Sample records for future technologies faster

  1. Superconducting Magnet Technology for Future Hadron Colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scanlan, R.M.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I. Superconducting Magnet Technology for Future Hadl"On1994. M.N. Wilson, Superconducting Magnets (Clarendon Press,The application of superconducting magnets to large-scale

  2. The future of defense and technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teller, E.

    1991-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides an insight into the future of national defense and the impacts of utilizing technology for improved defensive postures. (FI)

  3. CFB: technology of the future?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blankship, S.

    2008-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Fuel flexibility and a smaller carbon footprint are behind renewed interest in circulating fluidized bed (CFB) technology. The article explains the technology of CFB and discusses development of CFB units since the late 1990s. China is seeing an explosion in the number of utility-size CFBs. Alstom, Foster Wheeler, Babcock and Wilson and Alex Kvaener are today's major CFB boiler manufacturers. Alstom is testing and developing oxy-firing and post-combustion carbon capture strategies on CFB boilers. One CFB asset is its ability to burn a variety of fuels including waste coal, high sulfur coal and even discarded tires. The article mentions successful CFB projects at the Seward Station using waste coal and at the Gilbert 3 plant in the USA. Lamar is converting its Light and Power Plant from natural gas to burn coal in a 38.5 MW CFB boiler. 1 tab., 3 photos.

  4. Cost Effectiveness of Technology Solutions for Future Vehicle...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cost Effectiveness of Technology Solutions for Future Vehicle Systems Cost Effectiveness of Technology Solutions for Future Vehicle Systems Explores the economics of CO2 emission...

  5. The future steelmaking industry and its technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fruehan, R.J.; Paxton, H.W.; Giarratani, F.; Lave, L. [Carnegie-Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)]|[Pittsburgh Univ., PA (United States)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this report is to develop a vision of the future steelmaking industry including its general characteristics and technologies. In addition, the technical obstacles and research and development opportunities for commercialization of these technologies are identified. The report is being prepared by the Sloan Steel Industry Competitiveness Study with extensive input from the industry. Industry input has been through AISI (American Iron and Steel Institute), SMA (Steel Manufacturers Association) and contacts with individual company executives and technical leaders. The report identifies the major industry drivers which will influence technological developments in the industry for the next 5--25 years. Initially, the role of past drivers in shaping the current industry was examined to help understand the future developments. Whereas this report concentrates on future technologies other major factors such as national and international competition, human resource management and capital concerns are examined to determine their influence on the future industry. The future industry vision does not specify specific technologies but rather their general characteristics. Finally, the technical obstacles and the corresponding research and development required for commercialization are detailed.

  6. Technology Challenges in Designing the Future Grid to Enable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Technology Challenges in Designing the Future Grid to Enable Sustainable Energy Systems Future Grid the Future Electric Energy System #12;Technology Challenges in Designing the Future Grid to Enable Summary This white paper synthesizes technology challenges for reaching a vision of the future grid that

  7. Science and Technology of Future Light Sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knowles, David William

    Science and Technology of Future Light Sources A White Paper Report prepared by scientists from ANL Berkeley, CA 94720 SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory 2575 Sand Hill Road Menlo Park, CA 94025 Editors. This work was supported by the Director, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, of the U

  8. The Future of Absorption Technology in America: A Critical Look...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    The Future of Absorption Technology in America: A Critical Look at the Impact of Building, Cooling, Heating, and Power (BCHP) and Innovation, June 2000 The Future of Absorption...

  9. Future Technologies to Enhance Geothermal Energy Recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberts, J J; Kaahaaina, N; Aines, R; Zucca, J; Foxall, B; Atkins-Duffin, C

    2008-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Geothermal power is a renewable, low-carbon option for producing base-load (i.e., low-intermittency) electricity. Improved technologies have the potential to access untapped geothermal energy sources, which experts estimate to be greater than 100,000 MWe. However, many technical challenges in areas such as exploration, drilling, reservoir engineering, and energy conversion must be addressed if the United States is to unlock the full potential of Earth's geothermal energy and displace fossil fuels. (For example, see Tester et al., 2006; Green and Nix, 2006; and Western Governors Association, 2006.) Achieving next-generation geothermal power requires both basic science and applied technology to identify prospective resources and effective extraction strategies. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has a long history of research and development work in support of geothermal power. Key technologies include advances in scaling and brine chemistry, economic and resource assessment, direct use, exploration, geophysics, and geochemistry. For example, a high temperature, multi-spacing, multi-frequency downhole EM induction logging tool (GeoBILT) was developed jointly by LLNL and EMI to enable the detection and orientation of fractures and conductive zones within the reservoir (Figure 1). Livermore researchers also conducted studies to determine how best to stave off increased salinity in the Salton Sea, an important aquatic ecosystem in California. Since 1995, funding for LLNL's geothermal research has decreased, but the program continues to make important contributions to sustain the nation's energy future. The current efforts, which are highlighted in this report, focus on developing an Engineered Geothermal System (EGS) and on improving technologies for exploration, monitoring, characterization, and geochemistry. Future research will also focus on these areas.

  10. Invitation/Program Technology Watch Day on Future Biofuels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Invitation/Program Technology Watch Day on Future Biofuels and 4. TMFB International Workshop;International Research Centers Focussing on Future Biofuels are Presenting Their Research Approaches and Current Concerning Future Biofuels DBFZ ­ Deutsches Biomasseforschungszentrum M. Seiffert, F. Mueller-Langer German

  11. Science and Technology of Future Light Sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dierker,S.; Bergmann, U.; Corlett, J.; Dierker, S.; Falcone, R.; Galayda, J.; Gibson, M.; Hastings, J.; Hettel, B.; Hill, J.; Hussain, Z.; Kao, C.-C.; Kirx, J.; Long, G.; McCurdy, B.; Raubenheimer, T.; Sannibale, F.; Seeman, J.; Shen, Z.-X.; Shenoy, g.; Schoenlein, B.; Shen, Q.; Stephenson, B.; Stohr, J.; Zholents, A.

    2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many of the important challenges facing humanity, including developing alternative sources of energy and improving health, are being addressed by advances that demand the improved understanding and control of matter. While the visualization, exploration, and manipulation of macroscopic matter have long been technological goals, scientific developments in the twentieth century have focused attention on understanding matter on the atomic scale through the underlying framework of quantum mechanics. Of special interest is matter that consists of natural or artificial nanoscale building blocks defined either by atomic structural arrangements or by electron or spin formations created by collective correlation effects. The essence of the challenge to the scientific community has been expressed in five grand challenges for directing matter and energy recently formulated by the Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee [1]. These challenges focus on increasing our understanding of, and ultimately control of, matter at the level of atoms, electrons. and spins, as illustrated in Figure 1.1, and serve the entire range of science from advanced materials to life sciences. Meeting these challenges will require new tools that extend our reach into regions of higher spatial, temporal, and energy resolution. X-rays with energies above 10 keV offer capabilities extending beyond the nanoworld shown in Figure 1.1 due to their ability to penetrate into optically opaque or thick objects. This opens the door to combining atomic level information from scattering studies with 3D information on longer length scales from real space imaging with a resolution approaching 1 nm. The investigation of multiple length scales is important in hierarchical structures, providing knowledge about function of living organisms, the atomistic origin of materials failure, the optimization of industrial synthesis, or the working of devices. Since the fundamental interaction that holds matter together is of electromagnetic origin, it is intuitively clear that electromagnetic radiation is the critical tool in the study of material properties. On the level of atoms, electrons, and spins, x-rays have proved especially valuable. Future advanced x-ray sources and instrumentation will extend the power of x-ray methods to reach greater spatial resolution, increased sensitivity, and unexplored temporal domains. The purpose of this document is threefold: (1) summarize scientific opportunities that are beyond the reach of today's x-ray sources and instrumentation; (2) summarize the requirements for advanced x-ray sources and instrumentation needed to realize these scientific opportunities, as well as potential methods of achieving them; and (3) outline the R&D required to establish the technical feasibility of these advanced x-ray sources and instrumentation.

  12. Science and Technology of Future Light Sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bergmann, Uwe; Corlett, John; Dierker, Steve; Falcone, Roger; Galayda, John; Gibson, Murray; Hastings, Jerry; Hettel, Bob; Hill, John; Hussain, Zahid; Kao, Chi-Chang; Kirz, Janos; Long, Danielle; McCurdy, Bill; Raubenheimer, Tor; Sannibale, Fernando; Seeman, John; Shen, Z.-X.; Schenoy, Gopal; Schoenlein, Bob; Shen, Qun; Stephenson, Brian; St& #246; hr, Joachim; Zholents, Alexander

    2009-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Many of the important challenges facing humanity, including developing alternative sources of energy and improving health, are being addressed by advances that demand the improved understanding and control of matter. While the visualization, exploration, and manipulation of macroscopic matter have long been technological goals, scientific developments in the twentieth century have focused attention on understanding matter on the atomic scale through the underlying framework of quantum mechanics. Of special interest is matter that consists of natural or artificial nanoscale building blocks defined either by atomic structural arrangements or by electron or spin formations created by collective correlation effects The essence of the challenge to the scientific community has been expressed in five grand challenges for directing matter and energy recently formulated by the Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee [1]. These challenges focus on increasing our understanding of, and ultimately control of, matter at the level of atoms, electrons. and spins, as illustrated in Figure 1.1, and serve the entire range of science from advanced materials to life sciences. Meeting these challenges will require new tools that extend our reach into regions of higher spatial, temporal, and energy resolution. X-rays with energies above 10 keV offer capabilities extending beyond the nanoworld shown in Figure 1.1 due to their ability to penetrate into optically opaque or thick objects. This opens the door to combining atomic level information from scattering studies with 3D information on longer length scales from real space imaging with a resolution approaching 1 nm. The investigation of multiple length scales is important in hierarchical structures, providing knowledge about function of living organisms, the atomistic origin of materials failure, the optimization of industrial synthesis, or the working of devices. Since the fundamental interaction that holds matter together is of electromagnetic origin, it is intuitively clear that electromagnetic radiation is the critical tool in the study of material properties. On the level of atoms, electrons, and spins, x-rays have proved especially valuable. Future advanced x-ray sources and instrumentation will extend the power of x-ray methods to reach greater spatial resolution, increased sensitivity, and unexplored temporal domains. The purpose of this document is threefold: (1) summarize scientific opportunities that are beyond the reach of today's x-ray sources and instrumentation; (2) summarize the requirements for advanced x-ray sources and instrumentation needed to realize these scientific opportunities, as well as potential methods of achieving them; and (3) outline the R&D required to establish the technical feasibility of these advanced x-ray sources and instrumentation.

  13. Current Renewable Energy Technologies and Future Projections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allison, Stephen W [ORNL; Lapsa, Melissa Voss [ORNL; Ward, Christina D [ORNL; Smith, Barton [ORNL; Grubb, Kimberly R [ORNL; Lee, Russell [ORNL

    2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The generally acknowledged sources of renewable energy are wind, geothermal, biomass, solar, hydropower, and hydrogen. Renewable energy technologies are crucial to the production and utilization of energy from these regenerative and virtually inexhaustible sources. Furthermore, renewable energy technologies provide benefits beyond the establishment of sustainable energy resources. For example, these technologies produce negligible amounts of greenhouse gases and other pollutants in providing energy, and they exploit domestically available energy sources, thereby reducing our dependence on both the importation of fossil fuels and the use of nuclear fuels. The market price of renewable energy technologies does not reflect the economic value of these added benefits.

  14. Biopharmaceutical Manufacturing Technology: Vision for the Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Recombinant DNA Technology Acetylsalicylic Acid (Aspirin) Organic Chemistry MW: 180 Da MW: 150 kDa PDB American Books. Used with permission by W.H. Freeman and Company. Illustration by Tomo Narashioma #12

  15. Optical Technology Needs for Future Space Telescopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Stryland, Eric

    instruments & sensors. Future Space Telescopes will operate over broad spectrum: Gamma Rays, X-Rays, XUV and Sensors Direct Sensing of Particles, Fields and Waves See Scientific Instruments and Sensors (SIS Structure #12;NASA's Science Missions Directorate Themes: Earth Science Sun-Solar System Connection Solar

  16. Future AI and Robotics Technology for Nuclear Plants Decommissioning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Huosheng

    Future AI and Robotics Technology for Nuclear Plants Decommissioning Huosheng Hu and Liam Cragg to aid in decommissioning nuclear plants that have been used to process or store nuclear materials. Scope potential applications to nuclear plant decommissioning, namely Nanotechnology, Telepresence

  17. Future, Opportunities and Challenges of Inkjet Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Castrejon-Pita, J.R.; Baxter, W.R.S.; Morgan, J.; Temple, S; Martin, G.D.; Hutchings, I.M.

    2013-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    with competing technologies such as screen or offset printing which can handle more viscous inks. Inkjet inks therefore lack some of the opac- ity and brilliance displayed by competing technologies. 7For printing, it is the pigment which governs the final... quality print is needed. The most commonly used printing method is aqueous flexography, in which the board is taken from a stack through the entire print/dry/stack process using roller transport. Some problems exist due to nip-roller con- tact...

  18. Fossil energy, clean coal technology, and FutureGen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarkus, T.A.

    2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Future fossil use will rely heavily on carbon sequestration. Clean coal technologies are being incorporated in the USA, including air pollution control, and will need to incorporate carbon capture and sequestration. The paper ends with an outline of the restructured FutureGen project. 7 figs.

  19. Industries of the Future: Creating a Sustainable Technology Edge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glatt, S. L.

    INDUSTRIES OF THE FUTURE: Creating A Sustainable Technology Edge Sandra L. Glatt Office of Industrial Technologies Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy U. S. Department of Energy 55 ESL-IE-00-04-10 Proceedings from the Twenty... and Renewable Energy U.S, Department of Energy Industries of the Future: Creating a Sustainable Technology Edge . cUn' OFwlOd CCooI .. LPG .Eleclric~ CNI!hnIG. AgriclAtll'e Mining A1uminu",J Totll1* kldutb't.1 Conllomption: :W, 111 TrtIlion 8tus...

  20. Influence of Regional Development Policies and Clean Technology Adoption on Future Air Pollution Exposure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    development policies and clean technology adoption on futuredevelopment policies and clean technology adoption on futuredevelopment policies and clean technology adoption on future

  1. Integrating Future Communication Technologies for the Downstream Component of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gesbert, David

    Integrating Future Communication Technologies for the Downstream Component of Public Warning an alert system in case of coastal tsunami due to underwater landslides. Its downstream component combines of the alerting global system. This paper presents the RATCOM architecture, focusing mainly on its downstream

  2. ETSF5 -INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ENERGY TECHNOLOGIES FOR A SUSTAINABLE FUTURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ETSF5 - INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ENERGY TECHNOLOGIES FOR A SUSTAINABLE FUTURE Energy and Large Research Facilities: The role of large research facilities in the development of sustainable energy systems, Roskilde, Denmark. Günther G Scherer and Selmiye A Gursel, General Energy Research, Paul Scherrer Institute

  3. Evaluation of Future Energy Technology Deployment Scenarios for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subtask 2.1 Report By the University of Hawaii Hawaii Natural Energy Institute School of Ocean and EarthEvaluation of Future Energy Technology Deployment Scenarios for the Big Island Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Under Award No. DE-FC-06NT42847

  4. Long-term proliferation and safeguards issues in future technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keisch, B.; Auerbach, C.; Fainberg, A.; Fiarman, S.; Fishbone, L.G.; Higinbotham, W.A.; Lemley, J.R.; O'Brien, J.

    1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the task was to assess the effect of potential new technologies, nuclear and non-nuclear, on safeguards needs and non-proliferation policies, and to explore possible solutions to some of the problems envisaged. Eight subdivisions were considered: New Enrichment Technologies; Non-Aqueous Reprocessing Technologies; Fusion; Accelerator-Driven Reactor Systems; New Reactor Types; Heavy Water and Deuterium; Long-Term Storage of Spent Fuel; and Other Future Technologies (Non-Nuclear). For each of these subdivisions, a careful review of the current world-wide effort in the field provided a means of subjectively estimating the viability and qualitative probability of fruition of promising technologies. Technologies for which safeguards and non-proliferation requirements have been thoroughly considered by others were not restudied here (e.g., the Fast Breeder Reactor). The time scale considered was 5 to 40 years for possible initial demonstration although, in some cases, a somewhat optimistic viewpoint was embraced. Conventional nuclear-material safeguards are only part of the overall non-proliferation regime. Other aspects are international agreements, export controls on sensitive technologies, classification of information, intelligence gathering, and diplomatic initiatives. The focus here is on safeguards, export controls, and classification.

  5. Energy technologies at Sandia National Laboratories: Past, Present, Future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We at Sandia first became involved with developing energy technology when the nation initiated its push toward energy independence in the early 1970s. That involvement continues to be strong. In shaping Sandia's energy programs for the 1990s, we will build on our track record from the 70s and 80s, a record outlined in this publication. It contains reprints of three issues of Sandia's Lab News that were devoted to our non-nuclear energy programs. Together, they summarize the history, current activities, and future of Sandia's diverse energy concerns; hence my desire to see them in one volume. Written in the fall of 1988, the articles cover Sandia's extremely broad range of energy technologies -- coal, oil and gas, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaics, wind, rechargeable batteries, and combustion.

  6. Faster than Light Quantum Communication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Y. Shiekh

    2008-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Faster than light communication might be possible using the collapse of the quantum wave-function without any accompanying paradoxes.

  7. Decomposing the Impact of Alternative Technology Sets on Future Carbon Emissions Growth1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wing, Ian Sue

    Decomposing the Impact of Alternative Technology Sets on Future Carbon Emissions Growth1 Karen;1 Decomposing the Impact of Alternative Technology Sets on Future Carbon Emissions Growth ABSTRACT What are the drivers of future global carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions growth and how would the availability of key

  8. 2005 Final Report: New Technologies for Future Colliders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peter McIntyre; Al McInturff

    2005-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents an annual report on our long-term R&D grant for development of new technology for future colliders. The organizing theme of our development is to develop a compact high-field collider dipole, utilizing wind-and-react Nb3Sn coil fabrication, stress man-agement, conductor optimization, bladder preload, and flux plate suppression of magnetization multipoles. The development trail for this new technology began over four years ago with the successful testing of TAMU12, a NbTi model in which we put to a first test many of the construction details of the high-field design. We have built TAMU2, a mirror-geometry dipole containing a single coil module of the 3-module set required for the 14 Tesla design. This first Nb3Sn model was built using ITER conductor which carries much less current than high-performance conductor but enables us to prove in practice our reaction bake and impregnation strategies with ‘free’ su-perconductor. TAMU2 has been shipped to LBNL for testing. Work is beginning on the construction of TAMU3, which will contain two coil modules of the 14 Tesla design. TAMU3 has a design field of 13.5 Tesla and will enable us to fully evaluate the issues of stress management that will be important to the full design. With the completion of TAMU2 and the construction of TAMU3 the Texas A&M group ‘comes of age’ in the family of superconducting magnet R&D laboratories. We have completed the phase of developing core technologies and fixtures and entered the phase of building and testing a succession of model dipoles that each build incrementally upon a proven core design.

  9. The Technology Imperative and The Future of R&D Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Technology Imperative and The Future of R&D Policy Gregory Tassey Senior Economist National Institute of Standards and Technology September 2009 tassey@nist.gov 301-975-2663 http://www.nist.gov/director/planning/strategicplanning.htm The Technology Imperative and The Future of R&D Policy Gregory Tassey Senior Economist National Institute

  10. Light-Duty Diesel EngineTechnology to Meet Future Emissions and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    to Meet Future Emissions and Performance Requirements of the U.S. Market Light-Duty Diesel EngineTechnology to Meet Future Emissions and Performance Requirements of the U.S....

  11. Ad-hoc Technology in Future IP based Mobile Communication Frank Fitzek

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reisslein, Martin

    Ad-hoc Technology in Future IP based Mobile Communication Systems Frank Fitzek acticom Gmb@asu.edu Abstract In this paper we outline our future research activities in the field of ad--hoc communication systems for IP based services. We summarize why omnipresent technologies fail to support ad--hoc

  12. Concepts and methods for exploring the future of learning with digital technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Concepts and methods for exploring the future of learning with digital technologies D25.4.1 (Final) Current and future usages of E-learning metadata and ontologies. Main author : Carsten Ullrich (USAAR on current and future usages of annotations, metadata and ontologies in the e-learning projects of the JEIRP

  13. Hydrogen Production Roadmap: Technology Pathways to the Future, January 2009

    Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

    Roadmap to identify key challenges and priority R&D needs associated with various hydrogen fuel production technologies.

  14. Automotive and fuel technologies: current and future options

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, R.; Stamets, L.

    1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this work is to assess the likely commercial timeframe of a broad range of automotive and fuel technologies. The report assesses the status of existing and alternative engine technologies, associated fuels, and problems which may retard their introduction and use. It estimates, where possible, the earliest time of general commercial use for each developing automotive technology and fuel.

  15. talent and technology for the future Welcome CAP Executive Board

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hasty, Jeff

    -mentee program Strengthen tutoring program #12;Static Components · Cost Report · Design Presentation · Business women's FSAEFielded an all women's FSAE team in 2007team in 2007 #12;UCSD FSAE ProgressUCSD FSAE;Design Process #12;Fontana Practice Event May 2008 #12;Future PlansFuture Plans Hybrid power train

  16. Science and Technology of Future Light Sources: A White Paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bergmann, Uwe; Corlett, John; Dierker, Steve; Falcone, Roger; Galayda, John; Gibson, Murray; Hastings, Jerry; Hettel, Bob; Hill, John; Hussain, Zahid; Kao, Chi-Chang; Kirz, a= Janos; Long, Gabrielle; McCurdy, Bill; Raubenheimer, Tor; Sannibale, Fernando; Seeman, John; Shen, Z.-X.; Shenoy, Gopal; Schoenlein, Bob; Shen, Qun; /Argonne /Brookhaven /LBL, Berkeley /SLAC, SSRL

    2009-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Many of the important challenges facing humanity, including developing alternative sources of energy and improving health, are being addressed by advances that demand the improved understanding and control of matter. While the visualization, exploration, and manipulation of macroscopic matter have long been technological goals, scientific developments in the twentieth century have focused attention on understanding matter on the atomic scale through the underlying framework of quantum mechanics. Of special interest is matter that consists of natural or artificial nanoscale building blocks defined either by atomic structural arrangements or by electron or spin formations created by collective correlation effects (Figure 1.1). The essence of the challenge to the scientific community has been expressed in five grand challenges for directing matter and energy recently formulated by the Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee [1]. These challenges focus on increasing our understanding of, and ultimately control of, matter at the level of atoms, electrons. and spins, as illustrated in Figure 1.1, and serve the entire range of science from advanced materials to life sciences. Meeting these challenges will require new tools that extend our reach into regions of higher spatial, temporal, and energy resolution. X-rays with energies above 10 keV offer capabilities extending beyond the nanoworld shown in Figure 1.1 due to their ability to penetrate into optically opaque or thick objects. This opens the door to combining atomic level information from scattering studies with 3D information on longer length scales from real space imaging with a resolution approaching 1 nm. The investigation of multiple length scales is important in hierarchical structures, providing knowledge about function of living organisms, the atomistic origin of materials failure, the optimization of industrial synthesis, or the working of devices. Since the fundamental interaction that holds matter together is of electromagnetic origin, it is intuitively clear that electromagnetic radiation is the critical tool in the study of material properties. On the level of atoms, electrons, and spins, x-rays have proved especially valuable. Future advanced x-ray sources and instrumentation will extend the power of x-ray methods to reach greater spatial resolution, increased sensitivity, and unexplored temporal domains. The purpose of this document is threefold: (1) summarize scientific opportunities that are beyond the reach of today's x-ray sources and instrumentation; (2) summarize the requirements for advanced x-ray sources and instrumentation needed to realize these scientific opportunities, as well as potential methods of achieving them; and (3) outline the R&D required to establish the technical feasibility of these advanced x-ray sources and instrumentation.

  17. Future of Wind Energy Technology in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thresher, R.; Robinson, M.; Veers, P.

    2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the status of wind energy in the United States as of 2007, its cost, the potential for growth, offshore development, and potential technology improvements.

  18. The Future of Imaging Spectroscopy Prospective Technologies and Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Jeff

    , and intelligent on-board logic are prime prospective technologies. Scalable approaches in pre-processing for the detection of hydrothermal alteration minerals as proposed by A.F.H. Goetz), as well as first imaging

  19. Future nano- and micro-systems using nanobonding technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howlader, Matiar M. R., E-mail: mrhowlader@ece.mcmaster.ca, E-mail: jamal@mcmaster.ca; Deen, M. Jamal, E-mail: mrhowlader@ece.mcmaster.ca, E-mail: jamal@mcmaster.ca [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON L8S 4K1 (Canada)

    2014-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, some of the recent achievements in surface-activation-based nanobonding technology are described. This bonding technology allows for the combination of electronic, photonic, fluidic and mechanical functionalities into small form-factor systems for emerging applications in health diagnostics and screening, for example. These nanobonding technologies provide void-free, strong, and nanoscale bonding at room temperature or at low temperatures (<200 °C), and they do not require chemicals, adhesives, or high external pressure. The interfaces of the nanobonded materials in ultra-high vacuum and in air correspond to the covalent bonds, and hydrogen and hydroxyl bonds, respectively, which gives rise to excellent bonding properties. Further, these nanobonding technologies are well-suited for the development of low-cost, high-performance miniaturized systems such as biophotonic imaging systems.

  20. Automated construction technologies : analyses and future development strategies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoang, Han (Han Mai)

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Substandard productivity and the lack of skilled workers in the construction industry have led major corporations all over the world aiming to produce various types of automated construction technologies. During the process, ...

  1. Technology and architecture : informing investment decisions for the future of human space exploration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Battat, Jonathan Alexander

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NASA's detailed programmatic goals, system architectures, and mission designs for future human spaceflight beyond Earth orbit remain unspecified. Given this uncertainty, it is not clear exactly which technologies are ...

  2. FT-IR spectroscopy technology, market evolution and future strategies of Bruker Optics Inc.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Higdon, Thomas (Thomas Charles)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis explores the technology and market evolution of FT-IR spectroscopy over its nearly forty year history to aid in determining future product design and marketing strategies for an industry-leading firm, Bruker ...

  3. Overview of current and future energy storage technologies for electric power applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bahrami, Majid

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1519 6.2. Compressed air energy storageOverview of current and future energy storage technologies for electric power applications Ioannis September 2008 Keywords: Power generation Distributed generation Energy storage Electricity storage A B

  4. Renewable Electricity Futures Study. Volume 2: Renewable Electricity Generation and Storage Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Augustine, C.; Bain, R.; Chapman, J.; Denholm, P.; Drury, E.; Hall, D.G.; Lantz, E.; Margolis, R.; Thresher, R.; Sandor, D.; Bishop, N.A.; Brown, S.R.; Cada, G.F.; Felker, F.

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Renewable Electricity Futures (RE Futures) Study investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. The analysis focused on the sufficiency of the geographically diverse U.S. renewable resources to meet electricity demand over future decades, the hourly operational characteristics of the U.S. grid with high levels of variable wind and solar generation, and the potential implications of deploying high levels of renewables in the future. RE Futures focused on technical aspects of high penetration of renewable electricity; it did not focus on how to achieve such a future through policy or other measures. Given the inherent uncertainties involved with analyzing alternative long-term energy futures as well as the multiple pathways that might be taken to achieve higher levels of renewable electricity supply, RE Futures explored a range of scenarios to investigate and compare the impacts of renewable electricity penetration levels (30%-90%), future technology performance improvements, potential constraints to renewable electricity development, and future electricity demand growth assumptions. RE Futures was led by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).

  5. Optical Label Switching Technology and Energy-Efficient Future Networks S. J. Ben Yoo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kolner, Brian H.

    Optical Label Switching Technology and Energy-Efficient Future Networks S. J. Ben Yoo Department traffic with extremely low energy consumption and high goodput. Keywords: Optical packet switching, optical label switching, energy efficient networks. 1. Introduction The future Internet is rapidly

  6. www.nasa.gov Space Technology: Investments in our Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in both ground and air transportation, super computers, solar- and wind-generated energy, the cameras in science and exploration while proving the capabilities and lowering the cost of other government agencies, firefighters and police safe, have all benefitted from our nation's investments in aerospace technology

  7. Fewer Faults for Faster Computing | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing ZirconiaPolicyFeasibility ofSmall15.000TechnologyTuneFewer Faults for Faster

  8. The Future is Here: Smart Home Technology | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up from theDepartment of Energy TechnicalFlowNationThe Facts on GasTheThe Future is

  9. Advanced Gas Storage Concepts: Technologies for the Future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freeway, Katy (PB-KBB Inc.); Rogers, R.E. (Mississippi State University); DeVries, Kerry L.; Nieland, Joel D.; Ratigan, Joe L.; Mellegard, Kirby D. (RESPEC)

    2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This full text product includes: 1) A final technical report titled Advanced Underground Gas Storage Concepts, Refrigerated-Mined Cavern Storage and presentations from two technology transfer workshops held in 1998 in Houston, Texas, and Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (both on the topic of Chilled Gas Storage in Mined Caverns); 2) A final technical report titled Natural Gas Hydrates Storage Project, Final Report 1 October 1997 - 31 May 1999; 3) A final technical report titled Natural Gas Hydrates Storage Project Phase II: Conceptual Design and Economic Study, Final Report 9 June - 10 October 1999; 4) A final technical report titled Commerical Potential of Natural Gas Storage in Lined Rock Caverns (LRC) and presentations from a DOE-sponsored workshop on Alternative Gas Storage Technologies, held Feb 17, 2000 in Pittsburgh, PA; and 5) Phase I and Phase II topical reports titled Feasibility Study for Lowering the Minimum Gas Pressure in Solution-Mined Caverns Based on Geomechanical Analyses of Creep-Induced Damage and Healing.

  10. Bringing you a prosperous future where energy is clean, abundant, reliable and affordable Industrial Technologies Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beckermann, Christoph

    Technologies Program A Strong Energy Portfolio for a Strong America Energy efficiency and clean, renewableBringing you a prosperous future where energy is clean, abundant, reliable and affordable Industrial Technologies Program U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

  11. Bringing you a prosperous future where energy is clean, abundant, reliable and affordable Industrial Technologies Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beckermann, Christoph

    Bringing you a prosperous future where energy is clean, abundant, reliable and affordable Industrial Technologies Program U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy for a comprehensive, physics- based model of dimensional changes and hot tearing. Hot Tear #12;Industrial Technologies

  12. Future steelmaking technologies and the role of basic research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fruehan, R.J. [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The steel industry is going through a technological revolution which will not only change how steel is produced but, also, the entire structure of the industry. The drivers for the new or improved technologies, including reduction in capital requirements, possible shortages in raw materials such as coke and low residual scrap, environmental concerns and customer demands are briefly examined. The current status of research and development in the US and selected international producers was examined. As expected, it was found that the industry`s research capabilities have been greatly reduced. Furthermore, less than half of the companies which identified a given technology as critical have significant R and D programs addressing the technology. Examples of how basic research aided in process improvements in the past are given. The examples include demonstrating how fundamentals of reaction kinetics, improved nitrogen control, thermodynamics of systems helped reduce nozzle clogging and fluid flow studies reduced defects in casting. However, in general, basic research did not play a major role in processes previously developed, but helped understanding and aided optimization. To have a major impact, basic research must be focused and be an integral part of any new process development. An example where this has been done successfully is the AISI Direct Ironmaking and Waste Oxide Recycle Projects in which fundamental studies on reduction, slag foaming, and post combustion reactions have led to process understanding, control and optimization. Industry leaders recognize the value and need for basic research but insist it be truly relevant and done with industry input. From these examples the lessons learned on how to make basic research more effective are discussed.

