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Sample records for g-1cm2 nuclear collision

  1. collisions'' Ulrich W. Heinz 73 NUCLEAR PHYSICS AND RADIATION...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Theory of ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions'' Ulrich W. Heinz 73 NUCLEAR PHYSICS AND RADIATION PHYSICS Nuclear Theory, Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collisions, Quark-Gluon...

  2. Physics of Ultra-Peripheral Nuclear Collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bertulani, Carlos A.; Klein, Spencer R.; Nystrand, Joakim

    2005-02-02

    Moving highly-charged ions carry strong electromagnetic fields which act as a field of photons. In collisions at large impact parameters, hadronic interactions are not possible, and the ions interact through photon-ion and photon-photon collisions known as ultra-peripheral collisions (UPC). Hadron colliders like the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), the Tevatron and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) produce photonuclear and two-photon interactions at luminosities and energies beyond that accessible elsewhere; the LHC will reach a {gamma}p energy ten times that of the Hadron-Electron Ring Accelerator (HERA). Reactions as diverse as the production of anti-hydrogen, photoproduction of the {rho}{sup 0}, transmutation of lead into bismuth and excitation of collective nuclear resonances have already been studied. At the LHC, UPCs can study many types of ''new physics''.

  3. JETS OF NUCLEAR MATTER FROM HIGH ENERGY HEAVY ION COLLISIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stocker, H.; Csernai, L.P.; Graebner, G.; Buchwald, G.; Kruse, H.; Cusson, R.Y.; Maruhn, J.A.; Greiner, W.

    1980-11-01

    The nuclear fluid dynamical model with final thermal breakup is used to study the reactions {sup 20}Ne + {sup 238}U and {sup 40} Ar + {sup 40}Ca at E{sub LAB}=390 MeV/n. Calculated double differential cross sections d{sup 2}{sigma}/d{Omega}dE are in agreement with recent experimental data. It is shown that azimuthally dependent triple differential cross sections d{sup 3}{sigma}/dEd cos{theta}d{phi} yield considerably deeper insight into the collision process and allow for snapshots of the reactions. Strongly correlated jets of nuclear matter are predicted.

  4. Shape Matters in Nuclear Physics Collisions | U.S. DOE Office of Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (SC) Shape Matters in Nuclear Physics Collisions Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Funding Opportunities Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) Community Resources Contact Information Nuclear Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-26/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3613 F: (301) 903-3833 E: Email Us More Information » 02.29.16 Shape Matters in Nuclear Physics Collisions Nuclear

  5. QUARKONIUM PRODUCTION IN RELATIVISTIC NUCLEAR COLLISIONS. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP, VOLUME 12

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KHARZEEV,D.

    1999-04-20

    The RIKEN-BNL Workshop on Quarkonium Production in Relativistic Nuclear Collisions was held September 28--October 2, 1998, at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The Workshop brought together about 50 invited participants from around the world and a number of Brookhaven physicists from both particle and nuclear physics communities.

  6. γ production as a probe for early state dynamics in high energy nuclear collisions at RHIC

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Liu, Yunpeng; Chen, Baoyi; Xu, Nu; Zhuang, Pengfei

    2011-02-01

    γ production in heavy ion collisions at RHIC energy is investigated. While the transverse momentum spectra of the ground state γ(1s) are controlled by the initial state Cronin effect, the excited bb⁻ states are characterized by the competition between the cold and hot nuclear matter effects and sensitive to the dissociation temperatures determined by the heavy quark potential. We emphasize that it is necessary to measure the excited heavy quark states in order to extract the early stage information in high energy nuclear collisions at RHIC.

  7. Study of bulk properties at high energy nuclear collisions - The search for the partonic equation of state at RHIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Nu

    2004-01-01

    We discuss recent results from RHIC. Issues of energy loss and partonic collectivity from Au + Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV are the focus of this paper. We propose a path toward the understanding of the partonic Equation of State in high energy nuclear collisions.

  8. Evidence for Radial Flow of Thermal Dileptons in High-Energy Nuclear Collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arnaldi, R.; Colla, A.; Cortese, P.; Ferretti, A.; Oppedisano, C.; Scomparin, E.; Banicz, K.; Damjanovic, S.; Castor, J.; Devaux, A.; Fargeix, J.; Force, P.; Manso, F.; Chaurand, B.; Cicalo, C.; Falco, A. de; Floris, M.; Masoni, A.; Puddu, G.; Serci, S.

    2008-01-18

    The NA60 experiment at the CERN SPS has studied low-mass dimuon production in 158A GeV In-In collisions. An excess of pairs above the known meson decays has been reported before. We now present precision results on the associated transverse momentum spectra. The slope parameter T{sub eff} extracted from the spectra rises with dimuon mass up to the {rho}, followed by a sudden decline above. While the initial rise is consistent with the expectations for radial flow of a hadronic decay source, the decline signals a transition to an emission source with much smaller flow. This may well represent the first direct evidence for thermal radiation of partonic origin in nuclear collisions.

  9. Nuclear matter effects on J/? production in asymmetric Cu+Au collisions at ?SNN=200 GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adare, A.

    2014-12-18

    We report on J/? production from asymmetric Cu+Au heavy-ion collisions at ?sNN =200 GeV at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at both forward (Cu-going direction) and backward (Au-going direction) rapidities. The nuclear modification of J/? yields in Cu+Au collisions in the Au-going direction is found to be comparable to that in Au+Au collisions when plotted as a function of the number of participating nucleons. In the Cu-going direction, J/? production shows a stronger suppression. This difference is comparable in magnitude and has the same sign as the difference expected from shadowing effects due to stronger low-x gluon suppression in themorelarger Au nucleus. The relative suppression is opposite to that expected from hot nuclear matter dissociation, since a higher energy density is expected in the Au-going direction.less

  10. THE LOW-TEMPERATURE NUCLEAR SPIN EQUILIBRIUM OF H{sup +} {sub 3} IN COLLISIONS WITH H{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grussie, F.; Berg, M. H.; Wolf, A.; Kreckel, H.; Crabtree, K. N.; McCall, B. J.; Gaertner, S.; Schlemmer, S.

    2012-11-01

    Recent observations of H{sub 2} and H{sup +} {sub 3} in diffuse interstellar sightlines revealed a difference in the nuclear spin excitation temperatures of the two species. This discrepancy comes as a surprise, as H{sup +} {sub 3} and H{sub 2} should undergo frequent thermalizing collisions in molecular clouds. Non-thermal behavior of the fundamental H{sup +} {sub 3}/H{sub 2} collision system at low temperatures was considered as a possible cause for the observed irregular populations. Here, we present measurements of the steady-state ortho/para ratio of H{sup +} {sub 3} in collisions with H{sub 2} molecules in a temperature-variable radiofrequency ion trap between 45 and 100 K. The experimental results are close to the expected thermal outcome and they agree very well with a previous micro-canonical model. We briefly discuss the implications of the experimental results for the chemistry of the diffuse interstellar medium.

  11. Energy and system size dependence of chemical freeze-out in relativistic nuclear collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Becattini, F.; Manninen, J.; Gazdzicki, M.

    2006-04-15

    We present a detailed study of chemical freeze-out in p-p, C-C, Si-Si, and Pb-Pb collisions at beam momenta of 158A GeV as well as Pb-Pb collisions at beam momenta of 20A, 30A, 40A, and 80A GeV. By analyzing hadronic multiplicities within the statistical hadronization model, we studied the parameters of the source as a function of the number of participating nucleons and the beam energy. We observe a nice smooth behavior of temperature, baryon chemical potential, and strangeness under-saturation parameter as a function of energy and nucleus size. Interpolating formulas are provided which allow us to predict the chemical freeze-out parameters in central collisions at center-of-mass energies {radical}(s){sub NN} > or approx. 4.5 GeV and for any colliding ions. Specific discrepancies between data and the model emerge in particle ratios in Pb-Pb collisions at beam energies between 20A and 40A GeV which cannot be accounted for in the considered model schemes.

  12. Nuclear effects in lepton-pair production in hadron-nucleus collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berdnikov, Ya. A.; Zavatsky, M. E.; Kim, V. T.; Kosmach, V. F.; Ryzhinskiy, M. M. Samsonov, V. M.

    2006-03-15

    The results of experimental investigations of Drell-Yan dimuon production in pBe and pW collisions at an energy of 800 GeV on a fixed target are analyzed. The ratios of the inclusive differential cross sections for lepton-pair production are calculated. It is shown that allowance for the effect of multiple soft rescattering of a projectile-hadron quark inside the target nucleus improves agreement between theoretical and experimental results.

  13. Nuclear matter effects on J/? production in asymmetric Cu + Au collisions at \\(\\sqrt{s_{\\mathrm{NN}}} = 200\\) GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adare, A.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Akimoto, R.; Alexander, J.; Alfred, M.; Aoki, K.; Apadula, N.; Aramaki, Y.; Asano, H.; Atomssa, E. T.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Bai, M.; Bai, X.; Bandara, N. S.; Bannier, B.; Barish, K. N.; Bathe, S.; Baublis, V.; Baumann, C.; Baumgart, S.; Bazilevsky, A.; Beaumier, M.; Beckman, S.; Belmont, R.; Berdnikov, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Bing, X.; Black, D.; Blau, D. S.; Bok, J. S.; Boyle, K.; Brooks, M. L.; Bryslawskyj, J.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Butsyk, S.; Campbell, S.; Chen, C. -H.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Choi, J. B.; Choi, S.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Cianciolo, V.; Citron, Z.; Cole, B. A.; Cronin, N.; Crossette, N.; Csand, M.; Csrg?, T.; Datta, A.; Daugherity, M. S.; David, G.; DeBlasio, K.; Dehmelt, K.; Denisov, A.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Ding, L.; Dion, A.; Do, J. H.; Drapier, O.; Drees, A.; Drees, K. A.; Durham, J. M.; Durum, A.; D'Orazio, L.; Engelmore, T.; Enokizono, A.; En'yo, H.; Esumi, S.; Eyser, K. O.; Fadem, B.; Feege, N.; Fields, D. E.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Fleuret, F.; Fokin, S. L.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Fukao, Y.; Gainey, K.; Gal, C.; Gallus, P.; Garg, P.; Garishvili, A.; Garishvili, I.; Ge, H.; Giordano, F.; Glenn, A.; Gong, X.; Gonin, M.; Goto, Y.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Gu, Y.; Gunji, T.; Guragain, H.; Hachiya, T.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hahn, K. I.; Hamagaki, H.; Han, S. Y.; Hanks, J.; Hasegawa, S.; Hashimoto, K.; Hayano, R.; He, X.; Hemmick, T. K.; Hester, T.; Hill, J. C.; Hollis, R. S.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Hoshino, T.; Huang, J.; Huang, S.; Ichihara, T.; Ikeda, Y.; Imai, K.; Imazu, Y.; Inaba, M.; Iordanova, A.; Isenhower, D.; Isinhue, A.; Ivanishchev, D.; Jacak, B. V.; Jeon, S. J.; Jezghani, M.; Jia, J.; Jiang, X.; Johnson, B. M.; Joo, E.; Joo, K. S.; Jouan, D.; Jumper, D. S.; Kamin, J.; Kanda, S.; Kang, B. H.; Kang, J. H.; Kang, J. S.; Kapustinsky, J.; Kawall, D.; Kazantsev, A. V.; Key, J. A.; Khachatryan, V.; Khandai, P. K.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kihara, K.; Kijima, K. M.; Kim, C.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, E. -J.; Kim, H. -J.; Kim, M.; Kim, Y. -J.; Kim, Y. K.; Kistenev, E.; Klatsky, J.; Kleinjan, D.; Kline, P.; Koblesky, T.; Kofarago, M.; Komkov, B.; Koster, J.; Kotchetkov, D.; Kotov, D.; Krizek, F.; Kurita, K.; Kurosawa, M.; Kwon, Y.; Lacey, R.; Lai, Y. S.; Lajoie, J. G.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, D. M.; Lee, G. H.; Lee, J.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, S. H.; Leitch, M. J.; Leitgab, M.; Lewis, B.; Li, X.; Lim, S. H.; Liu, M. X.; Lynch, D.; Maguire, C. F.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Makek, M.; Manion, A.; Manko, V. I.; Mannel, E.; Maruyama, T.; McCumber, M.; McGaughey, P. L.; McGlinchey, D.; McKinney, C.; Meles, A.; Mendoza, M.; Meredith, B.; Miake, Y.; Mibe, T.; Mignerey, A. C.; Miller, A. J.; Milov, A.; Mishra, D. K.; Mitchell, J. T.; Miyasaka, S.; Mizuno, S.; Mohanty, A. K.; Montuenga, P.; Moon, T.; Morrison, D. P.; Moskowitz, M.; Moukhanova, T. V.; Murakami, T.; Murata, J.; Mwai, A.; Nagae, T.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagle, J. L.; Nagy, M. I.; Nakagawa, I.; Nakagomi, H.; Nakamiya, Y.; Nakamura, K. R.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, K.; Nattrass, C.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Nihashi, M.; Niida, T.; Nouicer, R.; Novak, T.; Novitzky, N.; Nyanin, A. S.; O'Brien, E.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Oide, H.; Okada, K.; Orjuela Koop, J. D.; Oskarsson, A.; Ozaki, H.; Ozawa, K.; Pak, R.; Pantuev, V.; Papavassiliou, V.; Park, I. H.; Park, S.; Park, S. K.; Pate, S. F.; Patel, L.; Patel, M.; Peng, J. -C.; Perepelitsa, D. V.; Perera, G. D. N.; Peressounko, D. Yu.; Perry, J.; Petti, R.; Pinkenburg, C.; Pinson, R.; Pisani, R. P.; Purschke, M. L.; Qu, H.; Rak, J.; Ravinovich, I.; Read, K. F.; Reynolds, D.; Riabov, V.; Riabov, Y.; Richardson, E.; Riveli, N.; Roach, D.; Rolnick, S. D.; Rosati, M.; Rowan, Z.; Rubin, J. G.; Ryu, M. S.; Sahlmueller, B.; Saito, N.; Sakaguchi, T.; Sako, H.; Samsonov, V.; Sarsour, M.; Sato, S.; Sawada, S.; Schaefer, B.; Schmoll, B. K.; Sedgwick, K.; Seele, J.; Seidl, R.; Sekiguchi, Y.; Sen, A.; Seto, R.; Sett, P.; Sexton, A.; Sharma, D.; Shaver, A.; Shein, I.; Shibata, T. -A.; Shigaki, K.; Shimomura, M.; Shoji, K.; Shukla, P.; Sickles, A.; Silva, C. L.; Silvermyr, D.; Singh, B. K.; Singh, C. P.; Singh, V.; Skolnik, M.; Slune?ka, M.; Solano, S.; Soltz, R. A.; Sondheim, W. E.; Sorensen, S. P.; Soumya, M.; Sourikova, I. V.; Stankus, P. W.; Steinberg, P.; Stenlund, E.; Stepanov, M.; Ster, A.; Stoll, S. P.; Stone, M. R.; Sugitate, T.; Sukhanov, A.; Sumita, T.; Sun, J.; Sziklai, J.; Takahara, A.; Taketani, A.; Tanida, K.; Tannenbaum, M. J.; Tarafdar, S.; Taranenko, A.; Tennant, E.; Timilsina, A.; Todoroki, T.; Tomek, M.; Torii, H.; Towell, M.; Towell, R.; Towell, R. S.; Tserruya, I.; van Hecke, H. W.; Vargyas, M.; Vazquez-Zambrano, E.; Veicht, A.; Velkovska, J.; Vrtesi, R.; Virius, M.; Vrba, V.

    2014-12-18

    We report on J/? production from asymmetric Cu+Au heavy-ion collisions at \\(\\sqrt{s_{\\mathrm{NN}}} = 200\\) GeV at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at both forward (Cu-going direction) and backward (Au-going direction) rapidities. The nuclear modification of J/? yields in Cu+Au collisions in the Au-going direction is found to be comparable to that in Au+Au collisions when plotted as a function of the number of participating nucleons. In the Cu-going direction, J/? production shows a stronger suppression. This difference is comparable in magnitude and has the same sign as the difference expected from shadowing effects due to stronger low-x gluon suppression in the larger Au nucleus. Thus, the relative suppression is opposite to that expected from hot nuclear matter dissociation, since a higher energy density is expected in the Au-going direction.

  14. Nuclear matter effects on J/ψ production in asymmetric Cu + Au collisions at \\(\\sqrt{s_{\\mathrm{NN}}} = 200\\) GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adare, A.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Akimoto, R.; Alexander, J.; Alfred, M.; Aoki, K.; Apadula, N.; Aramaki, Y.; Asano, H.; Atomssa, E. T.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Bai, M.; Bai, X.; Bandara, N. S.; Bannier, B.; Barish, K. N.; Bathe, S.; Baublis, V.; Baumann, C.; Baumgart, S.; Bazilevsky, A.; Beaumier, M.; Beckman, S.; Belmont, R.; Berdnikov, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Bing, X.; Black, D.; Blau, D. S.; Bok, J. S.; Boyle, K.; Brooks, M. L.; Bryslawskyj, J.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Butsyk, S.; Campbell, S.; Chen, C. -H.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Choi, J. B.; Choi, S.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Cianciolo, V.; Citron, Z.; Cole, B. A.; Cronin, N.; Crossette, N.; Csanád, M.; Csörgő, T.; Datta, A.; Daugherity, M. S.; David, G.; DeBlasio, K.; Dehmelt, K.; Denisov, A.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Ding, L.; Dion, A.; Do, J. H.; Drapier, O.; Drees, A.; Drees, K. A.; Durham, J. M.; Durum, A.; D'Orazio, L.; Engelmore, T.; Enokizono, A.; En'yo, H.; Esumi, S.; Eyser, K. O.; Fadem, B.; Feege, N.; Fields, D. E.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Fleuret, F.; Fokin, S. L.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Fukao, Y.; Gainey, K.; Gal, C.; Gallus, P.; Garg, P.; Garishvili, A.; Garishvili, I.; Ge, H.; Giordano, F.; Glenn, A.; Gong, X.; Gonin, M.; Goto, Y.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Gu, Y.; Gunji, T.; Guragain, H.; Hachiya, T.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hahn, K. I.; Hamagaki, H.; Han, S. Y.; Hanks, J.; Hasegawa, S.; Hashimoto, K.; Hayano, R.; He, X.; Hemmick, T. K.; Hester, T.; Hill, J. C.; Hollis, R. S.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Hoshino, T.; Huang, J.; Huang, S.; Ichihara, T.; Ikeda, Y.; Imai, K.; Imazu, Y.; Inaba, M.; Iordanova, A.; Isenhower, D.; Isinhue, A.; Ivanishchev, D.; Jacak, B. V.; Jeon, S. J.; Jezghani, M.; Jia, J.; Jiang, X.; Johnson, B. M.; Joo, E.; Joo, K. S.; Jouan, D.; Jumper, D. S.; Kamin, J.; Kanda, S.; Kang, B. H.; Kang, J. H.; Kang, J. S.; Kapustinsky, J.; Kawall, D.; Kazantsev, A. V.; Key, J. A.; Khachatryan, V.; Khandai, P. K.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kihara, K.; Kijima, K. M.; Kim, C.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, E. -J.; Kim, H. -J.; Kim, M.; Kim, Y. -J.; Kim, Y. K.; Kistenev, E.; Klatsky, J.; Kleinjan, D.; Kline, P.; Koblesky, T.; Kofarago, M.; Komkov, B.; Koster, J.; Kotchetkov, D.; Kotov, D.; Krizek, F.; Kurita, K.; Kurosawa, M.; Kwon, Y.; Lacey, R.; Lai, Y. S.; Lajoie, J. G.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, D. M.; Lee, G. H.; Lee, J.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, S. H.; Leitch, M. J.; Leitgab, M.; Lewis, B.; Li, X.; Lim, S. H.; Liu, M. X.; Lynch, D.; Maguire, C. F.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Makek, M.; Manion, A.; Manko, V. I.; Mannel, E.; Maruyama, T.; McCumber, M.; McGaughey, P. L.; McGlinchey, D.; McKinney, C.; Meles, A.; Mendoza, M.; Meredith, B.; Miake, Y.; Mibe, T.; Mignerey, A. C.; Miller, A. J.; Milov, A.; Mishra, D. K.; Mitchell, J. T.; Miyasaka, S.; Mizuno, S.; Mohanty, A. K.; Montuenga, P.; Moon, T.; Morrison, D. P.; Moskowitz, M.; Moukhanova, T. V.; Murakami, T.; Murata, J.; Mwai, A.; Nagae, T.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagle, J. L.; Nagy, M. I.; Nakagawa, I.; Nakagomi, H.; Nakamiya, Y.; Nakamura, K. R.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, K.; Nattrass, C.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Nihashi, M.; Niida, T.; Nouicer, R.; Novak, T.; Novitzky, N.; Nyanin, A. S.; O'Brien, E.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Oide, H.; Okada, K.; Orjuela Koop, J. D.; Oskarsson, A.; Ozaki, H.; Ozawa, K.; Pak, R.; Pantuev, V.; Papavassiliou, V.; Park, I. H.; Park, S.; Park, S. K.; Pate, S. F.; Patel, L.; Patel, M.; Peng, J. -C.; Perepelitsa, D. V.; Perera, G. D. N.; Peressounko, D. Yu.; Perry, J.; Petti, R.; Pinkenburg, C.; Pinson, R.; Pisani, R. P.; Purschke, M. L.; Qu, H.; Rak, J.; Ravinovich, I.; Read, K. F.; Reynolds, D.; Riabov, V.; Riabov, Y.; Richardson, E.; Riveli, N.; Roach, D.; Rolnick, S. D.; Rosati, M.; Rowan, Z.; Rubin, J. G.; Ryu, M. S.; Sahlmueller, B.; Saito, N.; Sakaguchi, T.; Sako, H.; Samsonov, V.; Sarsour, M.; Sato, S.; Sawada, S.; Schaefer, B.; Schmoll, B. K.; Sedgwick, K.; Seele, J.; Seidl, R.; Sekiguchi, Y.; Sen, A.; Seto, R.; Sett, P.; Sexton, A.; Sharma, D.; Shaver, A.; Shein, I.; Shibata, T. -A.; Shigaki, K.; Shimomura, M.; Shoji, K.; Shukla, P.; Sickles, A.; Silva, C. L.; Silvermyr, D.; Singh, B. K.; Singh, C. P.; Singh, V.; Skolnik, M.; Slunečka, M.; Solano, S.; Soltz, R. A.; Sondheim, W. E.; Sorensen, S. P.; Soumya, M.; Sourikova, I. V.; Stankus, P. W.; Steinberg, P.; Stenlund, E.; Stepanov, M.; Ster, A.; Stoll, S. P.; Stone, M. R.; Sugitate, T.; Sukhanov, A.; Sumita, T.; Sun, J.; Sziklai, J.; Takahara, A.; Taketani, A.; Tanida, K.; Tannenbaum, M. J.; Tarafdar, S.; Taranenko, A.; Tennant, E.; Timilsina, A.; Todoroki, T.; Tomášek, M.; Torii, H.; Towell, M.; Towell, R.; Towell, R. S.; Tserruya, I.; van Hecke, H. W.; Vargyas, M.; Vazquez-Zambrano, E.; Veicht, A.; Velkovska, J.; Vértesi, R.; Virius, M.; Vrba, V.; Vznuzdaev, E.; Wang, X. R.; Watanabe, D.; Watanabe, K.; Watanabe, Y.; Watanabe, Y. S.; Wei, F.; Whitaker, S.; Wolin, S.; Woody, C. L.; Wysocki, M.; Xia, B.; Xue, L.; Yalcin, S.; Yamaguchi, Y. L.; Yanovich, A.; Yokkaichi, S.; Yoon, I.; You, Z.; Younus, I.; Yushmanov, I. E.; Zajc, W. A.; Zelenski, A.; Zhou, S.

    2014-12-18

    We report on J/ψ production from asymmetric Cu+Au heavy-ion collisions at \\(\\sqrt{s_{\\mathrm{NN}}} = 200\\) GeV at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at both forward (Cu-going direction) and backward (Au-going direction) rapidities. The nuclear modification of J/ψ yields in Cu+Au collisions in the Au-going direction is found to be comparable to that in Au+Au collisions when plotted as a function of the number of participating nucleons. In the Cu-going direction, J/ψ production shows a stronger suppression. This difference is comparable in magnitude and has the same sign as the difference expected from shadowing effects due to stronger low-x gluon suppression in the larger Au nucleus. Thus, the relative suppression is opposite to that expected from hot nuclear matter dissociation, since a higher energy density is expected in the Au-going direction.

  15. First Measurement of the {rho} Spectral Function in High-Energy Nuclear Collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arnaldi, R.; Colla, A.; Cortese, P.; Ferretti, A.; Oppedisano, C.; Scomparin, E.; Averbeck, R.; Drees, A.; Banicz, K.; Specht, H.J.; Castor, J.; Devaux, A.; Fargeix, J.; Force, P.; Manso, F.; Chaurand, B.; Cicalo, C.; De Falco, A.; Floris, M.; Masoni, A.

    2006-04-28

    We report on a precision measurement of low-mass muon pairs in 158 AGeV indium-indium collisions at the CERN SPS. A significant excess of pairs is observed above the yield expected from neutral meson decays. The unprecedented sample size of 360 000 dimuons and the good mass resolution of about 2% allow us to isolate the excess by subtraction of the decay sources. The shape of the resulting mass spectrum is consistent with a dominant contribution from {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{yields}{rho}{yields}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} annihilation. The associated space-time averaged {rho} spectral function shows a strong broadening, but essentially no shift in mass. This may rule out theoretical models linking hadron masses directly to the chiral condensate.

  16. First Results on Angular Distributions of Thermal Dileptons in Nuclear Collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arnaldi, R.; Colla, A.; Cortese, P.; Ferretti, A.; Oppedisano, C.; Scomparin, E.; Banicz, K.; Damjanovic, S.; Castor, J.; Devaux, A.; Fargeix, J.; Force, P.; Manso, F.; Chaurand, B.; Cicalo, C.; Falco, A. de; Floris, M.; Masoni, A.; Puddu, G.; Serci, S.

    2009-06-05

    The NA60 experiment at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron has studied dimuon production in 158A GeV In-In collisions. The strong excess of pairs above the known sources found in the complete mass region 0.2

  17. Production of e+e- Pairs Accompanied by Nuclear Dissociation in Ultra-peripheral Heavy Ion Collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, J.; Adler, C.; Aggarwal, M.M.; Ahammed, Z.; Allgower, C.; Amonett, J.; Anderson, B.D.; Anderson, M.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G.S.; Bai, Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L.S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, V.V.; Bellwied, R.; Berger, J.; Bichsel, H.; Billmeier, A.; Bland, L.C.; Blyth, C.O.; Bonner, B.E.; Boucham, A.; Brandin, A.; Bravar, A.; Cadman, R.V.; Caines, H.; Calderon de la Barca Sanchez, M.; Cardenas, A.; Carroll, J.; Castillo, J.; Castro, M.; Cebra, D.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, Y.; Chernenko, S.P.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, B.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J.P.; Cormier, T.M.; Corral, M.M.; Cramer, J.G.; Crawford, H.J.; Deng, W.S.; Derevschikov, A.A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Draper, J.E.; Dunin, V.B.; Dunlop, J.C.; Eckardt, V.; Efimov, L.G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Fachini, P.; Faine, V.; Faivre, J.; Fatemi, R.; Filimonov, K.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flierl, D.; Foley, K.J.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, C.A.; Gagunashvili, N.; Gans, J.; Gaudichet, L.; Germain, M.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Grachov, O.; Grigoriev, V.; Guedon, M.; Guertin, S.M.; Gushin, E.; Hallman, T.J.; Hardtke, D.; Harris, J.W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T.W.; Heppelmann, S.; Herston, T.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, G.W.; Horsley, M.; Huang, H.Z.; Humanic, T.J.; Igo, G.; Ishihara, A.; Ivanshin, Yu.I.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W.W.; Janik, M.; Johnson, I.; Jones, P.G.; Judd, E.G.; Kaneta, M.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klay, J.; Klein, S.R.; Klyachko, A.; Kollegger, T.; Konstantinov, A.; Kopytine, S.M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kovalenko, A.D.; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, A.I.; Kunde, G.J.; Kunz, C.L.; Kutuev, R.K.; Kuznetsov, A.A.; Lamont, M.A.C.; Landgraf, J.M.; Lange, S.; Lansdell, C.P.; Lasiuk, B.; Laue, F.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Leontiev, V.M.; LeVine, M.J.; Li, Q.; Lindenbaum, S.J.; Lisa, M.A.; Liu, F.; Liu, L.; Liu, Z.; et al.

    2004-04-07

    We present the first data on e{sup +}e{sup -} pair production accompanied by nuclear breakup in ultra-peripheral gold-gold collisions at a center of mass energy of 200 GeV per nucleon pair. The nuclear breakup requirement selects events at small impact parameters, where higher-order corrections to the pair production cross section should be enhanced. We compare the pair kinematic distributions with two calculations: one based on the equivalent photon approximation, and the other using lowest-order quantum electrodynamics (QED); the latter includes the photon virtuality. The cross section, pair mass, rapidity and angular distributions are in good agreement with both calculations. The pair transverse momentum, p{sub T}, spectrum agrees with the QED calculation, but not with the equivalent photon approach. We set limits on higher-order contributions to the cross section. The e{sup +} and e{sup -} p{sub T} spectra are similar, with no evidence for interference effects due to higher-order diagrams.

  18. Coupled-channels density-matrix approach to low-energy nuclear collision dynamics: A technique for quantifying quantum decoherence effects on reaction observables

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diaz-Torres, Alexis

    2010-11-15

    The coupled-channels density-matrix technique for nuclear reaction dynamics, which is based on the Liouville-von Neumann equation with Lindblad dissipative terms, is developed with the inclusion of full angular momentum couplings. It allows a quantitative study of the role and importance of quantum decoherence in nuclear scattering. Formulas of asymptotic observables that can reveal effects of quantum decoherence are given. A method for extracting energy-resolved scattering information from the time-dependent density matrix is introduced. As an example, model calculations are carried out for the low-energy collision of the {sup 16}O projectile on the {sup 154}Sm target.

  19. Two-photon interactions with nuclear breakup in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baltz, Anthony J.; Gorbunov, Yuri; Klein, Spencer R.; Nystrand, Joakim

    2009-10-15

    Highly charged relativistic heavy ions have high cross sections for two-photon interactions. The photon flux is high enough that two-photon interactions may be accompanied by additional photonuclear interactions. Except for the shared impact parameter, these interactions are independent. Additional interactions like mutual Coulomb excitation are of experimental interest, because the neutrons from the nuclear dissociation provide a simple, relatively unbiased trigger. We calculate the cross sections, rapidity, mass, and transverse momentum (p{sub T}) distributions for exclusive {gamma}{gamma} production of mesons and lepton pairs and for {gamma}{gamma} reactions accompanied by mutual Coulomb dissociation. The cross sections for {gamma}{gamma} interactions accompanied by multiple neutron emission (XnXn) and single-neutron emission (1n1n) are about 1/10 and 1/100 of that for the unaccompanied {gamma}{gamma} interactions. We discuss the accuracy with which these cross sections may be calculated. The typical p{sub T} of {gamma}{gamma} final states is several times smaller than for comparable coherent photonuclear interactions, so p{sub T} may be an effective tool for separating the two classes of interactions.

  20. Two-Photon Interactions with Nuclear Breakup in Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baltz, Anthony J.; Gorbunov, Yuri; R Klein, Spencer; Nystrand, Joakim

    2010-07-07

    Highly charged relativistic heavy ions have high cross-sections for two-photon interactions. The photon flux is high enough that two-photon interactions may be accompanied by additional photonuclear interactions. Except for the shared impact parameter, these interactions are independent. Additional interactions like mutual Coulomb excitation are of experimental interest, since the neutrons from the nuclear dissociation provide a simple, relatively unbiased trigger. We calculate the cross sections, rapidity, mass and transverse momentum (p{sub T}) distributions for exclusive {gamma}{gamma} production of mesons and lepton pairs, and for {gamma}{gamma} reactions accompanied by mutual Coulomb dissociation. The cross-sections for {gamma}{gamma} interactions accompanied by multiple neutron emission (XnXn) and single neutron emission (1n1n) are about 1/10 and 1/100 of that for the unaccompanied {gamma}{gamma} interactions. We discuss the accuracy with which these cross-sections may be calculated. The typical p{sub T} of {gamma}{gamma} final states is several times smaller than for comparable coherent photonuclear interactions, so p{sub T} may be an effective tool for separating the two classes of interactions.

  1. Nuclear matter effects on J/ψ production in asymmetric Cu + Au collisions at \\(\\sqrt{s_{\\mathrm{NN}}} = 200\\) GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adare, A.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Akimoto, R.; Alexander, J.; Alfred, M.; Aoki, K.; Apadula, N.; Aramaki, Y.; et al

    2014-12-18

    We report on J/ψ production from asymmetric Cu+Au heavy-ion collisions at \\(\\sqrt{s_{\\mathrm{NN}}} = 200\\) GeV at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at both forward (Cu-going direction) and backward (Au-going direction) rapidities. The nuclear modification of J/ψ yields in Cu+Au collisions in the Au-going direction is found to be comparable to that in Au+Au collisions when plotted as a function of the number of participating nucleons. In the Cu-going direction, J/ψ production shows a stronger suppression. This difference is comparable in magnitude and has the same sign as the difference expected from shadowing effects due to stronger low-x gluon suppression inmore » the larger Au nucleus. Thus, the relative suppression is opposite to that expected from hot nuclear matter dissociation, since a higher energy density is expected in the Au-going direction.« less

  2. Nuclear effects on the transverse momentum spectra of charged particles in pPb collisions at ?sNN = 5.02 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, V.

    2015-05-29

    Transverse momentum spectra of charged particles are measured by the CMS experiment at the CERN LHC in pPb collisions at ?sNN = 5.02 TeV in the range 0.4 T CM| T CM = 0, with smaller yield observed in the direction of the proton beam, qualitatively consistent with expectations from shadowing in nuclear parton distribution functions (nPDF). A pp reference spectrum at ?sNN = 5.02 TeV is obtained by interpolation from previous measurements at higher and lowermorecenter-of-mass energies. The pT distribution measured in pPb collisions shows an enhancement of charged particles with pT > 20 GeV/c compared to expectations from the pp reference. The enhancement is larger than predicted by perturbative quantum chromodynamics calculations that include antishadowing modifications of nPDFs.less

  3. Observation of D0 meson nuclear modifications in Au+Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Anson, C. D.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; et al

    2014-09-30

    We report the first measurement of charmed-hadron (D0) production via the hadronic decay channel (D0→K-+π+) in Au+Au collisions at √sNN=200 GeV with the STAR experiment. The charm production cross section per nucleon-nucleon collision at midrapidity scales with the number of binary collisions, Nbin, from p+p to central Au+Au collisions. The D0 meson yields in central Au+Aucollisions are strongly suppressed compared to those in p+p scaled by Nbin, for transverse momenta pT>3 GeV/c, demonstrating significant energy loss of charm quarks in the hot and dense medium. An enhancement at intermediate pT is also observed. Model calculations including strong charm-medium interactions andmore »coalescence hadronization describe our measurements.« less

  4. Observation of D0 meson nuclear modifications in Au+Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Anson, C. D.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; et al

    2014-09-30

    We report the first measurement of charmed-hadron (D0) production via the hadronic decay channel (D0→K-+π+) in Au+Au collisions at √sNN=200 GeV with the STAR experiment. The charm production cross section per nucleon-nucleon collision at midrapidity scales with the number of binary collisions, Nbin, from p+p to central Au+Au collisions. The D0 meson yields in central Au+Aucollisions are strongly suppressed compared to those in p+p scaled by Nbin, for transverse momenta pT>3 GeV/c, demonstrating significant energy loss of charm quarks in the hot and dense medium. An enhancement at intermediate pT is also observed. Model calculations including strong charm-medium interactions andmore » coalescence hadronization describe our measurements.« less

  5. Charged particle spectra in [sup 32]S + [sup 32]S interactions at 200 GeV/nucleon from CCD-imaged nuclear collisions in a streamer chamber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teitelbaum, L.P.

    1992-04-01

    We have measured the transverse momentum spectra 1/p[sub T] dN/dp[sub T] and rapidity distributions dN/dy of negatively charged hadrons and protons for central [sup 32]S + [sup 32]S interactions at 200 GeV/nucleon incident energy. The negative hadron dN/dy distribution is too broad to be accounted for by thermal models which demand isotropic particle emission. It is compatible with models which emphasize longitudinal dynamics, by either a particle production mechanism, as in the Lund fragmentation model, or by introducing one-dimensional hydrodynamic expansion, as in the Landau model. The proton dN/dy distribution, although showing no evidence for a peak in the target fragmentation region, exhibits limited nuclear stopping power. We estimate the mean rapidity shift of participant target protons to be [Delta]y [approximately] 1.5, greater than observed for pp collisions, less than measured in central pA collisions, and much less than would be observed for a single equilibrated fireball at midrapidity. Both the negative hadron and proton dN/dy distributions can be fit by a symmetric Landau two-fireball model. Although the spectrum possesses a two-component structure, a comparison to pp data at comparable center-of-mass energy shows no evidence for enhanced production at low p[sub T]. The two-component structure can be explained by a thermal and chemical equilibrium model which takes into account the kinematics of resonance decay. Using an expression motivated by longitudinal expansion we find the same temperature for both the protons and negative hadrons at freezeout, T[sub f] [approximately] 170 MeV. We conclude that the charged particle spectra of negative hadrons and protons can be accommodated in a simple collision picture of limited nuclear stopping, evolution through a state of thermal equilibrium, followed by longitudinal hydrodynamic expansion until freezeout.

  6. Charged particle spectra in {sup 32}S + {sup 32}S interactions at 200 GeV/nucleon from CCD-imaged nuclear collisions in a streamer chamber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teitelbaum, L.P.

    1992-04-01

    We have measured the transverse momentum spectra 1/p{sub T} dN/dp{sub T} and rapidity distributions dN/dy of negatively charged hadrons and protons for central {sup 32}S + {sup 32}S interactions at 200 GeV/nucleon incident energy. The negative hadron dN/dy distribution is too broad to be accounted for by thermal models which demand isotropic particle emission. It is compatible with models which emphasize longitudinal dynamics, by either a particle production mechanism, as in the Lund fragmentation model, or by introducing one-dimensional hydrodynamic expansion, as in the Landau model. The proton dN/dy distribution, although showing no evidence for a peak in the target fragmentation region, exhibits limited nuclear stopping power. We estimate the mean rapidity shift of participant target protons to be {Delta}y {approximately} 1.5, greater than observed for pp collisions, less than measured in central pA collisions, and much less than would be observed for a single equilibrated fireball at midrapidity. Both the negative hadron and proton dN/dy distributions can be fit by a symmetric Landau two-fireball model. Although the spectrum possesses a two-component structure, a comparison to pp data at comparable center-of-mass energy shows no evidence for enhanced production at low p{sub T}. The two-component structure can be explained by a thermal and chemical equilibrium model which takes into account the kinematics of resonance decay. Using an expression motivated by longitudinal expansion we find the same temperature for both the protons and negative hadrons at freezeout, T{sub f} {approximately} 170 MeV. We conclude that the charged particle spectra of negative hadrons and protons can be accommodated in a simple collision picture of limited nuclear stopping, evolution through a state of thermal equilibrium, followed by longitudinal hydrodynamic expansion until freezeout.

  7. Nuclear effects on the transverse momentum spectra of charged particles in pPb collisions at ?sNN = 5.02 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, V.

    2015-05-29

    Transverse momentum spectra of charged particles are measured by the CMS experiment at the CERN LHC in pPb collisions at ?sNN = 5.02 TeV in the range 0.4 < pT < 120 GeV/c and pseudorapidity |?CM| < 1.8 in the protonnucleon center-of-mass frame. For pT < 10 GeV/c, the charged-particle production is asymmetric about ?CM = 0, with smaller yield observed in the direction of the proton beam, qualitatively consistent with expectations from shadowing in nuclear parton distribution functions (nPDF). A pp reference spectrum at ?sNN = 5.02 TeV is obtained by interpolation from previous measurements at higher and lower center-of-mass energies. The pT distribution measured in pPb collisions shows an enhancement of charged particles with pT > 20 GeV/c compared to expectations from the pp reference. The enhancement is larger than predicted by perturbative quantum chromodynamics calculations that include antishadowing modifications of nPDFs.

