee, F.C.; Yamauchi, T.

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Intergrated 3-D Ground-Penetrating Radar,Outcrop,and Boreholoe Data Applied to Reservoir Characterization and Flow Simulation.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Existing reservoir models are based on 2-D outcrop;3-D aspects are inferred from correlation between wells,and so are inadequately constrained for reservoir simulations. To overcome these deficiencies, we initiated a multidimensional characterization of reservoir analogs in the Cretaceous Ferron Sandstone in Utah.The study was conducted at two sites(Corbula Gulch Coyote Basin); results from both sites are contained in this report. Detailed sedimentary facies maps of cliff faces define the geometry and distribution of potential reservoir flow units, barriers and baffles at the outcrop. High resolution 2-D and 3-D ground penetrating radar(GPR) images extend these reservoir characteristics into 3-D to allow development of realistic 3-D reservoir models. Models use geometric information from the mapping and the GPR data, petrophysical data from surface and cliff-face outcrops, lab analyses of outcrop and core samples, and petrography. The measurements are all integrated into a single coordinate system using GPS and laser mapping of the main sedimentologic features and boundaries. The final step is analysis of results of 3-D fluid flow modeling to demonstrate applicability of our reservoir analog studies to well siting and reservoir engineering for maximization of hydrocarbon production. The main goals of this project are achieved. These are the construction of a deterministic 3-D reservoir analog model from a variety of geophysical and geologic measurements at the field sites, integrating these into comprehensive petrophysical models, and flow simulation through these models. This unique approach represents a significant advance in characterization and use of reservoir analogs. To data,the team has presented five papers at GSA and AAPG meetings produced a technical manual, and completed 15 technical papers. The latter are the main content of this final report. In addition,the project became part of 5 PhD dissertations, 3 MS theses,and two senior undergraduate research projects.

McMechan et al.

2001-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

170

(Great Plains Coal Gasification project): Quarterly environmental, safety, medical, and industrial hygiene report, First quarter, 1987  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ANG continued permitting activity during the reporting period. ANG conducted eight monitoring programs in the vicinity of the Great Plains facility. The RAMP network consists of five monitoring sites, and is designed to monitor meteorology and air quality in the vicinity of the Great Plains facility, and the Antelope Valley and Coyote electric generating stations. There were no exceedences of applicable state or federal standards for SO/sub 2/, NO/sub 2/, TSP, or ozone. ANG conducts ambient monitoring for H/sub 2/S at one site in the vicinity of the Great Plains facility. ANG conducts additional ambient monitoring for SO/sub 2/ at two sites in order to ensure that ambient air quality standards are not violated. ANG conducts groundwater monitoring programs associated with desulfurization waste disposal, deepwell injection, RCRA-compliance monitoring, gasifier ash disposal, and the surge ponds. Major activities on each program are summarized. ANG conducted six monitoring programs associated with process and effluent streams at the Great Plains facility to satisfy conditions in federal and state permits. The Continuous Emission Monitoring system is designed to provide for the continuous monitoring of emissions and fuel usage from all major fuel burning sources in the Great Plains facility. ANG conducts a comprehensive program to locate, characterize and eliminate objectionable odors. A total of thirty-three plant boundary surveys and sixty off-site surveys were conducted. Odors were detected at levels of two odor units or less approximately 81.7% of the time at distances up to 6 miles downwind during the off-site surveys. A total of nine odor complaints were received. To evaluate overall performance of pollution control systems, ANG examines selected process data and conducts periodic compliance and/or performance tests. 18 figs., 23 tabs.

Not Available

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Potential effects of four Flaming Gorge Dam hydropower operational scenarios on riparian vegetation of the Green River, Utah and Colorado  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Four hydropower operational scenarios at Flaming Gorge Dam were evaluated to determine their potential effects on riparian vegetation along the Green River in Utah and Colorado. Data collected in June 1992 indicated that elevation above the river had the largest influence on plant distribution. A lower riparian zone occupied the area between the approximate elevations of 800 and 4,200-cfs flows--the area within the range of hydropower operational releases. The lower zone was dominated by wetland plants such as cattail, common spikerush, coyote willow, juncus, and carex. An upper riparian zone was above the elevation of historical maximum power plant releases from the dam (4,200 cfs), and it generally supported plants adapted to mesic, nonwetland conditions. Common species in the upper zone included box elder, rabbitbrush, grasses, golden aster, and scouring rush. Multispectral aerial videography of the Green River was collected in May and June 1992 to determine the relationship between flow and the areas of water and the riparian zone. From these relationships, it was estimated that the upper zone would decrease in extent by about 5% with year-round high fluctuation, seasonally adjusted high fluctuation, and seasonally adjusted moderate fluctuation, but it would increase by about 8% under seasonally adjusted steady flow. The lower zone would increase by about 13% for both year-round and seasonally adjusted high fluctuation scenarios but would decrease by about 40% and 74% for seasonally adjusted moderate fluctuation and steady flows, respectively. These changes are considered to be relatively minor and would leave pre-dam riparian vegetation unaffected. Occasional high releases above power plant capacity would be needed for long-term maintenance of this relict vegetation.

LaGory, K.E.; Van Lonkhuyzen, R.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Ecological Sciences Section

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Heat Transfer Analysis and Assessment of Kinetics Systems for PBX 9501  

SciTech Connect

The study of thermal decomposition in high explosive (HE) charges has been an ongoing process since the early 1900s. This work is specifically directed towards the analysis of PBX 9501. In the early 1970s, Dwight Jaeger of Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) developed a single-step, two-species kinetics system that was used in the development of one of the first finite element codes for thermal analyses known as EXPLO. Jaeger's research focused on unconfined spherical samples of HE charges to determine if varied heating ramps would cause detonation or deflagration. Tarver and McGuire of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) followed soon after with a three-step, four-species kinetics system that was developed for confined spheres under relatively fast heating conditions. Peter Dickson et al. of LANL then introduced a kinetics system with four steps and five species that included bimolecular products to capture the effects of the endothermic phase change that the HE undergoes. The results of four experiments are examined to study the effectiveness of these kinetics systems. The experiments are: (1) The LLNL scaled thermal explosion (STEX) experiments on confined cylindrical charges with long heating ramps in the range of 90 hours. (2) The LLNL one-dimensional time to explosion (ODTX) experiments on spherical charges that include confined, partially confined, and aged HE experiments. (3) The LANL unconfined one-dimensional experiments for small spheres. (4) The Naval Air Warfare Center Weapons Division at China Lake experiments on small confined cylinders. The three kinetics systems are applied to each of the four experiments with the use of the finite element analysis (FEA) heat conduction solver COYOTE. The numerical results using the kinetics systems are compared to each other and to the experimental data to determine which kinetics systems are best suited for analyzing conditions such as time to ignition, containment, heating time, and location of ignition.

Jeffrey W. Jorenby

2006-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

173

Quarterly environmental, safety, and medical report: Second quarter, 1988  

SciTech Connect

ANG continued permitting activity during the reporting period. These activities include finalizing the revised RCRA Part B permit application; participating in the NDPDES QA/QC program; performing the required integrity tests on the deepwells; initiating a hydrogeologic assessment for the plant site; completing the DOE assigned sections for the modified permit to Construct/Operate application; preparing for the main stack CEM monitor certification test; completing the particle size distribution work on ''Donna'' coal lock vent; responding to NDSDH concerns about odor complaint followup surveys and lead in the drinking water supply; submitting a renewal application for the construction waste landfill; and requesting approval to dispose of spent shift catalyst in the gasifier ash pit. ANG conducted eight monitoring programs in the vicinity of the Great Plains facility. Major activities for these ambient monitoring programs are subsequently summarized. The RAMP network consists of five monitoring sites, and it is designed to monitor meteorology and air quality in the vicinity of the Great Plains facility and the Antelope Valley and Coyote electric generating stations. There was one exceedence of the air quality standards for TSP during the reporting period. ANG conducts ambient monitoring for H/sub 2/S at one site in the vicinity of the Great Plains facility. ANG conducts additional ambient monitoring for SO/sub 2/ at two (2) sites in order to ensure that ambient air quality standards are not violated during periods when H/sub 2/S- bearing wastes gases are incinerated in the event of temporary SRU shutdown. ANG conducts groundwater monitoring programs on a quarterly basis that are associated with desulfurization-gasifier ash waste disposal, deepwell injection, gasifier ash disposal, and the surge ponds. Major activities on each program are summarized.

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Comparing Two Types of Magnetically- Coupled Adjustable Speed Drives with Variable Frequency Drives in Pump and Fan Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents the results from laboratory tests on MagnaDrive Corporations fixed-magnet magnetically-coupled adjustable speed drive (MC-ASD) and Coyote Electronics electromagnetic MC-ASD as compared to a typical variable frequency drive (VFD) for typical fan and pump loads. It also discusses advantages and disadvantages of using mechanical MC-ASD versus VFDs and it provides field experience with VFDs in refrigerated warehouses as well as the fixed magnet MC-ASD in wastewater and other field applications. Laboratory tests for a 50 hp fan retrofit showed electronic VFD savings at 62%, the MagnaDrive Coupling at 39% and PAYBACK Drive at 46%. At $0.06/kWh and list prices, the simple payback for the VFD is 2.4 years, the MagnaDrive is 4.6 years and the PAYBACK is 1.9 years. MagnaDrive has models from 25 to 500 hp while PAYBACK has models from 3 to 200 hp. Contractors to the Northwest Energy Efficiency Alliance have helped to install VFDs for about 300 evaporator fans in over two dozen refrigerated warehouses and to install fixed-magnet MC-ASDs in about 50 applications with about half of these controlling wastewater pumps. The Alliance has no particular field experience with the electcromagnetic coupling. The primary advantages of magnetically coupled adjustable speed drives (MC-ASD) over VFDs come from reduced maintenance, resistance to dirty environments, separation of load vibration from the motor, and less stringent requirements for precise shaft alignment. Field experience indicates reductions in noise and repairs from vibration loads, tolerance of poor electrical power quality, and ease of installation are often more important than energy savings. The MC-ASDs are being used where VFDs have not survived or are considered too complicated.

Anderson, K. J.; Chvala, W. D.

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Bench-scale experimental determination of the thermal diffusivity of crushed tuff  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A bench-scale experiment was designed and constructed to determine the effective thermal diffusivity of crushed tuff. Crushed tuff particles ranging from 12.5 mm to 37.5 mm (0.5 in. to 1.5 in.) were used to fill a cylindrical volume of 1.58 m{sup 3} at an effective porosity of 0.48. Two iterations of the experiment were completed; the first spanning approximately 502 hours and the second 237 hours. Temperatures near the axial heater reached 700 degrees C, with a significant volume of the test bed exceeding 100 degrees C. Three post-test analysis techniques were used to estimate the thermal diffusivity of the crushed tuff. The first approach used nonlinear parameter estimation linked to a one dimensional radial conduction model to estimate thermal diffusivity from the first 6 hours of test data. The second method used the multiphase TOUGH2 code in conjunction with the first 20 hours of test data not only to estimate the crushed tuffs thermal diffusivity, but also to explore convective behavior within the test bed. Finally, the nonlinear conduction code COYOTE-II was used to determine thermal properties based on 111 hours of cool-down data. The post-test thermal diffusivity estimates of 5.0 x 10-7 m{sup 2}/s to 6.6 x 10-7 m{sup 2}/s were converted to effective thermal conductivities and compared to estimates obtained from published porosity-based relationships. No obvious match between the experimental data and published relationships was found to exist; however, additional data for other particle sizes and porosities are needed.

Ryder, E.E.; Finley, R.E.; George, J.T.; Ho, C.K.; Longenbaugh, R.S. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Connolly, J.R. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Small-scale stress heterogeneity in the Anza seismic gap, southern California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Focal mechanism inversions reveal significant lateral variations in stress orientations along the Anza segment of the San Jacinto fault zone. The most notable stress anomaly is within the 20-km aseismic (seismic gap) portion of the fault zone, where {sigma}{sub 1}, the maximum compressive stress, is nearly horizontal and is oriented at 74{degrees} {+-} 13{degrees} relative to the fault strike. This contrasts with orientations ranging from 62{degrees} {+-} 11{degrees} to 49{degrees} {+-} 7{degrees} along the more seismically active portions of the fault zone immediately to the northwest and southeast of the seismic gap. Regional stress results, found by inverting all focal mechanisms simultaneously, indicate that {sigma}{sub 1} is horizontal and trends north-south, while {sigma}{sub 3} is horizontal and trends east-west. Approximately, 15 km west of the seismic gap, in the off-fault Cahuilla swarm area, {sigma}{sub 1} and {sigma}{sub 3} solutions are rotated clockwise by about 25{degrees} relative to the regional model. Roughly, 10 km southeast of the seismic gap near the Buck Ridge fault, {sigma}{sub 1} and {sigma}{sub 3} are rotated counterclockwise by about 10{degrees} relative to the regional solution. Northwest of the seismic gap along the fault zone, {sigma}{sub 3} plunges about 30{degrees} from the horizontal, correlating with a local increase in reverse faulting between the Hot Springs and San Jacinto faults. Southeast of the seismic gap, {sigma}{sub 1} plunges about 45{degrees} from the horizontal, correlating with a local increase in normal faulting in the trifurcation region of the Buck Ridge, Clark, and Coyote Creek faults. The authors propose a simple mechanical model in which a block rotation superimposed on the dominant right-lateral strike-slip motion of the fault zone satisfies the first-order observations of stress orientation, faulting, and horizontal surface strain. 51 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

Hartse, H.E.; Fehler, M.C. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Aster, R.C. [New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, Socorro, NM (United States); Scott, J.S.; Vernon, F.L. [Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics, La Jolla, CA (United States)

1994-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

177

MHK Technologies/Syphon Wave Generator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Syphon Wave Generator Syphon Wave Generator < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Syphon Wave Generator.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Green Energy Corp Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Oscillating Water Column Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 1 3 Discovery Concept Def Early Stage Dev Design Engineering Technology Description The Syphon Wave Generator is composed of a horizontal pipe containing a propeller driven generator mounted above the highest normal wave at high tide and two or more vertical pipes at least one at each end of the horizontal pipe Each vertical pipe must extend below the water surface at all times and have openings below the surface All the air must be removed from the pipe thus filling the unit completely with water When the crest of a wave reaches the first vertical pipe the water level will be higher at that pipe than at the second vertical pipe This causes water to flow up the first pipe and through the horizontal pipe thus turning the propeller and generator to produce electricity and then down the second vertical pipe due to the siphon effect When the crest of the wave moves to the second vertical pipe the water level is higher there than at the first pipe This will cause the water to flow up the second pipe and through the system in the opposite direction again prod

178

Giant waves in weakly crossing sea states  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The formation of rogue waves in sea states with two close spectral maxima near the wave vectors k{sub 0} {+-} {Delta}k/2 in the Fourier plane is studied through numerical simulations using a completely nonlinear model for long-crested surface waves [24]. Depending on the angle {theta} between the vectors k{sub 0} and {Delta}k, which specifies a typical orientation of the interference stripes in the physical plane, the emerging extreme waves have a different spatial structure. If {theta} {<=} arctan(1/{radical}2), then typical giant waves are relatively long fragments of essentially two-dimensional ridges separated by wide valleys and composed of alternating oblique crests and troughs. For nearly perpendicular vectors k{sub 0} and {Delta}k, the interference minima develop into coherent structures similar to the dark solitons of the defocusing nonlinear Schroedinger equation and a two-dimensional killer wave looks much like a one-dimensional giant wave bounded in the transverse direction by two such dark solitons.

Ruban, V. P., E-mail: ruban@itp.ac.r [Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics (Russian Federation)

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

179

Production of jet fuel from coal-derived liquids  

SciTech Connect

Amoco and Lummus-Crest, under a contract with the United States Department of Energy, are evaluating the process options and economics for upgrading the naphtha, crude phenols, and tar oil by-products from the Great Plains Coal Gasification Plant to jet fuels and other salable products. Analytical characterizations of these three by-products indicate the range of products that can be manufactured from each and potential problems which could be encountered during refining. These characterizations, along with limited experimental data and Amoco's proprietary process models, were used to design conceptual processing schemes for maximizing the production of Grades JP-4, JP-8, and high-density (JP-8X) jet fuels from the by-product liquids. Conceptual designs have been completed and a case for profitable production of JP-8 has been selected for experimental testing and preliminary design. Samples of JP-4, JP-8, and JP-8X aviation turbine fuels have been manufactured from the Great Plains tar oil. Larger samples of JP-8 have also been produced and shipped to the US Air Force for further testing. Lummus-Crest Inc. is now completing a preliminary process design for the profitable production of JP-8 and has made recommendations for a production run to produce larger quantities of JP-8. 2 figs., 3 tabs.

Furlong, M.W.; Fox, J.D.; Masin, J.G.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Comparing GIS-based habitat models for applications in EIA and SEA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Land use changes, urbanisation and infrastructure developments in particular, cause fragmentation of natural habitats and threaten biodiversity. Tools and measures must be adapted to assess and remedy the potential effects on biodiversity caused by human activities and developments. Within physical planning, environmental impact assessment (EIA) and strategic environmental assessment (SEA) play important roles in the prediction and assessment of biodiversity-related impacts from planned developments. However, adapted prediction tools to forecast and quantify potential impacts on biodiversity components are lacking. This study tested and compared four different GIS-based habitat models and assessed their relevance for applications in environmental assessment. The models were implemented in the Stockholm region in central Sweden and applied to data on the crested tit (Parus cristatus), a sedentary bird species of coniferous forest. All four models performed well and allowed the distribution of suitable habitats for the crested tit in the Stockholm region to be predicted. The models were also used to predict and quantify habitat loss for two regional development scenarios. The study highlighted the importance of model selection in impact prediction. Criteria that are relevant for the choice of model for predicting impacts on biodiversity were identified and discussed. Finally, the importance of environmental assessment for the preservation of biodiversity within the general frame of biodiversity conservation is emphasised.

Gontier, Mikael, E-mail: gontier@kth.s [Department of Land and Water Resources Engineering, Royal Institute of Technology, SE-100 44 Stockholm (Sweden); Moertberg, Ulla, E-mail: mortberg@kth.s [Department of Land and Water Resources Engineering, Royal Institute of Technology, SE-100 44 Stockholm (Sweden); Balfors, Berit, E-mail: balfors@kth.s [Department of Land and Water Resources Engineering, Royal Institute of Technology, SE-100 44 Stockholm (Sweden)

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "g0313 coyote crest" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Improved computational schemes for the numerical modeling of hydrothermal resources in Wyoming  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A new method, the Conjugate Gradient Squared (CGS) solution technique, is shown to be extremely effective when applied to the finite-difference solution of conductive and convective heat transfer in geologic systems. The CGS method is compared to the Successive Over/Under Relaxation schemes, a version of the Gaussian elimination method, and the Generalized Minimum Residual (GMRES) approach. The CGS procedure converges at least ten times faster than the nearest competitor. The model is applied to the Thermopolis hydrothermal system, located in northwestern Wyoming. Modeled results are compared with measured temperature-depth profiles and results from other studies. The temperature decrease from 72{degree}C to 54{degrees}C along the crest of the Thermopolis anticline is shown to result from cooling of the geothermal fluid as it moves to the southeast. Modeled results show correct general trends, however, a time-varying three-dimensional model will be needed to fully explain the effects of mixing within the aquifers along the crest of the anticline and thermal affects of surface surface topography. 29 refs., 18 figs., 2 tabs.

Heasler, H.P.; George, J.H.; Allen, M.B.

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Survival and mammalian predation of Rio Grande Turkeys on the Edwards Plateau, Texas.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Trends in Rio Grande wild turkey (Meleagris gallopavo intermedia) abundance on the Edwards Plateau (EP), Texas, have been either stable or in decline since the 1970s. Four study areas, 2 each within stable (Stable Area A, SAA; Stable Area B, SAB) and declining regions (Declining Area A, DAA; Declining Area B, DAB), were delineated to examine (1) both annual and seasonal survival, (2) relative mammalian predator mean abundance (RMA), and (3) potential effects of lunar phase on scent-station visitation. During February 2001-March 2003, 257 turkeys were captured and instrumented with radio transmitters. Survival probabilities were generated using a Kaplan-Meier product limit estimator; a log-rank test tested for differences among sites. Annual survival was statistically different between regions (stable 0.566 0.081; declining 0.737 0.094; X2 = 3.68, P = 0.055) in 2002. Seasonal survival differed between regions (stable 0.812 0.103; declining 0.718 0.130; X2 = 3.88, P = 0.049) in spring 2003. Annual survival results during 2002 were counterintuitive with turkey trend data. Scent-station transects were established on non-paved ranch roads within study regions. Scent-station indices revealed higher (H = 19.653, P ? 0.001) RMA of opossum (Didelphis virginiana) and skunk (eastern spotted [Spilogale putorius], striped [Mephitis mephitis], or western spotted [S. gracilis]) (SAA, x? = 0.0148; SAB, x? = 0.0151; DAA, x? = 0.0042; DAB, x? = 0.0065) on stable areas. Higher RMA of coyotes (Canis latrans) on declining areas (SAA, x? = 0.0067; SAB, x? = 0.0022; DAA x? = 0.0234; DAB x? = 0.0434) suggested a possible causative factor of the decline, but abundance indices were not verified by empirical data though. Lunar phase was not a significant (T = -0.225, P = 0.822) covariate in scent-station visits by raccoons, opossums (new, x? = 0.0111; full, x? = 0.0324), or unidentified tracks (new, x? = 0.0649; full, x? = 0.0375). Nightly precipitation and wind speed probably influence mammalian use of scent stations more so than lunar illumination.