  13. The role of advanced technology in the future of the power generation industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bechtel, T.F.

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation reviews the directions that technology has given the power generation industry in the past and how advanced technology will be the key for the future of the industry. The topics of the presentation include how the industry`s history has defined its culture, how today`s economic and regulatory climate has constrained its strategy, and how certain technology options might give some of the players an unfair advantage.

  14. HIsmelt{reg_sign} technology: the future of ironmaking

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leczo, T.

    2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The unique liquid ironmaking process of HIsmelt{reg_sign} technology produces LD-quality hot metal or pig iron using lower-quality iron ore and non-coking coal, and a variety of iron and carbon-bearing mill wastes, without blending or agglomeration. A HIsmelt facility can replace an obsolete blast furnace in a brownfield application or can be the iron-producing component of a greenfield state-of-the-art steelmaking plant. Two companies in China have signed license agreements to build HIsmelt facilities, but are waiting until the plant in Kwinana, Australia operates for 3 months without any shutdowns or delays before they start construction on their plants.

  15. New National Wind Potential Estimates for Modern and Near-Future Turbine Technologies (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberts, J. O.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent advancements in utility-scale wind turbine technology and pricing have vastly increased the potential land area where turbines can be deployed in the United States. This presentation quantifies the new developable land potential (e.g., capacity curves), visually identifies new areas for possible development (e.g., new wind resource maps), and begins to address deployment barriers to wind in new areas for modern and future turbine technology.

  16. Ad-hoc Technology in Future IP based Mobile Communication Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reisslein, Martin

    Ad-hoc Technology in Future IP based Mobile Communication Systems Martin Reisslein Arizona State Heinrich Hertz Institut #12;Content · Required Research · Ad-hoc Testbed · Expected Results and Time Frame-Configuration · Assignment and release of IP addresses ­ omnipresent related protocols can not deployed in ad- hoc networks

  17. Development of Advanced Technologies to Reduce Design, Fabrication and Construction Costs for Future Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Camillo A. DiNunzio Framatome ANP DE& S; Dr. Abhinav Gupta Assistant Professor NCSU; Dr. Michael Golay Professor MIT Dr. Vincent Luk Sandia National Laboratories; Rich Turk Westinghouse Electric Company Nuclear Systems; Charles Morrow, Sandia National Laboratories; Geum-Taek Jin, Korea Power Engineering Company Inc.

    2002-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    OAK-B135 This report presents a summation of the third and final year of a three-year investigation into methods and technologies for substantially reducing the capital costs and total schedule for future nuclear plants. In addition, this is the final technical report for the three-year period of studies.

  18. CORSO DI FORMAZIONE IN "FUTURE TRENDS IN SCIENCE AND EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES" I EDIZIONE.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robbiano, Lorenzo

    /2013 ELENCO CANDIDATI AMMESSI AL SEMINARIO "SMART CITY" (scadenza per il perfezionamento: 17 ottobre 2013, ore per il seminario "Smart City" La domanda di iscrizione e i documenti sopra indicati potranno essere Corso di formazione in "Future Trends in Science and Emerging Technologies" ovvero al seminario "Smart

  19. INTERNATIONAL COMMAND AND CONTROL RESEARCH AND TECHNOLOGY SYMPOSIUM THE FUTURE OF C2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laskey, Kathryn Blackmond

    10TH INTERNATIONAL COMMAND AND CONTROL RESEARCH AND TECHNOLOGY SYMPOSIUM THE FUTURE OF C2 Modeling% of the responding organizations employed some form of access control mechanism [7]. Therefore, though insider users violations with the most damaging consequences take place through misuse of insider access privileges

  20. Technology and Architecture: Informing Investment Decisions for the Future of Human Space Exploration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Weck, Olivier L.

    , it is not clear exactly which technologies are necessary for enabling future exploration. The process Exploration by Jonathan Alexander Battat B.S. Mechanical Engineering Columbia University, 2009 M.Sc. Space Exploration by Jonathan Alexander Battat Submitted to the Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics on August

  1. Optimization Online - Faster convergence rates of relaxed ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Damek Davis

    2014-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Jul 19, 2014 ... Faster convergence rates of relaxed Peaceman-Rachford and ADMM under regularity assumptions. Damek Davis (damek ***at*** ...

  2. Convergence for the Smart Grid -On the technology opportunities for Future Cyber-Physical Energy Systems, invited paper at New Research Directions for Future Cyber-Physical Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Los Angeles, University of

    Convergence for the Smart Grid - On the technology opportunities for Future Cyber-Physical Energy Angeles, CA. 90095 http://winmec.ucla.edu Email:smartgrid@winmec.ucla.edu Convergence for the Smart Grid into what the Future / Smart Electric Grid should look like. For example the DOE has a vision for the Modern

  3. Electricity Demand-Side Management for an Energy Efficient Future in China: Technology Options and Policy Priorities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Weck, Olivier L.

    Electricity Demand-Side Management for an Energy Efficient Future in China: Technology Options Neufville Professor of Engineering Systems Chair, ESD Education Committee #12;2 #12;3 Electricity Demand-Side Management for an Energy Efficient Future in China: Technology Options and Policy Priorities By Chia

  4. Edison is Back and Faster

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series toESnet4: Networking for the Future ofTrouble Shooting and ErrorEdison is

  5. Edison is Back and Faster

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series toESnet4: Networking for the Future ofTrouble Shooting and ErrorEdison

  6. Innovative experimental particle physics through technological advances: Past, present and future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheung, Harry W.K.; /Fermilab

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This mini-course gives an introduction to the techniques used in experimental particle physics with an emphasis on the impact of technological advances. The basic detector types and particle accelerator facilities will be briefly covered with examples of their use and with comparisons. The mini-course ends with what can be expected in the near future from current technology advances. The mini-course is intended for graduate students and post-docs and as an introduction to experimental techniques for theorists.

  7. The ARPA-E Innovation Model: A Glimpse into the Future of Automotive Battery Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gur, Ilan (Program Director and Senior Advisor, ARPA-E) [Program Director and Senior Advisor, ARPA-E

    2014-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy's Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E) focuses on funding game-changing R&D aimed at reducing U.S. foreign energy dependence and emissions. ARPA-E has made a strong commitment to support breakthrough energy storage technologies that can accelerate the mass adoption of electrified vehicles. This presentation will highlight the range of ARPA-E's efforts in this area, offering a glimpse into the ARPA-E innovation model and the future of automotive battery technology.

  8. The ARPA-E Innovation Model: A Glimpse into the Future of Automotive Battery Technology

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Gur, Ilan (Program Director and Senior Advisor, ARPA-E)

    2014-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy's Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E) focuses on funding game-changing R&D aimed at reducing U.S. foreign energy dependence and emissions. ARPA-E has made a strong commitment to support breakthrough energy storage technologies that can accelerate the mass adoption of electrified vehicles. This presentation will highlight the range of ARPA-E's efforts in this area, offering a glimpse into the ARPA-E innovation model and the future of automotive battery technology.

  9. ITS Technologies in Military Wheeled Tactical Vehicles: Status Quo and the Future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knee, H.E.

    2001-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Army operates and maintains the largest trucking fleet in the United States. Its fleet consists of over 246,000 trucks, and it is responsible for buying and developing trucks for all branches of the armed forces. The Army's tactical wheeled vehicle fleet is the logistical backbone of the Army, and annually, the fleet logs about 823 million miles. The fleet consists of a number of types of vehicles. They include eight different families of trucks from the High Mobility Multi-Purpose Wheeled Vehicles to M900 series line haul tractors and special bodies. The average age of all the trucks within the Army fleet is 15 years, and very few have more than traditional driving instrumentation on-board. Over the past decade, the Department of Transportation's (DOT's) Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) Program has conducted research and deployment activities in a number of areas including in-vehicle systems, communication and telematics technologies. Many current model passenger vehicles have demonstrated the assimilation of these technologies to enhance safety and trip quality. Commercial vehicles are also demonstrating many new electronic devices that are assisting in making them safer and more efficient. Moreover, a plethora of new technologies are about to be introduced to drivers that promise greater safety, enhanced efficiency, congestion avoidance, fuel usage reduction, and enhanced trip quality. The U.S. Army has special needs with regard to fleet management, logistics, sustainability, reliability, survivability, and fuel consumption that goes beyond similar requirements within the private industry. In order to effectively apply emerging ITS technologies to the special needs of the U.S. Army, planning for the conduct of the Army's Vehicle Intelligence Program (AVIP) has now commenced. The AVIP will be focused on the conduct of research that: (1) will apply ITS technologies to the special needs of the Army, and (2) will conduct research for special needs wi th regard to vehicle control, driver assistance, integration of vehicle intelligence and robotic technologies, managing effectively the information flow to drivers, enhanced logistics capabilities and sustainability of the Army's fleet during battlefield conditions. This paper will highlight the special needs of the Army, briefly describe two programs, which are embracing ITS technologies to a limited extent, will outline the AVIP, and will provide some insight into future Army vehicle intelligence efforts.

  10. The confluence of ancient wisdom and future technology in our profession

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, D.P.

    1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The theme of this year`s Annual Meeting is ``Ancient Wisdom-Future Technology.`` The panel assembled for this session has been asked to think metaphorically about the theme and how it relates to their profession of human factors and ergonomics. Originally conceived as a debate centering around the older technologies and research techniques versus the newer ways of finding answers, it was soon realized that there was no dichotomy, but more of a synergy between the old and the new. If human factors is truly a philosophy of design rather than simply a body of knowledge, then one would expect consistency in approach regardless of field of application or new discoveries of human performance. Just as when two or more rivers combine to become a force mightier than the simple summation, the synergistic power of established techniques or knowledge and recent innovation is available to everyone in the profession. The invited panelists represent diverse perspectives in human factors and ergonomics, and this made for a stimulating discussion.

  11. Transportation Energy Futures Series: Vehicle Technology Deployment Pathways: An Examination of Timing and Investment Constraints

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Plotkin, S.; Stephens, T.; McManus, W.

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Scenarios of new vehicle technology deployment serve various purposes; some will seek to establish plausibility. This report proposes two reality checks for scenarios: (1) implications of manufacturing constraints on timing of vehicle deployment and (2) investment decisions required to bring new vehicle technologies to market. An estimated timeline of 12 to more than 22 years from initial market introduction to saturation is supported by historical examples and based on the product development process. Researchers also consider the series of investment decisions to develop and build the vehicles and their associated fueling infrastructure. A proposed decision tree analysis structure could be used to systematically examine investors' decisions and the potential outcomes, including consideration of cash flow and return on investment. This method requires data or assumptions about capital cost, variable cost, revenue, timing, and probability of success/failure, and would result in a detailed consideration of the value proposition of large investments and long lead times. This is one of a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency effort to pinpoint underexplored strategies for abating GHGs and reducing petroleum dependence related to transportation.

  12. Renewable Hydrogen: Technology Review and Policy Recommendations for State-Level Sustainable Energy Futures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lipman, Timothy; Edwards, Jennifer Lynn; Brooks, Cameron

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of previous clean technology development efforts, we do nothydrogen and other clean energy technologies would supportfor emerging clean energy technologies by combining support

  13. Renewable Hydrogen: Technology Review and Policy Recommendations for State-Level Sustainable Energy Futures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lipman, Timothy; Edwards, Jennifer Lynn; Brooks, Cameron

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for State-Level Sustainable Energy Futures Timothy E. Lipmanfor State-Level Sustainable Energy Futures Timothy E. Lipmana new role for sustainable energy strategies. The

  14. Physics is the liberal arts of high tech Physics and Technology for Future Presidents? Yes, that is a serious title. Energy, global

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landweber, Laura

    Preface Physics is the liberal arts of high tech Physics and Technology for Future Presidents? Yes studied physics, and do not understand science and technology. Even my school, the University of California at Berkeley, doesn't require physics. Physics and Technology for Future Presidents, PTff

  15. National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Hydrogen Technologies and Systems Center is Helping to Facilitate the Transition to a New Energy Future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hydrogen Technologies and Systems Center (HTSC) at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) uses a systems engineering and integration approach to hydrogen research and development to help the United States make the transition to a new energy future - a future built on diverse and abundant domestic renewable resources and integrated hydrogen systems. Research focuses on renewable hydrogen production, delivery, and storage; fuel cells and fuel cell manufacturing; technology validation; safety, codes, and standards; analysis; education; and market transformation. Hydrogen can be used in fuel cells to power vehicles and to provide electricity and heat for homes and offices. This flexibility, combined with our increasing demand for energy, opens the door for hydrogen power systems. HTSC collaborates with DOE, other government agencies, industry, communities, universities, national laboratories, and other stakeholders to promote a clean and secure energy future.

  16. From Technology-Driven Society to Socially Oriented Technology. The Future of Information Society -- Alternatives to Surveillance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Helbing, Dirk

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Our society is changing. Almost nothing these days works without a computer chip. Computing power doubles every 18 months, and in ten years it will probably exceed the capabilities of a human brain. Computers perform approximately 70 percent of all financial transactions today and IBM's Watson now seems to give better customer advise than some human telephone hotlines. What does this imply for our future society?

  17. Buildings of the Future Research Project Launch and Virtual Panel Discussion on Building Technology Trends

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Learn more about the DOE's Buildings of the Future Project. Buildings will no longer be passive objects that consume resources, but rather active participants engaged in the energy system and our community.

  18. Renewable Hydrogen: Technology Review and Policy Recommendations for State-Level Sustainable Energy Futures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lipman, Timothy; Edwards, Jennifer Lynn; Brooks, Cameron

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coalition To Unveil Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Initiatives toOverview of Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technology Status Reviewsuccessfully develop hydrogen and fuel cell system markets.

  19. Renewable Hydrogen: Technology Review and Policy Recommendations for State-Level Sustainable Energy Futures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lipman, Timothy; Edwards, Jennifer Lynn; Brooks, Cameron

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Commercialization Strategy for Hydrogen Energy Technologies,International Journal of Hydrogen Energy 23(7): 617-620.NYSERDA) (2005), “New York Hydrogen Energy Roadmap,” NYSERDA

  20. Hot water can freeze faster than cold?!?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monwhea Jeng

    2005-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We review the Mpemba effect, where intially hot water freezes faster than initially cold water. While the effect appears impossible at first sight, it has been seen in numerous experiments, was reported on by Aristotle, Francis Bacon, and Descartes, and has been well-known as folklore around the world. It has a rich and fascinating history, which culminates in the dramatic story of the secondary school student, Erasto Mpemba, who reintroduced the effect to the twentieth century scientific community. The phenomenon, while simple to describe, is deceptively complex, and illustrates numerous important issues about the scientific method: the role of skepticism in scientific inquiry, the influence of theory on experiment and observation, the need for precision in the statement of a scientific hypothesis, and the nature of falsifiability. We survey proposed theoretical mechanisms for the Mpemba effect, and the results of modern experiments on the phenomenon. Studies of the observation that hot water pipes are more likely to burst than cold water pipes are also described.

  1. Transportation Energy Futures Series: Non-Cost Barriers to Consumer Adoption of New Light-Duty Vehicle Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephens, T.

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Consumer preferences are key to the adoption of new vehicle technologies. Barriers to consumer adoption include price and other obstacles, such as limited driving range and charging infrastructure; unfamiliarity with the technology and uncertainty about direct benefits; limited makes and models with the technology; reputation or perception of the technology; standardization issues; and regulations. For each of these non-cost barriers, this report estimates an effective cost and summarizes underlying influences on consumer preferences, approximate magnitude and relative severity, and assesses potential actions, based on a comprehensive literature review. While the report concludes that non-cost barriers are significant, effective cost and potential market share are very uncertain. Policies and programs including opportunities for drivers to test drive advanced vehicles, general public outreach and information programs, incentives for providing charging and fueling infrastructure, and development of technology standards were examined for their ability to address barriers, but little quantitative data exists on the effectiveness of these measures. This is one in a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency effort to pinpoint underexplored strategies for reducing GHGs and petroleum dependence related to transportation.

  2. HST.921 / HST.922 Information Technology in the Health Care System of the Future, Spring 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bergeron, Bryan

    This course will show how information technologies (IT) shape and redefine the health care marketplace. Students will learn how IT enhances medical care through: 1) improved economies of scale, 2) greater technical ...

  3. Wind Power Today: Building a New Energy Future, Wind and Hydropower Technologies Program 2009 (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind Power Today is an annual publication that provides an overview of the wind energy research conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy Wind and Hydropower Technologies Program.

  4. Hafnium-doped tantalum oxide high-k gate dielectric films for future CMOS technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Jiang

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    of the doped films were explained by their compositions and bond structures. The Hf-doped TaOx film is a potential high-k gate dielectric for future MOS transistors. A 5 Ă?Â? tantalum nitride (TaNx) interface layer has been inserted between the Hf-doped Ta...

  5. Microfluidics in structural biology: smaller, faster. . . better Carl Hansen and Stephen R Quake

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, Carl L.

    Microfluidics in structural biology: smaller, faster. . . better Carl Hansen and Stephen R QuakeĂ? Microfluidic technologies promise unprecedented savings in cost and time through the integration of complex of this vision a reality, facilitating the first large-scale integration of microfluidic plumbing with biological

  6. POTENTIAL AND FUTURE TRENDS ON INDUSTRIAL RADIATION PROCESSING TECHNOLOGY APPLICATION IN EMERGING COUNTRY - BRAZIL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sampa, M.H.O.; Omi, N.M.; Rela, C.S.; Tsai, D.

    2004-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Brazil started the use of radiation technology in the seventies on crosslinking polyethylene for insulation of wire and electronic cables and sterilization of medical care devices. The present status of industrial applications of radiation shows that the use of this technology is increasing according to the economical development and the necessity to become the products manufactured in the local industries competitive in quality and price for internal and external market. The on going development activities in this area are concentrated on polymers processing (materials modification), foodstuff treatment and environmental protection. The development, the promotion and the technical support to consolidate this technology to the local industries is the main attribution of Institute for Energetic and Nuclear Research-IPEN, a governmental Institution.

  7. Communicating the Future: Best Practices for Communication of Science and Technology to the Public

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Porter, Gail

    2002-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    To advance the state of the art in science and technology communication to the public a conference was held March 6-8, 2002 at the National Institute of Standards and Technology in Gaithersburg, MD. This report of the conference proceedings includes a summary statement by the conference steering committee, transcripts or other text summarizing the remarks of conference speakers, and abstracts for 48 "best practice" communications programs selected by the steering committee through an open competition and a formal peer review process. Additional information about the 48 best practice programs is available on the archival conference Web site at www.nist.gov/bestpractices.

  8. The Future of Combustion Turbine Technology for Industrial and Utility Power Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karp, A. D.; Simbeck, D. R.

    Low capital cost and ample low-cost natural gas supplies will make natural gas-fired combustion turbine systems the power generation technology of choice over the next decade. Against the background of earlier use by electric utilities, this paper...

  9. Assessing selected technologies and operational strategies for improving the environmental performance of future aircraft

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahashabde, Anuja (Anuja Anil)

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The aviation industry is expected to grow at a rate of 4-5% in the next 20 years. Such a growth rate may have important impacts on local air quality, climate change and community noise. This work assesses selected technologies ...

  10. Renaissance in Flow-Cell Technologies Recent Advancements and Future Opportunities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    energy Limited life cycle Continuous self-discharge Conventional battery constraints Low round) Power out Electrode Electrode Energy and power independent Long life cycle Low self-discharge rates been demonstrated in field Technology is proven, but not cost effective · Flow Battery concept

  11. STATE OF THE ART AND FUTURE DEVELOPMENTS IN NATURAL GAS ENGINE TECHNOLOGIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunn, M

    2003-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Current, state of the art natural gas engines provide the lowest emission commercial technology for use in medium heavy duty vehicles. NOx emission levels are 25 to 50% lower than state of the art diesel engines and PM levels are 90% lower than non-filter equipped diesels. Yet, in common with diesel engines, natural gas engines are challenged to become even cleaner and more efficient to meet environmental and end-user demands. Cummins Westport is developing two streams of technologies to achieve these goals for medium-heavy and heavy-heavy duty applications. For medium-heavy duty applications, lowest possible emissions are sought on SI engines without significant increase in complexity and with improvements in efficiency and BMEP. The selected path builds on the capabilities of the CWI Plus technology and recent diesel engine advances in NOx controls, providing potential to reduce emissions to 2010 values in an accelerated manner and without the use of Selective Catalytic Reduction or NOx Storage and Reduction technology. For heavy-heavy duty applications where high torque and fuel economy are of prime concern, the Westport-Cycle{trademark} technology is in field trial. This technology incorporates High Pressure Direct Injection (HPDI{trademark}) of natural gas with a diesel pilot ignition source. Both fuels are delivered through a single, dual common rail injector. The operating cycle is entirely unthrottled and maintains the high compression ratio of a diesel engine. As a result of burning 95% natural gas rather than diesel fuel, NOx emissions are halved and PM is reduced by around 70%. High levels of EGR can be applied while maintaining high combustion efficiency, resulting in extremely low NOx potential. Some recent studies have indicated that DPF-equipped diesels emit less nanoparticles than some natural gas vehicles [1]. It must be understood that the ultrafine particles emitted from SI natural gas engines are generally accepted to consist predominantly of VOCs [2], and that lubricating oil is a major contributor. Fitting an oxidation catalyst to the natural gas engine leads to a reduction in nanoparticles emissions in comparison to engines without aftertreatment [2,3,4]. In 2001, the Cummins Westport Plus technology was introduced with the C Gas Plus engine, a popular choice for transit bus applications. This incorporates drive by wire, fully integrated, closed loop electronic controls and a standard oxidation catalyst for all applications. The B Gas Plus and the B Propane Plus engines, with application in shuttle and school buses were launched in 2002 and 2003. The gas-specific oxidation catalyst operates in concert with an optimized ring-pack and liner combination to reduce total particulate mass below 0.01g/bhphr, combat ultrafine particles and control VOC emissions.

  12. The DOE Wide Area Measurement System (WAMS) Project: Demonstration of dynamic information technology for the future power system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mittelstadt, W.A. [USDOE Bonneville Power Administration, Portland, OR (United States); Krause, P.E.; Wilson, R.E. [USDOE Western Area Power Administration, Golden, CO (United States); Overholt, P.N. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States); Sobajic, D.J. [Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (United States); Hauer, J.F. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Rizy, D.T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1989 the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Western Area Power Administration (WAPA) joined the US Department of Energy (DOE) in an assessment of longer-term research and development needs for future electric power system operation. The effort produced a progressively sharper vision of a future power system in which enhanced control and operation are the primary means for serving new customer demands, in an environment where increased competition, a wider range of services and vendors, and much narrower operating margins all contribute to increased system efficiencies and capacity. Technology and infrastructure for real time access to wide area dynamic information were identified as critical path elements in realizing that vision. In 1995 the DOE accordingly launched the Wide Area Measurement System (WAMS) Project jointly with the two Power Marketing Administrations (PMAs) to address these issues in a practical operating environment--the western North America power system. The Project draws upon many years of PMA effort and related collaboration among the western utilities, plus an expanding infrastructure that includes regionally involved contractors, universities, and National Laboratories plus linkages to the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). The WAMS project also brings added focus and resources to the evolving Western System Dynamic Information Network, or WesDINet. This is a collective response of the Western Systems Coordinating Council (WSCC) member utilities to their shared needs for direct information about power system characteristics, model fidelity, and operational performance. The WAMS project is a key source of the technology and backbone communications needed to make WesDINet a well integrated, cost effective enterprise network demonstrating the role of dynamic information technology in the emerging utility environment.

  13. Transportation Energy Futures Series: Vehicle Technology Deployment Pathways: An Examination of Timing and Investment Constraints

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism in Layered NbS2Topo II:LIGHT-DUTY VEHICLES Vehicle Technology

  14. Value of Faster Computation for Power Grid Operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Yousu; Huang, Zhenyu; Elizondo, Marcelo A.

    2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    As a result of the grid evolution meeting the information revolution, the power grid is becoming far more complex than it used to be. How to feed data in, perform analysis, and extract information in a real-time manner is a fundamental challenge in today’s power grid operation, not to mention the significantly increased complexity in the smart grid environment. Therefore, high performance computing (HPC) becomes one of the advanced technologies used to meet the requirement of real-time operation. This paper presents benefit case studies to show the value of fast computation for operation. Two fundamental operation functions, state estimation (SE) and contingency analysis (CA), are used as examples. In contrast with today’s tools, fast SE can estimate system status in a few seconds—comparable to measurement cycles. Fast CA can solve more contingencies in a shorter period, reducing the possibility of missing critical contingencies. The benefit case study results clearly show the value of faster computation for increasing the reliability and efficiency of power system operation.

  15. The DOE Wide Area Measurement System (WAMS) Project -- Demonstration of dynamic information technology for the future power system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mittelstadt, W.A. [Bonneville Power Administration (United States); Hauer, J.F. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Krause, P.E.; Wilson, R.E. [Western Power Administration (United States); Overholt, P.N. [USDOE (United States); Rizy, D.T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1989 the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Western Power Administration (WAPA) joined the US Department of Energy (DOE) in an assessment of longer-term research and development needs for future electric power system operation. The effort produced a progressively sharper vision of a future power system in which enhanced control and operation are the primary means for serving new customer demands in an environment characterized by increased competition, a wider range of services and vendors, and much narrower operating margins. Technology and infrastructure for real time access to wide area dynamic information were identified as critical path elements in realizing that vision. In 1995 the DOE accordingly launched the Wide Area Measurement System (WAMS) Project jointly with the two Power Marketing Administrations (PMAs) to address these issues in a practical operating environment the western North America power system. The Project draws upon many years of PMA effort and related collaboration among the western utilities, plus an expanding infrastructure that includes regionally involved contractors, universities, and National Laboratories plus linkages to the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI).

  16. Biomass energy: State of the technology present obstacles and future potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dobson, L.

    1993-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The prevailing image of wood and waste burning as dirty and environmentally harmful is no longer valid. The use of biomass combustion for energy can solve many of our nation`s problems. Wood and other biomass residues that are now causing expensive disposal problems can be burned as cleanly and efficiently as natural gas, and at a fraction of the cost. New breakthroughs in integrated waste-to-energy systems, from fuel handling, combustion technology and control systems to heat transfer and power generation, have dramatically improved system costs, efficiencies, cleanliness of emissions, maintenance-free operation, and end-use applications. Increasing costs for fossil fuels and for waste disposal strict environmental regulations and changing political priorities have changed the economics and rules of the energy game. This report will describe the new rules, new playing fields and key players, in the hope that those who make our nation`s energy policy and those who play in the energy field will take biomass seriously and promote its use.

  17. Renewable Electricity Futures Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renewable Electricity Futures Study Renewable Electricity Generation and Storage Technologies for Sustainable Energy, LLC. #12;Renewable Electricity Futures Study Edited By Hand, M.M. National Renewable;Suggested Citations Renewable Electricity Futures Study (Entire Report) National Renewable Energy Laboratory

  18. Sun-Sentinel South Florida consumer costs rising faster than

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Belogay, Eugene A.

    Sun-Sentinel South Florida consumer costs rising faster than the national average May 18, 2011|By Donna Gehrke-White, Sun Sentinel We are not imagining it: The cost of living has jumped in South Florida

  19. Technology Section of the White Paper on the Status and Future of Ground-based TeV Gamma-ray Astronomy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Byrum; J. Buckley; S. Bugayov; B. Dingus; S. Fegan; S. Funk; E. Hays; J. Holder; D. Horan; A. Konopelko; H. Krawczynski; F. Krennrich; S. Lebohec; G. Sinnis; A. Smith; V. Vassiliev; S. Wakely

    2008-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a report on the findings of the technology working group for the white paper on the status and future of TeV gamma-ray astronomy. The white paper is an APS commissioned document, and the overall version has also been released and can be found on astro-ph. This detailed section of the white paper discusses different technology opportunities and the technical feasibility for substantially improving IACTS and ground based particle detectors to achieve an order of magnitude better sensitivity than the instruments employed today as well as their planned upgrades. A technology roadmap for improving IACTS and ground based particle detectors is presented.

  20. Technology Section of the White Paper on the Status and Future of Ground-based TeV Gamma-ray Astronomy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Byrum, K; Bugayov, S; Dingus, B; Fegan, S; Funk, S; Hays, E; Holder, J; Horan, D; Konopelko, A; Krawczynski, H; Krennrich, F; Lebohec, S; Sinnis, G; Smith, A; Vasilev, V; Wakely, S

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a report on the findings of the technology working group for the white paper on the status and future of TeV gamma-ray astronomy. The white paper is an APS commissioned document, and the overall version has also been released and can be found on astro-ph. This detailed section of the white paper discusses different technology opportunities and the technical feasibility for substantially improving IACTS and ground based particle detectors to achieve an order of magnitude better sensitivity than the instruments employed today as well as their planned upgrades. A technology roadmap for improving IACTS and ground based particle detectors is presented.

  1. Hydrogen Futures and Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forsberg, Charles H.

    Concerns about the security of oil supplies and the environmental consequences of burning fossil fuels

  2. Faster Valuation of Financial Derivatives S. Paskov \\Lambda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    methods with Monte Carlo methods on the valuation of financial derivatives. We use a CollateralizedFaster Valuation of Financial Derivatives S. Paskov \\Lambda Department of Computer Science Columbia financial instruments. Vast sums are spent annually on these methods. Monte Carlo methods use random (or

  3. Faster Valuation of Financial Derivatives Department of Computer Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papageorgiou, Anargyros

    Faster Valuation of Financial Derivatives S. Paskov Department of Computer Science Columbia instruments. Vast sums are spent annually on these methods. Monte Carlo methods use random (or more precisely discrepancy point sets are known. We compared the e cacy of low discrepancy methods with Monte Carlo methods

  4. Faster high-quality processor allocation Peter Walker 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bunde, David

    and mesh dimensions are powers of 2. Furthermore, these algorithms are much faster than MC1x1, which takes]. Reduced contention is not suffi- cient to compensate for this utilization drop [6]. Thus, research has focused on noncontiguous allocators (e.g. [7], [8], [1], Shell 2 X Shell 0 Shell 1 Fig. 1. MC1x1's shells

  5. A Faster Hardware Implementation of RSA Ajay C Shantilal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 A Faster Hardware Implementation of RSA Algorithm Ajay C Shantilal Department of Electrical- cation systems. Central tools for achieving system security are cryptographic algorithms. For performance at the Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering, Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon 97331. E

  6. 02/03/2007 12:13 PMWhat's Next In Science & Technology -Aligned crystals hold potentia... of light -Important to future of telecommunications and computing Page 1 of 4http://www.whatsnextnetwork.com/technology/index.php/2007/01/18/aligned_crystals_hold_po

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glaser, Rainer

    - Important to future of telecommunications and computing Page 1 of 4http://www.whatsnextnetwork.com/technology/index.php and computing Page 2 of 4http://www.whatsnextnetwork.com/technology/index.php/2007/01/18/aligned_crystals

  7. Kicking Off the ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit: Where Innovations in Energy Technology Are “Winning the Future

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A preview of the ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit, which showcases the most advanced and revolutionary breakthroughs in energy technology today.

  8. Electricity demand-side management for an energy efficient future in China : technology options and policy priorities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheng, Chia-Chin

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The main objective of this research is to identify robust technology and policy options which achieve substantial reductions in electricity demand in China's Shandong Province. This research utilizes a scenario-based ...