  8. Nuclear effects on the transverse momentum spectra of charged particles in pPb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{_\\mathrm {NN}}} =5.02$ TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-05-29

    Transverse momentum spectra of charged particles are measured by the CMS experiment at the CERN LHC in pPb collisions at √sNN = 5.02 TeV, in the range 0.4T < 120 GeV/c and pseudorapidity |ηCM|<1.8 in the proton–nucleon center-of-mass frame. For pT < 10 GeV/c, the charged-particle production is asymmetric about ηCM=0, with smaller yield observed in the direction of the proton beam, qualitatively consistent with expectations from shadowing in nuclear parton distribution functions (nPDF). A pp reference spectrum at √s = 5.02 TeV is obtained by interpolation from previous measurements at higher and lower center-of-mass energies. The pTdistribution measured in pPb collisions shows an enhancement of charged particles with pT > 20GeV/c compared to expectations from the pp reference. As a result, the enhancement is larger than predicted by perturbative quantum chromodynamics calculations that include antishadowing modifications of nPDFs.

  9. Nuclear effects on the transverse momentum spectra of charged particles in pPb collisions at $$\\sqrt{s_{_\\mathrm {NN}}} =5.02$$ TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-05-29

    Transverse momentum spectra of charged particles are measured by the CMS experiment at the CERN LHC in pPb collisions at √sNN = 5.02 TeV, in the range 0.4T < 120 GeV/c and pseudorapidity |ηCM|<1.8 in the proton–nucleon center-of-mass frame. For pT < 10 GeV/c, the charged-particle production is asymmetric about ηCM=0, with smaller yield observed in the direction of the proton beam, qualitatively consistent with expectations from shadowing in nuclear parton distribution functions (nPDF). A pp reference spectrum at √s = 5.02 TeV is obtained by interpolation from previous measurements at higher and lower center-of-mass energies. The pTdistribution measured inmore » pPb collisions shows an enhancement of charged particles with pT > 20GeV/c compared to expectations from the pp reference. As a result, the enhancement is larger than predicted by perturbative quantum chromodynamics calculations that include antishadowing modifications of nPDFs.« less

  10. A reevaluation of cancer incidence near the Three Mile Island nuclear plant: The collision of evidence and assumptions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wing, S.; Richardson, D.; Armstrong, D.; Crawford-Brown, D.

    1997-01-01

    Previous studies concluded that there was no evidence that the 1979 nuclear accident at Three Mile Island (TMI) affected cancer incidence in the surrounding area; however, there were logical and methodological problems in earlier reports that led us to reconsider data previously collected. A 10-mile area around TMI was divided into 69 study tracts, which were assigned radiation dose estimates based on radiation readings and models of atmospheric dispersion. Incident cancers from 1975 to 1985 were ascertained from hospital records and assigned to study tracts. Associations between accident doses and incidence rates of leukemia, lung cancer, and all cancer were assessed using relative dose estimates calculated by the earlier investigators. Adjustments were made for age, sex, socioeconomic characteristics, and preaccident variation in incidence. Considering a 2-year latency, the estimated percent increase per dose unit {plus_minus} standard error was 0.020 {plus_minus} 0.012 for all cancer, 0.082 {plus_minus} 0.032 for lung cancer, and 0.116 {plus_minus} 0.067 for leukemia. Adjustment for socioeconomic variables increased the estimates to 0.034 {plus_minus} 0.013, 0.103 {plus_minus} 0.035, and 0.139 {plus_minus} 0.073 for all cancer, lung cancer, and leukemia, respectively. Associations were generally larger considering a 5-year latency, but were based on smaller numbers of cases. Results support the hypothesis that radiation doses are related to increased cancer incidence around TMI. The analysis avoids medical detection bias, but suffers from inaccurate dose classification; therefore, results may underestimate the magnitude of the association between radiation and cancer incidence. These associations would not be expected, based on previous estimates of near-background levels of radiation exposure following the accident. 35 refs., 3 tabs.

  11. Jets in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Xin-Nian; Gyulassy, M.

    1990-09-01

    Several aspects of hard and semihard QCD jets in relativistic heavy ion collisions are discussed, including multiproduction of minijets and the interaction of a jet with dense nuclear matter. The reduction of jet quenching effect in deconfined phase of nuclear matter is speculated to provide a signature of the formation of quark gluon plasma. HIJING Monte Carlo program which can simulate events of jets production and quenching in heavy ion collisions is briefly described. 35 refs., 13 figs.

  12. nuclear

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    2%2A en U.S-, Japan Exchange Best Practices on Nuclear Emergency Response http:nnsa.energy.govmediaroompressreleasesu.s-japan-exchange-best-practices-nuclear-emergency-respon...

  13. v{sub 4} from ideal and viscous hydrodynamic simulations of nuclear collisions at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luzum, Matthew; Gombeaud, Clement; Ollitrault, Jean-Yves

    2010-05-15

    We compute v{sub 4}/(v{sub 2}){sup 2} in ideal and viscous hydrodynamics. We investigate its sensitivity to details of the hydrodynamic model and compare the results to experimental data from the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). Whereas v{sub 2} has a significant sensitivity only to initial eccentricity and viscosity while being insensitive to freeze-out temperature, we find that v{sub 4}/(v{sub 2}){sup 2} is quite insensitive to initial eccentricity. On the other hand, it can still be sensitive to shear viscosity in addition to freeze-out temperature, although viscous effects do not universally increase v{sub 4}/(v{sub 2}){sup 2} as originally predicted. Consistent with data, we find no dependence on particle species. We also make a prediction for v{sub 4}/(v{sub 2}){sup 2} in heavy ion collisions at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC).

  14. Parton equilibration in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biro, T.S.; van Doorn, E.; Mueller, B.; Thoma, M.H.; Wang, X. Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Giessen, D-6300 Giessen Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 )

    1993-09-01

    We investigate the processes leading to phase-space equilibration of parton distributions in nuclear interactions at collider energies. We derive a set of rate equations describing the chemical equilibration of gluons and quarks including medium effects on the relevant QCD transport coefficients, and discuss their consequences for parton equilibration in heavy ion collisions.

  15. Determination of electron-nucleus collisions geometry with forward neutrons

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zheng, L.; Aschenauer, E.; Lee, J. H.

    2014-12-29

    There are a large number of physics programs one can explore in electron-nucleus collisions at a future electron-ion collider. Collision geometry is very important in these studies, while the measurement for an event-by-event geometric control is rarely discussed in the prior deep-inelastic scattering experiments off a nucleus. This paper seeks to provide some detailed studies on the potential of tagging collision geometries through forward neutron multiplicity measurements with a zero degree calorimeter. As a result, this type of geometry handle, if achieved, can be extremely beneficial in constraining nuclear effects for the electron-nucleus program at an electron-ion collider.

  16. Photon-photon collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burke, D.L.

    1982-10-01

    Studies of photon-photon collisions are reviewed with particular emphasis on new results reported to this conference. These include results on light meson spectroscopy and deep inelastic e..gamma.. scattering. Considerable work has now been accumulated on resonance production by ..gamma gamma.. collisions. Preliminary high statistics studies of the photon structure function F/sub 2//sup ..gamma../(x,Q/sup 2/) are given and comments are made on the problems that remain to be solved.

  17. Microscope collision protection apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    DeNure, Charles R.

    2001-10-23

    A microscope collision protection apparatus for a remote control microscope which protects the optical and associated components from damage in the event of an uncontrolled collision with a specimen, regardless of the specimen size or shape. In a preferred embodiment, the apparatus includes a counterbalanced slide for mounting the microscope's optical components. This slide replaces the rigid mounts on conventional upright microscopes with a precision ball bearing slide. As the specimen contacts an optical component, the contacting force will move the slide and the optical components mounted thereon. This movement will protect the optical and associated components from damage as the movement causes a limit switch to be actuated, thereby stopping all motors responsible for the collision.

  18. Azimuthal anisotropy in U+U collisions at STAR

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wang, Hui; Sorensen, Paul

    2014-10-06

    The azimuthal anisotropy of particle production is commonly used in high-energy nuclear collisions to study the early evolution of the expanding system. The prolate shape of uranium nuclei makes it possible to study how the geometry of the colliding nuclei affects #12;final state anisotropies. It also provides a unique opportunity to understand how entropy is produced in heavy ion collisions. In this paper, the two- and four- particle cumulant v2 (v2{2} and v2{4}) from U+U collisions at √sNN = 193 GeV and Au+Au collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV for inclusive charged hadrons will be presented. The STAR Zero Degreemore »Calorimeters are used to select very central collisions. Differences were observed between the multiplicity dependence of v2{2} for most central Au+Au and U+U collisions. The multiplicity dependence of v2{2} in central collisions were compared to Monte Carlo Glauber model predictions and it was seen that this model cannot explain the present results. (auth)« less

  19. Azimuthal anisotropy in U+U collisions at STAR

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wang, Hui; Sorensen, Paul

    2014-10-06

    The azimuthal anisotropy of particle production is commonly used in high-energy nuclear collisions to study the early evolution of the expanding system. The prolate shape of uranium nuclei makes it possible to study how the geometry of the colliding nuclei affects final state anisotropies. It also provides a unique opportunity to understand how entropy is produced in heavy ion collisions. In this paper, the two- and four- particle cumulant v2 (v2{2} and v2{4}) from U+U collisions at √sNN = 193 GeV and Au+Au collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV for inclusive charged hadrons will be presented. The STAR Zero Degreemore » Calorimeters are used to select very central collisions. Differences were observed between the multiplicity dependence of v2{2} for most central Au+Au and U+U collisions. The multiplicity dependence of v2{2} in central collisions were compared to Monte Carlo Glauber model predictions and it was seen that this model cannot explain the present results. (auth)« less

  20. Azimuthal anisotropy in U+U collisions at STAR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Hui; Sorensen, Paul

    2014-10-06

    The azimuthal anisotropy of particle production is commonly used in high-energy nuclear collisions to study the early evolution of the expanding system. The prolate shape of uranium nuclei makes it possible to study how the geometry of the colliding nuclei affects final state anisotropies. It also provides a unique opportunity to understand how entropy is produced in heavy ion collisions. In this paper, the two- and four- particle cumulant v2 (v2{2} and v2{4}) from U+U collisions at √sNN = 193 GeV and Au+Au collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV for inclusive charged hadrons will be presented. The STAR Zero Degree Calorimeters are used to select very central collisions. Differences were observed between the multiplicity dependence of v2{2} for most central Au+Au and U+U collisions. The multiplicity dependence of v2{2} in central collisions were compared to Monte Carlo Glauber model predictions and it was seen that this model cannot explain the present results. (auth)

  1. Photon-photon collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brodsky, S.J.

    1988-07-01

    Highlights of the VIIIth International Workshop on Photon-Photon Collisions are reviewed. New experimental and theoretical results were reported in virtually every area of ..gamma gamma.. physics, particularly in exotic resonance production and tests of quantum chromodynamics where asymptotic freedom and factorization theorems provide predictions for both inclusive and exclusive ..gamma gamma.. reactions at high momentum transfer. 73 refs., 12 figs.

  2. Radiological consequences of ship collisions that might occur in U.S. Ports during the shipment of foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel to the United States in break-bulk freighters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sprung, J.L.; Bespalko, S.J.; Massey, C.D.; Yoshimura, R.; Johnson, J.D.; Reardon, P.C.; Ebert, M.W.; Gallagher D.W.

    1996-08-01

    Accident source terms, source term probabilities, consequences, and risks are developed for ship collisions that might occur in U.S. ports during the shipment of spent fuel from foreign research reactors to the United States in break-bulk freighters.

  3. Nuclear Science Division: 1993 Annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myers, W.D.

    1994-06-01

    This report describes the activities of the Nuclear Science Division for the 1993 calendar year. This was another significant year in the history of the Division with many interesting and important accomplishments. Activities for the following programs are covered here: (1) nuclear structure and reactions program; (2) the Institute for Nuclear and Particle Astrophysics; (3) relativistic nuclear collisions program; (4) nuclear theory program; (5) nuclear data evaluation program, isotope project; and (6) 88-inch cyclotron operations.

  4. RHIC operation with asymmetric collisions in 2015

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, C.; Aschenauer, C.; Atoian, G.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brown, K. A.; Bruno, D.; Connolly, R.; Ottavio, T. D.; Drees, K. A.; Fischer, W.; Gardner, C. J.; Gu, X.; Hayes, T.; Huang, H.; Laster, J. S.; Luo, Y.; Makdisi, Y.; Marr, G.; Marusic, A.; Meot, F.; Mernick, K.; Michnoff, R.; Minty, M.; Montag, C.; Morris, J.; Narayan, G.; Nayak, S.; Nemesure, S.; Pile, P.; Poblaguev, A.; Ranjbar, V.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Roser, T.; Schmidke, B.; Schoefer, V.; Severino, F.; Shrey, T.; Smith, K.; Steski, D.; Tepikian, S.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Wang, G.; White, S.; Yip, K.; Zaltsman, A.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S. Y.

    2015-08-07

    To study low-x shadowing/saturation physics as well as other nuclear effects [1], [2], proton-gold (p-Au, for 5 weeks) and proton-Aluminum (p-Al, for 2 weeks) collisions were provided for experiments in 2015 at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), with polarized proton beam in the Blue ring and Au/Al beam in the Yellow ring. The special features of the asymmetric run in 2015 will be introduced. The operation experience will be reviewed as well in the report.

  5. Ultrarelativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions at CERN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Odyniec, G.

    1989-10-01

    The aim of the NA-35 experiment is to study nuclear matter under extreme conditions. Evidence that conditions reached in 60 GeV/N and 200 GeV/N relativistic heavy ion collisions are adequate for the formation of a quark-gluon plasma where color would no longer be confined to hadronic dimensions is presented. Future plans for experiments in 1990--1991 with {sup 32}S beams and 1993 and up with Pb beams at the SPS are discussed. 26 refs., 23 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Measurement of inclusive jet production and nuclear modifications in pPb collisions at $$$\\sqrt{s_{_\\mathrm {NN}}} =5.02\\,\\mathrm{TeV} $$$ s NN = 5.02 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2016-07-04

    Inclusive jet production in pPb collisions at a nucleon-nucleon (NN) center-of-mass energy of sqrt(s[NN])=5.02 TeV is studied with the CMS detector at the LHC. A data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 35 inverse nanobarns is analyzed.The jet transverse momentum spectra are studied in seven pseudorapidity intervals covering the range -2.0

  7. Catching Collisions in the LHC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fruguiele, Claudia; Hirschauer, Jim

    2015-06-16

    Now that the Large Hadron Collider has officially turned back on for its second run, within every proton collision could emerge the next new discovery in particle physics. Learn how the detectors on the Compact Muon Solenoid, or CMS, experiment capture and track particles as they are expelled from a collision. Talking us through these collisions are Claudia Fruguiele and Jim Hirschauer of Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, the largest U.S. institution collaborating on the LHC.

  8. Numerically Solvable Model for Resonant Collisions of Electronswith Diatomic Molecules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Houfek, Karel; Rescigno, T.N.; McCurdy, C.W.

    2006-01-27

    We describe a simple model for electron-molecule collisions that has one nuclear and one electronic degree of freedom and that can be solved to arbitrarily high precision, without making the Born-Oppenheimer approximation, by employing a combination of the exterior complex scaling method and a finite-element implementation of the discrete variable representation. We compare exact cross sections for vibrational excitation and dissociative attachment with results obtained using the local complex potential approximation as commonly applied in the ''boomerang'' model, and suggest how this two-dimensional model can be used to test the underpinnings of contemporary nonlocal approximations to resonant collisions.

  9. Photon-photon collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brodsky, S.J.

    1985-01-01

    The study of photon-photon collisions has progressed enormously, stimulated by new data and new calculational tools for QCD. In the future we can expect precise determinations of ..cap alpha../sub s/ and ..lambda../sup ms/ from the ..gamma..*..gamma.. ..-->.. ..pi../sup 0/ form factor and the photon structure function, as well as detailed checks of QCD, determination of the shape of the hadron distribution amplitudes from ..gamma gamma.. ..-->.. H anti H, reconstruction of sigma/sub ..gamma gamma../ from exclusive channels at low W/sub ..gamma gamma../, definitive studies of high p/sub T/ hadron and jet production, and studies of threshold production of charmed systems. Photon-photon collisions, along with radiative decays of the psi and UPSILON, are ideal for the study of multiquark and gluonic resonances. We have emphasized the potential for resonance formation near threshold in virtually every hadronic exclusive channel, including heavy quark states c anti c c anti c, c anti c u anti u, etc. At higher energies SLC, LEP, ...) parity-violating electroweak effects and Higgs production due to equivalent Z/sup 0/ and W/sup + -/ beams from e ..-->.. eZ/sup 0/ and e ..-->.. nu W will become important. 44 references.

  10. Sixteenth International Conference on the physics of electronic and atomic collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dalgarno, A.; Freund, R.S.; Lubell, M.S.; Lucatorto, T.B.

    1989-01-01

    This report contains abstracts of papers on the following topics: photons, electron-atom collisions; electron-molecule collisions; electron-ion collisions; collisions involving exotic species; ion- atom collisions, ion-molecule or atom-molecule collisions; atom-atom collisions; ion-ion collisions; collisions involving rydberg atoms; field assisted collisions; collisions involving clusters and collisions involving condensed matter.

  11. Nuclear effects in squark production at the LHC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Espindola, Danusa B.; Mariotto, C. B.; Rodriguez, M. C.

    2013-03-25

    In this contribution we study the production of squarks. If squarks are found in proton-proton (pp) collisions at the LHC, they might also be produced in collisions involving nuclei (pA and AA collisions). Here we investigate the influence of nuclear effects in the production of squarks in nuclear collisions at the LHC, and estimate the transverse momentum dependence of the nuclear ratios R{sub pA} = (d{sigma}(pA)/d{sub pT})/A(d{sigma}(pp)/d{sub pT}) and R{sub AA} = (d{sigma}(AA)/d{sub pT})/A{sup 2}(d{sigma}(pp)/d{sub pT}). We demonstrate that depending on the magnitude of the nuclear effects, the production of squarks could be enhanced or suppressed, compared to proton-proton collisions at same energies.

  12. Coupled wavepackets study of ion-molecule collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aguillon, F.

    1996-02-25

    A semiclassical coupled wavepacket method is used to study non adiabatic dynamics of ion molecule collisions. In this method, some of the nuclear degrees of freedom are treated classically. Simultaneously, the quantal degrees of freedom are handled numerically, resulting in a coupled wavepacket description. Applications to the study of dissociative charge transfer (e.g. He{sup +}+H2{yields}He+H+H{sup +}) and non adiabatic reaction (Ar{sup +}+H2{yields}ArH{sup +}+H) are presented.

  13. Nuclear stopping and energy deposition into the central rapidity region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zingman, J.A.

    1987-08-03

    Nuclear stopping and energy deposition into the central rapidity region of ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions are studied through the application of a model incorporating hydrodynamic baryon flow coupled to a self-consistent field calculated in the flux tube model. Ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions are modeled in which the nuclei have passed through each other and as a result are charged and heated.

  14. Strangeness signals in heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Remsberg, L.P.

    1992-11-01

    The experimental data on strange meson and strange baryon production in relativistic heavy ion collisions are reviewed.

  15. Strangeness signals in heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Remsberg, L.P.

    1992-01-01

    The experimental data on strange meson and strange baryon production in relativistic heavy ion collisions are reviewed.

  16. Charmonium production in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Song, Taesoo; Han, Kyong Chol; Ko, Che Ming

    2011-09-15

    Using the two-component model that includes charmonium production from both initial nucleon-nucleon hard scattering and regeneration in the produced quark-gluon plasma, we study J/{psi} production in heavy-ion collisions at the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS), Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), and Large Hadron Collider (LHC). For the expansion dynamics of produced hot dense matter, we use a schematic viscous hydrodynamic model with the specific shear viscosity in the quark-gluon plasma and the hadronic matter taken, respectively, to be two and ten times the lower bound of 1/4{pi} suggested by the anti-de Sitter/conformal field theory (AdS/CFT) correspondence. For the initial dissociation and the subsequent thermal decay of charmonia in the hot dense matter, we use the screened Cornell potential to describe the properties of charmonia and perturbative QCD to calculate their dissociation cross sections. Including regeneration of charmonia in the quark-gluon plasma via a kinetic equation with in-medium chamonium decay widths, we obtain a good description of measured J/{psi} nuclear modification factors in Pb + Pb collisions at {radical}(s{sub NN})=1.73 GeV at SPS and in Au + Au collisions at {radical}(s{sub NN})=200 GeV at RHIC. A reasonable description of the measured nuclear modification factor of high transverse momenta J/{psi} in Pb + Pb collisions at {radical}(s{sub NN})=2.76 TeV at LHC is also obtained.

  17. Physics of Electronic and Atomic Collisions: XXI International Conference, AIP Conference Proceedings, No. 500 [APCPCS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Itikawa, Y.; Okuno, K.; Tanaka, H.; Yagishita, A.; Matsuzawa, M.

    2000-12-31

    Topics covered in this conference included collisions involving photons, collisions involving electrons and positrons, and collisions involving heavy projectiles.

  18. {phi} meson production in Au + Au and p + p collisions at {radical}s{sub NN}=200 GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, J.; Adler, C.; Aggarwal, M.M.; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett, J.; Anderson, B.D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G.S.; Badyal, S.K.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L.S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, V.V.; Bellwied, R.; Berger, J.; Bezverkhny, B.I.; Bhardwaj, S.; Bhati, A.K.; Bichsel, H.; Billmeier, A.; Bland, L.C.; Blyth, C.O.; Bonner, B.E.; Botje, M.; Boucham, A.; Brandin, A.; Bravar, A.; Cadman, R.V.; Cai, X.Z.; Caines, H.; Calderon de la Barca Sanchez, M.; Carroll, J.; Castillo, J.; Cebra, D.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H.F.; Chen, Y.; Chernenko, S.P.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J.P.; Cormier, T.M.; Cramer, J.G.; Crawford, H.J.; Das, D.; Das, S.; Derevschikov, A.A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Dong, W.J.; Dong, X.; Draper, J.E.; Du, F.; Dubey, A.K.; Dunin, V.B.; Dunlop, J.C.; Dutta Majumdar, M.R.; Eckardt, V.; Efimov, L.G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Faine, V.; Faivre, J.; Fatemi, R.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flierl, D.; Foley, K.J.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, C.A.; Gagunashvili, N.; Gans, J.; Ganti, M.S.; Gaudichet, L.; Germain, M.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, J.E.; Grachov, O.; Grebenyuk, O.; Gronstal, S.; Grosnick, D.; Guedon, M.; Guertin, S.M.; Gupta, A.; Gutierrez, T.D.; Hallman, T.J.; Hamed, A.; Hardtke, D.; Harris, J.W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T.W.; Heppelmann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, G.W.; Horsley, M.; Huang, H.Z.; Huang, S.L.; Hughes, E.; Humanic, T.J.; Igo, G.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W.W.; Janik, M.; Johnson, I.; Jones, P.G.; Judd, E.G.; Kabana, S.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Khodyrev; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klay, J.; Klein, S.R.; Klyachko, A.; Koetke, D.D.; Kollegger, T.; Kopytine, S.M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kovalenko, A.D.; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravstov, V.I.; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, A.I.; Kumar, A.; Kunde, G.J.; Kunz, C.L.; Kutuev, R.Kh.; et al.

    2004-06-01

    We report the STAR measurement of {psi} meson production in Au + Au and p + p collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV. Using the event mixing technique, the {psi} spectra and yields are obtained at midrapidity for five centrality bins in Au+Au collisions and for non-singly-diffractive p+p collisions. It is found that the {psi} transverse momentum distributions from Au+Au collisions are better fitted with a single-exponential while the p+p spectrum is better described by a double-exponential distribution. The measured nuclear modification factors indicate that {psi} production in central Au+Au collisions is suppressed relative to peripheral collisions when scaled by the number of binary collisions (). The systematics of versus centrality and the constant {psi}/K{sup -} ratio versus beam species, centrality, and collision energy rule out kaon coalescence as the dominant mechanism for {psi} production.

  19. J/{psi} Production in Indium-Indium Collisions at 158 GeV/Nucleon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arnaldi, R.; Colla, A.; Cortese, P.; Ferretti, A.; Oppedisano, C.; Scomparin, E.; Banicz, K.; Damjanovic, S.; Castor, J.; Devaux, A.; Fargeix, J.; Force, P.; Manso, F.; Chaurand, B.; Cicalo, C.; De Falco, A.; Floris, M.; Masoni, A.; Puddu, G.; Serci, S.

    2007-09-28

    The NA60 experiment studies muon pair production at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron. In this Letter we report on a precision measurement of J/{psi} in In-In collisions. We have studied the J/{psi} centrality distribution, and we have compared it with the one expected if absorption in cold nuclear matter were the only active suppression mechanism. For collisions involving more than {approx}80 participant nucleons, we find that an extra suppression is present. This result is in qualitative agreement with previous Pb-Pb measurements by the NA50 experiment, but no theoretical explanation is presently able to coherently describe both results.

  20. Nuclear astrophysics in a q-environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coraddu, M.; Quarati, P.; Scarfone, A. M.

    2007-12-06

    Fluctuations and dynamical collisions can be responsible of non standard distributions observed in many astrophysical environments or astrophysical plasmas. In fact, since Coulomb collisions are the means to achieve equilibrium, plasmas are typically not in global thermodynamic equilibrium. We examine three different and linked problems whose solution is needed to determine parameters concerning evolution through metastable states of stars and other astrophysical systems: role of temperature and density fluctuation, electron screening of nuclear reactions and penetrability, evolution and comparison of different collision frequencies to establish the degree of deviation from the global thermodynamic equilibrium usually assumed. We indicate how these problems should be treated in a generalized environment by means of the q-generalized statistics and evaluate the collision frequencies, confirming that deviations from a global equilibrium cannot be neglected in these systems.

  1. Energy transfer upon collision of selectively excited CO{sub...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Energy transfer upon collision of selectively excited COsub 2 molecules: State-to-state ... Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Energy transfer upon collision of selectively ...

  2. Critical condition in gravitational shock wave collision and...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Critical condition in gravitational shock wave collision and heavy ion collisions Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Critical condition in gravitational shock wave ...

  3. Azimuthal anisotropy distributions in high-energy collisions...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Search Title: Azimuthal anisotropy distributions in high-energy collisions Elliptic flow in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions results from the hydrodynamic response to the...

  4. Hyperthermal Energy Collisions of CF3+ Ions With Modified Surfaces...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Hyperthermal Energy Collisions of CF3+ Ions With Modified Surfaces: Surface-Induced Dissociation Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Hyperthermal Energy Collisions of CF3+ ...

  5. Crab Waist Collision at DAFNE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milardi, C.; Alesini, D.; Biagini, M.E.; Boni, R.; Boscolo, M.; Bossi, F.; Buonomo, B.; Clozza, A.; Delle Monache, G.; Demma, T.; Di Pasquale, E.; Di Pirro, G.; Drago, A.; Gallo, A.; Ghigo, A.; Guiducci, S.; Ligi, C.; Marcellini, F.; Mazzitelli, G.; Murtas, F.; Pellegrino, L.; /Frascati /Novosibirsk, IYF /CERN /INFN, Cosenza /INFN, Rome /KEK, Tsukuba /Orsay, LAL /Rome U. /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /INFN, Rome3 /SLAC

    2011-11-30

    DAFNE is an accelerator complex consisting of a double ring lepton collider working at the c.m. energy of the {Phi}-resonance (1.02 GeV) and an injection system. In its original configuration the collider consisted of two independent rings, each {approx}97 m long, sharing two 10 m long interaction regions (IR1 and IR2) where the KLOE and FINUDA or DEAR detectors were respectively installed. A full energy injection system, including an S-band linac, 180 m long transfer lines and an accumulator/damping ring, provides fast and high efficiency electron positron injection also in topping-up mode during collisions. Recently the DAFNE collider has been upgraded in order to implement a new collision scheme based on large Piwinski angle and cancellation of the synchro-betatron resonances by means of electromagnetic sextupoles (Crab-Waist compensation). The novel approach has proved to be effective in improving beam-beam interaction and collider luminosity.

  6. Simulating Collisions for Hydrokinetic Turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richmond, Marshall C.; Romero Gomez, Pedro DJ; Rakowski, Cynthia L.

    2013-10-01

    Evaluations of blade-strike on an axial-flow Marine Hydrokinetic turbine were conducted using a conventional methodology as well as an alternative modeling approach proposed in the present document. The proposed methodology integrates the following components into a Computa- tional Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model: (i) advanced eddy-resolving flow simulations, (ii) ambient turbulence based on field data, (iii) moving turbine blades in highly transient flows, and (iv) Lagrangian particles to mimic the potential fish pathways. The sensitivity of blade-strike prob- ability to the following conditions was also evaluated: (i) to the turbulent environment, (ii) to fish size and (iii) to mean stream flow velocity. The proposed methodology provided fraction of collisions and offered the capability of analyzing the causal relationships between the flow envi- ronment and resulting strikes on rotating blades. Overall, the conventional methodology largely overestimates the probability of strike, and lacks the ability to produce potential fish and aquatic biota trajectories as they interact with the rotating turbine. By using a set of experimental corre- lations of exposure-response of living fish colliding on moving blades, the occurrence, frequency and intensity of the particle collisions was next used to calculate the survival rate of fish crossing the MHK turbine. This step indicated survival rates always greater than 98%. Although the proposed CFD framework is computationally more expensive, it provides the advantage of evaluating multiple mechanisms of stress and injury of hydrokinetic turbine devices on fish.

  7. Microsoft Word - Nuclear Theory Seminar

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Seminar, Friday, February 5th at 4:00 PM "Effects of Fluctuations in the Fireball on Jet Quenching Observables at RHIC" Ricardo Rodriguez Cyclotron Institute, Texas A&M University Abstract: In high energy nuclear collisions, jet energy loss is usually modeled with smooth, homogeneous backgrounds. We study the effect of realistic, inhomogeneous backgrounds by implementing Glauber profiles with fluctuations. We observe how the extraction of the energy loss parameter is affected by

  8. Nuclear Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Science Nuclear Science Experimental and theoretical nuclear research carried out at NERSC is driven by the quest for improving our understanding of the building blocks of...

  9. Jets and dijets in Au+Au and p+p collisions at RHIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hardtke, D.; STAR Collaboration

    2002-12-09

    Recent data from RHIC suggest novel nuclear effects in the production of high p{sub T} hadrons. We present results from the STAR detector on high p{sub T} angular correlations in Au+Au and p+p collisions at {radical}S = 200 GeV/c. These two-particle angular correlation measurements verify the presence of a partonic hard scattering and fragmentation component at high p{sub T} in both central and peripheral Au+Au collisions. When triggering on a leading hadron with p{sub T}>4 GeV, we observe a quantitative agreement between the jet cone properties in p+p and all centralities of Au+Au collisions. This quantitative agreement indicates that nearly all hadrons with p{sub T}>4 GeV/c come from jet fragmentation and that jet fragmentation properties are not substantially modified in Au+Au collisions. STAR has also measured the strength of back-to-back high p{sub T} charged hadron correlations, and observes a small suppression of the back-to-back correlation strength in peripheral collisions, and a nearly complete disappearance o f back-to-back correlations in central Au+Au events. These phenomena, together with the observed strong suppression of inclusive yields and large value of elliptic flow at high p{sub T}, are consistent with a model where high p{sub T} hadrons come from partons created near the surface of the collision region, and where partons that originate or propagate towards the center of the collision region are substantially slowed or completely absorbed.

  10. Dijet imbalance in hadronic collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boer, Danieel; Mulders, Piet J.; Pisano, Cristian

    2009-11-01

    The imbalance of dijets produced in hadronic collisions has been used to extract the average transverse momentum of partons inside the hadrons. In this paper we discuss new contributions to the dijet imbalance that could complicate or even hamper this extraction. They are due to polarization of initial state partons inside unpolarized hadrons that can arise in the presence of nonzero parton transverse momentum. Transversely polarized quarks and linearly polarized gluons produce specific azimuthal dependences of the two jets that in principle are not suppressed. Their effects cannot be isolated just by looking at the angular deviation from the back-to-back situation; rather they enter jet broadening observables. In this way they directly affect the extraction of the average transverse momentum of unpolarized partons that is thought to be extracted. We discuss appropriately weighted cross sections to isolate the additional contributions.

  11. Nuclear Astrophysics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear & Uranium Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data Status of U.S. nuclear outages (interactive) Nuclear power plants Uranium & nuclear fuel Spent nuclear fuel All nuclear data reports Analysis & Projections Major Topics Most popular Nuclear plants and reactors Projections Recurring Uranium All reports Browse by Tag Alphabetical Frequency Tag Cloud Current Issues & Trends See more › U.S. nuclear outages this summer were higher than in summer 2015

  12. Nuclear Forensics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    nuclear forensics Nuclear Forensics AMS is a Powerful Tool for Nuclear Forensics Nuclear forensics, which can be applied to both interdicted materials and debris from a nuclear explosion, is the application of laboratory analysis and interpretation to provide technical conclusions (provenance, design, etc.) about a nuclear device or interdicted nuclear material. Nuclear forensic analysts can build confidence in their conclusions by employing multiple signatures that collectively minimize the

  13. Nuclear Facilities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The nuclear sites list and map shows how DOE nuclear operations are mostly divided between nuclear weapons stockpile maintenance, research and environmental cleanup. The operations are performed within several different facilities supporting nuclear reactor operations, nuclear research, weapons disassembly, maintenance and testing, hot cell operations, nuclear material storage and processing and waste disposal.

  14. Resonance formation in photon-photon collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gidal, G.

    1988-08-01

    Recent experimental progress on resonance formation in photon-photon collisions is reviewed with particular emphasis on the pseudoscalar and tensor nonents and on the ..gamma gamma..* production of spin-one resonances. 37 refs., 17 figs., 5 tabs.

  15. Physics in Collision 2009 -- Kobe, Japan

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Dr. Yuji Yamazaki

    2010-01-08

    Dr. Yuji Yamazaki, a host of the Physics in Collision 2009 conference, and Dr. Thomas Muller, who will host the conference in 2010, talk about PIC 2009 in Kobe, Japan.

  16. Christmas burst reveals neutron star collision

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Christmas burst reveals neutron star collision Christmas burst reveals neutron star collision Called the Christmas Burst, GRB 101225A was freakishly lengthy and it produced radiation at unusually varying wavelengths. December 1, 2011 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los

  17. Coulomb collision effects on linear Landau damping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Callen, J. D.

    2014-05-15

    Coulomb collisions at rate ? produce slightly probabilistic rather than fully deterministic charged particle trajectories in weakly collisional plasmas. Their diffusive velocity scattering effects on the response to a wave yield an effective collision rate ?{sub eff} ? ? and a narrow dissipative boundary layer for particles with velocities near the wave phase velocity. These dissipative effects produce temporal irreversibility for times t???1/?{sub eff} during Landau damping of a small amplitude Langmuir wave.

  18. COMMISSIONING OF RHIC DEUTERON - GOLD COLLISIONS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SATOGATA,T.AHRENS,L.BAI,M.BEEBE-WANG,J.

    2003-05-12

    Deuteron and gold beams have been accelerated to a collision energy of {radical}s = 200 GeV/u in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), providing the first asymmetric-species collisions of this complex. Necessary changes for this mode of operation include new ramping software and asymmetric crossing angle geometries. This paper reviews machine performance, problem encountered and their solutions, and accomplishments during the 16 weeks of ramp-up and operations.

  19. Selected experimental results from heavy-ion collisions at LHC

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Singh, Ranbir; Kumar, Lokesh; Netrakanti, Pawan Kumar; Mohanty, Bedangadas

    2013-01-01

    We reviewmore » a subset of experimental results from the heavy-ion collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) facility at CERN. Excellent consistency is observed across all the experiments at the LHC (at center of mass energysNN=2.76 TeV) for the measurements such as charged particle multiplicity density, azimuthal anisotropy coefficients, and nuclear modification factor of charged hadrons. Comparison to similar measurements from the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at lower energy (sNN=200 GeV) suggests that the system formed at LHC has a higher energy density and larger system size and lives for a longer time. These measurements are compared to model calculations to obtain physical insights on the properties of matter created at the RHIC and LHC.« less

  20. Collision prediction software for radiotherapy treatments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Padilla, Laura; Pearson, Erik A.; Pelizzari, Charles A.

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: This work presents a method of collision predictions for external beam radiotherapy using surface imaging. The present methodology focuses on collision prediction during treatment simulation to evaluate the clearance of a patient’s treatment position and allow for its modification if necessary. Methods: A Kinect camera (Microsoft, Redmond, WA) is used to scan the patient and immobilization devices in the treatment position at the simulator. The surface is reconstructed using the SKANECT software (Occipital, Inc., San Francisco, CA). The treatment isocenter is marked using simulated orthogonal lasers projected on the surface scan. The point cloud of this surface is then shifted to isocenter and converted from Cartesian to cylindrical coordinates. A slab models the treatment couch. A cylinder with a radius equal to the normal distance from isocenter to the collimator plate, and a height defined by the collimator diameter is used to estimate collisions. Points within the cylinder clear through a full gantry rotation with the treatment couch at 0° , while points outside of it collide. The angles of collision are reported. This methodology was experimentally verified using a mannequin positioned in an alpha cradle with both arms up. A planning CT scan of the mannequin was performed, two isocenters were marked in PINNACLE, and this information was exported to AlignRT (VisionRT, London, UK)—a surface imaging system for patient positioning. This was used to ensure accurate positioning of the mannequin in the treatment room, when available. Collision calculations were performed for the two treatment isocenters and the results compared to the collisions detected the room. The accuracy of the Kinect-Skanect surface was evaluated by comparing it to the external surface of the planning CT scan. Results: Experimental verification results showed that the predicted angles of collision matched those recorded in the room within 0.5°, in most cases (largest deviation

  1. Modeling nuclear fusion in dense plasmas using a cryogenic non-neutral plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dubin, Daniel H. E.

    2008-05-15

    An analogy between the nuclear reaction rate in a dense neutral plasma and the energy equipartition rate in a strongly magnetized non-neutral plasma is discussed. This analogy allows the first detailed measurements of plasma screening enhancements in the strong screening and pycnonuclear regimes. In strong magnetic fields and at low temperatures, cyclotron energy, like nuclear energy, is released only through rare close collisions between charges. The probability of such collisions is enhanced by plasma screening, just as for nuclear reactions. Rate enhancements of up to 10{sup 10} are measured in simulations of equipartition, and are compared to theories of screened nuclear reactions.

  2. nuclear security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    3%2A en Shaping the future of nuclear detection http:nnsa.energy.govblogshaping-future-nuclear-detection

    Learning techniques to combat nuclear trafficking, touring the...

  3. Nuclear Science

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Engineering Education Sourcebook 2013 American Nuclear Society US Department of Energy Nuclear Science & Engineering Education Sourcebook 2013 North American Edition American Nuclear Society Education, Training, and Workforce Division US Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Editor and Founder John Gilligan Professor of Nuclear Engineering North Carolina State University Version 5.13 Welcome to the 2013 Edition of the Nuclear Science and Engineering Education (NS&EE)

  4. Measurement of K0S and K*0 in p+p, d+Au, and Cu+Cu collisions at sqrt SNN = 200 GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adare, A.; Aidala, C.