Willsey, Beau Judson

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

FE Categorical Exclusions | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7, 2010 7, 2010 CX-002306: Categorical Exclusion Determination Developing a Novel Method of Cleaning and Dewatering Fine Coal CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 05/17/2010 Location(s): Blacksburg, Virginia Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory May 17, 2010 CX-002303: Categorical Exclusion Determination Center for Renewable Energy Science and Technology (CREST) CX(s) Applied: B3.6, A11 Date: 05/17/2010 Location(s): Arlington, Texas Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory May 13, 2010 CX-002247: Categorical Exclusion Determination Alaska Rural Energy Conference CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 05/13/2010 Location(s): Fairbanks, Alaska Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory May 13, 2010 CX-002246: Categorical Exclusion Determination

184

EA-1374-SA-05: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5: Supplement Analysis 5: Supplement Analysis EA-1374-SA-05: Supplement Analysis Avian Predation on Juvenile Salmonids in the Lower Columbia River Research Project The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is funding ongoing research on Caspian terns, double-crested cormorants, and several species of gulls (glaucous-winged, western, California, and ring-billed) begun in 1996. BPA analyzed environmental impacts of the research in an Environmental Assessment (EA) completed in 2001 (DOE/EA-1374). The purpose of this Supplement Analysis (SA) is to determine if a supplemental EA is needed to analyze additional research activities proposed as part of that project. Avian Predation on Juvenile Salmonids in the Lower Columbia River Research Project, Supplement Analysis DOE/EA-1374-SA-05 (March 2006)

185

DOE/EA-1374-SA-02: Avian Predation on Juvenile Salmonids in the Lower Columbia River Research Project Supplement Analysis (April 2003)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8, 2003 8, 2003 In reply refer to: KEC-4 To: People Interested in the Project to Conduct Research on Avian Predation on Juvenile Salmonids in the Lower Columbia River Background: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) and Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) on this project in April of 2001. The project involves multi-year research begun in 1996 on Caspian terns, double-crested cormorants, and glaucous-winged gulls. The activities examined in the EA focused on measuring the salmonid smolt consumption rate of tern, cormorant, and gull populations in the lower Columbia River. Additionally, this project measured the impacts of this research on brown pelicans roosting in the area. Action: In 2002, BPA prepared modifications to the original proposal in a Supplement Analysis

186

Presentations from San Antonio, Texas Workshop - June 9, 2012 | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Presentations from San Antonio, Texas Workshop - June 9, 2012 Presentations from San Antonio, Texas Workshop - June 9, 2012 Presentations from San Antonio, Texas Workshop - June 9, 2012 Presentations given at the American Society for Engineering Education's Conference by the Department of Energy. Department of Energy Overview (2012 ASEE Conference).ppt Centers of Research Excellence in Science (CREST--June 2012).ppt Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (June 2012).ppt Office of Nuclear Energy (June 2012).ppt More Documents & Publications Nuclear Energy University Program: A Presentation to Vice Presidents of Research and Development of Historically Black Colleges and Universities, given by the Office of Nuclear Energy Meeting Materials: June 12, 2012 FY 2013 Consolidated Innovative Nuclear Research FOA (DE-FOA-0000799)

187

State and National Wind Resource Potential 30 Percent Capacity Factor at 80 Meters  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Note - 50% exclusions are not cumulative. If an area is non-ridgecrest forest on FS land, it is just excluded at the 50% level one time. Note - 50% exclusions are not cumulative. If an area is non-ridgecrest forest on FS land, it is just excluded at the 50% level one time. 1) Exclude areas of slope > 20% Derived from 90 m national elevation dataset. 6) 100% exclude 3 km surrounding criteria 2-5 (except water) Merged datasets and buffer 3 km 5) 100% exclusion of airfields, urban, wetland and water areas. USGS North America Land Use Land Cover (LULC), version 2.0, 1993; ESRI airports and airfields (2006); U.S. Census Urbanized Areas (2000 and 2003) 10) 50% exclusion of non-ridgecrest forest Ridge-crest areas defined using a terrain definition script, overlaid with USGS LULC data screened for the forest categories. Other Criteria 8) 50% exclusion of remaining Dept. of Defense lands except

188

Mapping and Assessment of the United States Ocean Wave Energy Resource |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

450 450 Varnish cache server Mapping and Assessment of the United States Ocean Wave Energy Resource Dataset Summary Description This project estimates the naturally available and technically recoverable U.S. wave energy resources, using a 51-month Wavewatch III hindcast database developed especially for this study by National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA's) National Centers for Environmental Prediction. For total resource estimation, wave power density in terms of kilowatts per meter is aggregated across a unit diameter circle. This approach is fully consistent with accepted global practice and includes the resource made available by the lateral transfer of wave energy along wave crests, which enables densities within a few kilometers of a linear array, even for fixed terminator devices.

189

MHK Technologies/The DUCK | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

DUCK DUCK < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage The DUCK.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Edinburgh University aka Wave Power Group Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Oscillating Wave Surge Converter Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 4 Proof of Concept Technology Description The Duck is a crest spanning spine mounted slack moored deep water floating electricity generating terminator Tank tests showed that it could capture energy from regular waves with great efficiency Technology Dimensions Device Testing Date Submitted 57:51.8 << Return to the MHK database homepage Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=MHK_Technologies/The_DUCK&oldid=681667"

190

Skin melanin  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Skin melanin Skin melanin Name: Janae Lepir Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: How does the skin produce melanin? Replies: There are special cells in the skin called melanocytes. They synthesize melanin from an amino acid, tyrosine. (Amino acids make up proteins; there are about 20 different ones). Melanocytes can be stimulated by a hormone in the pituitary gland called melanocyte stimulating hormone (MSH). I don't know how much biology you've had, but melanocytes are derived from an interesting embryonic tissue called the neural crest, which also gives rise to a lot of different types of neurons, so embryologically melanocytes are related to neurons. If melanocytes become malignant, it becomes a very bad form of cancer, called melanoma (often called "skin cancer", although there are other forms of skin cancer).

191

Cement Creek Ranch Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cement Creek Ranch Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Cement Creek Ranch Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Cement Creek Ranch Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Cement Creek Ranch Sector Geothermal energy Type Pool and Spa Location Crested Butte, Colorado Coordinates 38.8697146°, -106.9878231° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

192

Geomorphology K  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Geomorphology Geomorphology K . R. Everett Institute of Polar Studies and Department of Agronomy, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio Amchitkn Island is composed of six distinct geomorphic regions. The major elements of each region are strongly controlled by ~ e o l o g i c structure and to n lesser degree b y rock type. The eastern three regions are characterized b y pond-dotted uplaitds of low eleuatiolt. These aresurrounded b y areas of one or more elevated ? i ~ a r i l ~ e terraces. Struc- turally controlled dminngewnys cut tlte terracesat:d extend into the uplniid. A tltick blnnket of orgonic-rich soilsforms a nearly complete mantle ouer the regions. Across region IIT farther west, elevations rise to tire moutttai~t and plateau regions. The crest upland becomes increasingly dissected,

193

Avian Predation on Juvenile Salmonids in the Lower Columbia River Research Project Supplement Analysis (DOE/EA-1374-SA-03)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

March 29, 2004 March 29, 2004 In reply refer to: KEC-4 To: People Interested in the Project to Conduct Research on Avian Predation on Juvenile Salmonids in the Lower Columbia River Background: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) and Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) on this project in April of 2001. The project involves multi- year research begun in 1996 on Caspian terns, double-crested cormorants, and glaucous-winged gulls. The activities examined in the EA focused on measuring the salmonid smolt consumption rate of tern, cormorant, and gull populations in the lower Columbia River. Additionally, this project measured the impacts of this research on brown pelicans roosting in the area. Action: In 2002 and 2003, BPA prepared modifications to the original proposal in a Supplement

194

Instability of P-waves just below the transition region in a global solar wind simulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate how wave propagation is modified by the presence of heat sources and sinks, in the simple 1D, hydrodynamical case, including chromosphere and solar wind. We integrate the time-dependent hydrodynamic equations of the solar wind with spherical symmetry, including conduction, radiative cooling and a prescribed mechanical heat flux. Once a quasi-stationary wind is established, we study the response of the system to pressure oscillations at the photospheric boundary. We use transparent boundary conditions. We find that wavepackets with high enough amplitude propagating upward from the photosphere implode just below the transition region. This implosion is due to the radiative cooling term generating pressure holes close to the wave crests of the wave, which make the wave collapse. In the case where heat sources and sinks are not present in the equations, the wave remains stable whatever the initial wave amplitude, which is compatible with published work. Instability should be observable when and whe...

Grappin, R; Pinto, R; Wang, Y -M

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Microsoft PowerPoint - Wayne_Shirley_Decoupling_Mechanics_and_Issues.ppt [Compatibility Mode]  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Decoupling: Decoupling: Mechanics and Issues Presentation to the New Mexico Public Regulation Commission Energy Efficiency Incentives Workshop July 16-17, 2008 The Regulatory Assistance Project Presented by Wayne Shirley The Regulatory Assistance Project 110 B Water St. Hallowell, Maine USA 04347 Tel: 207.623.8393 50 State Street, Suite 3 Montpelier, Vermont USA 05602 Tel: 802.223.8199 27 Penny Lane Cedar Crest, New Mexico USA 87008 Tel: 505.286.4486 Fax: 207.623.8369 Fax: 802.223.8172 E-Fax: 773.347.1512 Website: http://www.raponline.org Context for Decoupling All forms of regulation are incentive regulation Utilities can be expected to respond to the incentives they are given - Direct relationship to profitability - Management pay structure If incentives are poorly designed, expect

196

Haiti Repowered | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Haiti Repowered Haiti Repowered Jump to: navigation, search Name Haiti Repowered Place Crested Butte, Colorado Zip 81224 Website http://www.HaitiRepowered.ning Coordinates 38.8697146°, -106.9878231° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.8697146,"lon":-106.9878231,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

197

EA-1374-SA-03: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3: Supplement Analysis 3: Supplement Analysis EA-1374-SA-03: Supplement Analysis Avian Predation on Juvenile Salmonids in the Lower Columbia River Research Project The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is funding ongoing research on Caspian terns, double-crested cormorants, and several species of gulls (glaucous-winged, western, California, and ring-billed) begun in 1996. BPA analyzed environmental impacts of the research in an Environmental Assessment (EA) completed in 2001 (DOE/EA-1374). The purpose of this Supplement Analysis (SA) is to determine if a supplemental EA is needed to analyze additional research activities proposed as part of that project. Avian Predation on Juvenile Salmonids in the Lower Columbia River Research Project, Supplement Analysis DOE/EA-1374-SA-03 (April 2003)

198

MHK Technologies/C5 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

< MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage C5.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Wave Star Energy Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Point Absorber - Floating Technology Description The C5 is anchored perpendicular to the motion of the waves On either side of the oblong machine are 20 hemisphere shaped floats that are partially submerged in the water When a wave rolls in the floats are lifted upwards in succession by the wave crest The floats are each positioned at the base of their own hydraulic cylinder When a float is raised a piston in the cylinder presses oil into the machines common transmission system with a pressure of up to 200 bar 2900 psi The pressure drives a hydraulic motor that is connected to a generator

199

EA-1374-SA-02: Supplment Analysis | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2: Supplment Analysis 2: Supplment Analysis EA-1374-SA-02: Supplment Analysis Avian Predation on Juvenile Salmonids in the Lower Columbia River Research Project The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is funding ongoing research on Caspian terns, double-crested cormorants, and several species of gulls (glaucous-winged, western, California, and ring-billed) begun in 1996. BPA analyzed environmental impacts of the research in an Environmental Assessment (EA) completed in 2001 (DOE/EA-1374). The purpose of this Supplement Analysis (SA) is to determine if a supplemental EA is needed to analyze additional research activities proposed as part of that project. Avian Predation on Juvenile Salmonids in the Lower Columbia River Research Project, Supplment Analysis DOE/EA-1374-SA-02 (April 2003)

200

Microsoft PowerPoint - Weston-Principles of Decoupling-Florida-August 2008.ppt [Compatibility Mode]  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Customer-Sited Resources Customer-Sited Resources and Utility Profits: Aligning Incentives with Public Policy Goals Aligning Incentives with Public Policy Goals Florida Public Service Commission 7 August 2008 Frederick Weston The Regulatory Assistance Project The Regulatory Assistance Project 110 B Water St. Hallowell, Maine USA 04347 Tel: 207.623.8393 50 State Street, Suite 3 Montpelier, Vermont USA 05602 Tel: 802.223.8199 27 Penny Lane Cedar Crest, New Mexico USA 87008 Tel: 505.286.4486 Fax: 207.623.8369 Fax: 802.223.8172 E-Fax: 773.347.1512 Website: http://www.raponline.org About RAP RAP is a non-profit organization providing technical and educational assistance to government officials on energy and environmental issues. RAP Principals all have and environmental issues. RAP Principals all have extensive utility regulatory experience.

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201

NREL: Dynamic Maps, GIS Data, and Analysis Tools - Marine & Hydrokinetic  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Marine & Hydrokinetic Data Marine & Hydrokinetic Data This project estimates the naturally available and technically recoverable U.S. wave energy resources, using a 51-month Wavewatch III hindcast database developed especially for this study by National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA's) National Centers for Environmental Prediction. For total resource estimation, wave power density in terms of kilowatts per meter is aggregated across a unit diameter circle. This approach is fully consistent with accepted global practice and includes the resource made available by the lateral transfer of wave energy along wave crests, which enables densities within a few kilometers of a linear array, even for fixed terminator devices. The total available energy resource along the U.S. continental shelf edge,

202

Lighting Research Group: Facilities: Power Analyzer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Power Analyzer Power Analyzer Power Analyzer power analyzer Gonio-photometer | Integrating sphere | Power analyzer | Spectro-radiometer A power analyzer is a very necessary tool for lighting research. With the power analyzer we are able to monitor the input voltage to the lamp as well as the input power and current. The amount of power a lamp or a lamp-ballast combination uses is very important when determining its efficiency. It is also important to monitor the input voltage to make sure it doesn't vary. This can affect the light output of a lamp greatly. With the power analyzer we can also measure things like the power factor, harmonic distortion, and current crest factor of some lamps. These measurements tell us how well a lamp is working. For example, a high power

203

Midwest Region Combined Heat and Power Projects | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Midwest Region Combined Heat and Power Projects Midwest Region Combined Heat and Power Projects Midwest Region Combined Heat and Power Projects November 1, 2013 - 11:40am Addthis DOE's CHP Technical Assistance Partnerships (CHP TAPs) have compiled a select number of combined heat and power (CHP) project profiles, which are available as Adobe Acrobat PDFs. Midwest www.midwestCHPTAP.org John Cuttica University of Illinois at Chicago 312-996-4382 cuttica@uic.edu Cliff Haefke University of Illinois at Chicago 312-355-3476 chaefk1@uic.edu Illinois Adkins Energy, Lena Advocate South Suburban Hospital, Hazel Crest Antioch Community High School, Antioch Elgin Community College, Elgin Evanston Township High School, Evanston Hunter Haven Farms, Inc., Pearl City Jesse Brown VA Medical Center, Chicago Lake Forest Hospital, Lake Forest

204

Peak Oil Awareness Network | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Awareness Network Awareness Network Jump to: navigation, search Name Peak Oil Awareness Network Place Crested Butte, Colorado Zip 81224 Website http://www.PeakOilAwarenessNet Coordinates 38.8697146°, -106.9878231° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.8697146,"lon":-106.9878231,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

205

Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determinations By Date | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7, 2010 7, 2010 CX-002306: Categorical Exclusion Determination Developing a Novel Method of Cleaning and Dewatering Fine Coal CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 05/17/2010 Location(s): Blacksburg, Virginia Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory May 17, 2010 CX-002303: Categorical Exclusion Determination Center for Renewable Energy Science and Technology (CREST) CX(s) Applied: B3.6, A11 Date: 05/17/2010 Location(s): Arlington, Texas Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory May 17, 2010 CX-002302: Categorical Exclusion Determination Competitive Renewable Grants Program - Central Electric Power Cooperative Solar Thermal CX(s) Applied: A9, B5.1 Date: 05/17/2010 Location(s): South Carolina Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy

206

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Fossil Energy | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

May 17, 2010 May 17, 2010 CX-002306: Categorical Exclusion Determination Developing a Novel Method of Cleaning and Dewatering Fine Coal CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 05/17/2010 Location(s): Blacksburg, Virginia Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory May 17, 2010 CX-002303: Categorical Exclusion Determination Center for Renewable Energy Science and Technology (CREST) CX(s) Applied: B3.6, A11 Date: 05/17/2010 Location(s): Arlington, Texas Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory May 13, 2010 CX-002247: Categorical Exclusion Determination Alaska Rural Energy Conference CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 05/13/2010 Location(s): Fairbanks, Alaska Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory May 13, 2010 CX-002246: Categorical Exclusion Determination

207

NREL: Photovoltaics Research - Photovoltaic Energy Ratings Methods  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Photovoltaic Energy Ratings Methods Validation Photovoltaic Energy Ratings Methods Validation The Photovoltaic (PV) Engineering group at NREL validates energy ratings methods by standards committees to establish an energy rating methodology. We are evaluating techniques to account for the impact on PV performance from variations in the spectral distribution of solar radiation. Two types of methods were evaluated for correcting the short-circuit current of PV modules for variations in the solar spectrum under clear skies: (1) empirical relationships based on air mass, and (2) use of spectral irradiance models and PV module spectral response data. Methods of the first type were the Sandia National Laboratories absolute air-mass function, or f(AMa), and the CREST air-mass function, or f(AM). The second

208

Microsoft PowerPoint - Wayne_Shirley_Overview_of_Incentives2008_08_22.ppt [Compatibility Mode]  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Utility Incentives Utility Incentives Presentation to the Kansas Corporation Commission E Effi i I i W k h Energy Efficiency Incentives Workshop August 26, 2008 Presented by The Regulatory Assistance Project Presented by Wayne Shirley The Regulatory Assistance Project 110 B Water St. Hallowell, Maine USA 04347 Tel: 207.623.8393 50 State Street, Suite 3 Montpelier, Vermont USA 05602 Tel: 802.223.8199 27 Penny Lane Cedar Crest, New Mexico USA 87008 Tel: 505.286.4486 Fax: 207.623.8369 Fax: 802.223.8172 E-Fax: 773.347.1512 Website: http://www.raponline.org About RAP RAP is a non-profit organization providing technical and educational assistance to government officials on energy and environmental issues. RAP Principals all have and environmental issues. RAP Principals all have extensive utility regulatory experience.

209

MHK Technologies/New Pendulor | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pendulor Pendulor < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage New Pendulor.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Muroran Institute of Technology Project(s) where this technology is utilized *MHK Projects/Muroran Institute of Technology Pilot Project Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Oscillating Wave Surge Converter Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 5/6: System Integration and Technology Laboratory Demonstration Technology Description The New Pendulor consists of a high-efficiency power extractor of the pendulum type installed in a pile supporting structure and a solid back wall, which will act as a detached breakwater. The structural system is designed to distribute the incident wave power to be reflected, absorbed and transmitted through a hydraulic pump. The back wall has low crest elevation to decrease wave force at storm waves, and a clearance between its bottom and the seabed to allow on-off shore movement of sediment.

210

DOE/EIS-0293 Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Conveyance and Transfer of Certain Land Tracts Administered by the U.S. Department of Energy and Located at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos and Santa Fe Counties, New Mexico (Oct. 1999)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

S-1 S-1 Final CT EIS SUMMARY Introduction Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is one of several national laboratories that supports the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) responsibilities for national security, energy resources, environmental quality, and science. LANL is located in north-central New Mexico, within Los Alamos County and Santa Fe County, about 60 miles (97 kilometers) north-northeast of Albuquerque and about 25 miles (40 kilometers) northwest of Santa Fe (see Figure S-1). The small communities of Los Alamos townsite, White Rock, Pajarito Acres, the Royal Crest Mobile Home Park, and San Ildefonso Pueblo are located in the immediate vicinity of LANL. On November 26, 1997, Congress passed Public Law (PL) 105-119, the Departments of Commerce, Justice, and State, the Judiciary,

211

Geothermal Brief: Market and Policy Impacts Update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Utility-scale geothermal electricity generation plants have generally taken advantage of various government initiatives designed to stimulate private investment. This report investigates these initiatives to evaluate their impact on the associated cost of energy and the development of geothermal electric generating capacity using conventional hydrothermal technologies. We use the Cost of Renewable Energy Spreadsheet Tool (CREST) to analyze the effects of tax incentives on project economics. Incentives include the production tax credit, U.S. Department of Treasury cash grant, the investment tax credit, and accelerated depreciation schedules. The second half of the report discusses the impact of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Loan Guarantee Program on geothermal electric project deployment and possible reasons for a lack of guarantees for geothermal projects. For comparison, we examine the effectiveness of the 1970s DOE drilling support programs, including the original loan guarantee and industry-coupled cost share programs.

Speer, B.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Production of jet fuels from coal-derived liquids. Volume 6. Preliminary analysis of upgrading alternatives for the Great Plains liquid by-production streams. Interim report, March 1987-February 1988  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Amoco and Lummus Crest have developed seven cases for upgrading by-product liquids from the Great Plains Coal Gasification plant to jet fuels, and in several of the cases, saleable chemicals in addition to jet fuels. The analysis shows that the various grades of jet fuel can be produced from the Great Plains tar oil, but not economically. However the phenolic and naptha streams do have the potential to significantly increase (on the order of $10-15 million/year) the net revenues at Great Plains by producing chemicals, especially cresylic acid, cresol, and xylenol. The amount of these chemicals, which can be marketed, is a concern, but profits can be generated even when oxygenated chemical sales are limited to 10% of the U.S. market. Another concern is that while commercial processes exist to extract phenolic mixtures, these processes have not been demonstrated with the Great Plains phenolic stream.

Fleming, B.A.; Fox, J.D.; Furlong, M.W.; Masin, J.G.; Sault, L.P.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Production of jet fuels from coal derived liquids  

SciTech Connect

Amoco and Lummus Crest have developed seven cases for upgrading by-product liquids from the Great Plains Coal Gasification Plant to jet fuels, and in several of the cases, saleable chemicals in addition to jet fuels. The analysis shows that the various grades of jet fuel can be produced from the Great Plains tar oil, but not economically. However, the phenolic and naphtha streams do have the potential to significantly increase (on the order of $10--15 million/year) the net revenues at Great Plains by producing chemicals, especially cresylic acid, cresol, and xylenol. The amount of these chemicals, which can be marketed, is a concern, but profits can be generated even when oxygenated chemical sales are limited to 10 percent of the US market. Another concern is that while commercial processes exist to extract phenolic mixtures, these processes have not been demonstrated with the Great Plains phenolic stream. 9 refs., 24 figs., 14 tabs.

Fleming, B.A.; Fox, J.D.; Furlong, M.W.; Masin, J.G.; Sault, L.P.; Tatterson, D.F. (Amoco Oil Co., Naperville, IL (USA). Research and Development Dept.); Fornoff, L.L.; Link, M.A.; Stahlnecker, E.; Torster, K. (Lummus Crest, Inc., Bloomfield, NJ (USA))

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

A simple approach to improve lightning performance of an uprated substation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a simple method to minimize lightning surges entering an uprated or compact substation. A severe lightning stress is caused by a backflashover in close proximity to the substation. Feasibility of uprating is based on the surge arrester technology available at present. However, some aspects of line design offer opportunities in reducing frequency and severity of lightning surges imposed on the substation. The tower surge response adds an inductive overshoot only during the front of the stroke which reduces considerably during the tail. If backflashover does not occur before reflections from adjacent towers arrive, it is unlikely to occur at all. Use of guys and underbuilt ground wires in the limiting distance will produce reflections with larger magnitude and reduce the effective surge impedance of the tower. This would not only reduce backflashover frequency but will also minimize crest and duration of surges entering the substation.