  9. Scope for Future CO2 Emission Reductions from Electricity Generation through the Deployment of Carbon Capture and Storage Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haszeldine, Stuart

    of sedimentary basins. 1. Introduction #12;In recent years emissions of carbon dioxide from the UK electricity of these measures for deployment in 2020 depends entirely on final UK carbon emission targets and the abilityScope for Future CO2 Emission Reductions from Electricity Generation through the Deployment

  10. Will China's Vehicle Population Grow Even Faster than Forecasted?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yunshi; Teter, Jacob; Sperling, Daniel

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2011. “China’s Soaring Vehicle Population: Even Greater Thanversion, “China’s Soaring Vehicle Population: Even Greater2012. “Modeling Future Vehicle Sales and Stock in China,”

  11. Proposal to negotiate a collaboration agreement related to the application of novel cavity fabrication techniques and Nb/Cu sputter coating technology in the field of superconducting RF for the Future Circular Collider (FCC) study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Proposal to negotiate a collaboration agreement related to the application of novel cavity fabrication techniques and Nb/Cu sputter coating technology in the field of superconducting RF for the Future Circular Collider (FCC) study

  12. Development of pyro-processing technology at CRIEPI for carving out the future of nuclear fuel cycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iizuka, M.; Koyama, T.; Sakamura, Y.; Uozumi, K.; Fujihata, K.; Kato, T.; Murakami, T.; Tsukada, T. [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Komae-shi, Tokyo 201-8511 (Japan); Glatz, J.P. [European Commission, JRC, Institute for Transuranium Elements (Germany)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pyro-processing has been attracting increasing attention as a promising candidate as an advanced nuclear fuel cycle technology. It provides economic advantage as well as reduction in proliferation risk and burden of long live radioactive waste, especially when it is combined with advanced fuels such as metallic or nitride fuel which gives excellent burning efficiency of minor actinides (MA). CRIEPI has been developing pyro-processing technology since late eighties with both domestic and international collaborations. In the early stage, electrochemical and thermodynamic properties in LiCl-KCl eutectic melt, and fundamental feasibility of core technology like electrorefining were chiefly investigated. Currently, stress in the process chemistry development is also placed on supporting technologies, such as treatment of anode residue and high temperature distillation for cathode product from electrorefining, and so on. Waste treatment process development, such as studies on adsorption behavior of various FP elements into zeolite and conditions for the fabrication of glass-bonded sodalite waste form, are steadily improved as well. In parallel, dedicated pyro-processing equipment such as zeolite column for treatment of spent electro-refiner salt is currently in progress. Recently, an integrated engineering-scale fuel cycle tests were performed funded by Japanese government (MEXT) as an important step before proceeding to large scale hot demonstration of pyro-processing. Oxide fuels can be readily introduced into the pyro-processing by reducing them to metals by adoption of electrochemical reduction technique. Making use of this advantage, the pyro-processing is currently under preliminary evaluation for its applicability to the treatment of the corium, mainly consisting of (U,Zr)O{sub 2}, formed in different composition during the accident of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. (authors)

  13. Community Petascale Project for Accelerator Science and Simulation: Advancing Computational Science for Future Accelerators and Accelerator Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spentzouris, P.; /Fermilab; Cary, J.; /Tech-X, Boulder; McInnes, L.C.; /Argonne; Mori, W.; /UCLA; Ng, C.; /SLAC; Ng, E.; Ryne, R.; /LBL, Berkeley

    2011-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The design and performance optimization of particle accelerators are essential for the success of the DOE scientific program in the next decade. Particle accelerators are very complex systems whose accurate description involves a large number of degrees of freedom and requires the inclusion of many physics processes. Building on the success of the SciDAC-1 Accelerator Science and Technology project, the SciDAC-2 Community Petascale Project for Accelerator Science and Simulation (ComPASS) is developing a comprehensive set of interoperable components for beam dynamics, electromagnetics, electron cooling, and laser/plasma acceleration modelling. ComPASS is providing accelerator scientists the tools required to enable the necessary accelerator simulation paradigm shift from high-fidelity single physics process modeling (covered under SciDAC1) to high-fidelity multiphysics modeling. Our computational frameworks have been used to model the behavior of a large number of accelerators and accelerator R&D experiments, assisting both their design and performance optimization. As parallel computational applications, the ComPASS codes have been shown to make effective use of thousands of processors. ComPASS is in the first year of executing its plan to develop the next-generation HPC accelerator modeling tools. ComPASS aims to develop an integrated simulation environment that will utilize existing and new accelerator physics modules with petascale capabilities, by employing modern computing and solver technologies. The ComPASS vision is to deliver to accelerator scientists a virtual accelerator and virtual prototyping modeling environment, with the necessary multiphysics, multiscale capabilities. The plan for this development includes delivering accelerator modeling applications appropriate for each stage of the ComPASS software evolution. Such applications are already being used to address challenging problems in accelerator design and optimization. The ComPASS organization for software development and applications accounts for the natural domain areas (beam dynamics, electromagnetics, and advanced acceleration), and all areas depend on the enabling technologies activities, such as solvers and component technology, to deliver the desired performance and integrated simulation environment. The ComPASS applications focus on computationally challenging problems important for design or performance optimization to all major HEP, NP, and BES accelerator facilities. With the cost and complexity of particle accelerators rising, the use of computation to optimize their designs and find improved operating regimes becomes essential, potentially leading to significant cost savings with modest investment.

  14. Methodology for Calculating Cost-per-Mile for Current and Future Vehicle Powertrain Technologies, with Projections to 2024: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruth, M.; Timbario, T. A.; Timbario, T. J.; Laffen, M.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Currently, several cost-per-mile calculators exist that can provide estimates of acquisition and operating costs for consumers and fleets. However, these calculators are limited in their ability to determine the difference in cost per mile for consumer versus fleet ownership, to calculate the costs beyond one ownership period, to show the sensitivity of the cost per mile to the annual vehicle miles traveled (VMT), and to estimate future increases in operating and ownership costs. Oftentimes, these tools apply a constant percentage increase over the time period of vehicle operation, or in some cases, no increase in direct costs at all over time. A more accurate cost-per-mile calculator has been developed that allows the user to analyze these costs for both consumers and fleets. The calculator was developed to allow simultaneous comparisons of conventional light-duty internal combustion engine (ICE) vehicles, mild and full hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), and fuel cell vehicles (FCVs). This paper is a summary of the development by the authors of a more accurate cost-per-mile calculator that allows the user to analyze vehicle acquisition and operating costs for both consumer and fleets. Cost-per-mile results are reported for consumer-operated vehicles travelling 15,000 miles per year and for fleets travelling 25,000 miles per year.

  15. Commnity Petascale Project for Accelerator Science And Simulation: Advancing Computational Science for Future Accelerators And Accelerator Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spentzouris, Panagiotis; /Fermilab; Cary, John; /Tech-X, Boulder; Mcinnes, Lois Curfman; /Argonne; Mori, Warren; /UCLA; Ng, Cho; /SLAC; Ng, Esmond; Ryne, Robert; /LBL, Berkeley

    2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The design and performance optimization of particle accelerators are essential for the success of the DOE scientific program in the next decade. Particle accelerators are very complex systems whose accurate description involves a large number of degrees of freedom and requires the inclusion of many physics processes. Building on the success of the SciDAC-1 Accelerator Science and Technology project, the SciDAC-2 Community Petascale Project for Accelerator Science and Simulation (ComPASS) is developing a comprehensive set of interoperable components for beam dynamics, electromagnetics, electron cooling, and laser/plasma acceleration modelling. ComPASS is providing accelerator scientists the tools required to enable the necessary accelerator simulation paradigm shift from high-fidelity single physics process modeling (covered under SciDAC1) to high-fidelity multiphysics modeling. Our computational frameworks have been used to model the behavior of a large number of accelerators and accelerator R&D experiments, assisting both their design and performance optimization. As parallel computational applications, the ComPASS codes have been shown to make effective use of thousands of processors.

  16. DOE Announces Restructured FutureGen Approach to Demonstrate...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Restructured FutureGen Approach to Demonstrate CCS Technology at Multiple Clean Coal Plants DOE Announces Restructured FutureGen Approach to Demonstrate CCS Technology at Multiple...

  17. Future Diesel Engine Thermal Efficiency Improvement andn Emissions...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Future Diesel Engine Thermal Efficiency Improvement andn Emissions Control Technology Future Diesel Engine Thermal Efficiency Improvement andn Emissions Control Technology 2005...

  18. ITP Mining: Mining Industry of the Future Mineral Processing...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of the Future Mineral Processing Technology Roadmap ITP Mining: Mining Industry of the Future Mineral Processing Technology Roadmap mptroadmap.pdf More Documents & Publications ITP...

  19. Technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmittedStatus TomAboutManusScience and InnovationexperimentsTechnology

  20. FUTURE LOGISTICS LIVING LABORATORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heiser, Gernot

    FUTURE LOGISTICS LIVING LABORATORY Delivering Innovation The Future Logistics Living Lab is a collaboration between NICTA, SAP and Fraunhofer. Australia's first Living Lab provides a platform for industry and research to work together, to investigate real-world problems and to demonstrate innovative technology

  1. An Overview of strategic measures to assess workforce needs and ensure technology transfer to meet current and future nuclear power operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vincenti, J.R. [acuri.net, 1344 Curtin Street, State College, PA (United States); Stigers, R.A. [Senior Health Physicist-Radwaste, PPL Susquehanna, Berwick, PA (United States)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Between 1956 and 1989, the number of operating commercial nuclear power plants in the United States increased from none to 109. With the exception of a few plants that were still in final construction, no new nuclear power plants were ordered in the United States as the new millennium began. In 2005, the federal government pronounced the need for new electric power generating systems during the first quarter of the 21. century. The need comes from a desire to curb our reliance on fossil fuels, as well as to provide for a cleaner environment. One of those fuel systems noted was nuclear energy. Given the time between the last active period of nuclear power plant development and construction, there is a need to supply a talented and well-prepared workforce to operate the new plants. It will also be necessary to assess the needs of our current fleet of operating nuclear power plants, of which many are in the process of re-licensing, yet also facing an aging plant workforce. This paper will review and discuss measures to assess diverse workforce needs and technology transfer to meet current licensing requirements as that of future nuclear power plant development in the United States. (authors)

  2. UNIVERSITY of STRATHCLYDE TECHNOLOGY &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mottram, Nigel

    electricity networks and distribution systems, through to using smart grid technologies for more effective of dynamic collaborations delivering productive outcomes. #12;#12;LOW CARBON POWER AND ENERGY FUTURE CITIES Advanced Manufacturing Future Cities Health Technologies Working collaboratively, programmes within

  3. NEW DATA SUPPORT ACTIVITIES FOR THE FAST-PHYSICS SYSTEM TESTBED & RESEARCH (FASTER) PROJECT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Energy Office of Science ABSTRACT The multi-institution FAst-physics System TEstbed and Research (FASTER) project, funded by the U.S. DOE Earth System Modeling program, aims to evaluate and improve, and in situ data. The FASTER data integration team provides tailored data sets, statistics, best estimates

  4. NEW HIGH STRENGTH AND FASTER DRILLING TSP DIAMOND CUTTERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Radtke

    2006-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The manufacture of thermally stable diamond (TSP) cutters for drill bits used in petroleum drilling requires the brazing of two dissimilar materials--TSP diamond and tungsten carbide. The ENDURUS{trademark} thermally stable diamond cutter developed by Technology International, Inc. exhibits (1) high attachment (shear) strength, exceeding 345 MPa (50,000 psi), (2) TSP diamond impact strength increased by 36%, (3) prevents TSP fracture when drilling hard rock, and (4) maintains a sharp edge when drilling hard and abrasive rock. A novel microwave brazing (MWB) method for joining dissimilar materials has been developed. A conventional braze filler metal is combined with microwave heating which minimizes thermal residual stress between materials with dissimilar coefficients of thermal expansion. The process results in preferential heating of the lower thermal expansion diamond material, thus providing the ability to match the thermal expansion of the dissimilar material pair. Methods for brazing with both conventional and exothermic braze filler metals have been developed. Finite element modeling (FEM) assisted in the fabrication of TSP cutters controllable thermal residual stress and high shear attachment strength. Further, a unique cutter design for absorbing shock, the densification of otherwise porous TSP diamond for increased mechanical strength, and diamond ion implantation for increased diamond fracture resistance resulted in successful drill bit tests.

  5. Wind Turbine Inspection Technology Reaches New Heights | GE Global...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    week, we announced our advancement in technology that will make the inspection of wind turbines faster and more reliable for our customers. Currently, an inspector examines the...

  6. Toward faster and more accurate star sensors using recursive centroiding and star identification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Samaan, Malak Anees

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    TOWARD FASTER AND MORE ACCURATE STAR SENSORS USING RECURSIVE CENTROIDING AND STAR IDENTIFICATION A Dissertation by MALAK ANEES SAMAAN Submitted to the O?ce of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY August 2003 Major Subject: Aerospace Engineering TOWARD FASTER AND MORE ACCURATE STAR SENSORS USING RECURSIVE CENTROIDING AND STAR IDENTIFICATION A Dissertation by MALAK ANEES SAMAAN Submitted to Texas A&M University...

  7. Future Accelerators (?)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John Womersley

    2003-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    I describe the future accelerator facilities that are currently foreseen for electroweak scale physics, neutrino physics, and nuclear structure. I will explore the physics justification for these machines, and suggest how the case for future accelerators can be made.

  8. Venus Technology Plan Venus Technology Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    Venus Technology Plan May 2014 #12; ii Venus Technology Plan At the Venus Exploration Survey priorities, and (3) develop a Technology Plan for future Venus missions (after a Technology Forum at VEXAG Meeting 11 in November 2013). Here, we present the 2014 Venus Technology Plan

  9. California's Energy Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    #12;California's Energy Future ­ The Potential for Biofuels May 2013 Heather Youngs and Christopher R. Somerville #12;LEGAL NOTICE This report was prepared pursuant to a contract between the California Energy Commission (CEC) and the California Council on Science andTechnology (CCST). It does

  10. Buildings of the Future Research Project Launch and Virtual Panel...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Buildings of the Future Research Project Launch and Virtual Panel Discussion on Building Technology Trends Buildings of the Future Research Project Launch and Virtual Panel...

  11. State of the Art and Future Developments In Natural Gas Engine...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    State of the Art and Future Developments In Natural Gas Engine Technologies State of the Art and Future Developments In Natural Gas Engine Technologies 2003 DEER Conference...

  12. FUEL CELL TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and fuel cells offer great promise for our energy future. Fuel cell vehicles are not yet commercially, such as a hydrogen fueling station or hydrogen fuel cell vehicle. Technology validation does not certify, and the Federal Government to evaluate hydrogen fuel cell vehicle and infrastructure technologies together in real

  13. frequency high efficiency two-stage approach for future microprocessors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuancheng Ren; Dusan Boroyevich; Daan Wyk; Guo Quan; Lu Douglas; K. Lindner; Yuancheng Ren

    It is perceived that Moore’s Law will prevail at least for the next decade, with continuous advancements of processing technologies for very-large-scale integrated (VLSI) circuits. Nano technology is driving VLSI circuits in a path of greater transistor integration, faster clock frequency, and lower operation voltage. This has imposed a new challenge for delivering highquality power to modern processors. Power management technology is critical for transferring the required high current in a highly efficient way, and accurately regulating the sub-1V voltage in very fast dynamic transient response conditions. Furthermore, the VRs are limited in a given area and the power density is important to save the precious real estate of the motherboard. Based on the power delivery path model, the analysis results show that as long as the bandwidth can reach around 350 kHz, the bulk capacitor of the VR can be completely eliminated, which means significant savings in cost and real estate. Analysis also indicates that 650kHz bandwidth can reduce the number of the decoupling capacitor from 230 to 50 for future microprocessor case. Beyond 650kHz, the reduction is not obvious any more due to the parasitic components along the power delivery path. Following the vision of high bandwidth, the VRs need to operate at much higher frequency

  14. Capturing the Sun, Creating a Clean Energy Future (Brochure), SunShot, Solar Energy Technologies Program (SETP), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Through partnerships with industry academia, and national laboratories, the DOE Solar Energy Technologies Program sponsors research and development (R&D) in addition to activities designed to accelerate solar market development and reduce the cost of solar power.

  15. Science and technology for a sustainable energy future: Accomplishments of the Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, M.A.; Vaughan, K.H.

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Accomplishments of the Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory are presented. Included are activities performed in the utilities, transportation, industrial, and buildings technology areas.

  16. Texas Industries of the Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferland, K.

    The purpose of the Texas Industries of the Future program is to facilitate the development, demonstration and adoption of advanced technologies and adoption of best practices that reduce industrial energy usage, emissions, and associated costs...

  17. Background paper for "The 10-50 Solution: Technologies and Policies for a Low-Carbon Future" Pew Center & NCEP Conference, Washington, DC, March 25 26, 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    School of Public Policy 310 Barrows Hall, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3050 USA Email, and nations. Over the next five decades solar and wind energy could provide well over one third of electricity for a future requiring significantly more energy than the current global supply capacity of ~10 TW demand

  18. The Future of Geothermal Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    The Future of Geothermal Energy Impact of Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) on the United States in the 21st Century #12;The Future of Geothermal Energy Impact of Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS and Renewable Energy, Office of Geothermal Technologies, Under DOE Idaho Operations Office Contract DE-AC07-05ID

  19. Aftertreatment Modeling Status, Futur Potential, and Application...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    States Future Diesel Engine Thermal Efficiency Improvement andn Emissions Control Technology Model-Based Transient Calibration Optimization for Next Generation Diesel Engines...

  20. A faster numerical scheme for a coupled system to model soil erosion and suspended sediment transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    or the kinetic energy of raindrop exceeds the cohesive strength of the soil particles. Once detachedA faster numerical scheme for a coupled system to model soil erosion and suspended sediment´eans, France Abstract Overland flow and soil erosion play an essential role in water quality and soil

  1. Reply to `On a recent proposal of faster than light quantum communication'

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Y. Shiekh

    2007-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

    In a recent paper the author proposed the possibility of an experiment to perform faster-than-light communication via the collapse of the quantum wave-function. This was analyzed by Bassi and Ghirardi, and it is believed that this analysis itself merits a detailed examination.

  2. Faster ECC over F2521-1 Robert Granger1 and Michael Scott2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faster ECC over F2521-1 Robert Granger1 and Michael Scott2 1 Laboratory for Cryptologic Algorithms School of Computer and Communication Sciences ´Ecole Polytechnique F´ed´erale de Lausanne, CH-1015, Switzerland robbiegranger@gmail.com 2 Certivox Labs mike.scott@certivox.com Abstract. In this paper we present

  3. Accelerated Corrective Consensus: Converge to the Exact Average at a Faster Rate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amir, Yair

    Accelerated Corrective Consensus: Converge to the Exact Average at a Faster Rate Yin Chen Roberto to reach convergence. Therefore, a great deal of effort has been devoted into accelerating consensus with improved accelerated consensus algorithms. Nevertheless, these techniques assume the communication graph

  4. Faster growth in warmer winters for large trees in a Mediterranean-climate ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    North, Malcolm

    Faster growth in warmer winters for large trees in a Mediterranean-climate ecosystem Seth W of large trees in a rapidly changing climate, we analyzed growth rings of five conifer species against 20th. Climatic Change DOI 10.1007/s10584-014-1060-0 Electronic supplementary material The online version

  5. Sleep with Guilt and Work Faster to Minimize Flow plus Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wong, Prudence W.H.

    to reduce energy usage. Re- cently there is a lot of theory research on online job scheduling taking speedSleep with Guilt and Work Faster to Minimize Flow plus Energy Tak-Wah Lam1, , Lap-Kei Lee1 , Hing. {isaacto, pwong}@liverpool.ac.uk Abstract. In this paper we extend the study of flow-energy scheduling

  6. Custom data support for the FAst -physics System Testbed and Research (FASTER) Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toto, T.; Jensen, M.; Vogelmann, A.; Wagener, R.; Liu, Y.; Lin, W.

    2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The multi-institution FAst -physics System Testbed and Research (FASTER) project, funded by the DOE Earth System Modeling program, aims to evaluate and improve the parameterizations of fast processes (those involving clouds, precipitation and aerosols) in global climate models, using a combination of numerical prediction models, single column models, cloud resolving models, large-eddy simulations, full global climate model output and ARM active and passive remote sensing and in-situ data. This poster presents the Custom Data Support effort for the FASTER project. The effort will provide tailored datasets, statistics, best estimates and quality control data, as needed and defined by FASTER participants, for use in evaluating and improving parameterizations of fast processes in GCMs. The data support will include custom gridding and averaging, for the model of interest, using high time resolution and pixel level data from continuous ARM observations and complementary datasets. In addition to the FASTER team, these datasets will be made available to the ARM Science Team. Initial efforts with respect to data product development, priorities, availability and distribution are summarized here with an emphasis on cloud, atmospheric state and aerosol properties as observed during the Spring 2000 Cloud IOP and the Spring 2003 Aerosol IOP at the ARM Southern Great Plains site.

  7. Home Previous Page Odd power: New microbe strain makes more electricity, faster

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lovley, Derek

    Home Previous Page Odd power: New microbe strain makes more electricity, faster Author: Newswise Issue: 8/2009 In their most recent experiments with Geobacter, the sediment-loving microbe whose hairlike filaments help it to produce electric current from mud and wastewater, Derek Lovley and colleagues

  8. Future Healthcare

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Datta, Shoumen

    2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Patients want answers, not numbers. Evidence-based medicine must have numbers to generate answers. Therefore, analysis of numbers to provide answers is the Holy Grail of healthcare professionals and its future systems. ...

  9. Buildings of the Future

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory are developing a vision for future buildings—at least one hundred years from today—based on the collective views of thought leaders. As part of this effort, we will explore technology and demographic trends that could revolutionize the built environment across energy, water, environment, resilient design, health, security, and productivity.

  10. FASTER: A new DOE effort to bridge ESM and ASR sciences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Y.

    2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to better use the long-term ARM measurements to evaluate parameterizations of fast processes used in global climate models --- mainly those related to clouds, precipitation and aerosols, the DOE Earth System Modeling (ESM) program funds a new multi-institution project led by the Brookhaven National Laboratory, FAst -physics System Testbed and Research (FASTER). This poster will present an overview of this new project and its scientific relationships to the ASR sciences and ARM measurements.

  11. FUTURE POWER GRID INITIATIVE GridOPTICSTM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FUTURE POWER GRID INITIATIVE GridOPTICSTM : A Software Framework for Power System Operations technologies needed to support the operations and planning of the future power grid » provide a framework for integrating novel new operations and planning technologies with external power grid systems, including energy

  12. Consortium for Electric Reliability Technology Solutions Grid of the Future White Paper on Review of Recent Reliability Issues and Systems Events

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hauer, John F.; Dagle, Jeffery E.

    1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is one of six reports developed under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) program in Power System Integration and Reliability (PSIR). The objective of this report is to review, analyze, and evaluate critical reliability issues demonstrated by recent disturbance events in the North America power system. Eleven major disturbances are examined, most occurring in this decade. The strategic challenge is that the pattern of technical need has persisted for a long period of time. For more than a decade, anticipation of market deregulation has been a major disincentive to new investments in system capacity. It has also inspired reduced maintenance of existing assets. A massive infusion of better technology is emerging as the final option to continue reliable electrical services. If an investment in better technology will not be made in a timely manner, then North America should plan its adjustments to a very different level of electrical service. It is apparent that technical operations staff among the utilities can be very effective at marshaling their forces in the immediate aftermath of a system emergency, and that serious disturbances often lead to improved mechanisms for coordinated operation. It is not at all apparent that such efforts can be sustained through voluntary reliability organizations in which utility personnel external to those organizations do most of the technical work. The eastern interconnection shows several situations in which much of the technical support has migrated from the utilities to the Independent System Operator (ISO), and the ISO staffs or shares staff with the regional reliability council. This process may be a natural and very positive consequence of utility restructuring. If so, the process should be expedited in regions where it is less advanced.

  13. Warming of the arctic ice-ocean system is faster than the global average since the 1960s

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Jinlun

    , downward longwave radiation, and therefore net heat flux. The faster warming of the arctic ice­ocean systemWarming of the arctic ice-ocean system is faster than the global average since the 1960s Jinlun Zhang Polar Science Center, Applied Physics Laboratory, College of Ocean and Fishery Sciences

  14. FUTURES with Jaime Escalante

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States Department of Energy awarded the Foundation for Advancements in Science and Education (FASE) $826,000 as support to produce the second set of FUTURES segments consisting of 12, 15-minute programs. The programs provide motivation for students to study math by connecting math to the work place and real-life problem scenarios. The programs are broadcast in 50 states through PBS Elementary and Secondary Service (E/SS). The grant term ended on December 16, 1993 and this final report documents program and financial activity results. The 12 episodes are titled: Animal Care, Meteorology, Mass Communication, Advanced Energy, Oceanography, Graphic Design, Future Habitats, Environmental Science & Technology, Fitness & Physical Performance, Interpersonal Communications, Advanced Transportation and Product Design. Each program addresses as many as ten careers or job types within the broader field named. Minority and gender-balanced role models appear throughout the programs.

  15. Assessment of Energy Impact of Window Technologies for Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Tianzhen

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1.2 quads. Future window technologies offer energy savingsImpact of Window Technologies for Commercial BuildingsEnvironmental Energy Technologies Division October 2009 This

  16. Bioenergy: America's Energy Future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, Bruce; Volz, Sara; Male, Johnathan; Wolfson, Johnathan; Pray, Todd; Mayfield, Stephen; Atherton, Scott; Weaver, Brandon

    2014-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Bioenergy: America's Energy Future is a short documentary film showcasing examples of bioenergy innovations across the biomass supply chain and the United States. The film highlights a few stories of individuals and companies who are passionate about achieving the promise of biofuels and addressing the challenges of developing a thriving bioeconomy. This outreach product supports media initiatives to expand the public's understanding of the bioenergy industry and sustainable transportation and was developed by the U.S. Department of Energy Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO), Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Green Focus Films, and BCS, Incorporated.

  17. Bioenergy: America's Energy Future

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Nelson, Bruce; Volz, Sara; Male, Johnathan; Wolfson, Johnathan; Pray, Todd; Mayfield, Stephen; Atherton, Scott; Weaver, Brandon

    2014-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Bioenergy: America's Energy Future is a short documentary film showcasing examples of bioenergy innovations across the biomass supply chain and the United States. The film highlights a few stories of individuals and companies who are passionate about achieving the promise of biofuels and addressing the challenges of developing a thriving bioeconomy. This outreach product supports media initiatives to expand the public's understanding of the bioenergy industry and sustainable transportation and was developed by the U.S. Department of Energy Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO), Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Green Focus Films, and BCS, Incorporated.

  18. Hydrogen Production - Current Technology | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Current Technology Hydrogen Production - Current Technology The development of clean, sustainable, and cost-competitive hydrogen production processes is key to a viable future...

  19. With faster processors and better numerical techniques, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) tools have revolutionized engineering design and optimization--

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapman, Clark R.

    With faster processors and better numerical techniques, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) tools have revolutionized engineering design and optimization-- limiting expensive experimentation and Engineering Division (GED) at Southwest Research Institute® (SwRI®) has extensive experience and capabilities

  20. Practical Issues when Selecting PV Technologies (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurtz, S.

    2010-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Presentation highlighting practical considerations for photovoltaic technologies and strategies for future reductions in cost and increases in efficiency.

  1. Future Directions for Magnetic Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Engineering Laboratory Magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) sensors are rapidly becoming the technology of choiceFuture Directions for Magnetic Sensors: HYBRIDMATERIALS Our goal is to develop the scientific expertise needed to allow modeling and simulation to become the driving force in improving magnetic sensors

  2. The Future of Transportation Finance: Gas Tax Plus and Beyond

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    The Future of Transportation Finance: Gas Tax Plus and Beyond The Future of Transportation Finance ON TRANSPORTATION POLICY AND TECHNOLOGY 2005 JAMES L. OBERSTAR FORUM ON TRANSPORTATION POLICY AND TECHNOLOGY #12;This report summarizes the fourth James L. Oberstar Forum on Transportation Policy and Technology. Over

  3. Mobility chains analysis of technologies for passenger cars and light duty vehicles fueled with biofuels : application of the Greet model to project the role of biomass in America's energy future (RBAEF) project.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, M.; Wu, Y.; Wang, M; Energy Systems

    2008-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Role of Biomass in America's Energy Future (RBAEF) is a multi-institution, multiple-sponsor research project. The primary focus of the project is to analyze and assess the potential of transportation fuels derived from cellulosic biomass in the years 2015 to 2030. For this project, researchers at Dartmouth College and Princeton University designed and simulated an advanced fermentation process to produce fuel ethanol/protein, a thermochemical process to produce Fischer-Tropsch diesel (FTD) and dimethyl ether (DME), and a combined heat and power plant to co-produce steam and electricity using the ASPEN Plus{trademark} model. With support from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) conducted, for the RBAEF project, a mobility chains or well-to-wheels (WTW) analysis using the Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy use in Transportation (GREET) model developed at ANL. The mobility chains analysis was intended to estimate the energy consumption and emissions associated with the use of different production biofuels in light-duty vehicle technologies.

  4. Framtidens lantbruk / Future Agriculture Future Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Framtidens lantbruk / Future Agriculture Future Agriculture ­ Livestock, Crops and Land Use Report from a multidisciplinary research platform. Phase I (2009 ­ 2012) #12;Future Agriculture ­ Livestock Waldenström Utgivningsår: 2012, Uppsala Utgivare: SLU, Framtidens lantbruk/Future Agriculture Layout: Pelle

  5. Science and Technology of Future Light Sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bergmann, Uwe

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by pressure, radiation, or electric and magnetic fields). Tocycle pulses of THz radiation with electric-field strengths

  6. Superconducting Magnet Technology for Future Hadron Colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scanlan, R.M.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Trans. on Applied Superconductivity, 5 (1995), J.R. Millersummer study on superconductingdevices and acceleratorsGeneral. Advanced Superconductors (IGC). Waterbury.

  7. Science and Technology of Future Light Sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bergmann, Uwe

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    UV). Powerful, ultrafast pulses in the extreme ultraviolet (recorded with individual ultrafast pulses may be compared.electronic damage” with ultrafast pulses. Only at a delay

  8. Growing America's Energy Future: Bioenergy Technologies Office...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    cost-share public-private partnerships to help sustainably develop cost-competitive biofuels and bioproducts in the United States from non-food biomass resources....

  9. NREL: Transportation Research - Future Automotive Systems Technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the Contributions andData andFleet Test and Evaluation Photo of medium-dutySimulator

  10. SuperComputing | Future Technology | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security AdministrationcontrollerNanocrystalline Gallium OxideSumin Kim Sumin KimSunil K. Sinha,Super Energy

  11. Renewable Electricity Futures Study. Executive Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mai, T.; Sandor, D.; Wiser, R.; Schneider, T.

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Renewable Electricity Futures (RE Futures) Study investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. The analysis focused on the sufficiency of the geographically diverse U.S. renewable resources to meet electricity demand over future decades, the hourly operational characteristics of the U.S. grid with high levels of variable wind and solar generation, and the potential implications of deploying high levels of renewables in the future. RE Futures focused on technical aspects of high penetration of renewable electricity; it did not focus on how to achieve such a future through policy or other measures. Given the inherent uncertainties involved with analyzing alternative long-term energy futures as well as the multiple pathways that might be taken to achieve higher levels of renewable electricity supply, RE Futures explored a range of scenarios to investigate and compare the impacts of renewable electricity penetration levels (30%-90%), future technology performance improvements, potential constraints to renewable electricity development, and future electricity demand growth assumptions. RE Futures was led by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).