    2014-11-01

    The PHENIX experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider has performed a systematic study of K0S and K*0 meson production at midrapidity in p+p, d+Au, and Cu+Cu collisions at sqrt SNN = 200 GeV. The K0S and K*0 mesons are reconstructed via their K0S and π0(→γγ)π0 (→γγ) and K*0 → K ±#25;π± decay modes, respectively. The measured transverse-momentum spectra are used to determine the nuclear modification factor of K0S and K*0 mesons in d+Au and Cu+Cu collisions at different centralities. In the d+Au collisions, the nuclear modification factor of K0S and K*0 mesons is almost constant as a function ofmore »transverse momentum and is consistent with unity showing that cold-nuclear-matter effects do not play a significant role in the measured kinematic range. In Cu+Cu collisions, within the uncertainties no nuclear modification is registered in peripheral collisions. In central collisions, both mesons show suppression relative to the expectations from the p+p yield scaled by the number of binary nucleon-nucleon collisions in the Cu+Cu system. In the pT range 2–5 GeV/c, the strange mesons ( K0S, K*0) similarly to the #30;Φ meson with hidden strangeness, show an intermediate suppression between the more suppressed light quark mesons (π0) and the nonsuppressed baryons (p, p-bar). At higher transverse momentum, pT > 5 GeV/c, production of all particles is similarly suppressed by a factor of ≈2. (auth)« less

  5. Measurement of K0S and K*0 in p+p, d+Au, and Cu+Cu collisions at sqrt SNN = 200 GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adare, A.; Aidala, C.

    2014-11-01

    The PHENIX experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider has performed a systematic study of K0S and K*0 meson production at midrapidity in p+p, d+Au, and Cu+Cu collisions at sqrt SNN = 200 GeV. The K0S and K*0 mesons are reconstructed via their K0S and π0(→γγ)π0 (→γγ) and K*0 → K ± π± decay modes, respectively. The measured transverse-momentum spectra are used to determine the nuclear modification factor of K0S and K*0 mesons in d+Au and Cu+Cu collisions at different centralities. In the d+Au collisions, the nuclear modification factor of K0S and K*0 mesons is almost constant as a functionmore » of transverse momentum and is consistent with unity showing that cold-nuclear-matter effects do not play a significant role in the measured kinematic range. In Cu+Cu collisions, within the uncertainties no nuclear modification is registered in peripheral collisions. In central collisions, both mesons show suppression relative to the expectations from the p+p yield scaled by the number of binary nucleon-nucleon collisions in the Cu+Cu system. In the pT range 2–5 GeV/c, the strange mesons ( K0S, K*0) similarly to the Φ meson with hidden strangeness, show an intermediate suppression between the more suppressed light quark mesons (π0) and the nonsuppressed baryons (p, p-bar). At higher transverse momentum, pT > 5 GeV/c, production of all particles is similarly suppressed by a factor of ≈2. (auth)« less

  6. Nuclear Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Physics Nuclear Physics Enabling remarkable discoveries and tools that transform our understanding of energy and matter and advance national, economic, and energy security. ...

  7. nuclear enterprise

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Outlines Accomplishments in Stockpile Stewardship, Nuclear Nonproliferation, Naval Reactors and Managing the Nuclear Enterprise

    The...

  8. Spent Nuclear Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nuclear & Uranium Glossary FAQS Overview Data Status of U.S. nuclear outages (interactive) Nuclear power plants Uranium & nuclear fuel Spent nuclear fuel All nuclear data ...

  9. Nuclear Science/Nuclear Chemistry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    nuclear science nuclear chemistry Nuclear Science/Nuclear Chemistry Nuclear Physics The 10-MV tandem accelerator at CAMS provides a platform for conducting nuclear physics experiment both for basic science and lab mission-related programs. For example, we performed a new cross section measurement of the astrophysically important reaction 40Ca(a,g)44Ti in which high purity CaO targets were irradiated with helium ions at several different discrete energies. The reaction rate was measured on-line

  10. Collision-spike sputtering of Au nanoparticles

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sandoval, Luis; Urbassek, Herbert M.

    2015-08-06

    Ion irradiation of nanoparticles leads to enhanced sputter yields if the nanoparticle size is of the order of the ion penetration depth. While this feature is reasonably well understood for collision-cascade sputtering, we explore it in the regime of collision-spike sputtering using molecular-dynamics simulation. For this specific case of 200-keV Xe bombardment of Au particles, we show that collision spikes lead to abundant sputtering with an average yield of 397 ± 121 atoms compared to only 116 ± 48 atoms for a bulk Au target. Only around 31% of the impact energy remains in the nanoparticles after impact; the remaindermore » is transported away by the transmitted projectile and the ejecta. The sputter yield of supported nanoparticles is estimated to be around 80% of that of free nanoparticles due to the suppression of forward sputtering.« less

  11. Collision-spike sputtering of Au nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sandoval, Luis; Urbassek, Herbert M.

    2015-08-06

    Ion irradiation of nanoparticles leads to enhanced sputter yields if the nanoparticle size is of the order of the ion penetration depth. While this feature is reasonably well understood for collision-cascade sputtering, we explore it in the regime of collision-spike sputtering using molecular-dynamics simulation. For this specific case of 200-keV Xe bombardment of Au particles, we show that collision spikes lead to abundant sputtering with an average yield of 397 ± 121 atoms compared to only 116 ± 48 atoms for a bulk Au target. Only around 31% of the impact energy remains in the nanoparticles after impact; the remainder is transported away by the transmitted projectile and the ejecta. The sputter yield of supported nanoparticles is estimated to be around 80% of that of free nanoparticles due to the suppression of forward sputtering.

  12. Rapidity dependence in holographic heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilke van der Schee; Schenke, Bjorn

    2015-12-11

    We present an attempt to closely mimic the initial stage of heavy ion collisions within holography, assuming a decoupling of longitudinal and transverse dynamics in the very early stage. We subsequently evolve the obtained initial state using state-of-the-art hydrodynamic simulations and compare results with experimental data. We present results for charged hadron pseudorapidity spectra and directed and elliptic flow as functions of pseudorapidity for √sNN = 200GeV Au-Au and 2.76TeV Pb-Pb collisions. As a result, the directed flow interestingly turns out to be quite sensitive to the viscosity. The results can explain qualitative features of the collisions, but the rapidity spectra in our current model is narrower than the experimental data.

  13. Rapidity dependence in holographic heavy ion collisions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wilke van der Schee; Schenke, Bjorn

    2015-12-11

    We present an attempt to closely mimic the initial stage of heavy ion collisions within holography, assuming a decoupling of longitudinal and transverse dynamics in the very early stage. We subsequently evolve the obtained initial state using state-of-the-art hydrodynamic simulations and compare results with experimental data. We present results for charged hadron pseudorapidity spectra and directed and elliptic flow as functions of pseudorapidity for √sNN = 200GeV Au-Au and 2.76TeV Pb-Pb collisions. As a result, the directed flow interestingly turns out to be quite sensitive to the viscosity. The results can explain qualitative features of the collisions, but the rapiditymore » spectra in our current model is narrower than the experimental data.« less

  14. Time-dependent Hartree-Fock description of heavy-ion collisions. Progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krieger, S.J.

    1982-01-01

    Given the theoretical difficulties in establishing the validity of the TDHF approximation, it is perhaps most effective at this time to assess the results of the TDHF calculations by comparing them, insofar as is possible, with experimental results. In this task we shall be limited by the fact that the TDHF approximation does not yield an inclusive description of nuclear reactions, but rather an exclusive description of nuclear collisions. Thus the semi-classical nature of the approximation which offers such a simple picture of certain gross properties, at the same time effectively prohibits the acquisition of detailed channel information. In spite of this we shall still succeed in showing rather good agreement between theory and experiment for the particular reactions which result in fusion or in deep inelastic collisions. The structure of this review is as follows. The TDHF equations are derived and briefly discussed. The effective interaction employed in the calculations is described, and some technical aspects of the calculations are discussed. Fusion results are presented along with a brief discussion of deep inelastic collisions. Finally, the results are summarized. (WHK)

  15. Intelligent Sensor Tasking for Space Collision Mitigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olivier, S S; Pertica, A J; Henderson, J R

    2010-04-01

    Orbital collisions pose a hazard to space operations. Using a high performance computer modeling and simulation environment for space situational awareness, we explore a new paradigm for improving satellite conjunction analysis by obtaining more precise orbital information only for those objects that pose a collision risk greater than a defined threshold to a specific set of satellites during a specified time interval. In particular, we assess the improvement in the quality of the conjunction analysis that can be achieved using a distributed network of ground-based telescopes.

  16. Nuclear Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Stationary Power/Nuclear Energy Nuclear Energy Tara Camacho-Lopez 2016-06-29T14:02:38+00:00 Contributing to the Next Generation of Nuclear Power Generation Our nuclear energy and fuel cycle technologies supports the safe, secure, reliable, and sustainable use of nuclear power worldwide through strengths in repository science, nonproliferation, safety and security, transportation, modeling, and system demonstrations. Areas of Expertise Defense Waste Management Sandia advises the U.S. Department

  17. Nuclear Energy!

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Energy Technical Assistance Nuclear Energy Technical Assistance "The United States will continue to promote the safe and secure use of nuclear power worldwide through a variety of bilateral and multilateral engagements. For example, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission advises international partners on safety and regulatory best practices, and the Department of Energy works with international partners on research and development, nuclear waste and storage, training, regulations,

  18. Initial conditions dependency in heavy-quarks suppression in ultra-relativistic collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alves Garcia Prado, Caio; Alarcon do Passo Suaide, Alexandre

    2013-05-06

    Heavy quark suppression in central Au+Au collisions is expected to be smaller than that of light quarks. However experimental data suggest that they are evenly suppressed. We propose considering fluctuations in the medium as they may lead to high-density regions which in turn can cause a considerable quark suppression at the early stages of the collision evolution. To analyse the overall effect of these fluctuations we perform computer simulations of charm and bottom propagating through the quark-gluon plasma and obtain estimates of the nuclear modification factor R{sub AA}. This quantity gives us information about the heavy quark suppression that can be compared to published experimental data from the STAR experiment.

  19. Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards System | National Nuclear...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    About Our Programs Nuclear Security Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards System NMMSS U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Nuclear Materials ...

  20. Single and double photonuclear excitations in Pb+Pb collisions at {radical}(s{sub NN})=2.76 TeV at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Djuvsland, Oystein; Nystrand, Joakim

    2011-04-15

    Cross sections are calculated for single and double photon exchange in ultraperipheral Pb+Pb collisions at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. The particle production is simulated with the DPMJET event generator. Large cross sections are found for particle production around midrapidity, making these processes an important background to hadronic nuclear interactions at both the trigger and analysis levels.

  1. Nuclear Navy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-12-31

    This video tells the story of the Navy`s development of nuclear power and its application in long-range submarines and the growing nuclear surface force. Narrated by Frank Blair.

  2. Collision lifetimes of polyatomic molecules at low temperatures: Benzenebenzene vs benzenerare gas atom collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cui, Jie; Krems, Roman V.; Li, Zhiying

    2014-10-28

    We use classical trajectory calculations to study the effects of the interaction strength and the geometry of rigid polyatomic molecules on the formation of long-lived collision complexes at low collision energies. We first compare the results of the calculations for collisions of benzene molecules with rare gas atoms He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe. The comparison illustrates that the mean lifetimes of the collision complexes increase monotonically with the strength of the atommolecule interaction. We then compare the results of the atombenzene calculations with those for benzenebenzene collisions. The comparison illustrates that the mean lifetimes of the benzenebenzene collision complexes are significantly reduced due to non-ergodic effects prohibiting the molecules from sampling the entire configuration space. We find that the thermally averaged lifetimes of the benzenebenzene collisions are much shorter than those for Xe with benzene and similar to those for Ne with benzene.

  3. Determination of the structure of the X(3872) in anti pA collisions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Larionov, A. B.; Strikman, M.; Bleicher, M.

    2015-07-22

    The structure of the X(3872) meson is unknown. Different competing models of the cc exotic state X(3872) exist, including the possibilities that this state is either a mesonic molecule with dominating D0D*0 + c.c. composition, a ccqq tetraquark, or a cc-gluon hybrid state. It is expected that the X(3872) state is rather strongly coupled to the pp channel and, therefore, can be produced in pp and pA collisions at PANDA. We propose to test the hypothetical molecular structure of X(3872) by studying the D or D* source stripping reactions on a nuclear residue.

  4. TWO-PHOTON PHYSICS IN NUCLEUS-NUCLEUS COLLISIONS AT RHIC.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NYSTRAND,J.

    1998-09-10

    Ultra-relativistic heavy-ions carry strong electromagnetic and nuclear fields. Interactions between these fields in peripheral nucleus-nucleus collisions can probe many interesting physics topics. This presentation will focus on coherent two-photon and photonuclear processes at RHIC. The rates for these interactions will be high. The coherent coupling of all the protons in the nucleus enhances the equivalent photon flux by a factor Z{sup 2} up to an energy of {approx} 3 GeV. The plans for studying coherent interactions with the STAR experiment will be discussed. Experimental techniques for separating signal from background will be presented.

  5. Theory of Electron-Ion Collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donald C. Griffin

    2009-10-02

    Collisions of electrons with atoms and ions play a crucial role in the modeling and diagnostics of fusion plasmas. In the edge and divertor regions of magnetically confined plasmas, data for the collisions of electrons with neutral atoms and low charge-state ions are of particular importance, while in the inner region, data on highly ionized species are needed. Since experimental measurements for these collisional processes remain very limited, data for such processes depend primarily on the results of theoretical calculations. Over the period of the present grant (January 2006 ?? August 2009), we have made additional improvements in our parallel scattering programs, generated data of direct fusion interest and made these data available on The Controlled Fusion Atomic Data Center Web site at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. In addition, we have employed these data to do collsional-radiative modeling studies in support of a variety of experiments with magnetically confined fusion plasmas.

  6. Femtoscopy in Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lisa, M; Pratt, S; Soltz, R A; Wiedemann, U

    2005-07-29

    Analyses of two-particle correlations have provided the chief means for determining spatio-temporal characteristics of relativistic heavy ion collisions. We discuss the theoretical formalism behind these studies and the experimental methods used in carrying them out. Recent results from RHIC are put into context in a systematic review of correlation measurements performed over the past two decades. The current understanding of these results are discussed in terms of model comparisons and overall trends.

  7. Gravity waves from cosmic bubble collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salem, Michael P.; Saraswat, Prashant; Shaghoulian, Edgar E-mail: ps88@stanford.edu

    2013-02-01

    Our local Hubble volume might be contained within a bubble that nucleated in a false vacuum with only two large spatial dimensions. We study bubble collisions in this scenario and find that they generate gravity waves, which are made possible in this context by the reduced symmetry of the global geometry. These gravity waves would produce B-mode polarization in the cosmic microwave background, which could in principle dominate over the inflationary background.

  8. Cross Sections for Electron Collisions with Methane

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Song, Mi-Young Yoon, Jung-Sik; Cho, Hyuck; Itikawa, Yukikazu; Karwasz, Grzegorz P.; Kokoouline, Viatcheslav; Nakamura, Yoshiharu; Tennyson, Jonathan

    2015-06-15

    Cross section data are compiled from the literature for electron collisions with methane (CH{sub 4}) molecules. Cross sections are collected and reviewed for total scattering, elastic scattering, momentum transfer, excitations of rotational and vibrational states, dissociation, ionization, and dissociative attachment. The data derived from swarm experiments are also considered. For each of these processes, the recommended values of the cross sections are presented. The literature has been surveyed through early 2014.

  9. Photon-Photon Collisions -- Past and Future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; /SLAC

    2005-12-02

    I give a brief review of the history of photon-photon physics and a survey of its potential at future electron-positron colliders. Exclusive hadron production processes in photon-photon and electron-photon collisions provide important tests of QCD at the amplitude level, particularly as measures of hadron distribution amplitudes. There are also important high energy {gamma}{gamma} and e{gamma} tests of quantum chromodynamics, including the production of jets in photon-photon collisions, deeply virtual Compton scattering on a photon target, and leading-twist single-spin asymmetries for a photon polarized normal to a production plane. Since photons couple directly to all fundamental fields carrying the electromagnetic current including leptons, quarks, W's and supersymmetric particles, high energy {gamma}{gamma} collisions will provide a comprehensive laboratory for Higgs production and exploring virtually every aspect of the Standard Model and its extensions. High energy back-scattered laser beams will thus greatly extend the range of physics of the International Linear Collider.

  10. Effects of overlapping strings in pp collisions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bierlich, Christian; Gustafson, Gösta; Lönnblad, Leif; Tarasov, Andrey

    2015-03-26

    In models for hadron collisions based on string hadronization, the strings are usually treated as independent, allowing no interaction between the confined colour fields. In studies of nucleus collisions it has been suggested that strings close in space can fuse to form "colour ropes." Such ropes are expected to give more strange particles and baryons, which also has been suggested as a signal for plasma formation. Overlapping strings can also be expected in pp collisions, where usually no phase transition is expected. In particular at the high LHC energies the expected density of strings is quite high. To investigate possiblemore » effects of rope formation, we present a model in which strings are allowed to combine into higher multiplets, giving rise to increased production of baryons and strangeness, or recombine into singlet structures and vanish. Also a crude model for strings recombining into junction structures is considered, again giving rise to increased baryon production. The models are implemented in the DIPSY MC event generator, using PYTHIA8 for hadronization, and comparison to pp minimum bias data, reveals improvement in the description of identified particle spectra.« less

  11. Effects of overlapping strings in pp collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bierlich, Christian; Gustafson, Gösta; Lönnblad, Leif; Tarasov, Andrey

    2015-03-26

    In models for hadron collisions based on string hadronization, the strings are usually treated as independent, allowing no interaction between the confined colour fields. In studies of nucleus collisions it has been suggested that strings close in space can fuse to form "colour ropes." Such ropes are expected to give more strange particles and baryons, which also has been suggested as a signal for plasma formation. Overlapping strings can also be expected in pp collisions, where usually no phase transition is expected. In particular at the high LHC energies the expected density of strings is quite high. To investigate possible effects of rope formation, we present a model in which strings are allowed to combine into higher multiplets, giving rise to increased production of baryons and strangeness, or recombine into singlet structures and vanish. Also a crude model for strings recombining into junction structures is considered, again giving rise to increased baryon production. The models are implemented in the DIPSY MC event generator, using PYTHIA8 for hadronization, and comparison to pp minimum bias data, reveals improvement in the description of identified particle spectra.

  12. Multilevel Monte Carlo simulation of Coulomb collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosin, M.S.; Ricketson, L.F.; Dimits, A.M.; Caflisch, R.E.; Cohen, B.I.

    2014-10-01

    We present a new, for plasma physics, highly efficient multilevel Monte Carlo numerical method for simulating Coulomb collisions. The method separates and optimally minimizes the finite-timestep and finite-sampling errors inherent in the Langevin representation of the Landau–Fokker–Planck equation. It does so by combining multiple solutions to the underlying equations with varying numbers of timesteps. For a desired level of accuracy ε, the computational cost of the method is O(ε{sup −2}) or O(ε{sup −2}(lnε){sup 2}), depending on the underlying discretization, Milstein or Euler–Maruyama respectively. This is to be contrasted with a cost of O(ε{sup −3}) for direct simulation Monte Carlo or binary collision methods. We successfully demonstrate the method with a classic beam diffusion test case in 2D, making use of the Lévy area approximation for the correlated Milstein cross terms, and generating a computational saving of a factor of 100 for ε=10{sup −5}. We discuss the importance of the method for problems in which collisions constitute the computational rate limiting step, and its limitations.

  13. Measurement of prompt D-meson production in p–Pb collisions at sNN=5.02TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abelev, B.; Adam, J.; Adamová, D.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Agnello, M.; Agostinelli, A.; Agrawal, N.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahmad, N.; et al

    2014-12-04

    The pT-differential production cross sections of the prompt charmed mesons D⁰, D⁺, D*⁺, and D⁺s and their charge conjugate in the rapidity interval −0.96 < ycms < 0.04 were measured in p−Pb collisions at a center-of-mass energy √sNN = 5.02  TeV with the ALICE detector at the LHC. The nuclear modification factor RpPb, quantifying the D-meson yield in p−Pb collisions relative to the yield in pp collisions scaled by the number of binary nucleon-nucleon collisions, is compatible within the 15%–20% uncertainties with unity in the transverse momentum interval 1 < pT < 24  GeV/c. No significant difference among the RpPb of themore » four D-meson species is observed. The results are described within uncertainties by theoretical calculations that include initial-state effects. The measurement adds experimental evidence that the modification of the momentum spectrum of D mesons observed in Pb-Pb collisions with respect to pp collisions is due to strong final-state effects induced by hot partonic matter.« less

  14. Investigating the Nuclear Equation of State through N/Z Equilibration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yennello, S.; Keksis, A.; Bell, E.

    2007-10-26

    The equilibration of the N/Z degree of freedom during heavy-ion collisions can be a discriminating observables for helping to understand the nuclear equation of state. Equilibration can be investigated by examining the ratios of isotopes produced in these reactions. The isotope ratio method and the tracer method yield consistent results. The quasiprojectiles produced in deep inelastic collisions are predicted to be sensitive to the density dependence of the equation of state.

  15. J/{psi} production in indium-indium collisions at SPS energies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pillot, P.; Ducroux, L.; Guichard, A.; Tieulent, R.; Arnaldi, R.; Colla, A.; Cortese, P.; Ferretti, A.; Oppedisano, C.; Scomparin, E.; Averbeck, R.; Drees, A.; Banicz, K.; Keil, M.; Castor, J.; Devaux, A.; Force, P.; Manso, F.; Chaurand, B.; Cicalo, C.

    2006-01-12

    The NA60 experiment collected data on dimuon production in indium-indium collisions at 158 GeV/c per incident nucleon, in year 2003, to contribute to the clarification of several questions raised by previous experiments studying high-energy heavy-ion physics at the CERN SPS in search of the quark gluon plasma. Among these previous results stands the observation, by NA50, that the production yield of J/{psi} mesons is suppressed in central Pb-Pb collisions beyond the normal nuclear absorption defined by proton-nucleus data. By comparing the centrality dependence of the suppression pattern between different colliding systems, S-U, Pb-Pb and In-In, we should be able to identify the corresponding scaling variable, and the physics mechanism driving the suppression. In this paper, we will present the ratio of J/{psi} and Drell-Yan production cross-sections in indium-indium collisions, in three centrality bins, and how these values compare to previous measurements. We will also present a study of the transverse momentum distributions of the J/{psi} mesons, in seven centrality bins.

  16. Chemistry-nuclear chemistry division. Progress report, October 1979-September 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryan, R.R. (comp.)

    1981-05-01

    This report presents the research and development programs pursued by the Chemistry-Nuclear Chemistry Division of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Topics covered include advanced analytical methods, atmospheric chemistry and transport, biochemistry, biomedical research, element migration and fixation, inorganic chemistry, isotope separation and analysis, atomic and molecular collisions, molecular spectroscopy, muonic x rays, nuclear cosmochemistry, nuclear structure and reactions, radiochemical separations, theoretical chemistry, and unclassified weapons research.

  17. Introduction to the study of collisions between heavy nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bayman, B.F.

    1980-01-01

    Current investigations concerning the collisions of nuclei governed by small de Broglie wavelengths are reviewed. The wave packets localize nuclei in regions small compared to their diameters. Cross sections are examined for potential scattering, elastic scattering, quasi-molecular states, peripheral particle-transfer reactions, fusion, and deep inelastic collisions. Theories of fusion and deep inelastic collisions are summarized. This paper is in the nature of a review-tutorial. 45 references, 51 figures, 2 tables. (RWR)

  18. Revisiting heavy ion collisions under the influence of strong magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paoli, M. G. de; Menezes, D. P.

    2013-05-06

    The quark-gluon plasma (QGP) phase refers to matter where quarks and gluons are believed to be deconfined and it probably takes place at temperatures of the order of 150 to 170 MeV. In large colliders around the world (RHIC/BNL, ALICE/CERN, GSI, etc), physicists are trying to convert hadronic matter at these order of temperatures into QGP by looking at non-central heavy ion collisions. Possible experiments towards this search are Au-Au collisions at RHIC/BNL and Pb-Pb collisions at SPS/CERN, where the hadron abundances and particle ratios are used in order to determine the temperature and baryonic chemical potential of the possibly present hadronic matter-QGP phase transition. The magnetic fields involved in heavy-ion collisions, although time dependent and short-lived, can reach intensities higher than the ones considered in magnetars, around 1.7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} to 10{sup 20} Gauss. In fact, the densities related to the chemical potentials obtained within the relativistic models framework developed in previous works are very low (of the order of 10{sup -3} fm{sup -3}). At these densities the nuclear interactions are indeed very small and this fact made us consider the possibility of free Fermi and Boson gases under the unfluence of strong magnetic fields. We investigate the effects of magnetic fields of the order of 10{sup 18}, 10{sup 19} and 10{sup 20} G through a {chi}{sup 2} fit to some data sets of the STAR experiment. Our results shown that a field of the order of 10{sup 19} G can produce a much better fit to the experimental data than the calculations without magnetic fields.

  19. Nuclear Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Physics Nuclear Physics Enabling remarkable discoveries and tools that transform our understanding of energy and matter and advance national, economic, and energy security. Isotopes» A roadmap of matter that will help unlock the secrets of how the universe is put together The DOE Office of Science's Nuclear Physics (NP) program supports the experimental and theoretical research needed to create this roadmap. This quest requires a broad approach to different, but related, scientific

  20. Nuclear Structure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Security Administration | (NNSA) Nuclear Security Centers of Excellence: Fact Sheet March 23, 2012 "We [the Participating States]... Acknowledge the need for capacity building for nuclear security and cooperation at bilateral, regional and multilateral levels for the promotion of nuclear security culture through technology development, human resource development, education, and training; and stress the importance of optimizing international cooperation and coordination of

  1. Nuclear Counterterrorism

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2013-08-26

    The Order defines requirements for the protection of sensitive improvised nuclear device information and provides a framework to support DOE activities related to nuclear counterterrorism. (A supplemental DOE Manual, Control of and Access to Improvised Nuclear Device Information, provides requirements and procedures for protecting Sigma 20 information.) Appendices A and B are Official Use Only. Point of contact is Adam Boyd (NA-82), 202-586-0010. Supersedes DOE O 457.1 and DOE M 457.1-1.

  2. Hydrodynamic evolution and jet energy loss in Cu + Cu collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schenke, Bjoern; Jeon, Sangyong; Gale, Charles

    2011-04-15

    We present results from a hybrid description of Cu + Cu collisions using (3 + 1)-dimensional hydrodynamics (music) for the bulk evolution and a Monte Carlo simulation (martini) for the evolution of high-momentum partons in the hydrodynamical background. We explore the limits of this description by going to small system sizes and determine the dependence on different fractions of wounded nucleon and binary collisions scaling of the initial energy density. We find that Cu + Cu collisions are well described by the hybrid description at least up to 20% central collisions.

  3. Azimuthal anisotropy distributions in high-energy collisions...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    the National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA at www.ntis.gov. Elliptic flow in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions results from the hydrodynamic response to the...

  4. Can CP violation be observed in heavy-ion collisions?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khriplovich, I. B. Rudenko, A. S.

    2012-09-15

    We demonstrate that, at least at present, there is no convincing way to detect CP violation in heavy-ion collisions.

  5. NUCLEAR ENERGY

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    NUCLEAR ENERGY RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT ROADMAP Table of Contents List of Acronyms ................................................................................................... iii Executive Summary ............................................................................................... v 1. Introduction ...................................................................................................... 1 2. Background

  6. nuclear smuggling

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    13, 2015

    SHANGHAI, CHINA - Today, the Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA) Principal Assistant Deputy Administrator for Defense...

  7. nuclear material

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    width"300" >WASHINGTON, D.C. - The Department of Energy's (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), in partnership with the Defense Threat Reduction...

  8. nuclear weapons

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    09, 2015

    WASHINGTON, D.C. - The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and United States Air Force completed eight successful...

  9. nuclear controls

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    which "international safeguards are fully integrated into the design process of a new nuclear facility from the initial planning through design, construction, operation, and...

  10. nuclear forensics

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    serves as the premier technical leader in responding to and successfully resolving nuclear and radiological threats worldwide. When the need arises, NNSA is prepared to...

  11. Cold Nuclear Matter Effects at PHENIX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wysocki, Matthew G; PHENIX, Collaboration

    2013-01-01

    While the study of the quark-gluon plasma has been the primary focus of the RHIC experiments, much work has also been done to understand so-called cold nuclear matter (CNM) eects through d+Au collisions where no hot plasma is produced. Eects such as nuclear shadowing, Cronin enhancement, and initial-state parton energy loss, among others, are not only interesting in their own right, but have direct implications on QGP-related measurements in A+A collisions. Recently PHENIX has measured CNM eects at midrapidity in s_NN = 200 GeV d+Au collisions. Measurements of reconstructed jets reveal the centrality dependence of both jet suppression and broadening of the away-side jet. Meanwhile, single electrons from heavy flavor decays exhibit enhancement, increasing with centrality, over a broad p_T range. J/psi and psi' modification have also been measured and are quite dierent in magnitude, in contrast with our expectations. The above results are presented here and compared to our present understanding of CNM effects.

  12. Theoretical analysis of integral neutron transport equation using collision probability method with quadratic flux approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shafii, Mohammad Ali Meidianti, Rahma Wildian, Fitriyani, Dian; Tongkukut, Seni H. J.; Arkundato, Artoto

    2014-09-30

    Theoretical analysis of integral neutron transport equation using collision probability (CP) method with quadratic flux approach has been carried out. In general, the solution of the neutron transport using the CP method is performed with the flat flux approach. In this research, the CP method is implemented in the cylindrical nuclear fuel cell with the spatial of mesh being conducted into non flat flux approach. It means that the neutron flux at any point in the nuclear fuel cell are considered different each other followed the distribution pattern of quadratic flux. The result is presented here in the form of quadratic flux that is better understanding of the real condition in the cell calculation and as a starting point to be applied in computational calculation.

  13. Research in theoretical nuclear and neutrino physics. Final report

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Research in theoretical nuclear and neutrino physics. Final report Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Research in theoretical nuclear and neutrino physics. Final report The main focus of the research supported by the nuclear theory grant DE-FG02-04ER41319 was on studying parton dynamics in high-energy heavy ion collisions, perturbative approach to charm production and its contribution to atmospheric neutrinos, application of AdS/CFT approach to

  14. Nuclear Science Division annual report, July 1, 1981-September 30, 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahoney, J.

    1983-06-01

    This report summarizes the scientific research carried out within the Nuclear Science Division between July 1, 1981, and September 30, 1982. Heavy-ion investigations continue to dominate the experimental and theoretical research efforts. Complementary programs in light-ion nuclear science, in nuclear data evaluation, and in the development of advanced instrumentation are also carried out. Results from Bevalac experiments employing a wide variety of heavy ion beams, along with new or upgraded detector facilities (HISS, the Plastic Ball, and the streamer chamber) are contained in this report. These relativistic experiments have shed important light on the degree of equilibration for central collisions, the time evolution of a nuclear collision, the nuclear density and compressional energy of these collisions, and strange particle production. Reaction mechanism work dominates the heavy-ion research at the 88-Inch Cyclotron and the SuperHILAC. Recent experiments have contributed to our understanding of the nature of light-particle emission in deep-inelastic collisions, of peripheral reactions, incomplete fusion, fission, and evaporation. Nuclear structure investigations at these accelerators continue to be directed toward the understanding of the behavior of nuclei at high angular momentum. Research in the area of exotic nuclei has led to the observation at the 88-Inch Cyclotron of the ..beta..-delayed proton decay of odd-odd T/sub z/ = -2 nuclides; ..beta..-delayed proton emitters in the rare earth region are being investigated at the SuperHILAC.

  15. IEA Wind Task 34 (WREN) Quarterly Webinar #3: Understanding Avian Collision Rate Modeling

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Wind farms can impact birds through collisions. Collision rate models have been developed to estimate the perceived risk to birds and the potential number of collisions within proposed wind farms....

  16. Nuclear Weapons Journal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Weapons Journal Nuclear Weapons Journal The Nuclear Weapons Journal ceased publication after Issue 2, 2009. Below are Nuclear Weapons Journal archived issues. Issue 2, 2009 ...

  17. 2013 Nuclear Workforce Development ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Myths Topics: Can a Nuclear Reactor Explode Like a Bomb? Will Nuclear Waste Be Around for Millions of Years? Is Nuclear Energy Dangerous? Moderator: Suzy Hobbs ...

  18. Chemistry-Nuclear Chemistry Division. Progress report, October 1980-September 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryan, R.R.

    1982-05-01

    This report describes major progress in the research and development programs pursued by the Chemistry-Nuclear Chemistry Division of the Los Alamos National Laboratory during FY 1981. Topics covered include advanced analytical methods, atmospheric chemistry and transport, biochemistry, biomedical research, medical radioisotopes research, element migration and fixation, nuclear waste isolation research, inorganic and structural chemistry, isotope separation, analysis and applications, the newly established Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Center, atomic and molecular collisions, molecular spectroscopy, nuclear cosmochemistry, nuclear structure and reactions, pion charge exchange, radiochemical separations, theoretical chemistry, and unclassified weapons research.

  19. Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty | National Nuclear Security Administra...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy ... Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty The Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons off ...

  20. Nuclear Nonproliferation, International Safeguards and Nuclear...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Nuclear Nonproliferation, International Safeguards and Nuclear Security in the Middle East Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Nuclear Nonproliferation, ...

  1. Nuclear Nonproliferation, International Safeguards and Nuclear...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Nuclear Nonproliferation, International Safeguards and Nuclear Security in the Middle East Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Nuclear Nonproliferation, International ...

  2. nuclear | National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    nuclear Nuclear Science Week releases 2015 Impact Report and 2016 Request for Proposal Last week the Nuclear Science Week (NSW) National Steering Committee released its impact ...

  3. Chernobyl Nuclear Accident | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Chernobyl Nuclear Accident Chernobyl Nuclear Accident Chernobyl, Ukraine A catastrophic nuclear accident occurs at Chernobyl Reactor 4 in the then Soviet Republic of Ukraine

  4. Nuclear Nonproliferation Program Offices | National Nuclear Security...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy ... and monitor nuclear weapons production, proliferation, and nuclear explosions worldwide. ...

  5. Φ meson production in d+Au collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adare, A.

    2015-10-19

    The PHENIX Collaboration has measured Φ meson production in d+Au collisions at √sNN=200 GeV using the dimuon and dielectron decay channels. The Φ meson is measured in the forward (backward) d-going (Au-going) direction, 1.2 T) range from 1–7 GeV/c and at midrapidity |y|T range below 7 GeV/c. The Φ meson invariant yields and nuclear-modification factors as a function of pT, rapidity, and centrality are reported. An enhancement of Φ meson production is observed in the Au-going direction, while suppression is seen in the d-going direction,more »and no modification is observed at midrapidity relative to the yield in p+p collisions scaled by the number of binary collisions. As a result, similar behavior was previously observed for inclusive charged hadrons and open heavy flavor, indicating similar cold-nuclear-matter effects.« less

  6. Φ meson production in d+Au collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adare, A.

    2015-10-19

    The PHENIX Collaboration has measured Φ meson production in d+Au collisions at √sNN=200 GeV using the dimuon and dielectron decay channels. The Φ meson is measured in the forward (backward) d-going (Au-going) direction, 1.2 < y < 2.2 (–2.2 < y < –1.2) in the transverse-momentum (pT) range from 1–7 GeV/c and at midrapidity |y|<0.35 in the pT range below 7 GeV/c. The Φ meson invariant yields and nuclear-modification factors as a function of pT, rapidity, and centrality are reported. An enhancement of Φ meson production is observed in the Au-going direction, while suppression is seen in the d-going direction, and no modification is observed at midrapidity relative to the yield in p+p collisions scaled by the number of binary collisions. As a result, similar behavior was previously observed for inclusive charged hadrons and open heavy flavor, indicating similar cold-nuclear-matter effects.

  7. Φ meson production in d+Au collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adare, A.

    2015-10-19

    The PHENIX Collaboration has measured Φ meson production in d+Au collisions at √sNN=200 GeV using the dimuon and dielectron decay channels. The Φ meson is measured in the forward (backward) d-going (Au-going) direction, 1.2 < y < 2.2 (–2.2 < y < –1.2) in the transverse-momentum (pT) range from 1–7 GeV/c and at midrapidity |y|<0.35 in the pT range below 7 GeV/c. The Φ meson invariant yields and nuclear-modification factors as a function of pT, rapidity, and centrality are reported. An enhancement of Φ meson production is observed in the Au-going direction, while suppression is seen in the d-going direction,more » and no modification is observed at midrapidity relative to the yield in p+p collisions scaled by the number of binary collisions. As a result, similar behavior was previously observed for inclusive charged hadrons and open heavy flavor, indicating similar cold-nuclear-matter effects.« less

  8. Observation of D0 meson nuclear modifications in Au+Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Anson, C. D.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Averichev, G. S.; Banerjee, A.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Borowski, W.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A. V.; Brovko, S. G.; Bültmann, S.; Bunzarov, I.; Burton, T. P.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, L.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Chwastowski, J.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Contin, G.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Cui, X.; Das, S.; Davila Leyva, A.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Derradi de Souza, R.; Dhamija, S.; di Ruzza, B.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Ding, F.; Djawotho, P.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, C. M.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Engelage, J.; Engle, K. S.; Eppley, G.; Eun, L.; Evdokimov, O.; Eyser, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Fedorisin, J.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Gliske, S.; Greiner, L.; Grosnick, D.; Gunarathne, D. S.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, S.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hamed, A.; Han, L.-X.; Haque, R.; Harris, J. W.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Horvat, S.; Huang, B.; Huang, H. Z.; Huang, X.; Huck, P.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jang, H.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kesich, A.; Khan, Z. H.; Kikola, D. P.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Konzer, J.; Koralt, I.; Kotchenda, L.; Kraishan, A. F.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, L.; Kycia, R. A.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, W.; Li, X.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Li, Z. M.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Lomnitz, M.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, X.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Madagodagettige Don, D. M. M. D.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T. S.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Mustafa, M. K.; Nandi, B. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Nigmatkulov, G.; Nogach, L. V.; Noh, S. Y.; Novak, J.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Ohlson, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldag, E. W.; Olvitt, D. L.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pan, Y. X.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Pruthi, N. K.; Przybycien, M.; Pujahari, P. R.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Riley, C. K.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Ross, J. F.; Roy, A.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Rusnakova, O.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sangaline, E.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P. V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, B.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, D.; Smirnov, N.; Solanki, D.; Sorensen, P.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stevens, J. R.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Symons, T. J. M.; Szelezniak, M. A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Trzeciak, B. A.; Tsai, O. D.; Turnau, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Vanfossen, J. A.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vertesi, R.; Videbæk, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Vossen, A.; Wada, M.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Webb, G.; Webb, J. C.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y. F.; Xiao, Z.; Xie, W.; Xin, K.; Xu, H.; Xu, J.; Xu, N.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yan, W.; Yang, C.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y.; Ye, Z.; Yepes, P.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yu, N.; Zawisza, Y.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhao, F.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhu, X.; Zhu, Y. H.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zyzak, M.

    2014-09-30

    We report the first measurement of charmed-hadron (D0) production via the hadronic decay channel (D0→K-+) in Au+Au collisions at √sNN=200 GeV with the STAR experiment. The charm production cross section per nucleon-nucleon collision at midrapidity scales with the number of binary collisions, Nbin, from p+p to central Au+Au collisions. The D0 meson yields in central Au+Aucollisions are strongly suppressed compared to those in p+p scaled by Nbin, for transverse momenta pT>3 GeV/c, demonstrating significant energy loss of charm quarks in the hot and dense medium. An enhancement at intermediate pT is also observed. Model calculations including strong charm-medium interactions and coalescence hadronization describe our measurements.

  9. Crabbed Waist Collisions in DAFNE and Super-B Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raimondi, P.; Alesini, D.; Biagini, M.E.; Biscari, C.; Boni, R.; Boscolo, M.; Bossi, F.; Buonomo, B.; Clozza, A.; Delle Monache, G.O.; Demma, T.; Di Pasquale, E.; Di Pirro, G.; Drago, A.; Gallo, A.; Ghigo, A.; Guiducci, S.; Ligi, C.; Marcellini, F.; Mazzitelli, Giovanni; Milardi, C.; /Frascati /Orsay, LAL /CERN /Rome III U. /Rome U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /KEK, Tsukuba /INFN, Pisa /INFN, Cosenza /SLAC /Frascati

    2011-11-02

    The new idea of increasing the luminosity of a collider with crab waist collisions and first experimental results from the DA{Phi}NE {Phi}-Factory at LNF, Frascati, using this concept are presented. Consequences for the design of future factories will be discussed. An outlook to the performance reach with crab waist collisions is given, with emphasis on future B Factories.