Harrington, R.J.; Mueen, M. [George Washington Univ., Washington, DC (United States). Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Thermopolis hydrothermal system, with an analysis of Hot Springs State Park. Preliminary report No. 20  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermopolis is the site of Hot Springs State Park, where numerous hot springs produce nearly 3000 gallons per minute (gpm) of 130/sup 0/F (54/sup 0/C) water. The University of Wyoming Geothermal Resource Assessment Group has studied a 1700-square-mile area centered roughly on the State Park. Available literature, bottom-hole temperatures from over 400 oil well logs, 62 oil field drill stem tests, the Wyoming State Engineer's water well files, 60 formation water analyses, thermal logs of 19 holes, and field investigations of geology and hydrology form the basis of this report. Analysis of thermal data reveals that temperatures of up to 161/sup 0/F (72/sup 0/C) occur along the crest of the Thermopolis Anticline within 500 feet of the surface. The hydrology and heat flow of these geothermal anomalies was studied.

Hinckley, B.S.; Heasler, H.P.; King, J.K.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Cheap Artificial AB-Mountains, Extraction of Water and Energy from Atmosphere and Change of Regional Climate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Author suggests and researches a new revolutionary method for changing the climates of entire countries or portions thereof, obtaining huge amounts of cheap water and energy from the atmosphere. In this paper is presented the idea of cheap artificial inflatable mountains, which may cardinally change the climate of a large region or country. Additional benefits: The potential of tapping large amounts of fresh water and energy. The mountains are inflatable semi-cylindrical constructions from thin film (gas bags) having heights of up to 3 - 5 km. They are located perpendicular to the main wind direction. Encountering these artificial mountains, humid air (wind) rises to crest altitude, is cooled and produces rain (or rain clouds). Many natural mountains are sources of rivers, and other forms of water and power production - and artificial mountains may provide these services for entire nations in the future. The film of these gasbags is supported at altitude by small additional atmospheric overpressure and may be...

Bolonkin, Alexander

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Productivity and injectivity of horizontal wells. Quarterly report, April 1, 1994--June 30, 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the fifth quarter of this project, progress was made concerning four of the stated objectives of the project. First, extensive sensitivity studies, based on reservoir simulation, have been performed on a field example to assess the effects of wellbore friction, inflow, skin, length, and diameter of the well, etc. on the productivity of a horizontal well. Secondly, the authors have launched a new phase of the project on developing models for scale-up and coarse grid pseudo functions for horizontal wells in heterogeneous reservoirs. The available methods have been applied to an example problem and their performance and limitations have been analyzed. Thirdly, the authors are in the process of developing a new analytical solution for the coning and cresting critical rates for horizontal wells. Finally, experimental data bases will be used to test the authors` newly developed general mechanistic model for two-phase flow.

Fayers, F.J.; Aziz, K.; Hewett, T.A.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Terahertz radiation source based on self-wake beam bunching  

SciTech Connect

A table top device for producing high power T-ray beams is described. A rectangular electron beam that can be produced out of a photoinjector via stacking of the laser pulse, and running off-crest of the photoinjector rf is sent through a dielectric loaded waveguide. Due to the beam's self-wake its energy becomes modulated. In the chicane beamline following the dielectric energy-bunching section this energy modulation is converted to a density modulation-a bunch train. The density modulated beam can be sent through a power extraction section, like a dielectric loaded accelerating structure, or simply can intercept a foil target, producing THz radiation of various bandwidths and power levels.

Antipov, Sergey; Jing Chunguang; Schoessow, Paul; Kanareykin, Alexei; Jiang Bo; Yakimenko, Vitaly; Zholents, Alexander; Gai Wei [Euclid Techlabs LLC, Solon OH 44139 (United States); Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Shanghai (China); Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton NY, 11973 (United States); Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne IL, 60439 (United States)

2012-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

219

Research, Monitoring, and Evaluation of Avian Predation on Salmonid Smolts in the Lower and Mid-Columbia River, 2006 Final Season Summary.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study investigates predation by piscivorous waterbirds on juvenile salmonids (Oncorhynchus spp.) from throughout the Columbia River Basin. During 2006, study objectives in the Columbia River estuary, work funded by the Bonneville Power Administration, were to (1) monitor and evaluate previous management initiatives to reduce Caspian tern (Hydroprogne caspia) predation on juvenile salmonids (smolts); (2) measure the impact of double-crested cormorant (Phalacrocorax auritus) predation on smolt survival, and assess potential management options to reduce cormorant predation; and (3) monitor large colonies of other piscivorous waterbirds in the estuary (i.e., glaucous-winged/western gulls [Larus glaucescens/occidentalis]) to determine the potential impacts on smolt survival. Study objectives on the mid-Columbia River, work funded by the Walla Walla District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, were to (1) measure the impact of predation by Caspian terns and double-crested cormorants on smolt survival; and (2) monitor large nesting colonies of other piscivorous waterbirds (i.e., California gulls [L. californicus], ring-billed gulls [L. delawarensis], American white pelicans [Pelecanus erythrorhynchos]) on the mid-Columbia River to determine the potential for significant impacts on smolt survival. Our efforts to evaluate system-wide losses of juvenile salmonids to avian predation indicated that Caspian terns and double-crested cormorants were responsible for the vast majority of smolt losses to avian predators in the Columbia Basin, with most losses occurring in the Columbia River estuary. In 2006, East Sand Island in the Columbia River estuary supported the largest known breeding colonies of Caspian terns and double-crested cormorants in the world. The Caspian tern colony on East Sand Island consisted of about 9,200 breeding pairs in 2006, up slightly (but not significantly so) from the estimate of colony size in 2005 (8,820 pairs). There has not been a statistically significant change in the size of the Caspian tern colony on East Sand Island since 2000. Tern nesting success averaged 0.72 fledglings per breeding pair in 2006, significantly higher than in 2005 (0.37 fledglings per breeding pair), a year of poor ocean conditions. Despite the presumably higher availability of marine forage fishes in 2006, the proportion of juvenile salmonids in diets of Caspian terns (32% of prey items) averaged higher than in 2005 (23% of prey items) and 2004 (18% of prey items). Steelhead smolts were particular vulnerable to predation by East Sand Island terns in 2006, with predation rates as high as 20% on particular groups of PIT-tagged fish reaching the estuary. Consumption of juvenile salmonids by terns nesting at the East Sand Island colony in 2006 was approximately 5.3 million smolts (95% c.i. = 4.4-6.2 million), significantly higher than the estimated 3.6 million smolts consumed in 2005, but still roughly 7 million fewer smolts consumed compared to 1998 (when all terns nested on Rice Island in the upper estuary). Caspian terns nesting on East Sand Island continue to rely primarily on marine forage fishes as a food supply, even in 2005 when availability of marine forage fishes declined due to poor ocean conditions. Further management of Caspian terns to reduce losses of juvenile salmonids would be implemented under the Caspian Tern Management Plan for the Columbia River Estuary; the Records of Decision (RODs) authorizing implementation of the plan were signed in November 2006. The ROD lists as the management goal the redistribution of approximately half of the East Sand Island Caspian tern colony to alternative colony sites in interior Oregon and San Francisco Bay, California (USFWS 2006). Implementation of the management plan is stalled, however, because of the lack of appropriated funds.

Roby, Daniel D. [USGS - Oregon Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit, Oregon State University; Collis, Ken [Real Time Research, Inc.; Lyons, Donald E. [USGS - Oregon Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit, Oregon State University

2009-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

220

Seismic Evidence For A Hydrothermal Layer Above The Solid Roof Of The Axial  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Evidence For A Hydrothermal Layer Above The Solid Roof Of The Axial Evidence For A Hydrothermal Layer Above The Solid Roof Of The Axial Magma Chamber At The Southern East Pacific Rise Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Seismic Evidence For A Hydrothermal Layer Above The Solid Roof Of The Axial Magma Chamber At The Southern East Pacific Rise Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: A full-waveform inversion of two-ship, wide-aperture, seismic reflection data from a ridge-crest seismic line at the southern East Pacific Rise indicates that the axial magma chamber here is about 50 m thick, is embedded within a solid roof, and has a solid floor. The 50-60-m-thick roof is overlain by a 150-200-m-thick low-velocity zone that may correspond to a fracture zone that hosts the hydrothermal circulation,

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221

Compact light source performance in recessed type luminaires  

SciTech Connect

Photometric comparisons were made with an indoor, recessed, type luminaire using incandescent, high intensity discharge and compact fluorescent lamps. The test results show substantial performance advantages, as expected, for the discharge light sources where the efficacy gains can be in the order for 400% even when including the ballast losses associated with the discharge lamps. The candlepower distribution patterns emerging from these luminaries are also different from those associated with the baseline incandescent lamps, and which are in some ways, even more desirable from a uniformity of illuminance perspective. A section on fluorescent lamp starting is also included which describes a system having excellent starting characteristics in terms of electrode starting temperature (RH/RC technique), proper operating frequency to minimize unwanted IR interactions, and satisfactory current crest factor values to help insure life performance.

Hammer, E.E.

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

New continuous-input current charge pump power-factor-correction electronic ballast  

SciTech Connect

Continuous-input current charge pump power-factor-correction (CIC-CPPFC) electronic ballasts are proposed in this paper. The CPPFC circuit and unity power factor condition using the charge pump concept are derived and analyzed. The average lamp current control with switching frequency modulation was developed so that the low crest factor and constant lamp power operation can be achieved. The developed electronic ballast has continuous input current, so that a small line input filter can be used. The proposed CIC-CPPFC electronic ballast was implemented and tested with two 45-W fluorescent lamps. It is shown that the measured line input current harmonics satisfy IEC 1000-3-2 Class C requirements.

Qian, J.; Lee, F.C. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States); Yamauchi, Tokushi [Matsushita Electric Works, Ltd., Osaka (Japan). Lighting Research and Development Center

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Structural analysis and evaluation of a mixer pump in a double-shell tank at the Hanford Site  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The double-shell waste tank 241-SY-101 is a 1,000,000 gallon tank used to store radioactive waste at the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. With time the waste has formed two layers of sludge, a convective and a nonconvective layer. In addition, a crest has formed over the surface of the waste, isolating the convective layer from the vapor space. Ongoing reactions in the waste cause a buildup of hydrogen molecules that become trapped within the nonconvective layer and under the crust. Over time, this hydrogen buildup increases pressure on the crest from beneath. Every 100 to 140 days, the pressure is released when the crust lifts upward in what is called a waste rollover. To prevent the release of a large volume of hydrogen to the vapor space, a mixer pump has been designed to be installed in the tank to circulate the waste and reduce or prevent the hydrogen buildup. The structural analysis and evaluation designed as part of the hydrogen mitigation test process and presented herein addresses the response of the mixer pump and the tank dome resulting from expected operational and design loads. The loads include deadweight, waste rollover, asymmetric thrust, and pump vibration, as well as seismic loads. The seismically induced loads take into consideration both the convective and the impulsive effects of the waste-filled tank. The structural evaluations were performed in accordance with applicable national codes and standards. The qualification of the mixer pump required the design of a unique mounting assembly to transfer the loads from the pump to the surrounding soil without overstressing the structural components such as the dome penetration riser. Also, special consideration was given to minimize the additional stresses in the already stressed concrete tank dome.

Rezvani, M.A.; Strehlow, J.P. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Baliga, R. [ADVENT Engineering Services, Inc., San Ramon, CA (United States)

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Thermal Water of Utah Topical Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Western and central Utah has 16 areas whose wells or springs yield hot water (35 C or higher), warm water (20-34.5 C), and slightly warm water (15.5-19.5 C). These areas and the highest recorded water temperature for each are: Lower Bear River Area, 105 C; Bonneville Salt Flats, 88 C; Cove Fort-Sulphurdale, 77 C; Curlew Valley, 43 C; East Shore Area, 60 C; Escalante Desert, 149 C; Escalante Valley (Roosevelt, 269 C, and Thermo, 85C); Fish Springs, 60.5 C; Grouse Creek Valley, 42 C; Heber Valley (Midway, 45 C); Jordan Valley, 58.5 C; Pavant Valley-Black Rock Desert, 67 C; Sevier Desert ( Abraham-Crater Hot Springs, 82 C); Sevier Valley (Monroe-Red Hill, 76.5 C, and Joseph Hot Spring, 64 C); Utah Valley, 46 C; and Central Virgin River Basin, 42 C. The only hot water in eastern Utah comes from the oil wells of the Ashley Valley Oil Field, which in 1977 yielded 4400 acre-feet of water at 43 C to 55 C. Many other areas yield warm water (20 to 34.5 C) and slightly warm water (15.5 to 19.5 C). With the possible exception of the Roosevelt KGRA, Crater Hot Springs in the Sevier Desert, Escalante Desert, Pavant-Black Rock, Cove Fort-Sulphurdale, and Coyote Spring in Curlew Valley, which may derive their heat from buried igneous bodies, the heat that warms the thermal water is derived from the geothermal gradient. Meteoric water circulates through fractures or permeable rocks deep within the earth, where it is warmed; it then rises by convection or artesian pressure and issues at the surface as springs or is tapped by wells. Most thermal springs thus rise along faults, but some thermal water is trapped in confined aquifers so that it spreads laterally as it mixes with and warms cooler near-surface water. This spreading of thermal waters is evident in Cache Valley, in Jordan Valley, and in southern Utah Valley; likely the spreading occurs in many other artesian basins where it has not yet been recognized. In the East Shore Area thermal water trapped in confined aquifers warms water in overlying aquifers. Some of the areas of hot water, such as Roosevelt, Pavant-Black Rock, and Cove Fort-Sulphurdale, probably have a potential to produce electricity; the estimated potential at Roosevelt is 300 megawatts. But the many areas of warm and hot water whose temperatures are too low to produce electricity may still have their waters utilized for space heating, as is planned for Monroe, for greenhouses, and for the processing of farm produce. In this report are tables that give records of about 1500 thermal springs and wells, 66 yield hot water, more than 400 yield warm water, and more than 1000 yield slightly warm water. The records include location, ownership, temperature, yield, depth (of wells), geologic unit, and some chemical analyses.

Goode, Harry D.

1978-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Dynamic context discrimination : psychological evidence for the Sandia Cognitive Framework.  

SciTech Connect

Human behavior is a function of an iterative interaction between the stimulus environment and past experience. It is not simply a matter of the current stimulus environment activating the appropriate experience or rule from memory (e.g., if it is dark and I hear a strange noise outside, then I turn on the outside lights and investigate). Rather, it is a dynamic process that takes into account not only things one would generally do in a given situation, but things that have recently become known (e.g., there have recently been coyotes seen in the area and one is known to be rabid), as well as other immediate environmental characteristics (e.g., it is snowing outside, I know my dog is outside, I know the police are already outside, etc.). All of these factors combine to inform me of the most appropriate behavior for the situation. If it were the case that humans had a rule for every possible contingency, the amount of storage that would be required to enable us to fluidly deal with most situations we encounter would rapidly become biologically untenable. We can all deal with contingencies like the one above with fairly little effort, but if it isn't based on rules, what is it based on? The assertion of the Cognitive Systems program at Sandia for the past 5 years is that at the heart of this ability to effectively navigate the world is an ability to discriminate between different contexts (i.e., Dynamic Context Discrimination, or DCD). While this assertion in and of itself might not seem earthshaking, it is compelling that this ability and its components show up in a wide variety of paradigms across different subdisciplines in psychology. We begin by outlining, at a high functional level, the basic ideas of DCD. We then provide evidence from several different literatures and paradigms that support our assertion that DCD is a core aspect of cognitive functioning. Finally, we discuss DCD and the computational model that we have developed as an instantiation of DCD in more detail. Before commencing with our overview of DCD, we should note that DCD is not necessarily a theory in the classic sense. Rather, it is a description of cognitive functioning that seeks to unify highly similar findings across a wide variety of literatures. Further, we believe that such convergence warrants a central place in efforts to computationally emulate human cognition. That is, DCD is a general principle of cognition. It is also important to note that while we are drawing parallels across many literatures, these are functional parallels and are not necessarily structural ones. That is, we are not saying that the same neural pathways are involved in these phenomena. We are only saying that the different neural pathways that are responsible for the appearance of these various phenomena follow the same functional rules - the mechanisms are the same even if the physical parts are distinct. Furthermore, DCD is not a causal mechanism - it is an emergent property of the way the brain is constructed. DCD is the result of neurophysiology (cf. John, 2002, 2003). Finally, it is important to note that we are not proposing a generic learning mechanism such that one biological algorithm can account for all situation interpretation. Rather, we are pointing out that there are strikingly similar empirical results across a wide variety of disciplines that can be understood, in part, by similar cognitive processes. It is entirely possible, even assumed in some cases (i.e., primary language acquisition) that these more generic cognitive processes are complemented and constrained by various limits which may or may not be biological in nature (cf. Bates & Elman, 1996; Elman, in press).

Speed, Ann Elizabeth

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Algorithms and Software Tools for Extracting Coastal Morphological Information from Airborne LiDAR Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With the ever increasing population and economic activities in coastal areas, coastal hazards have become a major concern for coastal management. The fundamental requirement of coastal planning and management is the scientific knowledge about coastal forms and processes. This research aims at developing algorithms for automatically extracting coastal morphological information from LiDAR data. The primary methods developed by this research include automated algorithms for beach profile feature extraction and change analysis, and an object-based approach for spatial pattern analysis of coastal morphologic and volumetric change. Automated algorithms are developed for cross-shore profile feature extraction and change analysis. Important features of the beach profile such as dune crest, dune toe, and beach berm crest are extracted automatically by using a scale-space approach and by incorporating contextual information. The attributes of important feature points and segments are derived to characterize the morphologic properties of each beach profile. Beach profiles from different time periods can be compared for morphologic and volumetric change analysis. An object-oriented approach for volumetric change analysis is developed to identify and delineate individual elevation change patches as discrete objects. A set of two-dimensional and three-dimensional attributes are derived to characterize the objects, which includes planimetric attributes, shape attributes, surface attributes, volumetric attributes, and summary attributes. Both algorithms are implemented as ArcGIS extension modules to perform the feature extraction and attribute derivation for coastal morphological change analysis. To demonstrate the utility and effectiveness of algorithms, the cross-shore profile change analysis method and software tool are applied to a case study area located at southern Monterey Bay, California, and the coastal morphology change analysis method and software tool are applied to a case study area located on Assateague Island, Maryland. The automated algorithms facilitate the efficient beach profile feature analysis over large geographical area and support the analysis of the spatial variations of beach profile changes along the shoreline. The explicit object representation of elevation change patches makes it easy to localize erosion hot spots, to classify the elevation changes caused by various mechanisms, and to analyze spatial pattern of morphologic and volumetric changes.

Gao, Yige

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

October 2001 NDB Newsletter  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

THE NUCLEIC ACID DATABASE NEWSLETTER THE NUCLEIC ACID DATABASE NEWSLETTER October 2001, Volume 5, Number 1 1. A Standard Reference Frame for the Description of Nucleic Acid Base-Pair Geometry Published 2. NDB Chapter in International Tables Published 1. Standard Reference Frame Published The paper "A Standard Reference Frame for the Description of Nucleic Acid Base-Pair Geometry" has been published in the Journal of Molecular Biology (2001; 313, pp. 229 - 237). This document is available from the NDB at http://ndbserver.rutgers.edu/NDB_news/ and from the Journal of Molecular Biology. The standardization of these parameters was the subject of the Tsukuba Workshop on Nucleic Acid Structure and Interactions that was organized by the NDB and the Structural Biology Centre and held at the Structural Biology Centre in Tsukuba, Japan on January 12-14, 1999. The meeting was funded by the COE program of the Science and Technology Agency, Japan and the CREST program of the Japan Science and Technology Corporation. The meeting was organized by Masashi Suzuki of the National Institute of Bioscience and Human-Technology and Helen M. Berman and Wilma K. Olson of the Nucleic Acid Database Project (supported by National Science Foundation (USA).

228

NETL: National Methane Hydrates R&D Program- 2009 GOM JIP Expedition  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Green Canyon Block 955 Green Canyon Block 955 The gas hydrates JIP site selection team identified numerous potential targets in Green Canyon block 955. Three of these sites were drilled in Leg II. The wells are located in over 6,500 ft of water near the foot of the Sigsbee Escarpment. The locations are near a major embayment into the Escarpment (“Green Canyon”) which has served as a persistent focal point for sediment delivery into the deep Gulf of Mexico. Topographic map of the seafloor in the Green Canyon area. Topographic map of the seafloor in the Green Canyon area. Block 955 lies just seaward of the Sigsbee Escarpment in ~6,500 feet of water Green Canyon block 995 includes a prominent channel/levee complex that has transported and deposited large volumes of sandy sediment from the canyon to the deep Gulf of Mexico abyssal plain. The southwest corner of the block includes a recently developed structural high caused by deeper mobilization of salt. The crest of the structural high is cut by complex network of faults that can provide pathways for migrating fluids and gases. Geophysical data reviewed during assessment of the site revealed a complex array of geophysical responses near the inferred base of gas hydrate stability. Some of these responses are suggestive of free gas and some indicative of gas hydrate, but all are limited to depths that are near or below the inferred base of gas hydrate stability.

229

postkwonTable2.xls  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2, W.M. Post, and K.C. Kwon. 2000. Soil Carbon Sequestration and Land-Use Change: 2, W.M. Post, and K.C. Kwon. 2000. Soil Carbon Sequestration and Land-Use Change: Processes and Potential. Global Change Biology 6:317-327 http://cdiac.ornl.gov/programs/CSEQ/terrestrial/postkwon2000/postkwon2000.html Years since Soil sample Rate of change (g m -2 y -1 ) Reference agriculture depth (cm) MAX AVG Cool temperate steppe Cultivated to perennial grass 12 300 110.00 Gebhart et al. (1994) cultivated to abandoned field 50 10 3.10 Burke et al. (1995) cultivated to seeded grass 6 5 0.00 Robles & Burke (1998) cultivated to improved pasture White et al. (1976) russian wildrye 8 7 6.86 crested wheatgrass 8 7 18.87 B-I-ALF (full) 8 7 14.01 B-I-ALF (short) 8 7 34.15 Mine tailing to grass-forb meadow 5 - 80 10 60.00 4.01 Titlyanova et al. (1988) Coal mine spoil to dry grassland 28 - 40

230

The Wood Duck  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wood Duck Wood Duck Nature Bulletin No. 502-A October 13, 1973 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation THE WOOD DUCK Of all the fowl that swim, the Wood Duck is a most unusual bird. They perch in trees like jaybirds, and nest in tree holes like woodpeckers. The hens do not quack like the females of most ducks, and the drakes are dressed in a riot of gaudy colors. Each summer we see dozens of them -- more than any other kind of wild duck -- rear their families of ducklings on and around the streams, ponds, lakes and sloughs of Cook County's forest preserves. Words can scarcely describe the brilliance of the drake's plumage. The head, crest and back glint with iridescent greens, purples and blues. The eyes are red, the throat white, and the bill orange-red. The breast is wine-colored flecked with white, the belly is white, and the sides are buff. The woodie is about midway in size between the mallard and the blue-winged teal. The drakes weigh about a pound and a half. The hen is smaller and plainer, with a gray-brown head and body, a white throat, and a conspicuous white ring around the eye. Her voice is a shrill, squealing "whoo-eek", while the male's is a mere squeak.

