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1

RELATIVISTIC NUCLEAR COLLISIONS: THEORY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Effects in Relativistic Nuclear Collisions", Preprint LBL-Pion Interferometry of Nuclear Collisions. 18.1 M.Gyulassy,was supported by the Office of Nuclear Physics of the U.S.

Gyulassy, M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Relativistic Nuclear Collisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A comprehensive introduction is given to the field of relativistic nuclear collisions, and the phase diagram of strongly interacting matter. The content of this complex of reviews is shown.

Reinhard Stock

2009-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

3

PROBING DENSE NUCLEAR MATTER VIA NUCLEAR COLLISIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

University of California. LBL-12095 Probing Dense NuclearMatter Nuclear Collisions* v~a H. Stocker, M.Gyulassy and J. Boguta Nuclear Science Division Lawrence

Stocker, H.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

PION, LIGHT FRAGMENT AND ENTROPY PRODUCTION IN NUCLEAR COLLISIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

description of high energy nuclear collisions requires thefragments in high energy nuclear collisions. The calculatedof the Office of High Energy and Nuclear Physics of the U.S.

Stocker, Horst

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Baryon Fluctuations in High Energy Nuclear Collisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose that dramatic changes in the variances and covariance of protons and antiprotons can result if baryons approach chemical equilibrium in nuclear collisions at RHIC. To explore how equilibration alters these fluctuations, we formulate both equilibrium and nonequilibrium hadrochemical descriptions of baryon evolution. Contributions to fluctuations from impact parameter averaging and finite acceptance in nuclear collisions are numerically simulated.

Sean Gavin; Claude Pruneau

1999-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

6

NUCLEAR FLUID DYNAMICS VERSUS INTRANUCLEAR CASCADE--POSSIBLE EVIDENCE FOR COLLECTIVE FLOW IN CENTRAL HIGH ENERGY NUCLEAR COLLISIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Flow in Central High Energy Nuclear Collisions H. Stockera,under Contract High energy nuclear collisions offer a uniquesidewards flow·in high-energy nuclear collisions. The

Stocker, H.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

NUCLEAR SLAB COLLISION IN A RELATIVISTIC QUANTUM FIELD THEORY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy under Contract W-7405-ENG-43 LBL-12893 NUCLEAR SLAB COLLISION IN A RELATIVISTIC QUANTUM FIELD THEORY

Muller, K.-H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Stochastic Jet Quenching in High Energy Nuclear Collisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy losses of fast color particles in random inhomogeneous color medium created in high energy nuclear collisions are estimated.

Kirakosyan, M R

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

High Energy Nuclear Collisions: Theory Overview  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We review some basic concepts of Relativistic Heavy Ion Physics and discuss our understanding of some key results from the experimental program at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). We focus in particular on the early time dynamics of nuclear collisions, some result from lattice QCD, hard probes and photons.

Fries, Rainer J

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

High Energy Nuclear Collisions: Theory Overview  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We review some basic concepts of Relativistic Heavy Ion Physics and discuss our understanding of some key results from the experimental program at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). We focus in particular on the early time dynamics of nuclear collisions, some result from lattice QCD, hard probes and photons.

Rainer J. Fries

2010-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

11

JETS OF NUCLEAR MATTER FROM HIGH ENERGY HEAVY ION COLLISIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the Office of High Energy and Nuclear Physics of the U.S.distributions and energy flux in violent nuclear collisions.of the Office of High Energy and Nuclear Physics of the U.S.

Stocker, H.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Partonic EoS in High-Energy Nuclear Collisions at RHIC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Partonic EoS in High-Energy Nuclear Collisions at RHIC Nu Xuproperties. In high-energy nuclear collisions, the term ?owthe early stage of high-energy nuclear collision, both the

Xu, Nu

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Partonic Equations of State in High-Energy Nuclear Collisions at RHIC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Partonic EoS in High-Energy Nuclear Collisions at RHIC Nu Xuproperties. In high-energy nuclear collisions, the term ?owthe early stage of high-energy nuclear collision, both the

Xu, Nu

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Quarkonium Production and Medium Effects in High Energy Nuclear Collisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Color screening and regeneration are both hot medium effects on quarkonium production in high energy nuclear collisions. However, they affect in an opposite way the finally observed quarkonium spectra. Due to the competition of the two dynamical effects, the ratio of the integrated quarkonium yield between nuclear and elementary nucleon collisions loses its sensitivity. Once the information of quarkonium transverse motion is included, on the other hand, the ratio of averaged transverse momentum square reveals the nature of the QCD medium created in high energy nuclear collisions.

Zhou, Kai; Zhuang, Pengfei

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Gluino production in ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions and nuclear shadowing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this article we investigate the influence of nuclear effects in the production of gluinos in nuclear collisions at the LHC, and estimate the transverse momentum dependence of the nuclear ratios $R_{pA} = {\\frac{d\\sigma (pA)}{dy d^2 p_T}} / A {\\frac{d\\sigma (pp)}{dy d^2 p_T}}$ and $R_{AA} = {\\frac{d\\sigma (AA)}{dy d^2 p_T}} / A^2 {\\frac{d\\sigma (pp)}{dy d^2 p_T}}$. We demonstrate that depending on the magnitude of the nuclear effects, the production of gluinos could be enhanced, compared to proton-proton collisions. The study of these observables can be useful to determine the magnitude of the shadowing and antishadowing effects in the nuclear gluon distribution. Moreover, we test different SPS scenarios, corresponding to different soft SUSY breaking mechanisms, and find that the nuclear ratios are strongly dependent on that choice.

Mariotto, C Brenner; Rodriguez, M C

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Physics of Ultra-Peripheral Nuclear Collisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Probes of Funda- mental Physics World Scienti?c, Singapore (H Theoretical Nuclear Physics: Nuclear Reactions, Wiley-CA, Hussein M and Muenzenberg G Physics of Radioactive Beams

Bertulani, Carlos A.; Klein, Spencer R.; Nystrand, Joakim

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

A fully dynamical simulation of central nuclear collisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a fully dynamical simulation of central nuclear collisions around mid-rapidity at LHC energies. Unlike previous treatments, we simulate all phases of the collision, including the equilibration of the system. For the simulation, we use numerical relativity solutions to AdS/CFT for the pre-equilibrium stage, viscous hydrodynamics for the plasma equilibrium stage and kinetic theory for the low density hadronic stage. Our pre-equilibrium stage provides initial conditions for hydrodynamics and our results are insensitive to the AdS/hydro switching time. The resulting light particle spectra reproduce the measurements from the ALICE experiment at all transverse momenta.

van der Schee, Wilke; Pratt, Scott

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Nuclear effects on J/? production in proton-nucleus collisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The study of nuclear effects for J/{\\psi} production in proton-nucleus collisions is crucial for a correct interpretation of the J/{\\psi} suppression patterns experimentally observed in heavy-ion collisions. By means of three representative sets of nuclear parton distribution, the energy loss effect in the initial state and the nuclear absorption effect in the final state are taken into account in the uniform framework of the Glauber model. A leading order phenomenological analysis is performed on J/{\\psi} production cross-section ratios RW/Be(xF) for the E866 experimental data. The J/{\\psi} suppression is investigated quantitatively due to the different nuclear effects. It is shown that the energy loss effect with resulting in the suppression on RW/Be(xF) is more important than the nuclear effects on parton distributions in high xF region. The E866 data in the small xF keep out the nuclear gluon distribution with a large anti-shadowing effect. However, the new HERA-B measurement is not in support of the anti-shadowing effect in the nuclear gluon distribution. It is found that the J/{\\psi}-nucleon inelastic cross section {\\sigma} J/{\\psi} abs depends on the kinematical variable xF, and increases as xF in the region xF > 0.2. 1 Introduction

Chun-Gui Duan; Jian-Chao Xu; Li-Hua Song

2011-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

19

Matter in extremis: Ultrarelativistic nuclear collisions at RHIC  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We review the physics of nuclear matter at high energy density and the experimental search for the Quark-Gluon Plasma at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The data obtained in the first three years of the RHIC physics program provide several lines of evidence that a novel state of matter has been created in the most violent, head-on collisions of Au nuclei at {radical}s = 200 GeV. Jet quenching and global measurements show that the initial energy density of the strongly interacting medium generated in the collision is about two orders of magnitude larger than that of cold nuclear matter, well above the critical density for the deconfinement phase transition predicted by lattice QCD. The observed collective flow patterns imply that the system thermalizes early in its evolution, with the dynamics of its expansion consistent with ideal hydrodynamic flow based on a Quark-Gluon Plasma equation of state.

Jacobs, Peter; Wang, Xin-Nian

2004-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

20

A study of nuclear stopping in central symmetric nuclear collisions at intermediate energies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear stopping has been investigated in central symmetric nuclear collisions at intermediate energies. Firstly, it is found that the isotropy ratio, Riso, reaches a minimum near the Fermi energy and saturates or slowly increases depending on the mass of the system as the beam energy increases. An approximate scaling based on the size of the system is found above the Fermi energy suggesting the increasing role of in-medium nucleon-nucleon collisions. Secondly, the charge density distributions in velocity space, dZ/dvk and dZ/dv?, reveal a strong memory of the entrance channel and, as such, a sizeable nuclear transparency in the intermediate energy range. Lastly, it is shown that the width of the transverse velocity distribution is proportional to the beam velocity.

C. Escano-Rodriguez; D. Durand; A. Chbihi; J. D. Frankland; the INDRA Collaboration

2005-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "g-1cm2 nuclear collision" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Nuclear like effects in proton-proton collisions at high energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show that several effects considered nuclear effects are not nuclear in the sense that they do not only occur in nucleus-nucleus and hadron-nucleus collisions but, as well, they are present in hadron-hadron (proton-proton) collisions. The matter creation mechanism in hh, hA and AA collisions is always the same. The pT suppression of particles produced in large multiplicity events compared to low multiplicity events, the elliptic flow and the Cronin effect are predicted to occur in pp collisions at LHC energies as a consequence of the obtained high density partonic medium.

L. Cunqueiro; J. Dias de Deus; C. Pajares

2008-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

22

Novel High Transverse Momentum Phenomena in Hadronic and Nuclear Collisions  

SciTech Connect

I discuss a number of novel phenomenological features of QCD in high transverse momentum reactions. The presence of direct higher-twist processes, where a proton is produced directly in the hard subprocess, can explain the 'baryon anomaly' - the large proton-to-pion ratio seen at RHIC in high centrality heavy ion collisions. Direct hadronic processes can also account for the deviation from leading-twist PQCD scaling at fixed x{sub T} = 2 p{sub T}/{radical}s. I suggest that the 'ridge' --the same-side long-range rapidity correlation observed at RHIC in high centrality heavy ion collisions is due to the imprint of semihard DGLAP gluon radiation from initial-state partons which have transverse momenta biased toward the trigger. A model for early thermalization of the quark-gluon medium is also outlined. Rescattering interactions from gluon-exchange, normally neglected in the parton model, have a profound effect in QCD hard-scattering reactions, leading to leading-twist single-spin asymmetries, diffractive deep inelastic scattering, diffractive hard hadronic reactions, the breakdown of the Lam-Tung relation in Drell-Yan reactions, nuclear shadowing--all leading-twist dynamics not incorporated in the light-front wavefunctions of the target computed in isolation. Anti shadowing is shown to be quark flavor specific and thus different in charged and neutral deep inelastic lepton-nucleus scattering. I also discuss other aspects of quantum effects in heavy ion collisions, such as tests of hidden color in nuclear wavefunctions, the use of diffraction to materialize the Fock states of a hadronic projectile and test QCD color transparency, and the important consequences of color-octet intrinsic heavy quark distributions in the proton for particle and Higgs production at high x{sub F}. I also discuss how the AdS/CFT correspondence between Anti-de Sitter space and conformal gauge theories allows one to compute the analytic form of frame-independent light-front wavefunctions of mesons and baryons and to compute quark and gluon hadronization at the amplitude level. Finally, the BLM method for determining the renormalization scale in PQCD calculations is reviewed.

Brodsky, Stanley J.; /SLAC

2009-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

23

Nuclear Equation of State: Picture from Medium Energy Heavy Ion Collisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Characteristics of the nuclear equation of state (EOS) and its importance, in particular for astrophysics, are discussed. Selected observables in nuclear collisions are sensitive to the EOS and can be used to constrain it. For central collisions, these include collective flow asymmetries, subthreshold kaon yields and isospin diffusion. Comparisons between the data and transport theory suggest an energy per nucleon that rises relatively slowly with density for symmetric matter and symmetry energy that rises relatively quickly around the normal nuclear density.

P. Danielewicz

2005-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

24

--No Title--  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Quantity Value Units 0.00000 Specific gravity ?? g cm-3 Minimum ionization 20.000 MeV g-1cm2 Nuclear collision length inf g cm-2 Nuclear interaction length inf g cm-2...

25

Are back-to-back particle--antiparticle correlations observable in high energy nuclear collisions?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analytical formulae are presented which provide quantitative estimates for the suppression of the anticipated back-to-back particle--antiparticle correlations in high energy nuclear collisions due to the finite duration of the transition dynamics. They show that it is unlikely to observ the effect.

Knoll, Joern

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Physics of Ultra-Relativistic Nuclear Collisions with Heavy Beams at LHC Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss current plans for experiments with ultra-relativistic nuclear collisions with heavy beams at LHC energy ($\\sqrt{s} = 5.5$ TeV/nucleon pair). Emphasis will be placed on processes which are unique to the LHC program. They include event-by-event interferometry, complete spectroscopy of the $\\Upsilon$ resonances, and open charm and open beauty measurements.

Peter Braun-Munzinger

1999-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

27

INDEPENDENT PARTICLE ASPECTS OF NUCLEAR DYNAMICS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

situations: nuclear vibrations, fission, collisions, theformulae to nuclear vibrations, fission, collisions, thenuclear phenomena: nuclear vibrations, fission, collisions,

Robel, M.C.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

The effect of partonic wind on charm quark correlations in high-energy nuclear collisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In high-energy collisions, massive heavy quarks are produced back-to-back initially and they are sensitive to early dynamical conditions. The strong collective partonic wind from the fast expanding quark-gluon plasma created in high-energy nuclear collisions modifies the correlation pattern significantly. As a result, the angular correlation function for D$\\bar{\\rm D}$ pairs is suppressed at the angle $\\Delta\\phi=\\pi$. While the hot and dense medium in collisions at RHIC ($\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=200$ GeV) can only smear the initial back-to-back D$\\bar {\\rm D}$ correlation, a clear and strong near side D$\\bar{\\rm D}$ correlation is expected at LHC ($\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=5500$ GeV).

X. Zhu; N. Xu; P. Zhuang

2007-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

29

Charged hadrons and nuclear parton distributions in p(d)A collisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear gluon modifications are the least constrained component of current global fits to nuclear parton distributions, due to the inadequate constraining power of presently available experimental data from nuclear deep inelastic scattering and nuclear Drell-Yan lepton-pair production. A recent advance is the use of observables from relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions to supplement the data pool for global fits. It is thus of interest to investigate the sensitivity of various experimental observables to different strengths of nuclear gluon modifications from large to small Bjorken $x$. In this work we utilize three recent global fits with different gluon strengths to investigate the sensitivity of three observables: nuclear modification factor, pseudorapidity asymmetry, and charge ratio. We observe that both nuclear modification factor and pseudorapidity asymmetry are quite sensitive to the strength of gluon modifications in a wide pseudorapidity interval. The sensitivity is greatly enhanced at LHC (Large Hadron Collider) energies relative to that at RHIC (Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider). The charge ratio is mildly sensitive only at large Bjorken x. Thus measurement of these observables in proton-lead collisions at the LHC affords the potential to further constrain gluon modifications in global fits.

Adeola Adeluyi; Trang Nguyen; Bao-An Li

2010-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

30

Nuclear k_T in d+Au Collisions from Multiparticle Jet Reconstruction at STAR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents the most recent nuclear k_T measurements from STAR derived from multiparticle jet reconstruction of d+Au and p+p collisions at sqrt(s)=200 GeV. Since jets reconstructed from multiple particles are relatively free of fragmentation biases, nuclear k_T can be measured with greater certainty in this way than with traditional di-hadron correlations. Multi-particle jet reconstruction can also be used for a direct measurement of the fragmentation function.

Thomas Henry

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Influence of the nucleon-nucleon collision geometry on the determination of the nuclear modification factor for nucleon-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The influence of the underlying nucleon-nucleon collision geometry on evaluations of the nuclear overlap function (TAB) and number of binary collisions (Ncoll) is studied. A narrowing of the spatial distribution of the hard-partons with large light-cone fraction x in nucleons leads to a downward correction for Ncoll and TAB, which in turn, results in an upward correction for the nuclear modification factor RAB. The size of this correction is estimated for several experimentally motivated nucleon-nucleon overlap functions for hard-partons. It is found to be significant in peripheral nucleus-nucleus and nucleon-nucleus collisions, and is much larger at the LHC energy of {radical}s = 5.5 TeV than for the RHIC energy of {radical}s = 200 GeV. The implications for experimental measurements are also discussed.

Jia, J.i.

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Quarkonium production in ultra-relativistic nuclear collisions: suppression vs. enhancement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

After a brief review of the various scenarios for quarkonium production in ultra-relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions we focus on the ingredients and assumptions underlying the statistical hadronization model. We then confront model predictions for J/$\\psi$ phase space distributions with the most recent data from the RHIC accelerator. Analysis of the rapidity dependence of the J/$\\psi$ nuclear modification factor yields first evidence for the production of J/$\\psi$ mesons at the phase boundary. We conclude with predictions for charmonium production at the LHC.

P. Braun-Munzinger

2007-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

33

Overview of event-by-event analysis of high energy nuclear collisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The event-by-event analysis of high energy nuclear collisions aims at revealing the richness of the underlying event structures and provide unique measures of dynamical fluctuations associated with QGP phase transition. The major challenge in these studies is to separate the dynamical fluctuations from the many other sources which contribute to the measured values. We present the fluctuations in terms of event multiplicity, mean transverse momentum, elliptic flow, source sizes, particle ratios and net charge distributions. In addition, we discuss the effect of long range correlations, disoriented chiral condensates and presence of jets. A brief review of various probes used for fluctuation studies and available experimental results are presented.

Nayak, Tapan K

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Particle distribution and nuclear stopping in Au-Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$=200 GeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The transverse momentum distribution of produced charged particles is investigated for gold-gold collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=200$ GeV. A simple parameterization is suggested for the particle distribution based on the nuclear stopping effect. The model can fit very well both the transverse momentum distributions at different pseudo-rapidities and the pseudo-rapidity distributions at different centralities. The ratio of rapidity distributions for peripheral and central collisions is calculated and compared with the data.

L. L. Zhu; C. B. Yang

2006-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

35

Nuclear-nuclear collision centrality determination by the spectators calorimeter for the MPD setup at the NICA facility  

SciTech Connect

The work conditions of the hadron calorimeter for spectators registration (Zero Degree Calorimeter, ZDC) were studied for the heavy nuclei collisions with the several GeV invariant energy. The ZDC simulations were performed for the MPD (Multi-Purpose Detector) at the NICA (Nuclotron-based Ion Collider fAcility) collider, which are under developement at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR, Dubna). Taking into account the spectator nuclear fragments leads to a nonmonotonic dependence of the ZDC response on the impact parameter. The reason for this dependence studied with several event generators is the primary beam hole in the ZDC center. It is shown, that the ZDC signal should be combined with a data from other MPD-NICA detector subsystems to determine centrality.

Golubeva, M. B.; Guber, F. F.; Ivashkin, A. P. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation)] [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation); Isupov, A. Yu. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation)] [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation); Kurepin, A. B. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation)] [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation); Litvinenko, A. G., E-mail: litvin@moonhe.jinr.ru; Litvinenko, E. I.; Migulina, I. I.; Peresedov, V. F. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation)] [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation)

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

36

Bayesian reweighting of nuclear PDFs and constraints from proton-lead collisions at the LHC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

New hard-scattering measurements from the LHC proton-lead run have the potential to provide important constraints on the nuclear parton distributions and thus contributing to a better understanding of the initial state in heavy ion collisions. In order to quantify these constraints, as well as to assess the compatibility with available nuclear data from fixed target experiments and from RHIC, the traditional strategy is to perform a global fit of nuclear PDFs. This procedure is however time consuming and technically challenging, and moreover can only be performed by the PDF fitters themselves. In the case of proton PDFs, an alternative approach has been suggested that uses Bayesian inference to propagate the effects of new data into the PDFs without the need of refitting. In this work, we apply this reweighting procedure to study the impact on nuclear PDFs of low-mass Drell-Yan and single-inclusive hadroproduction pseudo-data from proton-lead collisions at the LHC as representative examples. In the hadroproduction case, in addition we assess the possibility of discriminating between the DGLAP and CGC production frameworks. We find that the LHC proton-lead data could lead to a substantial reduction of the uncertainties on nuclear PDFs, in particular for the small-x gluon PDF where uncertainties could decrease by up to a factor two. The Monte Carlo replicas of EPS09 used in the analysis are released as a public code for general use. It can be directly used, in particular, by the experimental collaborations to check, in a straightforward manner, the degree of compatibility of the new data with the global nPDF analyses.

Nestor Armesto; Juan Rojo; Carlos A. Salgado; Pia Zurita

2013-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

37

Nuclear collisions at several tens of MeV per nucleus  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear beams with energies of several tens of MeV per nucleon will soon be available at a number of research centers around the world. Such beams offer a tool for probing new aspects of nuclear structure and dynamics. As the energy is raised models and concepts developed for the relatively well studied lower energy domain will be pressed to their limits and are likely to grow obsolete as novel phenomena enter the scene. The theory of ordinary damped collisions is considered; the testing of such theories is one important aspect of the research with higher beam energies. Another is the search for truly novel phenomena, and some more speculative material on that aspect are given. 15 references.

Randrup, J.

1979-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Testing nuclear parton distributions with pA collisions at the TeV scale  

SciTech Connect

Global perturbative QCD analyses, based on large data sets from electron-proton and hadron collider experiments, provide tight constraints on the parton distribution function (PDF) in the proton. The extension of these analyses to nuclear parton distribution functions (nPDFs) has attracted much interest in recent years. nPDFs are needed as benchmarks for the characterization of hot QCD matter in nucleus-nucleus collisions, and attract further interest since they may show novel signatures of nonlinear density-dependent QCD evolution. However, it is not known from first principles whether the factorization of long-range phenomena into process-independent parton distribution, which underlies global PDF extractions for the proton, extends to nuclear effects. As a consequence, assessing the reliability of nPDFs for benchmark calculations goes beyond testing the numerical accuracy of their extraction and requires phenomenological tests of the factorization assumption. Here, we argue that a proton-nucleus collision program at the Large Hadron Collider would provide a set of measurements, which allow for unprecedented tests of the factorization assumption, underlying global nPDF fits.

Quiroga-Arias, Paloma [Departamento de Fisica de Particulas and Instituto Galego de Fisica de Altas Enerxias, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela 15706 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Physics Department, Theory Unit, CERN, CH-1211 Geneve 23 (Switzerland); Milhano, Jose Guilherme [Centro Multidisciplinar de Astrofisica-CENTRA, Departamento de Fisica, Instituto Superior Tecnico (IST), Avenida Rovisco Pais 1, P-1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Physics Department, Theory Unit, CERN, CH-1211 Geneve 23 (Switzerland); Wiedemann, Urs Achim [Physics Department, Theory Unit, CERN, CH-1211 Geneve 23 (Switzerland)

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

39

Testing nuclear parton distributions with pA collisions at the LHC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Global perturbative QCD analyses, based on large data sets from electron-proton and hadron collider experiments, provide tight constraints on the parton distribution function (PDF) in the proton. The extension of these analyses to nuclear parton distributions (nPDF) has attracted much interest in recent years. nPDFs are needed as benchmarks for the characterization of hot QCD matter in nucleus-nucleus collisions, and attract further interest since they may show novel signatures of non-linear density-dependent QCD evolution. However, it is not known from first principles whether the factorization of long-range phenomena into process-independent parton distribution, which underlies global PDF extractions for the proton, extends to nuclear effects. As a consequence, assessing the reliability of nPDFs for benchmark calculations goes beyond testing the numerical accuracy of their extraction and requires phenomenological tests of the factorization assumption. Here we argue that a proton-nucleus collision program at the LHC would provide a set of measurements allowing for unprecedented tests of the factorization assumption underlying global nPDF fits.

Paloma Quiroga-Arias; Jose Guilherme Milhano; Urs Achin Wiedemann

2010-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

40

Effect of the Wood-Saxon nuclear distribution on the chiral magnetic field in Relativistic Heavy-ion Collisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The formation of the QCD vacuum with nonzero winding number $Q_w$ during relativistic heavy-ion collisions breaks the parity and charge-parity symmetry. A new kind of field configuration can separate charge in the presence of a background magnetic field-the "chiral magnetic effect". The strong magnetic field and the QCD vacuum can both completely be produced in the noncentral nuclear-nuclear collision. Basing on the theory of Kharzeev,Mclerran and Warringa, we use the Wood-Saxon nucleon distribution to replace that of the uniform distribution to improve the magnetic field calculation method of the noncentral collision. The chiral magnetic field distribution at LHC(Large Hadron Collider) energy regions are predicted. We also consider the contributions to the magnetic field of the total charge given by the produced quarks.

Yu-Jun Mo; Sheng-Qin Feng; Ya-Fei Shi

2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "g-1cm2 nuclear collision" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Search for the QCD critical point in nuclear collisions at 158A GeV at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pion production in nuclear collisions at the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) is investigated with the aim to search, in a restricted domain of the phase diagram, for power laws in the behavior of correlations that are ...

Roland, Christof E.

42

NUCLEAR COLLISIONS AT SEVERAL TENS OF MeV PER NUCLEUS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

dissipation theorem on low-energy nuclear dynamics has beensame size as the nuclear binding energy. The nuclear systemto the lotal nuclear binding energy. Hence, in principle, it

Randrup, J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Microscopic models and effective equation of state in nuclear collisions at FAIR energies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Two microscopic models, UrQMD and QGSM, were employed to study the formation of locally equilibrated hot and dense nuclear matter in heavy-ion collisions at energies from 11.6 AGeV to 160 AGeV. Analysis was performed for the fixed central cubic cell of volume V = 125 fm**3 and for the expanding cell which followed the growth of the central area with uniformly distributed energy. To decide whether or not the equilibrium was reached, results of the microscopic calculations were compared to that of the statistical thermal model. Both dynamical models indicate that the state of kinetic, thermal and chemical equilibrium is nearly approached at any bombarding energy after a certain relaxation period. The higher the energy, the shorter the relaxation time. Equation of state has a simple linear dependence P = a(sqrt{s})*e, where a = c_s**2 is the sound velocity squared. It varies from 0.12 \\pm 0.01 at E_{lab} = 11.6 AGeV to 0.145 \\pm 0.005 at E_{lab} = 160 AGeV. Change of the slope in a(sqrt{s}) behavior occurs at E_...

Bravina, L; Bleibel, J; Bleicher, M; Burau, G; Faessler, Amand; Fuchs, C; Nilsson, M S; Stöcker, H; Tywoniuk, K; Zabrodin, E

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Nuclear modification and elliptic flow measurements for $?$ mesons at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 200 GeV d+Au and Au+Au collisions by PHENIX  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report the first results of the nuclear modification factors and elliptic flow of the phi mesons measured by the PHENIX experiment at RHIC in high luminosity Au+Au collisions at sqrt(sNN) = 200 GeV. The nuclear modification factors R_AA and R_CP of the phi follow the same trend of suppression as pi0's in Au+Au collisions. In d+Au collisions at sqrt(sNN) = 200 GeV, the phi mesons are not suppressed. The elliptic flow of the phi mesons, measured in the minimum bias Au+Au events, is statistically consistent with other identified particles.

Dipali Pal

2005-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

45

Microscopic models and effective equation of state in nuclear collisions at FAIR energies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Two microscopic models, UrQMD and QGSM, were employed to study the formation of locally equilibrated hot and dense nuclear matter in heavy-ion collisions at energies from 11.6 AGeV to 160 AGeV. Analysis was performed for the fixed central cubic cell of volume V = 125 fm**3 and for the expanding cell which followed the growth of the central area with uniformly distributed energy. To decide whether or not the equilibrium was reached, results of the microscopic calculations were compared to that of the statistical thermal model. Both dynamical models indicate that the state of kinetic, thermal and chemical equilibrium is nearly approached at any bombarding energy after a certain relaxation period. The higher the energy, the shorter the relaxation time. Equation of state has a simple linear dependence P = a(sqrt{s})*e, where a = c_s**2 is the sound velocity squared. It varies from 0.12 \\pm 0.01 at E_{lab} = 11.6 AGeV to 0.145 \\pm 0.005 at E_{lab} = 160 AGeV. Change of the slope in a(sqrt{s}) behavior occurs at E_{lab} = 40 AGeV and can be assigned to the transition from baryon-rich to meson-dominated matter. The phase diagrams in the T - mu_B plane show the presence of kinks along the lines of constant entropy per baryon. These kinks are linked to the inelastic (i.e. chemical) freeze-out in the system.

L. Bravina; I. Arsene; J. Bleibel; M. Bleicher; G. Burau; Amand Faessler; C. Fuchs; M. S. Nilsson; H. Stoecker; K. Tywoniuk; E. Zabrodin

2008-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

46

Nonadiabatic nuclear dynamics of atomic collisions based on branching classical trajectories  

SciTech Connect

The branching classical trajectory method for inelastic atomic collision processes is proposed. The approach is based on two features: (i) branching of a classical trajectory in a nonadiabatic region and (ii) the nonadiabatic transition probability formulas particularly adapted for a classical trajectory treatment. In addition to transition probabilities and inelastic cross sections, the proposed approach allows one to calculate incoming and outgoing currents. The method is applied to inelastic Na + H collisions providing the results in reasonable agreement with full quantum calculations.

Belyaev, Andrey K. [Department of Theoretical Physics, Herzen University, St. Petersburg 191186 (Russian Federation); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, S-75120 Uppsala (Sweden) and LCPQ and LCAR, IRSAMC, Universite Paul Sabatier, F-31062 Toulouse (France); Lebedev, Oleg V. [Department of Theoretical Physics, Herzen University, St. Petersburg 191186 (Russian Federation)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

47

1ST. WORKSHOP ON ULTRA-RELATIVISTIC NUCLEAR COLLISIONS. MAY 21-24, 1979  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

developed in the nuclear context ve find the self-consi­of the nuclear fluid dynamical model which ve use later onI the sound ve­ which for groundst cice nuclear matter (p «

Wenzel, W.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Ramifications of the Nuclear Symmetry Energy for Neutron Stars, Nuclei, and Heavy-Ion Collisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The pervasive role of the nuclear symmetry energy in establishing some nuclear static and dynamical properties, and in governing some attributes of neutron star properties is highlighted.

Andrew W. Steiner; Bao-An Li; Madappa Prakash

2007-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

49

Ramifications of the Nuclear Symmetry Energy for Neutron Stars, Nuclei, and Heavy-Ion Collisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The pervasive role of the nuclear symmetry energy in establishing some nuclear static and dynamical properties, and in governing some attributes of neutron star properties is highlighted.

Steiner, Andrew W; Prakash, Madappa

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Nuclear Effects on Hadron Production in d+Au and p+p Collisions at sqrt(s_NN)=200 GeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PHENIX has measured the centrality dependence of mid-rapidity pion, kaon and proton transverse momentum distributions in d+Au and p+p collisions at sqrt(s_NN) = 200 GeV. The p+p data provide a reference for nuclear effects in d+Au and previously measured Au+Au collisions. Hadron production is enhanced in d+Au, relative to independent nucleon-nucleon scattering, as was observed in lower energy collisions. The nuclear modification factor for (anti) protons is larger than that for pions. The difference increases with centrality, but is not sufficient to account for the abundance of baryon production observed in central Au+Au collisions at RHIC. The centrality dependence in d+Au shows that the nuclear modification factor increases gradually with the number of collisions suffered by each participant nucleon. We also present comparisons with lower energy data as well as with parton recombination and other theoretical models of nuclear effects on particle production.

PHENIX Collaboration; S. S. Adler

2006-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

51

Particle number fluctuations in nuclear collisions within excluded volume hadron gas model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The multiplicity fluctuations are studied in the van der Waals excluded volume hadron-resonance gas model. The calculations are done in the grand canonical ensemble within the Boltzmann statistics approximation. The scaled variances for positive, negative and all charged hadrons are calculated along the chemical freeze-out line of nucleus-nucleus collisions at different collision energies. The multiplicity fluctuations are found to be suppressed in the van der Waals gas. The numerical calculations are presented for two values of hard-core hadron radius, $r=0.3$ fm and 0.5 fm, as well as for the upper limit of the excluded volume suppression effects.

M. I. Gorenstein; M. Hauer; D. O. Nikolajenko

2007-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

52

Nuclear astrophysics studies with ultra-peripheral heavy-ion collisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I describe in very simple terms the theoretical tools needed to investigate ultra-peripheral nuclear reactions for nuclear astrophysics purposes. For a more detailed account, see arXiv:0908.4307.

C. A. Bertulani

2009-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

53

--No Title--  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

g mole-1 Density 7.18 g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 257.0 eV Minimum ionization 1.456 MeV g-1cm2 10.46 MeV cm-1 Nuclear collision length 80.3 g cm-2 11.19 cm Nuclear...

54

Search for Chiral Magnetic Effects in High-Energy Nuclear Collisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present measurements of pion elliptic flow ($v_2$) in Au+Au collisions at $\\sNN =$ 200, 62.4, 39, 27 and 19.6 GeV, as a function of event-by-event charge asymmetry ($A_{\\pm}$), based on data from the STAR experiment at RHIC. We find that $\\pi^-$ ($\\pi^+$) elliptic flow linearly increases (decreases) with charge asymmetry for most centrality bins and for all the beam energies under study. The slope parameter ($r$) from $v_2(A_\\pm)$ difference between $\\pi^-$ and $\\pi^+$ shows a centrality dependency similar with the calculations with Chiral Magnetic Wave. The measurements of charge separation with respect to the reaction plane in search of Local Parity Violation and Chiral Magnetic Effect are also presented for Au+Au collisions at $\\sNN =$ 200, 62.4, 39, 27, 19.6, 11.5 and 7.7 GeV, and for U+U collisions at 193 GeV.

Gang Wang; for the STAR collaboration

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

55

A fully microscopical simulation of nuclear collisions by a new QMD model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nucleon-ion and ion-ion collisions at non relativistic bombarding energies can be described by means of Monte Carlo approaches, such as those based on the Quantum Molecular Dynamics (QMD) model. We have developed a QMD code, to simulate the fast stage of heavy-ion reactions, and we have coupled it to the de-excitation module available in the FLUKA Monte Carlo transport and interaction code. The results presented in this work span the projectile bombarding energy range within 200 - 600 MeV/A, allowing to investigate the capabilities and limits of our non-relativistic QMD approach.

M. V. Garzelli

2007-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

56

Probing the phases of QCD in ultra-relativistic nuclear collisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The status of RHIC theory and phenomenology is reviewed with an emphasis on the indications for the creation of a new deconfined state of matter. The critical role of high energy nuclear physics in the development of theoretical tools that address various aspects of the QCD many body dynamics is highlighted. The perspectives for studying nuclear matter under even more extreme conditions at the LHC and the overlap with high energy physics is discussed.

Ivan Vitev

2004-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

57

Neutron Flux Interpolation with Finite Element Method in the Nuclear Fuel Cell Calculation using Collision Probability Method  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear reactor design and analysis of next-generation reactors require a comprehensive computing which is better to be executed in a high performance computing. Flat flux (FF) approach is a common approach in solving an integral transport equation with collision probability (CP) method. In fact, the neutron flux distribution is not flat, even though the neutron cross section is assumed to be equal in all regions and the neutron source is uniform throughout the nuclear fuel cell. In non-flat flux (NFF) approach, the distribution of neutrons in each region will be different depending on the desired interpolation model selection. In this study, the linear interpolation using Finite Element Method (FEM) has been carried out to be treated the neutron distribution. The CP method is compatible to solve the neutron transport equation for cylindrical geometry, because the angle integration can be done analytically. Distribution of neutrons in each region of can be explained by the NFF approach with FEM and the calculation results are in a good agreement with the result from the SRAC code. In this study, the effects of the mesh on the k{sub eff} and other parameters are investigated.

Shafii, M. Ali [Departmen of Physics Bandung Institute of Technology, Jl. Ganesha 10, Bandung 40134 (Indonesia); Physics Department, Andalas University, Kampus Limau Manis, Padang, Sumatera Barat (Indonesia); Su'ud, Zaki; Waris, Abdul; Kurniasih, Neny [Departmen of Physics Bandung Institute of Technology, Jl. Ganesha 10, Bandung 40134 (Indonesia); Ariani, Menik [Physics Department, Sriwijaya University, Kampus Indralaya, Ogan Ilir, Sumatera Selatan (Indonesia); Departmen of Physics Bandung Institute of Technology, Jl. Ganesha 10, Bandung 40134 (Indonesia); Yulianti, Yanti [Physics Department, Lampung University, Jl.Sumantri Brojonegoro no 1, Lampung (Indonesia); Departmen of Physics Bandung Institute of Technology, Jl. Ganesha 10, Bandung 40134 (Indonesia)

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

58

Nuclear modification factors of phi mesons in d+Au, Cu+Cu and Au+Au collisions at sqrt(S_NN)=200 GeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The PHENIX experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) has performed systematic measurements of phi meson production in the K+K- decay channel at midrapidity in p+p, d+Au, Cu+Cu and Au+Au collisions at sqrt(S_NN)=200 GeV. Results are presented on the phi invariant yield and the nuclear modification factor R_AA for Au+Au and Cu+Cu, and R_dA for d+Au collisions, studied as a function of transverse momentum (1phi exhibits a suppression relative to expectations from binary scaled p+p results. The amount of suppression is smaller than that of the neutral pion and the eta meson in the intermediate p_T range (2--5 GeV/c); whereas at higher p_T the phi, pi^0, and eta show similar suppression. The baryon (protons and anti-protons) excess observed in central Au+Au collisions at intermediate p_T is not observed for the phi meson despite the similar mass of the proton and the phi. This suggests that the excess is linked to the number of constituent quarks rather than the hadron mass. The difference gradually disappears with decreasing centrality and for peripheral collisions the R_AA values for both particles are consistent with binary scaling. Cu+Cu collisions show the same yield and suppression as Au+Au collisions for the same number of N_part. The R_dA of phi shows no evidence for cold nuclear effects within uncertainties.

PHENIX Collaboration; A. Adare; S. Afanasiev; C. Aidala; N. N. Ajitanand; Y. Akiba; H. Al-Bataineh; J. Alexander; A. Al-Jamel; A. Angerami; K. Aoki; L. Aphecetche; Y. Aramaki; R. Armendariz; S. H. Aronson; J. Asai; E. T. Atomssa; R. Averbeck; T. C. Awes; B. Azmoun; V. Babintsev; M. Bai; G. Baksay; L. Baksay; A. Baldisseri; K. N. Barish; P. D. Barnes; B. Bassalleck; A. T. Basye; S. Bathe; S. Batsouli; V. Baublis; F. Bauer; C. Baumann; A. Bazilevsky; S. Belikov; R. Belmont; R. Bennett; A. Berdnikov; Y. Berdnikov; J. H. Bhom; A. A. Bickley; M. T. Bjorndal; D. S. Blau; J. G. Boissevain; J. S. Bok; H. Borel; N. Borggren; K. Boyle; M. L. Brooks; D. S. Brown; D. Bucher; H. Buesching; V. Bumazhnov; G. Bunce; J. M. Burward-Hoy; S. Butsyk; S. Campbell; A. Caringi; N. Cassano; J. -S. Chai; B. S. Chang; J. -L. Charvet; C. -H. Chen; S. Chernichenko; J. Chiba; C. Y. Chi; M. Chiu; I. J. Choi; J. B. Choi; R. K. Choudhury; P. Christiansen; T. Chujo; P. Chung; A. Churyn; O. Chvala; V. Cianciolo; Z. Citron; C. R. Cleven; Y. Cobigo; B. A. Cole; M. P. Comets; Z. Conesa del Valle; M. Connors; P. Constantin; M. Csanad; T. Csorgo; T. Dahms; S. Dairaku; I. Danchev; K. Das; A. Datta; G. David; M. K. Dayananda; M. B. Deaton; K. Dehmelt; H. Delagrange; A. Denisov; D. d'Enterria; A. Deshpande; E. J. Desmond; K. V. Dharmawardane; O. Dietzsch; A. Dion; M. Donadelli; L. D Orazio; J. L. Drachenberg; O. Drapier; A. Drees; K. A. Drees; A. K. Dubey; J. M. Durham; A. Durum; D. Dutta; V. Dzhordzhadze; S. Edwards; Y. V. Efremenko; J. Egdemir; F. Ellinghaus; W. S. Emam; T. Engelmore; A. Enokizono; H. En'yo; B. Espagnon; S. Esumi; K. O. Eyser; B. Fadem; D. E. Fields; M. Finger Jr.; M. Finger; F. Fleuret; S. L. Fokin; B. Forestier; Z. Fraenkel; J. E. Frantz; A. Franz; A. D. Frawley; K. Fujiwara; Y. Fukao; S. -Y. Fung; T. Fusayasu; S. Gadrat; I. Garishvili; F. Gastineau; M. Germain; A. Glenn; H. Gong; M. Gonin; J. Gosset; Y. Goto; R. Granier de Cassagnac; N. Grau; S. V. Greene; G. Grim; M. Grosse Perdekamp; T. Gunji; H. -A. Gustafsson; T. Hachiya; A. Hadj Henni; C. Haegemann; J. S. Haggerty; M. N. Hagiwara; K. I. Hahn; H. Hamagaki; J. Hamblen; J. Hanks; R. Han; H. Harada; E. P. Hartouni; K. Haruna; M. Harvey; E. Haslum; K. Hasuko; R. Hayano; M. Heffner; T. K. Hemmick; T. Hester; J. M. Heuser; X. He; H. Hiejima; J. C. Hill; R. Hobbs; M. Hohlmann; M. Holmes; W. Holzmann; K. Homma; B. Hong; T. Horaguchi; D. Hornback; S. Huang; M. G. Hur; T. Ichihara; R. Ichimiya; H. Iinuma; Y. Ikeda; K. Imai; M. Inaba; Y. Inoue; D. Isenhower; L. Isenhower; M. Ishihara; T. Isobe; M. Issah; A. Isupov; D. Ivanischev; Y. Iwanaga; B. V. Jacak; J. Jia; X. Jiang; J. Jin; O. Jinnouchi; B. M. Johnson; T. Jones; K. S. Joo; D. Jouan; D. S. Jumper; F. Kajihara; S. Kametani; N. Kamihara; J. Kamin; M. Kaneta; J. H. Kang; H. Kanou; J. Kapustinsky; K. Karatsu; M. Kasai; T. Kawagishi; D. Kawall; M. Kawashima; A. V. Kazantsev; S. Kelly; T. Kempel; A. Khanzadeev; K. M. Kijima; J. Kikuchi; A. Kim; B. I. Kim; D. H. Kim; D. J. Kim; E. J. Kim; E. Kim; Y. -J. Kim; Y. -S. Kim; E. Kinney; A. Kiss; E. Kistenev; A. Kiyomichi; J. Klay; C. Klein-Boesing; L. Kochenda; V. Kochetkov; B. Komkov; M. Konno; J. Koster; D. Kotchetkov; D. Kotov; A. Kozlov; A. Kral; A. Kravitz; P. J. Kroon; J. Kubart; G. J. Kunde; N. Kurihara; K. Kurita; M. Kurosawa; M. J. Kweon; Y. Kwon; G. S. Kyle; R. Lacey; Y. S. Lai; J. G. Lajoie; A. Lebedev; Y. Le Bornec; S. Leckey; D. M. Lee; J. Lee; K. B. Lee; K. S. Lee; M. K. Lee; T. Lee; M. J. Leitch; M. A. L. Leite; B. Lenzi; P. Lichtenwalner; P. Liebing; H. Lim; L. A. Linden Levy; T. Liska; A. Litvinenko; H. Liu; M. X. Liu; X. Li; X. H. Li; B. Love; D. Lynch; C. F. Maguire; Y. I. Makdisi; A. Malakhov; M. D. Malik; V. I. Manko; E. Mannel; Y. Mao; L. Masek; H. Masui; F. Matathias; M. C. McCain; M. McCumber; P. L. McGaughey; N. Means; B. Meredith; Y. Miake; T. Mibe; A. C. Mignerey; P. Mikes; K. Miki; T. E. Miller; A. Milov; S. Mioduszewski; G. C. Mishra; M. Mishra; J. T. Mitchell; M. Mitrovski; A. K. Mohanty; H. J. Moon; Y. Morino; A. Morreale; D. P. Morrison; J. M. Moss; T. V. Moukhanova; D. Mukhopadhyay; T. Murakami; J. Murata; S. Nagamiya; Y. Nagata; J. L. Nagle; M. Naglis; M. I. Nagy; I. Nakagawa; Y. Nakamiya; K. R. Nakamura; T. Nakamura; K. Nakano; S. Nam; J. Newby; M. Nguyen; M. Nihashi; B. E. Norman; R. Nouicer; A. S. Nyanin; J. Nystrand; C. Oakley; E. O'Brien; S. X. Oda; C. A. Ogilvie; H. Ohnishi; I. D. Ojha; K. Okada; M. Oka; O. O. Omiwade; Y. Onuki; A. Oskarsson; I. Otterlund; M. Ouchida; K. Ozawa; R. Pak; D. Pal; A. P. T. Palounek; V. Pantuev; V. Papavassiliou; I. H. Park; J. Park; S. K. Park; W. J. Park; S. F. Pate; H. Pei; J. -C. Peng; H. Pereira; V. Peresedov; D. Yu. Peressounko; R. Petti; C. Pinkenburg; R. P. Pisani; M. Proissl; M. L. Purschke; A. K. Purwar; H. Qu; J. Rak; A. Rakotozafindrabe; I. Ravinovich; K. F. Read; S. Rembeczki; M. Reuter

2010-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

59

NUCLEAR SCIENCE ANNUAL REPORT 1977-1978  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Relation Between Nuclear Dynamics and the RenormalizationMultiplicity Distributions in Nuclear Collision M. GyulassyHigh Energy Nuclear Collisions in the Resonance Dominated

Schroeder, L.S.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

--No Title--  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mix D wax Quantity Value Units Value Units 0.56479 Density 0.990 g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 60.9 eV Minimum ionization 2.048 MeV g-1cm2 2.027 MeV cm-1 Nuclear collision...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "g-1cm2 nuclear collision" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

--No Title--  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Benzene C6H6 Quantity Value Units Value Units 0.53769 Density 0.879 g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 63.4 eV Minimum ionization 1.951 MeV g-1cm2 1.715 MeV cm-1 Nuclear collision...