  10. Exact linearized Coulomb collision operator in the moment expansion

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ji, Jeong -Young; Held, Eric D.

    2006-10-05

    In the moment expansion, the Rosenbluth potentials, the linearized Coulomb collision operators, and the moments of the collision operators are analytically calculated for any moment. The explicit calculation of Rosenbluth potentials converts the integro-differential form of the Coulomb collision operator into a differential operator, which enables one to express the collision operator in a simple closed form for any arbitrary mass and temperature ratios. In addition, it is shown that gyrophase averaging the collision operator acting on arbitrary distribution functions is the same as the collision operator acting on the corresponding gyrophase averaged distribution functions. The moments of the collisionmore » operator are linear combinations of the fluid moments with collision coefficients parametrized by mass and temperature ratios. Furthermore, useful forms involving the small mass-ratio approximation are easily found since the collision operators and their moments are expressed in terms of the mass ratio. As an application, the general moment equations are explicitly written and the higher order heat flux equation is derived.« less

  11. Onset of radial flow in p+p collisions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jiang, Kun; Zhu, Yinying; Liu, Weitao; Chen, Hongfang; Li, Cheng; Ruan, Lijuan; Tang, Zebo; Xu, Zhangbu

    2015-02-23

    It has been debated for decades whether hadrons emerging from p+p collisions exhibit collective expansion. The signal of the collective motion in p+p collisions is not as clear as in heavy-ion collisions because of the low multiplicity and large fluctuation in p+p collisions. Tsallis Blast-Wave (TBW) model is a thermodynamic approach, introduced to handle the overwhelming correlation and fluctuation in the hadronic processes. We have systematically studied the identified particle spectra in p+p collisions from RHIC to LHC using TBW and found no appreciable radial flow in p+p collisions below ?s = 900 GeV. At LHC higher energy of 7moreTeV in p+p collisions, the radial flow velocity achieves an average of (?) = 0.320 0.005. This flow velocity is comparable to that in peripheral (40-60%) Au+Au collisions at RHIC. In addition, breaking of the identified particle spectra mT scaling was also observed at LHC from a model independent test.less

  12. Onset of radial flow in p+p collisions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jiang, Kun; Zhu, Yinying; Liu, Weitao; Chen, Hongfang; Li, Cheng; Ruan, Lijuan; Tang, Zebo; Xu, Zhangbu

    2015-02-23

    It has been debated for decades whether hadrons emerging from p+p collisions exhibit collective expansion. The signal of the collective motion in p+p collisions is not as clear as in heavy-ion collisions because of the low multiplicity and large fluctuation in p+p collisions. Tsallis Blast-Wave (TBW) model is a thermodynamic approach, introduced to handle the overwhelming correlation and fluctuation in the hadronic processes. We have systematically studied the identified particle spectra in p+p collisions from RHIC to LHC using TBW and found no appreciable radial flow in p+p collisions below √s = 900 GeV. At LHC higher energy of 7more » TeV in p+p collisions, the radial flow velocity achieves an average of (β) = 0.320 ± 0.005. This flow velocity is comparable to that in peripheral (40-60%) Au+Au collisions at RHIC. In addition, breaking of the identified particle spectra mT scaling was also observed at LHC from a model independent test.« less

  13. The 2011 Dynamics of Molecular Collisions Conference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nesbitt, David J.

    2011-07-11

    The Dynamics of Molecular Collisions Conference focuses on all aspects of molecular collisions--experimental & theoretical studies of elastic, inelastic, & reactive encounters involving atoms, molecules, ions, clusters, & surfaces--as well as half collisions--photodissociation, photo-induced reaction, & photodesorption. The scientific program for the meeting in 2011 included exciting advances in both the core & multidisciplinary forefronts of the study of molecular collision processes. Following the format of the 2009 meeting, we also invited sessions in special topics that involve interfacial dynamics, novel emerging spectroscopies, chemical dynamics in atmospheric, combustion & interstellar environments, as well as a session devoted to theoretical & experimental advances in ultracold molecular samples. Researchers working inside & outside the traditional core topics of the meeting are encouraged to join the conference. We invite contributions of work that seeks understanding of how inter & intra-molecular forces determine the dynamics of the phenomena under study. In addition to invited oral sessions & contributed poster sessions, the scientific program included a formal session consisting of five contributed talks selected from the submitted poster abstracts. The DMC has distinguished itself by having the Herschbach Medal Symposium as part of the meeting format. This tradition of the Herschbach Medal was first started in the 2007 meeting chaired by David Chandler, based on a generous donation of funds & artwork design by Professor Dudley Herschbach himself. There are two such awards made, one for experimental & one for theoretical contributions to the field of Molecular Collision Dynamics, broadly defined. The symposium is always held on the last night of the meeting & has the awardees are asked to deliver an invited lecture on their work. The 2011 Herschbach Medal was dedicated to the contributions of two long standing leaders in Chemical Physics, Professor

  14. Nuclear Counterterrorism

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2006-02-07

    The Order defines requirements for the protection of sensitive improvised nuclear device information and provides a framework to support DOE activities related to nuclear counterterrorism. (A supplemental DOE Manual, Control of and Access to Improvised Nuclear Device Information, provides requirements and procedures for protecting Sigma 20 information. The Manual is Official Use Only, and is not available on the Directives Portal. The point of contact for the Manual is Randall Weidman, NA-121.2, 202-586-4582.) Canceled by DOE O 457.1A

  15. National Nuclear Security Administration | National Nuclear Security...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    National Nuclear Security Administration | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing...

  16. RADIOCHEMISTRY, AND NUCLEAR CHEMISTRY; NUCLEAR MEDICINE; HISTORICAL

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The early days Richards, P. 38 RADIATION CHEMISTRY, RADIOCHEMISTRY, AND NUCLEAR CHEMISTRY; NUCLEAR MEDICINE; HISTORICAL ASPECTS; TECHNETIUM 99; COLLOIDS; MOLYBDENUM...

  17. Centrality dependence of high energy jets in p+Pb collisions at energies available at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bzdak, Adam; Skokov, Vladimir; Bathe, Stefan

    2016-04-08

    We investigate the recently measured centrality dependence of high energy jets in proton-lead collisions at the LHC. Here, we hypothesize that events with jets of very high energy (a few hundred GeV) are characterized by a suppressed number of soft particles, thus shifting these events into more peripheral bins. This naturally results in the suppression (enhancement) of the nuclear modification factor, RpA, in central (peripheral) collisions. Our calculations suggest that a moderate suppression of the order of 20%, for 103 GeV jets, can quantitatively reproduce the experimental data. Finally, we further extract the suppression factor as a function of jetmore » energy and test our conjecture using available RpA data for various centralities.« less

  18. Final Report for Project ``Theory of ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions''

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ulrich W. Heinz

    2012-11-09

    In the course of this project the Ohio State University group led by the PI, Professor Ulrich Heinz, developed a comprehensive theoretical picture of the dynamical evolution of ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions and of the numerous experimental observables that can be used to diagnose the evolving and short-lived hot and dense fireball created in such collisions. Starting from a qualitative understanding of the main features based on earlier research during the last decade of the twentieth century on collisions at lower energies, the group exploited newly developed theoretical tools and the stream of new high-quality data from the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory (which started operations in the summer of the year 2000) to arrive at an increasingly quantitative description of the experimentally observed phenomena. Work done at Ohio State University (OSU) was instrumental in the discovery during the years 2001-2003 that quark-gluon plasma (QGP) created in nuclear collisions at RHIC behaves like an almost perfect liquid with minimal viscosity. The tool of relativistic fluid dynamics for viscous liquids developed at OSU in the years 2005-2007 opened the possibility to quantitatively determine the value of the QGP viscosity empirically from experimental measurements of the collective flow patterns established in the collisions. A first quantitative extraction of the QGP shear viscosity, with controlled theoretical uncertainty estimates, was achieved during the last year of this project in 2010. OSU has paved the way for a transition of the field of relativistic heavy-ion physics from a qualitative discovery stage to a new stage of quantitative precision in the description of quark-gluon plasma properties. To gain confidence in the precision of our theoretical understanding of quark-gluon plasma dynamics, one must test it on a large set of experimentally measured observables. This achievement report demonstrates that we have, at

  19. K(892)* resonance production in Au+Au and p+p collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV at RHIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, J.; Aggarwal, M.M.; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett, J.; Anderson, B.D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G.S.; Badyal, S.K.; Bai, Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L.S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, V.V.; Bellwied, R.; Berger, J.; Bezverkhny, B.I.; Bharadwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A.K.; Bhatia, V.S.; Bichsel, H.; Billmeier, A.; Bland, L.C.; Blyth, C.O.; Bonner, B.E.; Botje, M.; Boucham, A.; Brandin, A.V.; Bravar, A.; Bystersky, M.; Cadman, R.V.; Cai, X.Z.; Caines, H.; Calderon de la Barca Sanchez, M.; Castillo, J.; Cebra, D.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H.F.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J.P.; Cormier, T.M.; Cramer, J.G.; Crawford, H.J.; Das, D.; Das, S.; de Moura, M.M.; Derevschikov, A.A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Dogra, S.M.; Dong, W.J.; Dong, X.; Draper, J.E.; Du, F.; Dubey, A.K.; Dunin, V.B.; Dunlop, J.C.; Dutta Mazumdar, M.R.; Eckardt, V.; Edwards, W.R.; Efimov, L.G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Faivre, J.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Fomenko, K.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, C.A.; Gaillard, L.; Gans, J.; Ganti, M.S.; Gaudichet, L.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, J.E.; Grachov, O.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Guertin, S.M.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gutierrez, T.D.; Hallman, T.J.; Hamed, A.; Hardtke, D.; Harris, J.W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T.W.; Hepplemann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, G.W.; Huang, H.Z.; Huang, S.L.; Hughes, E.W.; Humanic, T.J.; Igo, G.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W.W.; Janik, M.; Jiang, H.; Jones, P.G.; Judd, E.G.; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Khodyrev, V.Yu.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Kislov, E.M.; Klay, J.; Klein, S.R.; Koetke, D.D.; Kollegger, T.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, V.I.; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, A.I.; Kumar, A.; Kutuev, R.Kh.; et al.

    2004-12-09

    The short-lived K(892)* resonance provides an efficient tool to probe properties of the hot and dense medium produced in relativistic heavy-ion collisions. We report measurements of K* in {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV Au+Au and p+p collisions reconstructed via its hadronic decay channels K(892)*{sup 0} {yields} K{pi} and K(892)*{sup +-} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup +-} using the STAR detector at RHIC. The K*{sup 0} mass has been studied as function of p{sub T} in minimum bias p + p and central Au+Au collisions. The K* p{sub T} spectra for minimum bias p + p interactions and for Au+Au collisions in different centralities are presented. The K*/K ratios for all centralities in Au+Au collisions are found to be significantly lower than the ratio in minimum bias p + p collisions, indicating the importance of hadronic interactions between chemical and kinetic freeze-outs. The nuclear modification factor of K* at intermediate p{sub T} is similar to that of K{sub S}{sup 0}, but different from {Lambda}. This establishes a baryon-meson effect over a mass effect in the particle production at intermediate p{sub T} (2 < p{sub T} {le} 4 GeV/c). A significant non-zero K*{sup 0} elliptic flow (v{sub 2}) is observed in Au+Au collisions and compared to the K{sub S}{sup 0} and {Lambda} v{sub 2}.

  20. nuclear navy

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    7%2A en Powering the Nuclear Navy http:www.nnsa.energy.govourmissionpoweringnavy

    Page...

  1. nuclear navy

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    7%2A en Powering the Nuclear Navy http:nnsa.energy.govourmissionpoweringnavy

    Page...

  2. Nuclear option

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olson, P.S.

    1983-03-01

    The energy demand complexion of this country is always changing and promises to change in the future. The nuclear industry is responding to changing energy demands through standards writing activities. Since the oil embargo of 1973, there has been a change in the mix of fuels contributing to energy growth in this country; virtually all of the energy growth has come from coal and nuclear power. The predicted expansion of coal use by 1985, over 1977 level, is 37%, while the use of oil is expected to decline by 17%. Use of nuclear power is expected to increase 62% from the 1977 level. The feasibility of using nuclear energy to meet the needs of the USA for electric power is discussed.

  3. Nuclear Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, Morgan C.

    2014-01-23

    PowerPoint presentation targeted for educational use. Nuclear data comes from a variety of sources and in many flavors. Understanding where the data you use comes from and what flavor it is can be essential to understand and interpret your results. This talk will discuss the nuclear data pipeline with particular emphasis on providing links to additional resources that can be used to explore the issues you will encounter.

  4. Nuclear Nonproliferation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atkins-Duffin, C E

    2008-12-10

    With an explosion equivalent of about 20kT of TNT, the Trinity test was the first demonstration of a nuclear weapon. Conducted on July 16, 1945 in Alamogordo, NM this site is now a Registered National Historic Landmark. The concept and applicability of nuclear power was demonstrated on December 20, 1951 with the Experimental Breeder Reactor Number One (EBR-1) lit four light bulbs. This reactor is now a Registered National Historic Landmark, located near Arco, ID. From that moment forward it had been clearly demonstrated that nuclear energy has both peaceful and military applications and that the civilian and military fuel cycles can overlap. For the more than fifty years since the Atoms for Peace program, a key objective of nuclear policy has been to enable the wider peaceful use of nuclear energy while preventing the spread of nuclear weapons. Volumes have been written on the impact of these two actions on the world by advocates and critics; pundits and practioners; politicians and technologists. The nations of the world have woven together a delicate balance of treaties, agreements, frameworks and handshakes that are representative of the timeframe in which they were constructed and how they have evolved in time. Collectively these vehicles attempt to keep political will, nuclear materials and technology in check. This paper captures only the briefest abstract of the more significant aspects on the Nonproliferation Regime. Of particular relevance to this discussion is the special nonproliferation sensitivity associated with the uranium isotope separation and spent fuel reprocessing aspects of the nuclear fuel cycle.

  5. Measurement of Υ(1S + 2S +3S) production in p + p and Au + Au collisions at \\(\\sqrt{s_{\\mathrm{NN}}}=200\\) GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adare, A.; Afanasiev, S.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Akimoto, R.; Al-Bataineh, H.; Al-Ta'ani, H.; Alexander, J.; Angerami, A.; et al

    2015-02-24

    Measurements of bottomonium production in heavy-ion and p+p collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) are presented. The inclusive yield of the three Υ states, Υ(1S + 2S + 3S), was measured in the PHENIX experiment via electron-positron decay pairs at midrapidity for Au+Au and p+p collisions at \\(\\sqrt{s_{\\mathrm{NN}}}=200\\) GeV. The Υ(1S + 2S + 3S) → e⁺e⁻ differential cross section at midrapidity was found to be Beedσ/dy = 108 ± 38 (stat) ± 15 (syst) ± 11 (luminosity) pb in p+p collisions. The nuclear modification factor in the 30% most central Au+Au collisions indicates a suppression of themore »total Υ state yield relative to the extrapolation from p+p collision data. Thus, the suppression is consistent with measurements at higher energies by the CMS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider.« less

  6. Measurement of Υ(1S + 2S +3S) production in p + p and Au + Au collisions at \\(\\sqrt{s_{\\mathrm{NN}}}=200\\) GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adare, A.; Afanasiev, S.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Akimoto, R.; Al-Bataineh, H.; Al-Ta'ani, H.; Alexander, J.; Angerami, A.; Aoki, K.; Apadula, N.; Aphecetche, L.; Aramaki, Y.; Asai, J.; Asano, H.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Atomssa, E. T.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Bai, M.; Baksay, G.; Baksay, L.; Baldisseri, A.; Bannier, B.; Barish, K. N.; Barnes, P. D.; Bassalleck, B.; Basye, A. T.; Bathe, S.; Batsouli, S.; Baublis, V.; Baumann, C.; Baumgart, S.; Bazilevsky, A.; Belikov, S.; Belmont, R.; Bennett, R.; Berdnikov, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Bickley, A. A.; Bing, X.; Blau, D. S.; Boissevain, J. G.; Bok, J. S.; Borel, H.; Boyle, K.; Brooks, M. L.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Bunce, G.; Butsyk, S.; Camacho, C. M.; Campbell, S.; Castera, P.; Chang, B. S.; Chang, W. C.; Charvet, J. -L.; Chen, C. -H.; Chernichenko, S.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Choi, J. B.; Choi, S.; Choudhury, R. K.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, P.; Churyn, A.; Chvala, O.; Cianciolo, V.; Citron, Z.; Cole, B. A.; Connors, M.; Constantin, P.; Csanád, M.; Csörgő, T.; Dahms, T.; Dairaku, S.; Das, K.; Datta, A.; Daugherity, M. S.; David, G.; Denisov, A.; d'Enterria, D.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Dharmawardane, K. V.; Dietzsch, O.; Ding, L.; Dion, A.; Donadelli, M.; Drapier, O.; Drees, A.; Drees, K. A.; Dubey, A. K.; Durham, J. M.; Durum, A.; Dutta, D.; Dzhordzhadze, V.; D'Orazio, L.; Edwards, S.; Efremenko, Y. V.; Ellinghaus, F.; Engelmore, T.; Enokizono, A.; En'yo, H.; Esumi, S.; Eyser, K. O.; Fadem, B.; Fields, D. E.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Fleuret, F.; Fokin, S. L.; Fraenkel, Z.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Fujiwara, K.; Fukao, Y.; Fusayasu, T.; Gainey, K.; Gal, C.; Garishvili, A.; Garishvili, I.; Glenn, A.; Gong, H.; Gong, X.; Gonin, M.; Gosset, J.; Goto, Y.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Gunji, T.; Guo, L.; Gustafsson, H. -Å.; Hachiya, T.; Hadj Henni, A.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hahn, K. I.; Hamagaki, H.; Han, R.; Hanks, J.; Hartouni, E. P.; Haruna, K.; Hashimoto, K.; Haslum, E.; Hayano, R.; He, X.; Heffner, M.; Hemmick, T. K.; Hester, T.; Hill, J. C.; Hohlmann, M.; Hollis, R. S.; Holzmann, W.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Horaguchi, T.; Hori, Y.; Hornback, D.; Huang, S.; Ichihara, T.; Ichimiya, R.; Iinuma, H.; Ikeda, Y.; Imai, K.; Imrek, J.; Inaba, M.; Iordanova, A.; Isenhower, D.; Ishihara, M.; Isobe, T.; Issah, M.; Isupov, A.; Ivanischev, D.; Ivanishchev, D.; Jacak, B. V.; Javani, M.; Jia, J.; Jiang, X.; Jin, J.; Johnson, B. M.; Joo, K. S.; Jouan, D.; Jumper, D. S.; Kajihara, F.; Kametani, S.; Kamihara, N.; Kamin, J.; Kaneti, S.; Kang, B. H.; Kang, J. H.; Kang, J. S.; Kapustinsky, J.; Karatsu, K.; Kasai, M.; Kawall, D.; Kazantsev, A. V.; Kempel, T.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kijima, K. M.; Kikuchi, J.; Kim, B. I.; Kim, C.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, E.; Kim, E. -J.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, K. -B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. -J.; Kim, Y. K.; Kinney, E.; Kiriluk, K.; Kiss, Á.; Kistenev, E.; Klatsky, J.; Klay, J.; Klein-Boesing, C.; Kleinjan, D.; Kline, P.; Kochenda, L.; Komatsu, Y.; Komkov, B.; Konno, M.; Koster, J.; Kotchetkov, D.; Kotov, D.; Kozlov, A.; Král, A.; Kravitz, A.; Krizek, F.; Kunde, G. J.; Kurita, K.; Kurosawa, M.; Kweon, M. J.; Kwon, Y.; Kyle, G. S.; Lacey, R.; Lai, Y. S.; Lajoie, J. G.; Layton, D.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, B.; Lee, D. M.; Lee, J.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, S. H.; Lee, S. R.; Lee, T.; Leitch, M. J.; Leite, M. A. L.; Leitgab, M.; Lenzi, B.; Lewis, B.; Li, X.; Liebing, P.; Lim, S. H.; Linden Levy, L. A.; Liška, T.; Litvinenko, A.; Liu, H.; Liu, M. X.; Love, B.; Lynch, D.; Maguire, C. F.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Makek, M.; Malakhov, A.; Malik, M. D.; Manion, A.; Manko, V. I.; Mannel, E.; Mao, Y.; Mašek, L.; Masui, H.; Masumoto, S.; Matathias, F.; McCumber, M.; McGaughey, P. L.; McGlinchey, D.; McKinney, C.; Means, N.; Mendoza, M.; Meredith, B.; Miake, Y.; Mibe, T.; Mignerey, A. C.; Mikeš, P.; Miki, K.; Milov, A.; Mishra, D. K.; Mishra, M.; Mitchell, J. T.; Miyachi, Y.; Miyasaka, S.; Mohanty, A. K.; Moon, H. J.; Morino, Y.; Morreale, A.; Morrison, D. P.; Motschwiller, S.; Moukhanova, T. V.; Mukhopadhyay, D.; Murakami, T.; Murata, J.; Nagae, T.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagle, J. L.; Naglis, M.; Nagy, M. I.; Nakagawa, I.; Nakamiya, Y.; Nakamura, K. R.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, K.; Nattrass, C.; Nederlof, A.; Newby, J.; Nguyen, M.; Nihashi, M.; Niida, T.; Nouicer, R.; Novitzky, N.; Nyanin, A. S.; O'Brien, E.; Oda, S. X.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Oka, M.; Okada, K.; Onuki, Y.; Oskarsson, A.; Ouchida, M.; Ozawa, K.; Pak, R.; Palounek, A. P. T.; Pantuev, V.; Papavassiliou, V.; Park, B. H.; Park, I. H.; Park, J.; Park, S. K.; Park, W. J.; Pate, S. F.; Patel, L.; Pei, H.; Peng, J. -C.; Pereira, H.; Peresedov, V.; Peressounko, D. Yu.; Petti, R.; Pinkenburg, C.; Pisani, R. P.; Proissl, M.; Purschke, M. L.; Purwar, A. K.; Qu, H.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ravinovich, I.; Read, K. F.; Rembeczki, S.; Reygers, K.; Reynolds, D.; Riabov, V.; Riabov, Y.; Richardson, E.; Riveli, N.; Roach, D.; Roche, G.; Rolnick, S. D.; Rosati, M.; Rosendahl, S. S. E.; Rosnet, P.; Rukoyatkin, P.; Ružička, P.; Rykov, V. L.; Sahlmueller, B.; Saito, N.; Sakaguchi, T.; Sakai, S.; Sakashita, K.; Samsonov, V.; Sano, M.; Sarsour, M.; Sato, T.; Sawada, S.; Sedgwick, K.; Seele, J.; Seidl, R.; Semenov, A. Yu.; Semenov, V.; Sen, A.; Seto, R.; Sharma, D.; Shein, I.; Shibata, T. -A.; Shigaki, K.; Shimomura, M.; Shoji, K.; Shukla, P.; Sickles, A.; Silva, C. L.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Sim, K. S.; Singh, B. K.; Singh, C. P.; Singh, V.; Slunečka, M.; Soldatov, A.; Soltz, R. A.; Sondheim, W. E.; Sorensen, S. P.; Soumya, M.; Sourikova, I. V.; Staley, F.; Stankus, P. W.; Stenlund, E.; Stepanov, M.; Ster, A.; Stoll, S. P.; Sugitate, T.; Suire, C.; Sukhanov, A.; Sun, J.; Sziklai, J.; Takagui, E. M.; Takahara, A.; Taketani, A.; Tanabe, R.; Tanaka, Y.; Taneja, S.; Tanida, K.; Tannenbaum, M. J.; Tarafdar, S.; Taranenko, A.; Tarján, P.; Tennant, E.; Themann, H.; Thomas, T. L.; Todoroki, T.; Togawa, M.; Toia, A.; Tomášek, L.; Tomášek, M.; Tomita, Y.; Torii, H.; Towell, R. S.; Tram, V-N.; Tserruya, I.; Tsuchimoto, Y.; Tsuji, T.; Vale, C.; Valle, H.; van Hecke, H. W.; Vargyas, M.; Vazquez-Zambrano, E.; Veicht, A.; Velkovska, J.; Vértesi, R.; Vinogradov, A. A.; Virius, M.; Vossen, A.; Vrba, V.; Vznuzdaev, E.; Wang, X. R.; Watanabe, D.; Watanabe, K.; Watanabe, Y.; Watanabe, Y. S.; Wei, F.; Wei, R.; Wessels, J.; Whitaker, S.; White, S. N.; Winter, D.; Wolin, S.; Woody, C. L.; Wysocki, M.; Xie, W.; Yamaguchi, Y. L.; Yamaura, K.; Yang, R.; Yanovich, A.; Ying, J.; Yokkaichi, S.; You, Z.; Young, G. R.; Younus, I.; Yushmanov, I. E.; Zajc, W. A.; Zaudtke, O.; Zelenski, A.; Zhang, C.; Zhou, S.; Zolin, L.

    2015-02-24

    Measurements of bottomonium production in heavy-ion and p+p collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) are presented. The inclusive yield of the three Υ states, Υ(1S + 2S + 3S), was measured in the PHENIX experiment via electron-positron decay pairs at midrapidity for Au+Au and p+p collisions at \\(\\sqrt{s_{\\mathrm{NN}}}=200\\) GeV. The Υ(1S + 2S + 3S) → e⁺e⁻ differential cross section at midrapidity was found to be Beedσ/dy = 108 ± 38 (stat) ± 15 (syst) ± 11 (luminosity) pb in p+p collisions. The nuclear modification factor in the 30% most central Au+Au collisions indicates a suppression of the total Υ state yield relative to the extrapolation from p+p collision data. Thus, the suppression is consistent with measurements at higher energies by the CMS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider.

  7. Measurement of Υ(1S + 2S +3S) production in p + p and Au + Au collisions at \\(\\sqrt{s_{\\mathrm{NN}}}=200\\) GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adare, A.; Afanasiev, S.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Akimoto, R.; Al-Bataineh, H.; Al-Ta'ani, H.; Alexander, J.; Angerami, A.; et al

    2015-02-24

    Measurements of bottomonium production in heavy-ion and p+p collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) are presented. The inclusive yield of the three Υ states, Υ(1S + 2S + 3S), was measured in the PHENIX experiment via electron-positron decay pairs at midrapidity for Au+Au and p+p collisions at \\(\\sqrt{s_{\\mathrm{NN}}}=200\\) GeV. The Υ(1S + 2S + 3S) → e⁺e⁻ differential cross section at midrapidity was found to be Beedσ/dy = 108 ± 38 (stat) ± 15 (syst) ± 11 (luminosity) pb in p+p collisions. The nuclear modification factor in the 30% most central Au+Au collisions indicates a suppression of themore » total Υ state yield relative to the extrapolation from p+p collision data. Thus, the suppression is consistent with measurements at higher energies by the CMS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider.« less

  8. Pion, kaon, proton and anti-proton transverse momentum distributions from p+p and d+Au collisions at sqrt(sNN) = 200 GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, J.; Adler, C.; Aggarwal, M.M.; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett, J.; Anderson, B.D.; Anderson, M; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G.S.; Badyal, S.K.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L.S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, V.V.; Bellwied, R.; Berger, J.; Bezverkhny, B.I.; Bhardwaj, S.; Bhaskar, P.; Bhati, A.K.; Bichsel, H.; Billmeier, A.; Bland, L.C.; Blyth, C.O.; Bonner, B.E.; Botje, M.; Boucham, A.; Brandin, A.; Bravar, A.; Cadman, R.V.; Cai, X.Z.; Caines, H.; Calderon de la Barca Sanchez, M.; Carroll, J.; Castillo, J.; Castro, M.; Cebra, D.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H.F.; Chen, Y.; Chernenko, S.P.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, B.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J.P.; Cormier, T.M.; Cramer, J.G.; Crawford, H.J.; Das, D.; Das, S.; Derevschikov, A.A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Dong, X.; Draper, J.E.; Du, F.; Dubey, A.K.; Dunin, V.B.; Dunlop, J.C.; Dutta Majumdar, M.R.; Eckardt, V.; Efimov, L.G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Faine, V.; Faivre, J.; Fatemi, R.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flierl, D.; Foley, K.J.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, C.A.; Ganti, M.S.; Gutierrez, T.D.; Gagunashvili, N.; Gans, J.; Gaudichet, L.; Germain, M.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, J.E.; Grachov, O.; Grigoriev, V.; Cronstal, S.; Grosnick, D.; Guedon, M.; Guertin, S.M.; Gupta, A.; Gushin, E.; Hallman, T.J.; Hardtke, D.; Harris, J.W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T.W.; Heppelmann, S.; Herston, T.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, G.W.; Horsley, M.; Huang, H.Z.; Huang, S.L.; Humanic, T.J.; Igo, G.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W.W.; Janik, M.; Johnson, I.; Jones, P.G.; Judd, E.G.; Kabana, S.; Kaneta, M.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klay, J.; Klein, S.R.; Klyachko, A.; Koetke, D.D.; Kollegger, T.; Konstantinov, A.S.; Kopytine, S.M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kovalenko, A.D.; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, A.I.; Kumar, A.; et al.

    2003-09-16

    Identified mid-rapidity particle spectra of {pi}{sup {+-}}, K{sup {+-}}, and p({bar p}) from 200 GeV p+p and d+Au collisions are reported. A time-of-flight detector based on multi-gap resistive plate chamber technology is used for particle identification. The particle-species dependence of the Cronin effect is observed to be significantly smaller than that at lower energies. The ratio of the nuclear modification factor (R{sub dAu}) between (p+ {bar p}) and charged hadrons (h) in the transverse momentum range 1.2 < p{sub T} < 3.0 GeV/c is measured to be 1.19 {+-} 0.05(stat) {+-} 0.03(syst) in minimum-bias collisions and shows little centrality dependence. The yield ratio of (p + {bar p})/h in minimum-bias d+Au collisions is found to be a factor of 2 lower than that in Au+Au collisions, indicating that the Cronin effect alone is not enough to account for the relative baryon enhancement observed in heavy ion collisions at RHIC.

  9. Corrigendum to Suppression of ? production in d+Au and Au+Au collisions at ? SNN = 200 GeV" [Phys. Lett. B 735 (2014) 127-137

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adamczyk, L.

    2015-04-01

    We report measurements of ? meson production in p + p, d + Au, and Au+Au collisions using the STAR detector at RHIC. We compare the ? yield to the measured cross section in p + p collisions in order to quantify any modifications of the yield in cold nuclear matter using d + Au data and in hot nuclear matter using Au+Au data separated into three centrality classes. Our p + p measurement is based on three times the statistics of our previous result. We obtain a nuclear modification factor for Upsilon (1S + 2S + 3S) in the rapidity range |y| < 1 in d + Au collisions of RdAu = 0.79 0.24(stat.) 0.03(syst.) 0.10(p + p syst.). A comparison with models including shadowing and initial state parton energy loss indicates the presence of additional cold-nuclear matter suppression. Similarly, in the top 10% most-central Au + Au collisions, we measure a nuclear modification factor of R AA = 0.49 0.1(stat.) 0.02(syst.) 0.06(p + p syst.), which is a larger suppression factor than that seen in cold nuclear matter. Our results are consistent with complete suppression of excited-state Upsilon mesons in Au + Au collisions. The additional suppression in Au + Au is consistent with the level expected in model calculations that include the presence of a hot, deconfined QuarkGluon Plasma. However, understanding the suppression seen in d + Au is still needed before any definitive statements about the nature of the suppression in Au + Au can be made.

  10. Corrigendum to “Suppression of Υ production in d+Au and Au+Au collisions at √ SNN = 200 GeV" [Phys. Lett. B 735 (2014) 127-137

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adamczyk, L.

    2015-04-01

    We report measurements of Υ meson production in p + p, d + Au, and Au+Au collisions using the STAR detector at RHIC. We compare the Υ yield to the measured cross section in p + p collisions in order to quantify any modifications of the yield in cold nuclear matter using d + Au data and in hot nuclear matter using Au+Au data separated into three centrality classes. Our p + p measurement is based on three times the statistics of our previous result. We obtain a nuclear modification factor for Upsilon (1S + 2S + 3S) in themore » rapidity range |y| < 1 in d + Au collisions of RdAu = 0.79 ± 0.24(stat.) ± 0.03(syst.) ± 0.10(p + p syst.). A comparison with models including shadowing and initial state parton energy loss indicates the presence of additional cold-nuclear matter suppression. Similarly, in the top 10% most-central Au + Au collisions, we measure a nuclear modification factor of R AA = 0.49 ±0.1(stat.) ±0.02(syst.) ±0.06(p + p syst.), which is a larger suppression factor than that seen in cold nuclear matter. Our results are consistent with complete suppression of excited-state Upsilon mesons in Au + Au collisions. The additional suppression in Au + Au is consistent with the level expected in model calculations that include the presence of a hot, deconfined Quark–Gluon Plasma. However, understanding the suppression seen in d + Au is still needed before any definitive statements about the nature of the suppression in Au + Au can be made.« less

  11. Piezoelectric film load cell robot collision detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lembke, J.R.

    1988-03-15

    A piezoelectric load cell which can be utilized for detecting collisions and obstruction of a robot arm end effector includes a force sensing element of metallized polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) film. The piezoelectric film sensing element and a resilient support pad are clamped in compression between upper and lower plates. The lower plate has a central recess in its upper face for supporting the support pad and sensing element, while the upper plate has a corresponding central projection formed on its lower face for bearing on the sensing element and support pad. The upper and lower plates are dowelled together for concentric alignment and screwed together. The upper and lower plates are also adapted for mounting between the robot arm wrist and end effector. 3 figs.

  12. Piezoelectric film load cell robot collision detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lembke, J.R.

    1989-04-18

    A piezoelectric load cell which can be utilized for detecting collisions and obstruction of a robot arm end effector includes a force sensing element of metallized polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) film. The piezoelectric film sensing element and a resilient support pad are clamped in compression between upper and lower plates. The lower plate has a central recess in its upper face for supporting the support pad and sensing element, while the upper plate has a corresponding central projection formed on its lower face for bearing on the sensing element and support pad. The upper and lower plates are doweled together for concentric alignment and screwed together. The upper and lower plates are also adapted for mounting between the robot arm wrist and end effector. 3 figs.

  13. Piezoelectric film load cell robot collision detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lembke, John R.

    1989-04-18

    A piezoelectric load cell which can be utilized for detecting collisions and obstruction of a robot arm end effector includes a force sensing element of metallized polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) film. The piezoelectric film sensing element and a resilient support pad are clamped in compression between upper and lower plates. The lower plate has a central recess in its upper face for supporting the support pad and sensing element, while the upper plate has a corresponding central projection formed on its lower face for bearing on the sensing element and support pad. The upper and lower plates are dowelled together for concentric alignment and screwed together. The upper and lower plates are also adapted for mounting between the robot arm wrist and end effector.

  14. Adiabatic theory for anisotropic cold molecule collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pawlak, Mariusz; Shagam, Yuval; Narevicius, Edvardas; Moiseyev, Nimrod

    2015-08-21

    We developed an adiabatic theory for cold anisotropic collisions between slow atoms and cold molecules. It enables us to investigate the importance of the couplings between the projection states of the rotational motion of the atom about the molecular axis of the diatom. We tested our theory using the recent results from the Penning ionization reaction experiment {sup 4}He(1s2s {sup 3}S) + HD(1s{sup 2}) → {sup 4}He(1s{sup 2}) + HD{sup +}(1s) + e{sup −} [Lavert-Ofir et al., Nat. Chem. 6, 332 (2014)] and demonstrated that the couplings have strong effect on positions of shape resonances. The theory we derived provides cross sections which are in a very good agreement with the experimental findings.

  15. Measurements of {phi} meson production in relativistic heavy-ion collisions at the BNL relativistic heavy ion collider (RHIC).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abelev, B. I.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Krueger, K.; Spinka, H.; Underwood, D. G.; High Energy Physics; Univ. of Illinois; Kent State Univ.; Panjab Univ.; Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre; Kent State Univ.; Particle Physics Lab.; STAR Collaboration

    2009-01-01

    We present results for the measurement of {phi} meson production via its charged kaon decay channel {phi} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -} in Au+Au collisions at {radical}S{sub NN} = 62.4, 130, and 200 GeV, and in p+p and d+Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV from the STAR experiment at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The midrapidity (|y| < 0.5) {phi} meson transverse momentum (p{sub T}) spectra in central Au+Au collisions are found to be well described by a single exponential distribution. On the other hand, the p{sub T} spectra from p+p, d+Au, and peripheral Au+Au collisions show power-law tails at intermediate and high p{sub T} and are described better by Levy distributions. The constant {phi}/K{sup -} yield ratio vs beam species, collision centrality, and colliding energy is in contradiction with expectations from models having kaon coalescence as the dominant mechanism for {phi} production at RHIC. The {Omega}/{phi} yield ratio as a function of p{sub T} is consistent with a model based on the recombination of thermal s quarks up to p{sub T} {approx} 4 GeV/c, but disagrees at higher transverse momenta. The measured nuclear modification factor, R{sub dAu}, for the {phi} meson increases above unity at intermediate p{sub T}, similar to that for pions and protons, while R{sub AA} is suppressed due to the energy loss effect in central Au+Au collisions. Number of constituent quark scaling of both R{sub cp} and v{sub 2} for the {phi} meson with respect to other hadrons in Au+Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV at intermediate p{sub T} is observed. These observations support quark coalescence as being the dominant mechanism of hadronization in the intermediate p{sub T} region at RHIC.

  16. Measurements of {phi} meson production in relativistic heavy-ion collisions at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abelev, B. I.; Barannikova, O.; Betts, R. R.; Callner, J.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Iordanova, A.; Suarez, M. C.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Bhati, A. K.; Kumar, L.; Pruthi, N. K.; Ahammed, Z.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Mazumdar, M. R. Dutta; Ganti, M. S.; Ghosh, P.; Mohanty, B.; Nayak, T. K.

    2009-06-15

    We present results for the measurement of {phi} meson production via its charged kaon decay channel {phi}{yields}K{sup +}K{sup -} in Au+Au collisions at {radical}(s{sub NN})=62.4,130, and 200 GeV, and in p+p and d+Au collisions at {radical}(s{sub NN})=200 GeV from the STAR experiment at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The midrapidity (|y|<0.5) {phi} meson transverse momentum (p{sub T}) spectra in central Au+Au collisions are found to be well described by a single exponential distribution. On the other hand, the p{sub T} spectra from p+p, d+Au, and peripheral Au+Au collisions show power-law tails at intermediate and high p{sub T} and are described better by Levy distributions. The constant {phi}/K{sup -} yield ratio vs beam species, collision centrality, and colliding energy is in contradiction with expectations from models having kaon coalescence as the dominant mechanism for {phi} production at RHIC. The {omega}/{phi} yield ratio as a function of p{sub T} is consistent with a model based on the recombination of thermal s quarks up to p{sub T}{approx}4 GeV/c, but disagrees at higher transverse momenta. The measured nuclear modification factor, R{sub dAu}, for the {phi} meson increases above unity at intermediate p{sub T}, similar to that for pions and protons, while R{sub AA} is suppressed due to the energy loss effect in central Au+Au collisions. Number of constituent quark scaling of both R{sub cp} and v{sub 2} for the {phi} meson with respect to other hadrons in Au+Au collisions at {radical}(s{sub NN})=200 GeV at intermediate p{sub T} is observed. These observations support quark coalescence as being the dominant mechanism of hadronization in the intermediate p{sub T} region at RHIC.

  17. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center Workshop: Brookhaven Summer Program on Quarkonium Production in Elementary and Heavy Ion Collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dumitru, A.; Lourenco, C.; Petreczky, P.; Qiu, J., Ruan, L.