  12. Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Renewable energy for the future...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Renewable energy for the future. Local government options for promoting development of renewable energy resources Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map |...

  13. Smart, Connected, and Electrified The Future of the Automobile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eustice, Ryan

    Smart, Connected, and Electrified ­ The Future of the Automobile into the automobile where technologies such as embedded wireless modems, Bluetooth

  14. Assessment of Future Vehicle Transportation Options and their...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Future Vehicle Transportation Options and Their Impact on the Electric Grid January 10, 2010 New Analysis of Alternative Transportation Technologies 3 What's New? * Additional...

  15. DISTRIBUTED ENERGY SYSTEMS IN CALIFORNIA'S FUTURE: A PRELIMINARY REPORT, VOLUME I

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ASSESSMENTS VI. ALTERNATIVE ENERGY FUTURES FOR CALIFORNIA--ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS OF ALTERNATIVE ENERGY TECHNOLOGIES FORVolume 5, Status of Alternative Energy Technologies, 1977

  16. Wind Energy Status and Future Wind Engineering Challenges: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thresher, R.; Schreck, S.; Robinson, M.; Veers, P.

    2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the current status of wind energy technology, the potential for future wind energy development and the science and engineering challenges that must be overcome for the technology to meet its potential.

  17. Attack of the killer acronyms: The Future of IT Law 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guadamuz, Andres

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper discusses the reliance of internet technology law on acronyms, and its deeper socio-legal impact. It suggests that this resonantes for the future of research, teaching, and practice within information technology law.

  18. Rationale for State Support of Industries of the Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trabachino, C.; Muller, M.

    Through its Industries of the Future (IOF) strategy, the US DOE's Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) seeks to develop and deploy advanced technologies and practices that will increase energy efficiency, environmental performance...

  19. FutureGen Project Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cabe, Jim; Elliott, Mike

    2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the comprehensive siting, permitting, engineering, design, and costing activities completed by the FutureGen Industrial Alliance, the Department of Energy, and associated supporting subcontractors to develop a first of a kind near zero emissions integrated gasification combined cycle power plant and carbon capture and storage project (IGCC-CCS). With the goal to design, build, and reliably operate the first IGCC-CCS facility, FutureGen would have been the lowest emitting pulverized coal power plant in the world, while providing a timely and relevant basis for coal combustion power plants deploying carbon capture in the future. The content of this report summarizes key findings and results of applicable project evaluations; modeling, design, and engineering assessments; cost estimate reports; and schedule and risk mitigation from initiation of the FutureGen project through final flow sheet analyses including capital and operating reports completed under DOE award DE-FE0000587. This project report necessarily builds upon previously completed siting, design, and development work executed under DOE award DE-FC26- 06NT4207 which included the siting process; environmental permitting, compliance, and mitigation under the National Environmental Policy Act; and development of conceptual and design basis documentation for the FutureGen plant. For completeness, the report includes as attachments the siting and design basis documents, as well as the source documentation for the following: • Site evaluation and selection process and environmental characterization • Underground Injection Control (UIC) Permit Application including well design and subsurface modeling • FutureGen IGCC-CCS Design Basis Document • Process evaluations and technology selection via Illinois Clean Coal Review Board Technical Report • Process flow diagrams and heat/material balance for slurry-fed gasifier configuration • Process flow diagrams and heat/material balance for dry-fed gasifier configuration • Full capital cost report and cost category analysis (CAPEX) • Full operating cost report and assumptions (OPEX) Comparative technology evaluations, value engineering exercises, and initial air permitting activities are also provided; the report concludes with schedule, risk, and cost mitigation activities as well as lessons learned such that the products of this report can be used to support future investments in utility scale gasification and carbon capture and sequestration. Collectively, the FutureGen project enabled the comprehensive site specific evaluation and determination of the economic viability of IGCC-CCS. The project report is bound at that determination when DOE formally proposed the FutureGen 2.0 project which focuses on repowering a pulverized coal power plant with oxy-combustion technology including CCS.

  20. FUTURE POWER GRID INITIATIVE Future Power Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FUTURE POWER GRID INITIATIVE Future Power Grid Control Paradigm OBJECTIVE This project integration & exploit the potential of distributed smart grid assets » Significantly reduce the risk of advanced mathematical models, next- generation simulation and analytics capabilities for the power grid

  1. Mastering Uncertainty and Risk at Multiple Time Scales in the Future Electrical Grid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chertkov, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bent, Russell W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Backhaus, Scott N. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Today's electrical grids enjoy a relatively clean separation of spatio-temporal scales yielding a compartmentalization of grid design, optimization, control and risk assessment allowing for the use of conventional mathematical tools within each area. In contrast, the future grid will incorporate time-intermittent renewable generation, operate via faster electrical markets, and tap the latent control capability at finer grid modeling scales; creating a fundamentally new set of couplings across spatiotemporal scales and requiring revolutionary advances in mathematics techniques to bridge these scales. One example is found in decade-scale grid expansion planning in which today's algorithms assume accurate load forecasts and well-controlled generation. Incorporating intermittent renewable generation creates fluctuating network flows at the hourly time scale, inherently linking the ability of a transmission line to deliver electrical power to hourly operational decisions. New operations-based planning algorithms are required, creating new mathematical challenges. Spatio-temporal scales are also crossed when the future grid's minute-scale fluctuations in network flows (due to intermittent generation) create a disordered state upon which second-scale transient grid dynamics propagate effectively invalidating today's on-line dynamic stability analyses. Addressing this challenge requires new on-line algorithms that use large data streams from new grid sensing technologies to physically aggregate across many spatial scales to create responsive, data-driven dynamic models. Here, we sketch the mathematical foundations of these problems and potential solutions.

  2. Nuclear Futures Analysis and Scenario Building

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arthur, E.D.; Beller, D.; Canavan, G.H.; Krakowski, R.A.; Peterson, P.; Wagner, R.L.

    1999-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This LDRD project created and used advanced analysis capabilities to postulate scenarios and identify issues, externalities, and technologies associated with future ''things nuclear''. ''Things nuclear'' include areas pertaining to nuclear weapons, nuclear materials, and nuclear energy, examined in the context of future domestic and international environments. Analysis tools development included adaptation and expansion of energy, environmental, and economics (E3) models to incorporate a robust description of the nuclear fuel cycle (both current and future technology pathways), creation of a beginning proliferation risk model (coupled to the (E3) model), and extension of traditional first strike stability models to conditions expected to exist in the future (smaller force sizes, multipolar engagement environments, inclusion of actual and latent nuclear weapons (capability)). Accomplishments include scenario development for regional and global nuclear energy, the creation of a beginning nuclear architecture designed to improve the proliferation resistance and environmental performance of the nuclear fuel cycle, and numerous results for future nuclear weapons scenarios.

  3. T-Mobile is making mobile surfing for your personal Internet favorites even easier, faster and convenient

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deutschmann, Rainer

    T-Mobile is making mobile surfing for your personal Internet favorites even easier, faster on your mobile- phone display · Active widgets provide automatic notification of new information on personal Internet sites if required · Strategic partnership between T-Mobile and Opera for the creation

  4. Petrick Technology Trends Of Manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;323 Petrick Technology Trends chapter 9 The Future Of Manufacturing Irene Petrick Technology Trends This chapter is a story about the future of manufacturing based on three predictions: · that firms sophisticated modeling and simulation of both new products and production processes; · that additive

  5. Hydrogen: Fueling the Future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leisch, Jennifer

    2007-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    As our dependence on foreign oil increases and concerns about global climate change rise, the need to develop sustainable energy technologies is becoming increasingly significant. Worldwide energy consumption is expected to double by the year 2050, as will carbon emissions along with it. This increase in emissions is a product of an ever-increasing demand for energy, and a corresponding rise in the combustion of carbon containing fossil fuels such as coal, petroleum, and natural gas. Undisputable scientific evidence indicates significant changes in the global climate have occurred in recent years. Impacts of climate change and the resulting atmospheric warming are extensive, and know no political or geographic boundaries. These far-reaching effects will be manifested as environmental, economic, socioeconomic, and geopolitical issues. Offsetting the projected increase in fossil energy use with renewable energy production will require large increases in renewable energy systems, as well as the ability to store and transport clean domestic fuels. Storage and transport of electricity generated from intermittent resources such as wind and solar is central to the widespread use of renewable energy technologies. Hydrogen created from water electrolysis is an option for energy storage and transport, and represents a pollution-free source of fuel when generated using renewable electricity. The conversion of chemical to electrical energy using fuel cells provides a high efficiency, carbon-free power source. Hydrogen serves to blur the line between stationary and mobile power applications, as it can be used as both a transportation fuel and for stationary electricity generation, with the possibility of a distributed generation energy infrastructure. Hydrogen and fuel cell technologies will be presented as possible pollution-free solutions to present and future energy concerns. Recent hydrogen-related research at SLAC in hydrogen production, fuel cell catalysis, and hydrogen storage will be highlighted in this seminar.

  6. Living a Sustainable Future

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    solve the energy crisis through biological methods, including genetically engineering algae and cyanobacteria. Create a Sustainable Future: Living Living a Sustainable Future How...

  7. Introduction to Futures Markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mintert, James R.; Welch, Mark

    2009-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    An introduction to futures markets, this publication describes the history of the markets, defines terminology and offers advice on how to use futures effectively in farm marketing programs....

  8. Active stewardship: sustainable future

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Active stewardship: sustainable future Active stewardship: sustainable future Energy sustainability is a daunting task: How do we develop top-notch innovations with some of the...

  9. Next-gen RF MEMS Switch for a Smarter, Faster Internet of Things | GE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the Contributions andDataNationalNewport News Business55NewsNext JeffersonFutureGlobal

  10. IBVS 6000, 2011 Budapest -A. Holl: Electronic IBVS technology 1 Electronic IBVS technology -

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holl, András

    IBVS 6000, 2011 Budapest - A. Holl: Electronic IBVS technology 1 Electronic IBVS technology - innovation: past, present, future András Holl Konkoly Observatory #12;IBVS 6000, 2011 Budapest - A. Holl: Electronic IBVS technology

  11. Renewable Electricity Futures Study. Volume 1: Exploration of High-Penetration Renewable Electricity Futures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mai, T.; Wiser, R.; Sandor, D.; Brinkman, G.; Heath, G.; Denholm, P.; Hostick, D.J.; Darghouth, N.; Schlosser, A.; Strzepek, K.

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Renewable Electricity Futures (RE Futures) Study investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. The analysis focused on the sufficiency of the geographically diverse U.S. renewable resources to meet electricity demand over future decades, the hourly operational characteristics of the U.S. grid with high levels of variable wind and solar generation, and the potential implications of deploying high levels of renewables in the future. RE Futures focused on technical aspects of high penetration of renewable electricity; it did not focus on how to achieve such a future through policy or other measures. Given the inherent uncertainties involved with analyzing alternative long-term energy futures as well as the multiple pathways that might be taken to achieve higher levels of renewable electricity supply, RE Futures explored a range of scenarios to investigate and compare the impacts of renewable electricity penetration levels (30%-90%), future technology performance improvements, potential constraints to renewable electricity development, and future electricity demand growth assumptions. RE Futures was led by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).

  12. Getting to Know Nuclear Energy: The Past, Present & Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kemner, Ken

    Getting to Know Nuclear Energy: The Past, Present & Future Argonne National Laboratory was founded on the peaceful uses of nuclear energy and has pioneered many of the technologies in use today. Argonne's Roger Blomquist will discuss the history of nuclear energy, advanced reactor designs and future technologies, all

  13. Global Energy Futures: With International Futures (IFs)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hughes, Barry

    2013-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Dr. Hughes presents and discusses the results of simulations on alternative energy futures composed in collaboration with SNL's Sustainability Innovation Foundry.

  14. Renewable Electricity Futures Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renewable Electricity Futures Study Exploration of High-Penetration Renewable Electricity Futures PDF Volume 4 PDF #12;Renewable Electricity Futures Study Edited By Hand, M.M. National Renewable Citations Renewable Electricity Futures Study (Entire Report) National Renewable Energy Laboratory. (2012

  15. HELP SHAPE RESEARCH AND TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT AT UTARI Needs Forum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Haiying

    HELP SHAPE RESEARCH AND TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT AT UTARI TECHNOLOGY Needs Forum: Thursday, November areas of assistive technologies for persons with disabilities would help improve human performance in the future? How can technology help you in the future? What prospective assistive technologies would best

  16. Emerging Technologies Program Overview - 2014 BTO Peer Review...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of the Building Technologies Office's Emerging Technologies Program. Through robust feedback, the BTO Program Peer Review enhances existing efforts and improves future designs....

  17. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mai, T.

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation library summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050.

  18. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mai, T.

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050.

  19. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mai, T.

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050.

  20. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hand, M. M.

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050.

  1. ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY Engineering Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Mechatronics Technology, and Renewable Energy Technology. Career Opportunities Graduates of four: business administration, wind farm management, aircraft maintenance, tooling production, quality and safety or selected program track focus. Transfer students must talk to their advisor about transferring their courses

  2. ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY Engineering Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : business administration, energy management, wind farm management, automation and controls, aircraft, Mechatronics Technology, and Renewable Energy Technology. Career Opportunities Graduates of four students must talk to their advisor about transferring their courses over for WSU credit. Laboratory

  3. Dry cooling: Perspectives on future needs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guyer, E.C. (Yankee Scientific, Inc., Ashland, MA (United States))

    1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The factors that can be expected to determine the future role of dry cooling in the United States electric power generation industry are identified and characterized. Focus is primarily on the issues of water availability for the electric power industry and the environmental impacts of evaporative cooling systems. The question of future water availability is addressed in terms of both limitations and opportunities facing the industry. A brief review of the status of dry cooling applications is provided. Included is a summary of an extensive survey of electric utility industry perspectives on the future requirements and role for dry cooling. Some regional assessments of the expected future requirements for this technology are also provided. Conclusions are a qualitative characterization of the expected future role of dry cooling in the electric power industry. 72 refs., 7 figs., 13 tabs.

  4. Renewable Electricity Futures Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renewable Electricity Futures Study End-use Electricity Demand Volume 3 of 4 Volume 2 PDF Volume 3;Renewable Electricity Futures Study Edited By Hand, M.M. National Renewable Energy Laboratory Baldwin, S. U Sandor, D. National Renewable Energy Laboratory Suggested Citations Renewable Electricity Futures Study

  5. Renewable Electricity Futures Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renewable Electricity Futures Study Executive Summary NREL is a national laboratory of the U for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Volume 2 PDF Volume 3 PDF Volume 1 PDF Volume 4 PDF #12;Renewable Electricity Futures. National Renewable Energy Laboratory Suggested Citations Renewable Electricity Futures Study (Entire Report

  6. Renewable Electricity Futures Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renewable Electricity Futures Study Bulk Electric Power Systems: Operations and Transmission by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. #12;Renewable Electricity Futures Study Edited By Hand, M.M. National Suggested Citations Renewable Electricity Futures Study (Entire Report) National Renewable Energy Laboratory

  7. CHARTING BC'S ECONOMIC FUTURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kavanagh, Karen L.

    CHARTING BC'S ECONOMIC FUTURE discussionguide 100communityconversations #12;1 Thank you for agreeing to participate in this Community Conversation about BC's economic future. Each year Simon Fraser is "Charting BC's Economic Future". Faced with an increasingly competitive global economy, it is more important

  8. Value chain dynamics in the RFID technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tavshikar, Milind (Milind Murlidhar)

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    RFID (Radio Frequency Identification) technology has been one of the oldest renewed technologies with a promise of becoming a foundation of "The Internet of Things" in future. MIT's Auto-ID labs and EPCGlobal have been ...

  9. Control and Protection Paradigms of the Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , it is the premise of this paper that new technologies in energy production and storage (e.g., renewables), expanded Engineering Research Center Empowering Minds to Engineer the Future Electric Energy System #12;Thrust Area 2. Kezunovic, B. Matic-Cuka Texas A&M University PSERC Publication 12-10 May 2012 #12;For information about

  10. HVDC transmission: a path to the future?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teichler, Stephen L.; Levitine, Ilia

    2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Direct current transmission has been the poor stepchild of the U.S. electric industry. Although early-generation plants were based on DC technology, it was soon deemed uneconomical to transmit electricity over long distances, but it now appears poised for a change. Both the increasing technical potential and changing economics of HVDC lines promise a growing role in the future. (author)

  11. Building a Sustainable Future FACILITIES & OPERATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Building a Sustainable Future FACILITIES & OPERATIONS #12;A Laboratory on a Mission ...to meet: The Environmental Technology Building and National Security Building house more than 650 staff members. #12;Pacific capacity "The Facilities & Operations organization is dedicated to safely and sustainably building

  12. Coal: Energy for the future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report was prepared in response to a request by the US Department of energy (DOE). The principal objectives of the study were to assess the current DOE coal program vis-a-vis the provisions of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPACT), and to recommend the emphasis and priorities that DOE should consider in updating its strategic plan for coal. A strategic plan for research, development, demonstration, and commercialization (RDD and C) activities for coal should be based on assumptions regarding the future supply and price of competing energy sources, the demand for products manufactured from these sources, technological opportunities, and the need to control the environmental impact of waste streams. These factors change with time. Accordingly, the committee generated strategic planning scenarios for three time periods: near-term, 1995--2005; mid-term, 2006--2020; and, long-term, 2021--2040. The report is divided into the following chapters: executive summary; introduction and scope of the study; overview of US DOE programs and planning; trends and issues for future coal use; the strategic planning framework; coal preparation, coal liquid mixtures, and coal bed methane recovery; clean fuels and specialty products from coal; electric power generation; technology demonstration and commercialization; advanced research programs; conclusions and recommendations; appendices; and glossary. 174 refs.

  13. Status and Outlook for the U.S. Non-Automotive Fuel Cell Industry: Impacts of Government Policies and Assessment of Future Opportunities

    Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

    Non-Automotive Fuel Cell Industry, Government Policy and Future Opportunities. Fuel cells (FCs)are considered essential future energy technologies by developed and developing economies alike. Several

  14. My Amazing Future 2012

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Idaho National Laboratory's My Amazing Future program gives 8th grade women the opportunity to experience careers in science and engineering.

  15. Future City Competition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Competition is an unique opportunity for middle school children to combine skills in engineering, environmental science, and art to create a vision for the future. Exercising your...

  16. The Future Metropolitan Landscape

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bosselmann, Peter; Ruggeri, Deni

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    care for the design of this landscape, for its water, air,The Future Metropolitan Landscape Peter Bosselmann and Denirather to an urbanized landscape with multiple centers,

  17. Technology reviews: Glazing systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schuman, J.; Rubinstein, F.; Papamichael, K.; Beltran, L.; Lee, E.S.; Selkowitz, S.

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a representative review of existing, emerging, and future technology options in each of five hardware and systems areas in envelope and lighting technologies: lighting systems, glazing systems, shading systems, daylighting optical systems, and dynamic curtain wall systems. The term technology is used here to describe any design choice for energy efficiency, ranging from individual components to more complex systems to general design strategies. The purpose of this task is to characterize the state of the art in envelope and lighting technologies in order to identify those with promise for advanced integrated systems, with an emphasis on California commercial buildings. For each technology category, the following activities have been attempted to the extent possible: Identify key performance characteristics and criteria for each technology; determine the performance range of available technologies; identify the most promising technologies and promising trends in technology advances; examine market forces and market trends; and develop a continuously growing in-house database to be used throughout the project. A variety of information sources have been used in these technology characterizations, including miscellaneous periodicals, manufacturer catalogs and cut sheets, other research documents, and data from previous computer simulations. We include these different sources in order to best show the type and variety of data available, however publication here does not imply our guarantee of these data. Within each category, several broad classes are identified, and within each class we examine the generic individual technologies that fag into that class.

  18. Coal: the cornerstone of America's energy future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beck, R.A. [National Coal Council (United Kingdom)

    2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In April 2005, US Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman asked the National Coal Council to develop a 'report identifying the challenges and opportunities of more fully exploring our domestic coal resources to meet the nation's future energy needs'. The Council has responded with eight specific recommendations for developing and implementing advanced coal processing and combustion technologies to satisfy our unquenchable thirst for energy. These are: Use coal-to-liquids technologies to produce 2.6 million barrels/day; Use coal-to-natural gas technologies to produce 4 trillion ft{sup 3}/yr; Build 100 GW of clean coal plants by 2025; Produce ethanol from coal; Develop coal-to-hydrogen technologies; Use CO{sub 2} to enhance recovery of oil and coal-bed methane; Increase the capacity of US coal mines and railroads; and Invest in technology development and implementation. 1 ref.; 4 figs.; 1 tab.

  19. Economics of Current and Future Biofuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tao, L.; Aden, A.

    2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work presents detailed comparative analysis on the production economics of both current and future biofuels, including ethanol, biodiesel, and butanol. Our objectives include demonstrating the impact of key parameters on the overall process economics (e.g., plant capacity, raw material pricing, and yield) and comparing how next-generation technologies and fuels will differ from today's technologies. The commercialized processes and corresponding economics presented here include corn-based ethanol, sugarcane-based ethanol, and soy-based biodiesel. While actual full-scale economic data are available for these processes, they have also been modeled using detailed process simulation. For future biofuel technologies, detailed techno-economic data exist for cellulosic ethanol from both biochemical and thermochemical conversion. In addition, similar techno-economic models have been created for n-butanol production based on publicly available literature data. Key technical and economic challenges facing all of these biofuels are discussed.

  20. Present and Future Uses of Industrial Absorption Heat Pumps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erickson, D. C.; Davidson, W. F.

    This paper examines the present and projects the future uses of industrial absorption heat pumping. AHP technology is seen as an increasingly important component of plant and process heat integration for energy conservation. Existing installations...

  1. Capturing the Sun, Creating a Clean Energy Future (Brochure)...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Capturing the Sun, Creating a Clean Energy Future (Brochure), SunShot, Solar Energy Technologies Program (SETP), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Capturing the Sun, Creating a Clean...

  2. Faience Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicholson, Paul

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by Joanne Hodges. Faience Technology, Nicholson, UEE 2009Egyptian materials and technology, ed. Paul T. Nicholson,Nicholson, 2009, Faience Technology. UEE. Full Citation:

  3. The Hanford Story: Future

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Future Chapter of the Hanford Story illustrates the potential and possibilities offered by a post-cleanup Hanford. From land use plans and preservation at Hanford to economic development and tourism opportunities, the Future chapter touches on a variety of local economic, cultural and environmental perspectives.

  4. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hand, M.

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation library summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. It is being presented at the Utility Variable-Generation Integration Group Fall Technical Workshop on October 24, 2012.

  5. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mai, T.

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. It was presented in a Power Systems Engineering Research Center webinar on September 4, 2012.

  6. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hand, M.; Mai, T.

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation library summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. It was presented in an Union of Concerned Scientists webinar on June 12, 2012.

  7. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hand, M. M.

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation library summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. It was presented in a webinar given by the California Energy Commission.

  8. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mai, T.

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. This presentation was presented in a Wind Powering America webinar on August 15, 2012 and is now available through the Wind Powering America website.

  9. Technology transfer 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document, Technology Transfer 94, is intended to communicate that there are many opportunities available to US industry and academic institutions to work with DOE and its laboratories and facilities in the vital activity of improving technology transfer to meet national needs. It has seven major sections: Introduction, Technology Transfer Activities, Access to Laboratories and Facilities, Laboratories and Facilities, DOE Office, Technologies, and an Index. Technology Transfer Activities highlights DOE`s recent developments in technology transfer and describes plans for the future. Access to Laboratories and Facilities describes the many avenues for cooperative interaction between DOE laboratories or facilities and industry, academia, and other government agencies. Laboratories and Facilities profiles the DOE laboratories and facilities involved in technology transfer and presents information on their missions, programs, expertise, facilities, and equipment, along with data on whom to contact for additional information on technology transfer. DOE Offices summarizes the major research and development programs within DOE. It also contains information on how to access DOE scientific and technical information. Technologies provides descriptions of some of the new technologies developed at DOE laboratories and facilities.

  10. Solar Smarter Faster

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Armbrust, Dan; Haldar, Pradeep; Kaloyeros, Alain; Holladay, Dan

    2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the SunShot Initiative, U.S. Department of Energy Secretary Steven Chu announced on April 15th the selection of up to $112.5 million over five years for funding to support the development of advanced solar photovoltaic (PV)-related manufacturing processes throughout the United States. The effort is led by Sematech, with a proven track record in breathing life back into the US semiconduster industry, and in partnership with CNSE, The College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering, who supplies world class R&D experts and facilities.

  11. Three Investment Scenarios for Future Nuclear Reactors in Europe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Three Investment Scenarios for Future Nuclear Reactors in Europe Bianka SHOAI TEHRANI CEA nuclear reactors within a few decades (2040), several events and drivers could question this possibility or detrimental to future nuclear reactors compared with other technologies and according to four main investment

  12. Enabling Performance Intelligence for Application Adaptation in the Future Internet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calyam, Prasad

    plat- form. Achieving autonomicity in the Future Internet will require a performance architecture that such "Future Internet Perfor- mance Architecture" (FIPA), and present our reference implementation of FIPA in virtualization [1] technology at end-hosts and core network switches/routers. The Global Envir

  13. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeMeo, E.

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation library summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. It was presented at Wind Powering America States Summit. The Summit, which follows the American Wind Energy Association's (AWEA's) annual WINDPOWER Conference and Exhibition, provides state Wind Working Groups, state energy officials, U.S. Energy Department and national laboratory representatives, and professional and institutional partners an opportunity to review successes, opportunities, and challenges for wind energy and plan future collaboration.

  14. Future Grid: The Environment Future Grid Initiative White Paper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Future Grid: The Environment Future Grid Initiative White Paper Power Systems Engineering Research Center Empowering Minds to Engineer the Future Electric Energy System #12;Future Grid: The Environment Prepared for the Project "The Future Grid to Enable Sustainable Energy Systems" Funded by the U

  15. Future Climate Engineering Solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Future Climate Engineering Solutions Joint report 13 engineering participating engeneering. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11 Engineering Solutions ­ A Climate call from engineers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23 Summaries of National Reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25 Summary of The Climate Plan

  16. Comparative analysis of automotive powertrain choices for the near to mid-term future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kasseris, Emmanuel P

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis attempts a technological assessment of automotive powertrain technologies for the near to mid term future. The powertrain types to be assessed include naturally aspirated gasoline engines, turbocharged gasoline ...

  17. Buying Hedge with Futures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Welch, Mark; Kastens, Terry L.

    2009-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Agricultural Economist, Kansas State University Agricultural Experiment Station and Cooperative Extension Service. Many bulk purchasers of agricultural com- modities need price risk management tools to help stabilize input prices. Livestock feeders... anticipating future feed needs or grain export- ers making commitments to sell grain are two users of agricultural commodities who could benefit from input price management strate- gies. A common tool is a buying, or long, hedge using futures. Producers...

  18. Preparing for the Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    tx H2O | pg. 12 Preparing for the Future Story by Kathy Wythe Preparing for the Future University establishes water management degree program Texas A&M University launched an interdisci-plinary water management degree programduring the fall... 2005 semester with 12 stu-dents seeking either master?s or doctorate degrees in water management and hydrologic sciences. The degree program, the first in Texas, includes 42 faculty members in 12 departments from four differ- ent colleges, said Ron...

  19. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hand, M. M.

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation library summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. It was presented to the 2012 Western Conference of Public Service Commissioners, during their June, 2012, meeting. The Western Conference of Public Service Commissioners is a regional association within the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners (NARUC).

  20. National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance a given location for the best technology, or a renewable energy technology for the best location, accurate

  1. Toward an energy surety future.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tatro, Marjorie L.; Jones, Scott A.; Covan, John Morgan; Kuswa, Glenn W.; Menicucci, David F.; Robinett, Rush D. III (.; )

    2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Because of the inevitable depletion of fossil fuels and the corresponding release of carbon to the environment, the global energy future is complex. Some of the consequences may be politically and economically disruptive, and expensive to remedy. For the next several centuries, fuel requirements will increase with population, land use, and ecosystem degradation. Current or projected levels of aggregated energy resource use will not sustain civilization as we know it beyond a few more generations. At the same time, issues of energy security, reliability, sustainability, recoverability, and safety need attention. We supply a top-down, qualitative model--the surety model--to balance expenditures of limited resources to assure success while at the same time avoiding catastrophic failure. Looking at U.S. energy challenges from a surety perspective offers new insights on possible strategies for developing solutions to challenges. The energy surety model with its focus on the attributes of security and sustainability could be extrapolated into a global energy system using a more comprehensive energy surety model than that used here. In fact, the success of the energy surety strategy ultimately requires a more global perspective. We use a 200 year time frame for sustainability because extending farther into the future would almost certainly miss the advent and perfection of new technologies or changing needs of society.

  2. Nuclear materials safeguards for the future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tape, J.W.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Basic concepts of domestic and international safeguards are described, with an emphasis on safeguards systems for the fuel cycles of commercial power reactors. Future trends in institutional and technical measures for nuclear materials safeguards are outlined. The conclusion is that continued developments in safeguards approaches and technology, coupled with institutional measures that facilitate the global management and protection of nuclear materials, are up to the challenge of safeguarding the growing inventories of nuclear materials in commercial fuel cycles in technologically advanced States with stable governments that have signed the nonproliferation treaty. These same approaches also show promise for facilitating international inspection of excess weapons materials and verifying a fissile materials cutoff convention.

  3. Renewable Electricity Futures for the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mai, Trieu; Hand, Maureen; Baldwin, Sam F.; Wiser , Ryan; Brinkman, G.; Denholm, Paul; Arent, Doug; Porro, Gian; Sandor, Debra; Hostick, Donna J.; Milligan, Michael; DeMeo, Ed; Bazilian, Morgan

    2014-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper highlights the key results from the Renewable Electricity (RE) Futures Study. It is a detailed consideration of renewable electricity in the United States. The paper focuses on technical issues related to the operability of the U. S. electricity grid and provides initial answers to important questions about the integration of high penetrations of renewable electricity technologies from a national perspective. The results indicate that the future U. S. electricity system that is largely powered by renewable sources is possible and the further work is warranted to investigate this clean generation pathway. The central conclusion of the analysis is that renewable electricity generation from technologies that are commercially available today, in combination with a more flexible electric system, is more than adequate to supply 80% of the total U. S. electricity generation in 2050 while meeting electricity demand on an hourly basis in every region of the United States.

  4. Neutron sources: Present practice and future potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cierjacks, S.; Smith, A.B.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present capability and future potential of accelerator-based monoenergetic and white neutron sources are outlined in the context of fundamental and applied neutron-nuclear research. The neutron energy range extends from thermal to 500 MeV, and the time domain from steady-state to pico-second pulsed sources. Accelerator technology is summarized, including the production of intense light-ion, heavy-ion and electron beams. Target capabilities are discussed with attention to neutron-producing efficiency and power-handling capabilities. The status of underlying neutron-producing reactions is summarized. The present and future use of neutron sources in: fundamental neutron-nuclear research, nuclear data acquisition, materials damage studies, engineering tests, and biomedical applications are discussed. Emphasis is given to current status, near-term advances well within current technology, and to long-range projections. 90 refs., 4 figs.

  5. Leading the Charge: Exotic New Materials for Future Devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Yulin

    2010-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    How will we improve computer technology to create chips that are smaller, faster, and more efficient? For leaps in performance, we need to create new types of semiconductors. In this lecture, the speaker will describe a new class of materials -- the 'topological insulators' -- that achieve robust performance by tying the paths of electrons in knots. These materials arose from a bold theoretical proposal that was recently verified by X-ray experiments at SLAC. THe speaker will describe the special properties of these materials and the promise for their applications.