62

--No Title--  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MgCO3 Quantity Value Units Value Units 0.49814 Density 2.96 g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 118.0 eV Minimum ionization 1.704 MeV g-1cm2 5.040 MeV cm-1 Nuclear collision length...

63

--No Title--  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MgB4O7 Quantity Value Units Value Units 0.49014 Density 2.53 g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 108.3 eV Minimum ionization 1.692 MeV g-1cm2 4.282 MeV cm-1 Nuclear collision...

64

--No Title--  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CaO) Quantity Value Units Value Units 0.49929 Density 3.30 g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 176.1 eV Minimum ionization 1.650 MeV g-1cm2 5.445 MeV cm-1 Nuclear collision length...

65

--No Title--  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CdWO4) Quantity Value Units Value Units 0.42747 Density 7.90 g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 468.3 eV Minimum ionization 1.280 MeV g-1cm2 10.12 MeV cm-1 Nuclear collision...

66

--No Title--  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Quantity Value Units Value Units 0.48585 Density 1.48 g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 156.0 eV Minimum ionization 1.645 MeV g-1cm2 2.440 MeV cm-1 Nuclear collision length 71.6...

67

--No Title--  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

B2O3) Quantity Value Units Value Units 0.49839 Density 1.81 g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 99.6 eV Minimum ionization 1.742 MeV g-1cm2 3.157 MeV cm-1 Nuclear collision length...

68

--No Title--  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BaSO4 Quantity Value Units Value Units 0.44561 Density 4.50 g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 285.7 eV Minimum ionization 1.406 MeV g-1cm2 6.329 MeV cm-1 Nuclear collision length...

69

--No Title--  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CaWO4) Quantity Value Units Value Units 0.43761 Density 6.06 g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 395.0 eV Minimum ionization 1.336 MeV g-1cm2 8.101 MeV cm-1 Nuclear collision...

70

--No Title--  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Li2O Quantity Value Units Value Units 0.46952 Density 2.01 g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 73.6 eV Minimum ionization 1.669 MeV g-1cm2 3.361 MeV cm-1 Nuclear collision length...

71

--No Title--  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CaCO3) Quantity Value Units Value Units 0.49955 Density 2.80 g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 136.4 eV Minimum ionization 1.686 MeV g-1cm2 4.721 MeV cm-1 Nuclear collision...

72

--No Title--  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

glass Quantity Value Units Value Units 0.42101 Density 6.22 g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 526.4 eV Minimum ionization 1.255 MeV g-1cm2 7.808 MeV cm-1 Nuclear collision length...

73

--No Title--  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CsF) Quantity Value Units Value Units 0.42132 Density 4.11 g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 440.7 eV Minimum ionization 1.286 MeV g-1cm2 5.292 MeV cm-1 Nuclear collision length...

74

--No Title--  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Li2B4O7 Quantity Value Units Value Units 0.48487 Density 2.44 g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 94.6 eV Minimum ionization 1.688 MeV g-1cm2 4.119 MeV cm-1 Nuclear collision...

75

--No Title--  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MgO Quantity Value Units Value Units 0.49622 Density 3.58 g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 143.8 eV Minimum ionization 1.674 MeV g-1cm2 5.991 MeV cm-1 Nuclear collision length...

76

--No Title--  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(CaSO4) Quantity Value Units Value Units 0.49950 Density 2.96 g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 152.3 eV Minimum ionization 1.673 MeV g-1cm2 4.952 MeV cm-1 Nuclear collision...

77

--No Title--  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PbO) Quantity Value Units Value Units 0.40323 Density 9.53 g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 766.7 eV Minimum ionization 1.155 MeV g-1cm2 11.01 MeV cm-1 Nuclear collision length...

78

--No Title--  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

La2O2S Quantity Value Units Value Units 0.42706 Density 5.86 g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 421.2 eV Minimum ionization 1.301 MeV g-1cm2 7.624 MeV cm-1 Nuclear collision...

79

--No Title--  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(C10H16O) Quantity Value Units Value Units 0.55179 Density 1.10 g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 63.2 eV Minimum ionization 1.993 MeV g-1cm2 2.192 MeV cm-1 Nuclear collision...

80

--No Title--  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CaF2) Quantity Value Units Value Units 0.49670 Density 3.18 g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 166.0 eV Minimum ionization 1.655 MeV g-1cm2 5.263 MeV cm-1 Nuclear collision length...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "g-1cm2 nuclear collision" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

--No Title--  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(CH3OH) Quantity Value Units Value Units 0.56176 Density 0.791 g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 67.6 eV Minimum ionization 2.038 MeV g-1cm2 1.613 MeV cm-1 Nuclear collision...

82

--No Title--  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LiI) Quantity Value Units Value Units 0.41939 Density 3.49 g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 485.1 eV Minimum ionization 1.272 MeV g-1cm2 4.445 MeV cm-1 Nuclear collision length...

83

--No Title--  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

sucrose Quantity Value Units Value Units 0.54828 Density 1.11 g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 74.3 eV Minimum ionization 1.964 MeV g-1cm2 2.180 MeV cm-1 Nuclear collision...

84

--No Title--  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FeO) Quantity Value Units Value Units 0.47323 Density 5.70 g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 248.6 eV Minimum ionization 1.503 MeV g-1cm2 8.567 MeV cm-1 Nuclear collision length...

85

--No Title--  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MgF2 Quantity Value Units Value Units 0.48153 Density 3.00 g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 134.3 eV Minimum ionization 1.640 MeV g-1cm2 4.920 MeV cm-1 Nuclear collision length...

86

--No Title--  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BeO) Quantity Value Units Value Units 0.47979 Density 3.01 g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 93.2 eV Minimum ionization 1.665 MeV g-1cm2 5.012 MeV cm-1 Nuclear collision length...

87

--No Title--  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(CH3CHCH3) Quantity Value Units Value Units 0.55097 Density 0.790 g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 64.2 eV Minimum ionization 2.003 MeV g-1cm2 1.582 MeV cm-1 Nuclear collision...

88

Coupled-channels density-matrix approach to low-energy nuclear collision dynamics: A technique for quantifying quantum decoherence effects on reaction observables  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The coupled-channels density-matrix technique for nuclear reaction dynamics, which is based on the Liouville-von Neumann equation with Lindblad dissipative terms, is developed with the inclusion of full angular momentum couplings. It allows a quantitative study of the role and importance of quantum decoherence in nuclear scattering. Formulae of asymptotic observables that can reveal effects of quantum decoherence are given. A method for extracting energy-resolved scattering information from the time-dependent density matrix is introduced. As an example, model calculations are carried out for the low-energy collision of the $^{16}$O projectile on the $^{154}$Sm target.

Alexis Diaz-Torres

2010-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

89

WORKSHOP ON NUCLEAR DYNAMICS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Complete Events in Medium-Energy Nuclear Collisions" C-Y.+ corrections. (A) The nuclear potential-energy problem isquantum dynamics in high-energy nuclear collisions. We have

Myers, W.D.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

"Cosmic Collisions" Planetarium Show  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the Universe, from the very small (nuclear fusion processes powering our Sun) to the very large (galaxies), all of the Moon · Collisions between hydrogen atoms in solar interior, resulting in nuclear fusion · Charged particles in the Solar Wind creating an aurora display when they hit Earth's atmosphere · The very large

Mathis, Wayne N.

91

J$?$ nuclear modification factor at mid-rapidity in Pb-Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=$2.76 TeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report on the J$\\psi$ nuclear modification factor $R_{\\rm AA}$ at mid-rapidity ($|y|<0.9$) in Pb-Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=$2.76 TeV measured by ALICE. J$\\psi$ candidates are reconstructed using their $e^+e^-$ decay channel. The kinematical coverage extends to zero transverse momentum allowing the measurement of integrated cross sections. We show the centrality dependence of the J$\\psi$ $R_{\\rm AA}$ at mid-rapidity compared to the results from PHENIX at mid-rapidity and ALICE results at forward-rapidity. We also discuss comparisons to calculations from theoretical models.

Ionut-Cristian Arsene; for the ALICE Collaboration

2012-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

92

Nuclear modification factors of phi mesons in d+Au, Cu+Cu and Au+Au collisions at sqrt(S_NN)=200 GeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The PHENIX experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) has performed systematic measurements of phi meson production in the K+K- decay channel at midrapidity in p+p, d+Au, Cu+Cu and Au+Au collisions at sqrt(S_NN)=200 GeV. Results are presented on the phi invariant yield and the nuclear modification factor R_AA for Au+Au and Cu+Cu, and R_dA for d+Au collisions, studied as a function of transverse momentum (1phi exhibits a suppression relative to expectations from binary scaled p+p results. The amount of suppression is smaller than that of the neutral pion and the eta meson in the intermediate p_T range (2--5 GeV/c); whereas at higher p_T the phi, pi^0, and eta show similar suppression. The baryon (protons and anti-protons) excess observed in central Au+Au collisions at intermediate p_T is not observed for the phi meson despite the similar mass of the proton and the phi. This suggests that the excess is lin...

Adare, A; Aidala, C; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Al-Bataineh, H; Alexander, J; Al-Jamel, A; Angerami, A; Aoki, K; Aphecetche, L; Aramaki, Y; Armendariz, R; Aronson, S H; Asai, J; Atomssa, E T; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmoun, B; Babintsev, V; Bai, M; Baksay, G; Baksay, L; Baldisseri, A; Barish, K N; Barnes, P D; Bassalleck, B; Basye, A T; Bathe, S; Batsouli, S; Baublis, V; Bauer, F; Baumann, C; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Belmont, R; Bennett, R; Berdnikov, A; Berdnikov, Y; Bhom, J H; Bickley, A A; Bjorndal, M T; Blau, D S; Boissevain, J G; Bok, J S; Borel, H; Borggren, N; Boyle, K; Brooks, M L; Brown, D S; Bucher, D; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Burward-Hoy, J M; Butsyk, S; Campbell, S; Caringi, A; Cassano, N; Chai, J -S; Chang, B S; Charvet, J -L; Chen, C -H; Chernichenko, S; Chiba, J; Chi, C Y; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Choi, J B; Choudhury, R K; Christiansen, P; Chujo, T; Chung, P; Churyn, A; Chvala, O; Cianciolo, V; Citron, Z; Cleven, C R; Cobigo, Y; Cole, B A; Comets, M P; del Valle, Z Conesa; Connors, M; Constantin, P; Csanad, M; Csorgo, T; Dahms, T; Dairaku, S; Danchev, I; Das, K; Datta, A; David, G; Dayananda, M K; Deaton, M B; Dehmelt, K; Delagrange, H; Denisov, A; d'Enterria, D; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Dharmawardane, K V; Dietzsch, O; Dion, A; Donadelli, M; Orazio, L D; Drachenberg, J L; Drapier, O; Drees, A; Drees, K A; Dubey, A K; Durham, J M; Durum, A; Dutta, D; Dzhordzhadze, V; Edwards, S; Efremenko, Y V; Egdemir, J; Ellinghaus, F; Emam, W S; Engelmore, T; Enokizono, A; En'yo, H; Espagnon, B; Esumi, S; Eyser, K O; Fadem, B; Fields, D E; Finger, M; Finger, M; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Forestier, B; Fraenkel, Z; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fujiwara, K; Fukao, Y; Fung, S -Y; Fusayasu, T; Gadrat, S; Garishvili, I; Gastineau, F; Germain, M; Glenn, A; Gong, H; Gonin, M; Gosset, J; Goto, Y; de Cassagnac, R Granier; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Grim, G; Perdekamp, M Grosse; Gunji, T; Gustafsson, H -A; Hachiya, T; Henni, A Hadj; Haegemann, C; Haggerty, J S; Hagiwara, M N; Hahn, K I; Hamagaki, H; Hamblen, J; Hanks, J; Han, R; Harada, H; Hartouni, E P; Haruna, K; Harvey, M; Haslum, E; Hasuko, K; Hayano, R; Heffner, M; Hemmick, T K; Hester, T; Heuser, J M; He, X; Hiejima, H; Hill, J C; Hobbs, R; Hohlmann, M; Holmes, M; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Horaguchi, T; Hornback, D; Huang, S; Hur, M G; Ichihara, T; Ichimiya, R; Iinuma, H; Ikeda, Y; Imai, K; Inaba, M; Inoue, Y; Isenhower, D; Isenhower, L; Ishihara, M; Isobe, T; Issah, M; Isupov, A; Ivanischev, D; Iwanaga, Y; Jacak, B V; Jia, J; Jiang, X; Jin, J; Jinnouchi, O; Johnson, B M; Jones, T; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Jumper, D S; Kajihara, F; Kametani, S; Kamihara, N; Kamin, J; Kaneta, M; Kang, J H; Kanou, H; Kapustinsky, J; Karatsu, K; Kasai, M; Kawagishi, T; Kawall, D; Kawashima, M; Kazantsev, A V; Kelly, S; Kempel, T; Khanzadeev, A; Kijima, K M; Kikuchi, J; Kim, A; Kim, B I; Kim, D H; Kim, D J; Kim, E J; Kim, E; Kim, Y -J; Kim, Y -S; Kinney, E; Kiss, A; Kistenev, E; Kiyomichi, A; Klay, J; Klein-Boesing, C; Kochenda, L; Kochetkov, V; Komkov, B; Konno, M; Koster, J; Kotchetkov, D; Kotov, D; Kozlov, A; Kral, A; Kravitz, A; Kroon, P J; Kubart, J; Kunde, G J; Kurihara, N; Kurita, K; Kurosawa, M; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Lai, Y S; Lajoie, J G; Lebedev, A; Le Bornec, Y; Leckey, S; Lee, D M; Lee, J; Lee, K B; Lee, K S; Lee, M K; Lee, T; Leitch, M J; Leite, M A L; Lenzi, B; Lichtenwalner, P; Liebing, P; Lim, H; Levy, L A Linden; Liska, T; Litvinenko, A; Liu, H; Liu, M X; Li, X; Li, X H; Love, B; Lynch, D; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Malakhov, A; Malik, M D; Manko, V I; Mannel, E; Mao, Y; Masek, L; Masui, H; Matathias, F; McCain, M C; McCumber, M; McGaughey, P L; Means, N; Meredith, B; Miake, Y; Mibe, T; Mignerey, A C; Mikes, P; Miki, K; Miller, T E; Milov, A; Mioduszewski, S; Mishra, G C; Mishra, M; Mitchell, J T; Mitrovski, M; Mohanty, A K; Moon, H J; Morino, Y; Morreale, A; Morrison, D P; Moss, J M; Moukhanova, T V; Mukhopadhyay, D; Murakami, T; Murata, J; Nagamiya, S; Nagata, Y; Nagle, J L; Naglis, M; Nagy, M I; Nakagawa, I; Nakamiya, Y; Nakamura, K R; Nakamura, T; Nakano, K; Nam, S; Newby, J; Nguyen, M; Nihashi, M; Norman, B E; Nouicer, R; Nyanin, A S; Nystrand, J; Oakley, C; O'Brien, E; Oda, S X; Ogilvie, C A; Ohnishi, H; Ojha, I D; Okada, K; Oka, M; Omiwade, O O; Onuki, Y; Oskarsson, A; Otterlund, I; Ouchida, M; Ozawa, K; Pak, R; Pal, D; Palounek, A P T; Pantuev, V; Papavassiliou, V; Park, I H; Park, J; Park, S K; Park, W J; Pate, S F; Pei, H; Peng, J -C; Pereira, H; Peresedov, V; Peressounko, D Yu; Petti, R; Pinkenburg, C; Pisani, R P; Proissl, M; Purschke, M L; Purwar, A K; Qu, H; Rak, J; Rakotozafindrabe, A; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Rembeczki, S; Reuter, M; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Richardson, E; Roach, D; Roche, G; Rolnick, S D; Romana, A; Rosati, M; Rosen, C A; Rosendahl, S S E; Rosnet, P; Rukoyatkin, P; Ruzicka, P; Rykov, V L

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Effects of momentum-dependent nuclear potential on two-nucleon correlation functions and light cluster production in intermediate energy heavy-ion collisions RID A-2398-2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using an isospin- and momentum-dependent transport model, we study the effects due to the momentum dependence of isoscalar nuclear potential as well as that of symmetry potential on two-nucleon correlation functions and light cluster production in intermediate energy heavy-ion collisions induced by neutron-rich nuclei. It is found that both observables are affected significantly by the momentum dependence of nuclear potential, leading to a reduction of their sensitivity to the stiffness of nuclear symmetry energy. However, the t/He-3 ratio remains a sensitive probe of the density dependence of nuclear symmetry energy.

Chen, LW; Ko, Che Ming; Li, Ba.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Strangeness production from pp collisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The study of the strangeness production from pp collisions plays important roles in two aspects: exploring the properties of baryon resonances involved and understanding the strangeness production from heavy ion collisions to explore the properties of high energy and high density nuclear matter. Here we review our recent studies on several most important channels for the strangeness production from pp collisions. The previously ignored contributions from Delta*(1620) and N*(1535) resonances are found to play dominant role for the pp --> n K+ Sigma+, pp --> pK+ Lambda and pp --> pp phi reactions near-thresholds. These contributions should be included for further studies on the strangeness production from both pp collisions and heavy ion collisions.

Zou, Bing-Song

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Strangeness production from pp collisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The study of the strangeness production from pp collisions plays important roles in two aspects: exploring the properties of baryon resonances involved and understanding the strangeness production from heavy ion collisions to explore the properties of high energy and high density nuclear matter. Here we review our recent studies on several most important channels for the strangeness production from pp collisions. The previously ignored contributions from Delta*(1620) and N*(1535) resonances are found to play dominant role for the pp --> n K+ Sigma+, pp --> pK+ Lambda and pp --> pp phi reactions near-thresholds. These contributions should be included for further studies on the strangeness production from both pp collisions and heavy ion collisions.

Bing-Song Zou; Ju-Jun Xie

2009-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

96

Nuclear modification factor of nonphotonic electrons in heavy-ion collisions, and the heavy-flavor baryon-to-meson ratio  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The nuclear modification factor R(AA) of nonphotonic electrons in Au + Au collisions at root(S)NN = 200 GeV is studied by considering the decays of heavy-flavor hadrons produced in a quark coalescence model. Although an enhanced Lambda(c)/D(0) ratio is predicted by the coalescence model, it is peaked at small transverse momenta (similar to 2 GeV) due to the large difference between heavy and light quark masses. As a result, the enhanced Lambda(c)/D(0) ratio, which is expected to suppress the electron R(AA) as the branching ratio of Lambda(c) decay into electrons is smaller than that of D(0), does not lead to additional suppression of the electron R(AA) at large transverse momenta (>= 5 GeV), where the suppression is mainly due to heavy quark energy loss in produced quark-gluon plasma. Also, the enhanced Lambda(b)/(B) over bar (0) ratio predicted by the coalescence model has even smaller effect on the nonphotonic electron R(AA) as bottom baryons and mesons have similar branching ratios for semileptonic decays into electrons.

Oh, Yongseok; Ko, Che Ming.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Photon measurements in forward rapidity in heavy-ion collisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Contribution of a preshower photon multiplicity detector to the physics of ultra-relativistic nuclear collisions is reviewed and future possibilities at RHIC and LHC are discussed

Yogendra Pathak Viyogi

2005-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

98

Nuclear Shadowing and Diffraction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The relation between diffraction in lepton-proton collisions and shadowing of nuclear structure functions which arises from Gribov inelastic shadowing, is described. A model realizing such relation, which produces a parameter-free description of experimental data on nuclear structure functions at small $x$, is presented. The application to the description of multiplicities in nuclear collisions is discussed and related to other approaches.

J. L. Albacete; N. Armesto; A. Capella; A. B. Kaidalov; C. A. Salgado

2004-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

99

Nuclear Science Division Annual Report 1984-85  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

3. Nuclear Collisions at Relativistic Energies The theory6 Nuclear Theory 1. Hadronic and Quark Matter at High Energytheory group to calculate whether such energy densities could be generated in nuclear collisions at ultra-relativistic energies.

Mahoney Editor, Jeannette

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

NUCLEAR CHEMISTRY DIV. ANNUAL REPORT 1980-81  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Correlations in High-Energy Nuclear Colli­ sions, LBL-11418,Effects in High-Energy Nuclear Collisions: Implications onLarge Angles in High-Energy Nuclear Collisions, LBL-12123,

Cerny, J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "g-1cm2 nuclear collision" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Nuclear Science Division Annual Report 1984-85  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

M. Xcssi. and W. Wolf. Nuclear-Reaction-Time Studies of U +K° Produced in Relativistic Nuclear Collisions Phys. Lett.Momentum Distributions of Nuclear Fragments in im Collisions

Mahoney Editor, Jeannette

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

NUCLEAR CHEMISTRY DIV. ANNUAL REPORT 1980-81  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Polarization Phenomena in Nuclear Physics-1980, AIP Conf.Barrett and D.F. Jackson, Nuclear Sizes and Structure, (K Production in Relativistic Nuclear Collisions A. Shor, K.

Cerny, J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Complex problems arising in the collision probability theory for neutron transport.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Several comprehensive but time consuming neutronic codes are available for performing nuclear reactor and fuel cycle evaluations. In addition, simple models utilizing collision probability theory… (more)

Matavosian, Robert

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Some Intensive and Extensive Quantities in High-Energy Collisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We review the evolution of some statistical and thermodynamical quantities measured in difference sizes of high-energy collisions at different energies. We differentiate between intensive and extensive quantities and discuss the importance of their distinguishability in characterizing possible critical phenomena of nuclear collisions at various energies with different initial conditions.

Tawfik, A

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

plot_nuclear.eps  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

I , Pb T , Pb I , Fe T , Fe I , C T , C p lab (GeVc) (gcm 2 ) Nuclear interaction and collision lengths for Pb, Fe, and C (Incident p and n cases...

106

NUCLEAR SCIENCE DIVISION ANNUAL REPORT 1979-1980  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

high energy nuclear collisions. Application of HFB theory totheory that accounts for the known bulk properties of nuclear matter, i t s saturation energyenergy options. Sane neutron star physics involving nuclear theory.

Cerny, J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Shock Wave Collisions and Thermalization in AdS_5  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study heavy ion collisions at strong 't Hooft coupling using AdS/CFT correspondence. According to the AdS/CFT dictionary heavy ion collisions correspond to gravitational shock wave collisions in AdS_5. We construct the metric in the forward light cone after the collision perturbatively through expansion of Einstein equations in graviton exchanges. We obtain an analytic expression for the metric including all-order graviton exchanges with one shock wave, while keeping the exchanges with another shock wave at the lowest order. We read off the corresponding energy-momentum tensor of the produced medium. Unfortunately this energy-momentum tensor does not correspond to ideal hydrodynamics, indicating that higher order graviton exchanges are needed to construct the full solution of the problem. We also show that shock waves must completely stop almost immediately after the collision in AdS_5, which, on the field theory side, corresponds to complete nuclear stopping due to strong coupling effects, likely leading to Landau hydrodynamics. Finally, we perform trapped surface analysis of the shock wave collisions demonstrating that a bulk black hole, corresponding to ideal hydrodynamics on the boundary, has to be created in such collisions, thus constructing a proof of thermalization in heavy ion collisions at strong coupling.

Yuri V. Kovchegov

2010-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

108

Microscope collision protection apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A microscope collision protection apparatus for a remote control microscope which protects the optical and associated components from damage in the event of an uncontrolled collision with a specimen, regardless of the specimen size or shape. In a preferred embodiment, the apparatus includes a counterbalanced slide for mounting the microscope's optical components. This slide replaces the rigid mounts on conventional upright microscopes with a precision ball bearing slide. As the specimen contacts an optical component, the contacting force will move the slide and the optical components mounted thereon. This movement will protect the optical and associated components from damage as the movement causes a limit switch to be actuated, thereby stopping all motors responsible for the collision.

DeNure, Charles R. (Pocatello, ID)

2001-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

109

Collision detection and proximity queries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This course will primarily cover widely accepted and proved methodologies in collision detection. In addition more advanced or recent topics such as continuous collision detection, ADFs, and using graphics hardware will be introduced. When appropriate ...

Sunil Hadap; Dave Eberle; Pascal Volino; Ming C. Lin; Stephane Redon; Christer Ericson

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Photon-photon collisions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highlights of the VIIIth International Workshop on Photon-Photon Collisions are reviewed. New experimental and theoretical results were reported in virtually every area of ..gamma gamma.. physics, particularly in exotic resonance production and tests of quantum chromodynamics where asymptotic freedom and factorization theorems provide predictions for both inclusive and exclusive ..gamma gamma.. reactions at high momentum transfer. 73 refs., 12 figs.

Brodsky, S.J.

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Radiological consequences of ship collisions that might occur in U.S. Ports during the shipment of foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel to the United States in break-bulk freighters  

SciTech Connect

Accident source terms, source term probabilities, consequences, and risks are developed for ship collisions that might occur in U.S. ports during the shipment of spent fuel from foreign research reactors to the United States in break-bulk freighters.

Sprung, J.L.; Bespalko, S.J.; Massey, C.D.; Yoshimura, R. [Sandia National Laboratory, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Johnson, J.D. [GRAM Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Reardon, P.C. [PCRT Technologies, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ebert, M.W.; Gallagher D.W. [Science Applications International Corp., Reston, VA (United States)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Nuclear Reactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear reactions generate energy in nuclear reactors, in stars, and are responsible for the existence of all elements heavier than hydrogen in the universe. Nuclear reactions denote reactions between nuclei, and between nuclei and other fundamental particles, such as electrons and photons. A short description of the conservation laws and the definition of basic physical quantities is presented, followed by a more detailed account of specific cases: (a) formation and decay of compound nuclei; (b)direct reactions; (c) photon and electron scattering; (d) heavy ion collisions; (e) formation of a quark-gluon plasma; (f) thermonuclear reactions; (g) and reactions with radioactive beams. Whenever necessary, basic equations are introduced to help understand general properties of these reactions. Published in Wiley Encyclopedia of Physics, ISBN-13: 978-3-527-40691-3 - Wiley-VCH, Berlin, 2009.

C. A. Bertulani

2009-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

113

Nuclear Science Division: 1993 Annual report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the activities of the Nuclear Science Division for the 1993 calendar year. This was another significant year in the history of the Division with many interesting and important accomplishments. Activities for the following programs are covered here: (1) nuclear structure and reactions program; (2) the Institute for Nuclear and Particle Astrophysics; (3) relativistic nuclear collisions program; (4) nuclear theory program; (5) nuclear data evaluation program, isotope project; and (6) 88-inch cyclotron operations.

Myers, W.D. [ed.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Resonant electron-CF collision processes  

SciTech Connect

Electronic structure methods are combined with variationalfixed-nuclei electron scattering calculations and nuclear dynamicsstudies to characterize resonant vibrational excitation and electronattachment processes in collisions between low-energy electrons and CFradicals. Several low-lying negative ion states are found which give riseto strong vibrational excitation and which are expected to dominate thelow-energy electron scattering cross sections. We have also studiedseveral processes which could lead to production of negative ions (F- andC-), However, in contrast to other recent predictions, we do not find CFin itsground state to be a significant source of negative ion productionwhen interacting with thermal electrons.

Trevisan, Cynthia S.; Orel, Ann E.; Rescigno, Thomas N.

2005-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

115

NUCLEAR CHEMISTRY DIV. ANNUAL REPORT 1980-81  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

existing dynamical theories for intermediate- energy nuclearhigh-energy nuclear collisions is a major part of the theoryEnergy-Dependent Single Nucleón Potential in a Relativistic Field Theory of Nuclear

Cerny, J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Heavy-ion Collisions: Direct and indirect probes of the density and temperature dependence of Esym  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Heavy-ion collisions provide a versatile terrestrial probe of the nuclear equation of state through the formation of nuclear matter at a wide variety of temperatures, densities, and pressures. Direct and indirect approaches for constraining the density dependence of the symmetry energy using heavy-ion collisions have been developed. The direct approach relies on scaling methods which attempt to connect isotopic fragment distributions to the symmetry energy. Using the indirect approach constraints on the equation of state are extracted from comparison of experimental results and theoretical transport calculations which utilize effective nucleon-nucleon interactions. Besides exploring the density dependence of the equation of state, heavy-ion collisions are simultaneously probing different temperature gradients of nuclear matter allowing for the temperature dependence of the symmetry energy to be examined. The current progress and open questions related to constraining the density and temperature dependence of the symmetry energy with heavy-ion collisions are discussed in the review.

Z. Kohley; S. J. Yennello

2014-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

117

Numerically Solvable Model for Resonant Collisions of Electronswith Diatomic Molecules  

SciTech Connect

We describe a simple model for electron-molecule collisions that has one nuclear and one electronic degree of freedom and that can be solved to arbitrarily high precision, without making the Born-Oppenheimer approximation, by employing a combination of the exterior complex scaling method and a finite-element implementation of the discrete variable representation. We compare exact cross sections for vibrational excitation and dissociative attachment with results obtained using the local complex potential approximation as commonly applied in the ''boomerang'' model, and suggest how this two-dimensional model can be used to test the underpinnings of contemporary nonlocal approximations to resonant collisions.

Houfek, Karel; Rescigno, T.N.; McCurdy, C.W.

2006-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

118

Medium effects on charged pion ratio in heavy ion collisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have recently studied in the delta-resonance--nucleon-hole model the dependence of the pion spectral function in hot dense asymmetric nuclear matter on the charge of the pion due to the pion p-wave interaction in nuclear medium. In a thermal model, this isospin-dependent effect enhances the ratio of negatively charged to positively charged pions in neutron-rich nuclear matter, and the effect is comparable to that due to the uncertainties in the theoretically predicted stiffness of nuclear symmetry energy at high densities. This effect is, however, reversed if we also take into account the s-wave interaction of the pion in nuclear medium as given by chiral perturbation theory, resulting instead in a slightly reduced ratio of negatively charged to positively charged pions. Relevance of our results to the determination of the nuclear symmetry energy from the ratio of negatively to positively charged pions produced in heavy ion collisions is discussed.

Che Ming Ko; Yongseok Oh; Jun Xu

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Multiplicity and cold-nuclear matter effects from Glauber-Gribov theory at LHC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present predictions for nuclear modification factor in proton-lead collisions at LHC energy 5.5 TeV from Glauber-Gribov theory of nuclear shadowing. We have also made predictions for baseline cold-matter nuclear effects in lead-lead collisions at the same energy.

Arsene, I C; Kaidalov, A B; Tywoniuk, K; Zabrodin, E

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Multiplicity and cold-nuclear matter effects from Glauber-Gribov theory at LHC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present predictions for nuclear modification factor in proton-lead collisions at LHC energy 5.5 TeV from Glauber-Gribov theory of nuclear shadowing. We have also made predictions for baseline cold-matter nuclear effects in lead-lead collisions at the same energy.

I. C. Arsene; L. Bravina; A. B. Kaidalov; K. Tywoniuk; E. Zabrodin

2007-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "g-1cm2 nuclear collision" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Theorectical Studies of Excitation in Low-Energy Electron-Polyatomic Molecule Collisions  

SciTech Connect

This paper focuses on the channeling of energy from electronic to nuclear degrees of freedom in electron-polyatomic molecule collisions. We examine the feasibility of attacking the full scattering problem, both the fixed-nuclei electronic problem and the post-collision nuclear dynamics, entirely from first principles. The electron-CO{sub 2} system is presented as an example. We study resonant vibrational excitation, showing how a6 initio, fixed-nuclei electronic cross sections can provide the necessary input for a multi-dimensional treatment of the nuclear vibrational dynamics.

Rescigno, T N; McCurdy, C W; Isaacs, W A; Orel, A E; Meyer, H D

2001-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

122

Reversible Simulations of Elastic Collisions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Consider a system of N identical hard spherical particles moving in a d-dimensional box and undergoing elastic, possibly multi-particle, collisions. We develop a new algorithm that recovers the pre-collision state from the post-collision state of the system, across a series of consecutive collisions, \\textit{with essentially no memory overhead}. The challenge in achieving reversibility for an n-particle collision (where, in general, nN) arises from the presence of nd-d-1 degrees of freedom (arbitrary angles) during each collision, as well as from the complex geometrical constraints placed on the colliding particles. To reverse the collisions in a traditional simulation setting, all of the particular realizations of these degrees of freedom (angles) during the forward simulation must be tracked. This requires memory proportional to the number of collisions, which grows very fast with N and d, thereby severely limiting the \\textit{de facto} applicability of the scheme. This limitation is addressed here by first performing a pseudo-randomization of angles, which ensures determinism in the reverse path for any values of n and d. To address the more difficult problem of geometrical and dynamic constraints, a new approach is developed which correctly samples the constrained phase space. Upon combining the pseudo-randomization with correct phase space sampling, perfect reversibility of collisions is achieved, as illustrated for nn=2, d=3. This result enables, for the first time, reversible simulations of elastic collisions with essentially zero memory accumulation. In principle, the approach presented here could be generalized to larger values of n, which would be of definite interest for molecular dynamics simulations at high densities.

Perumalla, Kalyan S [ORNL; Protopopescu, Vladimir A [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Sixteenth International Conference on the physics of electronic and atomic collisions  

SciTech Connect

This report contains abstracts of papers on the following topics: photons, electron-atom collisions; electron-molecule collisions; electron-ion collisions; collisions involving exotic species; ion- atom collisions, ion-molecule or atom-molecule collisions; atom-atom collisions; ion-ion collisions; collisions involving rydberg atoms; field assisted collisions; collisions involving clusters and collisions involving condensed matter.

Dalgarno, A.; Freund, R.S.; Lubell, M.S.; Lucatorto, T.B. (eds.)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Jozso's Legacy Chemical and Kinetic Freeze-out in Heavy-Ion Collisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We review J. Zimanyi's key contributions to the theoretical understanding of dynamical freeze-out in nuclear collisions and their subsequent applications to ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions, leading to the discovery of a freeze-out hierarchy where chemical freeze-out of hadron yields precedes the thermal decoupling of their momentum spectra. Following Zimanyi's lines of reasoning we show that kinetic freeze-out necessarily leads to a dependence of the corresponding freeze-out temperature on collision centrality. This centrality dependence can be predicted within hydrodynamic models, and for Au+Au collisions at RHIC this prediction is shown to reproduce the experimentally observed centrality dependence of the thermal decoupling temperature, extracted from hadron momentum spectra. The fact that no such centrality dependence is observed for the chemical decoupling temperature, extracted from the hadron yields measured in these collisions, excludes a similar kinetic interpretation of the chemical decouplin...

Heinz, U

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Atomic and nuclear research with accelerators. Interim progress report, 1 October 1972--1 October 1973  

SciTech Connect

Research on ion-atom collisions and heavy-ion nuclear reactions is summarized. A list of publications is included. (JFP)

1973-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Nuclear effects in squark production at the LHC  

SciTech Connect

In this contribution we study the production of squarks. If squarks are found in proton-proton (pp) collisions at the LHC, they might also be produced in collisions involving nuclei (pA and AA collisions). Here we investigate the influence of nuclear effects in the production of squarks in nuclear collisions at the LHC, and estimate the transverse momentum dependence of the nuclear ratios R{sub pA} = (d{sigma}(pA)/d{sub pT})/A(d{sigma}(pp)/d{sub pT}) and R{sub AA} = (d{sigma}(AA)/d{sub pT})/A{sup 2}(d{sigma}(pp)/d{sub pT}). We demonstrate that depending on the magnitude of the nuclear effects, the production of squarks could be enhanced or suppressed, compared to proton-proton collisions at same energies.

Espindola, Danusa B. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Mariotto, C. B. [Instituto de Matematica, Estatistica e Fisica (IMEF), Universidade Federal do Rio Grande (FURG), Rio Grande, RS (Brazil); Rodriguez, M. C. [IMEF-FURG, Rio Grande, RS (Brazil)

2013-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

127

ZERO IMPACT PARAMETER WHITE DWARF COLLISIONS IN FLASH  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We systematically explore zero impact parameter collisions of white dwarfs (WDs) with the Eulerian adaptive grid code FLASH for 0.64 + 0.64 M {sub Sun} and 0.81 + 0.81 M {sub Sun} mass pairings. Our models span a range of effective linear spatial resolutions from 5.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} to 1.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} cm. However, even the highest resolution models do not quite achieve strict numerical convergence, due to the challenge of properly resolving small-scale burning and energy transport. The lack of strict numerical convergence from these idealized configurations suggests that quantitative predictions of the ejected elemental abundances that are generated by binary WD collision and merger simulations should be viewed with caution. Nevertheless, the convergence trends do allow some patterns to be discerned. We find that the 0.64 + 0.64 M {sub Sun} head-on collision model produces 0.32 M {sub Sun} of {sup 56}Ni and 0.38 M {sub Sun} of {sup 28}Si, while the 0.81 + 0.81 M {sub Sun} head-on collision model produces 0.39 M {sub Sun} of {sup 56}Ni and 0.55 M {sub Sun} of {sup 28}Si at the highest spatial resolutions. Both mass pairings produce {approx}0.2 M {sub Sun} of unburned {sup 12}C+{sup 16}O. We also find the 0.64 + 0.64 M {sub Sun} head-on collision begins carbon burning in the central region of the stalled shock between the two WDs, while the more energetic 0.81 + 0.81 M {sub Sun} head-on collision raises the initial post-shock temperature enough to burn the entire stalled shock region to nuclear statistical equilibrium.

Hawley, W. P.; Athanassiadou, T.; Timmes, F. X., E-mail: Wendy.Hawley@asu.edu [School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Nuclear Physics of Neutron Stars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Understanding the equation of state (EOS) of cold nuclear matter, namely, the relation between the pressure and energy density, is a central goal of nuclear physics that cuts across a variety of disciplines. Indeed, the limits of nuclear existence, the collision of heavy ions, the structure of neutron stars, and the dynamics of core-collapse supernova, all depend critically on the equation of state of hadronic matter. In this contribution I will concentrate on the special role that nuclear physics plays in constraining the EOS of cold baryonic matter and its impact on the properties of neutron stars.

J. Piekarewicz

2009-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

129

Overview and Perspectives in Nuclear Physics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This presentation reviews recent guiding themes in the broad context of nuclear physics, from developments in chiral effective field theory applied to nuclear systems, via the phases and structures of QCD, to matter under extreme conditions in heavy-ion collisions and neutron stars.

Wolfram Weise

2008-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

130

Initiative in Nuclear Theory at the Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We recall the path breaking contributions of the nuclear theory group of the Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, Kolkata. From a beginning of just one person in 1970s, the group has steadily developed into a leading group in the country today, with seminal contributions to almost the entire range of nuclear physics, viz., low energy nuclear reactions, nuclear structure, deep inelastic collisions, fission, liquid to gas phase transitions, nuclear matter, equation of state, mass formulae, neutron stars, relativistic heavy ion collisions, medium modification of hadron properties, quark gluon plasma, and cosmology of early universe.

Srivastava, D K; Basu, D N; Chaudhuri, A K; De, J N; Krishan, K; Pal, S

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Initiative in Nuclear Theory at the Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We recall the path breaking contributions of the nuclear theory group of the Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, Kolkata. From a beginning of just one person in 1970s, the group has steadily developed into a leading group in the country today, with seminal contributions to almost the entire range of nuclear physics, viz., low energy nuclear reactions, nuclear structure, deep inelastic collisions, fission, liquid to gas phase transitions, nuclear matter, equation of state, mass formulae, neutron stars, relativistic heavy ion collisions, medium modification of hadron properties, quark gluon plasma, and cosmology of early universe.