    2011-08-03

    Understanding the structure of the hadron is of fundamental importance in subatomic physics. Production of heavy quarkonia is arguably one of the most fascinating subjects in strong interaction physics. It offers unique perspectives into the formation of QCD bound states. Heavy quarkonia are among the most studied particles both theoretically and experimentally. They have been, and continue to be, the focus of measurements in all high energy colliders around the world. Because of their distinct multiple mass scales, heavy quarkonia were suggested as a probe of the hot quark-gluon matter produced in heavy-ion collisions; and their production has been one of the main subjects of the experimental heavy-ion programs at the SPS and RHIC. However, since the discovery of J/psi at Brookhaven National Laboratory and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory over 36 years ago, theorists still have not been able to fully understand the production mechanism of heavy quarkonia, although major progresses have been made in recent years. With this in mind, a two-week program on quarkonium production was organized at BNL on June 6-17, 2011. Many new experimental data from LHC and from RHIC were presented during the program, including results from the LHC heavy ion run. To analyze and correctly interpret these measurements, and in order to quantify properties of the hot matter produced in heavy-ion collisions, it is necessary to improve our theoretical understanding of quarkonium production. Therefore, a wide range of theoretical aspects on the production mechanism in the vacuum as well as in cold nuclear and hot quark-gluon medium were discussed during the program from the controlled calculations in QCD and its effective theories such as NRQCD to various models, and to the first principle lattice calculation. The scientific program was divided into three major scientific parts: basic production mechanism for heavy quarkonium in vacuum or in high energy elementary collisions; the

  18. p-Wave Cold Collisions in an Optical Lattice Clock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lemke, N. D.; Sherman, J. A.; Oates, C. W.; Ludlow, A. D.; Stecher, J. von; Rey, A. M.

    2011-09-02

    We study ultracold collisions in fermionic ytterbium by precisely measuring the energy shifts they impart on the atoms' internal clock states. Exploiting Fermi statistics, we uncover p-wave collisions, in both weakly and strongly interacting regimes. With the higher density afforded by two-dimensional lattice confinement, we demonstrate that strong interactions can lead to a novel suppression of this collision shift. In addition to reducing the systematic errors of lattice clocks, this work has application to quantum information and quantum simulation with alkaline-earth atoms.

  19. Nuclear Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fossion, Ruben [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 70-543, Mexico D. F., C.P. 04510 (Mexico)

    2010-09-10

    The atomic nucleus is a typical example of a many-body problem. On the one hand, the number of nucleons (protons and neutrons) that constitute the nucleus is too large to allow for exact calculations. On the other hand, the number of constituent particles is too small for the individual nuclear excitation states to be explained by statistical methods. Another problem, particular for the atomic nucleus, is that the nucleon-nucleon (n-n) interaction is not one of the fundamental forces of Nature, and is hard to put in a single closed equation. The nucleon-nucleon interaction also behaves differently between two free nucleons (bare interaction) and between two nucleons in the nuclear medium (dressed interaction).Because of the above reasons, specific nuclear many-body models have been devised of which each one sheds light on some selected aspects of nuclear structure. Only combining the viewpoints of different models, a global insight of the atomic nucleus can be gained. In this chapter, we revise the the Nuclear Shell Model as an example of the microscopic approach, and the Collective Model as an example of the geometric approach. Finally, we study the statistical properties of nuclear spectra, basing on symmetry principles, to find out whether there is quantum chaos in the atomic nucleus. All three major approaches have been rewarded with the Nobel Prize of Physics. In the text, we will stress how each approach introduces its own series of approximations to reduce the prohibitingly large number of degrees of freedom of the full many-body problem to a smaller manageable number of effective degrees of freedom.

  20. Nucleon-nucleon cross sections in nuclear matter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schulze, H.; Schnell, A.; Roepke, G.; Lombardo, U.

    1997-06-01

    We provide a microscopic calculation of neutron-proton and neutron-neutron cross sections in symmetric nuclear matter at various densities, using the Brueckner-Hartree-Fock approximation scheme with the Paris potential. We investigate separately the medium effects on the effective mass and on the scattering amplitude. We determine average cross sections suitable for application in the dynamical simulation of heavy ion collisions, including a parametrization of their energy and density dependence. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  1. Nuclear pursuits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    This table lists quantities of warheads (in stockpile, peak number per year, total number built, number of known test explosions), weapon development milestones (developers of the atomic bomb and hydrogen bomb, date of first operational ICBM, first nuclear-powered naval SSN in service, first MIRVed missile deployed), and testing milestones (first fission test, type of boosted fission weapon, multistage thermonuclear test, number of months from fission bomb to multistage thermonuclear bomb, etc.), and nuclear infrastructure (assembly plants, plutonium production reactors, uranium enrichment plants, etc.). Countries included in the tally are the United States, Soviet Union, Britain, France, and China.

  2. Photoproduction of Vector Mesons at LHC and the Nuclear Gluon Distribution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griep, M. T.; Goncalves, V. P.; Ayala Filho, A. L.

    2010-11-12

    A systematic measurement of the nuclear gluon distribution is of fundamental interest in understanding the parton structure of nuclei and to determine the initial conditions of the quark gluon plasma (QGP) predicted to be formed in central heavy ion collisions. At the moment the behavior of this distribution is completely undetermined by the fixed target experiments, with a possible improvement in the future electron-nucleus colliders. However, as the date of construction and start of operation of these colliders is still in debate, we need to obtain alternative searches to estimate the medium effects in the nuclear gluon distribution. An alternative is the study of the vector meson production in ultraperipheral heavy ion collisions at RHIC and LHC in order to constrain the nuclear medium effects present in the nuclear gluon distribution. In this contribution we present our main results for the J/{Psi} photoproduction.

  3. Investigation on collisions of filament pairs in dielectric barrier discharge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dong, Lifang; Zhang, Chao; Li, Ben; Zhang, Xinpu; He, Yafeng; Li, Xuechen; Hebei Key Laboratory of Optic-electronic Information Materials, Baoding 071002

    2013-12-15

    Collisions of filament pairs in a hexagonal superlattice pattern in dielectric barrier discharge are investigated on different timescales. In the evolution of the pattern, the space scale of each hexagon cell decreases with the increasing voltage. The duration of one collision is seven half voltage cycles at least. Two stable orientations of a pair are approximately perpendicular to each other and the orientational changes occurring during the entire colliding process should be a multiple of 30. The time interval between two consecutive collisions decreases with the increasing voltage. The distance between the paired spots decreases nonmonotonically. Based on the discharge order of the pattern, it is inferred that the collision should be the interaction between a discharging filament and the surface charges deposited by another discharged filament, and the nonmonotonic decrease of distance D is explained.

  4. Nuclear Controls | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA)

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Control Nuclear Controls Challenge: Detect/deter illicit transfers of nuclear/dual-use materials, technology, and commodities. Solution: Build domestic and international capacity to implement and meet export control obligations. Related Topics international security international security policy NIS nuclear controls safeguards safeguards and security verification Related News Nuclear Verification International Nuclear Safeguards Nonproliferation Policy Nonproliferation and Arms Control NIS

  5. Nuclear Verification | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA)

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Control Nuclear Verification Challenge: Maintain the U.S. ability to monitor and verify nuclear reduction agreements and detect violations of treaties and other nuclear nonproliferation commitments. Solution: Develop and deploy measures to ensure verifiable compliance with treaties and other international agreements, implement regimes to reduce nuclear weapons, and detect and dismantle undeclared nuclear programs. Specific subprogram activities include: Implementing current and developing future

  6. nuclear controls | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    controls Nuclear Verification Challenge: Maintain the U.S. ability to monitor and verify nuclear reduction agreements and detect violations of treaties and other nuclear nonproliferation commitments. Solution: Develop and deploy measures to ensure verifiable compliance with treaties and other international agreements,... International Nuclear Safeguards Challenge: Detect/deter undeclared nuclear materials and activities. Solution: Build capacity of the International Atomic Energy Agency and

  7. Defense Nuclear Facility | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Defense Nuclear Facility NNSA's safety office accredited and recognized for leadership in safe operation of defense nuclear facilities Part of NNSA's commitment to maintaining the nation's safe, secure, and effective nuclear deterrent are relentlessly high standards for technically capable nuclear enterprise personnel qualifications for all aspects of Defense Nuclear Facility operations. In December 2015, the Department of Energy

  8. Desorption induced by atomic and molecular ion collisions on LiF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pereira, J. A. M.; Silveira, E. F. da

    1999-06-10

    Atomic and molecular nitrogen ion beams, produced by the PUC-Rio Van de Graaff accelerator, were used to bombard lithium fluoride thin films. Desorption of secondary ions was measured by means of a time-of-flight mass spectrometer equipped with a double grid acceleration system. The outputs of the experiment are the axial kinetic energy distribution and the desorption yield of the emitted ions. This information allowed determination of the relative contribution to desorption due to collision cascades (nuclear sputtering) and to electronic excitation (electronic sputtering). It was observed that F{sup -} ions are desorbed as a result of collision cascades and that the F{sup -} ion yields depends linearly on the number of constuents in the projectile, i.e., Y(N{sub 2}{sup +})=2Y(N{sup +}). The emission of clusters such as (LiF)Li{sup +} was found to be caused by electronic excitation and the (LiF)Li{sup +} yield revealed a nonlinear dependence: Y(N{sub 2}{sup +})>2Y(N{sup +}). Both processes were found to contribute to Li{sup +} desorption. These effects are discussed in terms of the density of deposited energy which depends on the projectile velocity and on the electronic stopping power.

  9. A virtual simulator designed for collision prevention in proton therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jung, Hyunuk; Kum, Oyeon; Han, Youngyih Park, Hee Chul; Kim, Jin Sung; Choi, Doo Ho

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: In proton therapy, collisions between the patient and nozzle potentially occur because of the large nozzle structure and efforts to minimize the air gap. Thus, software was developed to predict such collisions between the nozzle and patient using treatment virtual simulation. Methods: Three-dimensional (3D) modeling of a gantry inner-floor, nozzle, and robotic-couch was performed using SolidWorks based on the manufacturer’s machine data. To obtain patient body information, a 3D-scanner was utilized right before CT scanning. Using the acquired images, a 3D-image of the patient’s body contour was reconstructed. The accuracy of the image was confirmed against the CT image of a humanoid phantom. The machine components and the virtual patient were combined on the treatment-room coordinate system, resulting in a virtual simulator. The simulator simulated the motion of its components such as rotation and translation of the gantry, nozzle, and couch in real scale. A collision, if any, was examined both in static and dynamic modes. The static mode assessed collisions only at fixed positions of the machine’s components, while the dynamic mode operated any time a component was in motion. A collision was identified if any voxels of two components, e.g., the nozzle and the patient or couch, overlapped when calculating volume locations. The event and collision point were visualized, and collision volumes were reported. Results: All components were successfully assembled, and the motions were accurately controlled. The 3D-shape of the phantom agreed with CT images within a deviation of 2 mm. Collision situations were simulated within minutes, and the results were displayed and reported. Conclusions: The developed software will be useful in improving patient safety and clinical efficiency of proton therapy.

  10. Nuclear Science & Technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Science & Technology Nuclear Science & Technology1354608000000Nuclear Science & TechnologySome of these resources are LANL-only and will require Remote Access. No...

  11. 2013 Nuclear Workforce Development ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Energy Impact Topics: Today's & Tomorrow's New Nuclear Energy Construction & the Workforce Outlook Current New Nuclear Energy Construction Projects Small Modular...

  12. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Starr, C.

    1963-01-01

    This patent relates to a combination useful in a nuclear reactor and is comprised of a casing, a mass of graphite irapregnated with U compounds in the casing, and at least one coolant tube extending through the casing. The coolant tube is spaced from the mass, and He is irtroduced irto the space between the mass and the coolant tube. (AEC)

  13. Positronium formation as a three-body reaction. II. The second-order nuclear amplitudes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shojaei, F.; Bolorizadeh, M. A.; Ghanbari-Adivi, E.; Brunger, M. J.

    2009-01-15

    We derive an exact analytic form for the second-order nuclear amplitudes, under the Faddeev three-body approach, which is applicable to the nonrelativistic high energy impact interaction where positronium is formed in the collision of a positron with an atom.

  14. High-resolution spectroscopic probes of collisions and half-collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, G.E.

    1993-12-01

    Research in this program explores the dynamics of gas phase collisions and photodissociation by high-resolution laser spectroscopy. Simultaneous state and velocity detection frequently permits a determination of scalar or vector correlations among products. The correlated product distributions are always more informative, and often easier to interpret than the uncorrelated product state distributions. The authors have recently built an apparatus to record transient absorption spectra with 50 nS time resolution and 20 MHz frequency resolution using a single frequency Ti:sapphire laser. The photodissociation of NCCN and C{sub 2}H{sub 5}SCN at 193 nm is discussed.

  15. Sideward flow in Au+Au collisions between 2A and 8A GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, H.; Ajitanand, N.N.; Alexander, J.; Anderson, M.; Best, D.; Brady, F.P.; Case, T.; Caskey, W.; Cebra, D.; Chance, J.; Cole, B.; Crowe, K.; Das, A.; Draper, J.; Gilkes, M.; Gushue, S.; Heffner, M.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Huo, L.; Justice, M.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kintner, J.; Klay, J.; Krofcheck, D.; Lacey, R.; Lisa, M.A.; Liu, Y.M.; McGrath, R.; Milosevich, Z.; Odyniec, G.; Olson, D.; Panitkin, S.Y.; Porile, N.; Rai, G.; Ritter, H.G.; Romero, J.; Scharenberg, R.; Schroeder, L.S.; Srivastava, B.; Stone, N.T.B.; Symons, T.J.M.; Wang, S.; Whitfield, J.; Wienold, T.; Witt, R.; Wood, L.; Yang, X.; Zhang, W.N.; Zhang, Y.; E895 Collaboration

    2000-04-05

    Using the large acceptance Time Projection Chamber of experiment E895 at Brookhaven, measurements of collective sideward flow in Au + Au collisions at beam energies of 2A, 4A, 6A, and 8A GeV are presented in the form of in-plane transverse momentum nuclear transport models which have an orientation towards this energy range. All four exhibit some qualitative trends similar to those found in the data, although none show a consistent pattern of agreement within experimental uncertainties.

  16. Determination of the structure of the X(3872) in p¯A collisions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Larionov, A. B.; Strikman, M.; Bleicher, M.

    2015-07-22

    The structure of the X(3872) meson is unknown. Different competing models of the cc¯ exotic state X(3872) exist, including the possibilities that this state is either a mesonic molecule with dominating D0D¯*0 + c.c. composition, a cc¯qq¯ tetraquark, or a cc¯-gluon hybrid state. It is expected that the X(3872) state is rather strongly coupled to the pp¯ channel and, therefore, can be produced in pp¯ and p¯A collisions at PANDA. We propose to test the hypothetical molecular structure of X(3872) by studying the D or D¯* source stripping reactions on a nuclear residue.

  17. Nonplanar solitons collision in ultracold neutral plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    El-Tantawy, S. A.; Moslem, W. M.; El-Metwally, M.; Sabry, R.; Department of Physics, College of Science and Humanitarian Studies, Salman Bin Abdulaziz University, Alkharj ; El-Labany, S. K.; Schlickeiser, R.

    2013-09-15

    Collisions between two nonplanar ion-acoustic solitons in strongly coupled ultracold neutral plasmas composed of ion fluid and non-Maxwellian (nonthermal or superthermal) electron distributions are investigated. The extended Poincare-Lighthill-Kuo method is used to obtain coupled nonplanar Kortweg-de Vries equations for describing the system. The nonplanar phase shifts after the interaction of the two solitons are calculated. It is found that the properties of the nonplanar colliding solitons and its corresponding phase shifts are different from those in the planar case. The polarity of the colliding solitons strongly depends on the type of the non-Maxwellian electron distributions. A critical nonthermality parameter β{sub c} is identified. For values of β ≤ β{sub c} solitons with double polarity exist, while this behavior cannot occur for superthermal plasmas. The phase shift for nonthermal plasmas increases below β{sub c} for a positive soliton, but it decreases for β > β{sub c} for a negative soliton. For superthermal plasmas, the phase shift enhances rapidly for low values of spectral index κ and higher values of ions effective temperature ratio σ{sub *}. For 2 ≲ κ<10, the phase shift decreases but does not change for κ > 10. The nonlinear structure, as reported here, is useful for controlling the solitons created in forthcoming ultracold neutral plasma experiments.

  18. Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation NNSA Announces Elimination of Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) from Indonesia All of Southeast Asia Now HEU-Free (WASHINGTON, D.C.) - The U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA), Indonesian Nuclear Industry, LLC (PT INUKI), the National Nuclear Energy Agency (BATAN), and the Nuclear Energy Regulatory Agency (BAPETEN) of the... NNSA program strengthens national security from afar The Nuclear Smuggling Detection and Deterrence

  19. Nuclear Forensics | National Nuclear Security Administration...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Forensics Forensics Operations The National Technical Nuclear Forensics (NTNF) program is a Homeland Security Council and National Security Council-sponsored policy ...

  20. Nuclear Security Enterprise | National Nuclear Security Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    About Our Programs Defense Programs Nuclear Security Enterprise The Nuclear Security Enterprise (NSE) mission is to ensure the Nation sustains a safe, secure, and effective ...

  1. Nuclear Verification | National Nuclear Security Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Challenge: Maintain the U.S. ability to monitor and verify nuclear reduction agreements and detect violations of treaties and other nuclear nonproliferation commitments. Solution: ...

  2. Nuclear Suppliers Group & Regimes | National Nuclear Security...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency ...

  3. Nuclear Controls | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Controls | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy ...

  4. Nuclear structure and nuclear reactions | Argonne Leadership...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear structure and nuclear reactions PI Name: James Vary PI Email: jvary@iastate.edu Institution: Iowa State University Allocation Program: INCITE Allocation Hours at ALCF: 15 ...

  5. Nuclear and Radiological Material Security | National Nuclear...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    This includes NNSA's work to advance physical protection standards for nuclear facilities and to strengthen nuclear safeguards, which are criteria for the physical security and the ...

  6. nuclear emergency | National Nuclear Security Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home nuclear emergency nuclear emergency Fukushima: Five Years Later After the March 11, 2011, Japan earthquake, tsunami, and ...

  7. Nuclear / Radiological Advisory Team | National Nuclear Security...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Nuclear Radiological Advisory Team (NRAT) provides an emergency response capability for on-scene scientific and technical advice for both domestic and international nuclear or ...

  8. Nuclear Incident Team | National Nuclear Security Administration...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Incident Team NNSA houses the Nuclear Incident Team (NIT), which is responsible for deploying assets at the request of coordinating agencies in response to a nuclear or ...

  9. Nuclear Energy Systems Laboratory (NESL) / Transient Nuclear...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transient Nuclear Fuels Testing - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations ... Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & ...

  10. nuclear science week | National Nuclear Security Administration...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    science week Nuclear Science Week releases 2015 Impact Report and 2016 Request for Proposal Last week the Nuclear Science Week (NSW) National Steering Committee released its impact ...

  11. Nuclear Security Enterprise | National Nuclear Security Administration...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Nuclear Security Enterprise The Nuclear Security Enterprise ... efficient 21stcentury NSE with less environmental impact. ... is referred to as Stockpile Stewardship and Management. ...

  12. Nuclear | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Nuclear Nuclear Radioisotope Power Systems, a strong partnership between the Energy Department's Office of Nuclear Energy and NASA, has been providing the energy for deep space exploration. Nuclear power is the use of sustained nuclear fission to generate heat and electricity. Nuclear power plants provide about 6 percent of the world's energy and 13-14 percent of the world's electricity. Featured Moving Forward to Address Nuclear Waste Storage and Disposal Three trucks transport nuclear waste

  13. NUCLEAR REACTORS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Long, E.; Ashby, J.W.

    1958-09-16

    ABS>A graphite moderator structure is presented for a nuclear reactor compriscd of an assembly of similarly orientated prismatic graphite blocks arranged on spaced longitudinal axes lying in common planes wherein the planes of the walls of the blocks are positioned so as to be twisted reintive to the planes of said axes so thatthe unlmpeded dtrect paths in direction wholly across the walls of the blocks are limited to the width of the blocks plus spacing between the blocks.

  14. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, C.R.

    1962-07-24

    A fluidized bed nuclear reactor and a method of operating such a reactor are described. In the design means are provided for flowing a liquid moderator upwardly through the center of a bed of pellets of a nentron-fissionable material at such a rate as to obtain particulate fluidization while constraining the lower pontion of the bed into a conical shape. A smooth circulation of particles rising in the center and falling at the outside of the bed is thereby established. (AEC)

  15. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grebe, J.J.

    1959-07-14

    High temperature reactors which are uniquely adapted to serve as the heat source for nuclear pcwered rockets are described. The reactor is comprised essentially of an outer tubular heat resistant casing which provides the main coolant passageway to and away from the reactor core within the casing and in which the working fluid is preferably hydrogen or helium gas which is permitted to vaporize from a liquid storage tank. The reactor core has a generally spherical shape formed entirely of an active material comprised of fissile material and a moderator material which serves as a diluent. The active material is fabricated as a gas permeable porous material and is interlaced in a random manner with very small inter-connecting bores or capillary tubes through which the coolant gas may flow. The entire reactor is divided into successive sections along the direction of the temperature gradient or coolant flow, each section utilizing materials of construction which are most advantageous from a nuclear standpoint and which at the same time can withstand the operating temperature of that particular zone. This design results in a nuclear reactor characterized simultaneously by a minimum critiral size and mass and by the ability to heat a working fluid to an extremely high temperature.

  16. Corrigendum to “Suppression of Υ production in d+Au and Au+Au collisions at √ SNN = 200 GeV" [Phys. Lett. B 735 (2014) 127-137

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adamczyk, L.

    2015-04-01

    We report measurements of Υ meson production in p + p, d + Au, and Au+Au collisions using the STAR detector at RHIC. We compare the Υ yield to the measured cross section in p + p collisions in order to quantify any modifications of the yield in cold nuclear matter using d + Au data and in hot nuclear matter using Au+Au data separated into three centrality classes. Our p + p measurement is based on three times the statistics of our previous result. We obtain a nuclear modification factor for Upsilon (1S + 2S + 3S) in themore »rapidity range |y| dAu = 0.79 ± 0.24(stat.) ± 0.03(syst.) ± 0.10(p + p syst.). A comparison with models including shadowing and initial state parton energy loss indicates the presence of additional cold-nuclear matter suppression. Similarly, in the top 10% most-central Au + Au collisions, we measure a nuclear modification factor of R AA = 0.49 ±0.1(stat.) ±0.02(syst.) ±0.06(p + p syst.), which is a larger suppression factor than that seen in cold nuclear matter. Our results are consistent with complete suppression of excited-state Upsilon mesons in Au + Au collisions. The additional suppression in Au + Au is consistent with the level expected in model calculations that include the presence of a hot, deconfined Quark–Gluon Plasma. However, understanding the suppression seen in d + Au is still needed before any definitive statements about the nature of the suppression in Au + Au can be made.« less

  17. Collision propagation in Papua New Guinea and Solomon Sea

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silver, E.A.; Abbott, L.; Kirchoff-Stein, K.; Reed, D.; Bernstein, B. )

    1990-06-01

    The collision of the Finisterre-New Britain terrane with the Australian continent is propagating eastward at a rate of approximately 125 km/m.y., based on plate motions and the collisional geometry, as well as on the geochemistry of the arc volcanics. A sequence of sedimentary facies is developed from east to west in the modern environment (pelagic sediments, turbidites, marine molasse, and fluvial molasse), and this sequence is accreted from north to south at the front of the terrane collision in the Markham valley. Based on the modern distribution, the authors suggest that the age of the initial marine molasse will predate the passage of the collision point, and that of the fluvial molasse will postdate its passage. Intense erosion in the Markham canyon, located along the suture between the collision point and the coast, appears to be responsible for stripping most of the accreted marine molasse and redepositing it in a basin just east of the collision point. Convergence along the suture zone deceases westward. At Lae, very young deformation is seen, but 80 km to the west undeformed terrace deposits cover the deformation front. Uplift appears active within the range, aided by out-of-sequence thrusting, but still farther west the rocks lack signs of young tectonism. In the region just west of Lae, the main locus of slip between the Australian and south Bismarck plates must transfer southward to the front of the Papuan fold-and-thrust belt.

  18. DETECTION OF LOW-VELOCITY COLLISIONS IN SATURN'S F RING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Attree, N. O.; Murray, C. D.; Cooper, N. J.; Williams, G. A.

    2012-08-20

    Jets of material extending several hundred kilometers from Saturn's F ring are thought to be caused by collisions at speeds of several tens of ms{sup -1} between {approx}10 km diameter objects such as S/2004 S 6 and the core of the ring. The subsequent effects of Keplerian shear give rise to the multi-stranded nature of the F ring. Observations of the ring by the Imaging Science Subsystem experiment on the Cassini spacecraft have provided evidence that some smaller protrusions from the ring's core are the result of low-velocity collisions with nearby objects. We refer to these protrusions as 'mini-jets' and one such feature has been observed for {approx}7.5 hr as its length changed from {approx}75 km to {approx}250 km while it simultaneously appeared to collapse into the core. Orbit determinations suggest that such mini-jets consist of ring material displaced by a {approx}1 ms{sup -1} collision with a nearby moonlet, resulting in paths relative to the core that are due to a combination of Keplerian shear and epicyclic motion. Detections of mini-jets in the Cassini images suggest that it may now be possible to understand most small-scale F ring structure as the result of such collisions. A study of these mini-jets will therefore put constraints on the properties of the colliding population as well as improve our understanding of low-velocity collisions between icy objects.

  19. Nuclear Detonation Detection | National Nuclear Security Administration |

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    (NNSA) Research and Development Nuclear Detonation Detection The Office of Nuclear Detonation Detection (NDD) develops and provide continuous, global capabilities to detect foreign nuclear weapon detonations, including for test ban treaty monitoring needs and military requirements. These efforts are aligned along three functional areas: Space-based Detection of Nuclear Detonations: Develops and builds space sensors for the nation's operational nuclear test treaty monitoring and Integrated

  20. nuclear threat science | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    threat science Counterterrorism Counterterrorism Policy and Cooperation Nuclear Threat Science Office of Nuclear Threat Science The Office of Nuclear Threat Science is responsible for overseeing the Nuclear Counterterrorism Program, an NNSA program that sustains specialized expertise and integrates and executes key activities to advise and enable technical aspects of U.S. Government nuclear counterterrorism and... Office of Counterterrorism Policy and Cooperation The 2011 National Strategy for

  1. nuclear science | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    science Nuclear Science Week releases 2015 Impact Report and 2016 Request for Proposal Last week the Nuclear Science Week (NSW) National Steering Committee released its impact report from the 2015 event, detailing the many ways people were educated about all things nuclear as a result of the event. Nuclear Science Week is an international weeklong celebration to focus interest on... Consortium Led by University of California, Berkeley Awarded $25M NNSA Grant for Nuclear Science and Security

  2. NUCLEAR REACTORS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Long, E.; Ashley, J.W.

    1958-12-16

    A graphite moderator structure is described for a gas-cooled nuclear reactor having a vertical orlentation wherein the structure is physically stable with regard to dlmensional changes due to Wigner growth properties of the graphite, and leakage of coolant gas along spaces in the structure is reduced. The structure is comprised of stacks of unlform right prismatic graphite blocks positioned in layers extending in the direction of the lengths of the blocks, the adjacent end faces of the blocks being separated by pairs of tiles. The blocks and tiles have central bores which are in alignment when assembled and are provided with cooperatlng keys and keyways for physical stability.

  3. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Young, G.

    1963-01-01

    This patent covers a power-producing nuclear reactor in which fuel rods of slightly enriched U are moderated by heavy water and cooled by liquid metal. The fuel rods arranged parallel to one another in a circle are contained in a large outer closed-end conduit that extends into a tank containing the heavy water. Liquid metal is introduced into the large conduit by a small inner conduit that extends within the circle of fuel rods to a point near the lower closed end of the outer conduit. (AEC) Production Reactors

  4. Nuclear Data Links

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Links to Other Useful Sites Online Journals Institutions and Programs Related to Nuclear Physics U.S. Nuclear Data Program: All evaluated nuclear data supported by the U.S. Department of Energy. National Nuclear Data Center: Brookhaven National Laboratory; Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data Files (ENSDF), Nuclear Science References (NSR) and other databases. Isotopes Project: (E.O.L. Berkeley National Laboratory) Table of Isotopes, Isotope Explorer, XUNDL, Nuclear Data Dissemination Homepage, and

  5. Progress with the COGENT Edge Kinetic Code: Collision operator options

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dorf, M. A.; Cohen, R. H.; Compton, J. C.; Dorr, M.; Rognlien, T. D.; Angus, J.; Krasheninnikov, S.; Colella, P.; Martin, D.; McCorquodale, P.

    2012-06-27

    In this study, COGENT is a continuum gyrokinetic code for edge plasmas being developed by the Edge Simulation Laboratory collaboration. The code is distinguished by application of the fourth order conservative discretization, and mapped multiblock grid technology to handle the geometric complexity of the tokamak edge. It is written in v∥-μ (parallel velocity – magnetic moment) velocity coordinates, and making use of the gyrokinetic Poisson equation for the calculation of a self-consistent electric potential. In the present manuscript we report on the implementation and initial testing of a succession of increasingly detailed collision operator options, including a simple drag-diffusion operatormore » in the parallel velocity space, Lorentz collisions, and a linearized model Fokker-Planck collision operator conserving momentum and energy (© 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim)« less

  6. Physics of collisions between ultrarelativistic nuclei: Manifestation of collective effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korotkikh, V. L.

    2009-11-15

    Experimental results concerning heavy-ion collisions studied by means of the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) at an energy of 100 GeV per nucleon and showing manifestations of collective effects are surveyed. These effects are interpreted as a consequence of the formation of a dense thermalized medium referred to as quark-gluon plasma (strongly interacting quark-gluon plasma, quark-gluon matter, parton medium). An azimuthal anisotropy of particles, the suppression of the particle yield at high transverse momenta in relation to proton-proton collisions, and a change in the shape of the peak from a hadron jet in nucleus-nucleus collisions are spectacular manifestations of collective effects.

  7. Collision--induced absorption in dense atmospheres of cool stars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borysow, Aleksandra; Joergensen, Uffe Graae

    1999-04-01

    In the atmosphere of the Sun the major interaction between the matter and the radiation is through light absorption by ions (predominantly the negative ion of hydrogen atoms), neutral atoms and a small amount of polar molecules. The majority of stars in the universe are, however, cooler and denser than our Sun, and for a large fraction of these, the above absorption processes are very weak. Here, collision-induced absorption (CIA) becomes the dominant opacity source. The radiation is absorbed during very short mutual passages ('collisions') of two non-polar molecules (and/or atoms), while their electric charge distributions are temporarily distorted which gives rise to a transient dipole moment. We present here a review of the present-day knowledge about the impact of collision-induced absorption processes on the structure and the spectrum of such stars.

  8. Leading twist nuclear shadowing phenomena in hard processes with nuclei

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    L. Franfurt; Guzey, V.; Strikman, M.

    2012-01-08

    We present and discuss the theory and phenomenology of the leading twist theory of nuclear shadowing which is based on the combination of the generalization of Gribov-Glauber theory, QCD factorization theorems, and HERA QCD analysis of diffraction in lepton-proton deep inelastic scattering (DIS). We apply this technique for the analysis of a wide range of hard processes with nuclei-inclusive DIS on deuterons, medium-range and heavy nuclei, coherent and incoherent diffractive DIS with nuclei, and hard diffraction in proton-nucleus scattering - and make predictions for the effect of nuclear shadowing in the corresponding sea quark and gluon parton distributions. We alsomore » analyze the role of the leading twist nuclear shadowing in generalized parton distributions in nuclei and certain characteristics of final states in nuclear DIS. We discuss the limits of applicability of the leading twist approximation for small x scattering off nuclei and the onset of the black disk regime and methods of detecting it. It will be possible to check many of our predictions in the near future in the studies of the ultraperipheral collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Further checks will be possible in pA collisions at the LHC and forward hadron production at Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). As a result, detailed tests will be possible at an Electon-Ion Collider (EIC) in USA and at the Large Hadron-Electron Collider (LHeC) at CERN.« less

  9. Leading twist nuclear shadowing phenomena in hard processes with nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leonid Frankfurt, Vadim Guzey, Mark Strikman

    2012-03-01

    We present and discuss the theory and phenomenology of the leading twist theory of nuclear shadowing which is based on the combination of the generalization of Gribov-Glauber theory, QCD factorization theorems, and HERA QCD analysis of diffraction in lepton-proton deep inelastic scattering (DIS). We apply this technique for the analysis of a wide range of hard processes with nuclei-inclusive DIS on deuterons, medium-range and heavy nuclei, coherent and incoherent diffractive DIS with nuclei, and hard diffraction in proton-nucleus scattering - and make predictions for the effect of nuclear shadowing in the corresponding sea quark and gluon parton distributions. We also analyze the role of the leading twist nuclear shadowing in generalized parton distributions in nuclei and certain characteristics of final states in nuclear DIS. We discuss the limits of applicability of the leading twist approximation for small x scattering off nuclei and the onset of the black disk regime and methods of detecting it. It will be possible to check many of our predictions in the near future in the studies of the ultraperipheral collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Further checks will be possible in pA collisions at the LHC and forward hadron production at Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). Detailed tests will be possible at an Electon-Ion Collider (EIC) in USA and at the Large Hadron-Electron Collider (LHeC) at CERN.

  10. Interpretation of the first data on central Au+Au collisions...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    production in central Au+Au collisions taken at RHIC by the PHOBOS Collaboration as well as to existing data on central Pb+Pb collisions taken at the SPS by the NA49 Collaboration. ...

  11. (3+1)D hydrodynamic simulation of relativistic heavy-ion collisions...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (3+1)D hydrodynamic simulation of relativistic heavy-ion collisions Citation Details In-Document Search Title: (3+1)D hydrodynamic simulation of relativistic heavy-ion collisions ...

  12. Study shows tanker spills about equal from groundings and collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-02-17

    This paper reports that figures compiled by International Tanker Owners Pollution Federation Ltd., London, dispel the commonly held belief that tanker groundings are more significant than collisions in terms of oil pollution. During the past 21 years, the number of spills and volumes released after collisions and groundings were almost the same, the Catherine Grey, the federation's database manager. The federation the efforts to design environmentally safer tankers, such as those with double hulls, to minimize oil spills following accidents should take full account of the causes of major spills.

  13. Fifty years of nuclear fission: Nuclear data and measurements...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: Fifty years of nuclear fission: Nuclear data and measurements series Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Fifty years of nuclear fission: Nuclear data and ...

  14. Fifty years of nuclear fission: Nuclear data and measurements...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Fifty years of nuclear fission: Nuclear data and measurements series Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Fifty years of nuclear fission: Nuclear data and measurements series ...

  15. Nuclear reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wade, Elman E.

    1979-01-01

    A nuclear reactor including two rotatable plugs and a positive top core holddown structure. The top core holddown structure is divided into two parts: a small core cover, and a large core cover. The small core cover, and the upper internals associated therewith, are attached to the small rotating plug, and the large core cover, with its associated upper internals, is attached to the large rotating plug. By so splitting the core holddown structures, under-the-plug refueling is accomplished without the necessity of enlarging the reactor pressure vessel to provide a storage space for the core holddown structure during refueling. Additionally, the small and large rotating plugs, and their associated core covers, are arranged such that the separation of the two core covers to permit rotation is accomplished without the installation of complex lifting mechanisms.

  16. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grebe, J.J.

    1959-12-15

    A reactor which is particularly adapted tu serve as a heat source for a nuclear powered alrcraft or rocket is described. The core of this reactor consists of a porous refractory modera;or body which is impregnated with fissionable nuclei. The core is designed so that its surface forms tapered inlet and outlet ducts which are separated by the porous moderator body. In operation a gaseous working fluid is circulated through the inlet ducts to the surface of the moderator, enters and passes through the porous body, and is heated therein. The hot gas emerges into the outlet ducts and is available to provide thrust. The principle advantage is that tremendous quantities of gas can be quickly heated without suffering an excessive pressure drop.

  17. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miller, H.I.; Smith, R.C.

    1958-01-21

    This patent relates to nuclear reactors of the type which use a liquid fuel, such as a solution of uranyl sulfate in ordinary water which acts as the moderator. The reactor is comprised of a spherical vessel having a diameter of about 12 inches substantially surrounded by a reflector of beryllium oxide. Conventionnl control rods and safety rods are operated in slots in the reflector outside the vessel to control the operation of the reactor. An additional means for increasing the safety factor of the reactor by raising the ratio of delayed neutrons to prompt neutrons, is provided and consists of a soluble sulfate salt of beryllium dissolved in the liquid fuel in the proper proportion to obtain the result desired.

  18. TUNL Nuclear Data Evaluation Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    TUNL Nuclear Data Evaluation Group As a part of the United States Nuclear Data Network and the international Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Evaluators' Network, the Nuclear Data...

  19. Measurement of K0S and K*0 in p+p, d+Au, and Cu+Cu collisions at sqrt SNN = 200 GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adare, A.; Aidala, C.

    2014-11-01

    The PHENIX experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider has performed a systematic study of K0S and K*0 meson production at midrapidity in p+p, d+Au, and Cu+Cu collisions at sqrt SNN = 200 GeV. The K0S and K*0 mesons are reconstructed via their K0S and ?0(???)?0 (???) and K*0 ? K #25;? decay modes, respectively. The measured transverse-momentum spectra are used to determine the nuclear modification factor of K0S and K*0 mesons in d+Au and Cu+Cu collisions at different centralities. In the d+Au collisions, the nuclear modification factor of K0S and K*0 mesons is almost constant as a function of transverse momentum and is consistent with unity showing that cold-nuclear-matter effects do not play a significant role in the measured kinematic range. In Cu+Cu collisions, within the uncertainties no nuclear modification is registered in peripheral collisions. In central collisions, both mesons show suppression relative to the expectations from the p+p yield scaled by the number of binary nucleon-nucleon collisions in the Cu+Cu system. In the pT range 25 GeV/c, the strange mesons ( K0S, K*0) similarly to the #30;? meson with hidden strangeness, show an intermediate suppression between the more suppressed light quark mesons (?0) and the nonsuppressed baryons (p, p-bar). At higher transverse momentum, pT > 5 GeV/c, production of all particles is similarly suppressed by a factor of ?2. (auth)

  20. System size dependence of cluster properties from two-particle angular correlations in Cu+Cu and Au+Au collisions at sq root(s{sub NN})=200 GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alver, B.; Ballintijn, M.; Busza, W.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Henderson, C.; Kane, J. L.; Kulinich, P.; Li, W.; Loizides, C.; Reed, C.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Nieuwenhuizen, G. J. van; Vaurynovich, S. S.; Verdier, R.; Veres, G. I.; Wenger, E.; Wyslouch, B.; Back, B. B.

    2010-02-15

    We present results on two-particle angular correlations in Cu+Cu and Au+Au collisions at a center-of-mass energy per nucleon pair of 200 GeV over a broad range of pseudorapidity (eta) and azimuthal angle (phi) values as a function of collision centrality. The PHOBOS detector at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider has a uniquely large angular coverage for inclusive charged particles, which allows for the study of correlations on both long- and short-range scales. A complex two-dimensional correlation structure in {Delta}{eta} and {Delta}{phi} emerges, which is interpreted in the context of a cluster model. The effective cluster size and decay width are extracted from the two-particle pseudorapidity correlation functions. The effective cluster size found in semicentral Cu+Cu and Au+Au collisions is comparable to that found in proton-proton collisions but a nontrivial decrease in size with increasing centrality is observed. Moreover, a comparison of results from Cu+Cu versus Au+Au collisions shows an interesting scaling of the effective cluster size with the measured fraction of total cross section (which is related to the ratio of the impact parameter to the nuclear radius, b/2R), suggesting a geometric origin. Further analysis for pairs from restricted azimuthal regions shows that the effective cluster size at {Delta}{phi}{approx}180 deg. drops more rapidly toward central collisions than the size at {Delta}{phi}{approx}0 deg. The effect of limited {eta} acceptance on the cluster parameters is also addressed, and a correction is applied to present cluster parameters for full {eta} coverage, leading to much larger effective cluster sizes and widths than previously noted in the literature. These results should provide insight into the hot and dense medium created in heavy ion collisions.