231

www.mdpi.com/journal/ijms Crossing the Border: Molecular Control of Motor Axon Exit  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Living organisms heavily rely on the function of motor circuits for their survival and for adapting to ever-changing environments. Unique among central nervous system (CNS) neurons, motor neurons (MNs) project their axons out of the CNS. Once in the periphery, motor axons navigate along highly stereotyped trajectories, often at considerable distances from their cell bodies, to innervate appropriate muscle targets. A key decision made by pathfinding motor axons is whether to exit the CNS through dorsal or ventral motor exit points (MEPs). In contrast to the major advances made in understanding the mechanisms that regulate the specification of MN subtypes and the innervation of limb muscles, remarkably little is known about how MN axons project out of the CNS. Nevertheless, a limited number of studies, mainly in Drosophila, have identified transcription factors, and in some cases candidate downstream effector molecules, that are required for motor axons to exit the spinal cord. Notably, specialized neural crest cell derivatives, referred to as Boundary Cap (BC) cells, pre-figure and demarcate MEPs in vertebrates. Surprisingly, however, BC cells are not required for MN axon exit, but rather restrict MN cell bodies from ectopically migrating along their axons out of the CNS. Here,

Arlene Bravo-ambrosio; Zaven Kaprielian

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Instability of P-waves just below the transition region in a global solar wind simulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate how wave propagation is modified by the presence of heat sources and sinks, in the simple 1D, hydrodynamical case, including chromosphere and solar wind. We integrate the time-dependent hydrodynamic equations of the solar wind with spherical symmetry, including conduction, radiative cooling and a prescribed mechanical heat flux. Once a quasi-stationary wind is established, we study the response of the system to pressure oscillations at the photospheric boundary. We use transparent boundary conditions. We find that wavepackets with high enough amplitude propagating upward from the photosphere implode just below the transition region. This implosion is due to the radiative cooling term generating pressure holes close to the wave crests of the wave, which make the wave collapse. In the case where heat sources and sinks are not present in the equations, the wave remains stable whatever the initial wave amplitude, which is compatible with published work. Instability should be observable when and where the TR is high enough above the optically thick regions.

R. Grappin; J. Lorat; R. Pinto; Y. -M. Wang

2007-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

233

Artificial insemination  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Artificial insemination Artificial insemination Name: Sandy C. and Becca S. and Jessica M. Grade 7 Glen Crest Jr. High Status: N/A Age: N/A Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: Would it ever be possible for an animal to have another animals baby? For example, women can be impregnated without having intercourse now because of modern technology. So, could a cow for example carry an endangered species' offspring? Replies: Sandy, Becca, and Jessica, Is suspect that you have not received an answer to this question yet because there is not a definite answer. In order to bear offspring there are many factors that must be met. Primarily, the father and mother must be of the same species or at least very similar. There are so many new developments in the area of artificial insemination that it is hard to say no, a cow can not carry and endangered species, it is highly unlikely at this time. Keep up your curiosity, it is a characteristic of all scientists! (By the way I teach 6th grade science and am currently teaching a human growth and development unit in which the students have been asking questions very similar to yours).

234

Gentivity, LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gentivity, LLC Gentivity, LLC Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Gentivity, LLC Name Gentivity, LLC Address 9314 Knoll Crest Loop Place Austin, Texas Zip 78759 Sector Renewable energy Product Consulting - Origination, Market Structure & Entry Year founded 2004 Number of employees 1-10 Phone number 512-814-7149 Website http://www.gentivity.com Coordinates 30.394897°, -97.7604719° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":30.394897,"lon":-97.7604719,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

235

MHK Technologies/WaveMaster | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

WaveMaster WaveMaster < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage WaveMaster.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Ocean Wavemaster Ltd Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Point Absorber - Submerged Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 1 3 Discovery Concept Def Early Stage Dev Design Engineering Technology Description The WaveMaster device consists of two pressure chambers connected via a number of turbines The device is located under the waters surface so that it is covered at all times The upper surface of each chamber is an active surface covered with one way valves that control the flow of water through the device The valves on the high pressure chamber allow water to flow into the chamber provided the external pressure is higher than the internal pressure in the chamber This situation typically occurs under wave crests If the external pressure is less than the internal pressure the valves remain closed and water does not flow in Similarly the valves on the low pressure chamber will only allow water to flow out of the chamber if the internal pressure is higher than the external pressure This situation typically occurs under wave troughs If the internal pressure is less than the external pressure the valves remain closed and there is no flow of water

236

Eder Acquisition 2007 Habitat Evaluation Procedures Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A habitat evaluation procedures (HEP) analysis was conducted on the Eder acquisition in July 2007 to determine how many protection habitat units to credit Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for providing funds to acquire the project site as partial mitigation for habitat losses associated with construction of Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Dams. Baseline HEP surveys generated 3,857.64 habitat units or 1.16 HUs per acre. HEP surveys also served to document general habitat conditions. Survey results indicated that the herbaceous plant community lacked forbs species, which may be due to both livestock grazing and the late timing of the surveys. Moreover, the herbaceous plant community lacked structure based on lower than expected visual obstruction readings (VOR); likely a direct result of livestock impacts. In addition, introduced herbaceous vegetation including cultivated pasture grasses, e.g. crested wheatgrass and/or invader species such as cheatgrass and mustard, were present on most areas surveyed. The shrub element within the shrubsteppe cover type was generally a mosaic of moderate to dense shrubby areas interspersed with open grassland communities while the 'steppe' component was almost entirely devoid of shrubs. Riparian shrub and forest areas were somewhat stressed by livestock. Moreover, shrub and tree communities along the lower reaches of Nine Mile Creek suffered from lack of water due to the previous landowners 'piping' water out of the stream channel.

Ashley, Paul R.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Evaluating Cumulative Ecosystem Response to Restoration Projects in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary, 2009  

SciTech Connect

This is the sixth annual report of a seven-year project (2004 through 2010) to evaluate the cumulative effects of habitat restoration actions in the lower Columbia River and estuary (LCRE). The project, called the Cumulative Effects Study, is being conducted for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Portland District (USACE) by the Marine Sciences Laboratory of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), the Pt. Adams Biological Field Station of the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), the Columbia River Estuary Study Taskforce (CREST), and the University of Washington. The goal of the Cumulative Effects Study is to develop a methodology to evaluate the cumulative effects of multiple habitat restoration projects intended to benefit ecosystems supporting juvenile salmonids in the 235-km-long LCRE. Literature review in 2004 revealed no existing methods for such an evaluation and suggested that cumulative effects could be additive or synergistic. From 2005 through 2009, annual field research involved intensive, comparative studies paired by habitat type (tidal swamp versus marsh), trajectory (restoration versus reference site), and restoration action (tidegate replacement vs. culvert replacement vs. dike breach).

Johnson, Gary E.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Borde, Amy B.; Bryson, Amanda J.; Cameron, April; Coleman, Andre M.; Corbett, C.; Dawley, Earl M.; Ebberts, Blaine D.; Kauffman, Ronald; Roegner, G. Curtis; Russell, Micah T.; Silva, April; Skalski, John R.; Thom, Ronald M.; Vavrinec, John; Woodruff, Dana L.; Zimmerman, Shon A.

2010-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

238

Correlations of whitecap coverage and gas transfer velocity with microwave brightness temperature for plunging and spilling breaking waves  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Bubbles and bubble plumes generated by wind-induced breaking waves significantly enhance the gas exchange across the interface between the ocean and atmosphere under high-wind conditions. Whitcaps, or active spilling wave crests, are the sea-surface manifestation of the bubbles and bubble plumes in the subsurface mixed layer, and the fractional area of the sea surface covered by which has been proposed to correlate linearly with the air-sea gas transfer velocity. The presence of whitecaps substantially increases the microwave brightness temperature of the sea surface. It could be possible to estimate the whitecap coverage from the sea-surface microwave brightness temperature would also be very helpful in developing a remote-sensing model for predicting air-sea gas transfer velocities from microwave brightness temperatures. As a part of an air-water gas exchange experiment conducted in an outdoor surf pool, measurements were made that were designed to investigate the correlation between whitecap coverage and microwave brightness temperature. A mechanical wave maker was located at the deep end of the pool and the generated waves propagate and break towards the shallow end of the pool. Two wave patterns characteristic of plunging and spilling breaking waves at four wave heights from 0.3 m to 1.2 m were produced.

Wang, Qin; Monahan, E.C. [Connecticut Univ., Groton, CT (United States). Marine Sciences Inst.; Asher, W.E. [Battelle/Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States); Smith, P.M. [Naval Research Lab. Detachment, Stennis Space Center, MS (United States)

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Production of jet fuel from coal-derived liquids  

SciTech Connect

Amoco and Lummus-Crest, under a contract with the United States Department of Energy, are evaluating the process options and economics for upgrading the naphtha, crude phenols, and tar oil by-products from the Great Plains Coal Gasification Plant to jet fuels and other salable products. Analytical characterizations of these three by-products indicate the range of products that can be manufactured from each and potential problems which could be encountered during refining. These characterizations, along with limited experimental data and Amoco's proprietary process models, were used to design conceptual processing schemes for maximizing the production of Grades JP-4, JP-8, and high-density (JP-8X) jet fuels from the by-product liquids. Conceptual designs have been completed and a case for profitable production of JP-8 has been selected for experimental testing and preliminary design in the later phases of the contract. Samples of JP-4, JP-8, and JP-8X aviation turbine fuels have been manufactured from the Great Plains tar oil. Larger samples of JP-8 are nearly completed. Specification of a design basis for profitable production of JP-8 is under way. 5 figs., 4 tabs.

Furlong, M.W.; Fox, J.D.; Masin, J.G.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Production of jet fuel from coal-derived liquids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Amoco and Lummus Crest, under a contract with the United States Department of Energy, are evaluating the process options and economics for upgrading the naphtha, crude phenols, and tar oil by-products from the Great Plains Coal Gasification Plant to jet fuels and other salable products. Conceptual processing schemes for maximizing the production of Grades JP-4, JP-8, and high-density (JP-8X) jet fuels, for maximizing profits, and for profitable production of each of the three jet fuels from the by-product liquids have been developed. Economic analyses of the designs show that jet fuel can be produced from the by-products, but not economically. However, jet fuel production could be subsidized profitably by processing the phenolic and naphtha streams to cresols, phenols, BTX, and other valuable chemical by-products. Uncertainties in the studies are marketability of the chemical by-products, replacement fuel costs, and viable schemes to process the phenol stream, among others. 8 figs., 2 tabs.

Furlong, M.W.; Fox, J.D.; Masin, J.G.; Soderberg, D.J.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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241

Production of jet fuel from coal-derived liquids  

SciTech Connect

Amoco and Lummus Crest, under a contract with the United States Department of Energy, are evaluating the process options and economics for upgrading the naphtha, crude phenols, and tar oil by-products from the Great Plains Coal Gasification Plant to jet fuels and other salable products. Analytical characterizations of these three by-products indicate the range of products that can be manufactured from each, and potential problems which could be encountered during refining. These characterizations, along with limited experimental data and Amoco's proprietary process models, were used to design conceptual processing schemes for maximizing the production of Grades JP-4, JP-8, and high-density (JP-8X) jet fuels from the by-product liquids. Conceptual designs have been completed and a case for profitable production of JP-8 has been selected for experimental testing and preliminary design in the later phases of the contract. Experimental work to date has shown that the tar oil stream requires substantially more severe processing than the preliminary design estimates indicated. A new design basis is now being tested and samples of JP-4, JP-8, and JP-8X are in production, based on that new, more severe processing scheme. Six barrels of tar oil have been hydrotreated according to the first step of the processing scheme and will be used to produce barrel quantities of JP-8. 2 refs., 2 figs.

Furlong, M.W.; Fox, J.D.; Masin, J.G.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Production of jet fuel from coal-derived liquids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Amoco and Lummus Crest, under a contract with the United States Department of Energy, are evaluating the process options and economics for upgrading the naphtha, crude phenols, and tar oil by-products from the Great Plains Coal Gasification Plant to jet fuels and other salable products. Task 1 of the work, in which processes to produce each of the three jet fuels, JP-4, JP-8, and JP-8X, were designed, has been completed. The formal Task 1 report should issue next quarter. Task 2 work was initiated this quarter. In Task 2, process conditions for producing jet fuel from the Great Plains tar oil stream will be verified and samples of each of the three jet fuels will be produced. Experimental work shows that the hydrotreating conditions specified in Task 1 will not convert sufficient aromatics in the tar oil to produce jet fuel. Alternative schemes have been proposed and are being tested in the laboratories at Amoco Research Center. The simplest of these schemes, in which the heavy ends from the hydrotreater are recycled to extinction, was tested and proved infeasible. A second stage, fixed bed hydrotreater will be added to the process along with the expanded bed, first-stage hydrotreater and the hydrocracker specified in the Task 1 design. Future work will include additional experiments to specify the best process configuration and production of samples of each of the three grades of jet fuel. 6 figs., 7 tabs.

Furlong, M.W.; Fox, J.D.; Masin, J.G.; Soderberg, D.J.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Production of jet fuel from coal-derived liquids  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Amoco and Lummus Crest are evaluating the process options and economics for upgrading the naphtha, crude phenols, and tar oil by-products from the Great Plains Coal Gasification Plant to jet fuels and other salable products. Analytical characterizations of these three by-products indicate the range of products that can be manufactured from each, and potential problems which could be encountered during refining. These characterizations, along with limited experimental data and Amoco's proprietary process models, were used to design conceptual processing schemes for maximizing the production of Grades JP-4, JP-8, and high density (JP-8X) jet fuels from the by-product liquids. In addition to the maximum jet fuel schemes, conceptual designs have also been formulated for maximizing profits from refining of the Great Plains by-products. Conceptual processing schemes for profitable production of JP-4, JP-8, and JP-8X have been developed, as has a maximum profit'' case. All four of these additional cases have now been transferred to Lummus for design and integration studies. Development of these schemes required the use of linear programming technology. This technology includes not only conventional refining processes which have been adapted for use with coal-derived liquids (e.g. hydrotreating, hydrocracking), but also processes which may be uniquely suited to the Great Plains by-products such as cresylic acid extraction, hydordealkylation, and needle coking. 6 figs., 3 tabs.

Furlong, M.W.; Fox, J.D.; Masin, J.G.; Soderberg, D.J.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Cheap Artificial AB-Mountains, Extraction of Water and Energy from Atmosphere and Change of Regional Climate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Author suggests and researches a new revolutionary method for changing the climates of entire countries or portions thereof, obtaining huge amounts of cheap water and energy from the atmosphere. In this paper is presented the idea of cheap artificial inflatable mountains, which may cardinally change the climate of a large region or country. Additional benefits: The potential of tapping large amounts of fresh water and energy. The mountains are inflatable semi-cylindrical constructions from thin film (gas bags) having heights of up to 3 - 5 km. They are located perpendicular to the main wind direction. Encountering these artificial mountains, humid air (wind) rises to crest altitude, is cooled and produces rain (or rain clouds). Many natural mountains are sources of rivers, and other forms of water and power production - and artificial mountains may provide these services for entire nations in the future. The film of these gasbags is supported at altitude by small additional atmospheric overpressure and may be connected to the ground by thin cables. The author has shown (in previous works about the AB-Dome) that this closed AB-Dome allows full control of the weather inside the Dome (the day is always fine, the rain is only at night, no strong winds) and influence to given region. This is a realistic and cheap method of economical irrigation, getting energy and virtual weather control on Earth at the current time.

Alexander Bolonkin

2008-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

245

CE IGCC Repowering plant sulfuric acid plant. Topical report, June 1993  

SciTech Connect

A goal of the CE IGCC Repowering project is to demonstrate a hot gas clean-up system (HGCU), for the removal of sulfur from the product gas stream exiting the gasifier island. Combustion Engineering, Inc. (ABB CE) intends to use a HGCU developed by General Electric Environmental Services (GEESI). The original design of this system called for the installation of the HGCU, with a conventional cold gas clean-up system included as a full-load operational back-up. Each of these systems removes sulfur compounds and converts them into an acid off-gas. This report deals with the investigation of equipment to treat this off-gas, recovering these sulfur compounds as elemental sulfur, sulfuric acid or some other form. ABB CE contracted ABB Lummus Crest Inc. (ABB LCI) to perform an engineering evaluation to compare several such process options. This study concluded that the installation of a sulfuric acid plant represented the best option from both a technical and economic point of view. Based on this evaluation, ABB CE specified that a sulfuric acid plant be installed to remove sulfur from off-gas exiling the gas clean-up system. ABB LCI prepared a request for quotation (RFQ) for the construction of a sulfuric acid production plant. Monsanto Enviro-Chem Inc. presented the only proposal, and was eventually selected as the EPC contractor for this system.

Chester, A.M.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Muon Acceleration - RLA and FFAG  

SciTech Connect

Various acceleration schemes for muons are presented. The overall goal of the acceleration systems: large acceptance acceleration to 25 GeV and 'beam shaping' can be accomplished by various fixed field accelerators at different stages. They involve three superconducting linacs: a single pass linear Pre-accelerator followed by a pair of multi-pass Recirculating Linear Accelerators (RLA) and finally a non-scaling FFAG ring. The present baseline acceleration scenario has been optimized to take maximum advantage of appropriate acceleration scheme at a given stage. The solenoid based Pre-accelerator offers very large acceptance and facilitates correction of energy gain across the bunch and significant longitudinal compression trough induced synchrotron motion. However, far off-crest acceleration reduces the effective acceleration gradient and adds complexity through the requirement of individual RF phase control for each cavity. The RLAs offer very efficient usage of high gradient superconducting RF and ability to adjust path-length after each linac pass through individual return arcs with uniformly periodic FODO optics suitable for chromatic compensation of emittance dilution with sextupoles. However, they require spreaders/recombiners switchyards at both linac ends and significant total length of the arcs. The non-scaling Fixed Field Alternating Gradient (FFAG) ring combines compactness with very large chromatic acceptance (twice the injection energy) and it allows for large number of passes through the RF (at least eight, possibly as high as 15).

Alex Bogacz

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Oil gravity distribution in the diatomite at South Belridge Field, Kern County, CA: Implications for oil sourcing and migration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Understanding oil gravity distribution in the Belridge Diatomite has led to economic infill development and specific enhanced recovery methods for targeted oil properties. To date more than 100 wells have provided samples used to determining vertical and areal distribution of oil gravity in the field. Detailed geochemical analyses were also conducted on many of the oil samples to establish different oil types, relative maturities, and to identify transformed oils. The geochemical analysis also helped identify source rock expulsion temperatures and depositional environments. The data suggests that the Belridge diatomite has been charged by a single hydrocarbon source rock type and was generated over a relatively wide range of temperatures. Map and statistical data support two distinct oil segregation processes occurring post expulsion. Normal gravity segregation within depositional cycles of diatomite have caused lightest oils to migrate to the crests of individual cycle structures. Some data suggests a loss of the light end oils in the uppermost cycles to the Tulare Formation above, or through early biodegradation. Structural rotation post early oil expulsion has also left older, heavier oils concentrated on the east flank of the structure. With the addition of other samples from the south central San Joaquin area, we have been able to tie the Belridge diatomite hydrocarbon charge into a regional framework. We have also enhanced our ability to predict oil gravity and well primary recovery by unraveling some key components of the diatomite oil source and migration history.

Hill, D.W.; Sande, J.J. [Shell Western E& P Inc., Bakersfield, CA (United States); Doe, P.H. [Shell Development Co., Houston, TX (United States)

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Conveyance and Transfer of Certain Land Tracts Administered by the U.S. Department of Energy and Located at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos and Santa Fe Counties, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is one of several national laboratories that supports the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) responsibilities for national security, energy resources, environmental quality, and science. LANL is located in north-central New Mexico, within Los Alamos County and Santa Fe County, about 60 miles (97 kilometers) north-northeast of Albuquerque and about 25 miles (40 kilometers) northwest of Santa Fe. The small communities of Los Alamos townsite, White Rock, Pajarito Acres, the Royal Crest Mobile Home Park, and San Ildefonso Pueblo are located in the immediate vicinity of LANL. On November 26, 1997, Congress passed Public Law (PL) 105-119, the ''Departments of Commerce, Justice, and State, the Judiciary, and Related Agencies Appropriations Act'', 1998 (Section 632, 42 United States Code [U.S.C.] Section 2391; ''the Act''), which directs the DOE to convey or transfer parcels of DOE land in the vicinity of LANL to the Incorporated County of Los Alamos, New Mexico, and the Secretary of the Interior, in trust for the Pueblo of San Ildefonso. Such parcels, or tracts, of land must not be required to meet the national security mission of the DOE and must also meet other criteria established by the Act.

N /A

2000-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

249

Experimental and numerical analysis of a deepwater mini-TLP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As the quest for oil and gas resources drives the industry to ever deeper waters, model testing still represents an essential step after numerical modeling when designing offshore platforms in these hostile environments. In an attempt to better understand the overall response behavior of a small-size deepwater tension leg platform (TLP) designed by the offshore industry, an experimental campaign was led at the Offshore Technology Research Center (OTRC) in cooperation with Statoil. Time-domain statistics and dimensionless ratios are used to characterize the environmental design sea conditions. Similar methods are utilized to examine the critical issues of the clearance between the wave train crests and the underside of the platform's deck, and the wave run-up on the TLP columns. Rough estimations of the wave forces applied on the hull are given by a Morison's equation modified to fit the TLP geometrical complexity. These predictions are compared with WAMIT numerical simulations and the experimental results. The structure's natural periods of vibration and damping coefficients are computed by fitting free-decay tests and by analyzing the motion spectral responses. The time-domain analysis provides estimates of extreme surge offset and maximum yaw angle. The low-frequency, wave-frequency and high-frequency components of the response signals are identified through the spectral density analysis of the platform's motions and tendon tensions.

Guichard, Aurelien

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Geological and Geothermal Investigation of the Lower Wind River Valley, Southwestern Washington Cascade Range  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Wind River Valley, on the west slope of the Cascade Range, is a northwest-trending drainage that joins the Columbia River near Carson, Washington. The region has been heavily dissected by fluvial and glacial erosion. Ridges have sharp crests and deep subsidiary valleys typical of a mature topography, with a total relief of as much as 900 m. The region is vegetated by fir and hemlock, as well as dense, brushy ground-cover and undergrowth. The lower 8 km of the valley is privately owned and moderately populated. The upper reaches lies within the Gifford Pinchot National Forest, and include several campgrounds and day parks, the Carson National Fish Hatchery, and the Wind River Ranger Station and Wind River Nursery of the US Forest Service. Logging activity is light due to the rugged terrain, and consequently, most valley slopes are not accessible by vehicle. The realization that a potential for significant geothermal resources exists in the Wind River area was brought about by earlier exploration activities. Geologic mapping and interpretation was needed to facilitate further exploration of the resource by providing a knowledge of possible geologic controls on the geothermal system. This report presents the detailed geology of the lower Wind River valley with emphasis on those factors that bear significantly on development of a geothermal resource.