D. K. Srivastava; J. Alam; D. N. Basu; A. K. Chaudhuri; J. N. De; K. Krishan; S. Pal

2005-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

132

Hadron Production in Heavy Ion Collisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2A GeV 3 Hadron Production from AGS to RHIC 3.1 SystematicsHadron Production in Heavy Ion Collisions Hans Georg RitterAC02- 05CH11231. Hadron Production in Heavy Ion Collisions

Ritter, Hans Georg

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Quarkonium production in high energyproton-proton and proton-nucleus collisions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a brief overview of the most relevant current issues related to quarkonium production in high energy proton-proton and proton-nucleus collisions along with some perspectives. After reviewing recent experimental and theoretical results on quarkonium production in pp and pA collisions, we discuss the emerging field of polarization studies. Afterwards, we report on issues related to heavy-quark production, both in pp and pA collisions, complemented by AA collisions. To put the work in broader perpectives, we emphasize the need for new observables to investigate the quarkonium production mechanisms and reiterate the qualities that make quarkonia a unique tool for many investigations in particle and nuclear physics.

del Valle, Z C; Corcella, G; Fleuret, F; Ferreiro, E G; Kartvelishvili, V; Kopeliovich, B; Lansberg, J P; Lourenco, C; Martinez, G; Papadimitriou, V; Satz, H; Scomparin, E; Ullrich, T; Teryaev, O; Vogt, R; Wang, J X

2011-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

134

Spectroscopic studies of hydrogen collisions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Low energy collisions involving neutral excited states of hydrogen are being studied with vacuum ultraviolet spectroscopy. Atomic hydrogen is generated by focusing an energetic pulse of ArF, KrF, or YAG laser light into a cell of molecular hydrogen, where a plasma is created near the focal point. The H{sub 2} molecules in and near this region are dissociated, and the cooling atomic hydrogen gas is examined with laser and dispersive optical spectroscopy. In related experiments, we are also investigating neutral H + O and H + metal {minus} atom collisions in these laser-generated plasmas.

Kielkopf, J.

1991-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

135

Heavy ion collisions: Correlations and Fluctuations in particle production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Correlations and fluctuations (the latter are directly related to the 2-particle correlations) is one of the important directions in analysis of heavy ion collisions. At the current stage of RHIC exploration, when the details matter, basically any physics question is addressed with help of correlation techniques. In this talk I start with a general introduction to the correlation and fluctuation formalism and discuss weak and strong sides of different type of observables. In more detail, I discuss the two-particle $p_t$ correlations/$\\mpt$ fluctuations. In spite of not observing any dramatic changes in the event-by-event fluctuations with energy, which would indicate a possible phase transition, such correlations measurements remain an interesting and important subject, bringing valuable information. Lastly, I show how radial flow can generate characteristic azimuthal, transverse momentum and rapidity correlations, which could qualitatively explain many of recently observed phenomena in nuclear collisions.

Sergei A. Voloshin

2005-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

136

Centrality categorization for R_{p(d)+A} in high-energy collisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High-energy proton- and deuteron-nucleus collisions provide an excellent tool for studying a wide array of physics effects, including modifications of parton distribution functions in nuclei, gluon saturation, and color neutralization and hadronization in a nuclear environment, among others. All of these effects are expected to have a significant dependence on the size of the nuclear target and the impact parameter of the collision, also known as the collision centrality. In this article, we detail a method for determining centrality classes in p(d)+A collisions via cuts on the multiplicity at backward rapidity (i.e., the nucleus-going direction) and for determining systematic uncertainties in this procedure. For d+Au collisions at sqrt(s_NN) = 200 GeV we find that the connection to geometry is confirmed by measuring the fraction of events in which a neutron from the deuteron does not interact with the nucleus. As an application, we consider the nuclear modification factors R_{p(d)+A}, for which there is a potential bias in the measured centrality dependent yields due to auto-correlations between the process of interest and the backward rapidity multiplicity. We determine the bias correction factor within this framework. This method is further tested using the HIJING Monte Carlo generator. We find that for d+Au collisions at sqrt(s_NN)=200 GeV, these bias corrections are small and vary by less than 5% (10%) up to p_T = 10 (20) GeV. In contrast, for p+Pb collisions at sqrt(s_NN) = 5.02 TeV we find these bias factors are an order of magnitude larger and strongly p_T dependent, likely due to the larger effect of multi-parton interactions.

A. Adare; C. Aidala; N. N. Ajitanand; Y. Akiba; H. Al-Bataineh; J. Alexander; A. Angerami; K. Aoki; N. Apadula; Y. Aramaki; E. T. Atomssa; R. Averbeck; T. C. Awes; B. Azmoun; V. Babintsev; M. Bai; G. Baksay; L. Baksay; K. N. Barish; B. Bassalleck; A. T. Basye; S. Bathe; V. Baublis; C. Baumann; A. Bazilevsky; S. Belikov; R. Belmont; R. Bennett; J. H. Bhom; D. S. Blau; J. S. Bok; K. Boyle; M. L. Brooks; H. Buesching; V. Bumazhnov; G. Bunce; S. Butsyk; S. Campbell; A. Caringi; C. -H. Chen; C. Y. Chi; M. Chiu; I. J. Choi; J. B. Choi; R. K. Choudhury; P. Christiansen; T. Chujo; P. Chung; O. Chvala; V. Cianciolo; Z. Citron; B. A. Cole; Z. Conesa del Valle; M. Connors; M. Csanád; T. Csörg?; T. Dahms; S. Dairaku; I. Danchev; K. Das; A. Datta; G. David; M. K. Dayananda; A. Denisov; A. Deshpande; E. J. Desmond; K. V. Dharmawardane; O. Dietzsch; A. Dion; M. Donadelli; O. Drapier; A. Drees; K. A. Drees; J. M. Durham; A. Durum; D. Dutta; L. D'Orazio; S. Edwards; Y. V. Efremenko; F. Ellinghaus; T. Engelmore; A. Enokizono; H. En'yo; S. Esumi; B. Fadem; D. E. Fields; M. Finger; M. Finger; \\, Jr.; F. Fleuret; S. L. Fokin; Z. Fraenkel; J. E. Frantz; A. Franz; A. D. Frawley; K. Fujiwara; Y. Fukao; T. Fusayasu; I. Garishvili; A. Glenn; H. Gong; M. Gonin; Y. Goto; R. Granier de Cassagnac; N. Grau; S. V. Greene; G. Grim; M. Grosse Perdekamp; T. Gunji; H. -Å. Gustafsson; J. S. Haggerty; K. I. Hahn; H. Hamagaki; J. Hamblen; R. Han; J. Hanks; E. Haslum; R. Hayano; X. He; M. Heffner; T. K. Hemmick; T. Hester; J. C. Hill; M. Hohlmann; W. Holzmann; K. Homma; B. Hong; T. Horaguchi; D. Hornback; S. Huang; T. Ichihara; R. Ichimiya; Y. Ikeda; K. Imai; M. Inaba; D. Isenhower; M. Ishihara; M. Issah; D. Ivanischev; Y. Iwanaga; B. V. Jacak; J. Jia; X. Jiang; J. Jin; B. M. Johnson; T. Jones; K. S. Joo; D. Jouan; D. S. Jumper; F. Kajihara; J. Kamin; J. H. Kang; J. Kapustinsky; K. Karatsu; M. Kasai; D. Kawall; M. Kawashima; A. V. Kazantsev; T. Kempel; A. Khanzadeev; K. M. Kijima; J. Kikuchi; A. Kim; B. I. Kim; D. J. Kim; E. -J. Kim; Y. -J. Kim; E. Kinney; Á. Kiss; E. Kistenev; D. Kleinjan; L. Kochenda; B. Komkov; M. Konno; J. Koster; A. Král; A. Kravitz; G. J. Kunde; K. Kurita; M. Kurosawa; Y. Kwon; G. S. Kyle; R. Lacey; Y. S. Lai; J. G. Lajoie; A. Lebedev; D. M. Lee; J. Lee; K. B. Lee; K. S. Lee; M. J. Leitch; M. A. L. Leite; X. Li; P. Lichtenwalner; P. Liebing; L. A. Linden Levy; T. Liška; H. Liu; M. X. Liu; B. Love; D. Lynch; C. F. Maguire; Y. I. Makdisi; M. D. Malik; V. I. Manko; E. Mannel; Y. Mao; H. Masui; F. Matathias; M. McCumber; P. L. McGaughey; D. McGlinchey; N. Means; B. Meredith; Y. Miake; T. Mibe; A. C. Mignerey; K. Miki; A. Milov; J. T. Mitchell; A. K. Mohanty; H. J. Moon; Y. Morino; A. Morreale; D. P. Morrison; T. V. Moukhanova; T. Murakami; J. Murata; S. Nagamiya; J. L. Nagle; M. Naglis; M. I. Nagy; I. Nakagawa; Y. Nakamiya; K. R. Nakamura; T. Nakamura; K. Nakano; S. Nam; J. Newby; M. Nguyen; M. Nihashi; R. Nouicer; A. S. Nyanin; C. Oakley; E. O'Brien; S. X. Oda; C. A. Ogilvie; M. Oka; K. Okada; Y. Onuki; J. D. Orjuela Koop; A. Oskarsson; M. Ouchida; K. Ozawa; R. Pak; V. Pantuev; V. Papavassiliou; I. H. Park; S. K. Park; W. J. Park; S. F. Pate; H. Pei; J. -C. Peng; H. Pereira; D. Perepelitsa; D. Yu. Peressounko; R. Petti; C. Pinkenburg; R. P. Pisani; M. Proissl; M. L. Purschke; H. Qu; J. Rak; I. Ravinovich; K. F. Read; S. Rembeczki; K. Reygers; V. Riabov; Y. Riabov; E. Richardson; D. Roach; G. Roche; S. D. Rolnick; M. Rosati; C. A. Rosen; S. S. E. Rosendahl; P. Ruži?ka; B. Sahlmueller; N. Saito; T. Sakaguchi; K. Sakashita; V. Samsonov; S. Sano; T. Sato; S. Sawada; K. Sedgwick; J. Seele; R. Seidl; R. Seto; D. Sharma; I. Shein; T. -A. Shibata; K. Shigaki; M. Shimomura; K. Shoji; P. Shukla; A. Sickles; C. L. Silva; D. Silvermyr; C. Silvestre; K. S. Sim; B. K. Singh; C. P. Singh; V. Singh; M. Slune?ka; R. A. Soltz; W. E. Sondheim; S. P. Sorensen; I. V. Sourikova; P. W. Stankus; E. Stenlund; S. P. Stoll; T. Sugitate; A. Sukhanov; J. Sziklai; E. M. Takagui; A. Taketani; R. Tanabe; Y. Tanaka; S. Taneja; K. Tanida; M. J. Tannenbaum; S. Tarafdar; A. Taranenko; H. Themann; D. Thomas; T. L. Thomas; M. Togawa; A. Toia; L. Tomášek; H. Torii; R. S. Towell; I. Tserruya; Y. Tsuchimoto; C. Vale; H. Valle; H. W. van Hecke; E. Vazquez-Zambrano; A. Veicht; J. Velkovska; R. Vértesi; M. Virius; V. Vrba; E. Vznuzdaev; X. R. Wang; D. Watanabe; K. Watanabe; Y. Watanabe; F. Wei; R. Wei; J. Wessels; S. N. White; D. Winter; C. L. Woody; R. M. Wright; M. Wysocki; Y. L. Yamaguchi; K. Yamaura; R. Yang; A. Yanovich; J. Ying; S. Yokkaichi; Z. You; G. R. Young; I. Younus; I. E. Yushmanov; W. A. Zajc; S. Zhou

2013-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

137

Long-lived quantum memory with nuclear atomic spins  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose to store non-classical states of light into the macroscopic collective nuclear spin ($10^{18}$ atoms) of a $^3$He vapor, using metastability exchange collisions. These collisions, commonly used to transfer orientation from the metastable state $2^{3}S\\_1$ to the ground state state of $^3$He, can also transfer quantum correlations. This gives a possible experimental scheme to map a squeezed vacuum field state onto a nuclear spin state with very long storage times (hours).

Aurelien Dantan; Gael Reinaudi; Alice Sinatra; Franck Laloë; Elisabeth Giacobino; Michel Pinard

2005-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

138

Viscosity of High Energy Nuclear Fluids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Relativistic high energy heavy ion collision cross sections have been interpreted in terms of almost ideal liquid droplets of nuclear matter. The experimental low viscosity of these nuclear fluids have been of considerable recent quantum chromodynamic interest. The viscosity is here discussed in terms of the string fragmentation models wherein the temperature dependence of the nuclear fluid viscosity obeys the Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann law.

V. Parihar; A. Widom; D. Drosdoff; Y. N. Srivastava

2007-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

139

Quantum collision states for positive charges in an octahedral cage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One-electron energy levels are studied for a configuration of two positive charges inside an octahedral cage, the vertices of the cage being occupied by atoms with a partially filled shell. Although ground states correspond to large separations, there are relatively low-lying states with large collision probabilities. Electromagnetic radiation fields used to excite the quantum collisional levels may provide a means to control nuclear reactions. However, given the scale of the excitation energies involved, this mechanism cannot provide an explanation for the unexplained ``cold fusion'' events.

R. Vilela Mendes

2001-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

140

ALICE results on quarkonium production in pp, p-Pb and Pb-Pb collisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The study of quarkonia, bound states of heavy (charm or bottom) quark-antiquark pairs such as the J/psi or the Upsilon?, provides insight into the earliest and hottest stages of high-energy nucleus-nucleus collisions where the formation of a Quark-Gluon Plasma is expected. High-precision data from proton-proton collisions represent an essential baseline for the measurement of nuclear modi?cations in nucleus-nucleus collisions and serve also as a crucial test for models of quarkonium hadroproduction. Another fundamental tool to understand the quarkonium production in nucleus-nucleus collisions is the the study of proton-nucleus interactions, which allows one to investigate cold nuclear matter e?ects, such as parton shadowing or gluon saturation. The ALICE detector provides excellent capabilities to study quarkonium production at the Large Hadron Collider at both central and forward rapidity. An overview on ALICE results on quarkonium production in pp, p-Pb and Pb-Pb collisions is presented. Results are compared to theoretical model predictions.

Giuseppe Eugenio Bruno for the ALICE Collaboration

2013-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "g-1cm2 nuclear collision" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Jozso's Legacy: Chemical and Kinetic Freeze-out in Heavy-Ion Collisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We review J. Zimanyi's key contributions to the theoretical understanding of dynamical freeze-out in nuclear collisions and their subsequent applications to ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions, leading to the discovery of a freeze-out hierarchy where chemical freeze-out of hadron yields precedes the thermal decoupling of their momentum spectra. Following Zimanyi's lines of reasoning we show that kinetic freeze-out necessarily leads to a dependence of the corresponding freeze-out temperature on collision centrality. This centrality dependence can be predicted within hydrodynamic models, and for Au+Au collisions at RHIC this prediction is shown to reproduce the experimentally observed centrality dependence of the thermal decoupling temperature, extracted from hadron momentum spectra. The fact that no such centrality dependence is observed for the chemical decoupling temperature, extracted from the hadron yields measured in these collisions, excludes a similar kinetic interpretation of the chemical decoupling process. We argue that the chemical decoupling data from Au+Au collisions at RHIC can only be consistently understood if the chemical freeze-out process is driven by a phase transition, and that the measured chemical decoupling temperature therefore measures the critical temperature of the quark-hadron phase transition. We propose additional experiments to further test this interpretation.

Ulrich W. Heinz; Gregory Kestin

2007-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

142

Electron capture in ion-molecule collisions at intermediate energy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Recent progress of theoretical charge transfer study in ion-molecule collisions at the intermediate energy is reviewed. Concept of close and distant collisions obtained from extensive ion-atom collision studies is identified so that it can be utilized to model two distinct collision processes. For a close collision, explicit representation of the whole collision complex is necessary to describe collision dynamics correctly, while a model potential approach for molecule is appropriate for a distant collision. It is shown that these two distinct models are indeed capable of reproducing experimental charge transfer cross sections. Some remarks for further theoretical study of ion-molecule collisions are also given. 21 refs., 8 figs.

Kumura, M.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Prospect of Rapidity Asymmetry and Nuclear Modifications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In asymmetric heavy ion collisions like dA or pA, particle production yields are different in the forward (d- or p-side) and backward (A-side) rapidity directions. The rapidity distribution reflects the geometry and phase-space distribution of nuclear matter. These properties may depend on the time evolution of the collision. Due to the smallness of the backward-forward differences, the rapidity asymmetry factor can be useful to quantify nuclear modification effects, like e.g. shadowing and the EMC effect. Our work is a survey of the nuclear modification factor and the rapidity asymmetries at RHIC energies. We analyze the rapidity dependence and the strength of the nuclear effects. We focus on the high transverse momentum region, and make predictions for the role of nuclear modifications and rapidity asymmetries for future experimental measurements at increasing absolute values of rapidity.

G. G. Barnaföldi; A. Adeluyi; G. Fai; P. Lévai; G. Papp

2008-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

144

Isospin effects in Nuclear Fragmentation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate properties of the symmetry term in the equation-of-state (EOS) of nuclear matter (NM) from the analysis of simulations of fragmentation events in intermediate energy heavy ion collisions. For charge asymmetric systems a qualitative new feature in the liquid-gas phase transition is predicted: the onset of chemical instabilities with a mixture of isoscalar and isovector components. This leads to a separation into a higher density (``liquid'') symmetric and a low density (``gas'') neutron-rich phase, the so-called neutron distillation effect. We analyse the simulations with respect to the time evolution of the isospin dynamics, as well as with respect to the distribution and asymmetry of the final primary fragments. Qualitatively different effects arise in central collisions, with bulk fragmentation, and peripheral collisions with neck-fragmentation. The neck fragments produced in this type of process appear systematically more neutron-rich from a dynamical nucleon migration effect which is very s...

Baran, V; Di Toro, M; Greco, V; Zielinska-Pfabé, M; Wolter, H H

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

PERSPECTIVES OF NUCLEAR PHYSICS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The organizers of this meeting have asked me to present perspectives of nuclear physics. This means to identify the areas where nuclear physics will be expanding in the next future. In six chapters a short overview of these areas will be given, where I expect that nuclear physics will develop quite fast: (1) Quantum Chromodynamics and effective field theories in the confinement region. (2) Nuclear structure at the limits. (3) High energy heavy ion collisions. (4) Nuclear astrophysics. (5) Neutrino physics. (6) Test of physics beyond the standard model by rare processes. After a survey over these six points I will pick out a few topics where I will go more in details. There is no time to give for all six points detailed examples. I shall discuss the following examples of the six topics mentionned above: (1) The perturbative chiral quark model and the nucleon ?-term. (2) VAMPIR (Variation After Mean field Projection In Realistic model spaces and with realistic forces) as an example of the nuclear structure renaissance. (3) Measurement of important astrophysical nuclear reactions in the Gamow peak. (4) The solar neutrino problem. As examples for testing new physics beyond the standard model by rare processes I had prepared to speak about the measurement of the electric neutron dipole moment and of the neutrinoless double beta decay. But the time is limited and so I have to skip these points, although they are extremely interesting.

Amand Faessler

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Charged Jets in Minimum Bias p-Pb Collisions at sqrt(s) = 5.02 TeV with ALICE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Highly energetic jets are sensitive probes for the kinematics and the topology of nuclear collisions. Jets are produced in an early stage of the collision from hard-scattered partons, which fragment into a spray of charged and neutral particles. The measurement of jet spectra in p-Pb collisions provides an important way to quantify the effects of cold nuclear matter on jet production, fragmentation and hadronization. This is possible because the hot, dense medium produced in Pb-Pb collisions is not expected to form. Proton-Lead collisions also provide an important constraint for the nuclear parton density functions. The exact evaluation of the background from the underlying event is an important ingredient to correct the measured jet spectra. The system size in p-Pb collisions is much smaller than in Pb-Pb so that the methods for background estimation need to be refined. The analysis reported here is performed on p-Pb data taken at sqrt(s_NN) = 5.02 TeV by the ALICE detector at the LHC in the beginning of 2013. The focus of our analysis lies on the minimum bias charged jet spectra and their comparison to the spectra from pp collisions. For this analysis various estimates for the background and its fluctuations have been tested in p-Pb and PYTHIA simulations.

Rüdiger Haake; for the ALICE collaboration

2013-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

147

Energy transport through rare collisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study a one-dimensional hamiltonian chain of masses perturbed by an energy conserving noise. The dynamics is such that, according to its hamiltonian part, particles move freely in cells and interact with their neighbors through collisions, made possible by a small overlap of size $\\epsilon > 0$ between near cells. The noise only randomly flips the velocity of the particles. If $\\epsilon \\rightarrow 0$, and if time is rescaled by a factor $1/{\\epsilon}$, we show that energy evolves autonomously according to a stochastic equation, which hydrodynamic limit is known in some cases. In particular, if only two different energies are present, the limiting process coincides with the simple symmetric exclusion process.

François Huveneers

2011-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

148

Initial orientation effect and selecting desired events in 520AMeV/u U-U collisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

How to select out those collisions with the desired geometry such as tip-tip and/or body-body in experiment is one key point for performing high energy UU collisions. With a relativistic transport model, we performed a simulation for deformed UU collision with vast different orientations at CSR energy area corresponding to the high net-baryon density region in QCD phase diagram. By investigating the centrality and initial collision orientation dependence of the center baryon density, we found that the tip-tip like UU collisions with extended high density phase, which is very important for studying the nuclear EoS of high baryon density matter and the possible end-point of the phase boundary, are those events with small initial orientations ($\\leq20^{0}$) for bath projectile and target in reaction plane and small impact parameter ($\\leq2.6fm$). We pointed out quantificationally two observations -- multiplicity of forward neutron and nuclear stopping power that both allows us to select out those most interesting events (i.e. tip-tip like), which will be very helpful for the future experiments at performing UU collisions.

K. J. Wu; F. Liu; N. Xu

2008-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

149

Alternative Scenarios of Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collisions: I. Baryon Stopping  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Simulations of relativistic heavy-ion collisions within the three-fluid model employing a purely hadronic equation of state (EoS) and two versions of the EoS involving deconfinement transition are presented. The latter are an EoS with the first-order phase transition and that with a smooth crossover transition. The model setup is described in detail. The analysis is performed in a wide range of incident energies 2.7 GeV $energy. Results on proton and net-proton rapidity distributions are reported. Comparison with available data indicate certain preference of the crossover EoS. It is found that predictions within deconfinement-transition scenarios exhibit a "peak-dip-peak-dip" irregularity in the incident energy dependence of the form of the net-proton rapidity distributions in central collisions. This irregularity is a signal of deconfinement onset occurring in the hot and dense stage of the nuclear collision.

Yu. B. Ivanov

2013-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

150

Perspectives of Nuclear Physics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The organizers of this meeting have asked me to present perspectives of nuclear physics. This means to identify the areas where nuclear physics will be expanding in the next future. In six chapters a short overview of these areas will be given, where I expect that nuclear physics willdevelop quite fast: A. Quantum Chromodynamics and effective field theories in the confinement region; B. Nuclear structure at the limits; C. High energy heavy ion collisions; D. Nuclear astrophysics; E. Neutrino physics; F. Test of physics beyond the standard model by rare processes. After a survey over these six points I will pick out a few topics where I will go more in details. There is no time to give for all six points detailed examples. I shall discuss the following examples of the six topics mentionned above: 1. The perturbative chiral quark model and the nucleon $\\Sigma$-term, 2. VAMPIR (Variation After Mean field Projection In Realistic model spaces and with realistic forces) as an example of the nuclear structure renais...

Faessler, A

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Nuclear data for nuclear transmutation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current status on nuclear data for the study of nuclear transmutation of radioactive wastes is reviewed

Hideo Harada

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Collision Detection and Response for Computer Animation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When several objects are moved about by computer animation, there is the chance that they will interpenetrate. This is often an undesired state, particularly if the animation is seeking to model a realistic world. Two issues are involved: detecting ... Keywords: analytical solution, collision detection, collision response, computer animation, dynamical simulation

Matthew Moore; Jane Wilhelms

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Simulating Collisions for Hydrokinetic Turbines  

SciTech Connect

Evaluations of blade-strike on an axial-flow Marine Hydrokinetic turbine were conducted using a conventional methodology as well as an alternative modeling approach proposed in the present document. The proposed methodology integrates the following components into a Computa- tional Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model: (i) advanced eddy-resolving flow simulations, (ii) ambient turbulence based on field data, (iii) moving turbine blades in highly transient flows, and (iv) Lagrangian particles to mimic the potential fish pathways. The sensitivity of blade-strike prob- ability to the following conditions was also evaluated: (i) to the turbulent environment, (ii) to fish size and (iii) to mean stream flow velocity. The proposed methodology provided fraction of collisions and offered the capability of analyzing the causal relationships between the flow envi- ronment and resulting strikes on rotating blades. Overall, the conventional methodology largely overestimates the probability of strike, and lacks the ability to produce potential fish and aquatic biota trajectories as they interact with the rotating turbine. By using a set of experimental corre- lations of exposure-response of living fish colliding on moving blades, the occurrence, frequency and intensity of the particle collisions was next used to calculate the survival rate of fish crossing the MHK turbine. This step indicated survival rates always greater than 98%. Although the proposed CFD framework is computationally more expensive, it provides the advantage of evaluating multiple mechanisms of stress and injury of hydrokinetic turbine devices on fish.

Richmond, Marshall C.; Romero Gomez, Pedro DJ; Rakowski, Cynthia L.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

JETS OF NUCLEAR MATTER FROM HIGH ENERGY HEAVY ION COLLISIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

experiments with single event analysis and special emphasisfragments in single event 4n analysis: ally dependent crossexperimental single event 4n analysis. The distribu- tions

Stocker, H.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

JETS OF NUCLEAR MATTER FROM HIGH ENERGY HEAVY ION COLLISIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with single event analysis, can yield considerably deeperexperiments with single event analysis can provide moreexperiments with single event analysis and special emphasis

Stocker, H.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Collective phenomena in non-central nuclear collisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Low density and ideal hydro limits, v 2 /? plot . Viscousexpression v 2 /? = (v 2 /?) hydro (1 + K/K 0 ) ?1 , wherebe up to 30% below the ideal “hydro limit” even for the most

Voloshin, Sergei A.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Experimental observables on nuclear liquid gas phase transition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Progress on nuclear liquid gas phase transition (LGPT) or critical behavior has been simply reviewed and some signals of LGPT in heavy ion collisions, especially in NIMROD data, are focused. These signals include the power-law charge distribution, the largest fluctuation of the fragment observables, the nuclear Zipf law, caloric curve and critical exponent analysis etc.

Y. G. Ma

2006-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

158

Exponential enhancement of nuclear reactions in condensed matter environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A mechanism that uses the environment to enhance the probability of the nuclear reaction when a beam of accelerated nuclei collides with a target nucleus implanted in condensed matter is suggested. The effect considered is exponentially large for low collision energies. For t + p collision the mechanism becomes effective when the energy of the projectile tritium is below $\\sim$ 1 Kev per nucleon. The gain in probability of the nuclear reaction is due to a redistribution of energy and momentum of the projectile in several ``preliminary'' elastic collisions with the target nucleus and the environmental nuclei in such a way that the final inelastic projectile-target collision takes place at a larger relative velocity, which is accompanied by a decrease of the center of mass energy. The gain of the relative velocity exponentially increases the penetration through the Coulomb barrier.

M. Yu. Kuchiev; B. L. Altshuler; V. V. Flambaum

2003-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

159

Cosmic string collision in cosmological backgrounds  

SciTech Connect

The collisions of cosmic string loops and the dynamics of junction formations in expanding backgrounds are studied. The key parameter controlling the dynamics of junction formation, the cosmic strings zipping and unzipping, is the relative size of the loops compared to the Hubble radius at the time of collision. We study analytically and numerically these processes for large superhorizon size loops, for small subhorizon size loops as well as for loops with the radii comparable to the Hubble radius at the time of collision.

Firouzjahi, Hassan [School of Physics, Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM), P.O. Box 19395-5531, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khoeini-Moghaddam, Salomeh [School of Physics, Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM), P.O. Box 19395-5531, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Tarbiat Mo'allem University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khosravi, Shahram [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Tarbiat Mo'allem University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); School of Astronomy, Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM), P.O. Box 19395-5531, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

160

Direct Photons in Heavy-Ion Collisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A brief overview of direct-photon measurements in ultra-relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions is given. The results for Pb+Pb collisions at sqrt{s_NN} = 17.3 GeV and for Au+Au collisions at sqrt{s_NN} = 200 GeV are compared to estimates of the direct-photon yield from hard scattering. Both results leave room for a significant thermal photon component. A description purely based on hard scattering processes, however, is not ruled out so far.

Klaus Reygers

2006-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "g-1cm2 nuclear collision" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

A collision avoidance system for workpiece protection  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes an application of Sandia`s non-contact capacitive sensing technology for collision avoidance during the manufacturing of rocket engine thrust chambers. The collision avoidance system consists of an octagon shaped collar with a capacitive proximity sensor mounted on each face. The sensors produced electric fields which extend several inches from the face of the collar and detect potential collisions between the robot and the workpiece. A signal conditioning system processes the sensor output and provides varying voltage signals to the robot controller for stopping the robot.

Schmitt, D.J.; Weber, T.M.; Novak, J.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Maslakowski, J.E. [Rockwell International Corp., Canoga Park, CA (United States). Rocketdyne Div.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Direct Photon Production in Au+Au Collisions at RHIC-PHENIX Experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Direct photons have been measured with the PHENIX experiment in Au+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_\\mathrm{NN}}$ = 200 GeV. The direct photon result obtained with PHENIX-EMCal up to 18 GeV/$c$ is consistent with the NLO pQCD calculation scaled by the nuclear overlap function. The measurement using internal conversion of photons into $e^+e^-$ shows the enhancement of the yield comparing with NLO pQCD calculation.

Tadaaki Isobe

2006-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

163

Sequential suppression of quarkonia and high-energy nucleus-nucleus collisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

According to the usual application of the sequential-suppression picture to the dynamics of heavy quarkonia in the hot medium formed in ultrarelativistic nuclear collisions, quark-antiquark pairs created in a given bound or unbound state remain in that same state as the medium evolves. We argue that this scenario implicitly assumes an adiabatic evolution of the quarkonia, and we show that the validity of the adiabaticity assumption is questionable.

Dutta, Nirupam

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Nuclear & Uranium  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Nuclear & Uranium. Uranium fuel ... nuclear reactors, generation, spent fuel. Total Energy. Comprehensive data summaries, comparisons, analysis, and projections ...

165

System-size dependence of open-heavy-flavor production in nucleus-nucleus collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}}$=200 GeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The PHENIX Collaboration at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider has measured open heavy flavor production in Cu$+$Cu collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}}$=200 GeV through the measurement of electrons at midrapidity that originate from semileptonic decays of charm and bottom hadrons. In peripheral Cu$+$Cu collisions an enhanced production of electrons is observed relative to $p$$+$$p$ collisions scaled by the number of binary collisions. In the transverse momentum range from 1 to 5 GeV/$c$ the nuclear modification factor is $R_{AA}$$\\sim$1.4. As the system size increases to more central Cu$+$Cu collisions, the enhancement gradually disappears and turns into a suppression. For $p_T>3$ GeV/$c$, the suppression reaches $R_{AA}$$\\sim$0.8 in the most central collisions. The $p_T$ and centrality dependence of $R_{AA}$ in Cu$+$Cu collisions agree quantitatively with $R_{AA}$ in $d+$Au and Au$+$Au collisions, if compared at similar number of participating nucleons $\\langle N_{\\rm part} \\rangle$.

Adare, A; Aidala, C; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Al-Bataineh, H; Alexander, J; Aoki, K; Apadula, N; Aphecetche, L; Armendariz, R; Aronson, S H; Asai, J; Atomssa, E T; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmoun, B; Babintsev, V; Baksay, G; Baksay, L; Baldisseri, A; Barish, K N; Barnes, P D; Bassalleck, B; Bathe, S; Batsouli, S; Baublis, V; Baumgart, S; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Bennett, R; Berdnikov, Y; Bickley, A A; Boissevain, J G; Borel, H; Boyle, K; Brooks, M L; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Butsyk, S; Campbell, S; Chang, B S; Charvet, J -L; Chernichenko, S; Chi, C Y; Chiba, J; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Chujo, T; Chung, P; Churyn, A; Cianciolo, V; Cleven, C R; Cole, B A; Comets, M P; Constantin, P; Csanád, M; Csörg?, T; Dahms, T; Das, K; David, G; Deaton, M B; Dehmelt, K; Delagrange, H; Denisov, A; d'Enterria, D; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Dietzsch, O; Dion, A; Donadelli, M; Drapier, O; Drees, A; Dubey, A K; Durham, J M; Durum, A; Dzhordzhadze, V; Efremenko, Y V; Egdemir, J; Ellinghaus, F; Emam, W S; Enokizono, A; En'yo, H; Esumi, S; Eyser, K O; Fields, D E; Finger, M; Finger, M; Jr., \\,; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Fraenkel, Z; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fujiwara, K; Fukao, Y; Fusayasu, T; Gadrat, S; Garishvili, I; Glenn, A; Gong, H; Gonin, M; Gosset, J; Goto, Y; de Cassagnac, R Granier; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Perdekamp, M Grosse; Gunji, T; Gustafsson, H -Å; Hachiya, T; Henni, A Hadj; Haegemann, C; Haggerty, J S; Hamagaki, H; Han, R; Harada, H; Hartouni, E P; Haruna, K; Haslum, E; Hayano, R; He, X; Heffner, M; Hemmick, T K; Hester, T; Hiejima, H; Hill, J C; Hobbs, R; Hohlmann, M; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Horaguchi, T; Hornback, D; Ichihara, T; Iinuma, H; Imai, K; Inaba, M; Inoue, Y; Isenhower, D; Isenhower, L; Ishihara, M; Isobe, T; Issah, M; Isupov, A; Jacak, B V; Jia, J; Jin, J; Jinnouchi, O; Johnson, B M; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Kajihara, F; Kametani, S; Kamihara, N; Kamin, J; Kaneta, M; Kang, J H; Kanou, H; Kawall, D; Kazantsev, A V; Khanzadeev, A; Kikuchi, J; Kim, D H; Kim, D J; Kim, E; Kinney, E; Kiss, Á; Kistenev, E; Kiyomichi, A; Klay, J; Klein-Boesing, C; Kochenda, L; Kochetkov, V; Komkov, B; Konno, M; Kotchetkov, D; Kozlov, A; Král, A; Kravitz, A; Kubart, J; Kunde, G J; Kurihara, N; Kurita, K; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Lai, Y S; Lajoie, J G; Lebedev, A; Lee, D M; Lee, M K; Lee, T; Leitch, M J; Leite, M A L; Lenzi, B; Li, X; Liška, T; Litvinenko, A; Liu, M X; Love, B; Lynch, D; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Malakhov, A; Malik, M D; Manko, V I; Mao, Y; Mašek, L; Masui, H; Matathias, F; McCumber, M; McGaughey, P L; McGlinchey, D; Miake, Y; Mikeš, P; Miki, K; Miller, T E; Milov, A; Mioduszewski, S; Mishra, M; Mitchell, J T; Mitrovski, M; Morreale, A; Morrison, D P; Moukhanova, T V; Mukhopadhyay, D; Murata, J; Nagamiya, S; Nagata, Y; Nagle, J L; Naglis, M; Nakagawa, I; Nakamiya, Y; Nakamura, T; Nakano, K; Newby, J; Nguyen, M; Norman, B E; Nouicer, R; Nyanin, A S; O'Brien, E; Oda, S X; Ogilvie, C A; Ohnishi, H; Oka, M; Okada, K; Omiwade, O O; Oskarsson, A; Ouchida, M; Ozawa, K; Pak, R; Pal, D; Palounek, A P T; Pantuev, V; Papavassiliou, V; Park, J; Park, W J; Pate, S F; Pei, H; Peng, J -C; Pereira, H; Peresedov, V; Peressounko, D Yu; Pinkenburg, C; Purschke, M L; Purwar, A K; Qu, H; Rak, J; Rakotozafindrabe, A; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Rembeczki, S; Reuter, M; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Roche, G; Romana, A; Rosati, M; Rosendahl, S S E; Rosnet, P; Rukoyatkin, P; Rykov, V L; Sahlmueller, B; Saito, N; Sakaguchi, T; Sakai, S; Sakata, H; Samsonov, V; Sato, S; Sawada, S; Seele, J; Seidl, R; Semenov, V; Seto, R; Sharma, D; Shein, I; Shevel, A; Shibata, T -A; Shigaki, K; Shimomura, M; Shoji, K; Sickles, A; Silva, C L; Silvermyr, D; Silvestre, C; Sim, K S; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Skutnik, S; Slune?ka, M; Soldatov, A; Soltz, R A; Sondheim, W E; Sorensen, S P; Sourikova, I V; Staley, F; Stankus, P W; Stenlund, E; Stepanov, M; Ster, A; Stoll, S P; Sugitate, T; Suire, C; Sziklai, J; Tabaru, T; Takagi, S; Takagui, E M; Taketani, A; Tanaka, Y; Tanida, K; Tannenbaum, M J; Taranenko, A; Tarján, P; Thomas, T L; Togawa, M; Toia, A; Tojo, J; Tomášek, L; Torii, H; Towell, R S; Tram, V-N; Tserruya, I; Tsuchimoto, Y; Vale, C; Valle, H; van Hecke, H W; Velkovska, J; Vértesi, R; Vinogradov, A A; Virius, M; Vrba, V; Vznuzdaev, E; Wagner, M; Walker, D; Wang, X R; Watanabe, Y; Wessels, J; White, S N; Winter, D; Woody, C L; Wysocki, M; Xie, W; Yamaguchi, Y L; Yanovich, A; Yasin, Z; Ying, J; Yokkaichi, S; Young, G R; Younus, I; Yushmanov, I E; Zajc, W A; Zaudtke, O; Zhang, C; Zhou, S; Zimányi, J; Zolin, L

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Hadron Production in Heavy Ion Collisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We review hadron production in heavy ion collisions with emphasis on pion and kaon production at energies below 2 AGeV and on partonic collectivity at RHIC energies.

Helmut Oeschler; Hans Georg Ritter; Nu Xu

2009-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

167

Nuclear power and nuclear weapons  

SciTech Connect

The proliferation of nuclear weapons and the expanded use of nuclear energy for the production of electricity and other peaceful uses are compared. The difference in technologies associated with nuclear weapons and nuclear power plants are described.

Vaughen, V.C.A.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Emergency Department Visits by Older Adults for Motor Vehicle Collisions: A Five-Year National Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

KM, Esserman DA, et al. Motor vehicle collision-relatedVisits by Older Adults for Motor Vehicle Collisions * Denvervisits by older adults for motor vehicle collisions (MVC) in

Vogel, Jody A; Ginde, Adit A.; Lowenstein, Steven R.; Betz, Marian E.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Isospin effects in Nuclear Fragmentation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate properties of the symmetry term in the equation-of-state (EOS) of nuclear matter (NM) from the analysis of simulations of fragmentation events in intermediate energy heavy ion collisions. For charge asymmetric systems a qualitative new feature in the liquid-gas phase transition is predicted: the onset of chemical instabilities with a mixture of isoscalar and isovector components. This leads to a separation into a higher density (``liquid'') symmetric and a low density (``gas'') neutron-rich phase, the so-called neutron distillation effect. We analyse the simulations with respect to the time evolution of the isospin dynamics, as well as with respect to the distribution and asymmetry of the final primary fragments. Qualitatively different effects arise in central collisions, with bulk fragmentation, and peripheral collisions with neck-fragmentation. The neck fragments produced in this type of process appear systematically more neutron-rich from a dynamical nucleon migration effect which is very sensitive to the symmetry term in regions just below normal density. In general the isospin dynamics plays an important role in all the steps of the reaction, from prompt nucleon emission to the sequential decay of the primary fragments. A fully microscopic description of the reaction dynamics including stochastic elements to treat fluctuations realistically is absolutely necessary in order to extract precise information on the fragmentation and the nuclear equation of state. We have performed simulations for fragment production events in $n$-rich ($^{124}Sn$) and $n$-poor ($^{112}Sn$) symmetric colliding systems.

V. Baran; M. Colonna; M. Di Toro; V. Greco; M. Zielinska-Phabe; H. H. Wolter

2001-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

170

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178

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179

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180

Nuclear Systems Analysis - Nuclear Engineering Division (Argonne...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "g-1cm2 nuclear collision" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Publications 2011 - Nuclear Data Program - Nuclear Engineering...  

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Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

182

The roles of deformation and orientation in heavy-ion collisions induced by light deformed nuclei at intermediate energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The reaction dynamics of axisymmetric deformed $^{24}$Mg + $^{24}$Mg collisions have been investigated systematically by an isospin-dependent quantum molecular dynamics (IDQMD) model. It is found that different deformations and orientations result in apparently different properties of reaction dynamics. We revealed that some observables such as nuclear stopping power ($R$), multiplicity of fragments, and elliptic flow are very sensitive to the initial deformations and orientations. There exists an eccentricity scaling of elliptic flow in central body-body collisions with different deformations. In addition, the tip-tip and body-body configurations turn out to be two extreme cases in central reaction dynamical process.

X. G. Cao; G. Q. Zhang; X. Z. Cai; Y. G. Ma; W. Guo; J. G. Chen; W. D. Tian; D. Q. Fang; H. W. Wang

2010-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

183

Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Nuclear Materials Assay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Potential of Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence . . . . . . . .2.9.1 Nuclear ThomsonSections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nuclear Resonance

Quiter, Brian Joseph

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

--No Title--  

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Compact bone (ICRU) Quantity Value Units Value Units 0.53010 Density 1.85 g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 91.9 eV Minimum ionization 1.849 MeV g-1cm2 3.421 MeV cm-1 Nuclear...

185

--No Title--  

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Dubnium (Db) Quantity Value Units Atomic number 105 Atomic mass 268.125(4) g mole-1 Density ?? g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 1061.0 eV Minimum ionization 1.088 MeV g-1cm2 Nuclear...

186

--No Title--  

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Bohrium (Bh) Quantity Value Units Atomic number 107 Atomic mass 270.134(4) g mole-1 Density ?? g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 1087.0 eV Minimum ionization 1.097 MeV g-1cm2 Nuclear...

187

Nuclear Reactions  

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Reactions Nuclear reactions and nuclear scattering are used to measure the properties of nuclei. Reactions that exchange energy or nucleons can be used to measure the energies of...

188

Nuclear Safety  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Nuclear Safety information site that provides assistance and resources to field elements in implementation of requirements and resolving nuclear safety, facility safety, and quality assurance issues.

189

Nuclear Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Materials and Fuels for the Current and Advanced Nuclear Reactors III ... response of oxide ceramics for nuclear applications through experiment, theory, and ...

190

Christmas burst reveals neutron star collision  

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Christmas burst reveals neutron star collision Christmas burst reveals neutron star collision Christmas burst reveals neutron star collision Called the Christmas Burst, GRB 101225A was freakishly lengthy and it produced radiation at unusually varying wavelengths. December 1, 2011 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Contact

191

An Exact Analytical Solution for Raindrop Collision Rate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An exact solution was found for the rate of collisions between raindrops by integrating over a finite drop size range. Collision rates computed from this solution were compared to those computed from a solution obtained by integrating over an ...

Robert R. Czys; Kung Chyun Tang

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

On the Median Volume Diameter Approximation for Droplet Collision Efficiency  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this note, we examine a shortcut for calculating the overall collision efficiency of a droplet spectrum, known as the “median volume diameter” (mvd) approximation. By calculating the overall collision efficiency of a circular cylinder for a ...