  1. Nuclear Explosive Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2014-07-10

    The Order establishes requirements to implement the nuclear explosive safety (NES) elements of DOE O 452.1E, Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program, for routine and planned nuclear explosive operations (NEOs).

  2. Office of Nuclear Safety

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Office of Nuclear Safety establishes nuclear safety requirements and expectations for the Department to ensure protection of workers and the public from the hazards associated with nuclear operations with all Department operations.

  3. Nuclear Materials Disposition

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In fulfilling its mission, EM frequently manages and completes disposition of surplus nuclear materials and spent nuclear fuel.  These are not waste. They are nuclear materials no longer needed for...

  4. Dependence of enhanced asymmetry-induced transport on collision frequency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eggleston, D. L.

    2014-07-15

    A single-particle code with collisional effects is used to study how asymmetry-induced radial transport in a non-neutral plasma depends on collision frequency. For asymmetries of the form ?{sub 1}(r)?cos(kz)?cos(?t?l?), two sources for the transport have been identified: resonant particles and axially trapped particles. The simulation shows that this latter type, which occurs near the radius where ? matches the azimuthal rotation frequency ?{sub R}, is usually dominant at low collision frequency ? but becomes negligible at higher ?. This behavior can be understood by noting that axially trapped particles have a lower trapping frequency than resonant particles. In the low ? (banana) regime, the radial oscillations have amplitude ?r???v{sub r}/?{sub T}, so axially trapped particles dominate, and the transport may even exceed the resonant particle plateau regime level. As ? increases, collisions start to interrupt the slower axially trapped particle oscillations, while the resonant particles are still in the banana regime, so the axially trapped particle contribution to the transport decreases. At the largest ? values, axially trapped particle transport is negligible and the observed diffusion coefficient matches that given by plateau regime resonant particle theory. Heuristic models based on these considerations give reasonable agreement with the observed scaling laws for the value of the collision frequency where axially trapped particle transport starts to decrease and for the enhancement of the diffusion coefficient produced by axially trapped particles.

  5. Future directions in electron--ion collision physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reed, K.J. ); Griffin, D.C. )

    1992-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics: Summary of session on synergistic co-ordination of theory and experiment; synergism between experiment and theory in atomic physics; comparison of theory and experiment for electron-ion excitation and ionization; summary of session on new theoretical and computational methods; new theoretical and computational methods-r-matrix calculations; the coulomb three-body problem: a progress report; summary of session on needs and applications for electron-ion collisional data; electron-ion collisions in the plasma edge; needs and applications of theoretical data for electron impact excitation; summary of session on relativistic effects, indirect effects, resonance, etc; direct and resonant processes in electron-ion collisions; relativistic calculations of electron impact ionization and dielectronic recombination cross section for highly charged ions; electron-ion recombination in the close-coupling approximation; modified resonance amplitudes with strongly correlated channels; a density-matrix approach to the broadening of spectral lines by autoionization, radiative transitions and electron-ion collisions; towards a time-dependent description of electron-atom/ion collisions two electron systems; and comments on inclusion of the generalized bright interaction in electron impact excitation of highly charged ions.

  6. Future directions in electron--ion collision physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reed, K.J.; Griffin, D.C.

    1992-10-01

    This report discusses the following topics: Summary of session on synergistic co-ordination of theory and experiment; synergism between experiment and theory in atomic physics; comparison of theory and experiment for electron-ion excitation and ionization; summary of session on new theoretical and computational methods; new theoretical and computational methods-r-matrix calculations; the coulomb three-body problem: a progress report; summary of session on needs and applications for electron-ion collisional data; electron-ion collisions in the plasma edge; needs and applications of theoretical data for electron impact excitation; summary of session on relativistic effects, indirect effects, resonance, etc; direct and resonant processes in electron-ion collisions; relativistic calculations of electron impact ionization and dielectronic recombination cross section for highly charged ions; electron-ion recombination in the close-coupling approximation; modified resonance amplitudes with strongly correlated channels; a density-matrix approach to the broadening of spectral lines by autoionization, radiative transitions and electron-ion collisions; towards a time-dependent description of electron-atom/ion collisions two electron systems; and comments on inclusion of the generalized bright interaction in electron impact excitation of highly charged ions.

  7. [12th International workshop on Inelastic Ion-Surface Collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rabalais, J.W.; Nordlander, P.

    1999-10-15

    The twelfth international workshop on inelastic ion surface collisions was held at the Bahia Mar Resort and Conference Center on South Padre Island, Texas (USA) from January 24-29, 1999. The workshop brought together most of the leading researchers from around the world to focus on both the theoretical and experimental aspects of particle - surface interactions and related topics.

  8. Entropy and hadrochemical composition in heavy ion collision

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biro, T.; Barz, H.W.; Lukacs, B.; Zimanyi, J.

    1983-06-01

    The composite particle production in a heavy ion collision is calculated in the framework of a hadrochemical model. A critical comparison is performed between the produced entropy and the observables. The entropy production during the hadrochemical processes is found to be negligible.

  9. Photon and dilepton production in high energy heavy ion collisions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sakaguchi, Takao

    2015-05-07

    The recent results on direct photons and dileptons in high energy heavy ion collisions, obtained particularly at RHIC and LHC are reviewed. The results are new not only in terms of the probes, but also in terms of the precision. We shall discuss the physics learned from the results.

  10. Monte Carlo event generators for hadron-hadron collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knowles, I.G.; Protopopescu, S.D.

    1993-06-01

    A brief review of Monte Carlo event generators for simulating hadron-hadron collisions is presented. Particular emphasis is placed on comparisons of the approaches used to describe physics elements and identifying their relative merits and weaknesses. This review summarizes a more detailed report.

  11. Azimuthal and Transverse Single Spin Asymmetries in Hadronic Collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murgia, Francesco

    2010-12-22

    We give a short overview of the phenomenology of azimuthal and transverse single spin asymmetries in (un)polarized high-energy hadronic collisions. We briefly summarize a transverse momentum dependent, generalized parton model approach to these polarization phenomena, and discuss some of its applications. Finally, open points and future developments will be outlined.

  12. Nuclear Incident Team | National Nuclear Security Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home Nuclear Incident Team Nuclear Incident Team Fukushima: Five Years Later After the March 11, 2011, Japan earthquake, tsunami, ...

  13. Nuclear Quadrupole Moments and Nuclear Shell Structure

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Townes, C. H.; Foley, H. M.; Low, W.

    1950-06-23

    Describes a simple model, based on nuclear shell considerations, which leads to the proper behavior of known nuclear quadrupole moments, although predictions of the magnitudes of some quadrupole moments are seriously in error.

  14. Heavy flavor in heavy-ion collisions at RHIC and RHIC II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frawley, A D; Ullrich, T; Vogt, R

    2008-03-30

    In the initial years of operation, experiments at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) have identified a new form of matter formed in nuclei-nuclei collisions at energy densities more than 100 times that of a cold atomic nucleus. Measurements and comparison with relativistic hydrodynamic models indicate that the matter thermalizes in an unexpectedly short time, has an energy density at least 15 times larger than needed for color deconfinement, has a temperature about twice the critical temperature predicted by lattice QCD, and appears to exhibit collective motion with ideal hydrodynamic properties--a 'perfect liquid' that appears to flow with a near-zero viscosity to entropy ratio--lower than any previously observed fluid and perhaps close to a universal lower bound. However, a fundamental understanding of the medium seen in heavy-ion collisions at RHIC does not yet exist. The most important scientific challenge for the field in the next decade is the quantitative exploration of the new state of nuclear matter. That will require new data that will, in turn, require enhanced capabilities of the RHIC detectors and accelerator. In this report we discuss the scientific opportunities for an upgraded RHIC facility --RHIC II--in conjunction with improved capabilities of the two large RHIC detectors, PHENIX and STAR. We focus solely on heavy flavor probes. Their production rates are calculable using the well-established techniques of perturbative QCD and their sizable interactions with the hot QCD medium provide unique and sensitive measurements of its crucial properties making them one of the key diagnostic tools available to us.

  15. PHENIX (Pioneering High Energy Nuclear Interaction eXperiment) Data Plots from the PHENIX Plot Database

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The PHENIX Experiment is the largest of the four experiments currently taking data at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. PHENIX, the Pioneering High Energy Nuclear Interaction eXperiment, is an exploratory experiment for the investigation of high energy collisions of heavy ions and protons. PHENIX is designed specifically to measure direct probes of the collisions such as electrons, muons, and photons.The primary goal of PHENIX is to discover and study a new state of matter called the Quark-Gluon Plasma.[From http://www.phenix.bnl.gov/phenix/WWW/intro/] The PHENIX plot database allows searching by collision species, energies of the X and Y axis, and specific runs. Figures and data plots from published PHENIX papers are also available at http://www.phenix.bnl.gov//WWW/talk/pub_papers.php. (Specialized Interface)

  16. Civilian Nuclear Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Civilian Nuclear Program Civilian Nuclear Program Los Alamos is committed to using its advanced nuclear expertise and unique facilities to meet the civilian nuclear national security demands of the future. CONTACT US Program Director Venkateswara Rao Dasari (Rao) (505) 667-5098 Email Los Alamos partners extensively with other laboratories, universities, industry, and the international nuclear community to address real-world technical challenges The Civilian Nuclear Program is the focal point for

  17. Nuclear Energy Programs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Services » Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee The Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee (NEAC), formerly the Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee (NERAC), was established on October 1, 1998, to provide independent advice to the Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) on complex science and technical issues that arise in the planning, managing, and implementation of DOE's nuclear energy program. NEAC periodically reviews the elements of the NE program and based on these

  18. Nuclear Security Summit | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

  19. Nuclear Forensics | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA)

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Nuclear Forensics Forensics Operations The National Technical Nuclear Forensics (NTNF) program is a Homeland Security Council and National Security Council-sponsored policy initiative that establishes federal agency missions and institutionalizes roles and responsibilities to enable operational support for materials, pre-detonation device, and post-detonation nuclear or radiological forensics programs with the broader goal of attribution. Technical nuclear forensics utilizes the data from

  20. International Nuclear Security | National Nuclear Security Administration |

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    (NNSA) International Nuclear Security The International Nuclear Security program collaborates with partners world-wide to improve the security of proliferation-sensitive materials, particularly weapons-usable nuclear material in both civilian and non-civilian use in key countries. As part of these efforts, INS works with partner countries to: Upgrade and sustain physical security and material control and accounting systems; Develop national-level nuclear security infrastructure in areas such

  1. Nuclear Materials Information Program | National Nuclear Security...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Information Program | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the...

  2. Nuclear & Radiological Material Removal | National Nuclear Security...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    & Radiological Material Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation...

  3. Production of inclusive Υ{hooktop}(1S) and Υ{hooktop}(2S) in p–Pb collisions at √sNN = 5.02 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    None

    2015-01-01

    We report on the production of inclusive Y{hooktop}(1S) and Y{hooktop} (2S) in p–Pb collisions at √sNN = 5.02 TeV at the LHC. The measurement is performed with the ALICE detector at backward (-4.46nuclear modification factor and the ratio of the forward to backward yields of Υ{hooktop}(1S). A suppression of the inclusive Υ{hooktop}(1S) yield in p–Pb collisions with respect to the yield from pp collisions scaled by the number of binary nucleon–nucleon collisions is observed atmore » forward rapidity but not at backward rapidity. The results are compared to theoretical model calculations including nuclear shadowing or partonic energy loss effects.« less

  4. University of Washington, Nuclear Physics Laboratory annual report, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-04-01

    The Nuclear Physics Laboratory of the University of Washington supports a broad program of experimental physics research. The current program includes in-house research using the local tandem Van de Graff and superconducting linac accelerators and non-accelerator research in double beta decay and gravitation as well as user-mode research at large accelerator and reactor facilities around the world. This book is divided into the following areas: nuclear astrophysics; neutrino physics; nucleus-nucleus reactions; fundamental symmetries and weak interactions; accelerator mass spectrometry; atomic and molecular clusters; ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions; external users; electronics, computing, and detector infrastructure; Van de Graff, superconducting booster and ion sources; nuclear physics laboratory personnel; degrees granted for 1994--1995; and list of publications from 1994--1995.

  5. Nuclear War Against Cancer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear War Against Cancer 1663 Los Alamos science and technology magazine Latest Issue:March 2016 past issues All Issues submit Nuclear War Against Cancer Los Alamos, in ...

  6. Nuclear weapons modernizations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristensen, Hans M.

    2014-05-09

    This article reviews the nuclear weapons modernization programs underway in the world's nine nuclear weapons states. It concludes that despite significant reductions in overall weapons inventories since the end of the Cold War, the pace of reductions is slowing - four of the nuclear weapons states are even increasing their arsenals, and all the nuclear weapons states are busy modernizing their remaining arsenals in what appears to be a dynamic and counterproductive nuclear competition. The author questions whether perpetual modernization combined with no specific plan for the elimination of nuclear weapons is consistent with the nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty and concludes that new limits on nuclear modernizations are needed.

  7. Advancing Global Nuclear Security

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Today world leaders gathered at The Hague for the Nuclear Security Summit, a meeting to measure progress and take action to secure sensitive nuclear materials.

  8. Nuclear Energy Systems Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management ...

  9. NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION 10 CFR Parts 71 and 73 RIN 3150-AG41 Advance Notification to Native American Tribes of Transportation of Certain Types of Nuclear Waste AGENCY: ...

  10. Nuclear Safety Regulatory Framework

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Authority and responsibility to regulate nuclear safety at DOE facilities 10 CFR 830 10 CFR 835 10 CFR 820 Regulatory Implementation Nuclear Safety Radiological Safety Procedural ...

  11. National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Federal Equal ... A. Name and Address of Agency National Nuclear Security Administration Office of ...

  12. National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Nuclear Security Administration FY 2013 PER Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Y-12, LLC Performance Evaluation Report NNSA Production Office Y-12 Nuclear Security Complex ...

  13. Nuclear Materials Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Materials Science Our multidisciplinary expertise comprises the core actinide materials science and metallurgical capability within the nuclear weapons production and ...

  14. National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Federal Equal ... A. Name and Address of Agency National Nuclear Security Administration 1000 Independence ...

  15. National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    15 National Nuclear Security Administration FY 2013 PER Babcock & Wilcox Technical ... The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Production Office (NPO) took into ...

  16. Nuclear | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    High construction costs for nuclear plants, especially relative to natural-gas-fired plants, make other options for new nuclear capacity uneconomical even in the alternative...

  17. Nuclear Security Summit

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Joint Research Centre and the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration regarding the reduction of excess nuclear material http:...

  18. Sandia Energy Nuclear Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    afety-expert-elected-to-national-academy-of-engineeringfeed 0 Sandia Teaches Nuclear Safety Course http:energy.sandia.govsandia-teaches-nuclear-safety-course http:...

  19. Nuclear Energy University Programs

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    (NSUF) Gateway to Nuclear Research J. Rory Kennedy Director, NSUF Idaho National ... to NSUF (Integration into CINR) * Nuclear Energy Infrastructure Database (NEID) * ...

  20. Sandia's Nuclear Weapons Mission

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Weapons Mission Ensuring that the nation's stockpile is safe, secure and effective, and that it meets military requirements America's Nuclear Weapons Systems Engineering ...

  1. Sandia Energy - Nuclear Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sandia's Brayton-Cycle Turbine Boosts Small Nuclear Reactor Efficiency Energy, Energy Efficiency, News, News & Events, Nuclear Energy Sandia's Brayton-Cycle Turbine Boosts Small...

  2. Advanced Nuclear Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Energy - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us ... Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & ...

  3. Nuclear Data Links

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Links to Useful Online Nuclear Physics Journals Important Online Resources Science Direct ... Elsevier Physics Online: Nuclear Physics A, B, Physics Repots, Physics Letters B and more. ...

  4. Nuclear Controls Checklist

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Controls Yes No 1) Is your Facility involved in the research on or development, design, manufacture, construction, testing or maintenance of any nuclear explosive ...

  5. Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee (NEAC), formerly the Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee (NERAC), was established on October 1, 1998, to provide independent advice to the Office of...

  6. Nuclear Physics: Campaigns

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Free-Electron Laser (FEL) Medical Imaging Physics Topics Campaigns The Structure of the Nuclear Building Blocks The Structure of Nuclei Symmetry Tests in Nuclear Physics Meetings ...

  7. 2013 Nuclear Workforce Development ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Practice in Nuclear Medicine Radiopharmacy Patient Care Medical Imaging & Computers Moderator: Deborah M. Gibbs, MEd, PET, CNMT Lead Nuclear Medicine PET Facility...

  8. nuclear reactors | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    nuclear reactors NNSA Researchers Advance Technology for Remote Reactor Monitoring NNSA's Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Research and Development Program drives the innovation of technical capabilities to detect, identify, and characterize foreign nuclear weapons development activities. To achieve this, NNSA leverages the unique capabilities of the national laboratories

  9. International Nuclear Safeguards | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    | (NNSA) International Nuclear Safeguards Challenge: Detect/deter undeclared nuclear materials and activities. Solution: Build capacity of the International Atomic Energy Agency and Member States to implement and meet safeguards obligations. The Office of International Nuclear Safeguards develops and supports the policies, concepts, technologies, expertise, and international safeguards infrastructure necessary to strengthen and sustain the international safeguards system as it evolves to

  10. nuclear enterprise | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    enterprise New Report from NNSA Highlights Major Achievements for 2015 Outlines Accomplishments in Stockpile Stewardship, Nuclear Nonproliferation, Naval Reactors and Managing the Nuclear Enterprise The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) today released "NNSA Achievements: 2015 By the Numbers," a report highlighting major accomplishments and milestones

  11. Nuclear reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thomson, Wallace B.

    2004-03-16

    A nuclear reactor comprising a cylindrical pressure vessel, an elongated annular core centrally disposed within and spaced from the pressure vessel, and a plurality of ducts disposed longitudinally of the pressure vessel about the periphery thereof, said core comprising an annular active portion, an annular reflector just inside the active portion, and an annular reflector just outside the active a portion, said annular active portion comprising rectangular slab, porous fuel elements radially disposed around the inner reflector and extending the length of the active portion, wedge-shaped, porous moderator elements disposed adjacent one face of each fuel element and extending the length of the fuel element, the fuel and moderator elements being oriented so that the fuel elements face each other and the moderator elements do likewise, adjacent moderator elements being spaced to provide air inlet channels, and adjacent fuel elements being spaced to provide air outlet channels which communicate with the interior of the peripheral ducts, and means for introducing air into the air inlet channels which passes through the porous moderator elements and porous fuel elements to the outlet channel.

  12. Pulsed deuterium lithium nuclear reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischer, A.G.

    1980-01-08

    A nuclear reactor that burns hydrogen bomb material 6-lithium deuterotritide to helium in successive microexplosions which are ignited electrically and enclosed by this same molten material, and that permits the conversion of the reaction heat into useful electrical power. A specially-constructed high-current pulse machine is discharged via a thermally-preformed highly conducting path through a mass of the molten salt 6lid1-xtx (0collisions. These hot particles initiate suprathermal multistepped propagating fission-fusion avalanches that heat the plasma by their own released energy up to thermonuclear temperature. The plasma is confined inertially and magnetically. Neutrons escaping sideways are utilized to breed tritium in the surrounding liquid blanket material, for participation in the next pulse. At the end of the current pulse and magnetic confinement the filament desintegrates and the nuclear fire is extinguished in the surrounding cold matter. The energy set free is insufficient to convert the blanket into a hot plasma in which chain reactions could propagate and escalate. The liquid blanket also serves as a neutron radiation shield. The shock wave is attenuated in it by a curtain of rising deuterium bubbles. The heat shock is buffered by partial melting of the external solid crust. The reaction heat is carried by the liquid metal of the external cooling jacket to the heat exchanger of the associated turbo-generator. Every few seconds, a new pulse can take place.

  13. Suppression of Upsilon production in d + Au and Au + Au collisions at root s(NN) = 200 GeV (vol 735, pg 127, 2014)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Anson, C. D.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Gliske, S.; Krueger, K.; Spinka, H. M.; Underwood, D.G.

    2014-07-30

    We report measurements of ? meson production in p + p, d +Au, and Au+Aucollisions using the STAR detector at RHIC. We compare the ? yield to the measured cross section in p + p collisions in order to quantify any modifications of the yield in cold nuclear matter using d +Au data and in hot nuclear matter using Au+Au data separated into three centrality classes. Our p +p measurement is based on three times the statistics of our previous result. We obtain a nuclear modification factor for ? (1S + 2S + 3S) in the rapidity range |y| < 1 in d + Aucollisions of RdAu = 0.79 0.24(stat.) 0.03(syst.) 0.10(p + p syst.). A comparison with models including shadowing and initial state parton energy loss indicates the presence of additional cold-nuclear matter suppression. Similarly, in the top 10% most-central Au + Au collisions, we measure a nuclear modification factor of R AA = 0.49 0.1(stat.) 0.02(syst.) 0.06(p + p syst.), which is a larger suppression factor than that seen in cold nuclear matter. Our results are consistent with complete suppression of excited-state ? mesons in Au + Aucollisions. The additional suppression in Au + Au is consistent with the level expected in model calculations that include the presence of a hot, deconfined QuarkGluon Plasma. However, understanding the suppression seen in d + Au is still needed before any definitive statements about the nature of the suppression in Au + Au can be made.

  14. State Nuclear Profiles - Energy Information Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear & Uranium Glossary FAQS Overview Data Status of U.S. nuclear outages (interactive) Nuclear power plants Uranium & nuclear fuel Spent nuclear fuel All nuclear data ...

  15. Neutron transport analysis for nuclear reactor design

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vujic, J.L.

    1993-11-30

    Replacing regular mesh-dependent ray tracing modules in a collision/transfer probability (CTP) code with a ray tracing module based upon combinatorial geometry of a modified geometrical module (GMC) provides a general geometry transfer theory code in two dimensions (2D) for analyzing nuclear reactor design and control. The primary modification of the GMC module involves generation of a fixed inner frame and a rotating outer frame, where the inner frame contains all reactor regions of interest, e.g., part of a reactor assembly, an assembly, or several assemblies, and the outer frame, with a set of parallel equidistant rays (lines) attached to it, rotates around the inner frame. The modified GMC module allows for determining for each parallel ray (line), the intersections with zone boundaries, the path length between the intersections, the total number of zones on a track, the zone and medium numbers, and the intersections with the outer surface, which parameters may be used in the CTP code to calculate collision/transfer probability and cross-section values. 28 figures.

  16. Neutron transport analysis for nuclear reactor design

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vujic, Jasmina L.

    1993-01-01

    Replacing regular mesh-dependent ray tracing modules in a collision/transfer probability (CTP) code with a ray tracing module based upon combinatorial geometry of a modified geometrical module (GMC) provides a general geometry transfer theory code in two dimensions (2D) for analyzing nuclear reactor design and control. The primary modification of the GMC module involves generation of a fixed inner frame and a rotating outer frame, where the inner frame contains all reactor regions of interest, e.g., part of a reactor assembly, an assembly, or several assemblies, and the outer frame, with a set of parallel equidistant rays (lines) attached to it, rotates around the inner frame. The modified GMC module allows for determining for each parallel ray (line), the intersections with zone boundaries, the path length between the intersections, the total number of zones on a track, the zone and medium numbers, and the intersections with the outer surface, which parameters may be used in the CTP code to calculate collision/transfer probability and cross-section values.

  17. The Joys of Nuclear Engineering

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Jon Carmack

    2010-01-08

    Nuclear fuels researcher Jon Carmack talks about the satisfactions of a career in nuclear engineering.

  18. Nuclear reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yant, Howard W.; Stinebiser, Karl W.; Anzur, Gregory C.

    1977-01-01

    A nuclear reactor, particularly a liquid-metal breeder reactor, whose upper internals include outlet modules for channeling the liquid-metal coolant from selected areas of the outlet of the core vertically to the outlet plenum. The modules are composed of a highly-refractory, high corrosion-resistant alloy, for example, INCONEL-718. Each module is disposed to confine and channel generally vertically the coolant emitted from a subplurality of core-component assemblies. Each module has a grid with openings, each opening disposed to receive the coolant from an assembly of the subplurality. The grid in addition serves as a holdown for the assemblies of the corresponding subplurality preventing their excessive ejection upwardly from the core. In the region directly over the core the outlet modules are of such peripheral form that they nest forming a continuum over the core-component assemblies whose outlet coolant they confine. Each subassembly includes a chimney which confines the coolant emitted by its corresponding subassemblies to generally vertical flow between the outlet of the core and the outlet plenum. Each subplurality of assemblies whose emitted coolant is confined by an outlet module includes assemblies which emit lower-temperature coolant, for example, a control-rod assembly, or fertile assemblies, and assemblies which emit coolant of substantially higher temperature, for example, fuel-rod assemblies. The coolants of different temperatures are mixed in the chimneys reducing the effect of stripping (hot-cold temperature fluctuations) on the remainder of the upper internals which are composed typically of AISI-304 or AISI-316 stainless steel.

  19. Nuclear reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pennell, William E.; Rowan, William J.

    1977-01-01

    A nuclear reactor in which the core components, including fuel-rod assemblies, control-rod assemblies, fertile rod-assemblies, and removable shielding assemblies, are supported by a plurality of separate inlet modular units. These units are referred to as inlet module units to distinguish them from the modules of the upper internals of the reactor. The modular units are supported, each removable independently of the others, in liners in the supporting structure for the lower internals of the reactor. The core assemblies are removably supported in integral receptacles or sockets of the modular units. The liners, units, sockets and assmblies have inlet openings for entry of the fluid. The modular units are each removably mounted in the liners with fluid seals interposed between the opening in the liner and inlet module into which the fluid enters and the upper and lower portion of the liner. Each assembly is similarly mounted in a corresponding receptacle with fluid seals interposed between the openings where the fluid enters and the lower portion of the receptacle or fitting closely in these regions. As fluid flows along each core assembly a pressure drop is produced along the fluid so that the fluid which emerges from each core assembly is at a lower pressure than the fluid which enters the core assembly. However because of the seals interposed in the mountings of the units and assemblies the pressures above and below the units and assemblies are balanced and the units are held in the liners and the assemblies are held in the receptacles by their weights as they have a higher specific gravity than the fluid. The low-pressure spaces between each module and its liner and between each core assembly and its module is vented to the low-pressure regions of the vessel to assure that fluid which leaks through the seals does not accumulate and destroy the hydraulic balance.

  20. Progress report on nuclear spectroscopic studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bingham, C.R.; Guidry, M.W.; Riedinger, L.L.; Sorensen, S.P.

    1994-02-18

    The Nuclear Physics group at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK) is involved in several aspects of heavy-ion physics including both nuclear structure and reaction mechanisms. While the main emphasis is on experimental problems, the authors have maintained a strong collaboration with several theorists in order to best pursue the physics of their measurements. During the last year they have had several experiments at the ATLAS at Argonne National Laboratory, the GAMMASPHERE at the LBL 88 Cyclotron, and with the NORDBALL at the Niels Bohr Institute Tandem. Also, they continue to be very active in the WA93/98 collaboration studying ultra-relativistic heavy ion physics utilizing the SPS accelerator at CERN in Geneva, Switzerland and in the PHENIX Collaboration at the RHIC accelerator under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory. During the last year their experimental work has been in three broad areas: (1) the structure of nuclei at high angular momentum, (2) the structure of nuclei far from stability, and (3) ultra-relativistic heavy-ion physics. The results of studies in these particular areas are described in this document. These studies concentrate on the structure of nuclear matter in extreme conditions of rotational motion, imbalance of neutrons and protons, or very high temperature and density. Another area of research is heavy-ion-induced transfer reactions, which utilize the transfer of nucleons to states with high angular momentum to learn about their structure and to understand the transfer of particles, energy, and angular momentum in collisions between heavy ions.

  1. Radiation effects in nuclear materials: Role of nuclear and electronic energy losses and their synergy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomé, Lionel; Debelle, Aurelien; Garrido, Frederico; Mylonas, Stamatis; Décamps, B.; Bachelet, C.; Sattonnay, G.; Pellegrino, S.; Miro, S.; Trocellier, P.; Serruys, Y.; Velisa, G.; Grygiel, C.; Monnet, I.; Toulemonde, Marcel; Simon, P.; Jagielski, Jacek; Jozwik-Biala, Iwona; Nowicki, Lech; Behar, M.; Weber, William J; Zhang, Yanwen; Backman, Marie; Nordlund, Kai; Djurabekova, Flyura

    2013-01-01

    Ceramic oxides and carbides are promising matrices for the immobilization and/or transmutation of nuclear wastes, cladding materials for gas-cooled fission reactors and structural components for fusion reactors. For these applications there is a need of fundamental data concerning the behavior of nuclear ceramics upon irradiation. This article is focused on the presentation of a few remarkable examples regarding ion-beam modifications of nuclear ceramics with an emphasis on the mechanisms leading to damage creation and phase transformations. Results obtained by combining advanced techniques (Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and channeling, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy) concern irradiations in a broad energy range (from keV to GeV) with the aim of exploring both nuclear collision (Sn) and electronic excitation (Se) regimes. Finally, the daunting challenge of the demonstration of the existence of synergistic effects between Sn and Se is tackled by discussing the healing due to intense electronic energy deposition (SHIBIEC) and by reporting results recently obtained in dual-beam irradiation (DBI) experiments.

  2. Advanced nuclear fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terrani, Kurt

    2014-07-14

    Kurt Terrani uses his expertise in materials science to develop safer fuel for nuclear power plants.

  3. 2016 Nuclear Science Week

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Science Week October 17 - 21, 2016 Nuclear Science Week is a national, broadly observed week-long celebration that focuses on all aspects of nuclear science. Events during this week will provide many learning opportunities about contributions, innovation and careers that can be found by exploring nuclear science. 6-22-16

  4. Advanced nuclear fuel

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Terrani, Kurt

    2014-07-15

    Kurt Terrani uses his expertise in materials science to develop safer fuel for nuclear power plants.

  5. Nuclear and Particle Futures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (NNSA) Nuclear Weapons Life Cycle Nuclear weapons are developed, produced, and maintained in the stockpile, and then retired and dismantled. This sequence of events is known as the nuclear weapons life cycle. The Department of Energy (DOE) through the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and in partnership with Department of Defense (DoD) conducts activities in a joint nuclear weapons life cycle process. The major steps, or phases, of the life cycle are described below. Currently,

  6. Spent Nuclear Fuel

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Spent Nuclear Fuel Release date: December 7, 2015 Next release date: Late 2018 Spent nuclear fuel data are collected by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) for the Department of Energy's Office of Standard Contract Management (Office of the General Counsel) on the Form GC-859, "Nuclear Fuel Data Survey." The data include detailed characteristics of spent nuclear fuel discharged from commercial U.S. nuclear power plants and currently stored at commercial sites in the United

  7. Measurement of electrons from heavy-flavour decays in p-Pb collisions at ?(S{sub NN}) = 5.02 TeV with ALICE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ALICE collaboration, Cristiane Jahnke for the

    2014-11-11

    Electrons from the decay of hadrons containing charm or beauty quarks have been measured in p-Pb collisions at ?(S{sub NN}) = 5.02 TeV with ALICE. Electrons from heavy-flavour hadron decays were identified using the Time Projection Chamber and the Electromagnetic Calorimeter of ALICE. The nuclear modification factor R{sub pPb} was calculated using a pp reference obtained from a perturbative QCD-based ?(s)-extrapolation of the cross section measured at 7 TeV and from a FONLL prediction.

  8. Nuclear-matter--quark-matter phase diagram with strangeness

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barz, H. W.; Friman, B. L.; Knoll, J.; Schulz, H.

    1989-07-01

    A phenomenological equation of state of strongly interacting matter, including strange degrees of freedom, is presented. It is shown that the hyperon and kaon interactions must be included, in order to obtain a reasonable description of the deconfinement transition at high baryon densities. The consequences of kaon condensation on the nuclear-matter--quark-matter phase diagram are explored. The relative particle abundances obtained in an isentropic expansion of a blob of quark-gluon plasma are presented for different initial conditions. Implications for ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions are briefly discussed.

  9. Global polarization measurement in Au+Au collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abelev, B.I.; Adams, J.; Aggarwal, M.M.; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett,J.; Anderson, B.D.; Anderson, M.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G.S.; Bai,Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L.S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, V.V.; Bellingeri-Laurikainen, A.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Bhardwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A.K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L.C.; Blyth, S.-L.; Bonner, B.E.; Botje, M.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A.V.; Bravar, A.; Bystersky, M.; Cadman, R.V.; Cai,X.Z.; Caines, H.; Calderon de la Barca Sanchez, M.; Castillo, J.; Catu,O.; Cebra, D.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen,H.F.; Chen, J.H.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J.P.; Cormier, T.M.; Cosentino, M.R.; Cramer, J.G.; Crawford,H.J.; Das, D.; Das, S.; Daugherity, M.; de Moura, M.M.; Dedovich, T.G.; DePhillips, M.; Derevschikov, A.A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Djawotho,P.; Dogra, S.M.; Dong, W.J.; Dong, X.; Draper, J.E.; Du, F.; Dunin, V.B.; Dunlop, J.C.; Dutta Mazumdar, M.R.; Eckardt, V.; Edwards, W.R.; Efimov,L.G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch,E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, C.A.; Gaillard, L.; Ganti,M.S.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, J.S.; Gorbunov, Y.G.; Gos,H.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Guertin, S.M.; Guimaraes, K.S.F.F.; Guo,Y.; Gupta, N.; Gutierrez, T.D.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T.J.; Hamed, A.; Harris, J.W.; He, W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T.W.; Hepplemann, S.; Hippolyte,B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffman, A.M.; Hoffmann, G.W.; Horner, M.J.; Huang, H.Z.; Huang, S.L.; Hughes, E.W.; Humanic, T.J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs,P.; Jacobs, W.W.; Jakl, P.; Jia, F.; Jiang, H.; Jones, P.G.; Judd, E.G.; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khodyrev,V.Yu.; Kim, B.C.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Kislov, E.M.; Klein,S.R.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D.D.; et al.

    2007-08-02

    The system created in non-central relativisticnucleus-nucleus collisions possesses large orbital angular momentum. Dueto spin-orbit coupling, particles produced in such a system could becomeglobally polarized along the direction of the system angular momentum. Wepresent the results of Lambda and anti-Lambda hyperon global polarizationmeasurements in Au+Au collisions at sqrt sNN=62.4 GeV and 200 GeVperformed with the STAR detector at RHIC. The observed globalpolarization of Lambda and anti-Lambda hyperons in the STAR acceptance isconsistent with zero within the precision of the measurements. Theobtained upper limit, lbar P Lambda, anti-Lambda rbar<= 0.02, iscompared to the theoretical values discussed recently in theliterature.

  10. Optimized Algorithm for Collision Probability Calculations in Cubic Geometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garcia, R.D.M.

    2004-06-15

    An optimized algorithm for implementing a recently developed method of computing collision probabilities (CPs) in three dimensions is reported in this work for the case of a homogeneous cube. Use is made of the geometrical regularity of the domain to rewrite, in a very compact way, the approximate formulas for calculating CPs in general three-dimensional geometry that were derived in a previous work by the author. The ensuing gain in computation time is found to be substantial: While the computation time associated with the general formulas increases as K{sup 2}, where K is the number of elements used in the calculation, that of the specific formulas increases only linearly with K. Accurate numerical results are given for several test cases, and an extension of the algorithm for computing the self-collision probability for a hexahedron is reported at the end of the work.

  11. Investigation of dominant spin wave modes by domain walls collision

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramu, M.; Purnama, I.; Goolaup, S.; Chandra Sekhar, M.; Lew, W. S.

    2014-06-28

    Spin wave emission due to field-driven domain wall (DW) collision has been investigated numerically and analytically in permalloy nanowires. The spin wave modes generated are diagonally symmetric with respect to the collision point. The non-propagating mode has the highest amplitude along the middle of the width. The frequency of this mode is strongly correlated to the nanowire geometrical dimensions and is independent of the strength of applied field within the range of 0.1?mT to 1?mT. For nanowire with film thickness below 5?nm, a second spin wave harmonic mode is observed. The decay coefficient of the spin wave power suggests that the DWs in a memory device should be at least 300?nm apart for them to be free of interference from the spin waves.

  12. Effects of collisions on energetic particle-driven chirping bursts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lesur, M.

    2013-05-15

    In the presence of an energetic particle population in a dissipative plasma, self-trapped structures in phase-space (holes and clumps) emerge from nonlinear wave-particle interactions. Their dynamics can lead to a nonlinear continuous shifting of the wave frequency (chirping). The effects of collisions on chirping characteristics are investigated, with a one-dimensional kinetic model. Existing analytic theory is extended to account for Krook-like collisions, which quantitatively explains a significant departure from widely accepted square-root time dependency. Relaxation oscillations, associated with chirping bursts, are investigated in the presence of dynamical friction and velocity-diffusion. The period increases with decreasing drag and weakly increases with decreasing diffusion. The mechanism is clarified with a simple semi-analytic model of hole/clump pair, which satisfies a Fokker-Planck equation. The model shows that the linear growth rate cannot be obtained simply by fitting an exponential to the amplitude time-series.

  13. A Hybrid Method for Accelerated Simulation of Coulomb Collisions in a Plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caflisch, R; Wang, C; Dimarco, G; Cohen, B; Dimits, A

    2007-10-09

    If the collisional time scale for Coulomb collisions is comparable to the characteristic time scales for a plasma, then simulation of Coulomb collisions may be important for computation of kinetic plasma dynamics. This can be a computational bottleneck because of the large number of simulated particles and collisions (or phase-space resolution requirements in continuum algorithms), as well as the wide range of collision rates over the velocity distribution function. This paper considers Monte Carlo simulation of Coulomb collisions using the binary collision models of Takizuka & Abe and Nanbu. It presents a hybrid method for accelerating the computation of Coulomb collisions. The hybrid method represents the velocity distribution function as a combination of a thermal component (a Maxwellian distribution) and a kinetic component (a set of discrete particles). Collisions between particles from the thermal component preserve the Maxwellian; collisions between particles from the kinetic component are performed using the method of or Nanbu. Collisions between the kinetic and thermal components are performed by sampling a particle from the thermal component and selecting a particle from the kinetic component. Particles are also transferred between the two components according to thermalization and dethermalization probabilities, which are functions of phase space.

  14. Results from {gamma}{gamma} collisions in OPAL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patt, Jochen

    1998-05-29

    The production of charged hadrons and jets is measured in collisions of quasi-real photons. The data were taken with the OPAL detector at LEP at e{sup +}e{sup -} centre-of-mass energies {radical}(s{sub ee})=161 and 172 GeV. The measured cross-sections are compared to perturbative next-to-leading order QCD calculations. The separation of the direct and the resolved component of the photon is demonstrated.

  15. Energy Transfer in Collisions of Peptide Ions with Surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laskin, Julia; Futrell, Jean H.

    2003-08-08

    Time- and energy-resolved surface induced (SID) dissociation of a singly protonated octapeptide des-Arg1-bradykinin (PPGFSPFR) was used to study the effect of physical properties of the SID target on the efficiency of translational to vibrational energy transfer (T > V) in collisions of peptide ions with surfaces. Four SID targets of varying chemical composition and stiffness were examined in this work: self-assembled monolayers of 1-dodecane thiol (HSAM) and its fluorinated analog (CF3(CF2)9C2H4SH - FSAM) on gold, a 300 nm thick layer of lithium fluoride (LiF) on a polished titanium surface, and a 2 m carbon vapor deposited diamond layer on a titanium surface. An RRKM-based modeling approach was utilized to extract internal energy distributions deposited into the precursor ion upon collisions with different surfaces. We found that the percent of T -> V transfer increases in the order: HSAM (10.1%), LiF (12.0%), diamond (19.2%), FSAM (20.5%). Furthermore, the width of the energy deposition function (EDF) is affected by the properties of the SID target. Collisions of peptide ions with the HSAM surface results in deposition of relatively narrow internal energy distributions with the width of the EDF increasing in the order: HSAM < FSAM < LiF < Diamond. The results demonstrate that surface stiffness has a major effect on the width of the EDF, while the average energy deposited into the ion is mainly affected by the mass of the chemical moiety representing an immediate collision partner for the ion impacting the surface.