Berri, Dulcy A.; Korosec, Michael A.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Recurrent faulting and petroleum accumulation, Cat Creek Anticline, central Montana  

SciTech Connect

The Cat Creek anticline, scene of central Montana's first significant oil discovery, is underlain by a south-dipping high-angle fault (Cat Creek fault) that has undergone several episodes of movement with opposite sense of displacement. Borehole data suggest that the Cat Creek fault originated as a normal fault during Proterozoic rifting concurrent with deposition of the Belt Supergroup. Reverse faulting took place in Late Cambrian time, and again near the end of the Devonian Period. The Devonian episode, coeval with the Antler orogeny, raised the southern block several hundred feet. The southern block remained high through Meramecian time, then began to subside. Post-Atokan, pre-Middle Jurassic normal faulting lowered the southern block as much as 1,500 ft. During the Laramide orogeny (latest Cretaceous-Eocene) the Cat Creek fault underwent as much as 4,000 ft of reverse displacement and a comparable amount of left-lateral displacement. The Cat Creek anticline is a fault-propagation fold; en echelon domes and listric normal faults developed along its crest in response to wrenching. Oil was generated mainly in organic-rich shales of the Heath Formation (upper Chesterian Series) and migrated upward along tectonic fractures into Pennsylvanian, Jurassic, and Cretaceous reservoir rocks in structural traps in en echelon domes. Production has been achieved only from those domes where structural closure was retained from Jurassic through Holocene time.

Nelson, W.J. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign (United States))

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Quality assurance project plan for the Chestnut Ridge Fly Ash Pond Stabilization Project at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

The Chestnut Ridge Fly Ash Pond Stabilization (CRFAPS) Project will stabilize a 19-m-high (62-ft-high) earthen embankment across Upper McCoy Branch situated along the southern slope of Chestnut Ridge. This task will be accomplished by raising the crest of the embankment, reinforcing the face of the embankment, removing trees from the face and top of the embankment, and repairing the emergency spillway. The primary responsibilities of the team members are: Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc., (Energy Systems) will be responsible for project integration, technical support, Title 3 field support, environmental oversight, and quality assurance (QA) oversight of the project; Foster Wheeler Environmental Corporation (FWENC) will be responsible for design and home office Title 3 support; MK-Ferguson of Oak Ridge Company (MK-F) will be responsible for health and safety, construction, and procurement of construction materials. Each of the team members has a QA program approved by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Operations. This project-specific QA project plan (QAPP), which is applicable to all project activities, identifies and integrates the specific QA requirements from the participant`s QA programs that are necessary for this project.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Best management practices plan for the Chestnut Ridge-Filled Coal Ash Pond at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

The Chestnut Ridge Filled Coal Ash Pond (FCAP) Project has been established to satisfy Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) requirements for the Chestnut Ridge Operable Unit 2. FCAP is on Chestnut Ridge, approximately 0.5 miles south of the Y-12 Plant. A 62-foot high earthen dam across Upper McCoy Branch was constructed in 1955 to create a pond to serve as a settling basin for fly and bottom ashes generated by burning coal at the Y-12 Steam Plant. Ash from the steam was mixed with water to form a slurry and then pumped to the crest of Chestnut Ridge and released through a large pipe to flow across the Sluice Channel area and into the pond. The ash slurry eventually overtopped the dam and flowed along Upper McCoy Branch to Rogers Quarry. The purpose of this document is to provide a site-specific Best Management Practices (BMP) Plan for construction associated with environmental restoration activities at the FCAP Site.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

SHORT-TERM SOLAR FLARE LEVEL PREDICTION USING A BAYESIAN NETWORK APPROACH  

SciTech Connect

A Bayesian network approach for short-term solar flare level prediction has been proposed based on three sequences of photospheric magnetic field parameters extracted from Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/Michelson Doppler Imager longitudinal magnetograms. The magnetic measures, the maximum horizontal gradient, the length of neutral line, and the number of singular points do not have determinate relationships with solar flares, so the solar flare level prediction is considered as an uncertainty reasoning process modeled by the Bayesian network. The qualitative network structure which describes conditional independent relationships among magnetic field parameters and the quantitative conditional probability tables which determine the probabilistic values for each variable are learned from the data set. Seven sequential features-the maximum, the mean, the root mean square, the standard deviation, the shape factor, the crest factor, and the pulse factor-are extracted to reduce the dimensions of the raw sequences. Two Bayesian network models are built using raw sequential data (BN{sub R}) and feature extracted data (BN{sub F}), respectively. The explanations of these models are consistent with physical analyses of experts. The performances of the BN{sub R} and the BN{sub F} appear comparable with other methods. More importantly, the comprehensibility of the Bayesian network models is better than other methods.

Yu Daren; Huang Xin; Hu Qinghua; Zhou Rui [Harbin Institute of Technology, No. 92 West Da Zhi Street, Harbin, Heilongjiang Province 150001 (China); Wang Huaning [National Astronomical Observatories, 20A Datun Road, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100012 (China); Cui Yanmei, E-mail: huangxinhit@yahoo.com.c [Center for Space Science and Applied Research, No. 1 Nanertiao, Zhongguancun, Haidian District, Beijing 100080 (China)

2010-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

255

Transverse emittance dilution due to coupler kicks in linear accelerators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One of the main concerns in the design of low emittance linear accelerators (linacs) is the preservation of beam emittance. Here we discuss one possible source of emittance dilution due to transverse electromagnetic fields in the accelerating cavities of the linac caused by the power coupler geometry. It is common wisdom that emittance growth from coupler kicks can be strongly reduced by having the coupler location alternate from above to below the beam pipe so that the coupler kick from one cavity is compensated by that of the next. While this is correct, alternating the coupler location requires large technical changes in superconducting cryomodules where cryogenic pipes are arranged parallel to a string of several cavities. We show here that cavities with high external $Q$ have coupler kicks that change the sign of their phase when the coupler is moved from before to after the cavity, as long as one accelerates on crest. This implies that the emittance growth from one cavity can be canceled by the next, pr...

Buckley, Brandon

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Shrub-Steppe Seasons A Natural History of the Mid-Columbia Basin  

SciTech Connect

This book collects and updates a series of articles about the natural history of the Mid-Columbia region. The articles first appeared as a monthly column titled ''Natural History'' in the Tri-City Herald, beginning in May 1991. My approach has been to condense the best of what is known about the ecology of the region to a manageable length with little in the way of technical language and terms. Admittedly, there is a bias toward those topics and species on which I have either been personally involved or observed as part of the ecology research programs conducted on the Fitzner/Eberhardt Arid Lands Ecology (ALE) Reserve. The ALE Reserve is situated on the northeast-facing flank of the Rattlesnake Hills. Rattlesnake Mountain with a crest of over 3,600 feet is visible throughout much of the Mid-Columbia. Shrub-steppe grasslands once covered a large part of the western United States but most have been converted to other uses. The ALE site is the only remaining sizeable acreage (120 square miles) that is in near pristine condition and provides the only clear indication as to what the early trappers, traders, pioneers, and tribal members may have encountered in their day-to-day activities. In this respect, ALE provides a visible touchstone linking the past with the present for all of us.

LE Rogers

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Differences in Bone Quality between High versus Low Turnover Renal Osteodystrophy  

SciTech Connect

Abnormal bone turnover is common in chronic kidney disease (CKD), but its effects on bone quality remain unclear. This study sought to quantify the relationship between abnormal bone turnover and bone quality. Iliac crest bone biopsies were obtained from CKD-5 patients on dialysis with low (n=18) or high (n=17) turnover, and from volunteers (n=12) with normal turnover and normal kidney function. Histomorphometric methods were used to quantify the microstructural parameters; Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and nanoindentation were used to quantify the material and mechanical properties in bone. Reduced mineral-to-matrix ratio, mineral crystal size, stiffness and hardness were observed in bone with high turnover compared to bone with normal or low turnover. Decreased cancellous bone volume and trabecular thickness were seen in bone with low turnover compared to bone with normal or high turnover. Bone quality, as defined by its microstructural, material, and mechanical properties, is related to bone turnover. These data suggest that turnover related alterations in bone quality may contribute to the known diminished mechanical competence of bone in CKD patients, albeit from different mechanisms for bone with high (material abnormality) vs. low (microstructural alteration) turnover. The present findings suggest that improved treatments for renal osteodystrophy should seek to avoid low or high bone turnover and aim for turnover rates as close to normal as possible.

Porter, Daniel S. [University of Kentucky, Lexington; Pienkowski, David [University of Kentucky, Lexington; Faugere, Marie-Claude [Albert B. Chandler Medical Center; Malluche, Hartmut H. [Albert B. Chandler Medical Center

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Sun-bleached hair  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sun-bleached hair Sun-bleached hair Name: Tami Thein, Kelly Frazier, Liz Valente 8 Glen Crest Jr. High Status: N/A Age: N/A Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: Why does some hair change color when exposed to the sun? We checked archives in biology and general science. Replies: This is a good question for a chemist but I'll try and give you a partial answer. Hair contains pigments that are vulnerable to chemical modification by a process called photobleaching. Rearrangements in the pigments molecular structure changes the way light is absorbed and reflected. A similar effect can be caused by chemical bleaching by the hair stylist or from chlorine in a swimming pool by a process called chemical bleaching. The sun may also change the water content of the hair and this can cause subtle color changes by changing the relative density of the color pigments. Try the chemistry board for a more complete answer. Don't let your roots show!

259

MHK Technologies/Archimedes Wave Swing | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Archimedes Wave Swing Archimedes Wave Swing < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Archimedes Wave Swing.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization AWS Ocean Energy formerly Oceanergia Project(s) where this technology is utilized *MHK Projects/AWS II *MHK Projects/Portugal Pre Commercial Pilot Project Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Point Absorber Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 1-3: Discovery / Concept Definition / Early Stage Development & Design & Engineering Technology Description The AWS wave energy converter is a cylindrical chamber moored to the seabed. Passing waves move an air-filled upper casing against a lower fixed cylinder, with up and down movement being converted into electricity. As a wave crest approaches, the water pressure on the top of the cylinder increases, and the upper part or 'floater' compresses the gas within the cylinder to balance the pressures. The reverse happens as the wave trough passes and the cylinder expands. The relative movement between the floater and the lower part or silo is converted to electricity by means of a hydraulic system and motor-generator set.

260

Gravity base, jack-up platform - method and apparatus  

SciTech Connect

The invention relates to an offshore, gravity base, jack-up platform comprising a deck, a gravity base and one or more legs interconnecting the deck and base. The gravity base comprises a generally polygonal shaped, monolithic hull structure with reaction members extending downwardly from the hull to penetrate the waterbed and react to vertical and lateral loads imposed upon the platform while maintaining the gravity hull in a posture elevated above the surface of the waterbed. A method aspect of the invention includes the steps of towing a gravity base, jack-up platform, as a unit, to a preselected offshore site floating upon the gravity hull. During the towing operation, the deck is mounted adjacent the gravity base with a leg or legs projecting through the deck. At a preselected offshore station ballast is added to the gravity base and the platform descends slightly to a posture where the platform is buoyantly supported by the deck. The base is then jacked down toward the seabed and the platform is laterally brought onto station. Ballast is then added to the deck and the reaction members are penetrated into the waterbed to operational soil refusal. Ballast is then ejected from the deck and the deck is jacked to an operational elevation above a predetermined statistical wave crest height.

Herrmann, R.P.; Pease, F.T.; Ray, D.R.

1981-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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261

Simulation studies of a horizontal well producing from a thin oil-rim reservoir in the SSB1 field, Malaysia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Three-dimensional simulation studies have been carried out to investigate the performance of a horizontal well producing from a thin oil-rim reservoir, X3/X4 in the SSBI field, Malaysia. A heterogeneous model was used which honored the reservoir heterogeneity as deduced from logs. Simulation results indicate that gas and water cresting are inevitable even at low oil production rate of 100 STB/D because of the thin oil column of only 45 feet. Continued production under the current gas/oil ratio limit of 1500 SCF/STB results in an oil recovery at 15 years production of 6% OOIP, compared to 7% OOIP if the gas/oil ratio limit is increased to 10,000 SCF/STB, with negligible oil resaturation losses into the gascap. Simulation results indicate that oil recovery from the X3/X4 reservoir would be increased if wells are produced at gas/oil ratios higher than 1500 SCF/STB, and the horizontal wells are completed at, or as near as possible to, the oil-water contact.

Abdul Hakim, Hazlan

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Energy Efficiency Strategies for Municipal Wastewater Treatment Facilities  

SciTech Connect

Water and wastewater systems are significant energy consumers with an estimated 3%-4% of total U.S. electricity consumption used for the movement and treatment of water and wastewater. Water-energy issues are of growing importance in the context of water shortages, higher energy and material costs, and a changing climate. In this economic environment, it is in the best interest for utilities to find efficiencies, both in water and energy use. Performing energy audits at water and wastewater treatment facilities is one way community energy managers can identify opportunities to save money, energy, and water. In this paper the importance of energy use in wastewater facilities is illustrated by a case study of a process energy audit performed for Crested Butte, Colorado's wastewater treatment plant. The energy audit identified opportunities for significant energy savings by looking at power intensive unit processes such as influent pumping, aeration, ultraviolet disinfection, and solids handling. This case study presents best practices that can be readily adopted by facility managers in their pursuit of energy and financial savings in water and wastewater treatment. This paper is intended to improve community energy managers understanding of the role that the water and wastewater sector plays in a community's total energy consumption. The energy efficiency strategies described provide information on energy savings opportunities, which can be used as a basis for discussing energy management goals with water and wastewater treatment facility managers.

Daw, J.; Hallett, K.; DeWolfe, J.; Venner, I.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Geologyy of the Yucca Mountain Site Area, Southwestern Nevada, Chapter in Stuckless, J.S., ED., Yucca Mountain, Nevada - A Proposed Geologic Repository for High-Level Radioactive Waste (Volume 1)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Yucca Mountain in southwestern Nevada is a prominent, irregularly shaped upland formed by a thick apron of Miocene pyroclastic-flow and fallout tephra deposits, with minor lava flows, that was segmented by through-going, large-displacement normal faults into a series of north-trending, eastwardly tilted structural blocks. The principal volcanic-rock units are the Tiva Canyon and Topopah Spring Tuffs of the Paintbrush Group, which consist of volumetrically large eruptive sequences derived from compositionally distinct magma bodies in the nearby southwestern Nevada volcanic field, and are classic examples of a magmatic zonation characterized by an upper crystal-rich (> 10% crystal fragments) member, a more voluminous lower crystal-poor (< 5% crystal fragments) member, and an intervening thin transition zone. Rocks within the crystal-poor member of the Topopah Spring Tuff, lying some 280 m below the crest of Yucca Mountain, constitute the proposed host rock to be excavated for the storage of high-level radioactive wastes. Separation of the tuffaceous rock formations into subunits that allow for detailed mapping and structural interpretations is based on macroscopic features, most importantly the relative abundance of lithophysae and the degree of welding. The latter feature, varying from nonwelded through partly and moderately welded to densely welded, exerts a strong control on matrix porosities and other rock properties that provide essential criteria for distinguishing hydrogeologic and thermal-mechanical units, which are of major interest in evaluating the suitability of Yucca Mountain to host a safe and permanent geologic repository for waste storage. A thick and varied sequence of surficial deposits mantle large parts of the Yucca Mountain site area. Mapping of these deposits and associated soils in exposures and in the walls of trenches excavated across buried faults provides evidence for multiple surface-rupturing events along all of the major faults during Pleistocene and Holocene times; these paleoseismic studies form the basis for evaluating the potential for future earthquakes and fault displacements. Thermoluminescence and U-series analyses were used to date the surficial materials involved in the Quaternary faulting events. The rate of erosional downcutting of bedrock on the ridge crests and hillslopes of Yucca Mountain, being of particular concern with respect to the potential for breaching of the proposed underground storage facility, was studied by using rock varnish cation-ratio and {sup 10}Be and {sup 36}Cl cosmogenic dating methods to determine the length of time bedrock outcrops and hillslope boulder deposits were exposed to cosmic rays, which then served as a basis for calculating long-term erosion rates. The results indicate rates ranging from 0.04 to 0.27 cm/k.y., which represent the maximum downcutting along the summit of Yucca Mountain under all climatic conditions that existed there during most of Quaternary time. Associated studies include the stratigraphy of surficial deposits in Fortymile Wash, the major drainage course in the area, which record a complex history of four to five cut-and-fill cycles within the channel during middle to late Quaternary time. The last 2 to 4 m of incision probably occurred during the last pluvial climatic period, 22 to 18 ka, followed by aggradation to the present time.

W.R. Keefer; J.W. Whitney; D.C. Buesch

2006-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

264

South Belridge fields, Borderland basin, U. S. , San Joaquin Valley  

SciTech Connect

South Belridge is a giant field in the west San Joaquin Valley, Kern County. Cumulative field production is approximately 700 MMBO and 220 BCFG, with remaining recoverable reserves of approximately 500 MMBO. The daily production is nearly 180 MBO from over 6100 active wells. The focus of current field development and production is the shallow Tulare reservoir. Additional probable diatomite reserves have been conservatively estimated at 550 MMBO and 550 BCFG. South Belridge field has two principal reservoir horizons; the Mio-Pliocene Belridge diatomite of the upper Monterey Formation, and the overlying Plio-Pleistocene Tulare Formation. The field lies on the crest of a large southeast-plunging anticline, sub-parallel to the nearby San Andreas fault system. The reservoir trap in both the Tulare and diatomite reservoir horizons is a combination of structure, stratigraphic factors, and tar seals; the presumed source for the oil is the deeper Monterey Formation. The diatomite reservoir produces light oil (20-32{degree} API gravity) form deep-marine diatomite and diatomaceous shales with extremely high porosity (average 60%) and low permeability (average 1 md). In contrast, the shallow ({lt}1000 ft (305 m) deep) overlying Tulare reservoir produces heavy oil (13-14{degree} API gravity) from unconsolidated, arkosic, fluviodeltaic sands of high porosity (average 35%) and permeability (average 3000 md). The depositional model is that of a generally prograding fluviodeltaic system sourced in the nearby basin-margin highlands. More than 6000 closely spaced, shallow wells are the key to steamflood production from hundreds of layered and laterally discontinuous reservoir sands which create laterally and vertically discontinuous reservoir flow units.

Miller, D.D. (Mobil Exploration and Producing U.S., Inc., Denver, CO (United States)); McPherson, J.G. (Mobil Research and Development Corp., Dallas, TX (United States))

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Comparison of results of two dye-tracer tests at the Chestnut Ridge Security Pits, Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

Personnel from Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems) manage a closed hazardous waste disposal unit the Chestnut Ridge Security Pits (CRSP), located on the crest of Chestnut Ridge near the Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. To investigate the discharge of groundwater from CRSP to springs and streams located along the flanks and base of Chestnut Ridge, an initial dye-tracer study was conducted during 1990. A hydraulic connection was inferred to exist between the injection well (GW-178) on Chestnut Ridge and several sites to the east-northeast, east, and southeast of CRSP. A second dye-tracer study was conducted in 1992 to verify the results of the initial test and identify additional discharge points that are active during wet-weather conditions. No definitive evidence for the presence of dye was identified at any of the 35 locations monitored during the second dye study. Although interpretations of the initial dye test suggest a hydraulic connection with several sites and CRSP, reevaluation of the spectrofluorescence data from this test suggests that dye may not have been detected during the initial test. A combination of relatively high analytical detection limits during the initial test, and high natural background interference spectral peaks observed during the second test, suggest that high natural background emission spectra near the wavelength of the dye used during the initial test may have caused the apparently high reported concentrations. The results of these two tests do not preclude that a hydraulic connection exists; dye may be present in concentrations below the analytical detection limits or has yet to emerge from the groundwater system. The dye injection well is not completed within any significant karst features. Dye migration therefore, may be within a diffuse, slow-flow portion of the aquifer, at least in the immediate vicinity of the source well.

Goldstrand, P.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Haas, J. [EIC Laboratories, Norwood, MA (United States)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Analysis of WACSIS data using a directional hybrid wave model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study focuses on the analysis of measured directional seas using a nonlinear model, named Directional Hybrid Wave Model (DHWM). The model has the capability of decomposing the directional wave field into its free wave components with different frequency, amplitude, direction and initial phase based on three or more time series of measured wave properties. With the information of free waves, the DHWM can predict wave properties accurately up to the second order in wave steepness. In this study, the DHWM is applied to the analyses of the data of Wave Crest Sensor Inter-comparison Study (WACSIS). The consistency between the measurements collected by different sensors in the WACSIS project was examined to ensure the data quality. The wave characteristics at the locations of selected sensors were predicted in time domain and were compared with those recorded at the same location. The degree of agreement between the predictions and the related measurements is an indicator of the consistency among different sensors. To analyze the directional seas in the presence of strong current, the original DHWM was extended to consider the Doppler effects of steady and uniform currents on the directional wave field. The advantage of extended DHWM originates from the use of the intrinsic frequency instead of the apparent frequency to determine the corresponding wavenumber and transfer functions relating wave pressure and velocities to elevation. Furthermore, a new approach is proposed to render the accurate and consistent estimates of the energy spreading parameter and mean wave direction of directional seas based on a cosine-2s model. In this approach, a Maximum Likelihood Method (MLM) is employed. Because it is more tolerant of errors in the estimated cross spectrum than a Directional Fourier Transfer (DFT) used in the conventional approach, the proposed approach is able to estimate the directional spreading parameters more accurately and consistently, which is confirmed by applying the proposed and conventional approach, respectively, to the time series generated by numerical simulation and recorded during the WACSIS project.

Zhang, Shaosong

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

CE IGCC repowering project preliminary hazard analysis. Topical report, November 1, 1990--May 31, 1993  

SciTech Connect

A preliminary hazard analysis was conducted on the CE IGCC unit by representatives from ABB Lummus Crest Process Systems, Lummus Technical Division, Combustion Engineering, and Lummus Initial Operations. As a basis for the review, available technical data and documentation was used. Two areas of the unit were reviewed, the coal yard delivery system and the gasifier island. The coal yard consists of the coal delivery and handling systems, both of these systems are conventional. The gasifier island encompasses the coal pulverizer and feed system, gasifier and syngas cooler, char removal system, char recycle system, and high temperature sulfur removal system. With first of a kind equipment incorporated in the gasifier island, most of the concerns of potential hazards were centered here. At the time of the review, there were no process flow diagrams for the rest of the combined cycle. To prevent detaining the review of the gasifier island, the remaining areas were not reviewed at this time. However, the remaining areas will be reviewed before final unit design is completed. In reviewing the above mentioned systems, the PHA identified several hazards which will be the basis for a subsequent detailed Hazard and Operability (HAZOP) study which will be performed at a later stage of this project. Results from the evaluation were documented by the team and then reviewed by engineers in the IGCC Product Development department. From the concerns of risks developed by the review team, rethinking of proposed operation and design of the plant during the preliminary design stages took place. (In doing so, cost and redesign time during final design phase will be reduced).