  6. The house of the future

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Learn what it will take to create tomorrow's net-zero energy home as scientists reveal the secrets of cool roofs, smart windows, and computer-driven energy control systems. The net-zero energy home: Scientists are working to make tomorrow's homes more than just energy efficient -- they want them to be zero energy. Iain Walker, a scientist in the Lab's Energy Performance of Buildings Group, will discuss what it takes to develop net-zero energy houses that generate as much energy as they use through highly aggressive energy efficiency and on-site renewable energy generation. Talking back to the grid: Imagine programming your house to use less energy if the electricity grid is full or price are high. Mary Ann Piette, deputy director of Berkeley Lab's building technology department and director of the Lab's Demand Response Research Center, will discuss how new technologies are enabling buildings to listen to the grid and automatically change their thermostat settings or lighting loads, among other demands, in response to fluctuating electricity prices. The networked (and energy efficient) house: In the future, your home's lights, climate control devices, computers, windows, and appliances could be controlled via a sophisticated digital network. If it's plugged in, it'll be connected. Bruce Nordman, an energy scientist in Berkeley Lab's Energy End-Use Forecasting group, will discuss how he and other scientists are working to ensure these networks help homeowners save energy.

  7. Future high energy colliders symposium. Summary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parsa, Z. [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States). Institute for Theoretical Physics]|[Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, CA (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A `Future High Energy Colliders` Symposium was held October 21-25, 1996 at the Institute for Theoretical Physics (ITP) in Santa Barbara. This was one of the 3 symposia hosted by the ITP and supported by its sponsor, the National Science Foundation, as part of a 5 month program on `New Ideas for Particle Accelerators`. The long term program and symposia were organized and coordinated by Dr. Zohreh Parsa of Brookhaven National Laboratory/ITP. The purpose of the symposium was to discuss the future direction of high energy physics by bringing together leaders from the theoretical, experimental and accelerator physics communities. Their talks provided personal perspectives on the physics objectives and the technology demands of future high energy colliders. Collectively, they formed a vision for where the field should be heading and how it might best reach its objectives.

  8. A Renewable Energy Future: Innovation and Beyond

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This PowerPoint slide deck was originally presented at the 2012 SunShot Grand Challenge Summit and Technology Forum during a plenary session by Dr. Dan E. Arvizu, director of NREL. Entitled "A Renewable Energy Future: Innovation and Beyond," the presentation demonstrates the transformation needed in the energy sector to achieve a clean energy vision and identifies innovation as what is needed to make it happen. The presentation also includes a discussion of the integration challenges that affect solar energy systems.

  9. The Future of Transportation Networks and Their

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levinson, David M.

    Vehicles 0 1000 2000 3000 4000 5000 6000 7000 Kilometers Total Registered Vehicles National Expressways S-Curves (Japan) Birthing Growth Maturity The Rise and Fall of Technologies(US) 0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 0 for with an "access" charge, much like a club. E.g. property tax, road utility fee #12;3 Local Roads ... Future · We

  10. GRID Technologies => `Education' = `Distance Michalis Xenos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    GRID Technologies => `Education' = `Distance Education' Michalis Xenos 1,2 , Bill Vassiliadis 1 possibilities that Grid technologies create in education, presents current learning paradigms and makes a prediction about the way in which Grid technologies may affect the future of education. The case

  11. Water for future Mars astronauts?

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Water for future Mars astronauts? Water for future Mars astronauts? Within its first three months on Mars, NASA's Curiosity Rover saw a surprising diversity of soils and sediments...

  12. Photonic quantum technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeremy L. O'Brien; Akira Furusawa; Jelena Vu?kovi?

    2010-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The first quantum technology, which harnesses uniquely quantum mechanical effects for its core operation, has arrived in the form of commercially available quantum key distribution systems that achieve enhanced security by encoding information in photons such that information gained by an eavesdropper can be detected. Anticipated future quantum technologies include large-scale secure networks, enhanced measurement and lithography, and quantum information processors, promising exponentially greater computation power for particular tasks. Photonics is destined for a central role in such technologies owing to the need for high-speed transmission and the outstanding low-noise properties of photons. These technologies may use single photons or quantum states of bright laser beams, or both, and will undoubtably apply and drive state-of-the-art developments in photonics.

  13. Selling Hedge with Futures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kastens, Terry L.; Welch, Mark

    2009-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    and Cooperative Extension Service. When a commodity price is acceptable prior to the time the commodity will be sold in the cash market, a producer can use a selling hedge to reduce the risk of declining prices. What Is a Hedge? A selling hedge involves... taking a position in the futures market that is equal and opposite to the position one expects to have in the cash market, so one is covered (subject to basis risk) against price declines during the intervening period. If futures and cash prices...

  14. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mai, T.

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation library summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. It was presented at the 2012 RE AMP Annual Meeting. RE-AMP is an active network of 144 nonprofits and foundations across eight Midwestern states working on climate change and energy policy with the goal of reducing global warming pollution economy-wide 80% by 2050.

  15. Technology Assessment

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Roll to Roll (R2R) Processing 1 Technology Assessment 2 3 Contents 4 1. Introduction to the TechnologySystem ......

  16. Energy and technology review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stowers, I.F.; Crawford, R.B.; Esser, M.A.; Lien, P.L.; O'Neal, E.; Van Dyke, P. (eds.)

    1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The state of the laboratory address by LLNL Director Roger Batzel is summarized, and a breakdown of the laboratory funding is given. The Livermore defense-related committment is described, including the design and development of advanced nuclear weapons as well as research in inertial confinement fusion, nonnuclear ordnance, and particle beam technology. LLNL is also applying its scientific and engineering resources to the dual challenge of meeting future energy needs without degrading the quality of the biosphere. Some representative examples are given of the supporting groups vital for providing the specialized expertise and new technologies required by the laboratory's major research programs. (GHT)

  17. Future Fixed Target Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melnitchouk, Wolodymyr

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We review plans for future fixed target lepton- and hadron-scattering facilities, including the 12 GeV upgraded CEBAF accelerator at Jefferson Lab, neutrino beam facilities at Fermilab, and the antiproton PANDA facility at FAIR. We also briefly review recent theoretical developments which will aid in the interpretation of the data expected from these facilities.

  18. Pennsylvania's Natural Gas Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Dongwon

    1 Pennsylvania's Natural Gas Future Penn State Natural Gas Utilization Workshop Bradley Hall sales to commercial and industrial customers ­ Natural gas, power, oil · Power generation ­ FossilMMBtuEquivalent Wellhead Gas Price, $/MMBtu Monthly US Spot Oil Price, $/MMBtu* U.S. Crude Oil vs. Natural Gas Prices, 2005

  19. Cooperative Monitoring Center Occasional Paper/16: The Potential of Technology for the Control of Small Weapons: Applications in Developing Countries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ALTMANN, JURGEN

    2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For improving the control of small arms, technology provides many possibilities. Present and future technical means are described in several areas. With the help of sensors deployed on the ground or on board aircraft, larger areas can be monitored. Using tags, seals, and locks, important objects and installations can be safeguarded better. With modern data processing and communication systems, more information can be available, and it can be more speedily processed. Together with navigation and transport equipment, action can be taken faster and at greater range. Particular considerations are presented for cargo control at roads, seaports, and airports, for monitoring designated lines, and for the control of legal arms. By starting at a modest level, costs can be kept low, which would aid developing countries. From the menu of technologies available, systems need to be designed for the intended application and with an understanding of the local conditions. It is recommended that states start with short-term steps, such as acquiring more and better radio transceivers, vehicles, small aircraft, and personal computers. For the medium term, states should begin with experiments and field testing of technologies such as tags, sensors, and digital communication equipment.

  20. Future Smart Energy -Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Summer School 2014, Aalborg, Denmark

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berning, Torsten

    Future Smart Energy - Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Technology Summer School 2014, Aalborg, Denmark August #12;31 Future Smart Energy - Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Technology Samuel Simon Araya Introduction to fuel cells History Why fuel cells? Fuel cell types Fuel and infrastructure Hydrogen production Hydrogen

  1. On average, 10x and up to 30x faster transaction processing with In-Memory OLTP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaudhuri, Surajit

    business operations." Team Leader BMW Michael Steineke VP of Information Technology Edgenet "By using In to suit your needs platform for hybrid cloud Consistency between local and cloud environ- ments using-premises and cloud environments with Visual Studio, System Center, SQL Server, Microsoft Azure SQL Database

  2. 2008 Annual Merit Review Results Summary - 16. Technology Integration...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    DOE established the Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) Program to train a future workforce of automotive engineering professionals knowledgeable about, and...

  3. BATT Program- Summary and Future Plans

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    in graphite were revealed and quantified (Kostecki) * Li diffusion in between graphene planes is much faster that along the grain boundaries Highlights of BATT in...

  4. Natural Gas Vehicle Webinar: Technology, Best Strategies, and Lessons Learned

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This Clean Cities program webinar elaborates first on successful past technology choices and then suggests future technological pathways that can be taken for the United States to expand its use of...

  5. Hydrogen Delivery Technologies and Pipeline Transmission of Hydrogen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hydrogen Delivery Technologies and Systems Pipeline Transmission of Hydrogen Strategic Initiatives, and Infrastructure Technologies Program #12;Pipeline Transmission of Hydrogen --- 2 Copyright: Design & Operation development) #12;Pipeline Transmission of Hydrogen --- 3 Copyright: Future H2 Infrastructure Wind Powered

  6. RHIC progress and future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montag,C.

    2009-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The talk reviews RHIC performance, including unprecedented manipulations of polarized beams and recent low energy operations. Achievements and limiting factors of RHIC operation are discussed, such as intrabeam scattering, electron cloud, beam-beam effects, magnet vibrations, and the efficiency of novel countermeasures such as bunched beam stochastic cooling, beam scrubbing and chamber coatings. Future upgrade plans and the pertinent R&D program will also be presented.

  7. Nuclear Proliferation Technology Trends Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zentner, Michael D.; Coles, Garill A.; Talbert, Robert J.

    2005-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is underway to develop mature, integrated methodologies to address nonproliferation issues. A variety of methodologies (both qualitative and quantitative) are being considered. All have one thing in common, a need for a consistent set of proliferation related data that can be used as a basis for application. One approach to providing a basis for predicting and evaluating future proliferation events is to understand past proliferation events, that is, the different paths that have actually been taken to acquire or attempt to acquire special nuclear material. In order to provide this information, this report describing previous material acquisition activities (obtained from open source material) has been prepared. This report describes how, based on an evaluation of historical trends in nuclear technology development, conclusions can be reached concerning: (1) The length of time it takes to acquire a technology; (2) The length of time it takes for production of special nuclear material to begin; and (3) The type of approaches taken for acquiring the technology. In addition to examining time constants, the report is intended to provide information that could be used to support the use of the different non-proliferation analysis methodologies. Accordingly, each section includes: (1) Technology description; (2) Technology origin; (3) Basic theory; (4) Important components/materials; (5) Technology development; (6) Technological difficulties involved in use; (7) Changes/improvements in technology; (8) Countries that have used/attempted to use the technology; (9) Technology Information; (10) Acquisition approaches; (11) Time constants for technology development; and (12) Required Concurrent Technologies.

  8. Independent Assessment of Technology Characterizations to Support the Biomass Program Annual State-of-Technology Assessments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yeh, B.

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses an investigation that addressed two thermochemical conversion pathways for the production of liquid fuels and addressed the steps to the process, the technology providers, a method for determining the state of technology and a tool to continuously assess the state of technology. This report summarizes the findings of the investigation as well as recommendations for improvements for future studies.

  9. Robi, Robichaud, Wind Technologies and Evolving Opportunities

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Wind Technologies and Innovation for Our Energy Future Evolving Opportunities Robi Robichaud Senior Engineer N NR REL EL i is s a a n na at ti io on na al l l la ab bo ora rat to...

  10. Mechanical Computation: its Computational Complexity and Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reif, John H.

    Mechanical Computation: its Computational Complexity and Technologies Chapter, Encyclopedia Importance II. Introduction to Computational Complexity III. Computational Complexity of Mechanical Devices and their Movement Problems IV. Concrete Mechanical Computing Devices V. Future Directions VI. Bibliography Glossary

  11. Prioritizing Climate Change Mitigation Alternatives: Comparing Transportation Technologies to Options in Other Sectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutsey, Nicholas P.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    included. As technologies to produce biodiesel from varyinginitial technology and lifetime operating costs Biodiesel (biodiesel usage through 2020 reveals a relatively small biofuel content in future diesel trucks, there are policy and technology

  12. Perspectives on the future of the electric utility industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tonn, B. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Schaffhauser, A. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report offers perspectives on the future of the electric utility industry. These perspectives will be used in further research to assess the prospects for Integrated Resource Planning (IRP). The perspectives are developed first by examining economic, political and regulatory, societal, technological, and environmental trends that are (1) national and global in scope and (2) directly related to the electric utility industry. Major national and global trends include increasing global economic competition, increasing political and ethnic strife, rapidly changing technologies, and increasing worldwide concern about the environment. Major trends in the utility industry include increasing competition in generation; changing patterns of electricity demand; increasing use of information technology to control power systems; and increasing implementation of environmental controls. Ways in which the national and global trends may directly affect the utility industry are also explored. The trends are used to construct three global and national scenarios- ``business as usual,`` ``technotopia future,`` and ``fortress state`` -and three electric utility scenarios- ``frozen in headlights,`` ``megaelectric,`` and ``discomania.`` The scenarios are designed to be thought provoking descriptions of potential futures, not predictions of the future, although three key variables are identified that will have significant impacts on which future evolves-global climate change, utility technologies, and competition. While emphasis needs to be placed on understanding the electric utility scenarios, the interactions between the two sets of scenarios is also of interest.

  13. Future Physics | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun with Big Sky Learning Fun with Big SkyDIII-D ExplorationsFuture Physics March

  14. Future of Transportation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun with Big Sky Learning Fun with Big SkyDIII-D ExplorationsFuture

  15. Milk Futures, Options and Basis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haigh, Michael; Stockton, Matthew; Anderson, David P.; Schwart Jr., Robert B.

    2001-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The milk futures and options market enables producers and processors to manage price risk. This publication explains hedging, margin accounts, basis and how to track it, and other fundamentals of the futures and options market....

  16. Powertrain Trends and Future Potential

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    parties. Automotive Technology 12 Evolution in Clean Diesel & Gasoline Technology 1) turbo-charged with downsizing and var. valve timing (VVT); 2) max. potential w downsizing,...

  17. The Asia-Pacific coal technology conference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Asia-Pacific coal technology conference was held in Honolulu, Hawaii, November 14--16, 1989. Topics discussed included the following: Expanded Horizons for US Coal Technology and Coal Trade; Future Coal-Fired Generation and Capacity Requirements of the Philippines; Taiwan Presentation; Korean Presentation; Hong Kong Future Coal Requirements; Indonesian Presentation; Electric Power System in Thailand; Coal in Malaysia -- A Position Paper; The US and Asia: Pacific Partners in Coal and Coal Technology; US Coal Production and Export; US Clean Coal Technologies; Developments in Coal Transport and Utilization; Alternative/Innovative Transport; Electricity Generation in Asia and the Pacific: Power Sector Demand for Coal, Oil and Natural Gas; Role of Clean Coal Technology in the Energy Future of the World; Global Climate Change: A Fossil Energy Perspective; Speaker: The Role of Coal in Meeting Hawaii's Power Needs; and Workshops on Critical Issues Associated with Coal Usage. Individual topics are processed separately for the data bases.

  18. The research programme Future Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The research programme Future Agriculture ­ livestock, crops and land use Welcome to a lunch.slu.se/futureagriculture For questions, please contact KatarinaVrede (katarina.vrede@slu.se) About Future Agriculture ­ livestock, crops and land use The changes and challenges facing agriculture in the future will be substantial, not only

  19. The Future of Coal in a Greenhouse Gas Constrained World Howard Herzog1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    technologies. · Coal Conversion Technologies. Coal-based power generation technologies were analyzed in detail1 The Future of Coal in a Greenhouse Gas Constrained World Howard Herzog1 , James Katzer1 1 M coal can make to the growing world energy demand during a period of increasing concern about global

  20. Notes From the Chair 2 Toward a Clean Energy Future: 4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Notes From the Chair 2 Toward a Clean Energy Future: 4 Issues for the Sixth Power Plan Neighborly. As the technology improves and tags become smaller, more fish can be tagged. For salmon, the technology is approaching the e-mail stage, and for sharks the "here-I-am" technology will be in use soon

  1. Future Implications of China's Energy-Technology Choices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ................................................................................................. 17 3.3.5 Hydroelectric Power

  2. PHASE-CHANGE TECHNOLOGY AND THE FUTURE OF MAIN MEMORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Moreover, the resulting thermal stress within the storage element degrades current-injection con they don't require precise charge placement and control. Programming mechanisms such as current injection to process scal- ing. During writes, an access transistor injects current into the storage material and ther

  3. Microsoft Word - Science and Technology of Future Light Sources...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    few THz range. Other collective excitations, like charge and spin fluctuations, or even Josephson plasma resonances could be driven at high amplitudes into the non-linear regime,...

  4. Revolution Now: The Future Arrives for Four Clean Energy Technologies...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    that are here today: onshore wind power, polysilicon photovoltaic (PV) modules, light-emitting diodes (LEDs), and electric vehicles (EVs). That study showed how dramatic...

  5. Future Engine Fluids Technologies: Durable, Fuel-Efficient, and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Market Introducution in Europe Characteristics and Effects of Lubricant Additive Chemistry and Exhaust Conditions on Diesel Particulate Filter Service Life and Vehicle Fuel...

  6. Bioseparations- An Assessment of Current Technologies and Future Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kitto, G. B.; Humphrey, J. L.

    effective production methods have to be established. Downstream processing, particularly the separation and purification of biotechnology products, presents special challenges because in many cases the new products are much more fragile, much more difficult...

  7. Growing America's Energy Future: Bioenergy Technologies Office Successes

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGY TAX POLICIES7.pdfFuel Cell VehicleEnergyGreensburg RebuildsSenate |Sustainedof 2014 |

  8. Future Engine Fluids Technologies: Durable, Fuel-Efficient, and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensional ElectricalEnergyQualityAUGUSTPart 3EfficientDynamics

  9. COLLOQUIUM: Future Electrical Technologies From a GE Viewpoint | Princeton

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone6Energy, science,Principles of Collective Behavior |Plasma

  10. Revolution Now: The Future Arrives for Four Clean Energy Technologies --

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNG |September 15,2015Department ofRequirementsEnergyJ uRevitalizing American2014

  11. Revolution Now: The Future Arrives for Four Clean Energy Technologies |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNG |September 15,2015Department ofRequirementsEnergyJ uRevitalizing

  12. About the Bioenergy Technologies Office: Growing America's Energy Future by

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergy Cooperation |South ValleyASGovLtr.pdfAbout the Better Buildings Residential Network

  13. Norwegian Marine Technology Research Institute Partnership for the future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nørvåg, Kjetil

    ;Greener operations Offshore renewable energy Autonomous surveillance Oil & gas in deeper water involvement «Ulstein X-bow» Revolutionary ship design Ship Model Towing Tank (1939) Cavitation Tunnel (1965

  14. Wide Bandgap Semiconductors: Essential to Our Technology Future |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered energy consumption byAbout PrintableBlenderWhat MakesEnergyWhy

  15. Growing America's Energy Future: Bioenergy Technologies Office Successes of 2014

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in3.pdf Flash2006-53.pdf0.pdfCostAnalysisTweet us! |Groundwater Cleanup ProgressesGroup

  16. Cost Effectiveness of Technology Solutions for Future Vehicle Systems |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartmentTieCelebrate EarthEnergyDistrict

  17. ITP Mining: Mining Industry of the Future Mineral Processing Technology

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensionalthe U.S. Department ofIOWA1999) |EnergyEnergyRoadmap |

  18. Future Science & Technology Programs | National Nuclear Security

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickr Flickr Editor's note:ComputingFusion roadmapping Subscribe to

  19. Renaissance in Flow-Cell Technologies: Recent Advancements and Future

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department ofT ib l L dDepartmentnews-flashes OfficeTexas |4WebinarAccessOpportunities |

  20. Dilation x-ray imager a new/faster gated x-ray imager for the NIF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nagel, S. R.; Bell, P. M.; Bradley, D. K.; Ayers, M. J.; Barrios, M. A.; Felker, B.; Smith, R. F.; Collins, G. W.; Jones, O. S.; Piston, K.; Raman, K. S. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Hilsabeck, T. J.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Chung, T.; Sammuli, B. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States); Hares, J. D.; Dymoke-Bradshaw, A. K. L. [Kentech Instruments Ltd., Wallingford, Oxfordshire OX10 (United Kingdom)

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    As the yield on implosion shots increases it is expected that the peak x-ray emission reduces to a duration with a FWHM as short as 20 ps for {approx}7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 18} neutron yield. However, the temporal resolution of currently used gated x-ray imagers on the NIF is 40-100 ps. We discuss the benefits of the higher temporal resolution for the NIF and present performance measurements for dilation x-ray imager, which utilizes pulse-dilation technology [T. J. Hilsabeck et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 81, 10E317 (2010)] to achieve x-ray imaging with temporal gate times below 10 ps. The measurements were conducted using the COMET laser, which is part of the Jupiter Laser Facility at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

  1. Department of Engineering Technology Technology Education

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bieber, Michael

    Department of Engineering Technology Technology Education A Teacher Education Program New Jersey Institute of Technology #12;WHAT WILL YOU LEARN? Technology teachers teach problem-based learning utilizing math, science and technology principles. Technological studies involve students: · Designing

  2. The RERTR Program: Past, present and future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woodruff, W.L.; Travelli, A.; Matos, J.E.; Snelgrove, J.L.

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The past, present and future of the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program are discussed with an emphasis on some of the reactor physics and thermal-hydraulics codes and modelling required to accommodate research and test reactor analysis, and some of the development work still in progress is described. Some comparisons with physical measurements and Monte Carlo are provided. The efforts in fuels development and the experimental support are summarized. The accomplishments in joint study programs and the transfer of technology are high lighted. The joint study with the Russian reduced enrichment program presents many new challenges.

  3. The future of energy and climate

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The talk will review some of the basic facts about the history and present status of the use of energy and its climatic consequences. It is clear that the world will have to change its way of energy production, the sooner the better. Because of the difficulty of storing electric energy, by far the best energy source for the future is thermal solar from the deserts, with overnight thermal storage. I will give some description of the present status of the technologies involved and end up with a pilot project for Europe and North Africa.

  4. Distributed Energy Technology Characterization (Desiccant Technologies...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Characterization (Desiccant Technologies), January 2004 Distributed Energy Technology Characterization (Desiccant Technologies), January 2004 The purpose of this report is to...

  5. Futures for energy cooperatives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A listing of Federal agencies and programs with potential funding for community-scale cooperatives using conservation measures and solar technologies is presented in Section 1. Section 2 presents profiles of existing community energy cooperatives describing their location, history, membership, services, sources of finance and technical assistance. A condensed summary from a recent conference on Energy Cooperatives featuring notes on co-op members' experiences, problems, and opportunities is presented in Section 3. Section 4 lists contacts for additional information. A National Consumer Cooperative Bank Load Application is shown in the appendix.

  6. Fossil fuels -- future fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fossil fuels -- coal, oil, and natural gas -- built America`s historic economic strength. Today, coal supplies more than 55% of the electricity, oil more than 97% of the transportation needs, and natural gas 24% of the primary energy used in the US. Even taking into account increased use of renewable fuels and vastly improved powerplant efficiencies, 90% of national energy needs will still be met by fossil fuels in 2020. If advanced technologies that boost efficiency and environmental performance can be successfully developed and deployed, the US can continue to depend upon its rich resources of fossil fuels.

  7. Ris Energy Report 4 Supply technologies in the future energy system 10 Supply technologies in the future energy system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    fuel (REtrol, Chapter 4) or heat, whether from direct electric heating, or heat pumps. Other uses the interaction between wind turbines, other energy sources and consumers in the electricity system. Biomass is combusted for heat and power (24%), A key theme of this chapter is that the energy systems should be (and

  8. Technology '90

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) laboratories have a long history of excellence in performing research and development in a number of areas, including the basic sciences, applied-energy technology, and weapons-related technology. Although technology transfer has always been an element of DOE and laboratory activities, it has received increasing emphasis in recent years as US industrial competitiveness has eroded and efforts have increased to better utilize the research and development resources the laboratories provide. This document, Technology '90, is the latest in a series that is intended to communicate some of the many opportunities available for US industry and universities to work with the DOE and its laboratories in the vital activity of improving technology transfer to meet national needs. Technology '90 is divided into three sections: Overview, Technologies, and Laboratories. The Overview section describes the activities and accomplishments of the DOE research and development program offices. The Technologies section provides descriptions of new technologies developed at the DOE laboratories. The Laboratories section presents information on the missions, programs, and facilities of each laboratory, along with a name and telephone number of a technology transfer contact for additional information. Separate papers were prepared for appropriate sections of this report.

  9. Magnesium for Future Autos

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nyberg, Eric A.; Luo, Alan A.; Sadayappan, Kumar; Shi, Wenfang

    2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the quest for better fuel economy and improved environmental performance, magnesium may well become a metal of choice for constructing lighter, more efficient vehicles. Magnesium is the lightest structural metal, yet it has a high strength-to-weight ratio makes it comparable to steel in many applications. The world’s automakers already use magnesium for individual components. But new alloys and processing methods are needed before the metal can become economically and technologically feasible as a major automotive structural material. This article will explore the formation, challenges and initial results of an international collaboration—the Magnesium Front End Research and Development (MFERD) project—that is leveraging the expertise and resources of Canada, China and the United States to advance the creation of magnesium-intensive vehicles. The MFERD project aims to develop the enabling technologies and knowledge base that will lead to a vehicles that are 50-60 percent lighter, equally affordable, more recyclable and of equal or better quality when compared to today’s vehicles. Databases of information also will be captured in models to enable further alloy and manufacturing process optimization. Finally, a life-cycle analysis of the magnesium used will be conducted.

  10. Information Technology The Mobile Semantic Web

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Yuan-Fang

    Information Technology The Mobile Semantic Web Shonali Krishnaswamya & Yuan-Fang Lib a Institute of Infocomm Research, A*STAR, Singapore b Faculty of Information Technology, Monash University, Australia introduction to ontology languages & reasoning 3. Strategies & systems for mobile semantic reasoning 4. Future

  11. Pellet Fueling Technology Development S. K. Combs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pellet Fueling Technology Development S. K. Combs Fusion Energy Division, Oak Ridge National/10/00 Pellet Sizes Are Relevant for Fueling Applications on Any Present Experimental Fusion Device and Future pellet injector technology ÂĄ Hydrogen properties ÂĄ Ice/pellet formation techniques ÂĄ Acceleration

  12. Literature Review in Languages, Technology and Learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    is committed to sharing the lessons learnt from our research and development in order to inform positive change OF GOOD TEACHING AND GOOD TEACHING MATERIALS 10 SECTION 7 RELEVANT TECHNOLOGIES AND TECHNOLOGY'S FUTURE, University of Wales Swansea This report has been designed to enable both rapid identification of the key

  13. RESEARCH FOR OUR ENERGY FUTURE BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    research. Right now, we derive the bulk of the energy we use from oil, gasoline, coal, and natural gasRESEARCH FOR OUR ENERGY FUTURE BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY #12;ON THE cOVER Energy research technologies and may enable completely new and vastly more efficient energy systems. One of ten national

  14. for a Sustainable Energy Future Sossina M. Haile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subramanian, Venkat

    Engineering California Institute of Technology Is There a Role for Nano-materials? I-CARES Lecture, November Future Energy Solutions Solar 1.2 x 105 TW at Earth surface 600 TW practical Biomass 5-7 TW gross all technically feasible 0.9 TW economically feasible 0.6 TW installed capacity 12 TW gross over land small

  15. Recent Action-Research and future course in Water Sector.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sohoni, Milind

    Block 380 Thakar people. 200 animals. 40 households. And an acute shortage of water for 5 monthsRecent Action-Research and future course in Water Sector. Milind Sohoni, CTARA, IIT-soil, water, energy end-user defined or demand-driven-drinking water. Towards change-deliver technology

  16. How ARPA-e is "Winning the Future"

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Obama, Barack; Chu, Steven; Majumdar, Arun;

    2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy (ARPA-E) is answering the President's call to "Win the Future". By directly funding some of the most groundbreaking discoveries in science and technology, we're encouraging the development of the most advanced clean tech innovations out there today.

  17. Cognitive Engineering and Decision Making: An Overview and Future Course

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaber, David B.

    Cognitive Engineering and Decision Making: An Overview and Future Course Mica R. Endsley SA Technologies Robert Hoffman Institute for Human-Machine Cognition David Kaber North Carolina State University Emilie Roth Roth Cognitive Engineering ABSTRACT: The field of cognitive engineering and decision making

  18. FUTURE POWER GRID INITIATIVE GridOPTICSTM Power Networking,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FUTURE POWER GRID INITIATIVE GridOPTICSTM Power Networking, Equipment, and Technology (powerNET) Testbed OBJECTIVE A lot of interest in research, improvements, and testing surrounds the power grid to these activities. Specifically, » power system equipment is expensive and has a high knowledge barrier

  19. How ARPA-e is "Winning the Future"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Obama, Barack; Chu, Steven; Majumdar, Arun

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy (ARPA-E) is answering the President's call to "Win the Future". By directly funding some of the most groundbreaking discoveries in science and technology, we're encouraging the development of the most advanced clean tech innovations out there today.

  20. Modeling China's energy future Pat DeLaquil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Modeling China's energy future Pat DeLaquil Clean Energy Commercialization, 1816 Crosspointe Drive, renewables, and coal gasification-based energy supply technologies, can enable China to meet economic), and (3) coal gasification technolo- gies co-producing electricity and clean liquid and gaseous energy

  1. The Future of Biofuels | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    The Future of Biofuels The Future of Biofuels Addthis Description Secretary Chu discusses why feedstock grasses such as miscanthus could be the future of biofuels. Speakers...

  2. Future plans at ISOLDE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lindroos, M

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The CERN ISOLDE facility has operated for over 30 years delivering beams of exotic ions to an ever-growing user community. The facility went through a major up-grade in the early 1990s with the move from the 600 MeV synchrocyclotron to the 1 GeV PS-Booster proton synchrotron. This was followed by a primary proton beam energy up grade to 1.4 GeV in 1999. Lately, an important step forward was taken with the start of the REX-ISOLDE experiment for charge breeding and post acceleration of exotic ions. CERN has recently decided on a consolidation project for the facility to assure that the required number of shifts can be delivered in the future. An overview will be given of the on-going consolidation and development programme and its implications on the physics programme, in particular the REX-ISOLDE post accelerator experiment. An important parameter for a better yield of very exotic elements is the primary proton beam intensity, beam energy and time structure. The possible short-term improvements of, in particul...

  3. James Smith: Building the Energy Future Shaping the Future Lecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mumby, Peter J.