  16. Vacancy sharing in strongly asymmetric heavy-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janev, R.K.; Krstic', P.S.; Rakovic', M.J.

    1987-04-15

    A complex-energy, complex-interaction Nikitin-like model is proposed to describe the vacancy-sharing process when many quasimolecular states are strongly coupled. The vacancy-sharing ratio is obtained in closed analytical form. The general result is used to calculate the L-K vacancy sharing in the C/sup +/+Ar, N/sup +/+Ar, and O/sup +/+Ar collisions.

  17. TURBULENCE-INDUCED RELATIVE VELOCITY OF DUST PARTICLES. IV. THE COLLISION KERNEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pan, Liubin; Padoan, Paolo E-mail: ppadoan@icc.ub.edu

    2014-12-20

    Motivated by its importance for modeling dust particle growth in protoplanetary disks, we study turbulence-induced collision statistics of inertial particles as a function of the particle friction time, ?{sub p}. We show that turbulent clustering significantly enhances the collision rate for particles of similar sizes with ?{sub p} corresponding to the inertial range of the flow. If the friction time, ?{sub p,} {sub h}, of the larger particle is in the inertial range, the collision kernel per unit cross section increases with increasing friction time, ?{sub p,} {sub l}, of the smaller particle and reaches the maximum at ?{sub p,} {sub l} = ?{sub p,} {sub h}, where the clustering effect peaks. This feature is not captured by the commonly used kernel formula, which neglects the effect of clustering. We argue that turbulent clustering helps alleviate the bouncing barrier problem for planetesimal formation. We also investigate the collision velocity statistics using a collision-rate weighting factor to account for higher collision frequency for particle pairs with larger relative velocity. For ?{sub p,} {sub h} in the inertial range, the rms relative velocity with collision-rate weighting is found to be invariant with ?{sub p,} {sub l} and scales with ?{sub p,} {sub h} roughly as ? ?{sub p,h}{sup 1/2}. The weighting factor favors collisions with larger relative velocity, and including it leads to more destructive and less sticking collisions. We compare two collision kernel formulations based on spherical and cylindrical geometries. The two formulations give consistent results for the collision rate and the collision-rate weighted statistics, except that the spherical formulation predicts more head-on collisions than the cylindrical formulation.

  18. D0 Collision Hall Outdoor Fresh Air Makeup

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Markley, D.; /Fermilab

    1992-03-27

    This note will briefly describe the collision hall ventilation system and how D0 will monitor outside air makeup and what actions occur in the event of system failures. The Dzero collision hall has two different fresh air makeup conditions it must meet. They are: (1) Tunnel Barriers removed-Fresh air makeup = 4500 CFM; and (2) Tunnel Barriers in place-Fresh air makeup = 2800 CFM. This note demonstrates how the fresh air minimums are met and guaranteed. The air flow paths and ducts at D0 for both AHU1 and EF-7 are fixed. The blower throughputs are not variable. The software stops on AHU1's dampers will be set for a minimum of 2800 cfm or 4500 cfm of outdoor air continuously added to the HVAC flow stream depending on the tunnel barrier state. AHU1 and EF-7 both have monitoring that can determine reliably as to whether the respective blower is on or off. Since the outside air makeup is fixed as long as the blowers are running, and the software AHU1 damper limits are set, we can rely on the blower status indicators to determine as to whether the collision hall is receiving the proper amount of outside makeup air.

  19. Nuclear Security Summit | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Security Summit U.S. and China Continue Cooperative Partnership to Advance Safe, Secure Civil Nuclear Energy for Clean Energy Future DOE/NNSA Hosts 11th U.S.-China Peaceful Uses of Nuclear Technology Meeting at Savannah River National Laboratory in Aiken, South Carolina (Aiken, South Carolina) - On May 10-11, 2016 the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and the China... Statement on Signing of the Administrative Arrangement to the Agreement for

  20. defense nuclear security | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    defense nuclear security NNSA Announces 2014 Security Professional of the Year Awards WASHINGTON, D.C. - The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) today announced the recipients of the 2014 Bradley A. Peterson Federal and Contractor Security Professional of the Year Awards. Pamela Valdez from the Los Alamos Field Office will receive the federal award and Randy Fraser from... Michael Lempke receives NNSA's Gold Medal of Excellence DOE Undersecretary for Nuclear Security and NNSA

  1. nuclear security | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    security U.S. and China Continue Cooperative Partnership to Advance Safe, Secure Civil Nuclear Energy for Clean Energy Future DOE/NNSA Hosts 11th U.S.-China Peaceful Uses of Nuclear Technology Meeting at Savannah River National Laboratory in Aiken, South Carolina (Aiken, South Carolina) - On May 10-11, 2016 the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and the China... Secretary Moniz awards Hutcheon memorial nonproliferation fellowship to Thomas Gray

  2. nuclear weapons | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    weapons DOE, NNSA leaders open summit on the physical security of nuclear weapons Deputy Secretary of Energy Elizabeth Sherwood-Randall, NNSA Principal Deputy Administrator Madelyn Creedon, and numerous speakers from throughout the Nuclear Security Enterprise spoke at the 2016 Nuclear Weapons Physical Security Collaboration Summit earlier this month at Joint Base Andrews in... Y-12 National Security Complex Completes W69 Dismantlement The man who trains everyone on the bombs Mark Meyer, training

  3. Wisconsin Nuclear Profile - Point Beach Nuclear Plant

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Point Beach Nuclear Plant" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration ...

  4. nuclear smuggling | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    NNSA Deputy Administrator Creedon Travels to China In March, National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Principal Deputy Administrator Madelyn Creedon traveled to China to ...

  5. Nuclear Structure and Nuclear Reactions | Argonne Leadership...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    x2 - triaxiality, and x3 - pairing correlations. Calculations were carried out using nuclear density functional theory. The collective action was minimized using the dynamical...

  6. Nuclear Detonation Detection | National Nuclear Security Administratio...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    NNSA builds the nation's operational sensors that monitor the entire planet from space to detect and report surface, atmospheric, or space nuclear detonations; produces and updates...

  7. Nuclear Safeguards | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy ... site link , and the emergence of new proliferation threats from both state and non-state ...

  8. Nuclear Detonation Detection | National Nuclear Security Administratio...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    the entire planet from space to detect and report surface, atmospheric, or space nuclear detonations; produces and updates the regional geophysical datasets enabling...

  9. National Nuclear Security Administration | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Administration | (NNSA) National Nuclear Security Administration FY15 Year End Report Semi Annual Report FY14 Year End Report Semi Annual

  10. nuclear material | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Researchers develop a new mathematical tool for analyzing and evaluating nuclear material Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory scientists have created a new method for detecting ...

  11. Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet - Minimize Nuclear Waste |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Minimize Nuclear Waste Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet - Minimize Nuclear Waste GNEP will increase the efficiency in the management of used nuclear fuel, also known as spent fuel, and defer the need for additional geologic nuclear waste repositories until the next century. Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet - Minimize Nuclear Waste (1.2 MB) More Documents & Publications GNEP Element:Develop Enhanced Nuclear Safeguards Global Nuclear Energy

  12. Dynamical dipole gamma radiation in heavy-ion collisions on the basis of a quantum molecular dynamics model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, H. L.; Tian, W. D.; Ma, Y. G.; Cai, X. Z.; Chen, J. G.; Fang, D. Q.; Guo, W.; Wang, H. W.

    2010-04-15

    Dynamical dipole gamma-ray emission in heavy-ion collisions is explored in the framework of the quantum molecular dynamics model. The studies are focused on systems of {sup 40}Ca bombarding {sup 48}Ca and its isotopes at different incident energies and impact parameters. Yields of gamma rays are calculated and the centroid energy and dynamical dipole emission width of the gamma spectra are extracted to investigate the properties of gamma emission. In addition, sensitivities of dynamical dipole gamma-ray emission to the isospin and the symmetry energy coefficient of the equation of state are studied. The results show that detailed study of dynamical dipole gamma radiation can provide information on the equation of state and the symmetry energy around the normal nuclear density.

  13. Transverse momentum spectra of b jets in pPb collisions at √(sNN) = 5.02 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-10-13

    We present a measurement of b jet transverse momentum (pT) spectra in protonlead (pPb) collisions using a dataset corresponding to about 35 nb-1 collected with the CMS detector at the LHC. Jets from b quark fragmentation are found by exploiting the long lifetime of hadrons containing a b quark through tagging methods using distributions of the secondary vertex mass and displacement. Extracted cross sections for b jets are scaled by the effective number of nucleon-nucleon collisions and are compared to a reference obtained from PYTHIA simulations of pp collisions. Furthermore, the PYTHIA-based estimate of the nuclear modification factor is found to be 1.22±0.15 (stat+syst pPb)_0.27 (syst PYTHIA) averaged over all jets with pT between 55 and 400 GeV/c and with |η lab| < 2. We then compare this result to predictions from models using perturbative calculations in quantum chromodynamics.

  14. NNSA Nuclear/Radiological Incident Response | National Nuclear...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    NNSA NuclearRadiological Incident Response December 01, 2008 The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) has over 60 years of nuclear weapons experience in responding to ...

  15. NUCLEAR POWER REACTORS AND ASSOCIATED PLANTS; 05 NUCLEAR FUELS...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title list of documents made publicly available, January 1-31, 1998 NONE 21 NUCLEAR POWER REACTORS AND ASSOCIATED PLANTS; 05 NUCLEAR FUELS; BIBLIOGRAPHIES; NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS;...

  16. NNSA Celebrates National Nuclear Science Week | National Nuclear...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Celebrates National Nuclear Science Week January 23, 2012 WASHINGTON, D.C. - The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) is committed to promoting excellence in nuclear ...

  17. Thermal Photon Radiation in High Multiplicity p+Pb Collisions at the Large Hadron Collider

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Shen, Chun; Paquet, Jean-François; Denicol, Gabriel S.; Jeon, Sangyong; Gale, Charles

    2016-02-18

    We observed the collective behavior of hadronic particles in high multiplicity proton-lead collisions at the Large Hadron Collider, as well as in deuteron-gold collisions at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider. In our work we present the first calculation, in the hydrodynamic framework, of thermal photon radiation from such small collision systems. Owing to their compact size, these systems can reach temperatures comparable to those in central nucleus-nucleus collisions. Moreover, the thermal photons can thus shine over the prompt background, and increase the low pT direct photon spectrum by a factor of 2–3 in 0%–1% p+Pb collisions at 5.02 TeV. This thermalmore » photon enhancement can therefore serve as a signature of the existence of a hot quark-gluon plasma during the evolution of these small collision systems, as well as validate hydrodynamic behavior in small systems.« less

  18. budget | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Reflects Commitment to Maintain a Safe, Secure, and Effective Nuclear Deterrent; Prevent, Counter, and Respond to Global Nuclear Dangers; and Effectively Power the Nuclear Navy(...

  19. Nuclear Engineering | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Milestones Publications News Press Releases Features Science Highlights In the ... Divisions Energy Systems Global Security Sciences Nuclear Engineering Nuclear Milestones ...

  20. Nuclear Physics from Lattice QCD

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Thursday, May 26, 2011 Exa-Scale Computational Resources Nuclear Astrophysics Accelerator Physics Cold QCD and Nuclear Forces Hot and Dense QCD Nuclear Structure and Reactions ...

  1. Nuclear Regulatory Commission | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Nuclear Regulatory Commission NNSA Receives Excellence Award for Radiological Security Enhancements in Hawaii HONOLULU - At an official event this week, the City and County of Honolulu presented the Department of Energy's (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) with the Homeland Security Excellence Award for DOE/NNSA's Office of Radiological Security's (ORS) efforts

  2. nuclear safety | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    safety United States and the Republic of Korea Sign Agreement for Civil Nuclear Cooperation Washington, DC - Today Secretary of Energy Ernest J. Moniz and Korean Foreign Minister Yun signed the successor United States - Republic of Korea Agreement for Civil Nuclear Cooperation, or 123 Agreement, as they are referred to in the United States. The United States and the Republic of Korea (ROK

  3. nuclear technology | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    technology NNSA Updates Export Control Regulation WASHINGTON, D.C. - The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) updated the Federal rule (10 CFR Part 810, or Part 810) that regulates the export of unclassified nuclear technology and assistance. The final rule was published in the Federal Register on Feb. 23 and will go into effect on

  4. Naval Nuclear Propulsion | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Naval Nuclear Propulsion Klotz visits Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory Lt. Gen. Frank G. Klotz, DOE Undersecretary for Nuclear Security and NNSA Administrator, visited the Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory in West Mifflin, PA on July 2, 2015. Gen. Klotz toured through several test facilities where Bettis personnel reviewed ongoing development efforts to qualify

  5. nuclear testing | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    testing NNSA scientists find more effective ways to detect nuclear explosions near and far NNSA activities are vital to detecting nuclear explosions and helping verify compliance with the testing ban worldwide. Recent developments at NNSA's Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) will help NNSA meet this commitment. Using computer-generated models and field experiments, LLNL simulates how

  6. Effect of collision parameters in electronegative plasma sheath with two species of positive ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moulick, R.; Goswami, K. S. [Center of Plasma Physics, Institute for plasma Research, Sonapur, Guwahati 782402 (India)] [Center of Plasma Physics, Institute for plasma Research, Sonapur, Guwahati 782402 (India); Mahanta, M. K. [Department of Physics, Arya Vidyapeeth College, Guwahati 781016 (India)] [Department of Physics, Arya Vidyapeeth College, Guwahati 781016 (India)

    2013-09-15

    The effect of ion neutral collision is shown for two species of positive ions in electronegative plasma. The ion neutral collision is modeled using power law of collision cross section. It is a usual case for processing plasma to have two species of positive ions and hence we attempt to study the dynamics of the two species of ions inside the collisional sheath of electronegative plasma.

  7. Nuclear Security for Floating Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skiba, James M.; Scherer, Carolynn P.

    2015-10-13

    Recently there has been a lot of interest in small modular reactors. A specific type of these small modular reactors (SMR,) are marine based power plants called floating nuclear power plants (FNPP). These FNPPs are typically built by countries with extensive knowledge of nuclear energy, such as Russia, France, China and the US. These FNPPs are built in one country and then sent to countries in need of power and/or seawater desalination. Fifteen countries have expressed interest in acquiring such power stations. Some designs for such power stations are briefly summarized. Several different avenues for cooperation in FNPP technology are proposed, including IAEA nuclear security (i.e. safeguards), multilateral or bilateral agreements, and working with Russian design that incorporates nuclear safeguards for IAEA inspections in non-nuclear weapons states

  8. Hydrodynamic evolution and jet energy loss in Cu + Cu collisions...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Publication Date: 2011-04-18 OSTI Identifier: 1100252 Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Physical review C. Nuclear physics Additional Journal Information: Journal ...

  9. Selected Topics in the Physics of Heavy Ion Collisions (1/3)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-04-25

    In these lectures, I discuss some classes of measurements accessible in heavy ion collisions at the LHC. How can these observables be measured, to what extent can they be calculated, and what do they tell us about the dense mesoscopic system created during the collision? In the first lecture, I shall focus in particular on measurements that constrain the spatio-temporal picture of the collisions and that measure centrality, orientations and extensions. In the subsequent lectures, I then discuss on how classes of measurements allow one to characterize collective phenomena, and to what extent these measurements can constrain the properties of matter produced in heavy ion collisions.

  10. Oblique collision of dust acoustic solitons in a strongly coupled dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boruah, A.; Sharma, S. K. Bailung, H.; Nakamura, Y.

    2015-09-15

    The oblique collision between two equal amplitude dust acoustic solitons is observed in a strongly coupled dusty plasma. The solitons are subjected to oblique interaction at different colliding angles. We observe a resonance structure during oblique collision at a critical colliding angle which is described by the idea of three wave resonance interaction modeled by Kadomtsev-Petviashvili equation. After collision, the solitons preserve their identity. The amplitude of the resultant wave formed during interaction is measured for different collision angles as well as for different colliding soliton amplitudes. At resonance, the maximum amplitude of the new soliton formed is nearly 3.7 times the initial soliton amplitude.

  11. Modeling and Analysis of Ultra-Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bass, Steffen A

    2008-06-02

    This document contains the final report for DOE grant DE-FG02-03ER41239: Modeling and Analysis of Ultra-Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collisions

  12. Monte Carlo Implementation Of Up- Or Down-Scattering Due To Collisions...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Monte Carlo Implementation Of Up- Or Down-Scattering Due To Collisions With Material At Finite Temperature Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Monte Carlo Implementation Of ...

  13. Nuclear radiation actuated valve

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Christiansen, David W.; Schively, Dixon P.

    1985-01-01

    A nuclear radiation actuated valve for a nuclear reactor. The valve has a valve first part (such as a valve rod with piston) and a valve second part (such as a valve tube surrounding the valve rod, with the valve tube having side slots surrounding the piston). Both valve parts have known nuclear radiation swelling characteristics. The valve's first part is positioned to receive nuclear radiation from the nuclear reactor's fuel region. The valve's second part is positioned so that its nuclear radiation induced swelling is different from that of the valve's first part. The valve's second part also is positioned so that the valve's first and second parts create a valve orifice which changes in size due to the different nuclear radiation caused swelling of the valve's first part compared to the valve's second part. The valve may be used in a nuclear reactor's core coolant system.

  14. State Nuclear Profiles 2010

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 11,441 25.9 96,190 47.8 Coal 15,551 35.2 ... Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Illinois nuclear power ...

  15. State Nuclear Profiles 2010

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 5,271 13.4 41,870 30.6 Coal 2,781 7.1 ... Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) New York nuclear power ...

  16. State Nuclear Profiles 2010

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 1,705 13.6 13,994 32.1 Coal 4,886 39.0 ... Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Maryland nuclear power ...

  17. State Nuclear Profiles 2010

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 3,947 13.2 29,625 26.6 Coal 11,531 38.7 ... Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Michigan nuclear power ...

  18. Promulgating Nuclear Safety Requirements

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1996-05-15

    Applies to all Nuclear Safety Requirements Adopted by the Department to Govern the Conduct of its Nuclear Activities. Cancels DOE P 410.1. Canceled by DOE N 251.85.

  19. Working Group Report on - Space Nuclear Power Systems and Nuclear...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Working Group Report on - Space Nuclear Power Systems and Nuclear Waste Technology R&D Working Group Report on - Space Nuclear Power Systems and Nuclear Waste Technology R&D "Even ...

  20. Security and Use Control of Nuclear Explosives and Nuclear Weapons...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    O 452.4C, Security and Use Control of Nuclear Explosives and Nuclear Weapons by LtCol Karl Basham Functional areas: Nuclear Explosives, Nuclear Weapons, Security, Safety, Weapon...

  1. 3D NUCLEAR SEGMENTAT

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    003029WKSTN00 Delineation of nuclear structures in 3D multicellular systems https://vision.lbl.gov/Software/3DMorphometry/

  2. Nuclear Explosive Safety Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2009-04-14

    This Manual provides supplemental details to support the requirements of DOE O 452.2D, Nuclear Explosive Safety.

  3. Sandia Energy - Nuclear Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Over Five Years Computational Modeling & Simulation, Energy, News, News & Events, Nuclear Energy, Partnership, Systems Analysis Consortium for Advanced Simulation of...

  4. Nuclear Safety Regulatory Framework

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Nuclear Safety Regulatory Framework DOE's Nuclear Safety Enabling Legislation Regulatory Enforcement & Oversight Regulatory Governance Atomic Energy Act 1946 Atomic Energy Act 1954 Energy Reorganization Act 1974 DOE Act 1977 Authority and responsibility to regulate nuclear safety at DOE facilities 10 CFR 830 10 CFR 835 10 CFR 820 Regulatory Implementation Nuclear Safety Radiological Safety Procedural Rules ISMS-QA; Operating Experience; Metrics and Analysis Cross Cutting

  5. Nuclear Materials Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Budget | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) Nuclear Materials Safeguards and Security Upgrade Project Completed Under Budget April 03, 2014 WASHINGTON, D.C. - The National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA) Nuclear Materials Safeguards and Security Upgrade Project (NMSSUP) was recently completed approximately $1 million under its original budget of $245 million. NMSSUP upgrades security at Los Alamos National Laboratory's (LANL) Technical Area-55, a facility that houses

  6. Nuclear and Radiochemistry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NR Nuclear and Radiochemistry We provide vital radiochemical and radioanalytical capabilities to a wide range of programs. Contact Us Group Leader Felicia Taw Deputy Group Leader Rich Oldenborg Group Office (505) 667-4546 The Nuclear and Radiochemistry (C-NR) Group provides vital radiochemical and radioanalytical capabilities to a wide range of programs. These programs include maintenance and stewardship of the nuclear stockpile, nuclear non-proliferation, environmental management, international

  7. Nuclear Explosive Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2009-04-14

    This Department of Energy (DOE) Order establishes requirements to implement the nuclear explosive safety (NES) elements of DOE O 452.1D, Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program, for routine and planned nuclear explosive operations (NEOs). Cancels DOE O 452.2C. Admin Chg 1, dated 7-10-13, cancels DOE O 452.2D.

  8. Nuclear Explosive Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2009-04-14

    This Order establishes requirements to implement the nuclear explosive safety elements of DOE O 452.1D, Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program, for routine and planned nuclear explosive operations. Cancels DOE O 452.2C. Admin Chg 1, 7-10-13

  9. Nuclear Explosive Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2015-01-26

    This Department of Energy (DOE) Order establishes requirements to implement the nuclear explosive safety (NES) elements of DOE O 452.1E, Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program, or successor directive, for routine and planned nuclear explosive operations (NEOs). Supersedes DOE O 452.2D and DOE M 452.2-1A.

  10. NUCLEAR REACTOR CONTROL SYSTEM

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Epler, E.P.; Hanauer, S.H.; Oakes, L.C.

    1959-11-01

    A control system is described for a nuclear reactor using enriched uranium fuel of the type of the swimming pool and other heterogeneous nuclear reactors. Circuits are included for automatically removing and inserting the control rods during the course of normal operation. Appropriate safety circuits close down the nuclear reactor in the event of emergency.

  11. President Obama Hosts Global Nuclear Security Summit | National Nuclear

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Security Administration | (NNSA) Hosts Global Nuclear Security Summit President Obama Hosts Global Nuclear Security Summit Washington, DC President Obama hosts a Global Nuclear Security Summit to facilitate discussion on the nature of the nuclear threat and develop steps that can be taken together to secure vulnerable materials, combat nuclear smuggling and deter, detect, and disrupt attempts at nuclear terrorism

  12. Proposal for a High Energy Nuclear Database

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, D A; Vogt, R

    2005-03-31

    The authors propose to develop a high-energy heavy-ion experimental database and make it accessible to the scientific community through an on-line interface. This database will be searchable and cross-indexed with relevant publications, including published detector descriptions. Since this database will be a community resource, it requires the high-energy nuclear physics community's financial and manpower support. This database should eventually contain all published data from Bevalac, AGS and SPS to RHIC and CERN-LHC energies, proton-proton to nucleus-nucleus collisions as well as other relevant systems, and all measured observables. Such a database would have tremendous scientific payoff as it makes systematic studies easier and allows simpler benchmarking of theoretical models to a broad range of old and new experiments. Furthermore, there is a growing need for compilations of high-energy nuclear data for applications including stockpile stewardship, technology development for inertial confinement fusion and target and source development for upcoming facilities such as the Next Linear Collider. To enhance the utility of this database, they propose periodically performing evaluations of the data and summarizing the results in topical reviews.

  13. Evidence for collective multiparticle correlations in p–Pb collisions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; et al

    2015-06-29

    The second-order azimuthal anisotropy Fourier harmonics, v₂, are obtained in p−Pb and PbPb collisions over a wide pseudorapidity (η) range based on correlations among six or more charged particles. The p-Pb data, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 35  nb⁻¹, were collected during the 2013 LHC p-Pb run at a nucleon-nucleon center-of-mass energy of 5.02  TeV by the CMS experiment. A sample of semiperipheral PbPb collision data at √s = 2.76  TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 2.5  μb⁻¹ and covering a similar range of particle multiplicities as the p−Pb data, is also analyzed for comparison. The six- and eight-particle cumulant and themore » Lee-Yang zeros methods are used to extract the v₂ coefficients, extending previous studies of two- and four-particle correlations. For both the p−Pb and PbPb systems, the v₂ values obtained with correlations among more than four particles are consistent with previously published four-particle results. These data support the interpretation of a collective origin for the previously observed long-range (large Δη) correlations in both systems. The ratios of v2 values corresponding to correlations including different numbers of particles are compared to theoretical predictions that assume a hydrodynamic behavior of a p−Pb system dominated by fluctuations in the positions of participant nucleons. These results provide new insights into the multiparticle dynamics of collision systems with a very small overlapping region.« less

  14. Single-collision studies of energy transfer and chemical reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valentini, J.J.

    1993-12-01

    The research focus in this group is state-to-state dynamics of reaction and energy transfer in collisions of free radicals such as H, OH, and CH{sub 3} with H{sub 2}, alkanes, alcohols and other hydrogen-containing molecules. The motivation for the work is the desire to provide a detailed understanding of the chemical dynamics of prototype reactions that are important in the production and utilization of energy sources, most importantly in combustion. The work is primarily experimental, but with an important and growing theoretical/computational component. The focus of this research program is now on reactions in which at least one of the reactants and one of the products is polyatomic. The objective is to determine how the high dimensionality of the reactants and products differentiates such reactions from atom + diatom reactions of the same kinematics and energetics. The experiments use highly time-resolved laser spectroscopic methods to prepare reactant states and analyze the states of the products on a single-collision time scale. The primary spectroscopic tool for product state analysis is coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) spectroscopy. CARS is used because of its generality and because the extraction of quantum state populations from CARS spectra is straightforward. The combination of the generality and easy analysis of CARS makes possible absolute cross section measurements (both state-to-state and total), a particularly valuable capability for characterizing reactive and inelastic collisions. Reactant free radicals are produced by laser photolysis of appropriate precursors. For reactant vibrational excitation stimulated Raman techniques are being developed and implemented.

  15. CLUSTER FORMATION TRIGGERED BY FILAMENT COLLISIONS IN SERPENS SOUTH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakamura, Fumitaka; Kawabe, Ryohei; Shinnaga, Hiroko; Sugitani, Koji; Tanaka, Tomohiro; Kimura, Kimihiko; Tokuda, Kazuki; Kozu, Minato; Okada, Nozomi; Hasegawa, Yutaka; Ogawa, Hideo; Nishitani, Hiroyuki; Mizuno, Izumi; Dobashi, Kazuhito; Shimoikura, Tomomi; Shimajiri, Yoshito; Kameno, Seiji; Momose, Munetake; Nakajima, Taku; and others

    2014-08-20

    The Serpens South infrared dark cloud consists of several filamentary ridges, some of which fragment into dense clumps. On the basis of CCS (J{sub N} = 4{sub 3}-3{sub 2}), HC{sub 3}N (J = 5-4), N{sub 2}H{sup +} (J = 1-0), and SiO (J = 2-1, v = 0) observations, we investigated the kinematics and chemical evolution of these filamentary ridges. We find that CCS is extremely abundant along the main filament in the protocluster clump. We emphasize that Serpens South is the first cluster-forming region where extremely strong CCS emission is detected. The CCS-to-N{sub 2}H{sup +} abundance ratio is estimated to be about 0.5 toward the protocluster clump, whereas it is about 3 in the other parts of the main filament. We identify six dense ridges with different V {sub LSR}. These ridges appear to converge toward the protocluster clump, suggesting that the collisions of these ridges may have triggered cluster formation. The collisions presumably happened within a few 10{sup 5}yr because CCS is abundant only for a short time. The short lifetime agrees with the fact that the number fraction of Class I objects, whose typical lifetime is 0.4 10{sup 5}yr, is extremely high, about 70% in the protocluster clump. In the northern part, two ridges appear to have partially collided, forming a V-shape clump. In addition, we detected strong bipolar SiO emission that is due to the molecular outflow blowing out of the protostellar clump, as well as extended weak SiO emission that may originate from the filament collisions.

  16. J/{psi} production and elliptic flow in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Song Taesoo; Xu Jun; Ko, Che Ming; Lee, Su Houng

    2011-01-15

    Using the two-component model for charmonium production, which includes contributions from both initial hard nucleon-nucleon scattering and from regeneration in the quark-gluon plasma, we study the nuclear modification factor R{sub AA} and elliptic flow v{sub 2} of J/{psi} in relativistic heavy-ion collisions. For the expansion dynamics of produced hot, dense matter, we introduce a schematic fireball model with its transverse acceleration determined from the pressure gradient inside the fireball and azimuthally anisotropic expansion parametrized to reproduce measured v{sub 2} of light hadrons. We assume that light hadrons freeze out at the temperature of 120 MeV while charmonia freeze out at 160 MeV, similar to the kinetic and chemical freeze-out temperatures in the statistical model, respectively. For the properties of charmonia in the quark-gluon plasma, we use the screening mass between their charm and anticharm quarks and their dissociation cross sections given by the perturbative quantum chromodynamical (pQCD) calculations in the leading order and up to the next-to-leading order, respectively. For the relaxation time of charm and anticharm quarks in the quark-gluon plasma, we also use the one calculated in the leading-order pQCD. Modeling the effect of higher-order corrections in pQCD by introducing multiplicative factors to the dissociation cross sections of charmonia and the elastic scattering cross sections of charm and anticharm quarks, we find that this effect is small for the R{sub AA} of J/{psi} as they suppress the number of initially produced J/{psi} but enhance the number of regenerated ones. The higher-order corrections increase, however, the v{sub 2} of J/{psi}. Our results suggest that the v{sub 2} of J/{psi} can play an important role in discriminating between J/{psi} production from initial hard collisions and from regeneration in the quark-gluon plasma.

  17. Nuclear Material Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration |

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    (NNSA) Nuclear Material Removal Once weapons-usable nuclear material is no longer required, the Office of Nuclear Material Removal works with global partners and facilities to consolidate, remove and dispose of the excess HEU and plutonium via 1) the U.S.-origin Removal Program that repatriates U.S.-origin HEU and LEU fuel (MTR and TRIGA), 2) the Russian-origin Removal Program that repatriates Russian-origin HEU and separated plutonium, and 3) the Gap Material Program that addresses material

  18. Triangularity and dipole asymmetry in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teaney, Derek; Yan Li

    2011-06-15

    We introduce a cumulant expansion to parametrize possible initial conditions in relativistic heavy ion collisions. We show that the cumulant expansion converges and that it can systematically reproduce the results of Glauber type initial conditions. At third order in the gradient expansion the cumulants characterize the triangularity and the dipole asymmetry of the initial entropy distribution. We show that for midperipheral collisions the orientation angle of the dipole asymmetry {psi}{sub 1,3} has a 20% preference out of plane. This leads to a small net v{sub 1} out of plane. In peripheral and midcentral collisions the orientation angles {psi}{sub 1,3} and {psi}{sub 3,3} are strongly correlated, but this correlation disappears towards central collisions. We study the ideal hydrodynamic response to these cumulants and determine the associated v{sub 1}/{epsilon}{sub 1} and v{sub 3}/{epsilon}{sub 3} for a massless ideal gas equation of state. The space time development of v{sub 1} and v{sub 3} is clarified with figures. These figures show that v{sub 1} and v{sub 3} develop toward the edge of the nucleus, and consequently the final spectra are more sensitive to the viscous dynamics of freezeout. The hydrodynamic calculations for v{sub 3} are provisionally compared to Alver and Roland fit of STAR inclusive two-particle correlation functions. Finally, we propose to measure the v{sub 1} associated with the dipole asymmetry and the correlations between {psi}{sub 1,3} and {psi}{sub 3,3} by measuring a two-particle correlation with respect to the participant plane . The hydrodynamic prediction for this correlation function is several times larger than a correlation currently measured by the STAR collaboration . This experimental measurement would provide

  19. accountability | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    accountability | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear...

  20. transportation | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    transportation | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear...

  1. Spallation process with simultaneous multi-particle emission in nuclear evaporation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santos, B. M.

    2013-05-06

    High energy probes have been used currently to explore nuclear reaction mechanism and nuclear structure. The spallation process governs the reaction process around 1 GeV energy regime. A new aspect introduced here to describe the nuclear reaction is the in-medium nucleonnucleon collision framework. The nucleon-nucleon scattering is kinematically treated by using an effective mass to represent the nuclear binding. In respect to the evaporation phase of the reaction, we introduce the simultaneous particles emission decay. This process becomes important due to the rise of new channels at high excitation energy regime of the compound nucleus. As results, the particles yields in the rapid and evaporation phases are obtained and compared to experimental data. The effect and relevance of these simultaneous emission processes in the evaporation chain is also discussed.

  2. Commercial nuclear power 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-09-28

    This report presents the status at the end of 1989 and the outlook for commercial nuclear capacity and generation for all countries in the world with free market economies (FME). The report provides documentation of the US nuclear capacity and generation projections through 2030. The long-term projections of US nuclear capacity and generation are provided to the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) for use in estimating nuclear waste fund revenues and to aid in planning the disposal of nuclear waste. These projections also support the Energy Information Administration's annual report, Domestic Uranium Mining and Milling Industry: Viability Assessment, and are provided to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. The foreign nuclear capacity projections are used by the DOE uranium enrichment program in assessing potential markets for future enrichment contracts. The two major sections of this report discuss US and foreign commercial nuclear power. The US section (Chapters 2 and 3) deals with (1) the status of nuclear power as of the end of 1989; (2) projections of nuclear capacity and generation at 5-year intervals from 1990 through 2030; and (3) a discussion of institutional and technical issues that affect nuclear power. The nuclear capacity projections are discussed in terms of two projection periods: the intermediate term through 2010 and the long term through 2030. A No New Orders case is presented for each of the projection periods, as well as Lower Reference and Upper Reference cases. 5 figs., 30 tabs.

  3. Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation | National Nuclear...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    National Nuclear Security Administration (DOENNSA) and the U.K. Department of Energy and Climate Change concluded a workshop at Wilton Park, About This Site Budget IG Web Policy...

  4. Nuclear / Radiological Advisory Team | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Administration | (NNSA) / Radiological Advisory Team NRAT Logo NNSA's Nuclear / Radiological Advisory Team (NRAT) provides an emergency response capability for on-scene scientific and technical advice for both domestic and international nuclear or radiological incidents. It is led by a Senior Energy Official who runs the NNSA field operation and who coordinates NNSA follow-on assets as needed. The NRAT is composed of scientists and technicians who can provide advice or conduct limited

  5. Azimuthal anisotropy distributions in high-energy collisions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yan, Li; Ollitrault, Jean-Yves; Poskanzer, Arthur M.

    2015-03-01

    Elliptic flow in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions results from the hydrodynamic response to the spatial anisotropy of the initial density profile. A long-standing problem in the interpretation of flow data is that uncertainties in the initial anisotropy are mingled with uncertainties in the response. We argue that the non-Gaussianity of flow fluctuations in small systems with large fluctuations can be used to disentangle the initial state from the response. We apply this method to recent measurements of anisotropic flow in Pb+Pb and p+Pb collisions at the LHC, assuming linear response to the initial anisotropy. The response coefficient is found to decreasemoreas the system becomes smaller and is consistent with a low value of the ratio of viscosity over entropy of ?/s 0.19. Deviations from linear response are studied. While they significantly change the value of the response coefficient they do not change the rate of decrease with centrality. Thus, we argue that the estimate of ?/s is robust against non-linear effects.less

  6. Collision dynamics of proton with formaldehyde: Fragmentation and ionization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Jing; Gao, Cong-Zhang; Beijing Radiation Center, Beijing 100875 ; Calvayrac, Florent; Zhang, Feng-Shou; Beijing Radiation Center, Beijing 100875; Center of Theoretical Nuclear Physics, National Laboratory of Heavy Ion Accelerator of Lanzhou, Lanzhou 730000

    2014-03-28

    Using time-dependent density functional theory, applied to the valence electrons and coupled non-adiabatically to molecular dynamics of the ions, we study the ionization and fragmentation of formaldehyde in collision with a proton. Four different impact energies: 35 eV, 85 eV, 135 eV, and 300 eV are chosen in order to study the energy effect in the low energy region, and ten different incident orientations at 85 eV are considered for investigating the steric effect. Fragmentation ratios, single, double, and total electron ionization cross sections are calculated. For large impact parameters, these results are close to zero irrespective of the incident orientations due to a weak projectile-target interaction. For small impact parameters, the results strongly depend on the collision energy and orientation. We also give the kinetic energy releases and scattering angles of protons, as well as the cross section of different ion fragments and the corresponding reaction channels.

  7. Collisions of deformable cells lead to collective migration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Löber, Jakob; Ziebert, Falko; Aranson, Igor S.

    2015-03-17

    Collective migration of eukaryotic cells plays a fundamental role in tissue growth, wound healing and immune response. The motion, arising spontaneously or in response to chemical and mechanical stimuli, is also important for understanding life-threatening pathologies, such as cancer and metastasis formation. We present a phase-field model to describe the movement of many self-organized, interacting cells. The model takes into account the main mechanisms of cell motility – acto-myosin dynamics, as well as substrate-mediated and cell-cell adhesion. It predicts that collective cell migration emerges spontaneously as a result of inelastic collisions between neighboring cells: collisions lead to a mutual alignment of the cell velocities and to the formation of coherently-moving multi-cellular clusters. Small cell-to-cell adhesion, in turn, reduces the propensity for large-scale collective migration, while higher adhesion leads to the formation of moving bands. Our study provides valuable insight into biological processes associated with collective cell motility.

  8. Collisions of deformable cells lead to collective migration

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Löber, Jakob; Ziebert, Falko; Aranson, Igor S.

    2015-03-17

    Collective migration of eukaryotic cells plays a fundamental role in tissue growth, wound healing and immune response. The motion, arising spontaneously or in response to chemical and mechanical stimuli, is also important for understanding life-threatening pathologies, such as cancer and metastasis formation. We present a phase-field model to describe the movement of many self-organized, interacting cells. The model takes into account the main mechanisms of cell motility – acto-myosin dynamics, as well as substrate-mediated and cell-cell adhesion. It predicts that collective cell migration emerges spontaneously as a result of inelastic collisions between neighboring cells: collisions lead to a mutual alignmentmore » of the cell velocities and to the formation of coherently-moving multi-cellular clusters. Small cell-to-cell adhesion, in turn, reduces the propensity for large-scale collective migration, while higher adhesion leads to the formation of moving bands. Our study provides valuable insight into biological processes associated with collective cell motility.« less

  9. Linearized Boltzmann collision integral with the correct cutoff

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, Yongbin; White, R. D.

    2014-07-15

    In the calculation of the linearized Boltzmann collision operator for an inverse-square force law interaction (Coulomb interaction) F(r)=κ/r{sup 2}, we found the widely used scattering angle cutoff θ≥θ{sub min} is a wrong practise since the divergence still exists after the cutoff has been made. When the correct velocity change cutoff |v′−v|≥δ{sub min} is employed, the scattering angle can be integrated. A unified linearized Boltzmann collision operator for both inverse-square force law and rigid-sphere interactions is obtained. Like many other unified quantities such as transition moments, Fokker-Planck expansion coefficients and energy exchange rates obtained recently [Y. B. Chang and L. A. Viehland, AIP Adv. 1, 032128 (2011)], the difference between the two kinds of interactions is characterized by a parameter, γ, which is 1 for rigid-sphere interactions and −3 for inverse-square force law interactions. When the cutoff is removed by setting δ{sub min}=0, Hilbert's well known kernel for rigid-sphere interactions is recovered for γ = 1.