Peletz, L.J.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

A Censored-Garch Model Of Asset Returns With Price Limits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As one important form of market circuit breakers, price limits have been often imposed in stock and futures markets. This paper considers modeling the return process of such assets, focusing on the treatment of price limits. As a result, a censored-GARCH model is formulated and a Bayesian approach to this model is developed. An application is provided to Treasury bill futures over a period of high volatility and frequent limit moves. The impacts of price limits are demonstrated with the real data and confirmed with a simulation example. Keywords: Price limits, censored-GARCH model, griddy Gibbs sampler-data augmentation. JEL classification: C13, C24 and G19 1 CORE, Universit'e Catholique de Louvain and Department of Finance, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Email: weix@uxmail.ust.hk. I am indebted to Dale J. Poirier for his excellent supervision and encouragement and ackowledge helpful discussions and comments from Luc Bauwens, Jin-Chuan Duan, Philip H. Dybvig, Christian Hafner, Gary Koop, Tom McCurdy, Angelo Melino, Michel Mouchart, and Efthymios G. Tsionas on earlier versions of this paper. I would also like to thank I.G. Morgan who kindly provided me with his data set. Seminar participants at CORE, CREST, University of Toronto, University of Western Ontario, Washington University at St. Louis, the 1997 Bayesian Research Day at Erasmus University Rotterdam, and the 1997 conference of Forecasting Financial Market in London made help suggestions. This paper was partly done when I visited CORE, Universite Catholique de Louvain in 1997. Financial support from University of Toronto Doctor Fellowsihip and CORE fellowship is gratefully ackowledged. All remaining errors are my responsibility. This paper presents research results of the Belgian Pr...

Steven X. Wei; Jel Classification C; Comments From Luc Bauwens; Jin-chuan Duan; Philip H. Dybvig; Christian Hafner; Gary Koop; Tom Mccurdy; Angelo Melino; Michel Mouchart; Efthymios G. Tsionas On Earlier

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Molecular analysis of placodal development in zebrafish  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Vertebrates have evolved a unique way to sense their environment: placodallyderived sense organs. These sensory structures emerge from a crescent-shaped domain, the preplacodal domain, which surrounds the anterior neural plate and generates the paired sense organs as well as the cranial ganglia. For decades, embryologists have attempted to determine the tissue interactions required for induction of various placodal tissues. More recently, technological advances have allowed investigators to ask probing questions about the molecular nature of placodal development. In this dissertation I largely focus on development of the otic placode. I utilize loss-of-function techniques available in the zebrafish model system to demonstrate that two members of the fibroblast growth factors family of secreted ligands, Fgf3 and Fgf8, are redundantly required for otic placode induction. I go on to show that these factors are expressed in periotic tissues from the beginning of gastrulation. These findings are consistent with a model where Fgf3 and Fgf8 signal to preotic tissue to induce otic-specific gene expression. This model does not address other potential inducers in otic induction. A study using chick explant cultures suggests that a member of the Wnt family of secreted ligands also has a role in otic induction. I therefore test the relative roles of Wnt and Fgf in otic placode induction. The results demonstrate that Wnt functions primarily to correctly position the Fgf expression domain and that it is these Fgf factors which are directly received by future otic cells. Lastly, I examine the function of the muscle segment homeobox (msx) gene family expressed in the preplacodal domain. This study demonstrates that Msx proteins refine the boundary between the preplacodal domain and the neural plate. Further, msx genes function in the differentiation and survival of posterior placodal tissues (including the otic field), neural crest and dorsal neural cell types. Loss of Msx function results in precocious cell death and morphogenesis defects which may reflect perturbed BMP signaling.

Phillips, Bryan T.

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Change in Land Cover along the Lower Columbia River Estuary as Determined from Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) Imagery, Technical Report 2003.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Lower Columbia River Estuary Management Plan (Jerrick, 1991) recognizes the positive relationship between the conservation of fish and wildlife habitat, and sustaining their populations. An important component of fish and wildlife conservation and management is the identification of habitats, trends in habitat change, and delineation of habitat for preservation, restoration or enhancement. Alterations to the environment, such as hydropower generation, dredging, forestry, agriculture, channel alteration, diking, bank stabilization and floodplain development, have dramatically altered both the type and distribution of habitats along the Columbia River Estuary (CRE) and its floodplain. Along the Columbia River, tidally influenced habitats occur from the river mouth to the Bonneville Dam, a distance of 230 km. If we are to effectively manage the natural resources of the Columbia River ecosystem, there is a need to understand how habitats have changed because fish and wildlife populations are known to respond to changes in habitat quality and distribution. The goal of this study was to measure the amount and type of change of CRE land cover from 1992 to 2000. We performed a change analysis on two spatial data sets describing land cover along the lower portion of the estuary (Fig. 1). The 1992 data set was created by the NOAA Coastal Remote Sensing, Coastal Change Analysis Program (C-CAP) in cooperation with Columbia River Estuary Study Task Force (CREST), the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) Point Adams Field Station, and State of Washington Department of Natural Resources (DNR). The 2000 data set was produced by Earth Design Consultants, Inc. (EDC) and the Wetland Ecosystem Team (WET: University of Washington) as part of a larger Lower Columbia River Estuary Partnership (Estuary Partnership) habitat mapping study. Although the image classification methodologies used to create the data sets differed, both data sets were produced by classifying Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) satellite imagery, making it feasible to assess land cover changes between 1992 and 2000.

Garono, Ralph; Anderson, Becci; Robinson, Rob

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Coal pyrolysis for utility use: Final report  

SciTech Connect

EPRI undertook an extensive research effort to evaluate the viability of coal pyrolysis products for utility use. The objectives of the studies were to evaluate the combustion and storage characteristics of pyrolysis char and to evaluate the upgrading potential of pyrolysis liquid products (tar). To achieve these objectives, it was necessary to produce sufficient quantities of the char and tar in a process unit large enough to produce commercially representative products. For both technical and availability reasons, EPRI selected the Lurgi-Ruhrgas (L-R) process for the production run (under subcontract to Bechtel Group, Inc. RP2505-2). Several contractors were to do the liquid upgrading. Two contractors were selected to use alternative processes for upgrading the L-R heavy tar: Lummus-Crest, Inc. (RP2505-5), using its LC-fining technology, and Veba Oel (RP2505-6), using its Combi-Cracking process. (The Combi-Cracking process also simultaneously hydrotreats the coal-tar-derived distillates.) Universal Oil Products, Inc. (UOP) was selected to hydrotreat the light and middle oils from the L-R process (RP2505-7), as well as the distillable material produced by Lummus. Unfortunately, none of these contractors received the anticipated products. The light oil was in the form of a light oil-water emulsion and the middle oil had been blended with the solids-laden heavy oil during L-R operation. Combustion Engineering, Inc. carried out a two-phase program to evaluate the combustion characteristics of pyrolysis char (RP2505-4).

McKinsey, R.; Luebke, C.P.; Thelen, H.J.; ya Nsakala, N.; Riegel, H.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

In-Situ Sampling and Characterization of Naturally Occurring Marine Methane Hydrate Using the D/V JOIDES Resolution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary accomplishments of the JOI Cooperative Agreement with DOE/NETL in this quarter were (1) the preliminary postcruise evaluation of the tools and measurement systems that were used during ODP Leg 204 to study hydrate deposits on Hydrate Ridge, offshore Oregon from July through September 2002; and (2) the preliminary study of the hydrate-bearing core samples preserved in pressure vessels and in liquid nitrogen cryofreezers, which are now stored at the ODP Gulf Coast Repository in College Station, TX. During ODP Leg 204, several newly modified downhole tools were deployed to better characterize the subsurface lithologies and environments hosting microbial populations and gas hydrates. A preliminary review of the use of these tools is provided herein. The DVTP, DVTP-P, APC-methane, and APC-Temperature tools (ODP memory tools) were used extensively and successfully during ODP Leg 204 aboard the D/V JOIDES Resolution. These systems provided a strong operational capability for characterizing the in situ properties of methane hydrates in subsurface environments on Hydrate Ridge during ODP Leg 204. Pressure was also measured during a trial run of the Fugro piezoprobe, which operates on similar principles as the DVTP-P. The final report describing the deployments of the Fugro Piezoprobe is provided in Appendix A of this report. A preliminary analysis and comparison between the piezoprobe and DVTP-P tools is provided in Appendix B of this report. Finally, a series of additional holes were cored at the crest of Hydrate Ridge (Site 1249) specifically geared toward the rapid recovery and preservation of hydrate samples as part of a hydrate geriatric study partially funded by the Department of Energy (DOE). In addition, the preliminary results from gamma density non-invasive imaging of the cores preserved in pressure vessels are provided in Appendix C of this report. An initial visual inspection of the samples stored in liquid nitrogen is provided in Appendix D of this report.

Frank Rack; Michael Storms; Derryl Schroeder; Brandon Dugan; Peter Schultheiss; ODP Leg 204 Shipboard Scientific Party

2002-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

273

Geology, characteristics, and resource potential of the low-temperature geothermal system near Midway, Wasatch County, Utah. Report of Investigation No. 142  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To evaluate the geothermal energy potential of the hot springs system near Midway, Wasatch Co., Utah, consideration was given to heat flow, water chemistry, and structural controls. Abnormal heat flow was indicated qualitatively by snow-melt patterns and quantitatively by heat-flow measurements that were obtained from two of four temperature-gradient wells drilled in the area. These measurements indicated that the area north of the town of Midway is characterized by heat flow equal to 321.75 MW/m/sup 2/, which is over four times the value generally considered as normal heat flow. Chemical analyses of water from six selected thermal springs and wells were used in conjunction with the silica and Na-K-Ca geothermometers to estimate the reservoir temperature of the thermal system. Because the calculated temperature was more than 25/sup 0/C above the maximum observed temperature, a mixing model calculation was used to project an upper limit for the reservoir temperature. Based on these calculations, the system has a reservoir temperature ranging from 46 to 125/sup 0/C. Structural information obtained from published geologic maps of the area and from an unpublished gravity survey, enabled two models to be developed for the system. The first model, based on geologic relationships in the mountains to the north and west of Midway, assumes that the heat for the thermal system comes from a relatively young intrusive or related hydrothermal convection system in the vicinity of the Mayflower mine. Meteoric waters would be heated as they approach the heat source and then move laterally to the south through faults and fractures in the rocks. These thermal waters then rise to the surface through fractures in the crest of an anticline underneath the Midway area. The second model, based on the gravity survey, assumes an igneous intrusion directly beneath Midway as the heat source.

Kohler, J.F.

1979-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Wadter Resources Data Ohio: Water year 1994. Volume 2, St. Lawrence River Basin and Statewide Project Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Water Resources Division of the US Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with State agencies, obtains a large amount of data each water year (a water year is the 12-month period from October 1 through September 30 and is identified by the calendar year in which it ends) pertaining to the water resources of Ohio. These data, accumulated during many years, constitute a valuable data base for developing an improved understanding of the water resources of the State. To make these data readily available to interested parties outside the USGS, they are published annually in this report series entitled ``Water Resources Data--Ohio.`` This report (in two volumes) includes records on surface water and ground water in the State. Specifically, it contains: (1) Discharge records for streamflow-gaging stations, miscellaneous sites, and crest-stage stations; (2) stage and content records for streams, lakes, and reservoirs; (3) water-quality data for streamflow-gaging stations, wells, synaptic sites, and partial-record sites; and (4) water-level data for observation wells. Locations of lake- and streamflow-gaging stations, water-quality stations, and observation wells for which data are presented in this volume are shown in figures ga through 8b. The data in this report represent that part of the National Water Data System collected by the USGS and cooperating State and Federal agencies in Ohio. This series of annual reports for Ohio began with the 1961 water year with a report that contained only data relating to the quantities of surface water. For the 1964 water year, a similar report was introduced that contained only data relating to water quality. Beginning with the 1975 water year, the report was changed to present (in two to three volumes) data on quantities of surface water, quality of surface and ground water, and ground-water levels.

NONE

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

275

Mapping and Assessment of the United States Ocean Wave Energy Resource  

SciTech Connect

This project estimates the naturally available and technically recoverable U.S. wave energy resources, using a 51-month Wavewatch III hindcast database developed especially for this study by National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration?¢????s (NOAA?¢????s) National Centers for Environmental Prediction. For total resource estimation, wave power density in terms of kilowatts per meter is aggregated across a unit diameter circle. This approach is fully consistent with accepted global practice and includes the resource made available by the lateral transfer of wave energy along wave crests, which enables wave diffraction to substantially reestablish wave power densities within a few kilometers of a linear array, even for fixed terminator devices. The total available wave energy resource along the U.S. continental shelf edge, based on accumulating unit circle wave power densities, is estimated to be 2,640 TWh/yr, broken down as follows: 590 TWh/yr for the West Coast, 240 TWh/yr for the East Coast, 80 TWh/yr for the Gulf of Mexico, 1570 TWh/yr for Alaska, 130 TWh/yr for Hawaii, and 30 TWh/yr for Puerto Rico. The total recoverable wave energy resource, as constrained by an array capacity packing density of 15 megawatts per kilometer of coastline, with a 100-fold operating range between threshold and maximum operating conditions in terms of input wave power density available to such arrays, yields a total recoverable resource along the U.S. continental shelf edge of 1,170 TWh/yr, broken down as follows: 250 TWh/yr for the West Coast, 160 TWh/yr for the East Coast, 60 TWh/yr for the Gulf of Mexico, 620 TWh/yr for Alaska, 80 TWh/yr for Hawaii, and 20 TWh/yr for Puerto Rico.

Paul T. Jacobson; George Hagerman; George Scott

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Estuarine Habitats for Juvenile Salmon in the Tidally-Influenced Lower Columbia River and Estuary : Reporting Period September 15, 2008 through May 31, 2009.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This work focuses on the numerical modeling of Columbia River estuarine circulation and associated modeling-supported analyses conducted as an integral part of a multi-disciplinary and multi-institutional effort led by NOAA's Northwest Fisheries Science Center. The overall effort is aimed at: (1) retrospective analyses to reconstruct historic bathymetric features and assess effects of climate and river flow on the extent and distribution of shallow water, wetland and tidal-floodplain habitats; (2) computer simulations using a 3-dimensional numerical model to evaluate the sensitivity of salmon rearing opportunities to various historical modifications affecting the estuary (including channel changes, flow regulation, and diking of tidal wetlands and floodplains); (3) observational studies of present and historic food web sources supporting selected life histories of juvenile salmon as determined by stable isotope, microchemistry, and parasitology techniques; and (4) experimental studies in Grays River in collaboration with Columbia River Estuary Study Taskforce (CREST) and the Columbia Land Trust (CLT) to assess effects of multiple tidal wetland restoration projects on various life histories of juvenile salmon and to compare responses to observed habitat-use patterns in the mainstem estuary. From the above observations, experiments, and additional modeling simulations, the effort will also (5) examine effects of alternative flow-management and habitat-restoration scenarios on habitat opportunity and the estuary's productive capacity for juvenile salmon. The underlying modeling system is part of the SATURN1coastal-margin observatory [1]. SATURN relies on 3D numerical models [2, 3] to systematically simulate and understand baroclinic circulation in the Columbia River estuary-plume-shelf system [4-7] (Fig. 1). Multi-year simulation databases of circulation are produced as an integral part of SATURN, and have multiple applications in understanding estuary/plume variability, the role of the estuary and plume on salmon survival, and functional changes in the estuary-plume system in response to climate and human activities.

Baptista, Antnio M. [Oregon Health & Science University, Science and Technology Center for Coastal Margin Observation and Prediction

2009-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

277

Estimating recharge at Yucca Mountain, Nevada: A case study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Obtaining values of net infiltration, groundwater travel time, and recharge is necessary at the Yucca Mountain site, Nevada, USA, in order to evaluate the expected performance of a potential repository as a containment system for high-level radioactive waste. However, the geologic complexities of this site, its low precipitation and net infiltration, with numerous mechanisms operating simultaneously to move water through the system, provide many challenges for the estimation of the spatial distribution of recharge. A variety of methods appropriate for arid environments has been applied, including water-balance techniques, calculations using Darcy's law in the unsaturated zone, a soil-physics method applied to neutron-hole water-content data, inverse modeling of thermal profiles in boreholes extending through the thick unsaturated zone, chloride mass balance, atmospheric radionuclides, and empirical approaches. These methods indicate that near-surface infiltration rates at Yucca Mountain are highly variable in time and space, with local (point) values ranging from zero to several hundred millimeters per year. Spatially distributed net-infiltration values average 5 mm/year, with the highest values approaching 20 mm/year near Yucca Crest. Site-scale recharge estimates range from less than 1 to about 12 mm/year. These results have been incorporated into a site-scale model that has been calibrated using these data sets that reflect infiltration processes acting on highly variable temporal and spatial scales. The modeling study predicts highly non-uniform recharge at the water table, distributed significantly differently from the non-uniform infiltration pattern at the surface.

Flint, A.; Flint, L.; Kwicklis, E.; Fabryka-Martin, J.; Bodvarsson, G.S.

2001-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

278

Estimating recharge at yucca mountain, nevada, usa: comparison of methods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Obtaining values of net infiltration, groundwater travel time, and recharge is necessary at the Yucca Mountain site, Nevada, USA, in order to evaluate the expected performance of a potential repository as a containment system for high-level radioactive waste. However, the geologic complexities of this site, its low precipitation and net infiltration, with numerous mechanisms operating simultaneously to move water through the system, provide many challenges for the estimation of the spatial distribution of recharge. A variety of methods appropriate for and environments has been applied, including water-balance techniques, calculations using Darcy's law in the unsaturated zone, a soil-physics method applied to neutron-hole water-content data, inverse modeling of thermal profiles in boreholes extending through the thick unsaturated zone, chloride mass balance, atmospheric radionuclides, and empirical approaches. These methods indicate that near-surface infiltration rates at Yucca Mountain are highly variable in time and space, with local (point) values ranging from zero to several hundred millimeters per year. Spatially distributed net-infiltration values average 5 mm/year, with the highest values approaching 20 nun/year near Yucca Crest. Site-scale recharge estimates range from less than I to about 12 mm/year. These results have been incorporated into a site-scale model that has been calibrated using these data sets that reflect infiltration processes acting on highly variable temporal and spatial scales. The modeling study predicts highly non-uniform recharge at the water table, distributed significantly differently from the non-uniform infiltration pattern at the surface. [References: 57

Flint, A. L.; Flint, L. E.; Kwicklis, E. M.; Fabryka-Martin, J. T.; Bodvarsson, G. S.

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Site Selection for DOE/JIP Gas Hydrate Drilling in the Northern Gulf of Mexico  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the late spring of 2008, the Chevron-led Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrate Joint Industry Project (JIP) expects to conduct an exploratory drilling and logging campaign to better understand gas hydrate-bearing sands in the deepwater Gulf of Mexico. The JIP Site Selection team selected three areas to test alternative geological models and geophysical interpretations supporting the existence of potential high gas hydrate saturations in reservoir-quality sands. The three sites are near existing drill holes which provide geological and geophysical constraints in Alaminos Canyon (AC) lease block 818, Green Canyon (GC) 955, and Walker Ridge (WR) 313. At the AC818 site, gas hydrate is interpreted to occur within the Oligocene Frio volcaniclastic sand at the crest of a fold that is shallow enough to be in the hydrate stability zone. Drilling at GC955 will sample a faulted, buried Pleistocene channel-levee system in an area characterized by seafloor fluid expulsion features, structural closure associated with uplifted salt, and abundant seismic evidence for upward migration of fluids and gas into the sand-rich parts of the sedimentary section. Drilling at WR313 targets ponded sheet sands and associated channel/levee deposits within a minibasin, making this a non-structural play. The potential for gas hydrate occurrence at WR313 is supported by shingled phase reversals consistent with the transition from gas-charged sand to overlying gas-hydrate saturated sand. Drilling locations have been selected at each site to 1) test geological methods and models used to infer the occurrence of gas hydrate in sand reservoirs in different settings in the northern Gulf of Mexico; 2) calibrate geophysical models used to detect gas hydrate sands, map reservoir thicknesses, and estimate the degree of gas hydrate saturation; and 3) delineate potential locations for subsequent JIP drilling and coring operations that will collect samples for comprehensive physical property, geochemical and other analyses.