Karen J. Finstad; Edward P. Lozowski; Lasse Makkonen

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Spectroscopic studies of hydrogen collisions. Progress report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Low energy collisions involving neutral excited states of hydrogen are being studied with vacuum ultraviolet spectroscopy. Atomic hydrogen is generated by focusing an energetic pulse of ArF, KrF, or YAG laser light into a cell of molecular hydrogen, where a plasma is created near the focal point. The H{sub 2} molecules in and near this region are dissociated, and the cooling atomic hydrogen gas is examined with laser and dispersive optical spectroscopy. In related experiments, we are also investigating neutral H + O and H + metal {minus} atom collisions in these laser-generated plasmas.

Kielkopf, J.

1991-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

194

An overview of laser effects on collision dynamics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The theoretical and experimental aspects of collision processes in the presence of laser radiation are discussed. (AIP)

Paul L. DeVries

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Nuclear Matter and Nuclear Dynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Highlights on the recent research activity, carried out by the Italian Community involved in the "Nuclear Matter and Nuclear Dynamics" field, will be presented.

M Colonna

2009-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

196

Wire-driven Parallel Robot: Permitting Collisions Between Wires  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In spatial designs of wire-driven parallel robots, collisions between wires by limiting platform trajectories. The common practice for avoiding collisions between wires is by limiting the moving platform trajectories. However, as opposed to rigid ... Keywords: cable robot, collision, tangling, wire robot, workspace

Yonatan Wischnitzer; Nir Shvalb; Moshe Shoham

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Langevin dynamics of heavy flavors in relativistic heavy-ion collisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the stochastic dynamics of c and b quarks, produced in hard initial processes, in the hot medium created after the collision of two relativistic heavy ions. This is done through the numerical solution of the relativistic Langevin equation. The latter requires the knowledge of the friction and diffusion coefficients, whose microscopic evaluation is performed treating separately the contribution of soft and hard collisions. The evolution of the background medium is described by ideal/viscous hydrodynamics. Below the critical temperature the heavy quarks are converted into hadrons, whose semileptonic decays provide single-electron spectra to be compared with the current experimental data measured at RHIC. We focus on the nuclear modification factor R_AA and on the elliptic-flow coefficient v_2, getting, for sufficiently large p_T, a reasonable agreement.

W. M. Alberico; A. Beraudo; A. De Pace; A. Molinari; M. Monteno; M. Nardi; F. Prino

2010-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

198

Langevin dynamics of heavy flavors in relativistic heavy-ion collisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the stochastic dynamics of c and b quarks, produced in hard initial processes, in the hot medium created after the collision of two relativistic heavy ions. This is done through the numerical solution of the relativistic Langevin equation. The latter requires the knowledge of the friction and diffusion coefficients, whose microscopic evaluation is performed treating separately the contribution of soft and hard collisions. The evolution of the background medium is described by ideal/viscous hydrodynamics. Below the critical temperature the heavy quarks are converted into hadrons, whose semileptonic decays provide single-electron spectra to be compared with the current experimental data measured at RHIC. We focus on the nuclear modification factor R_AA and on the elliptic-flow coefficient v_2, getting, for sufficiently large p_T, a reasonable agreement.

Alberico, W M; De Pace, A; Molinari, A; Monteno, M; Nardi, M; Prino, F

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

 

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Copper (Cu) Copper (Cu) Quantity Value Units Value Units Atomic number 29 Atomic mass 63.546(3) g mole-1 Density 8.96 g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 322.0 eV Minimum ionization 1.403 MeV g-1cm2 12.57 MeV cm-1 Nuclear collision length 84.2 g cm-2 9.393 cm Nuclear interaction length 137.3 g cm-2 15.32 cm Pion collision length 109.3 g cm-2 12.20 cm Pion interaction length 165.9 g cm-2 18.51 cm Radiation length 12.86 g cm-2 1.436 cm Critical energy 19.42 MeV (for e-) 18.79 MeV (for e+) Molière radius 14.05 g cm-2 1.568 cm Plasma energy 58.27 eV Muon critical energy 317. GeV Melting point 1358. K 1085. C Boiling point @ 1 atm 2835. K 2562. C For muons, dE/dx = a(E) + b(E) E. Tables of b(E): PS PDF TEXT

200

 

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ice) (H2O) ice) (H2O) Quantity Value Units Value Units 0.55509 Density 0.918 g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 79.7 eV Minimum ionization 1.984 MeV g-1cm2 1.822 MeV cm-1 Nuclear collision length 58.5 g cm-2 63.73 cm Nuclear interaction length 83.3 g cm-2 90.77 cm Pion collision length 86.0 g cm-2 93.68 cm Pion interaction length 115.2 g cm-2 125.5 cm Radiation length 36.08 g cm-2 39.31 cm Critical energy 78.60 MeV (for e-) 76.51 MeV (for e+) Molière radius 9.73 g cm-2 10.60 cm Plasma energy 20.57 eV Muon critical energy 1031. GeV Melting point 273.1 K 0.000E+00 C Boiling point @ 1 atm 373.1 K 99.96 C Index of refraction (@ STP, Na D) 1.31 Composition: Elem Z Atomic frac* Mass frac*

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "g-1cm2 nuclear collision" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

 

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ethane (C2H6) Ethane (C2H6) Quantity Value Units Value Units 0.59861 Specific gravity (20° C, 1 atm) 1.26E-03 g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 45.4 eV Minimum ionization 2.304 MeV g-1cm2 2.910E-03 MeV cm-1 Nuclear collision length 55.0 g cm-2 4.353E+04 cm Nuclear interaction length 75.9 g cm-2 6.009E+04 cm Pion collision length 82.7 g cm-2 6.546E+04 cm Pion interaction length 107.7 g cm-2 8.525E+04 cm Radiation length 45.66 g cm-2 3.615E+04 cm Critical energy 135.97 MeV (for e-) 133.10 MeV (for e+) Molière radius 7.12 g cm-2 5638. cm Plasma energy 0.79 eV Muon critical energy 1603. GeV Melting point 90.36 K -182.8 C Boiling point @ 1 atm 184.5 K -88.60 C Triple point 183.3 K -89.88 C

202

 

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iodide (CsI) iodide (CsI) Quantity Value Units Value Units 0.41569 Density 4.51 g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 553.1 eV Minimum ionization 1.243 MeV g-1cm2 5.605 MeV cm-1 Nuclear collision length 100.6 g cm-2 22.30 cm Nuclear interaction length 171.5 g cm-2 38.04 cm Pion collision length 124.7 g cm-2 27.65 cm Pion interaction length 199.0 g cm-2 44.12 cm Radiation length 8.39 g cm-2 1.860 cm Critical energy 11.17 MeV (for e-) 10.80 MeV (for e+) Molière radius 15.92 g cm-2 3.531 cm Plasma energy 39.46 eV Muon critical energy 198. GeV Melting point 894.2 K 621.0 C Boiling point @ 1 atm 1553. K 1280. C Index of refraction (@ STP, Na D) 1.79 Composition: Elem Z Atomic frac* Mass frac*

203

 

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dioxide gas (CO2) dioxide gas (CO2) Quantity Value Units Value Units 0.49989 Specific gravity (20° C, 1 atm) 1.84E-03 g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 85.0 eV Minimum ionization 1.819 MeV g-1cm2 3.351E-03 MeV cm-1 Nuclear collision length 60.7 g cm-2 3.297E+04 cm Nuclear interaction length 88.9 g cm-2 4.828E+04 cm Pion collision length 87.9 g cm-2 4.772E+04 cm Pion interaction length 120.8 g cm-2 6.555E+04 cm Radiation length 36.20 g cm-2 1.965E+04 cm Critical energy 86.17 MeV (for e-) 84.25 MeV (for e+) Molière radius 8.91 g cm-2 4835. cm Plasma energy 0.87 eV Muon critical energy 1095. GeV Index of refraction (@ STP, Na D) 449. (n-1)x106 Sublimination temperature (@ 1 atm) 194.8 K -78.40 C

204

 

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Paraffin (CH3(CH2)n\approx23CH3) Paraffin (CH3(CH2)n\approx23CH3) Quantity Value Units Value Units 0.57275 Density 0.930 g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 55.9 eV Minimum ionization 2.088 MeV g-1cm2 1.942 MeV cm-1 Nuclear collision length 56.0 g cm-2 60.24 cm Nuclear interaction length 78.3 g cm-2 84.14 cm Pion collision length 83.6 g cm-2 89.92 cm Pion interaction length 110.1 g cm-2 118.4 cm Radiation length 44.85 g cm-2 48.22 cm Critical energy 102.22 MeV (for e-) 99.54 MeV (for e+) Molière radius 9.30 g cm-2 10.00 cm Plasma energy 21.03 eV Muon critical energy 1288. GeV Composition: Elem Z Atomic frac* Mass frac* H 1 52.00 0.148605 C 6 25.00 0.851395 * calculated from mass fraction data. Explanation of some entries

205

 

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Neptunium (Np) Neptunium (Np) Quantity Value Units Value Units Atomic number 93 Atomic mass [237.04817(2)] g mole-1 Density 20.2 g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 902.0 eV Minimum ionization 1.095 MeV g-1cm2 22.17 MeV cm-1 Nuclear collision length 118.5 g cm-2 5.850 cm Nuclear interaction length 208.7 g cm-2 10.31 cm Pion collision length 141.4 g cm-2 6.984 cm Pion interaction length 235.0 g cm-2 11.60 cm Radiation length 5.87 g cm-2 0.2897 cm Critical energy 6.57 MeV (for e-) 6.33 MeV (for e+) Molière radius 18.93 g cm-2 0.9349 cm Plasma energy 81.22 eV Muon critical energy 127. GeV For muons, dE/dx = a(E) + b(E) E. Tables of b(E): PS PDF TEXT Table of muon dE/dx and Range: PS PDF TEXT Explanation of some entries

206

 

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Vanadium (V ) Vanadium (V ) Quantity Value Units Value Units Atomic number 23 Atomic mass 50.9415(1) g mole-1 Density 6.11 g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 245.0 eV Minimum ionization 1.436 MeV g-1cm2 8.776 MeV cm-1 Nuclear collision length 80.0 g cm-2 13.09 cm Nuclear interaction length 128.5 g cm-2 21.04 cm Pion collision length 105.3 g cm-2 17.24 cm Pion interaction length 157.5 g cm-2 25.77 cm Radiation length 15.84 g cm-2 2.593 cm Critical energy 24.67 MeV (for e-) 23.91 MeV (for e+) Molière radius 13.62 g cm-2 2.229 cm Plasma energy 47.86 eV Muon critical energy 385. GeV For muons, dE/dx = a(E) + b(E) E. Tables of b(E): PS PDF TEXT Table of muon dE/dx and Range: PS PDF TEXT Explanation of some entries

207

 

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(Na) (Na) Quantity Value Units Value Units Atomic number 11 Atomic mass 22.98976928(2) g mole-1 Density 0.971 g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 149.0 eV Minimum ionization 1.639 MeV g-1cm2 1.592 MeV cm-1 Nuclear collision length 67.4 g cm-2 69.46 cm Nuclear interaction length 102.6 g cm-2 105.6 cm Pion collision length 93.4 g cm-2 96.22 cm Pion interaction length 132.2 g cm-2 136.2 cm Radiation length 27.74 g cm-2 28.56 cm Critical energy 51.38 MeV (for e-) 49.99 MeV (for e+) Molière radius 11.45 g cm-2 11.79 cm Plasma energy 19.64 eV Muon critical energy 712. GeV For muons, dE/dx = a(E) + b(E) E. Tables of b(E): PS PDF TEXT Table of muon dE/dx and Range: PS PDF TEXT Explanation of some entries

208

 

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Ammonia (NH3) Ammonia (NH3) Quantity Value Units Value Units 0.59719 Specific gravity (20° C, 1 atm) 8.26E-04 g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 53.7 eV Minimum ionization 2.265 MeV g-1cm2 1.871E-03 MeV cm-1 Nuclear collision length 56.8 g cm-2 6.876E+04 cm Nuclear interaction length 79.5 g cm-2 9.620E+04 cm Pion collision length 84.5 g cm-2 1.023E+05 cm Pion interaction length 111.5 g cm-2 1.350E+05 cm Radiation length 40.87 g cm-2 4.948E+04 cm Critical energy 121.70 MeV (for e-) 119.12 MeV (for e+) Molière radius 7.12 g cm-2 8622. cm Plasma energy 0.64 eV Muon critical energy 1469. GeV Index of refraction (@ STP, Na D) 376. (n-1)x106 Composition: Elem Z Atomic frac* Mass frac* H 1

209

 

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Brain (ICRP) Brain (ICRP) Quantity Value Units Value Units 0.55423 Density 1.03 g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 73.3 eV Minimum ionization 1.990 MeV g-1cm2 2.050 MeV cm-1 Nuclear collision length 58.4 g cm-2 56.69 cm Nuclear interaction length 83.1 g cm-2 80.68 cm Pion collision length 85.9 g cm-2 83.39 cm Pion interaction length 115.0 g cm-2 111.7 cm Radiation length 36.72 g cm-2 35.65 cm Critical energy 79.96 MeV (for e-) 77.84 MeV (for e+) Molière radius 9.74 g cm-2 9.455 cm Plasma energy 21.77 eV Muon critical energy 1046. GeV Composition: Elem Z Atomic frac* Mass frac* H 1 1.00 0.110667 C 6 0.10 0.125420 N 7 0.01 0.013280 O 8 0.42 0.737723 Na 11 0.00 0.001840 Mg 12 0.00 0.000150 P 15 0.00 0.003540 S 16

210

 

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Fermium (Fm) Fermium (Fm) Quantity Value Units Atomic number 100 Atomic mass [257.09510(5)] g mole-1 Density ?? g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 994.0 eV Minimum ionization 1.090 MeV g-1cm2 Nuclear collision length 121.2 g cm-2 Nuclear interaction length 214.5 g cm-2 Pion collision length 144.0 g cm-2 Pion interaction length 240.5 g cm-2 Radiation length 5.62 g cm-2 Critical energy 6.42 MeV (for e-) Molière radius 18.57 g cm-2 Plasma energy 67.24 eV Muon critical energy 122. GeV Melting point 273.1 K For muons, dE/dx = a(E) + b(E) E. Tables of b(E): PS PDF TEXT Table of muon dE/dx and Range: PS PDF TEXT Explanation of some entries Note: Since there is no stable isotope, [atomic mass] is that of the longest-lived known isotope as of Jan 2007. Note: Density 14.0 g/cm3 and Ieff = 994 eV assumed in calculating critical

211

 

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Chlorine gas (Cl2) (Cl) Chlorine gas (Cl2) (Cl) Quantity Value Units Value Units Atomic number 17 Atomic mass 35.453(2) g mole-1 Specific gravity (20° C, 1 atm) 2.98E-03 g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 174.0 eV Minimum ionization 1.630 MeV g-1cm2 4.856E-03 MeV cm-1 Nuclear collision length 73.8 g cm-2 2.476E+04 cm Nuclear interaction length 115.7 g cm-2 3.882E+04 cm Pion collision length 99.5 g cm-2 3.340E+04 cm Pion interaction length 144.9 g cm-2 4.864E+04 cm Radiation length 19.28 g cm-2 6469. cm Critical energy 40.05 MeV (for e-) 39.04 MeV (for e+) Molière radius 10.21 g cm-2 3425. cm Plasma energy 1.09 eV Muon critical energy 592. GeV Melting point 171.6 K -101.5 C Boiling point @ 1 atm 239.1 K -34.04 C

212

 

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B-100 Bone-equivalent plastic B-100 Bone-equivalent plastic Quantity Value Units Value Units 0.52740 Density 1.45 g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 85.9 eV Minimum ionization 1.859 MeV g-1cm2 2.695 MeV cm-1 Nuclear collision length 61.0 g cm-2 42.10 cm Nuclear interaction length 88.5 g cm-2 61.01 cm Pion collision length 88.3 g cm-2 60.89 cm Pion interaction length 120.2 g cm-2 82.93 cm Radiation length 32.11 g cm-2 22.15 cm Critical energy 65.17 MeV (for e-) 63.40 MeV (for e+) Molière radius 10.45 g cm-2 7.206 cm Plasma energy 25.20 eV Muon critical energy 877. GeV Composition: Elem Z Atomic frac* Mass frac* H 1 1.00 0.065471 C 6 0.69 0.536945 N 7 0.02 0.021500 O 8 0.03 0.032085 F 9 0.14 0.167411 Ca 20 0.07 0.176589 * calculated from mass fraction data.

213

 

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(Bi) (Bi) Quantity Value Units Value Units Atomic number 83 Atomic mass 208.98040(1) g mole-1 Density 9.75 g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 823.0 eV Minimum ionization 1.128 MeV g-1cm2 10.99 MeV cm-1 Nuclear collision length 114.3 g cm-2 11.73 cm Nuclear interaction length 200.2 g cm-2 20.54 cm Pion collision length 137.6 g cm-2 14.11 cm Pion interaction length 226.7 g cm-2 23.26 cm Radiation length 6.29 g cm-2 0.6454 cm Critical energy 7.39 MeV (for e-) 7.13 MeV (for e+) Molière radius 18.04 g cm-2 1.851 cm Plasma energy 56.70 eV Muon critical energy 141. GeV For muons, dE/dx = a(E) + b(E) E. Tables of b(E): PS PDF TEXT Table of muon dE/dx and Range: PS PDF TEXT Explanation of some entries

214

 

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gem diamond) (C ) gem diamond) (C ) Quantity Value Units Value Units Atomic number 6 Atomic mass 12.0107(8) g mole-1 Density 3.52 g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 78.0 eV Minimum ionization 1.725 MeV g-1cm2 6.071 MeV cm-1 Nuclear collision length 59.2 g cm-2 16.82 cm Nuclear interaction length 85.8 g cm-2 24.38 cm Pion collision length 86.5 g cm-2 24.56 cm Pion interaction length 117.8 g cm-2 33.46 cm Radiation length 42.70 g cm-2 12.13 cm Critical energy 80.17 MeV (for e-) 77.94 MeV (for e+) Molière radius 11.29 g cm-2 3.208 cm Plasma energy 38.21 eV Muon critical energy 1044. GeV Index of refraction (@ STP, Na D) 2.42 For muons, dE/dx = a(E) + b(E) E. Tables of b(E): PS PDF TEXT Table of muon dE/dx and Range: PS PDF TEXT

215

 

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fluoride (LiF) fluoride (LiF) Quantity Value Units Value Units 0.46262 Density 2.63 g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 94.0 eV Minimum ionization 1.614 MeV g-1cm2 4.253 MeV cm-1 Nuclear collision length 61.0 g cm-2 23.13 cm Nuclear interaction length 88.7 g cm-2 33.68 cm Pion collision length 87.5 g cm-2 33.21 cm Pion interaction length 119.8 g cm-2 45.46 cm Radiation length 39.26 g cm-2 14.90 cm Critical energy 68.82 MeV (for e-) 66.93 MeV (for e+) Molière radius 12.09 g cm-2 4.590 cm Plasma energy 31.82 eV Muon critical energy 904. GeV Melting point 1121. K 848.2 C Boiling point @ 1 atm 1946. K 1673. C Index of refraction (@ STP, Na D) 1.39 Composition: Elem Z Atomic frac* Mass frac*

216

 

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Actinium (Ac) Actinium (Ac) Quantity Value Units Value Units Atomic number 89 Atomic mass [227.02775(2)] g mole-1 Density 10.1 g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 841.0 eV Minimum ionization 1.112 MeV g-1cm2 11.19 MeV cm-1 Nuclear collision length 117.0 g cm-2 11.62 cm Nuclear interaction length 205.8 g cm-2 20.43 cm Pion collision length 140.1 g cm-2 13.91 cm Pion interaction length 232.1 g cm-2 23.05 cm Radiation length 6.06 g cm-2 0.6016 cm Critical energy 7.00 MeV (for e-) 6.75 MeV (for e+) Molière radius 18.34 g cm-2 1.821 cm Plasma energy 57.25 eV Muon critical energy 134. GeV For muons, dE/dx = a(E) + b(E) E. Tables of b(E): PS PDF TEXT Table of muon dE/dx and Range: PS PDF TEXT Explanation of some entries

217

 

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Promethium (Pm) Promethium (Pm) Quantity Value Units Value Units Atomic number 61 Atomic mass [144.91275(3)] g mole-1 Density 7.26 g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 560.0 eV Minimum ionization 1.240 MeV g-1cm2 9.008 MeV cm-1 Nuclear collision length 103.5 g cm-2 14.25 cm Nuclear interaction length 177.7 g cm-2 24.46 cm Pion collision length 127.5 g cm-2 17.55 cm Pion interaction length 204.9 g cm-2 28.20 cm Radiation length 7.51 g cm-2 1.035 cm Critical energy 9.83 MeV (for e-) 9.49 MeV (for e+) Molière radius 16.21 g cm-2 2.231 cm Plasma energy 50.39 eV Muon critical energy 180. GeV For muons, dE/dx = a(E) + b(E) E. Tables of b(E): PS PDF TEXT Table of muon dE/dx and Range: PS PDF TEXT Explanation of some entries

218

 

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Praseodymium (Pr) Praseodymium (Pr) Quantity Value Units Value Units Atomic number 59 Atomic mass 140.90765(2) g mole-1 Density 6.71 g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 535.0 eV Minimum ionization 1.244 MeV g-1cm2 8.344 MeV cm-1 Nuclear collision length 102.7 g cm-2 15.31 cm Nuclear interaction length 176.1 g cm-2 26.24 cm Pion collision length 126.7 g cm-2 18.89 cm Pion interaction length 203.3 g cm-2 30.30 cm Radiation length 7.76 g cm-2 1.156 cm Critical energy 10.21 MeV (for e-) 9.87 MeV (for e+) Molière radius 16.11 g cm-2 2.401 cm Plasma energy 48.30 eV Muon critical energy 183. GeV For muons, dE/dx = a(E) + b(E) E. Tables of b(E): PS PDF TEXT Table of muon dE/dx and Range: PS PDF TEXT Explanation of some entries

219

 

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(Lu) (Lu) Quantity Value Units Value Units Atomic number 71 Atomic mass 174.9668(1) g mole-1 Density 9.84 g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 694.0 eV Minimum ionization 1.160 MeV g-1cm2 11.42 MeV cm-1 Nuclear collision length 108.9 g cm-2 11.07 cm Nuclear interaction length 188.9 g cm-2 19.19 cm Pion collision length 132.5 g cm-2 13.46 cm Pion interaction length 215.7 g cm-2 21.92 cm Radiation length 6.92 g cm-2 0.7037 cm Critical energy 8.36 MeV (for e-) 8.06 MeV (for e+) Molière radius 17.55 g cm-2 1.784 cm Plasma energy 57.58 eV Muon critical energy 157. GeV For muons, dE/dx = a(E) + b(E) E. Tables of b(E): PS PDF TEXT Table of muon dE/dx and Range: PS PDF TEXT Explanation of some entries Table of isotopes Warning: may not be current

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Americium (Am) Americium (Am) Quantity Value Units Value Units Atomic number 95 Atomic mass [243.06138(2)] g mole-1 Density 13.7 g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 934.0 eV Minimum ionization 1.089 MeV g-1cm2 14.88 MeV cm-1 Nuclear collision length 119.3 g cm-2 8.727 cm Nuclear interaction length 210.5 g cm-2 15.40 cm Pion collision length 142.2 g cm-2 10.40 cm Pion interaction length 236.7 g cm-2 17.31 cm Radiation length 5.80 g cm-2 0.4243 cm Critical energy 6.50 MeV (for e-) 6.25 MeV (for e+) Molière radius 18.93 g cm-2 1.385 cm Plasma energy 66.61 eV Muon critical energy 127. GeV For muons, dE/dx = a(E) + b(E) E. Tables of b(E): PS PDF TEXT Table of muon dE/dx and Range: PS PDF TEXT Explanation of some entries

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "g-1cm2 nuclear collision" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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Helium gas (He) Helium gas (He) Quantity Value Units Value Units Atomic number 2 Atomic mass 4.002602(2) g mole-1 Specific gravity (20° C, 1 atm) 1.66E-04 g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 41.8 eV Minimum ionization 1.937 MeV g-1cm2 3.222E-04 MeV cm-1 Nuclear collision length 51.8 g cm-2 3.117E+05 cm Nuclear interaction length 71.0 g cm-2 4.269E+05 cm Pion collision length 79.5 g cm-2 4.778E+05 cm Pion interaction length 103.6 g cm-2 6.229E+05 cm Radiation length 94.32 g cm-2 5.671E+05 cm Critical energy 257.13 MeV (for e-) 252.23 MeV (for e+) Molière radius 7.78 g cm-2 4.677E+04 cm Plasma energy 0.26 eV Muon critical energy 2352. GeV Boiling point @ 1 atm 4.220 K -268.9 C Index of refraction (@ STP, Na D) 35.0 (n-1)x106

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(U ) (U ) Quantity Value Units Value Units Atomic number 92 Atomic mass [238.02891(3)] g mole-1 Density 19.0 g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 890.0 eV Minimum ionization 1.081 MeV g-1cm2 20.49 MeV cm-1 Nuclear collision length 118.6 g cm-2 6.258 cm Nuclear interaction length 209.0 g cm-2 11.03 cm Pion collision length 141.5 g cm-2 7.469 cm Pion interaction length 235.3 g cm-2 12.42 cm Radiation length 6.00 g cm-2 0.3166 cm Critical energy 6.65 MeV (for e-) 6.41 MeV (for e+) Molière radius 19.12 g cm-2 1.009 cm Plasma energy 77.99 eV Muon critical energy 128. GeV Melting point 1408. K 1135. C Boiling point @ 1 atm 4404. K 4131. C For muons, dE/dx = a(E) + b(E) E. Tables of b(E): PS PDF TEXT

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Nitrogen gas (N2) (N ) Nitrogen gas (N2) (N ) Quantity Value Units Value Units Atomic number 7 Atomic mass 14.0067(2) g mole-1 Specific gravity (20° C, 1 atm) 1.17E-03 g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 82.0 eV Minimum ionization 1.825 MeV g-1cm2 2.127E-03 MeV cm-1 Nuclear collision length 61.1 g cm-2 5.242E+04 cm Nuclear interaction length 89.7 g cm-2 7.696E+04 cm Pion collision length 88.4 g cm-2 7.583E+04 cm Pion interaction length 121.7 g cm-2 1.044E+05 cm Radiation length 37.99 g cm-2 3.260E+04 cm Critical energy 91.73 MeV (for e-) 89.71 MeV (for e+) Molière radius 8.78 g cm-2 7536. cm Plasma energy 0.70 eV Muon critical energy 1154. GeV Melting point 63.15 K -210.0 C Boiling point @ 1 atm 77.29 K -195.9 C

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Lithium (Li) Lithium (Li) Quantity Value Units Value Units Atomic number 3 Atomic mass 6.941(2) g mole-1 Density 0.534 g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 40.0 eV Minimum ionization 1.639 MeV g-1cm2 0.8750 MeV cm-1 Nuclear collision length 52.2 g cm-2 97.69 cm Nuclear interaction length 71.3 g cm-2 133.6 cm Pion collision length 79.1 g cm-2 148.2 cm Pion interaction length 103.3 g cm-2 193.4 cm Radiation length 82.78 g cm-2 155.0 cm Critical energy 149.06 MeV (for e-) 145.33 MeV (for e+) Molière radius 11.78 g cm-2 22.05 cm Plasma energy 13.84 eV Muon critical energy 1578. GeV Melting point 453.6 K 180.5 C Boiling point @ 1 atm 1615. K 1342. C For muons, dE/dx = a(E) + b(E) E. Tables of b(E): PS PDF TEXT

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Lung (ICRP) Lung (ICRP) Quantity Value Units Value Units 0.54965 Density 1.05 g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 75.3 eV Minimum ionization 1.970 MeV g-1cm2 2.069 MeV cm-1 Nuclear collision length 58.6 g cm-2 55.85 cm Nuclear interaction length 83.7 g cm-2 79.69 cm Pion collision length 86.1 g cm-2 82.01 cm Pion interaction length 115.6 g cm-2 110.1 cm Radiation length 36.50 g cm-2 34.76 cm Critical energy 78.73 MeV (for e-) 76.63 MeV (for e+) Molière radius 9.83 g cm-2 9.362 cm Plasma energy 21.89 eV Muon critical energy 1031. GeV Composition: Elem Z Atomic frac* Mass frac* H 1 1.00 0.101278 C 6 0.08 0.102310 N 7 0.02 0.028650 O 8 0.47 0.757072 Na 11 0.00 0.001840 Mg 12 0.00 0.000730 P 15 0.00 0.000800 S 16

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Manganese (Mn) Manganese (Mn) Quantity Value Units Value Units Atomic number 25 Atomic mass 54.938045(5) g mole-1 Density 7.44 g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 272.0 eV Minimum ionization 1.428 MeV g-1cm2 10.62 MeV cm-1 Nuclear collision length 81.4 g cm-2 10.94 cm Nuclear interaction length 131.4 g cm-2 17.67 cm Pion collision length 106.7 g cm-2 14.34 cm Pion interaction length 160.2 g cm-2 21.54 cm Radiation length 14.64 g cm-2 1.968 cm Critical energy 22.59 MeV (for e-) 21.89 MeV (for e+) Molière radius 13.74 g cm-2 1.847 cm Plasma energy 53.02 eV Muon critical energy 358. GeV For muons, dE/dx = a(E) + b(E) E. Tables of b(E): PS PDF TEXT Table of muon dE/dx and Range: PS PDF TEXT Explanation of some entries

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(Cs) (Cs) Quantity Value Units Value Units Atomic number 55 Atomic mass 132.9054519(2) g mole-1 Density 1.87 g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 488.0 eV Minimum ionization 1.254 MeV g-1cm2 2.349 MeV cm-1 Nuclear collision length 101.2 g cm-2 54.01 cm Nuclear interaction length 172.8 g cm-2 92.25 cm Pion collision length 125.3 g cm-2 66.88 cm Pion interaction length 200.2 g cm-2 106.9 cm Radiation length 8.31 g cm-2 4.434 cm Critical energy 11.34 MeV (for e-) 10.97 MeV (for e+) Molière radius 15.53 g cm-2 8.292 cm Plasma energy 25.37 eV Muon critical energy 200. GeV For muons, dE/dx = a(E) + b(E) E. Tables of b(E): PS PDF TEXT Table of muon dE/dx and Range: PS PDF TEXT Explanation of some entries

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Solid carbon dioxide (dry ice; CO2) Solid carbon dioxide (dry ice; CO2) Quantity Value Units Value Units 0.49989 Density 1.56 g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 85.0 eV Minimum ionization 1.787 MeV g-1cm2 2.793 MeV cm-1 Nuclear collision length 60.7 g cm-2 38.86 cm Nuclear interaction length 88.9 g cm-2 56.90 cm Pion collision length 87.9 g cm-2 56.25 cm Pion interaction length 120.8 g cm-2 77.26 cm Radiation length 36.20 g cm-2 23.16 cm Critical energy 69.99 MeV (for e-) 68.11 MeV (for e+) Molière radius 10.97 g cm-2 7.016 cm Plasma energy 25.47 eV Muon critical energy 927. GeV Composition: Elem Z Atomic frac* Mass frac* C 6 2.00 0.272916 O 8 4.00 0.727084 * calculated from mass fraction data. Explanation of some entries

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Skeletal muscle (ICRP) Skeletal muscle (ICRP) Quantity Value Units Value Units 0.54938 Density 1.04 g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 75.3 eV Minimum ionization 1.970 MeV g-1cm2 2.049 MeV cm-1 Nuclear collision length 58.6 g cm-2 56.38 cm Nuclear interaction length 83.7 g cm-2 80.46 cm Pion collision length 86.1 g cm-2 82.80 cm Pion interaction length 115.6 g cm-2 111.1 cm Radiation length 36.55 g cm-2 35.14 cm Critical energy 78.83 MeV (for e-) 76.73 MeV (for e+) Molière radius 9.83 g cm-2 9.453 cm Plasma energy 21.78 eV Muon critical energy 1032. GeV Composition: Elem Z Atomic frac* Mass frac* H 1 1.00 0.100637 C 6 0.09 0.107830 N 7 0.02 0.027680 O 8 0.47 0.754773 Na 11 0.00 0.000750 Mg 12 0.00 0.000190 P 15 0.00

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(Y ) (Y ) Quantity Value Units Value Units Atomic number 39 Atomic mass 88.90585(2) g mole-1 Density 4.47 g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 379.0 eV Minimum ionization 1.359 MeV g-1cm2 6.075 MeV cm-1 Nuclear collision length 91.3 g cm-2 20.43 cm Nuclear interaction length 152.2 g cm-2 34.05 cm Pion collision length 116.0 g cm-2 25.96 cm Pion interaction length 180.3 g cm-2 40.34 cm Radiation length 10.41 g cm-2 2.329 cm Critical energy 15.30 MeV (for e-) 14.81 MeV (for e+) Molière radius 14.43 g cm-2 3.228 cm Plasma energy 40.35 eV Muon critical energy 256. GeV For muons, dE/dx = a(E) + b(E) E. Tables of b(E): PS PDF TEXT Table of muon dE/dx and Range: PS PDF TEXT Explanation of some entries

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Cyclohexane (C6H12) Cyclohexane (C6H12) Quantity Value Units Value Units 0.57034 Density 0.779 g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 56.4 eV Minimum ionization 2.087 MeV g-1cm2 1.626 MeV cm-1 Nuclear collision length 56.1 g cm-2 72.04 cm Nuclear interaction length 78.5 g cm-2 100.7 cm Pion collision length 83.7 g cm-2 107.5 cm Pion interaction length 110.4 g cm-2 141.7 cm Radiation length 44.77 g cm-2 57.48 cm Critical energy 102.33 MeV (for e-) 99.67 MeV (for e+) Molière radius 9.28 g cm-2 11.91 cm Plasma energy 19.21 eV Muon critical energy 1287. GeV Composition: Elem Z Atomic frac* Mass frac* H 1 12.00 0.143711 C 6 6.00 0.856289 * calculated from mass fraction data. Explanation of some entries For muons, dE/dx = a(E) + b(E) E. Tables of b(E): PS PDF TEXT

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fluoride [PbF2] fluoride [PbF2] Quantity Value Units Value Units 0.40784 Density 7.77 g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 635.4 eV Minimum ionization 1.206 MeV g-1cm2 9.373 MeV cm-1 Nuclear collision length 102.1 g cm-2 13.14 cm Nuclear interaction length 171.7 g cm-2 22.10 cm Pion collision length 127.3 g cm-2 16.38 cm Pion interaction length 201.9 g cm-2 25.98 cm Radiation length 7.28 g cm-2 0.9369 cm Critical energy 9.35 MeV (for e-) 9.04 MeV (for e+) Molière radius 16.50 g cm-2 2.124 cm Plasma energy 51.30 eV Muon critical energy 165. GeV Composition: Elem Z Atomic frac* Mass frac* Pb 82 1.00 0.845035 F 9 2.00 0.154965 * calculated from mass fraction data. Explanation of some entries For muons, dE/dx = a(E) + b(E) E. Tables of b(E): PS PDF TEXT

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Curium (Cm) Curium (Cm) Quantity Value Units Value Units Atomic number 96 Atomic mass [247.07035(3)] g mole-1 Density 13.5 g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 939.0 eV Minimum ionization 1.082 MeV g-1cm2 14.61 MeV cm-1 Nuclear collision length 119.9 g cm-2 8.871 cm Nuclear interaction length 211.6 g cm-2 15.66 cm Pion collision length 142.7 g cm-2 10.56 cm Pion interaction length 237.8 g cm-2 17.60 cm Radiation length 5.79 g cm-2 0.4287 cm Critical energy 6.44 MeV (for e-) 6.20 MeV (for e+) Molière radius 19.07 g cm-2 1.411 cm Plasma energy 66.02 eV Muon critical energy 126. GeV Melting point 278.1 K 5.000 C For muons, dE/dx = a(E) + b(E) E. Tables of b(E): PS PDF TEXT Table of muon dE/dx and Range: PS PDF TEXT

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Aluminum oxide (Sapphire, Al2O3) Aluminum oxide (Sapphire, Al2O3) Quantity Value Units Value Units 0.49038 Density 3.97 g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 145.2 eV Minimum ionization 1.647 MeV g-1cm2 6.540 MeV cm-1 Nuclear collision length 65.5 g cm-2 16.49 cm Nuclear interaction length 98.4 g cm-2 24.79 cm Pion collision length 92.1 g cm-2 23.20 cm Pion interaction length 129.3 g cm-2 32.57 cm Radiation length 27.94 g cm-2 7.038 cm Critical energy 50.18 MeV (for e-) 48.74 MeV (for e+) Molière radius 11.81 g cm-2 2.974 cm Plasma energy 40.21 eV Muon critical energy 706. GeV Melting point 2327. K 2054. C Boiling point @ 1 atm 3273. K 3000. C Index of refraction (@ STP, Na D) 1.77 Composition: Elem Z Atomic frac* Mass frac*

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(Si) (Si) Quantity Value Units Value Units Atomic number 14 Atomic mass 28.0855(3) g mole-1 Density 2.33 g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 173.0 eV Minimum ionization 1.664 MeV g-1cm2 3.876 MeV cm-1 Nuclear collision length 70.2 g cm-2 30.16 cm Nuclear interaction length 108.4 g cm-2 46.52 cm Pion collision length 96.2 g cm-2 41.29 cm Pion interaction length 137.7 g cm-2 59.14 cm Radiation length 21.82 g cm-2 9.370 cm Critical energy 40.19 MeV (for e-) 39.05 MeV (for e+) Molière radius 11.51 g cm-2 4.944 cm Plasma energy 31.05 eV Muon critical energy 582. GeV Melting point 1687. K 1414. C Boiling point @ 1 atm 3538. K 3265. C Index of refraction (@ STP, Na D) 3.95 For muons, dE/dx = a(E) + b(E) E. Tables of b(E): PS PDF TEXT

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Argon gas (Ar) Argon gas (Ar) Quantity Value Units Value Units Atomic number 18 Atomic mass 39.948(1) g mole-1 Specific gravity (20° C, 1 atm) 1.66E-03 g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 188.0 eV Minimum ionization 1.519 MeV g-1cm2 2.525E-03 MeV cm-1 Nuclear collision length 75.7 g cm-2 4.557E+04 cm Nuclear interaction length 119.7 g cm-2 7.204E+04 cm Pion collision length 101.3 g cm-2 6.097E+04 cm Pion interaction length 149.0 g cm-2 8.964E+04 cm Radiation length 19.55 g cm-2 1.176E+04 cm Critical energy 38.03 MeV (for e-) 37.06 MeV (for e+) Molière radius 10.90 g cm-2 6559. cm Plasma energy 0.79 eV Muon critical energy 572. GeV Melting point 83.81 K -189.3 C Boiling point @ 1 atm 87.26 K -185.9 C

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iodide (NaI) iodide (NaI) Quantity Value Units Value Units 0.42697 Density 3.67 g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 452.0 eV Minimum ionization 1.305 MeV g-1cm2 4.785 MeV cm-1 Nuclear collision length 93.1 g cm-2 25.38 cm Nuclear interaction length 154.6 g cm-2 42.16 cm Pion collision length 118.2 g cm-2 32.23 cm Pion interaction length 183.8 g cm-2 50.11 cm Radiation length 9.49 g cm-2 2.588 cm Critical energy 13.37 MeV (for e-) 12.94 MeV (for e+) Molière radius 15.05 g cm-2 4.105 cm Plasma energy 36.06 eV Muon critical energy 228. GeV Melting point 933.2 K 660.0 C Boiling point @ 1 atm 1577. K 1304. C Index of refraction (@ STP, Na D) 1.77 Composition: Elem Z Atomic frac* Mass frac*

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Propane (C3H8) Propane (C3H8) Quantity Value Units Value Units 0.58962 Specific gravity (20° C, 1 atm) 1.87E-03 g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 47.1 eV Minimum ionization 2.262 MeV g-1cm2 4.226E-03 MeV cm-1 Nuclear collision length 55.3 g cm-2 2.962E+04 cm Nuclear interaction length 76.7 g cm-2 4.106E+04 cm Pion collision length 83.0 g cm-2 4.443E+04 cm Pion interaction length 108.5 g cm-2 5.809E+04 cm Radiation length 45.37 g cm-2 2.429E+04 cm Critical energy 131.58 MeV (for e-) 128.77 MeV (for e+) Molière radius 7.31 g cm-2 3915. cm Plasma energy 0.96 eV Muon critical energy 1558. GeV Melting point 85.52 K -187.6 C Boiling point @ 1 atm 231.0 K -42.10 C Composition: Elem Z Atomic frac* Mass frac*

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fluoride [CeF3] fluoride [CeF3] Quantity Value Units Value Units 0.43123 Density 6.16 g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 348.4 eV Minimum ionization 1.349 MeV g-1cm2 8.311 MeV cm-1 Nuclear collision length 87.9 g cm-2 14.26 cm Nuclear interaction length 142.6 g cm-2 23.15 cm Pion collision length 113.7 g cm-2 18.46 cm Pion interaction length 173.2 g cm-2 28.12 cm Radiation length 10.19 g cm-2 1.654 cm Critical energy 14.63 MeV (for e-) 14.16 MeV (for e+) Molière radius 14.77 g cm-2 2.398 cm Plasma energy 46.97 eV Muon critical energy 241. GeV Composition: Elem Z Atomic frac* Mass frac* Ce 58 1.00 0.710847 F 9 3.00 0.289153 * calculated from mass fraction data. Explanation of some entries For muons, dE/dx = a(E) + b(E) E. Tables of b(E): PS PDF TEXT

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Californium (Cf) Californium (Cf) Quantity Value Units Atomic number 98 Atomic mass [251.07959(3)] g mole-1 Density ?? g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 966.0 eV Minimum ionization 1.097 MeV g-1cm2 Nuclear collision length 120.4 g cm-2 Nuclear interaction length 212.8 g cm-2 Pion collision length 143.2 g cm-2 Pion interaction length 238.9 g cm-2 Radiation length 5.68 g cm-2 Critical energy 6.53 MeV (for e-) Molière radius 18.45 g cm-2 Plasma energy 67.36 eV Muon critical energy 124. GeV Melting point 1173. K For muons, dE/dx = a(E) + b(E) E. Tables of b(E): PS PDF TEXT Table of muon dE/dx and Range: PS PDF TEXT Explanation of some entries Note: Since there is no stable isotope, [atomic mass] is that of the longest-lived known isotope as of Jan 2007. Note: Density 14.0 g/cm3 and Ieff = 966 eV assumed in calculating critical

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "g-1cm2 nuclear collision" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

 

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Photographic emulsion Photographic emulsion Quantity Value Units Value Units 0.45453 Density 3.82 g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 331.0 eV Minimum ionization 1.422 MeV g-1cm2 5.424 MeV cm-1 Nuclear collision length 84.2 g cm-2 22.08 cm Nuclear interaction length 135.1 g cm-2 35.42 cm Pion collision length 110.4 g cm-2 28.95 cm Pion interaction length 166.3 g cm-2 43.60 cm Radiation length 11.33 g cm-2 2.971 cm Critical energy 17.43 MeV (for e-) 16.88 MeV (for e+) Molière radius 13.79 g cm-2 3.614 cm Plasma energy 37.95 eV Muon critical energy 286. GeV Composition: Elem Z Atomic frac* Mass frac* H 1 1.00 0.014100 C 6 0.43 0.072261 N 7 0.10 0.019320 O 8 0.30 0.066101 S 16 0.00 0.001890 Br 35 0.31 0.349103 Ag 47 0.31