  10. COLLISIONS BETWEEN GRAVITY-DOMINATED BODIES. I. OUTCOME REGIMES AND SCALING LAWS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leinhardt, Zoee M.; Stewart, Sarah T. E-mail: sstewart@eps.harvard.edu

    2012-01-20

    Collisions are the core agent of planet formation. In this work, we derive an analytic description of the dynamical outcome for any collision between gravity-dominated bodies. We conduct high-resolution simulations of collisions between planetesimals; the results are used to isolate the effects of different impact parameters on collision outcome. During growth from planetesimals to planets, collision outcomes span multiple regimes: cratering, merging, disruption, super-catastrophic disruption, and hit-and-run events. We derive equations (scaling laws) to demarcate the transition between collision regimes and to describe the size and velocity distributions of the post-collision bodies. The scaling laws are used to calculate maps of collision outcomes as a function of mass ratio, impact angle, and impact velocity, and we discuss the implications of the probability of each collision regime during planet formation. Collision outcomes are described in terms of the impact conditions and the catastrophic disruption criteria, Q*{sub RD}-the specific energy required to disperse half the total colliding mass. All planet formation and collisional evolution studies have assumed that catastrophic disruption follows pure energy scaling; however, we find that catastrophic disruption follows nearly pure momentum scaling. As a result, Q*{sub RD} is strongly dependent on the impact velocity and projectile-to-target mass ratio in addition to the total mass and impact angle. To account for the impact angle, we derive the interacting mass fraction of the projectile; the outcome of a collision is dependent on the kinetic energy of the interacting mass rather than the kinetic energy of the total mass. We also introduce a new material parameter, c*, that defines the catastrophic disruption criteria between equal-mass bodies in units of the specific gravitational binding energy. For a diverse range of planetesimal compositions and internal structures, c* has a value of 5 {+-} 2; whereas

  11. Radiation re-solution of fission gas in non-oxide nuclear fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthews, Christopher; Schwen, Daniel; Klein, Andrew C.

    2015-02-01

    Renewed interest in fast nuclear reactors is creating a need for better understanding of fission gas bubble behavior in non-oxide fuels to support very long fuel lifetimes. Collisions between fission fragments and their subsequent cascades can knock fission gas atoms out of bubbles and back into the fuel lattice. We showed that these collisions can be treated as using the so-called ‘‘homogenous’’ atom-by-atom re-solution theory and calculated using the Binary Collision Approximation code 3DOT. The calculations showed that there is a decrease in the re-solution parameter as bubble radius increases until about 50 nm, at which the re-solution parameter stays nearly constant. Furthermore, our model shows ion cascades created in the fuel result in many more implanted fission gas atoms than collisions directly with fission fragments. This calculated re-solution parameter can be used to find a re-solution rate for future bubble simulations.

  12. British nuclear policymaking

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowie, C.J.; Platt, A.

    1984-01-01

    This study analyzes the domestic political, economic, and bureaucratic factors that affect the nuclear policymaking process in Great Britain. Its major conclusion is that, although there have been changes in that process in recent years (notably the current involvement of a segment of the British public in the debate about the deployment of intermediate-range nuclear forces), future British nuclear policymaking will remain much what it has been in the past. Three ideas are central to understanding British thinking on the subject: (1) Britain's long-standing resolve to have her own national nuclear force is largely traceable to her desire to maintain first-rank standing among the nations of the world in spite of loss of empire. (2) Financial considerations have always been important--so much so that they have usually dominated issues of nuclear policy. (3) The executive branch of government dominates the nuclear policymaking process but does not always present a united front. The United States heavily influences British nuclear policy through having supplied Britain since the late 1950s with nuclear data and components of nuclear weapon systems such as Polaris and Trident. The relationship works both ways since the U.S. depends on Britain as a base for deployment of both conventional and nuclear systems.

  13. Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet - Develop Enhanced Nuclear

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Safeguards | Department of Energy Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet - Develop Enhanced Nuclear Safeguards Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet - Develop Enhanced Nuclear Safeguards GNEP will help prevent misuse of civilian nuclear facilities for nonpeaceful purposes by developing enhanced safeguards programs and technologies. International nuclear safeguards are integral to implementing the GNEP vision of a peaceful expansion of nuclear energy and demonstration of more

  14. Nuclear Science References Database

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pritychenko, B.; Běták, E.; Singh, B.; Totans, J.

    2014-06-15

    The Nuclear Science References (NSR) database together with its associated Web interface, is the world's only comprehensive source of easily accessible low- and intermediate-energy nuclear physics bibliographic information for more than 210,000 articles since the beginning of nuclear science. The weekly-updated NSR database provides essential support for nuclear data evaluation, compilation and research activities. The principles of the database and Web application development and maintenance are described. Examples of nuclear structure, reaction and decay applications are specifically included. The complete NSR database is freely available at the websites of the National Nuclear Data Center (http://www.nndc.bnl.gov/nsr) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (http://www-nds.iaea.org/nsr)

  15. Nuclear Energy Workshops

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Workshops - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Energy Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear Energy

  16. Nuclear Energy Safety Technologies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Safety Technologies - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Energy Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear

  17. Nuclear Workforce Initiative - SRSCRO

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Safety » Nuclear Security & Nonproliferation Nuclear Security & Nonproliferation President Truman signed the Atomic Energy Act in 1946, creating the Atomic Energy Commission -- which later became a part of the Department of Energy. Read more about the Department of Energy's role in nuclear security in <a href="/node/1041771/">our interactive timeline.</a> | Energy Department Photo. President Truman signed the Atomic Energy Act in 1946, creating the Atomic Energy

  18. Nuclear Proliferation Challenges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Professor William Potter

    2005-11-28

    William C. Potter, Director of the Center for Non Proliferation Studies and the Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies at the Monterey Institute of International Studies, will present nuclear proliferation challenges following the 2005 Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) Review Conference. In addition to elucidating reasons for, and implications of, the conferences failure, Dr. Potter will discuss common ground between nuclear proliferation and terrorism issues and whether corrective action can be taken.

  19. Absolute nuclear material assay

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prasad, Manoj K.; Snyderman, Neal J.; Rowland, Mark S.

    2010-07-13

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  20. Absolute nuclear material assay

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prasad, Manoj K.; Snyderman, Neal J.; Rowland, Mark S.

    2012-05-15

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  1. Nuclear Physics Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Physics Program HALL A Hall A wide shot of detectors Scientists from across the country and around the world use the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility to ...

  2. Nuclear Physics: Experiment Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    search Nuclear Physics Program Please upgrade your browser. This site's design is only visible in a graphical browser that supports web standards, but its content is accessible to ...

  3. Nuclear Physics: Experiment Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Colloquium Experiment Research UserResearcher Information print version Research Highlights Public Interest Nuclear Physics Accelerator Free Electron Laser (FEL) Medical Imaging ...

  4. Nuclear Physics: Experiment Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Physics Privacy and Security Notice Skip over navigation Search the JLab Site Nuclear Physics Program Please upgrade your browser. This site's design is only visible in a graphical ...

  5. Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1995-09-25

    To prevent unauthorized dissemination of Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information (UCNI). Cancels DOE 5635.4 and DOE 5650.3A

  6. National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    the University of California for violations of nuclear safety rules at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in New Mexico. The University of California operates LANL for ...

  7. National Nuclear Security Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Security Administration Savannah River Site 1 NNSA Budget ( Millions) By Program Office FY 2015 Enacted FY 2016 Enacted FY 2017 President Request Delta FY Request Weapon ...

  8. Nuclear Spectra from Skyrmions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manton, N. S.

    2009-08-26

    The structures of Skyrmions, especially for baryon numbers 4, 8 and 12, are reviewed. The quantized Skyrmion states are compared with nuclear spectra.

  9. defense nuclear security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    3%2A en Defense Nuclear Security http:www.nnsa.energy.govaboutusourprogramsnuclearsecurity

  10. Nuclear criticality safety guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pruvost, N.L.; Paxton, H.C.

    1996-09-01

    This technical reference document cites information related to nuclear criticality safety principles, experience, and practice. The document also provides general guidance for criticality safety personnel and regulators.

  11. Sandia Energy - Nuclear Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Computer Power Clicks with Geochemistry Energy, News, News & Events, Nuclear Energy Computer Power Clicks with Geochemistry Sandia is developing computer models that show how...

  12. Nuclear Energy University Programs

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    * Awards that are experimental - 30 * Awards in materials and waste - 30 * Awards to Nuclear Engineering Faculty - 18 * Number of universities receiving awards - 26 * Number of...

  13. Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    span>

    WASHINGTON D.C - The Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (DOENNSA) announced today the removal of 36 kilograms...

  14. nuclear threat science

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    2011 National Strategy for Counterterrorism states that the danger of nuclear terrorism is the greatest threat to global security, and affirms preventing terrorist...

  15. Nuclear fuel composition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Feild, Jr., Alexander L.

    1980-02-19

    1. A high temperature graphite-uranium base nuclear fuel composition containing from about 1 to about 5 five weight percent rhenium metal.

  16. Management of Nuclear Materials

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2009-08-17

    To establish requirements for the lifecycle management of DOE owned and/or managed accountable nuclear materials. Cancels DOE O 5660.1B.

  17. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Operator: Dominion Energy Kewaunee Location and Service Territory: The Kewaunee nuclear plant occupies a 900-acre site in Carlton, Wisconsin, about 35 miles southeast of Green Bay. ...

  18. WIPP Nuclear Facilities Transparency

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the safety, security, and legitimate management of nuclear materials." Other Links Yucca Mountain Test Data Carlsbad Environmental Monitoring and Research Center Dimitrovograd Site ...

  19. National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    preparedness Read More NSC leader recognized as community role model Read More Apex Gold discussion fosters international cooperation in run-up to 2016 Nuclear Security Summit...

  20. Pioneering Nuclear Waste Disposal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... agen- cies, scientific advisory panels, and concerned citizens. * As a ... It also prohibited the disposal of high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel. In 1996, ...

  1. Nuclear reactor apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wade, Elman E.

    1978-01-01

    A lifting, rotating and sealing apparatus for nuclear reactors utilizing rotating plugs above the nuclear reactor core. This apparatus permits rotation of the plugs to provide under the plug refueling of a nuclear core. It also provides a means by which positive top core holddown can be utilized. Both of these operations are accomplished by means of the apparatus lifting the top core holddown structure off the nuclear core while stationary, and maintaining this structure in its elevated position during plug rotation. During both of these operations, the interface between the rotating member and its supporting member is sealingly maintained.

  2. Reference handbook: Nuclear criticality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-12-06

    The purpose for this handbook is to provide Rocky Flats personnel with the information necessary to understand the basic principles underlying a nuclear criticality.

  3. Nuclear Physics: Meetings

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Physics Topics: Meetings Talks given at the Science & Technology Review 2004 Larry Cardman: Science Overview and the Experimental Program ppt | pdf Tony Thomas: Nuclear Physics ...

  4. National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    The Department of Energy (DOE), the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and the University of California (UC) have agreed on new management and operations contracts for ...

  5. National Nuclear Security Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office . Environmental Management Operations February 2015 Nevada National Security ...

  6. A clinically feasible method for the detection of potential collision in proton therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zou Wei; Lin Haibo; Plastaras, John P.; Wang Huanshu; Bui, Viet; Vapiwala, Neha; McDonough, James; Tochner, Zelig; Both, Stefan

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: Potential collision between the patient/couch and the gantry could delay the start of the treatment and reduce clinical efficiency. The ability to accurately detect possible collisions during the treatment planning phase is desired. Such collision detection should account for the specific proton gantry design, the treatment beam configuration, couch orientation, and the patient specific geometry. In this paper the authors developed an approach to detect possible patient-machine collisions using patient treatment plan data. Methods: The geometry of the machine and the patient was reconstructed relative to the isocenter of the proton treatment room. The surface contour of the gantry was first captured from the proton computer aided design and reconstructed to account for specific gantry rotation, snout position, collimator rotation, and range compensator dimensions based on the patient treatment plan data. The patient body and couch contours were captured from the patient's CT DICOM structure file. They were reconstructed relative to the isocenter taking into account treatment couch rotation. For potential collision that occurs at body portions where no CT images exist, scout images are used to construct the body contour. A software program was developed using a ray casting algorithm that was applied to detect collisions by determining if any of the patient and couch contour points fall into the spatial polygons formed by the proton gantry surfaces. Results: Twenty-four patient plans with or without potential collisions were retrospectively identified and analyzed using the collision detection software. In addition, five collision cases were artificially generated using an anthropomorphic phantom. The program successfully detected the collisions in all cases. The calculation time for each case was within 20 s. The software program was implemented in the authors' clinic to detect patient-gantry or gantry-couch collisions in the treatment planning phase

  7. Simulating Collisions for Hydrokinetic Turbines. FY2010 Annual Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richmond, Marshall C.; Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Perkins, William A.; Serkowski, John A.

    2010-11-30

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of turbulent flow and particle motion are being conducted to evaluate the frequency and severity of collisions between marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) energy devices and debris or aquatic organisms. The work is part of a collaborative research project between Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Sandia National Laboratories , funded by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Wind and Water Power Program. During FY2010 a reference design for an axial flow MHK turbine was used to develop a computational geometry for inclusion into a CFD model. Unsteady simulations of turbulent flow and the moving MHK turbine blades are being performed and the results used for simulation of particle trajectories. Preliminary results and plans for future work are presented.

  8. Heavy Ion Collisions at the LHC - Last Call for Predictions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Armesto, N; Borghini, N; Jeon, S; Wiedemann, U A; Abreu, S; Akkelin, V; Alam, J; Albacete, J L; Andronic, A; Antonuv, D; Arleo, F; Armesto, N; Arsene, I C; Barnafoldi, G G; Barrette, J; Bauchle, B; Becattini, F; Betz, B; Bleicher, M; Bluhm, M; Boer, D; Bopp, F W; Braun-Munzinger, P; Bravina, L; Busza, W; Cacciari, M; Capella, A; Casalderrey-Solana, J; Chatterjee, R; Chen, L; Cleymans, J; Cole, B A; delValle, Z C; Csernai, L P; Cunqueiro, L; Dainese, A; de Deus, J D; Ding, H; Djordjevic, M; Drescher, H; Dremin, I M; Dumitru, A; El, A; Engel, R; d'Enterria, D; Eskola, K J; Fai, G; Ferreiro, E G; Fries, R J; Frodermann, E; Fujii, H; Gale, C; Gelis, F; Goncalves, V P; Greco, V; Gyulassy, M; van Hees, H; Heinz, U; Honkanen, H; Horowitz, W A; Iancu, E; Ingelman, G; Jalilian-Marian, J; Jeon, S; Kaidalov, A B; Kampfer, B; Kang, Z; Karpenko, I A; Kestin, G; Kharzeev, D; Ko, C M; Koch, B; Kopeliovich, B; Kozlov, M; Kraus, I; Kuznetsova, I; Lee, S H; Lednicky, R; Letessier, J; Levin, E; Li, B; Lin, Z; Liu, H; Liu, W; Loizides, C; Lokhtin, I P; Machado, M T; Malinina, L V; Managadze, A M; Mangano, M L; Mannarelli, M; Manuel, C; Martinez, G; Milhano, J G; Mocsy, A; Molnar, D; Nardi, M; Nayak, J K; Niemi, H; Oeschler, H; Ollitrault, J; Paic, G; Pajares, C; Pantuev, V S; Papp, G; Peressounko, D; Petreczky, P; Petrushanko, S V; Piccinini, F; Pierog, T; Pirner, H J; Porteboeuf, S; Potashnikova, I; Qin, G Y; Qiu, J; Rafelski, J; Rajagopal, K; Ranft, J; Rapp, R; Rasanen, S S; Rathsman, J; Rau, P; Redlich, K; Renk, T; Rezaeian, A H; Rischke, D; Roesler, S; Ruppert, J; Ruuskanen, P V; Salgado, C A; Sapeta, S; Sarcevic, I; Sarkar, S; Sarycheva, L I; Schmidt, I; Shoski, A I; Sinha, B; Sinyukov, Y M; Snigirev, A M; Srivastava, D K; Stachel, J; Stasto, A; Stocker, H; Teplov, C Y; Thews, R L; Torrieri, G; Pop, V T; Triantafyllopoulos, D N; Tuchin, K L; Turbide, S; Tywoniuk, K; Utermann, A; Venugopalan, R; Vitev, I; Vogt, R; Wang, E; Wang, X N; Werner, K; Wessels, E; Wheaton, S; Wicks, S; Wiedemann, U A; Wolschin, G; Xiao, B; Xu, Z; Yasui, S; Zabrodin, E; Zapp, K; Zhang, B

    2008-02-25

    In August 2006, the CERN Theory Unit announced to restructure its visitor program and to create a 'CERN Theory Institute', where 1-3 month long specific programs can take place. The first such Institute was held from 14 May to 10 June 2007, focusing on 'Heavy Ion Collisions at the LHC - Last Call for Predictions'. It brought together close to 100 scientists working on the theory of ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions. The aim of this workshop was to review and document the status of expectations and predictions for the heavy ion program at the Large Hadron Collider LHC before its start. LHC will explore heavy ion collisions at {approx} 30 times higher center of mass energy than explored previously at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider RHIC. So, on the one hand, the charge of this workshop provided a natural forum for the exchange of the most recent ideas, and allowed to monitor how the understanding of heavy ion collisions has evolved in recent years with the data from RHIC, and with the preparation of the LHC experimental program. On the other hand, the workshop aimed at a documentation which helps to distinguish pre- from post-dictions. An analogous documentation of the 'Last Call for Predictions' [1] was prepared prior to the start of the heavy-ion program at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider RHIC, and it proved useful in the subsequent discussion and interpretation of RHIC data. The present write-up is the documentation of predictions for the LHC heavy ion program, received or presented during the CERN TH Institute. The set-up of the CERN TH Institute allowed us to aim for the wide-most coverage of predictions. There were more than 100 presentations and discussions during the workshop. Moreover, those unable to attend could still participate by submitting predictions in written form during the workshop. This followed the spirit that everybody interested in making a prediction had the right to be heard. To arrive at a concise document, we required that

  9. Spectroscopy and reaction dynamics of collision complexes containing hydroxyl radicals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lester, M.I.

    1993-12-01

    The DOE supported work in this laboratory has focused on the spectroscopic characterization of the interaction potential between an argon atom and a hydroxyl radical in the ground X{sup 2}II and excited A {sup 2}{summation}{sup +} electronic states. The OH-Ar system has proven to be a test case for examining the interaction potential in an open-shell system since it is amenable to experimental investigation and theoretically tractable from first principles. Experimental identification of the bound states supported by the Ar + OH (X {sup 2}II) and Ar + OH(A {sup 2}{summation}{sup +}) potentials makes it feasible to derive realistic potential energy surfaces for these systems. The experimentally derived intermolecular potentials provide a rigorous test of ab initio theory and a basis for understanding the dramatically different collision dynamics taking place on the ground and excited electronic state surfaces.

  10. Production of photons in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jean -Francois Paquet; Denicol, Gabriel S.; Shen, Chun; Luzum, Matthew; Schenke, Bjorn; Jeon, Sangyong; Gale, Charles

    2016-04-18

    In this work it is shown that the use of a hydrodynamical model of heavy-ion collisions which incorporates recent developments, together with updated photon emission rates, greatly improves agreement with both ALICE and PHENIX measurements of direct photons, supporting the idea that thermal photons are the dominant source of direct photon momentum anisotropy. The event-by-event hydrodynamical model uses the impact parameter dependent Glasma model (IP-Glasma) initial states and includes, for the first time, both shear and bulk viscosities, along with second-order couplings between the two viscosities. Furthermore, the effect of both shear and bulk viscosities on the photon rates ismore » studied, and those transport coefficients are shown to have measurable consequences on the photon momentum anisotropy.« less

  11. verification | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    verification Nuclear Verification Challenge: Maintain the U.S. ability to monitor and verify nuclear reduction agreements and detect violations of treaties and other nuclear nonproliferation commitments. Solution: Develop and deploy measures to ensure verifiable compliance with treaties and other international agreements,... International Nuclear Safeguards Challenge: Detect/deter undeclared nuclear materials and activities. Solution: Build capacity of the International Atomic Energy Agency and

  12. Neutron and Nuclear Science News

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    News Recent news and events related to neutron and nuclear science at LANSCE. Neutron and Nuclear Science News Nuclear and Materials Science Research at LANSCE Nuclear science observations and opportunities at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center Links Neutron and Nuclear Science News Media Links Profiles Events at LANSCE LAPIS (LANSCE Proposal Intake System

  13. Nuclear Waste Partnership Contract Modifications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Control Nuclear Verification Challenge: Maintain the U.S. ability to monitor and verify nuclear reduction agreements and detect violations of treaties and other nuclear nonproliferation commitments. Solution: Develop and deploy measures to ensure verifiable compliance with treaties and other international agreements, implement regimes to reduce nuclear weapons, and detect and dismantle undeclared nuclear programs. Specific subprogram activities include: Implementing current and developing future

  14. Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies The Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies (NEET) Program will develop crosscutting technologies that ...

  15. Collision-induced vibrational absorption in molecular hydrogens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reddy, S.P.

    1993-05-01

    Collision induced absorption (CIA) spectra of the first overtone bands of H{sub 2}, D{sub 2}, and HD have been recorded for gas densities up to 500 amagat at 77-300 K. Analyses of these spectra reveal that (1) contrary to the observations in the fundamental bands, the contribution of the isotropic overlap interaction to the first overtone bands is negligible, (2) the squares of the matrix elements B{sub 32}(R)/ea{sub o} [= {lambda}{sub 32} exp(-(R-{sigma})/{rho}{sub 32}) + 3 (R/a{sub o}){sup -4}] where the subscripts 3 and 2 represent L and {lambda}, respectively, account for the absorption intensity of the bands and (3) the mixed term, 2,3 {lambda}{sub 32} exp (-(R-{sigma})/{rho}{sub 32}) <{vert_bar}Q{vert_bar}> <{alpha}> (R/a){sup -4}, gives a negative contribution. In the CIA spectra of H{sub 2} in its second overtone region recorded at 77, 201 and 298 K for gas densities up to 1000 amagat, a dip in the Q branch with characteristic Q{sub p} and Q{sub R} components has been observed. The analysis of the absorption profiles reveals, in addition to the previously known effects, the occurrence of the triple-collision transitions of H{sub 2} of the type Q{sub 1}(J) + Q{sub 1}(J) + Q{sub 1}(J) for the first time. From the profile analysis the absorption coefficient of these transitions is obtained.

  16. Azimuthal anisotophy in U + U and Au + Au collisions at RHIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adamczyk, L.

    2015-11-24

    Collisions between prolate uranium nuclei are used to study how particle production and azimuthal anisotropies depend on initial geometry in heavy-ion collisions. We report the two- and four-particle cumulants, v2{2} and v2{4}, for charged hadrons from U+U collisions at √SNN = 193 GeV and Au+Au collisions at √SNN = 200 GeV. Nearly fully overlapping collisions are selected based on the energy deposited by spectators in zero degree calorimeters (ZDCs). Within this sample, the observed dependence of v2{2} on multiplicity demonstrates that ZDC information combined with multiplicity can preferentially select different overlap configurations in U+U collisions. As a result, we also show that v2 vs multiplicity can be better described by models, such as gluon saturation or quark participant models, that eliminate the dependence of the multiplicity on the number of binary nucleon-nucleon collisions.

  17. Azimuthal anisotophy in U + U and Au + Au collisions at RHIC

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adamczyk, L.

    2015-11-24

    Collisions between prolate uranium nuclei are used to study how particle production and azimuthal anisotropies depend on initial geometry in heavy-ion collisions. We report the two- and four-particle cumulants, v2{2} and v2{4}, for charged hadrons from U+U collisions at √SNN = 193 GeV and Au+Au collisions at √SNN = 200 GeV. Nearly fully overlapping collisions are selected based on the energy deposited by spectators in zero degree calorimeters (ZDCs). Within this sample, the observed dependence of v2{2} on multiplicity demonstrates that ZDC information combined with multiplicity can preferentially select different overlap configurations in U+U collisions. As a result, we alsomore » show that v2 vs multiplicity can be better described by models, such as gluon saturation or quark participant models, that eliminate the dependence of the multiplicity on the number of binary nucleon-nucleon collisions.« less

  18. A conservative spectral method for the Boltzmann equation with anisotropic scattering and the grazing collisions limit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gamba, Irene M.; Haack, Jeffrey R.

    2014-08-01

    We present the formulation of a conservative spectral method for the Boltzmann collision operator with anisotropic scattering cross-sections. The method is an extension of the conservative spectral method of Gamba and Tharkabhushanam [17,18], which uses the weak form of the collision operator to represent the collisional term as a weighted convolution in Fourier space. The method is tested by computing the collision operator with a suitably cut-off angular cross section and comparing the results with the solution of the Landau equation. We analytically study the convergence rate of the Fourier transformed Boltzmann collision operator in the grazing collisions limit to the Fourier transformed Landau collision operator under the assumption of some regularity and decay conditions of the solution to the Boltzmann equation. Our results show that the angular singularity which corresponds to the Rutherford scattering cross section is the critical singularity for which a grazing collision limit exists for the Boltzmann operator. Additionally, we numerically study the differences between homogeneous solutions of the Boltzmann equation with the Rutherford scattering cross section and an artificial cross section, which give convergence to solutions of the Landau equation at different asymptotic rates. We numerically show the rate of the approximation as well as the consequences for the rate of entropy decay for homogeneous solutions of the Boltzmann equation and Landau equation.

  19. Clinton Extends Moratorium on Nuclear Weapons Testing | National Nuclear

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Security Administration | (NNSA) Clinton Extends Moratorium on Nuclear Weapons Testing Clinton Extends Moratorium on Nuclear Weapons Testing Washington, DC President Clinton extends the nuclear weapons testing moratorium for at least 15 months

  20. Eisenhower Halts Nuclear Weapons Testing | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Administration | (NNSA) Eisenhower Halts Nuclear Weapons Testing Eisenhower Halts Nuclear Weapons Testing Washington, DC President Eisenhower announces a moratorium on nuclear weapons testing to begin on October 31, 1958

  1. Nuclear Waste Policy Act Signed | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    | (NNSA) Waste Policy Act Signed Nuclear Waste Policy Act Signed Washington, DC President Reagan signs the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, the Nation's first comprehensive nuclear waste legislation

  2. Northern Papua New Guinea: Structure and sedimentation in a modern arc-continent collision

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abbott, L.; Silver, E. )

    1990-05-01

    Northern Papua New Guinea and the Solomon Sea are the site of a modern oblique, arc-continent collision, which is progressing from northwest to southeast. By combining offshore seismic data from the Solomon Sea with geologic mapping in the Markham Valley area of northern Papua New Guinea the authors are predicting the outcome of this collision. The Huon Gulf is the present site of initial collision. Seismic profiles show this area is dominated by thin thrust sheets. Onshore, the bulk of the uplifted accretionary wedge is a melange with exotic blocks of a variety of lithologies. Structurally below the melange lies the Leron Formation composed of thick channelized sandstone and conglomerate. It dips north at approximately 40{degree} and is cut by several thrust fault with associated folds. Limestone blocks within the melange are reported to be 2 Ma, and Beryllium 10 anomalies from Bismarck arc volcanoes suggest that initial collision of the Finisterre block (375 km northwest of the present collision point) began no earlier than 3 Ma. This implies the collision is propagating laterally at about 125 km/m.y.. Large outcrops of basalt and gabbro within the melange suggest that segments of oceanic crust were incorporated into the accretionary wedge. Modern sedimentation within the collision zone grades from fluvial sediments in the Markham Valley to deep-water turbidites ponded behind a structural ridge near the point of incipient collision. The Markham submarine canyon occupies the collision front here, and efficiently erodes the accretionary wedge. This setting may serve as a modem analog for deposition of much of the Leron Formation which exhibits tremendous sediment reworking.

  3. Nuclear Explosive Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2006-06-12

    The directive establishes specific nuclear explosive safety (NES) program requirements to implement the DOE NES standards and other NES criteria for routine and planned nuclear explosive operations. Cancels DOE O 452.2B. Canceled by DOE O 452.2D.

  4. Office of Nuclear Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy advances nuclear power as a resource capable of meeting the Nation's energy, environmental, and national security needs by resolving technical, cost, safety, proliferation resistance, and security barriers through research, development, and demonstration as appropriate.

  5. Vented nuclear fuel element

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grossman, Leonard N.; Kaznoff, Alexis I.

    1979-01-01

    A nuclear fuel cell for use in a thermionic nuclear reactor in which a small conduit extends from the outside surface of the emitter to the center of the fuel mass of the emitter body to permit escape of volatile and gaseous fission products collected in the center thereof by virtue of molecular migration of the gases to the hotter region of the fuel.

  6. About NNSA | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    of the U.S. nuclear weapons stockpile without nuclear testing; * Preventing the proliferation nuclear weapons and securing dangerous nuclear materials; * Providing the U.S. Navy ...

  7. Civilian Nuclear Programs, SPO-CNP: LANL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Civilian Nuclear Programs, SPO-CNP Science Program Office Applied Energy Civilian Nuclear Office of Science Civilian Nuclear Programs Home Advanced Nuclear Energy Programs Yucca ...

  8. Engineering | National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    reliability and performance of the current and future U.S. nuclear weapons stockpile. ... engineering components of both the non-nuclear and nuclear explosive package in nuclear ...

  9. NNSA Nuclear/Radiological Incident Response | National Nuclear Security

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Administration | (NNSA) December 01, 2008 The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) has over 60 years of nuclear weapons experience in responding to nuclear and radiological accidents and incidents. NNSA provides technical support to the Departments of Homeland Security, Justice, State, and Defense for nuclear terrorism events and domestic nuclear weapon accidents and incidents. The NNSA emergency response assets also provide support to nuclear site and facility accidents and

  10. NNSA Nuclear/Radiological Incident Response | National Nuclear Security

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Administration | (NNSA) January 01, 2009 The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) has more than 60 years of nuclear weapons experience in responding to nuclear and radiological accidents and incidents. NNSA provides technical support to the Departments of Homeland Security, Justice, State, and Defense for nuclear terrorism events and domestic nuclear weapon accidents and incidents. The NNSA emergency response assets also provide support to nuclear site and facility accidents and

  11. Nuclear Security 101 | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Security 101 March 23, 2012 The goal of United States Government's nuclear security programs is to prevent the illegal possession, use or transfer of nuclear material, technology and expertise or radioactive material. Successful nuclear security relies on the integration of technology, policy, operational concepts and international collaboration to prevent acts of nuclear terrorism. The Basics of Nuclear Security include: Removing or Eliminating Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) and

  12. Office of Nuclear Threat Science | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    | (NNSA) Nuclear Threat Science The Office of Nuclear Threat Science is responsible for overseeing the Nuclear Counterterrorism Program, an NNSA program that sustains specialized expertise and integrates and executes key activities to advise and enable technical aspects of U.S. Government nuclear counterterrorism and counterproliferation missions. Nuclear Counterterrorism The Nuclear Counterterrorism Program operates in partnership with weapons design-, stockpile science-, weapons surety-,

  13. The Office of Nuclear Energy Announces Central Europe Nuclear Safety

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Workshop in Prague | Department of Energy The Office of Nuclear Energy Announces Central Europe Nuclear Safety Workshop in Prague The Office of Nuclear Energy Announces Central Europe Nuclear Safety Workshop in Prague October 3, 2011 - 2:04pm Addthis The Office of Nuclear Energy, in partnership with Czech Republic Ministry of Industry and Trade, Ministry of Foreign Affairs, the State Agency for Nuclear Safety of the Czech Republic, and Argonne National Laboratory, is conducting a regional

  14. World nuclear outlook 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-12-01

    As part of the EIA program to provide energy information, this analysis report presents the current status and projections through 2010 of nuclear capacity, generation, and fuel cycle requirements for all countries in the world using nuclear power to generate electricity for commercial use. It also contains information and forecasts of developments in the uranium market. Long-term projections of US nuclear capacity, generation, and spent fuel discharges for three different scenarios through 2040 are developed for the Department of Energy`s Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM). In turn, the OCRWM provides partial funding for preparation of this report. The projections of uranium requirements are provided to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) for preparation of the Nuclear Energy Agency/OECD report, Summary of Nuclear Power and Fuel Cycle Data in OECD Member Countries.

  15. World nuclear outlook 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-09-29

    As part of the EIA program to provide energy information, this analysis report presents the current status and projections through 2015 of nuclear capacity, generation, and fuel cycle requirements for all countries in the world using nuclear power to generate electricity for commercial use. It also contains information and forecasts of developments in the uranium market. Long-term projections of US nuclear capacity, generation, and spent fuel discharges for two different scenarios through 2040 are developed for the Department of Energy`s Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM). In turn, the OCRWM provides partial funding for preparation of this report. The projections of uranium requirements are provided to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) for preparation of the Nuclear Energy Agency/OECD report, Summary of Nuclear Power and Fuel Cycle Data in OECD Member Countries.

  16. PHENIX (Pioneering High Energy Nuclear Interaction eXperiment): Data Tables and Figures from Published Papers

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The PHENIX Experiment is the largest of the four experiments currently taking data at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. PHENIX, the Pioneering High Energy Nuclear Interaction eXperiment, is an exploratory experiment for the investigation of high energy collisions of heavy ions and protons. PHENIX is designed specifically to measure direct probes of the collisions such as electrons, muons, and photons. The primary goal of PHENIX is to discover and study a new state of matter called the Quark-Gluon Plasma. More than 60 published papers and preprints are listed here with links to the full text and separate links to the supporting PHENIX data in plain text tables and to EPS and GIF figures from the papers.

  17. Propagation of terahertz electromagnetic wave in plasma with inhomogeneous collision frequency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tian, Yuan; Han, YiPing; Ling, YingJie; Ai, Xia

    2014-02-15

    In this paper, we investigate the absorption spectra of terahertz electromagnetic wave in plasma with inhomogeneous collision frequency. Profiles are introduced to describe the non-uniformity of collision frequency. It is interesting to find that when the plasma is collision frequency inhomogeneous, the absorption spectrum would decreases faster than that in uniform plasma. And the rate of decreasing would be different when the profile changes. Two parameters are set up to predict how the profiles affect the absorption spectra. Furthermore, the effects of electron density are also considered.

  18. nuclear bombs | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    bombs The man who trains everyone on the bombs Mark Meyer, training coordinator and field engineer at Sandia National Laboratories. Over the past five years, Mark Meyer, training coordinator and field engineer at Sandia National Laboratories, has introduced thousands of people across the Department of Energy and Department of Defense nuclear

  19. Preparing for the 2012 Nuclear Security Summit | National Nuclear...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    over 10 countries - enough for 16 nuclear bombs. A dozen new countries joining the key international treaties. Over a dozen new nuclear security training and research "centers...

  20. Naval Nuclear Propulsion Plants | National Nuclear Security Administra...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Naval Nuclear Propulsion Plants In naval nuclear propulsion plants, fissioning of uranium atoms in the reactor core produces heat. Because the fission process also produces...

  1. Nuclear Weapons Testing Resumes | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    | (NNSA) Weapons Testing Resumes Nuclear Weapons Testing Resumes Washington, DC The Soviet Union breaks the nuclear test moratorium and the United States resumes testing

  2. Peaceful Uses of Nuclear Technology | National Nuclear Security...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Peaceful Uses of Nuclear Technology United States and China Mark 10th Anniversary of Peaceful Uses of Nuclear Technology Joint Coordination Meetings CHENGDU, CHINA - On May 6 and ...

  3. National Nuclear Science Week Day 2: NNSA Showcases Nuclear Science...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    2: NNSA Showcases Nuclear Science Careers | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing...

  4. NNSA Celebrates National Nuclear Science Week | National Nuclear...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    National Nuclear Science Week | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering...

  5. National Nuclear Science Week - Jan. 24-28 | National Nuclear...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    - Jan. 24-28 | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy...

  6. JPRS report supplement: Nuclear developments. Iraq -- Nuclear and missile proliferation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1990-09-14

    This document contains articles from foreign periodicals from throughout the world, translated into English, that concern nuclear developments, specifically nuclear and missile proliferation in Iraq.

  7. Last U.S. Underground Nuclear Test Conducted | National Nuclear...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    U.S. Underground Nuclear Test Conducted | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing...

  8. Mr. John Kinneman, Chief Nuclear Materfals Branch Nuclear Regulatory...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    111989 Mr. John Kinneman, Chief Nuclear Materfals Branch Nuclear Regulatory Commission Region I 475 Allendale Road King of Prussia. Pennsylvania 19406 Dear Mr. Kinneman: -;' .-. 'W ...

  9. Nuclear Safety Information Agreement Between the U.S. Nuclear...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    DOE), Cathy Haney (Director, Office of Nuclear Materials Safety and Safeguards (NRC)), ... (NRC)) Back Row: Tom Hiltz, Office of Nuclear Safety (EHSS DOE), Roy Zimmerman (Deputy ...

  10. Electric Power Produced from Nuclear Reactor | National Nuclear...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Electric Power Produced from Nuclear Reactor Electric Power Produced from Nuclear Reactor Arco, ID The Experimental Breeder Reactor No. 1 located at the National Reactor Testing ...

  11. Neutron and Nuclear Science News

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    News Recent news and events related to neutron and nuclear science at LANSCE. Neutron and Nuclear Science News Links Neutron and Nuclear Science News Media Links Profiles Events at LANSCE

  12. hrp | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    hrp Personnel Security Program NNSA is responsible for managing national nuclear security and supports several key program areas including Defense, Nuclear Nonproliferation, Naval Reactors, Emergency Operations, Infrastructure and Environment, Nuclear Security, Management and Administration and the Office of the Administrator.

  13. Supporting Our Nation's Nuclear Industry

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Lyons, Peter

    2013-05-29

    On the 60th anniversary of the world's first nuclear power plant to produce electricity, Assistant Secretary for Nuclear Energy Peter Lyons discusses the Energy Department's and the Administration's commitment to promoting a nuclear renaissance in the United States.

  14. nr | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    nr On Womens Equality Day, we celebrate NNSA's talented Women in STEM About Naval Reactors What Is the Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program? The Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program comprises the military and civilian personnel who design, build, operate, maintain, and manage the nuclear-powered ships and the many facilities that support the U.S. nuclear-powered naval fleet. The Program... Powering the Nuclear Navy Concern for the Environment Protection of People Naval Nuclear Propulsion Plants Annual

  15. Nuclear Safety | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Criticality Safety The Nuclear Facility Safety Program establishes and maintains the DOE requirements for nuclear criticality safety. The DOE detailed requirements for criticality ...

  16. Nonproliferation | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    or rogue nations will acquire nuclear weapons or other weapons of mass destruction (WMD). NNSA, through its Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation (DNN), works closely ...

  17. Newsletters | National Nuclear Security Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the nuclear security enterprise. Online archives are available back to 2003. NNSA publishes a monthly newsletter featuring current events and activities across the nuclear ...

  18. performance | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    performance | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy...

  19. computing | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    computing | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy...

  20. sites | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    sites | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy...

  1. airport | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    airport | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy...

  2. Romania | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Romania | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy...

  3. ap | National Nuclear Security Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ap | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency...

  4. lllnl | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    lllnl | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy...

  5. Links | National Nuclear Security Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Links | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy...

  6. fleet | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    fleet | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy...

  7. NSTec | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency...

  8. Savannah | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency...

  9. green | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency...

  10. Vermont Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net ...

  11. Nuclear & Particle Physics, Astrophysics, Cosmology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear & Particle Physics Nuclear & Particle Physics, Astrophysics, Cosmology National security depends on science and technology. The United States relies on Los Alamos National ...

  12. Deputy Manager for Nuclear Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energy's Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) advances nuclear power as a resource capable of meeting the Nation's energy, environmental, and national security needs by resolving...

  13. Connecticut Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net ...

  14. SSAC | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    SSAC NNSA and IAEA Hold the 20th International Training Course on Nuclear Material Accounting and Control Washington, D.C. - The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)...

  15. ONAC | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ONAC NNSA and IAEA Hold the 20th International Training Course on Nuclear Material Accounting and Control Washington, D.C. - The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)...

  16. recycling | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    recycling | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy...

  17. dnn | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    National Nuclear Security Administration (DOENNSA) and the U.K. Department of Energy and Climate Change concluded a workshop at Wilton Park, Shaping the future of nuclear...

  18. sliderphotos | National Nuclear Security Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    sliderphotos | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy...

  19. Defense Nuclear Facility Safety Board

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8, 2014 Defense Nuclear Facility Safety Board Defense Nuclear Facility Safety Board (DNSFB) Vice Chairwoman Jesse Roberson visited and toured the WIPP site this week. While...

  20. Georgia Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net ...