Hutchinson, D.R. (USGS); Shelander, D. (Schlumberger, Houston, TX); Dai, J. (Schlumberger, Hoston, TX); McConnell, D. (AOA Geophysics, Inc., Houston, TX); Shedd, W. (Minerals Management Service); Frye, M. (Minerals Management Service); Ruppel, C. (USGS); Boswell, R.; Jones, E. (Chevron Energy Technology Corp., Houston, TX); Collett, T.S. (USGS); Rose, K.; Dugan, B. (Rice Univ., Houston, TX); Wood, W. (U.S. Naval Research Laboratory); Latham, T. (Chevron Energy Technology Corp., Houston, TX)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

2008 Draft Season Summary.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes investigations into predation by piscivorous colonial waterbirds on juvenile salmonids (Oncorhynchus spp.) from throughout the Columbia River basin during 2008. East Sand Island in the Columbia River estuary again supported the largest known breeding colony of Caspian terns (Hydroprogne caspia) in the world (approximately 10,700 breeding pairs) and the largest breeding colony of double-crested cormorants (Phalacrocorax auritus) in western North America (approximately 10,950 breeding pairs). The Caspian tern colony increased from 2007, but not significantly so, while the double-crested cormorant colony experienced a significant decline (20%) from 2007. Average cormorant nesting success in 2008, however, was down only slightly from 2007, suggesting that food supply during the 2008 nesting season was not the principal cause of the decline in cormorant colony size. Total consumption of juvenile salmonids by East Sand Island Caspian terns in 2008 was approximately 6.7 million smolts (95% c.i. = 5.8-7.5 million). Caspian terns nesting on East Sand Island continued to rely primarily on marine forage fishes as a food supply. Based on smolt PIT tag recoveries on the East Sand Island Caspian tern colony, predation rates were highest on steelhead in 2008; minimum predation rates on steelhead smolts detected passing Bonneville Dam averaged 8.3% for wild smolts and 10.7% for hatchery-raised smolts. In 2007, total smolt consumption by East Sand Island double-crested cormorants was about 9.2 million juvenile salmonids (95% c.i. = 4.4-14.0 million), similar to or greater than that of East Sand Island Caspian terns during that year (5.5 million juvenile salmonids; 95% c.i. = 4.8-6.2 million). The numbers of smolt PIT tags recovered on the cormorant colony in 2008 were roughly proportional to the relative availability of PIT-tagged salmonids released in the Basin, suggesting that cormorant predation on salmonid smolts in the estuary was less selective than tern predation. Cormorant predation rates in excess of 30%, however, were observed for some groups of hatchery-reared fall Chinook salmon released downstream of Bonneville Dam. Implementation of the federal plan 'Caspian Tern Management to Reduce Predation of Juvenile Salmonids in the Columbia River Estuary' was initiated in 2008 with construction by the Corps of Engineers of two alternative colony sites for Caspian terns in interior Oregon: a 1-acre island on Crump Lake in the Warner Valley and a 1-acre island on Fern Ridge Reservoir near Eugene. We deployed Caspian tern social attraction (decoys and sound systems) on these two islands and monitored for Caspian tern nesting. Caspian terns quickly colonized the Crump Lake tern island; about 430 pairs nested there, including 5 terns that had been banded at the East Sand Island colony in the Columbia River estuary, over 500 km to the northwest. No Caspian terns nested at the Fern Ridge tern island in 2008, but up to 9 Caspian terns were recorded roosting on the island after the nesting season. There were two breeding colonies of Caspian terns on the mid-Columbia River in 2008: (1) about 388 pairs nested at the historical colony on Crescent Island in the McNary Pool and (2) about 100 pairs nested at a relatively new colony site on Rock Island in the John Day Pool. Nesting success at the Crescent Island tern colony was only 0.28 young fledged per breeding pair, the lowest nesting success recorded at that colony since monitoring began in 2000, while only three fledglings were raised at the Rock Island tern colony. The diet of Crescent Island Caspian terns consisted of 68% salmonid smolts; total smolt consumption was estimated at 330,000. Since 2004, total smolt consumption by Crescent Island terns has declined by 34%, due mostly to a decline in colony size, while steelhead consumption has increased 10% during this same period. In 2008, approximately 64,000 steelhead smolts were consumed by Caspian terns nesting at Crescent Island. Based on smolt PIT tag recoveries on the Crescent Island Caspian tern colony, the average

Roby, Daniel D. [USGS - Oregon Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit, Department of Fisheries and Wildlife, Oregon State University; Collis, Ken [Real Time Research, Inc.; Lyons, Donald E. [USGS - Oregon Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit, Oregon State University

2009-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "g0313 coyote crest" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Gopherus Agassizii (Desert Tortoise). Predation/Mountain Lions (Pre-Print)  

SciTech Connect

During a long-term study on tortoise growth within 3 fenced 9-ha enclosures in Rock Valley, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nye County, Nevada, USA, tortoises have been captured annually since 1964 (Medica et al. 1975. Copeia 1975:630-643; Turner et al. 1987. Copeia 1987:974-979). Between early August and mid October 2003 we observed a significant mortality event. The Rock Valley enclosures were constructed of 6 x 6 mm mesh 1.2 m wide hardware cloth, buried 0.3 m in the soil with deflective flashing on both sides on the top to restrict the movement of small mammals and lizards from entering or leaving the enclosures (Rundel and Gibson 1996, Ecological communities and process in a Mojave Desert ecosystem: Rock Valley, Nevada, Cambridge University Press, Great Britain. 369 pp.). On August 6, 2003, the carcass of an adult female Desert Tortoise No.1411 (carapace length 234 mm when alive) was collected while adult male tortoise No.4414 (carapace length 269 mm) was observed alive and in good health on the same day. Subsequently the carcass of No.4414 was found on October 16, 2003. Between October 16-17, 2003, the remains of 6 (5 adult and 1 juvenile) Desert Tortoises were found, some within each of the 3 enclosures in Rock Valley. A seventh adult tortoise was found on September 26, 2006, its death also attributed to the 2003 mortality event based upon the forensic evidence. Each of the 7 adult Desert Tortoises had the central portion of their carapace broken open approximately to the dorsal portion of the marginal scutes while the plastron was still intact (Figure 1A). Adjacent to 7 of the 8 remains we located numerous bone fragments including parts of the carapace and limbs as well as dried intestines in a nearby Range Rhatany (Krameria parvifolia) shrub. The significance of the frequent use of this shrub is puzzling. Three of the Desert Tortoise shell remains possessed distinctive intercanine punctures measuring 55-60 mm center to center indicating that this was an adult sized Mountain Lion. By comparison, a 2 year old male Mountain Lion salvaged on NTS had an upper intercanine bite width of 45 mm, and a 6 month old kitten measured 35mm respectively. The Mountain Lion (Puma concolor) is the only predator that exists in southern Nevada that could possibly have a bite with a gap between its upper canine teeth that large (Murmann et al. 2006. J. Forensic Sci. 51:846-860). The appearance of the shell remains in Figure 1A is similar to that depicting Jaguar (Panthera onca) predation, on the Amazonian Tortoise (Geochelone denticulata) as illustrated by Emmons (1989. J. Herpetol. 23:311-314) with the majority of the carapace broken open and the plastron still intact. Predation of Desert Tortoises by Mountain Lions was also documented in 1993 in southern Arizona (Little Shipp Wash Plot), where 7 of 8 carcasses found were attributed to Mountain Lion predation (Averill-Murray et al. 2002. In. T.R.Van Devender [ed.], The Sonoran Desert Tortoise: Natural History, Biology, and Conservation, pp.109-134. University of Arizona Press and Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum, Tucson, Arizona). Similarly, predation by a Mountain Lion has been reported on the Argentine Tortoise (Chelonoidis chilensis) in Argentina (Acosta et al. 2004. Herpetol. Review 35:53-54), and a Mountain Lion kitten was observed to kill and consume a portion of the carapace of a Texas Tortoise (Gopherus berlandieri) in west Texas (Adams et al. 2006. Southwestern Nat. 51:581-581). Over the past 45 years this Desert Tortoise population has been monitored yearly, with no prior evidence of predation to tortoises within the fenced enclosures. On several occasions other predators such as Bobcats (Lynx rufus) have been observed within the study enclosures for as long as a week. Evidence of Kit Fox (Vulpes macrotus) sign has been observed on numerous occasions, and a Spotted Skunk (Spilogale putorius) and Longtail Weasels (Mustela frenata) have been captured and released (B.G. Maza, pers. comm.; Medica 1990. Great Basin Nat. 50:83-84), while Coyotes (Canis latrans) were never observed within th

Paul D. Greger and Philip A. Medica

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Remedial Investigation Report on Chestnut Ridge Operable Unit 2 (Filled Coal Ash Pond/Upper McCoy Branch) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 1. Main Text  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document is a report on the remedial investigation (RI) of Chestnut Ridge Operable Unit (OU) 2 at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. Chestnut Ridge OU 2 consists of Upper McCoy Branch (UMB), the Filled Coal Ash Pond (FCAP), and the area surrounding the Sluice Channel formerly associated with coal ash disposal in the FCAP. Chestnut Ridge OU 2 is located within the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Oak Ridge Reservation in Anderson County, Tennessee, approximately 24 miles west of Knoxville. The pond is an 8.5-acre area on the southern slope of Chestnut Ridge, 0.5 mile south of the main Y-12 Plant and geographically separated from the Y-12 Plant by Chestnut Ridge. The elevation of the FCAP is {approximately} 950 ft above mean sea level (msl), and it is relatively flat and largely vegetated. Two small ponds are usually present at the northeast and northwest comers of the FCAP. The Sluice Channel Area extends {approximately}1000 ft from the northern margin of the FCAP to the crest of Chestnut Ridge, which has an elevation of {approximately}1100 ft above msl. The Sluice Channel Area is largely vegetated also. McCoy Branch runs from the top of Chestnut Ridge across the FCAP into Rogers Quarry and out of the quarry where it runs a short distance into Milton Hill Lake at McCoy Embayment, termed UMB. The portion south of Rogers Quarry, within Chestnut Ridge OU 4, is termed Lower McCoy Branch. The DOE Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant disposed of coal ash from its steam plant operations as a slurry that was discharged into an ash retention impoundment; this impoundment is the FCAP. The FCAP was built in 1955 to serve as a settling basin after coal ash slurried over Chestnut Ridge from the Y-12 Plant. The FCAP was constructed by building an earthen dam across the northern tributary of McCoy Branch. The dam was designed to hold 20 years of Y-12 steam plant ash. By July 1967, ash had filled up the impoundment storage behind the dam to within 4 ft of the top.

Not Available

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Mineralogy and Geochemistry of Soils of Ultramafic Origin from the Great Dyke, Zimbabwe and Gillespie County, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Although soils developed from ultramafic parent materials have significance to agriculture, ecology and health, their bio-geochemistry is poorly understood. The mineralogical and bio-geochemistry of soils formed from the ultramafic parent materials of the Great Dyke, Zimbabwe and Gillespie County, Texas was investigated. The objectives were to determine the mineralogical and bio-geochemical properties of the soils in order to assess the potential impact and challenges to agriculture, and environmental quality. Soil samples were taken from the crest, shoulder, footslope and the toeslope. Chemical analyses were performed by nuclear and spectroscopic techniques. Mineral characterization was conducted by x-ray diffraction (XRD) and spectroscopic techniques. Microbial whole-community structure was determined by the fatty acid methyl esters (FAME) technique. The results indicate wide chemical and mineralogical compositions among the studied sites. The soils contain relatively high concentrations of heavy metals (some sites contain Cr(VI)), but low levels of K and Ca. The highest concentrations of trace metal were associated with chromite, Fe oxides and serpentinite. The concentrations of Mg were higher than those of Ca and varied between Zimbabwe and Texas soils largely due to the parent materials. Unique to these soils is the occurrence of talc, serpentine, chlorite, Fe-rich smectite, amphiboles, pyroxenes, Fe and Cr oxides in relatively large amounts. These soils also lack micas and have neglible amounts of kaolinite and feldspars. Palygorskite and serpentine occurred in specific soil horizons and at specific landscape positions. FAME profiles indicate that the soil microbial community structure is predominantly bacteria and fungi (including arbuscular mycorrhiza fungi) at each landscape position across the transect. Biomarkers for actinomycetes were undetectable. The proportions of Gram-positive bacteria were higher than those of the Gram-negative bacteria. Very low levels of nutrients (Ca and K), higher Mg/Ca molar ratios, and the relatively high concentrations of heavy metals in these soils impact agricultural productivity. High concentrations of heavy metals, the presence of the Cr(VI) as well as its great potential to form in these soils might impact microbial activity and environmental quality. The occurrence of fibrous minerals (e.g serpentine and amphiboles) in these soils will likely impact human health.

Bangira, Courage

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Are there significant hydrothermal resources in the US part of the Cascade Range?  

SciTech Connect

The Cascade Range is a geothermal dichotomy. On the one hand, it is an active volcanic arc above a subducting plate and is demonstrably an area of high heat flow. On the other hand, the distribution of hydrothermal manifestations compared to other volcanic arcs is sparse, and the hydrothermal outflow calculated from stream chemistry is low. Several large estimates of undiscovered geothermal resources in the U.S. part of the Cascade Range prepared in the 1970s and early 1980s were based fundamentally on two models of the upper crust. One model assumed that large, partly molten, intrusive bodies exist in the upper 10 km beneath major volcanic centers and serve as the thermal engines driving overlying hydrothermal systems. The other model interpreted the coincident heat-flow and gravity gradients west of the Cascade crest in central Oregon to indicate a partly molten heat source at 10 {+-} 2 km depth extending {approx}30 km west from the axis of the range. Investigations of the past ten years have called both models into question. Large long-lived high-temperature hydrothermal systems at depths <3 km in the U.S. part of the Cascade Range appear to be restricted to silicic domefields at the Lassen volcanic center, Medicine Lake volcano, Newberry volcano, and possibly the Three Sisters. Federal land-use restrictions further reduce this list to Medicine Lake and Newberry. Dominantly andesitic stratocones appear to support only small transitory hydrothermal systems related to small intrusive bodies along the volcanic conduits. The only young caldera, at Crater Lake, supports only low- to intermediate-temperature hydrothermal systems. Most of the Cascade Range comprises basaltic andesites and has little likelihood for high-level silicic intrusions and virtually no potential for resultant large high-temperature hydrothermal systems. Undiscovered hydrothermal resources of the Cascade Range of the United States are substantially lower than previous estimates. The range does have potential for intermediate-temperature hot dry rock and localized low- to intermediate-temperature hydrothermal systems.

Muffler, L.J. Patrick; Guffanti, Marianne

1995-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

285

Wakefield Calculations for the LCLS in Multbunch Operation  

SciTech Connect

Normally the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) operates in single-bunch mode, sending a bunch of up to 250 pC charge at 120 Hz through the linac and the undulator, and the resulting FEL radiation into one of the experimental hutches. With two bunches per rf pulse, each pulse could feed either two experiments or one experiment in a pump-probe type configuration. Two-bunch FEL operation has already been briefly tested at the LCLS, and works reasonably well, although not yet routinely. In this report we study the longitudinal and transverse long-range (bunch-to-bunch) wakefields of the linacs and their effects on LCLS performance in two-bunch mode, which is initially the most likely scenario. The longitudinal wake changes the average energy at the second bunch, and the transverse wake misaligns the second bunch (in transverse phase space) in the presence of e.g. transverse injection jitter or quad misalignments. Finally, we extend the study to consider the LCLS with trains of up to 20 bunches per rf pulse. In the LCLS the bunch is created in an rf gun, and then passes in sequence through Linac 0, Linac 1, Linac X, Bunch Compressor 1 (BC 1), Linac 2, BC 2, Linac 3, and finally the undulator. In the process the bunch energy reaches 13.5 GeV and peak current 3 kA. In Table 1 we present some machine and beam parameters in three of the linacs that we will use in the calculations: initial beam energy E{sub 0}, total accelerator length L, average beta function {beta}{sub y}, bunch peak current I, and rf phase (with respect to crest) {phi}; the final energy of a linac equals E{sub 0} of the following linac, and in Linac 3 is E{sub f} = 13.5 GeV. (The X-band linac, with L = 60 cm, has wake effects that are small compared to the other linacs, and will not be discussed.) In this report we limit our study to trains of equally populated, equally spaced bunches with a total length of less than 100 ns. The charge of each bunch is eN{sub b} = 250 pC.

Bane, K; /SLAC

2011-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

286

The Mercury Laser System-A scaleable average-power laser for fusion and beyond  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Nestled in a valley between the whitecaps of the Pacific and the snowcapped crests of the Sierra Nevada, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is home to the nearly complete National Ignition Facility (NIF). The purpose of NIF is to create a miniature star-on demand. An enormous amount of laser light energy (1.8 MJ in a pulse that is 20 ns in duration) will be focused into a small gold cylinder approximately the size of a pencil eraser. Centered in the gold cylinder (or hohlraum) will be a nearly perfect sphere filled with a complex mixture of hydrogen gas isotopes that is similar to the atmosphere of our Sun. During experiments, the laser light will hit the inside of the gold cylinder, heating the metal until it emits X-rays (similar to how your electric stove coil emits visible red light when heated). The X-rays will be used to compress the hydrogen-like gas with such pressure that the gas atoms will combine or 'fuse' together, producing the next heavier element (helium) and releasing energy in the form of energetic particles. 2010 will mark the first credible attempt at this world-changing event: the achievement of fusion energy 'break-even' on Earth using NIF, the world's largest laser! NIF is anticipated to eventually perform this immense technological accomplishment once per week, with the capability of firing up to six shots per day - eliminating the need for continued underground testing of our nation's nuclear stockpile, in addition to opening up new realms of science. But what about the day after NIF achieves ignition? Although NIF will achieve fusion energy break-even and gain, the facility is not designed to harness the enormous potential of fusion for energy generation. A fusion power plant, as opposed to a world-class engineering research facility, would require that the laser deliver drive pulses nearly 100,000 times more frequently - a rate closer to 10 shots per second as opposed to several shots per day.

Ebbers, C A; Moses, E I

2008-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

287

Future Prospects of Synthetic Fuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is important for the future of this nation to reach the goal of demonstrated definition and quantification of the parameters which influence the ability to use this country's vast resources of coal and oil shale for production of synthetic fuels which can contribute to the nation's future energy needs. Those parameters are: technical, environmental, and economic viability. In the final analysis, the key word is economics; can, or when can synthetic fuels compete in the marketplace? A commercial synthetic fuels plant requires a multi-billion dollar capital investment. It is the purpose of this paper to discuss the risk elements of a synthetic fuels venture and to speculate on what impact the current environment, e.g. governmental policy, world crude market prices, and general economic climate may have on the timetable for achievement of the aforementioned goal. In June 1980 the author presented a paper at the AIChE Meeting in Philadelphia, Pa. entitled 'Synthetic Fuels - Their Problems and Their Promises.' The opening paragraph of that paper started as follows: 'For three decades, since the days of World War II, a U.S. synthetic fuels industry has several times verged on becoming a reality but never succeeding, the ups and downs resembling a sine wave of variable frequency. As of this writing we are at the crest of the wave. Is this the time it will happen? For the good of the nation hopefully the answer will be yes.' It is the purpose of this paper, some 20 months later, to examine what has transpired in that time interval and to speculate, in the light of those events, about their impact on the likelihood of the answer still being 'yes' and on the timing as to when it may occur. To set the stage for consideration of the importance of recent events and to put them in perspective, it is necessary to return again to the earlier paper where some of the impediments to the establishment of a U.S. synfuels industry were discussed. In essence what was said was that the principal impediments were: economic, environmental, and regulatory, and since both the economic and regulatory aspects exert some direct and/or indirect influence on cost, the problem really reduced to the single most important factor--project economics. Synthetic fuels simply are expensive to produce!

Fryback, M. G.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Grays River Watershed Restoration Status Report 2007, May 1, 2007 - October 30, 2008.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Project 2003-013-00, 'Grays River Watershed Restoration', began in FY04 and continues into FY09. This status report is intended to summarize accomplishments during the period 1 May 2007 through 30 October 2008. Accomplishments are summarized by Work Elements, as detailed in the Statement of Work (see BPA's project management database PISCES). The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is collaborating with the Columbia River Estuary Task Force (CREST) on implementation of the Grays River Restoration Project. The Grays River is vitally important to the recovery of Lower Columbia River (LCR) chum salmon because it currently has the most viable population remaining in the LCR region. The Grays River watershed is also important to the recovery of salmon and steelhead in the LCR ecosystem. Today, numbers of naturally spawning salmon and steelhead have declined to levels far below historical numbers because of habitat limiting factors that include but are not limited to the lack of habitat connectivity, diversity, channel stability, riparian function and altered stream flow conditions. The objective of this project is to restore habitat-forming processes to enhance salmon and steelhead populations in the Grays River, following recommendations developed during the FY04-06 BPA-sponsored Grays River Watershed Assessment (BPA Project No. 2003-013-00). Specifically, this project will be the first step in restoring channel structure and function that will increase instream habitat diversity, channel stability, and riparian integrity in the critical response reach upstream and adjacent to critical salmon spawning areas of the Grays River. The major component of this strategy is the planning, design, installation, and monitoring of engineered logjams (ELJ) that will rejuvenate historic channel and floodplain processes. Additional restoration measures include reforesting the riparian corridor to enhance future large woody debris recruitment and investigation of conservation activities within ecologically critical areas. These activities include land acquisition and levee removal to protect critical areas and reconnect floodplain areas. Finally, monitoring integrated with restoration activities is proposed to evaluate restoration effectiveness and allow for adaptive management of future restoration treatments in the project area as well as other degraded watersheds in the Lower Columbia River.

Hanrahan, Tim [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2008-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

289

Cycloidal Wave Energy Converter  

SciTech Connect

This program allowed further advancing the development of a novel type of wave energy converter, a Cycloidal Wave Energy Converter or CycWEC. A CycWEC consists of one or more hydrofoils rotating around a central shaft, and operates fully submerged beneath the water surface. It operates under feedback control sensing the incoming waves, and converts wave power to shaft power directly without any intermediate power take off system. Previous research consisting of numerical simulations and two dimensional small 1:300 scale wave flume experiments had indicated wave cancellation efficiencies beyond 95%. The present work was centered on construction and testing of a 1:10 scale model and conducting two testing campaigns in a three dimensional wave basin. These experiments allowed for the first time for direct measurement of electrical power generated as well as the interaction of the CycWEC in a three dimensional environment. The Atargis team successfully conducted two testing campaigns at the Texas A&M Offshore Technology Research Center and was able to demonstrate electricity generation. In addition, three dimensional wave diffraction results show the ability to achieve wave focusing, thus increasing the amount of wave power that can be extracted beyond what was expected from earlier two dimensional investigations. Numerical results showed wave cancellation efficiencies for irregular waves to be on par with results for regular waves over a wide range of wave lengths. Using the results from previous simulations and experiments a full scale prototype was designed and its performance in a North Atlantic wave climate of average 30kW/m of wave crest was estimated. A full scale WEC with a blade span of 150m will deliver a design power of 5MW at an estimated levelized cost of energy (LCOE) in the range of 10-17 US cents per kWh. Based on the new results achieved in the 1:10 scale experiments these estimates appear conservative and the likely performance at full scale will exceed this initial performance estimates. In advancing the Technology Readiness Level (TRL) of this type of wave energy converter from 3 to 4, we find the CycWEC to exceed our initial estimates in terms of hydrodynamic performance. Once fully developed and optimized, it has the potential to not just outperform all other WEC technologies, but to also deliver power at a lower LCOE than competing conventional renewables like wind and solar. Given the large wave power resource both domestically and internationally, this technology has the potential to lead to a large improvement in our ability to produce clean electricity at affordable cost.

Stefan G. Siegel, Ph.D.