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Xylene C8H10 Xylene C8H10 Quantity Value Units Value Units 0.54631 Density 0.870 g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 61.8 eV Minimum ionization 1.986 MeV g-1cm2 1.728 MeV cm-1 Nuclear collision length 57.1 g cm-2 65.66 cm Nuclear interaction length 80.8 g cm-2 92.90 cm Pion collision length 84.6 g cm-2 97.28 cm Pion interaction length 112.8 g cm-2 129.6 cm Radiation length 44.05 g cm-2 50.63 cm Critical energy 95.94 MeV (for e-) 93.43 MeV (for e+) Molière radius 9.74 g cm-2 11.19 cm Plasma energy 19.87 eV Muon critical energy 1214. GeV Composition: Elem Z Atomic frac* Mass frac* H 1 10.00 0.094935 C 6 8.00 0.905065 * calculated from mass fraction data. Explanation of some entries For muons, dE/dx = a(E) + b(E) E. Tables of b(E): PS PDF TEXT

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chloride (NaCl) chloride (NaCl) Quantity Value Units Value Units 0.55509 Density 2.17 g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 175.3 eV Minimum ionization 1.847 MeV g-1cm2 4.008 MeV cm-1 Nuclear collision length 71.2 g cm-2 32.79 cm Nuclear interaction length 110.1 g cm-2 50.76 cm Pion collision length 97.0 g cm-2 44.71 cm Pion interaction length 139.7 g cm-2 64.36 cm Radiation length 21.91 g cm-2 10.09 cm Critical energy 44.97 MeV (for e-) 43.69 MeV (for e+) Molière radius 10.33 g cm-2 4.760 cm Plasma energy 31.63 eV Muon critical energy 646. GeV Melting point 1075. K 802.0 C Boiling point @ 1 atm 1738. K 1465. C Index of refraction (@ STP, Na D) 1.54 Composition: Elem Z Atomic frac* Mass frac*

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Berkelium (Bk) Berkelium (Bk) Quantity Value Units Atomic number 97 Atomic mass [247.07031(4)] g mole-1 Density ?? g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 952.0 eV Minimum ionization 1.106 MeV g-1cm2 Nuclear collision length 119.9 g cm-2 Nuclear interaction length 211.6 g cm-2 Pion collision length 142.7 g cm-2 Pion interaction length 237.8 g cm-2 Radiation length 5.69 g cm-2 Critical energy 6.59 MeV (for e-) Molière radius 18.32 g cm-2 Plasma energy 67.56 eV Muon critical energy 125. GeV Melting point 1269. K For muons, dE/dx = a(E) + b(E) E. Tables of b(E): PS PDF TEXT Table of muon dE/dx and Range: PS PDF TEXT Explanation of some entries Note: Since there is no stable isotope, [atomic mass] is that of the longest-lived known isotope as of Jan 2007. Table of isotopes Warning: may not be current

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(Ce) (Ce) Quantity Value Units Value Units Atomic number 58 Atomic mass 140.116(1) g mole-1 Density 6.77 g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 523.0 eV Minimum ionization 1.234 MeV g-1cm2 8.353 MeV cm-1 Nuclear collision length 102.6 g cm-2 15.15 cm Nuclear interaction length 175.7 g cm-2 25.96 cm Pion collision length 126.6 g cm-2 18.70 cm Pion interaction length 203.0 g cm-2 29.99 cm Radiation length 7.96 g cm-2 1.175 cm Critical energy 10.40 MeV (for e-) 10.04 MeV (for e+) Molière radius 16.23 g cm-2 2.397 cm Plasma energy 48.24 eV Muon critical energy 185. GeV For muons, dE/dx = a(E) + b(E) E. Tables of b(E): PS PDF TEXT Table of muon dE/dx and Range: PS PDF TEXT Explanation of some entries Table of isotopes Warning: may not be current

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oxysulfide (Gd2O2S) oxysulfide (Gd2O2S) Quantity Value Units Value Units 0.42266 Density 7.44 g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 493.3 eV Minimum ionization 1.257 MeV g-1cm2 9.352 MeV cm-1 Nuclear collision length 96.1 g cm-2 12.92 cm Nuclear interaction length 160.1 g cm-2 21.52 cm Pion collision length 121.5 g cm-2 16.33 cm Pion interaction length 190.2 g cm-2 25.57 cm Radiation length 8.49 g cm-2 1.141 cm Critical energy 11.27 MeV (for e-) 10.89 MeV (for e+) Molière radius 15.96 g cm-2 2.146 cm Plasma energy 51.10 eV Muon critical energy 199. GeV Composition: Elem Z Atomic frac* Mass frac* O 8 2.00 0.084528 S 16 1.00 0.084690 Gd 64 2.00 0.830782 * calculated from mass fraction data. Explanation of some entries

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Lawrencium (Lr) Lawrencium (Lr) Quantity Value Units Atomic number 103 Atomic mass [262.110(2)] g mole-1 Density ?? g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 1034.0 eV Minimum ionization 1.096 MeV g-1cm2 Nuclear collision length 121.9 g cm-2 Nuclear interaction length 215.8 g cm-2 Pion collision length 144.6 g cm-2 Pion interaction length 241.8 g cm-2 Radiation length 5.45 g cm-2 Critical energy 6.26 MeV (for e-) Molière radius 18.48 g cm-2 Plasma energy 67.59 eV Muon critical energy 120. GeV For muons, dE/dx = a(E) + b(E) E. Tables of b(E): PS PDF TEXT Table of muon dE/dx and Range: PS PDF TEXT Explanation of some entries Note: Since there is no stable isotope, [atomic mass] is that of the longest-lived known isotope as of Jan 2007. Note: Density 14.0 g/cm3 and Ieff = Z*10.0 eV assumed in calculating

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graphite) (C ) graphite) (C ) Quantity Value Units Value Units Atomic number 6 Atomic mass 12.0107(8) g mole-1 Density 2.21 g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 78.0 eV Minimum ionization 1.742 MeV g-1cm2 3.850 MeV cm-1 Nuclear collision length 59.2 g cm-2 26.79 cm Nuclear interaction length 85.8 g cm-2 38.83 cm Pion collision length 86.5 g cm-2 39.12 cm Pion interaction length 117.8 g cm-2 53.30 cm Radiation length 42.70 g cm-2 19.32 cm Critical energy 81.74 MeV (for e-) 79.51 MeV (for e+) Molière radius 11.08 g cm-2 5.012 cm Plasma energy 30.28 eV Muon critical energy 1057. GeV Sublimination temperature (@ 1 atm) 4098. K 3825. C For muons, dE/dx = a(E) + b(E) E. Tables of b(E): PS PDF TEXT Table of muon dE/dx and Range: PS PDF TEXT

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fluoride (BaF2) fluoride (BaF2) Quantity Value Units Value Units 0.42207 Density 4.89 g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 375.9 eV Minimum ionization 1.303 MeV g-1cm2 6.374 MeV cm-1 Nuclear collision length 90.8 g cm-2 18.56 cm Nuclear interaction length 149.0 g cm-2 30.46 cm Pion collision length 116.4 g cm-2 23.78 cm Pion interaction length 179.2 g cm-2 36.62 cm Radiation length 9.91 g cm-2 2.026 cm Critical energy 13.78 MeV (for e-) 13.34 MeV (for e+) Molière radius 15.25 g cm-2 3.117 cm Plasma energy 41.41 eV Muon critical energy 233. GeV Melting point 1641. K 1368. C Boiling point @ 1 atm 2533. K 2260. C Index of refraction (@ STP, Na D) 1.47 Composition: Elem Z Atomic frac* Mass frac*

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Neon gas (Ne) Neon gas (Ne) Quantity Value Units Value Units Atomic number 10 Atomic mass 20.1797(6) g mole-1 Specific gravity (20° C, 1 atm) 8.39E-04 g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 137.0 eV Minimum ionization 1.724 MeV g-1cm2 1.446E-03 MeV cm-1 Nuclear collision length 65.7 g cm-2 7.837E+04 cm Nuclear interaction length 99.0 g cm-2 1.181E+05 cm Pion collision length 91.8 g cm-2 1.095E+05 cm Pion interaction length 128.7 g cm-2 1.534E+05 cm Radiation length 28.93 g cm-2 3.450E+04 cm Critical energy 67.02 MeV (for e-) 65.47 MeV (for e+) Molière radius 9.15 g cm-2 1.092E+04 cm Plasma energy 0.59 eV Muon critical energy 907. GeV Melting point 24.56 K -248.6 C Boiling point @ 1 atm 27.07 K -246.1 C

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gas (H2) (H ) gas (H2) (H ) Quantity Value Units Value Units Atomic number 1 Atomic mass 1.00794(7) g mole-1 Specific gravity (20° C, 1 atm) 8.38E-05 g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 19.2 eV Minimum ionization 4.103 MeV g-1cm2 3.437E-04 MeV cm-1 Nuclear collision length 42.8 g cm-2 5.115E+05 cm Nuclear interaction length 52.0 g cm-2 6.209E+05 cm Pion collision length 70.4 g cm-2 8.406E+05 cm Pion interaction length 80.3 g cm-2 9.583E+05 cm Radiation length 63.04 g cm-2 7.527E+05 cm Critical energy 344.80 MeV (for e-) 338.33 MeV (for e+) Molière radius 3.88 g cm-2 4.629E+04 cm Plasma energy 0.26 eV Muon critical energy 3611. GeV Melting point 13.81 K -259.3 C Boiling point @ 1 atm 20.28 K -252.9 C

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Thorium (Th) Thorium (Th) Quantity Value Units Value Units Atomic number 90 Atomic mass [232.03806(2)] g mole-1 Density 11.7 g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 847.0 eV Minimum ionization 1.098 MeV g-1cm2 12.87 MeV cm-1 Nuclear collision length 117.7 g cm-2 10.05 cm Nuclear interaction length 207.3 g cm-2 17.68 cm Pion collision length 140.7 g cm-2 12.01 cm Pion interaction length 233.6 g cm-2 19.93 cm Radiation length 6.07 g cm-2 0.5182 cm Critical energy 6.91 MeV (for e-) 6.66 MeV (for e+) Molière radius 18.64 g cm-2 1.590 cm Plasma energy 61.44 eV Muon critical energy 132. GeV Melting point 1408. K 1135. C Boiling point @ 1 atm 4404. K 4131. C For muons, dE/dx = a(E) + b(E) E. Tables of b(E): PS PDF TEXT

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ICRP) ICRP) Quantity Value Units Value Units 0.55121 Density 1.00 g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 72.3 eV Minimum ionization 1.982 MeV g-1cm2 1.982 MeV cm-1 Nuclear collision length 58.3 g cm-2 58.28 cm Nuclear interaction length 83.0 g cm-2 82.96 cm Pion collision length 85.8 g cm-2 85.78 cm Pion interaction length 114.9 g cm-2 114.9 cm Radiation length 37.63 g cm-2 37.63 cm Critical energy 81.68 MeV (for e-) 79.51 MeV (for e+) Molière radius 9.77 g cm-2 9.770 cm Plasma energy 21.39 eV Muon critical energy 1064. GeV Composition: Elem Z Atomic frac* Mass frac* H 1 1.00 0.104472 C 6 0.19 0.232190 N 7 0.02 0.024880 O 8 0.38 0.630238 Na 11 0.00 0.001130 Mg 12 0.00 0.000130 P 15 0.00 0.001330 S 16 0.00

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Polonium (Po) Polonium (Po) Quantity Value Units Value Units Atomic number 84 Atomic mass [208.98243(2)] g mole-1 Density 9.32 g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 830.0 eV Minimum ionization 1.141 MeV g-1cm2 10.63 MeV cm-1 Nuclear collision length 114.3 g cm-2 12.27 cm Nuclear interaction length 200.2 g cm-2 21.48 cm Pion collision length 137.6 g cm-2 14.76 cm Pion interaction length 226.7 g cm-2 24.32 cm Radiation length 6.16 g cm-2 0.6611 cm Critical energy 7.33 MeV (for e-) 7.06 MeV (for e+) Molière radius 17.83 g cm-2 1.913 cm Plasma energy 55.77 eV Muon critical energy 140. GeV For muons, dE/dx = a(E) + b(E) E. Tables of b(E): PS PDF TEXT Table of muon dE/dx and Range: PS PDF TEXT Explanation of some entries

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Viton fluoroelastomer (C5H2F8)n Viton fluoroelastomer (C5H2F8)n Quantity Value Units Value Units 0.48585 Density 1.80 g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 98.6 eV Minimum ionization 1.701 MeV g-1cm2 3.062 MeV cm-1 Nuclear collision length 62.9 g cm-2 34.96 cm Nuclear interaction length 93.1 g cm-2 51.73 cm Pion collision length 89.4 g cm-2 49.69 cm Pion interaction length 123.8 g cm-2 68.76 cm Radiation length 35.36 g cm-2 19.64 cm Critical energy 65.82 MeV (for e-) 64.02 MeV (for e+) Molière radius 11.39 g cm-2 6.329 cm Plasma energy 26.95 eV Muon critical energy 879. GeV Composition: Elem Z Atomic frac* Mass frac* H 1 2.00 0.009417 C 6 5.00 0.280555 F 9 8.00 0.710028 * calculated from mass fraction data. Explanation of some entries

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Hassium (Hs) Hassium (Hs) Quantity Value Units Atomic number 108 Atomic mass [269.13410000(1)] g mole-1 Density ?? g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 1102.0 eV Minimum ionization 1.110 MeV g-1cm2 Nuclear collision length 122.8 g cm-2 Nuclear interaction length 217.7 g cm-2 Pion collision length 145.5 g cm-2 Pion interaction length 243.7 g cm-2 Radiation length 5.17 g cm-2 Critical energy 6.01 MeV (for e-) Molière radius 18.24 g cm-2 Plasma energy 68.30 eV Muon critical energy 119. GeV For muons, dE/dx = a(E) + b(E) E. Tables of b(E): PS PDF TEXT Table of muon dE/dx and Range: PS PDF TEXT Explanation of some entries Note: Since there is no stable isotope, [atomic mass] is that of the longest-lived known isotope as of Jan 2007. Note: Density 14.0 g/cm3 and Ieff = 1102 eV assumed in calculating critical

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dioxide (fused quartz) (SiO2) dioxide (fused quartz) (SiO2) Quantity Value Units Value Units 0.49930 Density 2.20 g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 139.2 eV Minimum ionization 1.699 MeV g-1cm2 3.737 MeV cm-1 Nuclear collision length 65.2 g cm-2 29.64 cm Nuclear interaction length 97.8 g cm-2 44.47 cm Pion collision length 91.9 g cm-2 41.77 cm Pion interaction length 128.8 g cm-2 58.56 cm Radiation length 27.05 g cm-2 12.29 cm Critical energy 50.58 MeV (for e-) 49.17 MeV (for e+) Molière radius 11.34 g cm-2 5.154 cm Plasma energy 30.20 eV Muon critical energy 708. GeV Melting point 1986. K 1713. C Boiling point @ 1 atm 3223. K 2950. C Index of refraction (@ STP, Na D) 1.46 Composition: Elem Z Atomic frac* Mass frac*

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(Ca) (Ca) Quantity Value Units Value Units Atomic number 20 Atomic mass 40.078(4) g mole-1 Density 1.55 g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 191.0 eV Minimum ionization 1.655 MeV g-1cm2 2.566 MeV cm-1 Nuclear collision length 75.8 g cm-2 48.89 cm Nuclear interaction length 119.8 g cm-2 77.31 cm Pion collision length 101.4 g cm-2 65.44 cm Pion interaction length 148.8 g cm-2 96.02 cm Radiation length 16.14 g cm-2 10.42 cm Critical energy 29.56 MeV (for e-) 28.71 MeV (for e+) Molière radius 11.58 g cm-2 7.471 cm Plasma energy 25.34 eV Muon critical energy 447. GeV For muons, dE/dx = a(E) + b(E) E. Tables of b(E): PS PDF TEXT Table of muon dE/dx and Range: PS PDF TEXT Explanation of some entries Table of isotopes Warning: may not be current

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Blood (ICRP) Blood (ICRP) Quantity Value Units Value Units 0.54995 Density 1.06 g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 75.2 eV Minimum ionization 1.971 MeV g-1cm2 2.089 MeV cm-1 Nuclear collision length 58.6 g cm-2 55.30 cm Nuclear interaction length 83.6 g cm-2 78.90 cm Pion collision length 86.1 g cm-2 81.22 cm Pion interaction length 115.5 g cm-2 109.0 cm Radiation length 36.53 g cm-2 34.46 cm Critical energy 78.81 MeV (for e-) 76.71 MeV (for e+) Molière radius 9.83 g cm-2 9.272 cm Plasma energy 22.00 eV Muon critical energy 1032. GeV Composition: Elem Z Atomic frac* Mass frac* H 1 1.00 0.101866 C 6 0.08 0.100020 N 7 0.02 0.029640 O 8 0.47 0.759414 Na 11 0.00 0.001850 Mg 12 0.00 0.000040 Si 14 0.00 0.000030 P 15

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(Ga) (Ga) Quantity Value Units Value Units Atomic number 31 Atomic mass 69.723(1) g mole-1 Density 5.90 g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 334.0 eV Minimum ionization 1.379 MeV g-1cm2 8.140 MeV cm-1 Nuclear collision length 86.0 g cm-2 14.57 cm Nuclear interaction length 141.2 g cm-2 23.92 cm Pion collision length 111.1 g cm-2 18.82 cm Pion interaction length 169.7 g cm-2 28.74 cm Radiation length 12.47 g cm-2 2.113 cm Critical energy 18.57 MeV (for e-) 17.98 MeV (for e+) Molière radius 14.24 g cm-2 2.412 cm Plasma energy 46.69 eV Muon critical energy 304. GeV For muons, dE/dx = a(E) + b(E) E. Tables of b(E): PS PDF TEXT Table of muon dE/dx and Range: PS PDF TEXT Explanation of some entries Table of isotopes Warning: may not be current

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "g-1cm2 nuclear collision" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


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tungstate (PbWO4) tungstate (PbWO4) Quantity Value Units Value Units 0.41315 Density 8.30 g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 600.7 eV Minimum ionization 1.229 MeV g-1cm2 10.20 MeV cm-1 Nuclear collision length 100.6 g cm-2 12.12 cm Nuclear interaction length 168.3 g cm-2 20.27 cm Pion collision length 126.2 g cm-2 15.21 cm Pion interaction length 199.5 g cm-2 24.04 cm Radiation length 7.39 g cm-2 0.8903 cm Critical energy 9.64 MeV (for e-) 9.31 MeV (for e+) Molière radius 16.26 g cm-2 1.959 cm Plasma energy 53.36 eV Muon critical energy 170. GeV Melting point 1396. K 1123. C Index of refraction (@ STP, Na D) 2.20 Composition: Elem Z Atomic frac* Mass frac* Pb 82 1.00 0.455347 W 74 1.00 0.404011

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deuterium (D2) (D ) deuterium (D2) (D ) Quantity Value Units Value Units Atomic number 1 Atomic mass 2.014101764(13) g mole-1 Density 0.169 g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 21.8 eV Minimum ionization 2.019 MeV g-1cm2 0.3411 MeV cm-1 Nuclear collision length 51.3 g cm-2 303.8 cm Nuclear interaction length 71.8 g cm-2 424.7 cm Pion collision length 81.4 g cm-2 481.8 cm Pion interaction length 110.1 g cm-2 651.6 cm Radiation length 125.98 g cm-2 745.4 cm Critical energy 278.02 MeV (for e-) 271.50 MeV (for e+) Molière radius 9.61 g cm-2 56.86 cm Plasma energy 8.35 eV Muon critical energy 1592. GeV Boiling point @ 1 atm 23.65 K -249.5 C Triple point 18.69 K -254.5 C Index of refraction (@ STP, Na D) 1.11

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(Tl) (Tl) Quantity Value Units Value Units Atomic number 81 Atomic mass 204.3833(2) g mole-1 Density 11.7 g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 810.0 eV Minimum ionization 1.125 MeV g-1cm2 13.19 MeV cm-1 Nuclear collision length 113.6 g cm-2 9.696 cm Nuclear interaction length 198.7 g cm-2 16.96 cm Pion collision length 136.9 g cm-2 11.68 cm Pion interaction length 225.3 g cm-2 19.22 cm Radiation length 6.42 g cm-2 0.5477 cm Critical energy 7.50 MeV (for e-) 7.23 MeV (for e+) Molière radius 18.15 g cm-2 1.549 cm Plasma energy 62.10 eV Muon critical energy 142. GeV For muons, dE/dx = a(E) + b(E) E. Tables of b(E): PS PDF TEXT Table of muon dE/dx and Range: PS PDF TEXT Explanation of some entries Table of isotopes Warning: may not be current

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(Pb) (Pb) Quantity Value Units Value Units Atomic number 82 Atomic mass 207.2(1) g mole-1 Density 11.4 g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 823.0 eV Minimum ionization 1.122 MeV g-1cm2 12.74 MeV cm-1 Nuclear collision length 114.1 g cm-2 10.05 cm Nuclear interaction length 199.6 g cm-2 17.59 cm Pion collision length 137.3 g cm-2 12.10 cm Pion interaction length 226.2 g cm-2 19.93 cm Radiation length 6.37 g cm-2 0.5612 cm Critical energy 7.43 MeV (for e-) 7.16 MeV (for e+) Molière radius 18.18 g cm-2 1.602 cm Plasma energy 61.07 eV Muon critical energy 141. GeV Melting point 600.6 K 327.5 C Boiling point @ 1 atm 2022. K 1749. C For muons, dE/dx = a(E) + b(E) E. Tables of b(E): PS PDF TEXT

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Polypropylene ([CH(CH3)CH2]n) Polypropylene ([CH(CH3)CH2]n) Quantity Value Units Value Units 0.55998 Density 0.905 g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 57.4 eV Minimum ionization 2.041 MeV g-1cm2 1.847 MeV cm-1 Nuclear collision length 56.1 g cm-2 62.01 cm Nuclear interaction length 78.5 g cm-2 86.72 cm Pion collision length 83.7 g cm-2 92.51 cm Pion interaction length 110.4 g cm-2 122.0 cm Radiation length 44.77 g cm-2 49.47 cm Critical energy 99.80 MeV (for e-) 97.18 MeV (for e+) Molière radius 9.51 g cm-2 10.51 cm Plasma energy 20.51 eV Muon critical energy 1259. GeV Composition: Elem Z Atomic frac* Mass frac* H 1 2.00 0.143711 C 6 1.00 0.856289 * calculated from mass fraction data. Explanation of some entries For muons, dE/dx = a(E) + b(E) E. Tables of b(E): PS PDF TEXT

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Nitrobenzene C6H5NO2 Nitrobenzene C6H5NO2 Quantity Value Units Value Units 0.51986 Density 1.20 g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 75.8 eV Minimum ionization 1.857 MeV g-1cm2 2.226 MeV cm-1 Nuclear collision length 59.0 g cm-2 49.23 cm Nuclear interaction length 85.0 g cm-2 70.94 cm Pion collision length 86.4 g cm-2 72.06 cm Pion interaction length 117.0 g cm-2 97.61 cm Radiation length 40.09 g cm-2 33.44 cm Critical energy 81.68 MeV (for e-) 79.50 MeV (for e+) Molière radius 10.41 g cm-2 8.682 cm Plasma energy 22.75 eV Muon critical energy 1058. GeV Composition: Elem Z Atomic frac* Mass frac* H 1 5.00 0.040935 C 6 6.00 0.585374 N 7 1.00 0.113773 O 8 2.00 0.259918 * calculated from mass fraction data. Explanation of some entries

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Eye lens (ICRP) Eye lens (ICRP) Quantity Value Units Value Units 0.54977 Density 1.10 g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 73.3 eV Minimum ionization 1.971 MeV g-1cm2 2.168 MeV cm-1 Nuclear collision length 58.4 g cm-2 53.10 cm Nuclear interaction length 83.3 g cm-2 75.69 cm Pion collision length 85.9 g cm-2 78.08 cm Pion interaction length 115.2 g cm-2 104.7 cm Radiation length 37.58 g cm-2 34.17 cm Critical energy 81.05 MeV (for e-) 78.89 MeV (for e+) Molière radius 9.83 g cm-2 8.939 cm Plasma energy 22.41 eV Muon critical energy 1057. GeV Composition: Elem Z Atomic frac* Mass frac* H 1 1.00 0.099269 C 6 0.16 0.193710 N 7 0.04 0.053270 O 8 0.41 0.653751 * calculated from mass fraction data. Explanation of some entries

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(Yb) (Yb) Quantity Value Units Value Units Atomic number 70 Atomic mass 173.054(5) g mole-1 Density 6.90 g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 684.0 eV Minimum ionization 1.159 MeV g-1cm2 8.001 MeV cm-1 Nuclear collision length 108.6 g cm-2 15.73 cm Nuclear interaction length 188.2 g cm-2 27.26 cm Pion collision length 132.2 g cm-2 19.15 cm Pion interaction length 215.1 g cm-2 31.16 cm Radiation length 7.02 g cm-2 1.017 cm Critical energy 8.52 MeV (for e-) 8.22 MeV (for e+) Molière radius 17.47 g cm-2 2.531 cm Plasma energy 48.15 eV Muon critical energy 161. GeV For muons, dE/dx = a(E) + b(E) E. Tables of b(E): PS PDF TEXT Table of muon dE/dx and Range: PS PDF TEXT Explanation of some entries Table of isotopes Warning: may not be current

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(K ) (K ) Quantity Value Units Value Units Atomic number 19 Atomic mass 39.0983(1) g mole-1 Density 0.862 g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 190.0 eV Minimum ionization 1.623 MeV g-1cm2 1.399 MeV cm-1 Nuclear collision length 75.4 g cm-2 87.44 cm Nuclear interaction length 119.0 g cm-2 138.0 cm Pion collision length 101.0 g cm-2 117.2 cm Pion interaction length 148.1 g cm-2 171.8 cm Radiation length 17.32 g cm-2 20.09 cm Critical energy 31.62 MeV (for e-) 30.72 MeV (for e+) Molière radius 11.61 g cm-2 13.47 cm Plasma energy 18.65 eV Muon critical energy 472. GeV For muons, dE/dx = a(E) + b(E) E. Tables of b(E): PS PDF TEXT Table of muon dE/dx and Range: PS PDF TEXT Explanation of some entries

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Europium (Eu) Europium (Eu) Quantity Value Units Value Units Atomic number 63 Atomic mass 151.964(1) g mole-1 Density 5.24 g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 580.0 eV Minimum ionization 1.219 MeV g-1cm2 6.389 MeV cm-1 Nuclear collision length 104.8 g cm-2 19.99 cm Nuclear interaction length 180.4 g cm-2 34.41 cm Pion collision length 128.7 g cm-2 24.54 cm Pion interaction length 207.5 g cm-2 39.58 cm Radiation length 7.44 g cm-2 1.419 cm Critical energy 9.59 MeV (for e-) 9.26 MeV (for e+) Molière radius 16.44 g cm-2 3.135 cm Plasma energy 42.48 eV Muon critical energy 175. GeV For muons, dE/dx = a(E) + b(E) E. Tables of b(E): PS PDF TEXT Table of muon dE/dx and Range: PS PDF TEXT Explanation of some entries

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Cortical bone (ICRP) Cortical bone (ICRP) Quantity Value Units Value Units 0.52130 Density 1.85 g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 106.4 eV Minimum ionization 1.803 MeV g-1cm2 3.336 MeV cm-1 Nuclear collision length 63.2 g cm-2 34.18 cm Nuclear interaction length 93.0 g cm-2 50.28 cm Pion collision length 90.4 g cm-2 48.87 cm Pion interaction length 124.8 g cm-2 67.45 cm Radiation length 27.42 g cm-2 14.82 cm Critical energy 53.99 MeV (for e-) 52.49 MeV (for e+) Molière radius 10.77 g cm-2 5.820 cm Plasma energy 28.30 eV Muon critical energy 749. GeV Composition: Elem Z Atomic frac* Mass frac* H 1 1.00 0.047234 C 6 0.26 0.144330 N 7 0.06 0.041990 O 8 0.59 0.446096 Mg 12 0.00 0.002200 P 15 0.07 0.104970 S 16 0.00 0.003150

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Standard rock Standard rock Quantity Value Units Value Units 0.50000 Density 2.65 g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 136.4 eV Minimum ionization 1.688 MeV g-1cm2 4.472 MeV cm-1 Nuclear collision length 66.8 g cm-2 25.23 cm Nuclear interaction length 101.3 g cm-2 38.24 cm Pion collision length 92.9 g cm-2 35.05 cm Pion interaction length 130.9 g cm-2 49.40 cm Radiation length 26.54 g cm-2 10.02 cm Critical energy 49.13 MeV (for e-) 47.74 MeV (for e+) Molière radius 11.46 g cm-2 4.323 cm Plasma energy 33.17 eV Muon critical energy 693. GeV Composition: Elem Atomic frac* Mass frac Z = 11, A = 22.00 1.00 1.000000 Along with density above, definition of standard rock Explanation of some entries For muons, dE/dx = a(E) + b(E) E. Tables of b(E): PS PDF TEXT

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Molybdenum (Mo) Molybdenum (Mo) Quantity Value Units Value Units Atomic number 42 Atomic mass 95.96(2) g mole-1 Density 10.2 g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 424.0 eV Minimum ionization 1.329 MeV g-1cm2 13.59 MeV cm-1 Nuclear collision length 93.0 g cm-2 9.105 cm Nuclear interaction length 155.8 g cm-2 15.25 cm Pion collision length 117.7 g cm-2 11.51 cm Pion interaction length 183.8 g cm-2 17.98 cm Radiation length 9.81 g cm-2 0.9594 cm Critical energy 13.85 MeV (for e-) 13.39 MeV (for e+) Molière radius 15.01 g cm-2 1.469 cm Plasma energy 60.94 eV Muon critical energy 235. GeV For muons, dE/dx = a(E) + b(E) E. Tables of b(E): PS PDF TEXT Table of muon dE/dx and Range: PS PDF TEXT Explanation of some entries

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(Al) (Al) Quantity Value Units Value Units Atomic number 13 Atomic mass 26.9815386(8) g mole-1 Density 2.70 g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 166.0 eV Minimum ionization 1.615 MeV g-1cm2 4.358 MeV cm-1 Nuclear collision length 69.7 g cm-2 25.82 cm Nuclear interaction length 107.2 g cm-2 39.70 cm Pion collision length 95.6 g cm-2 35.41 cm Pion interaction length 136.7 g cm-2 50.64 cm Radiation length 24.01 g cm-2 8.897 cm Critical energy 42.70 MeV (for e-) 41.48 MeV (for e+) Molière radius 11.93 g cm-2 4.419 cm Plasma energy 32.86 eV Muon critical energy 612. GeV Melting point 933.5 K 660.3 C Boiling point @ 1 atm 2792. K 2519. C For muons, dE/dx = a(E) + b(E) E. Tables of b(E): PS PDF TEXT

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(Gd) (Gd) Quantity Value Units Value Units Atomic number 64 Atomic mass 157.25(3) g mole-1 Density 7.90 g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 591.0 eV Minimum ionization 1.188 MeV g-1cm2 9.383 MeV cm-1 Nuclear collision length 105.8 g cm-2 13.39 cm Nuclear interaction length 182.4 g cm-2 23.09 cm Pion collision length 129.6 g cm-2 16.40 cm Pion interaction length 209.5 g cm-2 26.52 cm Radiation length 7.48 g cm-2 0.9472 cm Critical energy 9.34 MeV (for e-) 9.01 MeV (for e+) Molière radius 17.00 g cm-2 2.151 cm Plasma energy 51.67 eV Muon critical energy 171. GeV For muons, dE/dx = a(E) + b(E) E. Tables of b(E): PS PDF TEXT Table of muon dE/dx and Range: PS PDF TEXT Explanation of some entries Table of isotopes Warning: may not be current

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(Mg) (Mg) Quantity Value Units Value Units Atomic number 12 Atomic mass 24.3050(6) g mole-1 Density 1.74 g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 156.0 eV Minimum ionization 1.674 MeV g-1cm2 2.913 MeV cm-1 Nuclear collision length 68.2 g cm-2 39.20 cm Nuclear interaction length 104.1 g cm-2 59.84 cm Pion collision length 94.2 g cm-2 54.13 cm Pion interaction length 133.7 g cm-2 76.81 cm Radiation length 25.03 g cm-2 14.39 cm Critical energy 46.55 MeV (for e-) 45.25 MeV (for e+) Molière radius 11.40 g cm-2 6.553 cm Plasma energy 26.71 eV Muon critical energy 659. GeV For muons, dE/dx = a(E) + b(E) E. Tables of b(E): PS PDF TEXT Table of muon dE/dx and Range: PS PDF TEXT Explanation of some entries Table of isotopes Warning: may not be current

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Technetium (Tc) Technetium (Tc) Quantity Value Units Value Units Atomic number 43 Atomic mass [97.90722(3)] g mole-1 Density 11.5 g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 428.0 eV Minimum ionization 1.325 MeV g-1cm2 15.24 MeV cm-1 Nuclear collision length 93.5 g cm-2 8.132 cm Nuclear interaction length 156.8 g cm-2 13.64 cm Pion collision length 118.1 g cm-2 10.27 cm Pion interaction length 184.7 g cm-2 16.06 cm Radiation length 9.58 g cm-2 0.8331 cm Critical energy 13.46 MeV (for e-) 13.01 MeV (for e+) Molière radius 15.09 g cm-2 1.313 cm Plasma energy 64.76 eV Muon critical energy 232. GeV Melting point 2430. K 2157. C Boiling point @ 1 atm 4538. K 4265. C For muons, dE/dx = a(E) + b(E) E. Tables of b(E): PS PDF TEXT

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(Be) (Be) Quantity Value Units Value Units Atomic number 4 Atomic mass 9.012182(3) g mole-1 Density 1.85 g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 63.7 eV Minimum ionization 1.595 MeV g-1cm2 2.947 MeV cm-1 Nuclear collision length 55.3 g cm-2 29.93 cm Nuclear interaction length 77.8 g cm-2 42.10 cm Pion collision length 82.4 g cm-2 44.60 cm Pion interaction length 109.9 g cm-2 59.47 cm Radiation length 65.19 g cm-2 35.28 cm Critical energy 113.70 MeV (for e-) 110.68 MeV (for e+) Molière radius 12.16 g cm-2 6.579 cm Plasma energy 26.10 eV Muon critical energy 1328. GeV Melting point 1560. K 1287. C Boiling point @ 1 atm 2744. K 2471. C For muons, dE/dx = a(E) + b(E) E. Tables of b(E): PS PDF TEXT

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Hafnium (Hf) Hafnium (Hf) Quantity Value Units Value Units Atomic number 72 Atomic mass 178.49(2) g mole-1 Density 13.3 g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 705.0 eV Minimum ionization 1.152 MeV g-1cm2 15.33 MeV cm-1 Nuclear collision length 109.5 g cm-2 8.226 cm Nuclear interaction length 190.1 g cm-2 14.28 cm Pion collision length 133.0 g cm-2 9.995 cm Pion interaction length 216.9 g cm-2 16.30 cm Radiation length 6.89 g cm-2 0.5177 cm Critical energy 8.22 MeV (for e-) 7.93 MeV (for e+) Molière radius 17.77 g cm-2 1.335 cm Plasma energy 66.77 eV Muon critical energy 155. GeV For muons, dE/dx = a(E) + b(E) E. Tables of b(E): PS PDF TEXT Table of muon dE/dx and Range: PS PDF TEXT Explanation of some entries

280

 

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Striated muscle (ICRU) Striated muscle (ICRU) Quantity Value Units Value Units 0.55005 Density 1.04 g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 74.7 eV Minimum ionization 1.973 MeV g-1cm2 2.052 MeV cm-1 Nuclear collision length 58.5 g cm-2 56.24 cm Nuclear interaction length 83.4 g cm-2 80.24 cm Pion collision length 85.9 g cm-2 82.61 cm Pion interaction length 115.3 g cm-2 110.9 cm Radiation length 36.51 g cm-2 35.11 cm Critical energy 78.85 MeV (for e-) 76.75 MeV (for e+) Molière radius 9.82 g cm-2 9.441 cm Plasma energy 21.79 eV Muon critical energy 1033. GeV Composition: Elem Z Atomic frac* Mass frac* H 1 1.00 0.101997 C 6 0.10 0.123000 N 7 0.02 0.035000 O 8 0.45 0.729003 Na 11 0.00 0.000800 Mg 12 0.00 0.000200 P 15 0.00

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "g-1cm2 nuclear collision" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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281

 

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Ethanol (C2H5OH) Ethanol (C2H5OH) Quantity Value Units Value Units 0.56437 Density 0.789 g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 62.9 eV Minimum ionization 2.054 MeV g-1cm2 1.621 MeV cm-1 Nuclear collision length 57.0 g cm-2 72.25 cm Nuclear interaction length 80.3 g cm-2 101.7 cm Pion collision length 84.6 g cm-2 107.2 cm Pion interaction length 112.2 g cm-2 142.2 cm Radiation length 40.92 g cm-2 51.84 cm Critical energy 92.15 MeV (for e-) 89.73 MeV (for e+) Molière radius 9.42 g cm-2 11.93 cm Plasma energy 19.23 eV Muon critical energy 1178. GeV Melting point 159.0 K -114.1 C Boiling point @ 1 atm 351.4 K 78.29 C Index of refraction (@ STP, Na D) 1.36 Composition: Elem Z Atomic frac* Mass frac*

282

 

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Phosphorus (P ) Phosphorus (P ) Quantity Value Units Value Units Atomic number 15 Atomic mass 30.973762(2) g mole-1 Density 2.20 g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 173.0 eV Minimum ionization 1.613 MeV g-1cm2 3.548 MeV cm-1 Nuclear collision length 71.7 g cm-2 32.59 cm Nuclear interaction length 111.4 g cm-2 50.62 cm Pion collision length 97.5 g cm-2 44.33 cm Pion interaction length 140.7 g cm-2 63.97 cm Radiation length 21.21 g cm-2 9.639 cm Critical energy 37.92 MeV (for e-) 36.84 MeV (for e+) Molière radius 11.86 g cm-2 5.391 cm Plasma energy 29.74 eV Muon critical energy 552. GeV For muons, dE/dx = a(E) + b(E) E. Tables of b(E): PS PDF TEXT Table of muon dE/dx and Range: PS PDF TEXT Explanation of some entries

283

 

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Mercury (Hg) Mercury (Hg) Quantity Value Units Value Units Atomic number 80 Atomic mass 200.59(2) g mole-1 Density 13.5 g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 800.0 eV Minimum ionization 1.130 MeV g-1cm2 15.31 MeV cm-1 Nuclear collision length 113.1 g cm-2 8.346 cm Nuclear interaction length 197.5 g cm-2 14.58 cm Pion collision length 136.4 g cm-2 10.07 cm Pion interaction length 224.1 g cm-2 16.54 cm Radiation length 6.44 g cm-2 0.4752 cm Critical energy 7.53 MeV (for e-) 7.26 MeV (for e+) Molière radius 18.12 g cm-2 1.338 cm Plasma energy 66.98 eV Muon critical energy 143. GeV For muons, dE/dx = a(E) + b(E) E. Tables of b(E): PS PDF TEXT Table of muon dE/dx and Range: PS PDF TEXT Explanation of some entries

284

 

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Xenon gas (Xe) Xenon gas (Xe) Quantity Value Units Value Units Atomic number 54 Atomic mass 131.293(6) g mole-1 Specific gravity (20° C, 1 atm) 5.48E-03 g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 482.0 eV Minimum ionization 1.255 MeV g-1cm2 6.882E-03 MeV cm-1 Nuclear collision length 100.8 g cm-2 1.839E+04 cm Nuclear interaction length 172.1 g cm-2 3.139E+04 cm Pion collision length 125.0 g cm-2 2.279E+04 cm Pion interaction length 199.6 g cm-2 3.640E+04 cm Radiation length 8.48 g cm-2 1547. cm Critical energy 12.30 MeV (for e-) 11.91 MeV (for e+) Molière radius 14.63 g cm-2 2667. cm Plasma energy 1.37 eV Muon critical energy 232. GeV Melting point 161.4 K -111.8 C Boiling point @ 1 atm 165.1 K -108.0 C

285

 

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dioxide (PuO2) dioxide (PuO2) Quantity Value Units Value Units 0.40583 Density 11.5 g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 746.5 eV Minimum ionization 1.158 MeV g-1cm2 13.27 MeV cm-1 Nuclear collision length 107.4 g cm-2 9.374 cm Nuclear interaction length 182.0 g cm-2 15.88 cm Pion collision length 132.8 g cm-2 11.59 cm Pion interaction length 213.2 g cm-2 18.61 cm Radiation length 6.57 g cm-2 0.5735 cm Critical energy 7.86 MeV (for e-) 7.58 MeV (for e+) Molière radius 17.72 g cm-2 1.546 cm Plasma energy 62.14 eV Muon critical energy 147. GeV Composition: Elem Z Atomic frac* Mass frac* O 8 2.00 0.118055 Pu 94 0.98 0.881945 * calculated from mass fraction data. Explanation of some entries For muons, dE/dx = a(E) + b(E) E. Tables of b(E): PS PDF TEXT

286

 

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hexafluoride (WF6) hexafluoride (WF6) Quantity Value Units Value Units 0.42976 Density 2.40 g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 354.4 eV Minimum ionization 1.346 MeV g-1cm2 3.230 MeV cm-1 Nuclear collision length 87.1 g cm-2 36.28 cm Nuclear interaction length 140.0 g cm-2 58.32 cm Pion collision length 113.4 g cm-2 47.26 cm Pion interaction length 171.5 g cm-2 71.47 cm Radiation length 9.72 g cm-2 4.049 cm Critical energy 14.03 MeV (for e-) 13.59 MeV (for e+) Molière radius 14.69 g cm-2 6.120 cm Plasma energy 29.27 eV Muon critical energy 234. GeV Composition: Elem Z Atomic frac* Mass frac* F 9 6.00 0.382723 W 74 1.00 0.617277 * calculated from mass fraction data. Explanation of some entries For muons, dE/dx = a(E) + b(E) E. Tables of b(E): PS PDF TEXT

287

 

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Testes (ICRP) Testes (ICRP) Quantity Value Units Value Units 0.55108 Density 1.04 g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 75.0 eV Minimum ionization 1.976 MeV g-1cm2 2.056 MeV cm-1 Nuclear collision length 58.6 g cm-2 56.33 cm Nuclear interaction length 83.5 g cm-2 80.33 cm Pion collision length 86.1 g cm-2 82.75 cm Pion interaction length 115.4 g cm-2 111.0 cm Radiation length 36.47 g cm-2 35.07 cm Critical energy 78.91 MeV (for e-) 76.81 MeV (for e+) Molière radius 9.80 g cm-2 9.424 cm Plasma energy 21.82 eV Muon critical energy 1034. GeV Composition: Elem Z Atomic frac* Mass frac* H 1 1.00 0.104166 C 6 0.07 0.092270 N 7 0.01 0.019940 O 8 0.47 0.773884 Na 11 0.00 0.002260 Mg 12 0.00 0.000110 P 15 0.00 0.001250 S 16

288

 

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krypton (Kr) krypton (Kr) Quantity Value Units Value Units Atomic number 36 Atomic mass 83.798(2) g mole-1 Density 2.42 g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 352.0 eV Minimum ionization 1.357 MeV g-1cm2 3.281 MeV cm-1 Nuclear collision length 90.0 g cm-2 37.21 cm Nuclear interaction length 149.4 g cm-2 61.80 cm Pion collision length 114.8 g cm-2 47.46 cm Pion interaction length 177.6 g cm-2 73.47 cm Radiation length 11.37 g cm-2 4.703 cm Critical energy 17.03 MeV (for e-) 16.51 MeV (for e+) Molière radius 14.16 g cm-2 5.857 cm Plasma energy 29.37 eV Muon critical energy 277. GeV Melting point 115.8 K -157.4 C Boiling point @ 1 atm 119.9 K -153.2 C Index of refraction (@ STP, Na D) 1.30 For muons, dE/dx = a(E) + b(E) E. Tables of b(E): PS PDF TEXT

289

 

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Air (dry, 1 atm) Air (dry, 1 atm) Quantity Value Units Value Units 0.49919 Specific gravity (20° C, 1 atm) 1.20E-03 g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 85.7 eV Minimum ionization 1.815 MeV g-1cm2 2.187E-03 MeV cm-1 Nuclear collision length 61.3 g cm-2 5.088E+04 cm Nuclear interaction length 90.1 g cm-2 7.477E+04 cm Pion collision length 88.5 g cm-2 7.348E+04 cm Pion interaction length 122.0 g cm-2 1.013E+05 cm Radiation length 36.62 g cm-2 3.039E+04 cm Critical energy 87.92 MeV (for e-) 85.96 MeV (for e+) Molière radius 8.83 g cm-2 7330. cm Plasma energy 0.71 eV Muon critical energy 1115. GeV Boiling point @ 1 atm 78.80 K -194.4 C Index of refraction (@ STP, Na D) 172. (n-1)x106 Composition:

290

 

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Propane based) Propane based) Quantity Value Units Value Units 0.55027 Specific gravity (20° C, 1 atm) 1.83E-03 g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 59.5 eV Minimum ionization 2.068 MeV g-1cm2 3.778E-03 MeV cm-1 Nuclear collision length 57.6 g cm-2 3.153E+04 cm Nuclear interaction length 81.6 g cm-2 4.470E+04 cm Pion collision length 85.1 g cm-2 4.660E+04 cm Pion interaction length 113.6 g cm-2 6.220E+04 cm Radiation length 40.91 g cm-2 2.240E+04 cm Critical energy 109.50 MeV (for e-) 107.13 MeV (for e+) Molière radius 7.92 g cm-2 4338. cm Plasma energy 0.91 eV Muon critical energy 1335. GeV Composition: Elem Z Atomic frac* Mass frac* H 1 1.00 0.102672 C 6 0.47 0.568940 N 7 0.02 0.035022 O 8 0.18 0.293366

291

 

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Dysprosium (Dy) Dysprosium (Dy) Quantity Value Units Value Units Atomic number 66 Atomic mass 162.500(1) g mole-1 Density 8.55 g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 628.0 eV Minimum ionization 1.175 MeV g-1cm2 10.05 MeV cm-1 Nuclear collision length 106.7 g cm-2 12.48 cm Nuclear interaction length 184.4 g cm-2 21.56 cm Pion collision length 130.5 g cm-2 15.26 cm Pion interaction length 211.4 g cm-2 24.72 cm Radiation length 7.32 g cm-2 0.8562 cm Critical energy 9.02 MeV (for e-) 8.70 MeV (for e+) Molière radius 17.21 g cm-2 2.013 cm Plasma energy 53.70 eV Muon critical energy 167. GeV For muons, dE/dx = a(E) + b(E) E. Tables of b(E): PS PDF TEXT Table of muon dE/dx and Range: PS PDF TEXT Explanation of some entries

292

 

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(B ) (B ) Quantity Value Units Value Units Atomic number 5 Atomic mass 10.811(7) g mole-1 Density 2.37 g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 76.0 eV Minimum ionization 1.623 MeV g-1cm2 3.847 MeV cm-1 Nuclear collision length 58.0 g cm-2 24.47 cm Nuclear interaction length 83.3 g cm-2 35.16 cm Pion collision length 85.2 g cm-2 35.96 cm Pion interaction length 115.5 g cm-2 48.75 cm Radiation length 52.69 g cm-2 22.23 cm Critical energy 93.95 MeV (for e-) 91.41 MeV (for e+) Molière radius 11.89 g cm-2 5.018 cm Plasma energy 30.17 eV Muon critical energy 1170. GeV For muons, dE/dx = a(E) + b(E) E. Tables of b(E): PS PDF TEXT Table of muon dE/dx and Range: PS PDF TEXT Explanation of some entries Table of isotopes Warning: may not be current

293

 

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propane (C3H8) propane (C3H8) Quantity Value Units Value Units 0.58962 Density 0.493 g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 52.0 eV Minimum ionization 2.191 MeV g-1cm2 1.080 MeV cm-1 Nuclear collision length 55.3 g cm-2 112.2 cm Nuclear interaction length 76.7 g cm-2 155.6 cm Pion collision length 83.0 g cm-2 168.4 cm Pion interaction length 108.5 g cm-2 220.1 cm Radiation length 45.37 g cm-2 92.04 cm Critical energy 109.23 MeV (for e-) 106.43 MeV (for e+) Molière radius 8.81 g cm-2 17.87 cm Plasma energy 15.54 eV Muon critical energy 1360. GeV Melting point 85.52 K -187.6 C Boiling point @ 1 atm 231.0 K -42.10 C Composition: Elem Z Atomic frac* Mass frac* H 1 8.00 0.182855 C 6 3.00 0.817145 * calculated from mass fraction data.