    James Smith: Building the Energy Future Shaping the Future Lecture James Smith was appointed been involved in Shell business in a number of Middle Eastern countries and in the US. James Smith `ought'to do in response and assess what society will `choose'to do in reality. James Smith will identify

  4. Future Steelmaking Processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prof. R. J. Fruehan

    2004-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    There is an increasing demand for an ironmaking process with lower capital cost, energy consumption and emissions than a blast furnace. It is the hypothesis of the present work that an optimized combination of two reasonable proven technologies will greatly enhance the overall process. An example is a rotary hearth furnace (RHF) linked to a smelter (e.g., AISI, HIsmelt). The objective of this research is to select promising process combinations, develop energy, materials balance and productivity models for the individual processes, conduct a limited amount of basic research on the processes and evaluate the process combinations. Three process combinations were selected with input from the industrial partners. The energy-materials and productivity models for the RHF, smelter, submerged arc furnace and CIRCOFER were developed. Since utilization of volatiles in coal is critical for energy and CO{sub 2} emission reduction, basic research on this topic was also conducted. The process models developed are a major product developed in this research. These models can be used for process evaluation by the industry. The process combinations of an RHF-Smelter and a simplified CIRCOFER-Smelter appear to be promising. Energy consumption is reduced and productivity increased. Work on this project is continuing using funds from other sources.

  5. Emerging Energy-efficiency and Carbon Dioxide Emissions-reduction Technologies for the Iron and Steel Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hasanbeigi, Ali

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    E. Worrell. 1998a. “Future Technologies for Energy-Efficientand Control 3.3. Emerging Technologies for Ironmaking UsingAlternative Ironmaking Technologies 3.4.1. COREX® Process

  6. The Industries of the Future Program: What's in it for Texas Industries?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferland, K. A.

    The purpose of the TEXAS INDUSTRIES OF THE FUTURE program is to facilitate the development, demonstration and adoption of emerging technologies that reduce industrial energy usage, emissions, and associated costs, resulting in improved competitive...

  7. Future Carbon Regulations and Current Investments in Alternative Coal-Fired Power Plant Designs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sekar, Ram C.

    This paper assesses the role of uncertainty over future U.S. carbon regulations in shaping the current choice of which type of power plant to build. The pulverized coal technology (PC) still offer the lowest cost power— ...

  8. Multi-path transportation futures study : vehicle characterization and scenario analyses.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Plotkin, S. E.; Singh, M. K.; Energy Systems; TA Engineering; ORNL

    2009-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Projecting the future role of advanced drivetrains and fuels in the light vehicle market is inherently difficult, given the uncertainty (and likely volatility) of future oil prices, inadequate understanding of likely consumer response to new technologies, the relative infancy of several important new technologies with inevitable future changes in their performance and costs, and the importance - and uncertainty - of future government marketplace interventions (e.g., new regulatory standards or vehicle purchase incentives). This Multi-Path Transportation Futures (MP) Study has attempted to improve our understanding of this future role by examining several scenarios of vehicle costs, fuel prices, government subsidies, and other key factors. These are projections, not forecasts, in that they try to answer a series of 'what if' questions without assigning probabilities to most of the basic assumptions.

  9. Technology Transfer David Basin and Thai Son Hoang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Basin, David

    Technology Transfer David Basin and Thai Son Hoang Institute of Information Security, ETH Zurich, Switzerland Abstract. This paper presents our experience of knowledge and technology transfer within the lessons learned and what we would do differently in future technology transfer projects. Keywords

  10. Renewable Electricity Futures Study. Volume 4: Bulk Electric Power Systems: Operations and Transmission Planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milligan, M.; Ela, E.; Hein, J.; Schneider, T.; Brinkman, G.; Denholm, P.

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Renewable Electricity Futures (RE Futures) Study investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. The analysis focused on the sufficiency of the geographically diverse U.S. renewable resources to meet electricity demand over future decades, the hourly operational characteristics of the U.S. grid with high levels of variable wind and solar generation, and the potential implications of deploying high levels of renewables in the future. RE Futures focused on technical aspects of high penetration of renewable electricity; it did not focus on how to achieve such a future through policy or other measures. Given the inherent uncertainties involved with analyzing alternative long-term energy futures as well as the multiple pathways that might be taken to achieve higher levels of renewable electricity supply, RE Futures explored a range of scenarios to investigate and compare the impacts of renewable electricity penetration levels (30%-90%), future technology performance improvements, potential constraints to renewable electricity development, and future electricity demand growth assumptions. RE Futures was led by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).

  11. Renewable Electricity Futures Study. Volume 3: End-Use Electricity Demand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hostick, D.; Belzer, D.B.; Hadley, S.W.; Markel, T.; Marnay, C.; Kintner-Meyer, M.

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Renewable Electricity Futures (RE Futures) Study investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. The analysis focused on the sufficiency of the geographically diverse U.S. renewable resources to meet electricity demand over future decades, the hourly operational characteristics of the U.S. grid with high levels of variable wind and solar generation, and the potential implications of deploying high levels of renewables in the future. RE Futures focused on technical aspects of high penetration of renewable electricity; it did not focus on how to achieve such a future through policy or other measures. Given the inherent uncertainties involved with analyzing alternative long-term energy futures as well as the multiple pathways that might be taken to achieve higher levels of renewable electricity supply, RE Futures explored a range of scenarios to investigate and compare the impacts of renewable electricity penetration levels (30%-90%), future technology performance improvements, potential constraints to renewable electricity development, and future electricity demand growth assumptions. RE Futures was led by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).

  12. Available Technologies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAboutScience Program Cumulus Humilis,Technologies Available Technologies

  13. IFI-aktuelt: Gjesteforelesning, C-K. Toh Future Research Challenges in Ad Hoc Networking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toh, C-K.

    IFI-aktuelt: Gjesteforelesning, C-K. Toh Future Research Challenges in Ad Hoc Networking Fredag 23.8 kl. 13:15, Lille auditorium Future Research Challenges in Ad Hoc Networking by C-K. Toh, Ph technologies are mature, it is still a form of cellular local data network. Ad hoc mobile networks are entirely

  14. ICEPT Working Paper Comparison of Fuel Cell and Combustion Micro-CHP under Future Residential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ICEPT Working Paper Comparison of Fuel Cell and Combustion Micro-CHP under Future Residential and Combustion Micro-CHP under Future Residential Energy Demand Scenarios A.D. Hawkes2 and M.A. Leach Centre heat and power (micro-CHP) - a technology to provide heat and some electricity to individual

  15. 1 | Fuel Cell Technologies Program eere.energy.gov Fuel Cell Technologies Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Electricity Natural Gas Power Heat + Cooling Electricity Cooling Natural GasNatural Gas or Biogas Fuel Cell H Excess for Our Energy Future 5 | Fuel Cell Technologies Program eere.energy.govSource: US DOE 10/2010 #12;Biogas Cell Technologies Program eere.energy.gov #12;Biogas Resource Example: Methane from Waste Water

  16. PAVEMENT TECHNOLOGY UPDATE This Technology Transfer Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    PAVEMENT TECHNOLOGY UPDATE This Technology Transfer Program publication is funded by the Division to them in California. TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER PROGRAM MAY 2011, VOL. 3, NO. 1 California's Transition

  17. Review of nonconventional bioreactor technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turick, C.E.; Mcllwain, M.E.

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Biotechnology will significantly affect many industrial sectors in the future. Industrial sectors that will be affected include pharmaceutical, chemical, fuel, agricultural, and environmental remediation. Future research is needed to improve bioprocessing efficiency and cost-effectiveness in order to compete with traditional technologies. This report describes recent advances in bioprocess technologies and bioreactor designs and relates them to problems encountered in many industrial bioprocessing operations. The primary focus is directed towards increasing gas and vapor transfer for enhanced bioprocess kinetics as well as unproved by-product separation and removal. The advantages and disadvantages of various conceptual designs such as hollow-fiber, gas-phase, hyperbaric/hypobaric, and electrochemical bioreactors are also discussed. Specific applications that are intended for improved bioprocesses include coal desulfurization, coal liquefaction, soil bioremediation, biomass conversion to marketable chemicals, biomining, and biohydrometallurgy as well as bioprocessing of gases and vapors.

  18. Emerging energy-efficient technologies for industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Worrell, Ernst; Martin, Nathan; Price, Lynn; Ruth, Michael; Elliott, Neal; Shipley, Anna; Thorne, Jennifer

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    U.S. industry consumes approximately 37 percent of the nation's energy to produce 24 percent of the nation's GDP. Increasingly, society is confronted with the challenge of moving toward a cleaner, more sustainable path of production and consumption, while increasing global competitiveness. Technology is essential in achieving these challenges. We report on a recent analysis of emerging energy-efficient technologies for industry, focusing on over 50 selected technologies. The technologies are characterized with respect to energy efficiency, economics and environmental performance. This paper provides an overview of the results, demonstrating that we are not running out of technologies to improve energy efficiency, economic and environmental performance, and neither will we in the future. The study shows that many of the technologies have important non-energy benefits, ranging from reduced environmental impact to improved productivity, and reduced capital costs compared to current technologies.

  19. The Future of Microbial Genomics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kyrpides, Nikos [Genome Biology group at the DOE Joint Genome Institute

    2010-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Nikos Kyrpides, head of the Genome Biology group at the DOE Joint Genome Institute discusses current challenges in the field of microbial genomics on June 2, 2010 at the "Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future" meeting in Santa Fe, NM

  20. AUTO ID FUTURE - FREQUENCY AGNOSTIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DATTA, SHOUMEN

    Identification of information is one key to the development of intelligent decision systems of the future. Frequency agnostic automatic identification is only one step in the physical world to make physical objects identify ...

  1. Bright Future NW Energy Coalition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Getting To a Bright Future 1. Cap global-warming emissions. President Obama and the U.S. Congress should Climate Initiative: 15% reduction from 1990 levels by 2020, 80% or larger reduction by 2050. While

  2. Future Hadron Physics at Fermilab

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeffrey A. Appel

    2005-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Today, hadron physics research occurs at Fermilab as parts of broader experimental programs. This is very likely to be the case in the future. Thus, much of this presentation focuses on our vision of that future - a future aimed at making Fermilab the host laboratory for the International Linear Collider (ILC). Given the uncertainties associated with the ILC - the level of needed R&D, the ILC costs, and the timing - Fermilab is also preparing for other program choices. I will describe these latter efforts, efforts focused on a Proton Driver to increase the numbers of protons available for experiments. As examples of the hadron physics which will be coming from Fermilab, I summarize three experiments: MIPP/E907 which is running currently, and MINER A and Drell-Yan/E906 which are scheduled for future running periods. Hadron physics coming from the Tevatron Collider program will be summarized by Arthur Maciel in another talk at Hadron05.

  3. Saft Factory of the Future

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Factory of the Future Project Objectives: Construct and operate a 235,000 sq ft battery factory capable of manufacturing high quantities of Li-ION cells, modules, and...

  4. Future Fuels: Issues and Opportunities

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    R Y S L E R G R O U P Fuel Quality Issues * Cetane * Lubricity * Aromatics * Sulfur * Biodiesel - adequate quality standards needed * GTL, CTL, and BTL -- The Future 9142005 2 C...

  5. The Future Potential of Waver Power in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mirko Previsic; Jeff Epler; Maureen Hand; Donna Heimiller; Walter Short; Kelly Eurek

    2012-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The theoretical ocean wave energy resource potential exceeds 50% of the annual domestic energy demand of the United States, is located close to coastal population centers, and, although variable in nature, may be more consistent and predictable than some other renewable generation technologies. As a renewable electricity generation technology, ocean wave energy offers a low air pollutant option for diversifying the U.S. electricity generation portfolio. Furthermore, the output characteristics of these technologies may complement other renewable technologies. This study addresses the following: (1) The theoretical, technical and practical potential for electricity generation from wave energy (2) The present lifecycle cost profile (Capex, Opex, and Cost of Electricity) of wave energy conversion technology at a reference site in Northern California at different plant scales (3) Cost of electricity variations as a function of deployment site, considering technical, geo-spatial and and electric grid constraints (4) Technology cost reduction pathways (5) Cost reduction targets at which the technology will see significant deployment within US markets, explored through a series of deployment scenarios RE Vision Consulting, LLC (RE Vision), engaged in various analyses to establish current and future cost profiles for marine hydrokinetic (MHK) technologies, quantified the theoretical, technical and practical resource potential, performed electricity market assessments and developed deployment scenarios. RE Vision was supported in this effort by NREL analysts, who compiled resource information, performed analysis using the ReEDSa model to develop deployment scenarios, and developed a simplified assessment of the Alaska and Hawaii electricity markets.

  6. FutureGen_factsheet.cdr

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    on June 11, 2001, and the Global Climate Change Initiative on February 14, 2002. Carbon capture and sequestration technologies likely will be essential to meeting the...

  7. Technology Application Centers: Facilitating Technology Transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuhel, G. J.

    transfer plus technology application. A&C Enercom has learned from experience that technology deployment will not occur unless utilities achieve both technology transfer (e.g, the dissemination of information) and technology application (e.g., the direct...

  8. Clean coal technology applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bharucha, N.

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    {open_quotes}Coal is a stratified rock formed of the more or less altered remains of plants (together with associated mineral matter) which flourished in past ages{hor_ellipsis} The problem of the origin and maturing of coal is complicated by the fact that every coal contains, in addition to carbon, hydrogen and oxygen, variable proportions of nitrogen and sulfur which are combined in unknown ways in the organic molecules...{close_quotes}. The challenge with coal has always been the management of its mineral matter, sulfur and nitrogen contents during use. The carbon content of fuels, including coal, is a more recent concern. With clean coal technologies, there are opportunities for ensuring the sustained use of coal for a very long time. The clean coal technologies of today are already capable of reducing, if not eliminating, harmful emissions. The technologies of the future will allow coal to be burned with greatly reduced emissions, thus eliminating the necessity to treat them after they occur.

  9. Bill Gates and Deputy Secretary Poneman Discuss the Energy Technology Landscape

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bill Gates and Deputy Secretary of Energy Daniel Poneman discuss the future of energy technology during the twenty-second Plenary Meeting of the Nuclear Suppliers Group.

  10. E-Print Network 3.0 - assessment energy technology Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    22 Ris Energy Report 2 Three growing concerns sustainability (particularly in Summary: bioenergy technologies are assessed to show their current status, future trends and...

  11. National Policy of Future Nuclear Fusion Research and Development (Tentative Translation)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .2.3 Generalization as Academic Research 3.3 Education and Training, and Sustainable Development of Fusion Base Technology 3.3.1 Education and Training 3.3.2 Sustainable Development of Fusion Basic Technology 3National Policy of Future Nuclear Fusion Research and Development (Tentative Translation) 26

  12. Manufacturing technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blaedel, K.L.

    1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The specific goals of the Manufacturing Technology thrust area are to develop an understanding of fundamental fabrication processes, to construct general purpose process models that will have wide applicability, to document our findings and models in journals, to transfer technology to LLNL programs, industry, and colleagues, and to develop continuing relationships with industrial and academic communities to advance our collective understanding of fabrication processes. Advances in four projects are described here, namely Design of a Precision Saw for Manufacturing, Deposition of Boron Nitride Films via PVD, Manufacturing and Coating by Kinetic Energy Metallization, and Magnet Design and Application.

  13. Energy revolution: policies for a sustainable future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howard Geller [Southwest Energy Efficiency Project, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The book examines the policy options for mitigating or removing the entrenched advantages held by fossil fuels and speeding the transition to a more sustainable energy future, one based on improved efficiency and a shift to renewable sources such as solar, wind, and bioenergy. The book: examines today's energy patterns and trends and their consequences; describes the barriers to a more sustainable energy future and how those barriers can be overcome; provides ten case studies of integrated strategies that have been effective in different parts of the world examines international policies and institutions and recommends ways they could be improved; reviews global trends that suggest that the transition to renewables and increased efficiency is underway and is achievable. The core of the book are presentations of Clean Energy scenarios for the US and Brazil. His US scenario has 10 policies. These include: Adopt voluntary agreements to reduce industrial energy use; Provide tax incentives for innovative renewable energy and energy-efficient technologies; Expand federal R & D and deployment programs; Remove barriers to combined heat and power systems; and Strengthen emissions standards on coal-fired plants. Geller calculates that the impact of his ten policies would be a $600 billion cost and a $1200 billion savings, for a net savings of $600 billion compared to a baseline scenario of continued promotion of fossil fuels.

  14. Back to the FutureGen?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buchsbaum, L.

    2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    After years of political wrangling, Democrats may green-light the experimental clean coal power plants. The article relates how the project came to be curtailed, how Senator Dick Durbin managed to protect $134 million in funding for FutureGen in Mattoon, and how once Obama was in office a $2 billion line item to fund a 'near zero emissions power plant(s)' was placed in the Senate version of the Stimulus Bill. The final version of the legislation cut the funding to $1 billion for 'fossil energy research and development'. In December 2008 the FutureGen Alliance and the City of Mattoon spent $6.5 billion to purchase the plants eventual 440 acre site. A report by the Government Accountability Office (GAO) said that Bush's inaction may have set back clean coal technology in the US by as much as a decade. If additional funding comes through construction of the plant could start in 2010. 1 fig., 1 photo.

  15. FEMP/NTDP Technology Focus New Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FEMP/NTDP Technology Focus New Technology Demonstration Program Technology Focus FEMPFederal Energy Management Program Trends in Energy Management Technology: BCS Integration Technologies ­ Open Communications into a complete EMCIS. The first article [1] covered enabling technologies for emerging energy management systems

  16. E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced sige technology Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    mature application is the SiGe BiCMOS technology which... , CMOS technology, and optoelectronics. This paper attempts to give some perspective on the future of SiGe... . The bulk...

  17. Impact of New Irrigation Technology on the Texas High Plains: 1980-2020

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reneau, D. R.; Lacewell, R. D.; Ellis, J. R.

    , encourages greater use, overall. Advanced technology, however, is important to the future of crop production in the region, since it increased the level of production, and net revenue. Further, the impact of technology was proportionally greater under the low...

  18. Imaging detectors and electronics - A view of the future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spieler, Helmuth

    2004-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Imaging sensors and readout electronics have made tremendous strides in the past two decades. The application of modern semiconductor fabrication techniques and the introduction of customized monolithic integrated circuits have made large scale imaging systems routine in high energy physics. This technology is now finding its way into other areas, such as space missions, synchrotron light sources, and medical imaging. I review current developments and discuss the promise and limits of new technologies. Several detector systems are described as examples of future trends. The discussion emphasizes semiconductor detector systems, but I also include recent developments for large-scale superconducting detector arrays.

  19. (Environmental technology)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boston, H.L.

    1990-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The traveler participated in a conference on environmental technology in Paris, sponsored by the US Embassy-Paris, US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the French Environmental Ministry, and others. The traveler sat on a panel for environmental aspects of energy technology and made a presentation on the potential contributions of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to a planned French-American Environmental Technologies Institute in Chattanooga, Tennessee, and Evry, France. This institute would provide opportunities for international cooperation on environmental issues and technology transfer related to environmental protection, monitoring, and restoration at US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. The traveler also attended the Fourth International Conference on Environmental Contamination in Barcelona. Conference topics included environmental chemistry, land disposal of wastes, treatment of toxic wastes, micropollutants, trace organics, artificial radionuclides in the environment, and the use biomonitoring and biosystems for environmental assessment. The traveler presented a paper on The Fate of Radionuclides in Sewage Sludge Applied to Land.'' Those findings corresponded well with results from studies addressing the fate of fallout radionuclides from the Chernobyl nuclear accident. There was an exchange of new information on a number of topics of interest to DOE waste management and environmental restoration needs.

  20. Manufacturing technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Manufacturing Technologies Center is an integral part of Sandia National Laboratories, a multiprogram engineering and science laboratory, operated for the Department of Energy (DOE) with major facilities at Albuquerque, New Mexico, and Livermore, California. Our Center is at the core of Sandia`s Advanced Manufacturing effort which spans the entire product realization process.

  1. Vacuum Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biltoft, P J

    2004-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The environmental condition called vacuum is created any time the pressure of a gas is reduced compared to atmospheric pressure. On earth we typically create a vacuum by connecting a pump capable of moving gas to a relatively leak free vessel. Through operation of the gas pump the number of gas molecules per unit volume is decreased within the vessel. As soon as one creates a vacuum natural forces (in this case entropy) work to restore equilibrium pressure; the practical effect of this is that gas molecules attempt to enter the evacuated space by any means possible. It is useful to think of vacuum in terms of a gas at a pressure below atmospheric pressure. In even the best vacuum vessels ever created there are approximately 3,500,000 molecules of gas per cubic meter of volume remaining inside the vessel. The lowest pressure environment known is in interstellar space where there are approximately four molecules of gas per cubic meter. Researchers are currently developing vacuum technology components (pumps, gauges, valves, etc.) using micro electro mechanical systems (MEMS) technology. Miniature vacuum components and systems will open the possibility for significant savings in energy cost and will open the doors to advances in electronics, manufacturing and semiconductor fabrication. In conclusion, an understanding of the basic principles of vacuum technology as presented in this summary is essential for the successful execution of all projects that involve vacuum technology. Using the principles described above, a practitioner of vacuum technology can design a vacuum system that will achieve the project requirements.

  2. Emerging energy-efficient technologies for industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Worrell, Ernst; Martin, Nathan; Price, Lynn; Ruth, Michael; Elliott, Neal; Shipley, Anna; Thorn, Jennifer

    2001-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    For this study, we identified about 175 emerging energy-efficient technologies in industry, of which we characterized 54 in detail. While many profiles of individual emerging technologies are available, few reports have attempted to impose a standardized approach to the evaluation of the technologies. This study provides a way to review technologies in an independent manner, based on information on energy savings, economic, non-energy benefits, major market barriers, likelihood of success, and suggested next steps to accelerate deployment of each of the analyzed technologies. There are many interesting lessons to be learned from further investigation of technologies identified in our preliminary screening analysis. The detailed assessments of the 54 technologies are useful to evaluate claims made by developers, as well as to evaluate market potentials for the United States or specific regions. In this report we show that many new technologies are ready to enter the market place, or are currently under development, demonstrating that the United States is not running out of technologies to improve energy efficiency and economic and environmental performance, and will not run out in the future. The study shows that many of the technologies have important non-energy benefits, ranging from reduced environmental impact to improved productivity. Several technologies have reduced capital costs compared to the current technology used by those industries. Non-energy benefits such as these are frequently a motivating factor in bringing technologies such as these to market. Further evaluation of the profiled technologies is still needed. In particular, further quantifying the non-energy benefits based on the experience from technology users in the field is important. Interactive effects and inter-technology competition have not been accounted for and ideally should be included in any type of integrated technology scenario, for it may help to better evaluate market opportunities.

  3. Forest Products Industry of the Future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Los Alamos Technical Associates, Inc

    2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Los Alamos Technical Associates, Inc (LATA) conducted an evaluation of the potential impact and value of a portion of the current portfolio of r&d projects supported by the Office of Industrial Technology and the Forest Products Industry of the Future. The mission of the evaluation was to (a) assess the potential impact of the projects to meet the critical goals of the industry as identified in the vision and roadmapping documents. (b) Evaluate the relationship between the current portfolio of projects and the Agenda 202 Implementation Plan. In addition, evaluate the relationship between the portfolio and the newly revised draft technology strategy being created by the industry. (c) Identify areas where current efforts are making significant progress towards meeting industry goals and identify areas where additional work my be required to meet these goals. (d) Make recommendations to the DOE and the Forest Products Industry on possible improvements in the portfolio and in the current methodology that DOE uses to assess potential impacts on its R&D activities.

  4. Oil shale technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, S. (Akron Univ., OH (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oil shale is undoubtedly an excellent energy source that has great abundance and world-wide distribution. Oil shale industries have seen ups and downs over more than 100 years, depending on the availability and price of conventional petroleum crudes. Market forces as well as environmental factors will greatly affect the interest in development of oil shale. Besides competing with conventional crude oil and natural gas, shale oil will have to compete favorably with coal-derived fuels for similar markets. Crude shale oil is obtained from oil shale by a relatively simple process called retorting. However, the process economics are greatly affected by the thermal efficiencies, the richness of shale, the mass transfer effectiveness, the conversion efficiency, the design of retort, the environmental post-treatment, etc. A great many process ideas and patents related to the oil shale pyrolysis have been developed; however, relatively few field and engineering data have been published. Due to the vast heterogeneity of oil shale and to the complexities of physicochemical process mechanisms, scientific or technological generalization of oil shale retorting is difficult to achieve. Dwindling supplied of worldwide petroleum reserves, as well as the unprecedented appetite of mankind for clean liquid fuel, has made the public concern for future energy market grow rapidly. the clean coal technology and the alternate fuel technology are currently of great significance not only to policy makers, but also to process and chemical researchers. In this book, efforts have been made to make a comprehensive text for the science and technology of oil shale utilization. Therefore, subjects dealing with the terminological definitions, geology and petrology, chemistry, characterization, process engineering, mathematical modeling, chemical reaction engineering, experimental methods, and statistical experimental design, etc. are covered in detail.

  5. Physics Needs for Future Accelerators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joseph D. Lykken

    2000-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Contents: 1. Prologomena to any meta future physics 1.1 Physics needs for building future accelerators 1.2 Physics needs for funding future accelerators 2. Physics questions for future accelerators 2.1 Crimes and misapprehensions 2.1.1 Organized religion 2.1.2 Feudalism 2.1.3 Trotsky was right 2.2 The Standard Model as an effective field theory 2.3 What is the scale of new physics? 2.4 What could be out there? 2.5 Model-independent conclusions 3. Future accelerators 3.1 What is the physics driving the LHC? 3.2 What is the physics driving the LC? 3.2.1 Higgs physics is golden 3.2.2 LHC won't be sufficient to unravel the new physics as the TeV scale 3.2.3 LC precision measurements can pin down new physics scales 3.3 Why a Neutrino Factory? 3.4 Pushing the energy frontier

  6. Physics Needs for Future Accelerators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lykken, J D

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Contents: 1. Prologomena to any meta future physics 1.1 Physics needs for building future accelerators 1.2 Physics needs for funding future accelerators 2. Physics questions for future accelerators 2.1 Crimes and misapprehensions 2.1.1 Organized religion 2.1.2 Feudalism 2.1.3 Trotsky was right 2.2 The Standard Model as an effective field theory 2.3 What is the scale of new physics? 2.4 What could be out there? 2.5 Model-independent conclusions 3. Future accelerators 3.1 What is the physics driving the LHC? 3.2 What is the physics driving the LC? 3.2.1 Higgs physics is golden 3.2.2 LHC won't be sufficient to unravel the new physics as the TeV scale 3.2.3 LC precision measurements can pin down new physics scales 3.3 Why a Neutrino Factory? 3.4 Pushing the energy frontier

  7. Brain Receptor Structures Key to Future Therapeutics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Brain Receptor Structures Key to Future Therapeutics Brain Receptor Structures Key to Future Therapeutics Print Wednesday, 28 January 2015 00:00 With an aging population in...

  8. Evaluation of the commercial potential of novel organic photovoltaic technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barr, Jonathan (Jonathan Allan)

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Photovoltaic cells based on organic semiconducting materials have the potential to compete with the more mature crystalline and thin film based photovoltaic technologies in the future primarily due to the expectation of ...

  9. Hybrid & electric vehicle technology and its market feasibility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeon, Sang Yeob

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, Hybrid Electric Vehicles (HEV), Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle (PHEV) and Electric Vehicle (EV) technology and their sales forecasts are discussed. First, the current limitations and the future potential ...

  10. Fossil energy waste management. Technology status report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bossart, S.J.; Newman, D.A.

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the current status and recent accomplishments of the Fossil Energy Waste Management (FE WM) projects sponsored by the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The primary goal of the Waste Management Program is to identify and develop optimal strategies to manage solid by-products from advanced coal technologies for the purpose of ensuring the competitiveness of advanced coal technologies as a future energy source. The projects in the Fossil Energy Waste Management Program are divided into three types of activities: Waste Characterization, Disposal Technologies, and Utilization Technologies. This technology status report includes a discussion on barriers to increased use of coal by-products. Also, the major technical and nontechnical challenges currently being addressed by the FE WM program are discussed. A bibliography of 96 citations and a list of project contacts is included if the reader is interested in obtaining additional information about the FE WM program.

  11. On May 4, 2011, Intel Corporation announced what it called the most radical shift in semiconductor technology in 50 years.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Irvine, University of

    technology in 50 years. A new 3dimensional transistor design will enable the production of integratedcircuit chips that operate faster with less power... The 3D TriGate transistor is a variant of the Fin SYMBOLS Nchannel MOSFET Pchannel MOSFET GND VDD S S D D CMOS INVERTER CIRCUIT VIN VOUT VOUT VIN 0 VDD VDD

  12. Future

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest Region service area. TheEPSCI HomeTours,FrequentlyFunded

  13. The Future of Geothermal Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The objective of the workshop, the first in the series, was to gain insight from the MIT analysis to start the evaluation of EGS technology pathways. Special emphasis was placed on leveraging...

  14. Future Prospects of Synthetic Fuels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fryback, M. G.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is important for the future of this nation to reach the goal of demonstrated definition and quantification of the parameters which influence the ability to use this country's vast resources of coal and oil shale for production of synthetic fuels...

  15. Top quark physics: Future Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frey, Raymond; Gerdes, David; Jaros, John; Vejcik, Steve; Berger, Edmond L.; Chivukula, R. Sekhar; Cuypers, Frank; Drell, Persis S.; Fero, Michael; Hadley, Nicholas; Han, Tao; Heinson, Ann P.; Knuteson, Bruce; Larios, Francisco; Miettinen, Hannu; Orr, Lynne H.; Peskin, Michael E.; Rizzo, Thomas; Sarid, Uri; Schmidt, Carl; Stelzer, Tim; Sullivan, Zack

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the study of the top quark at future experiments and machines. Top's large mass makes it a unique probe of physics at the natural electroweak scale. We emphasize measurements of the top quark's mass, width, and couplings, as well as searches for rare or nonstandard decays, and discuss the complementary roles played by hadron and lepton colliders.

  16. Top quark physics: Future measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frey, R. [Univ. of Oregon, Eugene, OR (United States). Dept. of Physics; Vejcik, S. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Physics; Berger, E.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors discuss the study of the top quark at future experiments and machines. Top`s large mass makes it a unique probe of physics at the natural electroweak scale. They emphasize measurements of the top quark`s mass, width, and couplings, as well as searches for rare or nonstandard decays, and discuss the complementary roles played by hadron and lepton colliders.

  17. Envision your future in engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dyer, Bill

    , or construction or to persist in your program As you read about a woman's experience of overcoming health issues and construction, and on the future of our society cannot be overstated With great pride, Heidi Sherick Assistant various national laboratories, including the Gran Sasso Laboratory. After traveling, we went to Princeton

  18. Conservation Laws Past and Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keyfitz, Barbara Lee

    Conservation Laws Past and Future Barbara Lee Keyfitz Fields Institute and University of Houston;Outline Systems of quasilinear hyperbolic PDE (conservation laws) Where they come from; why-reversible Analysis of conservation laws Results on Riemann problems (geometric) BV spaces and well-posedness in one

  19. Options for Kentucky's Energy Future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larry Demick

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three important imperatives are being pursued by the Commonwealth of Kentucky: ? Developing a viable economic future for the highly trained and experienced workforce and for the Paducah area that today supports, and is supported by, the operations of the US Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP). Currently, the PGDP is scheduled to be taken out of service in May, 2013. ? Restructuring the economic future for Kentucky’s most abundant indigenous resource and an important industry – the extraction and utilization of coal. The future of coal is being challenged by evolving and increasing requirements for its extraction and use, primarily from the perspective of environmental restrictions. Further, it is important that the economic value derived from this important resource for the Commonwealth, its people and its economy is commensurate with the risks involved. Over 70% of the extracted coal is exported from the Commonwealth and hence not used to directly expand the Commonwealth’s economy beyond the severance taxes on coal production. ? Ensuring a viable energy future for Kentucky to guarantee a continued reliable and affordable source of energy for its industries and people. Today, over 90% of Kentucky’s electricity is generated by burning coal with a delivered electric power price that is among the lowest in the United States. Anticipated increased environmental requirements necessitate looking at alternative forms of energy production, and in particular electricity generation.