2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

290

A Systems Approach to Identifying Exploration and Development Opportunities in the Illinois Basin: Digital Portifolio of Plays in Underexplored Lower Paleozoic Rocks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study examined petroleum occurrence in Ordovician, Silurian and Devonian reservoirs in the Illinois Basin. Results from this project show that there is excellent potential for additional discovery of petroleum reservoirs in these formations. Numerous exploration targets and exploration strategies were identified that can be used to increase production from these underexplored strata. Some of the challenges to exploration of deeper strata include the lack of subsurface data, lack of understanding of regional facies changes, lack of understanding the role of diagenetic alteration in developing reservoir porosity and permeability, the shifting of structural closures with depth, overlooking potential producing horizons, and under utilization of 3D seismic techniques. This study has shown many areas are prospective for additional discoveries in lower Paleozoic strata in the Illinois Basin. This project implemented a systematic basin analysis approach that is expected to encourage exploration for petroleum in lower Paleozoic rocks of the Illinois Basin. The study has compiled and presented a broad base of information and knowledge needed by independent oil companies to pursue the development of exploration prospects in overlooked, deeper play horizons in the Illinois Basin. Available geologic data relevant for the exploration and development of petroleum reservoirs in the Illinois Basin was analyzed and assimilated into a coherent, easily accessible digital play portfolio. The primary focus of this project was on case studies of existing reservoirs in Devonian, Silurian, and Ordovician strata and the application of knowledge gained to future exploration and development in these underexplored strata of the Illinois Basin. In addition, a review of published reports and exploration in the New Albany Shale Group, a Devonian black shale source rock, in Illinois was completed due to the recent increased interest in Devonian black shales across the United States. The New Albany Shale is regarded as the source rock for petroleum in Silurian and younger strata in the Illinois Basin and has potential as a petroleum reservoir. Field studies of reservoirs in Devonian strata such as the Geneva Dolomite, Dutch Creek Sandstone and Grassy knob Chert suggest that there is much additional potential for expanding these plays beyond their current limits. These studies also suggest the potential for the discovery of additional plays using stratigraphic concepts to develop a subcrop play on the subkaskaskia unconformity boundary that separates lower Devonian strata from middle Devonian strata in portions of the basin. The lateral transition from Geneva Dolomite to Dutch Creek Sandstone also offers an avenue for developing exploration strategies in middle Devonian strata. Study of lower Devonian strata in the Sesser Oil Field and the region surrounding the field shows opportunities for development of a subcrop play where lower Devonian strata unconformably overlie Silurian strata. Field studies of Silurian reservoirs along the Sangamon Arch show that opportunities exist for overlooked pays in areas where wells do not penetrate deep enough to test all reservoir intervals in Niagaran rocks. Mapping of Silurian reservoirs in the Mt. Auburn trend along the Sangamon Arch shows that porous reservoir rock grades laterally to non-reservoir facies and several reservoir intervals may be encountered in the Silurian with numerous exploration wells testing only the uppermost reservoir intervals. Mapping of the Ordovician Trenton and shallower strata at Centralia Field show that the crest of the anticline shifted through geologic time. This study illustrates that the axes of anticlines may shift with depth and shallow structure maps may not accurately predict structurally favorable reservoir locations at depth.

Beverly Seyler; David Harris; Brian Keith; Bryan Huff; Yaghoob Lasemi

2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

291

Producing Light Oil from a Frozen Reservoir: Reservoir and Fluid Characterization of Umiat Field, National Petroleum Reserve, Alaska  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Umiat oil field is a light oil in a shallow, frozen reservoir in the Brooks Range foothills of northern Alaska with estimated oil-in-place of over 1 billion barrels. Umiat field was discovered in the 1940s but was never considered viable because it is shallow, in the permafrost, and far from any transportation infrastructure. The advent of modern drilling and production techniques has made Umiat and similar fields in northern Alaska attractive exploration and production targets. Since 2008 UAF has been working with Renaissance Alaska Inc. and, more recently, Linc Energy, to develop a more robust reservoir model that can be combined with rock and fluid property data to simulate potential production techniques. This work will be used to by Linc Energy as they prepare to drill up to 5 horizontal wells during the 2012-2013 drilling season. This new work identified three potential reservoir horizons within the Cretaceous Nanushuk Formation: the Upper and Lower Grandstand sands, and the overlying Ninuluk sand, with the Lower Grandstand considered the primary target. Seals are provided by thick interlayered shales. Reserve estimates for the Lower Grandstand alone range from 739 million barrels to 2437 million barrels, with an average of 1527 million bbls. Reservoir simulations predict that cold gas injection from a wagon-wheel pattern of multilateral injectors and producers located on 5 drill sites on the crest of the structure will yield 12-15% recovery, with actual recovery depending upon the injection pressure used, the actual Kv/Kh encountered, and other geologic factors. Key to understanding the flow behavior of the Umiat reservoir is determining the permeability structure of the sands. Sandstones of the Cretaceous Nanushuk Formation consist of mixed shoreface and deltaic sandstones and mudstones. A core-based study of the sedimentary facies of these sands combined with outcrop observations identified six distinct facies associations with distinctive permeability trends. The Lower Grandstand sand consists of two coarsening-upward shoreface sands sequences while the Upper Grandstand consists of a single coarsening-upward shoreface sand. Each of the shoreface sands shows a distinctive permeability profile with high horizontal permeability at the top getting progressively poorer towards the base of the sand. In contrast, deltaic sandstones in the overlying Ninuluk are more permeable at the base of the sands, with decreasing permeability towards the sand top. These trends impart a strong permeability anisotropy to the reservoir and are being incorporated into the reservoir model. These observations also suggest that horizontal wells should target the upper part of the major sands. Natural fractures may superimpose another permeability pattern on the Umiat reservoir that need to be accounted for in both the simulation and in drilling. Examination of legacy core from Umiat field indicate that fractures are present in the subsurface, but don't provide information on their orientation and density. Nearby surface exposures of folds in similar stratigraphy indicate there are at least three possible fracture sets: an early, N/S striking set that may predate folding and two sets possibly related to folding: an EW striking set of extension fractures that are parallel to the fold axes and a set of conjugate shear fractures oriented NE and NW. Analysis of fracture spacing suggests that these natural fractures are fairly widely spaced (25-59 cm depending upon the fracture set), but could provide improved reservoir permeability in horizontal legs drilled perpendicular to the open fracture set. The phase behavior of the Umiat fluid needed to be well understood in order for the reservoir simulation to be accurate. However, only a small amount of Umiat oil was available; this oil was collected in the 1940s and was severely weathered. The composition of this dead Umiat fluid was characterized by gas chromatography. This analysis was then compared to theoretical Umiat composition derived using the Pedersen method with original Umiat

Hanks, Catherine

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

292

Acoustic Camera Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Approach and Fate at Surface Flow Outlets of Two Hydropower Dams  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to estimate and compare fate probabilities for juvenile salmon approaching two surface flow outlets (SFOs) to identify effective design characteristics. The SFOs differed principally in forebay location, depth, discharge, and water velocity over a sharp-crested weir. Both outlets were about 20 ft wide. The 22-ft deep Bonneville Powerhouse 2 Corner Collector (B2CC) was located in the southwest corner of the forebay and passed 5,000 ft3/s of water at normal-pool elevation. In contrast, The Dalles Dam ice and trash sluiceway outlet above Main Unit 1-3 (TDITC) was not located in a forebay corner, was only 7-ft deep, and discharged about 933 ft3/s at normal-pool elevation. The linear velocity of water over the weir was about 15 ft/s at the B2CC and 5 ft/s at the TDITC. We used a Dual-Frequency Identification Sonar (DIDSON) to record movements of fish within about 65 ft of the B2CC and within 35 ft of the TDITC. We actively tracked fish by manually adjusting pan and tilt rotator angles to keep targets in view. Contrary to expectations, active tracking did not provide a predominance of long tracks that clearly indicated fish fate because most tracks were incomplete. Active tracking did increase error in fish-position estimation, which complicated data processing, so we plan to sample multiple fixed zones in the future. The probability of fish entering each SFO was estimated by a Markov chain analysis, which did not require complete fish tracks. At the B2CC, we tracked 7,943 juvenile salmonids and most of them entered the B2CC. Fish moving south 40 to 60 ft upstream of the dam face were more likely to enter the eddy at the south end of the powerhouse than to enter the B2CC. At the TDITC, we tracked 2,821 smolts. Fish movement was complex with active swimming toward and away from the entrance. The high entrance probability zone (EPZ), where over 90% of tracked fish entered the SFO, extended 32 ft out at the B2CC and only 8 ft out at the TDITC. Greater discharge at the B2CC pushed the entrainment zone (EZ - where flow exceeded 7 ft/s) upstream from the entrance so that fish were entrained before they began to struggle against the flow. The high EPZ also was extended by flow along the powerhouse face at both sites, but more at the B2CC (about 450 ft) than at the TDITC (about 50 ft). Fish entering the large south eddy that circulated past the B2CC entrance were provided multiple opportunities to discover and enter. In contrast, fish moving past the sampled TDITC entrance either entered adjacent sluiceway openings or moved west to the spillway because there was no eddy to provide additional opportunities. Information from our study should be useful to fisheries managers and engineers seeking to transfer SFO technologies from one site to another. There are two important components to designing SFOs, the location within the forebay to take advantage of forebay circulation and specific entrance characteristics such as discharge and depth which affect the size and shape of the EZ and the high EPZ. Providing SFOs with an EZ extending upstream of structure could reduce entrance rejection, decrease forebay residence time and risk of predation, and increase passage of schools of smolts.

Ploskey, Gene R.; Johnson, Gary E.; Weiland, Mark A.; Khan, Fenton; Mueller, Robert P.; Serkowski, John A.; Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Hedgepeth, J.; Skalski, John R.; Ebberts, Blaine D.; Klatte, Bernard A.

2006-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

293

Parameter Selection and Longitudinal Phase Space Simulation for a Single Stage X-Band FEL Driver at 250 MeV  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hard x-ray Free electron lasers (FEL) are being built or proposed at many accelerator laboratories as it supports wide range of applications in many aspects. Most of the hard x-ray FEL design is similar with the SLAC Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), which features a two (or multiple) stage bunch compression. For the first stage of the bunch compression, usually the beam is accelerated in a lower-frequency RF section (such as S-band for LCLS), and then the longitudinal phase space is linearized by a higher-frequency RF section (harmonic RF, such as X-band for LCLS). In this paper, a compact hard x-ray FEL design is proposed, which is based on X-band RF acceleration and eliminating the need of a harmonic RF. The parameter selection and relation is discussed, and the longitudinal phase space simulation is presented. The FEL coherence condition of the electron beam in the undulators requires a large charge density, a small emittance and small energy spread. The RMS electron bunch length from the injector is in the ps scale, with a bunch charge in the range of hundreds pC to several nC, which means that the current is roughly 0.1 kA. According to the requirement from soft x-ray lasing and hard x-ray lasing, a peak current of 1 kA and 3 kA is needed respectively. Thus the bunch has to be compressed. Usually a two stage bunch compression or multipole stage bunch compression is adopted. The z-correlated energy chirp is normally established by letting the beam pass through a section of RF cavities, with a RF phase off crest. As stated above, S-band RF (3 GHz) acceleration could be applied in this section. Due to the nature of RF acceleration wave, the chirp on the bunch is not linear, but has the RF curvature on it. In order to linearize the energy chirp, a harmonic RF section with higher frequency is needed. For LCLS a short X-band RF section (12 GHz) is used which is a fourth order harmonic. The linearized bunch is then passing by a dispersive region, in which the particles with different energy have different path length. A four dipole chicane is the natural choice for the dispersive region. As the example illustrated in Figure 1, the head of the bunch has smaller energy, and gets a stronger bending kick from the dipole magnet, then has a longer path length in the dispersive region. Similarly, the tail of the bunch has larger energy and shorter path length in the dispersive region. At the exit of the dispersive region, the relative longitudinal position of the head and tail of the bunch both move to the center of the bunch, so the bunch length will be shorter.

Sun, Yipeng

2011-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

294

Increasing the efficiency of organic solar cells by photonic and electrostatic-field enhancements  

SciTech Connect

Organic photovoltaic (OPV) technology is an attractive solar-electric conversion paradigm due to the promise of low cost roll-to-roll production and amenability to flexible substrates. Power conversion efficiency (PCE) exceeding 7% has recently been achieved. OPV cells suffer from low charge carrier mobilities of polymers, leading to recombination losses, higher series resistances and lower fill-factors. Thus, it is imperative to develop fabrication methodologies that can enable efficient optical absorption in films thinner than optical absorption length. Active layers conformally deposited on light-trapping, microscale textured, grating-type surfaces is one possible approach to achieve this objective. In this study, 40% theoretical increase in photonic absorption over flat OPVs is shown for devices with textured geometry by the simulation results. For verifying this theoretical result and improving the efficiency of OPVs by light trapping, OPVs were fabricated on grating-type textured substrates possessing t pitch and -coat PV active-layer on these textured substrates led to over filling of the valleys and shunts at the crest, which severely affected the performance of the resultant PV devices. Thus, it is established that although the optical design is important for OPV performance but the potential of light trapping can only be effectively tapped if the textures are amenable for realizing a conformal active layer. It is discovered that if the height of the underlying topographical features is reduced to sub-micron regime (e.g. 300 nm) and the pitch is increased to more than a micron (e.g. 2 ?m), the textured surface becomes amenable to coating a conformal PV active-layer. The resultant PV cells showed 100% increase in average light absorption near the band edge due to trapping of higher wavelength photons, and 20% improvement in power conversion efficiency as compared with the flat PV cell. Another factor that severely limits the performance of OPVs is recombination of charge carriers. Thus it becomes imperative to understand the effect of processing conditions such as spin coating speed and drying rate on defect density and hence induced carrier recombination mechanism. In this study, It is shown that slow growth (longer drying time) of the active-layer leads to reduction of sub-bandgap traps by an order of magnitude as compared to fast grown active-layer. By coupling the experimental results with simulations, it is demonstrated that at one sun condition, slow grown device has bimolecular recombination as the major loss mechanism while in the fast grown device with high trap density, the trap assisted recombination dominates. It has been estimated that non-radiative recombination accounts nearly 50% of efficiency loss in modern OPVs. Generally, an external bias (electric field) is required to collect all the photogenerated charges and thus prevent their recombination. The motivation is to induce additional electric field in otherwise low mobility conjugated polymer based active layer by incorporating ferroelectric dipoles. This is expected to facilitate singlet exciton dissociation in polymer matrix and impede charge transfer exciton (CTE) recombination at polymer:fullerene interface. For the first time, it is shown that the addition of ferroelectric dipoles to modern bulk heterojunction (BHJ) can significantly improve exciton dissociation, resulting in a ~50% enhancement of overall solar cell efficiency. The devices also exhibit the unique ferroelectric-photovoltaic effect with polarization-controlled power conversion efficiency.

Nalwa, Kanwar

2012-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

295

Development and Progression of Aeolian Blowouts in Padre Island National Seashore  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study characterizes the development and migration of blowouts within Padre Island National Seashore (PAIS). A combination of aerial photographs and Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) are used to track the migration of eighteen blowouts, while Ground-penetrating Radar (GPR) is used to investigate the subsurface at two smaller sites in the study area. This data, coupled with beach morphology and changing anthropogenic factors, helps understand why the dune blowouts develop and are restricted to a particular section of the National Seashore. Aerial Photographs taken at least twice a decade since 1969 were used to track blowouts. Each blowout was digitized in order to understand its morphometric characteristics by studying its length, width, area, segmentation, perimeter, and the width of the neck, when present, through the foredune. The velocity and direction of movement were also calculated. Cluster analysis was used to analyze the blowouts using these morphological variables. Based on this data, blows appear to group into two morphologically different clusters. Blowouts grouped into Cluster 1 are longer, thinner, have smaller perimeters and areas, smaller throat widths, and are furthest from the beach access road. A lower dune elevation leads to a larger wave runup to crest height ratio. A larger ratio suggests that the dunes are more easily overtopped during large storms, thus scarping, a precursor to blowout development, is increased. Cluster 2 blowouts tend to be longer, wider, and stabilized faster leading to a more undulated perimeter in addition to a smaller wave runup potential due to a higher dune elevation. Historically blowouts covered the entire northern portion of PAIS. In the 1970s the portion of the beach north of Park Road 22 was designated as non-driving. Since then all blowouts in this section have revegetated, while, blowouts in the driving section are still active. Beach driving pulverizes seaweed leading to less deposition along the dune toe and therefore a lower elevation of the backshore. As a result there is a greater wave runup in storms leading to an increase in susceptibility to scarping, and therefore, blowouts. Despite the fact that storms are the primary mechanism for blow development, anthropogenic effects, such as vehicle traffic, flatten the beach profile allowing for lower areas to become inundated during storms. This, along with decreased sediment budget and increased storm frequency increases the potential for blowouts to form events and leave the island vulnerable to an increased rate of sea level rise. GPR surveys were completed at two sites; an active blowout with a foredune that is not completely reestablished (Site 1) and a blowout that is stabilized by vegetation (Site 2). Six GPR surveys were completed at Site 1 and four surveys were completed at Site 2 that show the preservation of historic phases, surfaces, and facies used to interpret sequences and compare to aerial photography and LiDAR data. Site 1 moves through five phases that begin in 1969 and end at the present location, while Site 2 moves through three active phases and then ends in a fourth phase by becoming completely stabilized with vegetation in 2010.

Jewell, Mallorie E

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Heat Flow and Gas Hydrates on the Continental Margin of India: Building on Results from NGHP Expedition 01  

SciTech Connect

The Indian National Gas Hydrate Program (NGHP) Expedition 01 presented the unique opportunity to constrain regional heat flow derived from seismic observations by using drilling data in three regions on the continental margin of India. The seismic bottom simulating reflection (BSR) is a well-documented feature in hydrate bearing sediments, and can serve as a proxy for apparent heat flow if data are available to estimate acoustic velocity and density in water and sediments, thermal conductivity, and seafloor temperature. Direct observations of temperature at depth and physical properties of the sediment obtained from drilling can be used to calibrate the seismic observations, decreasing the uncertainty of the seismically-derived estimates. Anomalies in apparent heat flow can result from a variety of sources, including sedimentation, erosion, topographic refraction and fluid flow. We constructed apparent heat flow maps for portions of the Krishna-Godavari (K-G) basin, the Mahanadi basin, and the Andaman basin and modeled anomalies using 1-D conductive thermal models. Apparent heat flow values in the Krishna-Godavari (K-G) basin and Mahanadi basin are generally 0.035 to 0.055 watts per square meter (W/m2). The borehole data show an increase in apparent heat flow as water depth increases from 900 to 1500 m. In the SW part of the seismic grid, 1D modeling of the effect of sedimentation on heat flow shows that ~50% of the observed increase in apparent heat flow with increasing water depth can be attributed to trapping of sediments behind a "toe-thrust" ridge that is forming along the seaward edge of a thick, rapidly accumulating deltaic sediment pile. The remainder of the anomaly can be explained either by a decrease in thermal conductivity of the sediments filling the slope basin or by lateral advection of heat through fluid flow along stratigraphic horizons within the basin and through flexural faults in the crest of the anticline. Such flow probably plays a role in bringing methane into the ridge formed by the toe-thrust. Because of the small anomaly due to this process and the uncertainty in thermal conductivity, we did not model this process explicitly. In the NE part of the K-G basin seismic grid, a number of local heat flow lows and highs are observed, which can be attributed to topographic refraction and to local fluid flow along faults, respectively. No regional anomaly can be resolved. Because of lack of continuity between the K-G basin sites within the seismic grid and those ~70 km to the NE in water depths of 1200 to 1500 m, we do not speculate on the reason for higher heat flow at these depths. The Mahanadi basin results, while limited in geographic extent, are similar to those for the KG basin. The Andaman basin exhibits much lower apparent heat flow values, ranging from 0.015 to 0.025 W/m2. Heat flow here also appears to increase with increasing water depth. The very low heat flow here is among the lowest heat flow observed anywhere and gives rise to a very thick hydrate stability zone in the sediments. Through 1D models of sedimentation (with extremely high sedimentation rates as a proxy for tectonic thickening), we concluded that the very low heat flow can probably be attributed to the combined effects of high sedimentation rate, low thermal conductivity, tectonic thickening of sediments and the cooling effect of a subducting plate in a subduction zone forearc. Like for the K-G basin, much of the local variability can be attributed to topography. The regional increase in heat flow with water depth remains unexplained because the seismic grid available to us did not extend far enough to define the local tectonic setting of the slope basin controlling this observational pattern. The results are compared to results from other margins, both active and passive. While an increase in apparent heat flow with increasing water depth is widely observed, it is likely a result of different processes in different places. The very low heat flow due to sedimentation and tectonics in the Andaman basin is at the low end of glob

Trehu, Anne; Kannberg, Peter

2011-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

297

Heat Flow and Gas Hydrates on the Continental Margin of India: Building on Results from NGHP Expedition 01  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Indian National Gas Hydrate Program (NGHP) Expedition 01 presented the unique opportunity to constrain regional heat flow derived from seismic observations by using drilling data in three regions on the continental margin of India. The seismic bottom simulating reflection (BSR) is a well-documented feature in hydrate bearing sediments, and can serve as a proxy for apparent heat flow if data are available to estimate acoustic velocity and density in water and sediments, thermal conductivity, and seafloor temperature. Direct observations of temperature at depth and physical properties of the sediment obtained from drilling can be used to calibrate the seismic observations, decreasing the uncertainty of the seismically-derived estimates. Anomalies in apparent heat flow can result from a variety of sources, including sedimentation, erosion, topographic refraction and fluid flow. We constructed apparent heat flow maps for portions of the Krishna-Godavari (K-G) basin, the Mahanadi basin, and the Andaman basin and modeled anomalies using 1-D conductive thermal models. Apparent heat flow values in the Krishna-Godavari (K-G) basin and Mahanadi basin are generally 0.035 to 0.055 watts per square meter (W/m{sup 2}). The borehole data show an increase in apparent heat flow as water depth increases from 900 to 1500 m. In the SW part of the seismic grid, 1D modeling of the effect of sedimentation on heat flow shows that {approx}50% of the observed increase in apparent heat flow with increasing water depth can be attributed to trapping of sediments behind a 'toe-thrust' ridge that is forming along the seaward edge of a thick, rapidly accumulating deltaic sediment pile. The remainder of the anomaly can be explained either by a decrease in thermal conductivity of the sediments filling the slope basin or by lateral advection of heat through fluid flow along stratigraphic horizons within the basin and through flexural faults in the crest of the anticline. Such flow probably plays a role in bringing methane into the ridge formed by the toe-thrust. Because of the small anomaly due to this process and the uncertainty in thermal conductivity, we did not model this process explicitly. In the NE part of the K-G basin seismic grid, a number of local heat flow lows and highs are observed, which can be attributed to topographic refraction and to local fluid flow along faults, respectively. No regional anomaly can be resolved. Because of lack of continuity between the K-G basin sites within the seismic grid and those {approx}70 km to the NE in water depths of 1200 to 1500 m, we do not speculate on the reason for higher heat flow at these depths. The Mahanadi basin results, while limited in geographic extent, are similar to those for the K-G basin. The Andaman basin exhibits much lower apparent heat flow values, ranging from 0.015 to 0.025 W/m{sup 2}. Heat flow here also appears to increase with increasing water depth. The very low heat flow here is among the lowest heat flow observed anywhere and gives rise to a very thick hydrate stability zone in the sediments. Through 1D models of sedimentation (with extremely high sedimentation rates as a proxy for tectonic thickening), we concluded that the very low heat flow can probably be attributed to the combined effects of high sedimentation rate, low thermal conductivity, tectonic thickening of sediments and the cooling effect of a subducting plate in a subduction zone forearc. Like for the K-G basin, much of the local variability can be attributed to topography. The regional increase in heat flow with water depth remains unexplained because the seismic grid available to us did not extend far enough to define the local tectonic setting of the slope basin controlling this observational pattern. The results are compared to results from other margins, both active and passive. While an increase in apparent heat flow with increasing water depth is widely observed, it is likely a result of different processes in different places. The very low heat flow due to sedimentation and tectonics in the Andaman basi

Anne Trehu; Peter Kannberg

2011-06-30T23:59:59.000Z