294

 

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(Pu) (Pu) Quantity Value Units Value Units Atomic number 94 Atomic mass [244.06420(4)] g mole-1 Density 19.8 g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 921.0 eV Minimum ionization 1.071 MeV g-1cm2 21.25 MeV cm-1 Nuclear collision length 119.4 g cm-2 6.020 cm Nuclear interaction length 210.8 g cm-2 10.62 cm Pion collision length 142.3 g cm-2 7.174 cm Pion interaction length 237.0 g cm-2 11.94 cm Radiation length 5.93 g cm-2 0.2989 cm Critical energy 6.49 MeV (for e-) 6.25 MeV (for e+) Molière radius 19.36 g cm-2 0.9760 cm Plasma energy 79.66 eV Muon critical energy 126. GeV For muons, dE/dx = a(E) + b(E) E. Tables of b(E): PS PDF TEXT Table of muon dE/dx and Range: PS PDF TEXT Explanation of some entries

295

 

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Gold (Au) Gold (Au) Quantity Value Units Value Units Atomic number 79 Atomic mass 196.966569(4) g mole-1 Density 19.3 g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 790.0 eV Minimum ionization 1.134 MeV g-1cm2 21.90 MeV cm-1 Nuclear collision length 112.5 g cm-2 5.822 cm Nuclear interaction length 196.3 g cm-2 10.16 cm Pion collision length 135.8 g cm-2 7.031 cm Pion interaction length 223.0 g cm-2 11.54 cm Radiation length 6.46 g cm-2 0.3344 cm Critical energy 7.53 MeV (for e-) 7.26 MeV (for e+) Molière radius 18.19 g cm-2 0.9415 cm Plasma energy 80.21 eV Muon critical energy 143. GeV Melting point 1337. K 1064. C Boiling point @ 1 atm 3129. K 2856. C For muons, dE/dx = a(E) + b(E) E. Tables of b(E): PS PDF TEXT

296

 

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Adipose tissue (ICRP) Adipose tissue (ICRP) Quantity Value Units Value Units 0.55947 Density 0.920 g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 63.2 eV Minimum ionization 2.029 MeV g-1cm2 1.867 MeV cm-1 Nuclear collision length 57.1 g cm-2 62.06 cm Nuclear interaction length 80.5 g cm-2 87.55 cm Pion collision length 84.6 g cm-2 92.01 cm Pion interaction length 112.5 g cm-2 122.3 cm Radiation length 41.73 g cm-2 45.36 cm Critical energy 92.67 MeV (for e-) 90.23 MeV (for e+) Molière radius 9.55 g cm-2 10.38 cm Plasma energy 20.67 eV Muon critical energy 1184. GeV Composition: Elem Z Atomic frac* Mass frac* H 1 1.00 0.119477 C 6 0.45 0.637240 N 7 0.00 0.007970 O 8 0.12 0.232333 Na 11 0.00 0.000500 Mg 12 0.00 0.000020 P 15 0.00

297

 

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liquid) (H2O) liquid) (H2O) Quantity Value Units Value Units 0.55509 Density 1.00 g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 79.7 eV Minimum ionization 1.981 MeV g-1cm2 1.981 MeV cm-1 Nuclear collision length 58.5 g cm-2 58.50 cm Nuclear interaction length 83.3 g cm-2 83.33 cm Pion collision length 86.0 g cm-2 86.00 cm Pion interaction length 115.2 g cm-2 115.2 cm Radiation length 36.08 g cm-2 36.08 cm Critical energy 78.33 MeV (for e-) 76.24 MeV (for e+) Molière radius 9.77 g cm-2 9.768 cm Plasma energy 21.47 eV Muon critical energy 1029. GeV Melting point 273.1 K 0.000E+00 C Boiling point @ 1 atm 373.1 K 99.96 C Index of refraction (@ STP, Na D) 1.33 Composition: Elem Z Atomic frac* Mass frac*

298

Theoretical Formulation of Collision Rate and Collision Efficiency of Hydrodynamically Interacting Cloud Droplets in Turbulent Atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A methodology for conducting direct numerical simulations (DNSs) of hydrodynamically interacting droplets in the context of cloud microphysics has been developed and used to validate a new kinematic formulation capable of describing the collision ...

Lian-Ping Wang; Orlando Ayala; Scott E. Kasprzak; Wojciech W. Grabowski

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Collisions of particles advected in random flows  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider collisions of particles advected in a fluid. As already pointed out by Smoluchowski [Z. f. physik. Chemie XCII, 129-168, (1917)], macroscopic motion of the fluid can significantly enhance the frequency of collisions between the suspended particles. This effect was invoked by Saffman and Turner [J. Fluid Mech. 1, 16-30, (1956)] to estimate collision rates of small water droplets in turbulent rain clouds, the macroscopic motion being caused by turbulence. Here we show that the Saffman-Turner theory is unsatisfactory because it describes an initial transient only. The reason for this failure is that the local flow in the vicinity of a particle is treated as if it were a steady hyperbolic flow, whereas in reality it must fluctuate. We derive exact expressions for the steady-state collision rate for particles suspended in rapidly fluctuating random flows and compute how this steady state is approached. For incompressible flows, the Saffman-Turner expression is an upper bound.

K. Gustavsson; B. Mehlig; M. Wilkinson

2008-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

300

Subthreshold pion production within a transport description of central Au+Au collisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Understanding the equation of state (EOS) of nuclear matter is a long standing problem in nuclear physics. The recent emphasis is onto the density dependence of the symmetry energy with experiments needing dedicated symmetry-energy observables. Towards the latter goal, we employed pBUU transport model to simulate pion production in heavy ion collision (HIC). We find that the net pion yield can be used to constrain the momentum dependence of nuclear mean field (MF). In studying the sensitivity of observables to symmetry energy at higher than normal densities, our calculation on pion ratio contradicts predictions from both IBUU and ImIQMD models. We propose another ratio observable for future experiments, which may serve to distinguish between different variants of symmetry energies.

Jun Hong; P. Danielewicz

2013-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "g-1cm2 nuclear collision" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Suppression of Upsilon Production in d+Au and Au+Au Collisions at sqrt(s_NN) = 200 GeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report measurements of Upsilon meson production in p+p, d+Au, and Au+Au collisions using the STAR detector at RHIC. We compare the Upsilon yield to the measured cross section in p+p collisions in order to quantify any modifications of the yield in cold nuclear matter using d+Au data and in hot nuclear matter using Au+Au data separated into three centrality classes. Our p+p measurement is based on three times the statistics of our previous result. We obtain a nuclear modification factor for Upsilon(1S+2S+3S) in the rapidity range |y|<1 in d+Au collisions of R_dAu = 0.67 +/- 0.12 (stat.) +/- 0.04 (sys.) +/- 0.08 (pp sys.). A comparison with models including shadowing and initial state parton energy loss indicates the presence of additional cold-nuclear matter suppression. Similarly, in the top 10% most-central Au+Au collisions, we measure a nuclear modification factor of R_AA=0.36 +/- 0.09 (stat.) +/- 0.01 (sys.) +/- 0.04 (pp sys.), which is a larger suppression factor than that seen in cold nuclear matter. Our results are consistent with complete suppression of excited-state Upsilon mesons in Au+Au collisions. The additional suppression in Au+Au is consistent with the level expected in model calculations that include the presence of a hot, deconfined Quark-Gluon Plasma. However, understanding the suppression seen in d+Au is still needed before any definitive statements about the nature of the suppression in Au+Au can be made.

STAR Collaboration; L. Adamczyk; J. K. Adkins; G. Agakishiev; M. M. Aggarwal; Z. Ahammed; I. Alekseev; J. Alford; C. D. Anson; A. Aparin; D. Arkhipkin; E. C. Aschenauer; G. S. Averichev; A. Banerjee; D. R. Beavis; R. Bellwied; A. Bhasin; A. K. Bhati; P. Bhattarai; H. Bichsel; J. Bielcik; J. Bielcikova; L. C. Bland; I. G. Bordyuzhin; W. Borowski; J. Bouchet; A. V. Brandin; S. G. Brovko; S. Bültmann; I. Bunzarov; T. P. Burton; J. Butterworth; H. Caines; M. Calderón de la Barca Sánchez; D. Cebra; R. Cendejas; M. C. Cervantes; P. Chaloupka; Z. Chang; S. Chattopadhyay; H. F. Chen; J. H. Chen; L. Chen; J. Cheng; M. Cherney; A. Chikanian; W. Christie; J. Chwastowski; M. J. M. Codrington; G. Contin; J. G. Cramer; H. J. Crawford; X. Cui; S. Das; A. Davila Leyva; L. C. De Silva; R. R. Debbe; T. G. Dedovich; J. Deng; A. A. Derevschikov; R. Derradi de Souza; S. Dhamija; B. di Ruzza; L. Didenko; C. Dilks; F. Ding; P. Djawotho; X. Dong; J. L. Drachenberg; J. E. Draper; C. M. Du; L. E. Dunkelberger; J. C. Dunlop; L. G. Efimov; J. Engelage; K. S. Engle; G. Eppley; L. Eun; O. Evdokimov; R. Fatemi; S. Fazio; J. Fedorisin; P. Filip; E. Finch; Y. Fisyak; C. E. Flores; C. A. Gagliardi; D. R. Gangadharan; D. Garand; F. Geurts; A. Gibson; M. Girard; S. Gliske; L. Greiner; D. Grosnick; Y. Guo; A. Gupta; S. Gupta; W. Guryn; B. Haag; O. Hajkova; A. Hamed; L-X. Han; R. Haque; J. W. Harris; S. Heppelmann; K. Hill; A. Hirsch; G. W. Hoffmann; D. J. Hofman; S. Horvat; B. Huang; H. Z. Huang; X. Huang; P. Huck; T. J. Humanic; G. Igo; W. W. Jacobs; H. Jang; E. G. Judd; S. Kabana; D. Kalinkin; K. Kang; K. Kauder; H. W. Ke; D. Keane; A. Kechechyan; A. Kesich; Z. H. Khan; D. P. Kikola; I. Kisel; A. Kisiel; D. D. Koetke; T. Kollegger; J. Konzer; I. Koralt; L. Kotchenda; P. Kravtsov; K. Krueger; I. Kulakov; L. Kumar; R. A. Kycia; M. A. C. Lamont; J. M. Landgraf; K. D. Landry; J. Lauret; A. Lebedev; R. Lednicky; J. H. Lee; M. J. LeVine; C. Li; W. Li; X. Li; X. Li; Y. Li; Z. M. Li; L. M. Lima; M. A. Lisa; F. Liu; T. Ljubicic; W. J. Llope; M. Lomnitz; R. S. Longacre; X. Luo; G. L. Ma; Y. G. Ma; D. M. M. D. Madagodagettige Don; D. P. Mahapatra; R. Majka; S. Margetis; C. Markert; H. Masui; H. S. Matis; D. McDonald; T. S. McShane; N. G. Minaev; S. Mioduszewski; B. Mohanty; M. M. Mondal; D. A. Morozov; M. G. Munhoz; M. K. Mustafa; B. K. Nandi; Md. Nasim; T. K. Nayak; J. M. Nelson; G. Nigmatkulov; L. V. Nogach; S. Y. Noh; J. Novak; S. B. Nurushev; G. Odyniec; A. Ogawa; K. Oh; A. Ohlson; V. Okorokov; E. W. Oldag; R. A. N. Oliveira; M. Pachr; B. S. Page; S. K. Pal; Y. X. Pan; Y. Pandit; Y. Panebratsev; T. Pawlak; B. Pawlik; H. Pei; C. Perkins; W. Peryt; A. Peterson; P. Pile; M. Planinic; J. Pluta; N. Poljak; J. Porter; A. M. Poskanzer; N. K. Pruthi; M. Przybycien; P. R. Pujahari; J. Putschke; H. Qiu; A. Quintero; S. Ramachandran; R. Raniwala; S. Raniwala; R. L. Ray; C. K. Riley; H. G. Ritter; J. B. Roberts; O. V. Rogachevskiy; J. L. Romero; J. F. Ross; A. Roy; L. Ruan; J. Rusnak; N. R. Sahoo; P. K. Sahu; I. Sakrejda; S. Salur; J. Sandweiss; E. Sangaline; A. Sarkar; J. Schambach; R. P. Scharenberg; A. M. Schmah; W. B. Schmidke; N. Schmitz; J. Seger; P. Seyboth; N. Shah; E. Shahaliev; P. V. Shanmuganathan; M. Shao; B. Sharma; W. Q. Shen; S. S. Shi; Q. Y. Shou; E. P. Sichtermann; R. N. Singaraju; M. J. Skoby; D. Smirnov; N. Smirnov; D. Solanki; P. Sorensen; U. G. deSouza; H. M. Spinka; B. Srivastava; T. D. S. Stanislaus; J. R. Stevens; R. Stock; M. Strikhanov; B. Stringfellow; A. A. P. Suaide; M. Sumbera; X. Sun; X. M. Sun; Y. Sun; Z. Sun; B. Surrow; D. N. Svirida; T. J. M. Symons; A. Szanto de Toledo; M. A. Szelezniak; J. Takahashi; A. H. Tang; Z. Tang; T. Tarnowsky; J. H. Thomas; A. R. Timmins; D. Tlusty; M. Tokarev; S. Trentalange; R. E. Tribble; P. Tribedy; B. A. Trzeciak; O. D. Tsai; J. Turnau; T. Ullrich; D. G. Underwood; G. Van Buren; G. van Nieuwenhuizen; J. A. Vanfossen, Jr.; R. Varma; G. M. S. Vasconcelos; A. N. Vasiliev; R. Vertesi; F. Videbæk; Y. P. Viyogi; S. Vokal; A. Vossen; M. Wada; F. Wang; G. Wang; H. Wang; J. S. Wang; X. L. Wang; Y. Wang; Y. Wang; G. Webb; J. C. Webb; G. D. Westfall; H. Wieman; G. Wimsatt; S. W. Wissink; R. Witt; Y. F. Wu; Z. Xiao; W. Xie; K. Xin; H. Xu; J. Xu; N. Xu; Q. H. Xu; Y. Xu; Z. Xu; W. Yan; C. Yang; Y. Yang; Y. Yang; Z. Ye; P. Yepes; L. Yi; K. Yip; I-K. Yoo; N. Yu; Y. Zawisza; H. Zbroszczyk; W. Zha; J. B. Zhang; J. L. Zhang; S. Zhang; X. P. Zhang; Y. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; F. Zhao; J. Zhao; C. Zhong; X. Zhu; Y. H. Zhu; Y. Zoulkarneeva; M. Zyzak

2013-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

302

Fusion Nuclear Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Systems Modeling, Simulation & Validation Nuclear Systems Technology Reactor Technology Nuclear Science Home | Science & Discovery | Nuclear Science | Research...

303

Energy Loss in Nuclear Drell-Yan Process  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

By means of the nuclear parton distributions which can be used to provide a good explanation for the EMC effect in the whole x range, we investigate the energy loss effect in nuclear Drell-Yan process. When the cross section of lepton pair production is considered varying with the center-of-mass energy of the nucleon-nucleon collision, we find that the nuclear Drell-Yan(DY) ratio is suppressed due to the energy loss, which balances the overestimate of the DY ratio only in consideration of the effect of nuclear parton distributions.

Jian-Jun Yang; Guang-Lie Li

1998-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

304

Nuclear Analytical Chemistry Portal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST Home > Nuclear Analytical Chemistry Portal. Nuclear Analytical Chemistry Portal. ... see all Nuclear Analytical Chemistry news ... ...

2010-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

305

Single and Double Photonuclear Excitations in Pb+Pb Collisions at sqrt(s_NN) = 2.76 TeV at the CERN Large Hadron Collider  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cross sections are calculated for single and double photon exchange in ultraperipheral Pb+Pb collisions at the LHC. The particle production is simulated with the DPMJET event generator. Large cross sections are found for particle production around mid-rapidity making these processes an important background to hadronic nuclear interactions at both the trigger and analysis levels.

Oystein Djuvsland; Joakim Nystrand

2010-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

306

Single and double photonuclear excitations in Pb+Pb collisions at {radical}(s{sub NN})=2.76 TeV at the CERN Large Hadron Collider  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cross sections are calculated for single and double photon exchange in ultraperipheral Pb+Pb collisions at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. The particle production is simulated with the DPMJET event generator. Large cross sections are found for particle production around midrapidity, making these processes an important background to hadronic nuclear interactions at both the trigger and analysis levels.

Djuvsland, Oystein; Nystrand, Joakim [Department of Physics and Technology, University of Bergen, Bergen (Norway)

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

307

Suppression of bottomonia states in finite size quark gluon plasma in PbPb collisions at Large Hadron Collider  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The bottomonium states due to their varying binding energies dissolve at different temperatures and thus their nuclear modification factors and relative yields have potential to map the properties of Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP). We estimate the suppression of bottomonia states due to color screening in an expanding QGP of finite lifetime and size with the conditions relevant for PbPb collisions at LHC. The properties of $\\Upsilon$ states and recent results on their dissociation temperatures have been used as ingredient in the study. The nuclear modification factors and the ratios of yields of $\\Upsilon$ states are then obtained as a function of transverse momentum and centrality. We compare our theoretical calculations with the bottomonia yields measured with CMS in PbPb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{\\rm NN}}$ = 2.76 TeV. The model calculations explain the data very well.

A. Abdulsalam; Prashant Shukla

2012-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

308

Isospin-dependent pion in-medium effects on the charged-pion ratio in heavy ion collisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using results from the chiral perturbation theory for the s-wave interaction and the Delta-resonance model for the p-wave interaction of pions with nucleons, we evaluated the spectral functions of pions in asymmetric nuclear matter with unequal proton and neutron densities. We find that in hot dense neutron-rich matter the strength of the spectral function of positively charged pions at low energies is somewhat larger than that of negatively charged pions. In a thermal model, this isospin-dependent effect slightly reduces the ratio of negatively charged to positively charged pions that are produced in heavy ion collisions induced by radioactive beams. The relevance of our results to the determination of the nuclear symmetry energy from the measured ratio of negatively to positively charged pions produced in heavy ion collisions is discussed.

Xu, Jun; Ko, Che Ming; Oh, Yongseok.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Critical Temperature for the Nuclear Liquid-Gas Phase Transition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The charge distribution of the intermediate mass fragments produced in p (8.1 GeV) + Au collisions is analyzed in the framework of the statistical multifragmentation model with the critical temperature for the nuclear liquid-gas phase transition $T_c$ as a free parameter. It is found that $T_c=20\\pm3$ MeV (90% CL).

V. A. Karnaukhov; H. Oeschler; S. P. Avdeyev; E. V. Duginova; V. K. Rodionov; A. Budzanowski; W. Karcz; O. V. Bochkarev; E. A. Kuzmin; L. V. Chulkov; E. Norbeck; A. S. Botvina

2003-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

310

Future of Nuclear Data for Nuclear Astrophysics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear astrophysics is an exciting growth area in nuclear science. Because of the enormous nuclear data needs of this field

Michael S. Smith

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Countering Nuclear Terrorism | National Nuclear Security Administratio...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Countering Nuclear Terrorism | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response...

312

Nuclear Detonation Detection | National Nuclear Security Administratio...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Nonproliferation Program Offices > Office of Nonproliferation Research & Development > Nuclear Detonation Detection Nuclear Detonation Detection Develop, Demonstrate, and...

313

Chernobyl Nuclear Accident | National Nuclear Security Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chernobyl Nuclear Accident | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response...

314

Light nuclei production in heavy ion collisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Light nuclei production as a result of nuclear coalescence effect can give some signals on final state of Quark Gluon Plasma formation. We are studying the behavior of nuclear modification factor as a function of different variables using the simulated data coming from the FASTMC generator. This data is necessary to extract information on coalescence mechanism from experimental data on high energy nuclear-nuclear interactions.

K. H. Khan; M. K. Suleymanov; Z. Wazir; E. U. Khan; Mahnaz Q. Haseeb; M. Ajaz

2009-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

315

Nuclear Science  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Science Science and Engineering Education Sourcebook 2013 American Nuclear Society US Department of Energy Nuclear Science & Engineering Education Sourcebook 2013 North American Edition American Nuclear Society Education, Training, and Workforce Division US Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Editor and Founder John Gilligan Professor of Nuclear Engineering North Carolina State University Version 5.13 Welcome to the 2013 Edition of the Nuclear Science and Engineering Education (NS&EE) Sourcebook. We have evolved and improved! The core mission of the Sourcebook has not changed, however. Our purpose is to facilitate interaction among faculty, students, industry, and government agencies to accomplish nuclear research, teaching and service activities. Since 1986 we have compiled critical information on nuclear

316

Nuclear forces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

These lectures present an introduction into the theory of nuclear forces. We focus mainly on the modern approach

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Multiplicity and angular distribution of particles emitted in relativistic nuclear-nuclear interactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss the experimental results on the behavior of the average multiplicities and angular distributions of slow particles emitted in hadron-nuclear and nuclear-nuclear interactions at relativistic energies as a function of the centrality of collisions. It is observed that by increasing the mass of the projectiles the angular distributions of slow particles change and the structure which was demonstrated in the case of pi-mesons, protons and light nuclear projectiles, almost disappears. During the interaction of the heavier projectile with nuclear target, the number of secondary interactions as well as number of nucleon-nucleon elastic scattering and re-scattering events increases. We suggest to restore this information using the heavy ion generators taking into account the multiplicity distributions. Because our investigations show that the formation of the percolation cluster sufficiently influences the behaviour of the average multiplicity of the slow particles emitted in these interactions.

M. K. Suleymanov; E. U. Khan; A. Kravchakova; Mahnaz Q. Haseeb; S. M. Saleem; Y. H. Huseynaliyev; S. Vokal; A. S. Vodopianov; O. B. Abdinov

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Demonstrations: collisions on an air track  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Demonstrations: ·collisions on an air track Text: Fishbane 8-1, 8-2, 8-3, 8-4, 8-5, 8-6 Problems ) = d dt ( MTot Vcm ) = MTot dVcm dt = MTot acm Vcm = acm = dVcm dt cm velocity dRcm dt Thus, Rcm , Vcm , acm behave just like any kinematic set r, v, a, except that the dynamics is governed

Boal, David

319

Nuclear weapons, nuclear effects, nuclear war  

SciTech Connect

This paper provides a brief and mostly non-technical description of the militarily important features of nuclear weapons, of the physical phenomena associated with individual explosions, and of the expected or possible results of the use of many weapons in a nuclear war. Most emphasis is on the effects of so-called ``strategic exchanges.``

Bing, G.F.

1991-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

320

Isospin dependent properties of asymmetric nuclear matter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The density dependence of nuclear symmetry energy is determined from a systematic study of the isospin dependent bulk properties of asymmetric nuclear matter using the isoscalar and the isovector components of density dependent M3Y interaction. The incompressibility $K_\\infty$ for the symmetric nuclear matter, the isospin dependent part $K_{asy}$ of the isobaric incompressibility and the slope $L$ are all in excellent agreement with the constraints recently extracted from measured isotopic dependence of the giant monopole resonances in even-A Sn isotopes, from the neutron skin thickness of nuclei and from analyses of experimental data on isospin diffusion and isotopic scaling in intermediate energy heavy-ion collisions. This work provides a fundamental basis for the understanding of nuclear matter under extreme conditions, and validates the important empirical constraints obtained from recent experimental data.

P. Roy Chowdhury; D. N. Basu; C. Samanta

2009-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

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321

Investigating the Nuclear Equation of State through N/Z Equilibration  

SciTech Connect

The equilibration of the N/Z degree of freedom during heavy-ion collisions can be a discriminating observables for helping to understand the nuclear equation of state. Equilibration can be investigated by examining the ratios of isotopes produced in these reactions. The isotope ratio method and the tracer method yield consistent results. The quasiprojectiles produced in deep inelastic collisions are predicted to be sensitive to the density dependence of the equation of state.

Yennello, S.; Keksis, A.; Bell, E. [Department of Chemistry and Cyclotron Institute, Texas A and M University, College Station TX 77845-3366 (United States)

2007-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

322

Nuclear Deterrence  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Deterrence Nuclear Deterrence Nuclear Deterrence LANL's mission is to develop and apply science and technology to ensure the safety, security, and effectiveness of the U.S. nuclear deterrent; reduce global threats; and solve other emerging national security and energy challenges. April 12, 2012 A B-2 Spirit bomber refuels from a KC-135 Stratotanker A B-2 Spirit bomber refuels from a KC-135 Stratotanker. Contact Operator Los Alamos National Laboratory (505) 667-5061 Charlie McMillan, Director: "For the last 70 years there has not been a world war, and I have to think that our strong deterrent has something to do with that fact." Mission nuclear weapons Charlie McMillan, Director of Los Alamos National Laboratory 1:06 Director McMillan on nuclear deterrence While the role and prominence of nuclear weapons in U.S. security policy

323

Chemistry-nuclear chemistry division. Progress report, October 1979-September 1980  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the research and development programs pursued by the Chemistry-Nuclear Chemistry Division of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Topics covered include advanced analytical methods, atmospheric chemistry and transport, biochemistry, biomedical research, element migration and fixation, inorganic chemistry, isotope separation and analysis, atomic and molecular collisions, molecular spectroscopy, muonic x rays, nuclear cosmochemistry, nuclear structure and reactions, radiochemical separations, theoretical chemistry, and unclassified weapons research.

Ryan, R.R. (comp.)

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Probing gluon nuclear PDF with direct photon production in association with a heavy quark  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate a possible use of direct photon production in association with a heavy quark in $pA$ collisions at the large hadron collider to constrain the nuclear gluon parton distribution function. This process is sensitive to both, the nuclear heavy quark and gluon parton distribution functions and is a very promising candidate to help determine the gluon nuclear PDF which is still largely untested.

K. Kovarik; T. Stavreva

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

325

Quantum electrodynamics in a laser and the electron laser collision  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quantum electrodynamics in a laser is formulated, in which the electron-laser interaction is exactly considered, while the interaction of an electron and a single photon is considered by perturbation. The formulation is applied to the electron-laser collisions. The effect of coherence between photons in the laser is therefore fully considered in these collisions. The possibility of $\\gamma-$ray laser generation by use of this kind of collision is discussed.

Qi-Ren Zhang

2013-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

326

Introduction to the study of collisions between heavy nuclei  

SciTech Connect

Current investigations concerning the collisions of nuclei governed by small de Broglie wavelengths are reviewed. The wave packets localize nuclei in regions small compared to their diameters. Cross sections are examined for potential scattering, elastic scattering, quasi-molecular states, peripheral particle-transfer reactions, fusion, and deep inelastic collisions. Theories of fusion and deep inelastic collisions are summarized. This paper is in the nature of a review-tutorial. 45 references, 51 figures, 2 tables. (RWR)

Bayman, B.F.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Measurements of phi meson production in relativistic heavy-ion collisions at RHIC  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present results for the measurement of {phi} meson production via its charged kaon decay channel {phi} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -} in Au + Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 62.4, 130, and 200 GeV, and in p + p and d + Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV from the STAR experiment at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The midrapidity (|y| energy is in contradiction with expectations from models having kaon coalescence as the dominant mechanism for {phi} production at RHIC. The {Omega}/{phi} yield ratio as a function of p{sub T} is consistent with a model based on the recombination of thermal s quarks up to p{sub T} {approx} 4 GeV/c, but disagrees at higher transverse momenta. The measured nuclear modification factor, R{sub dAu}, for the {phi} meson increases above unity at intermediate p{sub T}, similar to that for pions and protons, while R{sub AA} is suppressed due to the energy loss effect in central Au + Au collisions. Number of constituent quark scaling of both R{sub cp} and v{sub 2} for the {phi} meson with respect to other hadrons in Au + Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV at intermediate p{sub T} is observed. These observations support quark coalescence as being the dominant mechanism of hadronization in the intermediate p{sub T} region at RHIC.

STAR Coll

2009-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

328

Destruction of a metastable string by particle collisions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We calculate the probability of destruction of a metastable string by collisions of the Goldstone bosons, corresponding to the transverse waves on the string. We find a general formula that allows to determine the probability of the string breakup by a collision of arbitrary number of the bosons. We find that the destruction of a metastable string takes place only in collisions of even number of the bosons, and we explicitly calculate the energy dependence of such process in a two-particle collision for an arbitrary relation between the energy and the largest infrared scale in the problem, the length of the critical gap in the string.

Monin, A. K. [University of Minnesota, School of Physics and Astronomy (United States); Voloshin, M. B., E-mail: voloshin@umn.ed [University of Minnesota, William I. Fine Theoretical Physics Institute (United States)

2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

329

Alignment and orientation in ion/endash/atom collisions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Recent progress in the theoretical study of alignment and orientation in atom-atom and ion-atom collisions at intermediate energies is reviewed. Recent systematic studies of the alignment and orientation of electronic charge cloud distributions of excited states resulting from such collisions clearly have provided more detailed information about the underlying collision dynamics. However, since accurate determination of these parameters is quite difficult, both theoretically and experimentally, a close collaboration between theory and experiment is necessary for a deeper understanding of the collision dynamics. A more complete approach, where the full density matrix is determined, is also discussed.

Kimura, M.; Lane, N.F.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Graphene Layer Growth: Collision of Migrating Five-Member Rings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Monte Carlo simulations of graphene edge buildup, the rateGraphene layer growth: Collision of migrating five- memberon the zigzag edge of a graphene layer. The process is

Whitesides, Russell; Kollias, Alexander C.; Domin, Dominik; Lester Jr., William A.; Frenklach, Michael

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Liquid-gas phase transition in nuclear multifragmentation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The equation of state of nuclear matter suggests that at suitable beam energies the disassembling hot system formed in heavy ion collisions will pass through a liquid-gas coexistence region. Searching for the signatures of the phase transition has been a very important focal point of experimental endeavours in heavy ion collisions, in the last fifteen years. Simultaneously theoretical models have been developed to provide information about the equation of state and reaction mechanisms consistent with the experimental observables. This article is a review of this endeavour.

S. Das Gupta; A. Z. Mekjian; M. B. Tsang

2000-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

332

Nuclear Science Division annual report, July 1, 1981-September 30, 1982  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the scientific research carried out within the Nuclear Science Division between July 1, 1981, and September 30, 1982. Heavy-ion investigations continue to dominate the experimental and theoretical research efforts. Complementary programs in light-ion nuclear science, in nuclear data evaluation, and in the development of advanced instrumentation are also carried out. Results from Bevalac experiments employing a wide variety of heavy ion beams, along with new or upgraded detector facilities (HISS, the Plastic Ball, and the streamer chamber) are contained in this report. These relativistic experiments have shed important light on the degree of equilibration for central collisions, the time evolution of a nuclear collision, the nuclear density and compressional energy of these collisions, and strange particle production. Reaction mechanism work dominates the heavy-ion research at the 88-Inch Cyclotron and the SuperHILAC. Recent experiments have contributed to our understanding of the nature of light-particle emission in deep-inelastic collisions, of peripheral reactions, incomplete fusion, fission, and evaporation. Nuclear structure investigations at these accelerators continue to be directed toward the understanding of the behavior of nuclei at high angular momentum. Research in the area of exotic nuclei has led to the observation at the 88-Inch Cyclotron of the ..beta..-delayed proton decay of odd-odd T/sub z/ = -2 nuclides; ..beta..-delayed proton emitters in the rare earth region are being investigated at the SuperHILAC.

Mahoney, J. (ed.)

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Nuclear Energy  

Nuclear Energy Environmental Mgmt. Study Objectives: Respond to the pressing need to refine existing corrosion models: Predict performance in wide range of environments

334

Nuclear Reactors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reactors Nuclear reactors created not only large amounts of plutonium needed for the weapons programs, but a variety of other interesting and useful radioisotopes. They produced...

335

Nuclear Astrophysics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

I review progress that has been made in nuclear astrophysics over the past few years and summarize some of the questions that remain. Topics selected include solar neutrinos

W. C. Haxton

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Nuclear & Uranium  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 17. Purchases of enrichment services by owners and operators of U.S. civilian nuclear power reactors by contract type in delivery year, 2012

337

Nuclear Weapons  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

nuclear science that has had a significant global influence. Following the observation of fission products of uranium by Hahn and Strassmann in 1938, a uranium fission weapon...

338

NUCLEAR ENERGY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

could improve the economic and safety performance of these advanced reactors. Nuclear power can reduce GHG emissions from electricity production and possibly in co-generation...

339

Effective interaction: From nuclear reactions to neutron stars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An equation of state (EoS) for symmetric nuclear matter is constructed using the density dependent M3Y effective interaction and extended for isospin asymmetric nuclear matter. Theoretically obtained values of symmetric nuclear matter incompressibility, isobaric incompressibility, symmetry energy and its slope agree well with experimentally extracted values. Folded microscopic potentials using this effective interaction, whose density dependence is determined from nuclear matter calculations, provide excellent descriptions for proton, alpha and cluster radioactivities, elastic and inelastic scattering. The nuclear deformation parameters extracted from inelastic scattering of protons agree well with other available results. The high density behavior of symmetric and asymmetric nuclear matter satisfies the constraints from the observed flow data of heavy-ion collisions. The neutron star properties studied using $\\beta$-equilibrated neutron star matter obtained from this effective interaction reconcile with the ...

Basu, D N

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Leading neutrons from polarized pp collisions  

SciTech Connect

We calculate the cross section and single-spin azimuthal asymmetry, A{sub n}(t) for inclusive neutron production in pp collisions at forward rapidities relative to the polarized proton. Absorptive corrections to the pion pole generate a relative phase between the spin-flip and non-flip amplitudes, which leads to an appreciable spin asymmetry. However, the asymmetry observed recently in the PHENIX experiment at RHIC at very small |t|{approx}0.01 GeV{sup 2} cannot be explained by this mechanism.

Kopeliovich, B. Z. [Departamento de Fisica y Centro de Estudios Subatomicos, Universidad Tecnica Federico Santa Maria, Casilla 110-V, Valparaiso (Chile); Institut fuer Theoretische Physik der Universitaet, Philosophenweg 19, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Potashnikova, I. K.; Schmidt, Ivan [Departamento de Fisica y Centro de Estudios Subatomicos, Universidad Tecnica Federico Santa Maria, Casilla 110-V, Valparaiso (Chile); Soffer, J. [Department of Physics, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA 19122-6082 (United States)

2008-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "g-1cm2 nuclear collision" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Chemistry-Nuclear Chemistry Division. Progress report, October 1980-September 1981  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes major progress in the research and development programs pursued by the Chemistry-Nuclear Chemistry Division of the Los Alamos National Laboratory during FY 1981. Topics covered include advanced analytical methods, atmospheric chemistry and transport, biochemistry, biomedical research, medical radioisotopes research, element migration and fixation, nuclear waste isolation research, inorganic and structural chemistry, isotope separation, analysis and applications, the newly established Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Center, atomic and molecular collisions, molecular spectroscopy, nuclear cosmochemistry, nuclear structure and reactions, pion charge exchange, radiochemical separations, theoretical chemistry, and unclassified weapons research.

Ryan, R.R. (comp.)

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Nuclear Forces and Nuclear Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Forces and Nuclear Systems Forces and Nuclear Systems Our goal is to achieve a description of nuclear systems ranging in size from the deuteron to nuclear matter and neutron stars using a single parameterization of the nuclear forces. Our work includes both the construction of two- and three-nucleon potentials and the development of many-body techniques for computing nuclear properties with these interactions. Detailed quantitative, computationally intense studies are essential parts of this work. In the last decade we have constructed several realistic two- and three-nucleon potential models. The NN potential, Argonne v18, has a dominant charge-independent piece plus additional charge-dependent and charge-symmetry-breaking terms, including a complete electromagnetic interaction. It fits 4301 pp and np elastic scattering data with a chi**2

343

DETERMINING THE UNCERTAINTY OF A GPS-BASED COLLISION VEHICLE DETECTION SYSTEM.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Automotive manufacturers are researching forward collision warning systems (FCWS) to reduce the occurrence of rear-end collision accidents between vehicles. Traditionally these systems use forward scanning… (more)

Amin, Sanket

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Descriptions of Motor Vehicle Collisions by Participants in Emergency Department–Based Studies: Are They Accurate?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

reports in determining motor vehicle crash characteristics.R ESEARCH Descriptions of Motor Vehicle Collisions byThe immediate aftermath of motor vehicle collisions. In:

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Nuclear Weapons Journal Archive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Weapons Journal Archive Nuclear Weapons Journal The Nuclear Weapons Journal ceased publication after Issue 2, 2009. Below are Nuclear Weapons Journal archived issues. Issue...

346

Nonreactor Nuclear Facilities Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

role in developing science and technology for nuclear power programs, nuclear propulsion, nuclear medicine, and the nation's nuclear weapon program among others. Many...

347

Collision Rate of Small Graupel and Water Drops  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An approach permitting one to calculate the collision efficiency and the collision kernel of spherical particles of different densities for Reynolds numbers up to 100 (300-?m-radius drops, or 700-?m-radius graupel) is presented. It is used for ...

A. Khain; M. Pinsky; M. Shapiro; A. Pokrovsky

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

ENERGY BASED ICE COLLISION FORCES Claude Daley1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ENERGY BASED ICE COLLISION FORCES Claude Daley1 1 Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada A1C 3X5 ABSTRACT Ice collision forces can be determined by energy considerations. A variety of interaction geometry cases are considered. The indentation energy functions for eight different

Daley, Claude

349

ENERGY BASED ICE COLLISION FORCES Claude Daley1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 ENERGY BASED ICE COLLISION FORCES Claude Daley1 1 Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada A1C 3X5 ABSTRACT Ice collision forces can be determined by energy considerations. A variety of interaction geometry cases are considered. The indentation energy functions for eight different

Daley, Claude

350

Crabbed Waist Collisions in DAFNE and Super-B Design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The new idea of increasing the luminosity of a collider with crab waist collisions and first experimental results from the DA{Phi}NE {Phi}-Factory at LNF, Frascati, using this concept are presented. Consequences for the design of future factories will be discussed. An outlook to the performance reach with crab waist collisions is given, with emphasis on future B Factories.