  20. SPADs for Vertex Tracker detectors in Future Colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vilella, E; Vila, A; Dieguez, A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Physics aims at the future linear colliders impose such stringent requirements on detector systems that exceed those met by any previous technology. Amongst other novel technologies, SPADs (Single Photon Avalanche Diodes) detectors are being developed to track high energy particles at ILC (International Linear Collider) and CLIC (Compact LInear Collider). These sensors offer outstanding qualities, such as an extraordinary high sensitivity, ultra-fast response time and virtually infinite gain, in addition to compatibility with standard CMOS technologies. As a result, SPAD detectors enable the direct conversion of a single particle event onto a CMOS digital signal in the sub-nanosecond time scale, which leads to the possibility of single BX (bunch crossing) resolution at some particle colliders. However, SPAD detectors suffer from two main problems, namely the noise pulses generated by the sensor and the low fill-factor. The noise pulses worsen the detector occupancy, while the low fill-factor reduces the detec...

  1. A Perspective on the Future of High Efficiency Engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagner, Robert M [ORNL] [ORNL; Curran, Scott [ORNL] [ORNL; Green Jr, Johney Boyd [ORNL] [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    New fuel economy standards and emissions regulations are accelerating the development of new engine technologies, sensors, and on-board computing. These developments will enable unprecedented engine control, which will in turn enable real-world implementations of low temperature combustion, high-speed controls, and other high efficiency engine technologies. With this expanded flexibility in engine design and control, the challenge will now be the exponential increase in the design and calibration space and the need for the development of new simulations, optimization methods, and self-learning control methodologies. This manuscript provides historical and future perspectives on the opportunities and challenges of this unparalleled technology growth on the next generation of high efficiency engines.

  2. Technology and the Box

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maitland, Padma

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    its explorations of technology in partnership with radicalPadma Maitland Technology and the Box The room is thedisciplines. The theme of “Technology and the Box” emerged

  3. Hydrogen Technologies Group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hydrogen Technologies Group at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory advances the Hydrogen Technologies and Systems Center's mission by researching a variety of hydrogen technologies.

  4. Water Requirements for Future Energy production in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sathaye, Jayant A.; Ritschard, R.L.

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    FOR FUTURE ENERGY PRODUCTION STATE'S PERSPECTIVE. CALIFORNIAREQUIREMENTS FOR FUTURE ENERGY PRODUCTION IN CALIFORNIAREQUIREMENTS POR FUTURE ENERGY PRODUCTION IN CALIFORNIA

  5. Water Requirements for Future Energy production in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sathaye, J.A.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    FOR FUTURE ENERGY PRODUCTION STATE'S PERSPECTIVE. CALIFORNIAREQUIREMENTS FOR FUTURE ENERGY PRODUCTION IN CALIFORNIAREQUIREMENTS POR FUTURE ENERGY PRODUCTION IN CALIFORNIA

  6. Technological Change, Industry Structure and the Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Andrew

    applied to the projection of GHG emissions from the energy sector" (p.141). This paper extends the work qualitatively in terms of changes in production scale and resource intensity and their resulting impact technological changes are bound to have important implications for the future state of the environment

  7. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2009 Advanced Vehicle Technology...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Vehicle Technology Analysis and Evaluation Activities and Heavy Vehicle Systems Optimization Program Annual Progress Report Vehicle Technologies Office: 2009 Advanced Vehicle...

  8. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2008 Advanced Vehicle Technology...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Vehicle Technology Analysis and Evaluation Activities and Heavy Vehicle Systems Optimization Program Annual Progress Report Vehicle Technologies Office: 2008 Advanced Vehicle...

  9. Dezincing Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dudek, F.J.; Daniels, E.J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Energy Service Div.; Morgan, W.A. [Metal Recovery Technologies, Inc., East Chicago, IN (United States)

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Half of the steel produced in the US is derived from scrap. With zinc-coated prompt scrap increasing fivefold since 1980, steel-makers are feeling the effect of increased contaminant loads on their operations. The greatest concern is the cost of treatment before disposal of waste dusts and water that arise from remelting zinc-coated scrap. An economic process is needed to strip and recover the zinc from scrap to provide a low residual scrap for steel- and iron-making. Metal Recovery Technologies, Inc., with the assistance of Argonne National Laboratory, have been developing a caustic leach dezincing process for upgrading galvanized stamping plant scrap into clean scrap with recovery of the zinc. With further development the technology could also process galvanized scrap from obsolete automobiles. This paper will review: (1) the status of recent pilot plant operations and plans for a commercial demonstration facility with a dezincing capacity of up to 250,000 tons/year, (2) the economics of caustic dezincing, and (3) benefits of decreased cost of environmental compliance, raw material savings, and improved operations with use of dezinced scrap.

  10. Heavy Duty Vehicle Futures Analysis.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Askin, Amanda Christine; Barter, Garrett; West, Todd H.; Manley, Dawn Kataoka

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes work performed for an Early Career Research and Development project. This project developed a heavy-duty vehicle (HDV) sector model to assess the factors influencing alternative fuel and efficiency technology adoption. This model builds on a Sandia light duty vehicle sector model and provides a platform for assessing potential impacts of technological advancements developed at the Combustion Research Facility. Alternative fuel and technology adoption modeling is typically developed around a small set of scenarios. This HDV sector model segments the HDV sector and parameterizes input values, such as fuel prices, efficiencies, and vehicle costs. This parameterization enables sensitivity and trade space analyses to identify the inputs that are most associated with outputs of interest, such as diesel consumption and greenhouse gas emissions. Thus this analysis tool enables identification of the most significant HDV sector drivers that can be used to support energy security and climate change goals.

  11. Transplanckian collisions at future accelerators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Riccardo Rattazzi

    2002-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Scattering at transplanckian energies offers model independent tests of TeV scale gravity. Black-hole production is one spectacular signal, though a full calculation of the cross section is not yet available. Another signal is given by gravitational elastic scattering, which is maybe less spectacular but which can be nicely computed in the forward region using the eikonal approximation. In this talk I discuss the distinctive signatures of eikonalized scattering at future accelerators.

  12. Future Vision for Instrumentation, Information and Control Modernization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ken D. Thomas

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Future Vision of a transformed nuclear plant operating model based on an integrated digital environment has been developed as part of the Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control (II&C) research pathway, under the Light Water Reactor (LWR) Sustainability Program. This is a research and development program sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), performed in close collaboration with the nuclear utility industry, to provide the technical foundations for licensing and managing the long-term, safe and economical operation of current nuclear power plants. II&C has been identified as a potential life-limiting issue for the domestic LWR fleet in addressing the reliability and aging concerns of the legacy systems in service today. The Future Vision is based on a digital architecture that encompasses all aspects of plant operations and support, integrating plant systems, plant work processes, and plant workers in a seamless digital environment to enhance nuclear safety, increase productivity, and improve overall plant performance. Pilot projects are being conducted as the means for industry to gain confidence in these new technologies for use in nuclear plant work activities. The pilot projects introduce new digital technologies into the nuclear plant operating environment at host operating plants to demonstrate and validate them for production usage. In turn, the pilot project technologies serve as the stepping stones to the eventual seamless digital environment as described in the Future Vision. Initial project results confirm that the technologies can address provide substantial efficiency and human performance benefits while resolving the reliability and aging concerns.

  13. Northwest Regional Technology Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northwest Regional Technology Center for Homeland Security The Northwest Regional Technology Center and deployment of technologies that are effective homeland security solutions for the region, and accelerate technology transfer to the national user community. Foster a collaborative spirit across agencies

  14. CSIR TECHNOLOGY AWARDS -2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jayaram, Bhyravabotla

    CSIR TECHNOLOGY AWARDS - 2013 GUIDELINES & PROFORMAE FOR NOMINATIONS Planning and Performance 2013 #12;CSIR TECHNOLOGY AWARDS BRIEF DETAILS ,,CSIR Technology Awards were instituted in 1990 to encourage multi-disciplinary in- house team efforts and external interaction for technology development

  15. Maps of crude oil futures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Masters, C.D.

    1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Crude Oil Futures presentation shows their concept of the quantity of oil possibly present (the combination of conventional demonstrated reserves plus undiscovered recoverable resources) within the areas outlined. The Crude Oil Futures is not as an exploration map but as a perspective on the distribution of world oil. The occurrence of oil is, after all, a function of particular geologic factors that are not everywhere present. Furthermore, large amounts of oil can occur only where the several necessary independent variables (geologic factors) combine optimally. In the Western Hemisphere, similar minimal crude oil futures are shown for North America and South America. This similarity is a reflection not of similar geology but rather of the fact that most of the oil has already been produced from North America, whereas South America as a whole (except for Venezuela) possesses a geology less likely to produce oil. In Europe, Africa, and Asia, four regions are dominant: the Middle East, Libya, North Sea, and west Siberia. Paleogeography and source rock distribution were keys to this distribution - the Middle East and Libya reflecting the Tethyan association, and the North Sea and west Siberia benefitting from the Late Jurassic marine transgression into geographic environments where ocean circulation was restricted by tectonic events.

  16. 5th International Seminar in Sustainable Technology Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Politčcnica de Catalunya, Universitat

    5th International Seminar in Sustainable Technology Development UPC, Vilanova i la Geltrú, 04 Master in Sustainable Development, and aims to connect experts, future researchers and policy · To increase the understanding of a sustainable development in the long term and the role of technology therein

  17. Helsinki University of Technology Department of Computer Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    mathematical problems. In [6], Gray surveys applications to complex analysis, algebraic geometry, differential Promotion Agency, Japan, as part of the R & D of Basic Technology for Future Industries ``New Models of Software Architecture'' project sponsored by NEDO (New Energy and Industrial Technology Developments

  18. Sestar Technologies, LLC Revolutionar y Solar Energy Products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jawitz, James W.

    Sestar Technologies, LLC Revolutionar y Solar Energy Products Sestar Technologies, LLC (SESTAR) is developing revolutionary solar energy products that will be integral components in the ultimate solution to the world's current and future energy pro- grams. It will lead to paradigm shifts in a number of solar

  19. Clean coal technologies in electric power generation: a brief overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janos Beer; Karen Obenshain [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), MA (United States)

    2006-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper talks about the future clean coal technologies in electric power generation, including pulverized coal (e.g., advanced supercritical and ultra-supercritical cycles and fluidized-bed combustion), integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC), and CO{sub 2} capture technologies. 6 refs., 2 tabs.

  20. INL Technology Transfer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technology Transfer Through collaboration with industry partners, INL's Technology Deployment office makes available to American agencies and international organizations unique...

  1. Transportation Energy Futures Series: Freight Transportation Modal Shares: Scenarios for a Low-Carbon Future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brogan, J. J.; Aeppli, A. E.; Beagan, D. F.; Brown, A.; Fischer, M. J.; Grenzeback, L. R.; McKenzie, E.; Vimmerstedt, L.; Vyas, A. D.; Witzke, E.

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Truck, rail, water, air, and pipeline modes each serve a distinct share of the freight transportation market. The current allocation of freight by mode is the product of technologic, economic, and regulatory frameworks, and a variety of factors -- price, speed, reliability, accessibility, visibility, security, and safety -- influence mode. Based on a comprehensive literature review, this report considers how analytical methods can be used to project future modal shares and offers insights on federal policy decisions with the potential to prompt shifts to energy-efficient, low-emission modes. There are substantial opportunities to reduce the energy used for freight transportation, but it will be difficult to shift large volumes from one mode to another without imposing considerable additional costs on businesses and consumers. This report explores federal government actions that could help trigger the shifts in modal shares needed to reduce energy consumption and emissions. This is one in a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency effort to pinpoint underexplored strategies for reducing GHGs and petroleum dependence related to transportation.

  2. Solid-state lighting technology perspective.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsao, Jeffrey Yeenien; Coltrin, Michael Elliott

    2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solid-State Lighting (SSL) uses inorganic light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) to convert electricity into light for illumination. SSL has the potential for enormous energy savings and accompanying environmental benefits if its promise of 50% (or greater) energy efficiencies can be achieved. This report provides a broad summary of the technologies that underlie SSL. The applications for SSL and potential impact on U.S. and world-wide energy consumption, and impact on the human visual experience are discussed. The properties of visible light and different technical metrics to characterize its properties are summarized. The many factors contributing to the capital and operating costs for SSL and traditional lighting sources (incandescent, fluorescent, and high-intensity discharge lamps) are discussed, with extrapolations for future SSL goals. The technologies underlying LEDs and OLEDs are also described, including current and possible alternative future technologies and some of the present limitations.

  3. Science & Technology Review November/December 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bearinger, J P

    2008-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This months issue has the following articles: (1) Innovation Is Key to Prosperity and Security --Commentary by Erik J. Stenehjem; (2) Taking Ultrafast Snapshots of Material Changes--The dynamic transmission electron microscope captures images a million times faster than conventional instruments; (3) Automated Technology for Laser Fusion Systems--The first completely computer-controlled system for aligning laser beams is helping make fusion research possible; (4) Protecting the Nation through Secure Cargo--A new device tracks and monitors cargo containers during transit to improve national security; (5) Atom by Atom, Layer by Layer--Extremely thin sandwiches of materials called nanolaminates exhibit remarkable, highly useful properties; and (6) Predicting the Bizarre Properties of Plutonium--A supercomputing 'grand challenge' team has made highly precise predictions of the behavior of plutonium's most important solid phase.

  4. Challenge the future University of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuzmanov, Georgi

    #12;1. 24 hr NL 2. Trade 3. Craft 4. Free time 5. Environment 6. Water 7. Housing 8. Danger 9-info & Land Development Urbanism § Urban Design & Planning § Environmental Technology & Design Architectural Environment Stefan van der Spek § Associate Professor of Urban Design § Director Geomatics Educational

  5. PAVEMENT TECHNOLOGY UPDATE This Technology Transfer Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    PAVEMENT TECHNOLOGY UPDATE This Technology Transfer Program publication is funded by the Division of asphalt pavements. TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER PROGRAM JULY 2010, VOL. 2, NO. 1 Warm Mix Asphalt Hits the Road, and California LTAP Field Engineer, Technology Transfer Program, Institute of Transportation Studies, UC Berkeley

  6. PAVEMENT TECHNOLOGY UPDATE This Technology Transfer Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    PAVEMENT TECHNOLOGY UPDATE This Technology Transfer Program publication is funded by the Division solve the very serious problem of waste tire disposal. TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER PROGRAM SEPTEMBER 2009, VOL, University of California Pavement Research Center, and California LTAP Field Engineer, Technology Transfer

  7. Prospects for future experiments to search for nucleon decay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ayres, D.S.; Heller, K.; LoSecco, J.; Mann, A.K.; Marciano, W.; Shrock, R.E.; Thornton, R.K.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We review the status of theoretical expectations and experimental searches for nucleon decay, and predict the sensitivities which could be reached by future experiments. For the immediate future, we concur with the conclusions of the 1982 Summer Workshop on Proton Decay Experiments: all detectors now in operation or construction will be relatively insensitive to some potentially important decay modes. Next-generation experiments must therefore be designed to search for these modes, and should be undertaken whether or not present experiments detect nucleon decay in other modes. These future experiments should be designed to push the lifetime limits on all decay modes to the levels at which irreducible cosmic-ray neutrino-induced backgrounds become important. Since the technology for these next-generation experiments is available now, the timetable for starting work on them will be determined by funding constraints and not by the need for extensive development of detectors. Efforts to develop advanced detector techniques should also be pursued, in order to mount more sensitive searches than can be envisioned using current technology, or to provide the most precise measurements possible of the properties of the nucleon decay interaction if it should occur at a detectable rate.

  8. Hydrogen and OUr Energy Future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rick Tidball; Stu Knoke

    2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2003, President George W. Bush announced the Hydrogen Fuel Initiative to accelerate the research and development of hydrogen, fuel cell, and infrastructure technologies that would enable hydrogen fuel cell vehicles to reach the commercial market in the 2020 timeframe. The widespread use of hydrogen can reduce our dependence on imported oil and benefit the environment by reducing greenhouse gas emissions and criteria pollutant emissions that affect our air quality. The Energy Policy Act of 2005, passed by Congress and signed into law by President Bush on August 8, 2005, reinforces Federal government support for hydrogen and fuel cell technologies. Title VIII, also called the 'Spark M. Matsunaga Hydrogen Act of 2005' authorizes more than $3.2 billion for hydrogen and fuel cell activities intended to enable the commercial introduction of hydrogen fuel cell vehicles by 2020, consistent with the Hydrogen Fuel Initiative. Numerous other titles in the Act call for related tax and market incentives, new studies, collaboration with alternative fuels and renewable energy programs, and broadened demonstrations--clearly demonstrating the strong support among members of Congress for the development and use of hydrogen fuel cell technologies. In 2006, the President announced the Advanced Energy Initiative (AEI) to accelerate research on technologies with the potential to reduce near-term oil use in the transportation sector--batteries for hybrid vehicles and cellulosic ethanol--and advance activities under the Hydrogen Fuel Initiative. The AEI also supports research to reduce the cost of electricity production technologies in the stationary sector such as clean coal, nuclear energy, solar photovoltaics, and wind energy.

  9. Future directions in inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bodner, S.E. (Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC (United States))

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The author discusses future directions for the ICF program. At this time there is still uncertainty on a number of key issues necessary to decide on what type of a National Ignition Facility should be constructed. Mechanisms are in place to answer these questions. The author offers his opinions of where the program is likely to proceed. Technology wise indications are that direct drive heating has the best chance of reaching ignition and high gain. This has the advantage of making all three major user programs happy, namely weapons physics, weapons effects, and electrical energy. The demand for and price of energy in the country will have a major impact on the way the program is developed. From the laser fusion side the most promising drivers at present seem to be KrF lasers, and a major concern for these systems is whether the peak to valley nonuniformities can be reduced to the 1 to 2% level when delivered to the target in order to avoid driving instabilities.

  10. Coal: America's energy future. Volume I

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2006-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman requested the National Coal Council in April 2005 a report identifying the challenges and opportunities of more fully exploring the USA's domestic coal resources to meet the nations' future energy needs. This resultant report addresses the Secretary's request in the context of the President's focus, with eight findings and recommendations that would use technology to leverage the USA's extensive coal assets and reduce dependence on imported energy. Volume I outlines these findings and recommendations. Volume II provides technical data and case histories to support the findings and recommendations. Chapter headings of Volume I are: Coal-to-Liquids to Produce 2.6 MMbbl/d; Coal-to-Natural Gas to Produce 4.0 Tcf Per Year; Coal-to-Clean Electricity; Coal to Produce Ethanol; Coal-to-Hydrogen; Enhanced Oil and Gas (Coalbed Methane); Recovery as Carbon Management Strategies; Delineate U.S. Coal Reserves and Transportation Constraints as Part of an Effort to Maximize U.S. Coal Production; and Penn State Study, 'Economic Benefits of Coal Conversion Investments'.

  11. World energy: Building a sustainable future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schipper, L.; Meyers, S.

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As the 20th century draws to a close, both individual countries and the world community face challenging problems related to the supply and use energy. These include local and regional environmental impacts, the prospect of global climate and sea level change associated with the greenhouse effect, and threats to international relations in connection with oil supply or nuclear proliferation. For developing countries, the financial cost of providing energy to provide basic needs and fuel economic development pose an additional burden. To assess the magnitude of future problems and the potential effectiveness of response strategies, it is important to understand how and why energy use has changed in the post and where it is heading. This requires study of the activities for which energy is used, and of how people and technology interact to provide the energy services that are desired. The authors and their colleagues have analyzed trends in energy use by sector for most of the world`s major energy-consuming countries. The approach we use considers three key elements in each sector: the level of activity, structural change, and energy intensity, which expresses the amount of energy used for various activities. At a disaggregated level, energy intensity is indicative of energy efficiency. But other factors besides technical efficiency also shape intensity.

  12. World energy: Building a sustainable future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schipper, L.; Meyers, S.

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As the 20th century draws to a close, both individual countries and the world community face challenging problems related to the supply and use energy. These include local and regional environmental impacts, the prospect of global climate and sea level change associated with the greenhouse effect, and threats to international relations in connection with oil supply or nuclear proliferation. For developing countries, the financial cost of providing energy to provide basic needs and fuel economic development pose an additional burden. To assess the magnitude of future problems and the potential effectiveness of response strategies, it is important to understand how and why energy use has changed in the post and where it is heading. This requires study of the activities for which energy is used, and of how people and technology interact to provide the energy services that are desired. The authors and their colleagues have analyzed trends in energy use by sector for most of the world's major energy-consuming countries. The approach we use considers three key elements in each sector: the level of activity, structural change, and energy intensity, which expresses the amount of energy used for various activities. At a disaggregated level, energy intensity is indicative of energy efficiency. But other factors besides technical efficiency also shape intensity.

  13. US/China Energy and Environmental Technology Center (EETC) international business development and technology transfer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hsieh, S.T. [Tulane Univ., New Orleans, LA (United States). US/China Inst.; Atwood, T. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States); Qiu Daxiong [Tsinghua Univ., Beijing (China); Zhang Guocheng [State Science and Technology Commission, Beijing (China)

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Since January 1997, the US/China Energy and Environmental Technology Center (EETC) in Beijing has been jointly operated by Tulane University and Tsinghua University. EETC is established to encourage the adoption of technologies for energy production with improved environmental performance which are essential for supporting economic growth and managing the Global Warming and Climate Change issues. International cooperation is critical to insure the environmental and energy security on a global basis. For example, the US has acquired a great deal of useful experience in clean coal technology which has been demonstrated with major utilities in commercial operations. The adaption of, and the installation of, clean coal technology should be given high priority. Worldwide, the continuous exchange of information and technology between developed and developing nations relating to the current and future clean coal technologies is of great importance. Developed nations which possess environmental responsive technologies and financial resources should work closely with developing nations to facilitate technology transfer and trade of technologies. International cooperation will lower the cost of deploying clean coal technologies directed toward the clean production of energy. This paper presents the updated activities of EETC on facilitating technology transfer and promoting the clean use of coal to satisfy growing energy demand in China.

  14. PLANS FOR FUTURE MEGAWATT FACILITIES.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ROSER,T.

    2004-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Proton accelerators producing beam powers of up to 1 MW are presently either operating or under construction and designs for Multi-Megawatt facilities are being developed. High beam power has applications in the production of high intensity secondary beams of neutrons, muons, kaons and neutrinos as well as in nuclear waste transmutation and accelerator-driven sub-critical reactors. Each of these applications has additional requirements on beam energy and duty cycle. This paper will review how present designs for future Multi-Megawatt facilities meet these requirements and will also review the experience with present high power facilities.

  15. Physics Reach at Future Colliders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krawczyk, Maria [Institute of Theoretical Physics, University of Warsaw, ul. Hoz-dota 69, 00-681 Warsaw (Poland); CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland)

    2007-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The physics reach at future colliders is discussed, with focus on the Higgs sector. First we present the Standard Model and some results obtained at the existing high-energy hadron collider, Tevatron, together with the corresponding expectations for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), which starts operating in 2008. Then we discuss important low energy measurements: the anomalous magnetic moment for muon and the leptonic B-decay together with b{yields}s{gamma}. Finally the potential of the planned e{sup +}e{sup -} International Linear Collider (ILC) and its possible option Photon Linear Collider (PLC), e{gamma} and {gamma}{gamma}, is shortly presented.

  16. The Future of Atomic Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism in Layered NbS2 and NbSe2DifferentThe Five FastestFuture is bright

  17. The Future of Scientific Workflow

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism in Layered NbS2 and NbSe2DifferentThe Five FastestFuturePowering

  18. Future Use | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun with Big Sky Learning Fun with Big SkyDIII-D ExplorationsFuture Physics

  19. The Future of Home Heating

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up from theDepartment of Energy TechnicalFlowNationThe Facts on GasTheThe Future

  20. Future missions require improving LANSCE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickr Flickr Editor's note:ComputingFusion roadmapping Subscribe toFuture

  1. 2012 Vehicle Technologies Market Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, Stacy Cagle [ORNL; Diegel, Susan W [ORNL; Boundy, Robert Gary [ORNL

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory s Center for Transportation Analysis developed and published the first Vehicle Technologies Market Report in 2008. Three editions of the report have been published since that time. This 2012 report details the major trends in U.S. light vehicle and medium/heavy truck markets as well as the underlying trends that caused them. The opening section on Energy and Economics discusses the role of transportation energy and vehicle markets on a national scale. The following section examines light-duty vehicle use, markets, manufacture, and supply chains. The discussion of medium and heavy trucks offers information on truck sales and fuel use. The technology section offers information on alternative fuel vehicles and infrastructure, and the policy section concludes with information on recent, current, and near-future Federal policies like the Corporate Average Fuel Economy standards.

  2. Addressing an Uncertain Future Using Scenario Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris

    2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) has had a longstanding goal of introducing uncertainty into the analysis it routinely conducts in compliance with the Government Performance and Results Act (GPRA) and for strategic management purposes. The need to introduce some treatment of uncertainty arises both because it would be good general management practice, and because intuitively many of the technologies under development by EERE have a considerable advantage in an uncertain world. For example, an expected kWh output from a wind generator in a future year, which is not exposed to volatile and unpredictable fuel prices, should be truly worth more than an equivalent kWh from an alternative fossil fuel fired technology. Indeed, analysts have attempted to measure this value by comparing the prices observed in fixed-price natural gas contracts compared to ones in which buyers are exposed to market prices (see Bolinger, Wiser, and Golove and (2004)). In addition to the routine reasons for exploring uncertainty given above, the history of energy markets appears to have exhibited infrequent, but troubling, regime shifts, i.e., historic turning points at which the center of gravity or fundamental nature of the system appears to have abruptly shifted. Figure 1 below shows an estimate of how the history of natural gas fired generating costs has evolved over the last three decades. The costs shown incorporate both the well-head gas price and an estimate of how improving generation technology has gradually tended to lower costs. The purpose of this paper is to explore scenario analysis as a method for introducing uncertainty into EERE's forecasting in a manner consistent with the preceding observation. The two questions are how could it be done, and what is its academic basis, if any. Despite the interest in uncertainty methods, applying them poses some major hurdles because of the heavy reliance of EERE on forecasting tools that are deterministic in nature, such as the Energy Information Administration's (EIA's) National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). NEMS is the source of the influential Annual Energy Outlook whose business-as-usual (BAU) case, the Reference Case, forms the baseline for most of the U.S. energy policy discussion. NEMS is an optimizing model because: 1. it iterates to an equilibrium among modules representing the supply, demand, and energy conversion subsectors; and 2. several subsectoral models are individually solved using linear programs (LP). Consequently, it is deeply rooted in the recent past and any effort to simulate the consequences of a major regime shift as depicted in Figure 1 must come by applying an exogenously specified scenario. And, more generally, simulating futures that lie outside of our recent historic experience, even if they do not include regime switches suggest some form of scenario approach. At the same time, the statistical validity of scenarios that deviate significantly outside the ranges of historic inputs should be questioned.

  3. Evolution of Ion Implantation Technology and its Contribution to Semiconductor Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsukamoto, Katsuhiro [Mitsubishi Electric Corporation (Japan); Kuroi, Takashi; Kawasaki, Yoji [Renesas Electronics Corporation (Japan)

    2011-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Industrial aspects of the evolution of ion implantation technology will be reviewed, and their impact on the semiconductor industry will be discussed. The main topics will be the technology's application to the most advanced, ultra scaled CMOS, and to power devices, as well as productivity improvements in implantation technology. Technological insights into future developments in ion-related technologies for emerging industries will also be presented.

  4. Emerging energy-efficient industrial technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, N.; Worrell, E.; Ruth, M.; Price, L.; Elliott, R.N.; Shipley, A.M.; Thorne, J.

    2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    U.S. industry consumes approximately 37 percent of the nation's energy to produce 24 percent of the nation's GDP. Increasingly, industry is confronted with the challenge of moving toward a cleaner, more sustainable path of production and consumption, while increasing global competitiveness. Technology will be essential for meeting these challenges. At some point, businesses are faced with investment in new capital stock. At this decision point, new and emerging technologies compete for capital investment alongside more established or mature technologies. Understanding the dynamics of the decision-making process is important to perceive what drives technology change and the overall effect on industrial energy use. The assessment of emerging energy-efficient industrial technologies can be useful for: (1) identifying R&D projects; (2) identifying potential technologies for market transformation activities; (3) providing common information on technologies to a broad audience of policy-makers; and (4) offering new insights into technology development and energy efficiency potentials. With the support of PG&E Co., NYSERDA, DOE, EPA, NEEA, and the Iowa Energy Center, staff from LBNL and ACEEE produced this assessment of emerging energy-efficient industrial technologies. The goal was to collect information on a broad array of potentially significant emerging energy-efficient industrial technologies and carefully characterize a sub-group of approximately 50 key technologies. Our use of the term ''emerging'' denotes technologies that are both pre-commercial but near commercialization, and technologies that have already entered the market but have less than 5 percent of current market share. We also have chosen technologies that are energy-efficient (i.e., use less energy than existing technologies and practices to produce the same product), and may have additional ''non-energy benefits.'' These benefits are as important (if not more important in many cases) in influencing the decision on whether to adopt an emerging technology. The technologies were characterized with respect to energy efficiency, economics, and environmental performance. The results demonstrate that the United States is not running out of technologies to improve energy efficiency and economic and environmental performance, and will not run out in the future. We show that many of the technologies have important non-energy benefits, ranging from reduced environmental impact to improved productivity and worker safety, and reduced capital costs.

  5. Market characteristics of future oil tanker operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Willemann, Simmy Dhawan

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work analyzes the market characteristics of future oil tanker operations with a particular emphasis on those aspects which will have a potential impact on the design of future vessels. The market analysis model used ...

  6. Hedging Milk with BFP Futures and Options

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, David P.; McCorkle, Dean; Schwart Jr., Robert B.; Jones, Rodney

    1999-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Basic Formula Price (BFP) milk futures and options can be used to hedge, or lock in, milk prices in order to manage milk price fluctuations. This publication offers information on futures contracts, basis, cash settlement and margin call. There also...

  7. Future Forests Program Plan 2013 2016

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is that knowledge produced by Future Forests will make possible an increased and yet, we envision that knowledge produced by Future Forests will contribute for biodiversity conservation, water protection, recreational needs, climate change mitigation

  8. Building Blocks for the Future of Manufacturing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for the Future of Manufacturing Building Blocks for the Future of Manufacturing Scott Smith 2011.05.04 Even though we grew up on opposite sides of the world, my colleague...

  9. What are future petrochemical feedstocks?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manning, T.J. [Purvin and Gertz, Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Continuing growth in olefins and aromatics demand will require investment in production facilities worldwide. Feedstock selection for these new plants must take into account changing co-product demand patterns and production technology. Feedstock availability and logistics will be the most important considerations. Competition with fuel demand will encourage petrochemical producers to increase feedstock integration, to expand feedstock flexibility and to seek new feedstock sources. The paper discusses the following feedstocks: ethane, propane, butane, naphtha, gas oil, and condensate.

  10. Cathode R&D for Future Light Sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dowell, D.H.; /SLAC; Bazarov, I.; Dunham, B.; /Cornell U., CLASSE; Harkay, K.; /Argonne; Hernandez-Garcia; /Jefferson Lab; Legg, R.; /Wisconsin U., SRC; Padmore, H.; /LBL, Berkeley; Rao, T.; Smedley, J.; /Brookhaven; Wan, W.; /LBL, Berkeley

    2010-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reviews the requirements and current status of cathodes for accelerator applications, and proposes a research and development plan for advancing cathode technology. Accelerator cathodes need to have long operational lifetimes and produce electron beams with a very low emittance. The two principal emission processes to be considered are thermionic and photoemission with the photocathodes being further subdivided into metal and semi-conductors. Field emission cathodes are not included in this analysis. The thermal emittance is derived and the formulas used to compare the various cathode materials. To date, there is no cathode which provides all the requirements needed for the proposed future light sources. Therefore a three part research plan is described to develop cathodes for these future light source applications.