Raimondi, P.; Alesini, D.; Biagini, M.E.; Biscari, C.; Boni, R.; Boscolo, M.; Bossi, F.; Buonomo, B.; Clozza, A.; Delle Monache, G.O.; Demma, T.; Di Pasquale, E.; Di Pirro, G.; Drago, A.; Gallo, A.; Ghigo, A.; Guiducci, S.; Ligi, C.; Marcellini, F.; Mazzitelli, Giovanni; Milardi, C.; /Frascati /Orsay, LAL /CERN /Rome III U. /Rome U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /KEK, Tsukuba /INFN, Pisa /INFN, Cosenza /SLAC /Frascati

2011-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

351

Nuclear hadrodynamics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The role of hadron dynamics in the nucleus is illustrated to show the importance of nuclear medium effects in hadron interactions. The low lying hadron spectrum is considered to provide the natural collective variable for nuclear systems. Recent studies of nucleon?nucleon and delta?nucleon interactions are reviewed

D. F. Geesaman

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Transport Theoretical Approach to the Nucleon Spectral Function in Nuclear Matter ?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The nucleon spectral function in infinite nuclear matter is calculated in a quantum transport theoretical approach. Exploiting the known relation between collision rates and correlation functions the spectral function is derived self-consistently. By re-inserting the spectral functions into the collision integrals the description of hard processes from the high-momentum components of wave functions and interactions is improved iteratively until convergence is achieved. The momentum and energy distributions and the nuclear matter occupation probabilities are in very good agreement with the results obtained from many-body theory. PACS numbers: 21.65.+f, 24.10.Cn

J. Lehr; M. Effenberger; H. Lenske; S. Leupold; U. Mosel

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Intelligent agent for aircraft collision avoidance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The trend of the air traffic system is toward a free flight environment. Free flight offers greater flexibility in planning for flights than the current air traffic control and management system. In free flight, operators are allowed to fly under instrument flight rules and choose their own flight path and speed in real time. One of the requirements to make the free flight environment feasible is an aircraft collision avoidance agent, also known as a traffic agent. One widely accepted concept of aircraft to aircraft communication for free flight environment is Automatic Dependent Surveillance Broadcast. In this research, the focus is on constructing a traffic agent, utilizing aircraft to aircraft information for flight management system. The agent includes a traffic conflict detection module and collision avoidance module. The method used by the modules is a combination of knowledge based expert system and optimal control. The expert system is the primary decision-maker and determines the appropriate actions required for conflict detection and avoidance. Optimal control is used to generate the optimum avoidance trajectory that adheres to the criteria assigned by the expert system. Results of various test cases presented in the research demonstrate that the combination of the two methods provides an efficient and effective way to obtain optimal traffic avoidance trajectories.

Shandy, Surya Utama

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards System | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Management & Safeguards System Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards System NMMSS U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Nuclear Materials...

355

Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards System | National Nuclear...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards System Home > About Us > Our Programs > Nuclear Security > Nuclear Materials Management &...

356

Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Nuclear Materials Assay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that are of interest for nuclear security applications. Theof interest to nuclear security. To either make theseother targets of nuclear security interest, such kilogram-

Quiter, Brian Joseph

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Nuclear Materials Assay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Diablo Canyon 2 nuclear reactors. Data were taken fromCapacity Operation of nuclear reactors for power generationby the operation of nuclear reactors. Therefore, ap-

Quiter, Brian Joseph

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards System | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

System Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards System NMMSS U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards System...

359

Nuclear Systems Modeling, Simulation & Validation | Nuclear Science...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Areas Fuel Cycle Science & Technology Fusion Nuclear Science Isotope Development and Production Nuclear Security Science & Technology Nuclear Systems Modeling, Simulation...

360

Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Nuclear Materials Assay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Transmission say for Nuclear Fuel Assemblies 4.1Facilities Spent nuclear fuel is another example wherein intact spent nuclear fuel would be a technological

Quiter, Brian Joseph

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "g-1cm2 nuclear collision" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Nuclear Halos  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We show that extreme nuclear halos are caused only by pairs of s?wave neutrons (or single s?wave neutrons) and that such states occur much more frequently in the periodic table than previously believed. Besides lingering long near zero neutron separation energy such extreme halos have very remarkable properties: they can contribute significantly to the nuclear density at more than twice the normal nuclear radius and their spreading width can be very narrow. The properties of these states are primarily determined by the “thickness” of the nuclear surface in the mean?free nuclear potential and thus their importance increases greatly as we approach the neutron drip line. We discuss what such extreme halos are

Erich Vogt

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Final Report for Project ``Theory of ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions''  

SciTech Connect

In the course of this project the Ohio State University group led by the PI, Professor Ulrich Heinz, developed a comprehensive theoretical picture of the dynamical evolution of ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions and of the numerous experimental observables that can be used to diagnose the evolving and short-lived hot and dense fireball created in such collisions. Starting from a qualitative understanding of the main features based on earlier research during the last decade of the twentieth century on collisions at lower energies, the group exploited newly developed theoretical tools and the stream of new high-quality data from the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory (which started operations in the summer of the year 2000) to arrive at an increasingly quantitative description of the experimentally observed phenomena. Work done at Ohio State University (OSU) was instrumental in the discovery during the years 2001-2003 that quark-gluon plasma (QGP) created in nuclear collisions at RHIC behaves like an almost perfect liquid with minimal viscosity. The tool of relativistic fluid dynamics for viscous liquids developed at OSU in the years 2005-2007 opened the possibility to quantitatively determine the value of the QGP viscosity empirically from experimental measurements of the collective flow patterns established in the collisions. A first quantitative extraction of the QGP shear viscosity, with controlled theoretical uncertainty estimates, was achieved during the last year of this project in 2010. OSU has paved the way for a transition of the field of relativistic heavy-ion physics from a qualitative discovery stage to a new stage of quantitative precision in the description of quark-gluon plasma properties. To gain confidence in the precision of our theoretical understanding of quark-gluon plasma dynamics, one must test it on a large set of experimentally measured observables. This achievement report demonstrates that we have, at different times, systematically investigated both so-called ``soft" and ``hard, penetrating" probes of the fireball medium: hadron yields and momentum spectra and their anisotropies, two-particle momentum correlations, high-energy partons fragmenting into jets, heavy quarks and heavy-flavor mesons, and electromagnetic probes (photons and dileptons). Our strongest emphasis, and our most significant achievements, has, however, always remained on understanding the bulk behavior of the heavy-ion fireball medium, for which soft probes provide the most abundantly available data and thus the most stringent constraints.

Ulrich W. Heinz

2012-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

363

Nuclear Astrophysics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear physics has a long and productive history of application to astrophysics which continues today. Advances in the accuracy and breadth of astrophysical data and theory drive the need for better experimental and theoretical understanding of the underlying nuclear physics. This paper will review some of the scenarios where nuclear physics plays an important role, including Big Bang Nucleosynthesis, neutrino production by our sun, nucleosynthesis in novae, the creation of elements heavier than iron, and neutron stars. Big-bang nucleosynthesis is concerned with the formation of elements with A nuclear physics inputs required are few-nucleon reaction cross sections. The nucleosynthesis of heavier elements involves a variety of proton-, alpha-, neutron-, and photon-induced reactions, coupled with radioactive decay. The advent of radioactive ion beam facilities has opened an important new avenue for studying these processes, as many involve radioactive species. Nuclear physics also plays an important role in neutron stars: both the nuclear equation of state and cooling processes involving neutrino emission play a very important role. Recent developments and also the interplay between nuclear physics and astrophysics will be highlighted.

Carl R. Brune

2005-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

364

(Nuclear theory). [Research in nuclear physics  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses research in nuclear physics. Topics covered in this paper are: symmetry principles; nuclear astrophysics; nuclear structure; quark-gluon plasma; quantum chromodynamics; symmetry breaking; nuclear deformation; and cold fusion. (LSP)

Haxton, W.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Photon-Hadron Jet Correlations in p+p and Au+Au Collisions at sqrt(s_NN) = 200 GeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report the observation at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) of suppression of back-to-back correlations in the direct photon+jet channel in Au+Au relative to p+p collisions. Two-particle correlations of direct photon triggers with associated hadrons are obtained by statistical subtraction of the decay photon-hadron background. The initial momentum of the away-side parton is tightly constrained, because the parton-photon pair exactly balance in momentum at leading order in perturbative quantum chromodynamics (pQCD), making such correlations a powerful probe of the in-medium parton energy loss. The away-side nuclear suppression factor, I_AA, in central Au+Au collisions, is 0.32 +/- 0.12(stat) +/- 0.09(syst) for hadrons of 3 photons of 5 photon associated yields in p+p collisions scale approximately with the momentum balance, z_T = p_T^hadron/p_T^photon, as expected for a measure of the away-side parton fragmentation function. We compare to Au+Au collisions for which the momentum balance dependence of the nuclear modification should be sensitive to the path-length dependence of parton energy loss.

PHENIX Collaboration; A. Adare

2009-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

366

Nuclear Forensics | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

367

Nuclear Incident Team | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

368

Nuclear / Radiological Advisory Team | National Nuclear Security...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

369

Countering Nuclear Terrorism and Trafficking | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

370

Nuclear Safeguards | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

371

Nuclear Controls | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

372

Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty | National Nuclear Security Administra...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

373

Nuclear Verification | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Verification | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our...

374

Climate Change, Nuclear Power and Nuclear  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Climate Change, Nuclear Power and Nuclear Proliferation: Magnitude Matters Rob Goldston MIT IAP biomass wind hydro coal CCS coal nat gas CCS nat gas nuclear Gen IV nuclear Gen III nuclear Gen II 5-1 Electricity Generation: CCS and Nuclear Power Technology Options Available Global Electricity Generation WRE

375

Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Laboratory. ... A 600 MHz Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectrometer. Analytical Data Compilation Reference Materials. ...

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Piezoelectric film load cell robot collision detector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A piezoelectric load cell which can be utilized for detecting collisions and obstruction of a robot arm end effector includes a force sensing element of metallized polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) film. The piezoelectric film sensing element and a resilient support pad are clamped in compression between upper and lower plates. The lower plate has a central recess in its upper face for supporting the support pad and sensing element, while the upper plate has a corresponding central projection formed on its lower face for bearing on the sensing element and support pad. The upper and lower plates are doweled together for concentric alignment and screwed together. The upper and lower plates are also adapted for mounting between the robot arm wrist and end effector. 3 figs.

Lembke, J.R.

1989-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

377

Piezoelectric film load cell robot collision detector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A piezoelectric load cell which can be utilized for detecting collisions and obstruction of a robot arm end effector includes a force sensing element of metallized polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) film. The piezoelectric film sensing element and a resilient support pad are clamped in compression between upper and lower plates. The lower plate has a central recess in its upper face for supporting the support pad and sensing element, while the upper plate has a corresponding central projection formed on its lower face for bearing on the sensing element and support pad. The upper and lower plates are dowelled together for concentric alignment and screwed together. The upper and lower plates are also adapted for mounting between the robot arm wrist and end effector. 3 figs.

Lembke, J.R.

1988-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

378

Nuclear Chirality  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear chirality is a novel manifestation of spontaneous symmetry breaking resulting from an orthogonal coupling of angular momentum vectors in triaxial nuclei. Three perpendicular angular momenta can form two systems of opposite handedness; the time reversal operator

Krzysztof Starosta

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

NUCLEAR REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor incorporating seed and blanket assemblies is designed. Means are provided for obtaining samples of the coolant from the blanket assemblies and for varying the flow of coolant through the blanket assemblies. (AEC)

Sherman, J.; Sharbaugh, J.E.; Fauth, W.L. Jr.; Palladino, N.J.; DeHuff, P.G.

1962-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

380

Nuclear Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Assessing the Thermal Stability of Bulk Metallic Glasses for Nuclear Waste Applications by K. Hildal, J.H. Perepezko, and L. Kaufman, $10.00 ($10.00), $25.00.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "g-1cm2 nuclear collision" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Nuclear & Uranium  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 21. Foreign sales of uranium from U.S. suppliers and owners and operators of U.S. civilian nuclear power reactors by origin and delivery year, 2008-2012

382

Nuclear Nonproliferation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With an explosion equivalent of about 20kT of TNT, the Trinity test was the first demonstration of a nuclear weapon. Conducted on July 16, 1945 in Alamogordo, NM this site is now a Registered National Historic Landmark. The concept and applicability of nuclear power was demonstrated on December 20, 1951 with the Experimental Breeder Reactor Number One (EBR-1) lit four light bulbs. This reactor is now a Registered National Historic Landmark, located near Arco, ID. From that moment forward it had been clearly demonstrated that nuclear energy has both peaceful and military applications and that the civilian and military fuel cycles can overlap. For the more than fifty years since the Atoms for Peace program, a key objective of nuclear policy has been to enable the wider peaceful use of nuclear energy while preventing the spread of nuclear weapons. Volumes have been written on the impact of these two actions on the world by advocates and critics; pundits and practioners; politicians and technologists. The nations of the world have woven together a delicate balance of treaties, agreements, frameworks and handshakes that are representative of the timeframe in which they were constructed and how they have evolved in time. Collectively these vehicles attempt to keep political will, nuclear materials and technology in check. This paper captures only the briefest abstract of the more significant aspects on the Nonproliferation Regime. Of particular relevance to this discussion is the special nonproliferation sensitivity associated with the uranium isotope separation and spent fuel reprocessing aspects of the nuclear fuel cycle.

Atkins-Duffin, C E

2008-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

383

Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center Workshop: Brookhaven Summer Program on Quarkonium Production in Elementary and Heavy Ion Collisions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Understanding the structure of the hadron is of fundamental importance in subatomic physics. Production of heavy quarkonia is arguably one of the most fascinating subjects in strong interaction physics. It offers unique perspectives into the formation of QCD bound states. Heavy quarkonia are among the most studied particles both theoretically and experimentally. They have been, and continue to be, the focus of measurements in all high energy colliders around the world. Because of their distinct multiple mass scales, heavy quarkonia were suggested as a probe of the hot quark-gluon matter produced in heavy-ion collisions; and their production has been one of the main subjects of the experimental heavy-ion programs at the SPS and RHIC. However, since the discovery of J/psi at Brookhaven National Laboratory and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory over 36 years ago, theorists still have not been able to fully understand the production mechanism of heavy quarkonia, although major progresses have been made in recent years. With this in mind, a two-week program on quarkonium production was organized at BNL on June 6-17, 2011. Many new experimental data from LHC and from RHIC were presented during the program, including results from the LHC heavy ion run. To analyze and correctly interpret these measurements, and in order to quantify properties of the hot matter produced in heavy-ion collisions, it is necessary to improve our theoretical understanding of quarkonium production. Therefore, a wide range of theoretical aspects on the production mechanism in the vacuum as well as in cold nuclear and hot quark-gluon medium were discussed during the program from the controlled calculations in QCD and its effective theories such as NRQCD to various models, and to the first principle lattice calculation. The scientific program was divided into three major scientific parts: basic production mechanism for heavy quarkonium in vacuum or in high energy elementary collisions; the formation of quarkonium in nuclear medium as well as the strong interacting quark-gluon matter produced in heavy ion collisions; and heavy quarkonium properties from the first principle lattice calculations. The heavy quarkonium production at a future Electron-Ion Collider (EIC) was also discussed at the meeting. The highlight of the meeting was the apparent success of the NRQCD approach at next-to-leading order in the description of the quarkonium production in proton-proton, electron-proton and electron positron collisions. Still many questions remain open in lattice calculations of in-medium quarkonium properties and in the area of cold nuclear matter effects.

Dumitru, A.; Lourenco, C.; Petreczky, P.; Qiu, J., Ruan, L.

2011-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

384

Role of density dependent symmetry energy in nuclear stopping  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Information about the nuclear matter under the extreme conditions of temperature and density and the role of symmetry energy under these conditions is still a topic of crucial importance in the present day nuclear physics research. The multifragmentation, collective flow and the nuclear stopping is among the various rare phenomenon which can be observed in heavy-ion collisions at intermediate energies. The nuclear stopping, which is sensitive towards the symmetry energy has gained a lot of interest because it provides the possibility to examine the degree of thermalization or equilibration in the matter. Aim of the present study is to pin down the nuclear stopping for the different forms of density dependent symmetry energy

Vinayak, Karan Singh

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Role of density dependent symmetry energy in nuclear stopping  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Information about the nuclear matter under the extreme conditions of temperature and density and the role of symmetry energy under these conditions is still a topic of crucial importance in the present day nuclear physics research. The multifragmentation, collective flow and the nuclear stopping is among the various rare phenomenon which can be observed in heavy-ion collisions at intermediate energies. The nuclear stopping, which is sensitive towards the symmetry energy has gained a lot of interest because it provides the possibility to examine the degree of thermalization or equilibration in the matter. Aim of the present study is to pin down the nuclear stopping for the different forms of density dependent symmetry energy

Karan Singh Vinayak; Suneel Kumar

2011-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

386

Quarkonium plus prompt-photon associated hadroproduction and nuclear shadowing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The quarkonium hadroproduction in association with a photon at high energies provides a probe of the dynamics of the strong interactions as it is dependent on the nuclear gluon distribution. Therefore, it could be used to constrain the behavior of the nuclear gluon distribution in proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions. Such processes are useful to single out the magnitude of the shadowing/antishadowing effects in the nuclear parton densities. In this work we investigate the influence of nuclear effects in the production of JPsi + photon and Upsilon + photon and estimate the transverse momentum dependence of the nuclear modification factors. The theoretical framework considered in the JPsi (Upsilon) production associated with a direct photon at the hadron collider is the non-relativistic QCD (NRQCD) factorization formalism.

C. Brenner Mariotto; M. V. T. Machado

2009-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

387

Thermalization in collisions of large nuclei at high energies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydrodynamical analysis of experimental data of ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions seems to indicate that the hot QCD matter created in the collisions thermalizes very quickly. Theoretically, we have no idea why this should be true. In this proceeding, I will describe how the thermalization takes place in the most theoretically clean limit -- that of large nuclei at asymptotically high energy per nucleon, where the system is described by weak-coupling QCD. In this limit, plasma instabilities dominate the dynamics from immediately after the collision until well after the plasma becomes nearly in equilibrium at time t \\alpha^(-5/2)Q^(-1).

Kurkela, Aleksi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Zipping and Unzipping of Cosmic String Loops in Collision  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper the collision of two cosmic string loops is studied. After collision junctions are formed and the loops are entangled. We show that after their formation the junctions start to unzip and the loops disentangle. This analysis provides a theoretical understanding of the unzipping effect observed in numerical simulations of a network of cosmic strings with more than one type of cosmic strings. The unzipping phenomena have important effects in the evolution of cosmic string networks when junctions are formed upon collision, such as in a network of cosmic superstrings.

Hassan Firouzjahi; Johanna Karouby; Shahram Khosravi; Robert Brandenberger

2009-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

389

Heavy-particle collisions in the plasma edge  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Available cross-section data for heavy-particle collision processes which play important roles in the edge plasma of magnetically-confined fusion devices are surveyed and reviewed. The species considered include H, H/sub 2/, He, C, O, Fe, and their ions. The most important heavy-particle collision processes occurring in the edge plasma are charge-exchange reactions. Excitation and dissociation processes are also considered. Emphasis is given to relative collision velocities corresponding to plasma ion temperatures in the 1 to 200 eV range. Evaluated or recommended data are presented where possible along with their estimated uncertainties, and gaps in the data base are indicated.

Phaneuf, R.A.; Hunter, H.T.; Barnett, C.F.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

International Cooperation on Safety of Nuclear Plants - Nuclear...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

391

Current R&D Activities in Nuclear Criticality Safety - Nuclear...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

392

NUCLEAR DATA AND MEASUREMENTS REPORTS 161-180 - Nuclear Data...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

393

Analysis Tools for Nuclear Criticality Safety - Nuclear Engineering...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

394

Nuclear multifragmentation and fission: similarity and differences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermal multifragmentation of hot nuclei is interpreted as the nuclear liquid–fog phase transition deep inside the spinodal region. The experimental data for p(8.1GeV) + Au collisions are analyzed. It is concluded that the decay process of hot nuclei is characterized by two size parameters: transition state and freeze-out volumes. The similarity between dynamics of fragmentation and ordinary fission is discussed. The IMF emission time is related to the mean rupture time at the multi-scission point, which corresponds to the kinetic freeze-out configuration. 1

V. Karnaukhov; H. Oeschler; S. Avdeyev; V. Rodionov; V. Kirakosyan; A. Simonenko; P. Rukoyatkin; A. Budzanowski; W. Karcz; I. Skwirczynska; B. Czech; L. Chulkov; E. Kuzmin; E. Norbeck; A. Botvina

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Nuclear multifragmentation and fission: similarity and differences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermal multifragmentation of hot nuclei is interpreted as the nuclear liquid--fog phase transition deep inside the spinodal region. The experimental data for p(8.1GeV) + Au collisions are analyzed. It is concluded that the decay process of hot nuclei is characterized by two size parameters: transition state and freeze-out volumes. The similarity between dynamics of fragmentation and ordinary fission is discussed. The IMF emission time is related to the mean rupture time at the multi-scission point, which corresponds to the kinetic freeze-out configuration.

V. Karnaukhov; H. Oeschler; S. Avdeyev; V. Rodionov; V. Kirakosyan; A. Simonenko; P. Rukoyatkin; A. Budzanowski; W. Karcz; I. Skwirczynska; B. Czech; L. Chulkov; E. Kuzmin; E. Norbeck; A. Botvina

2006-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

396

Countering Nuclear Terrorism | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Countering Nuclear Terrorism | National Nuclear Security Administration Countering Nuclear Terrorism | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog The National Nuclear Security Administration Countering Nuclear Terrorism Home > Our Mission > Countering Nuclear Terrorism Countering Nuclear Terrorism NNSA provides expertise, practical tools, and technically informed policy

397

Glenn T. Seaborg and heavy ion nuclear science  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radiochemistry has played a limited but important role in the study of nucleus-nucleus collisions. Many of the important radiochemical studies have taken place in Seaborg's laboratory or in the laboratories of others who have spent time in Berkeley working with Glenn T. Seaborg. I will discuss studies of low energy deep inelastic reactions with special emphasis on charge equilibration, studies of the properties of heavy residues in intermediate energy nuclear collisions and studies of target fragmentation in relativistic and ultrarelativistic reactions. The emphasis will be on the unique information afforded by radiochemistry and the physical insight derived from radiochemical studies. Future roles of radiochemistry in heavy ion nuclear science also will be discussed.

Loveland, W. (Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States). Dept. of Chemistry Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States))

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Glenn T. Seaborg and heavy ion nuclear science  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radiochemistry has played a limited but important role in the study of nucleus-nucleus collisions. Many of the important radiochemical studies have taken place in Seaborg`s laboratory or in the laboratories of others who have spent time in Berkeley working with Glenn T. Seaborg. I will discuss studies of low energy deep inelastic reactions with special emphasis on charge equilibration, studies of the properties of heavy residues in intermediate energy nuclear collisions and studies of target fragmentation in relativistic and ultrarelativistic reactions. The emphasis will be on the unique information afforded by radiochemistry and the physical insight derived from radiochemical studies. Future roles of radiochemistry in heavy ion nuclear science also will be discussed.

Loveland, W. [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States). Dept. of Chemistry]|[Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Recent results in relativistic heavy ion collisions: from ``a new state of matter'' to "the perfect fluid"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Experimental Physics with Relativistic Heavy Ions dates from 1992 when a beam of 197Au of energy greater than 10A GeV/c first became available at the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) soon followed in 1994 by a 208Pb beam of 158A GeV/c at the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) at CERN (European Center for Nuclear Research). Previous pioneering measurements at the Berkeley Bevalac in the late 1970's and early 1980's were at much lower bombarding energies (~ 1 A GeV/c) where nuclear breakup rather than particle production is the dominant inelastic process in A+A collisions. More recently, starting in 2000, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at BNL has produced head-on collisions of two 100A GeV beams of fully stripped Au ions, corresponding to nucleon-nucleon center-of-mass energy, sqrt(sNN)=200 GeV, total c.m. energy 200A GeV. The objective of this research program is to produce nuclear matter with extreme density and temperature, possibly resulting in a state of matter where the quarks and gluons normally confined inside individual nucleons (r laboratories: "A new state of matter", by CERN on Feb 10, 2000 and "The perfect fluid", by BNL on April 19, 2005.

M. J. Tannenbaum

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Organization - Nuclear Engineering Division (Argonne)  

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Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "g-1cm2 nuclear collision" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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401

Achievements: Nuclear Engineering Division (Argonne)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

402

Burnup calculation by the method of first-flight collision probabilities using average chords prior to the first collision  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A technique to calculate the burnup of materials of cells and fuel assemblies using the matrices of first-flight neutron collision probabilities rebuilt at a given burnup step is presented. A method to rebuild and correct first collision probability matrices using average chords prior to the first neutron collision, which are calculated with the help of geometric modules of constructed stochastic neutron trajectories, is described. Results of calculation of the infinite multiplication factor for elementary cells with a modified material composition compared to the reference one as well as calculation of material burnup in the cells and fuel assemblies of a VVER-1000 are presented.

Karpushkin, T. Yu., E-mail: timka83@yandex.ru [Russian Research Centre Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

403

Study of the behavior of nuclear modification factor in freeze-out state  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One of the latest trends in the advancement of experimental high-energy physics is to identify the quark gluon plasma (QGP) predicted qualitatively by quantum chromodynamics (QCD). We discuss whether nuclear transparency effect which is considered an important phenomenon, connected with dynamics of hadron-nuclear and nuclear-nuclear interactions could reflect some particular properties of the medium. FASTMC is used for Au-Au collision at RHIC energies. Critical change in the transparency is considered a signal on the appearance of new phases of strongly interacting matter and the QGP.

Ajaz, M; Khan, K H; Zaman, A; 10.1088/1674-1137/37/2/024101

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Effect of Electric Charge on Collisions between Cloud Droplets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple model is presented for the calculation of the effect of electric charges on the collision and coalescence of cloud droplets, a topic that is of importance for coalescence-induced natural rainfall and for the possible effectiveness of ...

Neville H. Fletcher

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Production of jets at forward rapidities in hadronic collisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss high-pT production processes at forward rapidities in hadron-hadron collisions, and describe recent results from using QCD high-energy factorization in forward jet production at the LHC.

F. Hautmann

2009-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

406

Analysis of Outflow Boundary Collisions in North-Central Alabama  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ninety-four outflow boundary (OB) collisions were documented in north-central Alabama over the summers of 2005–07 using the Advanced Radar for Meteorological and Operational Research (ARMOR) dual-polarimetric radar located at the Huntsville, ...

Stephen J. Harrison; John R. Mecikalski; Kevin R. Knupp

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Collision Energy Dependence of Defect Formation in Graphene  

SciTech Connect

Molecular dynamics simulations are performed using an empirical potential to simulate the collision process of an energetic carbon atom hitting a graphene sheet. According to the different impact locations within the graphene sheet, the incident threshold energies of different defects caused by the collision are determined to be 22 eV for a single vacancy, 36 eV for a divacancy, 60 eV for a Stone-Wales defect, and 65 eV for a hexavacancy. Study of the evolution and stability of the defects formed by these collisions suggests that the single vacancy reconstructs into a pentagon pair and the divacancy transforms into a pentagon-octagon-pentagon configuration. The displacement threshold energy in graphene is investigated by using the dynamical method, and a reasonable value 22.42 eV is clarified by eliminating the heating effect induced by the collision.

Mao, Fei [Beijing Normal University; Zhang, Chao [Beijing Normal University; Zhang, Yanwen [ORNL; Zhang, Fenf-Shou [Beijing Normal University

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Collision Rates of Cloud Droplets in Turbulent Flow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Direct numerical simulations of an evolving turbulent flow field have been performed to explore how turbulence affects the motion and collisions of cloud droplets. Large numbers of droplets are tracked through the flow field and their positions, ...

Charmaine N. Franklin; Paul A. Vaillancourt; M. K. Yau; Peter Bartello

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Consequences of energy conservation in relativistic heavy-ion collisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Complete characterization of particle production and emission in relativistic heavy-ion collisions is in general not feasible experimentally. This work demonstrates, however, that the availability of essentially complete pseudorapidity distributions for charged particles allows for a reliable estimate of the average transverse momenta and energy of emitted particles by requiring energy conservation in the process. The results of such an analysis for Au+Au collisions at sqrt{s_{NN}}= 130 and 200 GeV are compared with measurements of mean-p_T and mean-E_T in regions where such measurements are available. The mean-p_T dependence on pseudorapidity for Au+Au collisions at 130 and 200 GeV is given for different collision centralities.

B. B. Back

2005-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

410

Trends in Yield and Azimuthal Shape Modification in Dihadron Correlations in Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fast parton probes produced by hard scattering and embedded within collisions of large nuclei have shown that partons suffer large energy loss and that the produced medium may respond collectively to the lost energy. We present measurements of neutral pion trigger particles at transverse momenta p^t_T = 4-12 GeV/c and associated charged hadrons (p^a_T = 0.5-7 GeV/c) as a function of relative azimuthal angle Delta Phi at midrapidity in Au+Au and p+p collisions at sqrt(s_NN) = 200 GeV. These data lead to two major observations. First, the relative angular distribution of low momentum hadrons, whose shape modification has been interpreted as a medium response to parton energy loss, is found to be modified only for p^t_T < 7 GeV/c. At higher p^t_T, the data are consistent with unmodified or very weakly modified shapes, even for the lowest measured p^a_T. This observation presents a quantitative challenge to medium response scenarios. Second, the associated yield of hadrons opposite to the trigger particle in Au+Au relative to that in p+p (I_AA) is found to be suppressed at large momentum (IAA ~ 0.35-0.5), but less than the single particle nuclear modification factor (R_AA ~0.2).

A. Adare; S. Afanasiev; C. Aidala; N. N. Ajitanand; Y. Akiba; H. Al-Bataineh; J. Alexander; T. Alho; K. Aoki; L. Aphecetche; Y. Aramaki; J. Asai; E. T. Atomssa; R. Averbeck; T. C. Awes; B. Azmoun; V. Babintsev; M. Bai; G. Baksay; L. Baksay; A. Baldisseri; K. N. Barish; P. D. Barnes; B. Bassalleck; A. T. Basye; S. Bathe; S. Batsouli; V. Baublis; C. Baumann; A. Bazilevsky; S. Belikov; R. Belmont; R. Bennett; A. Berdnikov; Y. Berdnikov; A. A. Bickley; J. G. Boissevain; J. S. Bok; H. Borel; K. Boyle; M. L. Brooks; H. Buesching; V. Bumazhnov; G. Bunce; S. Butsyk; C. M. Camacho; S. Campbell; B. S. Chang; W. C. Chang; J. -L. Charvet; C. -H. Chen; S. Chernichenko; C. Y. Chi; M. Chiu; I. J. Choi; R. K. Choudhury; P. Christiansen; T. Chujo; P. Chung; A. Churyn; O. Chvala; V. Cianciolo; Z. Citron; B. A. Cole; M. Connors; P. Constantin; M. Csanád; T. Csörg?; T. Dahms; S. Dairaku; I. Danchev; K. Das; A. Datta; G. David; A. Denisov; D. d'Enterria; A. Deshpande; E. J. Desmond; O. Dietzsch; A. Dion; M. Donadelli; O. Drapier; A. Drees; K. A. Drees; A. K. Dubey; M. Durham; A. Durum; D. Dutta; V. Dzhordzhadze; S. Edwards; Y. V. Efremenko; F. Ellinghaus; T. Engelmore; A. Enokizono; H. En'yo; S. Esumi; K. O. Eyser; B. Fadem; D. E. Fields; M. Finger; \\, Jr.; M. Finger; F. Fleuret; S. L. Fokin; Z. Fraenkel; J. E. Frantz; A. Franz; A. D. Frawley; K. Fujiwara; Y. Fukao; T. Fusayasu; I. Garishvili; A. Glenn; H. Gong; M. Gonin; J. Gosset; Y. Goto; R. Granier de Cassagnac; N. Grau; S. V. Greene; M. Grosse Perdekamp; T. Gunji; H. -Å. Gustafsson; A. Hadj Henni; J. S. Haggerty; I. Hahn; H. Hamagaki; J. Hamblen; J. Hanks; R. Han; E. P. Hartouni; K. Haruna; E. Haslum; R. Hayano; M. Heffner; S. Hegyi; T. K. Hemmick; T. Hester; X. He; J. C. Hill; M. Hohlmann; W. Holzmann; K. Homma; B. Hong; T. Horaguchi; D. Hornback; S. Huang; T. Ichihara; R. Ichimiya; J. Ide; Y. Ikeda; K. Imai; J. Imrek; M. Inaba; D. Isenhower; M. Ishihara; T. Isobe; M. Issah; A. Isupov; D. Ivanischev; B. V. Jacak; J. Jia; J. Jin; B. M. Johnson; K. S. Joo; D. Jouan; D. S. Jumper; F. Kajihara; S. Kametani; N. Kamihara; J. Kamin; J. H. Kang; J. Kapustinsky; D. Kawall; M. Kawashima; A. V. Kazantsev; T. Kempel; A. Khanzadeev; K. M. Kijima; J. Kikuchi; B. I. Kim; D. H. Kim; D. J. Kim; E. -J. Kim; E. Kim; S. H. Kim; Y. J. Kim; E. Kinney; K. Kiriluk; A. Kiss; E. Kistenev; J. Klay; C. Klein-Boesing; L. Kochenda; B. Komkov; M. Konno; J. Koster; D. Kotchetkov; A. Kozlov; A. Král; A. Kravitz; G. J. Kunde; K. Kurita; M. Kurosawa; M. J. Kweon; Y. Kwon; G. S. Kyle; R. Lacey; Y. S. Lai; J. G. Lajoie; D. Layton; A. Lebedev; D. M. Lee; J. Lee; K. B. Lee; K. Lee; K. S. Lee; T. Lee; M. J. Leitch; M. A. L. Leite; E. Leitner; B. Lenzi; P. Liebing; L. A. Linden Levy; T. Liška; A. Litvinenko; H. Liu; M. X. Liu; X. Li; B. Love; R. Luechtenborg; D. Lynch; C. F. Maguire; Y. I. Makdisi; A. Malakhov; M. D. Malik; V. I. Manko; E. Mannel; Y. Mao; L. Mašek; H. Masui; F. Matathias; M. McCumber; P. L. McGaughey; N. Means; B. Meredith; Y. Miake; A. Mignerey; P. Mikeš; K. Miki; A. Milov; M. Mishra; J. T. Mitchell; A. K. Mohanty; Y. Morino; A. Morreale; D. P. Morrison; T. V. Moukhanova; D. Mukhopadhyay; J. Murata; S. Nagamiya; J. L. Nagle; M. Naglis; M. I. Nagy; I. Nakagawa; Y. Nakamiya; T. Nakamura; K. Nakano; J. Newby; M. Nguyen; T. Niita; R. Nouicer; A. S. Nyanin; E. O'Brien; S. X. Oda; C. A. Ogilvie; H. Okada; K. Okada; M. Oka; Y. Onuki; A. Oskarsson; M. Ouchida; K. Ozawa; R. Pak; A. P. T. Palounek; V. Pantuev; V. Papavassiliou; I. Park; J. Park; S. K. Park; W. J. Park; S. F. Pate; H. Pei; J. -C. Peng; H. Pereira; V. Peresedov; D. Yu. Peressounko; C. Pinkenburg; R. P. Pisani; M. Proissl; M. L. Purschke; A. K. Purwar; H. Qu; J. Rak; A. Rakotozafindrabe; I. Ravinovich; K. F. Read; S. Rembeczki; K. Reygers; V. Riabov; Y. Riabov; E. Richardson; D. Roach; G. Roche; S. D. Rolnick; M. Rosati; C. A. Rosen; S. S. E. Rosendahl; P. Rosnet; P. Rukoyatkin; P. Ruži?ka; V. L. Rykov; B. Sahlmueller; N. Saito; T. Sakaguchi; S. Sakai; K. Sakashita; V. Samsonov; S. Sano; T. Sato; S. Sawada; K. Sedgwick; J. Seele; R. Seidl; A. Yu. Semenov; V. Semenov; R. Seto; D. Sharma; I. Shein; T. -A. Shibata; K. Shigaki; M. Shimomura; K. Shoji; P. Shukla; A. Sickles; C. L. Silva; D. Silvermyr; C. Silvestre; K. S. Sim; B. K. Singh; C. P. Singh; V. Singh; M. Slune?ka; A. Soldatov; R. A. Soltz; W. E. Sondheim; S. P. Sorensen; I. V. Sourikova; N. A. Sparks; F. Staley; P. W. Stankus; E. Stenlund; M. Stepanov; A. Ster; S. P. Stoll; T. Sugitate; C. Suire; A. Sukhanov; J. Sziklai; E. M. Takagui; A. Taketani; R. Tanabe; Y. Tanaka; K. Tanida; M. J. Tannenbaum; S. Tarafdar; A. Taranenko; P. Tarján; H. Themann; T. L. Thomas; M. Togawa; A. Toia; L. Tomášek; Y. Tomita; H. Torii; R. S. Towell; V-N. Tram; I. Tserruya; Y. Tsuchimoto; C. Vale; H. Valle; H. W. van Hecke; E. Vazquez-Zambrano; A. Veicht; J. Velkovska; R. Vertesi

2010-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

411

Nuclear scales  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear scales are discussed from the nuclear physics viewpoint. The conventional nuclear potential is characterized as a black box that interpolates nucleon-nucleon (NN) data, while being constrained by the best possible theoretical input. The latter consists of the longer-range parts of the NN force (e.g., OPEP, TPEP, the {pi}-{gamma} force), which can be calculated using chiral perturbation theory and gauged using modern phase-shift analyses. The shorter-range parts of the force are effectively parameterized by moments of the interaction that are independent of the details of the force model, in analogy to chiral perturbation theory. Results of GFMC calculations in light nuclei are interpreted in terms of fundamental scales, which are in good agreement with expectations from chiral effective field theories. Problems with spin-orbit-type observables are noted.

Friar, J.L.

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Nuclear Power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The world of the twenty first century is an energy consuming society. Due to increasing population and living standards, each year the world requires more energy and new efficient systems for delivering it. Furthermore, the new systems must be inherently safe and environmentally benign. These realities of today's world are among the reasons that lead to serious interest in deploying nuclear power as a sustainable energy source. Today's nuclear reactors are safe and highly efficient energy systems that offer electricity and a multitude of co-generation energy products ranging from potable water to heat for industrial applications. The goal of the book is to show the current state-of-the-art in the covered technical areas as well as to demonstrate how general engineering principles and methods can be applied to nuclear power systems.

Tsvetkov, Pavel

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Evidence for nuclear gluon shadowing from the ALICE measurements of PbPb ultraperipheral exclusive J/{\\psi} production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show that the recent ALICE measurements of exclusive J/{\\psi} production in ultraperipheral PbPb collisions at 2.76 TeV provide the first direct experimental evidence for the strong nuclear gluon shadowing in lead at $x \\sim 10^{-3}$. The evidence is based on the comparison of the nuclear suppression factor S(x\\approx 0.001)=0.61^{+0.05}_{-0.04} found in the analysis of the coherent J/{\\psi} photoproduction cross sections measured by ALICE with the nuclear gluon shadowing predicted by the global fits of nuclear parton distributions and by the leading twist theory of nuclear shadowing.

Guzey, V; Strikman, M; Zhalov, M

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Nuclear Models  

SciTech Connect

The atomic nucleus is a typical example of a many-body problem. On the one hand, the number of nucleons (protons and neutrons) that constitute the nucleus is too large to allow for exact calculations. On the other hand, the number of constituent particles is too small for the individual nuclear excitation states to be explained by statistical methods. Another problem, particular for the atomic nucleus, is that the nucleon-nucleon (n-n) interaction is not one of the fundamental forces of Nature, and is hard to put in a single closed equation. The nucleon-nucleon interaction also behaves differently between two free nucleons (bare interaction) and between two nucleons in the nuclear medium (dressed interaction).Because of the above reasons, specific nuclear many-body models have been devised of which each one sheds light on some selected aspects of nuclear structure. Only combining the viewpoints of different models, a global insight of the atomic nucleus can be gained. In this chapter, we revise the the Nuclear Shell Model as an example of the microscopic approach, and the Collective Model as an example of the geometric approach. Finally, we study the statistical properties of nuclear spectra, basing on symmetry principles, to find out whether there is quantum chaos in the atomic nucleus. All three major approaches have been rewarded with the Nobel Prize of Physics. In the text, we will stress how each approach introduces its own series of approximations to reduce the prohibitingly large number of degrees of freedom of the full many-body problem to a smaller manageable number of effective degrees of freedom.

Fossion, Ruben [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 70-543, Mexico D. F., C.P. 04510 (Mexico)

2010-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

415

Multifragmentation and nuclear phase transitions (liquid-fog and liquid-gas)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermal multifragmentation of hot nuclei is interpreted as the nuclear liquid-fog phase transition. The charge distributions of the intermediate mass fragments produced in p(3.6 GeV) + Au and p(8.1 GeV) + Au collisions are analyzed within the statistical multifragmentation model with the critical temperature for the nuclear liquid-gas phase transition Tc as a free parameter. The analysis presented here provides strong support for a value of Tc > 15 MeV.

V. A. Karnaukhov; H. Oeschler; S. P. Avdeyev; V. K. Rodionov; A. V. Simomenko; V. V. Kirakosyan; A. Budzanowski; W. Karcz; I. Skwirczynska; E. A. Kuzmin; E. Norbeck; A. S. Botvina

2003-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

416

Z Production as a Test of Nuclear Effects at the LHC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We predict the Z transverse momentum distribution from proton-proton and nuclear collisions at the LHC. After demonstrating that higher-twist nuclear effects are very small, we propose $Z^0$ production as a precision test for leading-twist pQCD in the TeV energy region. We also point out that shadowing may result in unexpected phenomenology at the LHC.

Xiaofei Zhang; George Fai

2002-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

417

Determining the density dependence of the nuclear symmetry energy using heavy-ion reactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We review recent progress in the determination of the subsaturation density behavior of the nuclear symmetry energy from heavy-ion collisions as well as the theoretical progress in probing the high density behavior of the symmetry energy in heavy-ion reactions induced by high energy radioactive beams. We further discuss the implications of these results for the nuclear effective interactions and the neutron skin thickness of heavy nuclei.

Lie-Wen Chen; Che Ming Ko; Bao-An Li; Gao-Chan Yong

2007-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

418

Collaborating Organizations - Nuclear Data Program, Nuclear Engineering  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Collaborating Organizations Collaborating Organizations Nuclear Data Program Overview Current Projects & Recent Activities Collaborating Organizations Publications Nuclear Data Measurements (NDM) Reports Experimental Nuclear Data Resources Contact ND Program Related Resources Other Major Programs Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE Division on Flickr Nuclear Data Program Collaborating Organizations Bookmark and Share National Nuclear Data Center, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York. International Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Network, coordinated by IAEA, Vienna, Austria Heavy-Ion Nuclear Physics Group, Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois. Nuclear Spectroscopy Group, Department of Nuclear Physics,

419

Nuclear Data Program - Nuclear Engineering Division (Argonne)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Data Program Data Program Nuclear Data Program Overview Current Projects & Recent Activities Collaborating Organizations Publications Nuclear Data Measurements (NDM) Reports Experimental Nuclear Data Resources Contact ND Program Related Resources Other Major Programs Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE Division on Flickr Nuclear Data Program We contribute to the development of comprehensive nuclear reactions and nuclear structure databases, including nuclear data measurement, analysis, modeling and evaluation methodologies, that are implemented in basic science research and advanced nuclear technologies. Bookmark and Share Recent Events Nuclear Structure 2012 Conference Argonne National Laboratory hosted the

420

Dijet production, collision centrality and backgrounds in high-energy p-p collisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Two aspects of high-energy \\pp collisions share common phenomenological elements: (a) A correlation between jet production and \\pp centrality is suggested by the transverse partonic structure of hadrons inferred from deep-inelastic scattering data. (b) The {\\em underlying event} (UE) is defined as the final-state particles complementary to a triggered high-energy dijet. An observable common to both topics is variation of so-called {\\em transverse multiplicity} $N_\\perp$ with a $p_{t,trig}$ dijet trigger. We test assumptions associated with \\pp collision centrality and the UE. We determine the nature of the UE and explore the relation between jet production and \\pp centrality. We use the {\\em two-component model} (TCM) of spectra and correlations derived from 200 GeV \\pp collisions to construct a simulated particle distribution on $(p_t,n_{ch})$ to predict the $N_\\perp$ response to $p_{t,trig}$. The $p_t$ spectrum TCM combined in this analysis with measured minimum-bias \\pp angular correlations suggests that the UE includes a substantial contribution from the triggered dijet in addition to the contribution from projectile fragmentation (beam-beam remnants). The jet contribution to $N_\\perp$ may represent a universal large-angle base common to all dijets that extends across $2\\pi$ azimuth. The analysis further suggests that \\pp centrality is not controlled significantly by $p_{t,trig}$ but may be correlated to some extent with an imposed $n_{ch}$ condition, depending on the role of fluctuations. Future correlation studies may better determine the role of \\pp centrality. These results may have implications for ongoing RHIC analysis and LHC searches for physics beyond the standard model.

Thomas A. Trainor

2012-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "g-1cm2 nuclear collision" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Powering the Nuclear Navy | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

The National Nuclear Security Administration Powering the Nuclear Navy Home > Our Mission > Powering the Nuclear Navy Powering the Nuclear Navy The Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program...

422

Numerical Investigation of Collision-Induced Breakup of Raindrops. Part I: Methodology and Dependencies on Collision Energy and Eccentricity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Binary collisions of large raindrops moving with terminal fall velocity are numerically investigated using FS3D, a direct numerical simulation (DNS) code based on the “volume of fluid” method. The result of this process can be a permanent ...

Jan Schlottke; Winfried Straub; Klaus Dieter Beheng; Hassan Gomaa; Bernhard Weigand

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

National Nuclear Data Center Nuclear Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

National Nuclear Data Center and Nuclear Energy Pavel Oblozinsky National Nuclear Data Center;National Nuclear Data Center Probably the oldest active organization at BNL History · Founded in 1952 as Sigma Center, neutron cross sections · Changed to National Nuclear Data Center in 1977 · 40 staff

424

Explanation of Di-jet asymmetry in Pb+Pb collisions at the Large Hadron Collider  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the medium modification of a partonic jet shower traversing in a hot quark-gluon plasma. We derive and solve a differential equation that governs the evolution of the radiated gluon spectrum as the jet propagates through the medium. Energy contained inside the jet cone is lost by dissipation through elastic collisions with the medium and by scattering of shower partons to larger angles. We find that the jet energy loss at early times is dominated by medium effects on the vacuum radiation, and by medium-induced radiation effects at late times. We compare our numerical results for the nuclear modification of the di-jet asymmetry with that recently reported by the ATLAS collaboration.

Guang-You Qin; Berndt Müller

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

425

Midwest Nuclear Compact (Iowa)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Midwest Nuclear Compact establishes a Midwest Nuclear Board to cooperatively evaluate and make recommendations regarding the development of nuclear technology, distribute information about...

426

Nuclear Science & Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Science & Technology Nuclear Science & Technology Nuclear Science & Technology1354608000000Nuclear Science & TechnologySome of these resources are LANL-only and will require Remote Access. /No/ Nuclear Science & Technology Some of these resources are LANL-only and will require Remote Access. Key Resources Databases Organizations Journals Key Resources International Atomic Energy Agency IAEA scientific and technical publications cover areas of nuclear power, radiation therapy, nuclear security, nuclear law, and emergency repose. Search under Publications/Books and Reports for scientific books, standards, technical guides and reports National Nuclear Data Center Nuclear physics data for basic nuclear research and for applied nuclear technologies, operated by Brookhaven.

427

Nuclear | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Nuclear Radioisotope Power Systems, a strong partnership between the Energy Department's Office of Nuclear Energy and NASA, has been providing the energy for deep space...

428

Brookhaven Nuclear Physics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Brookhaven Nuclear Physics Historically, nuclear physicists have studied the structure, characteristics, and behavior of the atomic nucleus and the nature of the nuclear force....

429

NUCLEAR PROXIMITY FORCES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One might summarize of nuclear potential energy has beendegree of freedom) for the nuclear interaction between anyUniversity of California. Nuclear Proximity Forces 'I< at

Randrup, J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Nuclear | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Science & Innovation Energy Sources Nuclear Nuclear Radioisotope Power Systems, a strong partnership between the Energy Department's Office of Nuclear Energy and NASA, has...

431

Massive neutral gauge boson production as a probe of nuclear modifications of parton distributions at the LHC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze the role of nuclear modifications of parton distributions, notably, the nuclear shadowing and antishadowing corrections, in production of lepton pairs from decays of neutral electroweak gauge bosons in proton-lead and lead-collisions at the LHC. Using the Collins-Soper-Sterman resummation formalism that we extended to the case of nuclear parton distributions, we observed a direct correlation between the predicted behavior of the transverse momentum and rapidity distributions of the produced vector bosons and the pattern of quark and gluon nuclear modifications. This makes Drell-Yan pair production in $pA$ and $AA$ collisions at the LHC a useful tool for constraining nuclear PDFs in the small-$x$ shadowing and moderate-$x$ antishadowing regions.

Vadim Guzey; Marco Guzzi; Pavel M. Nadolsky; Mark Strikman; Bowen Wang

2012-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

432

NUCLEAR REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A boiling-water nuclear reactor is described wherein control is effected by varying the moderator-to-fuel ratio in the reactor core. This is accomplished by providing control tubes containing a liquid control moderator in the reactor core and providing means for varying the amount of control moderatcr within the control tubes.

Treshow, M.

1961-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Nuclear explosions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A summary of the physics of a nuclear bomb explosion and its effects on human beings is presented at the level of a sophomore general physics course without calculus. It is designed to supplement a standard text for such a course and problems are included.

A. A. Broyles

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Nuclear ferromagnetism  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The possibility of producing ordered states of nuclear spins by DNP followed by ADRF was first demonstrated in 1969. The spins of 19F in a crystal of CaF2 were cooled below one microdegree (with the applied field along the [100] axis) and their antiferromagnetic ordering was exhibited through the characteristic behaviour of their transverse and (later) longitudinal susceptibilities.

A. Abragam

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

NUCLEAR REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor is described that includes spaced vertical fuel elements centrally disposed in a pressure vessel, a mass of graphite particles in the pressure vessel, means for fluidizing the graphite particles, and coolant tubes in the pressure vessel laterally spaced from the fuel elements. (AEC)

Post, R.G.

1963-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

NUCLEAR REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent relates to a combination useful in a nuclear reactor and is comprised of a casing, a mass of graphite irapregnated with U compounds in the casing, and at least one coolant tube extending through the casing. The coolant tube is spaced from the mass, and He is irtroduced irto the space between the mass and the coolant tube. (AEC)

Starr, C.

1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Nuclear Terrorism.  

SciTech Connect

As pointed out by several speakers, the level of violence and destruction in terrorist attacks has increased significantly during the past decade. Fortunately, few have involved weapons of mass destruction, and none have achieved mass casualties. The Aum Shinrikyo release of lethal nerve agent, sarin, in the Tokyo subway on March 20, 1995 clearly broke new ground by crossing the threshold in attempting mass casualties with chemical weapons. However, of all weapons of mass destruction, nuclear weapons still represent the most frightening threat to humankind. Nuclear weapons possess an enormous destructive force. The immediacy and scale of destruction are unmatched. In addition to destruction, terrorism also aims to create fear among the public and governments. Here also, nuclear weapons are unmatched. The public's fear of nuclear weapons or, for that matter, of all radioactivity is intense. To some extent, this fear arises from a sense of unlimited vulnerability. That is, radioactivity is seen as unbounded in three dimensions - distance, it is viewed as having unlimited reach; quantity, it is viewed as having deadly consequences in the smallest doses (the public is often told - incorrectly, of course - that one atom of plutonium will kill); and time, if it does not kill you immediately, then it will cause cancer decades hence.

Hecker, Siegfried S.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Neutrino nuclear response and photo nuclear reaction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Photo nuclear reactions are shown to be used for studying neutrino/weak nuclear responses involved in astro-neutrino nuclear interactions and double beta decays. Charged current weak responses for ground and excited states are studied by using photo nuclear reactions through isobaric analog states of those states, while neutral current weak responses for excited states are studied by using photo nuclear reactions through the excited states. The weak interaction strengths are studied by measuring the cross sections of the photo nuclear reactions, and the spin and parity of the state are studied by measuring angular correlations of particles emitted from the photo nuclear reactions. Medium-energy polarized photons obtained from laser photons scattered off GeV electrons are very useful. Nuclear responses studied by photo nuclear reactions are used to evaluate neutrino/weak nuclear responses, i.e. nuclear beta and double beta matrix elements and neutrino nuclear interactions, and to verify theoretical calculation...

Ejiri, H; Boswell, M; Young, A

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Neutrino nuclear response and photo nuclear reaction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Photo nuclear reactions are shown to be used for studying neutrino/weak nuclear responses involved in astro-neutrino nuclear interactions and double beta decays. Charged current weak responses for ground and excited states are studied by using photo nuclear reactions through isobaric analog states of those states, while neutral current weak responses for excited states are studied by using photo nuclear reactions through the excited states. The weak interaction strengths are studied by measuring the cross sections of the photo nuclear reactions, and the spin and parity of the state are studied by measuring angular correlations of particles emitted from the photo nuclear reactions. Medium-energy polarized photons obtained from laser photons scattered off GeV electrons are very useful. Nuclear responses studied by photo nuclear reactions are used to evaluate neutrino/weak nuclear responses, i.e. nuclear beta and double beta matrix elements and neutrino nuclear interactions, and to verify theoretical calculations for them.

H. Ejiri; A. I. Titov; M. Boswell; A. Young

2013-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

440

Nuclear Forensics | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Forensics | National Nuclear Security Administration Forensics | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Nuclear Forensics Home > About Us > Our Programs > Emergency Response > Responding to Emergencies > Nuclear Forensics Nuclear Forensics Forensics Operations The National Technical Nuclear Forensics (NTNF) program is a Homeland Security Council and National Security

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "g-1cm2 nuclear collision" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Nuclear Detonation Detection | National Nuclear Security Administratio...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Research and Development > Nuclear Detonation Detection Nuclear Detonation Detection NNSA builds the nation's operational sensors that monitor the entire planet from space to...

442

Nuclear shadowing and prompt photons at relativistic hadron colliders  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The production of prompt photons at high energies provides a direct probe of the dynamics of the strong interactions. In particular, one expect that it could be used to constrain the behavior of the nuclear gluon distribution in $pA$ and $AA$ collisions. In this letter we investigate the influence of nuclear effects in the production of prompt photons and estimate the transverse momentum dependence of the nuclear ratios $R_{pA} = {\\frac{d\\sigma (pA)}{dy d^2 p_T}} / A {\\frac{d\\sigma (pp)}{dy d^2 p_T}}$ and $R_{AA} = {\\frac{d\\sigma (AA)}{dy d^2 p_T}} / A^2 {\\frac{d\\sigma (pp)}{dy d^2 p_T}}$ at RHIC and LHC energies. We demonstrate that the study of these observables can be useful to determine the magnitude of the shadowing and antishadowing effects in the nuclear gluon distribution.

C. Brenner Mariotto; V. P. Goncalves

2008-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

443

Why Nuclear Energy?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

nuclear Why nuclear energy? energy? Nuclear energy already meets a significant share of the Nuclear energy already meets a significant share of the world world' 's energy needs s...

444

Civilian Nuclear Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Civilian Nuclear Programs Civilian Nuclear Programs Civilian Nuclear Programs Los Alamos is committed to using its advanced nuclear expertise and unique facilities to meet the civilian nuclear national security demands of the future. CONTACT US Program Director Bruce Robinson (505) 667-1910 Email Los Alamos partners extensively with other laboratories, universities, industry, and the international nuclear community to address real-world technical challenges The Civilian Nuclear Programs Office is the focal point for nuclear energy research and development and next-generation repository science at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The Civilian Nuclear Programs Office manages projects funded by the Department of Energy's offices of Nuclear Energy Environmental Management Nuclear Regulatory Commission

445

ANS Nuclear Historic Landmark  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... NCNR declared a Nuclear Historic Landmark by the American Nuclear Society. The NIST Center for Neutron Research ...

446

WORKSHOP ON NUCLEAR DYNAMICS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

L. Wilets, "Theories of Nuclear Fission", Clarendon Press,of the nuclear force, result in lower calculated fission

Myers, W.D.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

448

Nuclear Analytical Methods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Nuclear Analytical Methods. Research activities in the Nuclear Analytical Methods Group are focused on the science that ...

449

Iterative Collision Resolution in Wireless Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With the growing popularity of smart phones and tablets, development of multimedia applications is on the rise. Speedy transmission of this massive amount information is already pushing the limits of the capacity of wireless networks, and in upcoming years wireless data traffic is projected to continue increasing dramatically. Advances in wireless network throughput are necessary to keep up with society’s data demands. In an uncoordinated wireless communications system, transmissions collide and interfere as multiple users transmit data to a central receiver. Slotted-ALOHA, the conventional method that schedules user transmissions, has only 37% throughput efficiency. However, theoretical results in recent studies suggest that scheduling transmissions over a number of random, fixed timeslots and employing iterative collision resolution techniques achieves optimal throughput efficiency of approximately 100%. This research considers how real-world conditions affect these theoretical results. A MATLAB model was developed create random graphs, representing users transmitting packets over such timeslots, and the packets were resolved by this method. This model was simulated extensively, representing networks of up to 10,000 users over 10,000 to 15,000 timeslots, and the number of packets resolved in each iteration was measured. These simulations have generated empirical data that backs up the theoretical claim. The distribution of the number of packets resolved also led to modifications of the current model to increase the percentage of packets resolved in each iteration. Furthermore, by investigating low density parity check coding techniques, other modifications to the current model can optimize the throughput over several consecutive transmissions where unresolved packets are resent with higher probability of recovery. These results demonstrate the potential of this method in handling uncoordinated transmissions in communications systems, even in the presence of finite conditions. This suggests that this method could eventually be employed in actual wireless systems.

Stuckman, Katherine Christine

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Nuclear rockets  

SciTech Connect

A systems analysis is made of a class of nuclear-propelled rockets in combination with chemical boosters. Various missions are considered including the delivery of 5000-lb payload 5500 nautical miles, the placement of a satellite in an orbit about the earth and the delivery of a payload to escape velocity. The reactors considered are of the heterogeneous type utilizing graphite fuel elements in a matrix of Be or hydrogenous moderator. Liquid hydrogen and ammonia are considered as propellants. Graphical results are presented which show the characteristics and performance of the nuclear rockets as the design parameters are varied. It should be emphasized that this report is not in any sense intended as a handbook of rocket parameters; it is intended only as a guide for determining areas of interest.

York, H.F.; Biehl, A.T.

1955-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

451

NUCLEAR REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

High temperature reactors which are uniquely adapted to serve as the heat source for nuclear pcwered rockets are described. The reactor is comprised essentially of an outer tubular heat resistant casing which provides the main coolant passageway to and away from the reactor core within the casing and in which the working fluid is preferably hydrogen or helium gas which is permitted to vaporize from a liquid storage tank. The reactor core has a generally spherical shape formed entirely of an active material comprised of fissile material and a moderator material which serves as a diluent. The active material is fabricated as a gas permeable porous material and is interlaced in a random manner with very small inter-connecting bores or capillary tubes through which the coolant gas may flow. The entire reactor is divided into successive sections along the direction of the temperature gradient or coolant flow, each section utilizing materials of construction which are most advantageous from a nuclear standpoint and which at the same time can withstand the operating temperature of that particular zone. This design results in a nuclear reactor characterized simultaneously by a minimum critiral size and mass and by the ability to heat a working fluid to an extremely high temperature.

Grebe, J.J.

1959-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

452

Collisions of Four Point Vortices in the Plane  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper addresses the question of existence of (not necessarily self-similar) solutions to the 4-vortex problem that lead to total or partial collision. We begin by showing that energy considerations alone imply that, for the general $N$-vortex problem, the virial being zero is a necessary condition for a solution to both evolve towards total collision and satisfy certain regularity condition. For evolutions assumed to be bounded, a classification for asymptotic partial collision configurations is offered. This classification depends on inertia and vorticity considerations. For non-necessarily bounded evolutions, we discuss the relationship between partial and (non-regular) total collisions when the virial is not zero and a generic condition on the vorticities holds. Finally, we give a canonical transformation that, for a class of 4-vortex systems satisfying a restriction on the vorticities, allows to formally apply the averaging principle in order reduce the dynamics when two of the vorticities are near a binary collision. The reduced system is a one-degree of freedom hamiltonian system.

Antonio Hernández-Garduño; Ernesto A. Lacomba

2006-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

453

Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Nuclear Research Advanced Nuclear Research Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology FY 2003 Programmatic Overview Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology Henderson/2003 Hydrogen Initiative.ppt 2 Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative Program Goal * Demonstrate the economic commercial-scale production of hydrogen using nuclear energy by 2015 Need for Nuclear Hydrogen * Hydrogen offers significant promise for reduced environmental impact of energy use, specifically in the transportation sector * The use of domestic energy sources to produce hydrogen reduces U.S. dependence on foreign oil and enhances national security * Existing hydrogen production methods are either inefficient or produce

454

Nuclear Nonproliferation Program Offices | National Nuclear Security  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nonproliferation Program Offices | National Nuclear Security Nonproliferation Program Offices | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Nuclear Nonproliferation Program Offices Home > About Us > Our Programs > Nonproliferation > Nuclear Nonproliferation Program Offices Nuclear Nonproliferation Program Offices One of the gravest threats the United States and the international

455

Nuclear Nonproliferation Program Offices | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nonproliferation Program Offices | National Nuclear Security Nonproliferation Program Offices | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Nuclear Nonproliferation Program Offices Home > About Us > Our Programs > Nonproliferation > Nuclear Nonproliferation Program Offices Nuclear Nonproliferation Program Offices One of the gravest threats the United States and the international

456

Nuclear Systems Technology | Nuclear Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Fuel Cycle Systems Criticality Safety Irradiation Experiment Development and Execution Robotics & Remote Systems Engineering and Applications Thermal & Hydraulic Experiments & Analysis Used Nuclear Fuel Storage, Transportation, and Disposal Reactor Technology Nuclear Science Home | Science & Discovery | Nuclear Science | Research Areas | Nuclear Systems Technology SHARE Nuclear Systems Technology Nuclear Systems Technology Image 2 ORNL has had historic involvement in a broad set of nuclear research areas: irradiated materials and isotopes R&D, fission and fusion reactors development, neutron scattering, fuel enrichment, used fuel recycling and disposal, etc. The skills and knowledge required to succeed in these research areas often cultivated core areas of expertise in which ORNL is

457

Nuclear / Radiological Advisory Team | National Nuclear Security  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

/ Radiological Advisory Team | National Nuclear Security / Radiological Advisory Team | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Nuclear / Radiological Advisory Team Home > About Us > Our Programs > Emergency Response > Responding to Emergencies > Operations > Nuclear / Radiological Advisory Team Nuclear / Radiological Advisory Team

458

A game theoretic approach to controller design for cyber-physical systems: collision avoidance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A collision avoidance problem for the vehicle equipped with adaptive cruise control is considered in the context of hybrid systems with emphasis on safety verification. Keywords: adaptive cruise control, collision avoidance, game theory, hybrid systems, reachability analysis

Jaeyong Park, Arda Kurt, Ümit Özgüner

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

On the Combined Effects of Turbulence and Gravity on Droplet Collisions in Clouds: A Numerical Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper examines the combined influences of turbulence and gravity on droplet collision statistics in turbulent clouds by means of direct numerical simulation (DNS). The essential microphysical mechanisms that determine the geometric collision ...

Eric J. P. Woittiez; Harm J. J. Jonker; Luís M. Portela

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Collisions of Small Drops in a Turbulent Flow. Part II: Effects of Flow Accelerations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effects of Lagrangian acceleration on collision efficiency and collision kernels of small cloud droplets in a turbulent flow are investigated using the results of the recent laboratory experiments by La Porta et al., conducted under high Re? ...

M. B. Pinsky; A. P. Khain

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "g-1cm2 nuclear collision" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Collisions between Small Precipitation Drops. Part I: Laboratory Measurements of Bounce, Coalescence, and Temporary Coalescence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Self-collection efficiencies were measured for isolated drop pairs failing at terminal velocity using orthogonal cameras to obtain the horizontal offset of the drops before collision and the collision outcome. Data were obtained on four different ...

Harry T. Ochs III; Kenneth V. Beard; Robert R. Czys; Neil F. Laird; Daniel E. Schaufelberger; Donna J. Holdridge

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Collision Regulation Lines in U.S. Waters | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Collision Regulation Lines in U.S. Waters Energy Data Apps Maps Challenges Resources Blogs Let's Talk Energy Beta You are here Data.gov Communities Energy Data Collision...

463

Time-dependent, lattice approach to atomic collisions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Recent progress in developing and applying methods of direct numerical solution of atomic collision problems is described. Various forms of the three-body problem are used to illustrate these techniques. Specifically, the process of ionization in proton-, antiproton-, and electron-impact of atomic hydrogen is considered in applications ranging in computational intensity from collisions simulated in two spatial dimensions to treatment of the three-dimensional, fully correlated two-electron Schroedinger equation. These examples demonstrate the utility and feasibility of treating strongly interacting atomic systems through time-dependent, lattice approaches.

Schultz, D.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Physics Div.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

464

Hard Collisions of Spinning Protons - History and Future  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There will be a review of the history of polarized proton beams, and a discussion of the unexpected and still unexplained large transverse spin effects found in several high energy proton-proton spin experiments at the ZGS, AGS, Fermilab and RHIC. Next there will be a discussion of possible future experiments on the violent collisions elastic collisions of polarized protons at the 70 GeV U-70 accelerator at IHEP-Protvino in Russia and the new high intensity 50 GeV J-PARC at Tokai in Japan.

A. D. Krisch

2010-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

465

QCD plasma instability and thermalisation at heavy ion collisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Under suitable non-equilibrium conditions QCD plasma can develop plasma instabilities, where some modes of the plasma grow exponentially. It has been argued that these instabilities can play a significant role in the thermalisation of the plasma in heavy-ion collision experiments. We study the instability in SU(2) plasmas using the hard thermal loop effective lattice theory, which is suitable for studying real-time evolution of long wavelength modes in the plasma. We observe that under suitable conditions the plasma can indeed develop an instability which can grow to a very large magnitude, necessary for the rapid thermalisation in heavy-ion collisions.

Dietrich Bodeker; Kari Rummukainen

2007-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

466

NUCLEAR REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent covers a power-producing nuclear reactor in which fuel rods of slightly enriched U are moderated by heavy water and cooled by liquid metal. The fuel rods arranged parallel to one another in a circle are contained in a large outer closed-end conduit that extends into a tank containing the heavy water. Liquid metal is introduced into the large conduit by a small inner conduit that extends within the circle of fuel rods to a point near the lower closed end of the outer conduit. (AEC) Production Reactors

Young, G.

1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Nuclear Photonics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With new gamma-beam facilities like MEGa-ray at LLNL (USA) or ELI-NP at Bucharest with 10^13 g/s and a bandwidth of Delta E_g/E_g ~10^-3, a new era of g-beams with energies Duke Univ., USA) with 10^8 g/s and Delta E_g/E_g~0.03. Even a seeded quantum FEL for g-beams may become possible, with much higher brilliance and spectral flux. At the same time new exciting possibilities open up for focused g-beams. We describe a new experiment at the g-beam of the ILL reactor (Grenoble), where we observed for the first time that the index of refraction for g-beams is determined by virtual pair creation. Using a combination of refractive and reflective optics, efficient monochromators for g-beams are being developed. Thus we have to optimize the system of the g-beam facility, the g-beam optics and g-detectors. We can trade g-intensity for band width, going down to Delta E_g/E_g ~ 10^-6 and address individual nuclear levels. 'Nuclear photonics' stresses the importance of nuclear applications. We can address with g-beams individual nuclear isotopes and not just elements like with X-ray beams. Compared to X rays, g-beams can penetrate much deeper into big samples like radioactive waste barrels, motors or batteries. We can perform tomography and microscopy studies by focusing down to micron resolution using Nucl. Reson. Fluorescence for detection with eV resolution and high spatial resolution. We discuss the dominating M1 and E1 excitations like scissors mode, two-phonon quadrupole octupole excitations, pygmy dipole excitations or giant dipole excitations under the new facet of applications. We find many new applications in biomedicine, green energy, radioactive waste management or homeland security. Also more brilliant secondary beams of neutrons and positrons can be produced.

D. Habs; M. M. Guenther; M. Jentschel; P. G. Thirolf

2012-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

468

Leading twist nuclear shadowing phenomena in hard processes with nuclei  

SciTech Connect

We present and discuss the theory and phenomenology of the leading twist theory of nuclear shadowing which is based on the combination of the generalization of Gribov-Glauber theory, QCD factorization theorems, and HERA QCD analysis of diffraction in lepton-proton deep inelastic scattering (DIS). We apply this technique for the analysis of a wide range of hard processes with nuclei-inclusive DIS on deuterons, medium-range and heavy nuclei, coherent and incoherent diffractive DIS with nuclei, and hard diffraction in proton-nucleus scattering - and make predictions for the effect of nuclear shadowing in the corresponding sea quark and gluon parton distributions. We also analyze the role of the leading twist nuclear shadowing in generalized parton distributions in nuclei and certain characteristics of final states in nuclear DIS. We discuss the limits of applicability of the leading twist approximation for small x scattering off nuclei and the onset of the black disk regime and methods of detecting it. It will be possible to check many of our predictions in the near future in the studies of the ultraperipheral collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Further checks will be possible in pA collisions at the LHC and forward hadron production at Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). Detailed tests will be possible at an Electon-Ion Collider (EIC) in USA and at the Large Hadron-Electron Collider (LHeC) at CERN.

Leonid Frankfurt, Vadim Guzey, Mark Strikman

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

GTRI: Reducing Nuclear Threats | National Nuclear Security Administrat...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reducing Nuclear Threats | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response...

470

Probabilistic DCS: An RFID reader-to-reader anti-collision protocol  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The wide adoption of radio frequency identification (RFID) for applications requiring a large number of tags and readers makes critical the reader-to-reader collision problem. Various anti-collision protocols have been proposed, but the majority require ... Keywords: RFID, Reader-to-reader collision

Filippo Gandino; Renato Ferrero; Bartolomeo Montrucchio; Maurizio Rebaudengo

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Optimal cooperative collision avoidance between multiple robots based on Bernstein-Bézier curves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper a new cooperative collision-avoidance method for multiple, nonholonomic robots based on Bernstein-Bezier curves is presented. The main contribution focuses on an optimal, cooperative, collision avoidance for a multi-robot system where the ... Keywords: Collision avoidance, Mobile robots, Path planning

Igor Škrjanc; Gregor Klan?ar

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet - Minimize Nuclear...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet - Minimize Nuclear Waste Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet - Minimize Nuclear Waste GNEP will increase the efficiency in the...

473

National Nuclear SecurityAdministration's Nuclear ExplosiveSafety...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

National Nuclear SecurityAdministration's Nuclear ExplosiveSafety Study Program, IG-0581 National Nuclear SecurityAdministration's Nuclear ExplosiveSafety Study Program, IG-0581 To...

474

Nuclear Weapons Testing Resumes | National Nuclear Security Administra...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

> Nuclear Weapons Testing Resumes Nuclear Weapons Testing Resumes September 01, 1961 Washington, DC Nuclear Weapons Testing Resumes The Soviet Union breaks the nuclear test...

475

Nuclear Waste Policy Act Signed | National Nuclear Security Administra...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

> Nuclear Waste Policy Act Signed Nuclear Waste Policy Act Signed January 07, 1983 Washington, DC Nuclear Waste Policy Act Signed President Reagan signs the Nuclear Waste...

476

WEB RESOURCE: Nuclear Materials and Nuclear Fuel/Waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 12, 2007 ... Select, Sandbox, Open Discussion Regarding Materials for Nuclear ... Trends in Nuclear Power, The Nuclear Fuel Cycle, Nuclear Science ...

477

Regulation of nuclear envelope breakdown by the nuclear pore complex;.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In higher eukaryotes, each time a cell divides dramatic changes occur at the nuclear periphery. The nuclear envelope, nuclear pore complexes, and nuclear lamina must… (more)

Prunuske, Amy Jeanette

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Nuclear Security Enterprise | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Enterprise | National Nuclear Security Administration Enterprise | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Nuclear Security Enterprise Home > About Us > Our Programs > Defense Programs > Nuclear Security Enterprise Nuclear Security Enterprise The Nuclear Security Enterprise (NSE) mission is to ensure the Nation sustains a safe, secure, and effective nuclear deterrent through the

479

Innovations in Nuclear Infrastructure  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Innovations in Nuclear Infrastructure Innovations in Nuclear Infrastructure and Education (INIE) Innovations in Nuclear Infrastructure and Education (INIE) Presented to the Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee Crystal City, Virginia John Gutteridge Director, University Programs Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology September 30 - October 1, 2002 Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology Gutteridge/Sep-Oct_02 INIE-NERAC.ppt (2) INIE The Stimuli .... INIE The Stimuli .... 6 Declining number of operating university research/training reactors 6 Dwindling student population in nuclear engineering 6 Closing or loss of identity of university nuclear engineering programs 6 Looming shortage of nuclear engineering graduates 6 Threat of additional reactor closures -- Cornell, Michigan, MIT

480

Reconversion of nuclear weapons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The nuclear predicament or nuclear option. Synopsis of three lectures : 1- The physical basis of nuclear technology. Physics of fission. Chain reaction in reactors and weapons. Fission fragments. Separration of isotopes. Radiochemistry.2- Nuclear reactors with slow and fast neutrons. Power, size, fuel and waste. Plutonium production. Dose rate, shielding and health hazard. The lessons of Chernobyl3- Nuclear weapons. Types, energy, blast and fallout. Fusion and hydrogen bombs. What to do with nuclear weapons when you cannot use them? Testing. Nonmilittary use. Can we get rid of the nuclear weapon? Nuclear proliferation. Is there a nuclear future?

Kapitza, Sergei P

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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481

Capabilities - Nuclear Engineering Division (Argonne)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Waste Form and Repository Performance Modeling Nuclear Systems Technologies Nuclear Criticality Safety Research Reactor Analysis System Process Monitoring,...

482

National Nuclear Data Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Internal Radiation Dose Evaluated Nuclear (reaction) Data File Experimental nuclear reaction data Sigma Retrieval & Plotting Nuclear structure & decay Data Nuclear Science References Experimental Unevaluated Nuclear Data List Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File NNDC databases Ground and isomeric states properties Nuclear structure & decay data journal Nuclear reaction model code Tools and Publications US Nuclear Data Program Cross Section Evaluation Working Group Nuclear data networks Basic properties of atomic nuclei Parameters & thermal values Basic properties of atomic nuclei Internal Radiation Dose Evaluated Nuclear (reaction) Data File Experimental nuclear reaction data Sigma Retrieval & Plotting Nuclear structure & decay Data Nuclear Science References Experimental Unevaluated Nuclear Data List Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File NNDC databases Ground and isomeric states properties Nuclear structure & decay data journal Nuclear reaction model code Tools and Publications US Nuclear Data Program Cross Section Evaluation Working Group Nuclear data networks Basic properties of atomic nuclei Parameters & thermal values Basic properties of atomic nuclei Homepage BNL Home Site Index - Go USDNP and CSEWG November 18-22! USNDP CSEWG Agenda Thanks for attending! EXFOR 20,000 Milestone EXFOR Milestone 20,000 experimental works are now in the EXFOR database!

483

Dynamics of hot and dense nuclear and partonic matter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The dynamics of hot and dense nuclear matter is discussed from the microscopic transport point of view. The basic concepts of the Hadron-String-Dynamical transport model (HSD)-derived from Kadanoff-Baym equations in phase phase-are presented as well as 'highlights' of HSD results for different observables in heavy-ion collisions from 100 A MeV (SIS) to 21 A TeV(RHIC) energies. Furthermore, a novel extension of the HSD model for the description of the partonic phase-the Parton-Hadron-String-Dynamics (PHSD) approach-is introduced. PHSD includes a nontrivial partonic equation of state-in line with lattice QCD-as well as covariant transition rates from partonic to hadronic degrees of freedom. The sensitivity of hadronic observables to the partonic phase is demonstrated for relativistic heavy-ion collisions from the FAIR/NICA up to the RHIC energy regime.

Bratkovskaya, E. L., E-mail: Elena.Bratkovskaya@th.physik.uni-frankfurt.de [Frankfurt University, Institute for Theoretical Physics (Germany); Cassing, W. [Giessen University, Institute for Theoretical Physics (Germany); Linnyk, O. [Frankfurt University, Institute for Theoretical Physics (Germany); Konchakovski, V. P. [Giessen University, Institute for Theoretical Physics (Germany); Voronyuk, V. [Frankfurt University, FIAS (Germany); Ozvenchuk, V. [Frankfurt University, Institute for Theoretical Physics (Germany)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

484

Nuclear Data | More Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Data SHARE Nuclear Data Nuclear Data ORNL is a recognized, international leader in nuclear data research and development (R&D) to support nuclear applications analyses. For more...

485

Nuclear Power and the Environment  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This Nuclear Issue Paper discusses Nuclear Plant Wastes, Interactions of Fossil Fuel and Nuclear Power Waste Decisions, and the Environmental Position of Nuclear Power.

2013-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

486

Heavy flavor in heavy-ion collisions at RHIC and RHIC II  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the initial years of operation, experiments at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) have identified a new form of matter formed in nuclei-nuclei collisions at energy densities more than 100 times that of a cold atomic nucleus. Measurements and comparison with relativistic hydrodynamic models indicate that the matter thermalizes in an unexpectedly short time, has an energy density at least 15 times larger than needed for color deconfinement, has a temperature about twice the critical temperature predicted by lattice QCD, and appears to exhibit collective motion with ideal hydrodynamic properties - a "perfect liquid" that appears to flow with a near-zero viscosity to entropy ratio - lower than any previously observed fluid and perhaps close to a universal lower bound. However, a fundamental understanding of the medium seen in heavy-ion collisions at RHIC does not yet exist. The most important scientific challenge for the field in the next decade is the quantitative exploration of the new state of nuclear matter. That will require new data that will, in turn, require enhanced capabilities of the RHIC detectors and accelerator. In this report we discuss the scientific opportunities for an upgraded RHIC facility - RHIC II - in conjunction with improved capabilities of the two large RHIC detectors, PHENIX and STAR. We focus solely on heavy flavor probes. Their production rates are calculable using the well-established techniques of perturbative QCD and their sizable interactions with the hot QCD medium provide unique and sensitive measurements of its crucial properties making them one of the key diagnostic tools available to us.

A. D. Frawley; T. Ullrich; R. Vogt

2008-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

487

Influence of external magnetic and laser radiation fields on Feshbach resonances in collision of atoms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study collision of two atoms with formation of Feshbach resonance at combined interaction with the external magnetic field and laser radiation. In cases of one- and two-photon resonances of laser radiation with two discrete vibrational molecular levels, we show that Feshbach resonances appear at interaction of external magnetic field with dressed states formed via Autler-Townes effect. In addition, in case of one-photon resonance the lower vibrational molecular state is coupled by laser radiation with the continuum of the elastic channel and forms laser-induced Feshbach resonance via both Autler-Townes effect and LICS mechanism. We study the combined process of formation of Feshbach resonances; this enables the control of Feshbach resonance by varying the magnetic field and intensity and frequency of laser radiation. We obtain the cross-sections of elastic and inelastic scattering and show that quenching of resonance occurs at the energy equal to that of the systems ground state. Dependence of the cross-sections on the magnetic field and laser intensity is examined in detail. In all considered cases, the scattering length is obtained depending on the magnetic and laser fields are studied. In the absence of magnetic interaction if the hyperfine substates of the quasibound state in the closed channel and those of individual colliding atoms in the open channel are the same, Feshbach resonances may arise via weak interaction between nuclear and electronic motions, which leads to transitions between electronic states. The obtained results can be employed in new studies of collisions of cold atoms, e.g., of alkali metal atoms and for interpretation of new experiments in BECs.

E. A. Gazazyan; A. D. Gazazyan; V. O. Chaltykyan

2012-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

488

$\\Delta$-scaling and heat capacity in relativistic ion collisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The $\\Delta$-scaling method and the multiplicity information entropy has been applied to the relativistic collisions of p+p, C+C and Pb+Pb which were simulated by a Monte Carlo package, LUCIAE 3.0. In addition, the heat capacities of different mesons and baryons have been extracted from event-by-event temperature fluctuation.

Ma, Y G; Cai, X Z; Chen, J G; Chen, J H; Fang, D Q; Guo, W; He, Z J; Huang, H Z; Long, J L; Ma, C W; Sá Ben-Hao; Shen, W Q; Su, Q M; Wang, K; Wei, Y B; Yan, T Z; Zhong, C; Zuo, J X

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Measurements of Scattering Processes in Negative Ion- Atom Collisions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The main research activity is to study various scattering processes which occur in H{sup -} collisions with atomic (specifically, noble gas and atomic hydrogen) targets in the intermediate energy region. These processes include: elastic scattering, single- and double-electron detachment, and target excitation/ionization.

Kvale, T. J.

2000-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

490

Direct photons ~basis for characterizing heavy ion collisions~  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

After years of experimental and theoretical efforts, direct photons become a strong and reliable tool to establish the basic characteristics of a hot and dense matter produced in heavy ion collisions. The recent direct photon measurements are reviewed and a future prospect is given.

Takao Sakaguchi

2008-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

491

Chemical Equilibrium in Heavy Ion Collisions: Rapidity Dependence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Particle yields in heavy ion collisions show an overwhelming evidence for chemical or relative chemical equilibrium at all beam energies. The rapidity dependence of the thermal parameters $T$ and $\\mu_B$ can now be determined over a wide range of rapidities and show a systematic behavior towards an increase in $\\mu_B$ away from mid-rapidity.

F. Becattini; J. Cleymans

2007-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

492

Micro-debris evolution from a satellite collision  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A hydrocode is used to model the expulsion of debris, down to micron sized particles, from a hypervelocity collision of a satellite at 7 km/s. Large numbers of such particles (> 1012 total) are released, with large relative velocities (100 to 1000 m/s) ...

Jeff P. Barnes; Erin M. Taylor; Nishant Mehta

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

NUCLEAR REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor of the homogeneous liquid fuel type is described wherein the fissionable isotope is suspended or dissolved in a liquid moderator such as water. The reactor core is comprised essentially of a spherical vessel for containing the reactive composition surrounded by a reflector, preferably of beryllium oxide. The reactive composition may be an ordinary water solution of a soluble salt of uranium, the quantity of fissionable isotope in solution being sufficient to provide a critical mass in the vessel. The liquid fuel is stored in a tank of non-crtttcal geometry below the reactor vessel and outside of the reflector and is passed from the tank to the vessel through a pipe connecting the two by air pressure means. Neutron absorbing control and safety rods are operated within slots in the reflector adjacent to the vessel.

Christy, R.F.

1958-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

494

Stellar Collisions and Ultracompact X-ray Binary Formation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(abridged) We report the results of SPH calculations of parabolic collisions between a subgiant or slightly evolved red-giant star and a neutron star (NS). Such collisions are likely to form ultracompact X-ray binaries (UCXBs) observed today in old globular clusters. In particular, we compute collisions of a 1.4 Msun NS with realistically modelled parent stars of initial masses 0.8 and 0.9 Msun, each at three different evolutionary stages (corresponding to three different radii R). The distance of closest approach for the initial orbit varies from 0.04 R (nearly head-on) to 1.3 R (grazing). These collisions lead to the formation of a tight binary, composed of the NS and the subgiant or red-giant core, embedded in an extremely diffuse common envelope (CE) typically of mass ~0.1 to 0.3 Msun. Our calculations follow the binary for many hundreds of orbits, ensuring that the orbital parameters we determine at the end of the calculations are close to final. Some of the fluid initially in the envelope of the (sub)giant, from 0.003 to 0.023 Msun in the cases we considered, is left bound to the NS. The eccentricities of the resulting binaries range from about 0.2 for our most grazing collision to about 0.9 for the nearly head-on cases. In almost all the cases we consider, gravitational radiation alone will cause sufficiently fast orbital decay to form a UCXB within a Hubble time, and often on a much shorter timescale. Our hydrodynamics code implements the recent SPH equations of motion derived with a variational approach by Springel & Hernquist and by Monaghan. Numerical noise is reduced by enforcing an analytic constraint equation that relates the smoothing lengths and densities of SPH particles. We present tests of these new methods to help demonstrate their improved accuracy.

J. C. Lombardi Jr.; Z. F. Proulx; K. L. Dooley; E. M. Theriault; N. Ivanova; F. A. Rasio

2005-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

495

NUCLEAR DEFORMATION ENERGIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

J.R. Nix, Theory of Nuclear Fission and Superheavy Nuclei,energy maps relevant for nuclear fission and nucleus-nucleusin connection with nuclear fission. The need for a better

Blocki, J.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

NUCLEAR STRUCTURE DATABASE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

d UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA NUCLEAR STRUCTURE DATABASE R. B.IS UNLfflfTEO LBL-11089 NUCLEAR STRUCTURE DATABASE by R.B.and E. Browne June 1980 Nuclear Science Division University

Firestone, R.B.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

WORKSHOP ON NUCLEAR DYNAMICS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Physics of the Office of High Energy and Nuclear Physics ofPhysics of the Office of High Energy and Nuclear Physics ofPhysics of the Office of High Energy and Nuclear Physics of

Myers, W.D.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

498

Asians Resist Nuclear Threat  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Midway carries soma 100 nuclear weapons and the missiles onthe removal of U. S. nuclear weapons from Asia. It is ti-aeof U. S. tactical nuclear weapons This set the figure for

Schirmer, Daniel Boone

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z