  11. AVESTAR Center for clean energy plant operators of the future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zitney, S.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Clean energy plants in the modern grid era will increasingly exploit carbon capture, utilization, and storage (CCUS), fuel/product flexibility, and load following. Integrated power/process plants will require next generation of well-trained engineering and operations professionals. High-fidelity dynamic simulators are well suited for training, education, and R&D on clean energy plant operations. Combining Operator Training System (OTS) with 3D virtual Immersive Training System (ITS) enables simultaneous training of control room and plant field operators of the future. Strong collaboration between industry, academia, and government is required to address advanced R&D challenges. AVESTAR Center brings together simulation technology and world-class expertise focused on accelerating development of clean energy plants and operators of the future.

  12. Systems analysis of past, present, and future chemical terrorism scenarios.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoette, Trisha Marie

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Throughout history, as new chemical threats arose, strategies for the defense against chemical attacks have also evolved. As a part of an Early Career Laboratory Directed Research and Development project, a systems analysis of past, present, and future chemical terrorism scenarios was performed to understand how the chemical threats and attack strategies change over time. For the analysis, the difficulty in executing chemical attack was evaluated within a framework of three major scenario elements. First, historical examples of chemical terrorism were examined to determine how the use of chemical threats, versus other weapons, contributed to the successful execution of the attack. Using the same framework, the future of chemical terrorism was assessed with respect to the impact of globalization and new technologies. Finally, the efficacy of the current defenses against contemporary chemical terrorism was considered briefly. The results of this analysis justify the need for continued diligence in chemical defense.

  13. Urologic robots and future directions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mozer, Pierre; Stoianovici, Dan; 10.1097/MOU.0b013e32831cc1ba

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Robot-assisted laparoscopic surgery in urology has gained immense popularity with the daVinci system, but a lot of research teams are working on new robots. The purpose of this study is to review current urologic robots and present future development directions. RECENT FINDINGS: Future systems are expected to advance in two directions: improvements of remote manipulation robots and developments of image-guided robots. SUMMARY: The final goal of robots is to allow safer and more homogeneous outcomes with less variability of surgeon performance, as well as new tools to perform tasks on the basis of medical transcutaneous imaging, in a less invasive way, at lower costs. It is expected that improvements for a remote system could be augmented in reality, with haptic feedback, size reduction, and development of new tools for natural orifice translumenal endoscopic surgery. The paradigm of image-guided robots is close to clinical availability and the most advanced robots are presented with end-use...

  14. National Engineers Week: Future City Competition

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2012-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    2011 Future Cities Competition inspires students all across South Carolina to pursue careers in environmental protection and engineering.

  15. European Strategy for Future Neutrino Physics

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A workshop to discuss the possibilities for future neutrino investigations in Europe and the links to CERN.

  16. The reduced environmental liability of clean coal technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leslie, A.C.D. [Energetics, Inc., Columbia, MD (United States); McMillen, M. [Energetics, Inc., Washington, DC (United States)

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper the authors will discuss the waste stream minimization that future commercially operated clean coal technologies can effect. They will explore the ability of these now-beginning-to-mature technologies to reduce those aspects of the emission streams that have greatest potential for what the authors term as environmental liability. Environmental liability is manifested in a variety of forms. There are both current liabilities and future liabilities. In addition, uncertainties may reside in future anticipated regulatory compliance and the costs of such compliance. Exposure to liability translates into perceived risk which creates an air of uncertainty to the power industry and its lenders who provide the capital to build new power plants. In the context of electric power generation, newer, high efficiency power generation technologies developed in the course of the Clean Coal Technology Program of the US Department of Energy result in reduced waste stream emissions when compared against more aging conventional combustion technologies. This paper will discuss how the introduction of new clean coal technologies will help balance the conflict between adverse environmental impact and the global demand for increased energy. The authors will discuss how clean coal technologies will facilitate compliance with future air standards that may otherwise expose power producers to modification and cleanup costs, noncompliance penalties, or premature shut down.

  17. Future Internet Infrastructures for FI Prototyping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wichmann, Felix

    ++ Fraunhofer Institute FOKUS, Berlin ++ www.fokus.fraunhofer.de/go/innovation ++ 11­2009 #12;Future Internet Berlin AV de- partment (Architektur für Vermittlungskno- ten). Part of the Fraunhofer innovation clusFuture Internet Infrastructures for FI Prototyping NGN Evolution toward Future Internet Fraunhofer

  18. ENERGY WHITE PAPER Our energy future -

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ENERGY WHITE PAPER Our energy future - creating a low carbon economy and consumers. And we stand up for fair and open markets in the UK, Europe and the world. #12;Our energy future ENERGY WHITE PAPER Our energy future - creating a low carbon economy 1 Foreword

  19. Bachelor Thesis Future sustainable terraced houses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vellekoop, Michel

    Cardiff University August 4, 2014 #12;Colophon Title: Future sustainable residential buildings in Cardiff a first introduction about sustainability in the building sector. Collecting data about the future climateBachelor Thesis Future sustainable terraced houses in Cardiff Karin Ernst University of Twente

  20. People Strategy Fit for Our Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    People Strategy Fit for Our Future People Strategy 2011-2016 #12;#12;Fit for Our Future Tim. The implications of the Comprehensive Spending Review settlements in each country will mean big changes for many of our people. Fit for Our Future: People Strategy 2011-2016 | 1 The Executive Board and the rest of my

  1. Construction of block-coil high-field model dipoles for future hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blackburn, Raymond; Elliott, Tim; Henchel, William; McInturff, Al; McIntyre, Peter; Sattarov, Akhdior

    2002-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A family of high-field dipoles is being developed at Texas A&M University, as part of the program to improve the cost-effectiveness of superconducting magnet technology for future hadron colliders. The TAMU technology employs stress management, flux-plate control of persistent-current multipoles, conductor optimization using mixed-strand cable, and metal-filled bladders to provide pre-load and surface compliance. Construction details and status of the latest model dipole will be presented.

  2. The Electricity Transmission System Future Vision & Grid Challenges

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment of EnergyProgram (Alabama)Technology forto lead those involved in theThereFuture

  3. Plasma technology directory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ward, P.P.; Dybwad, G.L.

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Plasma Technology Directory has two main goals: (1) promote, coordinate, and share plasma technology experience and equipment within the Department of Energy; and (2) facilitate technology transfer to the commercial sector where appropriate. Personnel are averaged first by Laboratory and next by technology area. The technology areas are accelerators, cleaning and etching deposition, diagnostics, and modeling.

  4. Fujita LaboratoryTokyo Instituteof Technology Tokyo Instituteof Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fujita LaboratoryTokyo Instituteof Technology Tokyo Instituteof Technology Fujita LaboratoryTokyo Institute of Technology Tokyo Institute of Technology 231 #12;Fujita LaboratoryTokyo Instituteof Technology Tokyo Instituteof Technology 2 IT #12;Fujita LaboratoryTokyo Instituteof

  5. FY08 Engineering Research and Technology Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Minichino, C; McNichols, D

    2009-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the core research, development, and technology accomplishments in Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Engineering Directorate for FY2008. These efforts exemplify Engineering's more than 50-year history of developing and applying the technologies needed to support the Laboratory's national security missions. A partner in every major program and project at the Laboratory throughout its existence, Engineering has prepared for this role with a skilled workforce and technical resources developed through both internal and external venues. These accomplishments embody Engineering's mission: 'Enable program success today and ensure the Laboratory's vitality tomorrow.' Engineering's mission is carried out through basic research and technology development. Research is the vehicle for creating competencies that are cutting-edge, or require discovery-class groundwork to be fully understood. Our technology efforts are discipline-oriented, preparing research breakthroughs for broader application to a variety of Laboratory needs. The term commonly used for technology-based projects is 'reduction to practice.' As we pursue this two-pronged approach, an enormous range of technological capabilities result. This report combines our work in research and technology into one volume, organized into thematic technical areas: Engineering Modeling and Simulation; Measurement Technologies; Micro/Nano-Devices and Structures; Engineering Systems for Knowledge and Inference; and Energy Manipulation. Our investments in these areas serve not only known programmatic requirements of today and tomorrow, but also anticipate the breakthrough engineering innovations that will be needed in the future.

  6. Technology Decisions Under Architectural Uncertainty: Informing Investment Decisions Through Tradespace Exploration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Weck, Olivier L.

    Technology Decisions Under Architectural Uncertainty: Informing Investment Decisions Through§ Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 DOI: 10.2514/1.A32562 Although NASA has-term investment in the enabling technologies that will be required for these future systems. Given

  7. Economics and regulation of petroleum futures markets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Because the futures market in petroleum products is a relatively recent phenomenon, the implications of public policies formulated for that market have not yet been fully explored. To provide the Office of Competition of the Department of Energy (DOE) with sufficient information to assess policy alternatives, Resource Planning Associates, Inc. (RPA) was asked to analyze the development of the futures market in No. 2 oil, assess the potential for futures markets in other petroleum products, and identify policy alternatives available to DOE. To perform this analysis, the criteria for a viable futures market was established first. Then, the experience to date with the 18-month-old futures market in No. 2 oil was examined, and the potential for viable futures markets in No. 6 oil, gasoline, jet fuel, and crude oil was assessed. Finally, how existing DOE regulations and prospective actions might affect petroleum futures market development was investigated.

  8. Science and technology for industrial ecology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilmartin, T.J.; Allenby, B.R.

    1996-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Scientific and technological communities have a significant role to play and responsibility for the evolution of global sustainability (continuously improving quality of life into the indefinite future). Sustainability is not possible without a substantially improved science and technology basis for industrial ecology. Society needs data and understanding of complex ecological issues to govern itself in a sustainable manner. We should: support and develop multi-disciplinary programs which create the scientific basis for understanding natural and anthropogenic complex systems and for developing environmentally and economically efficient technology; demonstrate a systems-based approach to science and technology issues which is life-cycle comprehensive, integrates environmental considerations, and promotes conservation of natural resources; and encourage development of responsible, technically and scientifically valid, cost-effective environmental laws and practices.

  9. Northwestern University Information Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shull, Kenneth R.

    ... Integrated Technology Classrooms Online Lectures Collaborative Course Management Tools ...in any teaching environment Classroom Laptop Mobile Device www.it.northwestern.edu NUITAcademic&ResearchTechnologiesNorthwestern University Information Technology (NUIT) is committed to supporting faculty research

  10. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Carbon Fiber Technology...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Carbon Fiber Technology Facility Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Carbon Fiber Technology Facility Presentation given...

  11. Technology Readiness Assessment (TRA)/Technology Maturation Plan...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technology Readiness Assessment (TRA)Technology Maturation Plan (TMP) Process Guide Technology Readiness Assessment (TRA)Technology Maturation Plan (TMP) Process Guide This...

  12. Fuel Cell Technologies Office Science and Technology Policy Fellowship...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fuel Cell Technologies Office Science and Technology Policy Fellowship Opportunities Available Fuel Cell Technologies Office Science and Technology Policy Fellowship Opportunities...

  13. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2010 Fuel Technologies R&D Annual...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    10 Fuel Technologies R&D Annual Progress Report Vehicle Technologies Office: 2010 Fuel Technologies R&D Annual Progress Report The Fuels Technologies subprogram supports fuels and...

  14. 2010 DOE EERE Vehicle Technologies Program Merit Review ? Technology...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Technology Integration 2010 DOE EERE Vehicle Technologies Program Merit Review Technology Integration Technology integration merit review results 2010amr08.pdf More...

  15. Hydrogen and the materials of a sustainable energy future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zalbowitz, M. [ed.

    1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Educator`s Workshop (NEW): Update 96 was held October 27--30, 1996, and was hosted by Los Alamos National Laboratory. This was the 11th annual conference aimed at improving the teaching of material science, engineering and technology by updating educators and providing laboratory experiments on emerging technology for teaching fundamental and newly evolving materials concepts. The Hydrogen Education Outreach Activity at Los Alamos National Laboratory organized a special conference theme: Hydrogen and the Materials of a Sustainable Energy Future. The hydrogen component of the NEW:Update 96 offered the opportunity for educators to have direct communication with scientists in laboratory settings, develop mentor relationship with laboratory staff, and bring leading edge materials/technologies into the classroom to upgrade educational curricula. Lack of public education and understanding about hydrogen is a major barrier for initial implementation of hydrogen energy technologies and is an important prerequisite for acceptance of hydrogen outside the scientific/technical research communities. The following materials contain the papers and view graphs from the conference presentations. In addition, supplemental reference articles are also included: a general overview of hydrogen and an article on handling hydrogen safely. A resource list containing a curriculum outline, bibliography, Internet resources, and a list of periodicals often publishing relevant research articles can be found in the last section.

  16. States & Emerging Energy Technologies

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    operations and maintenance, and occupant impact, so not only trying to quantify building energy or technology energy performance, but also the impacts of that technology on users....

  17. Hydropower Program Technology Overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    New fact sheets for the DOE Office of Power Technologies (OPT) that provide technology overviews, description of DOE programs, and market potential for each OPT program area.

  18. Technology Zones (Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Virginia’s 26 designated Technology Zones offer tax relief in the form of abatements, credits, deductions, deferrals, exemptions, or rebates. Local governments may designate technology zones to...

  19. Technology Transfer Reports

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E) Oil & Gas Technology Transfer Initiatives USEFUL LINKS Association of University Technology Managers (AUTM) Federal Laboratory...

  20. Green Purchasing & Green Technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Purchasing & Technology Goals 6 & 7: Green Purchasing & Green Technology Our goal is to purchase and use environmentally sustainable products whenever possible and to implement...

  1. Technology To Realize

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in Technology To Realize Fusion Energy in the International Context Kathryn A. McCarthy Deputy Associate Laboratory Director Nuclear Science & Technology Idaho National Laboratory...

  2. TECHNOLOGY READINESS ASSESSMENT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DECEMBER 2012 Pathway for readying the next generation of affordable clean energy technology -Carbon Capture, Utilization, and Storage (CCUS) 2012 TECHNOLOGY READINESS ASSESSMENT...

  3. Technology Integration Overview

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Technology Integration Overview Dennis A. Smith - Clean Cities Deployment Connie Bezanson - Vehicle Education June 17, 2014 VEHICLE TECHNOLOGIES OFFICE This presentation does not...

  4. Integrated Technology Deployment

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Integrated technology deployment is a comprehensive approach to implementing solutions that increase the use of energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies. Federal, state, and local...

  5. Fuel & Lubricant Technologies

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    May 15, 2012 Kevin Stork, Team Lead VTP Annual Merit Review VTP Fuel & Lubricant Technologies eere.energy.gov 2 | Vehicle Technologies Program Mission Enable advanced combustion...

  6. Technology Partnering Mechanisms

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    expand a business with INL technologies, or require business support our Technology Transfer team is available to discuss the following contractual mechanisms: Cooperative...

  7. Vehicle Technologies Office: News

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    EERE intends to issue, on behalf of its Fuel Cell Technologies Office, a Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) entitled "Fuel Cell Technologies Incubator: Innovations in Fuel Cell and Hydrogen...

  8. Morgantown Energy Technology Center, technology summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document has been prepared by the DOE Environmental Management (EM) Office of Technology Development (OTD) to highlight its research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation activities funded through the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC). Technologies and processes described have the potential to enhance DOE`s cleanup and waste management efforts, as well as improve US industry`s competitiveness in global environmental markets. METC`s R&D programs are focused on commercialization of technologies that will be carried out in the private sector. META has solicited two PRDAs for EM. The first, in the area of groundwater and soil technologies, resulted in twenty-one contact awards to private sector and university technology developers. The second PRDA solicited novel decontamination and decommissioning technologies and resulted in eighteen contract awards. In addition to the PRDAs, METC solicited the first EM ROA in 1993. The ROA solicited research in a broad range of EM-related topics including in situ remediation, characterization, sensors, and monitoring technologies, efficient separation technologies, mixed waste treatment technologies, and robotics. This document describes these technology development activities.

  9. Solar Energy in Inland Southern California: The Future Is Now Feb. 6, 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Riverside, University of

    Solar Energy in Inland Southern California: The Future Is Now Feb. 6, 2014 This conference to learn about the state of solar energy by discussing the latest technology, public policy and opportunities for incorporating solar energy in their communities, including how the marketplace works, local

  10. Solar Energy in Inland Southern California: The Future is Now The University of California, Riverside

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Riverside, University of

    Agenda Solar Energy in Inland Southern California: The Future is Now The University of California Southern California Research Initiative for Solar Energy February 6th 2014, 7:30 am - 6:00 pm and the general public to learn about the state of solar energy by discussing the latest technology, public policy

  11. Earth'sFuture Socio-hydrology: Use-inspired water sustainability science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Konar, Megan

    Earth'sFuture Socio-hydrology: Use-inspired water sustainability science for the Anthropocene M for Islamic Architecture, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA, 7Department is at the core of the most difficult sustainability challenges facing humans in the modern era, involving

  12. Goal Practice & Experience: Status Quo and Future for Industrial Scale Biomass Energy Development in China

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Breakout Session 3D—Fostering Technology Adoption III: International Market Opportunities in Bioenergy Goal Practice & Experience : Status Quo and Future for Industrial Scale Biomass Energy Development in China Huiyong Zhuang, Research Professor, National Energy Research Center of Liquid Biofuel, National Bio Energy Co., Ltd.

  13. FUTURES OF AUTOMOBILE INDUSTRY AND CHALLENGES ON SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT AND MOBILITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    FUTURES OF AUTOMOBILE INDUSTRY AND CHALLENGES ON SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT AND MOBILITY BRANDĂ?O MONIZ for the next 10 to 20 years. But this exercise can not be focus only on the technical aspects of the automobile of the automobile industry, on the steps that should be taken and on the visions about technological needs

  14. Preparing the U.S. Foundation for Future Electric Energy Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Preparing the U.S. Foundation for Future Electric Energy Systems: A Strong Power and Energy large-scale penetration of Renewable and Alternative Energy technologies Maintain U.S. Electric Power Vehicles to reduce oil consumption, reduce carbon emissions, and store energy for support of the electric

  15. Fuel cells for a sustainable future II: stakeholder attitudes to the barriers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Andrew

    . #12;3 1. Introduction Fuel cells coupled with the hydrogen economy have been identified as keyFuel cells for a sustainable future II: stakeholder attitudes to the barriers and opportunities for stationary fuel cell technologies in the UK Michael Peters and Jane Powell November 2004 Tyndall Centre

  16. Multi-Path Transportation Futures Study - Lessons for the Transportati...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Multi-Path Transportation Futures Study - Lessons for the Transportation Energy Futures Study Multi-Path Transportation Futures Study - Lessons for the Transportation Energy...

  17. Biomass 2014: Growing the Future Bioeconomy | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Biomass 2014: Growing the Future Bioeconomy Biomass 2014: Growing the Future Bioeconomy Bioenergy: America's Energy Future is a short documentary film showcasing examples of...

  18. Technology Deployment List | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Technologies Technology Deployment Technology Deployment List Technology Deployment List The Federal Energy Management Program's (FEMP) Technology Deployment List features...

  19. Foundation futures: Energy saving opportunities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christian, J.E.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Significant energy savings will result from compliance to the foundation insulation recommendations in ASHRAE Standard 90.2P, /open quotes/Energy Efficient Design of New, Low-Rise Residential Buildings/close quotes/ (ASHRAE 1987). This paper summarizes an assessment of current US energy savings from foundation insulation and estimates future savings resulting from broad-scale adoption of ASHRAE 90.2P. The assessment is based on the premise that the detailed analysis behind ASHRAE 90.2P and its systematic method of determining insulation levels in a balanced manner will allow it to become the accepted base energy performance standard for all residential construction. The total energy currently being saved by foundation insulation (30% of 1.7 million new units) in one year's worth of new housing starts in the United States is estimated at 9.6 /times/ 10/sup 12/ Btu/yr (10.1 PJ/yr (petajoule = 10/sup 15/ joule)). The full compliance with ASHRAE 90.2P leads to more than a doubling of current foundation insulation energy savings. The extrapolation of existing practice and the addition of other contributions resulting from compliance with ASHRAE 90.2 lead to an estimated energy savings by the year 2010 between 0.38 and 0.45 quad/yr (400 and 475 PJ/yr (quad = 10/sup 15/ Btu)). 11 refs., 14 tabs., 7 figs.

  20. Opportunity for America: Mexico`s coal future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loose, V.W.

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study examines the history, current status and future prospects for increased coal use in Mexico. Environmental implications of the power-generation capacity expansion plans are examined in general terms. Mexican environmental law and regulations are briefly reviewed along with the new sense of urgency in the cleanup of existing environmental problems and avoidance of new problems as clearly mandated in recent Mexican government policy initiatives. It is expected that new capital facilities will need to incorporate the latest in process and technology to comply with existing environmental regulation. Technology developments which address these issues are identified. What opportunities have new initiatives caused by the recent diversification of Mexico`s energy economy offered US firms? This report looks at the potential future use of coal in the Mexican energy economy, examining this issue with an eye toward identifying markets that might be available to US coal producers and the best way to approach them. Market opportunities are identified by examining new developments in the Mexican economy generally and the energy economy particularly. These developments are examined in light of the current situation and the history which brought Mexico to its present status.

  1. Wind Plant Cost of Energy: Past and Future (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hand, M.

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation examines trends in wind plant cost of energy over the last several decades and discusses methods and examples of projections for future cost trends. First, the presentation explores cost trends for wind energy from the 1980s, where there had been an overall downward trend in wind plant energy costs. Underlying factors that influenced these trends, including turbine technology innovation for lower wind speed sites, are explored. Next, the presentation looks at projections for the future development of wind energy costs and discusses a variety of methods for establishing these projections including the use of learning curves, qualitative assessment using expert elicitation, and engineering-based analysis. A comparison of the methods is provided to explore their relative merits. Finally, a brief introduction is provided for the U.S. Department of Energy program-wide shift towards an integrative use of qualitative and quantitative methods for assessing the potential impacts of wind plant technology innovations on reducing the wind plant cost of energy.

  2. Climate Change Technology Scenarios: Energy, Emissions, and Economic Implications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Placet, Marylynn; Humphreys, Kenneth K.; Mahasenan, N Maha

    2004-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes three advanced technology scenarios and various illustrative cases developed by staff of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Climate Change Technology Program. These scenarios and illustrative cases explore the energy, emissions and economic implications of using advanced energy technologies and other climate change related technologies to reduce future emissions of greenhouse gases (GHGs). The cases were modeled using the Mini Climate Assessment Model (MiniCAM) developed by PNNL. The report describes the scenarios, the specifications for the cases, and the results. The report also provides background information on current emissions of GHGs and issues associated with stabilizing GHG concentrations.

  3. Nanoscale Science, Engineering and Technology Research Directions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lowndes, D. H.; Alivisatos, A. P.; Alper, M.; Averback, R. S.; Jacob Barhen, J.; Eastman, J. A.; Imre, D.; Lowndes, D. H.; McNulty, I.; Michalske, T. A.; Ho, K-M; Nozik, A. J.; Russell, T. P.; Valentin, R. A.; Welch, D. O.; Barhen, J.; Agnew, S. R.; Bellon, P.; Blair, J.; Boatner, L. A.; Braiman, Y.; Budai, J. D.; Crabtree, G. W.; Feldman, L. C.; Flynn, C. P.; Geohegan, D. B.; George, E. P.; Greenbaum, E.; Grigoropoulos, C.; Haynes, T. E.; Heberlein, J.; Hichman, J.; Holland, O. W.; Honda, S.; Horton, J. A.; Hu, M. Z.-C.; Jesson, D. E.; Joy, D. C.; Krauss, A.; Kwok, W.-K.; Larson, B. C.; Larson, D. J.; Likharev, K.; Liu, C. T.; Majumdar, A.; Maziasz, P. J.; Meldrum, A.; Miller, J. C.; Modine, F. A.; Pennycook, S. J.; Pharr, G. M.; Phillpot, S.; Price, D. L.; Protopopescu, V.; Poker, D. B.; Pui, D.; Ramsey, J. M.; Rao, N.; Reichl, L.; Roberto, J.; Saboungi, M-L; Simpson, M.; Strieffer, S.; Thundat, T.; Wambsganss, M.; Wendleken, J.; White, C. W.; Wilemski, G.; Withrow, S. P.; Wolf, D.; Zhu, J. H.; Zuhr, R. A.; Zunger, A.; Lowe, S.

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes important future research directions in nanoscale science, engineering and technology. It was prepared in connection with an anticipated national research initiative on nanotechnology for the twenty-first century. The research directions described are not expected to be inclusive but illustrate the wide range of research opportunities and challenges that could be undertaken through the national laboratories and their major national scientific user facilities with the support of universities and industry.

  4. Innovating a Sustainable Energy Future (2011 EFRC Summit)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Little, Mark (GE Global Research)

    2012-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The second speaker in the 2011 EFRC Summit session titled "Leading Perspectives in Energy Research" was Mark Little, Senior Vice President and Director of GE Global Research. He discussed the role that industry and in particular GE is playing as a partner in innovative energy research. The 2011 EFRC Summit and Forum brought together the EFRC community and science and policy leaders from universities, national laboratories, industry and government to discuss "Science for our Nation's Energy Future." In August 2009, the Office of Science established 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers. The EFRCs are collaborative research efforts intended to accelerate high-risk, high-reward fundamental research, the scientific basis for transformative energy technologies of the future. These Centers involve universities, national laboratories, nonprofit organizations, and for-profit firms, singly or in partnerships, selected by scientific peer review. They are funded at $2 to $5 million per year for a total planned DOE commitment of $777 million over the initial five-year award period, pending Congressional appropriations. These integrated, multi-investigator Centers are conducting fundamental research focusing on one or more of several ?grand challenges? and use-inspired ?basic research needs? recently identified in major strategic planning efforts by the scientific community. The purpose of the EFRCs is to integrate the talents and expertise of leading scientists in a setting designed to accelerate research that transforms the future of energy and the environment.

  5. Technology development needs summary, FY 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Historic activities of DOE during the period of nuclear weapons development, and disposal practices of that time, resulted in the discharge of chemical and radioactive materials to the environment at many DOE facilities and sites. DOE has now focused a major technical effort on mitigating the effects of those discharges through an environmental restoration program. Since this could lead to prohibitive costs if conventional technology is applied for remedial action, a national program will be initiated to develop and demonstrate faster, better, cheaper, and safer means of restoring the DOE sites to conditions that will meet state and federal environment regulations. Key elements of the initiative are the Integrated Programs and Integrated Demonstrations, which work together to identify possible solutions to major environmental problems. Needed statements are given for the following programs: mixed waste landfill, uranium in soils, VOC-arid, decontamination and decommissioning of facilities, buried waste, characterization/monitoring/sensor technology, mixed waste, in situ remediation, efficient separations/processing, minimum additive waste stabilization, supercritical water oxidation. A section on how to get involved is included.

  6. Eau Canada: The Future of Canada's Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laberge, Yves

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Review : Eau Canada: TheFuture of Canada's Water Karen Bakker (Ed. )by Yves Laberge Quebec, Canada Bakker, Karen (Ed. ). Eau

  7. Brain Receptor Structures Key to Future Therapeutics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Brain Receptor Structures Key to Future Therapeutics Print With an aging population in America, it is more important than ever to discover ways to treat or prevent diseases...

  8. California's Energy Future - The View to 2050

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Strategies for Future Hydrogen Production and Use, Nationaldevelopment. 26 Off-peak hydrogen production could do thisfuels, the production of hydrogen, and the potential for

  9. Probing Higgs Boson Interactions At Future Colliders.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biswal, Sudhansu Sekhar

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??We present in this thesis a detailed analysis of Higgs boson interactions at future colliders. In particular we examine, in a model independent way, the… (more)

  10. Future Directions in Engines and Fuels

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    in Engines and Fuels Department of Energy DEER Conference Presented by Stuart Johnson, Engineering and Environmental Office September 28, 2010 Future Direction in Engines...

  11. Presentation to EAC: Renewable Electricity Futures Activities...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Presentation to the Electricity Advisory Committee, October 29, 2010, on Renewable Electricity Futures Activities & Status. The presentation provides a high-level overview of the...

  12. Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay: Present and Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliviero Cremonesi

    2002-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Present status, and future plans for Double Beta Decay searches are reviewed. Given the recent observations of neutrino oscillations, a possibility to observe $\\beta\\beta(0\

  13. Future Perfect Partnering with Portuguese Environmental Protection...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Portuguese Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Aviation Sector EU Emissions Trading Scheme Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Future Perfect Partnering...

  14. Fueling the Future with Fungal Genomics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grigoriev, Igor V.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Biofuels. 108:147-177. Harman GE,or future hydrocarbon biofuels, fungi are involved. Researchtopic areas that impact biofuels production. In this review,

  15. Fuel Modification t Facilitate Future Combustion Regimes?

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    University of Wisconsin -- Engine Research Center Fuel Modification to Facilitate Future Combustion Regimes? David E. Foster Phil and Jean Myers Professor Engine Research Center...

  16. General com Technology community

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrara, Katherine W.

    Campus IT General com m unity Technology community ITsystem owners Campus Council for Information Technology (CCFIT) · ~30 members · Advisory evaluation and review role · Input from faculty, staff, students formal representation on steering team and subcommittees Technology Support Program · Technology support

  17. The Technology & Innovation Centre

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mottram, Nigel

    The Technology & Innovation Centre #12;The Technology and Innovation Centre revolutionises the way in Scotland and further afield ­ including power and energy, renewable technologies, photonics and sensors, for industry, the Technology and Innovation Centre has already attracted major partners including Scottish

  18. Department of Information Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flener, Pierre

    Department of Information Technology Human-Computer Interaction http://www.it.uu.se/research/hci #12;InformationTechnology-HCI Department of Information Technology | www.it.uu.se Today's menu Who we and collaboration Teaching KoF 2007, effects? Vision and plans Challenges #12;InformationTechnology

  19. Predictive Maintenance Technologies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Several diagnostic technologies and best practices are available to assist Federal agencies with predictive maintenance programs.

  20. The future of FRMAC assessment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laiche, Thomas P.

    2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    FRMAC was born out of circumstances 25 years ago when 17 federal agencies descended on the states with good intention during the Three-Mile Island nuclear power plant incident. At that time it quickly became evident that a better way was needed to support state and local governments in their time of emergency and recovery process. FRMAC's single voice of Federal support coordinates the multiple agencies that respond to a radiological event. Over the years, FRMAC has exercised, evaluated, and honed its ability to quickly respond to the needs of our communities. As the times have changed, FRMAC has expanded its focus from nuclear power plant incidents, to threats of a terrorist radiological dispersal device (RDD), to the unthinkable - an Improvised nuclear device (IND). And just as having the right tools are part of any trade, FRMAC's tool set has and is evolving to meet contemporary challenges - not just to improve the time it takes to collect data and assess the situation, but to provide a quality and comprehensive product that supports a stressed decision maker, responsible for the protection of the public. Innovations in the movement of data and information have changed our everyday lives. So too, FRMAC is capitalizing on industry innovations to improve the flow of information: from the early predictive models, to streamlining the process of getting data out of the field; to improving the time it takes to get assessed products in to the hands of the decision makers. FRMAC is focusing on the future through the digital age of electronic data processing. Public protective action and dose avoidance is the challenge.